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Sample records for obstetric labor premature

  1. [Methods of evaluating labor progress in contemporary obstetrics].

    PubMed

    Głuszak, Michał; Fracki, Stanisław; Wielgoś, Mirosław; Wegrzyn, Piotr

    2013-08-01

    Assessment of progress in labor is one of the foremost problems in obstetrics. Obstructed labor increases danger to maternal and fetal life and health, and may be caused by birth canal pathologies, as well as inefficient uterine contractions or failure of cervical dilation. Such obstructions require the use of vacuum extraction, forceps, or a Caesarean section. Operative delivery should be performed only when specifically indicated. Conversely postponing an operative delivery when the procedure is necessary is detrimental to the neonatal outcome. Therefore, it is advisable to make the decision on the basis of objective, measurable parameters. Methods of evaluating the risk of labor disorders have evolved over the years. Currently ultrasonography is used for fetal biometric measurements and weight estimation. It helps to evaluate the risk of labor disorders. This method, however is limited by a relatively large measurement error At present, vaginal examination is still the primary method of evaluating labor progress, although the technique is known to be operator-dependent and poorly reproducible. Recent publications suggest that intrapartum translabial ultrasonography is more accurate and allows for an objective assessment of labor progress. Recent studies have evaluated fetal head engagement based on the following parameters: angle between the pubic symphysis and fetal head, distance between the presenting point and the interspinous line and fetal head direction in the birth canal. Each of the described parameters allowed for an objective assessment of head engagement but no advantage of any particular parameter has been revealed so far. PMID:24191505

  2. Labor stimulation with oxytocin: effects on obstetrical and neonatal outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo-Lopezosa, Pedro; Hidalgo-Maestre, María; Rodríguez-Borrego, María Aurora

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to evaluate the effects of labor stimulation with oxytocin on maternal and neonatal outcomes. Method: descriptive and analytical study with 338 women who gave birth at a tertiary hospital. Obstetric and neonatal variables were measured and compared in women submitted and non-submitted to stimulation with oxytocin. Statistics were performed using Chi-square test, Fisher exact test, Student t-test; and crude Odds Ratio with 95% confidence interval were calculated. A p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: stimulation with oxytocin increases the rates of cesarean sections, epidural anesthesia and intrapartum maternal fever in primiparous and multiparous women. It has also been associated with low pH values of umbilical cord blood and with a shorter duration of the first stage of labor in primiparous women. However, it did not affect the rates of 3rd and 4th degree perineal lacerations, episiotomies, advanced neonatal resuscitation, 5-minute Apgar scores and meconium. Conclusion: stimulation with oxytocin should not be used systematically, but only in specific cases. These findings provide further evidence to health professionals and midwives on the use of oxytocin during labor. Under normal conditions, women should be informed of the possible effects of labor stimulation with oxytocin. PMID:27463109

  3. [Induction of fetal lung maturity with combined hormonal therapy in premature labor].

    PubMed

    Serman, F; Pazols, R; Benavides, C; Sandoval, J; Ferres, I; Lamoza, P

    1994-01-01

    Thyrotropin Releasing Hormone (THR) induce fetal pulmonary maturation by direct stimulation, and increase of fetal T3 and T4 which produce biochemical and structural pulmonary maturation. To evaluate the effectivity of TRH associated to corticoides in the prevention of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in premature labor, we administered TRH plus Cidoten to patients with imminent premature labor and gestational age (GA) < or = 32 weeks. In a total of 12 patients, tolerance was good in 85% (n = 10), birthweight was 1.782 +/- 488 g (x +/- 2 SD). RDS incidence of only 15.3% and chronic lung disease (CLD) incidence = 0. Newborn of mothers treated with TRH plus corticoids form in evident premature labor in our unit, showed laser rates of RDS and CLD than the described in literature for newborn of similar weight and GA treated only with corticoids. PMID:7809432

  4. [The threat of premature labor: new aspects for management].

    PubMed

    Wertz, J P; Frising, M; Arendt, J

    1998-01-01

    Genital inflammation may play a major role in the pathogenesis of preterm labor. Screening and early treatment of subclinical genital tract infections (bacterial vaginosis, heavy group B streptococci colonization, primary genital HSV infection and other silent intra-uterine infections) seem to offer promise for the prevention of preterm labor. New factors have been studied in order to appreciate their benefit in the evaluation of the risk of preterm labor. None of these biologic markers (fetal-fibronectin, maternal interleukin-6, vaginal pH measuring) have enough sensitivity to permit efficient screening. Home uterine activity monitoring seems to be interesting for early identification of women with increased risk of preterm delivery, but can't be used on a large scale because of its costs. New tocolytic agents are investigated in order to protect from an adverse outcome. Atosiban exhibits more oxytocin selective and antagonistic activity without side-effects, and nimesulide seems to have a lack of effects on fetal functions. PMID:9868833

  5. Prematurity: present and future

    PubMed Central

    Tsimis, M. E.; Al-Hamayel, N. Abu; Germaine, H.; Burd, I.

    2014-01-01

    The study of preterm labor and prematurity, as with any medical science, has undergone a major transformation in its approach from an inevitable part of obstetrics with few answers to one in which science has led to knowledge and clinical intervention. Despite these advancements, understanding of preterm labor and prevention of prematurity is still limited. In the current review, we begin the discussion with fetal viability, first from a historical perspective and then from the understanding of this issue from a prospective of various professional organizations. We then present the scope of the problem of preterm birth from various countries including the discrepancy between the US and Europe. We continue with updates on extreme prematurity and outcomes with two longitudinal studies from the past 2 years. We further review available interventions for prematurity and discuss the use of antenatal corticosteroids. First, we examine their use in the context of professional recommendations and then examine the trajectory of their continued use in the late preterm period. We focus on a European-based trial with preliminary results and an ongoing American counterpart. The current knowledge of molecular mechanisms behind preterm labor is presented with a focus on the multiple etiologies of preterm labor, both known and presumed, with updates in the basic science realm. Furthermore, up-to-date studies on prediction of preterm birth and prematurity-related morbidity are presented. PMID:25300768

  6. [Motives for a revision of the physiology of labor and an updating of obstetric terminology].

    PubMed

    Mergoni, A

    2000-01-01

    During the second half of our century, revolutionary progress has been made in obstetrics in terms of care, prevention and technology, but curiously a number of doctrinal questions have been left unresolved which are more important in cultural and practical terms than is commonly thought. We refer in particular to the physiology of the mechanics of labour whose inveterate lacunae of interpretation and major conceptual inaccuracies would be easily resolved if tackled with sufficient interest. These are easy questions to resolve because the missing or incorrect aspects of the traditional model used to interpret the mechanics of labour are for the most part only caused by clashes with the basic principles of physical science. If the mechanics of labour are re-examined with a view to anchoring them rigorously and satisfactorily to the principles of physics, the traditional model of interpretation, which is currently in vogue, is completely invalidated and replaced by another based on a series of hydrodynamic phenomena of considerable obstetric interest. The advantages of these hydrodynamic phenomena are represented by the onset of the so-called "pelvic press", doubling the motor forces of labour during the release of the fetus, the constant maintenance of a balance of forces in the fetal environment, the rotary movements caused autonomously by a hydraulic and muscular system of fixing the womb during the release of the fetus, and above all by the equal interaction of the fetus in the mechanics of its own birth. Clearly, this new interpretative model calls for the use of partly updated and partly innovative obstetric terminology. PMID:10851863

  7. Periodontitis: A risk for delivery of premature labor and low-birth-weight infants.

    PubMed

    Saini, Rajiv; Saini, Santosh; Saini, Sugandha R

    2010-07-01

    Periodontitis is a destructive inflammatory disease of the supporting tissues of the teeth and is caused by specific microorganisms or group of specific microorganisms. The association of periodontal infection with organ systems like cardiovascular system, endocrine system, reproductive system, and respiratory system makes periodontal infection a complex multiphase disease. Inflamed periodontal tissues produce significant amounts of proinflammatory cytokines, mainly interleukin 1-beta (IL-1β), IL-6, prostaglandin E2, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), which may have systemic effects on the host. Low birth weight, defined as birth weight less than 2,500 g, continues to be a significant public health issue in both developed and developing countries. Research suggests that the bacteria that cause inflammation in the gums can actually get into the bloodstream and target the fetus, potentially leading to premature labor and low-birth-weight (PLBW) babies. One reasonable mechanism begins with deleterious effects of endotoxins released from Gram-negative bacteria responsible for periodontal disease. Hence periodontal disease appears to be an independent risk factor for PLBW and there is a need to expand preventive measures for pregnant women in harmonization with the gynecological and dental professions. PMID:22096335

  8. Periodontitis: A risk for delivery of premature labor and low birth weight infants.

    PubMed

    Saini, Rajiv; Saini, Santosh; Saini, Sugandha R

    2011-01-01

    Periodontitis is a destructive inflammatory disease of the supporting tissues of the teeth and is caused by specific microorganisms or a group of specific microorganisms. Association of periodontal infection with organ systems like cardiovascular system, endocrine system, reproductive system, and respiratory system makes periodontal infection a complex multiphase disease. Inflamed periodontal tissues produce significant amounts of pro-inflammatory cytokines, mainly interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β), IL-6, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), which may have systemic effects on the host. Low birth weight, defined as birth weight less than 2500 g, continues to be a significant public health issue in both developed and developing countries. Research suggests that the bacteria that cause inflammation in the gums can actually get into the bloodstream and target the fetus, potentially leading to premature labor and low birth weight (PLBW) babies. One reasonable mechanism for this is the deleterious effect of endotoxin released from gram-negative bacteria responsible for periodontal disease. Hence, periodontal disease appears to be an independent risk factor for PLBW and there is a need to expand preventive measures for pregnant women in coordination with the gynecological and dental professions. PMID:22470234

  9. Diagnostic Potential of Evaluation of SDF-1α and sRAGE Levels in Threatened Premature Labor

    PubMed Central

    Rajewska, Aleksandra; Budkowska, Marta; Kwiatkowski, Sebastian; Torbé, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Preterm birth remains the most prevalent cause of neonatal morbidity. This study aimed to evaluate the diagnostic value of SDF-1α, resistin, secretory RAGE (sRAGE), and endogenous secretory RAGE (esRAGE) in preterm labor. A total of 211 pregnant women participated in the study. Group A contained 72 women between 22 and 36 weeks of gestation, with premature labor, who finally had preterm birth. Group B contained 66 women in labor between 37 and 41 weeks of gestation. Women in group A had lower SDF-1α and sRAGE levels than those in group B. Moreover, in group A, SDF-1α and sRAGE levels were correlated with the latency period from the occurrence of premature labor symptoms until delivery. Sensitivity and specificity of studied parameters for prediction of preterm birth were 95% and 40% for SDF-1α and 51.3% and 93.5% for sRAGE, respectively. The prognostic value of plasma SDF-1α and sRAGE levels was comparable with that of cervical length ultrasound measurement and serum C-reactive protein levels. We conclude that SDF-1α and sRAGE appear to play a major role in the diagnosis of preterm birth and its evaluation could be convenient and useful for predicting preterm birth. PMID:27556030

  10. Impact of Obstetrician/Gynecologist Hospitalists on Quality of Obstetric Care (Cesarean Delivery Rates, Trial of Labor After Cesarean/Vaginal Birth After Cesarean Rates, and Neonatal Adverse Events).

    PubMed

    Iriye, Brian K

    2015-09-01

    Care via obstetric hospitalists continues to expand, quickly becoming an integral part of labor and delivery management in urban and suburban areas. Overall lower cesarean delivery rates have been found with obstetric hospitalist care. Continuous 24-hour coverage of labor units has displayed lower rates of neonatal adverse events and likely reduces time in decision to delivery. Further study is needed on maternal and neonatal outcomes to corroborate earlier observations, and to closely examine the type of obstetric hospitalist model being observed to aid in planning the ideal deployment of providers in this workforce of the future. PMID:26333637

  11. Preterm Labor

    MedlinePlus

    ... labor that starts before 37 completed weeks of pregnancy. It can lead to premature birth. Premature babies ... you might be having preterm labor, contact your health care provider. NIH: National Institute of Child Health and Human ...

  12. Hyaluronan (HA) and serum-derived hyaluronan-associated protein (SHAP)-HA complex as predictive markers of cervical ripening in premature labor.

    PubMed

    Kishida, Tameko; Yabushita, Hiromitsu; Wakatsuki, Akihiko; Zhuo, Lisheng; Kimata, Koji

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether serum hyaluronan (HA) and serum-derived HA-associated proteins (SHAP)-HA complex predict cervical ripening and premature delivery. Sera were obtained from 64 women with normal pregnancies, 20 with full term delivery, and 13 with threatened premature labor. Concentrations of HA and SHAP-HA complex in serum were measured by sandwich ELISA. Serum concentrations of HA and SHAP-HA complex did not differ within first, second, and third trimester groups. The serum SHAP-HA complex was elevated in the full term labor group more than in the third trimester group; however, the concentrations of serum HA did not differ between both groups. The HA and SHAP-HA complex levels in sera were higher in the premature labor group than in the second trimester group. In the premature labor group, the SHAP-HA complex levels were higher in the cases with Bishop scores more than 4 points when compared with the cases with Bishop scores of 4 points or less. Increased levels of SHAP-HA complex in sera are possible predictive markers for cervical ripening in premature labor. PMID:18382897

  13. Obstetric profile of pregnant adolescents in a public hospital: risk at beginning of labor, at delivery, postpartum, and in puerperium1

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Hugo Tapia; Silva, Marta Angélica Iossi; Cabrera, Iñiga Pérez; Mendoza, Araceli Jiménez

    2015-01-01

    Objective: describe the obstetric profile of adolescents at beginning of labor, at delivery, postpartum, and in puerperium. Method: Cross-sectional descriptive study with 85 pregnant adolescents, selected by convenience, referred by health centers to a public hospital in Mexico City. Risks were evaluated before, during and after delivery and in puerperium, and measured respectively with the "Previgenes" that compose the Reproductive and Perinatal Risk Assessment System. Results: socioeconomic status, occupation and education level had influence on the emotionality of adolescents in relation to labor, whose obstetric risk was low for 55%, medium for 35%, and high for 10%. Risk in labor was low for 55%, medium for 18%, and high for 27%. Risk postpartum was low for 50%, medium for 25%, and high for 25%. In puerperium, most adolescents (90%) had low risk. Conclusion: most adolescents had low risk in the stages evaluated. The study contributed to identify strategies to approach risk considering the vulnerability inherent in this type of population and favored the conduct of appropriate interventions for the respective needs. PMID:26487132

  14. [Fetal systolic time intervals in threatened premature labor and their relation to therapeutic efforts].

    PubMed

    Ruckhäberle, K E; Vogtmann, C; Forberg, J; Viehweg, B; Chaikha, S

    1989-01-01

    In a total of 113 single pregnancies we determined foetal systolic time intervals (pre-ejection period, left ventricular ejection time, a quotient of both) in order to investigate the impact of threatened premature labour and the different therapeutic regimen (betamimetics, maternal O2-inhalation, maternal transcutaneous dorsal nerve stimulation) on the myocardial performance capacity. Prolonged systolic time intervals (significant for pre-ejection period) in threatened premature labour (compared with control) supplement the concept of a chronic respiratory impairment of the foe-to-materno-placental relationships. Therapeutic prolongation of the pregnancy by betamimetics led to further impairment of the myocardial contractility while additional oxygen inhalation brought about a positive effect. As indicated by "no changes" after transcutaneous dorsal nerve stimulation, the decisive effect apparently seems not to be in the improvement of the uteroplacental perfusion but more on the direct influence of the raised O2-provision on the foetal myocardium. Non-demonstrable obvious relations to the cardiotocographic findings, such as to the postnatal evaluation criteria, speak against a serious threat to the foetus as the advantages of a reasonable prolongation of the gestational period by betamimetics preponderate. More than that the foetal myocardial impairments are to be favourably influenced by additional O2-therapy. PMID:2669398

  15. Pregnancy, Labor, and Delivery after Ebola Virus Disease and Implications for Infection Control in Obstetric Services, United States

    PubMed Central

    Jamieson, Denise J.; Kpaduwa, Julius; Schrier, Sarah; Kim, Moon; Green, Nicole M.; Ströher, Ute; Muehlenbachs, Atis; Bell, Michael; Rollin, Pierre E.; Mascola, Laurene

    2016-01-01

    Many of the survivors of the 2014–2015 epidemic of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in West Africa were women of childbearing age. Limited clinical and laboratory data exist that describe these women’s pregnancies and outcomes. We report the case of an EVD survivor who became pregnant and delivered her child in the United States, and we discuss implications of this case for infection control practices in obstetric services. Hospitals in the United States must be prepared to care for EVD survivors. PMID:27191253

  16. Pregnancy, Labor, and Delivery after Ebola Virus Disease and Implications for Infection Control in Obstetric Services, United States.

    PubMed

    Kamali, Amanda; Jamieson, Denise J; Kpaduwa, Julius; Schrier, Sarah; Kim, Moon; Green, Nicole M; Ströher, Ute; Muehlenbachs, Atis; Bell, Michael; Rollin, Pierre E; Mascola, Laurene

    2016-07-01

    Many of the survivors of the 2014-2015 epidemic of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in western Africa were women of childbearing age. Limited clinical and laboratory data exist that describe these women's pregnancies and outcomes. We report the case of an EVD survivor who became pregnant and delivered her child in the United States, and we discuss implications of this case for infection control practices in obstetric services. Hospitals in the United States must be prepared to care for EVD survivors. PMID:27191253

  17. The use of the partograph in labor monitoring: a cross-sectional study among obstetric caregivers in General Hospital, Calabar, Cross River State, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Asibong, Udeme; Okokon, Ita B; Agan, Thomas U; Oku, Affiong; Opiah, Margaret; Essien, E James; Monjok, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Background Prolonged and obstructed labor is a significant cause of maternal morbidity and mortality in Nigeria, one of the six countries contributing significantly to the global maternal mortality crisis. The use of the partograph would engender a remarkable reduction in the number of these deaths since abnormal markers in the progress of labor would be identified early on. Objective This study aimed to evaluate the non-physician obstetric caregivers’ (OCGs) knowledge of partograph use, assess the extent of its use, determine the factors that impede its usage, and unravel the relationship between years of experience and partograph use among the respondents (OCGs) in General Hospital, Calabar, Nigeria. Methodology Using a self-administered semi-structured questionnaire, a cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted among 130 purposely selected and consenting OCGs working in the General Hospital, Calabar, Nigeria. Results The majority of the respondents (70.8%) had good general knowledge of the partograph but lacked detailed and in-depth knowledge of the component parts of the partograph. Knowledge of partograph (χ2=12.05, P=0.0001) and partograph availability (χ2=56.5, P=0.0001) had a significant relationship with its utilization. Previous training (χ2=9.43, P=0.002) was significantly related to knowledge of partograph. Factors affecting utilization were: little or no knowledge of the partograph (85.4%), nonavailability (70%), shortage of staff (61.5%), and the fact that it is time-consuming to use (30%). Conclusion Lack of detailed knowledge of the partograph, nonavailability of the partograph, poor staff numbers, and inadequate training are factors that work against the effective utilization of the partograph in the study facility. Usage of this tool for labor monitoring can be enhanced by periodic training, making partographs available in labor wards, provision of reasonable staff numbers, and mandatory institutional policy. PMID:25342920

  18. Soluble and Endogenous Secretory Receptors for Advanced Glycation End Products in Threatened Preterm Labor and Preterm Premature Rupture of Fetal Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Rzepka, Rafał; Dołegowska, Barbara; Rajewska, Aleksandra; Kwiatkowski, Sebastian; Sałata, Daria; Budkowska, Marta; Domański, Leszek; Mikołajek-Bedner, Wioletta; Torbé, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare sRAGE and esRAGE plasma levels in pregnant women with (A) threatened premature labor (n = 41), (B) preterm premature rupture of membranes (n = 49), and (C) preterm rupture of membranes at term (n = 48). The relationship between these and classic intrauterine infection markers and the latent time from symptoms up to delivery depending on RAGE's concentration were investigated. In groups A and B, a positive correlation was found between plasma sRAGE and latent time (r = 0,422; p = 0,001; r = 0,413, p = 0,004, resp.). High prognostic values were found in both groups for plasma sRAGE concentration and the latent time from symptoms up to delivery. Groups B and C presented higher levels of esRAGE than group A (526,315 ± 129,453 pg/mL and 576,212 ± 136,237 pg/mL versus 485,918 ± 133,127 pg/mL, p< 0,05). The conclusion is that sRAGE concentration can be a favorable prognostic factor in the presence of symptoms of threatened premature labor. Higher esRAGE plasma level in case of the rupture of membranes in mature and premature pregnancy suggests its participation in fetal membranes destruction. PMID:26413536

  19. Promoting cultural humility during labor and birth: putting theory into action during PRONTO obstetric and neonatal emergency training.

    PubMed

    Fahey, Jenifer O; Cohen, Susanna R; Holme, Francesca; Buttrick, Elizabeth S; Dettinger, Julia C; Kestler, Edgar; Walker, Dilys M

    2013-01-01

    Maternal and neonatal mortality in Northern Guatemala, a region with a high percentage of indigenous people, is disproportionately high. Initiatives to improve quality of care at local health facilities equipped for births, and increasing the number of births attended at these facilities will help address this problem. PRONTO (Programa de Rescate Obstétrico y Neonatal: Tratamiento Óptimo y Oportuno) is a low-tech, high-fidelity, simulation-based, provider-to-provider training in the management of obstetric and neonatal emergencies. This program has been successfully tested and implemented in Mexico. PRONTO will now be implemented in Guatemala as part of an initiative to decrease maternal and perinatal mortality. Guatemalan health authorities have requested that the training include training on cultural humility and humanized birth. This article describes the process of curricular adaptation to satisfy this request. The PRONTO team adapted the existing program through 4 steps: (a) analysis of the problem and context through a review of qualitative data and stakeholder interviews, (b) literature review and adoption of a theoretical framework regarding cultural humility and adult learning, (c) adaptation of the curriculum and design of new activities and simulations, and (d) implementation of adapted and expanded curriculum and further refinement in response to participant response. PMID:23360940

  20. Foley Catheter or Oral Misoprostol for Induction of Labor in Women with Term Premature Rupture of Membranes: A Randomized Multicenter Trial.

    PubMed

    Kruit, Heidi; Tihtonen, Kati; Raudaskoski, Tytti; Ulander, Veli-Matti; Aitokallio-Tallberg, Ansa; Heikinheimo, Oskari; Paavonen, Jorma; Rahkonen, Leena

    2016-07-01

    Objectives To compare the Foley catheter and misoprostol for induction of labor in term women with premature rupture of membranes. Study Design A randomized controlled trial was performed in three university hospitals in Finland between March 2012 and September 2014. A total of 202 term women with ruptured membranes >18 hours, singleton pregnancies in cephalic presentation, unfavorable cervix, and no prior cesarean section were enrolled. Participants were randomly allocated to induction of labor by Foley catheter or oral misoprostol in a 1:1 ratio. All women received prophylactic antibiotics. The main outcomes were cesarean section and maternal and neonatal infections. Results Labor induction by Foley catheter or misoprostol showed no difference in cesarean delivery rates (23.6 vs. 18.2%; odds ratio [OR], 1.39; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.69-2.82; p = 0.36), maternal intrapartum infections (2.2 vs. 2%; OR, 1.12; 95% CI, 0.15-8.9; p = 1.00), postpartum infections (1.1 vs. 2.0%; OR, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.05-6.18; p = 1.00), or neonatal infections (1.1 vs. 5.1%; OR, 0.21; 95% CI, 0.24-1.87; p = 0.22). The total time from induction to delivery was similar (1,311 vs. 1,435 minutes; p = 0.31) in the two groups. Conclusions Foley catheter or misoprostol can both be used for induction of labor in women with term premature rupture of membranes. PMID:27031055

  1. Labor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martz, Carlton

    2001-01-01

    This theme issue of the "Bill of Rights in Action" looks at labor issues. The first article examines the unionization efforts of the Wobblies in the United States at the beginning of the 20th century. The second article explores the protests of the Luddites during Britain's Industrial Revolution. The final article looks at whether international…

  2. [Lung maturation therapy with glucocorticoids in threatened premature labor. Considerations of risk-benefit in evidence-based medicine].

    PubMed

    Sauerwald, A; Rath, W

    2000-01-01

    Prematurity is a major cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality. Antenatal administration of glucocorticoids improves the neonatal outcome of preterm born infants. 1994 the NIH published recommendations for the use of glucocorticoids for women at risk of preterm delivery. A recent evaluation by the Cochrane Collaboration in 1999 showed that antenatal administration of glucocorticoids significantly reduced the rate of RDS and IVH in the gestational age between 24 and 34 weeks. Consequences of repeated courses of antenatal glucocorticoids are not sufficiently studied. The effectivity and safety regarding birth weights, infectious diseases, and the best timing remains unknown. Administration of glucocorticoids lowers fetal activity and heart rate variability. Effects on fetal growth, maternal and fetal immunosystem, and the development of atopic diseases are controversely discussed. Thus preterm labour not leading to a cervical ripening is not necessarily a reason for antenatal glucocorticoids. Antenatal glucocorticoids with PROM do not lower the rate of RDS but of IVH. No prospective randomized trial evaluated the effectivity of antenatal glucocorticoids in diabetes mellitus and IUGR. In preeclampsia beta-methason could improve the rate of RDS and the neonatal outcome. Still our knowledge of antenatal glucocorticoid administration is not sufficient. But despite possible (longtime-) risks for mother and child the administration of glucocorticoids according to the guidelines of the NIH is a major part in the treatment of prematurity and improves the outcome of premature infants. The indication for multiple courses of glucocorticoids should be considered carefully. PMID:11199148

  3. Family Perspectives on Prematurity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zero to Three (J), 2003

    2003-01-01

    In this article, seven families describe their experiences giving birth to and raising a premature baby. Their perspectives vary, one from another, and shift over time, depending on each family's circumstances and the baby's developmental course. Experiences discussed include premature labor, medical interventions and the NICU, bringing the baby…

  4. Definitions of Obstetric and Gynecologic Hospitalists.

    PubMed

    McCue, Brigid; Fagnant, Robert; Townsend, Arthur; Morgan, Meredith; Gandhi-List, Shefali; Colegrove, Tanner; Stosur, Harriet; Olson, Rob; Meyer, Karenmarie; Lin, Andrew; Tessmer-Tuck, Jennifer

    2016-02-01

    The obstetric hospitalist and the obstetric and gynecologic hospitalist evolved in response to diverse forces in medicine, including the need for leadership on labor and delivery units, an increasing emphasis on quality and safety in obstetrics and gynecology, the changing demographics of the obstetric and gynecologic workforce, and rising liability costs. Current (although limited) research suggests that obstetric and obstetric and gynecologic hospitalists may improve the quality and safety of obstetric care, including lower cesarean delivery rates and higher vaginal birth after cesarean delivery rates as well as lower liability costs and fewer liability events. This research is currently hampered by the use of varied terminology. The leadership of the Society of Obstetric and Gynecologic Hospitalists proposes standardized definitions of an obstetric hospitalist, an obstetric and gynecologic hospitalist, and obstetric and gynecologic hospital medicine practices to standardize communication and facilitate program implementation and research. Clinical investigations regarding obstetric and gynecologic practices (including hospitalist practices) should define inpatient coverage arrangements using these standardized definitions to allow for fair conclusions and comparisons between practices. PMID:26942370

  5. The Making of the "Women's Physician" in American Obstetrics and Gynecology: Re-Forging an Occupational Identity and a Division of Labor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zetka, James R., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    After struggling as a surgical specialty, obstetrics and gynecology initiated its "women's physician" program in the 1970s. This program officially defined the mostly male obstetricians and gynecologists at that time as women's primary care physicians. Using archival data, this article explains this development as a response to the specialty's…

  6. Obstetrical Forceps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Marshall inventors Seth Lawson and Stanley Smeltzer display a pair of obstetrical forceps they designed. The forceps, made from composite space-age materials, measure the force applied during instrument-assisted delivery. The new forceps will help medical students get a feel for instrument-assisted deliveries before entering practice.

  7. The design of orally bioavailable 2, 5-diketopiperazine oxytocin antagonists: from concept to clinical candidate for premature labor.

    PubMed

    Borthwick, Alan D; Liddle, John

    2011-07-01

    A short, efficient and highly stereoselective synthesis has been developed for a series of 6-indanyl-3-alkyl-7-aryl/heterocyclic-(3R, 6R, 7R)-2, 5-diketopiperazine amides that are potent and selective oxytocin (OT) antagonists. Property-based design using an estimate of human oral absorption enabled focus to be directed to those templates with the greatest chance of delivering high bioavailability in humans. This led to the 2', 4'-difluorophenyl dimethylamide 40, a highly potent (pK(i) =9.2) and selective OT antagonist (>1,000-fold selectivity vs. the human vasopressin receptors V1a, V2, and V1b) with good oral bioavailability (>50%) in the rat and dog. Increased solubility and an improved Cyp450 profile was achieved with a range of 2'-substituted 7-(1',3'-oxazol-4'-yl)-(3R,6R,7R)-2,5-diketopiperazine amides and branching at the α-carbon of the 3-butyl group led to a superior rat pharmacokinetic profile that resulted in the discovery of the 2'-methyl-1',3'-oxazol-4'-yl morpholine amide derivative 74 GSK221149A (Retosiban), which had the best oral exposure and bioavailability in the rat. Retosiban has sub-nanomolar affinity (K(i) =0.65 nM) for the oxytocin receptor with >1400-fold selectivity over the closely related vasopressin receptors. It has good solubility, low protein binding and has a good Cyp450 profile with no significant inhibition IC(50) >100 µM. Retosiban is >15-fold more potent at the human oxytocin receptor than atosiban (a marketed i.v, peptide OT antagonist) and it has been shown to be an effective tocolytic by i.v. and by oral administration in rats, and was selected for progression as a potential clinical candidate for preterm labor. PMID:20027670

  8. Premature Contractions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tools & Resources Stroke More Premature Contractions - PACs and PVCs Updated:Apr 6,2016 Premature contraction = early beat ... chambers of the heart (atria). Premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) start in the lower chambers of the heart ( ...

  9. Preterm (Premature) Labor and Birth

    MedlinePlus

    ... with serious health problems. Some health problems, like cerebral palsy , can last a lifetime. Other problems, such as ... This medication may help reduce the risk of cerebral palsy that is associated with early preterm birth. What ...

  10. Foetal Gender and Obstetric Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Schildberger, B.; Leitner, H.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Data on specific characteristics based on the gender of the unborn baby and their significance for obstetrics are limited. The aim of this study is to analyse selected parameters of obstetric relevance in the phases pregnancy, birth and postpartum period in dependence on the gender of the foetus. Materials and Methods: The selected study method comprised a retrospective data acquisition and evaluation from the Austrian birth register of the Department of Clinical Epidemiology of Tyrolean State Hospitals. For the analysis all inpatient singleton deliveries in Austria during the period from 2008 to 2013 were taken into account (live and stillbirths n = 444 685). The gender of the baby was correlated with previously defined, obstetrically relevant parameters. Results: In proportions, significantly more premature births and sub partu medical interventions (vaginal and abdominal surgical deliveries. episiotomies) were observed for male foetuses (p < 0.001). The neonatal outcome (5-min Apgar score, umbilical pH value less than 7.1, transfer to a neonatal special unit) is significantly poorer for boys (p < 0.001). Discussion: In view of the vulnerability of male foetuses and infants, further research is needed in order to be able to react appropriately to the differing gender-specific requirements in obstetrics. PMID:27065487

  11. Dynamic changes in the myometrium during the third stage of labor, evaluated using two-dimensional ultrasound, in women with normal and abnormal third stage of labor and in women with obstetric complications

    PubMed Central

    Patwardhan, Manasi; Hernandez-Andrade, Edgar; Ahn, Hyunyoung; Korzeniewski, Steven J; Schwartz, Alyse; Hassan, Sonia S; Romero, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate dynamic changes in myometrial thickness during the third stage of labor. Methods Myometrial thickness was measured using ultrasound at one-minute time intervals during the third stage of labor in the mid-region of the upper and lower uterine segments in 151 patients including: women with a long third stage of labor (n=30), post-partum hemorrhage (n=4), preterm delivery (n=7) or clinical chorioamnionitis (n=4). Differences between uterine segments and as a function of time were evaluated. Results There was a significant linear increase in the mean myometrial thickness of the upper uterine segments, as well as a significant linear decrease in the mean myometrial thickness of the lower uterine segments until the expulsion of the placenta (p<0.001). The ratio of the measurements of the upper to the lower uterine segments increased significantly as a function of time (p<0.0001). In women with postpartum hemorrhage, preterm delivery and clinical chorioamnionitis, an uncoordinated pattern between the uterine segments was observed. Conclusion A well-coordinated activity between the upper and lower uterine segments is demonstrated in normal placental delivery. In some clinical conditions this pattern is not observed, increasing the time for placental delivery and the risk for post-partum hemorrhage. PMID:25634647

  12. Premature Menopause

    PubMed Central

    Okeke, TC; Anyaehie, UB; Ezenyeaku, CC

    2013-01-01

    Premature menopause affects 1% of women under the age of 40 years. The women are at risk of premature death, neurological diseases, psychosexual dysfunction, mood disorders, osteoporosis, ischemic heart disease and infertility. There is need to use simplified protocols and improved techniques in oocyte donation to achieve pregnancy and mother a baby in those women at risk. Review of the pertinent literature on premature menopause, selected references, internet services using the PubMed and Medline databases were included in this review. In the past, pregnancy in women with premature menopause was rare but with recent advancement in oocyte donation, women with premature menopause now have hoped to mother a child. Hormone replacement therapy is beneficial to adverse consequences of premature menopause. Women with premature menopause are at risk of premature death, neurological diseases, psychosexual dysfunction, mood disorders, osteoporosis, ischemic heart disease and infertility. Public enlightenment and education is important tool to save those at risk. PMID:23634337

  13. Obstetrical Complications and Violent Delinquency: Testing Two Developmental Pathways.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arseneault, Louise; Tremblay, Richard E.; Boulerice, Bernard; Saucier, Jean-Francois

    2002-01-01

    Assessed interaction between obstetrical complications and early family adversity in predicting violent behavior during childhood and adolescence among 849 boys from low SES areas. Found that elevated scores on scale of obstetrical complications (preeclampsia, umbilical cord prolapse, induced labor) increased risk of being violent at 6 and 17…

  14. What Role Does Obstetrical Care Play in Childbirth?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications What role does obstetrical care play in childbirth? Skip sharing on ... has ruptured (the woman’s water breaks), but labor does not start within 24 to 48 hours When ...

  15. Is Personalized Medicine Achievable in Obstetrics?

    PubMed Central

    Quinney, Sara K; Flockhart, David A; Patil, Avinash S

    2014-01-01

    Personalized medicine seeks to identify the right dose of the right drug for the right patient at the right time. Typically, individualization of therapy is based on the pharmacogenomic make-up of the individual and environmental factors that alter drug disposition and response. In addition to these factors, during pregnancy a woman’s body undergoes many changes that can impact the therapeutic efficacy of medications. Yet, there is minimal research regarding personalized medicine in obstetrics. Adoption of pharmacogenetic testing into the obstetrical care is dependent on evidence of analytical validity, clinical validity, and clinical utility. Here, we briefly present information regarding the potential utility of personalized medicine for treating the obstetric patient for pain with narcotics, hypertension, and preterm labor and discuss the impediments of bringing personalized medicine to the obstetrical clinic. PMID:25282474

  16. Strategies for getting through labor

    MedlinePlus

    ... through labor. Your coach can give you back massages, keep you distracted, or just cheer you on. ... JR, Simpson JL, eds. Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Churchill Livingstone; 2012: ...

  17. Treatments for Preterm Labor

    MedlinePlus

    ... leader Partner Spotlight Become a partner World Prematurity Day What's happening in your area Find out about ... may delay labor, often for just a few days. This delay may give you time to get ...

  18. Potential Impact of Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospitalists on Safety of Obstetric Care.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, Sindhu K

    2015-09-01

    Staffing models are critical aspects of care delivery. Provider staffing on the labor and delivery unit has recently received heightened attention. Based on the general medicine hospitalist model, the obstetrics and gynecology hospitalist or laborist model of obstetric care was introduced more than a decade ago as a plausible model-of-care delivery to improve provider satisfaction, with the goal of also improving safety and outcomes through continuous coverage by providers whose sole focus was on the labor and delivery unit without other competing clinical duties. It is plausible that this model of provider staffing and care delivery will increase safety. PMID:26333638

  19. Beta-adrenoceptors in obstetrics and gynecology.

    PubMed

    Modzelewska, Beata

    2016-01-01

    One hundred and twenty years after the description of extracts from the adrenal medulla, the use of beta-blockers and beta-agonists evolved from antianginal drugs and tocolytics to ligand-directed signaling. Beta-blockers in the fields of obstetrics and gynecology have so far been limited to the consideration of continuing treatment of disorders of the cardiovascular system and other dysfunctions that started before pregnancy. Studies in recent years have shown that beta-adrenoceptor signaling might be crucial in carcinogenesis and metastasis, apoptosis and anoikis. On the other hand, the use of beta-adrenoceptor agonists in tocolysis is, as yet, the primary method for inhibiting premature uterine contractions. Unfortunately, the efficacy of current pharmacological treatment for the management of preterm labor is regularly questioned. Moreover, studies related to non-pregnant myometrium performed to date indicate that the rhythmic contractions of the uterus are required for menstruation and have an important role in human reproduction. In turn, abnormal uterine contractility has been linked to dysmenorrhea, a condition associated with painful uterine cramping. The benefits of the use of beta2-adrenoceptor agonists in dysmenorrhea are still unclear and should be balanced against a wide range of adverse effects recognized with this class of medication. The ideal tocolytic agent is one which is effective for the pregnant or non-pregnant woman but has no side effects on either the woman or the baby. Looking to the future with both caution and hope, the potential metamorphosis of beta3-adrenoceptor agonists from experimental tools into therapeutic drugs for tocolysis warrants attention. PMID:27442692

  20. Premature labour

    PubMed Central

    Koh, K.S.

    1976-01-01

    Prematurity is by far the commonest cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality. The management of premature labour is empirical because little is understood about the mechanism of labour. Effective uterine relaxant drugs have an important, albeit minor role. Phototherapy has reduced the complications of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia, and the beneficial effect of antepartum corticosteroid therapy in minimizing the risk of respiratory distress syndrome is now convincing. Prophylactic antibiotic therapy in premature rupture of the membranes does not alter perinatal mortality, although postpartum maternal morbidity is reduced. The introduction of neonatal intensive care units has improved the survival rate of premature infants. Sound clinical judgement remains the mainstay in the management of premature labour. PMID:4217

  1. Obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Esteve-Valverde, E; Ferrer-Oliveras, R; Alijotas-Reig, J

    2016-04-01

    Obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome is an acquired autoimmune disorder that is associated with various obstetric complications and, in the absence of prior history of thrombosis, with the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies directed against other phospholipids, proteins called cofactors or PL-cofactor complexes. Although the obstetric complications have been related to the procoagulant properties of antiphospholipid antibodies, pathological studies of human placenta have shown the proinflammatory capacity of antiphospholipid antibodies via the complement system and proinflammatory cytokines. There is no general agreement on which antiphospholipid antibodies profile (laboratory) confers the greatest obstetric risk, but the best candidates are categories I and IIa. Combined treatment with low doses of aspirin and heparin achieves good obstetric and maternal outcomes. In this study, we also review the therapeutic possibilities in refractory cases, although the likelihood of progressing to other autoimmune diseases is low. We briefly comment on incomplete obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome, also known as antiphospholipid antibody-mediated pregnancy morbidity syndrome. PMID:26603476

  2. Premature infant

    MedlinePlus

    Preterm infant; Preemie; Premie ... The infant may have trouble breathing and keeping a constant body temperature. ... A premature infant may have signs of the following problems: Anemia Bleeding into the brain or damage to the brain's white ...

  3. Premature infant

    MedlinePlus

    ... infant. Common signs of prematurity include: Abnormal breathing patterns (shallow, irregular pauses in breathing called apnea) Body hair (lanugo) Enlarged clitoris (in female infants) Less body fat Lower muscle tone and ...

  4. Premature Ejaculation

    MedlinePlus

    ... orgasm before he wants to, he loses his erection and can’t continue with intercourse. Premature ejaculation ... seconds so that you begin to lose your erection. You repeat this process several times before you ...

  5. Sudden infant death syndrome: review for the obstetric care provider.

    PubMed

    Van Nguyen, Julie My; Abenhaim, Haim A

    2013-10-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is the leading cause of death among infants aged 1 to 12 months. In this article, we review risk factors that may predispose infants to increased vulnerability. Maternal characteristics, including nonmodifiable and modifiable factors, antenatal medical conditions, labor and delivery events, and infant characteristics, are reviewed, with the purpose of helping obstetric care providers target risk reduction efforts. We have reviewed over 85 case-control, retrospective, and prospective cohort studies published between 1975 and 2011. Major modifiable risk factors include maternal and paternal smoking, drug use, alcohol use, and insufficient prenatal care. Infants at increased risk include males, premature infants, infants of low birth weight or growth-restricted infants, and infants in multiple gestations. By targeting modifiable and nonmodifiable risk factors, it may be possible to decrease the incidence of SIDS. Efforts should be put on decreasing high-risk behaviors and encouraging sufficient antenatal follow-up. In view of recent increases in ethnic and social disparity with SIDS, it is essential that risk reduction guidelines, which have recently been expanded by the American Association of Pediatrics, be explained in a culturally sensitive manner. PMID:23292938

  6. Prenatal Stress, Prematurity, and Asthma.

    PubMed

    Medsker, Brock; Forno, Erick; Simhan, Hyagriv; Celedón, Juan C

    2015-12-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic disease of childhood, affecting millions of children in the United States and worldwide. Prematurity is a risk factor for asthma, and certain ethnic or racial minorities such as Puerto Ricans and non-Hispanic blacks are disproportionately affected by both prematurity and asthma. In this review, we examine current evidence to support maternal psychosocial stress as a putative link between prematurity and asthma, while also focusing on disruption of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and immune responses as potential underlying mechanisms for stress-induced "premature asthma." Prenatal stress may cause not only abnormalities in the HPA axis but also epigenetic changes in the fetal glucocorticoid receptor gene (NR3C1), leading to impaired glucocorticoid metabolism. Moreover, maternal stress can alter fetal cytokine balance, favoring TH2 (allergic) immune responses characteristic of atopic asthma: interleukin 6 (IL-6), which has been associated with premature labor, can promote TH2 responses by stimulating production of IL-4 and IL-13. Given a link among stress, prematurity, and asthma, future research should include birth cohorts aimed at confirming and better characterizing "premature asthma." If confirmed, clinical trials of prenatal maternal stress reduction would be warranted to reduce the burden of these common comorbidities. While awaiting the results of such studies, sound policies to prevent domestic and community violence (eg, from firearms) are justified, not only by public safety but also by growing evidence of detrimental effects of violence-induced stress on psychiatric and somatic health. PMID:26676148

  7. Steps toward a national disaster plan for obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Kay; Oakeson, Ann Marie; Hilton, Gillian

    2014-07-01

    Hospitals play a central role in disasters by receiving an influx of casualties and coordinating medical efforts to manage resources. However, plans have not been fully developed in the event the hospital itself is severely damaged, either from natural disasters like earthquakes or tornados or manmade events such as a massive electrical failure or terrorist attacks. Of particular concern is the limited awareness of the obstetric units' specialized needs in the world of disaster planning. Within the same footprint of any obstetric unit, there exists a large variety of patient acuity and needs including laboring women, postoperative patients, and healthy postpartum patients with their newborns. An obstetric-specific triage method is paramount to accurately assess and rapidly triage patients during a disaster. An example is presented here called OB TRAIN (Obstetric Triage by Resource Allocation for Inpatient). To accomplish a comprehensive obstetric disaster plan, there must be 1) national adoption of a common triage and evacuation language including an effective patient tracking system to avoid maternal-neonatal separation; 2) a stratification of maternity hospital levels of care; and 3) a collaborative network of obstetric hospitals, both regionally and nationally. However, obstetric disaster planning goes beyond evacuation and must include plans for shelter-in-place and surge capacity, all uniquely designed for the obstetric patient. Disasters, manmade or natural, are neither predictable nor preventable, but we can and should prepare for them. PMID:24901273

  8. [Premature ejaculation].

    PubMed

    Sapetti, Adrián

    2013-01-01

    Premature ejaculation is the more frequent sexological consultation in men along with the Erectile Dysfunction. In this article a revision will become of its definitions, its clinical manifestations that allow to an effective diagnosis and its therapeutic boarding with Sexual Therapies and, in certain cases, with drugs like PDE-5 Inhibitors, tricyclic antidepressants, IRSS, or dapoxetine. PMID:24260751

  9. [HYPNOSIS IN OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY].

    PubMed

    Rabinerson, David; Yeoshua, Effi; Gabbay-Ben-Ziv, Rinat

    2015-05-01

    Hypnosis is an ancient method of treatment, in which an enhanced state of mind and elevated susceptibility for suggestion of the patient, are increased. Hypnosis is executed, either by a caregiver or by the person himself (after brief training). The use of hypnosis in alleviating labor pain has been studied as of the second half of the 20th century. In early studies, the use of hypnosis for this purpose has been proven quite effective. However, later studies, performed in randomized controlled trial terms, have shown controversial results. Other studies, in which the effect of hypnosis was tested in various aspects of both obstetrics and gynecology and with different levels of success, are elaborated on in this review. PMID:26168643

  10. Obstetric ultrasound simulation.

    PubMed

    Nitsche, Joshua F; Brost, Brian C

    2013-06-01

    Obstetric ultrasound is becoming an increasingly important part of the practice of maternal-fetal medicine. Thus, it is important to develop rigorous and effective training curricula for obstetrics and gynecology residents and maternal-fetal medicine fellows. Traditionally, this training has come almost entirely from exposure to ultrasound in the clinical setting. However, with the increased complexity of modern ultrasound and advent of duty-hour restrictions, a purely clinical training model is no longer viable. With the advent of high-fidelity obstetric ultrasound simulators, a significant amount of training can occur in a non-clinical setting which allows learners to obtain significant skill prior to their first patient ultrasound encounter and obtain proficiency in a shorter period of time. In this manuscript we discuss the available obstetric ultrasound simulators and ways to construct a comprehensive ultrasound training curricula to meet the increasing demands of modern maternal-fetal medicine. PMID:23721777

  11. Obstetric life support.

    PubMed

    Puck, Andrea Lorraine; Oakeson, Ann Marie; Morales-Clark, Ana; Druzin, Maurice

    2012-01-01

    The death of a woman during pregnancy is devastating. Although the incidence of maternal cardiac arrest is increasing, it continues to be a comparatively rare event. Obstetric healthcare providers may go through their entire career without participating in a maternal cardiac resuscitation. Concern has been raised that when an arrest does occur in the obstetric unit, providers who are trained in life support skills at 2-year intervals are ill equipped to provide the best possible care. The quality of resuscitation skills provided during cardiopulmonary arrest of inpatients often may be poor, and knowledge of critical steps to be followed during resuscitation may not be retained after life support training. The Obstetric Life Support (ObLS) training program is a method of obstetric nursing and medical staff training that is relevant, comprehensive, and cost-effective. It takes into consideration both the care needs of the obstetric patient and the adult learning needs of providers. The ObLS program brings obstetric nurses, obstetricians, and anesthesiologists together in multidisciplinary team training that is crucial to developing efficient emergency response. PMID:22551860

  12. Osteopenia - premature infants

    MedlinePlus

    Neonatal rickets; Brittle bones - premature infants; Weak bones - premature infants; Osteopenia of prematurity ... baby. This helps the baby grow. A premature infant may not receive the proper amount of calcium ...

  13. Premature rupture of membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Poma, P. A.

    1996-01-01

    The management of patients with premature rupture of membranes has changed markedly in the past several years. The basis for this is a combination of a better understanding of newborn physiology, improved neonatal care, refinements in antibiotic therapy, and the widespread use of maternal and fetal monitoring. The best outcome for both mother and infant undoubtedly reflects data based on a combination of factors, among which are gestational age survival, evidence of fetal distress, presence or absence of labor and sepsis, and of course, the cervical condition as it is related to labor-readiness. An important recent advance is the recognition that an active observation management program is associated with less morbidity and mortality than the classic management course of delivery within 12 hours of membrane rupture. The fact that preterm premature rupture of membranes tends to recur in subsequent pregnancies offers an opportunity for prevention. Moreover, advances in perinatal and neonatal care will continue to improve the outcomes of these women and their children. PMID:8583489

  14. Preterm labor and preterm premature rupture of membranes have a different pattern in the involved compartments of acute histologoic chorioamnionitis and/or funisitis: Patho-physiologic implication related to different clinical manifestations.

    PubMed

    Park, Chan-Wook; Park, Joong Shin; Moon, Kyung Chul; Jun, Jong Kwan; Yoon, Bo Hyun

    2016-06-01

    It is unknown whether histo-topographic findings about the involved compartments (i.e., choriodecidua, amnion, chorionic-plate) of acute-histologic chorioamnionitis (acute-HCA) and/or funisitis according to the presence or absence of intra-amniotic inflammation (IAI) and/or fetal inflammatory response syndrome (FIRS) are different between preterm labor and intact membranes (PTL) and preterm premature rupture of membranes (preterm-PROM). The involved compartments of acute-HCA and/or funisitis were examined in 161 singleton preterm-births (<34 weeks) due to PTL (n = 88) and preterm-PROM (n = 73). The study-population was divided into IAI(-)/FIRS(-), IAI(+)/FIRS(-), and IAI(+)/FIRS(+) groups according to the presence or absence of IAI (amniotic-fluid MMP-8 ≥ 23 ng/ml) and/or FIRS (umbilical-cord plasma CRP ≥ 200 ng/ml). Histological inflammation was not detected in any-compartment except choriodecidua in IAI(-)/FIRS(-) group with PTL while inflammation appeared in all-compartment0s (choriodeciduitis-46.2 %; amnionitis-23.1 %; funisitis-30.8 %; chorionic-plate inflammation-7.7 %) in IAI(-)/FIRS(-) group with preterm-PROM. IAI(+)/FIRS(-) group had a significantly higher frequency of inflammation in each-compartment than IAI(-)/FIRS(-) group in PTL (each-for P < 0.01), but not preterm-PROM (each-for P > 0.1). However, IAI(+)/FIRS(+) group had a significantly higher rate of inflammation in each compartment than IAI(+)/FIRS(-) group in both PTL and preterm-PROM (each-for P < 0.05). We first demonstrated that PTL and preterm-PROM had a different pattern in the involved compartments of acute-HCA and/or funisitis in the IAI(-)/FIRS(--) group and in the change of involved compartments from IAI(-)/FIRS(-) to IAI(+)/FIRS(-). PMID:27090052

  15. Obstetrical data management systems.

    PubMed

    1997-03-01

    Obstetrical data management systems (OBDMSs) are computer systems designed to interface with fetal and maternal monitors. This allows monitoring and charting records to be created and maintained electronically and to be viewed from centralized workstations. In theory, these systems could eliminate paper record keeping from the obstetrics department altogether, although currently at least some paper documentation, such as fetal monitoring strips, is being kept. We evaluated five OBDMSs, one of which is no longer on the market and which we did not rate. Of the remaining systems, three were rated Acceptable; the fourth was rated Acceptable-Not Recommended because it lacks several important features and functions. This Evaluation also includes a Technology Overview, in which we discuss how OBDMSs function. The Overview incorporates a supplementary article, "Obstetrical Care Monitoring and Documentation," describing the monitoring and documentation typically performed during a pregnancy. And in the Selection and Use Guide, we discuss issues involved in choosing, purchasing, and implementing an OBDMS. PMID:9067726

  16. Prevention in Obstetrics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children in the Tropics, 1984

    1984-01-01

    The aim of this issue of "Children in the Tropics" is to describe work that may be done by a motivated health team having only the strict minimum of material resources. While not a handbook of obstetrics, this text serves as a reminder of basic information and procedures workers must be able to perform. Following a review of the educational and…

  17. Retinopathy of prematurity

    MedlinePlus

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is abnormal blood vessel development in the retina of the eye. It occurs in infants ... Certified Orthoptists. Screening examination of premature infants for retinopathy of prematurity. Pediatrics . 2013;131(1):189-95. PMID: 23277315 ...

  18. Osteopenia - premature infants

    MedlinePlus

    Neonatal rickets; Brittle bones - premature infants; Weak bones - premature infants; Osteopenia of prematurity ... the amount of calcium and phosphorus in the bone. This can cause bones to be weak and ...

  19. Drug Resistant Fetal Arrhythmia in Obstetric Cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Altug, Nahide; Kirbas, Ayse; Daglar, Korkut; Biberoglu, Ebru; Uygur, Dilek; Danisman, Nuri

    2015-01-01

    Obstetric cholestasis (OC) is a pregnancy specific liver disease characterized by increased levels of bile acid (BA) and pruritus. Raised maternal BA levels could be associated with intrauterine death, fetal distress, and preterm labor and also alter the rate and rhythm of cardiomyocyte contraction and may cause fetal arrhythmic events. We report a case of drug resistant fetal supraventricular tachycardia and concomitant OC. Conclusion. If there are maternal OC and concomitant fetal arrhythmia, possibility of the resistance to antiarrhythmic treatment should be kept in mind. PMID:25821617

  20. Prohemostatic interventions in obstetric hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Marie-Pierre; Basso, Olga

    2012-04-01

    Obstetric hemorrhage is a major cause of maternal morbidity and mortality. Pregnancy is associated with substantial hemostatic changes, resulting in a relatively hypercoagulable state. Acquired coagulopathy can, however, develop rapidly in severe obstetric hemorrhage. Therefore, prohemostatic treatments based on high fresh frozen plasma and red blood cell (FFP:RBC) ratio transfusion and procoagulant agents (fibrinogen concentrates, recombinant activated factor VII, and tranexamic acid) are crucial aspects of management. Often, evidence from trauma patients is applied to obstetric hemorrhage management, although distinct differences exist between the two situations. Therefore, until efficacy and safety are demonstrated in obstetric hemorrhage, clinicians should be cautious about wholesale adoption of high FFP:RBC ratio products. Applications of transfusion protocols, dedicated to massive obstetric hemorrhage and multidisciplinarily developed, currently remain the best available option. Similarly, while procoagulant agents appear promising in treatment of obstetric hemorrhage, caution is nonetheless warranted as long as clear evidence in the context of obstetric hemorrhage is lacking. PMID:22510859

  1. Premature ejaculation

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Chris G.

    2007-01-01

    Premature ejaculation (PE) is a common male sexual disorder. Recent normative data suggests that men with an intravaginal ejaculatory latency time (IELT) of less than 1 minute have “definite” PE, while men with IELTs between 1 and 1.5 minutes have “probable” PE. Although there is insufficient empirical evidence to identify the etiology of PE, there is limited correlational evidence to suggest that men with PE have high levels of sexual anxiety and inherited altered sensitivity of central 5-HT (5-hydroxytryptamine, serotonin) receptors. Pharmacological modulation of the ejaculatory threshold using off-label daily or on-demand selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors is well tolerated and offers patients a high likelihood of achieving improved ejaculatory control within a few days of initiating treatment, consequential improvements in sexual desire and other sexual domains. Investigational drugs such as the ejaculo-selective serotonin transport inhibitor, dapoxetine represent a major development in sexual medicine. These drugs offer patients the convenience of on-demand dosing, significant improvements in IELT, ejaculatory control and sexual satisfaction with minimal adverse effects. PMID:19675782

  2. Obstetric (nonfetal) complications.

    PubMed

    Shanbhogue, Alampady K P; Menias, Christine O; Lalwani, Neeraj; Lall, Chandana; Khandelwal, Ashish; Nagar, Arpit

    2013-11-01

    Pregnancy predisposes women to a wide array of obstetric and gynecological complications which are often complex, challenging and sometimes life-threatening. While some of these are unique to pregnancy, a few that occur in nonpregnant women are more common during pregnancy. Imaging plays a crucial role in the diagnosis and management of pregnancy-related obstetric and gynecologic complications. Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging confer the least risk to the fetus and should be the preferred examinations for evaluating these complications. Multidetector computed tomography should be used after carefully weighing the risk-benefit ratio based on the clinical condition in question. Interventional radiology is emerging as a preferred, noninvasive or minimally invasive treatment option that can obviate surgery and its antecedent short term and long term complications. Knowledge of appropriateness of imaging and image guided intervention is necessary for accurate patient management. PMID:24210440

  3. Obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Galarza-Maldonado, Claudio; Kourilovitch, Maria R; Pérez-Fernández, Oscar M; Gaybor, Mariana; Cordero, Christian; Cabrera, Sonia; Soroka, Nikolai F

    2012-02-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in pregnancy has a serious impact on maternal and fetal morbidity. It causes recurrent pregnancy miscarriage and it is associated with other adverse obstetric findings like preterm delivery, intrauterine growth restriction, preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome and others. The 2006 revised criteria, which is still valid, is used for APS classification. Epidemiology of obstetric APS varies from one population group to another largely due to different inclusion criteria and lack of standardization of antibody detection methods. Treatment is still controversial. This topic should include a multidisciplinary team and should be individualized. Success here is based on strict control and monitoring throughout pregnancy and even in the preconception and postpartum periods. Further research in this field and unification of criteria are required to yield better therapeutic strategies in the future. PMID:22001418

  4. Cell Salvage in Obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Goucher, Haley; Wong, Cynthia A; Patel, Samir K; Toledo, Paloma

    2015-08-01

    Intraoperative cell salvage is a strategy to decrease the need for allogeneic blood transfusion. Traditionally, cell salvage has been avoided in the obstetric population because of the perceived risk of amniotic fluid embolism or induction of maternal alloimmunization. With advances in cell salvage technology, the risks of cell salvage in the obstetric population parallel those in the general population. Levels of fetal squamous cells in salvaged blood are comparable to those in maternal venous blood at the time of placental separation. No definite cases of amniotic fluid embolism have been reported and appear unlikely with modern equipment. Cell salvage is cost-effective in patients with predictably high rates of transfusion, such as parturients with abnormal placentation. PMID:26197375

  5. Transitioning experienced registered nurses into an obstetrics specialty.

    PubMed

    Bell, Renee; Bossier-Bearden, Mary; Henry, Armilla A G; Kirksey, Kenn M

    2015-04-01

    Ensuring patient safety and enhancing nurse satisfaction both rank high on most hospitals' list of priorities. One of the concerns at a large, comprehensive, county health care system in the southwestern United States has been the shortage of experienced obstetrics (OB) nurses to provide patient care. To address this concern, a nursing fellowship was implemented to facilitate successful transition and retention of experienced RNs into the specialty area of obstetrics. The program provided a gateway for non-OB nurses to participate in relevant, evidence-based didactic and preceptor-facilitated clinical experiences to ensure adequate knowledge, skills, and competencies to care for patients in labor, delivery, and recovery suites. PMID:25856454

  6. Emergency preparedness in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Haeri, Sina; Marcozzi, David

    2015-04-01

    During and after disasters, focus is directed toward meeting the immediate needs of the general population. As a result, the routine health care and the special needs of some vulnerable populations such as pregnant and postpartum women may be overlooked within a resource-limited setting. In the event of hazards such as natural disasters, manmade disasters, and terrorism, knowledge of emergency preparedness strategies is imperative for the pregnant woman and her family, obstetric providers, and hospitals. Individualized plans for the pregnant woman and her family should include knowledge of shelter in place, birth at home, and evacuation. Obstetric providers need to have a personal disaster plan in place that accounts for work responsibilities in case of an emergency and business continuity strategies to continue to provide care to their communities. Hospitals should have a comprehensive emergency preparedness program utilizing an "all hazards" approach to meet the needs of pregnant and postpartum women and other vulnerable populations during disasters. With lessons learned in recent tragedies such as Hurricane Katrina in mind, we hope this review will stimulate emergency preparedness discussions and actions among obstetric providers and attenuate adverse outcomes related to catastrophes in the future. PMID:25751222

  7. Blood transfusion in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Nigam, A; Prakash, A; Saxena, P

    2013-01-01

    Transfusion of blood and blood components is a common practice in obstetric wards but it is not without risk. The incidence of transfusion reactions varies from 4 in every hundred transfusions for non-haemolytic reactions to one in every 40,000 for haemolytic transfusion reactions. The physiological basis of blood transfusion is outlined in this article. Most of the donated blood is processed into components: packed red cells (PRBCs), platelets, and fresh frozen plasma (FFP) or cryoprecipitate. Various alternatives to blood transfusion exist and include autotransfusion, pre-autologous blood storage, use of oxygen carrying blood substitutes and intraoperative cell salvage. Despite the risks associated with transfusions, obstetricians are frequently too aggressive in transfusing blood and blood products to their patients. Acute blood loss in obstetrics is usually due to placenta praevia, postpartum blood loss and surgery related. An early involvement of a consultant obstetrician, anaesthetist, haematologist and the blood bank is essential. There are no established criteria for initiating red cell transfusions and the decision is purely based on clinical and haematological parameters, which have been discussed along with the general principles of blood transfusion in obstetrics and some practical guidelines. PMID:24899337

  8. Early Menopause (Premature Menopause)

    MedlinePlus

    ... has been called “premature menopause” or “premature ovarian failure.” But a better term is “primary ovarian insufficiency,” ... and what procedures might cause it. Premature Ovarian Failure: Premature Menopause (Copyright © American Pregnancy Association) - This article ...

  9. Does maternal asthma contribute to racial/ethnic disparities in obstetric and neonatal complications?

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Katrina F.; Robledo, Candace A.; Hwang, Beom Seuk; Leishear, Kira; Grantz, Katherine Laughon; Mendola, Pauline

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Examine whether maternal asthma contributes to racial/ethnic differences in obstetric and neonatal complications. Methods Data on White (n=110,603), Black (n=50,284) and Hispanic (n=38,831) singleton deliveries came from the Consortium on Safe Labor. Multi-level logistic regression models, with an interaction term for asthma and race/ethnicity, estimated within-group adjusted odds ratios (aOR) for gestational diabetes, gestational hypertension, preeclampsia, placental abruption, premature rupture of membranes, preterm delivery, maternal hemorrhage, NICU admissions, small for gestational age (SGA), apnea, respiratory distress syndrome, transient tachypnea of the newborn, anemia and hyperbilirubinemia after adjustment for clinical and demographic confounders. Non-asthmatics of the same racial/ethnic group were the reference group. Results Compared to non-asthmatics, White asthmatics had increased odds of preeclampsia (aOR 1.28; 95% CI: 1.15–1.43) and maternal hemorrhage (1.14; 1.04–1.23). White and Hispanic infants were more likely to have NICU admissions (1.19; 1.11–1.28; 1.16; 1.02–1.32, respectively) and be SGA (1.11; 1.02–1.20; 1.26; 1.10–1.44, respectively) and Hispanic infants were more likely to have apnea (1.32; 1.02–1.69). Conclusions Maternal asthma did not impact most obstetric and neonatal complication risks within racial/ethnic groups. Despite their increased risk for both asthma and many complications, our findings for Black women were null. Asthma did not contribute to racial/ethnic disparities in complications. PMID:25724829

  10. Relevant Obstetric Factors for Cerebral Palsy: From the Nationwide Obstetric Compensation System in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Junichi; Toyokawa, Satoshi; Ikenoue, Tsuyomu; Asano, Yuri; Satoh, Shoji; Ikeda, Tomoaki; Ichizuka, Kiyotake; Tamiya, Nanako; Nakai, Akihito; Fujimori, Keiya; Maeda, Tsugio; Masuzaki, Hideaki; Suzuki, Hideaki; Ueda, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to identify the relevant obstetric factors for cerebral palsy (CP) after 33 weeks’ gestation in Japan. Study design This retrospective case cohort study (1:100 cases and controls) used a Japanese national CP registry. Obstetric characteristics and clinical course were compared between CP cases in the Japan Obstetric Compensation System for Cerebral Palsy database and controls in the perinatal database of the Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology born as live singleton infants between 2009 and 2011 with a birth weight ≥ 2,000 g and gestation ≥ 33 weeks. Results One hundred and seventy-five CP cases and 17,475 controls were assessed. Major relevant single factors for CP were placental abnormalities (31%), umbilical cord abnormalities (15%), maternal complications (10%), and neonatal complications (1%). A multivariate regression model demonstrated that obstetric variables associated with CP were acute delivery due to non-reassuring fetal status (relative risk [RR]: 37.182, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 20.028–69.032), uterine rupture (RR: 24.770, 95% CI: 6.006–102.160), placental abruption (RR: 20.891, 95% CI: 11.817–36.934), and preterm labor (RR: 3.153, 95% CI: 2.024–4.911), whereas protective factors were head presentation (RR: 0.199, 95% CI: 0.088–0.450) and elective cesarean section (RR: 0.236, 95% CI: 0.067–0.828). Conclusion CP after 33 weeks’ gestation in the recently reported cases in Japan was strongly associated with acute delivery due to non-reassuring fetal status, uterine rupture, and placental abruption. PMID:26821386

  11. Palliative Care for Extremely Premature Infants and Their Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boss, Renee D.

    2010-01-01

    Extremely premature infants face multiple acute and chronic life-threatening conditions. In addition, the treatments to ameliorate or cure these conditions often entail pain and discomfort. Integrating palliative care from the moment that extremely premature labor is diagnosed offers families and clinicians support through the process of defining…

  12. [Autologous transfusion in obstetrics and fetal safety].

    PubMed

    Rech, F; Patella, A; Cecchi, A; Ippolito, M; Indraccolo, S R

    1994-06-01

    It is common knowledge that for modern medicine transfusion therapy represents a precious resource and an often mandatory option. It is equally known that autohemotransfusion (or autologous transfusion) provides further advantages: certainty of blood availability when necessary, absence of transfusion reactions, elimination of the risk of infections that is still associated with the traditional homologous transfusions. In its most widespread application, autotransfusion provides for the donation of one or more units of autologous blood, mostly before elective surgery. Even in obstetrics the practice of autologous blood donation with the aim of autotransfusion is finding increasing employment. However, there are still controversial aspects and the need is pointed out for more authoritative verifications as refers to the alleged innocuity to the fetus of acute maternal blood loss. The present study was performed to contribute personal experience to a better definition of the possible interactions between autologous blood donation during pregnancy and unborn child welfare. To this end, 80 term pregnant women underwent fetal heart rate electronic monitoring before, during and after the donation of one unit of autologous blood. Both during and after the phlebotomy there were no cardiotocographic signs of fetal hypo-oxygenation. Even the non stress tests performed at a distance of 24 hours and those that were periodically repeated afterwards were normal, confirming the safety of autologous predonation during pregnancy. However, the authors think that in obstetrics it is still premature to consider the experimental phase of autotransfusion as definitively exhausted. PMID:7936387

  13. Labor Induction

    MedlinePlus

    ... QUESTIONS FAQ154 LABOR, DELIVERY, AND POSTPARTUM CARE Labor Induction • What is labor induction? • Why is labor induced? • What is the Bishop ... oxytocin? • What are the risks associated with labor induction? • Is labor induction always effective? • Glossary What is ...

  14. Parenteral opioids for labor analgesia.

    PubMed

    Campbell, David C

    2003-09-01

    Labor pain relief is an important aspect of women's health that has historically been neglected. Epidural analgesia is the only consistently effective method of labor pain relief and has recently undergone substantial improvements to address the concerns of both parturients and obstetric care providers. With increased physician awareness, these recent advances are becoming more widely accepted and routinely available for all laboring parturients. Unfortunately, an increasing number of women are presenting to maternity wards with an absolute contraindication to epidural labor analgesia. The present review will provide an outline of the recent developments in parenteral analgesic options which complement modern epidural analgesic techniques. Protocols for the initiation of "state-of-the-art" parenteral analgesic techniques are provided as a guide to facilitate effective, modern, parenteral labor analgesia. PMID:12972743

  15. Transfusion and coagulation management in major obstetric hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Butwick, A.J.; Goodnough, L.T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review Major obstetric hemorrhage is a leading cause of maternal morbidity and mortality. We will review transfusion strategies and the value of monitoring the maternal coagulation profile during severe obstetric hemorrhage. Recent Findings Epidemiologic studies indicate that rates of severe postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) in well-resourced countries are increasing. Despite these increases, rates of transfusion in obstetrics are low (0.9% - 2.3%), and investigators have questioned whether a pre-delivery ‘type and screen’ is cost-effective for all obstetric patients. Instead, blood ordering protocols specific to obstetric patients can reduce unnecessary antibody testing. When severe PPH occurs, a massive transfusion protocol (MTP) has attracted interest as a key therapeutic resource by ensuring sustained availability of blood products to the labor and delivery unit. During early postpartum bleeding, recent studies have shown that hypofibrinogenemia is an important predictor for the later development of severe PPH. Point-of-care technologies, such as thromboelastography and rotational thromboelastometry, can identify decreased fibrin-clot quality during PPH, which correlate with low fibrinogen levels. Summary A MTP provides a key resource in the management of severe PPH. However, future studies are needed to assess whether formula driven vs. goal-directed transfusion therapy improves maternal outcomes in women with severe PPH. PMID:25812005

  16. Premature rupture of membranes

    MedlinePlus

    ... When the water breaks early, it is called premature rupture of membranes (PROM). Most women will go ... th week of pregnancy, it is called preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM). The earlier your water ...

  17. Retinopathy of Prematurity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinweg, Sue Byrd; Griffin, Harold C.; Griffin, Linda W.; Gingras, Happy

    2005-01-01

    The eyes of premature infants are especially vulnerable to injury after birth. A serious complication is called retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), which is abnormal growth of the blood vessels in an infant's eye. Retinopathy of prematurity develops when abnormal blood vessels grow and spread throughout the retina, which is the nerve tissue at the…

  18. The obstetrical and postpartum benefits of continuous support during childbirth.

    PubMed

    Scott, K D; Klaus, P H; Klaus, M H

    1999-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the evidence regarding the effectiveness of continuous support provided by a trained laywoman (doula) during childbirth on obstetrical and postpartum outcomes. Twelve individual randomized trials have compared obstetrical and postpartum outcomes between doula-supported women and women who did not receive doula support during childbirth. Three meta-analyses, which used different approaches, have been performed on the results of the clinical trials. Emotional and physical support significantly shortens labor and decreases the need for cesarean deliveries, forceps and vacuum extraction, oxytocin augmentation, and analgesia. Doula-supported mothers also rate childbirth as less difficult and painful than do women not supported by a doula. Labor support by fathers does not appear to produce similar obstetrical benefits. Eight of the 12 trials report early or late psychosocial benefits of doula support. Early benefits include reductions in state anxiety scores, positive feelings about the birth experience, and increased rates of breastfeeding initiation. Later postpartum benefits include decreased symptoms of depression, improved self-esteem, exclusive breastfeeding, and increased sensitivity of the mother to her child's needs. The results of these 12 trials strongly suggest that doula support is an essential component of childbirth. A thorough reorganization of current birth practices is in order to ensure that every woman has access to continuous emotional and physical support during labor. PMID:10643833

  19. Obesity and obstetric anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Mace, H S; Paech, M J; McDonnell, N J

    2011-07-01

    Obesity is increasing in the population as a whole, and especially in the obstetric population, among whom pregnancy-induced physiological changes impact on those already present due to obesity. In particular, changes in the cardiovascular and respiratory systems during pregnancy further alter the physiological effects and comorbidities of obesity. Obese pregnant women are at increased risk of diabetes, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, ischaemic heart disease, congenital malformations, operative delivery postpartum infection and thromboembolism. Regional analgesia and anaesthesia is usually preferred but may be challenging. Obese pregnant women appear to have increased morbidity and mortality associated with caesarean delivery and general anaesthesia for caesarean delivery in particular, and more anaesthesia-related complications. This article summarises the physiological and pharmacological implications of obesity and pregnancy and describes the issues surrounding the management of these women for labour and delivery. PMID:21823371

  20. Teaching neuraxial anesthesia techniques for obstetric care in a Ghanaian referral hospital: achievements and obstacles.

    PubMed

    Olufolabi, Adeyemi J; Atito-Narh, Evans; Eshun, Millicent; Ross, Vernon H; Muir, Holly A; Owen, Medge D

    2015-06-01

    Anesthesia providers in low-income countries may infrequently provide regional anesthesia techniques for obstetrics due to insufficient training and supplies, limited manpower, and a lack of perceived need. In 2007, Kybele, Inc. began a 5-year collaboration in Ghana to improve obstetric anesthesia services. A program was designed to teach spinal anesthesia for cesarean delivery and spinal labor analgesia at Ridge Regional Hospital, Accra, the second largest obstetric unit in Ghana. The use of spinal anesthesia for cesarean delivery increased significantly from 6% in 2006 to 89% in 2009. By 2012, >90% of cesarean deliveries were conducted with spinal anesthesia, despite a doubling of the number performed. A trial of spinal labor analgesia was assessed in a small cohort of parturients with minimal complications; however, protocol deviations were observed. Although subsequent efforts to provide spinal analgesia in the labor ward were hampered by anesthesia provider shortages, spinal anesthesia for cesarean delivery proved to be practical and sustainable. PMID:25988637

  1. Obstetric aspects of the Guillan-Barré syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sudo, N; Weingold, A B

    1975-01-01

    Two additional cases of Guillain-Barre syndrome complicating pregnancy are reported and the 25 previously published cases reviewed. While fetal prognosis is generally favorable, the occurrence of the disease in late pregnancy is a high-rish maternal condition. Respiratory failure and aspiration pneumonitis may result in premature labor and maternal mortality. PMID:1110816

  2. Female circumcision: obstetric issues.

    PubMed

    Baker, C A; Gilson, G J; Vill, M D; Curet, L B

    1993-12-01

    Female circumcision is a problem unfamiliar to most Western obstetrician-gynecologists. We present a case illustrative of the unique management problems posed by these patients during labor. A method of releasing the anterior vulvar scar tissue to allow vaginal delivery is described. Sensitivity and a nonjudgmental approach as to what is culturally appropriate care for these women are of paramount importance. PMID:8267074

  3. Accounts of severe acute obstetric complications in Rural Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background As maternal deaths have decreased worldwide, increasing attention has been placed on the study of severe obstetric complications, such as hemorrhage, eclampsia, and obstructed labor, to identify where improvements can be made in maternal health. Though access to medical care is considered to be life-saving during obstetric emergencies, data on the factors associated with health care decision-making during obstetric emergencies are lacking. We aim to describe the health care decision-making process during severe acute obstetric complications among women and their families in rural Bangladesh. Methods Using the pregnancy surveillance infrastructure from a large community trial in northwest rural Bangladesh, we nested a qualitative study to document barriers to timely receipt of medical care for severe obstetric complications. We conducted 40 semi-structured, in-depth interviews with women reporting severe acute obstetric complications and purposively selected for conditions representing the top five most common obstetric complications. The interviews were transcribed and coded to highlight common themes and to develop an overall conceptual model. Results Women attributed their life-threatening experiences to societal and socioeconomic factors that led to delays in seeking timely medical care by decision makers, usually husbands or other male relatives. Despite the dominance of male relatives and husbands in the decision-making process, women who underwent induced abortions made their own decisions about their health care and relied on female relatives for advice. The study shows that non-certified providers such as village doctors and untrained birth attendants were the first-line providers for women in all categories of severe complications. Coordination of transportation and finances was often arranged through mobile phones, and referrals were likely to be provided by village doctors. Conclusions Strategies to increase timely and appropriate care seeking

  4. Contracting for Trust in Family Practice Obstetrics

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Michael

    1983-01-01

    A case is presented, illustrating a problem faced by family physicians who practice obstetrics; women who present with lists of inflexible requirements for labor and delivery may be attempting to control a situation in which they feel a great deal of fear, and little trust for the physician. The physician who tries to deal with every item on the list, rather than to explore the meaning of the total presentation, risks establishing a contract that cannot be met—and attracting more demanding patients. It is better to offer to discuss the patient's fear and distrust; this is described as `contracting for trust', and is a way to promote patient and doctor flexibility. PMID:21283484

  5. Three-dimensional obstetric ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Tache, Veronique; Tarsa, Maryam; Romine, Lorene; Pretorius, Dolores H

    2008-04-01

    Three-dimensional ultrasound has gained a significant popularity in obstetrical practice in recent years. The advantage of this modality in some cases is in question, however. This article provides a basic review of volume acquisition, mechanical positioning, and display modalities. Multiple uses of this technique in obstetrical care including first trimester applications and its utility in clarification of fetal anatomy such as brain, face, heart, and skeleton is discussed. PMID:18450140

  6. Doing obstetrics and staying alive.

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, J. L.

    1993-01-01

    Many family physicians have a love-hate relationship with childbirth care and struggle to balance their personal and family needs with the need to provide high-quality personal care during labour and birth. Many false assumptions undermine family practice obstetrics. Strategies are presented to simplify obstetric care for women and families while promoting reasoned self-care for physicians. Images p1948-a PMID:8219843

  7. Safety Assurance in Obstetrical Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Douglas L

    2008-01-01

    Safety assurance for diagnostic ultrasound in obstetrics began with a tacit assumption of safety allowed by a federal law enacted in 1976 for then-existing medical ultrasound equipment. The implementation of the 510(k) pre-market approval process for diagnostic ultrasound resulted in the establishment of guideline upper limits for several examination categories in 1985. The obstetrical category has undergone substantial evolution from initial limits (I. e., 46 mW/cm2 spatial peak temporal average (SPTA) intensity) set in 1985. Thermal and mechanical exposure indices, which are displayed on-screen according to an Output Display Standard (ODS), were developed for safety assurance with relaxed upper limits. In 1992, with the adoption of the ODS, the allowable output for obstetrical ultrasound was increased both in terms of the average exposure (e. g. to a possible 720 mW/cm2 SPTA intensity) and of the peak exposure (via the Mechanical Index). There has been little or no subsequent research with the modern obstetrical ultrasound machines to systematically assess potential risks to the fetus using either relevant animal models of obstetrical exposure or human epidemiology studies. The assurance of safety for obstetrical ultrasound therefore is supported by three ongoing means: (I) review of a substantial but uncoordinated bioeffect research literature, (ii) the theoretical evaluation of diagnostic ultrasound exposure in terms of thermal and nonthermal mechanisms for bioeffects, and (iii) the skill and knowledge of professional sonographers. At this time, there is no specific reason to suspect that there is any significant health risk to the fetus or mother from exposure to diagnostic ultrasound in obstetrics. This assurance of safety supports the prudent use of diagnostic ultrasound in obstetrics by trained professionals for any medically indicated examination. PMID:18450141

  8. Safety assurance in obstetrical ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Miller, Douglas L

    2008-04-01

    Safety assurance for diagnostic ultrasound in obstetrics began with a tacit assumption of safety allowed by a federal law enacted in 1976 for then-existing medical ultrasound equipment. The implementation of the 510(k) pre-market-approval process for diagnostic ultrasound resulted in the establishment of guideline upper limits for several examination categories in 1985. The obstetrical category has undergone substantial evolution from initial limits (ie, 46 mW/cm2 spatial peak temporal average [SPTA] intensity) set in 1985. Thermal and mechanical exposure indices, which are displayed onscreen according to an Output Display Standard, were developed for safety assurance with relaxed upper limits. In 1992, with the adoption of the Output Display Standard, the allowable output for obstetrical ultrasound was increased in terms of both the average exposure (eg, to a possible 720 mW/cm2 SPTA intensity) and the peak exposure (via the Mechanical Index). There has been little or no subsequent research with the modern obstetrical ultrasound machines to systematically assess potential risks to the fetus using either relevant animal models of obstetrical exposure or human epidemiology studies. The assurance of safety for obstetrical ultrasound therefore is supported by three ongoing means: (1) review of a substantial but uncoordinated bioeffect research literature; (2) the theoretical evaluation of diagnostic ultrasound exposure in terms of thermal and nonthermal mechanisms for bioeffects; and (3) the skill and knowledge of professional sonographers. At this time, there is no specific reason to suspect that there is any significant health risk to the fetus or mother from exposure to diagnostic ultrasound in obstetrics. This assurance of safety supports the prudent use of diagnostic ultrasound in obstetrics by trained professionals for any medically indicated examination. PMID:18450141

  9. Obstetric management of conjoined twins.

    PubMed

    Sakala, E P

    1986-03-01

    Three cases of conjoined twins are presented: two thorocopagus and one craniopagus. The diagnosis of conjoining varied from late second trimester to time of term delivery. Delivery mode was both by vaginal and cesarean routes, and occurred at both level one and level three hospitals. Antenatal diagnostic procedures and issues in obstetric management are discussed. A suggested obstetric management sequence for conjoined twins is proposed. PMID:3511423

  10. Outcomes for extremely premature infants.

    PubMed

    Glass, Hannah C; Costarino, Andrew T; Stayer, Stephen A; Brett, Claire M; Cladis, Franklyn; Davis, Peter J

    2015-06-01

    Premature birth is a significant cause of infant and child morbidity and mortality. In the United States, the premature birth rate, which had steadily increased during the 1990s and early 2000s, has decreased annually for 7 years and is now approximately 11.39%. Human viability, defined as gestational age at which the chance of survival is 50%, is currently approximately 23 to 24 weeks in developed countries. Infant girls, on average, have better outcomes than infant boys. A relatively uncomplicated course in the intensive care nursery for an extremely premature infant results in a discharge date close to the prenatal estimated date of confinement. Despite technological advances and efforts of child health experts during the last generation, the extremely premature infant (less than 28 weeks gestation) and extremely low birth weight infant (<1000 g) remain at high risk for death and disability with 30% to 50% mortality and, in survivors, at least 20% to 50% risk of morbidity. The introduction of continuous positive airway pressure, mechanical ventilation, and exogenous surfactant increased survival and spurred the development of neonatal intensive care in the 1970s through the early 1990s. Routine administration of antenatal steroids during premature labor improved neonatal mortality and morbidity in the late 1990s. The recognition that chronic postnatal administration of steroids to infants should be avoided may have improved outcomes in the early 2000s. Evidence from recent trials attempting to define the appropriate target for oxygen saturation in preterm infants suggests arterial oxygen saturation between 91% and 95% (compared with 85%-89%) avoids excess mortality; however, final analyses of data from these trials have not been published, so definitive recommendations are still pending. The development of neonatal neurocritical intensive care units may improve neurocognitive outcomes in this high-risk group. Long-term follow-up to detect and address

  11. EPIDURAL ANALGESIA IN LABOR - CONTROVERSIES.

    PubMed

    Bilić, Nada; Djaković, Ivka; Kličan-Jaić, Katarina; Rudman, Senka Sabolović; Ivanec, Željko

    2015-09-01

    Labor pain is one of the most severe pains. Labor is a complex and individual process with varying maternal requesting analgesia. Labor analgesia must be safe and accompanied by minimal amount of unwanted consequences for both the mother and the child, as well as for the delivery procedure. Epidural analgesia is the treatment that best meets these demands. According to the American Congress of Obstetrics and Gynecology and American Society of Anesthesiologists, mother's demand is a reason enough for the introduction of epidural analgesia in labor, providing that no contraindications exist. The application of analgesics should not cease at the end of the second stage of labor, but it is recommended that lower concentration analgesics be then applied. Based on the latest studies, it can be claimed that epidural analgesia can be applied during the major part of the first and second stage of labor. According to previous investigations, there is no definitive conclusion about the incidence of instrumental delivery, duration of second stage of labor, time of epidural analgesia initiation, and long term outcomes for the newborn. Cooperation of obstetric and anesthesiology personnel, as well as appropriate technical equipment significantly decrease the need of instrumental completion of a delivery, as well as other complications encountered in the application of epidural analgesia. Our hospital offers 24/7 epidural analgesia service. The majority of pregnant women in our hospital were aware of the advantages of epidural analgesia for labor, however, only a small proportion of them used it, mainly because of inadequate level of information. PMID:26666104

  12. Analgesia in Obstetrics

    PubMed Central

    Heesen, M.; Veeser, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: An effective relief of labour pain has become an important part of obstetric medicine. Therefore regional nerve blocks, systemic analgesic and non-pharmacologic techniques are commonly used. This review article gives a summary of pathophysiology and anatomy of labour pain as well as advantages, disadvantages, risks and adverse reactions of analgesic techniques in newborns and parturients. Methods: We performed a selective literature search in Medline via PubMed using the search-terms “Analgesia” and “Obstetrics”. We also included the current guidelines of the German Society for Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine. Results: PDA and CSE are safe techniques for the relief of labour pain if contraindications are excluded. The risk for instrumental delivery but not for caesarean section is increased under neuraxial analgesia. PDA and CSE should be performed in an early stage of labour using low doses of local anaesthetics if possible. It is not necessary to wait for a defined cervical dilatation before starting neuraxial analgesia. Anesthesiologists and obstetricians should inform patients as soon as possible before the situation of stress during labour. Systemic opioid analgesia is a possible alternative for neuraxial techniques. Because of possible side effects systemic remifentanil analgesia should only be performed under continuous monitoring. Several nonpharmacologic methods can also relieve labour pain, but results of studies about their effectiveness are inconsistent. PMID:25264376

  13. Retinopathy of prematurity.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Catherine O

    2014-06-01

    Premature infants born at 30 weeks' gestational age or younger, or 1500 g or smaller, are screened for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Guidelines for supplemental oxygen in neonatal intensive care units have decreased but not eliminated the incidence of severe ROP. The underlying cause for ROP is prematurity and low birth weight, and with the survival of smaller and younger babies, ROP continues to be a significant problem facing premature infants. Threshold ROP is treated with retinal photocoagulation, but newer treatments such as intraocular injections of bevacizumab (Avastin) are being used alone or in conjunction with laser. PMID:24852153

  14. Composite redesign of obstetrical forceps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Seth W.; Smeltzer, Stan S.

    1994-01-01

    Due to the increase in the number of children being born recently, medical technology has struggled to keep pace in certain areas. In these areas, particular needs have arisen to which the subject of this paper is directed. In the area of obstetrics, the forceps design and function has remained relatively unchanged for a number of years. In an effort to advance the technology, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has been asked by the obstetrical community to help in a redesign of the obstetric forceps. Traditionally the forceps design has been of tubular stainless steel, constructed in two halves which interlock and hinge to provide the gripping force necessary to aid in the delivery of an infant. The stainless steel material was used to provide for ease of cleaning and sterilization. However, one of the drawbacks of the non-flexible steel design is that excessive force can be placed upon an infants head which could result in damage or injury to the infant. The redesign of this particular obstetric tool involves applying NASA's knowledge of advanced materials and state of the art instrumentation to create a tool which can be used freely throughout the obstetrics community without the fear of injury to an infant being delivered.

  15. Utility of proteomics in obstetric disorders: a review

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Núñez, Jónathan; Valdés-Yong, Magel

    2015-01-01

    The study of proteomics could explain many aspects of obstetric disorders. We undertook this review with the aim of assessing the utility of proteomics in the specialty of obstetrics. We searched the electronic databases of MEDLINE, EBSCOhost, BVS Bireme, and SciELO, using various search terms with the assistance of a librarian. We considered cohort studies, case-control studies, case series, and systematic review articles published until October 2014 in the English or Spanish language, and evaluated their quality and the internal validity of the evidence provided. Two reviewers extracted the data independently, then both researchers simultaneously revised the data later, to arrive at a consensus. The search retrieved 1,158 papers, of which 965 were excluded for being duplicates, not relevant, or unrelated studies. A further 86 papers were excluded for being guidelines, protocols, or case reports, along with another 64 that did not contain relevant information, leaving 43 studies for inclusion. Many of these studies showed the utility of proteomic techniques for prediction, pathophysiology, diagnosis, management, monitoring, and prognosis of pre-eclampsia, perinatal infection, premature rupture of membranes, preterm birth, intrauterine growth restriction, and ectopic pregnancy. Proteomic techniques have enormous clinical significance and constitute an invaluable weapon in the management of obstetric disorders that increase maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. PMID:25926758

  16. Retinopathy of Prematurity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trief, E.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) has increased due to a high incidence of premature, low birthweight infants. Stages of severity range from no visual damage to total blindness, and educational problems of ROP children parallel those of other visually impaired children, early intervention being crucial. Treatments are either pharmacological or…

  17. Restriction of oral intake during labor: whither are we bound?

    PubMed

    Sperling, Jeffrey D; Dahlke, Joshua D; Sibai, Baha M

    2016-05-01

    In 1946, Dr Curtis Mendelson suggested that aspiration during general anesthesia for delivery was avoidable by restricting oral intake during labor. This suggestion proved influential, and restriction of oral intake in labor became the norm. These limitations may contribute to fear and feelings of intimidation among parturients. Modern obstetrics, especially in the setting of advances in obstetric anesthesia, does not mirror the clinical landscape of Mendelson; hence, one is left to question if his findings remain relevant or if they should inform current recommendations. The use of general anesthesia at time of cesarean delivery has seen a remarkable decline with increased use of effective neuraxial analgesia as the standard of care in modern obstetric anesthesia. While the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists now endorses clear liquids during labor, current recommendations continue to suggest that solid food intake should be avoided. Recent evidence from a systematic review involving 3130 women in active labor suggests that oral intake should not be restricted in women at low risk of complications, given there were no identified benefits or harms of a liberal diet. Aspiration and other adverse maternal outcomes may be unrelated to oral intake in labor and as such, qualitative measures such as patient satisfaction should be paramount. It is time to reassess the impact of oral intake restriction during labor given the minimal risk of aspiration during labor in the setting of modern obstetric anesthesia practices. PMID:26812080

  18. Obstetric Thromboprophylaxis: The Swedish Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Lindqvist, Pelle G.; Hellgren, Margareta

    2011-01-01

    Obstetric thromboprophylaxis is difficult. Since 10 years Swedish obstetricians have used a combined risk estimation model and recommendations concerning to whom, at what dose, when, and for how long thromboprophylaxis is to be administrated based on a weighted risk score. In this paper we describe the background and validation of the Swedish guidelines for obstetric thromboprophylaxis in women with moderate-high risk of VTE, that is, at similar or higher risk as the antepartum risk among women with history of thrombosis. The risk score is based on major risk factors (i.e., 5-fold increased risk of thromboembolism). We present data on the efficacy of the model, the cost-effectiveness, and the lifestyle advice that is given. We believe that the Swedish guidelines for obstetric thromboprophylaxis aid clinicians in providing women at increased risk of VTE with effective and appropriate thromboprophylaxis, thus avoiding both over- and under-treatment. PMID:22162688

  19. [Treatment of premature ejaculation].

    PubMed

    Targoński, Aleksander; Prajsner, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    Premature ejaculation is the most common sexual dysfunction in men. Its prevalence rate in Europe and in United States is estimated to be between 20% and 30%. The diagnosis of premature ejaculation is based on three main criteria: increased intravaginal ejaculatory latency time (IELT), lack of control over ejaculation and interpersonal psychological disturbances. Premature ejaculation is classified as lifelong (primary) or acquired (secondary) and might be facilitated by chronic prostatitis, diabetes mellitus, hyperthyroidism, obesity. The exact etiology of the disease remains unclear, although 5-HT (5-hydroxytryptamine) receptors are known to have a significant role. The use of SSRIs (selective serotonine reuptake inhibitors) is old and efficient form of therapy for premature ejaculation. Other drugs like tramadol, clomipramine, local anaesthetics and PDE-5 (phosphodiesterase 5) inhibitors also have some efficacy in the treatment of premature ejaculation. To minimize adverse effects the "on demand" therapy is preferred to the daily treatment. Simple questionnaires for patients are used to assess treatment effects. PMID:22827115

  20. Obstetric management of adolescents with bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    James, Andra H

    2010-12-01

    Adolescents with bleeding disorders who become pregnant must contend with the dual challenges of their bleeding disorder and their pregnancy. Adolescents are more likely to terminate a pregnancy than adult women, and when they do carry a pregnancy, they are more likely to deliver prematurely. Otherwise, they are at risk for the same complications that adult women with bleeding disorders experience, particularly bleeding complications postpartum. Since one half to two thirds of adolescent pregnancies are unplanned, issues related to reproduction should be addressed during routine visits with the pediatrician, hematologist or gynecologist. Girls who are at risk of being carriers for hemophilia A and B, severe von Willebrand disease, and other severe bleeding disorders should have their bleeding disorder status determined before they become pregnant. During pregnancy, a plan should be established to ensure that both mother and fetus deliver safely. Young women at risk for severe bleeding or at risk of having a severely affected infant should be referred for prenatal care and delivery to a center where, in addition to specialists in high-risk obstetrics, there is a hemophilia treatment center or a hematologist with expertise in hemostasis. Prior to delivery or any invasive procedures, young women at risk for severe bleeding should receive prophylaxis. Since administration of desmopressin may result in hyponatremia, whenever available, virally inactivated or recombinant clotting factor concentrates should be used for replacement as opposed to fresh frozen plasma or cryoprecipitate. PMID:20934895

  1. Obstetric management of intrauterine growth restriction.

    PubMed

    Marsál, Karel

    2009-12-01

    The aim of obstetric management is to identify growth-restricted foetuses at risk of severe intrauterine hypoxia, to monitor their health and to deliver when the adverse outcome is imminent. After 30-32 gestational weeks, a Doppler finding of absent or reverse end-diastolic flow in the umbilical artery of a small-for-gestational age foetus is in itself an indication for delivery. In very preterm foetuses, the intrauterine risks have to be balanced against the risk of prematurity. All available diagnostic information (e.g., Doppler velocimetry of umbilical artery, foetal central arteries and veins and of maternal uterine arteries; foetal heart rate with computerised analysis of short-term variability; amniotic fluid amount; and foetal gestational age-related weight) should be collected to support the timing of delivery. If possible, the delivery should optimally take place before the onset of late signs of foetal hypoxia (pathological foetal heart rate pattern, severely abnormal ductus venosus blood velocity waveform, pulsations in the umbilical vein). PMID:19854682

  2. Labor Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The labor force is the number of people ages 16 or older who are either working or looking for work. It does not include active-duty military personnel or the institutionalized population, such as prison inmates. Determining the size of the labor force is a way of determining how big the economy can get. The size of the labor force depends on two…

  3. Labor Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The labor force is the number of people aged 16 or older who are either working or looking for work. It does not include active-duty military personnel or institutionalized people, such as prison inmates. Quantifying this total supply of labor is a way of determining how big the economy can get. Labor force participation rates vary significantly…

  4. Association of maternal lithium exposure and premature delivery.

    PubMed

    Troyer, W A; Pereira, G R; Lannon, R A; Belik, J; Yoder, M C

    1993-01-01

    Lithium is widely used and the treatment of choice for patients with manic-depressive illness. For pregnant patients with manic-depressive illness, however, the use of lithium during the first trimester of pregnancy may present an increased risk for fetal maldevelopment. We have recently cared for several large-for-gestational-age, prematurely born infants whose mothers were treated with lithium throughout pregnancy. To determine whether maternal lithium use during pregnancy may predispose to the onset of premature labor and fetal macrosomia, we reviewed records from the International Register of Lithium Babies and from a cohort of manic-depressive pregnant women. More than one third (36%) of infants reported to the International Register were born prematurely, and 37% of the premature infants were large for gestational age; 15% of the term infants were born large for gestational age. In the cohort group, manic-depressive mothers who received lithium during pregnancy had a 2.5-fold higher incidence of premature births than manic-depressive pregnant patients who did not receive lithium treatment. The incidence of large-for-gestational-age births in lithium-treated women in the cohort was not different from that of the general population or from manic-depressive women not treated with lithium. In summary, an association between maternal lithium therapy and premature delivery is reported. We recommend that women receiving lithium therapy during pregnancy be closely monitored for the onset of premature labor. PMID:8515304

  5. Successive Relationships Between Maternal Attitudes During Pregnancy, Analgesic Medication During Labor and Delivery, and Newborn Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Raymond K.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Multiple regression analyses using maternal attitudes during pregnancy, obstetric analgesic medication, and labor variables as predictors did not yield impressive relationships to neonatal behavior as measured two days after delivery. (JMB)

  6. Intraoperative cell salvage in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Grainger, Hannah; Catling, Sue

    2011-08-01

    The use of Intraoperative Cell Salvage (ICS) in obstetrics has been slow to develop as a result of theoretical concerns relating to amniotic fluid embolism and fetal red cell contamination. In this article we examine the current UK position on the use of ICS in this clinical speciality and the recommendations for its safe and appropriate use. PMID:22029206

  7. Court-ordered obstetrical interventions.

    PubMed

    Kolder, V E; Gallagher, J; Parsons, M T

    1987-05-01

    In a national survey, we investigated the scope and circumstances of court-ordered obstetrical procedures in cases in which the women had refused therapy deemed necessary for the fetus. We also solicited the opinions of leading obstetricians regarding such cases. Court orders have been obtained for cesarean sections in 11 states, for hospital detentions in 2 states, and for intrauterine transfusions in 1 state. Among 21 cases in which court orders were sought, the orders were obtained in 86 percent; in 88 percent of those cases, the orders were received within six hours. Eighty-one percent of the women involved were black, Asian, or Hispanic, 44 percent were unmarried, and 24 percent did not speak English as their primary language. All the women were treated in a teaching-hospital clinic or were receiving public assistance. No important maternal morbidity or mortality was reported. Forty-six percent of the heads of fellowship programs in maternal-fetal medicine thought that women who refused medical advice and thereby endangered the life of the fetus should be detained. Forty-seven percent supported court orders for procedures such as intrauterine transfusions. We conclude from these data that court-ordered obstetrical procedures represent an important and growing problem that evokes sharply divided responses from faculty members in obstetrics. Such procedures are based on dubious legal grounds, and they may have far-reaching implications for obstetrical practice and maternal and infant health. PMID:3574370

  8. Medical complications of prematurity.

    PubMed

    Allen, M C; Jones, M D

    1986-03-01

    The improved survival of extremely premature infants has generated intense interest in the quality of life of the survivors. This review focuses on the major long-term complications of prematurity (developmental disability, retinopathy of prematurity, chronic lung disease) and concludes with an overview of the broader spectrum of morbidity. Severe impairment (cerebral palsy, mental retardation, retrolental fibroplasia, severe chronic lung disease) fortunately occurs in a small proportion of survivors. However, the prevalence of the lesser morbidities (minimal cerebral dysfunction/learning disability, poor growth, postneonatal illnesses, rehospitalization) is less clearly defined. These problems all have an impact on families, and on medical and educational services. PMID:2935764

  9. [Precarious situation of obstetric practice in Gabon].

    PubMed

    Roudière, J L

    1998-01-01

    In 1993, 2,008 deliveries were recorded at the Provincial Maternity Hospital at Franceville in Gabon. The frequency of cesarean section was 3%. The perinatal mortality of children born by cesaraean section was high, 213 per thousand. The principal indications for cesarean section were the baby being too large to pass through the pelvis, bicicatricial uterus, breech presentation and toxemia during pregnancy. The maternal mortality rate was 200 per 100,000, similar to the rates of most African countries, and 75% of the women that died had undergone cesarean section. The mortality rate for cesarean section was high (4.9%), so the indications for cesarean section in underdeveloped countries are limited. Malaria was the principal reason for the hospitalization of pregnant women, because it is endemic and is a serious condition for pregnant women. The next most frequent causes of hospitalization were a high risk of premature labor and hyperemesis gravidarum, the frequency of which is high among pregnant African women, particularly those of West Africa. Toxemia in pregnancy was the fourth most important cause of hospitalization. The rate of cesarean section rupture was 2.5 per thousand. Only 20% of these cases involved a cicatricial uterus, with no maternal deaths but a fetal mortality rate of 100%. The frequency of premature birth was 4.23% and the perinatal mortality rate was 48 per thousand, with 37 stillbirths per thousand and an early neonatal mortality rate of 11 per thousand. The perinatal mortality of breech presentations was high (330 per thousand), with 13.9 delivered by cesarean section. These levels are similar to those for other African countries. Maternal health could be improved by introducing several consultations during pregnancy, improving hospital hygiene and making antibiotics more widely available. Fetal survival could be improved by preventing premature births, providing more help with delivery, decreasing the time to intervention and improving

  10. Premature Ovarian Failure

    MedlinePlus

    Premature ovarian failure (POF) is when a woman's ovaries stop working before she is 40. POF is different from ... There is no treatment that will restore normal ovarian function. However, many health care providers suggest taking ...

  11. Apnea of Prematurity.

    PubMed

    Eichenwald, Eric C

    2016-01-01

    Apnea of prematurity is one of the most common diagnoses in the NICU. Despite the frequency of apnea of prematurity, it is unknown whether recurrent apnea, bradycardia, and hypoxemia in preterm infants are harmful. Research into the development of respiratory control in immature animals and preterm infants has facilitated our understanding of the pathogenesis and treatment of apnea of prematurity. However, the lack of consistent definitions, monitoring practices, and consensus about clinical significance leads to significant variation in practice. The purpose of this clinical report is to review the evidence basis for the definition, epidemiology, and treatment of apnea of prematurity as well as discharge recommendations for preterm infants diagnosed with recurrent apneic events. PMID:26628729

  12. Apnea of prematurity

    MedlinePlus

    Apnea - newborns; AOP; As and Bs; A/B/D; Blue spell - newborns; Dusky spell - newborns; Spell - newborns; Apnea - neonatal ... the airway open are weak Other stresses in a sick or premature baby may worsen apnea, including: ...

  13. Prenatal emotion management improves obstetric outcomes: a randomized control study

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jian; Li, He-Jiang; Wang, Jue; Mao, Hong-Jing; Jiang, Wen-Ying; Zhou, Hong; Chen, Shu-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Negative emotions can cause a number of prenatal problems and disturb obstetric outcomes. We determined the effectiveness of prenatal emotional management on obstetric outcomes in nulliparas. Methods: All participants completed the PHQ-9 at the baseline assessment. Then, the participants were randomly assigned to the emotional management (EM) and usual care (UC) groups. The baseline evaluation began at 31 weeks gestation and the participants were followed up to 42 days postpartum. Each subject in the EM group received an extra EM program while the participants in the UC groups received routine prenatal care and education only. The PHQ-9 and Edinburgh Postnatal Depression scale (EPDS) were used for assessment. Results: The EM group had a lower PHQ-9 score at 36 weeks gestation, and 7 and 42 days after delivery (P < 0.01), and a lower EPDS score 42 days postpartum (P < 0.05). The rate of cesarean section in the EM group was lower than the UC group (P < 0.01), and the cesarean section rate without a medical indication was lower (P < 0.01). The duration of the second stage of labor in the EM group was shorter than the UC group (P < 0.01). Conclusions: Prenatal EM intervention could control anxiety and depressive feelings in nulliparas, and improve obstetric outcomes. It may serve as an innovative approach to reduce the cesarean section rate in China. PMID:26309641

  14. Obstetrics anal sphincter injury and repair technique: a review.

    PubMed

    Temtanakitpaisan, Teerayut; Bunyacejchevin, Suvit; Koyama, Masayasu

    2015-03-01

    The Urogynecology Committee of the Asia and Oceania Federation of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (AOFOG) has held seminars and workshops on various urogynecological problems in each country in the Asia-Oceania area in order to encourage young obstetricians and gynecologists. In 2013, we organized the operative seminar for obstetrical anal sphincter injuries (OASIS) in which we prepared porcine models to educate young physicians in a hands-on workshop at the 23rd Asian and Oceanic Congress of Obstetrics and Gynaecology in Bangkok, Thailand. Laceration of the anal sphincter mostly occurs during vaginal delivery and it can develop into anal sphincter deficiency, which causes fecal incontinence, if an appropriate suture is not performed. OASIS has become an important issue, especially in developing countries. The prevalence of OASIS of more than the third degree is around 5% in primary parous women and the frequency is higher when detected by ultrasonographic evaluation. Several risk factors, such as macrosomia, instrumental labor, perineal episiotomy and high maternal age, have been recognized. In a society where pregnant women are getting older, OASIS is becoming a more serious issue. An intrapartum primary appropriate stitch is important, but the 1-year outcome of a delayed operation after 2 weeks postpartum is similar. A randomized controlled study showed that overlapping suture of the external sphincter is better than that of end-to-end surgical repair. The Urogynecology Committee of the AOFOG would like to continue with educative programs about the appropriate therapy for OASIS. PMID:25545893

  15. Teamwork in obstetric critical care

    PubMed Central

    Guise, Jeanne-Marie; Segel, Sally

    2016-01-01

    Whether seeing a patient in the ambulatory clinic environment, performing a delivery or managing a critically ill patient, obstetric care is a team activity. Failures in teamwork and communication are among the leading causes of adverse obstetric events, accounting for over 70% of sentinel events according to the Joint Commission. Effective, efficient and safe care requires good teamwork. Although nurses, doctors and healthcare staff who work in critical care environments are extremely well trained and competent medically, they have not traditionally been trained in how to work well as part of a team. Given the complexity and acuity of critical care medicine, which often relies on more than one medical team, teamwork skills are essential. This chapter discusses the history and importance of teamwork in high-reliability fields, reviews key concepts and skills in teamwork, and discusses approaches to training and working in teams. PMID:18701352

  16. Vaginal versus Obstetric Infection Escherichia coli Isolates among Pregnant Women: Antimicrobial Resistance and Genetic Virulence Profile

    PubMed Central

    Sáez-López, Emma; Guiral, Elisabet; Fernández-Orth, Dietmar; Villanueva, Sonia; Goncé, Anna; López, Marta; Teixidó, Irene; Pericot, Anna; Figueras, Francesc; Palacio, Montse; Cobo, Teresa; Bosch, Jordi; Soto, Sara M.

    2016-01-01

    Vaginal Escherichia coli colonization is related to obstetric infections and the consequent development of infections in newborns. Ampicillin resistance among E. coli strains is increasing, which is the main choice for treating empirically many obstetric and neonatal infections. Vaginal E. coli strains are very similar to extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli with regards to the virulence factors and the belonging to phylogroup B2. We studied the antimicrobial resistance and the genetic virulence profile of 82 E. coli isolates from 638 vaginal samples and 63 isolated from endometrial aspirate, placental and amniotic fluid samples from pregnant women with obstetric infections. The prevalence of E. coli in the vaginal samples was 13%, which was significant among women with associated risk factors during pregnancy, especially premature preterm rupture of membranes (p<0.0001). Sixty-five percent of the strains were ampicillin-resistant. The E. coli isolates causing obstetric infections showed higher resistance levels than vaginal isolates, particularly for gentamicin (p = 0.001). The most prevalent virulence factor genes were those related to the iron uptake systems revealing clear targets for interventions. More than 50% of the isolates belonged to the virulent B2 group possessing the highest number of virulence factor genes. The ampicillin-resistant isolates had high number of virulence factors primarily related to pathogenicity islands, and the remarkable gentamicin resistance in E. coli isolates from women presenting obstetric infections, the choice of the most appropriate empiric treatment and clinical management of pregnant women and neonates should be carefully made. Taking into account host-susceptibility, the heterogeneity of E. coli due to evolution over time and the geographical area, characterization of E. coli isolates colonizing the vagina and causing obstetric infections in different regions may help to develop interventions and avoid the aetiological link

  17. Obstetric Staffing in Small Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Chance, G.W.; Campbell, M.K.

    1992-01-01

    Responses from 82 of the 100 Ontario hospitals with fewer than 750 births annually showed that a sufficient number of general practice obstetricians are replacing those who leave. However, we found a worsening shortage of general practice anesthetists and specialists required for obstetric emergencies, which could threaten care in such hospitals. Implications for training programs, physician remuneration, pregnancy risk determination, and regionalized perinatal care are briefly discussed.

  18. Dapoxetine: in premature ejaculation.

    PubMed

    Hoy, Sheridan M; Scott, Lesley J

    2010-07-30

    Dapoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, is the first oral pharmacological agent indicated for the treatment of men aged 18-64 years with premature ejaculation. In four randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicentre studies of 12-24 weeks' duration, oral dapoxetine 30 or 60 mg (administered as needed) was effective in the treatment of men with premature ejaculation, inducing significantly (p < 0.001) greater improvements from baseline than placebo in the primary efficacy endpoint (mean intravaginal ejaculatory latency time [IELT] or mean average IELT [defined as the average of IELT values over the previous 4 weeks], as measured by the female partner utilizing a stopwatch). For the most part, dapoxetine recipients achieved significantly better outcomes than placebo recipients with regard to the secondary endpoints, including the Premature Ejaculation Profile (PEP) domains and the Clinical Global Impression or Patient Global Impression ratings of change in premature ejaculation, across these clinical studies. The beneficial effects of dapoxetine therapy on the perceived control over ejaculation and satisfaction with sexual intercourse PEP domains were sustained in a 9-month noncomparative extension phase of two identical 12-week, double-blind studies. Oral dapoxetine therapy for up to 12 months was generally well tolerated in men with premature ejaculation, with the nature of treatment-emergent adverse events generally similar across the clinical studies and between dapoxetine and placebo. PMID:20614950

  19. Dapoxetine for premature ejaculation.

    PubMed

    2014-03-01

    Premature ejaculation, also referred to as rapid or early ejaculation, is a poorly understood disorder with no single, widely-recognised, evidence-based definition. Studies based on patient self-reporting indicate that premature ejaculation is a common complaint with estimated prevalence ranging from 4%-39% of men in the general community.(1) However, a lack of an accurate validated definition has made comparison of the results of such studies difficult.(2) In addition, perception of normal ejaculatory latency varies by country and differs when assessed by the patient or their partner.(3) ▾Dapoxetine (Priligy-A. Menarini Farmaceutica Internazionale SRL), a short-acting selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) is the first drug to be licensed in the UK for on-demand management of diagnosed premature ejaculation.(4) In this article we review the evidence for dapoxetine and discuss some of the challenges associated with its introduction. PMID:24627135

  20. Overcoming phase 1 delays: the critical component of obstetric fistula prevention programs in resource-poor countries

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background An obstetric fistula is a traumatic childbirth injury that occurs when labor is obstructed and delivery is delayed. Prolonged obstructed labor leads to the destruction of the tissues that normally separate the bladder from the vagina and creates a passageway (fistula) through which urine leaks continuously. Women with a fistula become social outcasts. Universal high-quality maternity care has eliminated the obstetric fistula in wealthy countries, but millions of women in resource-poor nations still experience prolonged labor and tens of thousands of new fistula sufferers are added to the millions of pre-existing cases each year. This article discusses fistula prevention in developing countries, focusing on the factors which delay treatment of prolonged labor. Discussion Obstetric fistulas can be prevented through contraception, avoiding obstructed labor, or improving outcomes for women who develop obstructed labor. Contraception is of little use to women who are already pregnant and there is no reliable screening test to predict obstruction in advance of labor. Improving the outcome of obstructed labor depends on prompt diagnosis and timely intervention (usually by cesarean section). Because obstetric fistulas are caused by tissue compression, the time interval from obstruction to delivery is critical. This time interval is often extended by delays in deciding to seek care, delays in arriving at a hospital, and delays in accessing treatment after arrival. Communities can reasonably demand that governments and healthcare institutions improve the second (transportation) and third (treatment) phases of delay. Initial delays in seeking hospital care are caused by failure to recognize that labor is prolonged, confusion concerning what should be done (often the result of competing therapeutic pathways), lack of women’s agency, unfamiliarity with and fear of hospitals and the treatments they offer (especially surgery), and economic constraints on access to

  1. Monochorionic versus dichorionic twins: Are obstetric outcomes always different?

    PubMed

    Coutinho Nunes, Filipa; Domingues, Ana Patrícia; Vide Tavares, Mariana; Belo, Adriana; Ferreira, Cristina; Fonseca, Etelvina; Moura, Paulo

    2016-07-01

    This prospective cohort study compared obstetric, perinatal and postpartum outcomes of monochorionic diamniotic (n = 228) versus (vs.) dichorionic (n = 598) twin pregnancies. Statistical analysis was performed using software SPSS® v19.0.0.2. Chi square, Fischer's exact, Student's t and Mann-Withney tests were applied. Obstetrical complications rates were 85.5% vs. 75.1% (p < 0.01). Differences were found in preterm premature rupture of membranes (26.3% vs. 19.3%, p < 0.05) and intrauterine growth restriction (19.7% vs. 10.5%, p < 0.01). Twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) occurred in 7.9% of monochorionic pregnancies. Vaginal delivery occurred in 47.4% vs. 43.1%. Monochorionic pregnancies had earlier gestational ages at delivery and subsequently lower birthweights (p < 0.01). There was no difference in Apgar scores. Admission rate of at least one of the newborns in intensive care unit (NICU) was 50% vs. 38.9% (p < 0.05). Postpartum complications were similar. These results were the same excluding TTTS cases, except for admission in NICU (46.8% vs. 34.9%, p > 0.05). Analysing only the uncomplicated pregnancies (33 vs. 149), there were no differences in perinatal outcomes. We conclude that monochorionic pregnancies had higher rates of obstetrical complications, which were independent of TTTS occurrence in our sample. However, considering only the uncomplicated pregnancies till delivery, there were no significant differences in perinatal outcomes. PMID:27013084

  2. Obstetric near miss morbidity and maternal mortality in a Tertiary Care Centre in Western Rajasthan.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Priyanka; Kachhwaha, Chetan Prakash

    2014-01-01

    Obstetric near-miss (ONM) describes a situation of lethal complication during pregnancy, labor or puerperium in which the woman survives either because of medical care or just by chance. In a cross-sectional observational study, five factor scoring system was used to identify the near-miss cases from all the cases of severe obstetric morbidity. Assessment of the causes of maternal mortality and near-miss obstetric cases was done. The ONM rate in this study was 4.18/1000 live births. Totally 54 maternal deaths occurred during this period, resulting in a ratio of 202 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births. Hemorrhage, hypertension and sepsis were major causes of near-miss maternal morbidity and mortality, respectively in descending order. PMID:25116827

  3. Shigellosis and Pregnancy in French Guiana: Obstetric and Neonatal Complications.

    PubMed

    Parisot, Michaël; Jolivet, Anne; Boukhari, Rachida; Carles, Gabriel

    2016-07-01

    Shigella is a major cause of dysentery worldwide. Only a few cases of shigellosis during pregnancy have been reported. However, the neonatal and obstetric complications are potentially severe. The objective of this study was to describe the obstetric and neonatal complications of shigellosis during pregnancy. We carried out a retrospective study of 37 cases of shigellosis diagnosed in pregnant women at the maternity unit of Saint-Laurent du Maroni Hospital in west French Guiana between 2000 and 2014. Shigellosis diagnosis was based on the detection of Shigella in stool cultures from pregnant women (34 patients) or in a neonatal sample collected immediately after delivery (three neonates). In addition to the classic symptoms of shigellosis-an association of diarrhea, fever, and abdominal pain-we observed uterine contractions before the completion of 37 weeks of gestation in 61% of patients (N = 17/28). Cervical changes were associated with uterine contractions in 82% of cases (N = 14/17); 25% of the patients at risk of preterm birth went on to give birth prematurely (N = 3/12). Three cases of mother-to-child transmission were observed. Episodes of shigellosis in pregnant women may trigger uterine contractions and changes to the cervix, potentially resulting in miscarriage or preterm birth. PMID:27114299

  4. An evaluation of obstetrical analgesia.

    PubMed

    FIST, H S

    1954-02-01

    Relief of pain and safety of mother and child are fundamentals in obstetrical analgesia. Elimination of those drugs which are ineffective or dangerous is the best guide to proper medication. Morphine, codeine, or similar opium derivatives should be avoided as they depress fetal respiration. Barbiturates have the same fault, despite their popularity. Demerol in small dosage is safe and effective. Scopolamine yields excellent results with safety. Magnesium sulfate potentiates and reinforces the action of scopolamine and involves no danger. This combination of drugs may be used by any competent general practitioner in the home or hospital. PMID:13126811

  5. Second-stage labor: how long is too long?

    PubMed

    Leveno, Kenneth J; Nelson, David B; McIntire, Donald D

    2016-04-01

    The management of labor has come under increased scrutiny due to the rapid escalation of cesarean delivery in the United States. A workshop of the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, and the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists was convened to address the rising cesarean delivery rates and one of their recommendations was that the accepted upper limit of the second stage of labor should be increased to ≥4 hours in nulliparous women with epidural analgesia and to ≥3 hours in parous women with epidural. This led to the inaugural Obstetric Care Consensus series document, "Safe Prevention of the Primary Cesarean Delivery," wherein the workshop recommendations on second-stage labor were promulgated nationally. The result is that the now acceptable maximum length of the second stage of labor exceeds the obstetric precepts that have been in use for >50 years. In this Clinical Opinion, we review the evidence on infant safety, vis-à-vis length of the second stage of labor. Our examination of the evidence begins at the outset of the 20th century and culminates in the very recent (2014) recommendation to abandon the long accepted obstetric paradigm that second-stage labor >3 hours in nulliparous women with labor epidural is unsafe for the unborn infant. We conclude that the currently available evidence fails to support the Obstetric Care Consensus position that longer second-stage labor is safe for the unborn infant. Indeed, the evidence suggests quite the opposite. We suggest that when infant safety is at stake the evidence should be robust before a new clinical road is taken. The evidence is not robust. PMID:26546847

  6. Malpractice Burden, Rural Location, and Discontinuation of Obstetric Care: A Study of Obstetric Providers in Michigan

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiao; Siefert, Kristine A.; Jacobson, Peter D.; Lori, Jody R.; Gueorguieva, Iana; Ransom, Scott B.

    2011-01-01

    Context It has long been a concern that professional liability problems disproportionately affect the delivery of obstetrical services to women living in rural areas. Michigan, a state with a large number of rural communities, is considered to be at risk for a medical liability crisis. Purpose This study examined whether higher malpractice burden on obstetric providers was associated with an increased likelihood of discontinuing obstetric care and whether there were rural-urban differences in the relationship. Methods Data on 500 obstetrician-gynecologists and family physicians who had provided obstetric care at some point in their career (either currently or previously) were obtained from a statewide survey in Michigan. Statistical tests and multivariate regression analyses were performed to examine the interrelationship among malpractice burden, rural location, and discontinuation of obstetric care. Findings After adjusting for other factors that might influence a physician’s decision about whether to stop obstetric care, our results showed no significant impact of malpractice burden on physicians’ likelihood to discontinue obstetric care. Rural-urban location of the practice did not modify the nature of this relationship. However, family physicians in rural Michigan had a nearly four fold higher likelihood of withdrawing obstetric care when compared to urban family physicians. Conclusions The higher likelihood of rural family physicians to discontinue obstetric care should be carefully weighed in future interventions to preserve obstetric care supply. More research is needed to better understand the practice environment of rural family physicians and the reasons for their withdrawal from obstetric care. PMID:19166559

  7. A qualitative study of the experience of obstetric fistula survivors in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Gebresilase, Yenenesh Tadesse

    2014-01-01

    Research on obstetric fistula has paid limited attention to the lived experiences of survivors. This qualitative study explored the evolution of survivors’ perceptions of their social relationships and health since developing this obstetric complication. In-depth interviews were conducted with eight survivors who were selected based on purposive and snowball sampling techniques. Thematic categorization and content analysis was used to analyze the data. The resultant themes included participants’ understanding of factors predisposing to fistula, challenges they encounter, their coping responses, and the meaning of their experiences. First, the participants had a common understanding of the factors that predisposed them to obstetric fistula. They mentioned poor knowledge about pregnancy, early marriage, cultural practices, and a delay in or lack of access to emergency obstetric care. Second, the participants suffered from powerlessness experienced during their childhood and married lives. They also faced prolonged obstructed labor, physical injury, emotional breakdown, depression, erosion of social capital, and loss of healthy years. Third, to control their negative emotions, participants reported isolating themselves, having suicidal thoughts, positive interpretation about the future, and avoidance. To obtain relief from their disease, the women used their family support, sold their properties, and oriented to reality. Fourth, the participants were struggling to keep going, to accept their changed reality, and to change their perspectives on life. In conclusion, obstetric fistula has significant physical, psychosocial, and emotional consequences. The study participants were not passive victims but rather active survivors of these challenges. Adequate support was not provided by their formal or informal support systems. To prevent and manage obstetric fistula successfully, there should be family-based interventions that improve access to and provision of

  8. [Shoulder dystocia: an obstetrical emergency].

    PubMed

    Marques, Joana Borges; Reynolds, Ana

    2011-01-01

    Shoulder dystocia is one of the most feared obstetric emergencies due to related maternal and neonatal complications and therefore, the growing of medico-legal litigation that it entails. Although associated with risk factors such as fetal macrossomia, gestacional diabetes and instrumented delivery, the majority of cases are unpredictable. The lack of a consensus on shoulder dystocia diagnosis causes variations on its incidence and hampers a more comprehensive analysis. Management guidelines described for its resolution include several manoeuvres but the ideal sequence of procedures is not clearly defined in more severe cases. Hands-on and team training, through simulation-based techniques applied to medicine, seems to be a promising method to learn how to deal with shoulder dystocia having in mind a reduction in related maternal or neonatal morbidity and mortality. The main goal of this paper is to provide a comprehensive revision of shoulder dystocia highlighting its relevance as an obstetric emergency. A reflection on the management is presented emphasising the importance of simulation-based training. PMID:22521019

  9. Fast MR imaging in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Nagayama, Masako; Watanabe, Yuji; Okumura, Akira; Amoh, Yoshiki; Nakashita, Satoru; Dodo, Yoshihiro

    2002-01-01

    Ultrasonography (US) is the initial imaging modality of choice for evaluation of patients in obstetrics. However, the results of US are not always sufficient. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, which uses no ionizing radiation, may be an ideal method for further evaluation. Although MR imaging is not recommended during the first trimester and use of contrast material is not recommended in pregnant patients, fast MR imaging is useful in various obstetric settings and can provide more specific information with excellent tissue contrast and multiplanar views. In pregnant patients with acute conditions, various diseases (eg, red degeneration of a uterine leiomyoma) may be diagnosed. MR imaging allows characterization of pelvic masses discovered during pregnancy and diagnosis of postpartum complications (eg, abscess, hematoma, ovarian vein thrombosis). In pregnant patients with hydronephrosis, MR urography can demonstrate the site of obstruction and the cause (eg, a ureteral stone). MR pelvimetry may be beneficial in cases of breech presentation. Contrast material-enhanced dynamic MR imaging allows one to evaluate the vascularity of a placental polyp, detect the viable component of a gestational trophoblastic tumor, and diagnose a uterine arteriovenous malformation. MR imaging enables diagnosis of rare forms of ectopic pregnancy and early diagnosis of ectopic pregnancy. PMID:12006687

  10. Effectiveness of lifesaving skills training and improving institutional emergency obstetric care readiness in Lam Dong, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Nancy L; Nguyen, Thi Nhu Ngoc; Do, Trong Hieu; Quimby, Charlotte; Winikoff, Beverly; Fassihian, Goli

    2005-01-01

    Essential obstetric care is promoted as the prime strategy to save women's lives in developing countries. We measured the effect of improving lifesaving skills (LSS) capacity in Vietnam, a country in which most women deliver in health facilities. A quasi-experimental study was implemented to assess the impact of LSS training and readiness (availability of essential obstetric equipment, supplies, and medication) on the diagnosis of life-threatening obstetric conditions and appropriate management of labor and birth. The intervention (LSS training and readiness) was provided to all clinics and hospitals from 1 of 3 demographically similar districts in southcentral Vietnam, to hospitals only in another district, with the third district serving as the comparison group. Detection of life-threatening obstetric conditions increased in both experimental clinics and hospitals, but the intervention only improved the management of these conditions in hospitals. Management of life-threatening obstetric conditions is most effective in hospitals. The intervention did not clearly benefit women delivering in clinics. PMID:15973269

  11. [Prompt resuscitation by obstetric anesthesiologists saved a parturient with amniotic fluid embolism: a case report].

    PubMed

    Hyuga, Shunsuke; Kato, Rie; Okutomi, Toshiyuki

    2013-12-01

    Amniotic fluid embolism (AFE) is a disorder with a high mortarity rate, because it often causes sudden respiratory failure, circulatory collapse and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). We present a case of AFE in which an obstetric anesthesiologist promptly initiated resuscitation of a parturient and saved her without any sequelae. Her fetus was diagnosed as intrauterine fetal demise on 25th gestational week and vaginal delivery under epidural analgesia was planned. One hundred and five minutes after induction of labor with prostaglandine E1, sudden tetanic convulsion occurred with a loss of consciousness. An obstetric anesthesiologist immediately started to resuscitate her and her consciousness was restored. However, noncoagulable vaginal bleeding followed. As the hemorrhage persisted, AFE was suspected. Anesthesiologists gave effective massive transfusion therapy, and she recovered from coagulopathy. Total blood loss was 5,524 g. This case was diagnosed as AFE with high serum sialyl-Tn antigen and zinc-coproporphyrin. The obstetric anesthesiologists are one of the best groups of physicans for resuscitation because they have skills in managing obstetric emergencies such as AFE. In this case, the crucial points for successful resuscitation were prompt obstetric anesthesiologist involvement and good communications with obstetricians and midwives. PMID:24498777

  12. Obstetric Provider Maldistribution: Georgia, USA, 2011.

    PubMed

    Spelke, Bridget; Zertuche, Adrienne D; Rochat, Roger

    2016-07-01

    Objectives In 2010, Georgia had the nation's highest maternal mortality rate, sixteenth highest infant mortality rate, and a waning obstetrician/gynecologist (ob/gyn) workforce. Statewide ob/gyn workforce data, however, masked obstetric-specific care shortages and regional variation in obstetric services. The Georgia Maternal and Infant Health Research Group thereby assessed each Georgia region's obstetric provider workforce to identify service-deficient areas. Methods We identified 63 birthing facilities in the 82 Primary Care Service Areas (PCSAs) outside metropolitan Atlanta and interviewed nurse managers and others to assess the age, sex, and expected departure year of each delivering professional. Using accepted annual delivery rates of 155 per obstetrician (OB), 100 per certified nurse midwife (CNM), and 70 per family medicine physician (FP) we converted obstetric providers into "OB equivalents" to standardize obstetric services available in any given area. Using facility births and computed OB equivalents (contemporary and 2020 estimates), we calculated current and projected average annual births per provider (AABP) for each PCSA, categorizing its obstetric provider workforce as "adequate" (AABP < 144), "at risk" (144 ≤ AABP ≤ 166), or "deficient" (AABP > 166). We mapped results using ArcGIS. Results Of 82 surveyed PCSAs, 52 % (43) were deficient in obstetric care; 16 % (13) had a shortage and 37 % (30) lacked obstetric providers entirely. There were no delivering FPs in 89 % (73) of PCSAs and no CNMs in 70 % (56). If Georgia fails to recruit delivering providers, 72 % (58/77) of PCSAs will have deficient or no obstetric care by 2020. Conclusions Obstetric provider shortages in Georgia hinder access to prenatal and delivery services. Care-deficient areas will expand if recruitment and retention of delivering professionals does not improve. PMID:27084367

  13. [Premature ovarian failure].

    PubMed

    Assumpção, Carmen Regina Leal de

    2014-03-01

    This article is a review on different aspects of premature ovarian failure (POF) defined as the development of hypogonadism in women before 40 years of age. The review will discuss the etiopathogeny, autoimmune and iatrogenic causes, abnormalities of chromosome X, as well as clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment. Most of the women with this disorder do not have menstrual history, specific of POF development, but infertility associated with the diagnosis is the most problematic aspect of the disease. PMID:24830590

  14. Prematurely terminated slug tests

    SciTech Connect

    Karasaki, K. )

    1990-07-01

    A solution of the well response to a prematurely terminated slug test (PTST) is presented. The advantages of a PTST over conventional slug tests are discussed. A systematized procedure of a PTST is proposed, where a slug test is terminated in the midpoint of the flow point, and the subsequent shut-in data is recorded and analyzed. This method requires a downhole shut-in device and a pressure transducer, which is no more than the conventional deep-well slug testing. As opposed to slug tests, which are ineffective when a skin is present, more accurate estimate of formation permeability can be made using a PTST. Premature termination also shortens the test duration considerably. Because in most cases no more information is gained by completing a slug test to the end, the author recommends that conventional slug tests be replaced by the premature termination technique. This study is part of an investigation of the feasibility of geologic isolation of nuclear wastes being carried out by the US Department of Energy and the National Cooperative for the Storage of Radioactive Waste of Switzerland.

  15. A computerized obstetric medical record.

    PubMed

    Stead, W W; Brame, R G; Hammond, W E; Jelovsek, F R; Estes, E H; Parker, R T

    1977-04-01

    Duke University has utilized computerized obstetric medical records since 1971. System evolution is described. Deficiencies in the current system appear to evolve from the computer/human interface rather than from basic system design. Critical elements in system success are physician acceptance of the appearance of data collection sheets and printed notes and continual rapid response in programing modification to allow for physician individuality and changes in medical practice. The limiting factor in the potential usefulness of such a system is the rate of incomplete data collection. It is suggested that if the physician were to enter data directly into the computer through a terminal, data collection would be more accurate and complete. PMID:854253

  16. Autologous blood storage in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Herbert, W N; Owen, H G; Collins, M L

    1988-08-01

    Autologous transfusion, storage of one's own blood for subsequent infusion if needed, is safe and effective in a variety of scheduled operative procedures. Obstetric involvement in such programs is very limited, however. Thirty pregnant women with placenta previa or other potential complications underwent 55 phlebotomies in an autologous transfusion program. Phlebotomies were performed at an average gestational age of 32.4 weeks (range 13-40). Changes in mean diastolic blood pressure and pulse were minimal. Electronic fetal monitoring tracings were normal during the 34 procedures in which it was used. The frequency of mild donor reactions (4%) was consistent with that in nonpregnant donors. After entry into this program, 15 patients received a total of 29 U of packed red blood cells (23 autologous; six homologous). Homologous transfusion was avoided in 86.7% of patients receiving blood. Selected pregnant women can participate safely in autologous blood collection programs, minimizing the need, and therefore the risks, of homologous transfusion. PMID:3292974

  17. 21 CFR 884.4900 - Obstetric table and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Obstetric table and accessories. 884.4900 Section 884.4900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Surgical Devices § 884.4900 Obstetric table and...

  18. 21 CFR 884.4900 - Obstetric table and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Obstetric table and accessories. 884.4900 Section 884.4900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Surgical Devices § 884.4900 Obstetric table and...

  19. Obstetric Forceps: A Species on the Brink of Extinction.

    PubMed

    Dildy, Gary A; Belfort, Michael A; Clark, Steven L

    2016-09-01

    Both resident training in the use of obstetric forceps and forceps deliveries are experiencing precipitous declines in the United States. Current minimum training requirements are insufficient to ensure competency in this skill. These trends bear striking similarities to observations regarding the decline and ultimate extinction of biologic species and portend the inevitable disappearance of this valuable skill from the obstetric armamentarium. Attempts by experienced teaching faculty to provide residents with experience in a few forceps deliveries are of little value and may do more harm than good. There would seem to be only two viable solutions to this dilemma: 1) abandon attempts to teach forceps and prepare residents for a real-world practice setting in which management of second-stage labor does not include the availability forceps delivery; or 2) prioritize the development of high-fidelity simulation models in which fetal head size and attitude and pelvic size and architecture can be continuously varied to allow residents to obtain sufficient experience to know both how and when to proceed with forceps delivery. We believe this latter approach is the sole alternative to inevitable extinction of this species. PMID:27500345

  20. Knowledge and Attitude of Obstetric Care Providers on Partograph and Its Associated Factors in East Gojjam Zone, Northwest Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Zelellw, Desalegne Amare; Tegegne, Teketo Kassaw; Getie, Girma Alem

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Universal use of partograph is recommended during labor, to improve maternal and fetal outcome. The aim was to assess knowledge and attitude of obstetric caregivers about partograph and associated factors. Methods. Facility based cross-sectional study was conducted on 273 study participants. Study facilities and study units were selected using simple random sampling technique. Midwives, Nurses, Public Health Officers, Medical Doctors, and masters in Emergency Surgery and Obstetric were included in the study. Epi-data and SPSS statistical software were used. Results. About 153 (56.04%) and 150 (54.95%) of the obstetric caregivers had good knowledge and favorable attitude about partograph, respectively. Knowledge of partograph was significantly higher among obstetric caregivers that learnt about partograph during their College and who had received partograph on job training (AOR: 2.14, 95% C.I (1.17–3.93)) and (AOR: 2.25, 95% C.I (1.21–4.19)), respectively. Favorable attitude towards partograph was significantly higher among obstetrical caregivers who had training and learnt about partograph during their college (AOR: 3.37, 95% C.I (1.49–5.65)) and (AOR: 2.134, 95% C.I (1.175–3.877)), correspondingly. Conclusion. Above half of obstetric caregivers had good knowledge and a favorable attitude on partograph. The provision of on preservice and job training is necessary to improve caregivers' knowledge and attitude. PMID:27403453

  1. Tocolytic Drugs for Use in Veterinary Obstetrics

    PubMed Central

    Ménard, L.

    1984-01-01

    The author presents a literature review of two tocolytic agents used in veterinary obstetrics: isoxsuprine and clenbuterol. The medical background from which these drugs emerged for human use and to which is linked their application in animal medicine is described. Each drug is reviewed according to its pharmacology, basic considerations for its clinical use and the reports on its application in the treatment and management of obstetrical disorders in veterinary medicine. PMID:17422462

  2. The laryngeal mask airway in obstetrical anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Gataure, P S; Hughes, J A

    1995-02-01

    The laryngeal mask airway (LMA) has been used extensively to provide a safe airway in spontaneously breathing patients who are not at risk from aspiration of gastric contents. The role of the LMA in the event of a failed intubation in an obstetrical patient, and its place in a failed intubation drill remains unclear. Two hundred and fifty consultant obstetric anaesthetists in the United Kingdom were asked to complete an anonymous questionnaire regarding their views about using the laryngeal mask airway (LMA) in obstetrical anaesthesia. The LMA was available in 91.4% of obstetric units. Seventy-two per cent of anaesthetists were in favour of using the LMA to maintain oxygenation when tracheal intubation had failed and ventilation using a face mask was inadequate. Twenty-four respondents had had personal experience with the LMA in obstetrical anaesthesia, eight of whom stated that the LMA had proved to be a lifesaver. We believe that the LMA has a role in obstetrical anaesthesia when tracheal intubation has failed and ventilation using a face mask proves to be impossible, and it should be inserted before attempting cricothyroidectomy. PMID:7720155

  3. Obstetric Outcomes of Mothers Previously Exposed to Sexual Violence

    PubMed Central

    Gisladottir, Agnes; Luque-Fernandez, Miguel Angel; Harlow, Bernard L.; Gudmundsdottir, Berglind; Jonsdottir, Eyrun; Bjarnadottir, Ragnheidur I.; Hauksdottir, Arna; Aspelund, Thor; Cnattingius, Sven; Valdimarsdottir, Unnur A.

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a scarcity of data on the association of sexual violence and women's subsequent obstetric outcomes. Our aim was to investigate whether women exposed to sexual violence as teenagers (12–19 years of age) or adults present with different obstetric outcomes than women with no record of such violence. Methods We linked detailed prospectively collected information on women attending a Rape Trauma Service (RTS) to the Icelandic Medical Birth Registry (IBR). Women who attended the RTS in 1993–2010 and delivered (on average 5.8 years later) at least one singleton infant in Iceland through 2012 formed our exposed cohort (n = 1068). For each exposed woman's delivery, nine deliveries by women with no RTS attendance were randomly selected from the IBR (n = 9126) matched on age, parity, and year and season of delivery. Information on smoking and Body mass index (BMI) was available for a sub-sample (n = 792 exposed and n = 1416 non-exposed women). Poisson regression models were used to estimate Relative Risks (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results Compared with non-exposed women, exposed women presented with increased risks of maternal distress during labor and delivery (RR 1.68, 95% CI 1.01–2.79), prolonged first stage of labor (RR 1.40, 95% CI 1.03–1.88), antepartum bleeding (RR 1.95, 95% CI 1.22–3.07) and emergency instrumental delivery (RR 1.16, 95% CI 1.00–1.34). Slightly higher risks were seen for women assaulted as teenagers. Overall, we did not observe differences between the groups regarding the risk of elective cesarean section (RR 0.86, 95% CI 0.61–1.21), except for a reduced risk among those assaulted as teenagers (RR 0.56, 95% CI 0.34–0.93). Adjusting for maternal smoking and BMI in a sub-sample did not substantially affect point estimates. Conclusion Our prospective data suggest that women with a history of sexual assault, particularly as teenagers, are at increased risks of some adverse obstetric outcomes. PMID:27007230

  4. Obstetric audit: the Bradford way

    PubMed Central

    Lomas, Karen; Jaworskyj, Suzanne; Thomson, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound is widely used as a screening tool in obstetrics with the aim of reducing maternal and foetal morbidity. However, to be effective it is recommended that scanning services follow standard protocols based on national guidelines and that scanning practice is audited to ensure consistency. Bradford has a multi-ethnic population with one of the highest rates of birth defects in the UK and it requires an effective foetal anomaly screening service. We implemented a rolling programme of audits of dating scans, foetal anomaly scans and growth scans carried out by sonographers in Bradford. All three categories of scan were audited using measurable parameters based on national guidelines. Following feedback and re-training to address issues identified, re-audits of dating and foetal anomaly scans were carried out. In both cases, sonographers being re-audited had a marked improvement in their practice. Analysis of foetal abnormality detection rates showed that as a department, we were reaching the nationally agreed detection rates for the Fetal Anomaly Screening Programme auditable conditions. Audit has been shown to be a useful and essential process in achieving consistent scanning practices and high quality images and measurements.

  5. Obstetric hemorrhage: A global review.

    PubMed

    Goffman, Dena; Nathan, Lisa; Chazotte, Cynthia

    2016-03-01

    Postpartum hemorrhage remains the number one cause of maternal death globally despite the fact that it is largely a preventable and most often a treatable condition. While the global problem is appreciated, some may not realize that in the United States postpartum hemorrhage is a leading cause of mortality and unfortunately, the incidence is on the rise. In New York, obstetric hemorrhage is the second leading cause of maternal mortality in the state. National data suggests that hemorrhage is disproportionally overrepresented as a contributor to severe maternal morbidity and we suspect as we explore further this will be true in New York State as well. Given the persistent and significant contribution to maternal mortality, it may be useful to analyze the persistence of this largely preventable cause of death within the framework of the historic "Three Delays" model of maternal mortality. The ongoing national and statewide problem with postpartum hemorrhage will be reviewed in this context of delays in an effort to inform potential solutions. PMID:26742599

  6. Obstetric Care Consensus No. 4: Periviable Birth.

    PubMed

    2016-06-01

    Approximately 0.5% of all births occur before the third trimester of pregnancy, and these very early deliveries result in the majority of neonatal deaths and more than 40% of infant deaths. A recent executive summary of proceedings from a joint workshop defined periviable birth as delivery occurring from 20 0/7 weeks to 25 6/7 weeks of gestation. When delivery is anticipated near the limit of viability, families and health care teams are faced with complex and ethically challenging decisions. Multiple factors have been found to be associated with short-term and long-term outcomes of periviable births in addition to gestational age at birth. These include, but are not limited to, nonmodifiable factors (eg, fetal sex, weight, plurality), potentially modifiable antepartum and intrapartum factors (eg, location of delivery, intent to intervene by cesarean delivery or induction for delivery, administration of antenatal corticosteroids and magnesium sulfate), and postnatal management (eg, starting or withholding and continuing or withdrawing intensive care after birth). Antepartum and intrapartum management options vary depending upon the specific circumstances but may include short-term tocolytic therapy for preterm labor to allow time for administration of antenatal steroids, antibiotics to prolong latency after preterm premature rupture of membranes or for intrapartum group B streptococci prophylaxis, and delivery, including cesarean delivery, for concern regarding fetal well-being or fetal malpresentation. Whenever possible, periviable births for which maternal or neonatal intervention is planned should occur in centers that offer expertise in maternal and neonatal care and the needed infrastructure, including intensive care units, to support such services. This document describes newborn outcomes after periviable birth, provides current evidence and recommendations regarding interventions in this setting, and provides an outline for family counseling with the goal of

  7. Premature ejaculation: A review.

    PubMed

    Gajjala, Sukumar Reddy; Khalidi, Azheel

    2014-01-01

    Premature ejaculation (PE) is a common male sexual disorder. It is defined by the Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders as "ejaculation occurring, without control, on or shortly after penetration and before the person wishes it, causing marked distress or interpersonal difficulty.([1]) Although the timing of intravaginal ejaculatory latency time (IELT) (i.e., time from penetration to ejaculation) is not included in this definition, an IELT of <2 min, or ejaculation occurring before penetration, has been considered consistent with PE.([2]) Management involves both the patient and his partner. Therapeutic options should suit both partners and be appropriate to their habit in planning and frequency of intercourse. Follow-up at appropriate intervals to judge efficacy, titrate dosage of pharmacological treatments and ascertain side effects is mandatory. PMID:26396440

  8. Premature ejaculation: A review

    PubMed Central

    Gajjala, Sukumar Reddy; Khalidi, Azheel

    2014-01-01

    Premature ejaculation (PE) is a common male sexual disorder. It is defined by the Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders as “ejaculation occurring, without control, on or shortly after penetration and before the person wishes it, causing marked distress or interpersonal difficulty.[1] Although the timing of intravaginal ejaculatory latency time (IELT) (i.e., time from penetration to ejaculation) is not included in this definition, an IELT of <2 min, or ejaculation occurring before penetration, has been considered consistent with PE.[2] Management involves both the patient and his partner. Therapeutic options should suit both partners and be appropriate to their habit in planning and frequency of intercourse. Follow-up at appropriate intervals to judge efficacy, titrate dosage of pharmacological treatments and ascertain side effects is mandatory. PMID:26396440

  9. Obstetrical Practices in the United States, 1978. Hearing Before the Subcommittee on Health and Scientific Research of the Committee on Human Resources, United States Senate, Ninety-Fifth Congress, Second Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Human Resources.

    This document presents the proceedings of a U.S. Senate subcommittee hearing on obstetrical practices in the United States. Specific issues examined include the use of fetal monitors, the increasing rate of cesarean sections, elective induction of labor, and the use of drugs in pregnancy and labor. Information is presented in the form of…

  10. The obstetric consequences of female genital mutilation/cutting: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Berg, Rigmor C; Underland, Vigdis

    2013-01-01

    Various forms of female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C) have been performed for millennia and continue to be prevalent in parts of Africa. Although the health consequences following FGM/C have been broadly investigated, divergent study results have called into question whether FGM/C is associated with obstetric consequences. To clarify the present state of empirical research, we conducted a systematic review of the scientific literature and quantitative meta-analyses of the obstetric consequences of FGM/C. We included 44 primary studies, of which 28 were comparative, involving almost 3 million participants. The methodological study quality was generally low, but several studies reported the same outcome and were sufficiently similar to warrant pooling of effect sizes in meta-analyses. The meta-analyses results showed that prolonged labor, obstetric lacerations, instrumental delivery, obstetric hemorrhage, and difficult delivery are markedly associated with FGM/C, indicating that FGM/C is a factor in their occurrence and significantly increases the risk of delivery complications. There was no significant difference in risk with respect to cesarean section and episiotomy. These results can make up the background documentation for health promotion and health care decisions that inform work to reduce the prevalence of FGM/C and improve the quality of services related to the consequences of FGM/C. PMID:23878544

  11. Pakistan: the Faisalabad Obstetric Flying Squad.

    PubMed

    Andina, M M; Fikree, F F

    1995-01-01

    The Faisalabad Obstetric Flying Squad was established in 1988 and provides access to emergency obstetric services for the poor women of Faisalabad. The service is highly appreciated by both women and participating dais. The latter receive training from the Mother and Child Welfare Association of Faisalabad and form an integral part of the obstetric care team. While problems in accessing communication facilities exist, the project has made a lasting impact on the provision of emergency obstetric services in the city. Improved recording and reporting mechanisms would permit a more precise assessment of the impact of the service on the reduction of maternal morbidity and mortality. It would also permit an assessment of the operating costs of the service. One of the reasons the service functions effectively is that it is fully integrated into the general operations of the Allied Hospital. If similar institutional mechanisms can be established there is good reason to think that the Faisalabad Obstetric Flying Squad could be replicated in other developing country settings. PMID:7571713

  12. Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation Syndromes in Obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, F Gary; Nelson, David B

    2015-11-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is a syndrome that can be initiated by a myriad of medical, surgical, and obstetric disorders. Also known as consumptive coagulopathy, DIC is a common contributor to maternal morbidity and mortality and is associated with up to 25% of maternal deaths. The etiopathogenesis of DIC is complex and currently thought to be initiated by tissue factor or thromboplastin, which is released from trophoblastic or fetal tissue, or maternal decidua or endothelium. Tissue factor activates the coagulation sequence to cause fibrin clotting and its dissolution by the fibrinolysin system. The result of this process can range from mild, clinically insignificant laboratory derangements to marked coagulopathy with bleeding at sites of minimal trauma. Although clinical recognition varies by disease severity, several organizations have attempted to standardize the diagnosis through development of scoring systems. Several important--albeit not necessarily common--obstetric disorders associated with DIC include placental abruption, amniotic fluid embolism, sepsis syndrome, and acute fatty liver of pregnancy. More common disorders include severe preeclampsia, hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count syndrome, and massive obstetric hemorrhage. Importantly, many of these disorders either cause or are associated with substantive obstetric hemorrhage. Treatment of DIC is centered on two principles. The first is identification and treatment of the underlying disorder. Because many women with consumptive coagulopathy also have massive hemorrhage, the second tenet of treatment is that obstetric complications such as uterine atony or lacerations must be controlled simultaneously with prompt blood and component replacement for a salutary outcome. PMID:26444122

  13. Advances in treating premature ejaculation.

    PubMed

    Cayan, Selahittin; Serefoğlu, Ege Can

    2014-01-01

    In spite of its high prevalence and long history, the ambiguity regarding the definition, epidemiology and management of premature ejaculation continues. Topical anesthetic creams and daily or on-demand selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment forms the basis of pharmacotherapy for premature ejaculation today, in spite of low adherence by patients. Psychotherapy may improve the outcomes when combined with these treatment modalities. Tramadol and phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors have a limited role in the management of premature ejaculation. Further research is required to develop better options for the treatment of this common sexual disorder. PMID:25184045

  14. Advances in treating premature ejaculation

    PubMed Central

    Şerefoğlu, Ege Can

    2014-01-01

    In spite of its high prevalence and long history, the ambiguity regarding the definition, epidemiology and management of premature ejaculation continues. Topical anesthetic creams and daily or on-demand selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment forms the basis of pharmacotherapy for premature ejaculation today, in spite of low adherence by patients. Psychotherapy may improve the outcomes when combined with these treatment modalities. Tramadol and phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors have a limited role in the management of premature ejaculation. Further research is required to develop better options for the treatment of this common sexual disorder. PMID:25184045

  15. Dapoxetine for premature ejaculation.

    PubMed

    Feige, A M; Pinsky, M R; Hellstrom, W J G

    2011-01-01

    Premature ejaculation (PE) is the most common form of male sexual dysfunction, with an estimated worldwide prevalence of 20–30%.1 Although PE is not life threatening, it has significant impact on quality of life. The fourth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR)defines PE as “persistent or recurrent ejaculation with minimal sexual stimulation before, on, or shortly after penetration and before the person wishes it” that “causes marked distress or interpersonal difficulty” and “is not due exclusively to the direct effects of a substance.”2 The International Society for Sexual Medicine, which recently modified the definition to include the threshold ejaculatory latency time, defines PEas “male sexual dysfunction characterized by ejaculation which always or nearly always occurs prior to or within 1 min of vaginal penetration; the inability to delay ejaculation on all or nearly all vaginal penetrations; and negative personal consequences such as distress, bother, frustration, and/or the avoidance of sexual intimacy.”3 The lack of ejaculatory control is consistent among all clinical definitions of PE and is a highly sensitive predictor of the condition. PMID:21085116

  16. [Prostaglandins in gynecology and obstetrics].

    PubMed

    Klausch, B; Kyank, H

    1972-06-01

    A review of early research (up through 1970) on prostaglandins (PGs) is presented. Their chemical structure and classification based on their ring-structure is detailed as well as various analytic methods of mammalian tissues and body fluids. For clinical use PGE1 and 2, PGF2alpha and PGA1 are the most significant ones because of their properties. PGs have many physiological activities encompassing many organ systems. Their pharmacological actions include: 1) stimulation of nonvascular smooth muscle; 2) peripheral vasodilation (excluding PGFs which cause vasoconstriction); 3) inhibition of lipolysis; 4) inhibition of platelet aggregation; 5) inhibition of gastric peristalsis and gastric juice secretion; 6) bronchodilation; and 7) inhibition of spontaneous CNS activity. The level of PGEs in semen is closely related to the degree of fertility; normally fertile men have 55 mcg PGE/ml and never less than 11 mcg/ml. Current studies are under way on the effect of PGE in artificial insemination of sperm of subfertile men. PGF2alpha and PGE2 stimulate menstruation and uterine contraction; other PGs inhibit uterine contraction. PGs from semen have a role in sperm transport and possibly act on fallopian tube motility aiding sperm capacitation, and ovum retention and transport. Early trials with PGs point to a possible action as an abortifacient, as a once-a-month contraceptive, or a postconception contraceptive agent. PGF2alpha is found in variable concentrations in maternal blood during contraction of the pregnant uterus; levels increase as labor progresses. PGs have been used for labor induction, for induction of abortion and in mole pregnancy. Given as a constant intravenous infusion they produce regular contractions leading to natural expulsion of the fetus and causing very few side effects in the woman with no adverse effects on the fetus. PGs' action compares favorably with that of oxytocin and is preferable for labor induction in certain pregnancy complications. PGE1

  17. Acute myocardial infarction in the obstetric patient

    PubMed Central

    Firoz, Tabassum; Magee, Laura A

    2012-01-01

    Acute myocardial infraction (AMI) in the obstetric patient is a rare event, although the incidence is rising due to advancing maternal age and pre-existing cardiac risk factors and medical co-morbidities. While atherosclerotic disease is the leading cause of AMI, coronary artery dissection is an important consideration in pregnancy and in the postpartum period. The physiological changes of pregnancy as well as pregnancy-specific risk factors can predispose the obstetric patient to AMI. Diagnosis of AMI can be challenging as symptoms may be atypical. Furthermore, diagnostic tests must be interpreted in the context of pregnancy. While the overall management of the obstetric patient with AMI is similar to that outside of pregnancy, drug therapy requires modification as some medications may be contraindicated in pregnancy and breastfeeding. There is limited information about prognosis and risk stratification but it is anticipated that future studies will address this issue.

  18. The usage of blood components in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Adukauskienė, Dalia; Veikutienė, Audronė; Adukauskaitė, Agnė; Veikutis, Vincentas; Rimaitis, Kęstutis

    2010-01-01

    Major obstetric hemorrhage remains the leading cause of maternal morbidity and mortality worldwide. Even though blood transfusion may be a life-saving procedure, an inappropriate usage of blood products in obstetric emergencies especially in cases of massive bleeding is associated with increased morbidity and risk of death. Thorough knowledge of the etiology, pathophysiology, and optimal therapeutic options of major obstetric hemorrhage may help to avoid lethal outcomes. There are evidence-based data about some risks related with transfusion of blood components: acute or delayed hemolytic, febrile, allergic reactions, transfusion-related acute lung injury, negative immunomodulative effect, transmission of infectious diseases, dissemination of cancer. This is why the indications for allogeneic blood transfusion are restricted, and new safer methods are being discovered to decrease the requirement for it. Red cell alloimmunization may develop in pregnancy; therefore, all pregnant women should pass screening for irregular antibodies. Antierythrocytic irregular antibodies may occur due to previous pregnancies or allogeneic red blood cell transfusions, and it is important for blood cross-matching in the future. Under certain circumstances, such as complicated maternal history, severe coagulation abnormalities, severe anemia, the preparation of cross-matched blood is necessary. There is evidence of very significant variation in the use of blood products (red cells, platelets, fresh frozen plasma, or cryoprecipitate) among clinicians in various medical institutions, and sometimes indications for transfusion are not correctly motivated. The transfusion of each single blood product must be performed only in case of evaluation of expected effect. The need for blood products and for their combination is necessary to estimate for each patient individually in case of obstetric emergencies either. Indications for transfusion of blood components in obstetrics are presented in

  19. Relationship of blood lead levels to obstetric outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Angell, N.F.; Lavery, J.P.

    1982-01-01

    Lead represents a significant environmental hazard to pregnant women and their offspring. Exposure to high environmental levels of lead has been associated with spontaneous abortion, premature rupture of fetal membranes (PROM), and preterm delivery. The relationship between lower exposures and obstetric complications is unknown. The concentration of lead in the blood was measured in 635 specimens of umbilical cord blood collected at delivery. No relationship was found between concentrations of lead in cord blood and the incidence of PROM, preterm delivery, preeclampsia, or meconium staining. Maternal and infant capillary blood was collected 24 hours post partum from 154 of these deliveries. The concentrations of lead in the blood did not vary significantly among cord, infant, and maternal samples, and the three measurements were highly correlated. Levels of zinc protoporphyrin (ZnP) were increased in cord blood as compared with mothers' blood, but no concentration-response relationships between the ratio of cord ZnP to maternal ZnP and lead were found.

  20. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Sheffield, Jeanne S

    2013-02-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) remains one of the major multiple antibiotic-resistant bacterial pathogens causing serious community-associated and health care-associated infections. It is now pervasive in the obstetric population associated with skin and soft tissue infections, mastitis, episiotomy, and cesarean wound infections and urinary tract infections. This review addresses the epidemiology, definitions, microbiology, and pathogenesis as well as common clinical presentations. A discussion of the 2011 Infectious Diseases Society of America MRSA treatment guidelines details available antibiotics, invasive and noninvasive MRSA management, and specific factors related to obstetrics. Finally, prevention strategies including decolonization are discussed. PMID:23292915

  1. Vasopressors in obstetric anesthesia: A current perspective

    PubMed Central

    Nag, Deb Sanjay; Samaddar, Devi Prasad; Chatterjee, Abhishek; Kumar, Himanshu; Dembla, Ankur

    2015-01-01

    Vasopressors are routinely used to counteract hypotension after neuraxial anesthesia in Obstetrics. The understanding of the mechanism of hypotension and the choice of vasopressor has evolved over the years to a point where phenylephrine has become the preferred vasopressor. Due to the absence of definitive evidence showing absolute clinical benefit of one over the other, especially in emergency and high-risk Cesarean sections, our choice of phenylephrine over the other vasopressors like mephentermine, metaraminol, and ephedrine is guided by indirect evidence on fetal acid-base status. This review article evaluates the present day evidence on the various vasopressors used in obstetric anesthesia today. PMID:25610851

  2. [Sexual medicine in obstetrics and gynecology].

    PubMed

    Fornage, Sandra; Bianchi-Demicheli, Francesco

    2016-03-16

    Obstetrics and gynecology specialists should be women's favoured interlocutors when talking about their sexuality. Indeed every day they assess their patient's intimacy, they manage pathologies that have a potential but well-known impact on sexuality, and they are very early aware of a more global approach like psycho-somatic. Furthermore, women are going to meet their obstetrician and gynecologist through all ages, from adolescence to post-menopause. At every step sexual problems can occur that can be searched, investigated and mostly managed by this specialist. The relationship between female sexual medicine and obstetrics and gynecology is undeniable and deserve to be favoured and consolidated. PMID:27149716

  3. Your Premature Baby: Low Birthweight

    MedlinePlus

    ... experts Calculating your due date Ovulation calendar 39 weeks is best Order bereavement materials News Moms Need ... birthweight: Premature birth . This is birth before 37 weeks of pregnancy. About 7 of 10 low-birthweight ...

  4. [Premature ovarian failures].

    PubMed

    Bricaire, Léopoldine; Laroche, Emmanuelle; Bourcigaux, Nathalie; Donadille, Bruno; Christin-Maitre, Sophie

    2013-11-01

    Premature ovarian failure (POF) is clinically suspected by amenorrhea and confirmed by an elevated FSH serum level above 40 mUI/L (even 20 mUI/L) twice, in a woman before the age of 40. Prevalence of POF is between 1 to 2% in women. In 90% of cases, no aetiology is identified. Obvious causes are chemotherapy, pelvic radiotherapy, ovarian surgery and diethylstilbestrol exposure in utero. A karyotype should be performed as Turner Syndrome is the most frequent genetic cause of POF. Some X abnormalities such as X deletion or X autosome translocation can be found. FMR1 pre-mutation (fragile X syndrome) should be searched for, even though no cases of mental retardation are known, in the family. Other genetic abnormalities can be suggested by associated symptoms (i.e.: FOXL2, SF1 mutations). Auto-immune aetiology can be suspected if other auto-immune features are present, however, there are no reliable auto-antibodies to confirm auto-immunity in POF. Treatment of POF is based on hormonal replacement therapy in order to avoid estrogen deficiency, suppress vasomotor symptoms and avoid bone loss as well as cardiovascular risk. Estrogens should be associated with progesterone or a progestin, at least up to the age of 51. Patients with POF should be informed that spontaneous pregnancies may occur (in 5% of cases). In case of desire of pregnancy, the patient should be oriented to a specialized unit for in vitro fertilization with oocyte donation. Psychological support is essential and should be part of the treatment. POF is associated with an increased risk of emotional distress and depression. No preventive treatment of POF is available so far. PMID:24157186

  5. The Current Status and Future of Academic Obstetrics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowers, John Z., Ed.; Purcell, Elizabeth F., Ed.

    The state of research in academic obstetrics and its relationship to research in other academic disciplines was addressed in a 1979 conference. Participants included representatives of academic obstetrics, academic pediatrics, and public health. After an introductory discussion by Howard C. Taylor, Jr. on changes in obstetrics in the last 25…

  6. 21 CFR 884.5100 - Obstetric anesthesia set.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Obstetric anesthesia set. 884.5100 Section 884... § 884.5100 Obstetric anesthesia set. (a) Identification. An obstetric anesthesia set is an assembly of... anesthetic drug. This device is used to administer regional blocks (e.g., paracervical, uterosacral,...

  7. 21 CFR 884.5100 - Obstetric anesthesia set.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Obstetric anesthesia set. 884.5100 Section 884... § 884.5100 Obstetric anesthesia set. (a) Identification. An obstetric anesthesia set is an assembly of... anesthetic drug. This device is used to administer regional blocks (e.g., paracervical, uterosacral,...

  8. 21 CFR 884.5100 - Obstetric anesthesia set.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Obstetric anesthesia set. 884.5100 Section 884... § 884.5100 Obstetric anesthesia set. (a) Identification. An obstetric anesthesia set is an assembly of... anesthetic drug. This device is used to administer regional blocks (e.g., paracervical, uterosacral,...

  9. 21 CFR 884.5100 - Obstetric anesthesia set.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Obstetric anesthesia set. 884.5100 Section 884... § 884.5100 Obstetric anesthesia set. (a) Identification. An obstetric anesthesia set is an assembly of... anesthetic drug. This device is used to administer regional blocks (e.g., paracervical, uterosacral,...

  10. 21 CFR 884.2960 - Obstetric ultrasonic transducer and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Obstetric ultrasonic transducer and accessories... Monitoring Devices § 884.2960 Obstetric ultrasonic transducer and accessories. (a) Identification. An obstetric ultrasonic transducer is a device used to apply ultrasonic energy to, and to receive...

  11. 21 CFR 884.2960 - Obstetric ultrasonic transducer and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Obstetric ultrasonic transducer and accessories... Monitoring Devices § 884.2960 Obstetric ultrasonic transducer and accessories. (a) Identification. An obstetric ultrasonic transducer is a device used to apply ultrasonic energy to, and to receive...

  12. 21 CFR 884.2960 - Obstetric ultrasonic transducer and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Obstetric ultrasonic transducer and accessories... Monitoring Devices § 884.2960 Obstetric ultrasonic transducer and accessories. (a) Identification. An obstetric ultrasonic transducer is a device used to apply ultrasonic energy to, and to receive...

  13. 21 CFR 884.2960 - Obstetric ultrasonic transducer and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Obstetric ultrasonic transducer and accessories... Monitoring Devices § 884.2960 Obstetric ultrasonic transducer and accessories. (a) Identification. An obstetric ultrasonic transducer is a device used to apply ultrasonic energy to, and to receive...

  14. 21 CFR 884.2960 - Obstetric ultrasonic transducer and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Obstetric ultrasonic transducer and accessories... Monitoring Devices § 884.2960 Obstetric ultrasonic transducer and accessories. (a) Identification. An obstetric ultrasonic transducer is a device used to apply ultrasonic energy to, and to receive...

  15. 21 CFR 884.5100 - Obstetric anesthesia set.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Obstetric anesthesia set. 884.5100 Section 884.5100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... § 884.5100 Obstetric anesthesia set. (a) Identification. An obstetric anesthesia set is an assembly...

  16. 21 CFR 884.4900 - Obstetric table and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Obstetric table and accessories. 884.4900 Section 884.4900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological...

  17. 21 CFR 884.4900 - Obstetric table and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Obstetric table and accessories. 884.4900 Section 884.4900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological...

  18. 21 CFR 884.4900 - Obstetric table and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Obstetric table and accessories. 884.4900 Section 884.4900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological...

  19. Obstetrics and perinatal outcomes of dichorionic twin pregnancy following ART compared with spontaneous pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Pourali, Leila; Ayati, Sedigheh; Jelodar, Shahrzad; Zarifian, Ahmadreza; Sheikh Andalibi, Mohammad Sobhan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Regarding to the recent advances in assisted reproductive techniques (ART), twin and multiple pregnancies have increased during past years. Objective: This study was performed to compare obstetrics and perinatal outcomes of dichorionic twin pregnancy following ART with spontaneous pregnancy. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study which was performed in Ghaem Hospital, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, 107 dichorionic twin pregnancy were enrolled in two groups: spontaneous group (n=96) and ART group (n=31). Basic criteria and obstetrics and neonatal outcomes information including demographic data, gestational age, mode of delivery, pregnancy complications (preeclampsia, gestational diabetes, preterm labor, and intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR), postpartum hemorrhage), neonatal outcomes (weight, first and fifth minute Apgar score, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) admission, mortality, respiratory distress, and icterus) were recorded using a questionnaire. Results: Preterm labor, gestational diabetes, and preeclampsia were significantly higher in ART group compared to spontaneous pregnancy group. However, other factors such as anemia, IUGR, postpartum hemorrhage, and intrauterine fetal death (IUFD) were not significantly different between groups. There were no significant differences between groups in terms of neonatal outcomes (weight, 1st and 5th min Apgar score <7, NICU hospitalization, mortality, respiratory distress, and icterus). Conclusion: With regard of significantly higher poor outcomes such as preeclampsia, gestational diabetes and preterm labor in ART group, the couples should be aware of these potential risks before choosing ART. PMID:27326416

  20. Obstetric hemorrhage in a case of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy with automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillator: Anaesthesia and intensive care management

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Sandeep Kumar; Bhat, Ravindra R.; Kavitha, Jayaram; Kundra, Pankaj; Parida, Satyen

    2016-01-01

    The physiological changes occurring during pregnancy and labor may reveal or exacerbate the symptoms of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM). The addition of obstetric hemorrhage to this presents a unique challenge to the anesthesiologists and intensivists managing these patients in the operation theatres and the Intensive Care Units. Here we present a case of HOCM with automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillator in situ and postpartum hemorrhagic shock. PMID:26957702

  1. Integrating Prevention into Obstetrics/Gynecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, J. Christopher

    2000-01-01

    Discusses formats to teach preventive medicine in obstetrics and gynecology (including learning objectives, lectures/seminars, and rounds/office practice) and evaluation methods (oral examinations, computerized question banks, objective structured clinical examinations). Offers examples from specific programs at American medical schools, including…

  2. [Extraclinical obstetrics in the GDR? Medicohistorical notes].

    PubMed

    Major, S; David, M; Vetter, K

    2004-02-01

    In 1946 the share of clinic deliveries in the Soviet occupation zone amounted to 27 %, 1970 the given share of clinic deliveries in the GDR come to 99 %. From the beginning of the seventies home deliveries were not listed any more in the official statistics. After that neither the home obstetrics nor the family orientated clinical obstetrics took a larger space in the scientific discussions in the specialist public of the GDR. The following will show the development of the extraclinical obstetrics on the territory of the GDR as well as describe and discuss its medical and social context from the end of the forties until 1989. Usually in the (critical) reflections of the revival of home resp. extraclinical obstetrics in the eighties and nineties only the development in the "old" Federal Republic is taken into consideration. A description of the medicohistorical development in the former GDR in order to complete the all-German way of looking at this phenomenon was still due until now. PMID:14981563

  3. Marketing the nursing practice of obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Dill, P Z

    1991-01-01

    This article offers nurses a conceptual framework for marketing their skills and discusses how that framework can be applied to obstetric nursing practice. A thorough understanding of the framework presented will provide maternity nurses with the foundation they need to participate effectively in a marketing plan. Examples of the application of the framework to specific clinical situations are examined. PMID:1941295

  4. [Development of an obstetrical pocket slide rule].

    PubMed

    Krüger, G

    1986-01-01

    We present a slide rule to value old obstetric and ultrasound findings in prenatal care day by day. We have developed the scale. Manufacturer is VEB Mantissa Dresden, sales department is Staatliches Versorgungskontor für Pharmazie und Medizintechnik. PMID:3727852

  5. What is the role of amnioinfusion in modern day obstetrics?

    PubMed

    Dad, Nimra; Abushama, Mandy; Konje, Justin C; Ahmed, Badreldeen

    2016-09-01

    Amniotic fluid (AF) is a dynamic medium that plays a significant role in fetal well-being. It is production and amount varies with gestational age. It plays a vital role in fetal life as it contains antimicrobial factors, growth factors and it help the fetal lung to grow and expand. Amnioinfusion can be performed either transabdominally or transvaginal. Amnioinfuion can be done antenatally and during labor. Aminoinfusion can be used for diagnostic purposes to enable better visualization of the fetus as liquor is very important acoustic widow for better fetal examination. Amnioinfusion have some therapeutic benefits in conditions like early premature rupture of membrane and may help cases of external cephalic version for breech presentation at term. Amnioinfusion has been shown to reduce the incidence of variable deceleration due to cord compression, reduces the risk of meconium aspiration and it will help reduce cesarean delivery. PMID:26461043

  6. Oxytocin and the augmentation of labor : Human and medical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Curtis, P

    1993-12-01

    At least a third of the women giving birth in the United States receive intravenous oxytocin for the induction and augmentation of labor. The problem of inactive or ineffective labor remains a major challenge for birth attendants, midwives, and physicians who practice obstetrics. Before the discovery of oxytocin, traditional approaches to augmentation ranged from magical and folk interventions to extensive bloodletting. Despite its wide use the effectiveness of oxytocin augmentation has not been well studied, and current research raises new questions about its effect on the brain. PMID:24214403

  7. The 2015 Gerard W. Ostheimer Lecture: What's New in Labor Analgesia and Cesarean Delivery.

    PubMed

    Arendt, Katherine W

    2016-05-01

    Every year the Board of Directors of the Society for Obstetric Anesthesia and Perinatology selects an individual to review the literature pertinent to obstetric anesthesiology published the previous calendar year. This individual selects the most notable contributions, creates a syllabus of the articles, and then presents his/her overview in an annual lecture named in honor of the late Gerard W. Ostheimer, a pioneering obstetric anesthesiologist from the Brigham and Women's Hospital. This article reviews the literature published in 2014 focusing on the themes of labor analgesia and cesarean delivery. Its contents were presented as the Gerard W. Ostheimer Lecture at the 47th Annual Meeting of the Society for Obstetric Anesthesia and Perinatology, May 16, 2015, in Colorado Springs, Colorado. The syllabus is available as Supplemental Digital Content (http://links.lww.com/AA/B397). PMID:27101497

  8. Global obstetric medicine: Collaborating towards global progress in maternal health

    PubMed Central

    Ateka-Barrutia, Oier; Rojas-Suarez, Jose Antonio; Wijeyaratne, Chandrika; Castillo, Eliana; Lombaard, Hennie; Magee, Laura A

    2015-01-01

    Globally, the nature of maternal mortality and morbidity is shifting from direct obstetric causes to an increasing proportion of indirect causes due to chronic conditions and ageing of the maternal population. Obstetric medicine can address an important gap in the care of women by broadening its scope to include colleagues, communities and countries that do not yet have established obstetric medicine training, education and resources. We present the concept of global obstetric medicine by highlighting three low- and middle-income country experiences as well as an example of successful collaboration. The article also discusses ideas and initiatives to build future partnerships within the global obstetric medicine community. PMID:27512469

  9. CHALLENGES OF OBSTETRIC ANESTHESIA: DIFFICULT LARYNGEAL VISUALIZATION.

    PubMed

    Alanoğlu, Zekeriyya; Erkoç, Süheyla Karadağ; Güçlü, Çiğdem Yildirim; Meço, Başak Ceyda Orbey; Baytaş, Volkan; Can, Özlem Selvi; Alkiş, Neslihan

    2016-03-01

    Obstetric anesthesia is one of the high risk subspecialties of anesthesia practice. Anesthesia related complications are the sixth leading cause of maternal mortality. Difficult or failed intubation following induction of general anesthesia for CS remains the major contributory factor to anesthesia-related maternal complications. The airway management of obstetric patients is a challenging issue for several reasons. Anatomic and physiologic changes related to pregnancy may increase the difficult and failed intubation rates compared to the general surgical population. Proper evaluation of the airway anatomy and airway structures is vital to prevent airway management related catastrophes. In addition to basic airway and intubation equipment, each anesthesia department must have difficult intubation equipment cart including fiber optic laryngoscope, video laryngoscopes, and different types of laryngeal masks. It is essential that all anesthesiologists have a preconceived and well thought-out algorithm and emergency airway equipment to deal with airway emergencies during difficult or failed intubation of a parturient. PMID:27276775

  10. The history of imaging in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Benson, Carol B; Doubilet, Peter M

    2014-11-01

    During the past century, imaging of the pregnant patient has been performed with radiography, scintigraphy, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and ultrasonography (US). US imaging has emerged as the primary imaging modality, because it provides real-time images at relatively low cost without the use of ionizing radiation. This review begins with a discussion of the history and current status of imaging modalities other than US for the pregnant patient. The discussion then turns to an in-depth description of how US technology advanced to become such a valuable diagnostic tool in the obstetric patient. Finally, the broad range of diagnostic uses of US in these patients is presented, including its uses for distinguishing an intrauterine pregnancy from a failed or ectopic pregnancy in the first trimester; assigning gestational age and assessing fetal weight; evaluating the fetus for anomalies and aneuploidy; examining the uterus, cervix, placenta, and amniotic fluid; and guiding obstetric interventional procedures. PMID:25340440

  11. Imaging modalities in obstetrics and gynecology.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Benjamin P; Crystal, Chad S

    2003-08-01

    The practicing emergency physician often encounters diagnostic dilemmas involving the choice of the most appropriate radiologic study to evaluate patients in the emergency department. In addition, the uncertainty of potentially harmful fetal effects of radiation in the pregnant patient may add unnecessary delay and concern in the workup of obstetric emergencies. An emergency physician's in-depth understanding of the strengths, limitations, and potentially harmful effects of radiologic studies allows the safest and most appropriate studies to be ordered for the gynecologic and obstetric population. With the explosion of interest and growing level of expertise in focused emergency department ultrasonography during the last decade, the practicing emergency physician should add this skill to his or her armamentarium in the future. Many emergency physicians are already comfortable in using radiologic technologies in their daily practice and have discovered how quickly vital and specific information can be obtained. PMID:12962355

  12. Obstetric management of obesity in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Jarvie, Eleanor; Ramsay, Jane E

    2010-04-01

    Rates of obesity among the pregnant population have increased substantially and adiposity has a damaging effect on every aspect of female reproductive life. This review summarises epidemiological data concerning obesity-related complications of pregnancy. Obesity is linked to a number of adverse obstetric outcomes as well as increased maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. These complications include miscarriage, congenital abnormalities, pre-eclampsia, gestational diabetes mellitus, iatrogenic preterm delivery, postdates pregnancy with increased rates of induction of labour, caesarean section, postpartum haemorrhage, shoulder dystocia, infection, venous thromboembolism, and increased hospital stay. It is important to consider obese pregnant women as a high risk group with a linear increase in risk of complications associated with their degree of obesity. Their obstetric management should be consultant-led and involve a multidisciplinary team approach to improve outcome. PMID:19880362

  13. [Expansion dilatation balloons for cervical ripening in obstetric practice].

    PubMed

    Ducarme, G; Grange, J; Vital, M

    2016-02-01

    During recent decades, mechanical devices have been substituted by pharmacological methods. Their place in the therapeutic arsenal remains important with a renewed obstetrical interest for these devices. Due to a lack of data they are still not recommended as first-line. This review thus attempted to examine the use of expansion dilatation balloons (Foley catheter and double-balloons) to analyze their effectiveness in case of native uterus and previous cesarean section. Twenty-seven clinical trials had compared balloons catheter and prostaglandins in patients without a history of uterine scar. The risk of cesarean section did not differ. Mechanical methods seemed to be more effective in achieving delivery within 24hours, with fewer episodes of excessive uterine contractions, but they necessitated more oxytocin during labor. Ten clinical trials analyzed dilatation balloons in patients with previous cesarean section. More than 70% women had favorable cervical ripening (Bishop score>6), and vaginal delivery was reported between 35 and 70% of patients. The risk of uterine rupture was low between 0.64 and 0.72%, with neither increased risk of severe neonatal and maternal morbidity nor increased risk of infectious morbidity. Mechanical methods are effective and safe for third trimester cervical ripening, mainly in women with previous cesarean section. Potential advantages may include wide availability and reduction of some of the side effects. PMID:26774842

  14. The Family Doctor in Obstetrics: Who's Looking after the Shop?

    PubMed Central

    Bain, Stanley T.; Grava-Gubins, Inese; Edney, Rachel

    1987-01-01

    This article constitutes a report on a survey of 1338 family physicians/general practitioners in Ontario. The survey, which achieved a response rate of 74%, investigated respondents' patterns of obstetrical practice and attitudes towards that practice. The detailed statistics collected show a decline in FP/GP involvement in obstetrical care. Physicians who had never practised obstetrics cited inadequate training and lack of interest as their chief reasons. Physicians who had given up obstetrical practice cited most frequently its interference with personal and family life, interruption of office schedule, rising CMPA fees, and low financial incentives as reasons for their decision. In the youngest group of respondents, no significant differences were found between males' and females' rates of choice to practise or not to practise obstetrics. Respondents who had never practised obstetrics were likely to live in larger communities, and those practising obstetrics to live in smaller communities. Various changes in patterns of practice were identified by some respondents subsequent to their giving up obstetrics. A large majority of this group expressed satisfaction with those changes. Over half the respondents stated that they would accept well-trained midwives practising under supervision in a hospital setting. A strong majority of respondents favoured the concept of family physicians with a special interest in obstetrics taking over, either alone or in association with obstetricians and/or midwives, the obstetrical cases declined by their colleagues. PMID:20469467

  15. The Obstetric Regulations 1986, 21 April 1986.

    PubMed

    1988-01-01

    These New Zealand Regulations revoke and replace the Obstetric Regulations 1975. They include provisions on the staffing of maternity hospitals (Reg. 3); the use of facilities in maternity hospitals (Reg. 4); the obligations on the part of medical practitioners to notify septic conditions, etc. (Reg. 6); the keeping of clinical records with respect to maternity patients (Reg. 9); and the maintenance, availability, and retention of registers and clinical records (Reg. 10). PMID:12289418

  16. Music Therapy with Premature Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Standley, Jayne

    2003-01-01

    Over 20 years of research and clinical practice in music therapy with premature infants has been compiled into this text designed for Board Certified Music Therapists specializing in Neonatal Intensive Care clinical services, for NICU medical staff incorporating research-based music therapy into developmental care plans, and for parents of…

  17. Mothers' Retrospections of Premature Childbirth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalmar, Magda; And Others

    This study examined Hungarian mothers' recollections, 8 years after the birth of their premature baby, of their stress at the time of the baby's birth. Interviews were conducted with 30 mothers whose babies had been born between 30 and 37 weeks gestational age. At the time of the follow-up, all children had normal IQs and were attending normal…

  18. Obstetrical Disease Spectrum in China: An Epidemiological Study of 111,767 Cases in 2011

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiao-Lin; Zhang, Wei-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Background: No national research on maternal and fetal complications and outcomes has been carried out in the mainland of China in recent years. This study was to provide a scientific basis for better control of obstetrical and neonatal diseases and better allocation of medical resources by analyzing the epidemiological characteristics of obstetrical diseases in the mainland of China. Methods: Hospitalized obstetrical cases from 19 tertiary and 20 secondary hospitals in 14 provinces (nationally representative) during the period January 1, 2011 to December 31, 2011 were randomly selected. The general condition, pregnancy complications, and perinatal outcomes of the patients were studied. Results: The top five medical and surgical complications of pregnant women in the mainland of China were anemia (6.34%), uterine fibroids (2.69%), thyroid disease (1.11%), thrombocytopenia (0.59%), and heart disease (0.59%). The incidences of premature rupture of membranes (PROM), preterm birth, prolonged pregnancy, hypertensive disorders complicating pregnancy (HDCP), multiple pregnancy, intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP), placenta previa, placental abruption, postpartum hemorrhage, and amniotic fluid embolism were 15.27%, 7.04%, 6.71%, 5.35%, 1.57%, 1.22%, 1.14%, 0.54%, 3.26% and 0.06%, respectively. The incidences of anemia and prolonged pregnancy were significantly lower in tertiary than secondary hospitals (P < 0.001), whereas the incidence of uterine fibroids, thyroid diseases, thrombocytopenia, heart disease, PROM, preterm birth, HDCP, multiple pregnancy, ICP, placenta previa, and placental abruption were significantly higher in tertiary than secondary hospitals (P < 0.001). The cesarean section (CS) rate was 54.77%. The newborn sex ratio was 119:100, and 1.03% of the neonates were malformed. The percentages of low birth weight and fetal macrosomia in full-term babies were 2.10% and 7.09%, respectively. Conclusions: The incidence of some obstetrical diseases is still

  19. Development of an obstetric vital sign alert to improve outcomes in acute care obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Behling, Diana J; Renaud, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Maternal morbidity and mortality is a national health problem. Causal analysis of near-miss and actual serious patient safety events, including those resulting in maternal death, within obstetric units often highlights a failure to promptly recognize and treat women who were exhibiting signs of decompensation/deterioration. The Obstetric Vital Sign Alert (OBVSA) is an early warning tool that leverages discrete data points in the electronic health record, calculating a risk score that is displayed as a visual cue for acute care obstetric staff. When studied in a cohort of women with postpartum hemorrhage, use of the OBVSA reduced symptom-to-response time and intervention time, as well as key process and outcome measures. PMID:25900584

  20. Obstetric Provider Trainees in Georgia: Characteristics and Attitudes About Practice in Obstetric Provider Shortage Areas.

    PubMed

    Smulian, Elizabeth A; Zahedi, Leilah; Hurvitz, Julie; Talbot, Abigail; Williams, Audra; Julian, Zoë; Zertuche, Adrienne D; Rochat, Roger

    2016-07-01

    Objectives In Georgia, 52 % of the primary care service areas outside metropolitan Atlanta have a deficit of obstetric providers. This study was designed to identify factors associated with the likelihood of Georgia's obstetric trainees (obstetrics and gynecology (OB/GYN) residents and certified nurse midwifery (CNM) students) to practice in areas of Georgia that lack obstetric providers and services, i.e. rural Georgia. Methods Pilot-tested electronic and paper surveys were distributed to all of Georgia's OB/GYN residents (N = 95) and CNM students (N = 28). Mixed-methods survey questions assessed characteristics, attitudes, and incentives that might be associated with trainee desire to practice in areas of Georgia that lack obstetric providers and services. Surveys also gathered information about concerns that may prevent trainees from practicing in shortage areas. Univariate and bivariate analyses were performed, and qualitative themes were abstracted from open-ended questions. Results The survey response rate was 87.8 % (108/123). Overall, 24.4 % (19/78) of residents and 53.6 % (15/28) of CNM students expressed interest in practicing in rural Georgia, and both residents and CNM students were more likely to desire to practice in rural Georgia with the offer of any of six financial incentives (P < 0.001). Qualitative themes highlighted trainees' strong concerns about Georgia's political environment as it relates to reproductive healthcare. Conclusions Increasing state-level, rurally-focused financial incentive programs and emphasizing the role of CNMs may alleviate obstetric provider shortages in Georgia. PMID:27072048

  1. Auditing the standard of anaesthesia care in obstetric units.

    PubMed

    Mörch-Siddall, J; Corbitt, N; Bryson, M R

    2001-04-01

    We undertook an audit of 15 obstetric units in the north of England over a 10-month period to ascertain to what extent they conformed to the Obstetric Anaesthetists' Association 'Recommended Minimum Standards for Obstetric Anaesthetic Services' using a quality assurance approach. We demonstrated that all units conformed to the majority of standards but did not conform in at least one major and minor area. PMID:15321622

  2. [Clinical guideline. Obstetrical hemorrhage in the second half of pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Arce-Herrera, Rosa María; Calderón-Cisneros, Ernesto; del Rocío Cruz-Cruz, Polita; Díaz-Velázquez, Mary Flor; Medécigo-Micete, Agustina Consuelo; del Pilar Torres-Arreola, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Pregnancy at older ages and the increased frequency of caesarean births may increase the incidence of diseases associated with obstetric haemorrhage. Obstetric haemorrhage is the second leading cause of maternal mortality, preceded only by preeclampsia-eclampsia in Mexico and the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social. In recent years several studies have been conducted to improve the detection, diagnosis and treatment of women at risk of obstetric haemorrhage to reduce maternal and perinatal mortality. The objective of this clinical practice guideline is defining recommendations based in the best available evidence to standardize actions regarding the diagnosis and management of obstetric haemorrhage in hospital units. PMID:23331755

  3. BEYOND LABOR: THE ROLE OF NATURAL AND SYNTHETIC OXYTOCIN IN THE TRANSITION TO MOTHERHOOD

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Aleeca F.; Erickson, Elise N.; Carter, C. Sue

    2013-01-01

    Endogenous oxytocin is a key component in the transition to motherhood affecting molecular pathways that buffer stress reactivity, support positive mood, and regulate healthy mothering behaviors (including lactation). Synthetic oxytocin is widely used throughout labor and postpartum care in modern obstetrics. Yet research on the implications beyond labor of maternal exposure to perinatal synthetic oxytocin is rare. In this article, we review oxytocin-related biological pathways and behaviors associated with the transition to motherhood, and evidence supporting the need for further research on potential effects of intrapartum oxytocin beyond labor. We include a primer on oxytocin at the molecular level. PMID:24472136

  4. Tips for labor coaches

    MedlinePlus

    You have a big job as the labor coach. You are the main person who will: Help the mother as labor begins at ... how to comfort and support her when the big day arrives. Get to know the hospital. Take ...

  5. Labor Education in America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Kenneth D.

    1971-01-01

    Labor education reflects the pragmaticism of American culture and supports the system. It emphasizes leadership training, loyalty building, and political education. The control of labor education is centralized in union headquarters. (VW)

  6. Tips for labor coaches

    MedlinePlus

    ... some tips for getting prepared. Before the big day arrives Labor coaches should go to childbirth classes ... get through her labor and delivery. When the day arrives You might be at the hospital for ...

  7. Department of Labor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diplomacy & Engagement Back to Diplomacy & Engagement Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) G20 Labor and Employment Ministers' Meeting International Labor Organization International Visitors Program Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Organization of American States ( ...

  8. Am I in labor?

    MedlinePlus

    ... into labor. Nesting : There's no science behind the theory, but plenty of women feel the sudden urge to "nest" right before labor starts. If you feel the need to vacuum the entire house at 3 a. ...

  9. Preterm Labor and Birth

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Preterm Labor and Birth: Condition Information Skip sharing on social ... links Share this: Page Content What is preterm labor and birth? In general, a normal human pregnancy ...

  10. Preterm Labor and Birth

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Preterm Labor and Birth: Overview Skip sharing on social media ... start of the last menstrual period to childbirth. Labor that begins before 37 weeks is called preterm ...

  11. [Cerebral syndromes in premature children].

    PubMed

    Edel'shteĭn, E A; Bandarenko, E S

    1983-01-01

    Cerebral disturbances observed in premature infants are analyzed. These disturbances are a consequence of developmental slowdown and are associated with the pathological immaturity of the brain structures. On condition an active pathogenetic therapy is given these disturbances may gradually regress. On the basis of long-term observations of 600 prematurely born infants the authors describe the following clinical syndromes: muscular hypotonicity lasting up to 4-5 months and followed with a rise of the tone; the syndrome of "paretic hands" observed during the first two months of life; a hypertensive-hydrocephalic syndrome combined with a rise of the neuro-reflectory excitability; the syndrome of psychomotor development retardation followed at an age of over 1.5 to 2 years by complete recovery or minimal cerebral insufficiency with belated development of motor speech and neurosis-like reactions. PMID:6880498

  12. [Premature orgasm in the male].

    PubMed

    Köhn, F M

    2003-11-13

    To date, we have no uniform definition of ejaculatio praecox. In a qualitative approach, premature ejaculation is ascribed to a failure to control excitement. As causes, organic disorders and erectile dysfunction must be excluded. The majority of cases, however, are due to psychological or partnership problems. The history-taking should aim, in particular, to uncover possible anxiety in conjunction with premature orgasm, and also to establish the reactions of the partner. As therapy, medication (local anesthetics, antidepressive agents, PDE-5 inhibitors) and sexual-therapeutic measures are available. Since few sufferers take the initiative in seeking treatment, particular importance attaches to providing the public with information about the therapeutic options for treating this common disorder. PMID:14699829

  13. Malpractice Burden, Rural Location, and Discontinuation of Obstetric Care: A Study of Obstetric Providers in Michigan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Xiao; Siefert, Kristine A.; Jacobson, Peter D.; Lori, Jody R.; Gueorguieva, Iana; Ransom, Scott B.

    2009-01-01

    Context: It has long been a concern that professional liability problems disproportionately affect the delivery of obstetrical services to women living in rural areas. Michigan, a state with a large number of rural communities, is considered to be at risk for a medical liability crisis. Purpose: This study examined whether higher malpractice…

  14. Prevention of preterm birth in modern obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Markham, Kara B; Klebanoff, Mark

    2014-12-01

    Spontaneous preterm labor is a complex process characterized by the interplay of multiple different pathways. Prevention of preterm labor and delivery is also complicated. The most effective interventions for prevention of preterm birth (PTB) are progestin prophylaxis and lifestyle modifications, with cerclage placement also playing a role in selected populations. Interventions such as activity modification, home tocometry, and routine antibiotic use have fallen out of favor because of lack of effectiveness and possibility of harm. The solution to the problem of PTB remains elusive, and researchers and clinicians must collaborate to find a cure for preterm labor. PMID:25459773

  15. [Underwater delivery. Consensus of the Spanish Neonatology Society and the Perinatal Section of the Spanish Obstetrics and Gynecology Society].

    PubMed

    Iriondo Sanz, M; Sánchez Luna, M; Botet Mussons, F; Martínez-Astorquiza, T; Lailla Vicens, J M; Figueras Aloy, J

    2015-02-01

    Immersion in water during labor and delivery as an alternative to traditional delivery is a practice that has increased in many countries. This technique is effective in reducing pain and duration of labor. The American Academy of Pediatrics and The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists have published a clinical report which indicates the potential maternal benefits during the first stage of labor but, questions the performance of this technique during delivery and birth of the newborn. In this report, the Spanish Society of Neonatology and the Spanish Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology analyze the current scientific evidence on water immersion delivery, and the impact this practice could have in the mother and especially in the wellbeing of newborn. PMID:25074709

  16. Physician Labor Market in Croatia

    PubMed Central

    Bagat, Mario; Sekelj Kauzlarić, Katarina

    2006-01-01

    Aim To analyze the physician labor market in Croatia with respect to the internship and employment opportunities, Croatian needs for physicians and specialists, and trends in physician labor market in the European Union (EU) in the context of EU enlargement. Methods Data were collected from the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare, the Croatian Employment Service, and the Croatian Institute for Public Health. We compared the number of physicians waiting for internship before and 14 months after the implementation of the State Program for Intern Employment Stimulation. Also, the number of employed specialists in internal medicine, general surgery, gynecology and obstetrics, and pediatrics was compared with estimated number of specialists that will have been needed by the end of 2007. Average age of hospital physicians in the four specialties was determined and the number of Croatian physicians compared with the number of physicians in EU countries. Results The number of unemployed physicians waiting for internship decreased from 335 in 2003 to 82 in 2004, while a total number of unemployed physicians decreased from 436 to 379 (χ2 = 338, P<0.001). In October 2004, 79.3% of unemployed physicians waited for internship <6 months; of them, 89.2% waited for internship <3 months. In February 2005, 365 unemployed physicians were registered at the Croatian Employment Service and that number has been decreasing in the last couple of years. The number of employed specialists was lower than the estimated number of specialists needed in the analyzed specialists, as defined by the prescribed standards. A shortage of 328 internists, 319 surgeons, 209 gynecologists, and 69 pediatricians in Croatian hospitals is expected in 2007. Conclusion The lack of employment incentive seems to be the main reason for the large number of unemployed physicians waiting for internship before the implementation of the Employment Stimulation Program. According to the number of physicians per 100

  17. Obstetric and long-term kidney outcomes in renal transplant recipients: a 40-yr single-center study.

    PubMed

    Stoumpos, Sokratis; McNeill, Susan H; Gorrie, Morag; Mark, Patrick B; Brennand, Janet E; Geddes, Colin C; Deighan, Christopher J

    2016-06-01

    Female renal transplant recipients of childbearing age may ask what the outcomes are for pregnancy and whether pregnancy will affect graft function. We analyzed obstetric and transplant outcomes among renal transplant recipients in our center who have been pregnant between 1973 and 2013. A case-cohort study was performed identifying 83 pairs of pregnant and non-pregnant controls matched for sex, age, transplant vintage, and creatinine. There were 138 pregnancies reported from 89 renal transplant recipients. There were live births in 74% of pregnancies with high prevalence of prematurity (61%), low birth weight (52%), and pre-eclampsia (14%). Lower eGFR (OR 0.98; p = 0.05) and higher uPCR (OR 1.86; p = 0.02) at conception were independent predictors for poor composite obstetric outcome. Lower eGFR (OR 0.98; p = 0.04), higher uPCR (OR 1.50; p = 0.04), and live organ donation (OR 0.35; p = 0.02) were predictors of ≥20% loss of eGFR between immediately pre-pregnancy and one yr after delivery. There was no difference in eGFR at one, five, and 10 yr in pregnant women compared with non-pregnant controls and a pregnancy was not associated with poorer 10-yr transplant or 20-yr patient survival. Despite high rates of obstetric complications, most women had successful pregnancies with good long-term transplant function. PMID:26992458

  18. Labor migration in Asia.

    PubMed

    Martin, P L

    1991-01-01

    "A recent conference sponsored by the United Nations Center for Regional Development (UNCRD) in Nagoya, Japan examined the growing importance of labor migration for four major Asian labor importers (Japan, Hong Kong, Malaysia, and Singapore) and five major labor exporters (Bangladesh, Korea, Pakistan, Philippines, and Thailand).... The conference concluded that international labor migration would increase within Asia because the tight labor markets and rising wages which have stimulated Japanese investment in other Asian nations, for example, have not been sufficient to eliminate migration push and pull forces...." PMID:12316776

  19. Experience with a Family-Practice-Resident-Directed Obstetrical Clinic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Jerry L.; Snyder, Frank

    1980-01-01

    At Toledo Hospital, family practice residents have assumed responsibility for the normal obstetrics clinic. Specialty consultations are provided by the hospital's obstetrics residency program. A medical audit of the clinic indicates that the family practice residents obtained consultations and made referrals at the appropriate times. (JMD)

  20. Stages of Labor

    MedlinePlus

    ... youth volunteer leader Partner Spotlight Become a partner World Prematurity Day What's happening in your area Find ... you and your partner welcome him to the world. Last reviewed: May, 2014 Learning the signs of ...

  1. Obstetrics anyone? How family medicine residents' interests changed.

    PubMed Central

    Ruderman, J.; Holzapfel, S. G.; Carroll, J. C.; Cummings, S.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine family medicine residents' attitudes and plans about practising obstetrics when they enter and when they graduate from their residency programs. DESIGN: Residents in each of 4 consecutive years, starting July 1991, were surveyed by questionnaire when they entered the program and again when they graduated (ending in June 1996). Only paired questionnaires were used for analysis. SETTING: Family medicine residency programs at the University of Toronto in Ontario. PARTICIPANTS: Of 358 family medicine residents who completed the University of Toronto program, 215 (60%) completed questionnaires at entry and exit. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Changes in attitudes and plans during the residency program as ascertained from responses to entry and exit questionnaires. RESULTS: Analysis was based on 215 paired questionnaires. Women residents had more interest in obstetric practice at entry: 58% of women, but only 31% of men were interested. At graduation, fewer women (49%) and men (22%) were interested in practising obstetrics. The intent to undertake rural practice was strongly associated with the intent to practise obstetrics. By graduation, residents perceived lifestyle factors and compensation as very important negative factors in relation to obstetric practice. Initial interest and the eventual decision to practise obstetrics were strongly associated. CONCLUSIONS: Intent to practise obstetrics after graduation was most closely linked to being a woman, intending to practise in a rural area, and having an interest in obstetrics prior to residency. Building on the interest in obstetrics that residents already have could be a better strategy for producing more physicians willing to practise obstetrics than trying to change the minds of those uninterested in such practice. PMID:10099803

  2. Healthy Birth Practice #1: Let Labor Begin on Its Own

    PubMed Central

    Amis, Debby

    2014-01-01

    As cesarean rates have climbed to almost one-third of all births in the United States, current research and professional organizations have identified letting labor begin on its own as one of the most important strategies for reducing the primary cesarean rate. At least equally important, letting labor begin on its own supports normal physiology, prevents iatrogenic prematurity, and prevents the cascade of interventions caused by labor induction. This article is an updated evidence-based review of the “Lamaze International Care Practices That Promote Normal Birth, Care Practice #1: Let Labor Begin on Its Own,” published in The Journal of Perinatal Education, 16(3), 2007. PMID:25411537

  3. A critical role of interleukin-1 in preterm labor.

    PubMed

    Nadeau-Vallée, Mathieu; Obari, Dima; Quiniou, Christiane; Lubell, William D; Olson, David M; Girard, Sylvie; Chemtob, Sylvain

    2016-04-01

    Preterm birth (PTB) is a leading cause of neonatal mortality and morbidity worldwide, and represents a heavy economic and social burden. Despite its broad etiology, PTB has been firmly linked to inflammatory processes. Pro-inflammatory cytokines are produced in gestational tissues in response to stressors and can prematurely induce uterine activation, which precedes the onset of preterm labor. Of all cytokines implicated, interleukin (IL)-1 has been largely studied, revealing a central role in preterm labor. However, currently approved IL-1-targeting therapies have failed to show expected efficacy in pre-clinical studies of preterm labor. Herein, we (a) summarize animal and human studies in which IL-1 or IL-1-targeting therapeutics are implicated with preterm labor, (b) focus on novel IL-1-targeting therapies and diagnostic tests, and (c) develop the case for commercialization and translation means to hasten their development. PMID:26684042

  4. Multidisciplinary Obstetric Simulated Emergency Scenarios (MOSES): Promoting Patient Safety in Obstetrics with Teamwork-Focused Interprofessional Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeth, Della; Ayida, Gubby; Berridge, Emma Jane; Mackintosh, Nicola; Norris, Beverley; Sadler, Chris; Strachan, Alasdair

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: We describe an example of simulation-based interprofessional continuing education, the multidisciplinary obstetric simulated emergency scenarios (MOSES) course, which was designed to enhance nontechnical skills among obstetric teams and, hence, improve patient safety. Participants' perceptions of MOSES courses, their learning, and…

  5. Current therapies for premature ejaculation.

    PubMed

    Gur, Serap; Kadowitz, Philip J; Sikka, Suresh C

    2016-07-01

    Premature ejaculation (PE) subjectively affects 20-30% of men globally. Until recently, understanding of PE was hampered by the absence of a widely accepted definition, paucity of evidence-based clinical studies, and the absence of an appropriate animal model. Here, we elaborate on the current definition of PE, its pathogenesis, currently available therapies, and future treatment prospects. Most treatments for PE are 'off-label' and include selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), topical anesthetics, tramadol, and phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors. Such knowledge of the benefit and limitations of each treatment will help to direct future drug design and formulations. PMID:27179987

  6. [Forensic importance of premature craniosynostosis].

    PubMed

    Fehlow, P

    1991-01-01

    In agreement with Canabis craniosynostosis as a little known organic partial factor of sociopathy is demonstrated. A psychic syndrome of the frontal lobe with increased susceptibility in environmental damages is assumed to be basic disorder. In the criminals of the material sexual offenders were preponderating. Associated craniofacial dysplasias are a risk for psychic maldevelopment. The importance of premature craniosynostocis as a biological risk factor, incidence, diagnostic, indication for an operation, also in the meaning of a neurosurgical "Konflikttherapie" (cosmetical indication) are discussed. PMID:1811531

  7. [Skin antisepsis in premature infants].

    PubMed

    Agolini, G; Faldella, G; Janes, E; Raitano, A; Spinelli, M; Vitali, M

    2011-01-01

    In some premature newborns, 7 months old and with less than 1 kg of body wheight, total parenteral nutrition is used for weeks, so that good antiseptics can cooperate to the prevention of nosocomial infections, associating the best biocide effects to the best topical tolerability. Details are reported on the biocide cutaneous properties of some chloro-derivates, as sodium hypochlorite and NaDCC, of ethyl and propyl alcohols, of chlorhexidine, of iodophors and also of triclosan and octenidine (even if these latter biocids are not normally available in Italy as cutaneous antiseptics). PMID:22423476

  8. Premature ejaculation: is there an efficient therapy?

    PubMed

    Francischi, Fábio Barros de; Ayres, Daniel Cernach; Itao, Ricardo Eidi; Spessoto, Luis Cesar Fava; Arruda, Jose Germano Ferraz Del; Facio Junior, Fernando Nestor

    2011-12-01

    Premature ejaculation is the most frequent male sexual dysfunction, estimated to affect 20 to 30% of men at some time in their life. A Pubmed search from the year 2000 to the present was performed to retrieve publications related to management or treatment of premature ejaculation. Behavioral techniques have been the mainstay of premature ejaculation management for many years, although evidence of their short-term efficacy is limited. Topical therapies for premature ejaculation act by desensitizing the penis and do not alter the sensation of ejaculation. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), commonly used in the treatment of depression, are often used to treat premature ejaculation, based on the observation that delayed ejaculation is a frequent side effect of this drug class. Dapoxetine is a short-acting SSRI formulated to treat premature ejaculation, and results seem very promising. PMID:26761263

  9. Advances in understanding and treating premature ejaculation.

    PubMed

    Saitz, Theodore R; Serefoglu, Ege Can

    2015-11-01

    Over the past several years, many advances have been made in our understanding of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and management of premature ejaculation. Newly developed definitions of premature ejaculation are now available, and our perception of the classification, prevalence, aetiological factors, and treatment options for premature ejaculation have evolved. Despite ongoing research, there remains much to be learned about all aspects of this common sexual disorder, in particular effective clinical diagnosis and treatment options. PMID:26502991

  10. Mode of Delivery in Premature Neonates: Does It Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Racusin, Diana A.; Antony, Kathleen M.; Haase, Jennifer; Bondy, Melissa; Aagaard, Kjersti M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective  Despite the current prevalence of preterm births, no clear guidelines exist on the optimal mode of delivery. Our objective was to investigate the effects of mode of delivery on neonatal outcomes among premature infants in a large cohort. Study Design  We applied a retrospective cohort study design to a database of 6,408 births. Neonates were stratified by birth weight and a composite score was calculated to assess neonatal outcomes. The results were then further stratified by fetal exposure to antenatal steroids, birth weight, and mode of delivery. Results  No improvement in neonatal outcome with cesarean delivery (CD) was noted when subjects were stratified by mode of delivery, both in the presence or absence of antenatal corticosteroid administration. In the 1,500 to 1,999 g subgroup, there appears to be an increased risk of respiratory distress syndromes in neonates born by CD. Conclusion  In our all-comers cohort, replicative of everyday obstetric practice, CD did not improve neonatal outcomes in preterm infants. PMID:27468363

  11. Court ordered obstetric intervention: a commentary.

    PubMed

    Brenner, B; Burnet, P

    1995-10-27

    A case is presented where the Courts have authorised an obstetric intervention deemed necessary for the well-being of both mother and child. Although the case is one of maternal psychosis, there are legal and ethical concerns whenever court-ordered intervention is deemed necessary. Approaches to this difficult medical decision making problem in the form of utilitarian "burdens v benefit" ratio analysis or the recognised traditional ethical principles of beneficence, nonmaleficence, justice and acting in the patient's best interest are considered. The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists guidelines suggesting "that it is inappropriate ... to invoke judicial intervention to overrule an informed and competent woman's refusal of a proposed medical treatment, even though her refusal might place her life and that of her fetus at risk" are questioned. PMID:7478347

  12. Improving medical induction in obstetrics and gynaecology

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Eve; Palmer, Edward; Lloyd, Jilly

    2014-01-01

    We present a year long quality improvement project to bring a new induction programme to the obstetrics and gynaecology (O&G) department of University Hospital Lewisham (UHL). Aimed at non-speciality junior doctors, including general practice and foundation trainees, the induction programme has sought to improve the quality of care delivered and experience of these transiting junior doctors. We have demonstrated a readily implementable and sustainable programme that requires only modest input of time from senior trainees (ST3+) periodically throughout the year. We have highlighted the specific need for senior consultant investment in the success and sustainability of such a project. We have demonstrated improvement of learning outcomes (p=0.01) in junior doctors undertaking the induction programme at Kirkpatrick's hierarchy level 2.

  13. The obstetrics and gynaecology resident as teacher.

    PubMed

    Cullimore, Amie J; Dalrymple, John L; Dugoff, Lorraine; Hueppchen, Nancy A; Casey, Petra M; Chuang, Alice W; Espey, Eve L; Hammoud, Maya M; Kaczmarczyk, Joseph M; Katz, Nadine T; Nuthalapaty, Francis S; Peskin, Edward G

    2010-12-01

    In this article we discuss the role residents play in the clinical training and evaluation of medical students. A literature search was performed to identify articles dealing with research, curriculum, and the evaluation of residents as teachers. We summarize the importance of resident educators and the need to provide appropriate resources for house staff in this role, and we review evidence-based literature in the area of residents as teachers. Specific attention is given to the unique circumstances of the obstetrics and gynaecology resident, who is often faced with teaching in an emotionally charged and stress-filled environment. We present examples of curricula for residents as teachers and describe barriers to their implementation and evaluation. PMID:21176331

  14. [Simulation in obstetrics and gynecology - a new method to improve the management of acute obstetric emergencies].

    PubMed

    Blum, Ronja; Gairing Bürglin, Anja; Gisin, Stefan

    2008-11-01

    In medical specialties, such as anaesthesia, the use of simulation has increased over the past 15 years. Medical simulation attempts to reproduce important clinical situations to practise team training or individual skills in a risk free environment. For a long time simulators have only been used by the airline industry and the military. Simulation as a training tool for practicing critical situations in obstetrics is not very common yet. Experience and routine are crucial to evaluate a medical emergency correctly and to take the appropriate measures. Nowadays the obstetrician requires a combination of manual and communication skills, fast emergency management and decision-making skills. Therefore simulation may help to attain these skills. This may not only satisfy the high expectations and demands of the patients towards doctors and midwives but would also help to keep calm in difficult situations and avoid mistakes. The goal is a risk free delivery for mother and child. Therefore we developed a simulation- based curricular unit for hands-on training of four different obstetric emergency scenarios. In this paper we describe our results about the feedback of doctors and midwives on their personal experiences due to this simulation-based curricular unit. The results indicate that simulation seems to be an accepted method for team training in emergency situations in obstetrics. Whether patient security increases after the regularly use of drill training needs to be investigated in further studies. PMID:18979433

  15. Industrial labor relations manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The NASA Industrial Labor Relations Manual provides internal guidelines and procedures to assist NASA Field Installations in dealing with contractor labor management disputes, Service Contract Act variance hearings, and to provide access of Labor Union Representatives to NASA for the purpose of maintaining schedules and goals in connection with vital NASA programs. This manual will be revised by page changes as revisions become necessary. Initial distribution of this manual has been made to NASA Headquarters and Field Installations.

  16. Obstetric admissions to ICUs in Finland: A multicentre study.

    PubMed

    Seppänen, Pia; Sund, Reijo; Roos, Mervi; Unkila, Riitta; Meriläinen, Merja; Helminen, Mika; Ala-Kokko, Tero; Suominen, Tarja

    2016-08-01

    In this study, the objective was to describe and analyse reasons for obstetric admissions to the ICU, severity of illness, level and types of interventions, adverse events and patient outcomes. In a retrospective database study, we identified 291 obstetric patients during pregnancy and puerperium from four Finnish university hospitals. Most were admitted in the post-partum period and hypertensive disorders were the main indications for admissions, followed by obstetric haemorrhage. The median length of stay was 21hours. The most common intervention was blood transfusion and mechanical ventilation was required in nearly one fifth of the patients. Three patients had a prolonged stay and nine had re-admissions. One maternal death was recorded. This study found that severity of illness and organ failure scores describe the obstetric patient as having a good probability of recovery and a short length of stay. However, the obstetric patients reason for admission and their type of delivery were associated with both the severity of illness scores and level of intervention required. Those admitted for non-obstetric reasons and having had a vaginal delivery demonstrated higher severity of illness scores, organ failure scores, and levels of intervention when compared to those admitted for obstetric reasons or those who had delivered by caesarean section. In conclusion, care of these patients can be improved by understanding the severity of illness scores, common ICU interventions and patient outcomes. PMID:27209560

  17. Induction of labor.

    PubMed

    2000-06-01

    The goal of induction of labor is to achieve vaginal delivery by stimulating uterine contractions before the spontaneous onset of labor. According to the National Center for Health Statistics, the overall rate of induction of labor in the United States has increased from 90 per 1,000 live births in 1989 to 184 per 1,000 live births in 1997 (I). Generally, induction of labor has merit as a therapeutic option when the benefits of expeditious delivery outweigh the risks of continuing the pregnancy. The benefits of labor induction must be weighed against the potential maternal or fetal risks associated with this procedure. The purpose of this bulletin is to review current methods for cervical ripening and induction of labor and to summarize the effectiveness of these approaches based on appropriately conducted outcomes-based research. These practice guidelines classify the indications for and contraindications to induction of labor, describe the various agents used for cervical ripening, cite methods used to induce labor, and outline the requirements for the safe clinical use of the various methods of inducing labor. PMID:10979741

  18. Utilization of Emergency Service of Obstetrics and Gynecology: A Cross-Sectional Analysis of a Training Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Aksoy, Huseyin; Aksoy, Ulku; Ozturk, Mustafa; Ozyurt, Sezin; Acmaz, Gokhan; Karadag, Ozge Idem; Yucel, Burak; Aydin, Turgut

    2015-01-01

    Background Overutilization and inappropriate use of emergency departments (EDs) by patients with non-urgent health problems has become a major concern worldwide. This study aims to describe the characteristics of obstetric and gynecologic patients admitted to the Department of Emergency Obstetric and Gynecology. Methods A retrospective and cross-sectional study was designed at our Emergency Service of Obstetrics and Gynecology of Kayseri Education and Research Hospital of Medicine between January 1 and December 31, 2013. A total of 30,853 patients applying to emergency service were retrospectively analyzed from the admission charts, patient files and hospital automation system. Patients were assessed in terms of demographic features, presentation times, complaints, admission type (with own facilities, with consultation or with ambulance), diagnoses (urgent or non-ergent), discharge rates, clinical admission, rejection rate of examination, and rejection rate of hospitalization. Results A total of 30,853 patients were analyzed retrospectively. The mean age of patients was 27.69 ± 8.44 years; 51% of patients were between 20 and 29 years old. The categories of patients in urgent and non-urgent were 69% and 31% respectively. Most common presentation time period was between 19:00 and 21:00. Labor pain, pain and bleeding during pregnency, routine antenatal control, pelvic pain and menstrual irregularity were the most common complaints. Labor pain with the rate of 21% was the most common cause of ED admission. All patients who presented with labor pain were hospitalized. Patients hospitalized for labor constituted 56% of all hospitalized patients. Among patients, 62% were treated on an outpatient basis and 38% were hospitalized. Of patients, 3.54% refused to hospitalization. The cases using the ambulance to admission constituted 1.07% of all ED patients. Of these patients who have used ambulance 3.65% refused to the patient examination. Conclusions To improve the

  19. Obstetric training in Emergency Medicine: a needs assessment

    PubMed Central

    Janicki, Adam James; MacKuen, Courteney; Hauspurg, Alisse; Cohn, Jamieson

    2016-01-01

    Background Identification and management of obstetric emergencies is essential in emergency medicine (EM), but exposure to pregnant patients during EM residency training is frequently limited. To date, there is little data describing effective ways to teach residents this material. Current guidelines require completion of 2 weeks of obstetrics or 10 vaginal deliveries, but it is unclear whether this instills competency. Methods We created a 15-item survey evaluating resident confidence and knowledge related to obstetric emergencies. To assess confidence, we asked residents about their exposure and comfort level regarding obstetric emergencies and eight common presentations and procedures. We assessed knowledge via multiple-choice questions addressing common obstetric presentations, pelvic ultrasound image, and cardiotocography interpretation. The survey was distributed to residency programs utilizing the Council of Emergency Medicine Residency Directors (CORD) listserv. Results The survey was completed by 212 residents, representing 55 of 204 (27%) programs belonging to CORD and 11.2% of 1,896 eligible residents. Fifty-six percent felt they had adequate exposure to obstetric emergencies. The overall comfort level was 2.99 (1–5 scale) and comfort levels of specific presentations and procedures ranged from 2.58 to 3.97; all increased moderately with postgraduate year (PGY) level. Mean overall percentage of items answered correctly on the multiple-choice questions was 58% with no statistical difference by PGY level. Performance on individual questions did not differ by PGY level. Conclusions The identification and management of obstetric emergencies is the cornerstone of EM. We found preliminary evidence of a concerning lack of resident comfort regarding obstetric conditions and knowledge deficits on core obstetrics topics. EM residents may benefit from educational interventions to increase exposure to these topics. PMID:27357908

  20. The association of gonorrhoea and syphilis with premature birth and low birthweight.

    PubMed Central

    Donders, G G; Desmyter, J; De Wet, D H; Van Assche, F A

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--Provide evidence from prospective data that Neisseria gonorrhoeae may be an important cause of premature delivery and low birth weight in areas with high prevalence of genital infections. SETTING--Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Kalafong University Hospital, Pretoria, South Africa in collaboration with the Departments of Microbiology and of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Katholieke Universiteit, Leuven, Belgium. SUBJECTS--Two hundred and fifty six consecutive black pregnant women were examined during the first antenatal visit, and one to four weeks later a second culture for N gonorrhoeae was taken at random in 67 of them. Hundred and sixty seven were analysable, 75 were lost to follow up. METHODS--After obtaining detailed clinical history, an endocervical specimen for N gonorrhoeae culture (Thayer-Martin) and C trachomatis antigen detection (Chlamydiazyme (R)) was taken. Syphilis was diagnosed when both reactive plasma protein (RPR) and T pallidum haemagglutination inhibition assay (TPHA) were positive. Prematurity was defined as delivery at less than 37 gestational weeks. RESULTS--Infection with N gonorrhoeae (n = 9) and untreated syphilis (n = 7) were both associated with prematurity and low birth weight. After multi-variate regression analysis, age-adjusted parity, late sexual debut, number of recent sexual partners, infection with N gonorrhoeae and infection with syphilis revealed significant associations with low birth weight. However, infection with C trachomatis, presence of abundant vaginal discharge, social class, Trichomonas vaginalis infection, gestational weeks at first antenatal visit and number of previous miscarriages did not reveal such an association. Attributable risk of untreated gonorrhoea for premature birth was 72% and routine cultures were cost-benefit efficient. CONCLUSIONS--At least in countries where the prevalence is high, genital infections as well as the risk factors for acquiring them (young age, late sexual debut

  1. Interspecialty differences in the obstetric care of low-risk women.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblatt, R A; Dobie, S A; Hart, L G; Schneeweiss, R; Gould, D; Raine, T R; Benedetti, T J; Pirani, M J; Perrin, E B

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study examined differences among obstetricians, family physicians, and certified nurse-midwives in the patterns of obstetric care provided to low-risk patients. METHODS: For a random sample of Washington State obstetrician-gynecologists, family physicians, and certified nurse-midwives, records of a random sample of their low-risk patients beginning care between September 1, 1988, and August 31, 1989, were abstracted. RESULTS: Certified nurse-midwives were less likely to use continuous electronic fetal monitoring and had lower rates of labor induction or augmentation than physicians. Certified nurse-midwives also were less likely than physicians to use epidural anesthesia. The cesarean section rate for patients of certified nurse-midwives was 8.8% vs 13.6% for obstetricians and 15.1% for family physicians. Certified nurse-midwives used 12.2% fewer resources. There was little difference between the practice patterns of obstetricians and family physicians. CONCLUSIONS: The low-risk patients of certified nurse-midwives in Washington State received fewer obstetrical interventions than similar patients cared for by obstetrician-gynecologists or family physicians. These differences are associated with lower cesarean section rates and less resource use. PMID:9096532

  2. Managing disruptive behaviors in the health care setting: focus on obstetrics services.

    PubMed

    Rosenstein, Alan H

    2011-03-01

    Disruptive behaviors can have a significant negative impact on staff relationships, communication flow, task responsibility, and team collaboration, all of which can adversely impact patient outcomes of care. Addressing disruptive behaviors in a positive manner by emphasizing the benefits of mutual understanding, shared goals and priorities, and adherence to accepted standards of care will enhance communication flow and improve the process and outcomes of care. This is particularly relevant in the obstetrics setting, where care is delivered over a continuum of time, with multiple different members of the health care team playing a vital role as the patient progresses from labor to delivery. Critical strategies for success include having strong organizational commitment and leadership support, raising provider insight and awareness, implementing appropriate policies and procedures, providing appropriate educational and training programs, and facilitating action-oriented interventional support. PMID:21183152

  3. [Sexological intervention on premature ejaculation].

    PubMed

    San Martín Blanco, C

    2014-07-01

    Strategies, recommendations and techniques proposed by sex therapy for intervention on premature ejaculation, have represented for nearly four decades the most effective model of intervention in this sexual dysfunction, which currently is complemented by the efficacy of dapoxetine drug treatment. Clinical experience and recent studies support that combined intervention offers the best therapeutic results. In addition in sex therapy, etiologic diagnosis is obtained from the analysis of the interrelationship of the couple. Diagnostic and therapeutic intervention has to be always centered in the relationship, so the techniques and resources must be applied with the expectation of being implemented in the sexual interaction. It will therefore be the relationship that receive treatment, even if medication is used for one of the members of the couple. On the other hand, this model of intervention can be implemented by a professional with training, although not necessarily a specialist. PMID:25953038

  4. MIGRATORY LABOR IN COLORADO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DOUGLASS, M.R.; AND OTHERS

    CONDITIONS AND PROBLEMS RELATING TO THE EMPLOYMENT OF SEASONAL FARM WORKERS AND MIGRANTS IN COLORADO ARE PRESENTED. THE FIVE MAJOR SEASONAL FARM LABOR STATE EMPLOYMENT AREAS ARE SURVEYED ACCORDING TO (1) THE ORGANIZATION OF THE SEASONAL FARM LABOR (4) TRENDS IN AGRICULTURAL ACREAGE, PRODUCTION, AND TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGE, (5) COMMUNITY ATTITUDES AND…

  5. 7 CFR 29.2290 - Premature primings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Premature primings. 29.2290 Section 29.2290 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... 21) § 29.2290 Premature primings. Ground leaves harvested before reaching complete growth...

  6. 7 CFR 29.2290 - Premature primings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Premature primings. 29.2290 Section 29.2290 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... 21) § 29.2290 Premature primings. Ground leaves harvested before reaching complete growth...

  7. [Communicating with premature newborns through touch].

    PubMed

    Berne-Audéoud, Frédérique; Marcus, Leila; Lejeune, Fleur; Gentaz, Edouard; Debillon, Thierry

    2010-01-01

    How does the premature newborn perceive the outside world? The first sense developed by the foetus is touch. Through the physiology of sensoriality and brain maturation, touch can constitute an essential vector in communicating with and caring for the premature child. PMID:20925301

  8. 28 CFR 51.22 - Premature submissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Premature submissions. 51.22 Section 51.22 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES FOR THE ADMINISTRATION OF... § 51.22 Premature submissions. The Attorney General will not consider on the merits: (a) Any...

  9. Methods for cervical ripening and induction of labor.

    PubMed

    Tenore, Josie L

    2003-05-15

    Induction of labor is common in obstetric practice. According to the most current studies, the rate varies from 9.5 to 33.7 percent of all pregnancies annually. In the absence of a ripe or favorable cervix, a successful vaginal birth is less likely. Therefore, cervical ripening or preparedness for induction should be assessed before a regimen is selected. Assessment is accomplished by calculating a Bishop score. When the Bishop score is less than 6, it is recommended that a cervical ripening agent be used before labor induction. Nonpharmacologic approaches to cervical ripening and labor induction have included herbal compounds, castor oil, hot baths, enemas, sexual intercourse, breast stimulation, acupuncture, acupressure, transcutaneous nerve stimulation, and mechanical and surgical modalities. Of these nonpharmacologic methods, only the mechanical and surgical methods have proven efficacy for cervical ripening or induction of labor. Pharmacologic agents available for cervical ripening and labor induction include prostaglandins, misoprostol, mifepristone, and relaxin. When the Bishop score is favorable, the preferred pharmacologic agent is oxytocin. PMID:12776961

  10. Characteristics of childbearing women, obstetrical interventions and preterm delivery: a comparison of the US and France.

    PubMed

    Zeitlin, Jennifer; Blondel, Béatrice; Ananth, Cande V

    2015-05-01

    Preterm delivery rates have remained consistently higher in the US than France, but the reasons for this excess remain poorly understood. We examined if differences in socio-demographic risk factors or more liberal use of obstetrical interventions contributed to higher rates in the US. Data on singleton live births in 1995, 1998 and 2003 from US birth certificates and the French National Perinatal Survey were used to analyze preterm delivery rate by maternal characteristics (age, parity, marital status, education, race (US)/nationality (France), prenatal care and smoking). We distinguished between preterm deliveries with a cesarean or a labor induction and those without these interventions. Unadjusted and adjusted risk ratios (RR) for the US compared to France were estimated using log-binomial regression. Preterm delivery rates were 7.9 % in the US and 4.7 % in France (risk ratio [RR] = 1.7, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 1.6-1.8). The US had more teen mothers and late entry to prenatal care, but fewer women smoked, although adjustment for these and other confounders did not reduce RR (1.8, 95 % CI 1.7-1.9). Preterm delivery rates associated with labor induction or cesarean were 3.3 % in the US and 2.1 % in France (RR 1.6, 95 % CI 1.5-1.7); the corresponding rates for preterm delivery without these interventions were 4.5 and 2.5 % (RR 1.8, 95 % CI 1.7-1.9), respectively. Key socio-demographic risk factors and more obstetric intervention do not explain higher US preterm delivery rates. Avenues for future research include the impact of universal access to health services (universal health insurance?) on health care quality and the association between more generous social policies, stress and the risks of preterm delivery. PMID:25119892