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Sample records for obstructive disease nonsense

  1. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000091.htm Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common lung disease. Having COPD ...

  2. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Peter J; Burney, Peter G J; Silverman, Edwin K; Celli, Bartolome R; Vestbo, Jørgen; Wedzicha, Jadwiga A; Wouters, Emiel F M

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common disease with high global morbidity and mortality. COPD is characterized by poorly reversible airway obstruction, which is confirmed by spirometry, and includes obstruction of the small airways (chronic obstructive bronchiolitis) and emphysema, which lead to air trapping and shortness of breath in response to physical exertion. The most common risk factor for the development of COPD is cigarette smoking, but other environmental factors, such as exposure to indoor air pollutants - especially in developing countries - might influence COPD risk. Not all smokers develop COPD and the reasons for disease susceptibility in these individuals have not been fully elucidated. Although the mechanisms underlying COPD remain poorly understood, the disease is associated with chronic inflammation that is usually corticosteroid resistant. In addition, COPD involves accelerated ageing of the lungs and an abnormal repair mechanism that might be driven by oxidative stress. Acute exacerbations, which are mainly triggered by viral or bacterial infections, are important as they are linked to a poor prognosis. The mainstay of the management of stable disease is the use of inhaled long-acting bronchodilators, whereas corticosteroids are beneficial primarily in patients who have coexisting features of asthma, such as eosinophilic inflammation and more reversibility of airway obstruction. Apart from smoking cessation, no treatments reduce disease progression. More research is needed to better understand disease mechanisms and to develop new treatments that reduce disease activity and progression. PMID:27189863

  3. Nonsense-Mediated Decay in Genetic Disease: Friend or Foe?

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jake N.; Pearce, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells utilize various RNA quality control mechanisms to ensure high fidelity of gene expression, thus protecting against the accumulation of nonfunctional RNA and the subsequent production of abnormal peptides. Messenger RNAs (mRNAs) are largely responsible for protein production, and mRNA quality control is particularly important for protecting the cell against the downstream effects of genetic mutations. Nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) is an evolutionarily conserved mRNA quality control system in all eukaryotes that degrades transcripts containing premature termination codons (PTCs). By degrading these aberrant transcripts, NMD acts to prevent the production of truncated proteins that could otherwise harm the cell through various insults, such as dominant negative effects or the ER stress response. Although NMD functions to protect the cell against the deleterious effects of aberrant mRNA, there is a growing body of evidence that mutation-, codon-, gene-, cell-, and tissue-specific differences in NMD efficiency can alter the underlying pathology of genetic disease. In addition, the protective role that NMD plays in genetic disease can undermine current therapeutic strategies aimed at increasing the production of full-length functional protein from genes harboring nonsense mutations. Here, we review the normal function of this RNA surveillance pathway and how it is regulated, provide current evidence for the role that it plays in modulating genetic disease phenotypes, and how NMD can be used as a therapeutic target. PMID:25485595

  4. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a preventable and treatable disease that makes it difficult to empty air out of the lungs. This difficulty in ...

  5. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Hattab, Yousef; Alhassan, Sulaiman; Balaan, Marvin; Lega, Mark; Singh, Anil C

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a chronic smoking-related lung disease associated with significant mortality and morbidity. It carries an enormous economic burden on the health care system. This results in a significant social impact on affected patients and their families. In this article, we review COPD in general, critical care management of patients presenting with acute exacerbation of COPD, and methods of prevention. PMID:26919673

  6. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Brusasco, Vito; Martinez, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    COPD is characterized by airflow limitation that is not fully reversible. The morphological basis for airflow obstruction results from a varying combination of obstructive changes in peripheral conducting airways and destructive changes in respiratory bronchioles, alveolar ducts, and alveoli. A reduction of vascularity within the alveolar septa has been reported in emphysema. Typical physiological changes reflect these structural abnormalities. Spirometry documents airflow obstruction when the FEV1/FVC ratio is reduced below the lower limit of normality, although in early disease stages FEV1 and airway conductance are not affected. Current guidelines recommend testing for bronchoreversibility at least once and the postbronchodilator FEV1/FVC be used for COPD diagnosis; the nature of bronchodilator response remains controversial, however. One major functional consequence of altered lung mechanics is lung hyperinflation. FRC may increase as a result of static or dynamic mechanisms, or both. The link between dynamic lung hyperinflation and expiratory flow limitation during tidal breathing has been demonstrated. Hyperinflation may increase the load on inspiratory muscles, with resulting length adaptation of diaphragm. Reduction of exercise tolerance is frequently noted, with compelling evidence that breathlessness and altered lung mechanics play a major role. Lung function measurements have been traditionally used as prognostic indices and to monitor disease progression; FEV1 has been most widely used. An increase in FVC is also considered as proof of bronchodilatation. Decades of work has provided insight into the histological, functional, and biological features of COPD. This has provided a clearer understanding of important pathobiological processes and has provided additional therapeutic options. PMID:24692133

  7. Design of Novel Aminoglycoside Derivatives with Enhanced Suppression of Diseases-Causing Nonsense Mutations.

    PubMed

    Sabbavarapu, Narayana Murthy; Shavit, Michal; Degani, Yarden; Smolkin, Boris; Belakhov, Valery; Baasov, Timor

    2016-04-14

    New pseudotrisaccharide derivatives of aminoglycosides that exploit additional interaction on the shallow groove face of the decoding-site rRNA of eukaryotic ribosome were designed, synthesized and biologically evaluated. Novel lead structures (6 and 7 with an additional 7'-OH), exhibiting enhanced specificity to eukaryotic cytoplasmic ribosome, and superior nonsense mutation suppression activity than those of gentamicin, were discovered. The comparative benefit of new leads was demonstrated in four different nonsense DNA-constructs underling the genetic diseases cystic fibrosis, Usher syndrome, and Hurler syndrome. PMID:27096052

  8. Sporadic Hirschsprung`s disease due to a novel nonsense mutation in the RET protooncogene

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, K.M.; Donis-Keller, H.; Langer, J.C.

    1994-09-01

    Hirschsprung`s disease (HSCR, aganglionic megacolon) is characterized by a lack of ganglion cells along variable lengths of the hindgut. This is most likely due to a failure of the progenitor cells (that are destined to become the ganglion cells of the submucosal and myenteric plexuses) to complete their distal migration in the colon. Recently, mutations in the RET protoocogene have been reported in association with HSCR. We report a novel nonsense mutation resulting in a severely truncated protein. Germline DNA from a panel of 6 HSCR patients was analyzed by SSCP for 20 exons of RET. Eight exons were also directly sequenced. We identified a novel mutation within RET exon 2. The mutation (TAC{sub 36}{yields}TAG{sub 36}), which occurs at nucleotide position 108, involves the replacement of tyrosine with a stop codon and results in a truncated 35 amino acid protein. This mutation is the most 5{prime} nonsense mutation reported thus far. Interestingly, the patient has no prior family history of HSCR and was also diagnosed with multiple developmental anomalies including dysplastic kidney. Recent gene targeting studies with mouse models have shown that RET is essential for normal renal development. However, a parallel phenotype has not been seen in other reported HSCR patients with RET mutations. The observations reported here provide evidence that RET plays a role in human renal development. Ongoing studies will determine the extent of RET involvement in sporadic cases of HSCR.

  9. Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap: asthmatic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or chronic obstructive asthma?

    PubMed

    Slats, Annelies; Taube, Christian

    2016-02-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are different disease entities. They are both clinical diagnoses, with diagnostic tools to discriminate between one another. However, especially in older patients (>55 years) it seems more difficult to differentiate between asthma and COPD. This has led to the definition of a new phenotype called asthma COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS). However, our understanding of ACOS is at a very preliminary stage, as most research has involved subjects with existing diagnoses of asthma or COPD from studies with different definitions for ACOS. This has led to different and sometimes opposing results between studies on several features of ACOS, also depending on the comparison with COPD alone, asthma alone or both, which are summarized in this review.We suggest not using the term ACOS for a patient with features of both asthma and COPD, but to describe a patient with chronic obstructive airway disease as completely as possible, with regard to characteristics that determine treatment response (e.g. eosinophilic inflammation) and prognosis (such as smoking status, exacerbation rate, fixed airflow limitation, hyperresponsiveness, comorbidities). This will provide a far more clinically relevant diagnosis, and would aid in research on treatment in more homogenous groups of patients with chronic airways obstruction. More research is certainly needed to develop more evidence-based definitions for this patient group and to evaluate biomarkers, which will help to further classify these patients, treat them more adequately and unravel the underlying pathophysiological mechanism. PMID:26596632

  10. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - adults - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... visit when they're all better. Save Your Energy at Home Place items you use often in ... or the skin around your fingernails are blue Alternative Names COPD - adults - discharge; Chronic obstructive airways disease - ...

  11. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: clinical integrative physiology.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Denis E; Laveneziana, Pierantonio; Webb, Katherine; Neder, J Alberto

    2014-03-01

    Peripheral airway dysfunction, inhomogeneous ventilation distribution, gas trapping, and impaired pulmonary gas exchange are variably present in all stages of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This article provides a cogent physiologic explanation for the relentless progression of activity-related dyspnea and exercise intolerance that all too commonly characterizes COPD. The spectrum of physiologic derangements that exist in smokers with mild airway obstruction and a history compatible with COPD is examined. Also explored are the perceptual and physiologic consequences of progressive erosion of the resting inspiratory capacity. Finally, emerging information on the role of cardiocirculatory impairment in contributing to exercise intolerance in patients with varying degrees of airway obstruction is reviewed. PMID:24507837

  12. Diet and obstructive lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Romieu, I; Trenga, C

    2001-01-01

    The results presented in this review suggest that the impact of nutrition on obstructive lung disease is most evident for antioxidant vitamins, particularly vitamin C and, to a lesser extent, vitamin E. By decreasing oxidant insults to the lung, antioxidants could modulate the development of chronic lung diseases and lung function decrement. Antioxidant vitamins could also play an important role in gene-environment interactions in complex lung diseases such as childhood asthma. Data also suggest that omega-3 fatty acids may have a potentially protective effect against airway hyperreactivity and lung function decrements; however, relevant data are still sparse. Although epidemiologic data suggest that consumption of fresh fruit may reduce risk of noncarcinogenic airway limitation, there are no clear data on which nutrients might be most relevant. While some studies evaluate daily intake of vitamin C, other studies use fruit consumption as a surrogate for antioxidant intake. Given the dietary intercorrelations among antioxidant vitamins, particularly vitamin C, beta-carotene, and flavonoids, as well as other micronutrients, it may be difficult to isolate a specific effect. Some population subgroups with higher levels of oxidative stress, such as cigarette smokers, may be more likely to benefit from dietary supplementation, since some studies have suggested that antioxidant intake may have a greater impact in this group. Studies of lung function decrement and COPD in adults suggest that daily intake of vitamin C at levels slightly exceeding the current Recommended Dietary Allowance (60 mg/day among nonsmokers and 100 mg/day among smokers) may have a protective effect (20). In the Schwartz and Weiss (85) and Britton et al. (87) studies, an increase of 40 mg/day in vitamin C intake led to an approximate 20-ml increase in FEV1. Daily mean vitamin C intakes in these studies were 66 mg and 99.2 mg, respectively, and the highest intake level (178 mg/day) was approximately

  13. The genetics of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Alice M; Stockley, Robert A

    2006-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a heterogeneous disease caused by the interaction of genetic susceptibility and environmental influences. There is increasing evidence that genes link to disease pathogenesis and heterogeneity by causing variation in protease anti-protease systems, defence against oxidative stress and inflammation. The main methods of genomic research for complex disease traits are described, together with the genes implicated in COPD thus far, their roles in disease causation and the future for this area of investigation. PMID:17054776

  14. Early origins of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Narang, Indra; Bush, Andrew

    2012-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide and a significant challenge for adult physicians. However, there is a misconception that COPD is a disease of only adult smokers. There is a growing body of evidence to support the hypothesis that chronic respiratory diseases such as COPD have their origins in early life. In particular, adverse maternal factors will interact with the environment in a susceptible host promoting altered lung growth and development antenatally and in early childhood. Subsequent lung injury and further gene-environment interactions may result in permanent lung injury manifest by airway obstruction predisposing to COPD. This review will discuss the currently available data regarding risk factors in early life and their role in determining the COPD phenotype. PMID:22265926

  15. [Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease : new pharmacotherapeutic options].

    PubMed

    Greulich, T; Koczulla, A R; Vogelmeier, C

    2012-11-01

    Data about the clinical presentation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have resulted in a new classification of the disease. The degree of airflow limitation has been amended by symptoms and exacerbation rate. The standard pharmacotherapy of stable COPD is in transition, as fixed combinations of long acting beta agonists and long acting anticholinergics are in the late stages of clinical development. On this background inhaled corticosteroids will need to be re-evaluated. Roflumilast is a recently approved therapeutic option that primarily diminishes exacerbation frequency in patients with chronic bronchitis and severe airflow obstruction (FEV(1) < 50%). In COPD patients with acute exacerbations procalcitonin levels can be used to guide antibiotic therapy. Comparable clinical outcomes can be achieved while using significantly less amounts of antibiotics. PMID:22955248

  16. [Nutritional abnormalities in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Gea, Joaquim; Martínez-Llorens, Juana; Barreiro, Esther

    2014-07-22

    Nutritional abnormalities are associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with a frequency ranging from 2 to 50%, depending on the geographical area and the study design. Diagnostic tools include anthropometry, bioelectrical impedance, dual energy radioabsortiometry and deuterium dilution, being the body mass and the lean mass indices the most frequently used parameters. While the most important consequences of nutritional abnormalities are muscle dysfunction and exercise limitation, factors implicated include an imbalance between caloric intake and consumption, and between anabolic and catabolic hormones, inflammation, tobacco smoking, poor physical activity, hypoxemia, some drugs and aging/comorbidities. The most important molecular mechanism for malnutrition associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease appears to be the mismatching between protein synthesis and breakdown. Among the therapeutic measures proposed for these nutritional abnormalities are improvements in lifestyle and nutritional support, although the use of anabolic drugs (such as secretagogues of the growth hormone) offers a new therapeutic strategy. PMID:24054776

  17. Chronic Bronchitis and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Criner, Gerard J.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic bronchitis (CB) is a common but variable phenomenon in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). It has numerous clinical consequences, including an accelerated decline in lung function, greater risk of the development of airflow obstruction in smokers, a predisposition to lower respiratory tract infection, higher exacerbation frequency, and worse overall mortality. CB is caused by overproduction and hypersecretion of mucus by goblet cells, which leads to worsening airflow obstruction by luminal obstruction of small airways, epithelial remodeling, and alteration of airway surface tension predisposing to collapse. Despite its clinical sequelae, little is known about the pathophysiology of CB and goblet cell hyperplasia in COPD, and treatment options are limited. In addition, it is becoming increasingly apparent that in the classic COPD spectrum, with emphysema on one end and CB on the other, most patients lie somewhere in the middle. It is known now that many patients with severe emphysema can develop CB, and small airway pathology has been linked to worse clinical outcomes, such as increased mortality and lesser improvement in lung function after lung volume reduction surgery. However, in recent years, a greater understanding of the importance of CB as a phenotype to identify patients with a beneficial response to therapy has been described. Herein we review the epidemiology of CB, the evidence behind its clinical consequences, the current understanding of the pathophysiology of goblet cell hyperplasia in COPD, and current therapies for CB. PMID:23204254

  18. Comorbidity in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Negewo, Netsanet A; McDonald, Vanessa M; Gibson, Peter G

    2015-11-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD) often experience comorbid conditions. The most common comorbidities that have been associated with COPD include cardiovascular diseases, lung cancer, metabolic disorder, osteoporosis, anxiety and depression, skeletal muscle dysfunction, cachexia, gastrointestinal diseases, and other respiratory conditions. Not only are comorbidities common but they also considerably influence disease prognosis and patients׳ health status, and are associated with poor clinical outcomes. However, perusal of literature indicates that little has been done so far to effectively assess, manage, and treat comorbidities in patients with COPD. The aim of this review is to comprehensively narrate the comorbid conditions that often coexist with COPD, along with their reported prevalence and their significant impacts in the disease management of COPD. A perspective on integrated disease management approaches for COPD is also discussed. PMID:26521102

  19. Obstructive sleep apnea and vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Lanfranchi, Paola; Somers, Virend A

    2001-01-01

    There is emerging evidence linking obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) to vascular disease, including hypertension. This relationship may be independent of co-morbidity, such as obesity. Even apparently healthy OSA patients have evidence of subtle functional vascular abnormalities that are known to occur in patients with hypertension and atherosclerosis. Untreated OSA may possibly contribute to the initiation and/or progression of pathophysiologic mechanisms involved in hypertension, heart failure, cardiac ischemia and stroke. This brief commentary will examine the evidence and mechanisms linking OSA to vascular disease. PMID:11737928

  20. The pathology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Hogg, James C; Timens, Wim

    2009-01-01

    The pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is based on the innate and adaptive inflammatory immune response to the inhalation of toxic particles and gases. Although tobacco smoking is the primary cause of this inhalation injury, many other environmental and occupational exposures contribute to the pathology of COPD. The immune inflammatory changes associated with COPD are linked to a tissue-repair and -remodeling process that increases mucus production and causes emphysematous destruction of the gas-exchanging surface of the lung. The common form of emphysema observed in smokers begins in the respiratory bronchioles near the thickened and narrowed small bronchioles that become the major site of obstruction in COPD. The mechanism(s) that allow small airways to thicken in such close proximity to lung tissue undergoing emphysematous destruction remains a puzzle that needs to be solved. PMID:18954287

  1. [Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Huerta, Arturo; Domingo, Rebeca; Soler, Néstor

    2010-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a chronic disease causing increasing healthcare costs worldwide. Another respiratory disease causing high costs and morbidity is community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Because of the constant growth in the population with both diseases (CAP and COPD), analyzing their clinical characteristics is important. Several cellular factors are known to contribute to differences in clinical expression: some lead to COPD exacerbations while others lead to symptoms of pneumonia. The use of new biomarkers (procalcitonin, pro-adrenomedullin and copeptin) help to distinguish among these clinical pictures. To decrease morbidity and mortality, clinical guidelines on antibiotic therapy must be followed and this therapy should be prescribed to patients with CAP and COPD. There are also prevention measures such as the pneumococcal vaccine whose role in the prevention of pneumococcal CAP should be further studied. The present review aims to elucidate some of the above-mentioned issues. PMID:20620690

  2. Nonsense mutations of the CYBB gene in two Thai families with X-linked chronic granulomatous disease.

    PubMed

    Vilaiphan, Prapaporn; Chatchatee, Pantipa; Ngamphaiboon, Jarungchit; Tongkobpetch, Siraprapa; Suphapeetiporn, Kanya; Shotelersuk, Vorasuk

    2007-12-01

    X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (X-CGD) is an immunodeficiency disorder characterized by defective intracellular killing of microorganisms due to the neutrophils' inability to generate superoxide ions. Although it is always caused by mutations in the CYBB gene, clinical and molecular characteristics vary in different ethnic backgrounds. Two unrelated Thai boys presented with severe persistent pulmonary infections at the age of two months. Their abnormal dihydrorhodamine (DHR) flow cytometry assays supported the diagnosis of X-CGD. Mutation analysis was performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and sequencing of the entire coding regions of CYBB. Mutations identified were confirmed by restriction enzyme analyses. PCR-sequencing of the entire coding regions of CYBB identified nonsense mutations, 271C>T (R91X) in exon 4 and 456T>A (Y152X) in exon 5, in probands of each family. Both of the patients' mothers were found to be carriers. This observation supports that CYBB is the gene responsible for X-CGD across different populations and nonsense mutations are associated with severe phenotypes. PMID:18402298

  3. [Pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Vogelmeier, C; Koczulla, R; Fehrenbach, H; Bals, R

    2006-09-01

    It is currently believed that the most important factor in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is inflammation of the small airways caused by inhaled particles and gases. In this context, a disturbance of the physiological balance between proteases and antiproteases develops that may cause lung emphysema. Moreover, oxidative stress seems to be important, as it may enhance the inflammatory reaction. The development of emphysema may also involve a loss of alveolar cells by apoptosis. Finally, several studies have indicated that a systemic inflammation is induced by COPD that may be of relevance to the development of systemic components that are observed in COPD patients. PMID:16845536

  4. Osteoporosis in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Malay; Bhardwaj, Rajeev; Madabhavi, Irappa; Khatana, Jasmin

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a lifestyle-related chronic inflammatory pulmonary disease associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. COPD is associated with various comorbidities found in all stages of COPD. The comorbidities have significant impact in terms of morbidity, mortality, and economic burden in COPD. Management of comorbidities should be incorporated into the comprehensive management of COPD as this will also have an effect on the outcome in COPD patients. Various comorbidities reported in COPD include cardiovascular disease, skeletal muscle dysfunction, anemia, metabolic syndrome, and osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is a significant comorbidity in COPD patients. Various risk factors, such as tobacco smoking, systemic inflammation, vitamin D deficiency, and the use of oral or inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) are responsible for its occurrence in patients with COPD. This review will focus on the prevalence, pathogenesis, risk factors, diagnosis, and treatment of osteoporosis in COPD patients. PMID:25788838

  5. Osteoporosis in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Malay; Bhardwaj, Rajeev; Madabhavi, Irappa; Khatana, Jasmin

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a lifestyle-related chronic inflammatory pulmonary disease associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. COPD is associated with various comorbidities found in all stages of COPD. The comorbidities have significant impact in terms of morbidity, mortality, and economic burden in COPD. Management of comorbidities should be incorporated into the comprehensive management of COPD as this will also have an effect on the outcome in COPD patients. Various comorbidities reported in COPD include cardiovascular disease, skeletal muscle dysfunction, anemia, metabolic syndrome, and osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is a significant comorbidity in COPD patients. Various risk factors, such as tobacco smoking, systemic inflammation, vitamin D deficiency, and the use of oral or inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) are responsible for its occurrence in patients with COPD. This review will focus on the prevalence, pathogenesis, risk factors, diagnosis, and treatment of osteoporosis in COPD patients. PMID:25788838

  6. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Portillo, Karina; Abad-Capa, Jorge; Ruiz-Manzano, Juan

    2015-05-01

    Several studies have shown that the interaction between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and cardiovascular comorbidity is complex and bidirectional, since each of these diseases complicates the prognosis of the other. Recent advances in imaging technology have led to better characterization of cardiac chambers and allowed the relationship between certain cardiac function parameters and COPD clinical and functional variables to be explored. Although cardiac abnormalities in COPD have been mainly associated with the right ventricle, several studies have reported that the left ventricle may also be affected in this disease. A better understanding of the mechanisms involved and their clinical implications will establish diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for patients with both these conditions. PMID:24816034

  7. Pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Tuder, Rubin M.; Petrache, Irina

    2012-01-01

    The current epidemic of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has produced a worldwide health care burden, approaching that imposed by transmittable infectious diseases. COPD is a multidimensional disease, with varied intermediate and clinical phenotypes. This Review discusses the pathogenesis of COPD, with particular focus on emphysema, based on the concept that pulmonary injury involves stages of initiation (by exposure to cigarette smoke, pollutants, and infectious agents), progression, and consolidation. Tissue damage entails complex interactions among oxidative stress, inflammation, extracellular matrix proteolysis, and apoptotic and autophagic cell death. Lung damage by cigarette smoke ultimately leads to self-propagating processes, resulting in macromolecular and structural alterations — features similar to those seen in aging. PMID:22850885

  8. [Pulmonary obstructive chronic disease and physical exercise].

    PubMed

    António, Carla; Gonçalves, Ana Paula; Tavares, Alcina

    2010-01-01

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a disease that can be prevented and treated, with a pulmonary component and with significant systemic effects that contribute to the severity of clinical manifestations. COPD causes a number of changes, including those which lead to exercise tolerance limitation and to a progressive deterioration of life quality of the patients. Respiratory rehabilitation (RR) represents a key part of the treatment. The benefits of RR are independent of sex, age and disease severity. At the end of the program, the patient should have acquired a life style as independent and healthy as possible. With this article the authors intend to review the benefits of physical exercise in rehabilitation of patients with COPD and the different types of training used in the respiratory rehabilitation program established for each patient. PMID:20700562

  9. Animal models of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Rial, Sandra; Girón-Martínez, Álvaro; Peces-Barba, Germán

    2015-03-01

    Animal models of disease have always been welcomed by the scientific community because they provide an approach to the investigation of certain aspects of the disease in question. Animal models of COPD cannot reproduce the heterogeneity of the disease and usually only manage to represent the disease in its milder stages. Moreover, airflow obstruction, the variable that determines patient diagnosis, not always taken into account in the models. For this reason, models have focused on the development of emphysema, easily detectable by lung morphometry, and have disregarded other components of the disease, such as airway injury or associated vascular changes. Continuous, long-term exposure to cigarette smoke is considered the main risk factor for this disease, justifying the fact that the cigarette smoke exposure model is the most widely used. Some variations on this basic model, related to exposure time, the association of other inducers or inhibitors, exacerbations or the use of transgenic animals to facilitate the identification of pathogenic pathways have been developed. Some variations or heterogeneity of this disease, then, can be reproduced and models can be designed for resolving researchers' questions on disease identification or treatment responses. PMID:25201221

  10. Within-breath respiratory impedance and airway obstruction in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Karla Kristine Dames; Faria, Alvaro Camilo Dias; Lopes, Agnaldo José; de Melo, Pedro Lopes

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Recent work has suggested that within-breath respiratory impedance measurements performed using the forced oscillation technique may help to noninvasively evaluate respiratory mechanics. We investigated the influence of airway obstruction on the within-breath forced oscillation technique in smokers and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients and evaluated the contribution of this analysis to the diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. METHODS: Twenty healthy individuals and 20 smokers were assessed. The study also included 74 patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We evaluated the mean respiratory impedance (Zm) as well as values for the inspiration (Zi) and expiration cycles (Ze) at the beginning of inspiration (Zbi) and expiration (Zbe), respectively. The peak-to-peak impedance (Zpp=Zbe-Zbi) and the respiratory cycle dependence (ΔZrs=Ze-Zi) were also analyzed. The diagnostic utility was evaluated by investigating the sensitivity, the specificity and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01888705. RESULTS: Airway obstruction increased the within-breath respiratory impedance parameters that were significantly correlated with the spirometric indices of airway obstruction (R=−0.65, p<0.0001). In contrast to the control subjects and the smokers, the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients presented significant expiratory-inspiratory differences (p<0.002). The adverse effects of moderate airway obstruction were detected based on the Zpp with an accuracy of 83%. Additionally, abnormal effects in severe and very severe patients were detected based on the Zm, Zi, Ze, Zbe, Zpp and ΔZrs with a high degree of accuracy (>90%). CONCLUSIONS: We conclude the following: (1) chronic obstructive pulmonary disease introduces higher respiratory cycle dependence, (2) this increase is proportional to airway obstruction, and (3) the within-breath forced oscillation technique may

  11. Treatment of stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Rennard, Stephen I

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a readily diagnosable disorder that responds to treatment. Smoking cessation can reduce symptoms and prevent progression of disease. Bronchodilator therapy is key in improvement of lung function. Three classes of bronchodilators-beta agonists, anticholinergics, and theophylline-are available and can be used individually or in combination. Inhaled glucocorticoids can also improve airflow and can be combined with bronchodilators. Inhaled glucocorticoids, in addition, might reduce exacerbation frequency and severity as might some bronchodilators. Effective use of pharmacotherapy in COPD needs integration with a rehabilitation programme and successful treatment of co-morbidities, including depression and anxiety. Treatment for stable COPD can improve the function and quality of life of many patients, could reduce admissions to hospital, and has been suggested to improve survival. PMID:15337408

  12. Integrative Genomics of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, Brian D.; Hersh, Craig P.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a complex disease with both environmental and genetic determinants, the most important of which is cigarette smoking. There is marked heterogeneity in the development of COPD among persons with similar cigarette smoking histories, which is likely partially explained by genetic variation. Genomic approaches such as genomewide association studies and gene expression studies have been used to discover genes and molecular pathways involved in COPD pathogenesis; however, these “first generation” omics studies have limitations. Integrative genomic studies are emerging which can combine genomic datasets to further examine the molecular underpinnings of COPD. Future research in COPD genetics will likely use network-based approaches to integrate multiple genomic data types in order to model the complex molecular interactions involved in COPD pathogenesis. This article reviews the genomic research to date and offers a vision for the future of integrative genomic research in COPD. PMID:25078622

  13. Pharmacological treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Montuschi, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    None of the drugs currently available for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are able to reduce the progressive decline in lung function which is the hallmark of this disease. Smoking cessation is the only intervention that has proved effective. The current pharmacological treatment of COPD is symptomatic and is mainly based on bronchodilators, such as selective β2-adrenergic agonists (short- and long-acting), anticholinergics, theophylline, or a combination of these drugs. Glucocorticoids are not generally recommended for patients with stable mild to moderate COPD due to their lack of efficacy, side effects, and high costs. However, glucocorticoids are recommended for severe COPD and frequent exacerbations of COPD. New pharmacological strategies for COPD need to be developed because the current treatment is inadequate. PMID:18044097

  14. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Devine, John F.

    2008-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is a growing healthcare problem that is expected to worsen as the population ages and the worldwide use of tobacco products increases. Smoking cessation is the only effective means of prevention. Employers are in a unique position to help employees stop smoking. During the long asymptomatic phase, lung function nevertheless continues to decline; therefore, many patients seek medical attention only when they are at an advanced stage or when they have experienced an acute exacerbation. To help preserve patients' quality of life and reduce healthcare costs related to this chronic disease, clinicians need to accurately diagnose the condition and appropriately manage patients through the long course of their illness. This article discusses the current approach to patient management. PMID:25126252

  15. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: an overview.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Deborah

    As chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the major causes of worldwide mortality, it is important to prevent, diagnose and manage it. COPD creates a huge burden on the NHS and has a significant impact on patients. This is a problem with the increase in morbidity and mortality rates. In primary care there is a lack of knowledge, under-use of quality-assured spirometry and under-diagnosis in about half of all cases. To be able to effectively diagnose, assess and manage COPD, health professionals must understand the physiology and aetiology of the disease. COPD is similar to asthma in its presentation and physiology but management of the condition can differ. The authors therefore looked at the similarities between the two conditions and what tests one can use to make a diagnosis of COPD. PMID:27081728

  16. Recent updates in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), characterized by chronic airways inflammation and progressive airflow limitation, is a common, preventable and treatable disease. Worldwide, COPD is a major cause of morbidity and mortality; smoking tobacco is the most important risk factor. This translational review of recent updates in COPD care for the primary care audience, includes recommendations from the 2015 Global Initiative for chronic obstructive lung disease (GOLD) report on diagnosis, pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment, prevalence of comorbidities, management of exacerbations and the asthma and COPD overlap syndrome, with a focus on the importance and benefit of physical activity and exercise in COPD patients. Exacerbations and comorbidities contribute to the overall severity of COPD in individual patients. Management of exacerbations includes reducing the impact of the current exacerbation and preventing development of subsequent episodes. Healthcare professionals need to be alert to comorbidities, such as cardiovascular disease, anxiety/depression, lung cancer, infections and diabetes, which are common in COPD patients and can have a significant impact on HRQoL and prognosis. Pulmonary rehabilitation is recommended by a number of guidelines for all symptomatic COPD patients, regardless of severity, and involves exercise training, patient education, nutritional advice and psychosocial support. At all stages of COPD, regular physical activity and exercise can aid symptom control, improve HRQoL, reduce rates of hospitalization, and improve morbidity and respiratory mortality. Healthcare professionals play a pivotal role in improving HRQoL and health-related outcomes in COPD patients to meet their specific needs and in providing appropriate diagnosis, management and advice on smoking cessation. PMID:26560514

  17. Pulmonary rehabilitation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Saey, D; Bernard, S; Gagnon, P; Laviolette, L; Soicher, J; Maltais, F; Esgagne, P; Coats, V; Devost, A-A

    2009-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide and an important worldwide cause of disability and handicap. Centered around exercise training, pulmonary rehabilitation is a global, multidisciplinary, individualized and comprehensive approach acting on the patient as a whole and not only on the pulmonary component of the disease. Pulmonary rehabilitation is now well recognized as an effective and key intervention in the management of several respiratory diseases particularly in COPD. Modern and effective pulmonary rehabilitation programs are global, multidisciplinary, individualized and use comprehensive approach acting on the patient as a whole and not only on the pulmonary component of the disease. In the last two decades interest for pulmonary rehabilitation is on the rise and a growing literature including several guidelines is now available. This review addresses the recent developments in the broad area of pulmonary rehabilitation as well as new methods to consider in the development of future and better programs. Modern literature for rationale, physiopathological basis, structure, exercise training as well challenges for pulmonary rehabilitation programs are addressed. Among the main challenges of pulmonary rehabilitation, efforts have to be devoted to improve accessibility to early rehabilitation strategies, not only to patients with COPD but to those with other chronic respiratory diseases. PMID:19776711

  18. Osteoporosis Associated with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Reiko; Inoue, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Recent epidemiological studies have revealed that osteoporosis is closely associated with common chronic diseases including diabetes, hypertension, chronic kidney disorders, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). COPD is a chronic inflammatory airway disease but now well known to be associated with various systemic comorbidities including osteoporosis. Osteoporosis and osteoporotic fractures are extremely common in COPD patients, which have significant impacts on their quality of life (QOL), activities of daily life (ADL), respiratory function, and possibly their prognosis. COPD-associated osteoporosis is however extremely under-recognized, hence undertreated. Recent studies have suggested that both decreased bone mineral density (BMD) and impaired bone quality compromise bone strength causing fractures in COPD. In COPD patients, various general clinical risk factors for osteoporosis are present including smoking, older age, low body weight, and physical inactivity. In addition, disease-related risk factors such as decreased pulmonary function, inflammation, glucocorticoid use and vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency have been linked to the development of osteoporosis in COPD. Increased awareness of osteoporosis in COPD, especially that of high prevalence of vertebral fractures is called upon among general physicians as well as pulmonologists. Routine screening for osteoporosis and risk assessment of fractures will enable physicians to diagnose COPD patients with comorbid osteoporosis at an early stage. Timely prevention of developing osteoporosis together with appropriate treatment of established osteoporosis may improve QOL and ADL of the COPD patients, preserve their lung function and eventually result in better prognosis in these patients. PMID:27622174

  19. Osteoporosis Associated with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Ryo; Watanabe, Reiko; Inoue, Daisuke

    2016-08-01

    Recent epidemiological studies have revealed that osteoporosis is closely associated with common chronic diseases including diabetes, hypertension, chronic kidney disorders, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). COPD is a chronic inflammatory airway disease but now well known to be associated with various systemic comorbidities including osteoporosis. Osteoporosis and osteoporotic fractures are extremely common in COPD patients, which have significant impacts on their quality of life (QOL), activities of daily life (ADL), respiratory function, and possibly their prognosis. COPD-associated osteoporosis is however extremely under-recognized, hence undertreated. Recent studies have suggested that both decreased bone mineral density (BMD) and impaired bone quality compromise bone strength causing fractures in COPD. In COPD patients, various general clinical risk factors for osteoporosis are present including smoking, older age, low body weight, and physical inactivity. In addition, disease-related risk factors such as decreased pulmonary function, inflammation, glucocorticoid use and vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency have been linked to the development of osteoporosis in COPD. Increased awareness of osteoporosis in COPD, especially that of high prevalence of vertebral fractures is called upon among general physicians as well as pulmonologists. Routine screening for osteoporosis and risk assessment of fractures will enable physicians to diagnose COPD patients with comorbid osteoporosis at an early stage. Timely prevention of developing osteoporosis together with appropriate treatment of established osteoporosis may improve QOL and ADL of the COPD patients, preserve their lung function and eventually result in better prognosis in these patients. PMID:27622174

  20. [Anemias in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Budnevsky, A V; Esaulenko, I E; Ovsyannikov, E S; Zhusina, Yu G

    2016-01-01

    According to different studies, anemia occurs in 8--33% of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The paper describes the most important various causes of anemia in COPD, such as systemic inflammation and endocrine disorders, the use of some medications (theophylline, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors), frequent COPD exacerbations, and long-term oxygen therapy. Lower hemoglobin levels in COPD patients are accompanied by increased shortness of breath, reduced exercise tolerance, and lower quality of life. Furthermore, some investigations have shown that anemia is an independent predictor of death in patients with COPD. In spite of the fact that anemia may be successfully in these patients, the evidence suggesting the importance of its impact on the prognosis of COPD is limited. PMID:27191018

  1. Aerosol Therapy for Obstructive Lung Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Inhaled aerosol therapies are the mainstay of treatment of obstructive lung diseases. Aerosol devices deliver drugs rapidly and directly into the airways, allowing high local drug concentrations while limiting systemic toxicity. While numerous clinical trials, literature reviews, and expert panel guidelines inform the choice of inhalational drugs, deciding which aerosol device (ie, metered-dose inhaler, nebulizer, or dry powder inhaler) best suits a given patient and clinical setting can seem arbitrary and confusing. Similar confusion regarding Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) coding for administration of aerosol therapies can lead to lost revenue from underbilling and wasted administrative effort handling denied claims. This article reviews the aerosol devices currently available, discusses their relative merits in various clinical settings, and summarizes appropriate CPT coding for aerosol therapy. PMID:21896522

  2. Skeletal Implications of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Misof, Barbara M; Moreira, Carolina A; Klaushofer, Klaus; Roschger, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with numerous comorbidities, among which osteoporosis is of high significance. Low bone mass and the occurrence of fragility fractures is a common finding in patients with COPD. Typical risk factors related directly or indirectly to these skeletal complications include systemic inflammation, tobacco smoking, vitamin D deficiency, and treatment with oral or inhaled corticosteroids. In particular, treatment with glucocorticoids appears to be a strong contributor to bone changes in COPD, but does not fully account for all skeletal complications. Additional to the effects of COPD on bone mass, there is evidence for COPD-related changes in bone microstructure and material properties. This review summarizes the clinical outcomes of low bone mass and increased fracture risk, and reports on recent observations in bone tissue and material in COPD patients. PMID:26861899

  3. Gene polymorphisms and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaodan; Yuan, Bowei; López, Elena; Bai, Chunxue; Wang, Xiangdong

    2014-01-01

    The genetic component was suggested to contribute to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a major and growing public health burden. The present review aims to characterize the evidence that gene polymorphisms contribute to the aetiology of COPD and related traits, and explore the potential relationship between certain gene polymorphisms and COPD susceptibility, severity, lung function, phenotypes, or drug effects, even though limited results from related studies lacked consistency. Most of these studies were association studies, rather than confirmatory studies. More large-sized and strictly controlled studies are needed to prove the relationship between gene polymorphisms and the reviewed traits. More importantly, prospective confirmatory studies beyond initial association studies will be necessary to evaluate true relationships between gene polymorphisms and COPD and help individualized treatment for patients with COPD. PMID:24256364

  4. Palliative care in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Lilly, Evan J; Senderovich, Helen

    2016-10-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the only major worldwide cause of mortality that is currently increasing in prevalence. Furthermore, COPD is incurable, and the only therapy that has been shown to increase survival is oxygen therapy in selected patients. Compared to patients with cancer, patients with COPD experience similar levels of pain, breathlessness, fatigue, depression, and anxiety and have a worse quality of life but have comparatively little access to palliative care. When these patients do receive palliative care, they tend to be referred later than patients with cancer. Many disease, patient-, and provider-related factors contribute to this phenomenon, including COPD's unpredictable course, misperceptions of palliative care among patients and physicians, and lack of advance care planning discussions outside of crisis situations. A new paradigm for palliative care would introduce palliative treatments alongside, rather than at the exclusion of disease-modifying interventions. This integrated approach would circumvent the issue of difficult prognostication in COPD, as any patient would receive individualized palliative interventions from the time of diagnosis. These points will be covered in this review, which discusses the challenges in providing palliative care to COPD patients, the strategies to mitigate the challenges, management of common symptoms, and the evidence for integrated palliative care models as well as some suggestions for future development. PMID:27481751

  5. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Incalzi, Raffaele Antonelli; Scarlata, Simone; Pennazza, Giorgio; Santonico, Marco; Pedone, Claudio

    2014-04-01

    The prevalence of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) dramatically increases with age, and COPD complicated by chronic respiratory failure may be considered a geriatric condition. Unfortunately, most cases remain undiagnosed because of atypical clinical presentation and difficulty with current respiratory function diagnostic standards. Accordingly, the disease is under-recognized and undertreated. This is expected to impact noticeably the health status of unrecognized COPD patients because a timely therapy could mitigate the distinctive and important effects of COPD on the health status. Comorbidity also plays a pivotal role in conditioning both the health status and the therapy of COPD besides having major prognostic implication. Several problems affect the overall quality of the therapy for the elderly with COPD, and current guidelines as well as results from pharmacological trials only to some extent apply to this patient. Finally, physicians of different specialties care for the elderly COPD patient: physician's specialty largely determines the kind of approach. In conclusion, COPD, in itself a complex disease, becomes difficult to identify and to manage in the elderly. Interdisciplinary efforts are desirable to provide the practicing physician with a multidisciplinary guide to the identification and treatment of COPD. PMID:24183233

  6. Comorbidity in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Related to disease severity?

    PubMed Central

    Echave-Sustaeta, Jose M; Comeche Casanova, Lorena; Cosio, Borja G; Soler-Cataluña, Juan Jose; Garcia-Lujan, Ricardo; Ribera, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Background and objective Several diseases commonly co-exist with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), especially in elderly patients. This study aimed to investigate whether there is an association between COPD severity and the frequency of comorbidities in stable COPD patients. Patients and methods In this multicenter, cross-sectional study, patients with spirometric diagnosis of COPD attended to by internal medicine departments throughout Spain were consecutively recruited by 225 internal medicine specialists. The severity of airflow obstruction was graded using the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) and data on demographics, smoking history, comorbidities, and dyspnea were collected. The Charlson comorbidity score was calculated. Results Eight hundred and sixty-six patients were analyzed: male 93%, mean age 69.8 (standard deviation [SD] 9.7) years and forced vital capacity in 1 second 42.1 (SD 17.7)%. Even, the mean (SD) Charlson score was 2.2 (2.2) for stage I, 2.3 (1.5) for stage II, 2.5 (1.6) for stage III, and 2.7 (1.8) for stage IV (P=0.013 between stage I and IV groups), independent predictors of Charlson score in the multivariate analysis were age, smoking history (pack-years), the hemoglobin level, and dyspnea, but not GOLD stage. Conclusion COPD patients attended to in internal medicine departments show high scores of comorbidity. However, GOLD stage was not an independent predictor of comorbidity. PMID:25429213

  7. Nonsense mutations of the von Willebrand factor gene in patients with von Willebrand disease type III and type I

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.P.; Lindstedt, M.; Falk, G.; Blombaeck, M.; Egberg, N.; Anvret, M. )

    1992-10-01

    von Willebrand disease (vWD) is the most common inherited bleeding disorder in humans. The disease is caused by qualitative and quantitative abnormalities of the von Willebrand factor (vWF). Genomic DNA from 25 patients with vWD type III, the most severe form of the disease, was studied using PCR followed by restriction-enzyme analysis and direct sequencing of the products. Nonsense mutations (CGA[yields]TGA) were detected in exons 28, 32, and 45 by screening of all 11 CGA arginine codons of the vWF gene. Two patients were found to be homozygous and five heterozygous for the mutation. Both parents and some of the relatives of the homozygous patients carry the mutation. These are the first reported examples of homozygous point mutations associated with the severe form of vWD. In the three heterozygous probands, one of the parents carried the mutation and had vWD type I. Family studies including parents and family members with or without vWD type I indicted that these three heterozygous patients are likely to be compound heterozygous. Twenty-one individuals from these seven families with vWD type I found to be heterozygous for the mutation. 21 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Domej, W; Földes-Papp, Z; Flögel, E; Haditsch, B

    2006-04-01

    The respiratory tract as the main entrance for various inhalative substances has great potential to generate reactive species directly or indirectly in excess. Thus, heavy smokers are at high risk for development, impairment and failed response to treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The article is an update regarding the influence of reactive oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen (RNS) species on COPD; however, we do not intend to describe ROS and RNS actions on the entire lung tissue. Here, we focus on the airways, because in human most of the described effects of ROS and RNS species are measured on respiratory epithelial cells obtained by bronchoscopy. ROS and RNS species are physiological compounds in cells and risk factors for several respiratory diseases. In general, both kinds of species are thermodynamically stabile, but their reaction behaviors in cellular environments are very different. For example, the life times of the superoxide anion radical range from micro/milliseconds up to minutes and even hours in in-vitro model systems. Oxidative stress by cigarette smoke was investigated in detail by the authors of this article. In addition, original studies by the authors on the amount of fine particulate matter and trace elements in lung biopsies after defined inhalation indicate a distortion of the equilibrium between oxidants and antioxidants. We also try to present some modern views with respect to genomic medicine for future therapeutic perspectives, although this is an upcoming sector of COPD therapy. PMID:16724946

  9. Respiratory Conditions Update: Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Karel, Daphne J

    2016-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is defined as persistent airflow limitation due to irritant-induced chronic inflammation. A postbronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second to forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) ratio of 0.7 or less is diagnostic in a patient with dyspnea, chronic cough or sputum production, and a history of irritant exposure. Tobacco smoking is the most significant etiology, and smoking cessation is the only intervention shown to slow disease progression. Long-acting beta2-agonists and long-acting muscarinic antagonists are first-line treatments for patients with persistently symptomatic COPD with an FEV1 of 80% or less of predicted. When COPD is uncontrolled with a long-acting bronchodilator, combination therapy with a long-acting muscarinic antagonist-long-acting beta2-agonist or long-acting beta2-agonist-inhaled corticosteroid should be prescribed. Patients with COPD and reduced exercise tolerance should undergo pulmonary rehabilitation and be evaluated for supplemental oxygen therapy. Other treatment options for persistently symptomatic COPD include inhaler triple therapy (ie, long-acting muscarinic antagonist, long-acting beta2-agonist, inhaled corticosteroid), phosphodiesterase type 4 inhibitors, oxygen, and surgical interventions. PMID:27576232

  10. [Autoimmunity in pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Urboniene, Daiva; Sakalauskas, Raimundas; Sitkauskiene, Brigita

    2005-01-01

    For years, smoking induced inflammatory reaction, comprised mainly of neutrophils and macrophages, has been accepted to be the major component in pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. New developments in molecular and cell biology have provided scientists with new knowledge and understanding of inflammatory processes in lung. Recent reports have underlined the role of autoimmunity and T lymphocytes as a potential important factor, which takes place in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This article reviews potential mechanism of T cell mediated immune response in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:15827384

  11. Nutrition in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Schols, A M

    2000-03-01

    Weight loss is a frequently occurring complication in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and is a determining factor of functional capacity, health status, and mortality. Weight loss in COPD is a consequence of increased energy requirements unbalanced by dietary intake. Both metabolic and mechanical inefficiency contribute to the elevated energy expenditure. A disbalance between protein synthesis and protein breakdown may cause a disproportionate depletion of fat-free mass in some patients. Nutritional support is indicated for depleted patients with COPD because it provides not only supportive care, but direct intervention through improvement in respiratory and peripheral skeletal muscle function and in exercise performance. A combination of oral nutritional supplements and exercise or anabolic stimulus appears to be the best treatment approach to obtaining significant functional improvement. Patients responding to this treatment even demonstrated a decreased mortality. Poor response was related to the effects of systemic inflammation on dietary intake and catabolism. The effectiveness of anticatabolic modulation requires further investigation. PMID:10741769

  12. [Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: The golden decade. Implications for the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    López-Giraldo, Alejandra; Rodríguez-Roisin, Robert; Agustí, Alvar

    2015-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a complex and heterogeneous illness, which causes an important socio-economic burden. The last decade has witnessed significant advances in the understanding and knowledge of COPD with a paradigm shift in both the assessment and management of the disease. The article here reviews these changes with a particular focus on the last revision (2013) of the Global Strategy for the Diagnosis, Management, and Prevention of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:24820902

  13. Genetics of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Silverman, E K

    2001-01-01

    The marked variability in the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in response to cigarette smoking has been known for decades, but severe alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency (PI Z) remains the only proven genetic risk factor for COPD. With cigarette smoking, PI Z subjects tend to develop more severe pulmonary impairment at an earlier age than non-smoking PI Z individuals. However, PI Z individuals exhibit wide variability in pulmonary function impairment, even among individuals with similar smoking histories. Therefore, other genes and environmental exposures are also likely involved. The role of heterozygosity for the Z allele as a risk factor for COPD remains controversial, but accumulating evidence suggests that at least some PI MZ individuals are at increased risk of developing airflow obstruction. In individuals without alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency, familial aggregation of COPD has been reported in several studies. To study novel genetic determinants of COPD, our research group enrolled 44 severe, early-onset COPD probands (FEV1 < 40%, age < 53 yrs, non-PI Z) and 266 of their relatives. A marked female predominance was noted among the early-onset COPD probands. In addition, increased risk to current or ex-smoking first-degree relatives of early-onset COPD probands for reduced FEV1, chronic bronchitis and spirometric bronchodilator responsiveness has been demonstrated. These data strongly support the genetic basis for the development of COPD and the potential for gene-by-environment interaction. A variety of studies have examined candidate gene loci with association studies, comparing the distribution of variants in genes hypothesized to be involved in the development of COPD in COPD patients and control subjects. For most genetic loci which have been tested, there have been inconsistent results. Genetic heterogeneity could contribute to difficulty in replicating associations between studies. In addition, case-control association studies

  14. Cognitive Impairment in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Crişan, Alexandru F.; Oancea, Cristian; Timar, Bogdan; Fira-Mladinescu, Ovidiu; Crişan, Alexandru; Tudorache, Voicu

    2014-01-01

    Background/Purpose Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), especially in severe forms, is commonly associated with multiple cognitive problems. Montreal Cognitive Assessment test (MoCA) is used to detect cognitive impairment evaluating several areas: visuospatial, memory, attention and fluency. Our study aim was to evaluate the impact of stable COPD and exacerbation (AECOPD) phases on cognitive status using MoCA questionnaire. Methods We enrolled 39 patients (pts), smokers with COPD group D (30 stable and 9 in AECOPD) and 13 healthy subjects (control group), having similar level of education and no significant differences regarding the anthropometric measurements. We analyzed the differences in MoCA score between these three groups and also the correlation between this score and inflammatory markers. Results Patients with AECOPD had a significant (p<0.001) decreased MoCA score (14.6±3.4) compared to stable COPD (20.2±2.4) and controls (24.2±5.8). The differences between groups were more accentuated for the language abstraction and attention (p<0.001) and delayed recall and orientation (p<0.001) sub-topics. No significant variance of score was observed between groups regarding visuospatial and naming score (p = 0.095). The MoCA score was significantly correlated with forced expiratory volume (r = 0.28) and reverse correlated with C-reactive protein (CRP) (r = −0.57), fibrinogen (r = −0.58), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) (r = −0.55) and with the partial pressure of CO2 (r = −0.47). Conclusions According to this study, COPD significantly decreases the cognitive status in advanced and acute stages of the disease. PMID:25033379

  15. The intersection of obstructive lung disease and sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Sumita B; Ioachimescu, Octavian C

    2016-02-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) have synergistic detrimental effects. Their comorbid association leads to compromised gas exchange (hypoxia and hypercapnia) and higher rates of morbidity and death. As our understanding of the pathophysiologic processes of sleep evolves, the relationship between OSA and obstructive lung diseases such as COPD ("overlap syndrome") or asthma ("alternative overlap syndrome") has become more apparent. The pathophysiology of the combined conditions and optimal management are still being defined, but the effect on quality of life and morbidity underscore the importance of proper diagnosis and appropriately tailored management in these patients. PMID:26871389

  16. Smoking Cessation in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Tashkin, Donald P

    2015-08-01

    Smoking cessation is the most effective strategy for slowing down the progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and reducing mortality in the approximately 50% of patients with diagnosed COPD who continue to smoke. While behavioral interventions (including simple advice) have modest efficacy in improving smoking quit rates, the combination of counseling and pharmacotherapy is more effective than either alone. When combined with even brief counseling, nicotine replacement therapy (NRT), bupropion SR, and varenicline have all been shown to be effective in promoting smoking cessation and sustained abstinence in smokers with COPD to a degree comparable to that observed in the general smoking population. However, the recidivism rate is high after initial quitting so that at the end of 1 year, approximately 80% or more of patients are still smoking. Thus, new approaches to smoking cessation are needed. One approach is to combine different pharmacotherapies, for example, nicotine patch plus rapidly acting NRT (e.g., gum or nasal spray) and/or bupropion or even varenicline plus either NRT or bupropion, in a stepwise approach over a varying duration depending on the severity of nicotine dependence and nicotine withdrawal symptoms during the quit attempt, as proposed in the American College of Chest Physicians Tobacco Dependence Took Kit. Electronic (e)-cigarettes, which deliver vaporized nicotine without most of the noxious components in the smoke from burning tobacco cigarettes, also has potential efficacy as a smoking cessation aid, but their efficacy and safety as either substitutes for regular cigarettes or smoking cessation aids require additional study. This task is complicated because e-cigarettes are currently unregulated and hundreds of different brands are currently available. PMID:26238637

  17. Unplugging Mucus in Cystic Fibrosis and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Mall, Marcus A

    2016-04-01

    Airway mucus obstruction is a key feature of cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The thin layer of mucus that covers healthy airway surfaces has important protective functions in lung defense. However, excess mucus produces airflow obstruction and provides a nidus for bacterial infection and inflammation. Despite its importance in pathogenesis, understanding of the mechanisms underlying airway mucus obstruction, as well as therapeutic options, remain limited. Studies in the rare genetic disease CF identified airway surface dehydration due to cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene dysfunction as an important disease mechanism that may explain mucus stasis and plugging in a spectrum of muco-obstructive lung diseases, including COPD. This concept is supported by the phenotype of the β-epithelial Na(+) channel-transgenic mouse that exhibits airway surface dehydration and develops a spontaneous lung disease that shares key features with CF and COPD, such as airway mucus plugging, chronic neutrophilic inflammation, and structural lung damage. Furthermore, preclinical testing demonstrated that hydration strategies, including osmotically active hypertonic saline and preventive inhibition of the amiloride-sensitive epithelial Na(+) channel are effective in unplugging airways in this mouse model of chronic obstructive lung disease. On the other hand, genetic deletion of neutrophil elastase, a potent stimulus for mucus hypersecretion, reduced goblet cell metaplasia and mucin expression but had no effect on mucus obstruction in vivo. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that airway surface dehydration is sufficient to produce mucus obstruction even in the absence of mucus hypersecretion and support further clinical testing of hydrating agents as a promising therapeutic strategy to unplug mucus in CF and COPD. PMID:27115954

  18. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cerebrovascular disease: A comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Lahousse, Lies; Tiemeier, Henning; Ikram, M Arfan; Brusselle, Guy G

    2015-11-01

    Along with the aging population, the public health burden of cerebrovascular disease is increasing. Cerebral small vessel disease and accumulation of brain pathology associate with cognitive decline and can lead to clinical outcomes, such as stroke and dementia. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a common respiratory disease among elderly. The quality of life and prognosis of patients with COPD is greatly determined by the presence of comorbidities including stroke and cognitive impairment. Despite the clinical relevance of cerebral small vessel disease, stroke and (vascular) cognitive impairment in patients with COPD, literature is scarce and underlying mechanisms are unknown. The aim of the present review is therefore to summarize current scientific knowledge, to provide a better understanding of the interplay between COPD and the aging brain and to define remaining knowledge gaps. This narrative review article 1) overviews the epidemiology of cerebral small vessel disease, stroke and cognitive impairment in patients with COPD; 2) discusses potential underlying mechanisms including aging, smoking, systemic inflammation, vasculopathy, hypoxia and genetic susceptibility; and 3) highlights areas requiring further research. PMID:26342840

  19. Timing Matters: Circadian Rhythm in Sepsis, Obstructive Lung Disease, Obstructive Sleep Apnea, and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Truong, Kimberly K; Lam, Michael T; Grandner, Michael A; Sassoon, Catherine S; Malhotra, Atul

    2016-07-01

    Physiological and cellular functions operate in a 24-hour cyclical pattern orchestrated by an endogenous process known as the circadian rhythm. Circadian rhythms represent intrinsic oscillations of biological functions that allow for adaptation to cyclic environmental changes. Key clock genes that affect the persistence and periodicity of circadian rhythms include BMAL1/CLOCK, Period 1, Period 2, and Cryptochrome. Remarkable progress has been made in our understanding of circadian rhythms and their role in common medical conditions. A critical review of the literature supports the association between circadian misalignment and adverse health consequences in sepsis, obstructive lung disease, obstructive sleep apnea, and malignancy. Circadian misalignment plays an important role in these disease processes and can affect disease severity, treatment response, and survivorship. Normal inflammatory response to acute infections, airway resistance, upper airway collapsibility, and mitosis regulation follows a robust circadian pattern. Disruption of normal circadian rhythm at the molecular level affects severity of inflammation in sepsis, contributes to inflammatory responses in obstructive lung diseases, affects apnea length in obstructive sleep apnea, and increases risk for cancer. Chronotherapy is an underused practice of delivering therapy at optimal times to maximize efficacy and minimize toxicity. This approach has been shown to be advantageous in asthma and cancer management. In asthma, appropriate timing of medication administration improves treatment effectiveness. Properly timed chemotherapy may reduce treatment toxicities and maximize efficacy. Future research should focus on circadian rhythm disorders, role of circadian rhythm in other diseases, and modalities to restore and prevent circadian disruption. PMID:27104378

  20. Anaesthesia for patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Duggappa, Devika Rani; Rao, G Venkateswara; Kannan, Sudheesh

    2015-01-01

    The chronic obstructive pulmonary disease has become a disease of public health importance. Among the various risk factors, smoking remains the main culprit. In addition to airway obstruction, the presence of intrinsic positive end expiratory pressure, respiratory muscle dysfunction contributes to the symptoms of the patient. Perioperative management of these patients includes identification of modifiable risk factors and their optimisation. Use of regional anaesthesia alone or in combination with general anaesthesia improves pulmonary functions and reduces the incidence of post-operative pulmonary complications. PMID:26556916

  1. Modern management of obstructive salivary diseases

    PubMed Central

    Capaccio, P; Torretta, S; Ottaviani, F; Sambataro, G; Pignataro, L

    2007-01-01

    Summary Over the last fifteen years, increasing public demand for minimally-invasive surgery and recent technological advances have led to the development of a number of conservative options for the therapeutic management of obstructive salivary disorders such as calculi and duct stenosis. These include extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy, sialoendoscopy, laser intra-corporeal lithotripsy, interventional radiology, the video-assisted conservative surgical removal of parotid and sub-mandibular calculi and botulinum toxin therapy. Each of these techniques may be used as a single therapeutic modality or in combination with one or more of the above-mentioned options, usually in day case or one-day case under local or general anaesthesia. The multi-modal approach is completely successful in about 80% of patients and reduces the need for gland removal in 3%, thus justifying the combination of, albeit, time-consuming and relatively expensive techniques as part of the modern and functional management of salivary calculi. With regard to the management of salivary duct anomalies, such as strictures and kinkings, interventional radiology with fluoroscopically controlled balloon ductoplasty seems to be the most suitable technique despite the use of radiation. Operative sialoendoscopy alone is the best therapeutic option for all mobile intra-luminal causes of obstruction, such as microliths, mucous plugs or foreign bodies, or for the local treatment of inflammatory conditions such as recurrent chronic parotitis or autoimmune salivary disorders. Finally, in the case of failure of one of the above techniques and regardless of the cause of obstruction, botulinum toxin injection into the parenchyma of the salivary glands using colour Doppler ultrasonographic monitoring should be considered before deciding on surgical gland removal. PMID:17957846

  2. Congenital ureteropelvic junction obstruction: human disease and animal models

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Julie; Gonzalez, Julien; Miravete, Mathieu; Caubet, Cécile; Chaaya, Rana; Decramer, Stéphane; Bandin, Flavio; Bascands, Jean-Loup; Buffin-Meyer, Bénédicte; Schanstra, Joost P

    2011-01-01

    Ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) obstruction is the most frequently observed cause of obstructive nephropathy in children. Neonatal and foetal animal models have been developed that mimic closely what is observed in human disease. The purpose of this review is to discuss how obstructive nephropathy alters kidney histology and function and describe the molecular mechanisms involved in the progression of the lesions, including inflammation, proliferation/apoptosis, renin–angiotensin system activation and fibrosis, based on both human and animal data. Also we propose that during obstructive nephropathy, hydrodynamic modifications are early inducers of the tubular lesions, which are potentially at the origin of the pathology. Finally, an important observation in animal models is that relief of obstruction during kidney development has important effects on renal function later in adult life. A major short-coming is the absence of data on the impact of UPJ obstruction on long-term adult renal function to elucidate whether these animal data are also valid in humans. PMID:20681980

  3. [Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cardiovascular diseases--'cardiopulmonary continuum'].

    PubMed

    Batura-Gabryel, Halina; Grabicki, Marcin

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterised by persistent airflow limitation and extrapulmonary comorbidities, which contribute to the overall severity. Some risk factors, with tobacco smoking as the most serious one, lead to a chronic, systemic inflammation that plays the main role in the pathogenesis of COPD and comorbidities, including cardiovascular diseases (CVD). The course of COPD is diverse; it depends on pathologies in the respiratory system and on other organ dysfunctions. CVDs are the most commonly recognised comorbidities in COPD patients. The severity and natural course of COPD, as well as quality of the patient's life, are influenced by them. CVDs are frequently the reason for hospitalisation and may lead to death. They are also an important prognostic factor. Comorbidities may prolong exacerbation of COPD. On the other hand, COPD is an independent risk factor of CVD. The prevalence of COPD is high in patients suffering from coronary artery disease, and airflow limitation is a major risk factor for chronic heart failure. These complex interactions between heart and lung can be denoted as 'cardiopulmonary continuum'. These dependencies are not recognised in detail. Currently research is being done, which attempts to explain these complicated relations. For many years COPD and CVD were not connected. Today it is known that patients suffering from COPD must be provided comprehensive care. It is necessary to monitor the risk of CVD and their influence on the COPD course. Careful and proper treatment of all diseases is essential. An interdisciplinary team with good cooperation should prepare a plan of COPD treatment with simultaneous therapy of comorbidities. PMID:25339571

  4. The cytokine network in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are very common inflammatory diseases of the airways. They both cause airway narrowing and are increasing in incidence throughout the world, imposing enormous burdens on health care. Cytokines play a key role in orchestrating the chronic inflammation and structural changes of the respiratory tract in both asthma and COPD and have become important targets for the development of new therapeutic strategies in these diseases. PMID:18982161

  5. Progressive wheeze: atrial myxoma masquerading as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Aish; Apps, Andrew; Liong, Wei Chuen; Firoozan, Soroosh

    2015-01-01

    Atrial myxoma, the commonest primary cardiac neoplasm, presents with symptoms of heart failure, embolic phenomena or constitutional upset. We present an atypical case, with wheeze and symptomatic exacerbations typical of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. With no early clinical evidence of heart failure, the patient was managed with inhaled steroids and bronchodilators, with little relief. Only when the patient was in extremis requiring intubation, due to respiratory failure, did clinical evidence of left heart failure become apparent, with echocardiography demonstrating a massive left atrial myxoma obstructing the mitral valve annulus. Following successful surgical resection, the patient's symptoms fully abated. This case highlights the importance of considering cardiac wheeze in those initially managed as obstructive airway disease not responding in a typical fashion to initial bronchodilator therapy, and particularly in those with rapidly progressive symptoms. Such patients should be referred early for cardiac imaging. The excellent prognosis and quick recovery after timely surgical resection of a myxoma are also highlighted. PMID:26206781

  6. Computational modeling of the obstructive lung diseases asthma and COPD

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are characterized by airway obstruction and airflow limitation and pose a huge burden to society. These obstructive lung diseases impact the lung physiology across multiple biological scales. Environmental stimuli are introduced via inhalation at the organ scale, and consequently impact upon the tissue, cellular and sub-cellular scale by triggering signaling pathways. These changes are propagated upwards to the organ level again and vice versa. In order to understand the pathophysiology behind these diseases we need to integrate and understand changes occurring across these scales and this is the driving force for multiscale computational modeling. There is an urgent need for improved diagnosis and assessment of obstructive lung diseases. Standard clinical measures are based on global function tests which ignore the highly heterogeneous regional changes that are characteristic of obstructive lung disease pathophysiology. Advances in scanning technology such as hyperpolarized gas MRI has led to new regional measurements of ventilation, perfusion and gas diffusion in the lungs, while new image processing techniques allow these measures to be combined with information from structural imaging such as Computed Tomography (CT). However, it is not yet known how to derive clinical measures for obstructive diseases from this wealth of new data. Computational modeling offers a powerful approach for investigating this relationship between imaging measurements and disease severity, and understanding the effects of different disease subtypes, which is key to developing improved diagnostic methods. Gaining an understanding of a system as complex as the respiratory system is difficult if not impossible via experimental methods alone. Computational models offer a complementary method to unravel the structure-function relationships occurring within a multiscale, multiphysics system such as this. Here we review the current

  7. Computational modeling of the obstructive lung diseases asthma and COPD.

    PubMed

    Burrowes, Kelly Suzanne; Doel, Tom; Brightling, Chris

    2014-11-28

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are characterized by airway obstruction and airflow imitation and pose a huge burden to society. These obstructive lung diseases impact the lung physiology across multiple biological scales. Environmental stimuli are introduced via inhalation at the organ scale, and consequently impact upon the tissue, cellular and sub-cellular scale by triggering signaling pathways. These changes are propagated upwards to the organ level again and vice versa. In order to understand the pathophysiology behind these diseases we need to integrate and understand changes occurring across these scales and this is the driving force for multiscale computational modeling. There is an urgent need for improved diagnosis and assessment of obstructive lung diseases. Standard clinical measures are based on global function tests which ignore the highly heterogeneous regional changes that are characteristic of obstructive lung disease pathophysiology. Advances in scanning technology such as hyperpolarized gas MRI has led to new regional measurements of ventilation, perfusion and gas diffusion in the lungs, while new image processing techniques allow these measures to be combined with information from structural imaging such as Computed Tomography (CT). However, it is not yet known how to derive clinical measures for obstructive diseases from this wealth of new data. Computational modeling offers a powerful approach for investigating this relationship between imaging measurements and disease severity, and understanding the effects of different disease subtypes, which is key to developing improved diagnostic methods. Gaining an understanding of a system as complex as the respiratory system is difficult if not impossible via experimental methods alone. Computational models offer a complementary method to unravel the structure-function relationships occurring within a multiscale, multiphysics system such as this. Here we review the currentstate

  8. Serum periostin in obstructive airways disease.

    PubMed

    Fingleton, James; Braithwaite, Irene; Travers, Justin; Bowles, Darren; Strik, Rianne; Siebers, Rob; Holweg, Cecile; Matthews, John; Weatherall, Mark; Beasley, Richard

    2016-05-01

    Serum periostin is a potential biomarker of response to therapies that target type 2 inflammation in asthma. The objectives of this study were to describe: 1) the distribution of serum periostin levels in adults with symptomatic airflow obstruction; 2) its relationship with other variables, including type 2 biomarkers; and 3) the effect of inhaled corticosteroids on periostin levels.Serum periostin levels were measured in a cross-sectional study exploring phenotypes and biomarkers in 386 patients aged 18-75 years who reported wheeze and breathlessness in the past 12 months. In 49 ICS-naïve patients, periostin levels were measured again after 12 weeks of budesonide (800 μg·day(-1)).The distribution of serum periostin levels was right skewed (mean±sd 57.3±18.6 ng·mL(-1), median (interquartile range) 54.0 (45.1-65.6) ng·mL(-1), range 15.0-164.7 ng·mL(-1)). Periostin was positively associated with exhaled nitric oxide (Spearman's rho=0.22, p<0.001), blood eosinophil count (Spearman's rho=0.21, p<0.001), and total IgE (Spearman's rho=0.14, p=0.007). The Hodges-Lehmann estimator (95% CI) of change in periostin level after ICS therapy was -4.8 (-6.7- -3.2) ng·mL(-1) (p<0.001).These findings provide data on the distribution of serum periostin in adults with symptomatic airflow obstruction, the weak associations between periostin and other type 2 markers, and the reduction in periostin with inhaled corticosteroid therapy. PMID:26917610

  9. Serum periostin in obstructive airways disease

    PubMed Central

    Braithwaite, Irene; Travers, Justin; Bowles, Darren; Strik, Rianne; Siebers, Rob; Holweg, Cecile; Matthews, John; Weatherall, Mark; Beasley, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Serum periostin is a potential biomarker of response to therapies that target type 2 inflammation in asthma. The objectives of this study were to describe: 1) the distribution of serum periostin levels in adults with symptomatic airflow obstruction; 2) its relationship with other variables, including type 2 biomarkers; and 3) the effect of inhaled corticosteroids on periostin levels. Serum periostin levels were measured in a cross-sectional study exploring phenotypes and biomarkers in 386 patients aged 18–75 years who reported wheeze and breathlessness in the past 12 months. In 49 ICS-naïve patients, periostin levels were measured again after 12 weeks of budesonide (800 μg·day−1). The distribution of serum periostin levels was right skewed (mean±sd 57.3±18.6 ng·mL−1, median (interquartile range) 54.0 (45.1–65.6) ng·mL−1, range 15.0–164.7 ng·mL−1). Periostin was positively associated with exhaled nitric oxide (Spearman's rho=0.22, p<0.001), blood eosinophil count (Spearman's rho=0.21, p<0.001), and total IgE (Spearman's rho=0.14, p=0.007). The Hodges–Lehmann estimator (95% CI) of change in periostin level after ICS therapy was −4.8 (−6.7– −3.2) ng·mL−1 (p<0.001). These findings provide data on the distribution of serum periostin in adults with symptomatic airflow obstruction, the weak associations between periostin and other type 2 markers, and the reduction in periostin with inhaled corticosteroid therapy. PMID:26917610

  10. Evaluation of Continuing Medical Education for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li Wang, Virginia; And Others

    1979-01-01

    A continuing medical education program is discussed that addresses chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and that links primary care physicians to a source of needed clinical knowledge at a relatively low cost. The educational methods, evaluation design, diagnosis of educational needs, selection of program content and behavioral outcomes are…

  11. Sense and Nonsense in HPT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brethower, Dale

    2004-01-01

    Sense and nonsense is abound in human performance technology (HPT). There is no single cause of the abundance of nonsense. However, there is a reason that nonsense is more abundant than sense. The reason is that any principle has a specific domain of applicability. Within that domain it is sense. Outside that domain it is nonsense. Some…

  12. Early chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: definition, assessment, and prevention

    PubMed Central

    Rennard, Stephen I; Drummond, M Bradley

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the third leading cause of death worldwide. COPD, however, is a heterogeneous collection of diseases with differing causes, pathogenic mechanisms, and physiological effects. Therefore a comprehensive approach to COPD prevention will need to address the complexity of COPD. Advances in the understanding of the natural history of COPD and the development of strategies to assess COPD in its early stages make prevention a reasonable, if ambitious, goal. PMID:25943942

  13. Early chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: definition, assessment, and prevention.

    PubMed

    Rennard, Stephen I; Drummond, M Bradley

    2015-05-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the third leading cause of death worldwide. COPD, however, is a heterogeneous collection of diseases with differing causes, pathogenic mechanisms, and physiological effects. Therefore a comprehensive approach to COPD prevention will need to address the complexity of COPD. Advances in the understanding of the natural history of COPD and the development of strategies to assess COPD in its early stages make prevention a reasonable, if ambitious, goal. PMID:25943942

  14. [Management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Cuvelier, Antoine; Muir, Jean-François

    2011-06-01

    Long-term oxygen therapy (LTOT) is indicated in stage-IV COPD. It increases survival when used 24h/24, ideally, and at least 15h/24. There is no indication for prescribing nocturnal oxygen therapy without de LTOT. Ambulatory oxygen therapy is indicated in patients with COPD who benefit from LTOT in case of significant exercise-induced desaturation. In that regard, recent technologies allow to provide patients with small-size, stand-alone and portable oxygen units. Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) is a type of mechanical ventilation administered through a mouthpiece, a nasal mask or a facial mask. It should not be confused with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), indicated in the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea, which does not improve alveolar ventilation in hypercapnic patients. In patients with COPD, long-term NIV does not provide any benefits in terms of survival instead, it improves arterial gasometry, clinical symptoms, quality of life and the frequency of severe exacerbations. PMID:21826930

  15. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Prevalence and Mortality

    EPA Science Inventory

    This indicator describes data on chronic pulmonary disease (COPD) prevalence and deaths across the U.S. for the time periods 1997-2009 and 1979-2007, respectively. COPD, also known as chronic lung disease, may be partly caused or exacerbated by environmental exposures such as ...

  16. Phenotype of asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Chin Kook

    2015-07-01

    Many patients with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have overlapping characteristics of both diseases. By spirometric definition, patients with both fixed airflow obstruction (AO) and bronchodilator reversibility or fixed AO and bronchial hyperresponsiveness can be considered to have asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS). However, patients regarded to have ACOS by spirometric criteria alone are heterogeneous and can be classified by phenotype. Eosinophilic inflammation, a history of allergic disease, and smoke exposure are important components in the classification of ACOS. Each phenotype has a different underlying pathophysiology, set of characteristics, and prognosis. Medical treatment for ACOS should be tailored according to phenotype. A narrower definition of ACOS that includes both spirometric and clinical criteria is needed. PMID:26161009

  17. Phenotype of asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Many patients with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have overlapping characteristics of both diseases. By spirometric definition, patients with both fixed airflow obstruction (AO) and bronchodilator reversibility or fixed AO and bronchial hyperresponsiveness can be considered to have asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS). However, patients regarded to have ACOS by spirometric criteria alone are heterogeneous and can be classified by phenotype. Eosinophilic inflammation, a history of allergic disease, and smoke exposure are important components in the classification of ACOS. Each phenotype has a different underlying pathophysiology, set of characteristics, and prognosis. Medical treatment for ACOS should be tailored according to phenotype. A narrower definition of ACOS that includes both spirometric and clinical criteria is needed. PMID:26161009

  18. Underrecognized comorbidities of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Miłkowska-Dymanowska, Joanna; Białas, Adam J; Zalewska-Janowska, Anna; Górski, Paweł; Piotrowski, Wojciech J

    2015-01-01

    COPD is associated with different comorbid diseases, and their frequency increases with age. Comorbidities severely impact costs of health care, intensity of symptoms, quality of life and, most importantly, may contribute to life span shortening. Some comorbidities are well acknowledged and established in doctors’ awareness. However, both everyday practice and literature searches provide evidence of other, less recognized diseases, which are frequently associated with COPD. We call them underrecognized comorbidities, and the reason why this is so may be related to their relatively low clinical significance, inefficient literature data, or data ambiguity. In this review, we describe rhinosinusitis, skin abnormalities, eye diseases, different endocrinological disorders, and gastroesophageal reflux disease. Possible links to COPD pathogenesis have been discussed, if the data were available. PMID:26203239

  19. Lung cancer screening in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Jessica; Marín, Marta; Sánchez-Salcedo, Pablo; Zulueta, Javier J

    2016-04-01

    Lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are two intimately related diseases, with great impact on public health. Annual screening using low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) of the chest significantly reduces mortality due to lung cancer, and several scientific societies now recommend this technique. COPD, defined by the presence of airflow obstruction [forced expiratory volume and forced vital capacity (FVC) ratio less than 0.70], and their clinical phenotypes, namely emphysema and chronic bronchitis, have been associated with increased lung cancer risk. Several epidemiological studies, including lung cancer screening trials, have found a 2- to 4-fold increase in lung cancer risk in patients with COPD when compared to individuals without airflow obstruction. Part of the risk attributed to airflow obstruction appears to be derived from the presence of radiographic emphysema. The latter has proven to be an important lung cancer risk factor in smokers without airflow obstruction and even in never smokers. This evidence supports the idea of including patients with COPD and/or emphysema in lung cancer screening programs. There is evidence that lung cancer screening in this population is effective and can potentially reduce mortality. Specific lung cancer risk scores have been developed for patients with COPD [COPD lung cancer screening score (LUCSS) and COPD-LUCSS-diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO)] to identify those at high risk. A multidisciplinary approach for an adequate patient selection, especially of patients with severe disease, is key to maximize benefits and reduce harms from lung cancer screening in this population. Patients with COPD included in lung cancer screening programs could also benefit from other interventions, such as smoking cessation and adequate treatment. PMID:27195278

  20. Lung cancer screening in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Jessica; Marín, Marta; Sánchez-Salcedo, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are two intimately related diseases, with great impact on public health. Annual screening using low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) of the chest significantly reduces mortality due to lung cancer, and several scientific societies now recommend this technique. COPD, defined by the presence of airflow obstruction [forced expiratory volume and forced vital capacity (FVC) ratio less than 0.70], and their clinical phenotypes, namely emphysema and chronic bronchitis, have been associated with increased lung cancer risk. Several epidemiological studies, including lung cancer screening trials, have found a 2- to 4-fold increase in lung cancer risk in patients with COPD when compared to individuals without airflow obstruction. Part of the risk attributed to airflow obstruction appears to be derived from the presence of radiographic emphysema. The latter has proven to be an important lung cancer risk factor in smokers without airflow obstruction and even in never smokers. This evidence supports the idea of including patients with COPD and/or emphysema in lung cancer screening programs. There is evidence that lung cancer screening in this population is effective and can potentially reduce mortality. Specific lung cancer risk scores have been developed for patients with COPD [COPD lung cancer screening score (LUCSS) and COPD-LUCSS-diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO)] to identify those at high risk. A multidisciplinary approach for an adequate patient selection, especially of patients with severe disease, is key to maximize benefits and reduce harms from lung cancer screening in this population. Patients with COPD included in lung cancer screening programs could also benefit from other interventions, such as smoking cessation and adequate treatment. PMID:27195278

  1. Inhaled nitric oxide in chronic obstructive lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Tiihonen, J.; Hakola, P.; Paanila, J.; Turtiainen . Dept. of Forensic Psychiatry)

    1993-01-30

    During an investigation of the effect of nitric oxide on the pulmonary circulation the authors had the opportunity to give nitric oxide to a patient with longstanding obstructive airway disease, with successful results. A 72-year-old man with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was referred to the institution for assessment of pulmonary vascular reactivity to acetylcholine and nitric oxide. Acetylcholine was infused into the main pulmonary artery followed 15 min later by an inhalation of 80 parts per million (ppm) nitric oxide. Heart rate and systemic arterial and pulmonary arterial pressures were continuously monitored. Throughout the study the inspired oxygen concentration was kept constant at 98%. Nitrogen dioxide and nitric oxide concentrations were monitored while nitric oxide was delivered. The infusion of acetylcholine resulted in a small increase in pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance. Nitric oxide produced a substantial fall in pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance with a concomitant increase in systemic arterial oxygen tension. These results suggest that endothelium-dependent relaxation of the pulmonary vasculature was impaired in the patient and that exogenous nitric oxide was an effective pulmonary vasodilator. In-vitro investigation of explanted airways disease suggests not only that endothelium-dependent pulmonary artery relaxation is impaired but also that the dysfunction is related to pre-existing hypoxemia and hypercapnia. Nitric oxide inhibits proliferation of cultured vascular smooth muscle cells and might alter the pulmonary vascular remodeling characteristic of patients with chronic obstructive airways disease.

  2. Variability of Spirometry in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Herpel, Laura B.; Kanner, Richard E.; Lee, Shing M.; Fessler, Henry E.; Sciurba, Frank C.; Connett, John E.; Wise, Robert A.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Our goal is to determine short-term intraindividual biologic and measurement variability in spirometry of patients with a wide range of stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease severity, using datasets from the National Emphysema Treatment Trial (NETT) and the Lung Health Study (LHS). This may be applied to determine criteria that can be used to assess a clinically meaningful change in spirometry. Methods: A total of 5,886 participants from the LHS and 1,215 participants from the NETT performed prebronchodilator spirometry during two baseline sessions. We analyzed varying criteria for absolute and percent change of FEV1 and FVC to determine which criterion was met by 90% of the participants. Results: The mean ± SD FEV1 for the initial session was 2.64 ± 0.60 L (75.1 ± 8.8% predicted) for the LHS and 0.68 ± 0.22 L (23.7 ± 6.5% predicted) for the NETT. The mean ± SD number of days between test sessions was 24.9 ± 17.1 for the LHS and 85.7 ± 21.7 for the NETT. As the degree of obstruction increased, the intersession percent difference of FEV1 increased. However, the absolute difference between tests remained relatively constant despite the severity of obstruction (0.106 ± 0.10 L). Over 90% of participants had an intersession FEV1 difference of less than 225 ml irrespective of the severity of obstruction. Conclusions: Absolute changes in FEV1 rather than percent change should be used to determine whether patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease have improved or worsened between test sessions. PMID:16497996

  3. [Costs of occupational asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Pałczyński, Cezary

    2004-05-01

    Many published data indicate that a relevant proportion of cases of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are caused by occupational exposure. That phenomenon results in many negative economic consequences, including, apart from considerable medical costs, also costs owing to unemployment and claiming for compensation, which are frequent in patients suffering from that illnesses. Hence, it is probable that increasing prevalence of those diseases may result in higher economical costs. The effectiveness of primary and secondary prevention in reduction of costs concerning occupational asthma and COPD has been proved. Only effective prophylaxis may decrease individual and public costs related to both diseases. PMID:15524015

  4. Strategies for Management of the Early Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Yeon; Rhee, Chin Kook; Jung, Ki Suck

    2016-01-01

    Lung function reportedly declines with age and that this decline is accelerated during disease progression. However, a recent study showed that the decline might peak in the mild and moderate stage. The prognosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can be improved if the disease is diagnosed in its early stages, prior to the peak of decline in lung function. This article reviews recent studies on early COPD and the possibility of applying the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation 2008 and 2015 for early detection of COPD in Korea. PMID:27433171

  5. Sleep in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Evidence Gaps and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Jen, Rachel; Li, Yanru; Owens, Robert L; Malhotra, Atul

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) prevalence is rising to epidemic proportions due to historical smoking trends, the aging of the population, and air pollution. Although blaming the victims has been common in COPD, the majority of COPD worldwide is now thought to be nonsmoking related, that is, caused by air pollution and cookstove exposure. It is increasingly appreciated that subjective and objective sleep disturbances are common in COPD, although strong epidemiological data are lacking. People with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) plus COPD (the so-called overlap syndrome) have a high risk of cardiovascular death, although again mechanisms are unknown and untested. This review aims to draw attention to the problem of sleep in COPD, to encourage clinicians to ask their patients about symptoms, and to stimulate further research in this area given the large burden of the disease. PMID:27445564

  6. Glycopyrronium bromide for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Riario-Sforza, Gian Galeazzo; Ridolo, Erminia; Riario-Sforza, Edoardo; Incorvaia, Cristoforo

    2015-02-01

    Glycopyrronium bromide is a new long-acting muscarinic antagonist to be used once-daily, which is approved as a bronchodilator for the symptomatic maintenance treatment of adult patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In the Glycopyrronium bromide in chronic Obstructive pulmonary disease airWays trials, treatment with inhaled glycopyrronium bromide at 50 μg once daily achieved a significantly better lung function than placebo, as measured by the trough forced expiratory volume in 1 s in patients with moderate-to-severe COPD. The lung function improvement was maintained for up to 52 weeks. Other improved indexes were dyspnea scores, health status, exacerbation rates and time of exercise endurance. Studies comparing the efficacy of glycopyrronium versus tiotropium bromide found substantial equivalence of the two drugs. Glycopyrronium was generally well tolerated. These data add inhaled glycopyrronium bromide to the treatment of patients with moderate to severe COPD as an effective once-daily LAMA. PMID:25547422

  7. Multidisciplinary Care of the Patient with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kuzma, Anne Marie; Meli, Yvonne; Meldrum, Catherine; Jellen, Patricia; Butler-Lebair, Marianne; Koczen-Doyle, Debra; Rising, Peter; Stavrolakes, Kim; Brogan, Frances

    2008-01-01

    The National Emphysema Treatment Trial used a multidisciplinary team approach to implement the maximum medical care protocol, including adjustment of medications and outpatient pulmonary rehabilitation for all patients and nutritional and psychological counseling as needed. This article discusses the benefits of such an approach in the care of the patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Team member roles complement each other and contribute to the goal of providing the highest-quality medical care. The primary focus of the team is to reinforce the medical plan and to provide patient education and support. This article reviews the elements of the initial patient assessment and the functional and nutritional assessment. Patient education focuses on medication use, recognition and management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation symptoms, smoking cessation, advance directives, and travel. PMID:18453373

  8. Sleep in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Evidence Gaps and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanru; Owens, Robert L.; Malhotra, Atul

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) prevalence is rising to epidemic proportions due to historical smoking trends, the aging of the population, and air pollution. Although blaming the victims has been common in COPD, the majority of COPD worldwide is now thought to be nonsmoking related, that is, caused by air pollution and cookstove exposure. It is increasingly appreciated that subjective and objective sleep disturbances are common in COPD, although strong epidemiological data are lacking. People with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) plus COPD (the so-called overlap syndrome) have a high risk of cardiovascular death, although again mechanisms are unknown and untested. This review aims to draw attention to the problem of sleep in COPD, to encourage clinicians to ask their patients about symptoms, and to stimulate further research in this area given the large burden of the disease. PMID:27445564

  9. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease secondary to household air pollution.

    PubMed

    Assad, Nour A; Balmes, John; Mehta, Sumi; Cheema, Umar; Sood, Akshay

    2015-06-01

    Approximately 3 billion people around the world cook and heat their homes using solid fuels in open fires and rudimentary stoves, resulting in household air pollution. Household air pollution secondary to indoor combustion of solid fuel is associated with multiple chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) outcomes. The exposure is associated with both chronic bronchitis and emphysema phenotypes of COPD as well as a distinct form of obstructive airway disease called bronchial anthracofibrosis. COPD from household air pollution differs from COPD from tobacco smoke with respect to its disproportionately greater bronchial involvement, lesser emphysematous change, greater impact on quality of life, and possibly greater oxygen desaturation and pulmonary hypertensive changes. Interventions that decrease exposure to biomass smoke may decrease the risk for incident COPD and attenuate the longitudinal decline in lung function, but more data on exposure-response relationships from well-designed longitudinal studies are needed. PMID:26024348

  10. The objective evaluation of obstructive pulmonary diseases with spirometry

    PubMed Central

    Ozkaya, Sevket; Dirican, Adem; Tuna, Tibel

    2016-01-01

    Airway obstruction is variable in asthma, while it is progressive and persistent in chronic bronchitis and emphysema. However, some of the patients presenting with symptoms of chronic airway diseases have clinical features of both asthma and COPD. The group with “Asthma–COPD Overlap Syndrome” (ACOS) phenotype was characterized by definitely irreversible airway obstruction accompanied by symptoms and signs of reversibility. In this study, we aimed to classify obstructive airway diseases by clinical, radiological, and pulmonary function tests. Patients at Samsun Medical Park Hospital Chest Diseases outpatient clinic were evaluated between January 2013 and April 2016, and a total of 235 patients were included in this study. Mean age of the patients was 55.3±14.5 (15–88) years, and the male/female ratio was 45/190. The baseline pulmonary function test results of the patients were as follows: mean forced vital capacity (FVC) values 2,825±1,108 (710–6,870) mL and 74.3±22.4 (24–155)%, forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) values 1,789±774 (480–4,810) mL and 58.1±20.0 (20–130)%, FEV1/FVC values 62.5±6.8 (39–70)%. Reversibility criteria following bronchodilator treatment were present in 107 (45.5%) patients. We specified five subgroups for patients according to their clinical, radiological, and pulmonary test findings, namely Group 1 (asthma), Group 2 (ACOS), Group 3 (chronic bronchitis), and Group 4 (emphysema). Additionally, a group of patients who had clinical and spirometric features of both asthma and chronic bronchitis in association with underlying emphysema (emphysema with chronic bronchitis and emphysema with asthma) was defined as the undifferentiated obstruction (UNDO) group. Number and percentage distribution of patients by groups were 58 (24.7%) in the asthma group, 70 (29.8%) in the ACOS group, 61 (26%) in the chronic bronchitis group, 32 (13.6%) in the emphysema group, and 14 (6%) in the UNDO group. In conclusion, in our study

  11. The objective evaluation of obstructive pulmonary diseases with spirometry.

    PubMed

    Ozkaya, Sevket; Dirican, Adem; Tuna, Tibel

    2016-01-01

    Airway obstruction is variable in asthma, while it is progressive and persistent in chronic bronchitis and emphysema. However, some of the patients presenting with symptoms of chronic airway diseases have clinical features of both asthma and COPD. The group with "Asthma-COPD Overlap Syndrome" (ACOS) phenotype was characterized by definitely irreversible airway obstruction accompanied by symptoms and signs of reversibility. In this study, we aimed to classify obstructive airway diseases by clinical, radiological, and pulmonary function tests. Patients at Samsun Medical Park Hospital Chest Diseases outpatient clinic were evaluated between January 2013 and April 2016, and a total of 235 patients were included in this study. Mean age of the patients was 55.3±14.5 (15-88) years, and the male/female ratio was 45/190. The baseline pulmonary function test results of the patients were as follows: mean forced vital capacity (FVC) values 2,825±1,108 (710-6,870) mL and 74.3±22.4 (24-155)%, forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) values 1,789±774 (480-4,810) mL and 58.1±20.0 (20-130)%, FEV1/FVC values 62.5±6.8 (39-70)%. Reversibility criteria following bronchodilator treatment were present in 107 (45.5%) patients. We specified five subgroups for patients according to their clinical, radiological, and pulmonary test findings, namely Group 1 (asthma), Group 2 (ACOS), Group 3 (chronic bronchitis), and Group 4 (emphysema). Additionally, a group of patients who had clinical and spirometric features of both asthma and chronic bronchitis in association with underlying emphysema (emphysema with chronic bronchitis and emphysema with asthma) was defined as the undifferentiated obstruction (UNDO) group. Number and percentage distribution of patients by groups were 58 (24.7%) in the asthma group, 70 (29.8%) in the ACOS group, 61 (26%) in the chronic bronchitis group, 32 (13.6%) in the emphysema group, and 14 (6%) in the UNDO group. In conclusion, in our study, the types of

  12. Ophthalmic Diseases in Patients With Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Skorin, Leonid; Knutson, Rachel

    2016-08-01

    Symptomatic obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) affects 2% of women and 4% of men, but the prevalence of asymptomatic OSA is significantly higher. Several ophthalmic conditions are associated with OSA, including floppy eyelid syndrome, glaucoma, nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, papilledema, keratoconus, and central serous chorioretinopathy. The purpose of this review is to provide primary care physicians with a general knowledge of the signs, symptoms, and management of the ophthalmic diseases associated with OSA. PMID:27455101

  13. Narratives of breathlessness in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Kvangarsnes, Marit; Torheim, Henny; Hole, Torstein; Öhlund, Lennart S

    2013-01-01

    Aims and objectives To explore patient perceptions of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation and the patients’ experiences of their relations with health personnel during care and treatment. Background Patients suffering from acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease often experience life-threatening situations and undergo noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation via bi-level positive airway pressure in a hospital setting. Theory on trust, which often overlaps with the issue of power, can shed light on patient’s experiences during an acute exacerbation. Design Narrative research design was chosen. Methods Ten in-depth qualitative interviews (n = 10) were conducted with patients who had been admitted to two intensive care units in Western Norway during the autumn of 2009 and the spring of 2010. Narrative analysis and theories on trust and power were used to analyse the interviews. Results Because of their breathlessness, the patients perceived that they were completely dependent on others during the acute phase. Some stated that they had experienced an altered perception of reality and had not understood how serious their situation was. Although the patients trusted the health personnel in helping them breathe, they also told stories about care deficiencies and situations in which they felt neglected. Conclusions This study shows that patients with an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease often feel wholly dependent on health personnel during the exacerbation and, as a result, experience extreme vulnerability. Relevance to clinical practice The findings give nurses insight into building trust and a good relationship between patient and caregiver during an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive lung disease. PMID:23889291

  14. Pneumocystis: A Novel Pathogen in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Alison; Sciurba, Frank C.; Norris, Karen A.

    2008-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) results in significant morbidity and mortality. Smoking has long been recognized as the primary risk factor for development of COPD, but factors determining the severity or pattern of disease in smokers are largely unknown. Recent interest has focused on the potential role of infectious agents and the associated host response in accelerating progression of airway obstruction or in perpetuating its progression following discontinuation of tobacco exposure. Pneumocystis jirovecii is a fungal pathogen that causes pneumonia in immunocompromised individuals. Recent evidence has linked this organism with COPD. Using sensitive molecular techniques, low levels of Pneumocystis have been detected in the respiratory tract of certain individuals and termed colonization. Several findings support the theory that colonization with Pneumocystis is involved in the “vicious circle” hypothesis of COPD in which colonization with organisms perpetuates an inflammatory and lung remodeling response. Pneumocystis colonization is more prevalent in smokers and in those with severe COPD. The presence of Pneumocystis in the lungs, even at low levels, produces inflammatory changes similar to those seen in COPD, with increases in numbers of neutrophils and CD8+ lymphocytes. HIV-infected subjects who have had PCP develop permanent airway obstruction, and HIV-infected patients have a high prevalence of both emphysema and Pneumocystis colonization. In addition, a non-human primate model of colonization shows development of airway obstruction and radiographic emphysema. Additional studies are needed to confirm the role of Pneumocystis in the pathogenesis of COPD, given that this agent might be a treatable co-factor in disease progression. PMID:18259974

  15. Increased Selectivity towards Cytoplasmic versus Mitochondrial Ribosome Confers Improved Efficiency of Synthetic Aminoglycosides in Fixing Damaged Genes: A Strategy for Treatment of Genetic Diseases Caused by Nonsense Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Kandasamy, Jeyakumar; Atia-Glikin, Dana; Shulman, Eli; Shapira, Katya; Shavit, Michal; Belakhov, Valery; Baasov, Timor

    2012-01-01

    Compelling evidence is now available that gentamicin and geneticin (G418) can induce mammalian ribosome to suppress disease-causing nonsense mutations and partially restore the expression of functional proteins. However, toxicity and relative lack of efficacy at subtoxic doses limit the use of gentamicin for suppression therapy. Although G418 exhibits strongest activity, it is very cytotoxic even at low doses. We describe here the first systematic development of the novel aminoglycoside (S)-11 exhibiting similar in vitro and ex vivo activity to that of G418, while its cell toxicity is significantly lower than those of gentamicin and G418. Using a series of biochemical assays, we provide proof of principle that antibacterial activity and toxicity of aminoglycosides can be dissected from their suppression activity. The data further indicate that the increased specificity towards cytoplasmic ribosome correlates with the increased activity, and that the decreased specificity towards mitochondrial ribosome confers to the lowered cytotoxicity. PMID:23148581

  16. Edward Lear, Limericks, and Nonsense: A Little Nonsense. [Lesson Plan].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    British poet Edward Lear (1812-1888) is widely recognized as the father of the limerick form of poetry and is well known for his nonsense poems. In the first lesson for grades 3-5, which focuses on Lear's nonsense poem "The Owl and the Pussy Cat," students learn about nonsense poetry as well as the various poetic techniques and devices that poets…

  17. Peptides in Bronchoalveolar Lavage in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wendt, Chris H.; Nelsestuen, Gary; Harvey, Stephen; Gulcev, Makedonka; Stone, Matthew; Reilly, Cavan

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a heterogeneous disease with a significant public health burden. Currently there is no biomarker that identifies those at risk of developing COPD, progression of disease or disease phenotypes. We performed metabolomic profiling of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from COPD patients to determine if metabolites correlated with clinical measurements such as lung function, functional status and degree of emphysema. Methods Metabolomic components of BALF from 59 subjects with COPD and 20 healthy controls were separated by reversed-phase UPLC and analyzed by ESI-ToF mass spectrometry. We used univariate analysis and multiple regression models to investigate associations between metabolomic features and various clinical variables, such as lung function, functional status as measured by the St. George Respiratory Quotient Score and emphysema as measured by the CT density mask score. Results We identified over 3900 features by mass spectrometry, many consistent with peptides. Subjects with severe COPD had increased concentration of peptides compared to controls (p < 9.526e-05). The peptide concentration correlated with spirometry, specifically pulmonary function tests associated with airflow obstruction. There was no correlation with CT density, i.e. emphysema, or functional status. Conclusions Metabolomic profiling of BALF in COPD patients demonstrated a significant increase in peptides compared to healthy controls that associated strongly to lung function, but not emphysema or functional status. PMID:27227774

  18. Rimas Tontas. (Nonsense Rhymes)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galarza, Ernesto

    Part of the series "Coleccion Mini-Libros" (Mini-Book Collection), the booklet is a compilation of 50 short nonsense verses written in Spanish. The author and The Southwest Council of La Raza offer the collection for the use of parents and teachers dedicated to stimulating interest in Spanish among the youth of our country. (EJ)

  19. Different approaches in the treatment of obstructive pulmonary diseases.

    PubMed

    Kabir, Eva Rahman; Morshed, Nabila

    2015-10-01

    Advances in drug formulation, inhalation device design and disease management are generating new opportunities for patients suffering from obstructive pulmonary diseases. This article provides a comprehensive review of the different promising pulmonary drug delivery technologies in the treatment of obstructive pulmonary diseases, particularly with regard to the treatment of asthma and chronic pulmonary diseases (COPD), which are increasing day by day due to increasing environmental pollution and its harmful and toxic contaminants. In the recent years, a better knowledge has been gained regarding the mechanism of action of glucocorticoids and how they suppress the chronic inflammation. New etiology has been brought into light regarding the inactivity of glucocorticoids in some patients having asthma and COPDs even though the inflammatory genes are triggered by similar molecules in both the diseases. This new knowledge has given a new platform to improve glucocorticoids and their resistance also how other combination therapy can be used for these diseases. It has also led to the quest for improving and developing other alternatives such as anti-leukotriene agents, muscarinic inhibitors, combination therapy, as well as biologic immune-modulators in the treatment of the different pulmonary diseases. Several new combinations of glucocorticoids are available in the global market for the use in pulmonary diseases especially asthma although their availability fluctuates between continents. There has been several studies done regarding the variation of effectiveness of the different inhaled glucocorticoids and hence it is important to take into consideration the different delivery systems and the methods which are used to treat the patients. PMID:26172082

  20. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and obstructive sleep apnoea—the overlap syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) are highly prevalent disorders and the co-existence of both disorders, termed the overlap syndrome, affects at least 1% of the adult population. Patients with the overlap syndrome typically experience more pronounced nocturnal oxygen desaturation and there is a high prevalence of pulmonary hypertension in such patients. Recent evidence suggests that the prevalence of each disorder together is higher than might be predicted by simple prevalence statistics, although the evidence is not clear-cut in this regard. Sleep itself can have several negative effects in patients with COPD. Sleep quality is diminished with reduced amounts of slow wave and rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep, which may contribute to daytime symptoms such as fatigue and lethargy. Furthermore, normal physiological adaptations during sleep that result in mild hypoventilation in normal subjects are more pronounced in COPD, which can result in clinically important nocturnal oxygen desaturation. Management of sleep disorders in patients with COPD should address both sleep quality and disordered gas exchange. Non-invasive pressure support is beneficial in selected cases, particularly during acute exacerbations associated with respiratory failure, and is particularly helpful in patients with the overlap syndrome. There is limited evidence of benefit from pressure support in the chronic setting in COPD patients without OSA. PMID:26904264

  1. Speckle tracking echocardiography in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and overlapping obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Pizarro, Carmen; van Essen, Fabian; Linnhoff, Fabian; Schueler, Robert; Hammerstingl, Christoph; Nickenig, Georg; Skowasch, Dirk; Weber, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    Background COPD and congestive heart failure represent two disease entities of growing global burden that share common etiological features. Therefore, we aimed to identify the degree of left ventricular (LV) dysfunction in COPD as a function of COPD severity stages and concurrently placed particular emphasis on the presence of overlapping obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Methods A total of 85 COPD outpatients (64.1±10.4 years, 54.1% males) and 20 controls, matched for age, sex, and smoking habits, underwent speckle tracking echocardiography for LV longitudinal strain imaging. Complementary 12-lead electrocardiography, laboratory testing, and overnight screening for sleep-disordered breathing using the SOMNOcheck micro® device were performed. Results Contrary to conventional echocardiographic parameters, speckle tracking echocardiography revealed significant impairment in global LV strain among COPD patients compared to control smokers (−13.3%±5.4% vs −17.1%±1.8%, P=0.04). On a regional level, the apical septal LV strain was reduced in COPD (P=0.003) and associated with the degree of COPD severity (P=0.02). With regard to electrocardiographic findings, COPD patients exhibited a significantly higher mean heart rate than controls (71.4±13.0 beats per minute vs 60.3±7.7 beats per minute, P=0.001) that additionally increased over Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stages (P=0.01). Albeit not statistically significant, COPD led to elevated N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide levels (453.2±909.0 pg/mL vs 96.8±70.0 pg/mL, P=0.08). As to somnological testing, the portion of COPD patients exhibiting overlapping OSA accounted for 5.9% and did not significantly vary either in comparison to controls (P=0.07) or throughout the COPD Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stages (P=0.49). COPD-OSA overlap solely correlated with nocturnal hypoxemic events, whereas LV performance status was unrelated to coexisting OSA. Conclusion

  2. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations: latest evidence and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Hammad; Sharafkhaneh, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide and results in an economic and social burden that is both substantial and increasing. The natural history of COPD is punctuated by exacerbations which have major short- and long-term implications on the patient and healthcare system. Evidence-based guidelines stipulate that early detection and prompt treatment of exacerbations are essential to ensure optimal outcomes and to reduce the burden of COPD. Several factors can identify populations at risk of exacerbations. Implementing prevention measures in patients at risk is a major goal in the management of COPD. PMID:25177479

  3. Fatal obstructive lung disease after haploidentical sibling cord blood transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ohnuma, K; Toyoda, Y; Ishida, Y; Honda, K; Nagao, T; Ijiri, R; Tanaka, Y; Goto, K; Hiroki, K; Kigasawa, H; Nishihira, H

    1998-05-01

    We report the case of a patient with fatal obstructive lung disease after an HLA-haploidentical sibling cord blood transplant (CBT), with severe acute GVHD. A 2-year-old girl developed expiratory air trapping gradually with acute and chronic GVHD after CBT for the treatment of ALL. Anti-CMV and immunosuppressive therapy were ineffective, and the patient died of progressive respiratory acidosis. Necropsy of the lung revealed severe bronchiolitis obliterans with cytomegalic inclusion cells in the granulation tissues of the bronchiolitis. Thus, immunologic and GVHD problems can occur even in CBT. PMID:9613788

  4. Biomarkers in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: confusing or useful?

    PubMed Central

    Stockley, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    The field of biomarker research has almost reached unmanageable proportions in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The developments of new technology platforms have generated a huge information data base, both cross sectionally and increasingly, longitudinally. The knowledge emerging provides an enormous potential for understanding the disease pathophysiology, for developing markers specific for long-term outcomes, and for developing new therapeutic strategies. However, the excitement must be tempered with an understanding of the limitations of the data collection techniques, and of the variations in disease state, activity, impact, and progression. Nevertheless, the most crucial aspect in interpreting the current literature is the recognition of the relatively superficial characterization of what is a complex group of pathological processes with a common end point of airflow limitation. The current review explores some of these issues together with those areas where real progress appears to have been made, and provides caution on interpretation. PMID:24532968

  5. Behavioral Medicine Approaches to Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fritzsche, Anja; Trueba, Ana F.; Meuret, Alicia E.; Ritz, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a prevalent respiratory disease and associated with considerable individual and socioeconomic burden. Recent research started examining the role of psychosocial factors for course and management of the disease. Purpose This review provides an overview on recent findings on psychosocial factors and behavioral medicine approaches in COPD. Results Research has identified several important psychosocial factors and effective behavioral medicine interventions in COPD. However, there is considerable need for future research in this field. Conclusions Although beneficial effects of some behavioral medicine interventions have been demonstrated in COPD, future research efforts are necessary to study the effects of distinct components of these interventions, to thoroughly examine promising but yet not sufficiently proven interventions, and to develop new creative interventions. PMID:22351032

  6. Electrocardiographic abnormalities and cardiac arrhythmias in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Goudis, Christos A; Konstantinidis, Athanasios K; Ntalas, Ioannis V; Korantzopoulos, Panagiotis

    2015-11-15

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is independently associated with an increased burden of cardiovascular disease. Besides coronary artery disease (CAD) and congestive heart failure (CHF), specific electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities and cardiac arrhythmias seem to have a significant impact on cardiovascular prognosis of COPD patients. Disturbances of heart rhythm include premature atrial contractions (PACs), premature ventricular contractions (PVCs), atrial fibrillation (AF), atrial flutter (AFL), multifocal atrial tachycardia (MAT), and ventricular tachycardia (VT). Of note, the identification of ECG abnormalities and the evaluation of the arrhythmic risk may have significant implications in the management and outcome of patients with COPD. This article provides a concise overview of the available data regarding ECG abnormalities and arrhythmias in these patients, including an elaborated description of the underlying arrhythmogenic mechanisms. The clinical impact and prognostic significance of ECG abnormalities and arrhythmias in COPD as well as the appropriate antiarrhythmic therapy and interventions in this setting are also discussed. PMID:26218181

  7. [Pulsed hypoxia in the treatment of obstructive lung diseases].

    PubMed

    Sil'vestrov, V P; Kovalenko, E A; Krysin, Iu S

    1993-01-01

    A new approach to the treatment of chronic nonspecific pulmonary diseases is proposed: helium-oxygen therapy combined with repeated interrupted hypoxic stimuli. Helium inclusion into hypoxic gas mixture leads to reduced air density. Gas mixture containing 10-15% of oxygen is more effective at the level of alveolocapillary membrane. When conducted in normal atmospheric pressure, the method involved no complications and produced positive responses in coronary heart disease, hypertension, alimentary diseases. The mixture of helium with oxygen (85-90% of helium, 10-15% oxygen) in combination with impulse normobaric hypoxia has been tried in 25 chronics with obstructive bronchitis and bronchial asthma. The results were indicative of the treatment efficacy: bronchial permeability improved in 67% of the cases, forced vital capacity of the lungs increased, inspiratory reserve volume grew, dyspnea and cough diminished, sputum discharge improved, general tonicity and performance status changed positively. Six-month follow-up evidenced positive shifts too. PMID:8059397

  8. Cognitive status among patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Roncero, Carlos; Campuzano, Ana Isabel; Quintano, Jose Antonio; Molina, Jesús; Pérez, Joselín; Miravitlles, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We investigated the association between cognitive impairment and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), taking into account demographic and clinical variables evaluated during routine practice. Patients and methods We performed a post hoc analysis of a cross-sectional study that included subjects with stable COPD. Sociodemographic and clinical information was recorded using the Body mass index, airflow Obstruction, Dyspnea and Exacerbations index and the Charlson comorbidity index. Cognitive performance was studied by the mini-mental state examination, with a score less than 27 indicating clinical impairment. Depressive symptoms, physical activity, and quality of life (EuroQoL-5 dimensions and COPD Assessment Test) were also evaluated. Results The analysis included 940 subjects. The prevalence of cognitive impairment was 39.4%. Multivariate logistic regression models revealed that cognitive impairment was associated with educational level (odds ratio [OR] =0.096, 95% confidence interval [CI] =0.011–0.447) and poorer quality of life measured by the EuroQoL-5 dimensions social tariff (OR =0.967, 95% CI =0.950–0.983). When questionnaires were not included in the analysis, cognitive impairment was associated with educational level (OR =0.063, 95% CI =0.010–0.934), number of exacerbations (OR =11.070, 95% CI =1.450–84.534), Body mass index, airflow Obstruction, Dyspnea and Exacerbations index score (OR =1.261, 95% CI =1.049–1.515), and the Charlson comorbidity index (OR =1.412, 95% CI =1.118–1.783). Conclusion Cognitive impairment is common in COPD and is associated with low educational level, higher disease severity, and increased comorbidity. This could have therapeutic implications for this population. PMID:27042043

  9. Prevalence of psychiatric comorbidities in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Shyam Chand; Nanda, Satyan; Tripathi, Adarsh; Sawlani, Kamal Kumar; Gupta, Kamlesh Kumar; Himanshu, D; Verma, Ajay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Psychiatric disorders, especially anxiety and depression have been reported to have an increased prevalence in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, but there is a paucity of data from India. Aims and Objectives: Aim of our study is to study the frequency of psychiatric comorbidities in COPD patients and their correlation with severity of COPD, as per global initiative for obstructive lung disease guidelines. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted in outpatient department of a tertiary care hospital (King George's Medical University). A total of 74 COPD patients were included in this study and compared with 74 controls. The diagnosis and severity of COPD were assessed by spirometry. Psychiatric comorbidities were assessed using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview questionnaire. Results: The frequency of psychiatric comorbidities was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in COPD patients (28.4%) as compared to controls (2.7%). As regards to severity, the frequency was significantly increased in severe and very severe COPD. The frequency of psychiatric comorbidities in COPD patients increased significantly with the increase in duration of symptoms being present in 67% of patients with duration of symptoms more than 10 years and only 23% of patients with duration of symptoms ≤5 years. Conclusion: The frequency of psychiatric comorbidities is increased in COPD patients as compared to controls. We recommend that all patients with COPD should be screened for psychiatric comorbidity, if any. PMID:27051106

  10. Cytokines in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Reid, P T; Sallenave, J-M

    2003-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality. The term is heterogenous and encompasses a number of distinct but often overlapping phenotypes including chronic bronchitis, small airways obstruction, emphysema and in some individuals, a systemic component. Although there have been significant advances in understanding the pathophysiology of COPD, understanding of the role of the inflammation in the pathogenesis of the condition remains in its infancy. Indeed, cytokines that are known to orchestrate the inflammatory response in asthma and other inflammatory diseases are only beginning to be reported in COPD. In this review, we highlight the potential role of cytokines in the development of mucus hypersecretion observed in chronic bronchitis and the morphological changes observed in the small airways and airspaces contributing to the development of airflow limitation and respiratory failure respectively. We report evidence that exacerbations are linked to increased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and that the wasting and skeletal muscle dysfunction observed in some patients is most probably related to the presence of a systemic inflammatory response. In addition transgenic and gene therapy technology has been used to explore the temporal and co-ordinated role of cytokines in the development of COPD animal models. Enhanced understanding of the events involved in the pathogenesis of COPD will lead to the development of therapy with potential to modify the observed progressive decline in lung function and impact on the development of the illness. PMID:12570672

  11. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease--diagnosis and classification of severity.

    PubMed

    Viviers, P J; van Zyl-Smit, R N

    2015-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common, progressive and preventable non-communicable respiratory disorder. It is often confused with asthma and poorly understood by many lay people. The primary cause of COPD is tobacco smoking, but in the South African (SA) context, biomass fuel exposure/household pollution, tuberculosis, HIV and mining exposure are additional important causes.There is a very high prevalence of COPD in SA and it is the third leading cause of mortality globally.The diagnosis of COPD is based predominantly on symptoms, i.e. progressive shortness of breath and cough in a patient with risk factors–usually smoking. Lung function testing is required to formally make the diagnosis, which places a significant hurdle in correctly identifying COPD in SA, given the limited access to spirometry in many areas. Spirometry is also required to grade the severity of lung function obstruction.Severity assessment, which is used to plan a management strategy (predominantly bronchodilators with inhaled steroids in severe cases), combines symptoms, lung function and exacerbations. Based on these 3 factors, a patient can be categorised into 1 of 4 groups and appropriate management instituted. Additional comorbidities, particularly cardiovascular and mental illness, should also be evaluated.Early identification of COPD, with further avoidance of an aetiological cause such as smoking, is key in preventing disease progression.Appropriate therapy, comprising non-pharmacological and pharmacological interventions and based on a comprehensive severity assessment, should result in symptom improvement and reduced risk for exacerbations. PMID:26636168

  12. Towards a vaccine for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Clancy, R L

    2012-06-01

    This review discusses chronic obstructive pulmonary disease as an outcome of two pathogenic pathways: the first resulting from inhalation of toxins and the second a consequence of bacterial colonisation of damaged airways. Earlier assessment of the role played by bacteria in acute exacerbations was compromised by a deficiency of quality data and the use of parameters more relevant to invasive infection. Data are reviewed to support a hypothesis that states intrabronchial inflammation reflects an excessive and inappropriate host response (largely mediated by Th17 cells derived from gut-associated lymphoid tissues) to colonising bacteria acting as an 'antigen sump' (in essence, a hypersensitivity reaction). It is proposed that both viral and bacterial infections exacerbate inflammation through a common pathway that involves colonising bacteria. An oral vaccine containing inactivated non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae augments a protective loop that involves the aspiration of bronchus content into the gut and reduces the severity of acute exacerbations including the need for hospital admission by reducing the 'load' of bacteria comprising this final common path. The positive clinical results from trials using oral NTHi support both the concept that bacterial colonisation of damaged airways is a potent second pathogenic pathway and that oral immunotherapy provides a significant therapeutic advance in limiting damage in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:22372964

  13. Gas exchange in disease: asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cystic fibrosis, and interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Young, Iven H; Bye, Peter T P

    2011-04-01

    Ventilation-perfusion (VA/Q) inequality is the underlying abnormality determining hypoxemia and hypercapnia in lung diseases. Hypoxemia in asthma is characterized by the presence of low VA/Q units, which persist despite improvement in airway function after an attack. This hypoxemia is generally attenuated by compensatory redistribution of blood flow mediated by hypoxic vasoconstriction and changes in cardiac output, however, mediator release and bronchodilator therapy may cause deterioration. Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease have more complex patterns of VA/Q inequality, which appear more fixed, and changes in blood flow and ventilation have less benefit in improving gas exchange efficiency. The inability of ventilation to match increasing cardiac output limits exercise capacity as the disease progresses. Deteriorating hypoxemia during exacerbations reflects the falling mixed venous oxygen tension from increased respiratory muscle activity, which is not compensated by any redistribution of VA/Q ratios. Shunt is not a feature of any of these diseases. Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) have no substantial shunt when managed according to modern treatment regimens. Interstitial lung diseases demonstrate impaired oxygen diffusion across the alveolar-capillary barrier, particularly during exercise, although VA/Q inequality still accounts for most of the gas exchange abnormality. Hypoxemia may limit exercise capacity in these diseases and in CF. Persistent hypercapnic respiratory failure is a feature of advancing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and CF, closely associated with sleep disordered breathing, which is not a prominent feature of the other diseases. Better understanding of the mechanisms of hypercapnic respiratory failure, and of the detailed mechanisms controlling the distribution of ventilation and blood flow in the lung, are high priorities for future research. PMID:23737199

  14. [Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) - Rational Diagnostics and Therapy].

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, R; Pankow, W

    2016-08-01

    In general chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can be diagnosed in family practice from history and spirometry. Inconclusive spirometry findings have to be assessed further by techniques available in a pulmonologist's office. Further testing is done for differential diagnostic reasons and for prognostic appraisal. Successful smoking cessation importantly alters the natural downhill course of the disease. Patient education and rehabilitative interventions (e. g. participation in lung sport groups) help to improve life quality. Medical therapies with bronchospasmolytics applied by inhalation as monotherapies, free and fixed combinations have symptomatic benefit. Considering the increase of pneumonia risk from inhaled corticosteroids their use should be restricted to patients with a straightforward indication, e. g. coexisting asthma. PMID:27512933

  15. Sirtuin 1 and Aging Theory for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Conti, V.; Corbi, G.; Manzo, V.; Pelaia, G.; Filippelli, A.; Vatrella, A.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary disease (COPD) is an inflammatory syndrome that represents an increasing health problem, especially in the elderly population. Drug therapies are symptomatic and inadequate to contrast disease progression and mortality. Thus, there is an urgent need to clarify the molecular mechanisms responsible for this condition in order to identify new biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Processes including oxidant/antioxidant, protease/antiprotease, and proliferative/antiproliferative balance and control of inflammatory response become dysfunctional during aging as well as in COPD. Recently it was suggested that Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), an antiaging molecule involved in the response to oxidative stress and chronic inflammation, is implicated in both development and progression of COPD. The present review focuses on the involvement of SIRT1 in the regulation of redox state, inflammation, and premature senescence, all crucial characteristics of COPD phenotypes. Recent evidence corroborating the statement of the “aging theory for COPD” was also discussed. PMID:26236580

  16. Nonsense mutation in the phosphofructokinase muscle subunit gene associated with retention of intron 10 in one of the isolated transcripts in Ashkenazi Jewish patients with Tarui disease.

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcelos, O; Sivakumar, K; Dalakas, M C; Quezado, M; Nagle, J; Leon-Monzon, M; Dubnick, M; Gajdusek, D C; Goldfarb, L G

    1995-01-01

    Mutations in the human phosphofructokinase muscle subunit gene (PFKM) are known to cause myopathy classified as glycogenosis type VII (Tarui disease). Previously described molecular defects include base substitutions altering encoded amino acids or resulting in abnormal splicing. We report a mutation resulting in phosphofructokinase deficiency in three patients from an Ashkenazi Jewish family. Using a reverse transcription PCR assay, PFKM subunit transcripts differing by length were detected in skeletal muscle tissue of all three affected subjects. In the longer transcript, an insertion of 252 nucleotides totally homologous to the structure of the 10th intron of the PFKM gene was found separating exon 10 from exon 11. In addition, two single base transitions were identified by direct sequencing: [exon 6; codon 95; CGA (Arg) to TGA (stop)] and [exon 7; codon 172; ACC (Thr) to ACT (Thr)] in either transcript. Single-stranded conformational polymorphism and restriction enzyme analyses confirmed the presence of these point substitutions in genomic DNA and strongly suggested homozygosity for the pathogenic allele. The nonsense mutation at codon 95 appeared solely responsible for the phenotype in these patients, further expanding genetic heterogeneity of Tarui disease. Transcripts with and without intron 10 arising from identical mutant alleles probably resulted from differential pre-mRNA processing and may represent a novel message from the PFKM gene. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7479776

  17. Association of a nonsense mutation (W1282X), the most common mutation in the Ashkenazi Jewish cystic fibrosis patients in Israel, with presentation of severe disease

    SciTech Connect

    Shoshani, T.; Bashan, N.; Seret, H.; Kerem, B.; Kerem, E. ); Augarten, A.; Gazit, E.; Yahav, Y.; Yaar, L. ); Rivlin, Y. ); Tal, A. )

    1992-01-01

    Only about 30% of the cystic fibrosis chromosomes in the Israeli cystic fibrosis patient populations carry the major CF mutation ({Delta}F508). Since different Jewish ethnic groups tended to live as closed isolates until recent times, high frequencies of specific mutations are expected among the remainder cystic fibrosis chromosomes of these ethnic groups. Genetic factors appear to influence the severity of the disease. It is therefore expected that different mutations will be associated with either severe or mild phenotype. Direct genomic sequencing of exons included in the two nucleotide-binding folds of the putative CFTR protein was performed on 119 Israeli cystic fibrosis patients from 97 families. One sequence alteration which is expected to create a termination at residue 1282 (W1282X) was found in 63 chromosomes. Of 95 chromosomes, 57(60%) are of Ashkenazi origin. In conclusion, the W1282X mutation is the most common cystic fibrosis mutation in the Ashkenazi Jewish patient population in Israel. This nonsense mutation is associated with presentation of severe disease.

  18. [Regulatory T cells in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Limón-Camacho, Leonardo; Solleiro-Villavicencio, Helena; Pupko-Sissa, Ilana; Lascurain, Ricardo; Vargas-Rojas, María Inés

    2013-01-01

    Exposition to tobacco smoke has been established as the main risk factor to develop chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), by inducing inflammation of the airways. Several cell populations participate in this inflammatory process. It has been accepted that a maladaptive modulation of inflammatory responses plays a critical role in the development of the disease. Regulatory T cells (Treg) are a subset of T CD4(+) lymphocytes that modulate the immune response through secretion of cytokines. The role of the Treg cells in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is not clearly known, that is why it is important to focus in understanding their participation in the pathogenesis of the disease. To elaborate a systematic review of original articles in which we could describe Treg cells (their ontogeny, mechanisms of action) and their role in COPD, we made a systematic literature search in some data bases (MEDLINE, AMED, PubMed and Scielo) looking through the next keywords: "COPD and Regulatory T cells/EPOC y células T reguladoras", «Inflammation and COPD/Inflamación y EPOC», «Regulatory T cells/Células T reguladoras». We included basic science articles, controlled and non-controlled clinical trials, meta-analysis and guides. From this search we conclude that Treg cells are a subpopulation of T CD4(+) lymphocytes and their major functions are the suppression of immune responses and the maintenance of tolerance to self-antigens. A disruption in the regulatory mechanisms of the Treg cells leads to the development and perpetuation of inflammation in COPD. PMID:23474149

  19. [Morphological changes in the respiratory organs in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Malykhin, F T; Kostornaya, I V

    2016-01-01

    The basis for airway remoldeling in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is tissue changes contributing to thickening of the walls of the airway and its obstruction. As the disease becomes severer, there are increases in mucosal metaplasia, submucosal hypertrophy, peribronchial fibrosis, and airway smooth muscle mass. Drug therapy for COPD does not virtually lead to regression of airway obstruction, except when eosinophilia is present. PMID:27077144

  20. [Acute bacterial exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and biofilm].

    PubMed

    Legnani, Delfino

    2009-07-01

    The lower respiratory tract of patients affected by COPD is constantly colonized by pathogenic microrganisms such as H. influenzae, M. catarrhalis and S. pneumoniae. Role of bacterial colonization of big and small airways in patients affected by COPD is still unclear but it is likely to play a role in directly or indirectly maintaining the vicious circle of infection/inflammation. Colonizer pathogens are capable to stimulate mucus production, to alter the ciliary function by inducing dyskinesia and stasis; in addition, they represent a strong stimulus for neutrophils to come in the airways, which release elastase that, in turn, inhibit the mucus-ciliary function. The same pathogens are responsible for epithelial damage and chronic inflammation, by releasing neutrophilic elastase, leading to the damage progression and obstruction. Recent studies have also shown that infection sustained by H. influenzae is not limited to bronchial mucosa, i.e. surface epithelial cells, but that the pathogen is capable to penetrate cells, so spreading the infection in sub-epithelial cellular layers. In addition, the ability to produce biofilm is another possible defence mechanism which allows them to grow and colonise. Such a mechanism could in part explain the lack of response to antimicrobials and contribute to stimulation of parenchymal inflammatory response, the cause of pathological-anatomic damage which occurs in COPD. The impossibility to eradicate chronic infection and bacterial exacerbations of COPD are likely the elements that promt and worsen obstruction, so determining the disease's progression. PMID:19696555

  1. Circulating adhesion molecules in obstructive sleep apnea and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Pak, Victoria M.; Grandner, Michael A.; Pack, Allan I.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Over 20 years of evidence indicates a strong association between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and cardiovascular disease. Although inflammatory processes have been heavily implicated as an important link between the two, the mechanism for this has not been conclusively established. Atherosclerosis may be one of the mechanisms linking OSA to cardiovascular morbidity. This review addresses the role of circulating adhesion molecules in patients with OSA, and how these may be part of the link between cardiovascular disease and OSA. There is evidence for the role of adhesion molecules in cardiovascular disease risk. Some studies, albeit with small sample sizes, also show higher levels of adhesion molecules in patients with OSA compared to controls. There are also studies that show that levels of adhesion molecules diminish with continuous positive airway pressure therapy. Limitations of these studies include small sample sizes, cross-sectional sampling, and inconsistent control for confounding variables known to influence adhesion molecule levels. There are potential novel therapies to reduce circulating adhesion molecules in patients with OSA to diminish cardiovascular disease. Understanding the role of cell adhesion molecules generated in OSA will help elucidate one mechanistic link to cardiovascular disease in patients with OSA. PMID:23618532

  2. Cardiac effects of current treatments of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Lahousse, Lies; Verhamme, Katia M; Stricker, Bruno H; Brusselle, Guy G

    2016-02-01

    We review the cardiac safety of the drugs available at present for the maintenance treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in stable disease, focusing on inhaled long-acting muscarinic antagonists (LAMA) and long-acting β2 agonists (LABA), used either as a monotherapy or as a fixed-dose combination. We report the difficulties of, and pitfalls in, the investigation of the safety of drug treatments in COPD, which is hampered by the so-called COPD trial paradox: on the one hand, COPD is defined as a systemic disease and is frequently associated with comorbidities (especially cardiovascular comorbidities), which have an important effect on the prognosis of individual patients; on the other hand, patients with COPD and cardiovascular or other coexisting illnesses are often excluded from participation in randomised controlled clinical trials. In these trials, inhaled long-acting bronchodilators, both LAMA or LABA, or both, seem to be safe when used in the appropriate dose in adherent patients with COPD without uncontrolled cardiovascular disease or other notable comorbidities. However, the cardiac safety of LAMA and LABA is less evident when used inappropriately (eg, overdosing) or in patients with COPD and substantial cardiovascular disease, prolonged QTc interval, or polypharmacy. Potential warnings about rare cardiac events caused by COPD treatment from meta-analyses and observational studies need to be confirmed in high quality large randomised controlled trials. Finally, we briefly cover the cardiac safety issues of chronic oral drug treatments for COPD, encompassing theophylline, phosphodiesterase inhibitors, and macrolides. PMID:26794033

  3. Effect of yoga in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Fulambarker, Ashok; Farooki, Basheeruddin; Kheir, Fayez; Copur, Ahmet Sinan; Srinivasan, Lavanya; Schultz, Stephen

    2012-03-01

    Yoga is adjunctively utilized outside the United States in the treatment of a variety of diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but there are no studies assessing its adjunctive efficacy in the United States. We prospectively evaluated the effects of yoga training on the quality of life (QOL) and the parameters of lung function in patients with COPD. Thirty-three patients with documented COPD, per Global Initiative for Obstructive Lung Disease criteria, were recruited. All patients received standard COPD care. The QOL was assessed by the St. George Respiratory questionnaire. Standard spirometry and maximum inspiratory (maximal inspiratory pressure) and expiratory pressure (maximal expiratory pressure) were measured. Patients were taught selected yoga exercises including breathing exercises, meditation, and yoga postures for 1 hour, thrice a week for 6 weeks by a certified yoga therapist. The quality of life and lung function were again assessed at the end of 6 weeks. Twenty-two patients completed the study. Differences in preyoga versus postyoga scores were evaluated using paired t-tests. Statistically significant improvements (P < 0.05) were observed for the St. George Respiratory questionnaire [95% confidence interval (CI) 43.13-58.47], vital capacity (95% CI 2.53-7.65), maximal inspiratory pressure (95% CI 6.62-23.64), and maximal expiratory pressure (95% CI 1.63-13.81). Yoga when practiced by patients with COPD results in improvement in the QOL and lung function on a short-term basis. Additional research is needed to confirm these findings in a randomized controlled trial and in the longer term. PMID:21048431

  4. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Evidence for an Autoimmune Component

    PubMed Central

    Stefanska, Anna M; Walsh, Patrick T

    2009-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by an irreversible limitation on pulmonary airflow associated with chronic inflammation and mucous hypersecretion (chronic bronchitis) and/or the pathological destruction of alveolar airspaces leading to emphysema. COPD, predominantly as a result of tobacco smoke exposure, represents the fourth leading cause of mortality worldwide and its prevalence is increasing. Despite this, much of the basic mechanisms which contribute to disease progression remain to be elucidated and current therapeutic approaches are, for the most part, based upon alleviating patient symptoms (bronchodilators) as opposed to treating the underlying pathological mechanisms triggered in response to cigarette smoke exposure. The classic disease paradigm suggests that an imbalance of pulmonary matrix proteases versus anti-proteases underlies the tissue destruction and inflammation associated with COPD. However, there is a growing appreciation of the complex and multifaceted nature of the pathological mechanisms associated with disease progression. Recently, there has been mounting evidence indicating that COPD patients exhibit many of the characteristics of a classical autoimmune response. We will discuss current evidence in support of this paradigm and outline how future therapeutic approaches may be tailored to address this. PMID:19403056

  5. Tiotropium Bromide in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Bronchial Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado-Gonzalez, Alcibey; Arce, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Inhaled bronchodilators are the mainstay of pharmacological treatment for stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), including β2-agonists and muscarinic antagonists. Tiotropium bromide, a long-acting antimuscarinic bronchodilator (LAMA), is a treatment choice for moderate-to-severe COPD; its efficacy and safety have been demonstrated in recent trials. Studies also point to a beneficial role of tiotropium in the treatment of difficult-to-control asthma and a potential function in the asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS). Combination of different bronchodilator molecules and addition of inhaled corticosteroids are viable therapeutic alternatives. A condensation of the latest trials and the rationale behind these therapies will be presented in this article. PMID:26491494

  6. Biomarkers in Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Turino, Gerard M; Ma, Shuren; Cantor, Jerome O; Lin, Yong Y

    2016-08-01

    Biomarkers of pathogenesis in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can significantly accelerate drug development. In COPD related to alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, the role of neutrophil elastase and its inhibition by alpha-1 antitrypsin protein focused interest on elastin degradation and the development of pulmonary emphysema. Amino acids desmosine and isodesmosine are unique cross-links in mature elastin fibers and can serve as biomarkers of elastin degradation when measured in body fluids. This review gives a perspective on what has been learned by the earliest measurements of desmosine and isodesmosine followed by later studies using methods of increased sensitivity and specificity and the meaning for developing new therapies. Also included are brief statements on the biomarkers fibrinogen, CC-16, and Aa-Val-360 in COPD. PMID:27564670

  7. Consequences of physical inactivity in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Jorine E; Boezen, H Marike; de Greef, Mathieu H G; Bossenbroek, Linda; ten Hacken, Nick H T

    2010-12-01

    The many health benefits of regular physical activity underline the importance of this topic, especially in this period of time when the prevalence of a sedentary lifestyle in the population is increasing. Physical activity levels are especially low in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Regular physical activity and an active lifestyle has shown to be positively associated with outcomes such as exercise capacity and health-related quality of life, and therefore could be beneficial for the individual COPD patient. An adequate level of physical activity needs to be integrated into daily life, and stimulation of physical activity when absent is important. This article aims to discuss in more detail the possible role of regular physical activity for a number of well-known outcome parameters in COPD. PMID:21128749

  8. Oxygen therapy in acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Brill, Simon E; Wedzicha, Jadwiga A

    2014-01-01

    Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are important events in the history of this debilitating lung condition. Associated health care utilization and morbidity are high, and many patients require supplemental oxygen or ventilatory support. The last 2 decades have seen a substantial increase in our understanding of the best way to manage the respiratory failure suffered by many patients during this high-risk period. This review article examines the evidence underlying supplemental oxygen therapy during exacerbations of COPD. We first discuss the epidemiology and pathophysiology of respiratory failure in COPD during exacerbations. The rationale and evidence underlying oxygen therapy, including the risks when administered inappropriately, are then discussed, along with further strategies for ventilatory support. We also review current recommendations for best practice, including methods for improving oxygen provision in the future. PMID:25404854

  9. Prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in asymptomatic smokers

    PubMed Central

    Sansores, Raúl H; Velázquez-Uncal, Mónica; Pérez-Bautista, Oliver; Villalba-Caloca, Jaime; Falfán-Valencia, Ramcés; Ramírez-Venegas, Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    Background Physicians do not routinely recommend smokers to undergo spirometry unless they are symptomatic. Objective To test the hypothesis that there are a significant number of asymptomatic smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), we estimated the prevalence of COPD in a group of asymptomatic smokers. Methods Two thousand nine hundred and sixty-one smokers with a cumulative consumption history of at least 10 pack-years, either smokers with symptoms or smokers without symptoms (WOS) were invited to perform a spirometry and complete a symptom questionnaire. Results Six hundred and thirty-seven (21.5%) smokers had no symptoms, whereas 2,324 (78.5%) had at least one symptom. The prevalence of COPD in subjects WOS was 1.5% when considering the whole group of smokers (45/2,961) and 7% when considering only the group WOS (45/637). From 329 smokers with COPD, 13.7% were WOS. Subjects WOS were younger, had better lung function and lower cumulative consumption of cigarettes, estimated as both cigarettes per day and pack-years. According to severity of airflow limitation, 69% vs 87% of subjects were classified as Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stages I–II in the WOS and smokers with symptoms groups, respectively (P<0.001). A multivariate analysis showed that forced expiratory volume in 1 second (mL) was the only predictive factor for COPD in asymptomatic smokers. Conclusion Prevalence of COPD in asymptomatic smokers is 1.5%. This number of asymptomatic smokers may be excluded from the benefit of an “early” intervention, not just pharmacological but also from smoking cessation counseling. The higher forced expiratory volume in 1 second may contribute to prevent early diagnosis. PMID:26586941

  10. [Sense and nonsense of diets].

    PubMed

    Ballmer, P E

    1990-03-17

    Strict vegetarian diets and liquid formulations of "protein-sparing modified fast diets" can be harmful and represent potential "nonsense" in diets. "Sense" with respect to diets is demonstrated by a short summary of the physiological effects of dietary fibre. Fibre incorporates water, increases fecal bulk and reduces transit time of the bowel. Fermentation of fibres in the large bowel produces short-chain fatty acids, e.g. acetate, propionate and butyrate with desirable effects. Butyrate, for example, modifies colonic cell proliferation and may reduce the incidence of colorectal neoplasms. The beneficial effects of a diet, high in fibre, on blood lipids, overweight, colorectal disease and diabetes mellitus are briefly discussed. PMID:2157278

  11. FUMEPOC: Early detection of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in smokers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Currently is not feasible using conventional spirometry as a screening method in Primary Care especially among smoking population to detect chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in early stages. Therefore, the FUMEPOC study protocol intends to analyze the validity and reliability of Vitalograph COPD-6 spirometer as simpler tool to aid screening and diagnosis of this disease in early stages in primary care surgery. Methods / Design Study design: An observational, descriptive study of diagnostic tests, undertaken in Primary Care and Pneumology Outpatient Care Centre at San Juan Hospital and Elda Hospital. All smokers attending the primary care surgery and consent to participate in the study will undergo a test with Vitalograph COPD-6 spirometer. Subsequently, a conventional spirometry will be performed in the hospital and the results will be compared with those of the Vitalograph COPD-6 test. Discussion It is difficult to use the spirometry as screening for early diagnose test in real conditions of primary care clinical practice. The use of a simpler tool, Vitalograph COPD-6 spirometer, can help in the early diagnose and therefore, it could improve the clinical management of the disease. PMID:21627787

  12. Biomarkers of progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Annalicia; Dent, Annette G.; O’Hare, Phoebe E.; Goh, Felicia; Bowman, Rayleen V.; Fong, Kwun M.; Yang, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    Disease progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is variable, with some patients having a relatively stable course, while others suffer relentless progression leading to severe breathlessness, frequent acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD), respiratory failure and death. Radiological markers such as CT emphysema index, bronchiectasis and coronary artery calcification (CAC) have been linked with increased mortality in COPD patients. Molecular changes in lung tissue reflect alterations in lung pathology that occur with disease progression; however, lung tissue is not routinely accessible. Cell counts (including neutrophils) and mediators in induced sputum have been associated with lung function and risk of exacerbations. Examples of peripheral blood biological markers (biomarkers) include those associated with lung function (reduced CC-16), emphysema severity (increased adiponectin, reduced sRAGE), exacerbations and mortality [increased CRP, fibrinogen, leukocyte count, IL-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α)] including increased YKL-40 with mortality. Emerging approaches to discovering markers of gene-environment interaction include exhaled breath analysis [volatile organic compounds (VOCs), exhaled breath condensate], cellular and systemic responses to exposure to air pollution, alterations in the lung microbiome, and biomarkers of lung ageing such as telomere length shortening and reduced levels of sirtuins. Overcoming methodological challenges in sampling and quality control will enable more robust yet easily accessible biomarkers to be developed and qualified, in order to optimise personalised medicine in patients with COPD. PMID:25478195

  13. [Smoking cessation in smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Underner, M; Perriot, J; Peiffer, G

    2014-12-01

    One out of two smokers who smoke throughout their lifetime will die from a disease related to smoking. Tobacco smoking therefore represents a major global public health issue. Smoking is the leading cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Projections for 2020 indicate that by then, COPD will have become the third cause of death and the fifth cause of disability worldwide. Stopping smoking reduces the risk of developing COPD and is an essential treatment for this inflammatory disease. Smoking cessation decreases the prevalence of respiratory symptoms, number of hospitalizations, and decline in FEV1, as well as exacerbation frequency and overall mortality. Among the patients, 38-77% with COPD are smokers. Their daily cigarette consumption and level of nicotine dependence are often high. The combination of high intensity behavioral interventions and medication treatments (nicotine replacement therapy, varenicline, bupropion) is the most effective strategy for smokers with COPD. In contrast, behavioral interventions without medication are not more effective than simple advice to stop. Two factors seem to predict the success of the attempt to quit in smokers with COPD: a strong motivation to quit and the use of smoking cessation medications. PMID:25496790

  14. CFTR gene mutations in isolated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    SciTech Connect

    Pignatti, P.F.; Bombien, C.; Marigo, C.

    1994-09-01

    In order to identify a possible hereditary predisposition to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), we have looked for the presence of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene DNA sequence modifications in 28 unrelated patients with no signs of cystic fibrosis. The known mutations in Italian CF patients, as well as the most frequent worldwide CF mutations, were investigated. In addition, a denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of about half of the coding sequence of the gene in 56 chromosomes from the patients and in 102 chromosomes from control individuals affected by other pulmonary diseases and from normal controls was performed. Nine different CFTR gene mutations and polymorphisms were found in seven patients, a highly significant increase over controls. Two of the patients were compound heterozygotes. Two frequent CF mutations were detected: deletion F508 and R117H; two rare CF mutations: R1066C and 3667ins4; and five CF sequence variants: R75Q (which was also described as a disease-causing mutation in male sterility cases due to the absence of the vasa deferentia), G576A, 2736 A{r_arrow}G, L997F, and 3271+18C{r_arrow}T. Seven (78%) of the mutations are localized in transmembrane domains. Six (86%) of the patients with defined mutations and polymorphisms had bronchiectasis. These results indicate that CFTR gene mutations and sequence alterations may be involved in the etiopathogenesis of some cases of COPD.

  15. Vitamin D and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: hype or reality?

    PubMed

    Janssens, Wim; Decramer, Marc; Mathieu, Chantal; Korf, Hannelie

    2013-12-01

    Abundant laboratory findings show the important role vitamin D has in the innate and adaptive immune system. In human beings, observational studies have associated vitamin D deficiency with an increased risk for different inflammatory, infectious, and autoimmune diseases. With regard to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), conflicting data have been reported. Most epidemiological studies have been restricted by their design, and larger longitudinal studies of population-based samples and of cohorts with COPD are warranted. An alternative explanation for the discordant results in COPD might be related to the complexity of the intracellular vitamin D signalling pathway, which is not shown in systemic levels of the precursor 25-hydroxyvitamin D. For COPD in particular, we speculate that local downregulation of vitamin D signalling from and beyond the receptor might clarify why pro-inflammatory processes in the airways are not or are insufficiently countered by vitamin D-dependent control mechanisms. In a disease already characterised by glucocorticoid resistance, the potential activation and reactivation of an intrinsic comprehensive system of immune control should attract more attention to design appropriate interventions with promising therapeutic potential. PMID:24461760

  16. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Kidney Disease: A Potential Bidirectional Relationship?

    PubMed

    Abuyassin, Bisher; Sharma, Kumar; Ayas, Najib T; Laher, Ismail

    2015-08-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with high mortality rates and heavy economic and social burdens. Nearly 10% of the United States population suffer from CKD, with fatal outcomes increased by 16-40 times even before reaching end-stage renal disease. The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is between 3% and 7% in the general population, and has increased dramatically during the last 2 decades along with increased rates of obesity. However, the prevalence of OSA is much greater in patients with CKD. In addition, aggressive dialysis improves OSA. The current literature suggests a bidirectional association between CKD and OSA through a number of potential pathological mechanisms, which increase the possibility of both diseases being possible risk factors for each other. CKD may lead to OSA through a variety of mechanisms, including alterations in chemoreflex responsiveness, pharyngeal narrowing due to fluid overload, and accumulation of uremic toxins. It is also being increasingly recognized that OSA can also accelerate loss of kidney function. Moreover, animals exposed to intermittent hypoxia suffer histopathological renal damage. Potential mechanisms of OSA-associated renal dysfunction include renal hypoxia, hypertension, endothelial dysfunction, activation of the sympathetic nervous system, and increased oxidative stress. PMID:25845900

  17. A Nonsense Mutation in the Acid α-Glucosidase Gene Causes Pompe Disease in Finnish and Swedish Lapphunds

    PubMed Central

    Seppälä, Eija H.; Reuser, Arnold J. J.; Lohi, Hannes

    2013-01-01

    Pompe disease is a recessively inherited and often fatal disorder caused by the deficiency of acid α-glucosidase, an enzyme encoded by the GAA gene and needed to break down glycogen in lysosomes. This glycogen storage disease type II has been reported also in Swedish Lapphund dogs. Here we describe the genetic defect in canine Pompe disease and show that three related breeds from Scandinavia carry the same mutation. The affected dogs are homozygous for the GAA c.2237G>A mutation leading to a premature stop codon at amino acid position 746. The corresponding mutation has previously been reported in humans and causes infantile Pompe disease in combination with a second fully deleterious mutation. The affected dogs from both the Finnish as well as the Swedish breed mimic infantile-onset Pompe disease genetically, but also clinico-pathologically. Therefore this canine model provides a valuable tool for preclinical studies aimed at the development of gene therapy in Pompe disease. PMID:23457621

  18. A nonsense mutation in the acid α-glucosidase gene causes Pompe disease in Finnish and Swedish Lapphunds.

    PubMed

    Seppälä, Eija H; Reuser, Arnold J J; Lohi, Hannes

    2013-01-01

    Pompe disease is a recessively inherited and often fatal disorder caused by the deficiency of acid α-glucosidase, an enzyme encoded by the GAA gene and needed to break down glycogen in lysosomes. This glycogen storage disease type II has been reported also in Swedish Lapphund dogs. Here we describe the genetic defect in canine Pompe disease and show that three related breeds from Scandinavia carry the same mutation. The affected dogs are homozygous for the GAA c.2237G>A mutation leading to a premature stop codon at amino acid position 746. The corresponding mutation has previously been reported in humans and causes infantile Pompe disease in combination with a second fully deleterious mutation. The affected dogs from both the Finnish as well as the Swedish breed mimic infantile-onset Pompe disease genetically, but also clinico-pathologically. Therefore this canine model provides a valuable tool for preclinical studies aimed at the development of gene therapy in Pompe disease. PMID:23457621

  19. Sleep complaints and sleep breathing disorders in upper and lower obstructive lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Ferrando, Matteo; Bagnasco, Diego; Roustan, Valeria; Canonica, Giorgio Walter; Braido, Fulvio; Baiardini, Ilaria

    2016-08-01

    Upper and lower obstructive lung diseases can induce sleep complaints and can be part of the pathogenesis of sleep breathing disorders. In fact, the physiological changes of the pattern of respiration during sleep, added to the airways disease can lead to symptomatic worsening of rhinitis, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD); moreover, their functional and anatomical features can lead to sleep breathing disorders such as obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). This review highlights the above-mentioned relationships and the effect of disease management on its comorbidities and the patient's quality of life. Rhinitis, asthma and COPD represent causes of sleep complaints that may be reduced with optimal management of these obstructive airways diseases. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment of sleep apnea needs to be tailored after optimization of the therapy of concomitant diseases, but it can often ameliorate comorbid disease. PMID:27621908

  20. Sleep complaints and sleep breathing disorders in upper and lower obstructive lung diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ferrando, Matteo; Bagnasco, Diego; Roustan, Valeria; Canonica, Giorgio Walter; Braido, Fulvio

    2016-01-01

    Upper and lower obstructive lung diseases can induce sleep complaints and can be part of the pathogenesis of sleep breathing disorders. In fact, the physiological changes of the pattern of respiration during sleep, added to the airways disease can lead to symptomatic worsening of rhinitis, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD); moreover, their functional and anatomical features can lead to sleep breathing disorders such as obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). This review highlights the above-mentioned relationships and the effect of disease management on its comorbidities and the patient’s quality of life. Rhinitis, asthma and COPD represent causes of sleep complaints that may be reduced with optimal management of these obstructive airways diseases. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment of sleep apnea needs to be tailored after optimization of the therapy of concomitant diseases, but it can often ameliorate comorbid disease. PMID:27621908

  1. Impaired sympathetic skin response in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Bir, Levent Sinan; Ozkurt, Sibel; Daloğlu, Güner; Kurt, Tülay

    2005-12-01

    The sympathetic skin response (SSR) is considered as one of the indexes of autonomic nervous system functions, especially related with the sudomotor function of unmyelinated sympathetic fibers. SSRs are recorded as the potentials with biphasic or multiphasic waveforms by conventional electromyography. SSRs are evaluated by measuring latency (time from the stimulus to the onset), amplitude, and area (the space under the curve of the waveform). Although dysautonomia is a feature of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), as demonstrated by acetylcholine sweat-spot test, there are no data concerning SSR in COPD patients. In this study, we electrophysiologically investigated the sudomotor function of the sympathetic nervous system in patients with COPD. SSRs were recorded in 30 patients with COPD and 21 healthy volunteers. Normal responses were obtained from all subjects in the control group. No response was observed in three patients with COPD. The mean latency, amplitude and area values of the potentials recorded of the remaining 27 patients were compared to the control. The mean latency was longer (p<0.01) and the mean amplitude and area values were lower (p=0.012, p=0.021, respectively) in the patients compared to the control. We also demonstrated significant correlations between the latency, amplitude, or area values of the SSR and two parameters of pulmonary function tests forced expiratory volume one second/forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) and FEV1/FVC %. In conclusion, SSR is impaired in patients with COPD, which indicates the dysfunction of the sympathetic nervous system. Furthermore, the degree of impairment in SSR may reflect the severity of airway obstruction in patients with COPD. PMID:16272793

  2. Ventilation-perfusion inequality in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, P D; Dantzker, D R; Dueck, R; Clausen, J L; West, J B

    1977-01-01

    A multiple inert gas elimination method was used to study the mechanism of impaired gas exchange in 23 patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Three patterns of ventilation-perfusion (Va/Q) inequality were found: (a) A pattern with considerable regions of high (greater than 3) VA/Q, none of low (less than 0.1) VA/Q, and essentially no shunt. Almost all patients with type A COPD showed this pattern, and it was also seen in some patients with type B. (b) A pattern with large amounts of low but almost none of high VA/Q, and essentially no shunt. This pattern was found in 4 of 12 type B patients and 1 of type A. (c) A pattern with both low and high VA/Q areas was found in the remaining 6 patients. Distributions with high VA/Q areas occurred mostly in patients with greatly increased compliance and may represent loss of blood-glow due to alveolar wall destruction. Similarly, well-defined modes of low VA/Q areas were seen mostly in patients with severe cough and sputum and may be due to reduced ventilation secondary to mechanical airways obstruction or distortion. There was little change in the VA/Q distributions on exercise or on breathing 100% O2. The observed patterns of VA/Q inequality and shunt accounted for all of the hypoxemia at rest and during exercise. There was therefore no evidence for hypoxemia caused by diffusion impairment. Patients with similar arterial blood gases often had dissimilar VA/Q patterns. As a consequence the pattern of VA/Q inequality could not necessarily be inferred from the arterial PO2 and PCO2. PMID:833271

  3. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and HIV: are we appropriately screening?

    PubMed

    Ghadaki, Bahareh; Kronfli, Nadine; Vanniyasingam, Thuva; Haider, Shariq

    2016-10-01

    Individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) represent a population that is at a higher risk of developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In this study, we sought to determine the effects of smoking on respiratory symptoms and diseases among HIV-positive patients and to determine if symptomatic patients are being appropriately screened for COPD. HIV-positive individuals completed a self-administered questionnaire. The effects of smoking on respiratory symptoms and diseases were reported as odds ratios (ORs). The COPD screening criteria were adapted from the Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS) guidelines. Two hundred and forty-seven participants were recruited. The median age was 49 years; 75% were male and 92% were on highly active antiretroviral therapy. Smokers represented 66% of the population. Smoking had a statistically significant effect on respiratory symptoms including wheeze (OR 4.8 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.6-14.2]), phlegm production (OR 4.9 [95% CI: 2.2-10.5]), cough (OR 7.0 [95% CI: 3.0-16.2]), and dyspnea (OR 7.2 [95% CI: 1.7-31.2]). Smoking had a higher odds of respiratory diseases including COPD (OR 4.9 [95% CI: 1.1-21.9]) and bronchitis (OR 3.8 [95% CI: 1.9-7.7]). Among HIV-positive smokers, 40% met the CTS screening criteria, while only 12% self-reported a diagnosis of COPD. The burden of smoking in the HIV population is significant. HIV-positive smokers are more likely to report both respiratory symptoms and diseases than HIV-positive non-smokers. A discrepancy exists between patients who met the CTS screening criteria and those who were diagnosed with COPD, raising the concern for under-recognition and under-diagnosis of COPD in this population. PMID:27240624

  4. Tay-Sachs disease in an Arab family due to c.78G>A HEXA nonsense mutation encoding a p.W26X early truncation enzyme peptide.

    PubMed

    Haghighi, Alireza; Masri, Amira; Kornreich, Ruth; Desnick, Robert J

    2011-12-01

    Tay-Sachs disease (TSD), a pan-ethnic, autosomal recessive, neurodegenerative, lysosomal disease, results from deficient β-hexosaminidase A activity due to β-hexosaminidase α-subunit (HEXA) mutations. Prenatal/premarital carrier screening programs in the Ashkenazi Jewish community have markedly reduced disease occurrence. We report the first Jordanian Arab TSD patient diagnosed by deficient β-hexosaminidase A activity. HEXA mutation analysis revealed homozygosity for a nonsense mutation, c.78G>A (p.W26X). Previously reported in Arab patients, this mutation is a candidate for TSD screening in Arab populations. PMID:21967858

  5. Ultrasound in obstructive lung diseases: the effect of airway obstruction on diaphragm kinetics. A short pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Zanforlin, Alessandro; Smargiassi, Andrea; Inchingolo, Riccardo; Valente, Salvatore; Ramazzina, Emilio

    2015-12-01

    The ultrasound study of the chest is showing a continuous development. This technique could be helpful in managing several chest diseases, but it is limited to the acoustic windows provided by intercostal spaces and by the inability to study healthy lung parenchyma and all intra-parenchymal diseases such as chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD), because the interaction between ventilated lung and ultrasound generates only artifacts. Currently, there are few applications of ultrasound that are useful in COPD, with recent studies providing some innovation potentially useful in clinical practice. The similarity of the trend between the time/volume curve of spirometry and the M-mode representation of diaphragm during forced breath allowed to identify the M-mode Index of Obstruction (MIO), an index obtained from the ratio between forced diaphragmatic excursion in the first second (FEDE1, cm) and the maximal expiratory diaphragmatic excursion (EDEMax, cm). MIO has shown a linear correlation with the ratio between forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1) and vital capacity (VC), used in spirometry to identify airways obstruction. The value of MIO seems to be lower in patients affected by airways obstruction as showed by a recent study. The technique is easy to learn and fast to perform and the analysis could be provided with any ultrasound machine equipped with M-mode. In conclusion, these findings, if confirmed by other studies, could suggest a new add-on screening tool for obstructive lung diseases, in particular COPD, that could be performed during a routine abdominal ultrasound exam. PMID:26550063

  6. Treating the systemic effects of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Vogelmeier, Claus F; Wouters, Emiel F M

    2011-08-01

    Many patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) also suffer from other disorders that are considered to be comorbidities and that may have a major impact on morbidity and mortality. So far, it is not clear if these diseases in the context of COPD need specific drugs or if patients diagnosed with COPD should receive certain medications to prevent the development of systemic effects of COPD. Cachexia may be caused by many contributing factors and thus may prove to be very difficult to reverse. For the treatment of osteoporosis in patients with COPD, treatment recommendations have been published. COPD is associated with reduced systemic levels of vitamin D, which has not only calcemic, but also extracalcemic effects that may play a role in the development of COPD and its consequences. Available evidence suggests that statins have a high potential, although definitive studies have not been published yet. Physical inactivity may be a major cause for systemic inflammation. In turn, exercise training may be an effective form of therapy. Although smoking cessation is very effective, it is not successful in the majority of cases. PMID:21816995

  7. Determination of Trace Elements in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devrim, Saribal; Can, Akyolcu Mehmet; Birsen, Aydemir

    2007-04-01

    Many trace elements have activatory or inhibitory roles in enzyme activities and changes in hemorehology and relation of them with defense system molecules in diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD). Methods: While, 25 male COPD patients (during acute attack) were taken as a Patient Group, another healthy 25 male taken as Control Group. Serum concentrations of copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), and iron (Fe) were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AA-680 Shimadzu). Results: While decreased Fe (100.00 +/- 36.98; 123.26 +/- 37.58 μg/dL) (M+/-SD) and Zn (96.31+/-31.92 116.12+/-28.17 μg/dL) (M+/-SD), while increased Cu (117.92+/- 25.02; 101.27+/-8.29 μg/dL) (M+/-SD) concentrations were determined in patient samples than that of control group values (p<0.05), (p<0.01). Conclusion: According to findings of present study it may be said that: In organism while trace elements perform their activities on biomaterials they also possible carry out competition against others.

  8. Murine models of cardiovascular comorbidity in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Khedoe, P Padmini S J; Rensen, Patrick C N; Berbée, Jimmy F P; Hiemstra, Pieter S

    2016-06-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have an increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Currently, COPD patients with atherosclerosis (i.e., the most important underlying cause of CVD) receive COPD therapy complemented with standard CVD therapy. This may, however, not be the most optimal treatment. To investigate the link between COPD and atherosclerosis and to develop specific therapeutic strategies for COPD patients with atherosclerosis, a substantial number of preclinical studies using murine models have been performed. In this review, we summarize the currently used murine models of COPD and atherosclerosis, both individually and combined, and discuss the relevance of these models for studying the pathogenesis and development of new treatments for COPD patients with atherosclerosis. Murine and clinical studies have provided complementary information showing a prominent role for systemic inflammation and oxidative stress in the link between COPD and atherosclerosis. These and other studies showed that murine models for COPD and atherosclerosis are useful tools and can provide important insights relevant to understanding the link between COPD and CVD. More importantly, murine studies provide good platforms for studying the potential of promising (new) therapeutic strategies for COPD patients with CVD. PMID:26993520

  9. Supplemental Oxygen Therapy for Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Barjaktarevic, Igor; Cooper, Christopher B

    2015-08-01

    Oxygen is necessary for aerobic metabolism. Since the human body cannot produce or store oxygen, a continuous and adequate delivery of oxygen needs to be secured by oxygen uptake from inhaled air via the respiratory system and oxygen delivery to body tissues via the circulation. Severely reduced lung function in advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) may be a limiting factor for adequate oxygen uptake and patients with this disease may require supplemental oxygen therapy. While the methodology of oxygen delivery in home settings represents a continuously evolving field, oxygen therapy itself has been an integral part of the management of severely hypoxemic patients with COPD for more than 50 years despite the lack of full understanding of its effects and the relative paucity of clinical evidence supporting its use. In this article, we review the physiological effects and discuss the clinical benefits of oxygen therapy. We also evaluate the evidence supporting and arguing against its use in the published literature, discuss its risks and benefits, define criteria for prescribing oxygen therapy, and review methods of oxygen delivery in home settings. PMID:26238641

  10. Risk Factors for Venous Thromboembolism in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Victor; Goel, Nishant; Gangar, Jinal; Zhao, Huaqing; Ciccolella, David E.; Silverman, Edwin K.; Crapo, James D.; Criner, Gerard J.

    2015-01-01

    Background COPD patients are at increased risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE). VTE however remains under-diagnosed in this population and the clinical profile of VTE in COPD is unclear. Methods Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) stages II-IV participants in the COPD Genetic Epidemiology (COPDGene) study were divided into 2 groups: VTE+, those who reported a history of VTE by questionnaire, and VTE−, those who did not. We compared variables in these 2 groups with either t-test or chi-squared test for continuous and categorical variables, respectively. We performed a univariate logistic regression for VTE, and then a multivariate logistic regression using the significant predictors of interest in the univariate analysis to ascertain the determinants of VTE. Results The VTE+ group was older, more likely to be Caucasian, had a higher body mass index (BMI), smoking history, used oxygen, had a lower 6-minute walk distance, worse quality of life scores, and more dyspnea and respiratory exacerbations than the VTE− group. Lung function was not different between groups. A greater percentage of the VTE+ group described multiple medical comorbidities. On multivariate analysis, BMI, 6-minute walk distance, pneumothorax, peripheral vascular disease, and congestive heart failure significantly increased the odds for VTE by history. Conclusions BMI, exercise capacity, and medical comorbidities were significantly associated with VTE in moderate to severe COPD. Clinicians should suspect VTE in patients who present with dyspnea and should consider possibilities other than infection as causes of COPD exacerbation. PMID:25844397

  11. Glutathione cycle in stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Biljak, Vanja Radisić; Rumora, Lada; Cepelak, Ivana; Pancirov, Dolores; Popović-Grle, Sanja; Sorić, Jasna; Grubisić, Tihana Zanić

    2010-08-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by chronic inflammation and oxidant/antioxidant imbalance. Glutathione is the most abundant cellular low-molecular weight thiol and the glutathione redox cycle is the fundamental component of the cellular antioxidant defence system. Concentration of total glutathione and catalytic activities of glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase were determined in peripheral blood of patients (n = 109) and healthy subjects (n = 51). Concentration of total glutathione in patients was not changed in comparison to healthy controls. However, we found statistically significant difference between patients with moderate and severe disease stages. Glutathione reductase activity was increased, while glutathione proxidase activity was decreased in the patients with COPD, when compared to healthy controls. We found no significant difference in glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase activities between stages. Patients who smoked had lower concentration of total glutathione compared with former smokers and never-smoking patients. Lung function parameters were inversely associated with glutathione level. Evidence is presented for differential modulation of glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase activities in peripheral blood of patients with stable COPD. We suppose that in addition to glutathione biosynthesis, glutathione reductase-dependent regulation of the glutathione redox state is vital for protection against oxidative stress. PMID:20648694

  12. Nutritional supplementation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Meng-Jer; Yang, Tsung-Ming; Tsai, Ying-Huang

    2016-08-01

    Malnutrition in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with cachexia, sarcopenia, and weight loss, and may result in poorer pulmonary function, decreased exercise capacity, and increased risk of exacerbations. Providing nutritional supplementation is an important therapeutic intervention, particularly for severely ill COPD patients with malnutrition. Higher calorie intake through nutritional supplementation significantly increases body weight and muscle strength, and improves quality of life in malnourished COPD patients. Difficulties may be experienced by these COPD patients, who are struggling to breathe and eliminate CO2 from the lungs, resulting in dyspnea, hypercapnia, hypoxia, and respiratory acidosis, which exacerbates muscle loss through oxidative stress and inflammatory responses. To overcome these problems, nutritional supplements should aim to reduce metabolic CO2 production, lower respiratory quotient, and improve lung function. Several studies have shown that high-fat supplements produce less CO2 and have lower respiratory quotient value than high-carbohydrate supplements. In addition, high-fat supplements may be the most efficient means of providing a low-volume, calorie-dense supplement to COPD patients, and may be most beneficial to patients with prolonged mechanical ventilation where hypercapnia and malnutrition are most pronounced. Further studies are required to investigate the optimal nutritional supplements for COPD patients according to their disease severity. PMID:26822811

  13. Oral doxophylline in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Villani, F; De Maria, P; Ronchi, E; Galimberti, M

    1997-03-01

    Doxophylline, or 2-(7'-theophyllinemethyl)1,3-dioxolane, is a theophylline derivative which has shown interesting bronchodilating activity, and it appears to determine few adverse effects. The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate clinical therapeutic effects of the drug in the treatment of 2 groups of patients suffering from moderate to severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease differing in acute response to the inhaled beta 2-agonist salbutamol and to compare changes of lung function tests to serum concentration of doxophylline. We studied 67 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (median age 63 years, 9 females and 58 males) who were all clinically stable at the time of the study. Patients were separated into 2 groups on the basis of their reaction to inhalation of 200 micrograms of salbutamol: those with an increased FEV1 of more than 20% from baseline value (group 1), and those with no increase (group 2). Doxophylline was administered orally at the dose of 400 mg 3 times daily. Serum levels of doxophylline were determined by high-pressure liquid chromatography. Spirometry and blood gas analysis were performed before and 10 days after treatment. Four patients stopped drug assumption because of side effects (3 for dyspepsia and 1 for anxiety). In group 1 (34 patients), a significant increase in SVC, FVC, FEV1, FEF 25-75% and PEFR was observed. In group 1 (29 patients), only PEFR significantly increased. No modifications in blood gas analysis were observed. The mean serum level of doxophylline was 14 micrograms/ml in group 1 and 9 micrograms/ml in group 2: the difference was statistically significant. The relation between serum levels of doxophylline and FVC showed an increase in the parameter up to the concentration of 12-13 micrograms/ml, after which a plateau phase was observed. On the basis of our data, doxophylline appears to have an interesting bronchodilating effect in patients responsive to the inhaled beta 2-agonist salbutamol

  14. Expiratory muscle endurance in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez-Sarmiento, A; Orozco-Levi, M; Barreiro, E; Mendez, R; Ferrer, A; Broquetas, J; Gea, J

    2002-01-01

    Background: A reduction in expiratory muscle (ExM) endurance in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) may have clinically relevant implications. This study was carried out to evaluate ExM endurance in patients with COPD. Methods: Twenty three patients with COPD (FEV1 35 (14)% predicted) and 14 matched controls were studied. ExM endurance was assessed using a method based on the use of an expiratory threshold valve which includes two steps. In step 1 the load is progressively increased (50 g every 2 minutes) until task failure is reached, and the pressure generated against the highest tolerated load is defined as the maximal expiratory sustainable pressure (Pthmax). In step 2 subjects breathe against a submaximal constant load (80% of Pthmax) and the time elapsed until task failure is termed the expiratory endurance time (Tth80). In addition, the strength of peripheral muscles (handgrip, HGS) and respiratory muscles (maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures, PImax and PEmax, respectively) was evaluated. Results: Patients with COPD had lower ExM strength and endurance than controls: PEmax 64 (19)% predicted v 84 (14)% predicted (mean difference 20%; 95% confidence intervals (CI) 14 to 39); Pthmax 52 (27) v 151 (46) cm H2O (mean difference 99, 95% CI 74 to 123); and Tth80 9.4 (6.3) v 14.2 (7.4) min (mean difference 4.8, 95% CI 1.0 to 10.4; p<0.01 for all). Interestingly, ExM endurance directly correlated with both the severity of airways obstruction (Pthmax with FEV1, r=0.794, p<0.01) and the reduction in strength observed in different muscle groups (Pthmax with HG, PImax or PEmax, r=0.550, p<0.05; r=0.583, p<0.001; and r=0.584, p<0.001, respectively). Conclusions: ExM endurance is decreased in patients with COPD. This impairment is proportional to the severity of the disease and is associated with lower strength in different muscle groups. This suggests that systemic effects are implicated in the impairment observed in ExM function. PMID

  15. Forced Expiratory Capnography and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Robert H.; Brooker, Allison; Wise, Robert A.; Reynolds, Curt; Loccioni, Claudio; Russo, Adolfo; Risby, Terence H.

    2013-01-01

    This report proposes a potentially sensitive and simple physiological method to detect early changes and to follow disease progression in obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) based upon the usual pulmonary function test. Pulmonary function testing is a simple, although relatively insensitive, method to detect and follow COPD. As a proof-of-concept, we have examined the slope of the plateau for carbon dioxide during forced expiratory capnography in healthy (n=10) and COPD subjects (n=10). We compared the change in the rate of exhalation of carbon dioxide over time as a marker of heterogeneous ventilation of the lung. All subjects underwent pulmonary function testing, body-plethysmography, and forced exhalation capnography. The subjects with COPD also underwent high-resolution computed tomography of the chest. Regression lines were fitted to the slopes of the forced exhalation capnogram curves. There was no difference in the mean levels of exhaled carbon dioxide between the COPD and the healthy groups (p>0.48). We found a significant difference in the mean slope of the forced exhalation capnogram for the COPD subjects compared to the healthy subjects (p=0.01). Most important, for the COPD subjects, there was a significant positive correlation between the slope of the forced exhaled capnogram and a defined radiodensity measurement of the lung by high-resolution computed tomography (r2=0.49, p=0.02). The slope of the forced exhalation capnogram may be a simple way to determine physiological changes in the lungs in patients with COPD that are not obtainable with standard pulmonary function tests. Forced exhalation capnography would be of great clinical benefit if it can identify early disease changes and at-risk individuals. PMID:23445906

  16. Computed Tomography-based Subclassification of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Dirksen, Asger; Wille, Mathilde M W

    2016-04-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is an obvious modality for subclassification of COPD. Traditionally, the pulmonary involvement of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in smokers is understood as a combination of deleterious effects of smoking on small airways (chronic bronchitis and small airways disease) and distal to the airways with destruction and loss of lung parenchyma (emphysema). However, segmentation of airways is still experimental; with contemporary high-resolution CT (HRCT) we can just see the "entrance" of small airways, and until now changes in airway morphology that have been observed in COPD are subtle. Furthermore, recent results indicate that emphysema may also be the essential pathophysiologic mechanism behind the airflow limitation of COPD. The definition of COPD excludes bronchiectasis as a symptomatic subtype of COPD, and CT findings in chronic bronchitis and exacerbations of COPD are rather unspecific. This leaves emphysema as the most obvious candidate for subclassification of COPD. Both chest radiologists and pulmonary physicians are quite familiar with the appearance of various patterns of emphysema on HRCT, such as centrilobular, panlobular, and paraseptal emphysema. However, it has not yet been possible to develop operational definitions of these patterns that can be used by computer software to automatically classify CT scans into distinct patterns. In conclusion, even though various emphysema patterns can be recognized visually, CT has not yet demonstrated a great potential for automated subclassification of COPD, and it is an open question whether it will ever be possible to achieve success equivalent to that obtained by HRCT in the area of interstitial lung diseases. PMID:27115944

  17. Functional Performance in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Declines with Time

    PubMed Central

    Kapella, Mary C.; Larson, Janet L.; Covey, Margaret K.; Alex, Charles G.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose It is well known that people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) experience declines in functional performance, but little is known about the rate of decline. The purpose of this research was to describe the rate of decline in functional performance and to examine the contribution of disease severity, body composition, symptoms and functional capacity. Functional performance was defined as the activities that people choose to engage in on a day-to-day basis. Methods People (N=108) with COPD were enrolled and followed yearly for three years with: self-reported functional performance (Functional Performance Inventory), spirometry, lung volumes, diffusion capacity, body composition (dual energy x-ray absorptiometry), dyspnea and fatigue (Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire) and functional capacity (six-minute walk distance (6MWD), isokinetic strength of knee flexors and extensors, handgrip strength and maximal inspiratory pressure). A total of 88 subjects completed a (mean ± SD) of 2.7 ± 0.9 years of follow-up. Results Significant negative slopes were observed for functional performance (P=0.001), spirometry (the ratio of forced expiratory volume in one second to forced vital capacity ((FEV1/FVC), P<0.0001), diffusion capacity (P<0.0001) and muscle strength (P<0.0001). The slopes for dyspnea, fatigue and functional capacity were not significantly different from zero, but there was wide individual variation. Hierarchical regression demonstrated that 31% of the variance in the slope of functional performance was accounted for by the hierarchical model and the primary predictors were the slopes of the FEV1/FVC, 6MWD and muscle strength (knee flexors/extensor and handgrip). Conclusions Subjects experienced a slow decline in functional performance, associated with declines in functional capacity and increases in body fat. Symptoms were relatively stable and not associated with declines in functional performance. PMID:20543752

  18. Diagnosis of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in general practice.

    PubMed

    Van Schayck, C P

    1996-03-01

    There may be an overlap between the clinical pictures of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease which hampers a clear distinction between the two diseases. Most symptoms presented by patients do not clearly belong exclusively to either asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. By the nature of their discipline and training, general practitioners focus mainly on symptoms presented, which do not give a decisive answer in the differential diagnosis between the two diseases. Therefore, general practitioners must rely on objective parameters, such as determining the presence and degree of reversibility of airway obstruction, diurnal peak flow variability, bronchial hyper-responsiveness and allergy. This paper puts forward a pragmatic, primary care definition of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:8731629

  19. Diagnosis of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in general practice.

    PubMed Central

    Van Schayck, C P

    1996-01-01

    There may be an overlap between the clinical pictures of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease which hampers a clear distinction between the two diseases. Most symptoms presented by patients do not clearly belong exclusively to either asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. By the nature of their discipline and training, general practitioners focus mainly on symptoms presented, which do not give a decisive answer in the differential diagnosis between the two diseases. Therefore, general practitioners must rely on objective parameters, such as determining the presence and degree of reversibility of airway obstruction, diurnal peak flow variability, bronchial hyper-responsiveness and allergy. This paper puts forward a pragmatic, primary care definition of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:8731629

  20. Systemic inflammation after inspiratory loading in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Fuster, Antonia; Sauleda, Jaume; Sala, Ernest; Barceló, Bernardí; Pons, Jaume; Carrera, Miguel; Noguera, Aina; Togores, Bernat; Agustí, Alvar GN

    2008-01-01

    Objective Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) present systemic inflammation. Strenuous resistive breathing induces systemic inflammation in healthy subjects. We hypothesized that the increased respiratory load that characterizes COPD can contribute to systemic inflammation in these patients. Patients and methods To test this hypothesis, we compared leukocyte numbers and levels of circulating cytokines (tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNFα], interleukin-1β [IL-1β], IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10), before and 1 hour after maximal incremental inspiratory loading in 13 patients with stable COPD (forced expiratory volume in one second [FEV1] 29 ± 2.5% ref) and in 8 healthy sedentary subjects (FEV1 98 ± 5% ref). Results We found that: (1) at baseline, patients with COPD showed higher leukocyte counts and IL-8 levels than controls (p < 0.01); and, (2) one hour after maximal inspiratory loading these values were unchanged, except for IL-10, which increased in controls (p < 0.05) but not in patients with COPD. Conclusions This study confirms the presence of systemic inflammation in COPD, shows that maximal inspiratory loading does not increase the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-8) in COPD patients or controls, but suggests that the former may be unable to mount an appropriate systemic anti-inflammatory response to exercise. PMID:18488438

  1. [Inspiratory muscle training in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Lisboa, C; Borzone, G; Cruz, E

    1998-05-01

    We analyze the effect of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), with special emphasis on its effects on inspiratory muscle function and clinical outcomes. We reviewed only randomized, controlled studies that have either controlled both the load and the breathing pattern when using resistive training or have employed a threshold trainer in which the load is independent of the pattern of breathing, since methodological aspects may explain inconsistent results in the literature. In these circumstances, most of the studies demonstrated positive effects on inspiratory muscle function. Clinical effects were seldom evaluated; limited available data showed a reduction in dyspnea that was related to an increase in maximal inspiratory pressures (PIMax). When exercise capacity was evaluated through the distance the patients were able to walk in 6 or 12 minutes, most studies demonstrated a significant increase. Other reported positive effects were improvement in nocturnal SaO2, inspiratory muscle power output and maximal inspiratory flow rate. Based in this review, a recommended training regime appears to be an intermediate load (30-40% PIMax) using a threshold device for 30 minutes daily for at least 5 weeks. Although in the literature the criteria for selecting patients are not always well defined, we consider IMT as a helpful procedure for pulmonar rehabilitation in those patients with a moderately severe inspiratory muscle dysfunction presenting dyspnea during daily living activities despite optimal therapy. PMID:9731440

  2. [Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by biomass smoke exposure].

    PubMed

    Lopez, Matías; Mongilardi, Nicole; Checkley, William

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the relationship between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and biomass smoke will be discussed. More than half of the world population uses biomass for fuel, especially in rural areas and in developing countries where usage reaches 80%. Biomass smoke inhalation creates an inflammatory chronic state, which is accompanied by metalloproteinases activation and mucociliary mobility reduction. This could explain the existing association between biomass exposure and COPD, revealed by observational and epidemiological studies from developing and developed countries. In this review, the differences between COPD caused by tobacco and biomass were explored. It was found that despite the pathophysiological differences, most of the clinical characteristics, quality of life and mortality were similar. In the last ten years there have been interventions to reduce the biomass smoke exposure by using improved stoves and cleaner fuels. However, these strategies have not yet been successful due to inability to reduce contamination levels to those recommended by the World Health Organization as well as due to the lack of use. Therefore, there is an urgent need for carefully conducted, randomized field trials to determine the actual range of potentially reachable contamination reductions, the probability of use and the long term benefits of reducing the global burden of COPD. PMID:24718533

  3. [Methods of nutritional assessment in chronic obstructive lung diseases].

    PubMed

    Doré, M F; Laaban, J P

    1999-06-01

    A poor nutritional state is often encountered in the course of chronic obstructive lung disease (COLD) and worsens the prognosis. The methods used to assess nutritional status proposed in the literature vary greatly. We detail here the methods used in clinical practice and in research, describing results obtained in patients with COLD. Appropriate routine tests are discussed. Body weight should be followed in this population, but weight loss may be masked by sodium-water retention. Bioelectric impedancemetry or biphotonic absorptiometry are used to define body composition in patients with COLD. Lean mass can be measured with the creatinine/height index but is difficult in the ambulatory patient. Plasma levels of visceral proteins are often normal and do not appear to be useful markers in these patients. Immunology tests (delayed hypersensitivity, total lymphocyte counts) are not sensitive screening tests. An evaluation of skeletal muscle function using the walking test or an exercise test is recommended before starting a renutrition program and to evaluate its efficacy. PMID:10486837

  4. Update on pulmonary hypertension complicating chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Jyothula, Soma; Safdar, Zeenat

    2009-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is the hemodynamic manifestation of various pathological processes that result in elevated pulmonary artery pressures (PAP). The National Institutes of Health Registry defined pulmonary arterial hypertension as the mean PAP of more than 25 mm Hg with a pulmonary capillary wedge pressure or left atrial pressure equal to or less than 15 mm Hg. This definition remains the currently accepted definition of PH that is used to define PH related to multiple clinical conditions including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The estimated US prevalence of COPD by the National Health Survey in 2002 in people aged >25 was 12.1 million. There is a lack of large population-based studies in COPD to document the correct prevalence of PH and outcome. The major cause of PH in COPD is hypoxemia leading to vascular remodeling. Echocardiogram is the initial screening tool of choice for PH. This simple noninvasive test can provide an estimate of right ventricular systolic and right atrial pressures. Right heart catheterization remains the gold standard to diagnose PH. It provides accurate measurement of mean PAP and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure. Oxygen therapy remains the cornerstone therapeutic for hypoxemia in COPD patients. Anecdotal reports suggest utility of PDE5-inhibitors and prostacyclin to treat COPD-related PH. Large randomized clinical trials are needed before the use of these drugs can be recommended. PMID:19802350

  5. Penalizing Hospitals for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Readmissions

    PubMed Central

    Au, David H.

    2014-01-01

    In October 2014, the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) will expand its Hospital Readmission Reduction Program (HRRP) to include chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Under the new policy, hospitals with high risk-adjusted, 30-day all-cause unplanned readmission rates after an index hospitalization for a COPD exacerbation will be penalized with reduced reimbursement for the treatment of Medicare beneficiaries. In this perspective, we review the history of the HRRP, including the recent addition of COPD to the policy. We critically assess the use of 30-day all-cause COPD readmissions as an accountability measure, discussing potential benefits and then highlighting the substantial drawbacks and potential unintended consequences of the measure that could adversely affect providers, hospitals, and patients with COPD. We conclude by emphasizing the need to place the 30-day COPD readmission measure in the context of a reconceived model for postdischarge quality and review several frameworks that could help guide this process. PMID:24460431

  6. Immunologic impact of nutrient depletion in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Ronit; Cunningham-Rundles, Susanna

    2011-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by small airways, alveolar and systemic inflammation and remodeling causing airflow limitation and parenchymal destruction. Mechanisms of oxidative stress include exposure to cigarette smoke and environmental stimuli that activate proinflammatory responses, stimulate alveolar neutrophils and macrophages and lead to apoptosis of endothelial and epithelial cells. COPD may have origins in fetal and neonatal factors that affect intrauterine growth of lungs and airways, lead to low birth weight and impair the development of immune response. Maternal smoking may diminish interferon response secondary to micronutrient deficiency, particularly of Vitamin A, and support persistence of Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV), normally a childhood pathogen, into adult life. Muscle wasting and cachexia are systemic features of COPD. Cachexia is associated with systemic inflammation and worsened by Vitamin D deficiency. Nutritional depletion is related to poor survival and is a rational target for therapeutic intervention in advanced and critically ill patients. Preliminary studies and suggest that supplementation with omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and micronutrient repletion with Vitamin A, Vitamin D3, and zinc may have beneficial effects in COPD. PMID:21194406

  7. Matrix Metalloproteinases and Their Inhibitors in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Navratilova, Zdenka; Kolek, Vitezslav; Petrek, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterised by irreversible airflow limitation associated with chronic inflammation. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are proteolytic enzymes that contribute to the inflammatory response in COPD and degrade extracellular matrix components. Their enzymatic activity is inhibited by a four-member family of tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs). In COPD, the MMP/TIMP network, mainly MMP-9, has been repeatedly observed to be dysregulated at both the local (lung) and systemic levels. Here, we review the findings reported in numerous cross-sectional studies with our primary focus on longitudinal observations in human COPD studies. The data from longitudinal prospective studies on the MMP/TIMP network may lead to the introduction of novel prognostic biomarkers into clinical management of COPD. We address the relationship between the systemic and local lung MMP/TIMP network in COPD patients and briefly describe the involvement of microRNAs. Finally, the role of the MMP/TIMP network in COPD treatment is discussed. PMID:26611761

  8. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Aron-Wisnewsky, Judith; Clement, Karine; Pépin, Jean-Louis

    2016-08-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and more importantly its hallmark, chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), are established factors in the pathogenesis and exacerbation of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). This has been clearly demonstrated in rodent models exposed to intermittent hypoxia, and strong evidence now also exists in both paediatric and adult human populations. OSA and CIH induce insulin-resistance and dyslipidemia which are involved in NAFLD physiopathogenesis. CIH increases the expression of the hypoxia inducible transcription factor HIF1α and that of downstream genes involved in lipogenesis, thereby increasing β-oxidation and consequently exacerbating liver oxidative stress. OSA also disrupts the gut liver axis, increasing intestinal permeability and with a possible role of gut microbiota in the link between OSA and NAFLD. OSA patients should be screened for NAFLD and vice versa those with NAFLD for OSA. To date there is no evidence that treating OSA with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) will improve NAFLD but it might at least stabilize and slow its progression. Nevertheless, these multimorbid patients should be efficiently treated for all their metabolic co-morbidities and be encouraged to follow weight stabilization or weight loss programs and physical activity life style interventions. PMID:27324067

  9. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease management: the evidence base.

    PubMed

    MacIntyre, N R

    2001-11-01

    In long-term management of stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a number of medications improve pulmonary function test results. The long-term clinical benefits of those drugs would seem intuitive, but there is very little strong evidence that long-term outcomes in COPD are substantially affected by those drugs. Nevertheless, symptom improvement such as dyspnea reduction is certainly strong reason to use those agents. The 2 most compelling bodies of evidence in stable COPD are for oxygen therapy in the chronically hypoxemic patient and pulmonary rehabilitation to improve exercise tolerance and dyspnea. Inhaled corticosteroids also appear to be useful in patients at risk for frequent exacerbations. In acute exacerbations, the rationale for therapy comes in part from the large body of literature regarding acute asthma therapy. Bronchodilator therapy and corticosteroids both seem to reduce the severity and the duration of exacerbations. Moreover, routine antibiotic use seems beneficial, and the role of noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation with patients suffering impending respiratory failure from acute COPD exacerbations is well supported by the literature. PMID:11679148

  10. Diaphragm activation during exercise in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Sinderby, C; Spahija, J; Beck, J; Kaminski, D; Yan, S; Comtois, N; Sliwinski, P

    2001-06-01

    Although it has been postulated that central inhibition of respiratory drive may prevent development of diaphragm fatigue in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) during exercise, this premise has not been validated. We evaluated diaphragm electrical activation (EAdi) relative to maximum in 10 patients with moderately severe COPD at rest and during incremental exhaustive bicycle exercise. Flow was measured with a pneumotachograph and volume by integration of flow. EAdi and transdiaphragmatic pressures (Pdi) were measured using an esophageal catheter. End-expiratory lung volume (EELV) was assessed by inspiratory capacity (IC) maneuvers, and maximal voluntary EAdi was obtained during these maneuvers. Minute ventilation (V E) was 12.2 +/- 1.9 L/min (mean +/- SD) at rest, and increased progressively (p < 0.001) to 31.0 +/- 7.8 L/min at end-exercise. EELV increased during exercise (p < 0.001) causing end-inspiratory lung volume to attain 97 +/- 3% of TLC at end-exercise. Pdi at rest was 9.4 +/- 3.2 cm H(2)O and increased during the first two thirds of exercise (p < 0.001) to plateau at about 13 cm H(2)O. EAdi was 24 +/- 6% of voluntary maximal at rest and increased progressively during exercise (p < 0.001) to reach 81 +/- 7% at end-exercise. In conclusion, dynamic hyperinflation during exhaustive exercise in patients with COPD reduces diaphragm pressure-generating capacity, promoting high levels of diaphragm activation. PMID:11401887

  11. Epidemiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Rycroft, Catherine E; Heyes, Anne; Lanza, Lee; Becker, Karin

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to quantify the burden of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) – incidence, prevalence, and mortality – and identify trends in Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, The Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, the United Kingdom, and the United States of America. A structured literature search was performed (January 2000 to September 2010) of PubMed and EMBASE, identifying English-language articles reporting COPD prevalence, incidence, or mortality. Of 2838 articles identified, 299 full-text articles were reviewed, and data were extracted from 133 publications. Prevalence data were extracted from 80 articles, incidence data from 15 articles, and mortality data from 58 articles. Prevalence ranged from 0.2%–37%, but varied widely across countries and populations, and by COPD diagnosis and classification methods. Prevalence and incidence were greatest in men and those aged 75 years and older. Mortality ranged from 3–111 deaths per 100,000 population. Mortality increased in the last 30–40 years; more recently, mortality decreased in men in several countries, while increasing or stabilizing in women. Although COPD mortality increased over time, rates declined more recently, likely indicating improvements in COPD management. In many countries, COPD mortality has increased in women but decreased in men. This may be explained by differences in smoking patterns and a greater vulnerability in women to the adverse effects of smoking. PMID:22927753

  12. Rat models of asthma and chronic obstructive lung disease.

    PubMed

    Martin, James G; Tamaoka, Meiyo

    2006-01-01

    The rat has been extensively used to model asthma and somewhat less extensively to model chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The features of asthma that have been successfully modeled include allergen-induced airway constriction, eosinophilic inflammation and allergen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness. T-cell involvement has been directly demonstrated using adoptive transfer techniques. Both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells are activated in response to allergen challenge in the sensitized rat and express Thelper2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13). Repeated allergen exposure causes airway remodeling. Dry gas hyperpnea challenge also evokes increases in lung resistance, allowing exercise-induced asthma to be modeled. COPD is modeled using elastase-induced parenchymal injury to mimic emphysema. Cigarette smoke-induced airspace enlargement occurs but requires months of cigarette exposure. Inflammation and fibrosis of peripheral airways is an important aspect of COPD that is less well modeled. Novel approaches to the treatment of COPD have been reported including treatments aimed at parenchymal regeneration. PMID:16337418

  13. Identification of a Novel NLRP12 Nonsense Mutation (Trp408X) in the Extremely Rare Disease FCAS by Exome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Xiaoru; Dai, Caijun; Zhu, Xiaochun; Liao, Qiumei; Luo, Xu; Fu, Yangyang; Wang, Liangxing

    2016-01-01

    Familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome (FCAS) is an extremely rare autosomal dominant inherited disease. Although there are four genes that have been linked with FCAS, its molecular diagnosis has been challenging in a relatively large proportion of cases. In this study, we aimed to investigate the genetic defect of a recruited FCAS family using exome sequencing followed by in-depth bioinformatics analysis. As a result, a novel heterozygous stop-gain mutation (Trp408X) in NLRP12 was identified in autosomal dominant inherited FCAS with clinical features of recurrent fever and skin urticaria due to cold conditions. When combined with previous studies, all of the reported mutations were found to have occurred in a highly conserved region in the NACHT domain coding sequence in NLRP12 exon 3, suggesting that a screening strategy for FCAS should focus on this area of the gene. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the importance of exome sequencing for clinical diagnosis of genetic disorders and provides molecular insight into FCAS treatment and diagnosis. PMID:27314497

  14. A Novel Nonsense Mutation of the AGL Gene in a Romanian Patient with Glycogen Storage Disease Type IIIa.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Anca; Rossmann, Heidi; Bucerzan, Simona; Grigorescu-Sido, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Background. Glycogen storage disease type III (GSDIII) is a rare metabolic disorder with autosomal recessive inheritance, caused by deficiency of the glycogen debranching enzyme. There is a high phenotypic variability due to different mutations in the AGL gene. Methods and Results. We describe a 2.3-year-old boy from a nonconsanguineous Romanian family, who presented with severe hepatomegaly with fibrosis, mild muscle weakness, cardiomyopathy, ketotic fasting hypoglycemia, increased transaminases, creatine phosphokinase, and combined hyperlipoproteinemia. GSD type IIIa was suspected. Accordingly, genomic DNA of the index patient was analyzed by next generation sequencing of the AGL gene. For confirmation of the two mutations found, genetic analysis of the parents and grandparents was also performed. The patient was compound heterozygous for the novel mutation c.3235C>T, p.Gln1079(⁎) (exon 24) and the known mutation c.1589C>G, p.Ser530(⁎) (exon 12). c.3235 >T, p.Gln1079(⁎) was inherited from the father, who inherited it from his mother. c.1589C>G, p.Ser530(⁎) was inherited from the mother, who inherited it from her father. Conclusion. We report the first genetically confirmed case of a Romanian patient with GSDIIIa. We detected a compound heterozygous genotype with a novel mutation, in the context of a severe hepatopathy and an early onset of cardiomyopathy. PMID:26885414

  15. A Novel Nonsense Mutation of the AGL Gene in a Romanian Patient with Glycogen Storage Disease Type IIIa

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Anca; Rossmann, Heidi; Bucerzan, Simona; Grigorescu-Sido, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Background. Glycogen storage disease type III (GSDIII) is a rare metabolic disorder with autosomal recessive inheritance, caused by deficiency of the glycogen debranching enzyme. There is a high phenotypic variability due to different mutations in the AGL gene. Methods and Results. We describe a 2.3-year-old boy from a nonconsanguineous Romanian family, who presented with severe hepatomegaly with fibrosis, mild muscle weakness, cardiomyopathy, ketotic fasting hypoglycemia, increased transaminases, creatine phosphokinase, and combined hyperlipoproteinemia. GSD type IIIa was suspected. Accordingly, genomic DNA of the index patient was analyzed by next generation sequencing of the AGL gene. For confirmation of the two mutations found, genetic analysis of the parents and grandparents was also performed. The patient was compound heterozygous for the novel mutation c.3235C>T, p.Gln1079⁎ (exon 24) and the known mutation c.1589C>G, p.Ser530⁎ (exon 12). c.3235 >T, p.Gln1079⁎ was inherited from the father, who inherited it from his mother. c.1589C>G, p.Ser530⁎ was inherited from the mother, who inherited it from her father. Conclusion. We report the first genetically confirmed case of a Romanian patient with GSDIIIa. We detected a compound heterozygous genotype with a novel mutation, in the context of a severe hepatopathy and an early onset of cardiomyopathy. PMID:26885414

  16. Chronic obstructive lung disease and posttraumatic stress disorder: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Abrams, Thad E; Blevins, Amy; Weg, Mark W Vander

    2015-01-01

    Background Several studies have reported on the co-occurrence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and psychiatric conditions, with the most robust evidence base demonstrating an impact of comorbid anxiety and depression on COPD-related outcomes. In recent years, research has sought to determine if there is a co-occurrence between COPD and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as well as for associations between PTSD and COPD-related outcomes. To date, there have been no published reviews summarizing this emerging literature. Objectives The primary objective of this review was to determine if there is adequate evidence to support a co-occurrence between PTSD and COPD. Secondary objectives were to: 1) determine if there are important clinical considerations regarding the impact of PTSD on COPD management, and 2) identify targeted areas for further research. Methods A structured review was performed using a systematic search strategy limited to studies in English, addressing adults, and to articles that examined: 1) the co-occurrence of COPD and PTSD and 2) the impact of PTSD on COPD-related outcomes. To be included, articles must have addressed some type of nonreversible obstructive lung pathology. Results A total of 598 articles were identified for initial review. Upon applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria, n=19 articles or abstracts addressed our stated objectives. Overall, there is inconclusive evidence to support the co-occurrence between PTSD and COPD. Studies finding a significant co-occurrence generally had inferior methods of identifying COPD; in contrast, studies that utilized more robust COPD measures (such as a physician exam) generally failed to find a relationship. Among studies that examined the impact of PTSD on COPD-related outcomes, there was more consistent evidence that PTSD affects the perception of respiratory symptom burden and management. In addition, methods for measuring an important confounder (smoking) were generally

  17. Palliative care provision for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Yohannes, Abebaw Mengistu

    2007-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major cause of disability, morbidity and mortality in old age. Patients with advanced stage COPD are most likely to be admitted three to four times per year with acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD) which are costly to manage. The adverse events of AECOPD are associated with poor quality of life, severe physical disability, loneliness, and depression and anxiety symptoms. Currently there is a lack of palliative care provision for patients with advanced stage COPD compared with cancer patients despite having poor prognosis, intolerable dyspnoea, lower levels of self efficacy, greater disability, poor quality of life and higher levels of anxiety and depression. These symptoms affect patients' quality of life and can be a source of concern for family and carers as most patients are likely to be housebound and may be in need of continuous support and care. Evidence of palliative care provision for cancer patients indicate that it improves quality of life and reduces health care costs. The reasons why COPD patients do not receive palliative care are complex. This partly may relate to prognostic accuracy of patients' survival which poses a challenge for healthcare professionals, including general practitioners for patients with advanced stage COPD, as they are less likely to engage in end-of-life care planning in contrast with terminal disease like cancer. Furthermore there is a lack of resources which constraints for the wider availability of the palliative care programmes in the health care system. Potential barriers may include unwillingness of patients to discuss advance care planning and end-of-life care with their general practitioners, lack of time, increased workload, and fear of uncertainty of the information to provide about the prognosis of the disease and also lack of appropriate tools to guide general practitioners when to refer patients for palliative care. COPD is a chronic incurable disease; those in an

  18. Palliative care provision for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Yohannes, Abebaw Mengistu

    2007-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major cause of disability, morbidity and mortality in old age. Patients with advanced stage COPD are most likely to be admitted three to four times per year with acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD) which are costly to manage. The adverse events of AECOPD are associated with poor quality of life, severe physical disability, loneliness, and depression and anxiety symptoms. Currently there is a lack of palliative care provision for patients with advanced stage COPD compared with cancer patients despite having poor prognosis, intolerable dyspnoea, lower levels of self efficacy, greater disability, poor quality of life and higher levels of anxiety and depression. These symptoms affect patients' quality of life and can be a source of concern for family and carers as most patients are likely to be housebound and may be in need of continuous support and care. Evidence of palliative care provision for cancer patients indicate that it improves quality of life and reduces health care costs. The reasons why COPD patients do not receive palliative care are complex. This partly may relate to prognostic accuracy of patients' survival which poses a challenge for healthcare professionals, including general practitioners for patients with advanced stage COPD, as they are less likely to engage in end-of-life care planning in contrast with terminal disease like cancer. Furthermore there is a lack of resources which constraints for the wider availability of the palliative care programmes in the health care system. Potential barriers may include unwillingness of patients to discuss advance care planning and end-of-life care with their general practitioners, lack of time, increased workload, and fear of uncertainty of the information to provide about the prognosis of the disease and also lack of appropriate tools to guide general practitioners when to refer patients for palliative care. COPD is a chronic incurable disease; those in an

  19. Exposure to PM10 as a risk factor for the development of nasal obstruction and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Sichletidis, Lazaros; Spyratos, Dionisios; Tsiotsios, Anastasios; Haidich, Anna-Bettina; Chloros, Diamantis; Ganidis, Ioannis; Michailidis, Dimitrios; Triantafyllou, Georgios; Kottakis, George; Melas, Dimitrios

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate whether air pollution is a potential risk factor for airways obstruction. Methods: A prospective cohort study (11.3±2.9 years) that took place in two areas (Eordea where concentration of PM10 was high and Grevena, Greece). We used the MRC questionnaire, spirometry, and anterior rhinomanometry at both visits. Results: Initially we examined 3046 subjects. After excluding chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, we re-examined 872 subjects and 168 of them had developed COPD (Grevena: 24.3%, Eordea: 18.5%). Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that the area of residence and thus exposure to air pollution was not a risk factor for the development of COPD (OR: 0.51, 95% CI: 0.18–1.46, P = 0.21). On the other hand, residence in Eordea was strongly related to the development of severe nasal obstruction (OR: 11.47, 95% CI: 6.15–21.40, P<0.001). Similar results were found after excluding patients with COPD stage I as well as in the subgroup of never smokers. Conclusion: Air pollution was associated with severe nasal obstruction but not with COPD development. PMID:24804336

  20. Inflammatory mechanisms in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Peter J

    2016-07-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with chronic inflammation affecting predominantly the lung parenchyma and peripheral airways that results in largely irreversible and progressive airflow limitation. This inflammation is characterized by increased numbers of alveolar macrophages, neutrophils, T lymphocytes (predominantly TC1, TH1, and TH17 cells), and innate lymphoid cells recruited from the circulation. These cells and structural cells, including epithelial and endothelial cells and fibroblasts, secrete a variety of proinflammatory mediators, including cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, and lipid mediators. Although most patients with COPD have a predominantly neutrophilic inflammation, some have an increase in eosinophil counts, which might be orchestrated by TH2 cells and type 2 innate lymphoid cells though release of IL-33 from epithelial cells. These patients might be more responsive to corticosteroids and bronchodilators. Oxidative stress plays a key role in driving COPD-related inflammation, even in ex-smokers, and might result in activation of the proinflammatory transcription factor nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), impaired antiprotease defenses, DNA damage, cellular senescence, autoantibody generation, and corticosteroid resistance though inactivation of histone deacetylase 2. Systemic inflammation is also found in patients with COPD and can worsen comorbidities, such as cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and osteoporosis. Accelerated aging in the lungs of patients with COPD can also generate inflammatory protein release from senescent cells in the lung. In the future, it will be important to recognize phenotypes of patients with optimal responses to more specific therapies, and development of biomarkers that identify the therapeutic phenotypes will be important. PMID:27373322

  1. Sildenafil for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Randomized Crossover Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lederer, David J.; Bartels, Matthew N.; Schluger, Neil W.; Brogan, Frances; Jellen, Patricia; Thomashow, Byron M.; Kawut, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Pulmonary hypertension with exercise is common in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and may contribute to exercise limitation in this disease. We aimed to determine the effects of treatment with sildenafil on exercise capacity in patients with COPD and emphysema. Methods We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled 2-period crossover trial of sildenafil thrice daily in ten adults with COPD and emphysema on CT scan without pulmonary hypertension. We randomized study participants to 4 weeks of sildenafil (or placebo) followed by a 1-week washout and then 4 weeks of placebo (or sildenafil). The 2 primary outcomes were the 6-minute walk distance and oxygen consumption at peak exercise. Results Sildenafil had no effect on 6-minute walk distance (placebo-corrected difference = −7.8 m, 95% confidence interval, −23.2 to 7.5 m, p = 0.35) or oxygen consumption at peak exercise (placebo-corrected difference = −0.1 ml/kg/min, 95% confidence interval −2.1 to 1.8 ml/kg/min, p = 0.89). Sildenafil increased the alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient (p = 0.02), worsened symptoms (p = 0.04), and decreased quality-of-life (p = 0.03). Adverse events were more frequent while receiving sildenafil (p = 0.005). Conclusions Routine sildenafil administration did not have a beneficial effect on exercise capacity in patients with COPD and emphysema without pulmonary hypertension. Sildenafil significantly worsened gas exchange at rest and quality of life. (clinicaltrials.gov NCT00104637). PMID:22360383

  2. Sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (hepatic veno-occlusive disease).

    PubMed

    Fan, Cathy Q; Crawford, James M

    2014-12-01

    Hepatic sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS) is an obliterative venulitis of the terminal hepatic venules, which in its more severe forms imparts a high risk of mortality. SOS, also known as veno-occlusive disease (VOD), occurs as a result of cytoreductive therapy prior to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), following oxaliplatin-containing adjuvant or neoadjuvant chemotherapy for colorectal carcinoma metastatic to the liver and treated by partial hepatectomy, in patients taking pyrrolizidine alkaloid-containing herbal remedies, and in other particular settings such as the autosomal recessive condition of veno-occlusive disease with immunodeficiency (VODI). A central pathogenic event is toxic destruction of hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells (SEC), with sloughing and downstream occlusion of terminal hepatic venules. Contributing factors are SEC glutathione depletion, nitric oxide depletion, increased intrahepatic expression of matrix metalloproteinases and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and activation of clotting factors. The clinical presentation of SOS includes jaundice, development of right upper-quadrant pain and tender hepatomegaly, ascites, and unexplained weight gain. Owing to the potentially critical condition of these patients, transjugular biopsy may be the preferred route for liver biopsy to exclude other potential causes of liver dysfunction and to establish a diagnosis of SOS. Treatment includes rigorous fluid management so as to avoid excessive fluid overload while avoiding too rapid diuresis or pericentesis, potential use of pharmaceutics such as defibrotide, coagulolytic agents, or methylprednisolone, and liver transplantation. Proposed strategies for prevention and prophylaxis include reduced-intensity conditioning radiation for HSCT, treatment with ursodeoxycholic acid, and inclusion of bevacizumab with oxaliplatin-based chemotherapeutic regimes. While significant progress has been made in understanding the pathogenesis

  3. Solid fuel smoke exposure and risk of obstructive airways disease.

    PubMed

    Qorbani, Mostafa; Yunesian, Masud

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether there is an association between Obstructive Airways Disease (OAD) and indoor exposure to baking home-made bread smoke (BHBS) in ground oven at home. In this hospital-based case-control study, 83 patients with OAD (cases) were compared with 72 patients without any known pulmonary diseases from the surgical ward (controls) who were frequently matched with cases on age. The interview was performed using the modified questionnaire recommended by the "American Thoracic Society". The questionnaire comprised of demographic information, occupational history, cigarette smoking and indoor exposure to BHBS in ground oven at home. The exposure to BHBS was considered both as a dichotomous and quantitative variable (number of years being exposed to smoke) and the population attributable fraction (PAF) was estimated due to BHBS exposure. The percentage of indoor exposure to BHBS was measured as 51.8% and 30.6% in the cases and the controls, respectively. The average years of exposure to BHBS was 20.46 years (SD: 11.60) for the cases and 15.38 years (SD: 13.20) for the controls. The univariate analysis comparing the cases and the controls showed that exposure to BHBS (as a binary variable) and occupational exposure to dust was significantly associated with OAD. In the multivariate model, only exposure to BHBS was associated with OAD (OR=2.22, 95%CI = 1.14-4.35). Duration of exposure to BHBS (as a quantitative variable) was significantly associated with OAD in the univariate model. In the multivariate model, only the duration of exposure to BHBS (years) showed a significant association with OAD (OR=1.04, 95% CI=1.01-1.08). Population attributable risk due to BHBS exposure was equal to 28.5%. PMID:23369551

  4. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease phenotypes and balance impairment

    PubMed Central

    Voica, Alina Sorina; Oancea, Cristian; Tudorache, Emanuela; Crisan, Alexandru F; Fira-Mladinescu, Ovidiu; Tudorache, Voicu; Timar, Bogdan

    2016-01-01

    Background/objective Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a respiratory disease that results in airflow limitation and respiratory distress, also having many nonrespiratory manifestations that affect both function and mobility. Preliminary evidence suggests that balance deficits constitute an important secondary impairment in individuals with COPD. Our objective was to investigate balance performance in two groups of COPD patients with different body compositions and to observe which of these groups are more likely to experience falls in the future. Methods We included 27 stable COPD patients and 17 healthy individuals who performed a series of balance tests. The COPD patients were divided in two groups: emphysematous and bronchitic. Patients completed the activities balance confidence scale and the COPD assessment test questionnaire and afterward performed the Berg Balance Scale, timed up and go, single leg stance and 6-minute walking distance test. We analyzed the differences in the balance tests between the studied groups. Results Bronchitic COPD was associated with a decreased value when compared to emphysematous COPD for the following variables: single leg stance (8.7 vs 15.6; P<0.001) and activities balance confidence (53.2 vs 74.2; P=0.001). Bronchitic COPD patients had a significantly higher value of timed up and go test compared to patients with emphysematous COPD (14.7 vs 12.8; P=0.001). Conclusion Patients with COPD have a higher balance impairment than their healthy peers. Moreover, we observed that the bronchitic COPD phenotype is more likely to experience falls compared to the emphysematous phenotype. PMID:27199555

  5. Nutritional status in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: role of hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Raguso, Comasia A; Luthy, Christophe

    2011-02-01

    In patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), malnutrition and limited physical activity are very common and contribute to disease prognosis, whereas a balance between caloric intake and exercise allows body weight stability and muscle mass preservation. The goal of this review is to analyze the implications of chronic hypoxia on three key elements involved in energy homeostasis and its role in COPD cachexia. The first one is energy intake. Body weight loss, often observed in patients with COPD, is related to lack of appetite. Inflammatory cytokines are known to be involved in anorexia and to be correlated to arterial partial pressure of oxygen. Recent studies in animals have investigated the role of hypoxia in peptides involved in food consumption such as leptin, ghrelin, and adenosine monophosphate activated protein kinase. The second element is muscle function, which is strongly related to energy use. In COPD, muscle atrophy and muscle fiber shift to the glycolytic type might be an adaptation to chronic hypoxia to preserve the muscle from oxidative stress. Muscle atrophy could be the result of a marked activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway as found in muscle of patients with COPD. Hypoxia, via hypoxia inducible factor-1, is implicated in mitochondrial biogenesis and autophagy. Third, hormonal control of energy balance seems to be affected in patients with COPD. Insulin resistance has been described in this group of patients as well as a sort of "growth hormone resistance." Hypoxia, by hypoxia inducible factor-1, accelerates the degradation of tri-iodothyronine and thyroxine, decreasing cellular oxygen consumption, suggesting an adaptive mechanism rather than a primary cause of COPD cachexia. COPD rehabilitation aimed at maintaining function and quality of life needs to address body weight stabilization and, in particular, muscle mass preservation. PMID:21145207

  6. Perspectives that influence action plans for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Costi, S; Brooks, D; Goldstein, RS

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prompt treatment of acute exacerbations (AEs) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) improves quality of life and reduces the use of health care resources. Although patient self-management through an individualized action plan (AP) can help with early initiation of therapy, its use is critically dependent on the patient recognizing the features of an exacerbation. OBJECTIVE: To describe COPD patients’ experiences with AEs, as well as health care professionals’ (HCPs’) attitudes toward the provision of an AP as part of self-management education. METHODS: Thirty-two patients with moderate to severe COPD who recently experienced at least one AE, and 22 HCPs with experience in the management of COPD, were interviewed. RESULTS: The most common symptoms and signs associated with an AE were difficulty breathing (84%), fatigue (81%), cold symptoms (59%), changes in sputum colour (53%) or amount (47%), and cough (44%). The main precipitants identified were environmental triggers (47%), infective agents (31%), excessive activities (25%), emotional factors (16%) and changes in medications (9%). Strategies for dyspnea relief included increasing medications (72%), resting (56%), avoiding exposure to environmental triggers (41%) and performing breathing exercises (31%). Patients supported the use of an AP and recommended that it be individualized for symptoms and triggers, and that it should also include strategies for addressing anxiety and depression. HCPs also supported the use of an individualized AP and recommended that it be regularly revisited, depending on the patient’s disease severity. CONCLUSIONS: Patients’ experiences with AEs do not always conform to a standard medical definition. Therefore, an understanding of their experience is of value in the design of an individualized AP. HCPs support the use of an AP that emphasizes self-management of exacerbations as well as general COPD management. PMID:17036089

  7. Sinusoidal Obstruction Syndrome (Hepatic Veno-Occlusive Disease)

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Cathy Q.; Crawford, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS) is an obliterative venulitis of the terminal hepatic venules, which in its more severe forms imparts a high risk of mortality. SOS, also known as veno-occlusive disease (VOD), occurs as a result of cytoreductive therapy prior to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), following oxaliplatin-containing adjuvant or neoadjuvant chemotherapy for colorectal carcinoma metastatic to the liver and treated by partial hepatectomy, in patients taking pyrrolizidine alkaloid-containing herbal remedies, and in other particular settings such as the autosomal recessive condition of veno-occlusive disease with immunodeficiency (VODI). A central pathogenic event is toxic destruction of hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells (SEC), with sloughing and downstream occlusion of terminal hepatic venules. Contributing factors are SEC glutathione depletion, nitric oxide depletion, increased intrahepatic expression of matrix metalloproteinases and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and activation of clotting factors. The clinical presentation of SOS includes jaundice, development of right upper-quadrant pain and tender hepatomegaly, ascites, and unexplained weight gain. Owing to the potentially critical condition of these patients, transjugular biopsy may be the preferred route for liver biopsy to exclude other potential causes of liver dysfunction and to establish a diagnosis of SOS. Treatment includes rigorous fluid management so as to avoid excessive fluid overload while avoiding too rapid diuresis or pericentesis, potential use of pharmaceutics such as defibrotide, coagulolytic agents, or methylprednisolone, and liver transplantation. Proposed strategies for prevention and prophylaxis include reduced-intensity conditioning radiation for HSCT, treatment with ursodeoxycholic acid, and inclusion of bevacizumab with oxaliplatin-based chemotherapeutic regimes. While significant progress has been made in understanding the pathogenesis

  8. A review of halotherapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Rashleigh, Rachael; Smith, Sheree MS; Roberts, Nicola J

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a chronic, progressive disease and is treated with inhaled medication to optimize the patient’s lung health through decreasing their symptoms, especially breathlessness. Halotherapy is the inhalation of micronized dry salt within a chamber that mimics a salt cave environment. Recent media reports suggest that this therapy may help with the symptoms of COPD. Objective To critically evaluate and summarize the evidence for the use of halotherapy as a treatment for COPD. Design A review using systematic approach and narrative synthesis. Data sources Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and Google Scholar were searched. Two reviewers independently reviewed abstracts and selected eligible studies based on predetermined selection criteria. Results Of the 151 articles retrieved from databases and relevant reference lists, only one randomized controlled trial met the inclusion criteria. A meta-analysis was unable to be conducted due to the limited number of published studies. Inclusion criteria were subsequently expanded to allow three case-control studies to be included, ensuring that a narrative synthesis could be completed. From the pooled data of the four studies, there were 1,041 participants (661 in the intervention group and 380 in the control group). The assessment of methodological quality raised issues associated with randomization and patient selection. Three themes were identified from the narrative synthesis: respiratory function, quality of life, and medication use. Conclusion Themes generated from the narrative synthesis data reflect outcome measures regularly used for interventional research associated with COPD. From this review, recommendations for inclusion of halotherapy as a therapy for COPD cannot be made at this point and there is a need for high quality studies to determine the effectiveness of this therapy. PMID:24591823

  9. Ambient air pollution particles and the acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    EPA Science Inventory

    Investigation has repeatedly demonstrated an association between exposure to ambient air pollution particles and numerous indices of human morbidity and mortality. Individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are among those with an increased sensitivity to air p...

  10. Pharmacology Update on Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Rheumatoid Arthritis, and Major Depression.

    PubMed

    Weatherspoon, Deborah; Weatherspoon, Christopher A; Abbott, Brianna

    2015-12-01

    This article presents a brief review and summarizes current therapies for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, major depression, and rheumatoid arthritis. One new pharmaceutical agent is highlighted for each of the topics. PMID:26596663

  11. Perseverant, non-indicated treatment of obese patients for obstructive lung disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bronchodilators are a mainstay of treatment for patients with airflow obstruction. We hypothesized that patients with obesity and no objective documentation of airflow obstruction are inappropriately treated with bronchodilators. Methods Spirometric results and medical records of all patients with body mass index >30 kg/m2 who were referred for testing between March 2010 and August 2011 were analyzed. Results 155 patients with mean age of 52.6 ± (SE)1.1 y and BMI of 38.7 ± 0.7 kg/m2 were studied. Spirometry showed normal respiratory mechanics in 62 (40%), irreversible airflow obstruction in 36 (23.2%), flows suggestive of restriction in 35 (22.6%), reversible obstruction, suggestive of asthma in 11 (7.1%), and mixed pattern (obstructive and restrictive) in 6 (3.9%). Prior to testing, 45.2% (28 of 62) of patients with normal spirometry were being treated with medications for obstructive lung diseases and 33.9% (21 of 62) continued them despite absence of airflow obstruction on spirometry. 60% (21 of 35) of patients with a restrictive pattern in their spirometry received treatment for obstruction prior to spirometry and 51.4% (18 of 35) continued bronchodilator therapy after spirometric testing. There was no independent association of non-indicated treatment with spirometric results, age, BMI, co-morbidities or smoking history. All patients with airflow obstruction on testing who were receiving bronchodilators before spirometry continued to receive them after testing. Conclusion A substantial proportion of patients with obesity referred for pulmonary function testing did not have obstructive lung disease, but were treated nonetheless, before and after spirometry demonstrating absence of airway obstruction. PMID:24266961

  12. Endothelial dysfunction of cerebral and major arteries during chronic obstructive disease.

    PubMed

    Geltser, B I; Brodskaya, T A; Kotelnikov, V N; Agafonova, I G; Lukyanov, P A

    2007-12-01

    Vasomotor activity of the major and cerebral arteries was studied in mice with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Regional differences were revealed in the endothelium-dependent response of arteries. The development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was associated with a paradoxical response of the dilatational component of vasoregulation against the background of increased constrictive influences of the vascular endothelium in the major and cerebral vessels. PMID:18856197

  13. Effects of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Obstructive Sleep Apnea on Cognitive Functions: Evidence for a Common Nature

    PubMed Central

    Andreou, Georgia; Makanikas, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) show similar neurocognitive impairments. Effects are more apparent in severe cases, whereas in moderate and mild cases the effects are equivocal. The exact mechanism that causes cognitive dysfunctions in both diseases is still unknown and only suggestions have been made for each disease separately. The primary objective of this review is to present COPD and OSAS impact on cognitive functions. Secondly, it aims to examine the potential mechanisms by which COPD and OSAS can be linked and provide evidence for a common nature that affects cognitive functions in both diseases. Patients with COPD and OSAS compared to normal distribution show significant deficits in the cognitive abilities of attention, psychomotor speed, memory and learning, visuospatial and constructional abilities, executive skills, and language. The severity of these deficits in OSAS seems to correlate with the physiological events such as sleep defragmentation, apnea/hypopnea index, and hypoxemia, whereas cognitive impairments in COPD are associated with hypoventilation, hypoxemia, and hypercapnia. These factors as well as vascocerebral diseases and changes in systemic hemodynamic seem to act in an intermingling and synergistic way on the cause of cognitive dysfunctions in both diseases. However, low blood oxygen pressure seems to be the dominant factor that contributes to the presence of cognitive deficits in both COPD and OSAS. PMID:24649370

  14. Intestinal obstruction

    MedlinePlus

    Obstruction of the bowel may due to: A mechanical cause, which means something is in the way ... lung disease Use of certain medicines, especially narcotics Mechanical causes of intestinal obstruction may include: Adhesions or ...

  15. The Lung Tissue Microbiome in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sze, Marc A.; Dimitriu, Pedro A.; Hayashi, Shizu; Elliott, W. Mark; McDonough, John E.; Gosselink, John V.; Cooper, Joel; Sin, Don D.; Mohn, William W.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Based on surface brushings and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, Hilty and coworkers demonstrated microbiomes in the human lung characteristic of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which have now been confirmed by others. Objectives: To extend these findings to human lung tissue samples. Methods: DNA from lung tissue samples was obtained from nonsmokers (n = 8); smokers without COPD (n = 8); patients with very severe COPD (Global Initiative for COPD [GOLD] 4) (n = 8); and patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) (n = 8). The latter served as a positive control, with sterile water as a negative control. All bacterial community analyses were based on polymerase chain reaction amplifying 16S rRNA gene fragments. Total bacterial populations were measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and bacterial community composition was assessed by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and pyrotag sequencing. Measurement and Main Results: Total bacterial populations within lung tissue were small (20–1,252 bacterial cells per 1,000 human cells) but greater in all four sample groups versus the negative control group (P < 0.001). Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and sequencing distinguished three distinct bacterial community compositions: one common to the nonsmoker and smoker groups, a second to the GOLD 4 group, and the third to the CF-positive control group. Pyrotag sequencing identified greater than 1,400 unique bacterial sequences and showed an increase in the Firmicutes phylum in GOLD 4 patients versus all other groups (P < 0.003) attributable to an increase in the Lactobacillus genus (P < 0.0007). Conclusions: There is a detectable bacterial community within human lung tissue that changes in patients with very severe COPD. PMID:22427533

  16. Airway Microbiome Dynamics in Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Sanjay; Murphy, Timothy; Nariya, Snehal; Boushey, Homer A.; Lynch, Susan V.

    2014-01-01

    Specific bacterial species are implicated in the pathogenesis of exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, recent studies of clinically stable COPD patients have demonstrated a greater diversity of airway microbiota, whose role in acute exacerbations is unclear. In this study, temporal changes in the airway microbiome before, at the onset of, and after an acute exacerbation were examined in 60 sputum samples collected from subjects enrolled in a longitudinal study of bacterial infection in COPD. Microbiome composition and predicted functions were examined using 16S rRNA-based culture-independent profiling methods. Shifts in the abundance (≥2-fold, P < 0.05) of many taxa at exacerbation and after treatment were observed. Microbiota members that were increased at exacerbation were primarily of the Proteobacteria phylum, including nontypical COPD pathogens. Changes in the bacterial composition after treatment for an exacerbation differed significantly among the therapy regimens clinically prescribed (antibiotics only, oral corticosteroids only, or both). Treatment with antibiotics alone primarily decreased the abundance of Proteobacteria, with the prolonged suppression of some microbiota members being observed. In contrast, treatment with corticosteroids alone led to enrichment for Proteobacteria and members of other phyla. Predicted metagenomes of particular microbiota members involved in these compositional shifts indicated exacerbation-associated loss of functions involved in the synthesis of antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory products, alongside enrichment in functions related to pathogen-elicited inflammation. These trends reversed upon clinical recovery. Further larger studies will be necessary to determine whether specific compositional or functional changes detected in the airway microbiome could be useful indicators of exacerbation development or outcome. PMID:24850358

  17. Impact of Prolonged Exacerbation Recovery in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Law, Martin; Kowlessar, Beverly; Singh, Richa; Brill, Simon E.; Allinson, James P.; Wedzicha, Jadwiga A.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Exacerbations are important and heterogeneous events in the natural history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Objectives: To examine the consequences of prolonged exacerbation recovery in patients with COPD. Methods: A cohort of 384 patients with COPD (FEV1 % predicted 45.8 [SD, 16.6] and a median exacerbation rate of 2.13 per year [interquartile range, 1.0–3.2]) were followed for 1,039 days (interquartile range, 660–1,814) between October 1995 and January 2013. Patients recorded daily worsening of respiratory symptoms and peak expiratory flow (PEF), and when stable underwent spirometry every 3 months, and completed the St. George’s Respiratory Questionnaire annually. Exacerbations were diagnosed as 2 consecutive days with one major symptom plus another respiratory symptom. Exacerbation duration was defined as the time from onset to the day preceding 2 consecutive symptom-free days and recovery in PEF as return to preexacerbation levels. Measurements and Main Results: A total of 351 patients had one or more exacerbations. Patients with a longer symptom duration (mean, 14.5 d) had a worse St. George’s Respiratory Questionnaire total score (0.2 units per 1 day; P = 0.040). A longer symptomatic duration was associated with a shorter interval between exacerbation recovery and onset of the next exacerbation (hazard ratio, 1.004; P = 0.013). For 257 (7.3%) exacerbations, PEF did not recover within 99 days. These exacerbations were associated with symptoms of a viral infection (cold and sore throat). Patients with these nonrecovered exacerbations showed a 10.8 ml/yr (P < 0.001) faster decline in FEV1. Conclusions: Prolonged exacerbation symptomatic duration is associated with poorer health status and a greater risk of a new event. Exacerbations where lung function does not recover are associated with symptoms of viral infections and accelerated decline in FEV1. PMID:26151174

  18. Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) is an infection often occurring in neutropenic patients and has high mortality rates. In recent years, it has been reported that the incidence of IPA has also increased in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The purpose of this study is to investigate the clinical and demographic characteristics and treatment responses of IPA in patients with COPD. Methods Seventy-one patients with a positive culture of Aspergillus from lower respiratory tract samples were examined retrospectively. Eleven (15.4%) of these patients, affected with grade 3 or 4 COPD, had IPA. Results Aspergillus hyphae were detected in lung biopsy in three (27.3%) out of 11 patients and defined as proven IPA; a pathological sample was not taken in the other eight (72.7%) patients, and these were defined as probable IPA. Aspergillus isolates were identified as six cases of Aspergillusfumigatus and three of Aspergillusniger in nine patients, while two isolates were not identified at species level. While five patients required intensive care unit admission, four of them received mechanical ventilation. The most common finding on chest X-ray and computed tomography (CT) (respectively 63.6%, 72.7%) was infiltration. Amphotericin B was the initial drug of choice in all patients and five patients were discharged with oral voriconazole after amphotericin B therapy. Six patients (54.5%) died before treatment was completed. Conclusions IPA should be taken into account in the differential diagnosis particularly in patients with severe and very severe COPD presenting with dyspnea exacerbation, poor clinical status, and a new pulmonary infiltrate under treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics and steroids. PMID:24135224

  19. Systemic and Pulmonary Vascular Remodelling in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Esquerre, Mariana; López-Sánchez, Marta; Escobar, Ignacio; Huertas, Daniel; Penín, Rosa; Molina-Molina, María; Manresa, Frederic; Dorca, Jordi; Santos, Salud

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is associated with subclinical systemic atherosclerosis and pulmonary vascular remodelling characterized by intimal hyperplasia and luminal narrowing. We aimed to determine differences in the intimal thickening of systemic and pulmonary arteries in COPD subjects and smokers. Secondary aims include comparisons with a non-smokers group; determining the clinical variables associated with systemic and pulmonary intimal thickening, and the correlations between systemic and pulmonary remodelling changes. Methods All consecutive subjects undergoing lung resection were included and divided into 3 groups: 1) COPD, 2) smokers, and 3) non-smokers. Sections of the 5th intercostal artery and muscular pulmonary arteries were measured by histo-morphometry. Four parameters of intimal thickening were evaluated: 1) percentage of intimal area (%IA), 2) percentage of luminal narrowing, 3) intimal thickness index, and 4) intima-to-media ratio. Results In the adjusted analysis, the systemic arteries of COPD subjects showed greater intimal thickening (%IA) than those of smokers (15.6±1.5% vs. 14.2±1.6%, p = 0.038). In the pulmonary arteries, significant differences were observed for %IA between the 2 groups (37.3±2.2% vs. 29.3±2.3%, p = 0.016). Among clinical factors, metabolic syndrome, gender and COPD status were associated with the systemic intimal thickening, while only COPD status was associated with pulmonary intimal thickening. A correlation between the %IA of the systemic and pulmonary arteries was observed (Spearman’s rho = 0.46, p = 0.008). Conclusions Greater intimal thickening in systemic and pulmonary arteries is observed in COPD patients than in smokers. There is a correlation between systemic and pulmonary vascular remodelling in the overall population. PMID:27046203

  20. Pulmonary hemodynamic profile in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Portillo, Karina; Torralba, Yolanda; Blanco, Isabel; Burgos, Felip; Rodriguez-Roisin, Roberto; Rios, Jose; Roca, Josep; Barberà, Joan A

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Few data are available in regards to the prevalence of pulmonary hypertension (PH) in the broad spectrum of COPD. This study was aimed at assessing the prevalence of PH in a cohort of COPD patients across the severity of airflow limitation, and reporting the hemodynamic characteristics at rest and during exercise. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis on COPD patients who underwent right-heart catheterization in our center with measurements obtained at rest (n=139) and during exercise (n=85). PH was defined as mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) ≥25 mmHg and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure <15 mmHg. Exercise-induced PH (EIPH) was defined by a ratio of ΔmPAP/Δcardiac output >3. Results PH was present in 25 patients (18%). According to the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) classification, PH prevalence in GOLD 2 was 7% (3 patients); 25% (14 patients) in GOLD 3; and 22% (8 patients) in GOLD 4. Severe PH (mPAP ≥35 mmHg) was identified in four patients (2.8%). Arterial partial oxygen pressure was the outcome most strongly associated with PH (r=−0.29, P<0.001). EIPH was observed in 60 patients (71%) and had a similar prevalence in both GOLD 2 and 3, and was present in all GOLD 4 patients. Patients with PH had lower cardiac index during exercise than patients without PH (5.0±1.2 versus 6.7±1.4 L/min/m2, respectively; P=0.001). Conclusion PH has a similar prevalence in COPD patients with severe and very-severe airflow limitation, being associated with the presence of arterial hypoxemia. In contrast, EIPH is highly prevalent, even in moderate COPD, and might contribute to limiting exercise tolerance. PMID:26203238

  1. Abdominal muscle and quadriceps strength in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Man, W; Hopkinson, N; Harraf, F; Nikoletou, D; Polkey, M; Moxham, J

    2005-01-01

    Background: Quadriceps muscle weakness is common in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) but is not observed in a small hand muscle (adductor pollicis). Although this could be explained by reduced activity in the quadriceps, the observation could also be explained by anatomical location of the muscle or fibre type composition. However, the abdominal muscles are of a similar anatomical and fibre type distribution to the quadriceps, although they remain active in COPD. Cough gastric pressure is a recently described technique that assesses abdominal muscle (and hence expiratory muscle) strength more accurately than traditional techniques. A study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that more severe weakness exists in the quadriceps than in the abdominal muscles of patients with COPD compared with healthy elderly controls. Methods: Maximum cough gastric pressure and quadriceps isometric strength were measured in 43 patients with stable COPD and 25 healthy elderly volunteers matched for anthropometric variables. Results: Despite a significant reduction in mean quadriceps strength (29.9 kg v 41.2 kg; 95% CI –17.9 to –4.6; p = 0.001), cough gastric pressure was preserved in patients with COPD (227.3 cm H2O v 204.8 cm H2O; 95% CI –5.4 to 50.6; p = 0.11). Conclusions: Abdominal muscle strength is preserved in stable COPD outpatients in the presence of quadriceps weakness. This suggests that anatomical location and fibre type cannot explain quadriceps weakness in COPD. By inference, we conclude that disuse and consequent deconditioning are important factors in the development of quadriceps muscle weakness in COPD patients, or that activity protects the abdominal muscles from possible systemic myopathic processes. PMID:15923239

  2. [Possible correlations between periodontitis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Martos, Renáta; Márton, Ildikó

    2011-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a complex, multifactorial inflammatory disease of the airways and the pulmonary parenchyme, caused by infection, air pollution and particles. 4-7% of the adult population is involved. COPD is the 4th-6th common cause of death throughout the world. The main aetiological factor is smoking. Bacteria, such as bacteria from the oral cavity, could play a keyrole in the progression of the disease. Epidemiologic studies have noted a relationship between poor oral hygiene or periodontal bone loss and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The prevalence and mortality of the disease is increasing worldwide, the treatment is expensive, the efficiency of the present pharmacotherapy is poor, so the importance of prevention should be increasing. Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are prone to frequent exacerbations which are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. This review is a short summary of studies about the possible relationship between periodontitis and COPD. PMID:22039714

  3. Relationship between Dysphagia and Exacerbations in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Steidl, Eduardo; Ribeiro, Carla Simone; Gonçalves, Bruna Franciele; Fernandes, Natália; Antunes, Vívian; Mancopes, Renata

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The literature presents studies correlating chronic obstructive pulmonary disease to dysphagia and suggesting that the aspiration laryngeal phenomenon related to changes in the pharyngeal phase contributes significantly to the exacerbation of symptoms of lung disease. Objectives This study aimed to conduct a literature review to identify the relation between dysphagia and exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Data Synthesis We found 21 studies and included 19 in this review. The few studies that related to the subject agreed that the presence of dysphagia, due to lack of coordination between swallowing and breathing, may be one of the triggering factors of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation. Conclusions The review noted that there is a relationship between dysphagia and exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, identified by studies demonstrating that the difficulties associated with swallowing may lead to exacerbation of the disease. There was difficulty in comparing studies by their methodological differences. More research is needed to clarify the relationship between dysphagia and exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, making it possible to develop multiprofessional treatment strategies for these patients, catered to specific needs due to the systemic manifestations of the disease. PMID:25992155

  4. Influenza and Pneumococcal Vaccinations for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

    PubMed Central

    Sehatzadeh, S

    2012-01-01

    Executive Summary In July 2010, the Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) began work on a Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) evidentiary framework, an evidence-based review of the literature surrounding treatment strategies for patients with COPD. This project emerged from a request by the Health System Strategy Division of the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care that MAS provide them with an evidentiary platform on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of COPD interventions. After an initial review of health technology assessments and systematic reviews of COPD literature, and consultation with experts, MAS identified the following topics for analysis: vaccinations (influenza and pneumococcal), smoking cessation, multidisciplinary care, pulmonary rehabilitation, long-term oxygen therapy, noninvasive positive pressure ventilation for acute and chronic respiratory failure, hospital-at-home for acute exacerbations of COPD, and telehealth (including telemonitoring and telephone support). Evidence-based analyses were prepared for each of these topics. For each technology, an economic analysis was also completed where appropriate. In addition, a review of the qualitative literature on patient, caregiver, and provider perspectives on living and dying with COPD was conducted, as were reviews of the qualitative literature on each of the technologies included in these analyses. The Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Mega-Analysis series is made up of the following reports, which can be publicly accessed at the MAS website at: http://www.hqontario.ca/en/mas/mas_ohtas_mn.html. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Evidentiary Framework Influenza and Pneumococcal Vaccinations for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis Smoking Cessation for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis Community-Based Multidisciplinary Care for Patients With Stable Chronic Obstructive

  5. Association of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome and Buerger's Disease: a Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Kazemzadeh, Gholam Hosein; Bameshki, Ali Reza; Navvabi, Iman; Ahmadi Hoseini, Seyed Hosein; Taghavi Gilani, Mehryar

    2015-10-01

    In this study we evaluated the incidence and severity of obstructive sleep apnea and Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in patients with thromboangiitis obliterans for reduction of crisis. In 40 patients with Buerger's disease daily sleepiness and risk of Obstructive sleep apnea were evaluated using the Epworth sleeping scale (ESS) and the Stop-Bang score. An Apnea-link device was used for evaluation of chest motion, peripheral oxygenation, and nasal airflow during night-time sleep. The apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) and respiratory disurbance index were used for Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome diagnosis. All subjects were cigarette smokers and 80% were opium addicted. The prevalence of Obstructive sleep apnea (AHI>5) was 80%, but incidence of Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (AHI>5 + ESS≥10) was 5% (2/40). There was no association between duration or frequency of hospitalization and Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (P=0.74 and 0.86, respectively). In addition, no correlation between ESS and Stop-Bang scores and AHI was observed (P=0.58 and 0.41, respectively). There was an inverse correlation between smoking rate and AHI (P=0.032, r = -0.48). We did not find an association between Buerger's disease and Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Although the AHI was high (80%) and daily sleepiness was low. The negative correlation of smoking with AHI and on the other hand daily napping in addiction may be caused by the absence of a clear relationship between Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and Buerger's disease. PMID:26615374

  6. [Bronchial asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with acute exacerbation: preclinical differential diagnostic and emergency treatment].

    PubMed

    Friege, B; Friege, L; Pelz, J; Weber, M; von Spiegel, T; Schröder, S

    2009-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and bronchial asthma are the most common causes of obstructive pulmonary diseases and acute dyspnoea. In the preclinical emergency situation a distinction between bronchial asthma and exacerbated COPD is difficult because symptoms are similar. Although the preclinical measures differ only marginally, a differential diagnosis from other causes of respiratory obstruction and acute dyspnoea, such as cardiac decompensation, anaphylaxis, aspiration of foreign bodies, tension pneumothorax and inhalation trauma is necessary because alternative treatment options are required. In the treatment of COPD and bronchial asthma inhalative bronchodilatory beta(2)-mimetics are the first choice especially for serious obstructive emergencies because there is an unfavorable relationship between effect and side-effects for the intravenous route. Dosable aerosols, nebulization and if necessary, continuous nebulization, are appropriate application forms even for serious obstructive crises with the need of a respirator. In these cases a minimal inspiratory flow in patients is not required. Theophylline only plays a minor role to beta(2)-mimetics and anticholinergics as a bronchodilator in asthma and COPD guidelines, even in serious obstructive diseases. For severe asthma attacks the administration of magnesium is a possible additional option. Systemic intravenous administration of steroids has an anti-inflammatory effect and for this reason is the second column of treatment for both diseases. Invasive ventilation remains a last resort to ensure respiratory function and indications for this are given in patients with clinical signs of impending exhaustion of breathing. PMID:19424670

  7. Nutrition therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and related nutritional complications.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Amanda Carla; Bezerra, Olívia Maria de Paula Alves

    2006-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is characterized by progressive and partially reversible airway obstruction. The innumerable complications that occur during the progression of the disease can affect the nutritional state of patients suffering from this illness. The objective of this study was to present a brief review of the literature regarding the nutrition therapy used in the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. To that end, we performed a bibliographic search for related articles published within the last 18 years and indexed for the Literatura Latinoamericana y del Caribe en Ciencias de la Salud (LILACS, Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature) and Medline databases. Malnutrition is associated with a poor prognosis for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, since it predisposes such patients to infections, as well as reducing respiratory muscle force, exercise tolerance and quality of life. Despite the fact that such malnutrition is extremely common in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients, it should be recognized as an independent risk factor, since it can be modified through appropriate and efficacious diet therapy and monitoring. For patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, nutrition therapy is initiated after the evaluation of the nutritional state of the patient, which identifies nutritional risk, thereby allowing the proper level of treatment to be established. In this evaluation, anthropometric and biochemical markers, as well as indicators of dietary consumption and body composition, should be used. The prescribed diet should contain appropriate proportions of macronutrients, micronutrients and immunonutrients in order to regain or maintain the proper nutritional state and to avoid complications. The physical characteristics of the diet should be tailored to the individual needs and tolerances of each patient. In the treatment of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

  8. Body mass index and mortality in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yibin; Zhang, Tianyi; Wang, Zhiyong; Yu, Feifei; Xu, Qin; Guo, Wei; Wu, Cheng; He, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study is to summarize the evidence on the dose–response relationship between body mass index (BMI) and mortality in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We performed a systemic literature search in PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science for relevant studies that were published until June 2015. A random effects meta-analysis was used to estimate the pooled relative risks (RRs) of all-cause mortality in COPD patients with normal weight compared with those who were underweight, overweight, or obese. In addition, a dose–response meta-analysis was conducted to explore the dose–response relationship between BMI and all-cause mortality in COPD patients. A total of 17 observational studies involving 30,182 COPD patients among 285,960 participants were included. Compared with the reference category, the RRs of underweight, overweight, and obese individuals were 1.40 (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.20–1.63), 0.80 (95% CI, 0.67–0.96), and 0.77 (95% CI, 0.62–0.95), respectively. A significant nonlinear relationship between BMI and mortality of COPD patients was found by using a random effects model. COPD patients with BMI of <21.75 kg/m2 had a higher risk of death. Moreover, an increase in the BMI resulted in a decrease in the risk of death. The risk of death was lowest when BMI was 30 kg/m2 (RR = 0.69; 95% CI, 0.53–0.89). The BMI was not associated with all-cause mortality when BMI was >32 kg/m2. Our findings indicate that overweight is associated with a lower risk of all-cause mortality among patients with COPD whereas underweight is associated with a higher risk of all-cause mortality in these patients. However, there is limited evidence to support the association between obesity and the risk of all-cause mortality in patients with COPD. PMID:27428228

  9. Pharmacological and dietary antioxidant therapies for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Biswas, S; Hwang, J W; Kirkham, P A; Rahman, I

    2013-01-01

    The progression and exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are intimately associated with tobacco smoke/biomass fuel-induced oxidative and aldehyde/carbonyl stress. Alterations in redox signaling proinflammatory kinases and transcription factors, steroid resistance, unfolded protein response, mucus hypersecretion, extracellular matrix remodeling, autophagy/apoptosis, epigenetic changes, cellular senescence/aging, endothelial dysfunction, autoimmunity, and skeletal muscle dysfunction are some of the pathological hallmarks of COPD. In light of the above it would be prudent to target systemic and local oxidative stress with agents that can modulate the antioxidants/ redox system or by boosting the endogenous levels of antioxidants for the treatment and management of COPD. Identification of various antioxidant agents, such as thiol molecules (glutathione and mucolytic drugs, such as N-acetyl-L-cysteine, N-acystelyn, erdosteine, fudosteine, ergothioneine, and carbocysteine lysine salt), dietary natural product-derived polyphenols and other compounds (curcumin, resveratrol, green tea catechins, quercetin sulforaphane, lycopene, acai, alpha-lipoic acid, tocotrienols, and apocynin) have made it possible to modulate various biochemical aspects of COPD. Various researches and clinical trials have revealed that these antioxidants can detoxify free radicals and oxidants, control expression of redox and glutathione biosynthesis genes, chromatin remodeling, and ultimately inflammatory gene expression. In addition, modulation of cigarette smoke-induced oxidative stress and related cellular changes have also been reported to be effected by synthetic molecules. This includes specific spin traps like α-phenyl-N-tert-butyl nitrone, a catalytic antioxidant (ECSOD mimetic), porphyrins (AEOL 10150 and AEOL 10113), and a superoxide dismutase mimetic M40419, lipid peroxidation and protein carbonylation blockers/inhibitors, such as edaravone and lazaroids

  10. Metabolic syndrome in hospitalized patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Mekov, Evgeni; Slavova, Yanina; Tsakova, Adelina; Genova, Marianka; Kostadinov, Dimitar; Minchev, Delcho; Marinova, Dora

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The metabolic syndrome (MS) affects 21-53% of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with a higher prevalence in the early stages of COPD, with results being highly variable between studies. MS may also affect natural course of COPD-number of exacerbations, quality of life and lung function. Aim. To examine the prevalence of MS and its correlation with comorbidities and COPD characteristics in patients with COPD admitted for exacerbation. Material and methods. 152 patients with COPD admitted for exacerbation were studied for presence of MS. All of them were also assessed for vitamin D status and diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM). Data were gathered for smoking status and exacerbations during the last year. All patients completed CAT (COPD assessment test) and mMRC (Modified Medical Research Council Dyspnea scale) questionnaires and underwent spirometry. Duration of current hospital stay was recorded. Results. 25% of patients have MS. 23.1% of the male and 29.5% of the female patients have MS (p > 0.05). The prevalence of MS in this study is significantly lower when compared to a national representative study (44.6% in subjects over 45 years). 69.1% of all patients and 97.4% from MS patients have arterial hypertension. The presence of MS is associated with significantly worse cough and sleep (1st and 7th CAT questions; p = 0.002 and p = 0.001 respectively) and higher total CAT score (p = 0.017). Average BMI is 27.31. None of the patients have MS and BMI <25. There is a correlation between the presence of MS and DM (p = 0.008) and with the number of exacerbations in the last year (p = 0.015). There is no correlation between the presence of MS and the pulmonary function. Conclusion. This study among hospitalized COPD patients finds comparable but relatively low prevalence of MS (25%) compared to previously published data (21-53%) and lower prevalence compared to general population (44.6%). MS may impact quality of life and the number of

  11. Metabolic syndrome in hospitalized patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Slavova, Yanina; Tsakova, Adelina; Genova, Marianka; Kostadinov, Dimitar; Minchev, Delcho; Marinova, Dora

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The metabolic syndrome (MS) affects 21–53% of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with a higher prevalence in the early stages of COPD, with results being highly variable between studies. MS may also affect natural course of COPD—number of exacerbations, quality of life and lung function. Aim. To examine the prevalence of MS and its correlation with comorbidities and COPD characteristics in patients with COPD admitted for exacerbation. Material and methods. 152 patients with COPD admitted for exacerbation were studied for presence of MS. All of them were also assessed for vitamin D status and diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM). Data were gathered for smoking status and exacerbations during the last year. All patients completed CAT (COPD assessment test) and mMRC (Modified Medical Research Council Dyspnea scale) questionnaires and underwent spirometry. Duration of current hospital stay was recorded. Results. 25% of patients have MS. 23.1% of the male and 29.5% of the female patients have MS (p > 0.05). The prevalence of MS in this study is significantly lower when compared to a national representative study (44.6% in subjects over 45 years). 69.1% of all patients and 97.4% from MS patients have arterial hypertension. The presence of MS is associated with significantly worse cough and sleep (1st and 7th CAT questions; p = 0.002 and p = 0.001 respectively) and higher total CAT score (p = 0.017). Average BMI is 27.31. None of the patients have MS and BMI <25. There is a correlation between the presence of MS and DM (p = 0.008) and with the number of exacerbations in the last year (p = 0.015). There is no correlation between the presence of MS and the pulmonary function. Conclusion. This study among hospitalized COPD patients finds comparable but relatively low prevalence of MS (25%) compared to previously published data (21–53%) and lower prevalence compared to general population (44.6%). MS may impact quality of life and the

  12. Anesthetic considerations in the patients of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease undergoing laparoscopic surgeries.

    PubMed

    Khetarpal, Ranjana; Bali, Kusum; Chatrath, Veena; Bansal, Divya

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review the various anesthetic options which can be considered for laparoscopic surgeries in the patients with the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The literature search was performed in the Google, PubMed, and Medscape using key words "analgesia, anesthesia, general, laparoscopy, lung diseases, obstructive." More than thirty-five free full articles and books published from the year 1994 to 2014 were retrieved and studied. Retrospective data observed from various studies and case reports showed regional anesthesia (RA) to be valid and safer option in the patients who are not good candidates of general anesthesia like patients having obstructive pulmonary diseases. It showed better postoperative patient outcome with respect to safety, efficacy, postoperative pulmonary complications, and analgesia. So depending upon disease severity RA in various forms such as spinal anesthesia, paravertebral block, continuous epidural anesthesia, combined spinal epidural anesthesia (CSEA), and CSEA with bi-level positive airway pressure should be considered. PMID:26957682

  13. A case of ileo-caecal Crohn's disease presenting as acute intestinal obstruction.

    PubMed

    Islam, S R; Boksh, Z; Ahaduzzaman, M; Barman, A

    2012-10-01

    We report a case of 42 year old man who presented with one month history of weight loss, gradual abdominal distension and constipation. X-ray of the abdomen showed features of small gut obstruction. A tight stricture at the ileoceacal junction was found to be the cause of obstruction on laparotomy. Distal ileum was found to be severely inflammed with enlarged regional lymph nodes. Right hemicolectomy with resection of distal ileum was done. Histology revealed non caseating granuloma of Chroh's disease. Crohn's disease is relatively rare in Bangladesh. Recent data suggests rising incidence of Crohn's disease (CD) in the Indian sub-continent. PMID:23134927

  14. Asthma-Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Overlap Syndrome: Nothing New Under the Sun.

    PubMed

    Putcha, Nirupama; Wise, Robert A

    2016-08-01

    The debate about whether asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are distinct clinical syndromes is not new; there is heightened interest in understanding the group of individuals with obstructive lung disease who seem to have elements of both conditions because recent studies have demonstrated increased risk for respiratory events and exacerbations. We describe the clinical characteristics of this subtype of disease and suggest 4 working definitions of individuals who would fall into the asthma-COPD overlap category. Understanding the mechanisms underlying these subtypes will hopefully lead into a better understanding of therapeutic strategies that can target specific pathobiologic pathways. PMID:27401623

  15. The effect of increased lung volume in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease on upper airway obstruction during sleep.

    PubMed

    Biselli, Paolo; Grossman, Peter R; Kirkness, Jason P; Patil, Susheel P; Smith, Philip L; Schwartz, Alan R; Schneider, Hartmut

    2015-08-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exhibit increases in lung volume due to expiratory airflow limitation. Increases in lung volumes may affect upper airway patency and compensatory responses to inspiratory flow limitation (IFL) during sleep. We hypothesized that COPD patients have less collapsible airways inversely proportional to their lung volumes, and that the presence of expiratory airflow limitation limits duty cycle responses to defend ventilation in the presence of IFL. We enrolled 18 COPD patients and 18 controls, matched by age, body mass index, sex, and obstructive sleep apnea disease severity. Sleep studies, including quantitative assessment of airflow at various nasal pressure levels, were conducted to determine upper airway mechanical properties [passive critical closing pressure (Pcrit)] and for quantifying respiratory timing responses to experimentally induced IFL. COPD patients had lower passive Pcrit than their matched controls (COPD: -2.8 ± 0.9 cmH2O; controls: -0.5 ± 0.5 cmH2O, P = 0.03), and there was an inverse relationship of subject's functional residual capacity and passive Pcrit (-1.7 cmH2O/l increase in functional residual capacity, r(2) = 0.27, P = 0.002). In response to IFL, inspiratory duty cycle increased more (P = 0.03) in COPD patients (0.40 to 0.54) than in controls (0.41 to 0.51) and led to a marked reduction in expiratory time from 2.5 to 1.5 s (P < 0.01). COPD patients have a less collapsible airway and a greater, not reduced, compensatory timing response during upper airway obstruction. While these timing responses may reduce hypoventilation, it may also increase the risk for developing dynamic hyperinflation due to a marked reduction in expiratory time. PMID:26048975

  16. PTC124 targets genetic disorders caused by nonsense mutations.

    PubMed

    Welch, Ellen M; Barton, Elisabeth R; Zhuo, Jin; Tomizawa, Yuki; Friesen, Westley J; Trifillis, Panayiota; Paushkin, Sergey; Patel, Meenal; Trotta, Christopher R; Hwang, Seongwoo; Wilde, Richard G; Karp, Gary; Takasugi, James; Chen, Guangming; Jones, Stephen; Ren, Hongyu; Moon, Young-Choon; Corson, Donald; Turpoff, Anthony A; Campbell, Jeffrey A; Conn, M Morgan; Khan, Atiyya; Almstead, Neil G; Hedrick, Jean; Mollin, Anna; Risher, Nicole; Weetall, Marla; Yeh, Shirley; Branstrom, Arthur A; Colacino, Joseph M; Babiak, John; Ju, William D; Hirawat, Samit; Northcutt, Valerie J; Miller, Langdon L; Spatrick, Phyllis; He, Feng; Kawana, Masataka; Feng, Huisheng; Jacobson, Allan; Peltz, Stuart W; Sweeney, H Lee

    2007-05-01

    Nonsense mutations promote premature translational termination and cause anywhere from 5-70% of the individual cases of most inherited diseases. Studies on nonsense-mediated cystic fibrosis have indicated that boosting specific protein synthesis from <1% to as little as 5% of normal levels may greatly reduce the severity or eliminate the principal manifestations of disease. To address the need for a drug capable of suppressing premature termination, we identified PTC124-a new chemical entity that selectively induces ribosomal readthrough of premature but not normal termination codons. PTC124 activity, optimized using nonsense-containing reporters, promoted dystrophin production in primary muscle cells from humans and mdx mice expressing dystrophin nonsense alleles, and rescued striated muscle function in mdx mice within 2-8 weeks of drug exposure. PTC124 was well tolerated in animals at plasma exposures substantially in excess of those required for nonsense suppression. The selectivity of PTC124 for premature termination codons, its well characterized activity profile, oral bioavailability and pharmacological properties indicate that this drug may have broad clinical potential for the treatment of a large group of genetic disorders with limited or no therapeutic options. PMID:17450125

  17. Natural and disease-specific autoantibodies in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Daffa, N I; Tighe, P J; Corne, J M; Fairclough, L C; Todd, I

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmunity may contribute to the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Studies have identified disease-specific autoantibodies (DSAAbs) in COPD patients, but natural autoantibodies (NAAbs) may also play a role. Previous studies have concentrated on circulating autoantibodies, but lung-associated autoantibodies may be most important. Our aim was to investigate NAAbs and DSAAbs in the circulation and lungs of COPD smoking (CS) patients compared to smokers (S) without airway obstruction and subjects who have never smoked (NS). Immunoglobulin (Ig)G antibodies that bind to lung tissue components were significantly lower in the circulation of CS patients than NS (with intermediate levels in S), as detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The levels of antibodies to collagen-1 (the major lung collagen) detected by ELISA were also reduced significantly in CS patients’ sera compared to NS. The detection of these antibodies in NS subjects indicates that they are NAAbs. The occurrence of DSAAbs in some CS patients and S subjects was indicated by high levels of serum IgG antibodies to cytokeratin-18 and collagen-5; furthermore, antibodies to collagen-5 eluted from homogenized lung tissue exposed to low pH (0·1 M glycine, pH 2·8) were raised significantly in CS compared to S and NS. Thus, this study supports a role in COPD for both NAAbs and DSAAbs. PMID:25469980

  18. Systemic inflammation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who are colonized with Pneumocystis jiroveci.

    PubMed

    Calderón, Enrique J; Rivero, Laura; Respaldiza, Nieves; Morilla, Rubén; Montes-Cano, Marco A; Friaza, Vicente; Muñoz-Lobato, Fernando; Varela, José M; Medrano, Francisco J; Horra, Carmen de la

    2007-07-15

    In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, high levels of airway and systemic inflammatory markers are associated with a faster decrease in lung function. Our study shows that patients colonized by Pneumocystis jiroveci have higher proinflammatory cytokine levels than do noncolonized patients. This suggests that Pneumocystis may play a role in disease progression. PMID:17578770

  19. Anxiety and Depression in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A New Intervention and Case Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanley, Melinda A.; Veazey, Connie; Hopko, Derek; Diefenbach, Gretchen; Kunik, Mark E.

    2005-01-01

    Anxiety and depression coexist frequently in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and compound the impact of the disease on quality of life and functional status. However, little attention has been given to the development of treatment strategies for this subset of patients. The current article describes the development of a new, multicomponent…

  20. Epidemiology of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) in Aging Populations.

    PubMed

    Fragoso, Carlos A Vaz

    2016-01-01

    Current epidemiologic practice evaluates COPD based on self-reported symptoms of chronic bronchitis, self-reported physician-diagnosed COPD, spirometry confirmed airflow obstruction, or emphysema diagnosed by volumetric computed chest tomography (CT). Because the highest risk population for having COPD includes a predominance of middle-aged or older persons, aging related changes must also be considered, including: 1) increased multimorbidity, polypharmacy, and severe deconditioning, as these identify mechanisms that underlie respiratory symptoms and can impart a complex differential diagnosis; 2) increased airflow limitation, as this impacts the interpretation of spirometry confirmed airflow obstruction; and 3) "senile" emphysema, as this impacts the specificity of CT-diagnosed emphysema. Accordingly, in an era of rapidly aging populations worldwide, the use of epidemiologic criteria that do not rigorously consider aging related changes will result in increased misidentification of COPD and may, in turn, misinform public health policy and patient care. PMID:26629987

  1. The Prevalence and Type of Chronic Obstructive Bronchopulmonary Disease in Very Old People

    PubMed Central

    Aguzzi, G.; Woolf, C. R.; Paterson, J. F.

    1966-01-01

    One hundred men and 100 women between the ages of 70 and 89 years were examined clinically and with pulmonary function tests to determine the prevalence and type of chronic obstructive bronchopulmonary disease in very old people. Rhonchi were present in 45% of the old men and 24% of the old women. Obstruction to air flow (FEV1 < 60% of FVC) was demonstrated in 23% of the men and 6% of the women. Chronic bronchitis was present in 32% and 12% of the old men and women, respectively. Only five individuals, all men, showed emphysema as defined by significant obstruction to air flow with a low diffusing capacity. In old people there was a relationship between smoking, chronic cough and obstruction to air flow. PMID:4952376

  2. Ubiquitous monitoring system for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and heart disease patients.

    PubMed

    Shin, Il Hyung; Lee, Jae Ho; Kim, Hee Chan

    2007-01-01

    The Purpose of this paper is to report a code division multiple access (CDMA) based wireless device that is able to measure pulse oxygen saturation(SpO2) and Electrocardiogram(ECG) during chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and heart disease patients' daily life at home. Global Positioning System (GPS) and a specific database system are also included in this device to trace patient's location. Unlike the pre-reported devices using wireless network like Bluetooth or Zigbee which has a limited connection area, the developed system enables the literally ubiquitous service in reporting the patient's data to their doctors at any time and any place using the CDMA-based cellular phone network. PMID:18002798

  3. Synthesis and evaluation of airway targeted PLGA nanoparticles for drug delivery in obstructive lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Vij, Neeraj

    2012-01-01

    Chronic airway inflammation is a hallmark of chronic obstructive airway diseases, including asthma, COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), and CF (cystic fibrosis). It is also a major challenge in delivery and therapeutic efficacy of nano-based delivery systems in these chronic airway conditions as nanoparticle (NP) need to bypass airways defense mechanisms as we recently discussed. NPs which are capable of overcoming airways defense mechanisms should allow targeted drug delivery to disease cells. Over the last decade there has been increasing interest in development of targeted NPs for cancer but relatively little effort on designing novel systems for treating chronic inflammatory and obstructive airway conditions. Here we describe methods for preparing drug loaded multifunctional nanoparticles for targeted delivery to specific cell types in airways. The formulations and methods for selective drug delivery, discussed here are currently under preclinical development in our laboratory for treating chronic airway conditions such as COPD, CF, and asthma. PMID:22791443

  4. Pulmonary Physiology of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Cystic Fibrosis, and Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Stockley, James A; Stockley, Robert A

    2016-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis is predominantly an airway disease with marked bronchiectatic changes associated with inflammation, chronic colonization, and progressive airflow obstruction. The condition can be identified in childhood and monitored with detectable airway changes early in life while conventional spirometry remains in the normal range. Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency can also be detected early in life through blood spot and genetic testing and leads (in some) to the development of airflow obstruction and a predominant emphysema phenotype with bronchiectatic changes in about 30%. Early detection also allows the natural history of the pulmonary physiological changes to be determined. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is usually detected late in the disease process when significant damage has occurred. The condition consists of varying combinations of airway disease, bronchiectasis, colonization, and emphysema. Lessons learned from the physiological evolution of airway disease in cystic fibrosis and the emphysema of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency provide strategies to enable early detection of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in general and its phenotypes. PMID:27115945

  5. Co-existence of Bronchiectasis and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Goel, Nitin; Gupta, Pawan; Singh, Abhijeet; Prasad, Rajendra

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of a 56-year-old male who presented with cough and breathlessness. Chest radiograph (postero-anterior view) showed bulla and signs of hyperinflation in the right upper zone with cystic shadows in the left lower zone. Spirometry showed severe irreversible airflow obstruction with restriction and decreased diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide. On high resolution computed tomography (HRCT), right upper lobe bulla with emphysematous changes and left lower lobe cystic bronchiectasis were seen. Considering its rarity of occurrence and paucity of data in literature regarding co-existence of bronchiectasis with emphysema, this case is being reported. PMID:26591975

  6. Spirometric indices after bronchodilator test in obstructive lung disease.

    PubMed

    Mehrparvar, Amir Houshang; Mirmohammadi, Seyed Jalil; Sohrabi, Mohammad Mehdi

    2010-01-01

    Bronchial responsiveness to bronchodilator medications is usually tested to establish reversibility of airflow obstruction. Among the various tests to establish bronchodilator response, FEV1, FEF(25-75%) or FEF50%, and FVC are the most widely used. In a cross-sectional study, we assessed spirometric responses after administration of bronchodilator in 187 workers with obstructive pattern in spirometry. Considering responsiveness to bronchodilator (200 cc and 12% increase in FEV1 or FVC), the study cases were divided into responsive or non-responsive groups, and the average increase in spirometric indices were measured and compared between two groups. 35.8% of cases were responsive to bronchodilator. Among responsive cases, FEV1 was the most frequent index increased significantly; And PEF and FVC were the least frequent ones. The highest mean increase from baseline after administration of bronchodilator was observed in FEF75%. Increases in all indices were significantly higher in responsive group. The increase in FEV1% predicted was inversely correlated with baseline FEV1. In conclusion, we consider that FEV1 is the most reliable spirometric index for assessing bronchodilator response. And Bronchial reversibility has an inverse relationship with baseline measures. PMID:21279934

  7. Dietary Patterns and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Pei-Fen; Shu, Long; Si, Cai-Juan; Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Yu, Xiao-Long; Gao, Wei

    2016-08-01

    Investigation of the relationship between dietary patterns and some chronic noncommunicable diseases has become appealing in nutritional epidemiology. Some studies have reported potential associations between dietary patterns and the risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; however, the results remain conflicting. Thus, we conducted this meta-analysis to pool the results of studies to clarify the associations between dietary patterns and the risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. A literature search of MEDLINE and EBSCO databases was performed to identify relevant studies published from January 1990 up to June 2015. A total of 13 studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in this meta-analysis. The highest category of healthy/prudent dietary patterns when compared with the lowest category was apparently associated with a decreased risk (OR = 0.55; CI: 0.46, 0.66; P < 0.0001). An increase in the risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was shown for the highest compared with the lowest categories of "unhealthy/western-style" dietary patterns (OR = 2.12; CI: 1.64, 2.74; P < (0.0001). The results of this meta-analysis indicate that different dietary pattern may be associated with the risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:26678388

  8. Risk of Periodontal Diseases in Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Te-Chun; Chang, Pei-Ying; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chen, Chia-Hung; Tu, Chih-Yen; Hsia, Te-Chun; Shih, Chuen-Ming; Hsu, Wu-Huei; Sung, Fung-Chang; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Several studies have reported an association between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and periodontal diseases. However, a large-scale population-based cohort study was previously absent from the literature. Therefore, we evaluated the risk of periodontal diseases in patients with COPD in a nationwide population. From the National Health Insurance claims data of Taiwan, we identified 22,332 patients with COPD who were newly diagnosed during 2000 to 2010. For each case, two individuals without COPD were randomly selected and frequency matched by age, sex, and diagnosis year. Both groups were followed up till the end of 2011. The overall incidence of periodontal diseases was 1.19-fold greater in the COPD group than in the comparison group (32.2 vs 26.4 per 1000 person-years; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.15–1.24). Compared with non-COPD patients, the adjusted hazard ratios of patients with COPD increased with the number of emergency room visits (from 1.14 [95% CI 1.10–1.19] to 5.09 [95% CI 4.53–5.72]) and admissions (from 1.15 [95% CI 1.10–1.20] to 3.17 [95% CI 2.81–3.57]). In addition, the adjusted hazard ratios of patients with COPD treated with inhaled corticosteroids (1.22, 95% CI 1.11–1.34) and systemic corticosteroids (1.15, 95% CI 1.07–1.23) were significantly higher than those of patients not treated with corticosteroids. Patient with COPD are at a higher risk of developing periodontal diseases than the general population. Our results also support that the risk of periodontal diseases is proportional to COPD control. In addition, patients who receive corticosteroid treatment are at a higher risk of developing periodontal diseases. PMID:26579813

  9. [Roflumilast: a new approach to therapy of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Kreutzkamp, Barbara

    2010-07-01

    Roflumilast, a new inhibitor of phosphodiesterase 4, showed moderate efficacy in clinical trials with patients suffering from chonic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Improvement of pulmonary function is predominantly attributed to antiinflammatory effects with decrease in mucus secretion and less exacerbations. Diarrhoea, headache and nausea are typical adverse events. PMID:20687460

  10. THE ACUTE EFFECTS OF 0.2 PPM OZONE IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiologic data suggest that patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) might be more sensitive than normal persons to the respiratory effects of oxidant pollutant exposure. The study was designed to determine the response of patients with COPD to ozone. Thirte...

  11. The Care Needs of Community-Dwelling Seniors Suffering from Advanced Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Donna M.; Ross, Carolyn; Goodridge, Donna; Davis, Penny; Landreville, Alison; Roebuck, Kim

    2008-01-01

    Aim: This study was undertaken to determine the care needs of Canadian seniors living at home with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Background: COPD is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although hospitalizations for illness exacerbations and end-stage care may be common, most persons with COPD live out…

  12. [Anesthetic management of nephrectomy in a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patient with recurrent spontaneous pneumothorax].

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Mysore Chandramouli Basappaji; Bhat Pai, Rohini; Rao, Raghavendra P

    2016-01-01

    Nephrectomies are usually performed under general anesthesia alone or in combination with regional anesthesia and rarely under regional anesthesia alone. We report the management of a patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with a history of recurrent spontaneous pneumothorax undergoing nephrectomy under regional anesthesia alone. PMID:27343353

  13. Study Design and Outcomes of Korean Obstructive Lung Disease (KOLD) Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Tai Sun; Lee, Jae Seung; Seo, Joon Beom; Hong, Yoonki; Yoo, Jung-Wan; Kang, Byung Ju; Lee, Sei Won; Oh, Yeon-Mok

    2014-01-01

    Background The Korean Obstructive Lung Disease (KOLD) Cohort Study is a prospective longitudinal study of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, or other unclassified obstructive lung diseases. It was designed to develop new classification models and biomarkers that predict clinically relevant outcomes for patients with obstructive lung diseases. Methods Patients over 18 years old who have chronic respiratory symptoms and airflow limitations or bronchial hyper-responsiveness were enrolled at 17 centers in South Korea. After a baseline visit, the subjects were followed up every 3 months for various assessments. Results From June 2005 to October 2013, a total of 477 subjects (433 [91%] males; 381 [80%] diagnosed with COPD) were enrolled. Analyses of the KOLD Cohort Study identified distinct phenotypes in patients with COPD, and predictors of therapeutic responses and exacerbations as well as the factors related to pulmonary hypertension in COPD. In addition, several genotypes were associated with radiological phenotypes and therapeutic responses among Korean COPD patients. Conclusion The KOLD Cohort Study is one of the leading long-term prospective longitudinal studies investigating heterogeneity of the COPD and is expected to provide new insights for pathogenesis and the long-term progression of COPD. PMID:24851130

  14. RESPONSES OF SUBJECTS WITH CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE AFTER EXPOSURES TO 0.3 PPM OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The authors previously reported (1982) that the respiratory mechanics of intermittently exercising persons with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were unaffected by a 2-h exposure to 0.2 ppm ozone. Employing a single-blind cross-over design protocol, 13 white men with ...

  15. Behavioral Exercise Programs in the Management of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkins, Catherine J.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Compared the effectiveness of behavior modification, cognitive modification, and cognitive-behavior modification in increasing compliance with an exercise prescription for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients (N=96). Although all treatment groups showed improvement, the cognitive-behavior modification strategy produced the most…

  16. Anesthetic management of nephrectomy in a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patient with recurrent spontaneous pneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Mysore Chandramouli Basappaji; Bhat Pai, Rohini; Rao, Raghavendra P

    2016-01-01

    Nephrectomies are usually performed under general anesthesia alone or in combination with regional anesthesia and rarely under regional anesthesia alone. We report the management of a patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with a history of recurrent spontaneous pneumothorax undergoing nephrectomy under regional anesthesia alone. PMID:27343795

  17. Strategies for reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Claudio

    2015-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is frequently accompanied by multimorbidities in affected patients. Even though the majority of these comorbidities are also related to advanced age and cigarette smoke, also COPD itself has significant impact on insurgence, or worsening of these conditions. As a consequence, COPD is regarded as a complex disease with pulmonary and extra-pulmonary involvement. According to current guidelines for the management of COPD patients, the comprehensive treatment of this condition should target respiratory symptoms as well as comorbidities. Cardiovascular disease is one of the most frequent comorbidities in COPD patients and there are several strategies for reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease in COPD patients. These include smoking cessation, pharmacologic prevention of cardiovascular disease, and the treatment of COPD. Beta-blockers for the prevention of cardiovascular disease have been traditionally limited in COPD patients, albeit current evidence supporting their efficacy and safety in these patients. With regard to COPD medications, corticosteroids are generally not recommended, except for exacerbations, while long-acting beta2-agonists have demonstrated an acceptable profile of cardiovascular safety. Long-acting anticholinergic bronchodilators, in particular tiotropium in the mist inhaler formulation, have been associated with an increased risk of major cardiovascular events and mortality. Data on this issue remain, however, controversial. Glycopyrronium, a recently introduced anticholinergic, demonstrated. a rapid and sustained relief of respiratory symptoms with a favorable safety profile and no increase in cardiovascular risk, in monotherapy and in combination with a long-acting beta2-agonist in a comprehensive trial program indicating a valid option for COPD patients with CV comorbidities. PMID:25655487

  18. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and ischemic heart disease comorbidity: overview of mechanisms and clinical management.

    PubMed

    Campo, Gianluca; Pavasini, Rita; Malagù, Michele; Mascetti, Susanna; Biscaglia, Simone; Ceconi, Claudio; Papi, Alberto; Contoli, Marco

    2015-04-01

    In the last few years, many studies focused their attention on the relationship between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and ischemic heart disease (IHD), showing that these diseases are mutually influenced. Many different biological processes such as hypoxia, systemic inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, heightened platelet reactivity, arterial stiffness and right ventricle modification interact in the development of the COPD-IHD comorbidity, which therefore deserves special attention in early diagnosis and treatment. Patients with COPD-IHD comorbidity have a worst outcome, when compared to patients with only COPD or only IHD. These patients showed a significant increase on risk of adverse events and of hospital readmissions for recurrent myocardial infarction, heart failure, coronary revascularization, and acute exacerbation of COPD. Taken together, these complications determine a significant increase in mortality. In most cases death occurs for cardiovascular cause, soon after an acute exacerbation of COPD or a cardiovascular adverse event. Recent data regarding incidence, mechanisms and prognosis of this comorbidity, along with the development of new drugs and interventional approaches may improve the management and long-term outcome of COPD-IHD patients. The aim of this review is to describe the current knowledge on COPD-IHD comorbidity. Particularly, we focused our attention on underlying pathological mechanisms and on all treatment and strategies that may improve and optimize the clinical management of COPD-IHD patients. PMID:25645653

  19. Inhaled treatment for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: what's new and how does it fit?

    PubMed

    Currie, G P; Lipworth, B J

    2016-08-01

    Since chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by progressive airflow obstruction, inhaled bronchodilators form the mainstay of treatment. A variety of new inhaled drugs and inhaler devices have recently been licensed and approved for prescribing to patients with COPD; many such drugs have been formulated in devices to deliver two different drugs at the same time. The evidence based review article highlights all of the drugs now licensed, describes some of the evidence surrounding their use and highlights practical steps in helping decide when these drugs should be considered in the context of guidelines. PMID:26559079

  20. The chronic obstructive pulmonary disease comorbidity spectrum in Japan differs from that in western countries.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Saeko; Betsuyaku, Tomoko

    2015-11-01

    Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) frequently suffer from various comorbidities, such as cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, depression, malnutrition, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and lung cancer. These comorbidities have a significant impact on disease severity and survival. In fact, guidelines from both the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease and the Japanese Respiratory Society recommend that physicians take comorbidities into account when they evaluate COPD severity. These guidelines also emphasize the importance of managing comorbidities alongside airway obstruction in COPD. The mechanisms by which the many COPD-related comorbidities develop are still unclear. Aging and smoking are well-established as major factors. However, systemic inflammation may also contribute to the disease process. Having developed from the classical theory to differentiate COPD patients into "pink puffers" and "blue bloaters", COPD is now generally considered as a heterogeneous condition. On this point, we have noticed that the characteristics of Japanese COPD patients tend to differ from those of Westerners. Specifically, Japanese patients tend to be older, to have lower body mass index, to suffer from emphysema-dominant lung disease, and to experience exacerbations less frequently. The comorbidity spectrum of Japanese COPD patients also seems to differ from that of Westerners. For instance, in Japanese patients, cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome are less prevalent, whereas osteoporosis and malnutrition are more frequent. In order to treat Japanese COPD patients optimally, we must pay particular attention to their unique demographics and comorbidity spectrum, which contrast with those of Western COPD patients. PMID:26521103

  1. Mortality from lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in New Mexico, 1958-82.

    PubMed Central

    Samet, J M; Wiggins, C L; Key, C R; Becker, T M

    1988-01-01

    We examined mortality from lung cancer and from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Hispanic White, Other White, and Native American residents of New Mexico during the period 1958-82. Age-specific mortality was calculated by combining death certificate data with population estimates based on the 1960, 1970, and 1980 censuses that were adjusted for inconsistencies in the designation of race and ethnicity. In Other Whites, age-adjusted mortality rates from lung cancer and from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease increased progressively in males and females. Mortality rates for both diseases also increased in Hispanics during the study period, but the most recent rates for Hispanics were well below those for Other Whites. Age-specific mortality rates for lung cancer declined for more recently born Hispanic women at older ages. In Native Americans, rates for both diseases were low throughout the study period and did not show consistent temporal trends. PMID:3407816

  2. Risk stratification for cardiac death in hemodialysis patients without obstructive coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Masato; Tsukamoto, Kazumasa; Tamaki, Nagara; Kikuchi, Kenjiro; Iwamoto, Noriyuki; Ono, Toshihiko

    2011-02-01

    The incidence of cardiac death is higher among patients receiving dialysis compared with the general population. Although obstructive coronary artery disease is involved in cardiac deaths in the general population, deaths in hemodialysis patients occur in the apparent absence of obstructive coronary artery disease. To study this further, we prospectively enrolled 155 patients receiving hemodialysis after angiography had confirmed the absence of obstructive coronary lesions. All patients were examined by single-photon emission computed tomography using the iodinated fatty acid analog, BMIPP, the uptake of which was graded in 17 standard myocardial segments and assessed as summed scores. Insulin resistance was determined using the homeostasis model assessment index of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). During a mean follow-up of 5.1 years, 42 patients died of cardiac events. Stepwise Cox hazard analysis associated cardiac death with reduced BMIPP uptake and increased insulin resistance. Patients were assigned to subgroups based on BMIPP summed scores and HOMA-IR cutoff values for cardiac death of 12 and 5.1, respectively, determined by receiver operating characteristic analysis. Cardiac death-free survival rates at 5 years were the lowest (32.2%) in the subgroup with both a summed score and assessment equal to or above the cutoff values compared with any other combination (52.9-98.7%) above, equal to, or below the thresholds. Thus, impaired myocardial fatty acid metabolism and insulin resistance may be associated with cardiac death among hemodialysis patients without obstructive coronary artery disease. PMID:20944544

  3. [Possible side effects of drugs in elderly patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and comorbidity].

    PubMed

    Malykhin, F T; Baturin, V A

    2016-01-01

    the papers gives data on the positive effects and adverse reactions of drugs used to treat chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and its comorbidity, first of all cardiovascular disease. The authors present alternative points of views based on both the data available in the literature and their findings. they propose to modify pharmacotherapy for COPD in the presence of comorbidity in patients of old age groups. PMID:27191019

  4. Preliminary studies: differences in microRNA expression in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Pająk, Aneta; Górski, Paweł; Kuna, Piotr; Szemraj, Janusz; Goździńska-Nielepkowicz, Agnieszka; Pietras, Tadeusz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The asthma- and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)-related morbidity has been increasing during the recent years. Both asthma and COPD are diseases of inflammatory etiology. The increasing interest in the pathomechanisms involved in the development of obstructive pulmonary diseases seems to be fully justified. Recent research has attempted to determine the associations of microRNA with the pathogenesis of pulmonary diseases. Aim To assess the expression of microRNA in the blood sera of patients diagnosed with bronchial asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in comparison with healthy subjects. Material and methods In our study, at the preliminary stage, we compared the expression of miRNA in the groups of patients with asthma and COPD versus the control group of healthy subjects. Results A significant difference in hsa-miRNA-224, hsa-miRNA-339-5p, hsa-miRNA-382 in patients with asthma and COPD as compared with the controls was noted. Conclusions With such difference of expression of specific micro-RNA in serum of patient with asthma and COPD, those small non-coding RNA has to play a significant role in those diseases pathway. Therefore we expect to increase the size and differentation of the study groups in next studies. PMID:27605898

  5. Long-term IL-33–producing epithelial progenitor cells in chronic obstructive lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Byers, Derek E.; Alexander-Brett, Jennifer; Patel, Anand C.; Agapov, Eugene; Dang-Vu, Geoffrey; Jin, Xiaohua; Wu, Kangyun; You, Yingjian; Alevy, Yael; Girard, Jean-Philippe; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S.; Patterson, G. Alexander; Pierce, Richard A.; Brody, Steven L.; Holtzman, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive lung disease is characterized by persistent abnormalities in epithelial and immune cell function that are driven, at least in part, by infection. Analysis of parainfluenza virus infection in mice revealed an unexpected role for innate immune cells in IL-13–dependent chronic lung disease, but the upstream driver for the immune axis in this model and in humans with similar disease was undefined. We demonstrate here that lung levels of IL-33 are selectively increased in postviral mice with chronic obstructive lung disease and in humans with very severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In the mouse model, IL-33/IL-33 receptor signaling was required for Il13 and mucin gene expression, and Il33 gene expression was localized to a virus-induced subset of airway serous cells and a constitutive subset of alveolar type 2 cells that are both linked conventionally to progenitor function. In humans with COPD, IL33 gene expression was also associated with IL13 and mucin gene expression, and IL33 induction was traceable to a subset of airway basal cells with increased capacities for pluripotency and ATP-regulated release of IL-33. Together, these findings provide a paradigm for the role of the innate immune system in chronic disease based on the influence of long-term epithelial progenitor cells programmed for excess IL-33 production. PMID:23945235

  6. Evaluation of C-Reactive Protein in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Simonovska, Ljiljana; Ahmeti, Irfan; Mitreski, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is associated with evidence of systemic oxidative stress, activation of circulating inflammatory cells and increased plasma level of proinflamatory cytokines which include C-reactive protein (CRP). CRP is one biomarker of extrapulmonary or systemic consequences of COPD that can be detected. AIM: The aim of this research is to determine whether the level of CRP statistically significantly correlates with the level of bronchial obstruction and the accompanying co-morbidities in patients with COPD. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This study included 80 patients with exacerbation of COPD, hospitalised at the Institute for Lung Diseases and Tuberculosis in Skopje. We measured the level of CRP in the blood in all of these patients in fasting conditions. The classification of COPD patients by the severity of airflow limitation was made according to the actual version of the Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD). The Student’s Independent Samples t-test was used for the statistic analysis of the data. RESULTS: In 52 (65%) of the patients with exacerbation of COPD we detected an increase of the mean value of CRP. The statistical analysis using the Student’s t-test showed statistically significant differences in the mean value of CRP in patients with different level of bronchial obstruction. Hypertension, heart failure, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, coronary disease, and CVI were confirmed as co-morbidities in 45 (73.1%) of the patients, hypertension being the most frequent one (40%). The statistical analysis using the Student’s t-test showed statistically significant difference of the mean value of CRP (p< 0.01) depending on the number of co-morbidities. CONCLUSION: In 52 (65%) of the patients with exacerbation of COPD, were detected an increase of the mean value of CRP. The mean values of CRP statistically significantly correlate with the level of bronchial obstruction and the number of co

  7. COPD in Nonsmokers: Reports from the Tunisian Population-Based Burden of Obstructive Lung Disease Study

    PubMed Central

    Denguezli, Meriam; Daldoul, Hager; Harrabi, Imed; Gnatiuc, Louisa; Coton, Sonia; Burney, Peter; Tabka, Zouhair

    2016-01-01

    Background It’s currently well known that smoking and increasing age constitute the most important risk factors for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, little is known about COPD among nonsmokers. The present study aimed to investigate prevalence, risk factors and the profiles of COPD among nonsmokers based on the Tunisian Burden of Obstructive Lung Disease (BOLD) study. Methods 807 adults aged 40 years+ were randomly selected from the general population. We collected information about history of respiratory disease, risk factors for COPD and quality of life. Post-bronchodilator spirometry was performed for assessment of COPD. COPD diagnostic was based on the post-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC ratio, according to the Global Initiative for Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) guidelines. The lower limit of normal (LLN) was determined as an alternative threshold for the FEV1/FVC ratio. Results and Conclusions Among 485 nonsmokers, 4.7% met the criteria for GOLD grade I and higher COPD. These proportions were similar even when the LLN was used as a threshold. None of the nonsmokers with COPD reported a previous doctor diagnosis of COPD compared to 7.1% of smokers. Nonsmokers accounted for 45.1% of the subjects fulfilling the GOLD spirometric criteria of COPD. Nonsmokers were predominately men and reported more asthma problems than obstructed smokers. Among nonsmokers significantly more symptoms and higher co-morbidity were found among those with COPD. Increasing age, male gender, occupational exposure, lower body mass index and a previous diagnosis of asthma are associated with increased risk for COPD in nonsmokers. This study confirms previous evidence that nonsmokers comprise a substantial proportion of individuals with COPD. Nonsmokers with COPD have a specific profile and should, thus, receive far greater attention to prevent and treat chronic airway obstruction. PMID:27010214

  8. Connectivity Map Analysis of Nonsense-Mediated Decay–Positive BMPR2-Related Hereditary Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Provides Insights into Disease Penetrance

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Charles; Zheng, Siyuan; Yan, Ling; Hedges, Lora; Womack, Bethany; Fessel, Josh; Cogan, Joy; Austin, Eric; Loyd, James; West, James; Zhao, Zhongming

    2012-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the reduced penetrance seen in the nonsense-mediated decay–positive (NMD+) BMPR2 mutation–associated hereditary pulmonary arterial hypertension (HPAH) remain unknown. We reasoned that the cellular and genetic mechanisms behind this phenomenon could be uncovered by combining expression profiling with Connectivity Map (cMap) analysis. Cultured lymphocytes from 10 patients with HPAH and 10 matched familial control subjects, all with NMD+ BMPR2 mutations, were subjected to expression analysis. For each group, the expression data were combined before analysis. This generated a signature of 23 up-regulated and 12 down-regulated genes in patients with HPAH compared with control subjects (the “PAH penetrance signature”). Although gene set enrichment analysis of this signature was not uniquely informative, cMap analysis identified drugs with expression signatures similar to the PAH penetrance signature. Several of these drugs were predicted to influence reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. This hypothesis was tested and confirmed in the same cells initially subjected to the expression analysis using quantitative biochemical detection of ROS concentration. We conclude that expression of the PAH penetrance signature represents an increased risk of developing clinical HPAH and that ROS formation may play a role in pathogenesis of HPAH. These results provide the first molecular insights into NMD+ BMPR2 related HPAH penetrance and highlight the potential utility of cMap analyses in pulmonary research. PMID:22312021

  9. Lung hyperinflation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: mechanisms, clinical implications and treatment.

    PubMed

    Langer, Daniel; Ciavaglia, Casey E; Neder, J Alberto; Webb, Katherine A; O'Donnell, Denis E

    2014-12-01

    Lung hyperinflation is highly prevalent in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and occurs across the continuum of the disease. A growing body of evidence suggests that lung hyperinflation contributes to dyspnea and activity limitation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and is an important independent risk factor for mortality. In this review, we will summarize the recent literature on pathogenesis and clinical implications of lung hyperinflation. We will outline the contribution of lung hyperinflation to exercise limitation and discuss its impact on symptoms and physical activity. Finally, we will examine the physiological rationale and efficacy of selected pharmacological and non-pharmacological 'lung deflating' interventions aimed at improving symptoms and physical functioning. PMID:25159007

  10. Does right ventricular function predict survival in patients with chronic obstructive lung disease?

    PubMed Central

    France, A J; Prescott, R J; Biernacki, W; Muir, A L; MacNee, W

    1988-01-01

    Non-invasive measurements of the right ventricular ejection fraction by radionuclide ventriculography were made in 115 patients with chronic obstructive lung disease. Survival was assessed over a mean period of 918 days. The right ventricular ejection fraction was reasonably normal in most patients (mean 0.42, range 0.10-0.66) but was lower in those with peripheral oedema, indicating cor pulmonale (mean 0.31 (SD 0.07); p less than 0.0001). Right ventricular ejection fraction was related to survival, but the relationship was weak (p = 0.03) by comparison with the association between the arterial oxygen and carbon dioxide tensions and survival (both p less than 0.0001). It is concluded that, although right ventricular function is predictive of survival in patients with chronic obstructive lung disease, it is probably a reflection of severity of disease and does not directly affect the prognosis. PMID:3175974