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Sample records for occipital cortex loc

  1. Disambiguating the roles of area V1 and the lateral occipital complex (LOC) in contour integration.

    PubMed

    Shpaner, Marina; Molholm, Sophie; Forde, Emmajane; Foxe, John J

    2013-04-01

    Contour integration, the linking of collinear but disconnected visual elements across space, is an essential facet of object and scene perception. Here, we set out to arbitrate between two previously advanced mechanisms of contour integration: serial facilitative interactions between collinear cells in the primary visual cortex (V1) versus pooling of inputs in higher-order visual areas. To this end, we used high-density electrophysiological recordings to assess the spatio-temporal dynamics of brain activity in response to Gabor contours embedded in Gabor noise (so-called "pathfinder displays") versus control stimuli. Special care was taken to elicit and detect early activity stemming from the primary visual cortex, as indexed by the C1 component of the visual evoked potential. Arguing against a purely early V1 account, there was no evidence for contour-related modulations within the C1 timeframe (50-100 ms). Rather, the earliest effects were observed within the timeframe of the N1 component (160-200 ms) and inverse source analysis pointed to principle generators in the lateral occipital complex (LOC) within the ventral visual stream. Source anlaysis also suggested that it was only during this relatively late processing period that contextual effects emerged in hierarchically early visual regions (i.e. V1/V2), consistent with a more distributed process involving recurrent feedback/feedforward interactions between LOC and early visual sensory regions. The distribution of effects uncovered here is consistent with pooling of information in higher order cortical areas as the initial step in contour integration, and that this pooling occurs relatively late in processing rather than during the initial sensory-processing period. PMID:23201366

  2. Neural Responses to Central and Peripheral Objects in the Lateral Occipital Cortex.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Guo, Jiayue; Yan, Tianyi; Ohno, Seiichiro; Kanazawa, Susumu; Huang, Qiang; Wu, Jinglong

    2016-01-01

    Human object recognition and classification depend on the retinal location where the object is presented and decrease as eccentricity increases. The lateral occipital complex (LOC) is thought to be preferentially involved in the processing of objects, and its neural responses exhibit category biases to objects presented in the central visual field. However, the nature of LOC neural responses to central and peripheral objects remains largely unclear. In the present study, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and a wide-view presentation system to investigate neural responses to four categories of objects (faces, houses, animals, and cars) in the primary visual cortex (V1) and the lateral visual cortex, including the LOC and the retinotopic areas LO-1 and LO-2. In these regions, the neural responses to objects decreased as the distance between the location of presentation and center fixation increased, which is consistent with the diminished perceptual ability that was found for peripherally presented images. The LOC and LO-2 exhibited significantly positive neural responses to all eccentricities (0-55°), but LO-1 exhibited significantly positive responses only to central eccentricities (0-22°). By measuring the ratio relative to V1 (RRV1), we further demonstrated that eccentricity, category and the interaction between them significantly affected neural processing in these regions. LOC, LO-1, and LO-2 exhibited larger RRV1s when stimuli were presented at an eccentricity of 0° compared to when they were presented at the greater eccentricities. In LOC and LO-2, the RRV1s for images of faces, animals and cars showed an increasing trend when the images were presented at eccentricities of 11 to 33°. However, the RRV1s for houses showed a decreasing trend in LO-1 and no difference in the LOC and LO-2. We hypothesize, that when houses and the images in the other categories were presented in the peripheral visual field, they were processed via different strategies in the lateral visual cortex. PMID:26924972

  3. Neural Responses to Central and Peripheral Objects in the Lateral Occipital Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bin; Guo, Jiayue; Yan, Tianyi; Ohno, Seiichiro; Kanazawa, Susumu; Huang, Qiang; Wu, Jinglong

    2016-01-01

    Human object recognition and classification depend on the retinal location where the object is presented and decrease as eccentricity increases. The lateral occipital complex (LOC) is thought to be preferentially involved in the processing of objects, and its neural responses exhibit category biases to objects presented in the central visual field. However, the nature of LOC neural responses to central and peripheral objects remains largely unclear. In the present study, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and a wide-view presentation system to investigate neural responses to four categories of objects (faces, houses, animals, and cars) in the primary visual cortex (V1) and the lateral visual cortex, including the LOC and the retinotopic areas LO-1 and LO-2. In these regions, the neural responses to objects decreased as the distance between the location of presentation and center fixation increased, which is consistent with the diminished perceptual ability that was found for peripherally presented images. The LOC and LO-2 exhibited significantly positive neural responses to all eccentricities (0–55°), but LO-1 exhibited significantly positive responses only to central eccentricities (0–22°). By measuring the ratio relative to V1 (RRV1), we further demonstrated that eccentricity, category and the interaction between them significantly affected neural processing in these regions. LOC, LO-1, and LO-2 exhibited larger RRV1s when stimuli were presented at an eccentricity of 0° compared to when they were presented at the greater eccentricities. In LOC and LO-2, the RRV1s for images of faces, animals and cars showed an increasing trend when the images were presented at eccentricities of 11 to 33°. However, the RRV1s for houses showed a decreasing trend in LO-1 and no difference in the LOC and LO-2. We hypothesize, that when houses and the images in the other categories were presented in the peripheral visual field, they were processed via different strategies in the lateral visual cortex. PMID:26924972

  4. Impossible expectations: fMRI adaptation in the lateral occipital complex (LOC) is modulated by the statistical regularities of 3D structural information.

    PubMed

    Freud, Erez; Ganel, Tzvi; Avidan, Galia

    2015-11-15

    fMRI adaptation (fMRIa), the attenuation of fMRI signal which follows repeated presentation of a stimulus, is a well-documented phenomenon. Yet, the underlying neural mechanisms supporting this effect are not fully understood. Recently, short-term perceptual expectations, induced by specific experimental settings, were shown to play an important modulating role in fMRIa. Here we examined the role of long-term expectations, based on 3D structural statistical regularities, in the modulation of fMRIa. To this end, human participants underwent fMRI scanning while performing a same-different task on pairs of possible (regular, expected) objects and spatially impossible (irregular, unexpected) objects. We hypothesized that given the spatial irregularity of impossible objects in relation to real-world visual experience, the visual system would always generate a prediction which is biased to the possible version of the objects. Consistently, fMRIa effects in the lateral occipital cortex (LOC) were found for possible, but not for impossible objects. Additionally, in alternating trials the order of stimulus presentation modulated LOC activity. That is, reduced activation was observed in trials in which the impossible version of the object served as the prime object (i.e. first object) and was followed by the possible version compared to the reverse order. These results were also supported by the behavioral advantage observed for trials that were primed by possible objects. Together, these findings strongly emphasize the importance of perceptual expectations in object representation and provide novel evidence for the role of real-world statistical regularities in eliciting fMRIa. PMID:26254586

  5. Occipital cortex of blind individuals is functionally coupled with executive control areas of frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Deen, Ben; Saxe, Rebecca; Bedny, Marina

    2015-08-01

    In congenital blindness, the occipital cortex responds to a range of nonvisual inputs, including tactile, auditory, and linguistic stimuli. Are these changes in functional responses to stimuli accompanied by altered interactions with nonvisual functional networks? To answer this question, we introduce a data-driven method that searches across cortex for functional connectivity differences across groups. Replicating prior work, we find increased fronto-occipital functional connectivity in congenitally blind relative to blindfolded sighted participants. We demonstrate that this heightened connectivity extends over most of occipital cortex but is specific to a subset of regions in the inferior, dorsal, and medial frontal lobe. To assess the functional profile of these frontal areas, we used an n-back working memory task and a sentence comprehension task. We find that, among prefrontal areas with overconnectivity to occipital cortex, one left inferior frontal region responds to language over music. By contrast, the majority of these regions responded to working memory load but not language. These results suggest that in blindness occipital cortex interacts more with working memory systems and raise new questions about the function and mechanism of occipital plasticity. PMID:25803598

  6. Relevance of Spectral Cues for Auditory Spatial Processing in the Occipital Cortex of the Blind

    PubMed Central

    Voss, Patrice; Lepore, Franco; Gougoux, Frdric; Zatorre, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    We have previously shown that some blind individuals can localize sounds more accurately than their sighted counterparts when one ear is obstructed, and that this ability is strongly associated with occipital cortex activity. Given that spectral cues are important for monaurally localizing sounds when one ear is obstructed, and that blind individuals are more sensitive to small spectral differences, we hypothesized that enhanced use of spectral cues via occipital cortex mechanisms could explain the better performance of blind individuals in monaural localization. Using positron-emission tomography (PET), we scanned blind and sighted persons as they discriminated between sounds originating from a single spatial position, but with different spectral profiles that simulated different spatial positions based on head-related transfer functions. We show here that a sub-group of early blind individuals showing superior monaural sound localization abilities performed significantly better than any other group on this spectral discrimination task. For all groups, performance was best for stimuli simulating peripheral positions, consistent with the notion that spectral cues are more helpful for discriminating peripheral sources. PET results showed that all blind groups showed cerebral blood flow increases in the occipital cortex; but this was also the case in the sighted group. A voxel-wise covariation analysis showed that more occipital recruitment was associated with better performance across all blind subjects but not the sighted. An inter-regional covariation analysis showed that the occipital activity in the blind covaried with that of several frontal and parietal regions known for their role in auditory spatial processing. Overall, these results support the notion that the superior ability of a sub-group of early-blind individuals to localize sounds is mediated by their superior ability to use spectral cues, and that this ability is subserved by cortical processing in the occipital cortex. PMID:21716600

  7. The causal role of the occipital face area (OFA) and lateral occipital (LO) cortex in symmetry perception.

    PubMed

    Bona, Silvia; Cattaneo, Zaira; Silvanto, Juha

    2015-01-14

    Symmetry is an important cue in face and object perception. Here we used fMRI-guided transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to shed light on the role of the occipital face area (OFA), a key region in face processing, and the lateral occipital (LO) cortex, a key area in object processing, in symmetry detection. In the first experiment, we applied TMS over the rightOFA, its left homolog (leftOFA), rightLO, and vertex (baseline) while participants were discriminating between symmetric and asymmetric dot patterns. Stimulation of rightOFA and rightLO impaired performance, causally implicating these two regions in detection of symmetry in low-level dot configurations. TMS over rightLO but not rightOFA also significantly impaired detection of nonsymmetric shapes defined by collinear Gabor patches, demonstrating that rightOFA responds to symmetry but not to all cues mediating figure-ground segregation. The second experiment showed a causal role for rightOFA but not rightLO in facial symmetry detection. Overall, our results demonstrate that both the rightOFA and rightLO are sensitive to symmetry in dot patterns, whereas only rightOFA is causally involved in facial symmetry detection. PMID:25589766

  8. Engagement of Fusiform Cortex and Disengagement of Lateral Occipital Cortex in the Acquisition of Radiological Expertise

    PubMed Central

    Harley, Erin M.; Pope, Whitney B.; Villablanca, J. Pablo; Mumford, Jeanette; Suh, Robert; Mazziotta, John C.; Enzmann, Dieter

    2009-01-01

    The human visual pathways that are specialized for object recognition stretch from lateral occipital cortex (LO) to the ventral surface of the temporal lobe, including the fusiform gyrus. Plasticity in these pathways supports the acquisition of visual expertise, but precisely how training affects the different regions remains unclear. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to measure neural activity in both LO and the fusiform gyrus in radiologists as they detected abnormalities in chest radiographs. Activity in the right fusiform face area (FFA) correlated with visual expertise, measured as behavioral performance during scanning. In contrast, activity in left LO correlated negatively with expertise, and the amount of LO that responded to radiographs was smaller in experts than in novices. Activity in the FFA and LO correlated negatively in experts, whereas in novices, the 2 regions showed no stable relationship. Together, these results suggest that the FFA becomes more engaged and left LO less engaged in interpreting radiographic images over the course of training. Achieving expert visual performance may involve suppressing existing neural representations while simultaneously developing others. PMID:19321653

  9. Role of the human retrosplenial cortex/parieto-occipital sulcus in perspective priming.

    PubMed

    Sulpizio, Valentina; Committeri, Giorgia; Lambrey, Simon; Berthoz, Alain; Galati, Gaspare

    2016-01-15

    The ability to imagine the world from a different viewpoint is a fundamental competence for spatial reorientation and for imagining what another individual sees in the environment. Here, we investigated the neural bases of such an ability using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Healthy participants detected target displacements across consecutive views of a familiar virtual room, either from the perspective of an avatar (primed condition) or in the absence of such a prime (unprimed condition). In the primed condition, the perspective at test always corresponded to the avatar's perspective, while in the unprimed condition it was randomly chosen as 0, 45 or 135deg of viewpoint rotation. We observed a behavioral advantage in performing a perspective transformation during the primed condition as compared to an equivalent amount of unprimed perspective change. Although many cortical regions (dorsal parietal, parieto-temporo-occipital junction, precuneus and retrosplenial cortex/parieto-occipital sulcus or RSC/POS) were involved in encoding and retrieving target location from different perspectives and were modulated by the amount of viewpoint rotation, the RSC/POS was the only area showing decreased activity in the primed as compared to the unprimed condition, suggesting that this region anticipates the upcoming perspective change. The retrosplenial cortex/parieto-occipital sulcus appears to play a special role in the allocentric coding of heading directions. PMID:26484830

  10. V1 surface size predicts GABA concentration in medial occipital cortex.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Johanna; Pilatus, Ulrich; Genç, Erhan; Kohler, Axel; Singer, Wolf; Pearson, Joel

    2016-01-01

    A number of recent studies have established a link between behavior and the anatomy of the primary visual cortex (V1). However, one often-raised criticism has been that these studies provide little insight into the mechanisms of the observed relationships. As inhibitory neural interactions have been postulated as an important mechanism for those behaviors related to V1 anatomy, we measured the concentration of inhibitory gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) in the medial occipital cortex where V1 is located using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and estimated the surface area of V1 using fMRI retinotopic mapping. We found a significant positive relationship between GABA concentration and V1 surface area. This relationship was present irrespective of whether the MRS voxel had a fixed size across participants or was proportionally sized to each individual's V1 surface area. Hence, individuals with a larger V1 had a higher GABA concentration in the medial occipital cortex. By tying together V1 size and GABA concentration, our findings point towards individual differences in the level of neural inhibition that might partially mediate the relationships between behavior and V1 neuroanatomy. In addition, they illustrate how stable microscopic properties of neural activity and function are reflected in macro-measures of V1 structure. PMID:26416651

  11. Orienting Auditory Spatial Attention Engages Frontal Eye Fields and Medial Occipital Cortex in Congenitally Blind Humans

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Arun; Schwartz, Daniel; Stevens, Alexander A.

    2007-01-01

    What happens in vision related cortical areas when congenitally blind (CB) individuals orient attention to spatial locations? Previous neuroimaging of sighted individuals has found overlapping activation in a network of frontoparietal areas including frontal eye-fields (FEF), during both overt (with eye movement) and covert (without eye movement) shifts of spatial attention. Since voluntary eye movement planning seems irrelevant in CB, their FEF neurons should be recruited for alternative functions if their attentional role in sighted individuals is only due to eye movement planning. Recent neuroimaging of the blind has also reported activation in medial occipital areas, normally associated with visual processing, during a diverse set of non-visual tasks, but their response to attentional shifts remains poorly understood. Here, we used event-related fMRI to explore FEF and medial occipital areas in CB individuals and sighted controls with eyes closed (SC) performing a covert attention orienting task, using endogenous verbal cues and spatialized auditory targets. We found robust stimulus-locked FEF activation of all CB subjects, similar but stronger than in SC, suggesting that FEF plays a role in endogenous orienting of covert spatial attention even in individuals in whom voluntary eye movements are irrelevant. We also found robust activation in bilateral medial occipital cortex in CB but not in SC subjects. The response decreased below baseline following endogenous verbal cues but increased following auditory targets, suggesting that the medial occipital area in CB does not directly engage during cued orienting of attention but may be recruited for processing of spatialized auditory targets. PMID:17397882

  12. Extrastriate visual cortex reorganizes despite sequential bilateral occipital stroke: implications for vision recovery

    PubMed Central

    Brodtmann, Amy; Puce, Aina; Darby, David; Donnan, Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    The extent of visual cortex reorganization following injury remains controversial. We report serial functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data from a patient with sequential posterior circulation strokes occurring 3 weeks apart, compared with data from an age-matched healthy control subject. At 8 days following a left occipital stroke, contralesional visual cortical activation was within expected striate and extrastriate sites, comparable to that seen in controls. Despite a further infarct in the right (previously unaffected hemisphere), there was evolution of visual cortical reorganization progressed. In this patient, there was evidence of utilization of peri-infarct sites (right-sided) and recruitment of new activation sites in extrastriate cortices, including in the lateral middle and inferior temporal lobes. The changes over time corresponded topographically with the patient's lesion site and its connections. Reorganization of the surviving visual cortex was demonstrated 8 days after the first stroke. Ongoing reorganization in extant cortex was demonstrated at the 6 month scan. We present a summary of mechanisms of recovery following stroke relevant to the visual system. We conclude that mature primary visual cortex displays considerable plasticity and capacity to reorganize, associated with evolution of visual field deficits. We discuss these findings and their implications for therapy within the context of current concepts in visual compensatory and restorative therapies. PMID:25972800

  13. Recruitment of Occipital Cortex during Sensory Substitution Training Linked to Subjective Experience of Seeing in People with Blindness

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Toms; Poch, Joaqun; Santos, Juan M.; Requena, Carmen; Martnez, Ana M.; Ortiz-Tern, Laura; Turrero, Agustn; Barcia, Juan; Nogales, Ramn; Calvo, Agustn; Martnez, Jos M.; Crdoba, Jos L.; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2011-01-01

    Over three months of intensive training with a tactile stimulation device, 18 blind and 10 blindfolded seeing subjects improved in their ability to identify geometric figures by touch. Seven blind subjects spontaneously reported visual qualia, the subjective sensation of seeing flashes of light congruent with tactile stimuli. In the latter subjects tactile stimulation evoked activation of occipital cortex on electroencephalography (EEG). None of the blind subjects who failed to experience visual qualia, despite identical tactile stimulation training, showed EEG recruitment of occipital cortex. None of the blindfolded seeing humans reported visual-like sensations during tactile stimulation. These findings support the notion that the conscious experience of seeing is linked to the activation of occipital brain regions in people with blindness. Moreover, the findings indicate that provision of visual information can be achieved through non-visual sensory modalities which may help to minimize the disability of blind individuals, affording them some degree of object recognition and navigation aid. PMID:21853098

  14. Resting-state connectivity and functional specialization in human medial parieto-occipital cortex.

    PubMed

    Tosoni, Annalisa; Pitzalis, Sabrina; Committeri, Giorgia; Fattori, Patrizia; Galletti, Claudio; Galati, Gaspare

    2015-11-01

    According to recent models of visuo-spatial processing, the medial parieto-occipital cortex is a crucial node of the dorsal visual stream. Evidence from neurophysiological studies in monkeys has indicated that the parieto-occipital sulcus (POS) contains three functionally and cytoarchitectonically distinct areas: the visual area V6 in the fundus of the POS, and the visuo-motor areas V6Av and V6Ad in a progressively dorsal and anterior location with respect to V6. Besides different topographical organization, cytoarchitectonics, and functional properties, these three monkey areas can also be distinguished based on their patterns of cortico-cortical connections. Thanks to wide-field retinotopic mapping, areas V6 and V6Av have been also mapped in the human brain. Here, using a combined approach of resting-state functional connectivity and task-evoked activity by fMRI, we identified a new region in the anterior POS showing a pattern of functional properties and cortical connections that suggests a homology with the monkey area V6Ad. In addition, we observed distinct patterns of cortical connections associated with the human V6 and V6Av which are remarkably consistent with those showed by the anatomical tracing studies in the corresponding monkey areas. Consistent with recent models on visuo-spatial processing, our findings demonstrate a gradient of functional specialization and cortical connections within the human POS, with more posterior regions primarily dedicated to the analysis of visual attributes useful for spatial navigation and more anterior regions primarily dedicated to analyses of spatial information relevant for goal-directed action. PMID:25096286

  15. Exploratory Metabolomic Analyses Reveal Compounds Correlated with Lutein Concentration in Frontal Cortex, Hippocampus, and Occipital Cortex of Human Infant Brain

    PubMed Central

    Lieblein-Boff, Jacqueline C.; Johnson, Elizabeth J.; Kennedy, Adam D.; Lai, Chron-Si; Kuchan, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Lutein is a dietary carotenoid well known for its role as an antioxidant in the macula, and recent reports implicate a role for lutein in cognitive function. Lutein is the dominant carotenoid in both pediatric and geriatric brain tissue. In addition, cognitive function in older adults correlated with macular and postmortem brain lutein concentrations. Furthermore, lutein was found to preferentially accumulate in the infant brain in comparison to other carotenoids that are predominant in diet. While lutein is consistently related to cognitive function, the mechanisms by which lutein may influence cognition are not clear. In an effort to identify potential mechanisms through which lutein might influence neurodevelopment, an exploratory study relating metabolite signatures and lutein was completed. Post-mortem metabolomic analyses were performed on human infant brain tissues in three regions important for learning and memory: the frontal cortex, hippocampus, and occipital cortex. Metabolomic profiles were compared to lutein concentration, and correlations were identified and reported here. A total of 1276 correlations were carried out across all brain regions. Of 427 metabolites analyzed, 257 were metabolites of known identity. Unidentified metabolite correlations (510) were excluded. In addition, moderate correlations with xenobiotic relationships (2) or those driven by single outliers (3) were excluded from further study. Lutein concentrations correlated with lipid pathway metabolites, energy pathway metabolites, brain osmolytes, amino acid neurotransmitters, and the antioxidant homocarnosine. These correlations were often brain region—specific. Revealing relationships between lutein and metabolic pathways may help identify potential candidates on which to complete further analyses and may shed light on important roles of lutein in the human brain during development. PMID:26317757

  16. Repetition Suppression for Speech Processing in the Associative Occipital and Parietal Cortex of Congenitally Blind Adults

    PubMed Central

    Arnaud, Laureline; Sato, Marc; Ménard, Lucie; Gracco, Vincent L.

    2013-01-01

    In the congenitally blind (CB), sensory deprivation results in cross-modal plasticity, with visual cortical activity observed for various auditory tasks. This reorganization has been associated with enhanced auditory abilities and the recruitment of visual brain areas during sound and language processing. The questions we addressed are whether visual cortical activity might also be observed in CB during passive listening to auditory speech and whether cross-modal plasticity is associated with adaptive differences in neuronal populations compared to sighted individuals (SI). We focused on the neural substrate of vowel processing in CB and SI adults using a repetition suppression (RS) paradigm. RS has been associated with enhanced or accelerated neural processing efficiency and synchronous activity between interacting brain regions. We evaluated whether cortical areas in CB were sensitive to RS during repeated vowel processing and whether there were differences across the two groups. In accordance with previous studies, both groups displayed a RS effect in the posterior temporal cortex. In the blind, however, additional occipital, temporal and parietal cortical regions were associated with predictive processing of repeated vowel sounds. The findings suggest a more expanded role for cross-modal compensatory effects in blind persons during sound and speech processing and a functional transfer of specific adaptive properties across neural regions as a consequence of sensory deprivation at birth. PMID:23717628

  17. Occipital cortex activation by long-term repetitive tactile stimulation is necessary for object recognition in blinds: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Tomás; Poch, Joaquín; Santos, Juan M; Martínez, Ana M; Ortiz-Terán, Laura; Requena, Carmen; Barcia, Juan A; de Erausquin, Gabriel A; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2014-06-01

    Tactile vision has been approached from a variety of angles using different techniques. So far, a certain kind of object (and text) recognition has been shown, though seeing as such has not been achieved yet, and it remains unclear. Trough repetitive passive tactile stimulation perceptual processing is transferred from temporo-parietal to occipital areas, which affects object recognition. We report the results of passive tactile stimulation, as well as rTMS, applied to a 50 year old left handed blind male with over 97% loss of vision, who suffers from Peter's anomaly and microphthalmia. After 15 weeks of passive tactile stimulation, the subject showed increased activity in occipital areas associated with the development of visual-like perception which remained unchanged after three months without passive tactile stimulation. Inhibitory rTMS over the visual cortex led to noticeable reduction of spatial recognition performance and visual sensations in this subject. Stable changes in occipital cortical activity can be associated with subjective sensations of seeing. Once occipital activation has been achieved, it is necessary for spatial object recognition. Both facts highlight the implication of occipital areas in tactile vision and the cortical plasticity of passive tactile long-term stimulation in people with blindness. PMID:23819463

  18. Functional interactions of feature-selective responses in MT+ and LOC and primary visual cortex in dynamic feature interpolation during apparent motion.

    PubMed

    Ma, Feilong; Shim, Won Mok

    2015-01-01

    When a static stimulus appears at two locations in succession, one can perceive the illusion of apparent motion (AM) across the two locations. Previous research using fMRI and a forward encoding model shows that intermediate visual features of a transforming object, which are absent in the retinal input but are spatiotemporally interpolated during AM, are reconstructed in population-level feature-selective tuning responses in the region of V1 corresponding to the AM path (Familiar, Chong, & Shim, 2014 VSS). However, little is known about how this interpolated feature information is reconstructed in non-stimulated regions of early visual cortex via top-down processing. Here using fMRI and a novel method of feature channel-based functional connectivity we examined functional interactions between the region of V1 that is retinotopically mapped to the AM path (V1-AM path) and high-level visual areas that are implicated in motion and shape processing (MT+ and LOC) during the perception of AM. Participants viewed rotational AM between two oriented gratings in the periphery and the population-level orientation channel responses in the V1-AM path, MT+ and LOC ROIs were reconstructed. We used the response at each orientation channel as input to compute channel-based inter-area correlations between V1 and each of the higher-level areas. The results showed that correlations between V1-AM path and MT+, as well as V1-AM path and LOC, were higher at orientation channels corresponding to the interpolated orientations on the AM path (0° or 90° depending on AM condition) when AM was perceived compared to when AM was abolished by simultaneously presenting the two gratings. This channel-selective increase in functional connectivity was not evident at other orientation channels. These results suggest that signals from high-level motion and shape processing areas, such as MT+ and LOC, may provide feedback information that mediates dynamic feature reconstruction in early retinotopic cortex during AM. Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015. PMID:26326175

  19. Anodal-tDCS over the human right occipital cortex enhances the perception and memory of both faces and objects.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Marica; Negrini, Marcello; Nitsche, Michael A; Rivolta, Davide

    2016-01-29

    Accurate face processing skills are pivotal for typical social cognition, and impairments in this ability characterise various clinical conditions (e.g., prosopagnosia). No study to date has investigated whether transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) can causally enhance face processing. In addition, the category- and the process-specificity of tDCS effects, as well as the role of the timing of neuromodulation with respect to the execution of cognitive tasks are still unknown. In this single-blind, sham-controlled study, we examined whether the administration of anodal-tDCS (a-tDCS) over the right occipital cortex of healthy volunteers (N=64) enhances performance on perceptual and memory tasks involving both face and object stimuli. Neuromodulation was delivered in two conditions: online (a-tDCS during task execution) and offline (a-tDCS before task execution). The results demonstrate that offline a-tDCS enhances the perception and memory performance of both faces and objects. There was no effect of online a-tDCS on behaviour. Furthermore, the offline effect was site-specific since a-tDCS over the sensory-motor cortex did not lead to behavioural changes. Our results add relevant information about the breadth of cognitive processes and visual stimuli that can be modulated by tDCS, and about the design of effective neuromodulation protocols, which have implications for advancing theories in cognitive neuroscience and clinical applications. PMID:26744225

  20. Development of neuropeptide Y (NPY) immunoreactive neurons in the rat occipital cortex: A combined immunohistochemical-autoradiographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Cavanagh, M.E.; Parnavelas, J.G. )

    1990-07-22

    The postnatal development of neuropeptide Y (NPY)-immunoreactive neurons, previously labeled with (3H)thymidine on embryonic days E14-E21, has been studied in the rat occipital cortex. Immunohistochemistry combined with autoradiography showed evidence of a modified inside-out pattern of maturation. NPY-neurons are generated between E14 and E20 and are found in layers II-VI of the cortex and the subcortical white matter. NPY neurons from all these birthdates are overproduced at first, although cells generated at E16 produce the greatest excess, followed by E15 and E17. Some of these transient neurons are found in the wrong layer for their birthdates, and their elimination produces a more correct alignment at maturity. However, most of the NPY neurons that survive are generated at E17, and these cells are found throughout layers II-VI with a preponderance in layer VI. This evidence is strongly suggestive of cell death rather than merely cessation of production of NPY.

  1. Neural mechanisms of feature conjunction learning: enduring changes in occipital cortex after a week of training.

    PubMed

    Frank, Sebastian M; Reavis, Eric A; Tse, Peter U; Greenlee, Mark W

    2014-04-01

    Most visual activities, whether reading, driving, or playing video games, require rapid detection and identification of learned patterns defined by arbitrary conjunctions of visual features. Initially, such detection is slow and inefficient, but it can become fast and efficient with training. To determine how the brain learns to process conjunctions of visual features efficiently, we trained participants over eight consecutive days to search for a target defined by an arbitrary conjunction of color and location among distractors with a different conjunction of the same features. During each training session, we measured brain activity with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The speed of visual search for feature conjunctions improved dramatically within just a few days. These behavioral improvements were correlated with increased neural responses to the stimuli in visual cortex. This suggests that changes in neural processing in visual cortex contribute to the speeding up of visual feature conjunction search. We find evidence that this effect is driven by an increase in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the BOLD signal for search targets over distractors. In a control condition where target and distractor identities were exchanged after training, learned search efficiency was abolished, suggesting that the primary improvement was perceptual learning for the search stimuli, not task-learning. Moreover, when participants were retested on the original task after nine months without further training, the acquired changes in behavior and brain activity were still present, showing that this can be an enduring form of learning and neural reorganization. PMID:23418123

  2. Transient decrease in water diffusion observed in human occipital cortex during visual stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Darquié, Anne; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Poupon, Cyril; Saint-Jalmes, Hervé; Le Bihan, Denis

    2001-01-01

    Using MRI, we report the observation of a transient decrease of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of water in the human brain visual cortex during activation by a black and white 8-Hz-flickering checkerboard. The ADC decrease was small (<1%), but significant and reproducible, and closely followed the time course of the activation paradigm. Based on the known sensitivity of diffusion MRI to cell size in tissues and on optical imaging studies that have revealed changes in the shape of neurons and glial cells during activation, the observed ADC findings have been tentatively ascribed to a transient swelling of cortical cells. These preliminary results suggest a new approach to produce images of brain activation with MRI from signals directly associated with neuronal activation, and not through changes in local blood flow. PMID:11459931

  3. Shape from sound: evidence for a shape operator in the lateral occipital cortex

    PubMed Central

    James, Thomas W.; Stevenson, Ryan A.; Kim, Sunah; VanDerKlok, Ross M.; James, Karin Harman

    2011-01-01

    A recent view of cortical functional specialization suggests that the primary organizing principle of the cortex is based on task requirements, rather than sensory modality. Consistent with this view, recent evidence suggests that a region of the lateral occipitotemporal cortex (LO) may process object shape information regardless of the modality of sensory input. There is considerable evidence that area LO is involved in processing visual and haptic shape information. However, sound can also carry acoustic cues to an objects shape, for example, when a sound is produced by an objects impact with a surface. Thus, the current study used auditory stimuli that were created from recordings of objects impacting a hard surface to test the hypothesis that area LO is also involved in auditory shape processing. The objects were of two shapes, rods and balls, and of two materials, metal and wood. Subjects were required to categorize the impact sounds in one of three tasks, 1) by the shape of the object while ignoring material, 2) by the material of the object while ignoring shape, or 3) by using all the information available. Area LO was more strongly recruited when subjects discriminated impact sounds based on the shape of the object that made them, compared to when subjects discriminated those same sounds based on material. The current findings suggest that activation in area LO is shape selective regardless of sensory input modality, and are consistent with an emerging theory of perceptual functional specialization of the brain that is task-based rather than sensory modality-based. PMID:21397616

  4. rTMS of medial parieto-occipital cortex interferes with attentional reorienting during attention and reaching tasks.

    PubMed

    Ciavarro, Marco; Ambrosini, Ettore; Tosoni, Annalisa; Committeri, Giorgia; Fattori, Patrizia; Galletti, Claudio

    2013-09-01

    Unexpected changes in the location of a target for an upcoming action require both attentional reorienting and motor planning update. In both macaque and human brain, the medial posterior parietal cortex is involved in both phenomena but its causal role is still unclear. Here we used on-line rTMS over the putative human V6A (pV6A), a reach-related region in the dorsal part of the anterior bank of the parieto-occipital sulcus, during an attention and a reaching task requiring covert shifts of attention and planning of reaching movements toward cued targets in space. We found that rTMS increased RTs to invalidly cued but not to validly cued targets during both the attention and reaching task. Furthermore, we found that rTMS induced a deviation of reaching endpoints toward visual fixation and that this deviation was larger for invalidly cued targets. The results suggest that reorienting signals are used by human pV6A area to rapidly update the current motor plan or the ongoing action when a behaviorally relevant object unexpectedly occurs in an unattended location. The current findings suggest a direct involvement of the action-related dorso-medial visual stream in attentional reorienting and a more specific role of pV6A area in the dynamic, on-line control of reaching actions. PMID:23647519

  5. Dynamic Modulation of Local Population Activity by Rhythm Phase in Human Occipital Cortex During a Visual Search Task

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Kai J.; Hermes, Dora; Honey, Christopher J.; Sharma, Mohit; Rao, Rajesh P. N.; den Nijs, Marcel; Fetz, Eberhard E.; Sejnowski, Terrence J.; Hebb, Adam O.; Ojemann, Jeffrey G.; Makeig, Scott; Leuthardt, Eric C.

    2010-01-01

    Brain rhythms are more than just passive phenomena in visual cortex. For the first time, we show that the physiology underlying brain rhythms actively suppresses and releases cortical areas on a second-to-second basis during visual processing. Furthermore, their influence is specific at the scale of individual gyri. We quantified the interaction between broadband spectral change and brain rhythms on a second-to-second basis in electrocorticographic (ECoG) measurement of brain surface potentials in five human subjects during a visual search task. Comparison of visual search epochs with a blank screen baseline revealed changes in the raw potential, the amplitude of rhythmic activity, and in the decoupled broadband spectral amplitude. We present new methods to characterize the intensity and preferred phase of coupling between broadband power and band-limited rhythms, and to estimate the magnitude of rhythm-to-broadband modulation on a trial-by-trial basis. These tools revealed numerous coupling motifs between the phase of low-frequency (?, ?, ?, ?, and ? band) rhythms and the amplitude of broadband spectral change. In the ? and ? ranges, the coupling of phase to broadband change is dynamic during visual processing, decreasing in some occipital areas and increasing in others, in a gyrally specific pattern. Finally, we demonstrate that the rhythms interact with one another across frequency ranges, and across cortical sites. PMID:21119778

  6. Bodies are Represented as Wholes Rather Than Their Sum of Parts in the Occipital-Temporal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Brandman, Talia; Yovel, Galit

    2016-02-01

    Behavioral studies suggested that bodies are represented as wholes rather than in a part-based manner. However, neural selectivity for body stimuli is found for both whole bodies and body parts. It is therefore undetermined whether the neural representation of bodies is configural or part-based. We used functional MRI to test the role of first-order configuration on body representation in the human occipital-temporal cortex by comparing the response to a whole body versus the sum of its parts. Results show that body-selective areas, whether defined by selectivity to headless bodies or body parts, preferred whole bodies over their sum of parts and successfully decoded body configuration. This configural representation was specific to body stimuli and not found for faces. In contrast, general object areas showed no preference for wholes over parts and decoded the configuration of both bodies and faces. Finally, whereas effects of inversion on configural face representation were specific to face-selective mechanisms, effects of body inversion were not unique to body-selective mechanisms. We conclude that the neural representation of body parts is strengthened by their arrangement into an intact body, thereby demonstrating a central role of first-order configuration in the neural representation of bodies in their category-selective areas. PMID:25217470

  7. Occipital Alpha Activity during Stimulus Processing Gates the Information Flow to Object-Selective Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Zumer, Johanna M.; Scheeringa, Ren; Schoffelen, Jan-Mathijs; Norris, David G.; Jensen, Ole

    2014-01-01

    Given the limited processing capabilities of the sensory system, it is essential that attended information is gated to downstream areas, whereas unattended information is blocked. While it has been proposed that alpha band (813 Hz) activity serves to route information to downstream regions by inhibiting neuronal processing in task-irrelevant regions, this hypothesis remains untested. Here we investigate how neuronal oscillations detected by electroencephalography in visual areas during working memory encoding serve to gate information reflected in the simultaneously recorded blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) signals recorded by functional magnetic resonance imaging in downstream ventral regions. We used a paradigm in which 16 participants were presented with faces and landscapes in the right and left hemifields; one hemifield was attended and the other unattended. We observed that decreased alpha power contralateral to the attended object predicted the BOLD signal representing the attended object in ventral object-selective regions. Furthermore, increased alpha power ipsilateral to the attended object predicted a decrease in the BOLD signal representing the unattended object. We also found that the BOLD signal in the dorsal attention network inversely correlated with visual alpha power. This is the first demonstration, to our knowledge, that oscillations in the alpha band are implicated in the gating of information from the visual cortex to the ventral stream, as reflected in the representationally specific BOLD signal. This link of sensory alpha to downstream activity provides a neurophysiological substrate for the mechanism of selective attention during stimulus processing, which not only boosts the attended information but also suppresses distraction. Although previous studies have shown a relation between the BOLD signal from the dorsal attention network and the alpha band at rest, we demonstrate such a relation during a visuospatial task, indicating that the dorsal attention network exercises top-down control of visual alpha activity. PMID:25333286

  8. Occipital Neuralgia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Occipital Neuralgia Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... is being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Occipital Neuralgia? Occipital neuralgia is a distinct type of ...

  9. Crossmodal enhancement in the LOC for visuohaptic object recognition over development.

    PubMed

    Jao, R Joanne; James, Thomas W; James, Karin Harman

    2015-10-01

    Research has provided strong evidence of multisensory convergence of visual and haptic information within the visual cortex. These studies implement crossmodal matching paradigms to examine how systems use information from different sensory modalities for object recognition. Developmentally, behavioral evidence of visuohaptic crossmodal processing has suggested that communication within sensory systems develops earlier than across systems; nonetheless, it is unknown how the neural mechanisms driving these behavioral effects develop. To address this gap in knowledge, BOLD functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) was measured during delayed match-to-sample tasks that examined intramodal (visual-to-visual, haptic-to-haptic) and crossmodal (visual-to-haptic, haptic-to-visual) novel object recognition in children aged 7-8.5 years and adults. Tasks were further divided into sample encoding and test matching phases to dissociate the relative contributions of each. Results of crossmodal and intramodal object recognition revealed the network of known visuohaptic multisensory substrates, including the lateral occipital complex (LOC) and the intraparietal sulcus (IPS). Critically, both adults and children showed crossmodal enhancement within the LOC, suggesting a sensitivity to changes in sensory modality during recognition. These groups showed similar regions of activation, although children generally exhibited more widespread activity during sample encoding and weaker BOLD signal change during test matching than adults. Results further provided evidence of a bilateral region in the occipitotemporal cortex that was haptic-preferring in both age groups. This region abutted the bimodal LOtv, and was consistent with a medial to lateral organization that transitioned from a visual to haptic bias within the LOC. These findings converge with existing evidence of visuohaptic processing in the LOC in adults, and extend our knowledge of crossmodal processing in adults and children. PMID:26272239

  10. The development and organization of visuohaptic modality-biased signals in the LOC.

    PubMed

    Jao, R Joanne; James, Karin; James, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Areas of the putative visual cortex are involved in combining multisensory information about object shape. In particular, the lateral occipital complex (LOC) is a known region involved in visuohaptic object recognition. Relative to adult research, there have been few studies investigating the development of crossmodal perception of visual and haptic information, and fewer still exploring the neural substrates of this ability. In the present study, BOLD fMRI was measured in children aged 7 to 8.5 years and in adults during intramodal (visual-to-visual, haptic-to-haptic) and crossmodal (visual-to-haptic, haptic-to-visual) delayed match-to-sample recognition tasks. In both children and adults, results indicated that the ventral occipitotemporal cortex followed a medial to lateral organization in which there was a visual to haptic bias in the mapping of sensory modalities used to process shape information. These areas were adjacent to (and on either side of) an overlapping bimodal region within the LOC (corresponding to LOtv). Additionally, results showed a crossmodal enhancement effect in which crossmodal matching produced greater activation than intramodal matching in the overlapping bimodal LOC region (LOtv), but not in the medial visual-preferring or lateral haptic-preferring areas of the LOC, suggesting that this bimodal region was sensitive to sensory changes. Finally, although children and adults did not differ qualitatively in the overall patterns of neural activity, children produced more widespread, but lower intensity, activation than adults. This suggests that fundamental neural support for visuohaptic object processing is present by 7 years, but requires fine-tuning to be adult-like. Finding a haptic-preferring region in the LOC suggests that the multisensory signals integrated in the LOtv likely arrive via neighboring modality-biased regions within the LOC itself. We hypothesize that these modality-biased regions transform somatosensory and visual signals to facilitate multisensory integration in the LOtv. A future step should be identifying the exact nature of those transformations. Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015. PMID:26326548

  11. The role of the lateral occipital cortex in aesthetic appreciation of representational and abstract paintings: a TMS study.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, Zaira; Lega, Carlotta; Ferrari, Chiara; Vecchi, Tomaso; Cela-Conde, Camilo Jos; Silvanto, Juha; Nadal, Marcos

    2015-04-01

    Neuroimaging studies of aesthetic appreciation have shown that activity in the lateral occipital area (LO)-a key node in the object recognition pathway-is modulated by the extent to which visual artworks are liked or found beautiful. However, the available evidence is only correlational. Here we used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to investigate the putative causal role of LO in the aesthetic appreciation of paintings. In our first experiment, we found that interfering with LO activity during aesthetic appreciation selectively reduced evaluation of representational paintings, leaving appreciation of abstract paintings unaffected. A second experiment demonstrated that, although the perceived clearness of the images overall positively correlated with liking, the detrimental effect of LO TMS on aesthetic appreciation does not owe to TMS reducing perceived clearness. Taken together, our findings suggest that object-recognition mechanisms mediated by LO play a causal role in aesthetic appreciation of representational art. PMID:25682351

  12. Activity in the lateral occipital cortex between 200 and 300 ms distinguishes between physically identical seen and unseen stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Paradis, Anne-Lise; Yahia-Cherif, Lydia; Tallon-Baudry, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    There is converging evidence that electrophysiological responses over posterior cortical regions in the 200300 ms range distinguish between physically identical stimuli that reach consciousness or remain unseen. Here, we attempt at determining the sources of this awareness-related activity using magneto-encephalographic (MEG). Fourteen subjects were presented with faint colored gratings at threshold for contrast and reported on each trial whether the grating was seen or unseen. Subjects were primed with a color cue that could be congruent or incongruent with the color of the grating, to probe to what extent two co-localized features (color and orientation) would be bound in consciousness. The contrast between neural responses to seen and unseen physically identical gratings revealed a sustained posterior difference between 190 and 350 ms, thereby replicating prior studies. We further show that the main sources of the awareness-related activity were localized bilaterally on the lateral convexity of the occipito-temporal region, in the Lateral Occipital (LO) complex, as well as in the right posterior infero-temporal region. No activity differentiating seen and unseen trials could be observed in frontal or parietal regions in this latency range, even at lower threshold. Color congruency did not improve grating's detection, and the awareness-related activity was independent from color congruency. However, at the neural level, color congruency was processed differently in grating-present and grating-absent trials. The pattern of results suggests the existence of a neural process of color congruency engaging left parietal regions that is affected by the mere presence of another feature, whether this feature reaches consciousness or not. Altogether, our results reveal an occipital source of visual awareness insensitive to color congruency, and a simultaneous parietal source not engaged in visual awareness, but sensitive to the manipulation of co-localized features. PMID:22848195

  13. Task-related laterality effects in the lateral occipital complex.

    PubMed

    Large, Mary-Ellen; Aldcroft, Adrian; Vilis, Tutis

    2007-01-12

    Using functional imaging, we investigated the effects of two different tasks on activation in the lateral occipital complex (LOC). Alternating blocks of intact and scrambled objects were presented. In one task, subjects responded when an object repeated (matching task). In a second task subjects silently named objects (naming task). Identical objects (tools, animals and letters) were presented for both tasks. A relative measure of the number of voxels activated in LOC in left and right hemispheres was calculated for each task across a range of thresholds. Also the effects of task demands on category specific areas in LOC were examined. The object matching task resulted in proportionally more activity in the right hemisphere. The object naming task resulted in proportionally more activity in the left hemisphere, most prominently in the anterior portion of LOC. Effectively, changing the task changed the lateralization of activation to intact objects in LOC. In contrast, changing the task did not change the lateralization of category-specific activations. The results suggest that there are task-related top-down influences on the activation of neural populations in LOC as a whole, but the lateralization of category-specific regions in LOC is independent of task demands and may reflect bottom-up processing. PMID:17141747

  14. Occipital bending in depression.

    PubMed

    Maller, Jerome J; Thomson, Richard H S; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V; Anderson, Rodney; Daskalakis, Zafiris J; Fitzgerald, Paul B

    2014-06-01

    There are reports of differences in occipital lobe asymmetry within psychiatric populations when compared with healthy control subjects. Anecdotal evidence and enlarged lateral ventricles suggests that there may also be a different pattern of curvature whereby one occipital lobe wraps around the other, termed 'occipital bending'. We investigated the prevalence of occipital bending in 51 patients with major depressive disorder (males mean age = 41.96 14.00 years, females mean age = 40.71 12.41 years) and 48 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects (males mean age = 40.29 10.23 years, females mean age = 42.47 14.25 years) and found the prevalence to be three times higher among patients with major depressive disorder (18/51, 35.3%) when compared with control subjects (6/48, 12.5%). The results suggest that occipital bending is more common among patients with major depressive disorder than healthy subjects, and that occipital asymmetry and occipital bending are separate phenomena. Incomplete neural pruning may lead to the cranial space available for brain growth being restricted, or ventricular enlargement may exacerbate the natural occipital curvature patterns, subsequently causing the brain to become squashed and forced to 'wrap' around the other occipital lobe. Although the clinical implications of these results are unclear, they provide an impetus for further research into the relevance of occipital bending in major depression disorder. PMID:24740986

  15. Objective Assessment of Nuclear and Cortical Cataracts through Scheimpflug Images: Agreement with the LOCS III Scale

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess nuclear and cortical opacities through the objective analysis of Scheimpflug images, and to check the correlation with the Lens Opacity Classification System III (LOCS III). Methods Nuclear and cortical opacities were graded according to the LOCS III rules after pupil dilation. The maximum and average pixel intensity values along an elliptical mask within the lens nucleus were taken to analyse nuclear cataracts. A new metric based on the percentage of opaque pixels within a region of interest was used to analyse cortical cataracts. The percentage of opaque pixels was also calculated for half, third and quarter areas from the region of interest’s periphery. Results The maximum and average intensity values along the nucleus were directly proportional to the LOCS III grade: The larger the LOCS III value, the larger maximum and average intensity ones. These metrics showed a positive and significant correlation with the LOCS grade: The larger the LOCS grade, the higher was percentage of opaque pixels along the cortex within the same mask’s size. This metric showed a significant correlation to the LOCS grade. Conclusion The metrics used to assess nuclear opacities showed good correlation with the LOCS III. The percentage of opaque pixels showed to be a useful metric to measure objectively the severity of the cortical opacity. These metrics could be implemented in an algorithm to detect and grade lens opacities automatically and objectively. PMID:26890694

  16. Early occipital injury affects numerosity counting but not simple arithmetic.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Han; Chen, Chuansheng; Sun, Zhaohui; Lin, Jiuluan; Zhou, Wenjing; Zhou, Xinlin

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the effects of early occipital injury on the development of counting and simple arithmetic abilities in an occipital epileptic patient. This patient had obvious softening lesions in the bilateral occipital regions due to viral encephalitis at the age of 1.5 years. Results showed that she could perform subitizing and simple arithmetic very well, but could not perform numerosity counting tasks. These results suggest that the occipital cortex plays an important role in the development of numerosity counting skills, but not in the development of subitizing and simple arithmetic. PMID:25771703

  17. The evolution of a disparity decision in human visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Cottereau, Benoit R.; Ales, Justin M.; Norcia, Anthony M.

    2015-01-01

    We used fMRI-informed EEG source-imaging in humans to characterize the dynamics of cortical responses during a disparity-discrimination task. After the onset of a disparity-defined target, decision-related activity was found within an extended cortical network that included several occipital regions of interest (ROIs): V4, V3A, hMT+ and the Lateral Occipital Complex (LOC). By using a response-locked analysis, we were able to determine the timing relationships in this network of ROIs relative to the subject's behavioral response. Choice-related activity appeared first in the V4 ROI almost 200 ms before the button press and then subsequently in the V3A ROI. Modeling of the responses in the V4 ROI suggests that this area provides an early contribution to disparity discrimination. Choice-related responses were also found after the button-press in ROIs V4, V3A, LOC and hMT+. Outside the visual cortex, choice-related activity was found in the frontal and temporal pole before the button-press. By combining the spatial resolution of fMRI-informed EEG source imaging with the ability to sort out neural activity occurring before, during and after the behavioral manifestation of the decision, our study is the first to assign distinct functional roles to the extra-striate ROIs involved in perceptual decisions based on disparity, the primary cue for depth. PMID:24513152

  18. LocTree3 prediction of localization

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Tatyana; Hecht, Maximilian; Hamp, Tobias; Karl, Timothy; Yachdav, Guy; Ahmed, Nadeem; Altermann, Uwe; Angerer, Philipp; Ansorge, Sonja; Balasz, Kinga; Bernhofer, Michael; Betz, Alexander; Cizmadija, Laura; Do, Kieu Trinh; Gerke, Julia; Greil, Robert; Joerdens, Vadim; Hastreiter, Maximilian; Hembach, Katharina; Herzog, Max; Kalemanov, Maria; Kluge, Michael; Meier, Alice; Nasir, Hassan; Neumaier, Ulrich; Prade, Verena; Reeb, Jonas; Sorokoumov, Aleksandr; Troshani, Ilira; Vorberg, Susann; Waldraff, Sonja; Zierer, Jonas; Nielsen, Henrik; Rost, Burkhard

    2014-01-01

    The prediction of protein sub-cellular localization is an important step toward elucidating protein function. For each query protein sequence, LocTree2 applies machine learning (profile kernel SVM) to predict the native sub-cellular localization in 18 classes for eukaryotes, in six for bacteria and in three for archaea. The method outputs a score that reflects the reliability of each prediction. LocTree2 has performed on par with or better than any other state-of-the-art method. Here, we report the availability of LocTree3 as a public web server. The server includes the machine learning-based LocTree2 and improves over it through the addition of homology-based inference. Assessed on sequence-unique data, LocTree3 reached an 18-state accuracy Q18 = 80 3% for eukaryotes and a six-state accuracy Q6 = 89 4% for bacteria. The server accepts submissions ranging from single protein sequences to entire proteomes. Response time of the unloaded server is about 90 s for a 300-residue eukaryotic protein and a few hours for an entire eukaryotic proteome not considering the generation of the alignments. For over 1000 entirely sequenced organisms, the predictions are directly available as downloads. The web server is available at http://www.rostlab.org/services/loctree3. PMID:24848019

  19. Atlanto-occipital dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Graham C; Kinsman, Michael J; Nazar, Ryan G; Hruska, Rob T; Mansfield, Kevin J; Boakye, Maxwell; Rahme, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Atlanto-occipital dislocation (AOD) is being increasingly recognized as a potentially survivable injury as a result of improved prehospital management of polytrauma patients and increased awareness of this entity, leading to earlier diagnosis and more aggressive treatment. However, despite overall improved outcomes, AOD is still associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this paper is to review the biomechanical aspects, clinical features, radiologic criteria, and treatment strategies of AOD. Given that the diagnosis of AOD can be very challenging, a high degree of clinical suspicion is essential to ensure timely recognition and treatment, thus preventing neurological decline or death. PMID:25793163

  20. Contextual influences on object representations in the occipito-temporal cortex.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Olivia; Caramazza, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    What are the factors that determine how objects are represented in the visual system? Apart from visual shape, conceptual information such as animacy and object size has been established as major organizational principles for object representations in the occipito-temporal cortex. However, it remains unclear whether object representations may also be influenced by contextual information (i.e., where objects appear in the world). There has been debate regarding whether contextual information is retrieved when objects are seen, and whether the neural locus of contextual effect may be in the object-selective lateral occipital complex (LOC) or the scene-selective parahippocampal cortex (PHC). We examined how object representations in the occipito-temporal cortex may be influenced by animacy, object size, and context. We used 24 items, including 4 animals, 4 big and 4 small inanimate objects for each of 2 contexts (e.g., beach items: dolphin, lifeguard chair, goggles; house items: dog, coffee table, vase). Sixteen exemplars were included for each item. Using fMRI, neural responses for the 24 items were obtained when participants (n=15) performed a one-back task to match identical images. To analyze the nature of object representations, we first calculated representational similarity matrices (RSMs) on the neural response patterns for the 24 items in both the LOC and the PHC (defined in a separate localizer). We then correlated the neural RSMs with several candidate models of RSMs. We found that a RSM that incorporated the effects of animacy, object size, and context was significantly correlated with the RSMs in both LOC and PHC. The correlations were stronger compared to those with other candidate RSMs, which concerned only animacy and size, or animacy alone. These results suggest that contextual information is engaged, even when such information is task-irrelevant. It appears that multiple sources of object knowledge contribute to form object representations in the occipito-temporal cortex. Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015. PMID:26326857

  1. Early processing in human LOC is highly responsive to illusory contours but not to salient regions

    PubMed Central

    Shpaner, Marina; Murray, Micah M.; Foxe, John J.

    2011-01-01

    Human electrophysiological studies support a model whereby sensitivity to so-called illusory contour stimuli is first seen within the lateral occipital complex. A challenge to this model posits that the lateral occipital complex is a general site for crude region-based segmentation, based on findings of equivalent hemodynamic activations in the lateral occipital complex to illusory contour and so-called salient region stimuli, a stimulus class that lacks the classic bounding contours of illusory contours. Using high-density electrical mapping of visual evoked potentials, we show that early lateral occipital cortex activity is substantially stronger to illusory contour than to salient region stimuli, while later lateral occipital complex activity is stronger to salient region than to illusory contour stimuli. Our results suggest that equivalent hemodynamic activity to illusory contour and salient region stimuli likely reflects temporally integrated responses, a result of the poor temporal resolution of hemodynamic imaging. The temporal precision of visual evoked potentials is critical for establishing viable models of completion processes and visual scene analysis. We propose that crude spatial segmentation analyses, which are insensitive to illusory contours, occur first within dorsal visual regions, not lateral occipital complex, and that initial illusory contour sensitivity is a function of the lateral occipital complex. PMID:19895562

  2. Occipital and inferotemporal responses to visual signals in the monkey.

    PubMed

    Ashford, J W; Fuster, J M

    1985-11-01

    This study analyzes cellular and field-potential responses in striate and inferotemporal cortex to visual stimuli in monkeys performing a memory task (delayed matching-to-sample). Each trial was initiated by a brief alerting diffuse flash preceding presentation of the memorandum (sample); the latter was a lighted circle (red or green, 1.5 s) to be retained by the animal during a subsequent delay for correct behavioral response (color match). The alerting flash evoked distinct excitatory cell responses and field potentials in the occipital cortex; those two orders of phenomena were broadly related to each other in temporal terms. By contrast, most cells in the inferotemporal region were inhibited by the flash, although the local evoked field potential had a configuration similar to that of the occipital potential. In each region, the sample stimuli elicited excitatory unit responses which summed to a unimodal distribution with an initial component roughly corresponding in time course to the local field potential. Although the shortest response latencies were found in occipital cortex, considerable temporal overlap of the sample-related activities in the two cortices was observed. The finding that most inferotemporal cells, unlike occipital cells, treated only the sample with excitatory response indicates that the inferotemporal cortex is selectively attuned to visual detail. However, the largely simultaneous activation of both cortical regions following the onset of the sample suggests that discriminative visual information is processed by hierarchic interactions of the two cortices through their reciprocal connections. PMID:4054294

  3. A case of G-LOC in a propeller aircraft.

    PubMed

    Ross, J A

    1990-06-01

    The occurrence of +Gz-induced loss of consciousness (G-LOC) is well recognized in high-performance aircraft. A case of G-LOC is described involving a co-pilot on a flying instructor's course in a propeller-driven aircraft, the CT-4. The cause of G-LOC is attributed to a combination of a lack of recent G exposure, not commanding the aircraft, fatigue, and a possibly less-than-optimal straining manoeuvre. This case reinforces the problems of G-LOC in any aircraft capable of performing aerobatics. PMID:2369398

  4. Human V4 and ventral occipital retinotopic maps

    PubMed Central

    Winawer, Jonathan; Witthoft, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    The ventral surface of the human occipital lobe contains multiple retinotopic maps. The most posterior of these maps is considered a potential homolog of macaque V4, and referred to as human V4 (hV4). The location of the hV4 map, its retinotopic organization, its role in visual encoding, and the cortical areas it borders have been the subject of considerable investigation and debate over the last 25 years. We review the history of this map and adjacent maps in ventral occipital cortex, and consider the different hypotheses for how these ventral occipital maps are organized. Advances in neuroimaging, computational modeling, and characterization of the nearby anatomical landmarks and functional brain areas have improved our understanding of where human V4 is and what kind of visual representations it contains. PMID:26241699

  5. The role of sensory cortex and cortical "hubs" in category-specific executive function.

    PubMed

    James, Thomas; Arcurio, Lindsay; Nikoulina, Anastasia

    2015-09-01

    Human executive functions are sensitive to visual cues that make up the environmental context, but there are few research programs that study this influence or study the impact of changes in sensory neural signals on frontal cortical function. In this talk, I will present findings from studies of people with alcohol use disorders (AUD) that implicate the lateral occipital cortex (LOC) and its connections with the anterior insular cortex (AIC) in impulsive decisions-to-drink when exposed to visual alcohol cues. Specifically, 31 women (15 AUD) were scanned using fMRI while performing a decisions-to-drink task. In that task, they were presented with alcohol and food cues that were normed for attractiveness/desirability. They were asked to imagine themselves in a situation where deciding to drink had a high or low probability of a negative consequence and were asked to rate their likelihood of drinking (or eating) on a 4-point scale. AUD women endorsed alcohol cues more than non-AUD, but not food cues - a category-specific effect on decision making. Differences in BOLD signal between AUD women and non-AUD for alcohol vs food cues were widespread and always greater for AUD. This finding suggests that there was no single neural system (e.g., cognitive control) that accounts for the group difference in behavior. Comparing high- to low-risk scenarios highlighted differences between AUD and non-AUD in the LOC and AIC. A task-based functional connectivity analyses provided further support for the role of LOC and AIC in AUD women producing more impulsive category-specific decisions. In conclusion, widespread differences in decision-related BOLD signal between AUD and non-AUD may originate in the visual cortex (LOC) and cascade throughout the brain by way of network "hubs" such as the AIC. These results highlight the important (but underappreciated) role of sensory cortices in decision making and other executive functions. Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015. PMID:26326143

  6. Crystal structure of Homo sapiens protein LOC79017

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Euiyoung; Bingman, Craig A.; Aceti, David J.; Phillips, Jr., George N.

    2010-02-08

    LOC79017 (MW 21.0 kDa, residues 1-188) was annotated as a hypothetical protein encoded by Homo sapiens chromosome 7 open reading frame 24. It was selected as a target by the Center for Eukaryotic Structural Genomics (CESG) because it did not share more than 30% sequence identity with any protein for which the three-dimensional structure is known. The biological function of the protein has not been established yet. Parts of LOC79017 were identified as members of uncharacterized Pfam families (residues 1-95 as PB006073 and residues 104-180 as PB031696). BLAST searches revealed homologues of LOC79017 in many eukaryotes, but none of them have been functionally characterized. Here, we report the crystal structure of H. sapiens protein LOC79017 (UniGene code Hs.530024, UniProt code O75223, CESG target number go.35223).

  7. LocSigDB: a database of protein localization signals

    PubMed Central

    Negi, Simarjeet; Pandey, Sanjit; Srinivasan, Satish M.; Mohammed, Akram; Guda, Chittibabu

    2015-01-01

    LocSigDB (http://genome.unmc.edu/LocSigDB/) is a manually curated database of experimental protein localization signals for eight distinct subcellular locations; primarily in a eukaryotic cell with brief coverage of bacterial proteins. Proteins must be localized at their appropriate subcellular compartment to perform their desired function. Mislocalization of proteins to unintended locations is a causative factor for many human diseases; therefore, collection of known sorting signals will help support many important areas of biomedical research. By performing an extensive literature study, we compiled a collection of 533 experimentally determined localization signals, along with the proteins that harbor such signals. Each signal in the LocSigDB is annotated with its localization, source, PubMed references and is linked to the proteins in UniProt database along with the organism information that contain the same amino acid pattern as the given signal. From LocSigDB webserver, users can download the whole database or browse/search for data using an intuitive query interface. To date, LocSigDB is the most comprehensive compendium of protein localization signals for eight distinct subcellular locations. Database URL: http://genome.unmc.edu/LocSigDB/ PMID:25725059

  8. Sex differences in interactions between nucleus accumbens and visual cortex by explicit visual erotic stimuli: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Lee, S W; Jeong, B S; Choi, J; Kim, J-W

    2015-01-01

    Men tend to have greater positive responses than women to explicit visual erotic stimuli (EVES). However, it remains unclear, which brain network makes men more sensitive to EVES and which factors contribute to the brain network activity. In this study, we aimed to assess the effect of sex difference on brain connectivity patterns by EVES. We also investigated the association of testosterone with brain connection that showed the effects of sex difference. During functional magnetic resonance imaging scans, 14 males and 14 females were asked to see alternating blocks of pictures that were either erotic or non-erotic. Psychophysiological interaction analysis was performed to investigate the functional connectivity of the nucleus accumbens (NA) as it related to EVES. Men showed significantly greater EVES-specific functional connection between the right NA and the right lateral occipital cortex (LOC). In addition, the right NA and the right LOC network activity was positively correlated with the plasma testosterone level in men. Our results suggest that the reason men are sensitive to EVES is the increased interaction in the visual reward networks, which is modulated by their plasma testosterone level. PMID:25971857

  9. A preliminary examination of Loss of Control Eating Disorder (LOC-ED) in middle childhood.

    PubMed

    Matherne, Camden E; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Altschul, Anne M; Shank, Lisa M; Schvey, Natasha A; Brady, Sheila M; Galescu, Ovidiu; Demidowich, Andrew P; Yanovski, Susan Z; Yanovski, Jack A

    2015-08-01

    Loss of Control Eating Disorder (LOC-ED) has been proposed as a diagnostic category for children 6-12years with binge-type eating. However, characteristics of youth with LOC-ED have not been examined. We tested the hypothesis that the proposed criteria for LOC-ED would identify children with greater adiposity, more disordered eating attitudes, and greater mood disturbance than those without LOC-ED. Participants were 251 youth (10.29years1.54, 53.8% female, 57.8% White, 35.5% Black, 2.0% Asian, 4.8% Hispanic, 53.0% overweight). Youth were interviewed regarding eating attitudes and behaviors, completed questionnaires to assess general psychopathology, and underwent measurements of body fat mass. Using previously proposed criteria for LOC-ED, children were classified as LOC-ED (n=19), LOC in the absence of the full disorder (subLOC, n=33), and youth not reporting LOC (noLOC, n=199). LOC-ED youth had higher BMIz (p=0.001) and adiposity (p=0.003) and reported greater disordered eating concerns (p<0.001) compared to noLOC youth. Compared to subLOC youth, LOC-ED youth had non-significantly higher BMIz (p=0.11), and significantly higher adiposity (p=0.04) and disordered eating attitudes (p=0.02). SubLOC youth had greater disordered eating concerns (p<0.001) and BMIz (p=0.03) but did not differ in adiposity (p=0.33) compared to noLOC youth. These preliminary data suggest that LOC-ED youth are elevated on disordered eating cognitions and anthropometric measures compared to youth without LOC-ED. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine if those with LOC-ED are at particularly increased risk for progression of disordered eating and excess weight gain. PMID:25913008

  10. A Preliminary Examination of Loss of Control Eating Disorder (LOC-ED) in Middle Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Matherne, Camden E.; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Altschul, Anne M.; Shank, Lisa M.; Schvey, Natasha A.; Brady, Sheila M.; Galescu, Ovidiu; Demidowich, Andrew P.; Yanovski, Susan Z.; Yanovski, Jack A.

    2015-01-01

    Loss of Control Eating Disorder (LOC-ED) has been proposed as a diagnostic category for children 6–12y with binge-type eating. However, characteristics of youth with LOC-ED have not been examined. We tested the hypothesis that the proposed criteria for LOC-ED would identify children with greater adiposity, more disordered eating attitudes, and greater mood disturbance than those without LOC-ED. Participants were 251 youth (10.29y ± 1.54, 53.8% female, 57.8 % White, 35.5% Black, 2.0% Asian, 4.8% Hispanic, 53.0% overweight). Youth were interviewed regarding eating attitudes and behaviors, completed questionnaires to assess general psychopathology, and underwent measurements of body fat mass. Using previously proposed criteria for LOC-ED, children were classified as LOC-ED (n = 19), LOC in the absence of the full disorder (subLOC, n = 33), and youth not reporting LOC (noLOC, n = 199). LOC-ED youth had higher BMIz (p = 0.001) and adiposity (p = 0.003) and reported greater disordered eating concerns (p < 0.001) compared to noLOC youth. Compared to subLOC youth, LOC-ED youth had non-significantly higher BMIz (p = 0.11), and significantly higher adiposity (p = 0.04) and disordered eating attitudes (p = 0.02). SubLOC youth had greater disordered eating concerns (p < 0.001) and BMIz (p = 0.03) but did not differ in adiposity (p = 0.33) compared to noLOC youth. These preliminary data suggest that LOC-ED youth are elevated on disordered eating cognitions and anthropometric measures compared to youth without LOC-ED. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine if those with LOC-ED are at particularly increased risk for progression of disordered eating and excess weight gain. PMID:25913008

  11. Decoding the content of visual short-term memory under distraction in occipital and parietal areas.

    PubMed

    Bettencourt, Katherine C; Xu, Yaoda

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have provided conflicting accounts regarding where in the human brain visual short-term memory (VSTM) content is stored, with strong univariate fMRI responses being reported in superior intraparietal sulcus (IPS), but robust multivariate decoding being reported in occipital cortex. Given the continuous influx of information in everyday vision, VSTM storage under distraction is often required. We found that neither distractor presence nor predictability during the memory delay affected behavioral performance. Similarly, superior IPS exhibited consistent decoding of VSTM content across all distractor manipulations and had multivariate responses that closely tracked behavioral VSTM performance. However, occipital decoding of VSTM content was substantially modulated by distractor presence and predictability. Furthermore, we found no effect of target-distractor similarity on VSTM behavioral performance, further challenging the role of sensory regions in VSTM storage. Overall, consistent with previous univariate findings, our results indicate that superior IPS, but not occipital cortex, has a central role in VSTM storage. PMID:26595654

  12. On the concept of third occipital headache.

    PubMed Central

    Bogduk, N; Marsland, A

    1986-01-01

    One of the putative causes of headache is osteoarthritis of the C2-3 zygapophysial joint. A technique for blocking the third occipital nerve which innervates this joint was devised and used as a screening procedure for headache mediated by this nerve. Seven out of ten consecutive patients presenting with suspected cervical headache were found to suffer pain mediated by the third occipital nerve and stemming from a C2-3 zygapophysial joint. Because third occipital headache may be indistinguishable clinically from tension or other forms of headache, third occipital nerve blocks are advocated as means of establishing this largely unrecognised diagnosis. Images PMID:3018167

  13. An ELISA Lab-on-a-Chip (ELISA-LOC).

    PubMed

    Rasooly, Avraham; Bruck, Hugh A; Kostov, Yordan

    2013-01-01

    Laminated object manufacturing (LOM) technology using polymer sheets is an easy and affordable method for rapid prototyping of Lab-on-a-Chip (LOC) systems. It has recently been used to fabricate a miniature 96 sample ELISA lab-on-a-chip (ELISA-LOC) by integrating the washing step directly into an ELISA plate. LOM has been shown to be capable of creating complex 3D microfluidics through the assembly of a stack of polymer sheets with features generated by laser micromachining and by bonding the sheets together with adhesive. A six layer ELISA-LOC was fabricated with an acrylic (poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)) core and five polycarbonate layers micromachined by a CO(2) laser with simple microfluidic features including a miniature 96-well sample plate. Immunological assays can be carried out in several configurations (1 96 wells, 2 48 wells, or 4 24 wells). The system includes three main functional elements: (1) a reagent loading fluidics module, (2) an assay and detection wells plate, and (3) a reagent removal fluidics module. The ELISA-LOC system combines several biosensing elements: (1) carbon nanotube (CNT) technology to enhance primary antibody immobilization, (2) sensitive ECL (electrochemiluminescence) detection, and (3) a charge-coupled device (CCD) detector for measuring the light signal generated by ECL. Using a sandwich ELISA assay, the system detected Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) at concentrations as low as 0.1 ng/ml, a detection level similar to that reported for conventional ELISA. ELISA-LOC can be operated by a syringe and does not require power for operation. This simple point-of-care (POC) system is useful for carrying out various immunological assays and other complex medical assays without the laboratory required for conventional ELISA, and therefore may be more useful for global healthcare delivery. PMID:23329460

  14. Alterations of the occipital lobe in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Tohid, Hassaan; Faizan, Muhammad; Faizan, Uzma

    2015-01-01

    The relationship of the occipital lobe of the brain with schizophrenia is not commonly studied; however, this topic is considered an essential subject matter among clinicians and scientists. We conducted this systematic review to elaborate the relationship in depth. We found that most schizophrenic patients show normal occipital anatomy and physiology, a minority showed dwindled values, and some demonstrated augmented function and structure. The findings are laborious to incorporate within single disease models that present the involvement of the occipital lobe in schizophrenia. Schizophrenia progresses clinically in the mid-twenties and thirties and its prognosis is inadequate. Changes in the volume, the gray matter, and the white matter in the occipital lobe are quite evident; however, the mechanism behind this involvement is not yet fully understood. Therefore, we recommend further research to explore the occipital lobe functions and volumes across the different stages of schizophrenia. PMID:26166588

  15. Occipital Cortical Thickness Predicts Performance on Pitch and Musical Tasks in Blind Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Zatorre, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    The behavioral and neurofunctional consequences of blindness often include performance enhancements and recruitment of occipital regions for nonvisual tasks. How the neuroanatomical changes resulting from this sensory loss relate to these functional changes is, however, less clear. Previous studies using cortical thickness (CT) measures have shown thicker occipital cortex in early-blind (EB) individuals compared with sighted controls. We hypothesized that this finding reflects the crossmodal plasticity often observed in blind individuals and thus could reflect behavioral adaptations. To address this issue, CT measures in blind (early and late) and sighted subjects were obtained along with several auditory behavioral measures in an attempt to relate behavioral and neuroanatomical changes. Group contrasts confirmed previous results in showing thicker occipital cortex in the EB. Regression analyses between CT measures across the whole brain of all blind individuals with the behavioral scores from 2 tasks in which EB subjects were superior (pitch and melody discrimination) showed that CT of occipital areas was directly related to behavioral enhancements. These findings constitute a compelling demonstration that anatomical changes in occipital areas are directly related to heightened behavioral abilities in the blind and hence support the idea that these anatomical features reflect adaptive compensatory plasticity. PMID:22095215

  16. Roentgen Findings in Occipital Pole Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Bilodeau, Larry; Hanafee, William

    1967-01-01

    The arteriographic findings of occipital pole tumors consist of the following: 1. Anterior displacement and elevation of the middle cerebral group. 2. Accordioning of the anterior choroidal artery. 3. Anterior displacement of the lateral branch of the posterior choroidal artery. 4. Local stretching of vessels about the tumor. 5. Onion skinning of the pial vessels. 6. Anterior displacement of the vein of the occipital horn. 7. Greater displacement of the internal cerebral vein than of the anterior cerebral artery. Air studies require precise radiographic technique lest the subtle displacements of the occipital horn and trigone area be missed. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4. PMID:6044288

  17. Increased expression of long noncoding RNAs LOC100652951 and LOC100506036 in T cells from patients with rheumatoid arthritis facilitates the inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ming-Chi; Yu, Hui-Chun; Yu, Chia-Li; Huang, Hsien-Bin; Koo, Malcolm; Tung, Chien-Hsueh; Lai, Ning-Sheng

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the presence of aberrantly expressed lncRNAs could promote T cell inflammatory responses in patients with RA. The expression levels of 10 potential aberrantly expressed lncRNAs were evaluated in T cells from 39 patients with RA and 17 controls using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The aberrantly expressed lncRNAs were measured in Jurkat cells co-cultured with or without ionomycin and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Transfection studies using small interfering RNA (siRNA) were conducted for biological functions, and microarray analysis was performed to search for target genes of specific lncRNAs. We confirmed that the expression levels of LOC100652951 and LOC100506036 were higher in RA T cells compared with controls. RA patients treated with biologic agents had lower expression levels of LOC100652951, and female RA patients had lower LOC100506036 expression levels after multivariate analysis. After activation, the expression levels of LOC100506036, but not LOC100652951, increased in Jurkat cells. Transfection of siRNA targeting LOC100506036 inhibited interferon gamma production and the expression of nuclear factor of activated T cells in activated Jurkat cells. After the microarray analysis with validation, inhibition of LOC100506036 expression by siRNA leaded to the decreased expression of sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase 1 (SMPD1). In conclusion, the expression levels of LOC100652951 and LOC100506036 were increased in RA T cells. Treatment with biologic agents could lower the expression of LOC100652951 in RA T cells. LOC100506036 could regulate the expression of SMPD1 and NFAT1 and could contribute to the inflammatory responses in RA. PMID:26616293

  18. Differential visually-induced gamma-oscillations in human cerebral cortex

    PubMed Central

    Asano, Eishi; Nishida, Masaaki; Fukuda, Miho; Rothermel, Robert; Juhasz, Csaba; Sood, Sandeep

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Using intracranial electrocorticography, we determined how cortical gamma-oscillations (50150Hz) were induced by different visual tasks in nine children with focal epilepsy. In all children, full-field stroboscopic flash-stimuli induced gamma-augmentation in the anterior-medial occipital cortex (starting on average at 31-msec after stimulus presentation) and subsequently in the lateral-polar occipital cortex; minimal gamma-augmentation was noted in the inferior occipital-temporal cortex; occipital gamma-augmentation was followed by gamma-attenuation in three children. Central-field picture-stimuli induced sustained gamma-augmentation in the lateral-polar occipital cortex (starting on average at 69-msec) and subsequently in the inferior occipital-temporal cortex in all children and in the posterior frontal cortex in three children; the anterior-medial occipital cortex showed no gamma-augmentation but rather gamma-attenuation. Electrical stimulation of the anterior-medial occipital cortex induced a phosphene in the peripheral-field or eye deviation to the contralateral side, whereas that of the lateral-polar occipital cortex induced a phosphene in the central-field. In summary, full-field, simple and short-lasting visual information might be preferentially processed by the anterior-medial occipital cortex, and subsequently by the lateral-polar occipital cortex. Gamma-attenuation following augmentation in the striate cortex might be associated with a relative refractory-period to flash-stimuli or feed-forward inhibition by other areas. Central-field complex visual information might be processed by a network involving the lateral-polar occipital cortex and the inferior occipital-temporal cortex. A plausible interpretation of posterior-frontal gamma-augmentation during central-field picture stimuli includes activation of the frontal-eye-field for visual searching. Gamma-attenuation in the anterior-medial occipital cortex during central-field picture-stimuli might be associated with relative inattention to the peripheral visual field during central-field object visualization. PMID:19135157

  19. Concurrent occipital hypoplasia, occipital dysplasia, syringohydromyelia, and hydrocephalus in a Yorkshire terrier

    PubMed Central

    Cagle, Laura

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of a 7.5-year-old neutered male Yorkshire terrier with mild generalized ataxia and intermittent neck scratching led to a diagnosis of caudal occipital malformation and syringohydromyelia. Surgical exploration led to a diagnosis of occipital dysplasia with concurrent occipital hypoplasia. Following a dorsal laminectomy of the first cervical vertebra there was no progression or improvement a month later. PMID:21037897

  20. Concurrent occipital hypoplasia, occipital dysplasia, syringohydromyelia, and hydrocephalus in a Yorkshire terrier.

    PubMed

    Cagle, Laura

    2010-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of a 7.5-year-old neutered male Yorkshire terrier with mild generalized ataxia and intermittent neck scratching led to a diagnosis of caudal occipital malformation and syringohydromyelia. Surgical exploration led to a diagnosis of occipital dysplasia with concurrent occipital hypoplasia. Following a dorsal laminectomy of the first cervical vertebra there was no progression or improvement a month later. PMID:21037897

  1. Human occipital cortices differentially exert saccadic suppression: intracranial recording in children

    PubMed Central

    Uematsu, Mitsugu; Matsuzaki, Naoyuki; Brown, Erik C.; Kojima, Katsuaki; Asano, Eishi

    2013-01-01

    By repeating saccades unconsciously, humans explore the surrounding world every day. Saccades inevitably move external visual images across the retina at high velocity; nonetheless, healthy humans don’t perceive transient blurring of the visual scene during saccades. This perceptual stability is referred to as saccadic suppression. Functional suppression is believed to take place transiently in the visual systems, but it remains unknown how commonly or differentially the human occipital lobe activities are suppressed at the large-scale cortical network level. We determined the spatial-temporal dynamics of intracranially-recorded gamma activity at 80–150 Hz around spontaneous saccades under no-task conditions during wakefulness and those in darkness during REM sleep. Regardless of wakefulness or REM sleep, a small degree of attenuation of gamma activity was noted in the occipital regions during saccades, most extensively in the polar and least in the medial portions. Longer saccades were associated with more intense gamma-attenuation. Gamma-attenuation was subsequently followed by gamma-augmentation most extensively involving the medial and least involving the polar occipital region. Such gamma-augmentation was more intense during wakefulness and temporally locked to the offset of saccades. The polarities of initial peaks of perisaccadic event-related potentials (ERPs) were frequently positive in the medial and negative in the polar occipital regions. The present study, for the first time, provided the electrophysiological evidence that human occipital cortices differentially exert peri-saccadic modulation. Transiently suppressed sensitivity of the primary visual cortex in the polar region may be an important neural basis for saccadic suppression. Presence of occipital gamma-attenuation even during REM sleep suggests that saccadic suppression might be exerted even without external visual inputs. The primary visual cortex in the medial region, compared to the polar region, may be more sensitive to an upcoming visual scene provided at the offset of each saccade. PMID:23792979

  2. Early processing in the human lateral occipital complex is highly responsive to illusory contours but not to salient regions.

    PubMed

    Shpaner, Marina; Murray, Micah M; Foxe, John J

    2009-11-01

    Human electrophysiological studies support a model whereby sensitivity to so-called illusory contour stimuli is first seen within the lateral occipital complex. A challenge to this model posits that the lateral occipital complex is a general site for crude region-based segmentation, based on findings of equivalent hemodynamic activations in the lateral occipital complex to illusory contour and so-called salient region stimuli, a stimulus class that lacks the classic bounding contours of illusory contours. Using high-density electrical mapping of visual evoked potentials, we show that early lateral occipital cortex activity is substantially stronger to illusory contour than to salient region stimuli, whereas later lateral occipital complex activity is stronger to salient region than to illusory contour stimuli. Our results suggest that equivalent hemodynamic activity to illusory contour and salient region stimuli probably reflects temporally integrated responses, a result of the poor temporal resolution of hemodynamic imaging. The temporal precision of visual evoked potentials is critical for establishing viable models of completion processes and visual scene analysis. We propose that crude spatial segmentation analyses, which are insensitive to illusory contours, occur first within dorsal visual regions, not the lateral occipital complex, and that initial illusory contour sensitivity is a function of the lateral occipital complex. PMID:19895562

  3. Multiple routes from occipital to temporal cortices during reading

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Fiona M.; Seghier, Mohamed L.; Leff, Alex P.; Thomas, Michael S.C.; Price, Cathy J.

    2013-01-01

    Contemporary models of the neural system that supports reading propose that activity in a ventral occipital-temporal area (vOT) drives activity in higher order language areas, for example, those in the posterior and anterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS and aSTS). We used fMRI with dynamic causal modelling (DCM) to investigate evidence for other routes from visual cortex to the left temporal lobe language areas. First we identified activations in posterior inferior occipital (iO) and vOT areas that were more activated for silent reading than listening to words and sentences; and in pSTS and aSTS areas that were commonly activated for reading relative to false-fonts and listening to words relative to reversed words. Second, in 3 different DCM analyses, we tested whether visual processing of words modulates activity from (1) iO? vOT, iO? pSTS, both or neither; (2) vOT? pSTS, iO?pSTS, both or neither; and (3) pSTS? aSTS, vOT? aSTS, both or neither. We found that reading words increased connectivity (1) from iO to both pSTS and vOT; (2) to pSTS from both iO and vOT; and (3) to aSTS from both vOT and pSTS. These results highlight three potential processing streams in the occipito-temporal cortex: iO?pSTS?aSTS; iO?vOT?aSTS; and iO?vOT?pSTS?aSTS. We discuss these results in terms of cognitive models of reading and propose that efficient reading relies on the integrity of all these pathways. PMID:21632945

  4. Coexistence of occipital dysplasia and occipital hypoplasia/syringomyelia in the cavalier King Charles spaniel.

    PubMed

    Rusbridge, C; Knowler, S P

    2006-10-01

    Concurrent occurrence of occipital dysplasia and occipital hypoplasia in two dogs is described in this report. Occipital hypoplasia results in reduced volume of the caudal fossa, leading to overcrowding of the neural structures and, in severe cases, development of syringomyelia. In occipital dysplasia, there is a failure of complete ossification of the supraoccipital bone. When the two conditions occur concurrently, it is possible that syringomyelia may develop more slowly, resulting in presentation with clinical signs in middle to old age. This has implications for screening tests for early detection of syringomyelia, with a view to using the dog for breeding purposes, as dogs with an apparently mild phenotype for occipital hypoplasia/syringomyelia may actually have a more severe genotype. PMID:17004953

  5. Emotional face expression modulates occipital-frontal effective connectivity during memory formation in a bottom-up fashion

    PubMed Central

    Xiu, Daiming; Geiger, Maximilian J.; Klaver, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the role of bottom-up and top-down neural mechanisms in the processing of emotional face expression during memory formation. Functional brain imaging data was acquired during incidental learning of positive (“happy”), neutral and negative (“angry” or “fearful”) faces. Dynamic Causal Modeling (DCM) was applied on the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data to characterize effective connectivity within a brain network involving face perception (inferior occipital gyrus and fusiform gyrus) and successful memory formation related areas (hippocampus, superior parietal lobule, amygdala, and orbitofrontal cortex). The bottom-up models assumed processing of emotional face expression along feed forward pathways to the orbitofrontal cortex. The top-down models assumed that the orbitofrontal cortex processed emotional valence and mediated connections to the hippocampus. A subsequent recognition memory test showed an effect of negative emotion on the response bias, but not on memory performance. Our DCM findings showed that the bottom-up model family of effective connectivity best explained the data across all subjects and specified that emotion affected most bottom-up connections to the orbitofrontal cortex, especially from the occipital visual cortex and superior parietal lobule. Of those pathways to the orbitofrontal cortex the connection from the inferior occipital gyrus correlated with memory performance independently of valence. We suggest that bottom-up neural mechanisms support effects of emotional face expression and memory formation in a parallel and partially overlapping fashion. PMID:25954169

  6. Headache Following Occipital Brain Lesion: A Case of Migraine Triggered by Occipital Spikes?

    PubMed

    Vollono, Catello; Mariotti, Paolo; Losurdo, Anna; Giannantoni, Nadia Mariagrazia; Mazzucchi, Edoardo; Valentini, Piero; De Rose, Paola; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2015-10-01

    This study describes the case of an 8-year-old boy who developed a genuine migraine after the surgical excision, from the right occipital lobe, of brain abscesses due to selective infestation of the cerebrum by Entamoeba histolytica. After the surgical treatment, the boy presented daily headaches with typical migraine features, including right-side parieto-temporal pain, nausea, vomiting, and photophobia. Electroencephalography (EEG) showed epileptiform discharges in the right occipital lobe, although he never presented seizures. Clinical and neurophysiological observations were performed, including video-EEG and polygraphic recordings. EEG showed "interictal" epileptiform discharges in the right occipital lobe. A prolonged video-EEG recording performed before, during, and after an acute attack ruled out ictal or postictal migraine. In this boy, an occipital lesion caused occipital epileptiform EEG discharges without seizures, probably prevented by the treatment. We speculate that occipital spikes, in turn, could have caused a chronic headache with features of migraine without aura. Occipital epileptiform discharges, even in absence of seizures, may trigger a genuine migraine, probably by means of either the trigeminovascular or brainstem system. PMID:25406125

  7. Hypoplastic occipital condyle and third occipital condyle: review of their dysembryology.

    PubMed

    Tubbs, R Shane; Lingo, Patrick Ryan; Mortazavi, Martin M; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2013-11-01

    Disruption or embryologic derailment of the normal bony architecture of the craniovertebral junction (CVJ) may result in symptoms. As studies of the embryology and pathology of hypoplasia of the occipital condyles and third occipital condyles are lacking in the literature, the present review was performed. Standard search engines were accessed and queried for publications regarding hypoplastic occipital condyles and third occipital condyles. The literature supports the notion that occipital condyle hypoplasia and a third occipital condyle are due to malformation or persistence of the proatlas, respectively. The Pax-1 gene is most likely involved in this process. Clinically, condylar hypoplasia may narrow the foramen magnum and lead to lateral medullary compression. Additionally, this maldevelopment can result in transient vertebral artery compression secondary to posterior subluxation of the occiput. Third occipital condyles have been associated with cervical canal stenosis, hypoplasia of the dens, transverse ligament laxity, and atlanto-axial instability causing acute and chronic spinal cord compression. Treatment goals are focused on craniovertebral stability. A better understanding of the embryology and pathology related to CVJ anomalies is useful to the clinician treating patients presenting with these entities. PMID:23338989

  8. [Preparation and application of monoclonal antibody against human LOC339524 protein].

    PubMed

    Long, Zonghong; Li, Hong; Chen, Feng; Yi, Weijing

    2015-12-01

    Objective To prepare and apply monoclonal antibody (mAb) against human LOC339524 protein. Methods The non-glycosylated antigenic gene sequence of the LOC339524 protein was expressed in triplicate to enhance immunogenicity. Then this synthetic gene was connected to pET28a plasmid. Recombinant LOC339524 protein was obtained by E.coli expression system and was administered intraperitoneally as an immunogen to BALB/c mice to obtain mAb. The specificity and titer of the mAb were characterized by ELISA. Recombinant LOC339524 protein was identified through Western blotting. The expression of the LOC339524 protein in human myocardial tissues and H9C2 cells were detected by immunohistochemistry, and its level in the sera of patients with different heart diseases was detected with the antibody. Results We obtained two hybridoma cell lines, 5-D3 and 4-F8, secreting specific mAbs against LOC339524 protein. The titer of 5-D3 was up to 210(6), higher than the titer of 4-F8. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry demonstrated that 5-D3 could specifically recognize LOC339524 protein of Homo sapiens and Rattus norvegicus. With the antibody we obtained, we successfully detected the serum level of LOC339524 protein in patients with different heart diseases. Conclusion The mAb against human LOC339524 protein with good specificity and high titer has been successfully prepared. PMID:26648306

  9. [Occipital dysplasia in a Pomeranian dog].

    PubMed

    van Herpen, H; Voorhout, G

    1993-05-15

    Occipital dysplasia, a congenital malformation of the foramen magnum, was diagnosed in a 4-year-old Pomeranian dog. The diagnosis was made by clinical and radiographic findings. Caudal displacement of the cerebellum and hydrocephalus were diagnosed postmortem, using a radiographic contrast study of the subarachnoid space. PMID:8506541

  10. Adverse effect profile of lidocaine injections for occipital nerve block in occipital neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Sahai-Srivastava, Soma; Subhani, Dawood

    2010-12-01

    To determine whether there are differences in the adverse effect profile between 1, 2 and 5% Lidocaine when used for occipital nerve blocks (ONB) in patients with occipital neuralgia. Occipital neuralgia is an uncommon cause of headaches. Little is known regarding the safety of Lidocaine injections for treatment in larger series of patients. Retrospective chart analysis of all ONB was performed at our headache clinic during a 6-year period on occipital neuralgia patients. 89 consecutive patients with occipital neuralgia underwent a total of 315 ONB. All the patients fulfilled the IHS criteria for Occipital Neuralgia. Demographic data were collected including age, gender, and ethnicity. The average age of this cohort was 53.25years, and the majority of patients were females 69 (78%). Ethnicity of patients was diverse, with Caucasian 48(54%), Hispanics 31(35%), and others 10 (11%). 69 patients had 1%, 18 patients had 2% and 29 patient were given 5% Lidocaine. All Lidocaine injections were given with 20mg Depo-medrol and the same injection technique and location were used for all the procedures. Eight patients (9%)had adverse effects to the Lidocaine and Depo-medrol injections, of which 5 received 5% and 3 received 1% Lidocaine. Majority of patients who had adverse effects were female 7(87%), and had received bilateral blocks (75%). ONB is a safe procedure with 1% Lidocaine; however, caution should be exerted with 5% in elderly patients, 70 or older, especially when administering bilateral injections. PMID:20665065

  11. Adverse effect profile of lidocaine injections for occipital nerve block in occipital neuralgia.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Sahai-Srivastava S; Subhani D

    2010-12-01

    To determine whether there are differences in the adverse effect profile between 1, 2 and 5% Lidocaine when used for occipital nerve blocks (ONB) in patients with occipital neuralgia. Occipital neuralgia is an uncommon cause of headaches. Little is known regarding the safety of Lidocaine injections for treatment in larger series of patients. Retrospective chart analysis of all ONB was performed at our headache clinic during a 6-year period on occipital neuralgia patients. 89 consecutive patients with occipital neuralgia underwent a total of 315 ONB. All the patients fulfilled the IHS criteria for Occipital Neuralgia. Demographic data were collected including age, gender, and ethnicity. The average age of this cohort was 53.25years, and the majority of patients were females 69 (78%). Ethnicity of patients was diverse, with Caucasian 48(54%), Hispanics 31(35%), and others 10 (11%). 69 patients had 1%, 18 patients had 2% and 29 patient were given 5% Lidocaine. All Lidocaine injections were given with 20mg Depo-medrol and the same injection technique and location were used for all the procedures. Eight patients (9%)had adverse effects to the Lidocaine and Depo-medrol injections, of which 5 received 5% and 3 received 1% Lidocaine. Majority of patients who had adverse effects were female 7(87%), and had received bilateral blocks (75%). ONB is a safe procedure with 1% Lidocaine; however, caution should be exerted with 5% in elderly patients, 70 or older, especially when administering bilateral injections.

  12. Does Shape Discrimination by the Mouth Activate the Parietal and Occipital Lobes? Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Kagawa, Tomonori; Narita, Noriyuki; Iwaki, Sunao; Kawasaki, Shingo; Kamiya, Kazunobu; Minakuchi, Shunsuke

    2014-01-01

    A cross-modal association between somatosensory tactile sensation and parietal and occipital activities during Braille reading was initially discovered in tests with blind subjects, with sighted and blindfolded healthy subjects used as controls. However, the neural background of oral stereognosis remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated whether the parietal and occipital cortices are activated during shape discrimination by the mouth using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). Following presentation of the test piece shape, a sham discrimination trial without the test pieces induced posterior parietal lobe (BA7), extrastriate cortex (BA18, BA19), and striate cortex (BA17) activation as compared with the rest session, while shape discrimination of the test pieces markedly activated those areas as compared with the rest session. Furthermore, shape discrimination of the test pieces specifically activated the posterior parietal cortex (precuneus/BA7), extrastriate cortex (BA18, 19), and striate cortex (BA17), as compared with sham sessions without a test piece. We concluded that oral tactile sensation is recognized through tactile/visual cross-modal substrates in the parietal and occipital cortices during shape discrimination by the mouth. PMID:25299397

  13. Giant epidermal cyst of the occipital area.

    PubMed

    Antoszewski, Bogus?aw; Pisera, Pawe?; Fija?kowska, Marta; Kasielska-Trojan, Anna

    2013-11-01

    Epidermal cyst is the most commonly observed cutaneous tumor. It usually involves the scalp, neck, face, back, and trunk. A commonly seen epidermal cyst is usually a slow-growing tumor of a diameter of 1-2 cm. Cysts with a diameter of more than 5 cm have rarely been reported in the literature. Herein we report a case of a giant epidermal cyst localized in the scalp of the occipital area, diagnostic problems and therapeutic proceedings. PMID:24413207

  14. Cervico-occipital joint (RX,CT)

    SciTech Connect

    Wackenheim, A.

    1985-01-01

    This book is a continuation of the author's Exercises in Radiological Diagnosis series. The text is organized into an atlas of 158 sets of images of normal anatomy and pathologic processes affecting the cervico-occipital junction, followed by comments, interpretations, and drawings in the second half of the book. The text includes a wide range of pathologic conditions extending from tumor to congenital variation.

  15. Analysis of the volumetric relationship among human ocular, orbital and fronto-occipital cortical morphology.

    PubMed

    Masters, Michael; Bruner, Emiliano; Queer, Sarah; Traynor, Sarah; Senjem, Jess

    2015-10-01

    Recent research on the visual system has focused on investigating the relationship among eye (ocular), orbital, and visual cortical anatomy in humans. This issue is relevant in evolutionary and medical fields. In terms of evolution, only in modern humans and Neandertals are the orbits positioned beneath the frontal lobes, with consequent structural constraints. In terms of medicine, such constraints can be associated with minor deformation of the eye, vision defects, and patterns of integration among these features, and in association with the frontal lobes, are important to consider in reconstructive surgery. Further study is therefore necessary to establish how these variables are related, and to what extent ocular size is associated with orbital and cerebral cortical volumes. Relationships among these anatomical components were investigated using magnetic resonance images from a large sample of 83 individuals, which also included each subject's body height, age, sex, and uncorrected visual acuity score. Occipital and frontal gyri volumes were calculated using two different cortical parcellation tools in order to provide a better understanding of how the eye and orbit vary in relation to visual cortical gyri, and frontal cortical gyri which are not directly related to visual processing. Results indicated that ocular and orbital volumes were weakly correlated, and that eye volume explains only a small proportion of the variance in orbital volume. Ocular and orbital volumes were also found to be equally and, in most cases, more highly correlated with five frontal lobe gyri than with occipital lobe gyri associated with V1, V2, and V3 of the visual cortex. Additionally, after accounting for age and sex variation, the relationship between ocular and total visual cortical volume was no longer statistically significant, but remained significantly related to total frontal lobe volume. The relationship between orbital and visual cortical volumes remained significant for a number of occipital lobe gyri even after accounting for these cofactors, but was again found to be more highly correlated with the frontal cortex than with the occipital cortex. These results indicate that eye volume explains only a small amount of variation in orbital and visual cortical volume, and that the eye and orbit are generally more structurally associated with the frontal lobes than they are functionally associated with the visual cortex of the occipital lobes. Results also demonstrate that these components of the visual system are highly complex and influenced by a multitude of factors in humans. PMID:26250048

  16. Occipital nerve stimulation: technical and surgical aspects of implantation.

    PubMed

    Trentman, Terrence L; Zimmerman, Richard S; Dodick, David W

    2011-01-01

    Occipital nerve stimulation may provide pain relief for patients with otherwise refractory primary headache disorders. While this treatment modality remains an off-label use of spinal cord stimulator technology, a growing body of literature documents surgical techniques, stimulation parameters, complications, and outcome of this novel form of neuromodulation. This chapter will review occipital nerve stimulation, including surgical techniques and complications noted in the literature. A discussion of stimulation parameters used for occipital stimulation will be included. Prospective, blinded studies of occipital nerve stimulation may clarify the role of occipital stimulation in chronic headache management. PMID:21422780

  17. The timing of spheno-occipital fusion in hominoids.

    PubMed

    Balolia, Katharine L

    2015-01-01

    The degree of spheno-occipital fusion has been used to assign a relative age to dentally mature hominoid cranial specimens. However, a recent study of captive individuals (Poe: Am J Phys Anthropol 144 (2011) 162–165) concluded that fusion of the spheno-occipital suture in great ape taxa is of little utility for aging dentally mature individuals. In this contribution, I use dentally mature samples of extant hominoid taxa (Homo sapiens, Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii, Gorilla gorilla gorilla, Pongo pygmaeus pygmaeus and Hylobates lar) to investigate a) the temporal relationship between spheno-occipital fusion and dental maturity, b) whether there is an association between the degree of spheno-occipital fusion and relative age, c) whether there are differences in relative timing of spheno-occipital fusion between taxa, and d) whether there are sex differences in the relative timing of spheno-occipital fusion. Results suggest that a) a substantial proportion of dentally mature wild-shot chimpanzee, gorilla and orang-utans have unfused or partially fused spheno-occipital synchondoses, b) there is an association between the degree of spheno-occipital fusion and age, c) there are interspecific differences in the timing of spheno-occipital fusion, and d) there are significant sex differences in spheno-occipital fusion in chimpanzees, orang-utans and gibbons. Thus, contrary to previous work, degree of spheno-occipital fusion is a potentially useful indicator of relative maturity, especially in great ape taxa. PMID:25293964

  18. Retractorless surgery for a pineal region tumor through an occipital transtentorial approach.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Naoyuki

    2016-01-01

    This video demonstrates surgical techniques of the occipital transtentorial approach to a pineal region tumor without using a fixed brain retractor, which may cause functional impairment or even tissue injury to the occipital visual cortex. There are several ways to facilitate retractorless surgery through this approach. A lateral-semiprone positioning of the patient can induce gravity retraction. The brain is relaxed by draining CSF fluid through lumbar drainage or lateral ventricular tap in the case of obstructive hydrocephalus. Dynamic retraction with handheld instruments after extensive dissection of the deep venous system, including basal veins, can provide a sufficient working space. The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/kQvEHiNcRow . PMID:26722684

  19. A locus for bilateral occipital polymicrogyria maps to chromosome 6q16-q22.

    PubMed

    Ben Cheikh, Bouchra Ouled Amar; Baulac, Stphanie; Lahjouji, Fatiha; Bouhouche, Ahmed; Couarch, Philippe; Khalili, Naima; Regragui, Wafae; Lehericy, Stphane; Ruberg, Merle; Benomar, Ali; Heath, Simon; Chkili, Taib; Yahyaoui, Mohamed; Jiddane, Mohamed; Ouazzani, Reda; LeGuern, Eric

    2009-02-01

    We describe the clinical, radiographic, and genetic features of a large consanguineous Moroccan family in which bilateral occipital polymicrogyria segregated as an autosomal recessive trait. Six affected members of the family had partial complex seizures often associated with behavioral abnormalities. On MRI, three patients had a thickened irregular cortex in the lateral occipital lobes with small gyri. A high-density genome-wide scan with 10,000 SNPs established linkage by homozygosity mapping to a 14-Mb region on chromosome 6q16-q22. Candidate genes by function (TUBE1, GRIK2, GPRC6A, GPR6, NR2E1, MICAL1, and MARCKS) in this locus were screened for mutations. PMID:18758830

  20. Long non-coding RNA Loc554202 regulates proliferation and migration in breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Yongguo; Lu, Jianwei; Zhou, Jing; Tan, Xueming; He, Ye; Ding, Jie; Tian, Yun; Wang, Li; Wang, Keming

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • First, we have shown that upregulated of the Loc554202 in breast cancer tissues. • Second, we demonstrated the function of Loc554202 in breast cancer cell. • Finally, we demonstrated that LOC554202 knockdown could inhibit tumor growth in vivo. - Abstract: Data derived from massive cloning and traditional sequencing methods have revealed that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNA) play important roles in the development and progression of cancer. Although many studies suggest that the lncRNAs have different cellular functions, many of them are not yet to be identified and characterized for the mechanism of their functions. To address this question, we assay the expression level of lncRNAs–Loc554202 in breast cancer tissues and find that Loc554202 is significantly increased compared with normal control, and associated with advanced pathologic stage and tumor size. Moreover, knockdown of Loc554202 decreased breast cancer cell proliferation, induced apoptosis and inhibits migration/invasion in vitro and impeded tumorigenesis in vivo. These data suggest an important role of Loc554202 in breast tumorigenesis.

  1. Ultrasonic doppler flowmeter-guided occipital nerve block

    PubMed Central

    Na, Se Hee; Kim, Tae Wan; Oh, Se-Young; Kweon, Tae Dong; Yoon, Kyung Bong; Yoon, Duck Mi

    2010-01-01

    Background Greater occipital nerve block is used in the treatment of headaches and neuralgia in the occipital area. We evaluated the efficacy of ultrasonic doppler flowmeter-guided occipital nerve block in patients experiencing headache in the occipital region in a randomized, prospective, placebo-controlled study. Methods Twenty-six patients, aged 18 to 70, with headache in the occipital region, were included in the study. Patients received a greater occipital nerve block performed either under ultrasonic doppler flowmeter guidance using 1% lidocaine or the traditional method. Sensory examination findings in the occipital region were evaluated. Results The complete block rate of greater occipital nerve blockade in the doppler group was significantly higher than in the control group respectively (76.9% vs. 30.8%, P < 0.05). Only one patient in the control group had a complication (minimal bleeding). Conclusions Ultrasonic doppler flowmeter-guided occipital nerve block may be a useful method for patients suffering headache in the occipital region. PMID:21253376

  2. [Panic attacks simulated by occipital lobe seizures].

    PubMed

    Stolle, Martin; Sieben, Claudia; Pst, Burkhard

    2009-05-01

    Eleven-year-old Stephanie was admitted to a child and adolescent psychiatry day hospital with symptoms of an anxiety and panic disorder, and compulsive and self-harmful behavior. The patient described detailed threatening scenic sequences that caused her to feel panicky. They symptoms could be classified as epilepsy with visually dominated seizures of the occipital lobe. In addition to pharmacological treatment with oxcabazepine, extensive multimodal interventions as part of the child and adolescent psychiatric day hospital treatment program helped all family members to understand and handle the seizures. Eight weeks after initiation of treatment, Stephanie was seizure-free. Complex partial epilepsy can be mistaken for primary child-psychiatric disorder. PMID:19415605

  3. Coherent Activity in Bilateral Parieto-Occipital Cortices during P300-BCI Operation

    PubMed Central

    Takano, Kouji; Ora, Hiroki; Sekihara, Kensuke; Iwaki, Sunao; Kansaku, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    The visual P300 braincomputer interface (BCI), a popular system for electroencephalography (EEG)-based BCI, uses the P300 event-related potential to select an icon arranged in a flicker matrix. In earlier studies, we used green/blue (GB) luminance and chromatic changes in the P300-BCI system and reported that this luminance and chromatic flicker matrix was associated with better performance and greater subject comfort compared with the conventional white/gray (WG) luminance flicker matrix. To highlight areas involved in improved P300-BCI performance, we used simultaneous EEGfMRI recordings and showed enhanced activities in bilateral and right lateralized parieto-occipital areas. Here, to capture coherent activities of the areas during P300-BCI, we collected whole-head 306-channel magnetoencephalography data. When comparing functional connectivity between the right and left parieto-occipital channels, significantly greater functional connectivity in the alpha band was observed under the GB flicker matrix condition than under the WG flicker matrix condition. Current sources were estimated with a narrow-band adaptive spatial filter, and mean imaginary coherence was computed in the alpha band. Significantly greater coherence was observed in the right posterior parietal cortex under the GB than under the WG condition. Re-analysis of previous EEG-based P300-BCI data showed significant correlations between the power of the coherence of the bilateral parieto-occipital cortices and their performance accuracy. These results suggest that coherent activity in the bilateral parieto-occipital cortices plays a significant role in effectively driving the P300-BCI. PMID:24860546

  4. Alexia without agraphia associated with right occipital lesion.

    PubMed Central

    Hirose, G; Kin, T; Murakami, E

    1977-01-01

    A 78 year old, right handed man developed the syndrome of alexia without agraphia due to a right occipital thrombotic stroke. The cerebral dominance test strongly suggests that his right hemisphere is dominant. This is believed to be the first case of alexia without agraphia secondary to a right occipital lesion in a right handed person. PMID:886349

  5. Cloning and sequence analysis of the LOC339524 gene in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Long, Z H; Li, H; Chen, F; Zou, L Y

    2015-01-01

    We cloned the LOC339524 gene in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats and analyzed the structure and function of the protein encoded by it. Based on the known human LOC339524 gene sequences, the full-length coding sequence of the LOC339524 gene in SD rats was cloned and amplified by the polymerase chain reaction using the complementary DNA of SD rats as a template. Bioinformatics analysis showed that the length of the cloned LOC339524 gene (GenBank accession No. KM224520) was 831 bp and it encoded a deduced protein of 276 amino acids. Sequence analysis revealed that the coded protein was identical to that produced in humans and its functional domain was located in the 138-236 amino acid fragments, a proline-rich region. Our results suggest that the encoded protein may be a significant regulator of the inflammatory response and may provide sufficient information to justify an in-depth investigation of the role of the LOC339524 gene. PMID:26681003

  6. Occipital nerve stimulation in primary headache syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Lambru, Giorgio

    2012-01-01

    Chronic daily headache is a major worldwide health problem that affects 3–5% of the population and results in substantial disability. Advances in the management of headache disorders have meant that a substantial proportion of patients can be effectively treated with medical treatments. However, a significant minority of these patients are intractable to conventional medical treatments. Occipital nerve stimulation (ONS) is emerging as a promising treatment for patients with medically intractable, highly disabling chronic headache disorders, including migraine, cluster headache and other less common headache syndromes. Open-label studies have suggested that this treatment modality is effective and recent controlled trial data are also encouraging. The procedure is performed using several technical variations that have been reviewed along with the complications, which are usually minor and tolerable. The mechanism of action is poorly understood, though recent data suggest that ONS could restore the balance within the impaired central pain system through slow neuromodulatory processes in the pain neuromatrix. While the available data are very encouraging, the ultimate confirmation of the utility of a new therapeutic modality should come from controlled trials before widespread use can be advocated; more controlled data are still needed to properly assess the role of ONS in the management of medically intractable headache disorders. Future studies also need to address the variables that are predictors of response, including clinical phenotypes, surgical techniques and stimulation parameters. PMID:22276076

  7. Occipital neuromodulation for refractory headache in the Chiari malformation population.

    PubMed

    Vadivelu, Sudhakar; Bolognese, Paolo; Milhorat, Thomas H; Mogilner, Alon Y

    2011-01-01

    Chronic occipital and suboccipital headache is a common symptom in patients with Chiari I malformation (CMI). These headaches may persist despite appropriate surgical treatment of the underlying pathology via suboccipital decompression, duraplasty and related procedures. Occipital stimulation has been shown to be effective in the treatment of a variety of occipital headache/pain syndromes. We present our series of 18 patients with CMI and persistent occipital headaches who underwent occipital neurostimulator trials and, following successful trials, permanent stimulator placement. Seventy-two percent (13/18) of patients had a successful stimulator trial and proceeded to permanent implant. Of those implanted, 11/13 (85%) reported continued pain relief at a mean follow-up of 23 months. Device-related complications requiring additional surgeries occurred in 31% of patients. Occipital neuromodulation may provide significant long-term pain relief in selected CMI patients with persistent occipital pain. Larger and longer-term studies are needed to further define appropriate patient selection criteria as well as to refine the surgical technique to minimize device-related complications. PMID:21422782

  8. Algorithmic, LOCS and HOCS (chemistry) exam questions: performance and attitudes of college students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoller, Uri

    2002-02-01

    The performance of freshmen biology and physics-mathematics majors and chemistry majors as well as pre- and in-service chemistry teachers in two Israeli universities on algorithmic (ALG), lower-order cognitive skills (LOCS), and higher-order cognitive skills (HOCS) chemistry exam questions were studied. The driving force for the study was an interest in moving science and chemistry instruction from an algorithmic and factual recall orientation dominated by LOCS, to a decision-making, problem-solving and critical system thinking approach, dominated by HOCS. College students' responses to the specially designed ALG, LOCS and HOCS chemistry exam questions were scored and analysed for differences and correlation between the performance means within and across universities by the questions' category. This was followed by a combined student interview - 'speaking aloud' problem solving session for assessing the thinking processes involved in solving these types of questions and the students' attitudes towards them. The main findings were: (1) students in both universities performed consistently in each of the three categories in the order of ALG > LOCS > HOCS; their 'ideological' preference, was HOCS > algorithmic/LOCS, - referred to as 'computational questions', but their pragmatic preference was the reverse; (2) success on algorithmic/LOCS does not imply success on HOCS questions; algorithmic questions constitute a category on its own as far as students success in solving them is concerned. Our study and its results support the effort being made, worldwide, to integrate HOCS-fostering teaching and assessment strategies and, to develop HOCS-oriented science-technology-environment-society (STES)-type curricula within science and chemistry education.

  9. Charged-coupled device (CCD) detectors for Lab-on-a Chip (LOC) optical analysis.

    PubMed

    Rasooly, Avraham; Kostov, Yordan; Bruck, Hugh A

    2013-01-01

    A critical element of any Lab-on-a-Chip (LOC) is a detector; among the many detection approaches, optical detection is very widely used for biodetection. One challenge for advancing the development of LOC for biodetection has been to enhance the portability and lower the cost for Point-of-Care diagnostics, which has the potential to enhance the quality of healthcare delivery for underserved populations and for global health. We describe a simple and relatively low cost charged-coupled device (CCD)-based detector that can be integrated with a conventional microtiter plate or a portable LOC assay for various optical detection modalities including fluorescence, chemiluminescence, densitometry, and colorimetric assays. In general, the portable battery-operated CCD-based detection system consists of four modules: (1) a cooled CCD digital camera to monitor light emission, (2) a LOC or microtiter plate to perform assays, (3) a light source to illuminate the assay (such as electroluminescence (EL) or light emitting diode (LED)), and (4) a portable computer to acquire and analyze images. The configuration of the fluorescence detector presented here was designed to measure fluorogenic excitation at 490 nm and to monitor emission at 523 nm used for FITC detection.The LOC used for this detection system was fabricated with laminated object manufacturing (LOM) technology, and was designed to detection activity of botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT-A) using a fluorogenic peptide substrate (SNAP-25) for botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT-A) labeled with FITC. The limit of detection (LOD) for the CCD detector is 0.5 nM (25 ng/ml). The portable system is small and is powered by a 12 V source. The modular detector was designed with easily interchangeable LEDs, ELs, filters, lenses, and LOC, and can be used and adapted for a wide variety of densitometry, florescence and colorimetric assays. PMID:23329454

  10. Anton's Syndrome due to Bilateral Ischemic Occipital Lobe Strokes

    PubMed Central

    Zukić, Sanela; Sinanović, Osman; Hodžić, Renata; Mujagić, Svjetlana; Smajlović, Edina

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of a patient with Anton's syndrome (i.e., visual anosognosia with confabulations), who developed bilateral occipital lobe infarct. Bilateral occipital brain damage results in blindness, and patients start to confabulate to fill in the missing sensory input. In addition, the patient occasionally becomes agitated and talks to himself, which indicates that, besides Anton's syndrome, he might have had Charles Bonnet syndrome, characterized by both visual loss and hallucinations. Anton syndrome, is not so frequent condition and is most commonly caused by ischemic stroke. In this particular case, the patient had successive bilateral occipital ischemia as a result of massive stenoses of head and neck arteries. PMID:25530893

  11. Successful Treatment of Occipital Radiating Headache Using Pulsed Radiofrequency Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun Yeul; Jang, Dae Il; Noh, Chan

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease involving multiple joints. The cervical spine is often affected, and cases involving atlantoaxial joint can lead to instability. Anterior atlantoaxial subluxation in RA patients can lead to posterior neck pain or occipital headache because of compression of the C2 ganglion or nerve. Here, we report the successful treatment of a RA patient with occipital radiating headache using pulsed radiofrequency therapy at the C2 dorsal root ganglion. PMID:26279821

  12. 48 CFR 732.406-71 - Circumstances for use of an LOC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...,000; and (c) The Office of Financial Management, Cash Management and Payment Division (FM/CMP) agrees... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Circumstances for use of an LOC. 732.406-71 Section 732.406-71 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR...

  13. Credit Card Misuse, Money Attitudes, and Compulsive Buying Behaviors: A Comparison of Internal and External Locus of Control (LOC) Consumers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Stevie

    2009-01-01

    This study examined attitudinal and behavioral differences between internal and external locus of control (LOC) consumers on credit card misuse, the importance of money, and compulsive buying. Using multiple analysis of variance and separate analyses of variance, internal LOC consumers were found to have lower scores on credit card misuse and

  14. Credit Card Misuse, Money Attitudes, and Compulsive Buying Behaviors: A Comparison of Internal and External Locus of Control (LOC) Consumers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Stevie

    2009-01-01

    This study examined attitudinal and behavioral differences between internal and external locus of control (LOC) consumers on credit card misuse, the importance of money, and compulsive buying. Using multiple analysis of variance and separate analyses of variance, internal LOC consumers were found to have lower scores on credit card misuse and…

  15. Early (N170/M170) Face-Sensitivity Despite Right Lateral Occipital Brain Damage in Acquired Prosopagnosia

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, Esther Alonso; Caharel, Stphanie; Henson, Richard; Rossion, Bruno

    2011-01-01

    Compared to objects, pictures of faces elicit a larger early electromagnetic response at occipito-temporal sites on the human scalp, with an onset of 130?ms and a peak at about 170?ms. This N170 face effect is larger in the right than the left hemisphere and has been associated with the early categorization of the stimulus as a face. Here we tested whether this effect can be observed in the absence of some of the visual areas showing a preferential response to faces as typically identified in neuroimaging. Event-related potentials were recorded in response to faces, cars, and their phase-scrambled versions in a well-known brain-damaged case of prosopagnosia (PS). Despite the patients right inferior occipital gyrus lesion encompassing the most posterior cortical area showing preferential response to faces (occipital face area), we identified an early face-sensitive component over the right occipito-temporal hemisphere of the patient that was identified as the N170. A second experiment supported this conclusion, showing the typical N170 increase of latency and amplitude in response to inverted faces. In contrast, there was no N170 in the left hemisphere, where PS has a lesion to the middle fusiform gyrus and shows no evidence of face-preferential response in neuroimaging (no left fusiform face area). These results were replicated by a magnetoencephalographic investigation of the patient, disclosing a M170 component only in the right hemisphere. These observations indicate that face-preferential activation in the inferior occipital cortex is not necessary to elicit early visual responses associated with face perception (N170/M170) on the human scalp. These results further suggest that when the right inferior occipital cortex is damaged, the integrity of the middle fusiform gyrus and/or the superior temporal sulcus two areas showing face-preferential responses in the patients right hemisphere might be necessary to generate the N170 effect. PMID:22275889

  16. ngLOC: software and web server for predicting protein subcellular localization in prokaryotes and eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Understanding protein subcellular localization is a necessary component toward understanding the overall function of a protein. Numerous computational methods have been published over the past decade, with varying degrees of success. Despite the large number of published methods in this area, only a small fraction of them are available for researchers to use in their own studies. Of those that are available, many are limited by predicting only a small number of organelles in the cell. Additionally, the majority of methods predict only a single location for a sequence, even though it is known that a large fraction of the proteins in eukaryotic species shuttle between locations to carry out their function. Findings We present a software package and a web server for predicting the subcellular localization of protein sequences based on the ngLOC method. ngLOC is an n-gram-based Bayesian classifier that predicts subcellular localization of proteins both in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. The overall prediction accuracy varies from 89.8% to 91.4% across species. This program can predict 11 distinct locations each in plant and animal species. ngLOC also predicts 4 and 5 distinct locations on gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial datasets, respectively. Conclusions ngLOC is a generic method that can be trained by data from a variety of species or classes for predicting protein subcellular localization. The standalone software is freely available for academic use under GNU GPL, and the ngLOC web server is also accessible at http://ngloc.unmc.edu. PMID:22780965

  17. Detection of G-Induced Loss of Consciousness (G-LOC) prognosis through EMG monitoring on gastrocnemius muscle in flight.

    PubMed

    Booyong Choi; Yongkyun Lee; Taehwan Cho; Hyojin Koo; Dongsoo Kim

    2015-08-01

    G-Induced Loss of Consciousness (G-LOC) is mainly caused by the sudden acceleration in the direction of +Gz axis from the fighter pilots, and is considered as an emergent situation of which fighter pilots are constantly aware. In order to resist against G-LOC, fighter pilots are subject to run Anti-G straining maneuver (AGSM), which includes L-1 respiration maneuvering and muscular contraction of the whole body. The purpose of this study is to create a G-LOC warning alarm prior to G-LOC by monitoring the Electromyogram (EMG) of the gastrocnemius muscle on the calf, which goes under constant muscular contraction during the AGSM process. EMG data was retrieved from pilots and pilot trainees of the Korean Air Force, during when subjects were under high G-trainings on a human centrifugal simulator. Out of the EMG features, integrated absolute value (IAV), reflecting muscle contraction, and waveform length (WL), reflecting muscle contraction and fatigue, have shown a rapid decay during the alarm phase, 3 seconds before G-LOC, compared to that of a normal phase withstanding G-force. Such results showed consistency amongst pilots and pilot trainees who were under G-LOC. Based on these findings, this study developed an algorithm which can detect G-LOC prognosis during flight, and at the same time, generate warning signals. The probability of G-LOC occurrence is detected through monitoring the decay trend and degree of the IVA and WL value of when the pilot initiates AGSM during sudden acceleration above 6G. Conclusively, this G-LOC prognosis detecting and warning system is a customized, real-time countermeasure which enhanced the accuracy of detecting G-LOC. PMID:26737905

  18. The Classical Pathways of Occipital Lobe Epileptic Propagation Revised in the Light of White Matter Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Latini, Francesco; Hjortberg, Mats; Aldskogius, Håkan; Ryttlefors, Mats

    2015-01-01

    The clinical evidences of variable epileptic propagation in occipital lobe epilepsy (OLE) have been demonstrated by several studies. However the exact localization of the epileptic focus sometimes represents a problem because of the rapid propagation to frontal, parietal, or temporal regions. Each white matter pathway close to the supposed initial focus can lead the propagation towards a specific direction, explaining the variable semiology of these rare epilepsy syndromes. Some new insights in occipital white matter anatomy are herein described by means of white matter dissection and compared to the classical epileptic patterns, mostly based on the central position of the primary visual cortex. The dissections showed a complex white matter architecture composed by vertical and longitudinal bundles, which are closely interconnected and segregated and are able to support specific high order functions with parallel bidirectional propagation of the electric signal. The same sublobar lesions may hyperactivate different white matter bundles reemphasizing the importance of the ictal semiology as a specific clinical demonstration of the subcortical networks recruited. Merging semiology, white matter anatomy, and electrophysiology may lead us to a better understanding of these complex syndromes and tailored therapeutic options based on individual white matter connectivity. PMID:26063964

  19. Spatial attention enhances object coding in local and distributed representations of the lateral occipital complex.

    PubMed

    Guggenmos, Matthias; Thoma, Volker; Haynes, John-Dylan; Richardson-Klavehn, Alan; Cichy, Radoslaw Martin; Sterzer, Philipp

    2015-08-01

    The modulation of neural activity in visual cortex is thought to be a key mechanism of visual attention. The investigation of attentional modulation in high-level visual areas, however, is hampered by the lack of clear tuning or contrast response functions. In the present functional magnetic resonance imaging study we therefore systematically assessed how small voxel-wise biases in object preference across hundreds of voxels in the lateral occipital complex were affected when attention was directed to objects. We found that the strength of attentional modulation depended on a voxel's object preference in the absence of attention, a pattern indicative of an amplificatory mechanism. Our results show that such attentional modulation effectively increased the mutual information between voxel responses and object identity. Further, these local modulatory effects led to improved information-based object readout at the level of multi-voxel activation patterns and to an increased reproducibility of these patterns across repeated presentations. We conclude that attentional modulation enhances object coding in local and distributed object representations of the lateral occipital complex. PMID:25865144

  20. Alexia Without Agraphia in a Right-Handed Individual Following Right Occipital Stroke.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Jordan S; Collins, Robert L; Mukhi, Shalini V

    2016-01-01

    Alexia without agraphia is a disconnection syndrome that typically involves damage to the occipital lobe, with splenium involvement, in the dominant left hemisphere. We describe an exceptionally rare case of a right-handed individual displaying this deficit following a right-sided occipital stroke. A report of a single case of a 65-year-old man is presented with data from appointments with the neurology and neuropsychology departments that occurred approximately 10 and 12 months following the patient's stroke. During the evaluation, he exhibited a marked deficit in his ability to read, with vision grossly intact. His ability to write single words and short phrases from dictation was intact, but he was later unable to read them. This case demonstrates the complexity of the organization of language in the human brain. Although a large majority of individuals exhibit language dominance in their left hemispheres, it remains possible that some right-handed individuals may show atypical organization of language. This highlights the need for clinicians to consider atypical cortical organization when observed deficits may not necessarily match expected lesions within the cortex. PMID:26397830

  1. Occipital long-interval paired pulse TMS leads to slow wave components in NREM sleep.

    PubMed

    Stamm, Mihkel; Aru, Jaan; Rutiku, Renate; Bachmann, Talis

    2015-09-01

    Neural correlates of conscious vs unconscious states can be studied by contrasting EEG markers of brain activity between those two states. Here, a task-free experimental setup was used to study the state dependent effects of occipital transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). EEG responses to single and paired pulse TMS with an inter-stimulus-interval (ISI) of 100 ms were investigated under Non-REM (NREM) sleep and wakefulness. In the paired pulse TMS condition adopting this long ISI, a robust positive deflection starting around 200 ms after the second pulse was found. This component was not obtained under wakefulness or when a single TMS pulse was applied in sleep. These findings are discussed in the context of NREM sleep slow waves. The present results indicate that the long interval paired-pulse paradigm could be used to manipulate plasticity processes in the visual cortex. The present setup might also become useful for evaluating states of consciousness. PMID:25978462

  2. Reduced Occipital and Prefrontal Brain Volumes in Dysbindin-Associated Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Donohoe, Gary; Frodl, Thomas; Morris, Derek; Spoletini, Ilaria; Cannon, Dara M; Cherubini, Andrea; Caltagirone, Carlo; Boss, Paola; McDonald, Colm; Gill, Michael; Corvin, Aiden P; Spalletta, Gianfranco

    2010-01-01

    A three-marker CAT dysbindin haplotype identified by Williams et al (PMID: 15066891) is associated with increased risk for schizophrenia, decreased mRNA expression, poorer cognitive performance, and early sensory processing deficits. We investigated whether this same dysbindin risk haplotype was also associated with structural variation in the gray matter volume (GMV). Using voxel-based morphometry, whole-volume analysis revealed significantly reduced GMVs in both the right dorsolateral prefrontal and left occipital cortex, corresponding to the behavioral findings of impaired spatial working memory and EEG findings of impaired visual processing already reported. These data provide important evidence of the influence of dysbindin risk variants on brain structure, and suggest a possible mechanism by which disease risk is being increased. PMID:19794403

  3. Imaging features of atlanto-occipital overlapping in dogs.

    PubMed

    Cerda-Gonzalez, Sofia; Dewey, Curtis W; Scrivani, Peter V; Kline, Karen L

    2009-01-01

    The imaging features of four dogs with atlanto-occipital overlapping are described. This malformation appeared to play a role in the development of neck pain, ataxia, variable cerebellar involvement, medullary kinking, and possibly syringomyelia. Using cervical radiographs, three of the four dogs were initially diagnosed with an atlanto-axial malformation. Because this disorder could not account for all clinical signs, magnetic resonance and computed tomography images were also acquired. These provided a more complete evaluation of the craniocervical junction, allowing detection of atlanto-occipital overlapping, medullary kinking, occipital dysplasia, abnormalities of the dens, and syringomyelia in these dogs. Head position during imaging affected the degree of atlanto-occipital overlap. These findings emphasize the need to modify the currently accepted imaging recommendations for dogs with head and neck pain and/or cranial cervical myelopathy. We suggest that the entire craniocervical junction be evaluated, even if atlanto-axial subluxation has already been detected. Moreover, we propose that atlanto-occipital overlapping is a perhaps underrecognized disorder that can influence the clinical signs and therapeutic outcome of dogs with anomalies of the craniocervical junction. PMID:19507388

  4. Two-layer Lab-on-a-chip (LOC) with passive capillary valves for mHealth medical diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Balsam, Joshua; Bruck, Hugh Alan; Rasooly, Avraham

    2015-01-01

    There is a new potential to address needs for medical diagnostics in Point-of-Care (PoC) applications using mHealth (Mobile computing, medical sensors, and communications technologies for health care), a mHealth based lab test will require a LOC to perform clinical analysis. In this work, we describe the design of a simple Lab-on-a-chip (LOC) platform for mHealth medical diagnostics. The LOC utilizes a passive capillary valve with no moving parts for fluid control using channels with very low aspect ratios cross sections (i.e., channel width ≫ height) achieved through transitions in the channel geometry via that arrest capillary flow. Using a CO2 laser in raster engraving mode, we have designed and fabricated an eight-channel LOC for fluorescence signal detection fabricated by engraving and combining just two polymer layers. Each of the LOC channels is capable of mixing two reagents (e.g., enzyme and substrate) for various assays. For mHealth detection, we used a mobile CCD detector equipped with LED multispectral illumination in the red, green, blue, and white range. This technology enables the development of low-cost LOC platforms for mHealth whose fabrication is compatible with standard industrial plastic fabrication processes to enable mass production of mHealth diagnostic devices, which may broaden the use of LOCs in PoC applications, especially in global health settings. PMID:25626544

  5. Portable multi-immunosensing lab-on-a-chip (LOC) triggered by air bladder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Tae Ho; Park, Sin Wook; Lee, Jun Hwang; Yoon, Hyun C.; Yang, Sang Sik

    2007-12-01

    This paper presents a simple and reliable multi-immunosensing lab-on-a-chip detecting antibodies as multi-disease markers using electrochemical method suitable for a portable point-of-care system. Since multi-immunosensing LOCs are to be disposable and cheap, the complications associated with the liquid control need to be removed. The main complication arises from the active microfluidic part driven by the external electric power. In this paper, a multi-stacked PDMS LOC including PDMS passive valves is proposed. The sequential liquid driving by capillary attraction and the action of check valve provide a reliable immunosensing tool simply triggered by an air bladder push without an electrical power. The immunosensing-LOC with the size of "25mm × 20mm × 6 mm" is fabricated with PDMS using the replica molding and oxygen plasma bonding. The LOC consists of a PDMS valve, channel, and a glass substrate. The fluidic tests were performed using DI water. The liquids are controlled by two kinds of passive valve, one is capillary stop valve and the other is membrane type check valve. The capillary stop valve stops liquids using pressure barrier of expanded channel. The check valve stops the liquid triggered by an air bladder from flowing backward. The assembly of these two valves assures the well controlled liquid driving for the immunosensing. The model experiments were performed with anti-DNP antibody and anti-biotin antibody as target analytes. The antibodies conjugated with GOX are used as a signaling molecule for cyclic voltammetry. The different amplified signals show different target analyte affinities and make sure the multi-immunosensing.

  6. Neurochemical changes in the pericalcarine cortex in congenital blindness attributable to bilateral anophthalmia.

    PubMed

    Coullon, Gaelle S L; Emir, Uzay E; Fine, Ione; Watkins, Kate E; Bridge, Holly

    2015-09-01

    Congenital blindness leads to large-scale functional and structural reorganization in the occipital cortex, but relatively little is known about the neurochemical changes underlying this cross-modal plasticity. To investigate the effect of complete and early visual deafferentation on the concentration of metabolites in the pericalcarine cortex, (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy was performed in 14 sighted subjects and 5 subjects with bilateral anophthalmia, a condition in which both eyes fail to develop. In the pericalcarine cortex, where primary visual cortex is normally located, the proportion of gray matter was significantly greater, and levels of choline, glutamate, glutamine, myo-inositol, and total creatine were elevated in anophthalmic relative to sighted subjects. Anophthalmia had no effect on the structure or neurochemistry of a sensorimotor cortex control region. More gray matter, combined with high levels of choline and myo-inositol, resembles the profile of the cortex at birth and suggests that the lack of visual input from the eyes might have delayed or arrested the maturation of this cortical region. High levels of choline and glutamate/glutamine are consistent with enhanced excitatory circuits in the anophthalmic occipital cortex, which could reflect a shift toward enhanced plasticity or sensitivity that could in turn mediate or unmask cross-modal responses. Finally, it is possible that the change in function of the occipital cortex results in biochemical profiles that resemble those of auditory, language, or somatosensory cortex. PMID:26180125

  7. LOC387761 polymorphism is associated with type 2 diabetes in the Mexican population.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Vidal, Roxana; Rodríguez-Trejo, Adriana; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Herrera-Cornejo, Martín; Granados-Silvestre, Maria Angeles; Montúfar-Robles, Isela; Ortiz-López, María Guadalupe; Menjívar, Marta

    2011-01-01

    Worldwide researchers have invested time, effort, and money during the last years to find new genes associated with diabetes susceptibility, such as LOC387761, HHEX, EXT2, and SLC30A8. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of these genes are associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and metabolic traits in the Mexican population. We also assessed these SNPs in Mexican indigenous groups to identify a possible inherited susceptibility. Seven SNPs were analyzed in 789 Mexicans (234 control subjects, 455 type 2 diabetic patients, and 100 of indigenous origin), using the KASPar assay (KBioscience Company). Analysis of the data showed an association of the LOC387761 SNP rs7480010 with T2D (p = 0.019). The risk allele A of rs7480010 increased body mass index in diabetic patients (p = 0.01). In addition, there was no association between T2D and the SNPs of HHEX, EXT2, and SLC30A8. Our findings suggest that the SNP rs7480010 (LOC387761) can contribute to a failure in insulin secretion, thus increasing the susceptibility to T2D in Mexicans. PMID:21198374

  8. Grievous Temporal and Occipital Injury Caused by a Bear Attack

    PubMed Central

    Thada, Nikhil Dinaker; Rao, Pallavi; Thada, Smitha Rani; Prasad, Kishore Chandra

    2013-01-01

    Bear attacks are reported from nearly every part of the world. The chance of a human encountering a bear increases as the remote bear territory diminishes. The sloth bear is one of the three species of bears found in India, which inhabits the forests of India and its neighboring countries. Here we describe a teenager who came to us with a critical injury involving the face, temporal and occipital bones inflicted by a sloth bear attack. He underwent a temporal exploration, facial nerve decompression, pinna reconstruction, and occipital bone repair to save him from fatality. PMID:24396623

  9. LocARNAscan: Incorporating thermodynamic stability in sequence and structure-based RNA homology search

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The search for distant homologs has become an import issue in genome annotation. A particular difficulty is posed by divergent homologs that have lost recognizable sequence similarity. This same problem also arises in the recognition of novel members of large classes of RNAs such as snoRNAs or microRNAs that consist of families unrelated by common descent. Current homology search tools for structured RNAs are either based entirely on sequence similarity (such as blast or hmmer) or combine sequence and secondary structure. The most prominent example of the latter class of tools is Infernal. Alternatives are descriptor-based methods. In most practical applications published to-date, however, the information contained in covariance models or manually prescribed search patterns is dominated by sequence information. Here we ask two related questions: (1) Is secondary structure alone informative for homology search and the detection of novel members of RNA classes? (2) To what extent is the thermodynamic propensity of the target sequence to fold into the correct secondary structure helpful for this task? Results Sequence-structure alignment can be used as an alternative search strategy. In this scenario, the query consists of a base pairing probability matrix, which can be derived either from a single sequence or from a multiple alignment representing a set of known representatives. Sequence information can be optionally added to the query. The target sequence is pre-processed to obtain local base pairing probabilities. As a search engine we devised a semi-global scanning variant of LocARNA’s algorithm for sequence-structure alignment. The LocARNAscan tool is optimized for speed and low memory consumption. In benchmarking experiments on artificial data we observe that the inclusion of thermodynamic stability is helpful, albeit only in a regime of extremely low sequence information in the query. We observe, furthermore, that the sensitivity is bounded in particular by the limited accuracy of the predicted local structures of the target sequence. Conclusions Although we demonstrate that a purely structure-based homology search is feasible in principle, it is unlikely to outperform tools such as Infernal in most application scenarios, where a substantial amount of sequence information is typically available. The LocARNAscan approach will profit, however, from high throughput methods to determine RNA secondary structure. In transcriptome-wide applications, such methods will provide accurate structure annotations on the target side. Availability Source code of the free software LocARNAscan 1.0 and supplementary data are available at http://www.bioinf.uni-leipzig.de/Software/LocARNAscan. PMID:23601347

  10. Fabrication and testing of a PDMS multi-stacked hand-operated LOC for use in portable immunosensing systems.

    PubMed

    Park, Sin Wook; Lee, Jun Hwang; Yoon, Hyun C; Kim, Byung Woo; Sim, Sang Jun; Chae, Heeyeop; Yang, Sang Sik

    2008-12-01

    This paper presents the development of a reliable multi-liquid lab-on-a-chip (LOC), with a hand-operated mechanism, for the application in portable immunosensing systems. To control the transport of multiple liquids without any external equipment, we utilize capillary attraction force for filling and surface tension for stopping liquid flow. As a driving force, hydraulic pressure caused by the elastic deformation of a liquid reservoir transfers liquid stopped at passive valves. The proposed LOC successfully demonstrates a reliable sequential liquid transfer within the reaction channel. To highlight its feasibility as a portable diagnostic system, we performed the electrochemical immunoassay measuring antibody concentrations within the fabricated LOC. As a test biorecognition reaction, the anti-dinitrophenyl (DNP) antibody with an enzymatic catalysis was selected as the target analyte. The amplified signals obtained from this experiment indicated a high selectivity of the immunosensing LOC. PMID:18553169

  11. dLocAuth: a dynamic multifactor authentication scheme for mCommerce applications using independent location-based obfuscation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuseler, Torben; Lami, Ihsan A.

    2012-06-01

    This paper proposes a new technique to obfuscate an authentication-challenge program (named LocProg) using randomly generated data together with a client's current location in real-time. LocProg can be used to enable any handsetapplication on mobile-devices (e.g. mCommerce on Smartphones) that requires authentication with a remote authenticator (e.g. bank). The motivation of this novel technique is to a) enhance the security against replay attacks, which is currently based on using real-time nonce(s), and b) add a new security factor, which is location verified by two independent sources, to challenge / response methods for authentication. To assure a secure-live transaction, thus reducing the possibility of replay and other remote attacks, the authors have devised a novel technique to obtain the client's location from two independent sources of GPS on the client's side and the cellular network on authenticator's side. The algorithm of LocProg is based on obfuscating "random elements plus a client's data" with a location-based key, generated on the bank side. LocProg is then sent to the client and is designed so it will automatically integrate into the target application on the client's handset. The client can then de-obfuscate LocProg if s/he is within a certain range around the location calculated by the bank and if the correct personal data is supplied. LocProg also has features to protect against trial/error attacks. Analysis of LocAuth's security (trust, threat and system models) and trials based on a prototype implementation (on Android platform) prove the viability and novelty of LocAuth.

  12. Benign Occipital Epilepsies of Childhood: Clinical Features and Genetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Isabella; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Kivity, Sara; Scheffer, Ingrid E.

    2008-01-01

    The early and late benign occipital epilepsies of childhood (BOEC) are described as two discrete electro-clinical syndromes, eponymously known as Panayiotopoulos and Gastaut syndromes. Our aim was to explore the clinical features, classification and clinical genetics of these syndromes using twin and multiplex family studies to determine whether…

  13. Occipital Nerve Blocks for Pediatric Posttraumatic Headache: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Seeger, Trevor A; Orr, Serena; Bodell, Lisa; Lockyer, Lisette; Rajapakse, Thilinie; Barlow, Karen M

    2015-08-01

    Posttraumatic headache is one of the most common and disabling symptoms after traumatic brain injury. However, evidence for treating posttraumatic headache is sparse, especially in the pediatric literature. This retrospective chart review evaluated the use of occipital nerve blocks in adolescents treated for posttraumatic headache following mild traumatic brain injury, presenting to the Complex Concussion and Traumatic Brain Injury clinic. Fifteen patients (mean age 15.47; range: 13-17) received occipital nerve block for posttraumatic headache. Follow-up was obtained in 14 patients at 5.57 (standard deviation = 3.52) months postinjury. The headache burden was high, with all except one having headaches 15 or more days per month (median 30, range 10-30). Sixty-four percent reported long-term response to the occipital nerve blocks, with associated improved quality of life and decreased postconcussion symptom scores (P < .05). One patient reported transient allopecia. Occipital nerve blocks are well tolerated and can be helpful in posttraumatic headache. PMID:25406154

  14. Anatomic basis for localized occipital thinning: a normal anatomic variant

    SciTech Connect

    Haden, M.A.; Keats, T.E.

    1982-06-01

    The radiographic evidence presented in this case confirms that the asymptomatic, incidentally found occipital radiolucencies previously described by Keats are not a problem in differential diagnosis of inner table erosion. The entity appears to be a developmental variant with typical features and occurring in a characteristic location.

  15. Benign Occipital Epilepsies of Childhood: Clinical Features and Genetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Isabella; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Kivity, Sara; Scheffer, Ingrid E.

    2008-01-01

    The early and late benign occipital epilepsies of childhood (BOEC) are described as two discrete electro-clinical syndromes, eponymously known as Panayiotopoulos and Gastaut syndromes. Our aim was to explore the clinical features, classification and clinical genetics of these syndromes using twin and multiplex family studies to determine whether

  16. LocZ Is a New Cell Division Protein Involved in Proper Septum Placement in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Holečková, Nela; Molle, Virginie; Buriánková, Karolína; Benada, Oldřich; Kofroňová, Olga; Ulrych, Aleš; Branny, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT How bacteria control proper septum placement at midcell, to guarantee the generation of identical daughter cells, is still largely unknown. Although different systems involved in the selection of the division site have been described in selected species, these do not appear to be widely conserved. Here, we report that LocZ (Spr0334), a newly identified cell division protein, is involved in proper septum placement in Streptococcus pneumoniae. We show that locZ is not essential but that its deletion results in cell division defects and shape deformation, causing cells to divide asymmetrically and generate unequally sized, occasionally anucleated, daughter cells. LocZ has a unique localization profile. It arrives early at midcell, before FtsZ and FtsA, and leaves the septum early, apparently moving along with the equatorial rings that mark the future division sites. Consistently, cells lacking LocZ also show misplacement of the Z-ring, suggesting that it could act as a positive regulator to determine septum placement. LocZ was identified as a substrate of the Ser/Thr protein kinase StkP, which regulates cell division in S. pneumoniae. Interestingly, homologues of LocZ are found only in streptococci, lactococci, and enterococci, indicating that this close phylogenetically related group of bacteria evolved a specific solution to spatially regulate cell division. PMID:25550321

  17. The vertical occipital fasciculus: A century of controversy resolved by in vivo measurements

    PubMed Central

    Yeatman, Jason D.; Weiner, Kevin S.; Pestilli, Franco; Rokem, Ariel; Mezer, Aviv; Wandell, Brian A.

    2014-01-01

    The vertical occipital fasciculus (VOF) is the only major fiber bundle connecting dorsolateral and ventrolateral visual cortex. Only a handful of studies have examined the anatomy of the VOF or its role in cognition in the living human brain. Here, we trace the contentious history of the VOF, beginning with its original discovery in monkey by Wernicke (1881) and in human by Obersteiner (1888), to its disappearance from the literature, and recent reemergence a century later. We introduce an algorithm to identify the VOF in vivo using diffusion-weighted imaging and tractography, and show that the VOF can be found in every hemisphere (n = 74). Quantitative T1 measurements demonstrate that tissue properties, such as myelination, in the VOF differ from neighboring white-matter tracts. The terminations of the VOF are in consistent positions relative to cortical folding patterns in the dorsal and ventral visual streams. Recent findings demonstrate that these same anatomical locations also mark cytoarchitectonic and functional transitions in dorsal and ventral visual cortex. We conclude that the VOF is likely to serve a unique role in the communication of signals between regions on the ventral surface that are important for the perception of visual categories (e.g., words, faces, bodies, etc.) and regions on the dorsal surface involved in the control of eye movements, attention, and motion perception. PMID:25404310

  18. The Involvement of Occipital and Inferior Frontal Cortex in the Phonological Learning of Chinese Characters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deng, Yuan; Chou, Tai-li; Ding, Guo-sheng; Peng, Dan-ling; Booth, James R.

    2011-01-01

    Neural changes related to the learning of the pronunciation of Chinese characters in English speakers were examined using fMRI. We examined the item-specific learning effects for trained characters and the generalization of phonetic knowledge to novel transfer characters that shared a phonetic radical (part of a character that gives a clue to the

  19. Object Working Memory Performance Depends on Microstructure of the Frontal-Occipital Fasciculus

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Megan; Montojo, Caroline A.; Sheu, Yi-Shin; Marchette, Steven A.; Harrison, Daniel M.; Newsome, Scott D.; Zhou, Feng; Shelton, Amy L.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Re-entrant circuits involving communication between the frontal cortex and other brain areas have been hypothesized to be necessary for maintaining the sustained patterns of neural activity that represent information in working memory, but evidence has so far been indirect. If working memory maintenance indeed depends on such temporally precise and robust long-distance communication, then performance on a delayed recognition task should be highly dependent on the microstructural integrity of white-matter tracts connecting sensory areas with prefrontal cortex. This study explored the effect of variations in white-matter microstructure on working memory performance in two separate groups of participants: patients with multiple sclerosis and age- and sex-matched healthy adults. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was performed to reveal cortical regions involved in spatial and object working memory, which, in turn, were used to define specific frontal to extrastriate white-matter tracts of interest via diffusion tensor tractography. After factoring out variance due to age and the microstructure of a control tract (the corticospinal tract), the number of errors produced in the object working memory task was specifically related to the microstructure of the inferior frontal-occipital fasciculus. This result held for both groups, independently, providing a within-study replication with two different types of white-matter structural variability: multiple sclerosis–related damage and normal variation. The results demonstrate the importance of interactions between specific regions of the prefrontal cortex and sensory cortices for a nonspatial working memory task that preferentially activates those regions. PMID:22432421

  20. LACEwING: LocAting Constituent mEmbers In Nearby Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedel, Adric R.

    2016-01-01

    LACEwING (LocAting Constituent mEmbers In Nearby Groups) uses the kinematics (positions and motions) of stars to determine if they are members of one of 10 nearby young moving groups or 4 nearby open clusters within 100 parsecs. It is written for Python 2.7 and depends upon Numpy, Scipy, and Astropy (ascl:1304.002) modules. LACEwING can be used as a stand-alone code or as a module in other code. Additional python programs are present in the repository for the purpose of recalibrating the code and producing other analyses, including a traceback analysis.

  1. Peripheral nerve stimulation for occipital neuralgia: surgical leads.

    PubMed

    Kapural, Leonardo; Sable, James

    2011-01-01

    Peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) has been used for the treatment of various neuropathic pain disorders, including occipital neuralgia, for the patients who failed less-invasive therapeutic approaches. Several different mechanisms of pain relief were proposed when PNS is used to treat occipital neuralgia and clinical studies using various types of electrical leads suggested largely positive clinical responses in patients with mostly refractory, severe neuropathic pain. With advancements in cylindrical lead design for PNS and placement/implantation techniques, there are very few clear indications where 'paddle' (surgical) leads could be advantageous. Those include patients who experienced repeated migration of cylindrical lead as paddle lead may provide greater stability, who are experiencing unpleasant recruitment of surrounding muscle and/or motor nerve stimulation and for cases where skin erosions were caused by a cylindrical lead. However, disregarding the type of lead used, multiple clinical advantages of this minimally invasive, easily reversible approach include relatively low morbidity and a high treatment efficacy. PMID:21422779

  2. Assessment of Brain Damage and Plasticity in the Visual System Due to Early Occipital Lesion: Comparison of FDG-PET with Diffusion MRI Tractography

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jeong-won; Tiwari, Vijay N.; Shin, Joseph; Chugani, Harry T.; Juhsz, Csaba

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the relation between glucose metabolic changes of the primary visual cortex, structural abnormalities of the corresponding visual tracts, and visual symptoms in children with Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS). Materials and Methods In 10 children with unilateral SWS (ages 1.55.5 years), a region-of-interest analysis was applied in the bilateral medial occipital cortex on positron emission tomography (PET) and used to track diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) streamlines corresponding to the central visual pathway. Normalized streamline volumes of individual SWS patients were compared with values from age-matched control groups as well as correlated with normalized glucose uptakes and visual field deficit. Results Lower glucose uptake and lower corresponding streamline volumes were detected in the affected occipital lobe in 9/10 patients, as compared to the contralateral side. Seven of these 9 patients had visual field deficit and normal or decreased streamline volumes on the unaffected side. The two other children had no visual symptoms and showed high contralateral visual streamline volumes. There was a positive correlation between the normalized ratios on DWI and PET, indicating that lower glucose metabolism was associated with lower streamline volume in the affected hemisphere (R = 0.70, P = 0.024). Conclusion We demonstrated that 18F-flurodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET combined with DWI tractography can detect both brain damage on the side of the lesion and contralateral plasticity in children with early occipital lesions. PMID:24391057

  3. Atypical evolution in childhood epilepsy with occipital paroxysms (Panayiotopoulos type).

    PubMed

    Caraballo, R H; Astorino, F; Cerssimo, R; Soprano, A M; Fejerman, N

    2001-09-01

    We report, on two, school-age girls with clinical and electroencephalographic features of early onset childhood epilepsy with occipital paroxysms (CEOP) of the "Panayiotopoulos type" that showed atypical evolution. Neurological examination and brain imaging were normal in both. One child presented at age 2.5 years episodes of oculocephalic deviation, and ictal vomiting during nocturnal sleep. The EEG showed left occipital spikes during wakefulness and sleep. One year later, frequent inhibitory seizures appeared in the lower limbs causing, "pseudoataxic gait". At the same time she presented with behavioral disturbances and aphasia. EEG showed bilateral spike-waves while awake and continuous spike-waves during slow sleep (CSWSS). After switching AEDs to benzodiazepines, control of seizures along with improvement of behavior, and partial restoration of cognitive functions were achieved. The CSWSS disappeared and the last EEG at age 8 years only showed only isolated right occipital spikes. The other girl had a personal and familial history of febrile seizures. At 4 years of age she presented the first non-febrile seizures during sleep, with oculocephalic deviation and ictal vomiting, followed by a generalized tonic-clonic seizure. Partial control of seizures was obtained with antiepileptic drugs. At age 7, the child began to have weekly episodes of oculocephalic version, occasionally with secondary generalization. Repeated inhibitory seizures and absences also appeared. EEG showed frequent bilateral spikes occupying predominantly the posterior regions while awake, and CSWSS. At 7.5 years the same electro-clinical picture persisted. Ethosuximide was added to sodium valproate and clobazam. Fifteen days later, the seizures disappeared and the EEG showed less frequent bilateral occipital spikes. She is now 9 years old and she has been seizure-free for 18 months. Her present neuropsychological profile shows mild mental retardation. The two children with typical electroclinical features of "Panayiotopoulos Type" CEOP developed an atypical evolution which, to our knowledge, has not been described previously. PMID:11679309

  4. Prenatal Diagnosis of Tectocerebellar Dysraphia with Occipital Encephalocele

    PubMed Central

    Sanhal, Cem Y; Tokmak, Aytekin; Mftoglu, Kamil H; Danisman, Nuri

    2015-01-01

    Tectocerebellar dysraphia (TCD) is an extremely rare disorder and comprises the congenital abnormalities including occipital encephalocele, aplasia and/or hypoplasia of cerebellar vermis and deformity of tectum. Only few reported cases of this entity are there in the literature. However, the diagnosis in each of the previous cases had been made after birth. We herein describe the first reported case of prenatal diagnosis for TCD in a Turkish woman. PMID:26816952

  5. Gyrokinetic Simulations of Diluted Plasmas in the LOC regime in Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porkolab, M.; Ennever, P.; Reinke, M. L.; Rice, J.; Rost, C.; Tsujii, N.; Davis, E.; Ernst, D.; Fiore, C.; Greenwald, M.; Hubbard, A.; Hughes, J.; Marmar, E.; Candy, J.; Staebler, G. M.; Waltz, R.

    2012-10-01

    Previous investigations of ITG and TEM/ETG turbulence using the reduced gyro-landau fluid code TGLF, and gyrokinetic code GYRO have predicted that in the linear ohmic confinement (LOC) regime in Alcator C-Mod the dilution of the main D ion species by low-Z impurities reduces the ion transport to experimentally observed levels. This analysis assumed an average impurity ion charge Zi= 8. Recent spectroscopic measurements of the impurity ion species in the LOC regime in C-Mod have shown that the average Zi is approximately 9, which at the measured Zeff values (2-4) results in a significant dilution (>10%) of the majority D ion species. By puffing in nitrogen while using a cryopump to keep the density constant, new experiments enabled us to lower Zi to values near 8, thus further increasing dilution. To account for the sensitivity of the turbulent transport on the density (Lne) and temperature (LTe) gradient scale lengths, recently we used TGYRO to improve the agreement between theory and the measurements. The results of such simulations will be presented.

  6. LocTree2 predicts localization for all domains of life

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Tatyana; Hamp, Tobias; Rost, Burkhard

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Subcellular localization is one aspect of protein function. Despite advances in high-throughput imaging, localization maps remain incomplete. Several methods accurately predict localization, but many challenges remain to be tackled. Results: In this study, we introduced a framework to predict localization in life's three domains, including globular and membrane proteins (3 classes for archaea; 6 for bacteria and 18 for eukaryota). The resulting method, LocTree2, works well even for protein fragments. It uses a hierarchical system of support vector machines that imitates the cascading mechanism of cellular sorting. The method reaches high levels of sustained performance (eukaryota: Q18=65%, bacteria: Q6=84%). LocTree2 also accurately distinguishes membrane and non-membrane proteins. In our hands, it compared favorably with top methods when tested on new data. Availability: Online through PredictProtein (predictprotein.org); as standalone version at http://www.rostlab.org/services/loctree2. Contact: localization@rostlab.org Supplementary Information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:22962467

  7. Brain Herniation in Neurofibromatosis with Dysplasia of Occipital Bone and Posterior Skull Base

    PubMed Central

    Rangarajan, Vithal; Mahore, Amit; Patil, Manoj; Sathe, Prashant; Kaswa, Amol; Gore, Sandeep; Dharurkar, Pralhad; Kawale, Juhi

    2015-01-01

    A 22-year-old female, a known case of neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1), presented with a congenital swelling in the left occipital region. She had developed recent onset dysphagia and localized occipital headache. Neuroradiology revealed a left occipital meningoencephalocele and a left parapharyngeal meningocele. This was associated with ventriculomegaly. She was advised on cranioplasty along with duraplasty which she denied. She agreed to a lumbar-peritoneal shunt. She described a dramatic improvement in her symptoms following the lumbar-peritoneal shunt. Occipital dysplasias, though uncommon, have been reported in the literature. We review this case and its management and discuss relevant literature on occipital dysplasias in NF1. PMID:26600957

  8. Traumatic atlanto-occipital dissociation presenting as locked-in syndrome.

    PubMed

    Desai, Rupen; Kinon, Merritt D; Loriaux, Daniel B; Bagley, Carlos A

    2015-12-01

    We present an unusual presentation of unstable atlanto-occipital dissociation as locked-in syndrome. Traumatic atlanto-occipital dissociation is a severe injury that accounts for 15-20% of all fatal cervical spinal injuries. A disruption occurs between the tectorial ligaments connecting the occipital condyle to the superior articulating facets of the atlas, resulting in anterior, longitudinal, or posterior translation, and it may be associated with Type III odontoid fractures. Furthermore, the dissociation may be complete (atlanto-occipital dislocation) or incomplete (atlanto-occipital subluxation), with neurologic findings ranging from normal to complete quadriplegia with respiratory compromise. PMID:26190221

  9. No improvement in long-term wear and revision rates with the second-generation Biomet cup (RingLoc) in young patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A number of excellent results with the cementless titanium femoral component of the Mallory Head Total Hip Replacement have been published. Unfortunately, these excellent results have been counteracted by the poor performance of the cementless titanium acetabular components. In 1994, the HexLoc acetabular component was replaced with a second-generation design, the RingLoc. We hypothesized that the new generation would have improved the results. Methods We retrospectively studied 111 consecutive patients (150 hips) younger than 55 years. Median follow-up time was 14 (6–18) years for the HexLoc and 10 (1–14) years for the RingLoc. 7 patients were lost to follow-up and 7 patients died. The 10-year survival rate, radiographic liner wear, and radiographic signs of prosthesis failure were compared between the 2 acetabular components. Results The Kaplan-Meier survival estimate with revision for any reason as the endpoint showed a 10-year survival of 89% (95% CI: 81–97) for the HexLoc and 92% (CI: 85–98) for the RingLoc. The mean annual wear rate for the HexLoc was 0.16 (SD 0.16) mm and it was 0.15 (0.1) mm for the RingLoc (p = 0.3). The radiographic signs of failure were equally distributed between the 2 groups. Interpretation Compared to the HexLoc type, the RingLoc system did not improve the mean percentage survival at 10 years; nor did it reduce the liner wear. Despite correction of the known design flaws in the HexLoc design, the RingLoc system did not show a clinically relevant improvement compared to its predecessor. PMID:22066563

  10. Operational requirements for avoidance and eventual elimination of Gz-induced loss of consciousness (G-LOC) in flight.

    PubMed

    Wood, E

    1993-02-01

    Fifty years of more or less active research experiences concerning the cardiovascular, respiratory, and neurologic dynamics of G-LOC carried out in healthy humans, both on centrifuges and in flight, have convinced me that on the basis of the physiology involved and because of the risk of the very high cost in pilot lives and their planes due to G-LOC, three operational requirements should be adopted as follows. Operational Requirement I. A noninvasive continuous on-line, real-time recording of arterial pulsations at brain level should be a mandatory requirement for every human centrifuge exposure to Gz accelerations that carry an appreciable likelihood of loss of vision and/or consciousness. A similar system should be a mandatory requirement for every pilot when performing high G air-to-air or air-to-ground combat maneuvers both in training and in actual combat conditions. Operational Requirement II. A physiological G-LOC forewarning system based on arterial pulsations at head level coupled with a last-resort automatic plane recovery system should be installed in all advanced fighter aircraft. Operational Requirement III. Because of the inherent biomedical hazards associated with very high Gz protection and the risk of G-LOC when in conventional upright or partially supinated positions, an automatic 9 Gz or greater activated timer, G-LOC avoidance system should be installed in advanced fighter aircraft. This system should be set to activate an auditory G-LOC forewarning signal when a Gz level of more than 9 is maintained for 3 seconds, i.e., a period less than the cerebral anoxic reserve time. Failure of pilot response, that is, maintenance of Gz levels of greater than 9 for more than 4 seconds following this forewarning signal (i.e., a total sustained very high period of 6-7 seconds, a period equal to the average human cerebral anoxic reserve time), then activates a follow-on automatic plane recovery system. PMID:11538505

  11. Remapping in Human Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Merriam, Elisha P.; Genovese, Christopher R.; Colby, Carol L.

    2008-01-01

    With each eye movement, stationary objects in the world change position on the retina, yet we perceive the world as stable. Spatial updating, or remapping, is one neural mechanism by which the brain compensates for shifts in the retinal image caused by voluntary eye movements. Remapping of a visual representation is believed to arise from a widespread neural circuit including parietal and frontal cortex. The current experiment tests the hypothesis that extrastriate visual areas in human cortex have access to remapped spatial information. We tested this hypothesis using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We first identified the borders of several occipital lobe visual areas using standard retinotopic techniques. We then tested subjects while they performed a single-step saccade task analogous to the task used in neurophysiological studies in monkeys, and two conditions that control for visual and motor effects. We analyzed the fMRI time series data with a nonlinear, fully Bayesian hierarchical statistical model. We identified remapping as activity in the single-step task that could not be attributed to purely visual or oculomotor effects. The strength of remapping was roughly monotonic with position in the visual hierarchy: remapped responses were largest in areas V3A and hV4 and smallest in V1 and V2. These results demonstrate that updated visual representations are present in cortical areas that are directly linked to visual perception. PMID:17093130

  12. Current and emerging technology in G-LOC detection: pulse wave delay for +Gz tolerance assessment.

    PubMed

    Hrebien, L

    1988-01-01

    We have found that pulse wave delay increases linearly with +Gz experienced by conscious subjects and that G-tolerance limits, as measured using conventional light bars, occur repeatedly at the same pulse wave delays or delta delay. When protective modalities such as anti-G suits or supinating seats are used, the delta delays increase at a slower rate as a function of +Gz. G-tolerance thresholds occur at higher +Gz levels with protection but the delta pulse wave delays reach the same value for all tolerance levels. This parameter can be used to warn expert systems of the approach of G-LOC during actual flight and/or provides an objective measure of G protection provided by new or modified anti-G equipment. Therefore, this tool can be used in the research setting to evaluate the efficacy of G-protective equipment in an objective manner. PMID:3355462

  13. Language Networks in Anophthalmia: Maintained Hierarchy of Processing in "Visual" Cortex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Kate E.; Cowey, Alan; Alexander, Iona; Filippini, Nicola; Kennedy, James M.; Smith, Stephen M.; Ragge, Nicola; Bridge, Holly

    2012-01-01

    Imaging studies in blind subjects have consistently shown that sensory and cognitive tasks evoke activity in the occipital cortex, which is normally visual. The precise areas involved and degree of activation are dependent upon the cause and age of onset of blindness. Here, we investigated the cortical language network at rest and during an

  14. Bilateral parieto-occipital dermoid sinuses in a Rottweiler.

    PubMed

    Bornard, N; Pin, D; Carozzo, C

    2007-02-01

    Bilateral dermoid sinuses were identified on the parieto-occipital region of a Rottweiler. Diagnosis was confirmed by histological examination after successful complete surgical resection. The dermoid sinuses were independent with separate tracts. This unusual parasagittal location can be explained by craniofacial development: dermoid sinuses on the head could occur along the lines of embryological fusion and not only in the sagittal plane. A hypothesis of an origin at the level of the suture between the parietal and interparietal bones is possible in this case. PMID:17286665

  15. [A painful occipital mass revealing a posterior encephalocele].

    PubMed

    Meunier, Sarah; Michalak, Sophie; Chaigneau, Julien; Mercier, Philippe; Rousseau, Audrey

    2014-08-01

    Encephalocele is a congenital malformation caused by a neural tube defect during embryonic development. We report a case of posterior encephalocele in a 7-month-old infant with a painful occipital mass known since birth. Pathological examination of the mass showed different mature tissues derived from the brain and its coverings (e.g., neuroglia, ependymal canals and clusters of meningothelial cells). A diagnosis of encephalocele was made. The different forms of neural tube defect will be briefly discussed, especially the "aborted" forms (e.g., non-specific midline mass lesion or angioma) that the pathologist may encounter in his/her daily practice. PMID:25132445

  16. Occipital Neuralgia after Hair Transplantation and Its Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Siefferman, Jason; Khelemsky, Yury

    2015-01-01

    While undergoing full thickness tissue harvest from the posterior scalp, a 72-year-old man experienced immediate severe pain in the right occiput and was unable to complete the procedure. The pain was constant sharp and shocking with numbness in the distribution of the lesser occipital nerve, exacerbated by physical activity, and local anesthetic blocks provided temporary complete relief. After numerous treatments over several years, including oral analgesics, botulinum toxin injections, and acupuncture, proved ineffective, pulsed radiofrequency neuromodulation provided greater than 80% relief for 5 months. PMID:25688308

  17. Traumatic aneurysm of the occipital artery secondary to paintball injury.

    PubMed

    John, Neely; Leach, James L; Rachana, Tyagi; Mangano, Francesco T

    2009-01-01

    Paintball is an "extreme sport" that has been steadily growing in popularity since the early 1980s. Although this activity is considered recreational, there are a number of inherent dangers associated. Most notably, the number of head and neck injuries due to paintball participation has been increasing in recent years. In this paper we present the first reported case of occipital artery traumatic pseudoaneurysm resulting from a paintball accident. The presentation, diagnosis and intraoperative findings are detailed. A discussion including a review of the literature is also presented. The authors recommend a re-evaluation of guidelines within the paintball sporting industry, including improvements in protective equipment. PMID:18922630

  18. Occipital and orbitofrontal hemodynamics during naturally paced reading: an fNIRS study.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Markus J; Dambacher, Michael; Jacobs, Arthur M; Kliegl, Reinhold; Radach, Ralph; Kuchinke, Lars; Plichta, Michael M; Fallgatter, Andreas J; Herrmann, Martin J

    2014-07-01

    Humans typically read at incredibly fast rates, because they predict likely occurring words from a given context. Here, we used functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) to track the ultra-rapid hemodynamic responses of words presented every 280 ms in a naturally paced sentence context. We found a lower occipital deoxygenation to unpredictable than to predictable words. The greater hemodynamic responses to unexpected words suggest that the visual features of expected words have been pre-activated previous to stimulus presentation. Second, we tested opposing theoretical proposals about the role of the medial orbitofrontal cortex (OFC): Either OFC may respond to the breach of expectation; or OFC is activated when the present stimulus matches the prediction. A significant interaction between word frequency and predictability indicated OFC responses to breaches of expectation for low- but not for high-frequency words: OFC is sensitive to both, bottom-up processing as mediated by word frequency, as well as top-down predictions. Particularly, when a rare word is unpredictable, OFC becomes active. Finally, we discuss how a high temporal resolution can help future studies to disentangle the hemodynamic responses of single trials in such an ultra-rapid event succession as naturally paced reading. PMID:24642288

  19. Neuropsychological profile of adult patients with nonsymptomatic occipital lobe epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Bilo, Leonilda; Santangelo, Gabriella; Improta, Ilaria; Vitale, Carmine; Meo, Roberta; Trojano, Luigi

    2013-02-01

    To explore the neuropsychological and neurobehavioral profile in adult patients affected by nonsymptomatic (cryptogenic and idiopathic) occipital lobe epilepsy (OLE), with normal intelligence, we enrolled 20 adult patients with nonsymptomatic OLE and 20 age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy subjects. All participants underwent neuropsychiatric assessment scales, and standardized neuropsychological tests tapping memory, executive functions, constructional, visuospatial and visuoperceptual skills. After Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons, patients performed significantly worse than controls on several tests tapping complex visuospatial skills and frontal lobe functions. The analysis of single patients' performance revealed that a significantly higher number of OLE patients achieved age- and education-adjusted pathological scores on three tests (Benton Judgment of Line Orientation Test, Freehand Copying of Drawings Test, color-word interference task of Stroop test) with respect to controls. Patients did not differ from control subjects on neuropsychiatric aspects. The direct comparison between OLE subtypes showed that cryptogenetic OLE patients tended to achieve lower scores than idiopathic OLE patients on most tests, but no difference between the two groups was fully significant. In summary, patients with nonsymptomatic OLE can be affected by clinically relevant impairments in selected neuropsychological domains: complex visuospatial skills and executive functions. It could be speculated that frontal and visuospatial cognitive deficits might be the result of epileptic activity spreading within a neural network that includes structures far beyond the occipital lobe. PMID:22903808

  20. Current and emerging technology in G-LOC detection: noninvasive monitoring of cerebral microcirculation using near infrared.

    PubMed

    Glaister, D H

    1988-01-01

    G-induced loss of consciousness (G-LOC) has emerged as an important operational problem of high-performance aircraft. Since it appears that G-LOC will continue to be a problem, a requirement exists to detect its occurrence in pilots so that the aircraft may be placed on autopilot. One excellent method of detecting G-LOC physiologically, one would assume, would be based on the oxidative status of the brain. This determination can be made noninvasively with an Oxidative Metabolism Near-Infrared monitor using 4 wave lengths (OMNI-4). The OMNI-4 is capable of measuring the relative quantities in the brain of hemoglobin (Hb), oxygenated hemoglobin (HbO2), blood volume (BV), and oxidative status of cytochrome c oxidase. This instrument was tested on subjects in the USAFSAM human-use centrifuge at +3, 4, and 5 Gz with onset rates of 1 G.s-1. Results showed changes within the brain, as expected, during increased G with reductions in Hb, BV, and HbO2. Cytochrome c oxidase measurements were inconclusive. Immediately following G exposure, Hb, BV, and HbO2 "overshoots" occurred suggesting vasodilation of the cerebral microcirculation. The use of OMNI-4 in the laboratory and its possible role as a detector of G-LOC in pilots are discussed including suggestions for future developments. PMID:3355461

  1. Graphical Analysis of Electromagnetic Coupling on B-737 and B-757 Aircraft for VOR and LOC IPL Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jafri, Madiha; Ely, Jay; Vahala, Linda

    2005-01-01

    Electromagnetic coupling measurements were performed from numerous passenger cabin locations to aircraft instrument landing system localizer (LOC) and VHF Omni-Ranging (VOR) systems. This paper presents and compares the data for B-757 and B-737 airplanes, and provides a basis for fuzzy modeling of coupling patterns in different types of airplanes and airplanes with different antenna locations.

  2. The human cerebral cortex is neither one nor many: neuronal distribution reveals two quantitatively different zones in the gray matter, three in the white matter, and explains local variations in cortical folding.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Pedro F M; Ventura-Antunes, Lissa; Gabi, Mariana; Mota, Bruno; Grinberg, Lea T; Farfel, Jos M; Ferretti-Rebustini, Renata E L; Leite, Renata E P; Filho, Wilson J; Herculano-Houzel, Suzana

    2013-01-01

    The human prefrontal cortex has been considered different in several aspects and relatively enlarged compared to the rest of the cortical areas. Here we determine whether the white and gray matter of the prefrontal portion of the human cerebral cortex have similar or different cellular compositions relative to the rest of the cortical regions by applying the Isotropic Fractionator to analyze the distribution of neurons along the entire anteroposterior axis of the cortex, and its relationship with the degree of gyrification, number of neurons under the cortical surface, and other parameters. The prefrontal region shares with the remainder of the cerebral cortex (except for occipital cortex) the same relationship between cortical volume and number of neurons. In contrast, both occipital and prefrontal areas vary from other cortical areas in their connectivity through the white matter, with a systematic reduction of cortical connectivity through the white matter and an increase of the mean axon caliber along the anteroposterior axis. These two parameters explain local differences in the distribution of neurons underneath the cortical surface. We also show that local variations in cortical folding are neither a function of local numbers of neurons nor of cortical thickness, but correlate with properties of the white matter, and are best explained by the folding of the white matter surface. Our results suggest that the human cerebral cortex is divided in two zones (occipital and non-occipital) that differ in how neurons are distributed across their gray matter volume and in three zones (prefrontal, occipital, and non-occipital) that differ in how neurons are connected through the white matter. Thus, the human prefrontal cortex has the largest fraction of neuronal connectivity through the white matter and the smallest average axonal caliber in the white matter within the cortex, although its neuronal composition fits the pattern found for other, non-occipital areas. PMID:24032005

  3. The human cerebral cortex is neither one nor many: neuronal distribution reveals two quantitatively different zones in the gray matter, three in the white matter, and explains local variations in cortical folding

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Pedro F. M.; Ventura-Antunes, Lissa; Gabi, Mariana; Mota, Bruno; Grinberg, Lea T.; Farfel, José M.; Ferretti-Rebustini, Renata E. L.; Leite, Renata E. P.; Filho, Wilson J.; Herculano-Houzel, Suzana

    2013-01-01

    The human prefrontal cortex has been considered different in several aspects and relatively enlarged compared to the rest of the cortical areas. Here we determine whether the white and gray matter of the prefrontal portion of the human cerebral cortex have similar or different cellular compositions relative to the rest of the cortical regions by applying the Isotropic Fractionator to analyze the distribution of neurons along the entire anteroposterior axis of the cortex, and its relationship with the degree of gyrification, number of neurons under the cortical surface, and other parameters. The prefrontal region shares with the remainder of the cerebral cortex (except for occipital cortex) the same relationship between cortical volume and number of neurons. In contrast, both occipital and prefrontal areas vary from other cortical areas in their connectivity through the white matter, with a systematic reduction of cortical connectivity through the white matter and an increase of the mean axon caliber along the anteroposterior axis. These two parameters explain local differences in the distribution of neurons underneath the cortical surface. We also show that local variations in cortical folding are neither a function of local numbers of neurons nor of cortical thickness, but correlate with properties of the white matter, and are best explained by the folding of the white matter surface. Our results suggest that the human cerebral cortex is divided in two zones (occipital and non-occipital) that differ in how neurons are distributed across their gray matter volume and in three zones (prefrontal, occipital, and non-occipital) that differ in how neurons are connected through the white matter. Thus, the human prefrontal cortex has the largest fraction of neuronal connectivity through the white matter and the smallest average axonal caliber in the white matter within the cortex, although its neuronal composition fits the pattern found for other, non-occipital areas. PMID:24032005

  4. Clinical Outcomes of Pulsed Radiofrequency Neuromodulation for the Treatment of Occipital Neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Oh, In Ho; Choi, Seok Keun; Lim, Young Jin

    2012-01-01

    Objective Occipital neuralgia is characterized by paroxysmal jabbing pain in the dermatomes of the greater or lesser occipital nerves caused by irritation of these nerves. Although several therapies have been reported, they have only temporary therapeutic effects. We report the results of pulsed radiofrequency treatment of the occipital nerve, which was used to treat occipital neuralgia. Methods Patients were diagnosed with occipital neuralgia according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders classification criteria. We performed pulsed radiofrequency neuromodulation when patients presented with clinical findings suggestive occipital neuralgia with positive diagnostic block of the occipital nerves with local anesthetics. Patients were analyzed according to age, duration of symptoms, surgical results, complications and recurrence. Pain was measured every month after the procedure using the visual analog and total pain indexes. Results From 2010, ten patients were included in the study. The mean age was 52 years (34-70 years). The mean follow-up period was 7.5 months (6-10 months). Mean Visual Analog Scale and mean total pain index scores declined by 6.1 units and 192.1 units, respectively, during the follow-up period. No complications were reported. Conclusion Pulsed radiofrequency neuromodulation of the occipital nerve is an effective treatment for occipital neuralgia. Further controlled prospective studies are necessary to evaluate the exact effects and long-term outcomes of this treatment method. PMID:22792425

  5. Pitfalls in the Management of Atlanto-Occipital Dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Muneyoshi; Joko, Masahioro; Takeuchi, Mikinobu; Niwa, Aichi; Takayasu, Masakazu

    2015-01-01

    Atlanto-occipital dislocation (AOD) is rarely seen in clinic because it is characteristically immediately fatal. With recent progress in the pre-hospital care, an increasing number of AOD survivors have been reported. However, because the pathophysiology of AOD is not clearly understood yet, the appropriate strategy for the initial management remains still unclear. We report a case of successful AOD treatment and describe important points in the management of this condition. It is important to note that abducens nerve palsy is a warning sign of AOD and that AOD can result in a life-threatening distortion of the arteries and the brain stem. We recommend the application of a halo vest to protect the patient's neural and vascular competence as the immediate initial step in the treatment of AOD. Horn's grading system is useful in assessing indications for surgery. Finally, when performing posterior fixation, C2 should be included because of the anatomy of the ligamentous architecture. PMID:26097666

  6. Occipital lymph node metastasis from nasopharyngeal carcinoma: a special case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Xia, Wei-Xiong; Xiang, Yan-Qun; Lv, Xing; Ke, Liang-Ru; Yu, Ya-Hui; Guo, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Cervical lymph node metastasis is common in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), but occipital lymph node metastasis in NPC patients has not yet been reported. In this case report, we describe an NPC patient with occipital lymph node metastasis. The clinical presentation, diagnostic procedure, treatment, and outcome of this case were presented, with a review of the related literature. PMID:26728009

  7. Occipital Condyle Syndrome in a Young Male: A Rare Presentation of Cranio-Vertebral Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Yogesh, Patidar; Vinod, Puri; A, Khwaja Geeta

    2014-01-01

    Occipital condyle syndrome (OCS) is a rare syndrome characterized by severe, unilateral, occipital headache and ipsilateral 12th nerve palsy. Tumors are a common cause of OCS. Inflammatory lesions causing OCS is however rare. We describe a young male with OCS as the only manifestation of cranio-vertebral tuberculosis. PMID:25664279

  8. Suture material for flexor tendon repair: 30V-Loc versus 30 Stratafix in a biomechanical comparison ex vivo

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Barbed suture material offers the possibility of knotless flexor tendon repair, as suggested in an increasing number of biomechanical studies. There are currently two different absorbable barbed suture products available, V-Loc and Stratafix, and both have not been compared to each other with regard to flexor tendon repair. The purpose of this study was to evaluate both suture materials for primary stability under static and cyclic loading in a biomechanical ex vivo model. Methods Forty fresh porcine flexor digitorum profundus tendons were randomized in two groups. A four-strand modified Kessler suture technique was used to repair the tendon either with a 30V-Loc or 30 Stratafix without a knot. Parameters of interest were mode of failure, 2-mm gap formation force, displacement, stiffness and maximum load under static and cyclic testing. Results The maximum load was 42.3??7.2 for the Stratafix group and 50.7??8.8N for the V-Loc group. Thus, the ultimate tensile strength was significantly higher for V-Loc (p?Loc group (n.s.). Displacement was 2.65??0.56mm in the V-Loc group and 2.71??0.59mm in the Stratafix group (n.s.). Stiffness was 4.24??0.68 (N/mm) in the V-Loc group and 3.85??0.55 (N/mm) the Stratafix group (n.s.). Those measured differences were not significant. Conclusion V-Loc demonstrates a higher maximum load in tendon reconstruction. The differences in 2-mm gap formation force, displacement and stiffness were not significant. Hereby, the V-Loc has an advantage when used as unidirectional barbed suture for knotless flexor tendon repair. PMID:25205062

  9. Differential contribution of right and left parietal cortex to the control of spatial attention: a simultaneous EEG-rTMS study.

    PubMed

    Capotosto, Paolo; Babiloni, Claudio; Romani, Gian Luca; Corbetta, Maurizio

    2012-02-01

    We have recently shown that interference with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of right posterior intraparietal sulcus (IPS) cortex during the allocation of spatial attention leads to abnormal desynchronization of anticipatory (pretarget) electroencephalographic alpha rhythms (8-12 Hz) in occipital-parietal cortex and the detection of subsequently presented visual targets (Capotosto et al. 2009). Since lesion data suggest that lesions of the right frontoparietal cortices produce more severe and long-lasting deficits of visual spatial attention than lesions of the left hemisphere, here, we used the mentioned rTMS-electroencephalographic procedure to test if the control of anticipatory alpha rhythms by IPS is asymmetrically organized in the 2 hemispheres. Results showed that interference with either left or right IPS during covert spatial attention equally disrupted the normally lateralized anticipatory modulation of occipital visual cortex, with stronger alpha desynchronization contralaterally to the attended visual field. In contrast, only interference with right IPS induced a paradoxical pretarget synchronization of alpha rhythms and bilateral deficits of target identification. These results suggest that the control of spatial topography of anticipatory alpha rhythms in occipital-parietal cortex is shared between left and right IPS cortex, but that right IPS uniquely contributes to a bilateral prestimulus activation of occipital visual cortex. PMID:21666126

  10. Long non-coding RNA LOC389641 promotes progression of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and increases cell invasion by regulating E-cadherin in a TNFRSF10A-related manner.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shangyou; Chen, Huimou; Wang, Yingxue; Gao, Wenchao; Fu, Zhiqiang; Zhou, Quanbo; Jiang, Yanhui; Lin, Qing; Tan, Langping; Ye, Huilin; Zhao, Xiaohui; Luo, Yuming; Li, Guolin; Ye, Liangtao; Liu, Yimin; Li, Wenzhu; Li, Zhihua; Chen, Rufu

    2016-02-28

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are important regulators in pathological processes, yet their potential roles in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) are poorly understood. Here, we found that a novel lncRNA, LOC389641, was upregulated in PDAC tissues and cell lines. The expression of LOC389641 was significantly correlated with staging, lymph node metastasis and overall survival. Knockdown of LOC389641 impaired cell proliferation and invasion and induced cell apoptosis in vitro, whereas overexpression of LOC389641 had the opposite effect. The growth promoting effect of LOC389641 was also demonstrated in vivo. Further, a significant negative correlation was observed between E-cadherin levels and LOC389641 levels in vivo. Knockdown of LOC389641 upregulated E-cadherin expression, but knockdown of E-cadherin had a limited influence on LOC389641. Importantly, after E-cadherin was inhibited, the enhancement of LOC389641 on cell invasion was hindered. Moreover, the expression of LOC389641 was closely associated with its genomic neighboring gene TNFRSF10A. Lastly, knockdown experiments showed that TNFRSF10A might be a connection between LOC389641and E-cadherin. We conclude that LOC389641 promotes PDAC progression and increases cell invasion by regulating E-cadherin with the possible involvement of TNFRSF10A. PMID:26708505

  11. Contribution of skeletal muscle activity to the natural history of acceleration-induced loss of consciousness (G-LOC).

    PubMed

    Bagshaw, R J; Whinnery, J E

    1989-10-01

    G-LOC and the ensuing incapacitation represents an ever present threat to modern fighter aircraft and aviators. Of the techniques developed to combat gravitational induced stress, particularly such stress acting along the head to foot axis (+Gz), a variety of straining maneuvers have assumed prominence. All the latter techniques involve voluntary skeletal muscle tensing to a varying degree. It is hypothesized that the basis for the importance of skeletal muscle activity in improving G tolerance predominantly lies in the increased muscle spindle afferent activity to the reticular activating system. It is also hypothesized that the natural history of G-LOC can be significantly improved by supplementing muscle spindle activity via active and passive skeletal muscle activity. PMID:2811713

  12. Central modulation in cluster headache patients treated with occipital nerve stimulation: an FDG-PET study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Occipital nerve stimulation (ONS) has raised new hope for drug-resistant chronic cluster headache (drCCH), a devastating condition. However its mode of action remains elusive. Since the long delay to meaningful effect suggests that ONS induces slow neuromodulation, we have searched for changes in central pain-control areas using metabolic neuroimaging. Methods Ten drCCH patients underwent an 18FDG-PET scan after ONS, at delays varying between 0 and 30 months. All were scanned with ongoing ONS (ON) and with the stimulator switched OFF. Results After 6-30 months of ONS, 3 patients were pain free and 4 had a ? 90% reduction of attack frequency (responders). In all patients compared to controls, several areas of the pain matrix showed hypermetabolism: ipsilateral hypothalamus, midbrain and ipsilateral lower pons. All normalized after ONS, except for the hypothalamus. Switching the stimulator ON or OFF had little influence on brain glucose metabolism. The perigenual anterior cingulate cortex (PACC) was hyperactive in ONS responders compared to non-responders. Conclusions Metabolic normalization in the pain neuromatrix and lack of short-term changes induced by the stimulation might support the hypothesis that ONS acts in drCCH through slow neuromodulatory processes. Selective activation in responders of PACC, a pivotal structure in the endogenous opioid system, suggests that ONS could restore balance within dysfunctioning pain control centres. That ONS is nothing but a symptomatic treatment might be illustrated by the persistent hypothalamic hypermetabolism, which could explain why autonomic attacks may persist despite pain relief and why cluster attacks recur shortly after stimulator arrest. PET studies on larger samples are warranted to confirm these first results. PMID:21349186

  13. MitoLoc: A method for the simultaneous quantification of mitochondrial network morphology and membrane potential in single cells.

    PubMed

    Vowinckel, Jakob; Hartl, Johannes; Butler, Richard; Ralser, Markus

    2015-09-01

    Mitochondria assemble into flexible networks. Here we present a simple method for the simultaneous quantification of mitochondrial membrane potential and network morphology that is based on computational co-localisation analysis of differentially imported fluorescent marker proteins. Established in, but not restricted to, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, MitoLoc reproducibly measures changes in membrane potential induced by the uncoupling agent CCCP, by oxidative stress, in respiratory deficient cells, and in ?fzo1, ?ref2, and ?dnm1 mutants that possess fission and fusion defects. In combination with super-resolution images, MitoLoc uses 3D reconstruction to calculate six geometrical classifiers which differentiate network morphologies in ?fzo1, ?ref2, and ?dnm1 mutants, under oxidative stress and in cells lacking mtDNA, even when the network is fragmented to a similar extent. We find that mitochondrial fission and a decline in membrane potential do regularly, but not necessarily, co-occur. MitoLoc hence simplifies the measurement of mitochondrial membrane potential in parallel to detect morphological changes in mitochondrial networks. Marker plasmid open-source software as well as the mathematical procedures are made openly available. PMID:26184437

  14. Electrochemical dissolved oxygen removal from microfluidic streams for LOC sample pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Marei, Mohamed M; Roussel, Thomas J; Keynton, Robert S; Baldwin, Richard P

    2014-09-01

    Current water quality monitoring for heavy metal contaminants largely results in analytical snapshots at a particular time and place. Therefore, we have been interested in miniaturized and inexpensive sensors suitable for long-term, real-time monitoring of the drinking water distribution grid, industrial wastewater effluents, and even rivers and lakes. Among the biggest challenges for such sensors are the issues of in-field device calibration and sample pretreatment. Previously, we have demonstrated use of coulometric stripping analysis for calibration-free determination of copper and mercury. For more negatively reduced metals, O2 reduction interferes with stripping analysis; hence, most electroanalysis techniques rely on pretreatments to remove dissolved oxygen (DO). Current strategies for portable DO removal offer limited practicality, because of their complexity, and often cause inadvertent sample alterations. Therefore, we have designed an indirect in-line electrochemical DO removal device (EDOR), utilizing a silver cathode to reduce DO in a chamber that is fluidically isolated from the sample stream by an O2-permeable membrane. The resulting concentration gradient supports passive DO diffusion from the sample stream into the deoxygenation chamber. The DO levels in the sample stream were determined by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and amperometry at a custom thin-layer cell (TLC) detector. Results show removal of 98% of the DO in a test sample at flow rates approaching 50 ?L/min and power consumption as low as 165 mW h L(-1) at steady state. Besides our specific stripping application, this device is well-suited for LOC applications where miniaturized DO removal and/or regulation are desirable. PMID:25082792

  15. Occipital Condyle Fracture With Isolated Unilateral Hypoglossal Nerve Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jin Won; Lim, Oh Kyung; Park, Ki Deok

    2014-01-01

    Occipital condyle fractures (OCFs) with selective involvement of the hypoglossal canal are rare. OCFs usually occur after major trauma and combine multiple fractures. We describe a 38-year-old man who presented with neck pain and a tongue deviation to the right side after a traffic accident. Severe limitations were detected during active and passive range of neck motion in all directions. A physical examination revealed a normal gag reflex and normal mobility of the palate, larynx, and shoulder girdle. He had normal taste and general sensation in his tongue. However, he presented with a tongue deviation to the right side on protrusion. A videofluoroscopic swallowing study revealed piecemeal deglutition due to decreased tongue mobility but no aspiration of food. Plain X-ray film findings were negative, but a computed tomography study with coronal reconstruction demonstrated a right OCF involving the hypoglossal canal. An electrodiagnostic study revealed evidence of right hypoglossal nerve palsy. We report a rare case of isolated hypoglossal nerve palsy caused by an OCF. PMID:25379499

  16. The human cerebral cortex flattens during adolescence.

    PubMed

    Alemán-Gómez, Yasser; Janssen, Joost; Schnack, Hugo; Balaban, Evan; Pina-Camacho, Laura; Alfaro-Almagro, Fidel; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina; Otero, Soraya; Baeza, Immaculada; Moreno, Dolores; Bargalló, Nuria; Parellada, Mara; Arango, Celso; Desco, Manuel

    2013-09-18

    The human cerebral cortex appears to shrink during adolescence. To delineate the dynamic morphological changes involved in this process, 52 healthy male and female adolescents (11-17 years old) were neuroimaged twice using magnetic resonance imaging, approximately 2 years apart. Using a novel morphometric analysis procedure combining the FreeSurfer and BrainVisa image software suites, we quantified global and lobar change in cortical thickness, outer surface area, the gyrification index, the average Euclidean distance between opposing sides of the white matter surface (gyral white matter thickness), the convex ("exposed") part of the outer cortical surface (hull surface area), sulcal length, depth, and width. We found that the cortical surface flattens during adolescence. Flattening was strongest in the frontal and occipital cortices, in which significant sulcal widening and decreased sulcal depth co-occurred. Globally, sulcal widening was associated with cortical thinning and, for the frontal cortex, with loss of surface area. For the other cortical lobes, thinning was related to gyral white matter expansion. The overall flattening of the macrostructural three-dimensional architecture of the human cortex during adolescence thus involves changes in gray matter and effects of the maturation of white matter. PMID:24048830

  17. Sensitivity to syntax in visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Dikker, Suzanne; Rabagliati, Hugh; Pylkknen, Liina

    2009-01-01

    One of the most intriguing findings on language comprehension is that violations of syntactic predictions can affect event-related potentials as early as 120 ms, in the same time-window as early sensory processing. This effect, the so-called early left-anterior negativity (ELAN), has been argued to reflect word category access and initial syntactic structure building (Friederici, 2002). In two experiments, we used magnetoencephalography to investigate whether (a) rapid word category identification relies on overt category-marking closed-class morphemes and (b) whether violations of word category predictions affect modality-specific sensory responses. Participants read sentences containing violations of word category predictions. Unexpected items varied in whether or not their word category was marked by an overt function morpheme. In Experiment 1, the amplitude of the visual evoked M100 component was increased for unexpected items, but only when word category was overtly marked by a function morpheme. Dipole modeling localized the generator of this effect to the occipital cortex. Experiment 2 replicated the main results of Experiment 1 and eliminated two non-morphology-related explanations of the M100 contrast we observed between targets containing overt category-marking and targets that lacked such morphology. Our results show that during reading, syntactically relevant cues in the input can affect activity in occipital regions at around 125 ms, a finding that may shed new light on the remarkable rapidity of language processing. PMID:19121826

  18. The course of the greater occipital nerve in the suboccipital region: a proposal for setting landmarks for local anesthesia in patients with occipital neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Natsis, K; Baraliakos, X; Appell, H J; Tsikaras, P; Gigis, I; Koebke, J

    2006-05-01

    The anatomical relationships of the greater occipital nerve (GON) to the semispinalis capitis muscle (SCM) and the trapezius muscle aponeurosis (TMA) were examined to identify topographic landmarks for use in anesthetic blockade of the GON in occipital neuralgia. The course and the diameter of the GON were studied in 40 cadavers (29 females, 11 males), and the points where it pierced the SCM and the TMA were identified. The course of the GON did not differ between males and females. A left-right difference was detected in the site of the GON in the TMA region but not in the SCM region. The nerve became wider towards the periphery. This may be relevant to entrapment of the nerve in the development of occipital neuralgia. In three cases, the GON split into two branches before piercing the TMA and reunited after having passed the TMA, and it pierced the obliquus capitis inferior muscle in another three cases. The GON and the lesser occipital nerve reunited at the level of the occiput in 80% of the specimens. The occiput and the nuchal midline are useful topographic landmarks to guide anesthetic blockade of the GON for diagnosis and therapy of occipital neuralgia. The infiltration is probably best aimed at the site where the SCM is pierced by the GON. PMID:16258972

  19. Parieto-occipital encephalomalacia in children; clinical and electrophysiological features of twenty-seven cases

    PubMed Central

    Karao?lu, Pakize; Polat, Ay?e ?pek; Yi?, Ulu; H?z, Semra

    2015-01-01

    Context: Brain injuries occurring at a particular time may cause damages in well-defined regions of brain. Perinatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy and hypoglycemia are some of the most common types of brain injuries. Neonatal hypoglycemia can cause abnormal myelination in parietal and occipital lobes resulting in parieto-occipital encephalomalacia. There is a small number of studies about clinical and electroencephalographic (EEG) features of children with parieto-occipital encephalomalacia. They might have important neurologic sequelae such as cortical visual loss, seizures, and psychomotor retardation. Aims: We aimed to evaluate the causes of parieto-occipital encephalomalacia and evaluate the clinical and electrophysiological features of children with parieto-occipital encephalomalacia. Settings and Design: We evaluated clinical features and EEGs of 27 children with parieto-occipital encephalomalacia. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive statistics were used. Results: Hospitalization during the neonatal period was the most common cause (88.9%) of parieto-occipital brain injury. Eleven patients (40.7%) had a history of neonatal hypoglycemia. Twenty-three patients (85.2%) had epilepsy and nine of the epileptic patients (39%) had refractory seizures. Most of the patients had bilateral (50%) epileptic discharges originating from temporal, parietal, and occipital lobes (56.2%). However, some patients had frontal sharp waves and some had continuous spike and wave discharges during sleep. Visual abnormalities were evident in 15 (55.6%) patients. Twenty-two (81.5%) had psychomotor retardation. Fine motor skills, social contact and language development were impaired more than gross motor skills. Conclusions: In our study, most of the patients with parieto-occipital encephalomalacia had an eventful perinatal history. Epilepsy, psychomotor retardation, and visual problems were common neurologic complications. PMID:26167209

  20. Auditory temporal expectations modulate activity in visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Bueti, Domenica; Macaluso, Emiliano

    2010-07-01

    Temporal expectation is the ability to make predictions and to use temporal information to anticipate the occurrence of future events. This capacity is associated with highly efficient perceptual and motor behaviors. However, how cognitive systems use temporal information to optimize behavior and what brain structures are engaged during these processes remains largely unknown. Neurophysiological and recent neuroimaging data have suggested that temporal expectations modulate activity not only in parietal and motor-related frontal regions, but also in occipital visual cortex, when the expected stimulus is a simple visual object. Here we investigate crossmodal properties and category selectivity of temporal expectations examining activity in visual cortex during expectation of auditory stimuli (the sound of hand-clapping or of a hammer-hammering). We found that activity in occipital cortex changed over time, reflecting the subject's temporal expectations about the upcoming auditory event. This modulatory effect included extrastriate visual areas known to process body-parts and tools, despite these were never presented visually during the experiment. However activity in these areas was not specific for the expected sound category, but it was rather related to the overall probability of the auditory target to occur. We conclude that crossmodal associations can influence activity in sensory-specific visual areas in an anticipatory manner, consistent with temporal expectations affecting activity in a distributed system of motor-related and sensory-related brain regions. PMID:20298791

  1. Target sites for transcallosal fibers in human visual cortex - A combined diffusion and polarized light imaging study.

    PubMed

    Caspers, Svenja; Axer, Markus; Caspers, Julian; Jockwitz, Christiane; Jtten, Kerstin; Reckfort, Julia; Grssel, David; Amunts, Katrin; Zilles, Karl

    2015-11-01

    Transcallosal fibers of the visual system have preferential target sites within the occipital cortex of monkeys. These target sites coincide with vertical meridian representations of the visual field at borders of retinotopically defined visual areas. The existence of preferential target sites of transcallosal fibers in the human brain at the borders of early visual areas was claimed, but controversially discussed. Hence, we studied the distribution of transcallosal fibers in human visual cortex, searching for an organizational principle across early and higher visual areas. In-vivo high angular resolution diffusion imaging data of 28 subjects were used for probabilistic fiber tracking using a constrained spherical deconvolution approach. The fiber architecture within the target sites was analyzed at microscopic resolution using 3D polarized light imaging in a post-mortem human hemisphere. Fibers through a seed in the splenium of the corpus callosum reached the occipital cortex via the forceps major and the tapetum. We found target sites of these transcallosal fibers at borders of cytoarchitectonically defined occipital areas not only between early visual areas V1 and V2, V3d and V3A, and V3v and V4, but also between higher extrastriate areas, namely V4 (ventral) and posterior fusiform area FG1 as well as posterior fusiform area FG2 and lateral occipital cortex. In early visual areas, the target sites coincided with the vertical meridian representations of retinotopic maps. The spatial arrangement of the fibers in the 'border tuft' region at the V1/V2 border was found to be more complex than previously observed in myeloarchitectonic studies. In higher visual areas, our results provided additional evidence for a hemi-field representation in human area V4. The fiber topography in posterior fusiform gyrus indicated that additional retinotopic areas might exist, located between the recently identified retinotopic representations phPITv/phPITd and PHC-1/PHC-2 in lateral occipital cortex and parahippocampal gyrus. PMID:25697048

  2. Reading impairment in an adolescent with temporo-occipital epilepsy. Pre- and post-surgical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Grosmaitre, Catherine; Auclair, Laurent; Dorfmuller, Georg; Leunen, Dorothe; Delalande, Olivier; Folhen, Martine; Bulteau, Christine; Jambaqu, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    We present a 16 year-old right-handed case who underwent a left temporo-occipital resection to treat intractable epilepsy. Pre- and post-surgical evaluations showed an average intellectual quotient, preserved abilities in language and visuo-spatial functions and increased reading and spelling deficits (difficulties with irregular words, homophones and phonologically valid spelling errors of irregularly spelled words, associated with preserved performances in non-words). This pattern of characteristic lexical route deficits highlights the major role of the temporo-occipital areas in reading acquisition. We discussed the consequences of temporo-occipital dysfunction on reading. PMID:23116198

  3. The occipital place area represents the local elements of scenes.

    PubMed

    Kamps, Frederik; Julian, Joshua; Kubilius, Jonas; Kanwisher, Nancy; Dilks, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    Behavioral and computational research has proposed that a scene (e.g., a kitchen) can be represented by two independent, yet complementary descriptors: i) its spatial boundary (i.e., the external shape, size, and scope of the space the scene represents) and ii) its content (i.e., the internal elements encompassing objects, textures, colors, and materials). But how does the brain represent these descriptors? A central hypothesis is that one scene-selective cortical region (parahippocampal place area - PPA) represents both spatial boundary and content information, while a second region (retrosplenial complex - RSC) represents spatial boundary only. Such representation for a third scene-selective region (occipital place area - OPA) has never been tested. To test spatial boundary representation, we compared responses to images of intact rooms with images of these same rooms when their walls, floors, and ceilings had been fractured and rearranged, such that they no longer defined a coherent space. We found OPA, unlike PPA and RSC, responded similarly to both the intact and fractured rooms, suggesting OPA does not represent spatial boundary per se, but rather the local elements (i.e., walls, floors, ceilings) composing the space, independent of their spatial arrangement. To test content representation, we compared responses to images of furniture with non-furniture objects. We found OPA, like PPA, responded more to furniture than non-furniture objects. Interestingly, however, while both OPA and PPA represent content information, they do so differently; in another test, we found only OPA was sensitive to the number of pieces of furniture, suggesting OPA represents the local elements of scene content, while PPA represents the global aspects of scene content, independent of the number of objects present. Taken together, our results suggest OPA analyzes local scene elements - both in spatial boundary and content representation - while PPA and RSC represent global scene properties. Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015. PMID:26326202

  4. Randomized, double-blind, comparative-effectiveness study comparing pulsed radiofrequency to steroid injections for occipital neuralgia or migraine with occipital nerve tenderness.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Steven P; Peterlin, B Lee; Fulton, Larry; Neely, Edward T; Kurihara, Connie; Gupta, Anita; Mali, Jimmy; Fu, Diana C; Jacobs, Michael B; Plunkett, Anthony R; Verdun, Aubrey J; Stojanovic, Milan P; Hanling, Steven; Constantinescu, Octav; White, Ronald L; McLean, Brian C; Pasquina, Paul F; Zhao, Zirong

    2015-12-01

    Occipital neuralgia (ON) is characterized by lancinating pain and tenderness overlying the occipital nerves. Both steroid injections and pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) are used to treat ON, but few clinical trials have evaluated efficacy, and no study has compared treatments. We performed a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, comparative-effectiveness study in 81 participants with ON or migraine with occipital nerve tenderness whose aim was to determine which treatment is superior. Forty-two participants were randomized to receive local anesthetic and saline, and three 120 second cycles of PRF per targeted nerve, and 39 were randomized to receive local anesthetic mixed with deposteroid and 3 rounds of sham PRF. Patients, treating physicians, and evaluators were blinded to interventions. The PRF group experienced a greater reduction in the primary outcome measure, average occipital pain at 6 weeks (mean change from baseline -2.743 2.487 vs -1.377 1.970; P < 0.001), than the steroid group, which persisted through the 6-month follow-up. Comparable benefits favoring PRF were obtained for worst occipital pain through 3 months (mean change from baseline -1.925 3.204 vs -0.541 2.644; P = 0.043), and average overall headache pain through 6 weeks (mean change from baseline -2.738 2.753 vs -1.120 2.1; P = 0.037). Adverse events were similar between groups, and few significant differences were noted for nonpain outcomes. We conclude that although PRF can provide greater pain relief for ON and migraine with occipital nerve tenderness than steroid injections, the superior analgesia may not be accompanied by comparable improvement on other outcome measures. PMID:26447705

  5. Randomized, double-blind, comparative-effectiveness study comparing pulsed radiofrequency to steroid injections for occipital neuralgia or migraine with occipital nerve tenderness

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Steven P.; Peterlin, B. Lee; Fulton, Larry; Neely, Edward T.; Kurihara, Connie; Gupta, Anita; Mali, Jimmy; Fu, Diana C.; Jacobs, Michael B.; Plunkett, Anthony R.; Verdun, Aubrey J.; Stojanovic, Milan P.; Hanling, Steven; Constantinescu, Octav; White, Ronald L.; McLean, Brian C.; Pasquina, Paul F.; Zhao, Zirong

    2015-01-01

    Occipital neuralgia (ON) is characterized by lancinating pain and tenderness overlying the occipital nerves. Both steroid injections and pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) are used to treat ON, but few clinical trials have evaluated efficacy, and no study has compared treatments. We performed a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, comparative-effectiveness study in 81 participants with ON or migraine with occipital nerve tenderness whose aim was to determine which treatment is superior. Forty-two participants were randomized to receive local anesthetic and saline, and three 120 second cycles of PRF per targeted nerve, and 39 were randomized to receive local anesthetic mixed with deposteroid and 3 rounds of sham PRF. Patients, treating physicians, and evaluators were blinded to interventions. The PRF group experienced a greater reduction in the primary outcome measure, average occipital pain at 6 weeks (mean change from baseline −2.743 ± 2.487 vs −1.377 ± 1.970; P <0.001), than the steroid group, which persisted through the 6-month follow-up. Comparable benefits favoring PRF were obtained for worst occipital pain through 3 months (mean change from baseline−1.925 ± 3.204 vs−0.541 ± 2.644; P = 0.043), and average overall headache pain through 6 weeks (mean change from baseline −2.738 ± 2.753 vs −1.120 ± 2.1; P = 0.037). Adverse events were similar between groups, and few significant differences were noted for nonpain outcomes. We conclude that although PRF can provide greater pain relief for ON and migraine with occipital nerve tenderness than steroid injections, the superior analgesia may not be accompanied by comparable improvement on other outcome measures. PMID:26447705

  6. Ventral fixation of chronic atlanto-occipital luxation in a dog.

    PubMed

    Buks, Y; Snelling, S R; Yates, G D

    2011-09-01

    A 45-year-old male Australian Kelpie was presented for evaluation of ambulatory tetraparesis and neck pain of five weeks duration. Atlanto-occipital luxation was diagnosed by computed tomography. The joint was unstable following closed reduction, and a ventral surgical approach to the cranial cervical spine and occiput permitted manual reduction and stabilisation of the atlanto-occipital joint. The thickened joint capsule and articular cartilage were removed to promote AO arthrodesis. Eight cortical screws, inserted into the occipital condyles and C1, were embedded in polymethylmethacrylate to stabilise the atlanto-occipital articulation. The dog recovered uneventfully after it was placed in a neck brace and rested for six weeks. Neurologic examination at six weeks was normal and the dog returned to normal farm work 12 weeks after surgery. PMID:21824148

  7. Comparison of the relative occipital bone volume between Cavalier King Charles spaniels with and without syringohydromyelia and French bulldogs.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, M J; Kramer, M; Ondreka, N

    2012-01-01

    Our aim was to determine the relative volume of the occipital bone of Cavalier King Charles spaniels with and without syringohydromyelia and normal French bulldogs to reappraise the role of a possible insufficiency of the paraxial mesoderm in the pathogenesis of the caudal occipital malformation syndrome. Analysis of the occipital bone volume of 43 dogs based on computed tomography datasets was performed. Volume was determined by means of three-dimensional models. Using manual segmentation of the occipital bone in sagittal, transverse, and dorsal images, the volume of the occipital bone and the rest of the skull was calculated. The absolute occipital bone volume was put in relation to the total skull volume, the occipital bone index. For the Cavalier King Charles spaniels without syringomyelia, the median occipital bone index was 0.0681; for Cavalier King Charles spaniels with syringomyelia, it was 0.0646 and for French bulldogs, it was 0.0676. There was no global difference of the occipital bone index between examined groups (P = 0.4331). A reduced volume of the occipital bone was not found in Cavalier King Charles spaniels in general in comparison to French bulldogs, or in Cavalier King Charles spaniels with syringomyelia compared to Cavalier King Charles spaniels without syringomyelia. These results do not support occipital hypoplasia as a cause for syringomyelia development, challenging the paraxial mesoderm insufficiency theory. This also suggests that the term Chiari-like malformation, a term derived from human studies, is not appropriate in the Cavalier King Charles spaniel. PMID:22702890

  8. Epidemiology and characteristics of occipital brain infarcts in young adults in southwestern Finland.

    PubMed

    Martikainen, Mika H; Majamaa, Kari

    2010-02-01

    Occipital stroke and occipital epilepsy are possible manifestations of mitochondrial diseases. A previous study in northern Finland suggested a frequency of 10% for mitochondrial disorder in young patients with stroke. Here we studied the epidemiology of occipital brain infarcts in a defined population in southwestern Finland. Patients diagnosed with brain infarct or visual field defect with onset at the ages of 18-45 years were identified from the discharge files at the Turku University Hospital. We further ascertained those patients with an occipital brain infarct in brain imaging or homonymous hemianopia with no signs of other etiology in brain imaging. We reviewed the clinical data for known stroke risk factors and analyzed samples for the m.3243A > G and m.8344A > G mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), and determined mtDNA haplogroups and five common mutations in the gene encoding polymerase gamma (POLG1). Migraine was more common in young patients with occipital brain infarct than in the general population, especially among women. None of the patients harboured the m.3243A > G or m.8344A > G mutation in mtDNA or any of the five common mutations in POLG1. Interestingly, 17% of the men and 33% of the women belonged to the mtDNA haplogroup Uk, while its frequency in the general population is 17%. Our results suggest that mtDNA haplogroup Uk is associated with increased risk of occipital stroke in young women. POLG1 mutations have been associated with occipital epilepsy, but we did not find the common mutations in patients with occipital stroke. PMID:19730927

  9. Missed Total Occlusion Due to the Occipital Artery Arising from the Internal Carotid Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Ustunsoz, Bahri Gumus, Burcak; Koksal, Ali; Koroglu, Mert; Akhan, Okan

    2007-02-15

    A 56-year-old man was referred for digital subtraction angiography (DSA) with an ultrasound diagnosis of right proximal internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis for possible carotid artery stenting. DSA revealed total occlusion of the ICA and an occipital artery arising from the stump and simulating continuation of the ICA. An ascending pharyngeal artery also arose from the same occipital artery. This case is of interest because this is a rare variation besides being a cause of misdiagnosis at carotid ultrasound.

  10. Ewings Sarcoma Multifocal Metastases to Temporal and Occipital Bone: A Rare Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Wadhwa, Vikram; Bhargava, Eishaan Kamta; Batra, Vasun; Mandal, Shramana

    2015-01-01

    Ewings sarcoma (ES) is a common malignant bone tumour seen to involve long bones, flat pelvic bones and ribs and vertebrae in majority of cases. Here, we present a rare case of aggressive primary ES of pelvic bones with multifocal metastases to temporal bone and occipital bone. The patient presented with facial palsy and an occipital swelling, and was referred for chemotherapy. PMID:26266142

  11. Salient, Irrelevant Sounds Reflexively Induce Alpha Rhythm Desynchronization in Parallel with Slow Potential Shifts in Visual Cortex.

    PubMed

    Strmer, Viola; Feng, Wenfeng; Martinez, Antigona; McDonald, John; Hillyard, Steven

    2016-03-01

    Recent findings suggest that a salient, irrelevant sound attracts attention to its location involuntarily and facilitates processing of a colocalized visual event [McDonald, J. J., Strmer, V. S., Martinez, A., Feng, W. F., & Hillyard, S. A. Salient sounds activate human visual cortex automatically. Journal of Neuroscience, 33, 9194-9201, 2013]. Associated with this cross-modal facilitation is a sound-evoked slow potential over the contralateral visual cortex termed the auditory-evoked contralateral occipital positivity (ACOP). Here, we further tested the hypothesis that a salient sound captures visual attention involuntarily by examining sound-evoked modulations of the occipital alpha rhythm, which has been strongly associated with visual attention. In two purely auditory experiments, lateralized irrelevant sounds triggered a bilateral desynchronization of occipital alpha-band activity (10-14 Hz) that was more pronounced in the hemisphere contralateral to the sound's location. The timing of the contralateral alpha-band desynchronization overlapped with that of the ACOP (?240-400 msec), and both measures of neural activity were estimated to arise from neural generators in the ventral-occipital cortex. The magnitude of the lateralized alpha desynchronization was correlated with ACOP amplitude on a trial-by-trial basis and between participants, suggesting that they arise from or are dependent on a common neural mechanism. These results support the hypothesis that the sound-induced alpha desynchronization and ACOP both reflect the involuntary cross-modal orienting of spatial attention to the sound's location. PMID:26696295

  12. Characterizing occipital condyle loads under high-speed head rotation.

    PubMed

    Pintar, Frank A; Yoganandan, Narayan; Baisden, Jamie

    2005-11-01

    Because of the need to evaluate anthropomorphic test device (ATD) biofidelity under high-head angular accelerations, the purpose of the present investigation was to develop appropriate instrumentation for intact post mortem human subject (PMHS) testing, validate the instrumentation, and obtain information to characterize the response of the head-neck complex under this loading scenario. A series of rigid-arm pendulum, inertially loaded ATD tests was conducted. Head and neck ATD hydraulic piston chin pull tests were conducted. Subsequently, a series of PMHS tests was conducted to derive the response of the human head-neck under high-rate chin loading. Finally, Hybrid III and THOR-NT ATD head-neck systems were evaluated under the same scenario as the PMHS. A parametric analysis for center of gravity (CG) location and accelerometer orientation determined that even small errors (+/- 3 mm or 2 degrees), produced errors in the force and moment calculations by as much as 17 %. If the moment of inertia (MOI) term was varied by 5 %, resulting moment calculations were affected by as much as 8 %. If the 5 % error in MOI was used to compute occipital condyle moments, and results compared to upper load cell derived moments, peaks differed by as much as 24 %. The head CG and mass MOI should be directly measured for each preparation to obtain accurate results. The injury run on each specimen resulted in predominantly C1-C2 separations or partial separations. The 50(th) percentile probability of AIS=2+ neck injury using tensile force was about 2400 N; for AIS=3+ neck injury the 50(th) percentile risk was about 3180 N. When inserting extension moment as the criteria, the 50(th) percentile probability of an AIS=2+ injury was 51 Nm. The AIS=3+ extension moment at the 50(th) percentile probability was 75 Nm. The new THOR-NT ATD head-neck produced more biofidelic responses with an alternate head-neck junction design compared to the Hybrid III ATD. PMID:17096267

  13. Preferential effect of isoflurane on top-down vs. bottom-up pathways in sensory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Raz, Aeyal; Grady, Sean M.; Krause, Bryan M.; Uhlrich, Daniel J.; Manning, Karen A.; Banks, Matthew I.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism of loss of consciousness (LOC) under anesthesia is unknown. Because consciousness depends on activity in the cortico-thalamic network, anesthetic actions on this network are likely critical for LOC. Competing theories stress the importance of anesthetic actions on bottom-up core thalamo-cortical (TC) vs. top-down cortico-cortical (CC) and matrix TC connections. We tested these models using laminar recordings in rat auditory cortex in vivo and murine brain slices. We selectively activated bottom-up vs. top-down afferent pathways using sensory stimuli in vivo and electrical stimulation in brain slices, and compared effects of isoflurane on responses evoked via the two pathways. Auditory stimuli in vivo and core TC afferent stimulation in brain slices evoked short latency current sinks in middle layers, consistent with activation of core TC afferents. By contrast, visual stimuli in vivo and stimulation of CC and matrix TC afferents in brain slices evoked responses mainly in superficial and deep layers, consistent with projection patterns of top-down afferents that carry visual information to auditory cortex. Responses to auditory stimuli in vivo and core TC afferents in brain slices were significantly less affected by isoflurane compared to responses triggered by visual stimuli in vivo and CC/matrix TC afferents in slices. At a just-hypnotic dose in vivo, auditory responses were enhanced by isoflurane, whereas visual responses were dramatically reduced. At a comparable concentration in slices, isoflurane suppressed both core TC and CC/matrix TC responses, but the effect on the latter responses was far greater than on core TC responses, indicating that at least part of the differential effects observed in vivo were due to local actions of isoflurane in auditory cortex. These data support a model in which disruption of top-down connectivity contributes to anesthesia-induced LOC, and have implications for understanding the neural basis of consciousness. PMID:25339873

  14. Bridging the gap: global disparity processing in the human visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    McKee, Suzanne P.; Norcia, Anthony M.

    2012-01-01

    The human stereoscopic system is remarkable in its ability to utilize widely separated features as references to support fine depth discrimination. In a search for possible neural substrates of this ability, we recorded high-density EEG and used a distributed inverse technique to estimate population-level disparity responses in five regions of interest (ROIs): V1, V3A, hMT+, V4, and lateral occipital complex (LOC). The stimulus was a central modulating disk surrounded by a correlated reference annulus presented in the fixation plane. We varied a gap separating the disk from the annulus parametrically from 0 to 5.5 as a test of long-range disparity integration. In the V1, LOC, and hMT+ ROIs, the responses with gaps >0.5 were equal to those obtained in a control condition where the surround was composed of uncorrelated noise (no reference). By contrast, in the V4 and V3A ROIs, responses with gaps as large as 5.5 were still significantly higher than the control. As a test of the spatial distribution of the disparity reference information, we manipulated the properties of the stimulus by placing noise between the center and the surround or throughout the surround. The V3A ROI was particularly sensitive to disparity noise between the center and annulus regions, suggesting an important contribution of disparity edge detectors in this ROI. PMID:22323636

  15. Changes in Cerebral Cortex of Children Treated for Medulloblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Arthur K. . E-mail: aliu1@partners.org; Marcus, Karen J.; Fischl, Bruce; Grant, P. Ellen; Young Poussaint, Tina; Rivkin, Michael J.; Davis, Peter; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Yock, Torunn I.

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: Children with medulloblastoma undergo surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. After treatment, these children have numerous structural abnormalities. Using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging, we measured the thickness of the cerebral cortex in a group of medulloblastoma patients and a group of normally developing children. Methods and Materials: We obtained magnetic resonance imaging scans and measured the cortical thickness in 9 children after treatment of medulloblastoma. The measurements from these children were compared with the measurements from age- and gender-matched normally developing children previously scanned. For additional comparison, the pattern of thickness change was compared with the cortical thickness maps from a larger group of 65 normally developing children. Results: In the left hemisphere, relatively thinner cortex was found in the perirolandic region and the parieto-occipital lobe. In the right hemisphere, relatively thinner cortex was found in the parietal lobe, posterior superior temporal gyrus, and lateral temporal lobe. These regions of cortical thinning overlapped with the regions of cortex that undergo normal age-related thinning. Conclusion: The spatial distribution of cortical thinning suggested that the areas of cortex that are undergoing development are more sensitive to the effects of treatment of medulloblastoma. Such quantitative methods may improve our understanding of the biologic effects that treatment has on the cerebral development and their neuropsychological implications.

  16. APFiLoc: An Infrastructure-Free Indoor Localization Method Fusing Smartphone Inertial Sensors, Landmarks and Map Information.

    PubMed

    Shang, Jianga; Gu, Fuqiang; Hu, Xuke; Kealy, Allison

    2015-01-01

    The utility and adoption of indoor localization applications have been limited due to the complex nature of the physical environment combined with an increasing requirement for more robust localization performance. Existing solutions to this problem are either too expensive or too dependent on infrastructure such as Wi-Fi access points. To address this problem, we propose APFiLoc-a low cost, smartphone-based framework for indoor localization. The key idea behind this framework is to obtain landmarks within the environment and to use the augmented particle filter to fuse them with measurements from smartphone sensors and map information. A clustering method based on distance constraints is developed to detect organic landmarks in an unsupervised way, and the least square support vector machine is used to classify seed landmarks. A series of real-world experiments were conducted in complex environments including multiple floors and the results show APFiLoc can achieve 80% accuracy (phone in the hand) and around 70% accuracy (phone in the pocket) of the error less than 2 m error without the assistance of infrastructure like Wi-Fi access points. PMID:26516858

  17. Word or word-like? Dissociating orthographic typicality from lexicality in left occipito-temporal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Woollams, Anna M.; Silani, Giorgia; Okada, Kayoko; Patterson, Karalyn; Price, Cathy J.

    2016-01-01

    Prior lesion and functional imaging studies have highlighted the importance of the left ventral occipital-temporal (LvOT) cortex for visual word recognition. Within this area, there is a posterior-anterior hierarchy of sub-regions that are specialised for different stages of orthographic processing. The aim of the present fMRI study was to dissociate the effects of subword orthographic typicality (e.g., cider [high] versus cynic [low]) from the effect of lexicality (e.g., pollen [word] versus pillen [pseudoword]). We therefore orthogonally manipulated the orthographic typicality of written words and pseudowords (nonwords and pseudohomophones) in a visual lexical decision task. Consistent with previous studies, we identified greater activation for pseudowords than words (i.e., an effect of lexicality) in posterior LvOT cortex. In addition, we revealed higher activation for atypical than typical strings, irrespective of lexicality, in a left inferior occipital region that is posterior to LvOT cortex. When lexical decisions were made more difficult in the context of pseudohomophone foils, left anterior temporal activation also increased for atypical relative to typical strings. The latter finding agrees with the behaviour of patients with progressive anterior temporal lobe degeneration, who have particular difficulty recognising words with atypical orthography. The most novel outcome of this study is that, within a distributed network of regions supporting orthographic processing, we have identified a left inferior occipital region that is particularly sensitive to the typicality of subword orthographic patterns. PMID:20429854

  18. Experience-related structural changes of degenerated occipital white matter in late-blind humans - a diffusion tensor imaging study.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Susanne; Hertrich, Ingo; Kumar, Vinod; Ackermann, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    Late-blind humans can learn to understand speech at ultra-fast syllable rates (ca. 20 syllables/s), a capability associated with hemodynamic activation of the central-visual system. Thus, the observed functional cross-modal recruitment of occipital cortex might facilitate ultra-fast speech processing in these individuals. To further elucidate the structural prerequisites of this skill, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was conducted in late-blind subjects differing in their capability of understanding ultra-fast speech. Fractional anisotropy (FA) was determined as a quantitative measure of the directionality of water diffusion, indicating fiber tract characteristics that might be influenced by blindness as well as the acquired perceptual skills. Analysis of the diffusion images revealed reduced FA in late-blind individuals relative to sighted controls at the level of the optic radiations at either side and the right-hemisphere dorsal thalamus (pulvinar). Moreover, late-blind subjects showed significant positive correlations between FA and the capacity of ultra-fast speech comprehension within right-hemisphere optic radiation and thalamus. Thus, experience-related structural alterations occurred in late-blind individuals within visual pathways that, presumably, are linked to higher order frontal language areas. PMID:25830371

  19. Dissociation of object and spatial visual processing pathways in human extrastriate cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Haxby, J.V.; Grady, C.L.; Horwitz, B.; Ungerleider, L.G.; Mishkin, M.; Carson, R.E.; Herscovitch, P.; Schapiro, M.B.; Rapoport, S.I. )

    1991-03-01

    The existence and neuroanatomical locations of separate extrastriate visual pathways for object recognition and spatial localization were investigated in healthy young men. Regional cerebral blood flow was measured by positron emission tomography and bolus injections of H2(15)O, while subjects performed face matching, dot-location matching, or sensorimotor control tasks. Both visual matching tasks activated lateral occipital cortex. Face discrimination alone activated a region of occipitotemporal cortex that was anterior and inferior to the occipital area activated by both tasks. The spatial location task alone activated a region of lateral superior parietal cortex. Perisylvian and anterior temporal cortices were not activated by either task. These results demonstrate the existence of three functionally dissociable regions of human visual extrastriate cortex. The ventral and dorsal locations of the regions specialized for object recognition and spatial localization, respectively, suggest some homology between human and nonhuman primate extrastriate cortex, with displacement in human brain, possibly related to the evolution of phylogenetically newer cortical areas.

  20. Hemodynamic Response to Featural Changes in the Occipital and Inferior Temporal Cortex in Infants: A Preliminary Methodological Exploration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox, Teresa; Bortfeld, Heather; Woods, Rebecca; Wruck, Eric; Boas, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Over the past 30 years researchers have learned a great deal about the development of object processing in infancy. In contrast, little is understood about the neural mechanisms that underlie this capacity, in large part because there are few techniques available to measure brain functioning in human infants. The present research examined the

  1. Color and spatial error in block design in stone-age Auca Indians: ecological underuse of occipital-parietal system in men and of frontal lobes in women.

    PubMed

    Pontius, A A

    1989-05-01

    The entire healthy adult population of 19 nonmissionized nomadic Auca Indians of the Ecuadorian Amazon basin were given tests involving the four-colored Kohs Block Design, spatial-relational, lexical, and body and face shapes. The test results reveal a specific grouping of deficiencies in color naming (with preservation of color concept), block design especially related to representation, and construction of certain intrapattern spatial relations and graphic representational skills. This ecologically determined grouping of deficiencies suggests a homology to certain neuropsychological syndromes (E. Stengel, 1948, Journal of Mental Science, 94, 46-58; J. de Ajuriaguerra & H. Hcaen, 1960, Le cortex crbrale; N. Geschwind & M. Fusillo, 1966, Archives of Neurology, 15, 137-146). Further, specifically deficient components of constructional praxis (A. R. Luria & L. S. Tsvetkova, 1964, Neuropsychologia, 2, 95-107) are proposed to reflect gender-related limitations of daily tasks, suggesting occipital-parietal underuse in Auca men and frontal system underuse in Auca women. PMID:2713145

  2. Leaf photosynthesis of 'Cat Hoa Loc' mango (Mangifera indica L.) and 'Nam Roi' pummelo (Citrus grandis (L.) Osbeck.) in the rainy season.

    PubMed

    Le, Thanh Phong; Le, Van Be; Vo, Van Binh; Nguyen, Van Lam

    2002-01-01

    With an EARS--Plant photosynthesis meter we determined gross photosynthesis (P) of leaves of 'Cat Hoa Loc' mango on 4 years old trees planted in the Fruit Tree Experiment and Production Station, Campus 2, Department of Crop Science, College of Agriculture, Can Tho University in the rainy season of the year 2000. The same experiment was conducted on 'Nam Roi' pummelo on a farm located in the Binh Minh district, Vinh Long province. In the rainy season the calculated gross photosynthesis of 'Cat Hoa Loc' mango leaves at flowering stage was higher than that at the vegetative stage. However, the photosynthetically active radiation and quantum yield of 'Cat Hoa Loc' mango leaves in both stages did not reach the light saturation point when compared with values from estimated equation of photosynthetic light curve. The same holds true for 'Nam Roi' pummelo in the vegetative stage. PMID:12491966

  3. Is the Medial Prefrontal Cortex Necessary for Theory of Mind?

    PubMed Central

    Otti, Alexander; Wohlschlaeger, Afra M.; Noll-Hussong, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background Successful social interaction relies on the ability to attribute mental states to other people. Previous functional neuroimaging studies have shown that this process, described as Theory of Mind (ToM) or mentalization, is reliably associated with activation of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). However, this study presents a novel and surprising finding that provides new insight into the role of the mPFC in mentalization tasks. Methodology/Principal Findings Twenty healthy individuals were recruited from a wide range of ages and social backgrounds. Participants underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while viewing a well-established ToM visual paradigm involving moving triangles. Functional MRI data were analyzed using a classical general linear model. No activation was detected in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) during movement patterns that typically elicit ToM. However, increased activity was observed in the right middle occipital gyrus, right temporoparietal junction (TPJ), left middle occipital gyrus and right inferior frontal gyrus. No correlation was found between participants’ age and BOLD response. Conclusions/Significance In contrast with previous neuroimaging research, our findings support the notion that mPFC function is not critical for reasoning about the mental states of others; furthermore, our data indicate that the right TPJ and right inferior frontal gyrus are able to perform mentalization without any contributions from the mPFC. PMID:26301900

  4. Task modulates category selectivity along a gradient from occipitotemporal cortex to prefrontal cortex in word- and face-selective regions.

    PubMed

    Bugatus, Lior; Weiner, Kevin; Grill-Spector, Kalanit

    2015-01-01

    The human brain contains separate functional networks constituting of multiple regions across occipital, temporal, and prefrontal cortices that are involved in processing faces and words. It is hypothesized that regions in occipitotemporal cortex process visual attributes of these stimuli and regions in the prefrontal cortex are involved with higher cognitive functions such as selective attention or working memory. However, it is unknown whether task and stimuli differentially affect responses of regions within these networks. Here we addressed this question by scanning 9 subjects using fMRI while they viewed stimuli from five categories: faces, bodies, houses, cars, and pseudo-words. Subjects performed in the same session three tasks in separate runs, and task order was counterbalanced across subjects. Oddball: subjects detected a randomly presented phase-scrambled image. Working memory: subjects indicated whether a stimulus repeated after an intervening image. Selective attention: subjects viewed superimposed images from two categories, attended to one stimulus category and reported when the attended stimulus was flipped upside-down. Word- and face-selective regions of interest in analogous anatomical locations were identified independently in each subject. Our analysis found a differential effect of task on stimulus selectivity across category-selective regions (task by region interaction, F(8,184) = 2.68, p = 0.008). Specifically, category-selectivity in lateral occipital cortex regions was similar across tasks, but was moderately increased in ventral temporal regions during the working memory task. In prefrontal cortex, however, the working memory task had a significant effect on category-selectivity: there was prominent face- and word-selectivity during the working memory task, but insignificant selectivity during the oddball and selective attention tasks. Together, these results reveal a gradient of selectivity that is modulated differentially by task, suggesting that the multiplicity of face- and word-selective regions may be related to task-relevant functional differences of individual components in these functional networks. Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015. PMID:26326858

  5. The management of the atlanto-occipital and atlanto-axial joint pain.

    PubMed

    Ogoke, B A

    2000-07-01

    Headaches secondary to atlanto-occipital and atlanto-axial joints are often associated with suboccipital pain and aggravated by lateral rotation of the cervical spine and/or flexion or extension of the cervical spine. They are frequently under-diagnosed using traditional radiological evaluation including plain X-rays, computerized tomographic scan, and magnetic resonance imaging. While the natural history of most acute atlanto-occipital and atlanto-axial joint inflammation is resolution over a 2-to-4-week period with conservative management, however, when chronicity sets in, resolution is difficult to achieve using conservative measures, and interventional pain management procedures may be indicated. This review will describe the anatomy of the upper cervical spine, clinical presentation of atlanto-occipital and atlanto-axial joint involvement, and various modalities of treatment, including conservative and interventional modalities. PMID:16906186

  6. Thrombosed traumatic aneurysm of the occipital artery: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Occipital artery aneurysms are very rare vascular lesions. Most cases reported in the literature have been post-traumatic pseudoaneurysms of the occipital artery. Case presentation We report the case of a 14-year-old Caucasian boy presented with a painless non-pulsatile scalp mass that developed rapidly after minor blunt head trauma. The scalp mass was excised six months after the trauma. A pathologic diagnosis of a thrombosed true aneurysm was made. Our patient has had no recurrence of the mass at 15?months follow-up. Conclusions We present a case of a true aneurysm of the occipital artery following minor head trauma. We review the literature for similar cases and discuss the difficulty of establishing a diagnosis prior to surgical intervention. PMID:22804804

  7. Modelling and simulation of passive Lab-on-a-Chip (LoC) based micromixer for clinical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikat, Chakraborty; Sharath, M.; Srujana, M.; Narayan, K.; Pattnaik, Prasant Kumar

    2016-03-01

    In biomedical application, micromixer is an important component because of many processes requires rapid and efficient mixing. At micro scale, the flow is Laminar due to small channel size which enables controlled rapid mixing. The reduction in analysis time along with high throughput can be achieved with the help of rapid mixing. In LoC application, micromixer is used for mixing of fluids especially for the devices which requires efficient mixing. Micromixer of this type of microfluidic devices with a rapid mixing is useful in application such as DNA/RNA synthesis, drug delivery system & biological agent detection. In this work, we design and simulate a microfluidic based passive rapid micromixer for lab-on-a-chip application.

  8. Effect of arginine vasopressin on the cortex edema in the ischemic stroke of Mongolian gerbils.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xue-Yan; Wu, Chun-Fang; Yang, Jun; Gao, Yang; Sun, Fang-Jie; Wang, Da-Xin; Wang, Chang-Hong; Lin, Bao-Cheng

    2015-06-01

    Brain edema formation is one of the most important mechanisms of ischemia-evoked cerebral edema. It has been demonstrated that arginine vasopressin (AVP) receptors are involved in the pathophysiology of secondary brain damage after focal cerebral ischemia. In a well-characterized animal model of ischemic stroke of Mongolian gerbils, the present study was undertaken to clear the effect of AVP on cortex edema in cerebral ischemia. The results showed that (1) occluding the left carotid artery of Mongolian gerbils not only decreased the cortex specific gravity (cortex edema) but also increased AVP levels in the ipsilateral cortex (ischemic area) including left prefrontal lobe, left parietal lobe, left temporal lobe, left occipital lobe and left hippocampus for the first 6 hours, and did not change of the cortex specific gravity and AVP concentration in the right cortex (non-ischemic area); (2) there were many negative relationships between the specific gravity and AVP levels in the ischemic cortex; (3) intranasal AVP (50 ng or 200 ng), which could pass through the blood-brain barrier to the brain, aggravated the focal cortex edema, whereas intranasal AVP receptor antagonist-D(CH2)5Tyr(ET)DAVP (2 g) mitigated the cortex edema in the ischemic area after occluding the left carotid artery of Mongolian gerbils; and (4) either intranasal AVP or AVP receptor antagonist did not evoke that edema in the non-ischemic cortex. The data indicated that AVP participated in the process of ischemia-evoked cortex edema, and the cerebral AVP receptor might serve as an important therapeutic target for the ischemia-evoked cortex edema. PMID:25843346

  9. A New Role for LOC101928437 in Non-Syndromic Intellectual Disability: Findings from a Family-Based Association Test

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shaohe; Shi, Zhangyan; Cui, Meng; Li, Junlin; Ma, Zhe; Shi, Yuanyu; Zheng, Zijian; Zhang, Fuchang; Jin, Tianbo; Geng, Tingting; Chen, Chao; Guo, Yale; Zhou, Jianping; Huang, Shaoping; Guo, Xingli; Gao, Lin; Gong, Pingyuan; Gao, Xiaocai; Zhang, Kejin

    2015-01-01

    Non-syndromic intellectual disability (NSID) is mental retardation in persons of normal physical appearance who have no recognisable features apart from obvious deficits in intellectual functioning and adaptive ability; however, its genetic etiology of most patients has remained unknown. The main purpose of this study was to fine map and identify specific causal gene(s) by genotyping a NSID family cohort using a panel of markers encompassing a target region reported in a previous work. A total of 139 families including probands, parents and relatives were included in the household survey, clinical examinations and intelligence tests, recruited from the Qinba mountain region of Shannxi province, western China. A collection of 34 tagged single nucleotide polymorphisms (tSNPs) spanning five microsatellite marker (STR) loci were genotyped using an iPLEX Gold assay. The association between tSNPs and patients was analyzed by family-based association testing (FBAT) and haplotype analysis (HBAT). Four markers (rs5974392, rs12164331, rs5929554 and rs3116911) in a block that showed strong linkage disequilibrium within the first three introns of the LOC101928437 locus were found to be significantly associated with NSID (all P<0.01) by the FBAT method for a single marker in additive, dominant and recessive models. The results of haplotype tests of this block also revealed a significant association with NSID (all P<0.05) using 2-window and larger HBAT analyses. These results suggest that LOC101928437 is a novel candidate gene for NSID in Han Chinese individuals of the Qinba region of China. Although the biological function of the gene has not been well studied, knowledge about this gene will provide insights that will increase our understanding of NSID development. PMID:26287547

  10. Benign occipital unicameral bone cyst causing lower cranial nerve palsies complicated by iophendylate arachnoiditis

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, W. G.; Kalbag, R. M.; Ramani, P. S.; Tomlinson, B. E.

    1974-01-01

    A 20 year old girl presented with a history of neck and occipital pain for six weeks, which was found to be due to a unicameral bone cyst of the left occipital condylar region. The differential diagnosis of bone cysts in the skull is discussed. Six months after the operation, the patient again presented with backache due to adhesive arachnoiditis. The latter was believed to have arisen as a result of a combination of spinal infective meningitis and intrathecal ethyl iodophenyl undecylate (iophendylate, Myodil, Pantopaque). The nature of meningeal reactions to iophendylate and the part played by intrathecal corticosteroids in relieving the arachnoiditis in the present case are discussed. Images

  11. Anesthetic management of a newborn with occipital meningocele for magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Neeta, S.; Upadya, Madusudhan; Pachala, Sri Sruthi

    2015-01-01

    Cranial Meningocoele is a term which represents herniation of meninges and cerebrospinal fluid through the congenital defect in the cranium. Anaesthetic challenges in the management of neonates with occipital meningocoele include airway management and proper positioning of the neonate without pressure on the meningocoele sac so as to preventthe rupture of the membranes. Associated congenital anomalies also can cause anaesthesia and procedure related complications. Other difficulties include performing a difficult airway case in an unfamiliar environment outside operation theatre. We report a case of 6 day old neonate with occipital meningocoele posted for MRI brain and the successful anaesthetic management. PMID:26417133

  12. Parieto-occipital encephalomalacia in neonatal hyperammonemia with ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency: A case report.

    PubMed

    Okanishi, Tohru; Ito, Tetsuya; Nakajima, Yoko; Ito, Koichi; Kakita, Hiroki; Yamada, Yasumasa; Kobayashi, Satoru; Ando, Naoki; Togari, Hajime

    2010-08-01

    Urea cycle disorders are congenital metabolic disorders that often cause episodic hyperammonemia. Neuroimaging in episodic hyperammonemia demonstrates several patterns of brain injuries, including focal lesions in the lentiform nucleus, insula, cingulate gyrus, and perirolandic fissure, as well as diffuse cerebral edema. In cases with neonatal onset of hyperammonemia, similar lesions have also been reported. We herein report a boy with severe neonatal hyperammonemia caused by ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency. He presented with parieto-occipital encephalomalacia, which resembles severe neonatal hypoglycemia on magnetic resonance imaging. This radiological finding may indicate parieto-occipital vulnerability not only to hypoglycemia but also to hyperammonemia. PMID:19640662

  13. Cross-Modal Functional Reorganization of Visual and Auditory Cortex in Adult Cochlear Implant Users Identified with fNIRS

    PubMed Central

    Thorne, Jeremy D.; Bleichner, Martin G.; Debener, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Cochlear implant (CI) users show higher auditory-evoked activations in visual cortex and higher visual-evoked activation in auditory cortex compared to normal hearing (NH) controls, reflecting functional reorganization of both visual and auditory modalities. Visual-evoked activation in auditory cortex is a maladaptive functional reorganization whereas auditory-evoked activation in visual cortex is beneficial for speech recognition in CI users. We investigated their joint influence on CI users' speech recognition, by testing 20 postlingually deafened CI users and 20 NH controls with functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). Optodes were placed over occipital and temporal areas to measure visual and auditory responses when presenting visual checkerboard and auditory word stimuli. Higher cross-modal activations were confirmed in both auditory and visual cortex for CI users compared to NH controls, demonstrating that functional reorganization of both auditory and visual cortex can be identified with fNIRS. Additionally, the combined reorganization of auditory and visual cortex was found to be associated with speech recognition performance. Speech performance was good as long as the beneficial auditory-evoked activation in visual cortex was higher than the visual-evoked activation in the auditory cortex. These results indicate the importance of considering cross-modal activations in both visual and auditory cortex for potential clinical outcome estimation. PMID:26819766

  14. Sounds Activate Visual Cortex and Improve Visual Discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Strmer, Viola S.; Martinez, Antigona; McDonald, John J.; Hillyard, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    A recent study in humans (McDonald et al., 2013) found that peripheral, task-irrelevant sounds activated contralateral visual cortex automatically as revealed by an auditory-evoked contralateral occipital positivity (ACOP) recorded from the scalp. The present study investigated the functional significance of this cross-modal activation of visual cortex, in particular whether the sound-evoked ACOP is predictive of improved perceptual processing of a subsequent visual target. A trial-by-trial analysis showed that the ACOP amplitude was markedly larger preceding correct than incorrect pattern discriminations of visual targets that were colocalized with the preceding sound. Dipole modeling of the scalp topography of the ACOP localized its neural generators to the ventrolateral extrastriate visual cortex. These results provide direct evidence that the cross-modal activation of contralateral visual cortex by a spatially nonpredictive but salient sound facilitates the discriminative processing of a subsequent visual target event at the location of the sound. Recordings of event-related potentials to the targets support the hypothesis that the ACOP is a neural consequence of the automatic orienting of visual attention to the location of the sound. PMID:25031419

  15. Distinct causal mechanisms of attentional guidance by working memory and repetition priming in early visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Soto, David; Llewelyn, Dafydd; Silvanto, Juha

    2012-03-01

    Human attention may be guided by representations held in working memory (WM) and also by priming from implicit memory. Neurophysiological data suggest that WM and priming may be associated with distinct neural mechanisms, but this prior evidence is only correlative. Furthermore, the role of the visual cortex in attention biases from memory remains unclear, because most previous studies conflated memory and selection processes. Here, we manipulated memory and attention in an orthogonal fashion and used an interventional approach to demonstrate the functional significance of WM and priming states in visual cortex for attentional biasing. Observers searched for a Landolt target that was preceded by a nonpredictive color cue that either had to be held in WM for a later recognition test or merely attended (priming counterpart). The application of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the occipital cortex modulated the impact of memory on search. Critically, the direction of this modulation depended on the memory state. In the WM condition, the application of TMS on validly cued trials (when the cue surrounded the sought target) enhanced search accuracy relative to the invalid trials (when the cue surrounded a distracter); the opposite pattern was observed in the priming condition. That the effects of occipital TMS on selection were contingent on memory context demonstrates that WM and priming represent distinct states in the early visual cortex that play a causal role in memory-based guidance of attention. PMID:22399767

  16. A sensitive period for language in the visual cortex: Distinct patterns of plasticity in congenitally versus late blind adults

    PubMed Central

    Bedny, Marina; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Dravida, Swethasri; Saxe, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that blindness enables visual circuits to contribute to language processing. We examined whether this dramatic functional plasticity has a sensitive period. BOLD fMRI signal was measured in congenitally blind, late blind (blindness onset 9-years-old or later) and sighted participants while they performed a sentence comprehension task. In a control condition, participants listened to backwards speech and made match/non-match to sample judgments. In both, congenitally and late blind participants BOLD signal increased in bilateral foveal-pericalcarine cortex during response preparation, irrespective of whether the stimulus was a sentence or backwards speech. However, only in congenitally blind people left occipital areas (pericalcarine, extrastriate, fusiform and lateral) responded more to sentences than backwards speech. We conclude that age of blindness onset constrains the non-visual functions of occipital cortex: while plasticity is present in both congenitally and late blind individuals, recruitment of visual circuits for language depends on blindness during childhood. PMID:22154509

  17. ???????Hair braids as a risk factor for occipital pressure ulcer development: a case study.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Marilu; Ratliff, Catherine

    2011-09-01

    The development of pressure ulcers in acute care settings remains an important concern, especially in high-risk populations such as patients who are critically ill and admitted to an ICU setting. In addition to immobility and other risk factors associated with critical illness, occipital pressure ulcer development has been associated with young age (neonates, infants, and young children) and patient care devices (cervical collars, bed lateral rotation). A 7-year-old boy was admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit with severe sepsis that progressed to multi-organ failure including respiratory distress requiring mechanical ventilation, cardiovascular failure requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, and renal failure requiring dialysis. At 4 weeks, hair braids that were placed before admission were taken down, revealing five full-thickness occipital lesions. All wounds eventually healed, but scarring alopecia at the site of the largest wound was visible. This is the first case study describing hair braids as a potential risk factor for occipital pressure-related skin dam- age and suggests that if a patient is immobile and admitted with braids, patient/family and nursing staff education should include discussing the importance of releasing the hair to decrease the risk of occipital ulcers. PMID:21918247

  18. Elementary visual hallucinations, blindness, and headache in idiopathic occipital epilepsy: differentiation from migraine

    PubMed Central

    Panayiotopoulos, C

    1999-01-01

    This is a qualitative and chronological analysis of ictal and postictal symptoms, frequency of seizures, family history, response to treatment, and prognosis in nine patients with idiopathic occipital epilepsy and visual seizures. Ictal elementary visual hallucinations are stereotyped for each patient, usually lasting for seconds. They consist of mainly multiple, bright coloured, small circular spots, circles, or balls. Mostly, they appear in a temporal hemifield often moving contralaterally or in the centre where they may be flashing. They may multiply and increase in size in the course of the seizure and may progress to other non-visual occipital seizure symptoms and more rarely to extra-occipital manifestations and convulsions. Blindness occurs usually from the beginning and postictal headache, often indistinguishable from migraine, is common. It is concluded that elementary visual hallucinations in occipital seizures are entirely different from visual aura of migraine when individual elements of colour, shape, size, location, movement, speed of development, duration, and progress are synthesised together. Postictal headache does not show preference for those with a family history of migraine. Most of the patients are misdiagnosed as having migraine with aura, basilar migraine, acephalgic migraine, or migralepsy simply because physicians are not properly informed of differential diagnostic criteria. As a result, treatment may be delayed for years. Response to carbamazepine is excellent and seizures may remit.?? PMID:10201433

  19. The white matter of the human cerebrum: Part I The occipital lobe by Heinrich Sachs

    PubMed Central

    Forkel, Stephanie J.; Mahmood, Sajedha; Vergani, Francesco; Catani, Marco

    2015-01-01

    This is the first complete translation of Heinrich Sachs' outstanding white matter atlas dedicated to the occipital lobe. This work is accompanied by a prologue by Prof Carl Wernicke who for many years was Sachs' mentor in Breslau and enthusiastically supported his work. PMID:25527430

  20. Occipital Rhythmic Activity and Other Developmental Measures of Infants from High and Low Socioeconomic Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inselberg, Rachel; And Others

    This study sought to determine whether differences existed between infants from low socioeconomic status (SES) families and those from high SES families in the occipital rhythmic activity of the brain, as recorded in their electroencephalograms (EEGs), as well as in other developmental measures. Ten low SES white infants and 10 high SES white

  1. Giant cell tumor of the occipital bone in a case of von Recklinghausen neurofibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Opitz, H; Petersen, D; Heiss, E; Duffner, F; Meyermann, R

    1996-01-01

    Von Recklinghausen neurofibromatosis (NF1) is the most common hereditary syndrome predisposing to neoplasia. The most common symptomatic manifestation of NF1 is the plexiform neurofibroma. We describe the case of a patient with classical von Recklinghausen neurofibromatosis presenting with a giant cell tumor (GCT) of the occipital bone infiltrating a surrounding plexiform neurofibroma. PMID:8836608

  2. Anastomosis of occipital artery to anterior inferior cerebellar artery for vertebrobasilar junction stenosis.

    PubMed

    Ausman, J I; Diaz, F G; de los Reyes, R A; Pak, H; Patel, S; Boulos, R

    1981-08-01

    A new approach to revascularization of the posterior fossa for vertebrobasilar insufficiency due to vertebrobasilar junction stenosis is reported. The procedure involves anastomosing the occipital artery to a branch of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery. Rationale for the procedure and surgical technique are discussed. PMID:7280991

  3. Irreversible Loss of Vision in a Child due to Occipital Infarction after Gastroenteritis

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Ahmad M.; Hasbini, Dana; Younis, Muhammad H.; Bhatti, M. Tariq

    2015-01-01

    A 2-year-old girl developed a bilateral occipital infarct following severe gastroenteritis with bilateral vision of light perception. Evaluations for sickle cell anemia, hemolytic anemia and coagulopathies were negative. Cortical blindness is an uncommon but dramatic complication of gastroenteritis, hence the need of prompt hydration and other supportive measures to avoid irreversible visual loss or mental sequela. PMID:25960732

  4. Characterization of visual percepts evoked by noninvasive stimulation of the human posterior parietal cortex.

    PubMed

    Fried, Peter J; Elkin-Frankston, Seth; Rushmore, Richard Jarrett; Hilgetag, Claus C; Valero-Cabre, Antoni

    2011-01-01

    Phosphenes are commonly evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to study the functional organization, connectivity, and excitability of the human visual brain. For years, phosphenes have been documented only from stimulating early visual areas (V1-V3) and a handful of specialized visual regions (V4, V5/MT+) in occipital cortex. Recently, phosphenes were reported after applying TMS to a region of posterior parietal cortex involved in the top-down modulation of visuo-spatial processing. In the present study, we systematically characterized parietal phosphenes to determine if they are generated directly by local mechanisms or emerge through indirect activation of other visual areas. Using technology developed in-house to record the subjective features of phosphenes, we found no systematic differences in the size, shape, location, or frame-of-reference of parietal phosphenes when compared to their occipital counterparts. In a second experiment, discrete deactivation by 1 Hz repetitive TMS yielded a double dissociation: phosphene thresholds increased at the deactivated site without producing a corresponding change at the non-deactivated location. Overall, the commonalities of parietal and occipital phosphenes, and our ability to independently modulate their excitability thresholds, lead us to conclude that they share a common neural basis that is separate from either of the stimulated regions. PMID:22087266

  5. Visual cortex activation to drug cues: a meta-analysis of functional neuroimaging papers in addiction and substance abuse literature

    PubMed Central

    Hanlon, Colleen A.; Dowdle, Logan T.; Naselaris, Thomas; Canterberry, Melanie; Cortese, Bernadette M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although the visual cortex does not typically receive much attention in addiction literature, neuroimaging studies often report significant activity in visual areas when drug users are exposed to drug cues. The purpose of this meta-analysis was to investigate the frequency with which occipital cortex activity is observed during drug cue exposure and to determine its spatial distribution. Methods A comprehensive literature search was performed of human functional neuroimaging studies of drug cue-reactivity. Fifty-five studies were used to determine the frequency with which clusters of significant visual cortex activity during visual drug cues versus non-drug cues were reported. The spatial distribution of visual cortex activations was determined via activation likelihood estimation (ALE; FDR corrected, p<0.01) in a subset of these studies (n=24). Results Eighty-six percent of studies that reported fMRI results for drug versus neutral visual cues within a substance-dependent group showed significant drug-elicited activity in the visual cortex. ALE revealed clusters in the left secondary visual cortex (BA 19) and clusters in the primary visual cortex (BA 17) that were consistently activated by drug cues. Conclusions These data demonstrate that the visual cortex, often overlooked in our discussions of the neural circuitry of addiction, consistently discriminates drug cues from neutral cues in substance dependent populations. While it remains unclear whether drug cue-elicited activation in occipital cortex is related to the rewarding properties of the drug and/or attentional mechanisms, these data support further exploration. PMID:25155889

  6. Abnormal visual field maps in human cortex: a mini-review and a case report.

    PubMed

    Haak, Koen V; Langers, Dave R M; Renken, Remco; van Dijk, Pim; Borgstein, Johannes; Cornelissen, Frans W

    2014-07-01

    Human visual cortex contains maps of the visual field. Much research has been dedicated to answering whether and when these visual field maps change if critical components of the visual circuitry are damaged. Here, we first provide a focused mini-review of the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies that have evaluated the human cortical visual field maps in the face of retinal lesions, brain injury, and atypical retinocortical projections. We find that there is a fair body of research that has found abnormal fMRI activity, but also that this abnormal activity does not necessarily stem from cortical remapping. The abnormal fMRI activity can often be explained in terms of task effects and/or the uncovering of normally hidden system dynamics. We then present the case of a 16-year-old patient who lost the entire left cerebral hemisphere at age three for treatment of chronic focal encephalitis (Rasmussen syndrome) and intractable epilepsy. Using an fMRI retinotopic mapping procedure and population receptive field (pRF) modeling, we found that (1) despite the long period since the hemispherectomy, the retinotopic organization of early visual cortex remained unaffected by the removal of an entire cerebral hemisphere, and (2) the intact lateral occipital cortex contained an exceptionally large representation of the center of the visual field. The same method also indicates that the neuronal receptive fields in these lateral occipital brain regions are extraordinarily small. These features are clearly abnormal, but again they do not necessarily stem from cortical remapping. For example, the abnormal features can also be explained by the notion that the hemispherectomy took place during a critical period in the development of the lateral occipital cortex and therefore arrested its normal development. Thus, caution should be exercised when interpreting abnormal fMRI activity as a marker of cortical remapping; there are often other explanations. PMID:23347557

  7. Faciotopy—A face-feature map with face-like topology in the human occipital face area

    PubMed Central

    Henriksson, Linda; Mur, Marieke; Kriegeskorte, Nikolaus

    2015-01-01

    The occipital face area (OFA) and fusiform face area (FFA) are brain regions thought to be specialized for face perception. However, their intrinsic functional organization and status as cortical areas with well-defined boundaries remains unclear. Here we test these regions for “faciotopy”, a particular hypothesis about their intrinsic functional organisation. A faciotopic area would contain a face-feature map on the cortical surface, where cortical patches represent face features and neighbouring patches represent features that are physically neighbouring in a face. The faciotopy hypothesis is motivated by the idea that face regions might develop from a retinotopic protomap and acquire their selectivity for face features through natural visual experience. Faces have a prototypical configuration of features, are usually perceived in a canonical upright orientation, and are frequently fixated in particular locations. To test the faciotopy hypothesis, we presented images of isolated face features at fixation to subjects during functional magnetic resonance imaging. The responses in V1 were best explained by low-level image properties of the stimuli. OFA, and to a lesser degree FFA, showed evidence for faciotopic organization. When a single patch of cortex was estimated for each face feature, the cortical distances between the feature patches reflected the physical distance between the features in a face. Faciotopy would be the first example, to our knowledge, of a cortical map reflecting the topology, not of a part of the organism itself (its retina in retinotopy, its body in somatotopy), but of an external object of particular perceptual significance. PMID:26235800

  8. A real-world size organization of object responses in occipitotemporal cortex.

    PubMed

    Konkle, Talia; Oliva, Aude

    2012-06-21

    While there are selective regions of occipitotemporal cortex that respond to faces, letters, and bodies, the large-scale neural organization of most object categories remains unknown. Here, we find that object representations can be differentiated along the ventral temporal cortex by their real-world size. In a functional neuroimaging experiment, observers were shown pictures of big and small real-world objects (e.g., table, bathtub; paperclip, cup), presented at the same retinal size. We observed a consistent medial-to-lateral organization of big and small object preferences in the ventral temporal cortex, mirrored along the lateral surface. Regions in the lateral-occipital, inferotemporal, and parahippocampal cortices showed strong peaks of differential real-world size selectivity and maintained these preferences over changes in retinal size and in mental imagery. These data demonstrate that the real-world size of objects can provide insight into the spatial topography of object representation. PMID:22726840

  9. A real-world size organization of object responses in occipito-temporal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Konkle, Talia; Oliva, Aude

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY While there are selective regions of occipito-temporal cortex that respond to faces, letters, and bodies, the large-scale neural organization of most object categories remains unknown. Here we find that object representations can be differentiated along the ventral temporal cortex by their real-world size. In a functional neuroimaging experiment, observers were shown pictures of big and small real-world objects (e.g. table, bathtub; paperclip, cup), presented at the same retinal size. We observed a consistent medial-to-lateral organization of big and small object preferences in the ventral temporal cortex, mirrored along the lateral surface. Regions in the lateral-occipital, infero-temporal, and parahippocampal cortices showed strong peaks of differential real-world size selectivity, and maintained these preferences over changes in retinal size and in mental imagery. These data demonstrate that the real-world size of objects can provide insight into the spatial topography of object representation. PMID:22726840

  10. Neural sources of prediction in visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Hindy, Nicholas C; Ng, Felicia Y; Turk-Browne, Nicholas B

    2015-09-01

    Predictive coding refers to the theory that top-down expectations from higher-level brain areas interact with sensory evidence in lower-level areas. Neural responses in lateral occipital (LO) cortex reflect the consequences of this interaction, with reduced activity when expectations are fulfilled. But where do these predictions come from? We used a multi-session training paradigm and background connectivity to explore the neural mechanisms of prediction based on associations learned either immediately before ("Recent") or three days before ("Remote") an fMRI scan. Training sessions were separated in time because different memory systems are thought to support new and old memories. Within each training session, cue stimuli appeared individually and subjects pressed a button to transform the cue into an outcome stimulus. For predictable cues, a particular outcome appeared when the left button was pressed and a different outcome appeared when the right button was pressed. For unpredictable cues, both outcomes appeared with equal probability irrespective of which button was pressed. After training, subjects completed an fMRI session in which Recent and Remote associations were presented in alternating runs. Each run was structured as a block design, with blocks containing either predictable or unpredictable cues. To examine background connectivity during these blocks, we first regressed out variance attributable to stimulus-evoked responses and nuisance variables, and then measured correlations among brain areas in the residual time-series. Correlations were computed in an exploratory manner using the residual time-series in stimulus-selective LO as a predictor of the time-series of all voxels. By comparing predictable to unpredictable blocks, initial results reveal a tradeoff in LO background connectivity for Recent vs. Remote associations between medial temporal lobe structures that support rapid encoding and broader areas of temporal cortex that represent consolidated long-term memories. These findings suggest a neural model of how actions influence predictive coding in the visual system. Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015. PMID:26326077

  11. USP38, FREM3, SDC1, DDC, and LOC727982 Gene Polymorphisms and Differential Susceptibility to Severe Malaria in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Manjurano, Alphaxard; Seplveda, Nuno; Nadjm, Behzad; Mtove, George; Wangai, Hannah; Maxwell, Caroline; Olomi, Raimos; Reyburn, Hugh; Drakeley, Christopher J.; Riley, Eleanor M.; Clark, Taane G.

    2015-01-01

    Populations exposed to Plasmodium falciparum infection develop genetic mechanisms of protection against severe malarial disease. Despite decades of genetic epidemiological research, the sickle cell trait (HbAS) sickle cell polymorphism, ABO blood group, and other hemoglobinopathies remain the few major determinants in severe malaria to be replicated across different African populations and study designs. Within a case-control study in a region of high transmission in Tanzania (n = 983), we investigated the role of 40 new loci identified in recent genome-wide studies. In 32 loci passing quality control procedures, we found polymorphisms in USP38, FREM3, SDC1, DDC, and LOC727982 genes to be putatively associated with differential susceptibility to severe malaria. Established candidates explained 7.4% of variation in severe malaria risk (HbAS polymorphism, 6.3%; ?-thalassemia, 0.3%; ABO group, 0.3%; and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency, 0.5%) and the new polymorphisms, another 4.3%. The regions encompassing the loci identified are promising targets for the design of future treatment and control interventions. PMID:25805752

  12. USP38, FREM3, SDC1, DDC, and LOC727982 Gene Polymorphisms and Differential Susceptibility to Severe Malaria in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Manjurano, Alphaxard; Seplveda, Nuno; Nadjm, Behzad; Mtove, George; Wangai, Hannah; Maxwell, Caroline; Olomi, Raimos; Reyburn, Hugh; Drakeley, Christopher J; Riley, Eleanor M; Clark, Taane G

    2015-10-01

    Populations exposed to Plasmodium falciparum infection develop genetic mechanisms of protection against severe malarial disease. Despite decades of genetic epidemiological research, the sickle cell trait (HbAS) sickle cell polymorphism, ABO blood group, and other hemoglobinopathies remain the few major determinants in severe malaria to be replicated across different African populations and study designs. Within a case-control study in a region of high transmission in Tanzania (n = 983), we investigated the role of 40 new loci identified in recent genome-wide studies. In 32 loci passing quality control procedures, we found polymorphisms in USP38, FREM3, SDC1, DDC, and LOC727982 genes to be putatively associated with differential susceptibility to severe malaria. Established candidates explained 7.4% of variation in severe malaria risk (HbAS polymorphism, 6.3%; ?-thalassemia, 0.3%; ABO group, 0.3%; and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency, 0.5%) and the new polymorphisms, another 4.3%. The regions encompassing the loci identified are promising targets for the design of future treatment and control interventions. PMID:25805752

  13. APFiLoc: An Infrastructure-Free Indoor Localization Method Fusing Smartphone Inertial Sensors, Landmarks and Map Information

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Jianga; Gu, Fuqiang; Hu, Xuke; Kealy, Allison

    2015-01-01

    The utility and adoption of indoor localization applications have been limited due to the complex nature of the physical environment combined with an increasing requirement for more robust localization performance. Existing solutions to this problem are either too expensive or too dependent on infrastructure such as Wi-Fi access points. To address this problem, we propose APFiLoc—a low cost, smartphone-based framework for indoor localization. The key idea behind this framework is to obtain landmarks within the environment and to use the augmented particle filter to fuse them with measurements from smartphone sensors and map information. A clustering method based on distance constraints is developed to detect organic landmarks in an unsupervised way, and the least square support vector machine is used to classify seed landmarks. A series of real-world experiments were conducted in complex environments including multiple floors and the results show APFiLoc can achieve 80% accuracy (phone in the hand) and around 70% accuracy (phone in the pocket) of the error less than 2 m error without the assistance of infrastructure like Wi-Fi access points. PMID:26516858

  14. Category-Selective Background Connectivity in Ventral Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Norman-Haignere, Samuel V.; McCarthy, Gregory; Chun, Marvin M.

    2012-01-01

    Ventral visual cortex contains specialized regions for particular object categories, but little is known about how these regions interact during object recognition. Here we examine how the face-selective fusiform gyrus (FG) and the scene-selective parahippocampal cortex (PHC) interact with each other and with the rest of the brain during different visual tasks. To assess these interactions, we developed a novel approach for identifying patterns of connectivity associated with specific task sets, independent of stimulus-evoked responses. We tested whether this background connectivity between the FG and PHC was modulated when subjects engaged in face and scene processing tasks. In contrast to what would be predicted from biased competition or intrinsic activity accounts, we found that the strength of FGPHC background connectivity depended on which category was task relevant: connectivity increased when subjects attended to scenes (irrespective of whether a competing face was present) and decreased when subjects attended to faces (irrespective of competing scenes). We further discovered that posterior occipital cortex was correlated selectively with the FG during face tasks and the PHC during scene tasks. These results suggest that category specificity exists not only in which regions respond most strongly but also in how these and other regions interact. PMID:21670097

  15. Hypoglycemia-occipital syndrome: a specific neurologic syndrome following neonatal hypoglycemia?

    PubMed

    Karimzadeh, Parvaneh; Tabarestani, Sepideh; Ghofrani, Mohammad

    2011-02-01

    This study attempted to elaborate the existence of a specific neurologic pattern observed in children who experienced neonatal hypoglycemia. Twenty-seven patients with seizure and history of neonatal hypoglycemia were compared with 28 children suffering from idiopathic occipital epilepsy. In both groups the most common type of seizure activities included eye movements and impaired consciousness responding well to treatment; however, ictal vomiting was more common in controls. Subjects were in epileptic and nonepileptic groups. Ninety percent of cases showed abnormal signal of the posterior head region on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A large number showed posterior abnormalities on electroencephalography (EEG). Visual loss with abnormal visual evoked potential was the most frequent visual finding. Fifty-five percent showed mild psychomotor retardation. This study demonstrates that neonatal hypoglycemia can induce a syndrome with a specific clinical spectrum consisting of epilepsy, visual disturbances, and psychomotor retardation. Hypoglycemia-occipital syndrome is an entity without statistically significant semiologic differences from the idiopathic type. PMID:20639407

  16. Chronic daily headaches secondary to greater auricular and lesser occipital neuromas following endolymphatic shunt surgery.

    PubMed

    Vorobeichik, Leon; Fallucco, Michael A; Hagan, Robert R

    2012-01-01

    In head and neck surgery, peripheral sensory nerves are at risk for traumatic injury. These injuries are known to be peripheral triggers of chronic headaches if left untreated or unrecognised. We report the case of a patient that presented with a severe headache, nausea and emesis of 2 years duration following endolymphatic shunt placement for Meniere's disease. Nerve blockade suggested a peripheral trigger, and surgical exploration of the incision site revealed traumatic neuromas of the greater auricular and lesser occipital nerves. Subsequent nerve resection yielded complete symptomatic relief. This is the first case report of a peripherally triggered migraine headache due to the development of neuromas of the greater auricular and lesser occipital nerves, also representing a previously unreported complication of endolymphatic shunt placement. It is recommended that in patients presenting with intractable migraines and a history of head and neck surgery, diagnostic nerve blockage be used to assess for neuromas. PMID:23048004

  17. Atlas occipitalization in a supersonic fighter pilot involved in a midair collision: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gips, Hadas; Hiss, Jehuda; Davidson, Benjamin

    2010-11-01

    We report a case of a midair collision between two F16 fighter aircraft, in which one pilot survived and the other was ejected upon impact and his remains recovered from sea. In autopsy, no patholgy was detected, other than the expected evidence of mechanical trauma. No defects in the aircraft or faults in the parachute or ejection mechanism were found. Reconstruction of the shattered skull base and the cervical vertebrae revealed fusion of the atlanto-occipital joint (occipitalization) and a left paracondylar process. The effective diameter of the spinal canal was decreased by the abnormal articulation. Such malformations can cause a wide range of neurologic deficits. Considering the skill and alertness needed to operate a supersonic fighter aircraft, with the pressure applied by the heavy protective head gear and various G forces endured by the spinal column during flight, we postulate that the collision was related to the pilot's sudden incapacitation. PMID:21121510

  18. Improvement in clinical outcomes after dry needling in a patient with occipital neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Bryan M.; Kinslow, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The primary purpose of this case report is to outline the diagnosis, intervention and clinical outcome of a patient presenting with occipital neuralgia. Upon initial presentation, the patient described a four-year history of stabbing neck pain and headaches. After providing informed consent, the patient underwent a total of four dry needling (DN) sessions over a two-week duration. During each of the treatment sessions, needles were inserted into the trapezii and suboccipital muscles. Post-intervention, the patient reported a 32-point change in her neck disability index score along with a 28-point change in her headache disability index score. Thus, it appears that subsequent four sessions of DN over two weeks, our patient experienced meaningful improvement in her neck pain and headaches. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report describing DN to successfully improve clinical outcomes in a patient diagnosed with occipital neuralgia. PMID:26136602

  19. Age-related changes in occipital alpha rhythm of adults with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ono, Y; Yoshida, H; Momotani, Y; Yoshimasu, F; Higashi, Y

    1992-09-01

    A power spectral analysis was performed on occipital EEGs recorded from 36 Down Syndrome (DS) subjects aged 15 to 54 and compared with two control groups; 47 healthy volunteers (Control) and 42 mentally retarded people without DS (MR). The frequencies of occipital alpha rhythms of DS showed a significant inverse correlation with chronological age, while Control and MR did not. The average frequencies of DS were significantly low even in the youngest age-group in comparison with those of Control, and also decreased in the age-groups of 35 and older compared with MR. It was considered that a slowing of alpha rhythm was a manifestation of premature aging that occurred in the underdeveloped brains of DS. PMID:1487850

  20. Neurofibromatosis Type 1: Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Ruptured Occipital Arterial Aneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Kanematsu, Masayuki; Kato, Hiroki; Kondo, Hiroshi; Goshima, Satoshi; Tsuge, Yusuke; Kojima, Toshiaki; Watanabe, Haruo

    2011-02-15

    Two cases of ruptured aneurysms in the posterior cervical regions associated with type-1 neurofibromatosis treated by transcatheter embolization are reported. Patients presented with acute onset of swelling and pain in the affected areas. Emergently performed contrast-enhanced CT demonstrated aneurysms and large hematomas widespread in the posterior cervical regions. Angiography revealed aneurysms and extravasations of the occipital artery. Patients were successfully treated by percutaneous transcatheter arterial microcoil embolization. Transcatheter arterial embolization therapy was found to be an effective method for treating aneurysmal rupture in the posterior cervical regions occurring in association with type-1 neurofibromatosis. A literature review revealed that rupture of an occipital arterial aneurysm, in the setting of neurofibromatosis type 1, has not been reported previously.

  1. Morphological investigations of the occipital area in adult American Staffordshire Terriers.

    PubMed

    Janeczek, M; Chrszcz, A; Czerski, A

    2011-08-01

    Morphological investigations into the occipital area were carried out on the skulls of 24 adult American Staffordshire Terriers. The dorsal notch was found in one skull. The normal height (h) and width (W) of the foramen magnum was measured, and the foramen magnum index was calculated. In the case of the presence of the dorsal notch, total height (H) and normal height (h) of foramen magnum were measured, and dorsal notch height (N) was estimated. The mean value of the foramen magnum index (FMIa = W/H 100) was 82.7. The foramen magnum index with the exception of the skull with dorsal notch (FMIb = W/h 100) was 77.89. The dysplasia index (ISD = N/h 100) was 44.05. A radiographic evaluation was made according to the method introduced by Rusbridge. Occipital dysplasia is not a clinical problem itself but can provoke one. PMID:21517942

  2. Occipital Lobe Gray Matter Volume in Male Patients with Chronic Schizophrenia: A Quantitative MRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Onitsuka, Toshiaki; McCarley, Robert W.; Kuroki, Noriomi; Dickey, Chandlee C.; Kubicki, Marek; Demeo, Susan S.; Frumin, Melissa; Kikinis, Ron; Jolesz, Ferenc A.; Shenton, Martha E.

    2008-01-01

    Schizophrenia is characterized by deficits in cognition as well as visual perception. There have, however, been few magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of the occipital lobe as an anatomically defined region of interest in schizophrenia. To examine whether or not patients with chronic schizophrenia show occipital lobe volume abnormalities, we measured gray matter volumes for both the primary visual area (PVA) and the visual association areas (VAA) using MRI based neuroanatomical landmarks and three-dimensional information. PVA and VAA gray matter volumes were measured using high-spatial resolution MRI in 25 male patients diagnosed with chronic schizophrenia and in 28 male normal controls. Chronic schizophrenia patients showed reduced bilateral VAA gray matter volume (11%), compared with normal controls, whereas patients showed no group difference in PVA gray matter volume. These results suggest that reduced bilateral VAA may be a neurobiological substrate of some of the deficits observed in early visual processing in schizophrenia. PMID:17350226

  3. [Lacunae of the occipital bone. Radiological aspects of normal anatomical variants].

    PubMed

    Sciascia, R; Pavlica, P

    1988-09-01

    Sixteen patients with lacunar alterations of the squamous occipital bone were studied in various radiographic projections; in many cases tomography and technetium 99m bone scan studies were also performed. In 7 cases lacunae in the cerebral fossa were observed, with an average diameter of 3 cm. These defects were due to a thinning of the inner table of the theca. In 9 cases smaller lacunae were demonstrated bilaterally, which were more radiolucent, isolated or confluent, located in the area corresponding to the internal occipital protuberance at the ridges of the cruciform eminence. The latter were representative of diploic venous lakes, as best demonstrated in lateral projection. This kind of lacunae are considered as anatomic variants, because no bone destruction is demonstrable, as confirmed by technetium scintigraphy. PMID:3175070

  4. Improvement in clinical outcomes after dry needling in a patient with occipital neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Bond, Bryan M; Kinslow, Christopher

    2015-06-01

    The primary purpose of this case report is to outline the diagnosis, intervention and clinical outcome of a patient presenting with occipital neuralgia. Upon initial presentation, the patient described a four-year history of stabbing neck pain and headaches. After providing informed consent, the patient underwent a total of four dry needling (DN) sessions over a two-week duration. During each of the treatment sessions, needles were inserted into the trapezii and suboccipital muscles. Post-intervention, the patient reported a 32-point change in her neck disability index score along with a 28-point change in her headache disability index score. Thus, it appears that subsequent four sessions of DN over two weeks, our patient experienced meaningful improvement in her neck pain and headaches. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report describing DN to successfully improve clinical outcomes in a patient diagnosed with occipital neuralgia. PMID:26136602

  5. Parieto-occipital suppression eliminates implicit bidirectionality in grapheme-colour synaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Rothen, Nicolas; Nyffeler, Thomas; von Wartburg, Roman; Mri, Ren; Meier, Beat

    2010-10-01

    Synaesthesia is a condition in which the input of one sensory modality triggers extraordinary additional experiences. On an explicit level, subjects affected by this condition normally report unidirectional experiences. In grapheme-colour synaesthesia for example, the letter A printed in black may trigger a red colour experience but not vice versa. However on an implicit level, at least for some types of synaesthesia, bidirectional activation is possible. In this study we tested whether bidirectional implicit activation is mediated by the same brain areas as explicit synaesthetic experiences. Specifically, we demonstrated suppression of implicit bidirectional activation with the application of transcranial magnetic stimulation over parieto-occipital brain areas. Our findings indicate that parieto-occipital regions are not only involved in explicit but also implicit synaesthetic binding. PMID:20678509

  6. Occipital neuralgia secondary to unilateral atlantoaxial osteoarthritis: Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Guha, Daipayan; Mohanty, Chandan; Tator, Charles H.; Shamji, Mohammed F.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Atlantoaxial osteoarthritis (AAOA), either in isolation or in the context of generalized peripheral or spinal arthritis, presents most commonly with neck pain and limitation of cervical rotational range of motion. Occipital neuralgia (ON) is only rarely attributed to AAOA, as fewer than 30 cases are described in the literature. Case Description: A 64-year-old female presented with progressive incapacitating cervicalgia and occipital headaches, refractory to medications, and local anesthetic blocks. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging studies documented advanced unilateral atlantoaxial arthrosis with osteophytic compression that dorsally displaced the associated C2 nerve root. Surgical decompression and atlantoaxial fusion achieved rapid and complete relief of neuralgia. Ultimately, postoperative spinal imaging revealed osseous union. Conclusions: Atlantoaxial arthrosis must be considered in the differential diagnosis of ON. Surgical treatment is effective for managing refractory cases. Intraoperative neuronavigation is also a useful adjunct to guide instrumentation and the intraoperative extent of bony decompression. PMID:26759731

  7. Evaluation of spheno-occipital synchondrosis: A review of literature and considerations from forensic anthropologic point of view

    PubMed Central

    Krishan, Kewal; Kanchan, Tanuj

    2013-01-01

    Cranial sutures and synchondrosis have long been studied by forensic scientists, human anatomists, and anthropologists for estimation of age in different population groups. Observation of the closure of spheno-occipital synchondrosis has an important role to play in the estimation of age in the examination of unknown human remains when a skull is brought for examination. The present article reviews the studies conducted on the closure of spheno-occipital synchondrosis and presents a few valuable considerations that would be essential for carrying out research related to closure of spheno-occipital synchondrosis in humans. PMID:24255553

  8. Outcomes of Greater Occipital Nerve Injections in Pediatric Patients with Chronic Primary Headache Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gelfand, Amy A.; Reider, Amanda C.; Goadsby, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic migraine is common in pediatrics and generally disabling. In adults, infiltration of the area around the greater occipital nerve can provide short to medium term benefit in some patients. This study reports the efficacy of greater occipital nerve infiltrations in pediatric patients with chronic primary headache disorders. Methods Retrospective chart review of patients <18 years with a chronic primary headache disorder undergoing a first-time injection. Infiltrations were unilateral and consisted of a mixture of methylprednisolone acetate, adjusted for weight, and lidocaine 2%. Results Forty-six patients were treated. Thirty-five (76%) had chronic migraine, nine (20%) New Daily Persistent Headache (NDPH), and two (4%) a chronic trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia. Medication overuse was present in 26%. Ages ranged from 717 years. Follow-up data were available for 40 (87%). Overall, 53% (21/40) benefitted, 52% (11/21) significantly. Benefit onset ranged from 014 days, mean 4.7(SD 4.3), with mean benefit duration of 5.4(SD 4.9) weeks. In chronic migraine, 62% (18/29) benefitted, 56% (10/18) significantly. In NDPH, 33% (3/9) benefitted; 33% (n=1) significantly. Neither child with a chronic trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia benefitted. In logistic regression modeling, medication overuse, age, sex, and sensory change in the distribution of the infiltrated nerve did not predict outcome. There were no serious side effects. Conclusions Greater occipital nerve injections benefitted 53% of pediatric patients with chronic primary headache disorders. Efficacy appeared higher in chronic migraine than NDPH. Given the benign side effect profile, a greater occipital nerve infiltration prior to more aggressive approaches seems appropriate. PMID:24268688

  9. Occipital lobe seizures: Rare hyperglycemic sequelae of type 1 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Jalal, Muhammed Jasim Abdul; Menon, Murali Krishna; Kumar, K. Arun; Gomez, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    A 15-year-old boy presented with osmotic symptoms and photopsia. He had short-term memory impairment, visual hallucinations, and headache. His random blood sugar was 474 mg/dl, HbA1c −9.4%, and glutamic acid decarboxylase −65 >2000 IU/ml. Magnetic resonance imaging brain and cerebrospinal fluid study were normal. Digital electroencephalography was suggestive of bilateral hemispheric occipital lobe seizures. He responded well to insulin and antiepileptic medications.

  10. Partial, non-thrombotic, superior sagittal sinus occlusion due to occipital skull tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Plant, G T; Donald, J J; Jackowski, A; Vinnicombe, S J; Kendall, B E

    1991-01-01

    Two cases are described in which raised intracranial pressure occurred as a result of superior sagittal sinus (SSS) occlusion by an occipital skull tumour. One was a plasmacytoma, the other a metastatic deposit from a Ewing's sarcoma. The difficulties in diagnosis of this syndrome are illustrated together with the importance and success of appropriate treatment. From the literature it appears possible that these two tumours may be particularly likely to occlude the SSS and the reasons for this are discussed. Images PMID:1880514

  11. Dissociation between Conceptual and Perceptual Implicit Memory: Evidence from Patients with Frontal and Occipital Lobe Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Liang; Wang, JiHua; Yang, XuDong; Feng, Lei; Li, Xiu; Gu, Cui; Wang, MeiHong; Hu, JiaYun; Cheng, Huaidong

    2016-01-01

    The latest neuroimaging studies about implicit memory (IM) have revealed that different IM types may be processed by different parts of the brain. However, studies have rarely examined what subtypes of IM processes are affected in patients with various brain injuries. Twenty patients with frontal lobe injury, 25 patients with occipital lobe injury, and 29 healthy controls (HC) were recruited for the study. Two subtypes of IM were investigated by using structurally parallel perceptual (picture identification task) and conceptual (category exemplar generation task) IM tests in the three groups, as well as explicit memory (EM) tests. The results indicated that the priming of conceptual IM and EM tasks in patients with frontal lobe injury was poorer than that observed in HC, while perceptual IM was identical between the two groups. By contrast, the priming of perceptual IM in patients with occipital lobe injury was poorer than that in HC, whereas the priming of conceptual IM and EM was similar to that in HC. This double dissociation between perceptual and conceptual IM across the brain areas implies that occipital lobes may participate in perceptual IM, while frontal lobes may be involved in processing conceptual memory. PMID:26793093

  12. Biofidelic neck influences head kinematics of parietal and occipital impacts following short falls in infants.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Sarah; Coats, Brittany; Margulies, Susan S

    2015-09-01

    Falls are a major cause of traumatic head injury in children. Understanding head kinematics during low height falls is essential for evaluating injury risk and designing mitigating strategies. Typically, these measurements are made with commercial anthropomorphic infant surrogates, but these surrogates are designed based on adult biomechanical data. In this study, we improve upon the state-of-the-art anthropomorphic testing devices by incorporating new infant cadaver neck bending and tensile data. We then measure head kinematics following head-first falls onto 4 impact surfaces from 3 fall heights with occipital and parietal head impact locations. The biofidelic skull compliance and neck properties of the improved infant surrogate significantly influenced the measured kinematic loads, decreasing the measured impact force and peak angular accelerations, lowering the expected injury risk. Occipital and parietal impacts exhibited distinct kinematic responses in primary head rotation direction and the magnitude of the rotational velocities and accelerations, with larger angular velocities as the head rebounded after occipital impacts. Further evaluations of injury risk due to short falls should take into account the impact surface and head impact location, in addition to the fall height. PMID:26072183

  13. Multiple Occipital, Parietal, Temporal, and Frontal Foramina: A Variant of Enlarged Parietal Foramina in an Infant

    PubMed Central

    Y?lmaz, Erdem; Yetim, Aylin; Erol, O?uz Blent; Pekcan, Melih; Yekeler, Ensar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Calvarial lesions are often detected incidentally in routine radiology. Most lytic lesions of the skull are benign. Enlarged parietal foramina are benign lesions caused by deficient intramembranous ossification. Case Report: An 11 month-old female patient was admitted with a mass on the right of the back of the head. Physical examination showed a soft 5 cm mass area with no palpable bone in the right occipital. The family history revealed a similar mass in a maternal cousin that resolved over time. Craniography showed lytic lesions, and there were no other pathologies on a complete skeletal X-ray. Computed tomography (CT) showed regular-shaped defects in the bilateral temporal bones, right parietal bone, bilateral frontal bones in the upper-medial orbital wall, and particularly in the occipital bone. The well-defined contours, absence of a soft tissue component, and normal structure and density of the adjacent calvarial bones all pointed to a congenital defect. No change in the lesions was observed during a three-year ultrasound follow-up period. Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first described case of multiple occipital, parietal, temporal, and frontal foramina in the cranium. A diagnosis of enlarged parietal foramina variant should be considered after ruling out the differential diagnosis in patients with multiple calvarial lesions. CT may provide valuable findings for the differential diagnosis, and sonography may be used for follow-up. PMID:25667790

  14. Long Noncoding RNA LOC100129973 Suppresses Apoptosis by Targeting miR-4707-5p and miR-4767 in Vascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wei; Huang, Shu Ya; Su, Le; Zhao, Bao Xiang; Miao, Jun Ying

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are key regulators of multiple biological processes by altering gene expression at various levels. Apoptosis in vascular endothelial cells (VECs) is closely linked to numerous cardiovascular diseases, such as arteriosclerosis, thrombus formation and plaque erosion. However, studies on lncRNAs in the cardiovascular system are just beginning. And thus far, no anti-apoptosis lncRNAs have been identified in VECs. Here, we focused on the anti-apoptosis roles of lncRNAs in the serum and FGF-2 starvation-induced apoptosis of VECs. Using microarray analysis, we found a novel lncRNA LOC100129973 which acted as an apoptosis inhibitor in VECs. Through sponging miR-4707-5p and miR-4767, lncRNA LOC100129973 upregulated the expression of two apoptosis repressors gene, Apoptosis Inhibitor 5 (API5) and BCL2 like 12 (BCL2L12), and thus alleviated the serum and FGF-2 starvation-induced apoptosis in VECs. This evidence suggests that lncRNA LOC100129973 is an attractive target to improve endothelial function and for therapy of apoptosis related cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26887505

  15. Long Noncoding RNA LOC100129973 Suppresses Apoptosis by Targeting miR-4707-5p and miR-4767 in Vascular Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wei; Huang, Shu Ya; Su, Le; Zhao, Bao Xiang; Miao, Jun Ying

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are key regulators of multiple biological processes by altering gene expression at various levels. Apoptosis in vascular endothelial cells (VECs) is closely linked to numerous cardiovascular diseases, such as arteriosclerosis, thrombus formation and plaque erosion. However, studies on lncRNAs in the cardiovascular system are just beginning. And thus far, no anti-apoptosis lncRNAs have been identified in VECs. Here, we focused on the anti-apoptosis roles of lncRNAs in the serum and FGF-2 starvation-induced apoptosis of VECs. Using microarray analysis, we found a novel lncRNA LOC100129973 which acted as an apoptosis inhibitor in VECs. Through sponging miR-4707-5p and miR-4767, lncRNA LOC100129973 upregulated the expression of two apoptosis repressors gene, Apoptosis Inhibitor 5 (API5) and BCL2 like 12 (BCL2L12), and thus alleviated the serum and FGF-2 starvation-induced apoptosis in VECs. This evidence suggests that lncRNA LOC100129973 is an attractive target to improve endothelial function and for therapy of apoptosis related cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26887505

  16. TMS to object cortex affects both object and scene remote networks while TMS to scene cortex only affects scene networks.

    PubMed

    Rafique, Sara A; Solomon-Harris, Lily M; Steeves, Jennifer K E

    2015-12-01

    Viewing the world involves many computations across a great number of regions of the brain, all the while appearing seamless and effortless. We sought to determine the connectivity of object and scene processing regions of cortex through the influence of transient focal neural noise in discrete nodes within these networks. We consecutively paired repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) with functional magnetic resonance-adaptation (fMR-A) to measure the effect of rTMS on functional response properties at the stimulation site and in remote regions. In separate sessions, rTMS was applied to the object preferential lateral occipital region (LO) and scene preferential transverse occipital sulcus (TOS). Pre- and post-stimulation responses were compared using fMR-A. In addition to modulating BOLD signal at the stimulation site, TMS affected remote regions revealing inter and intrahemispheric connections between LO, TOS, and the posterior parahippocampal place area (PPA). Moreover, we show remote effects from object preferential LO to outside the ventral perception network, in parietal and frontal areas, indicating an interaction of dorsal and ventral streams and possibly a shared common framework of perception and action. PMID:26511624

  17. Abnormal Contrast Responses in the Extrastriate Cortex of Blindsight Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rees, Geraint; Kennard, Christopher; Bridge, Holly

    2015-01-01

    When the human primary visual cortex (V1) is damaged, the dominant geniculo-striate pathway can no longer convey visual information to the occipital cortex. However, many patients with such damage retain some residual visual function that must rely on an alternative pathway directly to extrastriate occipital regions. This residual vision is most robust for moving stimuli, suggesting a role for motion area hMT+. However, residual vision also requires high-contrast stimuli, which is inconsistent with hMT+ sensitivity to contrast in which even low-contrast levels elicit near-maximal neural activation. We sought to investigate this discrepancy by measuring behavioral and neural responses to increasing contrast in patients with V1 damage. Eight patients underwent behavioral testing and functional magnetic resonance imaging to record contrast sensitivity in hMT+ of their damaged hemisphere, using Gabor stimuli with a spatial frequency of 1 cycle/. The responses from hMT+ of the blind hemisphere were compared with hMT+ and V1 responses in the sighted hemisphere of patients and a group of age-matched controls. Unlike hMT+, neural responses in V1 tend to increase linearly with increasing contrast, likely reflecting a dominant parvocellular channel input. Across all patients, the responses in hMT+ of the blind hemisphere no longer showed early saturation but increased linearly with contrast. Given the spatiotemporal parameters used in this study and the known direct subcortical projections from the koniocellular layers of the lateral geniculate nucleus to hMT+, we propose that this altered contrast sensitivity in hMT+ could be consistent with input from the koniocellular pathway. PMID:26019336

  18. MCT8 expression in human fetal cerebral cortex is reduced in severe intrauterine growth restriction.

    PubMed

    Chan, Shiao Y; Hancox, Laura A; Martín-Santos, Azucena; Loubière, Laurence S; Walter, Merlin N M; González, Ana-Maria; Cox, Phillip M; Logan, Ann; McCabe, Christopher J; Franklyn, Jayne A; Kilby, Mark D

    2014-02-01

    The importance of the thyroid hormone (TH) transporter, monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8), to human neurodevelopment is highlighted by findings of severe global neurological impairment in subjects with MCT8 (SLC16A2) mutations. Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), usually due to uteroplacental failure, is associated with milder neurodevelopmental deficits, which have been partly attributed to dysregulated TH action in utero secondary to reduced circulating fetal TH concentrations and decreased cerebral thyroid hormone receptor expression. We postulate that altered MCT8 expression is implicated in this pathophysiology; therefore, in this study, we sought to quantify changes in cortical MCT8 expression with IUGR. First, MCT8 immunohistochemistry was performed on occipital and parietal cerebral cortex sections obtained from appropriately grown for gestational age (AGA) human fetuses between 19 weeks of gestation and term. Secondly, MCT8 immunostaining in the occipital cortex of stillborn IUGR human fetuses at 24-28 weeks of gestation was objectively compared with that in the occipital cortex of gestationally matched AGA fetuses. Fetuses demonstrated widespread MCT8 expression in neurons within the cortical plate and subplate, in the ventricular and subventricular zones, in the epithelium of the choroid plexus and ependyma, and in microvessel wall. When complicated by IUGR, fetuses showed a significant fivefold reduction in the percentage area of cortical plate immunostained for MCT8 compared with AGA fetuses (P<0.05), but there was no significant difference in the proportion of subplate microvessels immunostained. Cortical MCT8 expression was negatively correlated with the severity of IUGR indicated by the brain:liver weight ratios (r(2)=0.28; P<0.05) at post-mortem. Our results support the hypothesis that a reduction in MCT8 expression in the IUGR fetal brain could further compromise TH-dependent brain development. PMID:24204008

  19. Density and Frequency Caudo-Rostral Gradients of Sleep Spindles Recorded in the Human Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Peter-Derex, Laure; Comte, Jean-Christophe; Mauguire, Franois; Salin, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    Study Objective: This study aims at providing a quantitative description of intrinsic spindle frequency and density (number of spindles/min) in cortical areas using deep intracerebral recordings in humans. Patients or Participants: Thirteen patients suffering from pharmaco-resistant focal epilepsy and investigated through deep intracortical EEG in frontal, parietal, temporal, occipital, insular, and limbic cortices including the hippocampus were included. Methods: Spindle waves were detected from the ongoing EEG during slow wave sleep (SWS) by performing a time-frequency analysis on filtered signals (band-pass filter: 10-16 Hz). Then, spindle intrinsic frequency was determined using a fast Fourier transform, and spindle density (number of spindles per minute) was computed. Results: Firstly, we showed that sleep spindles were recorded in all explored cortical areas, except temporal neocortex. In particular, we observed the presence of spindles during SWS in areas such as the insular cortex, medial parietal cortex, occipital cortex, and cingulate gyrus. Secondly, we demonstrated that both spindle frequency and density smoothly change along the caudo-rostral axis, from fast frequent posterior spindles to slower and less frequent anterior spindles. Thirdly, we identified the presence of spindle frequency oscillations in the hippocampus and the entorhinal cortex. Conclusions: Spindling activity is widespread among cortical areas, which argues for the fundamental role of spindles in cortical functions. Mechanisms of caudo-rostral gradient modulation in spindle frequency and density may result from a complex interplay of intrinsic properties and extrinsic modulation of thalamocortical and corticothalamic neurons. Citation: Peter-Derex L; Comte JC; Mauguire F; Salin PA. Density and frequency caudo-rostral gradients of sleep spindles recorded in the human cortex. SLEEP 2012;35(1):69-79. PMID:22215920

  20. Non-invasive electric current stimulation for restoration of vision after unilateral occipital stroke.

    PubMed

    Gall, Carolin; Silvennoinen, Katri; Granata, Giuseppe; de Rossi, Francesca; Vecchio, Fabrizio; Brsel, Doreen; Bola, Micha?; Sailer, Michael; Waleszczyk, Wioletta J; Rossini, Paolo M; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Sabel, Bernhard A

    2015-07-01

    Occipital stroke often leads to visual field loss, for which no effective treatment exists. Little is known about the potential of non-invasive electric current stimulation to ameliorate visual functions in patients suffering from unilateral occipital stroke. One reason is the traditional thinking that visual field loss after brain lesions is permanent. Since evidence is available documenting vision restoration by means of vision training or non-invasive electric current stimulation future studies should also consider investigating recovery processes after visual cortical strokes. Here, protocols of repetitive transorbital alternating current stimulation (rtACS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) are presented and the European consortium for restoration of vision (REVIS) is introduced. Within the consortium different stimulation approaches will be applied to patients with unilateral occipital strokes resulting in homonymous hemianopic visual field defects. The aim of the study is to evaluate effects of current stimulation of the brain on vision parameters, vision-related quality of life, and physiological parameters that allow concluding about the mechanisms of vision restoration. These include EEG-spectra and coherence measures, and visual evoked potentials. The design of stimulation protocols involves an appropriate sham-stimulation condition and sufficient follow-up periods to test whether the effects are stable. This is the first application of non-invasive current stimulation for vision rehabilitation in stroke-related visual field deficits. Positive results of the trials could have far-reaching implications for clinical practice. The ability of non-invasive electrical current brain stimulation to modulate the activity of neuronal networks may have implications for stroke rehabilitation also in the visual domain. PMID:26072125

  1. Abnormal activation of the occipital lobes during emotion picture processing in major depressive disorder patients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianying; Xu, Cheng; Cao, Xiaohua; Gao, Qiang; Wang, Yan; Wang, Yanfang; Peng, Juyi; Zhang, Kerang

    2013-01-01

    A large number of studies have demonstrated that depression patients have cognitive dysfunction. With recently developed brain functional imaging, studies have focused on changes in brain function to investigate cognitive changes. However, there is still controversy regarding abnormalities in brain functions or correlation between cognitive impairment and brain function changes. Thus, it is important to design an emotion-related task for research into brain function changes. We selected positive, neutral, and negative pictures from the International Affective Picture System. Patients with major depressive disorder were asked to judge emotion pictures. In addition, functional MRI was performed to synchronously record behavior data and imaging data. Results showed that the total correct rate for recognizing pictures was lower in patients compared with normal controls. Moreover, the consistency for recognizing pictures for depressed patients was worse than normal controls, and they frequently recognized positive pictures as negative pictures. The consistency for recognizing pictures was negatively correlated with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Functional MRI suggested that the activation of some areas in the frontal lobe, temporal lobe, parietal lobe, limbic lobe, and cerebellum was enhanced, but that the activation of some areas in the frontal lobe, parietal lobe and occipital lobe was weakened while the patients were watching positive and neutral pictures compared with normal controls. The activation of some areas in the frontal lobe, temporal lobe, parietal lobe, and limbic lobe was enhanced, but the activation of some areas in the occipital lobe were weakened while the patients were watching the negative pictures compared with normal controls. These findings indicate that patients with major depressive disorder have negative cognitive disorder and extensive brain dysfunction. Thus, reduced activation of the occipital lobe may be an initiating factor for cognitive disorder in depressed patients. PMID:25206466

  2. Dopamine D sub 2 receptors in the cerebral cortex: Distribution and pharmacological characterization with ( sup 3 H)raclopride

    SciTech Connect

    Lidow, M.S.; Goldman-Rakic, P.S.; Rakic, P.; Innis, R.B. )

    1989-08-01

    An apparent involvement of dopamine in the regulation of cognitive functions and the recognition of a widespread dopaminergic innervation of the cortex have focused attention on the identity of cortical dopamine receptors. However, only the presence and distribution of dopamine D{sub 1} receptors in the cortex have been well documented. Comparable information on cortical D{sub 2} sites is lacking. The authors report here the results of binding studied in the cortex and neostriatum of rat and monkey using the D{sub 2} selective antagonist ({sup 3}H)raclopride. In both structures ({sup 3}H)raclopride bound in a sodium-dependent and saturable manner to a single population of sites with pharmacological profiles of dopamine D{sub 2} receptors. D{sub 2} sites were present in all regions of the cortex, although their density was much lower than in the neostriatum. The density of these sites in both monkey and, to a lesser extent, rat cortex displayed a rostral-caudal gradient with highest concentrations in the prefrontal and lowest concentrations in the occipital cortex, corresponding to dopamine levels in these areas. Thus, the present study established the presence and widespread distribution of dopamine D{sub 2} receptors in the cortex.

  3. Aberrant internal carotid artery associated with occipital artery arising from the internal carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Uchino, Akira; Saito, Naoko; Okano, Nanami; Kakehi, Yoshiaki

    2015-11-01

    We present an extremely rare case of an aberrant course of the petrous internal carotid artery (ICA) associated with the ipsilateral occipital artery arising from the cervical ICA, a combination not previously reported by magnetic resonance (MR) angiography. The patient was a 53-year-old woman with no symptoms related to the anomalous ICA. Source images and partial maximum-intensity-projection images of MR angiography are useful in diagnosing these variations. Source images and curved multiplanar reconstruction images of computed tomography angiography are important for the accurate evaluation of reduced arterial diameter and the relationship between the anomalous artery and petrous bone. PMID:25724942

  4. Cognition without Cortex.

    PubMed

    Güntürkün, Onur; Bugnyar, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Assumptions on the neural basis of cognition usually focus on cortical mechanisms. Birds have no cortex, but recent studies in parrots and corvids show that their cognitive skills are on par with primates. These cognitive findings are accompanied by neurobiological discoveries that reveal avian and mammalian forebrains are homologous, and show similarities in connectivity and function down to the cellular level. But because birds have a large pallium, but no cortex, a specific cortical architecture cannot be a requirement for advanced cognitive skills. During the long parallel evolution of mammals and birds, several neural mechanisms for cognition and complex behaviors may have converged despite an overall forebrain organization that is otherwise vastly different. PMID:26944218

  5. Experience-Related Structural Changes of Degenerated Occipital White Matter in Late-Blind Humans – A Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Susanne; Hertrich, Ingo; Kumar, Vinod; Ackermann, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    Late-blind humans can learn to understand speech at ultra-fast syllable rates (ca. 20 syllables/s), a capability associated with hemodynamic activation of the central-visual system. Thus, the observed functional cross-modal recruitment of occipital cortex might facilitate ultra-fast speech processing in these individuals. To further elucidate the structural prerequisites of this skill, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was conducted in late-blind subjects differing in their capability of understanding ultra-fast speech. Fractional anisotropy (FA) was determined as a quantitative measure of the directionality of water diffusion, indicating fiber tract characteristics that might be influenced by blindness as well as the acquired perceptual skills. Analysis of the diffusion images revealed reduced FA in late-blind individuals relative to sighted controls at the level of the optic radiations at either side and the right-hemisphere dorsal thalamus (pulvinar). Moreover, late-blind subjects showed significant positive correlations between FA and the capacity of ultra-fast speech comprehension within right-hemisphere optic radiation and thalamus. Thus, experience-related structural alterations occurred in late-blind individuals within visual pathways that, presumably, are linked to higher order frontal language areas. PMID:25830371

  6. Motor cortex inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Isaacs, K.M.; Augusta, M.; MacNeil, L.K.; Mostofsky, S.H.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a childhood-onset behavioral diagnosis in which children often fail to meet age norms in development of motor control, particularly timed repetitive and sequential movements, motor overflow, and balance. The neural substrate of this motor delay may include mechanisms of synaptic inhibition in or adjacent to the motor cortex. The primary objective of this study was to determine whether transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)–evoked measures, particularly short interval cortical inhibition (SICI), in motor cortex correlate with the presence and severity of ADHD in childhood as well as with commonly observed delays in motor control. Methods: In this case-control study, behavioral ratings, motor skills, and motor cortex physiology were evaluated in 49 children with ADHD (mean age 10.6 years, 30 boys) and 49 typically developing children (mean age 10.5 years, 30 boys), all right-handed, aged 8–12 years. Motor skills were evaluated with the Physical and Neurological Examination for Subtle Signs (PANESS) and the Motor Assessment Battery for Children version 2. SICI and other physiologic measures were obtained using TMS in the left motor cortex. Results: In children with ADHD, mean SICI was reduced by 40% (p < 0.0001) and less SICI correlated with higher ADHD severity (r = −0.52; p = 0.002). Mean PANESS motor development scores were 59% worse in children with ADHD (p < 0.0001). Worse PANESS scores correlated modestly with less SICI (r = −.30; p = 0.01). Conclusion: Reduced TMS-evoked SICI correlates with ADHD diagnosis and symptom severity and also reflects motor skill development in children. PMID:21321335

  7. Nuclear Shuttling of She2p Couples ASH1 mRNA Localization to its Translational Repression by Recruiting Loc1p and Puf6p

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zhifa; Paquin, Nicolas; Forget, Amlie

    2009-01-01

    The transport and localization of mRNAs results in the asymmetric synthesis of specific proteins. In yeast, the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein She2 binds the ASH1 mRNA and targets it for localization at the bud tip by recruiting the She3pMyo4p complex. Although the cytoplasmic role of She2p in mRNA localization is well characterized, its nuclear function is still unclear. Here, we show that She2p contains a nonclassical nuclear localization signal (NLS) that is essential for its nuclear import via the importin ? Srp1p. Exclusion of She2p from the nucleus by mutagenesis of its NLS leads to defective ASH1 mRNA localization and Ash1p sorting. Interestingly, these phenotypes mimic knockouts of LOC1 and PUF6, which encode for nuclear RNA-binding proteins that bind the ASH1 mRNA and control its translation. We find that She2p interacts with both Loc1p and Puf6p and that excluding She2p from the nucleus decreases this interaction. Absence of nuclear She2p disrupts the binding of Loc1p and Puf6p to the ASH1 mRNA, suggesting that nuclear import of She2p is necessary to recruit both factors to the ASH1 transcript. This study reveals that a direct coupling between localization and translation regulation factors in the nucleus is required for proper cytoplasmic localization of mRNAs. PMID:19244342

  8. How Visual Is the Visual Cortex? Comparing Connectional and Functional Fingerprints between Congenitally Blind and Sighted Individuals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoying; Peelen, Marius V; Han, Zaizhu; He, Chenxi; Caramazza, Alfonso; Bi, Yanchao

    2015-09-01

    Classical animal visual deprivation studies and human neuroimaging studies have shown that visual experience plays a critical role in shaping the functionality and connectivity of the visual cortex. Interestingly, recent studies have additionally reported circumscribed regions in the visual cortex in which functional selectivity was remarkably similar in individuals with and without visual experience. Here, by directly comparing resting-state and task-based fMRI data in congenitally blind and sighted human subjects, we obtained large-scale continuous maps of the degree to which connectional and functional "fingerprints" of ventral visual cortex depend on visual experience. We found a close agreement between connectional and functional maps, pointing to a strong interdependence of connectivity and function. Visual experience (or the absence thereof) had a pronounced effect on the resting-state connectivity and functional response profile of occipital cortex and the posterior lateral fusiform gyrus. By contrast, connectional and functional fingerprints in the anterior medial and posterior lateral parts of the ventral visual cortex were statistically indistinguishable between blind and sighted individuals. These results provide a large-scale mapping of the influence of visual experience on the development of both functional and connectivity properties of visual cortex, which serves as a basis for the formulation of new hypotheses regarding the functionality and plasticity of specific subregions. Significance statement: How is the functionality and connectivity of the visual cortex shaped by visual experience? By directly comparing resting-state and task-based fMRI data in congenitally blind and sighted subjects, we obtained large-scale continuous maps of the degree to which connectional and functional "fingerprints" of ventral visual cortex depend on visual experience. In addition to revealing regions that are strongly dependent on visual experience (early visual cortex and posterior fusiform gyrus), our results showed regions in which connectional and functional patterns are highly similar in blind and sighted individuals (anterior medial and posterior lateral ventral occipital temporal cortex). These results serve as a basis for the formulation of new hypotheses regarding the functionality and plasticity of specific subregions of the visual cortex. PMID:26354920

  9. CX-516 Cortex pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Danysz, Wojciech

    2002-07-01

    CX-516 is one of a series of AMPA modulators under development by Cortex, in collaboration with Shire and Servier, for the potential treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD), schizophrenia and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) [234221]. By June 2001, CX-516 was in phase II trials for both schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) [412513]. A phase II trial in fragile X syndrome and autism was expected to start in May 2002 [449861]. In October 2001, Cortex was awarded a Phase II SBIR grant of $769,818 from the National Institutes of Mental Health to investigate the therapeutic potential of AMPAkines in schizophrenia. This award was to support a phase IIb study of CX-516 as a combination therapy in schizophrenia patients concomitantly treated with olanzapine. The trial was to enroll 80 patients and employ a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled design in which the placebo group was to receive olanzapine plus placebo and the active group was to receive olanzapine plus CX-516 [425982]. In April 2000, Shire and Cortex signed an option agreement in which Shire was to evaluate CX-516for the treatment of ADHD. Under the terms of the agreement, Shire would undertake a double-blind, placebo-controlled evaluation of CX-516 involving ADHD patients. If the study proved effective, Shire would have the right to convert its option into an exclusive worldwide license for the AMPAkines for ADHD under a development and licensing agreement. Should Shire elect to execute this agreement, Shire would bear all future developmental costs [363618]. By February 2002, Cortex and Servier had revealed their intention to begin enrolment for an international study of an AMPAkine compound as a potential treatment for MCI in the near future. Assuming enrollment proceeded as anticipated, results were expected during the second quarter of 2003 [439301]. By May 2002, phase II trials were underway [450134]. In March 2002, Cortex was awarded extended funding under the University of California BioSTAR projectfor the research project: 'Ampakine modulation of brain neurotrophin expression: a novel therapeutic strategy'. This funding was expected to amount to $193,000 over a two-year period [444872]. PMID:12186271

  10. The cortex is in overall control of ‘voluntary' eye movement

    PubMed Central

    Pouget, P

    2015-01-01

    The neural circuits that control eye movements are complex and distributed in brainstem, basal ganglia, cerebellum, and multiple areas of cortex. The anatomical function of the substrates implicated in eye movements has been studied for decades in numerous countries, laboratories, and clinics. The modest goal of this brief review is twofold. (1) To present a focused overview of the knowledge about the role of the cerebral cortex in voluntary control of eye movements. (2) To very briefly mention two findings showing that the accepted hierarchy between the frontal and the occipital sensory areas involved in sensory–motor transformation might not be so trivial to reconcile, and to interpret in the context of eye movement command. This presentation has been part of the 44th Cambridge Ophthalmological Symposium, on ocular motility, 3 September 2014 to 5 November 2014. PMID:25475239

  11. Direct control of visual perception with phase-specific modulation of posterior parietal cortex.

    PubMed

    Jaegle, Andrew; Ro, Tony

    2014-02-01

    We examined the causal relationship between the phase of alpha oscillations (9-12 Hz) and conscious visual perception using rhythmic TMS (rTMS) while simultaneously recording EEG activity. rTMS of posterior parietal cortex at an alpha frequency (10 Hz), but not occipital or sham rTMS, both entrained the phase of subsequent alpha oscillatory activity and produced a phase-dependent change on subsequent visual perception, with lower discrimination accuracy for targets presented at one phase of the alpha oscillatory waveform than for targets presented at the opposite phase. By extrinsically manipulating the phase of alpha before stimulus presentation, we provide direct evidence that the neural circuitry in the parietal cortex involved with generating alpha oscillations plays a causal role in determining whether or not a visual stimulus is successfully perceived. PMID:24116843

  12. Distinctive Menkes disease variant with occipital horns: Delineation of natural history and clinical phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Proud, V.K.; Mussell, H.G.; Percy, A.K.

    1996-10-02

    To delineate further the clinical spectrum of Menkes disease, an X-linked recessive disorder of copper transport, we studied 4 related males, ranging in age from 4-38 years, with a unique phenotype that combines manifestations of classical and mild Menkes disease and occipital horn syndrome (OHS). The propositus, an 18-year-old man, was evaluated following an intracerebral hemorrhage at age 15 years and was noted to have marked hypotonia, motor delay with mental retardation, bladder diverticula, failure to thrive, and diarrhea from infancy; seizures from age 3 years; and abnormal hair (pili torti) and face, cutis laxa, and multiple joint dislocations. Radiographic abnormalities included occipital exostoses, tortuous cerebral blood vessels with multiple branch occlusions, and hammer-shaped clavicles. Biochemical studies demonstrated reduced copper and ceruloplasmin levels in serum, and abnormal plasma catecholamine ratios. We reported previously the molecular defect in this family, a splice-site mutation that predicts formation of approximately 20% of the normal Menkes gene product. Here, we detail the clinical course and physical features and radiographic findings in these 4 individuals, and compare their phenotype with classical and mild Menkes and OHS. Unusual Menkes disease variants such as this may escape recognition due to anomalies that appear inconsistent with the diagnosis, particularly prolonged survival and later onset of seizures. Males with mental retardation and connective tissue abnormalities should be evaluated for biochemical evidence of defective copper transport. 28 refs., 8 figs.

  13. Occipital nerve stimulation for the treatment of intractable chronic migraine headache: ONSTIM feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Saper, Joel R; Dodick, David W; Silberstein, Stephen D; McCarville, Sally; Sun, Mark; Goadsby, Peter J

    2011-01-01

    Background: Medically intractable chronic migraine (CM) is a disabling illness characterized by headache ?15 days per month. Methods: A multicenter, randomized, blinded, controlled feasibility study was conducted to obtain preliminary safety and efficacy data on occipital nerve stimulation (ONS) in CM. Eligible subjects received an occipital nerve block, and responders were randomized to adjustable stimulation (AS), preset stimulation (PS) or medical management (MM) groups. Results: Seventy-five of 110 subjects were assigned to a treatment group; complete diary data were available for 66. A responder was defined as a subject who achieved a 50% or greater reduction in number of headache days per month or a three-point or greater reduction in average overall pain intensity compared with baseline. Three-month responder rates were 39% for AS, 6% for PS and 0% for MM. No unanticipated adverse device events occurred. Lead migration occurred in 12 of 51 (24%) subjects. Conclusion: The results of this feasibility study offer promise and should prompt further controlled studies of ONS in CM. PMID:20861241

  14. The Gravettian occipital bone from the site of Malladetes (Barx, Valencia, Spain).

    PubMed

    Arsuaga, Juan Luis; Villaverde, Valentín; Quam, Rolf; Gracia, Ana; Lorenzo, Carlos; Martínez, Ignacio; Carretero, José-Miguel

    2002-09-01

    The juvenile occipital bone from the site of Malladetes in Valencia (Spain) is described and compared with other European Pleistocene representatives of the genus Homo. This specimen derives from a Gravettian cultural context and has been AMS radiocarbon-dated to 25,120 +/- 240 years BP. As such, it provides evidence on early modern human anatomy from the Central Mediterranean region of the Iberian peninsula. The clear evidence for a late survival of Neandertals in southern Iberia, has led to considerable debate surrounding the biological and cultural interactions between these Pleistocene humans and their early modern human successors, and it is within this context that the Malladetes specimen represents an important contribution to the discussion. The recently discovered Upper Paleolithic infant from the site of Lagar Velho in Portugal is said to show a mosaic of Neandertal and early modern human characteristics throughout the skeleton and is argued to represent the strongest evidence yet recovered in favor of hybridization between these two Pleistocene populations. Our analysis of the Malladetes occipital, however, reveals no evidence of Neandertal genetic influence. PMID:12234549

  15. Imaging of Atlanto-Occipital and Atlantoaxial Traumatic Injuries: What the Radiologist Needs to Know.

    PubMed

    Riascos, Roy; Bonfante, Eliana; Cotes, Claudia; Guirguis, Mary; Hakimelahi, Reza; West, Clark

    2015-01-01

    Approximately one-third of all cervical spine injuries involve the craniocervical junction (CCJ). Composed of the occiput and the first two cervical vertebrae, this important anatomic landmark, in conjunction with an intricate ligamentous complex, is essential to maintaining the stability of the cervical spine. The atlantoaxial joint is the most mobile portion of the spine, predominantly relying on the ligamentous framework for stability at that level. As acute onsite management of trauma patients continues to improve, CCJ injuries, which often lead to death onsite where the injury occurred, are increasingly being encountered in the emergency department. Understanding the anatomy of the CCJ is crucial in properly evaluating the cervical spine, allowing the radiologist to assess its stability in the trauma setting. The imaging findings of important CCJ injuries, such as atlanto-occipital dissociation, occipital condyle fractures, atlas fractures with transverse ligament rupture, atlantoaxial distraction, and traumatic rotatory subluxation, are important to recognize in the acute setting, often dictating patient management. Thin-section multidetector computed tomography with sagittal and coronal reformats is the study of choice in evaluating the extent of injury, allowing the radiologist to thoroughly evaluate the stability of the cervical spine. Furthermore, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is increasingly being used to evaluate the spinal soft tissues and ligaments, and to identify associated spinal cord injury, if present. MR imaging is also indicated in patients whose neurologic status cannot be evaluated within 48 hours of injury. . PMID:26562241

  16. Increased Visual Stimulation Systematically Decreases Activity in Lateral Intermediate Cortex.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Shahin; Stemmann, Heiko; Vanduffel, Wim; Tootell, Roger B H

    2015-10-01

    Previous studies have attributed multiple diverse roles to the posterior superior temporal cortex (STC), both visually driven and cognitive, including part of the default mode network (DMN). Here, we demonstrate a unifying property across this multimodal region. Specifically, the lateral intermediate (LIM) portion of STC showed an unexpected feature: a progressively decreasing fMRI response to increases in visual stimulus size (or number). Such responses are reversed in sign, relative to well-known responses in classic occipital temporal visual cortex. In LIM, this "reversed" size function was present across multiple object categories and retinotopic eccentricities. Moreover, we found a significant interaction between the LIM size function and the distribution of subjects' attention. These findings suggest that LIM serves as a part of the DMN. Further analysis of functional connectivity, plus a meta-analysis of previous fMRI results, suggests that LIM is a heterogeneous area including different subdivisions. Surprisingly, analogous fMRI tests in macaque monkeys did not reveal a clear homolog of LIM. This interspecies discrepancy supports the idea that self-referential thinking and theory of mind are more prominent in humans, compared with monkeys. PMID:25480358

  17. Increased Visual Stimulation Systematically Decreases Activity in Lateral Intermediate Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Nasr, Shahin; Stemmann, Heiko; Vanduffel, Wim; Tootell, Roger B. H.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have attributed multiple diverse roles to the posterior superior temporal cortex (STC), both visually driven and cognitive, including part of the default mode network (DMN). Here, we demonstrate a unifying property across this multimodal region. Specifically, the lateral intermediate (LIM) portion of STC showed an unexpected feature: a progressively decreasing fMRI response to increases in visual stimulus size (or number). Such responses are reversed in sign, relative to well-known responses in classic occipital temporal visual cortex. In LIM, this “reversed” size function was present across multiple object categories and retinotopic eccentricities. Moreover, we found a significant interaction between the LIM size function and the distribution of subjects' attention. These findings suggest that LIM serves as a part of the DMN. Further analysis of functional connectivity, plus a meta-analysis of previous fMRI results, suggests that LIM is a heterogeneous area including different subdivisions. Surprisingly, analogous fMRI tests in macaque monkeys did not reveal a clear homolog of LIM. This interspecies discrepancy supports the idea that self-referential thinking and theory of mind are more prominent in humans, compared with monkeys. PMID:25480358

  18. The application of temporo-occipital fascial flap in the wound of medium scalp defect with bone exposure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian-Li; Huang, Wen-Gang; Liu, Xing-Long

    2015-01-01

    We are aimed to observe the effect of applying the combined temporo-occipital fascial flap in the medium scalp defect with bone exposure. Three cases of moderate scalp defect with bone exposure were admitted by The 89th Hospital of PLA and China-Japan Friendship Hospital from October 2009 to March 2014, and the wounds were repaired by application of the temporo-occipital fascial flap with medium-thickness skin grafting. And then these 3 patients were followed up after the operation, and the wound repair was observed. These 3 cases of fascial flaps all survived well with good appearance and covered the wound completely. Fibrosarcoma of one case had a relapse 3 months after operation, and the other two cases were followed up from 6 months to 3 years. Meanwhile, the appearance and function were satisfactory. The communicating branches between superficial temporal artery and occipital artery are rich. Therefore we designed and utilized the long temporo-occipital fascial flap containing the ipsilateral occipital superficial fascia to repair the scalp defect with bone exposure, and the curative effect is satisfactory. PMID:26550384

  19. A Functional Neuroimaging Study of Sound Localization: Visual Cortex Activity Predicts Performance in Early-Blind Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Gougoux, Frdric; Zatorre, Robert J; Lassonde, Maryse; Voss, Patrice

    2005-01-01

    Blind individuals often demonstrate enhanced nonvisual perceptual abilities. However, the neural substrate that underlies this improved performance remains to be fully understood. An earlier behavioral study demonstrated that some early-blind people localize sounds more accurately than sighted controls using monaural cues. In order to investigate the neural basis of these behavioral differences in humans, we carried out functional imaging studies using positron emission tomography and a speaker array that permitted pseudo-free-field presentations within the scanner. During binaural sound localization, a sighted control group showed decreased cerebral blood flow in the occipital lobe, which was not seen in early-blind individuals. During monaural sound localization (one ear plugged), the subgroup of early-blind subjects who were behaviorally superior at sound localization displayed two activation foci in the occipital cortex. This effect was not seen in blind persons who did not have superior monaural sound localization abilities, nor in sighted individuals. The degree of activation of one of these foci was strongly correlated with sound localization accuracy across the entire group of blind subjects. The results show that those blind persons who perform better than sighted persons recruit occipital areas to carry out auditory localization under monaural conditions. We therefore conclude that computations carried out in the occipital cortex specifically underlie the enhanced capacity to use monaural cues. Our findings shed light not only on intermodal compensatory mechanisms, but also on individual differences in these mechanisms and on inhibitory patterns that differ between sighted individuals and those deprived of vision early in life. PMID:15678166

  20. The multifunctional application of microfluidic lab-on-a-chip surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (LOC-SERS) within the field of bioanalytics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    März, Anne; Mönch, Bettina; Walter, Angela; Bocklitz, Thomas; Schumacher, Wilm; Rösch, Petra; Kiehntopf, Michael; Popp, Jürgen

    2011-07-01

    This contribution will present a variety of applications of lab-on-a-chip surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy in the field of bioanalytic. Beside the quantification and online monitoring of drugs and pharmaceuticals, determination of enzyme activity and discrimination of bacteria are successfully carried out utilizing LOC-SERS. The online-monitoring of drugs using SERS in a microfluidic device is demonstrated for nicotine. The enzyme activity of thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT) in lysed red blood cells is determined by SERS in a lab-on-a-chip device. To analyse the activity of TPMT the metabolism of 6-mercaptopurine to 6-methylmercaptopurine is investigated. The discrimination of bacteria on strain level is carried out with different E. coli strains. For the investigations, the bacteria are busted by ultra sonic to achieve a high information output. This sample preparation provides the possibility to detect SERS spectra containing information of the bacterial cell walls as well as of the cytoplasm. This contribution demonstrates the great potential of LOC-SERS in the field of bioanalytics.

  1. Interim Measures Report for the Headquarters Building Area Location of Concern (LOC) 2E East SWMU 104 John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sager, Eric D.

    2016-01-01

    The Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendment portion of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Permit issued by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP), requires identification and evaluation of all known Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) and Locations of Concern (LOCs) located on Kennedy Space Center (KSC) property. The KSC Headquarters Building Area (KHQA) has been identified as SWMU 104 under KSC's RCRA Program. This report summarizes the Interim Measure (IM) conducted by Geosyntec Consultants (Geosyntec) for NASA under Indefinite Delivery Indefinite Quantity Contract NNK12CA13B at the KHQA to mitigate potential exposure to polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-affected media at the eastern side of LOC 2E. The IM activities were conducted in June and July 2015 to remediate PCBs above the FDEP Residential Direct-Exposure (R-) Soil Cleanup Target Level (SCTL) of 0.5 milligram per kilogram (mg/kg) established by Chapter 62-777, Florida Administrative Code. The IM was performed in accordance with the IM Work Plan (IMWP) approved by the FDEP, dated August 2012. IM activities were conducted in accordance with the KSC Generic PCB Work Plan (NASA 2007).

  2. Associations of Haplotypes Upstream of IRS1 with Insulin Resistance, Type 2 Diabetes, Dyslipidemia, Preclinical Atherosclerosis, and Skeletal Muscle LOC646736 mRNA Levels

    PubMed Central

    Soyal, Selma M.; Felder, Thomas; Auer, Simon; Oberkofler, Hannes; Iglseder, Bernhard; Paulweber, Bernhard; Dossena, Silvia; Nofziger, Charity; Paulmichl, Markus; Esterbauer, Harald; Krempler, Franz; Patsch, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    The genomic region ~500?kb upstream of IRS1 has been implicated in insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, adverse lipid profile, and cardiovascular risk. To gain further insight into this chromosomal region, we typed four SNPs in a cross-sectional cohort and subjects with type 2 diabetes recruited from the same geographic region. From 16 possible haplotypes, 6 haplotypes with frequencies >0.01 were observed. We identified one haplotype that was protective against insulin resistance (determined by HOMA-IR and fasting plasma insulin levels), type 2 diabetes, an adverse lipid profile, increased C-reactive protein, and asymptomatic atherosclerotic disease (assessed by intima media thickness of the common carotid arteries). BMI and total adipose tissue mass as well as visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue mass did not differ between the reference and protective haplotypes. In 92 subjects, we observed an association of the protective haplotype with higher skeletal muscle mRNA levels of LOC646736, which is located in the same haplotype block as the informative SNPs and is mainly expressed in skeletal muscle, but only at very low levels in liver or adipose tissues. These data suggest a role for LOC646736 in human insulin resistance and warrant further studies on the functional effects of this locus. PMID:26090471

  3. The neural representation of Arabic digits in visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Lien; De Smedt, Bert; Op de Beeck, Hans P.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated how Arabic digits are represented in the visual cortex, and how their representation changes throughout the ventral visual processing stream, compared to the representation of letters. We probed these questions with two functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiments. In Experiment 1, we explored whether we could find brain regions that were more activated for digits than for number words in a subtraction task. One such region was detected in lateral occipital cortex. However, the activity in this region might have been confounded by string lengthnumber words contain more characters than digits. We therefore conducted a second experiment in which string length was systematically controlled. Experiment 2 revealed that the findings of the first experiment were task dependent (as it was only observed in a task in which numerosity was relevant) or stimulus dependent (as it was only observed when the number of characters of a stimulus was not controlled). We further explored the characteristics of the activation patterns for digit and letter strings across the ventral visual processing stream through multi-voxel pattern analyses. We found an alteration in representations throughout the ventral processing stream from clustering based on amount of visual information in primary visual cortex (V1) towards clustering based on symbolic stimulus category higher in the visual hierarchy. The present findings converge to the conclusion that in the ventral visual system, as far as can be detected with fMRI, the distinction between Arabic digits and letter strings is represented in terms of distributed patterns rather than separate regions. PMID:26441613

  4. Pulsed radiofrequency to the great occipital nerve for the treatment of intractable postherpetic itch: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Ding, De-Fang; Li, Rong-Chun; Xiong, Qiu-Ju; Zhou, Ling; Xiang, Hong-Bing

    2014-01-01

    A patient with intractable postherpetic itch lasting for 1 year was reported. The itch was mainly from the left vertex, frontal and ophthalmic regions and extended to the left neck area. The patient had negative response to the ophthalmic nerve block. Under the initial positive response to the great occipital nerve block, pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) was performed on the position of the great occipital nerve. After 4 months treatment, the itch was completely vanished. This case study demonstrates the effectiveness of PRF for intractable postherpetic itch originating in the head and neck. However, more samples needed to verify this management. PMID:25419389

  5. Giant Prolactinoma Presenting with Neck Pain and Structural Compromise of the Occipital Condyles

    PubMed Central

    Yecies, Derek; Ajlan, Abdulrazag; Ratliff, John; Ziskin, Jennifer; Hwang, Peter; Vogel, Hannes; Katznelson, Laurence; Harsh, Griffith

    2015-01-01

    Prolactinomas are the most common form of endocrinologically active pituitary adenoma; they account for ? 45% of pituitary adenomas encountered in clinical practice. Giant adenomas are those?>?4 cm in diameter. Less than 0.5% of pituitary adenomas encountered in neurosurgical practice are giant prolactinomas. Patients with giant prolactinomas typically present with highly elevated prolactin levels, endocrinologic disturbances, and neurologic symptoms from mass-induced pressure. Described here is an unusual case of a giant prolactinoma presenting with neck pain and structural compromise of the occipital condyles. Transnasal biopsy of the nasopharyngeal portion of the mass obtained tissue consistent with an atypical prolactinoma with p53 reactivity and a high Ki-67 index of 5%. Despite the size and invasiveness of the tumor, the patient had resolution of his clinical symptoms, dramatic reduction of his hyperprolactinemia, and near-complete disappearance of his tumor following medical treatment. PMID:26623246

  6. Haptic face identification activates ventral occipital and temporal areas: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Kilgour, Andrea R; Kitada, Ryo; Servos, Philip; James, Thomas W; Lederman, Susan J

    2005-12-01

    Many studies in visual face recognition have supported a special role for the right fusiform gyrus. Despite the fact that faces can also be recognized haptically, little is known about the neural correlates of haptic face recognition. In the current fMRI study, neurologically intact participants were intensively trained to identify specific facemasks (molded from live faces) and specific control objects. When these stimuli were presented in the scanner, facemasks activated left fusiform and right hippocampal/parahippocampal areas (and other regions) more than control objects, whereas the latter produced no activity greater than the facemasks. We conclude that these ventral occipital and temporal areas may play an important role in the haptic identification of faces at the subordinate level. We further speculate that left fusiform gyrus may be recruited more for facemasks than for control objects because of the increased need for sequential processing by the haptic system. PMID:16157435

  7. Chiari I malformation associated with atlanto-occipital assimilation presenting as orthopnea and cough syncope.

    PubMed

    Mangubat, Erwin Zeta; Wilson, Tom; Mitchell, Brian A; Byrne, Richard W

    2014-02-01

    Although it is not uncommon for patients with Chiari I malformations to present with respiratory complaints, cough syncope is a rare presenting symptom. We report an adult patient who had both a Chiari I malformation and atlanto-occipital assimilation, and complained of cough syncope, orthopnea, and central sleep apnea. The patient underwent decompressive craniectomy of the posterior fossa and a cervical level 2 laminectomy. However, due to an initial under-appreciation of the profound narrowing of the foramen magnum as a result of these concomitant pathologies, the patient had continued impaired cerebrospinal fluid flow, leading to a symptomatic pseudomeningocele and required a more extensive decompression that included a cervical level 3 laminectomy as well as a temporary lumbar drain. On 2 year follow-up, he remained asymptomatic. PMID:24080068

  8. Giant Prolactinoma Presenting with Neck Pain and Structural Compromise of the Occipital Condyles.

    PubMed

    Yecies, Derek; Ajlan, Abdulrazag; Ratliff, John; Ziskin, Jennifer; Hwang, Peter; Vogel, Hannes; Katznelson, Laurence; Harsh, Griffith

    2015-11-01

    Prolactinomas are the most common form of endocrinologically active pituitary adenoma; they account for ? 45% of pituitary adenomas encountered in clinical practice. Giant adenomas are those?>?4 cm in diameter. Less than 0.5% of pituitary adenomas encountered in neurosurgical practice are giant prolactinomas. Patients with giant prolactinomas typically present with highly elevated prolactin levels, endocrinologic disturbances, and neurologic symptoms from mass-induced pressure. Described here is an unusual case of a giant prolactinoma presenting with neck pain and structural compromise of the occipital condyles. Transnasal biopsy of the nasopharyngeal portion of the mass obtained tissue consistent with an atypical prolactinoma with p53 reactivity and a high Ki-67 index of 5%. Despite the size and invasiveness of the tumor, the patient had resolution of his clinical symptoms, dramatic reduction of his hyperprolactinemia, and near-complete disappearance of his tumor following medical treatment. PMID:26623246

  9. Computer-tomographic (CT) studies and anthropological measurements in patients with atlanto-occipital fusion.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S; Gupta, S; Kalla, A K; Khanna, S; Singh, I P; Vogel, F

    1991-12-01

    Computer tomographic (CT) studies and anthropological measurements were performed in individuals showing complete or partial atlanto-occipital fusion. In 13 patients and 13 matched controls all measurements excepting head length and head breadth gave smaller, and in some instances significantly smaller values in the patients. The two head measurements, on the other hand, turned out to be somewhat, though not significantly larger. This suggested a certain amount of hydrocephalus internus. Computer-tomographic (CT) studies in 11 patients and 9 controls gave some--not very clearcut--evidence in favor of this hypothesis. Moreover, some other mild anomalies such as prominent and dilated sulci and cisterns were observed in 9 of 11 patients and in 3 of 9 controls (P1 one tailed = 0.0399). PMID:1793258

  10. The Magnetoencephalography correlate of EEG POSTS (Positive Occipital Sharp Transients of Sleep)

    PubMed Central

    Kakisaka, Yosuke; Wang, Zhong I.; Enatsu, Rei; Dubarry, Anne-Sophie; Mosher, John C.; Alexopoulos, Andreas V.; Burgess, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In contrast to EEG, which has guidelines for interpretation and a plethora of textbooks, the full range of activity seen in Magnetoencephalography (MEG) has not been fleshed out. Currently, magnetoencephalographers apply criteria for EEG waveforms to MEG signals based on an assumption that MEG activity should have morphology that is similar to EEG. The purpose of this paper is to show the characteristic MEG profile of Positive Occipital Sharp Transients of Sleep (POSTS) Method Simultaneous MEG-EEG recordings of two cases are shown. Result In the both cases, the morphological features of POSTS in MEG vary, and sometimes mimic epileptic spikes. Conclusion This report raises a caution that a normal variant may have an even more epileptic appearance on MEG than on EEG. Employing the simultaneously recorded EEG to avoid misinterpretation of spikey-looking POSTS in MEG is a natural and prudent practice. PMID:23733086

  11. Greater occipital nerve injection in primary headache syndromes--prolonged effects from a single injection.

    PubMed

    Afridi, S K; Shields, K G; Bhola, R; Goadsby, P J

    2006-05-01

    Most patients with primary headache syndromes who have frequent attacks of pain have tenderness in the sub-occipital region. Injection of the greater occipital nerve (GON) with local anesthetic and corticosteroids has been widely used in clinical practice for many years, yet there is no clear understanding of its mechanisms of action. Moreover, there is no current gold-standard of practice regarding GON injections in the management of headache. We audited of our practice to generate hypotheses about the range of primary headaches that might benefit, to determine response rates to power future studies, and to assess whether we should continue to do this procedure. Twenty-six of fifty-seven injections in 54 migraineurs yielded a complete or partial response that lasted for the partial response a median of 30 days. For cluster headache 13 of 22 injections yielded a complete or partial response lasting for a median of 21 days for the partial response. Tenderness over the GON was strongly predictive of outcome, although local anesthesia after the injection was not. The presence or absence of medication overuse did not predict outcome. Apart from two patients with a small patch of alopecia the injection was well tolerated. GON injection is a useful tool in some patients that provides interim relief while other approaches are explored. It is remarkable that in all conditions in which an effect is observed the response time so much exceeds the local anesthetic effect that the mechanism of action may well be through changes in brain nociceptive pathways. PMID:16527404

  12. Representational Similarity of Body Parts in Human Occipitotemporal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Bracci, Stefania; Caramazza, Alfonso; Peelen, Marius V

    2015-09-23

    Regions in human lateral and ventral occipitotemporal cortices (OTC) respond selectively to pictures of the human body and its parts. What are the organizational principles underlying body part responses in these regions? Here we used representational similarity analysis (RSA) of fMRI data to test multiple possible organizational principles: shape similarity, physical proximity, cortical homunculus proximity, and semantic similarity. Participants viewed pictures of whole persons, chairs, and eight body parts (hands, arms, legs, feet, chests, waists, upper faces, and lower faces). The similarity of multivoxel activity patterns for all body part pairs was established in whole person-selective OTC regions. The resulting neural similarity matrices were then compared with similarity matrices capturing the hypothesized organizational principles. Results showed that the semantic similarity model best captured the neural similarity of body parts in lateral and ventral OTC, which followed an organization in three clusters: (1) body parts used as action effectors (hands, feet, arms, and legs), (2) noneffector body parts (chests and waists), and (3) face parts (upper and lower faces). Whole-brain RSA revealed, in addition to OTC, regions in parietal and frontal cortex in which neural similarity was related to semantic similarity. In contrast, neural similarity in occipital cortex was best predicted by shape similarity models. We suggest that the semantic organization of body parts in high-level visual cortex relates to the different functions associated with the three body part clusters, reflecting the unique processing and connectivity demands associated with the different types of information (e.g., action, social) different body parts (e.g., limbs, faces) convey. Significance statement: While the organization of body part representations in motor and somatosensory cortices has been well characterized, the principles underlying body part representations in visual cortex have not yet been explored. In the present fMRI study we used multivoxel pattern analysis and representational similarity analysis to characterize the organization of body maps in human occipitotemporal cortex (OTC). Results indicate that visual and shape dimensions do not fully account for the organization of body part representations in OTC. Instead, the representational structure of body maps in OTC appears strongly related to functional-semantic properties of body parts. We suggest that this organization reflects the unique processing and connectivity demands associated with the different types of information different body parts convey. PMID:26400929

  13. Reduced Resting-State Functional Connectivity of the Somatosensory Cortex Predicts Psychopathological Symptoms in Women with Bulimia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Lavagnino, Luca; Amianto, Federico; DAgata, Federico; Huang, Zirui; Mortara, Paolo; Abbate-Daga, Giovanni; Marzola, Enrica; Spalatro, Angela; Fassino, Secondo; Northoff, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Background: Alterations in the resting-state functional connectivity (rs-FC) of several brain networks have been demonstrated in eating disorders. However, very few studies are currently available on brain network dysfunctions in bulimia nervosa (BN). The somatosensory network is central in processing body-related stimuli and it may be altered in BN. The present study therefore aimed to investigate rs-FC in the somatosensory network in bulimic women. Methods: Sixteen medication-free women with BN (age?=?23??5?years) and 18 matched controls (age?=?23??3?years) underwent a functional magnetic resonance resting-state scan and assessment of eating disorder symptoms. Within-network and seed-based functional connectivity analyses were conducted to assess rs-FC within the somatosensory network and to other areas of the brain. Results: Bulimia nervosa patients showed a decreased rs-FC both within the somatosensory network (t?=?9.0, df?=?1, P?=?0.005) and with posterior cingulate cortex and two visual areas (the right middle occipital gyrus and the right cuneus) (P?=?0.05 corrected for multiple comparison). The rs-FC of the left paracentral lobule with the right middle occipital gyrus correlated with psychopathology measures like bulimia (r?=??0.4; P?=?0.02) and interoceptive awareness (r?=??0.4; P?=?0.01). Analyses were conducted using age, BMI (body mass index), and depressive symptoms as covariates. Conclusion: Our findings show a specific alteration of the rs-FC of the somatosensory cortex in BN patients, which correlates with eating disorder symptoms. The region in the right middle occipital gyrus is implicated in body processing and is known as extrastriate body area (EBA). The connectivity between the somatosensory cortex and the EBA might be related to dysfunctions in body image processing. The results should be considered preliminary due to the small sample size. PMID:25136302

  14. Word Recognition in Auditory Cortex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeWitt, Iain D. J.

    2013-01-01

    Although spoken word recognition is more fundamental to human communication than text recognition, knowledge of word-processing in auditory cortex is comparatively impoverished. This dissertation synthesizes current models of auditory cortex, models of cortical pattern recognition, models of single-word reading, results in phonetics and results in…

  15. Word Recognition in Auditory Cortex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeWitt, Iain D. J.

    2013-01-01

    Although spoken word recognition is more fundamental to human communication than text recognition, knowledge of word-processing in auditory cortex is comparatively impoverished. This dissertation synthesizes current models of auditory cortex, models of cortical pattern recognition, models of single-word reading, results in phonetics and results in

  16. Activity of the human visual cortex measured non-invasively by diffusing-wave spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaillon, Franck; Li, Jun; Dietsche, Gregor; Elbert, Thomas; Gisler, Thomas

    2007-05-01

    Activity of the human visual cortex, elicited by steady-state flickering at 8Hz, is non-invasively probed by multi-speckle diffusingwave spectroscopy (DWS). Parallel detection of the intensity fluctuations of statistically equivalent, but independent speckles allows to resolve stimulation-induced changes in the field autocorrelation of multiply scattered light of less than 2%. In a group of 9 healthy subjects we find a faster decay of the field autocorrelation function during the stimulation periods for data measured with a long-distance probe (30mm source-receiver distance) at 2 positions over the occipital cortex (t-test: t(8) = -2.672, p = 0.028 < 0.05 for position 1, t(8) = -2.874, p = 0.021 < 0.05 for position 2). In contrast, no statistically significant change is seen when a short-distance probe (16mm source-receiver distance) is used (t-test: t(8) = -2.043, p = 0.075 > 0.05 for position 1, t(8) = -2.146, p = 0.064 > 0.05 for position 2). The enhanced dynamics observed with DWS is positively correlated with the functional increase of blood volume in the visual cortex, while the heartbeat rate is not affected by stimulation. Our results indicate that the DWS signal from the visual cortex is governed by the regional cerebral blood flow velocity.

  17. Phosphene Perception Relates to Visual Cortex Glutamate Levels and Covaries with Atypical Visuospatial Awareness.

    PubMed

    Terhune, Devin B; Murray, Elizabeth; Near, Jamie; Stagg, Charlotte J; Cowey, Alan; Cohen Kadosh, Roi

    2015-11-01

    Phosphenes are illusory visual percepts produced by the application of transcranial magnetic stimulation to occipital cortex. Phosphene thresholds, the minimum stimulation intensity required to reliably produce phosphenes, are widely used as an index of cortical excitability. However, the neural basis of phosphene thresholds and their relationship to individual differences in visual cognition are poorly understood. Here, we investigated the neurochemical basis of phosphene perception by measuring basal GABA and glutamate levels in primary visual cortex using magnetic resonance spectroscopy. We further examined whether phosphene thresholds would relate to the visuospatial phenomenology of grapheme-color synesthesia, a condition characterized by atypical binding and involuntary color photisms. Phosphene thresholds negatively correlated with glutamate concentrations in visual cortex, with lower thresholds associated with elevated glutamate. This relationship was robust, present in both controls and synesthetes, and exhibited neurochemical, topographic, and threshold specificity. Projector synesthetes, who experience color photisms as spatially colocalized with inducing graphemes, displayed lower phosphene thresholds than associator synesthetes, who experience photisms as internal images, with both exhibiting lower thresholds than controls. These results suggest that phosphene perception is driven by interindividual variation in glutamatergic activity in primary visual cortex and relates to cortical processes underlying individual differences in visuospatial awareness. PMID:25725043

  18. The cerebral cortex of the pygmy hippopotamus, Hexaprotodon liberiensis (Cetartiodactyla, Hippopotamidae): MRI, cytoarchitecture, and neuronal morphology.

    PubMed

    Butti, Camilla; Ewan Fordyce, R; Ann Raghanti, Mary; Gu, Xiaosi; Bonar, Christopher J; Wicinski, Bridget A; Wong, Edmund W; Roman, Jessica; Brake, Alanna; Eaves, Emily; Spocter, Muhammad A; Tang, Cheuk Y; Jacobs, Bob; Sherwood, Chet C; Hof, Patrick R

    2014-04-01

    The structure of the hippopotamus brain is virtually unknown because few studies have examined more than its external morphology. In view of their semiaquatic lifestyle and phylogenetic relatedness to cetaceans, the brain of hippopotamuses represents a unique opportunity for better understanding the selective pressures that have shaped the organization of the brain during the evolutionary process of adaptation to an aquatic environment. Here we examined the histology of the cerebral cortex of the pygmy hippopotamus (Hexaprotodon liberiensis) by means of Nissl, Golgi, and calretinin (CR) immunostaining, and provide a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) structural and volumetric dataset of the anatomy of its brain. We calculated the corpus callosum area/brain mass ratio (CCA/BM), the gyrencephalic index (GI), the cerebellar quotient (CQ), and the cerebellar index (CI). Results indicate that the cortex of H. liberiensis shares one feature exclusively with cetaceans (the lack of layer IV across the entire cerebral cortex), other features exclusively with artiodactyls (e.g., the morphologiy of CR-immunoreactive multipolar neurons in deep cortical layers, gyrencephalic index values, hippocampus and cerebellum volumetrics), and others with at least some species of cetartiodactyls (e.g., the presence of a thick layer I, the pattern of distribution of CR-immunoreactive neurons, the presence of von Economo neurons, clustering of layer II in the occipital cortex). The present study thus provides a comprehensive dataset of the neuroanatomy of H. liberiensis that sets the ground for future comparative studies including the larger Hippopotamus amphibius. PMID:24474726

  19. Functional Connectivity Between Superior Parietal Lobule and Primary Visual Cortex "at Rest" Predicts Visual Search Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Bueichek, Elisenda; Ventura-Campos, Noelia; Palomar-Garca, Mara-ngeles; Mir-Padilla, Anna; Parcet, Mara-Antonia; vila, Csar

    2015-10-01

    Spatiotemporal activity that emerges spontaneously "at rest" has been proposed to reflect individual a priori biases in cognitive processing. This research focused on testing neurocognitive models of visual attention by studying the functional connectivity (FC) of the superior parietal lobule (SPL), given its central role in establishing priority maps during visual search tasks. Twenty-three human participants completed a functional magnetic resonance imaging session that featured a resting-state scan, followed by a visual search task based on the alphanumeric category effect. As expected, the behavioral results showed longer reaction times and more errors for the within-category (i.e., searching a target letter among letters) than the between-category search (i.e., searching a target letter among numbers). The within-category condition was related to greater activation of the superior and inferior parietal lobules, occipital cortex, inferior frontal cortex, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, and the superior colliculus than the between-category search. The resting-state FC analysis of the SPL revealed a broad network that included connections with the inferotemporal cortex, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and dorsal frontal areas like the supplementary motor area and frontal eye field. Noteworthy, the regression analysis revealed that the more efficient participants in the visual search showed stronger FC between the SPL and areas of primary visual cortex (V1) related to the search task. We shed some light on how the SPL establishes a priority map of the environment during visual attention tasks and how FC is a valuable tool for assessing individual differences while performing cognitive tasks. PMID:26230367

  20. Clinical and Anatomical Features as well as Pathological Conditions of Surgically Treated Adult Patients with Occipitalization of the Atlas

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Takachika; Fueki, Keisuke; Ino, Masatake; Toda, Naofumi; Tanouchi, Tetsu; Manabe, Nodoka

    2016-01-01

    Background This paper intends to clarify clinical and anatomical features as well as pathological conditions of surgically treated adult patients with occipitalization of the atlas. Methods The authors reviewed 12 consecutive adult patients with occipitalization of the atlas who underwent surgery for myleopathy in our hospital. Mainly using preoperative computed tomography and three-dimensional computed tomography angiography, we investigated their anomalies of the osseous structures and vertebral artery at the cervical spine including the craniovertebral junction (CVJ). We also developed a new classification system for occipitalization of the atlas. Results Atlantoaxial subluxation (AAS) was detected in 9 patients (75%). The condition of AAS was irreducible in 7 patients. Among these 7 patients, deformity at the lateral atlantoaxial joints was detected in 2 patients. C2-3 fusion was detected in 6 patients (67%) among 9 patients with AAS. Anomalies of the VA were detected in 11 patients (92%). Occipitalization of the atlas was classified into three types according to their pathological conditions. In type 1 (2 patients) the medial atlantoaxial joint is semi-dislocated and the lateral atlantoaxial joints are severely deformed. Type 2 (7 patients) exhibits AAS but the lateral atlantoaxial joints are not deformed. Type 3 (3 patients) is not associated with AAS and therefore does not exhibit osseous stenosis at the CVJ. In type 3 the myelopathy was caused by another coexisting condition. Conclusions Occipitalization of the atlas is classified into three types. The main pathological condition in both types 1 and 2 is AAS. Reduction of AAS is essential in both; however, reduction of AAS in type 1 is more technically demanding than in type 2. The pathological conditions of type 3 are completely different from those of the others, so an accurate diagnosis must be made. The new classification system is a useful guide for surgeons when planning surgical strategies. PMID:26913225

  1. Retrosplenial cortex connectivity in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Bluhm, Robyn L; Miller, Jodi; Lanius, Ruth A; Osuch, Elizabeth A; Boksman, Kristine; Neufeld, Richard W J; Théberge, Jean; Schaefer, Betsy; Williamson, Peter C

    2009-10-30

    In this paper, we build on our previous analysis [Bluhm, R.L., Miller, J., Lanius, R.A., Osuch, E.A., Boksman, K., Neufeld, R.W.J., et al., 2007 Spontaneous low-frequency fluctuations in the BOLD signal in schizophrenic patients: anomalies in the default network. Schizophrenia Bulletin 33, 1004-1012] of resting state connectivity in schizophrenia by examining alterations in connectivity of the retrosplenial cortex. We have previously demonstrated altered connectivity of the posterior cingulate/precuneus, particularly with other regions of the "default network" (which includes the medial prefrontal cortex and bilateral lateral parietal cortex). It was hypothesized that the retrosplenial cortex would show aberrant patterns of connectivity with regions of the default network and regions associated with memory. Patients with schizophrenia (N=17) and healthy controls (N=17) underwent a 5.5-min resting functional magnetic resonance imaging scan. Lower correlations were observed in patients with schizophrenia than in healthy controls between the retrosplenial cortex and both the temporal lobe and regions of the default network. In patients with schizophrenia, activity in the retrosplenial cortex correlated negatively with activity in bilateral anterior cingulate gyrus/medial prefrontal cortex (BA 32/10), despite the fact that these regions, as part of the default network, were expected to show positive correlations in activity. Connectivity of the retrosplenial cortex was greater in patients with more positive symptoms with areas previously associated with hallucinations, particularly the left superior temporal gyrus. These results suggest that spontaneous activity in the retrosplenial cortex during rest is altered in patients with schizophrenia. These alterations may help to explain alterations in self-oriented processing in this patient population. PMID:19783410

  2. OCCIPITAL SOURCES OF RESTING STATE ALPHA RHYTHMS ARE RELATED TO LOCAL GRAY MATTER DENSITY IN SUBJECTS WITH AMNESIC MILD COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT AND ALZHEIMERS DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Claudio, Babiloni; Claudio, Del Percio; Marina, Boccardi; Roberta, Lizio; Susanna, Lopez; Filippo, Carducci; Nicola, Marzano; Andrea, Soricelli; Raffaele, Ferri; Ivano, Triggiani Antonio; Annapaola, Prestia; Serenella, Salinari; Rasser Paul, E; Erol, Basar; Francesco, Fam; Flavio, Nobili; Grsev, Yener; Durusu, Emek-Sava? Derya; Gesualdo, Loreto; Ciro, Mundi; Thompson Paul, M; Rossini Paolo, M.; Frisoni Giovanni, B

    2014-01-01

    Occipital sources of resting state electroencephalographic (EEG) alpha rhythms are abnormal, at the group level, in patients with amnesic mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimers disease (AD). Here we evaluated the hypothesis that amplitude of these occipital sources is related to neurodegeneration in occipital lobe as measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Resting-state eyes-closed EEG rhythms were recorded in 45 healthy elderly (Nold), 100 MCI, and 90 AD subjects. Neurodegeneration of occipital lobe was indexed by weighted averages of gray matter density (GMD), estimated from structural MRIs. EEG rhythms of interest were alpha 1 (810.5 Hz) and alpha 2 (10.513 Hz). EEG cortical sources were estimated by low resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (LORETA). Results showed a positive correlation between occipital GMD and amplitude of occipital alpha 1 sources in Nold, MCI and AD subjects as a whole group (r=0.3, p=0.000004, N=235). Furthermore, there was a positive correlation between amplitude of occipital alpha 1 sources and cognitive status as revealed by Mini Mental State Evaluation (MMSE) score across all subjects (r=0.38, p=0.000001, N=235). Finally, amplitude of occipital alpha 1 sources allowed a moderate classification of individual Nold and AD subjects (sensitivity: 87.8%; specificity: 66.7%; area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve: 0.81). These results suggest that the amplitude of occipital sources of resting state alpha rhythms is related to AD neurodegeneration in occipital lobe along pathological aging. PMID:25442118

  3. Occipital sources of resting-state alpha rhythms are related to local gray matter density in subjects with amnesic mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Babiloni, Claudio; Del Percio, Claudio; Boccardi, Marina; Lizio, Roberta; Lopez, Susanna; Carducci, Filippo; Marzano, Nicola; Soricelli, Andrea; Ferri, Raffaele; Triggiani, Antonio Ivano; Prestia, Annapaola; Salinari, Serenella; Rasser, Paul E; Basar, Erol; Fam, Francesco; Nobili, Flavio; Yener, Grsev; Emek-Sava?, Derya Durusu; Gesualdo, Loreto; Mundi, Ciro; Thompson, Paul M; Rossini, Paolo M; Frisoni, Giovanni B

    2015-02-01

    Occipital sources of resting-state electroencephalographic (EEG) alpha rhythms are abnormal, at the group level, in patients with amnesic mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here, we evaluated the hypothesis that amplitude of these occipital sources is related to neurodegeneration in occipital lobe as measured by magnetic resonance imaging. Resting-state eyes-closed EEG rhythms were recorded in 45 healthy elderly (Nold), 100 MCI, and 90 AD subjects. Neurodegeneration of occipital lobe was indexed by weighted averages of gray matter density, estimated from structural MRIs. EEG rhythms of interest were alpha 1 (8-10.5 Hz) and alpha 2 (10.5-13 Hz). EEG cortical sources were estimated by low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography. Results showed a positive correlation between occipital gray matter density and amplitude of occipital alpha 1 sources in Nold, MCI, and AD subjects as a whole group (r = 0.3, p = 0.000004, N = 235). Furthermore, there was a positive correlation between the amplitude of occipital alpha 1 sources and cognitive status as revealed by Mini Mental State Examination score across all subjects (r = 0.38, p = 0.000001, N = 235). Finally, amplitude of occipital alpha 1 sources allowed a moderate classification of individual Nold and AD subjects (sensitivity: 87.8%; specificity: 66.7%; area under the receiver operating characteristic curve: 0.81). These results suggest that the amplitude of occipital sources of resting-state alpha rhythms is related to AD neurodegeneration in occipital lobe along pathologic aging. PMID:25442118

  4. The mendosal suture of the occipital bone: occurrence in Indian population, embryology and clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Soubhagya R; Krishnamurthy, Ashwin; Madhan Kumar, S J; Prabhu, Latha V; Jiji, P J; Pai, Mangala M; Kumar, Arunachalam; Avadhani, Ramakrishna

    2007-06-01

    The occipital bone is ontogenetically and functionally unique when compared to the other bones of the skull in humans and other mammalian cousins. The occipital bone develops from six ossification centers; any defect in the ossification process will give rise to mendosal suture (accessory suture) and conditions like posterior plagiocephaly. There is a paucity of literature regarding the mendosal suture and further more, its report in Indian population is not known. The present study was conducted to find out the occurrence of mendosal suture in the Indian dry skulls. Fifteen specimens (3%) were found to have these sutures out of five hundred (500) skulls examined. Nine (3.1%) samples are of male skulls out of two hundred ninety (290) and six (2.85%) samples are that of female skulls out of two hundred ten (210). The mendosal suture ran close to the superior nuchal line in all specimens and traveled medially from the lambdoidal suture. The length of the sutures ranged from 0.8 cm to 2.6 cm (1.88 cm) on the right side and 1.4 cm to 2.9 cm (1.94 cm) on the left side respectively in male skulls; and 0.7 cm to 2.8 cm (1.55 cm) on the right side and 1 cm to 2.4 cm (1.42 cm) on the left side, respectively, in female skulls. The origin of mendosal suture from the lambdoidal suture was 5.7 cm to -6.3 cm (5.98 cm) from the tip of the mastoid process on the right side and 5.6 to -6.3 cm (6 cm) on the left side, respectively, in male skulls; and 5.4 cm to -5.8 cm (5.58 cm) on the right side and 5.4 cm to -5.6 cm on the left side respectively in female skulls. The occurrence and clinical significance of the present study is discussed. PMID:17502983

  5. Tonic inhibition and ponto-geniculo-occipital-related activities shape abducens motoneuron discharge during REM sleep

    PubMed Central

    Escudero, Miguel; Mrquez-Ruiz, Javier

    2008-01-01

    Eye movements, ponto-geniculo-occipital (PGO) waves, muscular atonia and desynchronized cortical activity are the main characteristics of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Although eye movements designate this phase, little is known about the activity of the oculomotor system during REM sleep. In this work, we recorded binocular eye movements by the scleral search-coil technique and the activity of identified abducens (ABD) motoneurons along the sleepwake cycle in behaving cats. The activity of ABD motoneurons during REM sleep was characterized by a tonic decrease of their mean firing rate throughout this period, and short bursts and pauses coinciding with the occurrence of PGO waves. We demonstrate that the decrease in the mean firing discharge was due to an active inhibition of ABD motoneurons, and that the occurrence of primary and secondary PGO waves induced a pattern of simultaneous but opposed phasic activation and inhibition on each ABD nucleus. With regard to eye movements, during REM sleep ABD motoneurons failed to codify eye position as during alertness, but continued to codify eye velocity. The pattern of tonic inhibition and the phasic activations and inhibitions shown by ABD motoneurons coincide with those reported in other non-oculomotor motoneurons, indicating that the oculomotor system contrary to what has been accepted until now is not different from other motor systems during REM sleep, and that all motor systems are receiving similar command signals during this period. PMID:18499728

  6. Ultrasound-guided atlanto-occipital puncture for cerebrospinal fluid analysis on the standing horse.

    PubMed

    Depecker, M; Bizon-Mercier, C; Courouc-Malblanc, A

    2014-01-11

    The atlanto-occipital site (AO) is convenient for retrieving an adequate volume and quality of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the diagnosis of neurological disease in horses. However, general anaesthesia is not always possible for horses displaying severe neurological signs, or for economical reasons. The objectives of the present work were to determine the feasibility and safety of ultrasound-guided CSF puncture at the AO site on the standing horse. Seven horses (six healthy and one mildly ataxic) were sedated with acepromazine (0.02 mg/kg bodyweight intravenously or 0.04 mg/kg bodyweight intramuscularly) and detomidine (0.01 mg/kg bodyweight intravenously), and placed in stocks or in a recovery stall with the head kept on a headstand. Puncture was performed by ultrasonographic guidance with a parasagittal technique, as previously described, using a 20 g, 3.5 inch spinal needle. In all horses, no adverse reaction was observed when crossing the dura mater and 20 ml of CSF was rapidly retrieved without any blood contamination. Ultrasound-guided CSF puncture can be performed easily at the AO site on a healthy standing horse. Regarding the potential risk of this procedure, safety measures and close observation are essential. Further studies on a larger amount of ataxic horses are also required before considering this technique as an alternative option for CSF puncture. PMID:24225443

  7. Successful Treatment of Occipital Neuralgia with Implantable Peripheral Nerve Stimulation in a Pacemaker-Dependent Patient

    PubMed Central

    Chaiban, Gassan; Tolba, Reda; Eissa, Hazem; Lirette, Lesley Smallwood; Almualim, Mohammed; Malaty, Adham; Atallah, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Background Peripheral nerve stimulation has been used to treat patients with occipital nerverelated chronic headaches who have been unsuccessful with less invasive therapeutic approaches. Patients with pacemaker-dependent cardiac conduction abnormalities require unique consideration prior to the implantation of peripheral nerve stimulators because the placement of the devices may lead to failure of the systems secondary to electromagnetic interference or crosstalk between the devices. Case Report An 86-year-old female who suffered from chronic right-sided cervicogenic headaches and neck pain had received only temporary relief from previous treatments. Additional comorbidities included longstanding pacemaker-dependent atrioventricular node conduction disease. Because the extent to which nerve stimulators electrically interact with pacemakers is unclear, we tunneled the leads to the lumbar region of the back and placed the generator on the contralateral side to the pacemaker to minimize the chance that the 2 devices would interfere. The patient has remained pain free for 1 year since implantation. Conclusion Although no current published trials evaluate the degree of interference between medical devices, case reports increasingly suggest that simultaneous implantation of a spinal cord stimulator and pacemaker is safe as long as precautions are taken and the devices are checked periodically, particularly when the devices are adjusted. PMID:24688344

  8. The unilateral occipital transtentorial approach for pineal region meningiomas: a report of 15 cases.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Bo; Wang, Yong; Ou, Shaowu; Guo, Zongze; Wang, Yunjie

    2014-10-01

    In the current study, we reviewed and re-evaluated the experiences of microsurgical management for pineal region meningiomas via the unilateral occipital transtentorial approach (Poppen's approach). Clinical data were obtained on 15 meningiomas of the pineal region, which underwent microsurgery via unilateral Poppen's approach from March 2009 to June 2012. These patients were hospitalized in our department; their data were collected and analyzed retrospectively. The tumors were removed via the right Poppen's approach in 12 cases and left Poppen's approach in 3 cases, and intraoperative external ventricular drainage was performed for hydrocephalus in 3 cases. As a result, gross total resection was achieved in 11 cases, near total resection in 3 cases and subtotal resection in 1 case. All resected tumors were pathologically confirmed. The postoperative complications included two cases of homonymous hemianopia, and deteriorated Parinaud syndrome and diplopia in one case. Ten cases were followed up (range 1-4 years) and no death occurred. On the basis of the existing literature and our experiences, the unilateral Poppen's approach is appropriate for most meningiomas of the pineal region that are small or intermediate in size. However, gross total resection might be difficult via the unilateral Poppen's approach for large-sized meningiomas with much contralateral infratentorial extension due to limited exposure. For these cases, combined supra-infratentorial or bilateral Poppen's approaches are recommended. Preoperative or intraoperative external ventricular drainage can increase tumor exposure and improve microsurgical effects. PMID:24397496

  9. [A case of occipital diploic dermoid tumor with perforation of the dura].

    PubMed

    Isobe, Naoyuki; Takano, Motoki; Chikuie, Hidekazu; Nosaka, Ryo; Eguchi, Kuniki; Kuniyasu, Hiroki

    2013-04-01

    Along with epidermoid cysts, dermoid cysts are uncommon, benign and slow-growing lesions. We described a case of diploic dermoid cyst of the occipital bone with an intracranial extension in the right posterior fossa diagnosed and subjected to pathological examination. A 63-year-old man presented with dizziness at the time of posture conversion. Magnetic resonance imaging(MRI)showed a heterogenous hypo-intensity area on T1-weighted image, hyper-intensity on T2-weighted image and remarkably-strong intensity on diffusion-weighted image. Gadolinium enhancement was partially seen in the tumor capsule. Bone density computed tomography (CT) and 3-dimensional CT using helical CT scan revealed the osteolytic range with destruction of the inner and outer table. From these findings, this tumor was diagnosed as diploic epidermoid cyst before surgery. The tumor was totally removed and underwent cranioplasty with a titanium plate. However, pathological examination confirmed dermoid cyst with existence of sebaceous gland in some cyst-walls. It was difficult to diagnose this case as dermoid tumor from radiological features before surgery. PMID:23542796

  10. First-drug treatment failures in 42 Turkish children with idiopathic childhood occipital epilepsies

    PubMed Central

    Incecik, Faruk; Herguner, Ozlem M.; Altunbasak, Sakir

    2015-01-01

    Background: The early and late benign occipital epilepsies of childhood (BOEC) are described as two discrete electro-clinical syndromes, eponymously known as Panayiotopoulos and Gastaut syndromes. The purpose of this study was to identify predictors of failure to respond to the initial antiepileptic drug (AED). Materials and Methods: A total of 42 children with BOEC were enrolled. Predictive factors were analyzed by survival methods. Results: Among the 42, 25 patients (59.5%) were boys and 17 (40.5%) were girls and the mean age at the seizure onset was 7.46 2.65 years (414 years). Of the 42 patients, 34 (81.0%) were treated relatively successfully with the first AED treatment, and 8 (19.0%) were not responded initial AED treatment. There was no correlation between response to initial AED treatment and sex, consanguinity, epilepsy history of family, age of seizure onset, frequency of seizures, history of status epilepticus, duration of starting first treatment, findings on electroencephalogram. However, history of febrile seizure and type of BOEC were significantly associated with failure risk. Conclusions: Factors predicting failure to respond to the AED were history of febrile seizure and type of BOEC in children with BOEC. PMID:26167008

  11. Experienced Mindfulness Meditators Exhibit Higher Parietal-Occipital EEG Gamma Activity during NREM Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Ferrarelli, Fabio; Smith, Richard; Dentico, Daniela; Riedner, Brady A.; Zennig, Corinna; Benca, Ruth M.; Lutz, Antoine; Davidson, Richard J.; Tononi, Giulio

    2013-01-01

    Over the past several years meditation practice has gained increasing attention as a non-pharmacological intervention to provide health related benefits, from promoting general wellness to alleviating the symptoms of a variety of medical conditions. However, the effects of meditation training on brain activity still need to be fully characterized. Sleep provides a unique approach to explore the meditation-related plastic changes in brain function. In this study we performed sleep high-density electroencephalographic (hdEEG) recordings in long-term meditators (LTM) of Buddhist meditation practices (approximately 8700 mean hours of life practice) and meditation naive individuals. We found that LTM had increased parietal-occipital EEG gamma power during NREM sleep. This increase was specific for the gamma range (25–40 Hz), was not related to the level of spontaneous arousal during NREM and was positively correlated with the length of lifetime daily meditation practice. Altogether, these findings indicate that meditation practice produces measurable changes in spontaneous brain activity, and suggest that EEG gamma activity during sleep represents a sensitive measure of the long-lasting, plastic effects of meditative training on brain function. PMID:24015304

  12. Frontal and occipital-parietal alpha oscillations distinguish between stimulus conflict and response conflict

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Dandan; Hu, Li; Lei, Yi; Li, Hong; Chen, Antao

    2015-01-01

    Conflicts between target and distraction can occur at the level of both stimulus and response processing. However, the neural oscillations underlying occurrence of the interference in different levels have not been understood well. Here, we reveal such a neural oscillation modulation by combining a 4:2 mapping design (two targets are mapped into one response key) with a practice paradigm (pretest, practice, and posttest) when healthy human participants were performing a novel color-word flanker task. Response time (RT) results revealed constant stimulus conflict (SC, stimulus incongruent minus congruent, SI-CO) but increased response conflict (RC, response incongruent minus stimulus incongruent, RI-SI) with practice. Event-related potential (ERP) results demonstrated stable P3 amplitude differences for the SI-CO in the centro-parietal region across practice, which may reflect maintenance of the stimulus processing; and significantly larger P3 amplitudes in the same region for the RI relative to SI trial type in posttest, which may reflect inhibition of the distraction response. Further, neural oscillatory results showed that with practice, the lower alpha band in the frontal region and the upper alpha band in the occipital-parietal region distinguished between stimulus- and response-conflicts, respectively, suggesting that practice reduces the alertness (sensitiveness) of the brain to conflict occurrence, and enhances stimulus-response associations. PMID:26300758

  13. Ontogeny of the spheno-occipital synchondrosis in a modern Queensland, Australian population using computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Lottering, Nicolene; MacGregor, Donna M; Alston, Clair L; Gregory, Laura S

    2015-05-01

    Due to disparity regarding the age at which skeletal maturation of the spheno-occipital synchondrosis occurs in forensic and biological literature, this study provides recalibrated multislice computed tomography (MSCT) age standards for the Australian (Queensland) population, using a Bayesian statistical approach. The sample comprises retrospective cranial/cervical MSCT scans obtained from 448 males and 416 females aged birth to 20 years from the Skeletal Biology and Forensic Anthropology Research Osteological Database. Fusion status of the synchondrosis was scored using a modified six-stage scoring tier on an MSCT platform, with negligible observer error (? = 0.911 0.04, intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.994). Bayesian transition analysis indicates that females are most likely to transition to complete fusion at 13.1 years and males at 15.6 years. Posterior densities were derived for each morphological stage, with complete fusion of the synchondrosis attained in all Queensland males over 16.3 years of age and females aged 13.8 years and older. The results demonstrate significant sexual dimorphism in synchondrosis fusion and are suggestive of intrapopulation variation between major geographic regions in Australia. This study contributes to the growing repository of contemporary anthropological standards calibrated for the Queensland milieu to improve the efficacy of the coronial process for medicolegal death investigation. As a stand-alone age indicator, the basicranial synchondrosis may be consulted as an exclusion criterion when determining the age of majority that constitutes 17 years in Queensland forensic practice. PMID:25546173

  14. Occipital Artery Function during the Development of 2-Kidney, 1-Clip Hypertension in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chelko, Stephen P.; Schmiedt, Chad W.; Lewis, Tristan H.; Robertson, Tom P.; Lewis, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    This study compared the contractile responses elicited by angiotensin II (AII), arginine vasopressin (AVP), and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in isolated occipital arteries (OAs) from sham-operated (SHAM) and 2-kidney, 1-clip (2K-1C) hypertensive rats. OAs were isolated and bisected into proximal segments (closer to the common carotid artery) and distal segments (closer to the nodose ganglion) and mounted separately on myographs. On day 9, 2K-1C rats had higher mean arterial blood pressures, heart rates, and plasma renin concentrations than SHAM rats. The contractile responses to AII were markedly diminished in both proximal and distal segments of OAs from 2K-1C rats as compared to those from SHAM rats. The responses elicited by AVP were substantially greater in distal than in proximal segments of OAs from SHAM rats and that AVP elicited similar responses in OA segments from 2K-1C rats. The responses elicited by 5-HT were similar in proximal and distal segments from SHAM and 2K-1C rats. These results demonstrate that continued exposure to circulating AII and AVP in 2K-1C rats reduces the contractile efficacy of AII but not AVP or 5-HT. The diminished responsiveness to AII may alter the physiological status of OAs in vivo. PMID:25140254

  15. MRI volumetry of prefrontal cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheline, Yvette I.; Black, Kevin J.; Lin, Daniel Y.; Pimmel, Joseph; Wang, Po; Haller, John W.; Csernansky, John G.; Gado, Mokhtar; Walkup, Ronald K.; Brunsden, Barry S.; Vannier, Michael W.

    1995-05-01

    Prefrontal cortex volumetry by brain magnetic resonance (MR) is required to estimate changes postulated to occur in certain psychiatric and neurologic disorders. A semiautomated method with quantitative characterization of its performance is sought to reliably distinguish small prefrontal cortex volume changes within individuals and between groups. Stereological methods were tested by a blinded comparison of measurements applied to 3D MR scans obtained using an MPRAGE protocol. Fixed grid stereologic methods were used to estimate prefrontal cortex volumes on a graphic workstation, after the images are scaled from 16 to 8 bits using a histogram method. In addition images were resliced into coronal sections perpendicular to the bicommissural plane. Prefrontal cortex volumes were defined as all sections of the frontal lobe anterior to the anterior commissure. Ventricular volumes were excluded. Stereological measurement yielded high repeatability and precision, and was time efficient for the raters. The coefficient of error was cortex boundaries on 3D images was critical to obtaining accurate measurements. MR prefrontal cortex volumetry by stereology can yield accurate and repeatable measurements. Small frontal lobe volume reductions in patients with brain disorders such as depression and schizophrenia can be efficiently assessed using this method.

  16. Reading without the left ventral occipito-temporal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Seghier, Mohamed L.; Neufeld, Nicholas H.; Zeidman, Peter; Leff, Alex P.; Mechelli, Andrea; Nagendran, Arjuna; Riddoch, Jane M.; Humphreys, Glyn W.; Price, Cathy J.

    2012-01-01

    The left ventral occipito-temporal cortex (LvOT) is thought to be essential for the rapid parallel letter processing that is required for skilled reading. Here we investigate whether rapid written word identification in skilled readers can be supported by neural pathways that do not involve LvOT. Hypotheses were derived from a stroke patient who acquired dyslexia following extensive LvOT damage. The patient followed a reading trajectory typical of that associated with pure alexia, re-gaining the ability to read aloud many words with declining performance as the length of words increased. Using functional MRI and dynamic causal modelling (DCM), we found that, when short (three to five letter) familiar words were read successfully, visual inputs to the patients occipital cortex were connected to left motor and premotor regions via activity in a central part of the left superior temporal sulcus (STS). The patient analysis therefore implied a left hemisphere reading-without-LvOT pathway that involved STS. We then investigated whether the same reading-without-LvOT pathway could be identified in 29 skilled readers and whether there was inter-subject variability in the degree to which skilled reading engaged LvOT. We found that functional connectivity in the reading-without-LvOT pathway was strongest in individuals who had the weakest functional connectivity in the LvOT pathway. This observation validates the findings of our patients case study. Our findings highlight the contribution of a left hemisphere reading pathway that is activated during the rapid identification of short familiar written words, particularly when LvOT is not involved. Preservation and use of this pathway may explain how patients are still able to read short words accurately when LvOT has been damaged. PMID:23017598

  17. Aversive learning shapes neuronal orientation tuning in human visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    McTeague, Lisa M.; Gruss, L. Forest; Keil, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The responses of sensory cortical neurons are shaped by experience. As a result perceptual biases evolve, selectively facilitating the detection and identification of sensory events that are relevant for adaptive behaviour. Here we examine the involvement of human visual cortex in the formation of learned perceptual biases. We use classical aversive conditioning to associate one out of a series of oriented gratings with a noxious sound stimulus. After as few as two grating-sound pairings, visual cortical responses to the sound-paired grating show selective amplification. Furthermore, as learning progresses, responses to the orientations with greatest similarity to the sound-paired grating are increasingly suppressed, suggesting inhibitory interactions between orientation-selective neuronal populations. Changes in cortical connectivity between occipital and fronto-temporal regions mirror the changes in visuo-cortical response amplitudes. These findings suggest that short-term behaviourally driven retuning of human visual cortical neurons involves distal topdown projections as well as local inhibitory interactions. PMID:26215466

  18. Population receptive field estimates in human visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Dumoulin, Serge O.; Wandell, Brian A.

    2011-01-01

    We introduce functional MRI methods for estimating the neuronal population receptive field (pRF). These methods build on conventional visual field mapping that measures responses to ring and wedge patterns shown at a series of visual field locations and estimates the single position in the visual field that produces the largest response. The new method computes a model of the population receptive field from responses to a wide range of stimuli and estimates the visual field map as well as other neuronal population properties, such as receptive field size and laterality. The visual field maps obtained with the pRF method are more accurate than those obtained using conventional visual field mapping, and we trace with high precision the visual field maps to the center of the foveal representation. We report quantitative estimates of pRF size in medial, lateral and ventral occipital regions of human visual cortex. Also, we quantify the amount of input from ipsi- and contralateral visual fields. The human pRF size estimates in V1V3 agree well with electrophysiological receptive field measurements at a range of eccentricities in corresponding locations within monkey and human visual field maps. The pRF method is non-invasive and can be applied to a wide range of conditions when it is useful to link fMRI signals in the visual pathways to neuronal receptive fields. PMID:17977024

  19. Aversive learning shapes neuronal orientation tuning in human visual cortex.

    PubMed

    McTeague, Lisa M; Gruss, L Forest; Keil, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The responses of sensory cortical neurons are shaped by experience. As a result perceptual biases evolve, selectively facilitating the detection and identification of sensory events that are relevant for adaptive behaviour. Here we examine the involvement of human visual cortex in the formation of learned perceptual biases. We use classical aversive conditioning to associate one out of a series of oriented gratings with a noxious sound stimulus. After as few as two grating-sound pairings, visual cortical responses to the sound-paired grating show selective amplification. Furthermore, as learning progresses, responses to the orientations with greatest similarity to the sound-paired grating are increasingly suppressed, suggesting inhibitory interactions between orientation-selective neuronal populations. Changes in cortical connectivity between occipital and fronto-temporal regions mirror the changes in visuo-cortical response amplitudes. These findings suggest that short-term behaviourally driven retuning of human visual cortical neurons involves distal top-down projections as well as local inhibitory interactions. PMID:26215466

  20. Decoding face categories in diagnostic subregions of primary visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Petro, Lucy S; Smith, Fraser W; Schyns, Philippe G; Muckli, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Higher visual areas in the occipitotemporal cortex contain discrete regions for face processing, but it remains unclear if V1 is modulated by top-down influences during face discrimination, and if this is widespread throughout V1 or localized to retinotopic regions processing task-relevant facial features. Employing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we mapped the cortical representation of two feature locations that modulate higher visual areas during categorical judgements – the eyes and mouth. Subjects were presented with happy and fearful faces, and we measured the fMRI signal of V1 regions processing the eyes and mouth whilst subjects engaged in gender and expression categorization tasks. In a univariate analysis, we used a region-of-interest-based general linear model approach to reveal changes in activation within these regions as a function of task. We then trained a linear pattern classifier to classify facial expression or gender on the basis of V1 data from ‘eye’ and ‘mouth’ regions, and from the remaining non-diagnostic V1 region. Using multivariate techniques, we show that V1 activity discriminates face categories both in local ‘diagnostic’ and widespread ‘non-diagnostic’ cortical subregions. This indicates that V1 might receive the processed outcome of complex facial feature analysis from other cortical (i.e. fusiform face area, occipital face area) or subcortical areas (amygdala). PMID:23373719

  1. Progressive cortical visual failure associated with occipital calcification and coeliac disease with relative preservation of the dorsal 'action' pathway.

    PubMed

    Plant, Gordon T; James-Galton, Merle; Wilkinson, David

    2015-10-01

    We describe the first reported case of a patient with coeliac disease and cerebral occipital calcification who shows a progressive and seemingly selective failure to recognise visual stimuli. This decline was tracked over a study period of 22 years and occurred in the absence of primary sensory or widespread intellectual impairment. Subsequent tests revealed that although the patient was unable to use shape and contour information to visually identify objects, she was nevertheless able to use this information to reach, grasp and manipulate objects under central, immediate vision. This preservation of visuo-motor control was echoed in her day-to-day ability to navigate and live at home independently. We conclude that occipital calcification following coeliac disease can lead to prominent higher visual failure that, under prescribed viewing conditions, is consistent with separable mechanisms for visual perception and action control. PMID:26218620

  2. Atlanto-axial approach for cervical myelography in a Thoroughbred horse with complete fusion of the atlanto-occipital bones

    PubMed Central

    Aleman, Monica; Dimock, Abigail N.; Wisner, Erik R.; Prutton, Jamie W.; Madigan, John E.

    2014-01-01

    A 2-year-old Thoroughbred gelding with clinical signs localized to the first 6 spinal cord segments (C1 to C6) had complete fusion of the atlanto-occipital bones which precluded performing a routine myelogram. An ultrasound-assisted myelogram at the intervertebral space between the atlas and axis was successfully done and identified a marked extradural compressive myelopathy at the level of the atlas and axis, and axis and third cervical vertebrae. PMID:25392550

  3. Visual agnosia with bilateral temporo-occipital brain lesions in a child with autistic disorder: a case study.

    PubMed

    Mottron, L; Mineau, S; Décarie, J C; Jambaqué, I; Labrecque, R; Pépin, J P; Aroichane, M

    1997-10-01

    A 2-year-old boy meeting the criteria for autistic disorder was diagnosed 2 years later with a visual agnosia characterised by a combination of certain aspects of associative and apperceptive agnosia. MRI then revealed a severe encephalomalacia of the right temporal lobe and bilateral temporo-occipital areas. This association is discussed in terms of a clinical and aetiological relation between autistic disorder and visual agnosia. PMID:9352734

  4. Ultrasound-guided bilateral greater occipital nerve block for the treatment of post-dural puncture headache

    PubMed Central

    Akyol, Fethi; Binici, Orhan; Kuyrukluyildiz, Ufuk; Karabakan, Guldane

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: Post-dural puncture headache (PDPH) is one of the complications frequently observed after spinal or epidural anesthesia with dural penetration. For PDPH patients who do not respond to conservative medical treatment, alternative treatments such as bilateral occipital nerve block should be considered.In this study the efficacy of bilateral occipital nerve block was retrospectively evaluated in patients with post-dural puncture headache. Methods: Ultrasound-guided bilateral occipital nerve block was administrated in 21 patients who developed PDPH after spinal anesthesia, but did not respond to conservative medical treatment within 48 hours between January 2012 and February 2014. The study was conducted at Erzincan University Faculty of Medicine Gazi Mengucek Education and Research Hospital Results: Mean Visual Analog Scale (VAS) pain scores at 10 minutes and 6, 10, 15 and 24 hours after the block were significantly improved compared to the patients with a pre-block VAS score between 4 and 6 as well as patients with a pre-block VAS score between 7 and 9 (p<0.01). After 24 hours of the block applied, VAS pain score dropped to 1 for all 12 patients who had a pre-block VAS score between 4 and 6. Whereas, VAS score decreased to 2 at 24 hours after the block in only one of the patients with a pre-block VAS between 7 and 9. For the patients with a pre-block VAS score between 7 and 9, there was no significant improvement in the mean VAS score 24 hours after the block. Conclusions: For patients with PDPH and a pre-block VAS score between 4 and 6 who do not respond to conservative medical treatment, an ultrasound-guided bilateral occipital nerve block may be effective. PMID:25878625

  5. MRI of the tectorial and posterior atlanto-occipital membranes in the late stage of whiplash injury.

    PubMed

    Krakenes, J; Kaale, B R; Moen, G; Nordli, H; Gilhus, N E; Rorvik, J

    2003-09-01

    Our aim was to characterise and classify permanent structural changes in the tectorial and posterior atlanto-occipital membranes several years after a whiplash injury, and to evaluate the reliability of our classification. We obtained sagittal proton density-weighted images of the craniovertebral junction of 92 whiplash-injured and 30 uninjured individuals. Structural abnormalities in the two membranes were classified as grades 1-3 independently by three radiologists blinded for clinical information. Grading criteria were based on reduced tectorial membrane thickness, and elongation or rupture of the posterior atlanto-occipital membrane/dura mater complex. The same images were reassessed 4 months later. Image quality was graded good in 104 cases, slightly reduced in 13 and unsatisfactory in five. Of 117 tectorial membranes 31 (26.5%) showed grade 2 or 3 lesions, in the uninjured group none were grade 3 and only three were grade 2. Pair-wise interobserver agreement (weighted kappa) was moderate (0.47-0.50), while the intraobserver agreement was moderate to good (0.51-0.70). Of 117 posterior atlanto-occipital membranes 20 (17.1%) had grade 2 or 3 lesions; there was no grade 3 and only one grade 2 lesion in the uninjured group. Inter- and intraobserver agreement was good (0.61-0.74 and 0.65-0.86, respectively). Reduced image quality was the main reason for disagreement, but partial thinning and lateral tapering, as normal tectorial membrane variations, created difficulties in some cases. This study strongly indicates that whiplash trauma can damage the tectorial and posterior atlanto-occipital membranes; this can be shown on high-resolution MRI. Better knowledge of normal anatomical variations and improved image quality should increase the reliability of lesion classification. PMID:12904927

  6. Altered SPECT (123)I-iomazenil Binding in the Cingulate Cortex of Children with Anorexia Nervosa.

    PubMed

    Nagamitsu, Shinichiro; Sakurai, Rieko; Matsuoka, Michiko; Chiba, Hiromi; Ozono, Shuichi; Tanigawa, Hitoshi; Yamashita, Yushiro; Kaida, Hayato; Ishibashi, Masatoshi; Kakuma, Tatsuki; Croarkin, Paul E; Matsuishi, Toyojiro

    2016-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that anxiety plays a key role in the development and maintenance of anorexia nervosa (AN) in children. The purpose of this study was to examine cortical GABA(A)-benzodiazepine receptor binding before and after treatment in children beginning intensive AN treatment. Brain single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) measurements using (123)I-iomazenil, which binds to GABA(A)-benzodiazepine receptors, was performed in 26 participants with AN who were enrolled in a multimodal treatment program. Sixteen of the 26 participants underwent a repeat SPECT scan immediately before discharge at conclusion of the intensive treatment program. Eating behavior and mood disturbances were assessed using Eating Attitudes Test with 26 items (EAT-26) and the short form of the Profile of Mood States (POMS). Clinical outcome scores were evaluated after a 1-year period. We examined association between relative iomazenil-binding activity in cortical regions of interest and psychometric profiles and determined which psychometric profiles show interaction effects with brain regions. Further, we determined if binding activity could predict clinical outcome and treatment changes. Higher EAT-26 scores were significantly associated with lower iomazenil-binding activity in the anterior and posterior cingulate cortex. Higher POMS subscale scores were significantly associated with lower iomazenil-binding activity in the left frontal, parietal cortex, and posterior cingulate cortex (PCC). "Depression-Dejection" and "Confusion" POMS subscale scores, and total POMS score showed interaction effects with brain regions in iomazenil-binding activity. Decreased binding in the anterior cingulate cortex and left parietal cortex was associated with poor clinical outcomes. Relative binding increases throughout the PCC and occipital gyrus were observed after weight gain in children with AN. These findings suggest that cortical GABAergic receptor binding is altered in children with AN. This may be a state-related change, which could be used to monitor and guide the treatment of eating disorders. PMID:26909048

  7. Altered SPECT 123I-iomazenil Binding in the Cingulate Cortex of Children with Anorexia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Nagamitsu, Shinichiro; Sakurai, Rieko; Matsuoka, Michiko; Chiba, Hiromi; Ozono, Shuichi; Tanigawa, Hitoshi; Yamashita, Yushiro; Kaida, Hayato; Ishibashi, Masatoshi; Kakuma, Tatsuki; Croarkin, Paul E.; Matsuishi, Toyojiro

    2016-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that anxiety plays a key role in the development and maintenance of anorexia nervosa (AN) in children. The purpose of this study was to examine cortical GABA(A)-benzodiazepine receptor binding before and after treatment in children beginning intensive AN treatment. Brain single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) measurements using 123I-iomazenil, which binds to GABA(A)-benzodiazepine receptors, was performed in 26 participants with AN who were enrolled in a multimodal treatment program. Sixteen of the 26 participants underwent a repeat SPECT scan immediately before discharge at conclusion of the intensive treatment program. Eating behavior and mood disturbances were assessed using Eating Attitudes Test with 26 items (EAT-26) and the short form of the Profile of Mood States (POMS). Clinical outcome scores were evaluated after a 1-year period. We examined association between relative iomazenil-binding activity in cortical regions of interest and psychometric profiles and determined which psychometric profiles show interaction effects with brain regions. Further, we determined if binding activity could predict clinical outcome and treatment changes. Higher EAT-26 scores were significantly associated with lower iomazenil-binding activity in the anterior and posterior cingulate cortex. Higher POMS subscale scores were significantly associated with lower iomazenil-binding activity in the left frontal, parietal cortex, and posterior cingulate cortex (PCC). “Depression–Dejection” and “Confusion” POMS subscale scores, and total POMS score showed interaction effects with brain regions in iomazenil-binding activity. Decreased binding in the anterior cingulate cortex and left parietal cortex was associated with poor clinical outcomes. Relative binding increases throughout the PCC and occipital gyrus were observed after weight gain in children with AN. These findings suggest that cortical GABAergic receptor binding is altered in children with AN. This may be a state-related change, which could be used to monitor and guide the treatment of eating disorders. PMID:26909048

  8. Perceptual specificity in visual object priming: functional magnetic resonance imaging evidence for a laterality difference in fusiform cortex.

    PubMed

    Koutstaal, W; Wagner, A D; Rotte, M; Maril, A; Buckner, R L; Schacter, D L

    2001-01-01

    Seeing an object on one occasion may facilitate or prime processing of the same object if it is later again encountered. Such priming may also be found -- but at a reduced level -- for different but perceptually similar objects that are alternative exemplars or 'tokens' of the initially presented object. We explored the neural correlates of this perceptual specificity using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) procedures, contrasting neural activity when participants made object classification decisions (size judgments) regarding previously presented objects (repeated same), alternative exemplars of previously presented objects (repeated different), or entirely new objects (novel). Many frontal regions (including bilateral frontal operculum, bilateral posterior inferior frontal/precentral, left anterior inferior frontal, and superior frontal cortices) and multiple late visual and posterior regions (including middle occipital, fusiform, fusiform-parahippocampal, precuneus, and posterior cingulate, all bilaterally), demonstrated reduced neural activity for repeated compared to novel objects. Greater repetition-induced reductions were observed for same than for different exemplars in several of these regions (bilateral posterior inferior frontal, right precuneus, bilateral middle occipital, bilateral fusiform, bilateral parahippocampal and bilateral superior parietal). Additionally, right fusiform (occipitotemporal) cortex showed significantly less priming for different versus same exemplars than did left fusiform. These findings converge with behavioral evidence from divided visual field studies and with neuropsychological evidence underscoring the key role of right occipitotemporal cortex in processing specific visual form information; possible differences in the representational-functional role of left fusiform are discussed. PMID:11163375

  9. Bilateral occipital dysplasia, seizure identification, and ablation: a novel surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Dave F; Tindall, Kristi; Lee, Mark; Patel, Bhairav

    2014-06-01

    MRI-guided thermal ablation is a relatively new technique utilising heat to ablate both tumours and epileptogenic lesions. Its use against epilepsy offers some patients a new and relatively safe way of reducing or aborting seizures. Most cases of MRI-guided thermal ablation have been performed in patients with isolated lesions. Placement of depth electrodes prior to laser ablation has been rarely performed. We present a case with bilateral independent lesions traversing eloquent cortex, which, after sampling for seizures and successful ablation, retained normal function. The patient is, to date, seizure-free. PMID:24842711

  10. Occipital Nerve Stimulation for Chronic MigraineA Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yen-Fu; Bramley, George; Unwin, Gemma; Hanu-Cernat, Dalvina; Dretzke, Janine; Moore, David; Bayliss, Sue; Cummins, Carole; Lilford, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic migraine is a debilitating headache disorder that has significant impact on quality of life. Stimulation of peripheral nerves is increasingly being used to treat chronic refractory pain including headache disorders. This systematic review examines the effectiveness and adverse effects of occipital nerve stimulation (ONS) for chronic migraine. Methods Databases, including the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and clinical trial registers were searched to September 2014. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs), other controlled and uncontrolled observational studies and case series (n? 10) were eligible. RCTs were assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Meta-analysis was carried out using a random-effects model. Findings are presented in summary tables and forest plots. Results Five RCTs (total n=402) and seven case series (total n=115) met the inclusion criteria. Pooled results from three multicenter RCTs show that ONS was associated with a mean reduction of 2.59 days (95% CI 0.91 to 4.27, I2=0%) of prolonged, moderate to severe headache per month at 3 months compared with a sham control. Results for other outcomes generally favour ONS over sham controls but quantitative analysis was hampered by incomplete publication and reporting of trial data. Lead migration and infections are common and often require revision surgery. Open-label follow-up of RCTs and case series suggest long-term effectiveness can be maintained in some patients but evidence is limited. Conclusions While the effectiveness of ONS compared to sham control has been shown in multiple RCTs, the average effect size is modest and may be exaggerated by bias as achieving effective blinding remains a methodological challenge. Further measures to reduce the risk of adverse events and revision surgery are needed. Systematic Review Registration this systematic review is an update and expanded work of part of a broader review registered with PROSPERO. Registration No. CRD42012002633. PMID:25793740

  11. The left inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus subserves language semantics: a multilevel lesion study.

    PubMed

    Almairac, Fabien; Herbet, Guillaume; Moritz-Gasser, Sylvie; de Champfleur, Nicolas Menjot; Duffau, Hugues

    2015-07-01

    Consequential works in cognitive neuroscience have led to the formulation of an interactive dual-stream model of language processing: the dorsal stream may process the phonological aspects of language, whereas the ventral stream may process the semantic aspects of language. While it is well-accepted that the dorsal route is subserved by the arcuate fasciculus, the structural connectivity of the semantic ventral stream is a matter of dispute. Here we designed a longitudinal study to gain new insights into this central but controversial question. Thirty-one patients harboring a left diffuse low-grade gliomaa rare neurological condition that infiltrates preferentially white matter associative pathwayswere assessed with a prototypical task of language (i.e. verbal fluency) before and after surgery. All were operated under local anesthesia with a cortical and subcortical brain mappingenabling to identify and preserve eloquent structures for language. We performed voxel-based lesion-symptom (VLSM) analyses on pre- and postoperative behavioral data. Preoperatively, we found a significant relationship between semantic fluency scores and the white matter fibers shaping the ventro-lateral connectivity (P < 0.05 corrected). The statistical map was found to substantially overlap with the spatial position of the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF) (37.7%). Furthermore, a negative correlation was observed between semantic fluency scores and the infiltration volumes in this fasciculus (r = -0.4, P = 0.029). Postoperatively, VLSM analyses were inconclusive. Taken as a whole and when combined with the literature data, our findings strengthen the view that the IFOF plays an essential role in semantic processing and may subserve the direct ventral pathway of language. PMID:24744151

  12. Visual distraction in a patient with abnormal occipital gyration - an eye-tracking study.

    PubMed

    Urgen, Buse; Demirayak, Pinar; Ustun, Fatma; Doerschner, Katja

    2015-01-01

    Maintaining focus and resisting distraction is critical for many visual tasks. We investigated these abilities in a patient with congenital abnormal bilateral occipital and parietal gyration, caused by a single gene (LAMC3) mutation. Because of the location and nature of these structural idiosyncrasies as well as compromised performance in several attention-related screening tasks we set out to measure the patient's visual attention in detail. Here, we assessed the patient's ability to maintain focus in the presence of several types of visual distractors. The patient's performance was compared to that of five sex- and education-matched healthy controls. Participants performed four eye-tracking conditions in randomized order in one experimental session: Fixation-only, Fixation with rapid sequential visual perception (RSVP), Fixation with relevant peripheral distractor (RPD), and Fixation with irrelevant peripheral distractors (IPD). Participants were required to fixate at the center and to respond when a target was detected (in RSVP, RPD, IPD). In the RPD condition relevant cues were presented for 100 ms at 8.71 degrees visual angle eccentricity in one of four possible directions, followed by a 200 ms target in the same location. In the IPD condition no cues preceded targets, everything else was as in the RPD condition. Experiments were done in MATLAB using Psychtoolbox and with an ASL Eye-Trac6 D6 Desk Mounted Optics. We measured percent correct in RSVP, RDP and IDP tasks and mean deviation from fixation in horizontal and vertical directions in all experimental conditions. Patient and control group performed comparably in behavioral tasks. Fixation results, however, indicated a decreased fixation quality of the patient in the presence of visual distractors, with deviations from fixation more than doubling (compared to controls) in RDP and IDP conditions. We discuss these results in light of the patient's structural connectivity and morphometry. Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015. PMID:26326955

  13. Revisiting the cortical system for peripheral reaching at the parieto-occipital junction.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jason A; Karnath, Hans-Otto; Himmelbach, Marc

    2015-03-01

    Optic ataxia (OA) is a neurological disorder that is characterised by misreaching to targets in the visual periphery. The anatomy of OA thus provides important information for the neural representation of visually guided reaching in humans. In 2005 a lesion mapping analysis of OA localised the critical lesion site at the parieto-occipital junction (POJ) (Karnath & Perenin, 2005). This work was accompanied by the discovery of a peripheral reaching module at the POJ in an fMRI study (Prado et al., 2005). The ostensible overlap between the territory typically affected in patients with OA and the findings of Prado et al. (2005) had a tremendous influence on the search for a cortical peripheral reaching module. However, a close inspection of the functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) study revealed that a comparison between reaching towards visible targets in the peripheral visual field and reaching to visible targets in the central visual field--which is the key aspect in clinical examinations of OA--was not conducted. Moreover, whereas main effects of reaching overlapped with the OA lesion site, specific interaction effects did not overlap. We performed a direct comparison between reaching to visible peripheral targets and reaching to visible central targets to address the inconsistencies between the aforementioned studies. Our analysis shows that Prado et al.'s study cannot be taken as evidence for a delineated module for peripheral reaching. In contrast to Prado et al. we found a combined system of POJ, IPS and SPL areas--the posterior human 7A, mIPS, V6A and the posterior IPS--with increased signals during reaching to peripheral targets. PMID:25614234

  14. The response of face-selective cortex with single face parts and part combinations

    PubMed Central

    Dachille, Lindsay R.; Gold, Jason M.; James, Thomas W.

    2012-01-01

    A critical issue in object recognition research is how the parts of an object are analyzed by the visual system and combined into a perceptual whole. However, most of the previous research has examined how changes to object parts influence recognition of the whole, rather than recognition of the parts themselves. This is particularly true of the research on face recognition, and especially with questions related to the neural substrates. Here, we investigated patterns of BOLD fMRI brain activation with internal face parts (features) presented singly and in different combinations. A preference for single features over combinations was found in the occipital face area (OFA) as well as a preference for the two-eyes combination stimulus over other combination stimulus types. The fusiform face area (FFA) and lateral occipital cortex (LO) showed no preferences among the single feature and combination stimulus types. The results are consistent with a growing view that the OFA represents processes involved in early, feature-based analysis. PMID:22750118

  15. The response of face-selective cortex with single face parts and part combinations.

    PubMed

    Arcurio, Lindsay R; Gold, Jason M; James, Thomas W

    2012-08-01

    A critical issue in object recognition research is how the parts of an object are analyzed by the visual system and combined into a perceptual whole. However, most of the previous research has examined how changes to object parts influence recognition of the whole, rather than recognition of the parts themselves. This is particularly true of the research on face recognition, and especially with questions related to the neural substrates. Here, we investigated patterns of BOLD fMRI brain activation with internal face parts (features) presented singly and in different combinations. A preference for single features over combinations was found in the occipital face area (OFA) as well as a preference for the two-eyes combination stimulus over other combination stimulus types. The fusiform face area (FFA) and lateral occipital cortex (LO) showed no preferences among the single feature and combination stimulus types. The results are consistent with a growing view that the OFA represents processes involved in early, feature-based analysis. PMID:22750118

  16. The chronometry of visual perception: review of occipital TMS masking studies.

    PubMed

    de Graaf, Tom A; Koivisto, Mika; Jacobs, Christianne; Sack, Alexander T

    2014-09-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) continues to deliver on its promise as a research tool. In this review article we focus on the application of TMS to early visual cortex (V1, V2, V3) in studies of visual perception and visual awareness. Depending on the asynchrony between visual stimulus onset and TMS pulse (SOA), TMS can suppress visual perception, allowing one to track the time course of functional relevance (chronometry) of early visual cortex for vision. This procedure has revealed multiple masking effects ('dips'), some consistently (∼+100ms SOA) but others less so (∼-50ms, ∼-20ms, ∼+30ms, ∼+200ms SOA). We review the state of TMS masking research, focusing on the evidence for these multiple dips, the relevance of several experimental parameters to the obtained 'masking curve', and the use of multiple measures of visual processing (subjective measures of awareness, objective discrimination tasks, priming effects). Lastly, we consider possible future directions for this field. We conclude that while TMS masking has yielded many fundamental insights into the chronometry of visual perception already, much remains unknown. Not only are there several temporal windows when TMS pulses can induce visual suppression, even the well-established 'classical' masking effect (∼+100ms) may reflect more than one functional visual process. PMID:25010557

  17. Flood risk analysis and adaptive strategy in context of uncertainties: a case study of Nhieu Loc Thi Nghe Basin, Ho Chi Minh City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Long-Phi; Chau, Nguyen-Xuan-Quang; Nguyen, Hong-Quan

    2013-04-01

    The Nhieu Loc - Thi Nghe basin is the most important administrative and business area of Ho Chi Minh City. Due to system complexity of the basin such as the increasing trend of rainfall intensity, (tidal) water level and land subsidence, the simulation of hydrological, hydraulic variables for flooding prediction seems rather not adequate in practical projects. The basin is still highly vulnerable despite of multi-million USD investment for urban drainage improvement projects since the last decade. In this paper, an integrated system analysis in both spatial and temporal aspects based on statistical, GIS and modelling approaches has been conducted in order to: (1) Analyse risks before and after projects, (2) Foresee water-related risk under uncertainties of unfavourable driving factors and (3) Develop a sustainable flood risk management strategy for the basin. The results show that given the framework of risk analysis and adaptive strategy, certain urban developing plans in the basin must be carefully revised and/or checked in order to reduce the highly unexpected loss in the future

  18. A rare case of atlantooccipital dissociation in the context of occipitalization of the atlas, with a 2-year follow-up: case report.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Navjot; Wang, Bill H; Gurr, Kevin R; Bailey, Stewart I; Bailey, Christopher S

    2013-02-01

    Atlantooccipital dislocation (AOD) is a rare and often fatal injury. In cases of survival, residual deficits are severe and often include cranial nerve palsy, quadriplegia, or respiratory issues. Occipitalization is defined as partial or complete congenital fusion of the occiput to the atlas and is exceptionally rare. The authors present a rare case of AOD superimposed on a congenital occipitalization of the atlas. This 39-year-old man had AOD following a motor vehicle collision. On examination, his overall motor score on the American Spinal Injury Association scale was 5/100, and his rectal tone was absent. Computed tomography demonstrated AOD in an area of occipitalization. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed ligamentous injury leading to C1-2 instability. Intervention included occipital cervical instrumentation fusion from the occiput to C-3. Six months postoperatively, imaging revealed fusion of the graft and consolidation of the fractured occipitalization. At the 2-year follow-up, the patient's strength was 3/5 for wrist extension and handgrip on the right side and full strength in the rest of the myotomes. Bladder and bowel function was also normalized. A high-velocity collision led to disruption of the atlantooccipital ligaments and fracture of the occipitalized lateral masses in this patient. Internal fixation and fusion led to good fusion postoperatively. Occipitalization probably led to abnormal joint mechanics at the C1-occiput junction, which might have altered the amount of force required to fracture the occipitalization and produce AOD. This difference may partially account for the favorable neurological outcome in the featured patient compared with traditional cases of AOD. PMID:23198835

  19. Feasibility of C2 Vertebra Screws Placement in Patient With Occipitalization of Atlas

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Wei; Liu, Xiang; Huang, Wenhan; Huang, Zucheng; Li, Xueshi; Chen, Jianting; Wu, Zenghui; Zhu, Qingan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Occipitalization of atlas (OA) is a congenital disease with the possibility of anomalous bony anatomies and the C2 pedicle screw insertion is technically challenging. However, there are no existing literatures clarified the dimensions and angulations of the C2 pedicles, lamina and lateral masses for screw insertion in patients with OA. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the morphometric features of C2 for screw placement in OA to guide the use of surgical screws. Measurements of the OA patients on the computer tomography (CT) images including lamina angle, length and thickness, pedicle angle, length and thickness, and lateral mass thickness and length of the axis vertebra. The OA patients data were compared with age and gender matched cohort of randomly selected patients in a control group without OA. The picture archiving and communication system was used for all patients who had received cervical CT scanning between January 2001 and January 2015. Measurements were performed independently by 2 experienced observers who reviewed the CT scans and recorded the patients with OA. Statistical analysis was performed at a level of significance P?

  20. Feasibility of C2 Vertebra Screws Placement in Patient With Occipitalization of Atlas: A Tomographic Study.

    PubMed

    Ji, Wei; Liu, Xiang; Huang, Wenhan; Huang, Zucheng; Li, Xueshi; Chen, Jianting; Wu, Zenghui; Zhu, Qingan

    2015-09-01

    Occipitalization of atlas (OA) is a congenital disease with the possibility of anomalous bony anatomies and the C2 pedicle screw insertion is technically challenging. However, there are no existing literatures clarified the dimensions and angulations of the C2 pedicles, lamina and lateral masses for screw insertion in patients with OA. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the morphometric features of C2 for screw placement in OA to guide the use of surgical screws. Measurements of the OA patients on the computer tomography (CT) images including lamina angle, length and thickness, pedicle angle, length and thickness, and lateral mass thickness and length of the axis vertebra. The OA patients data were compared with age and gender matched cohort of randomly selected patients in a control group without OA. The picture archiving and communication system was used for all patients who had received cervical CT scanning between January 2001 and January 2015. Measurements were performed independently by 2 experienced observers who reviewed the CT scans and recorded the patients with OA. Statistical analysis was performed at a level of significance P?

  1. Quantitative assessment of diffuse optical tomography sensitivity to the cerebral cortex using a whole-head probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perdue, Katherine L.; Fang, Qianqian; Diamond, Solomon G.

    2012-05-01

    We quantify the variability in diffuse optical tomography (DOT) sensitivity over the cortical surface in eight young adult subjects. We use the 10/5 electroencephalography system as a basis for our whole-head optical high-density probe design. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) is calculated along with the percentage of the cortex that is above a CNR = 0 dB threshold. We also quantify the effect of including vasculature on the forward model and list our assumptions that allow us to estimate light penetration depth in the head. We show that using the 10/5 system for the optical probe design allows for the measurement of 37% of the cortical surface on average, with a mean CNR in the visible region of 5.5 dB. Certain anatomical regions, such as the lateral occipital cortex, had a very high percentage above the CNR threshold, while other regions such as the cingulate cortex were not measurable. Vasculature blocked optical sensitivity over 1% of the cortex. Cortical coverage was positively correlated with intracranial volume and relative cerebrospinal fluid volume, and negatively correlated with relative scalp volume and skull volume. These contributions allow experimenters to understand how anatomical variation in a subject population may impact DOT or functional near-infrared spectroscopy measurements.

  2. Quantitative assessment of diffuse optical tomography sensitivity to the cerebral cortex using a whole-head probe

    PubMed Central

    Perdue, Katherine L; Fang, Qianqian; Diamond, Solomon G

    2012-01-01

    We quantify the variability in diffuse optical tomography (DOT) sensitivity over the cortical surface in eight young adult subjects. We use the 10/5 electroencephalography system as a basis for our whole-head optical high-density probe design. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) is calculated along with the percentage of the cortex that is above a CNR=0 dB threshold. We also quantify the effect of including vasculature on the forward model and list our assumptions that allow us to estimate light penetration depth in the head. We show that using the 10/5 system for optical probe design allows for measurement of 37% of the cortical surface on average, with a mean CNR in the visible region of 5.5 dB. Certain anatomical regions, such as the lateral occipital cortex, had a very high percentage above the CNR threshold, while other regions such as the cingulate cortex were not measurable. Vasculature blocked optical sensitivity over 1% of the cortex. Cortical coverage was positively correlated with intracranial volume and relative cerebrospinal fluid volume, and negatively correlated with relative scalp volume and skull volume. These contributions allow experimenters to understand how anatomical variation in a subject population may impact DOT or functional near-infrared spectroscopy measurements. PMID:22513789

  3. Attention modulates spatial priority maps in the human occipital, parietal and frontal cortices

    PubMed Central

    Sprague, Thomas C.; Serences, John T.

    2014-01-01

    Computational theories propose that attention modulates the topographical landscape of spatial priority maps in regions of visual cortex so that the location of an important object is associated with higher activation levels. While single-unit recording studies have demonstrated attention-related increases in the gain of neural responses and changes in the size of spatial receptive fields, the net effect of these modulations on the topography of region-level priority maps has not been investigated. Here, we used fMRI and a multivariate encoding model to reconstruct spatial representations of attended and ignored stimuli using activation patterns across entire visual areas. These reconstructed spatial representations reveal the influence of attention on the amplitude and size of stimulus representations within putative priority maps across the visual hierarchy. Our results suggest that attention increases the amplitude of stimulus representations in these spatial maps, particularly in higher visual areas, but does not substantively change their size. PMID:24212672

  4. The insular cortex: a review.

    PubMed

    Nieuwenhuys, Rudolf

    2012-01-01

    The human insular cortex forms a distinct, but entirely hidden lobe, situated in the depth of the Sylvian fissure. Here, we first review the recent literature on the connectivity and the functions of this structure. It appears that this small lobe, taking up less than 2% of the total cortical surface area, receives afferents from some sensory thalamic nuclei, is (mostly reciprocally) connected with the amygdala and with many limbic and association cortical areas, and is implicated in an astonishingly large number of widely different functions, ranging from pain perception and speech production to the processing of social emotions. Next, we embark on a long, adventurous journey through the voluminous literature on the structural organization of the insular cortex. This journey yielded the following take-home messages: (1) The meticulous, but mostly neglected publications of Rose (1928) and Brockhaus (1940) are still invaluable for our understanding of the architecture of the mammalian insular cortex. (2) The relation of the insular cortex to the adjacent claustrum is neither ontogenetical nor functional, but purely topographical. (3) The insular cortex has passed through a spectacular progressive differentiation during hominoid evolution, but the assumption of Craig (2009) that the human anterior insula has no homologue in the rhesus monkey is untenable. (4) The concept of Mesulam and Mufson (1985), that the primate insula is essentially composed of three concentrically arranged zones, agranular, dysgranular, and granular, is presumably correct, but there is at present much confusion concerning the more detailed architecture of the anterior insular cortex. (5) The large spindle-shaped cells in the fifth layer of the insular cortex, currently known as von Economo neurons (VENs), are not only confined to large-brained mammals, such as whales, elephants, apes, and humans, but also occur in monkeys and prosimians, as well as in the pygmy hippopotamus, the Atlantic walrus, and Florida manatee. Finally, we point out that the human insula presents a unique opportunity for performing an in-depth comparative analysis of the relations between structure and function in a typical sensory and a typical cognitive cortical domain. PMID:22230626

  5. The Functions of the Orbitofrontal Cortex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rolls, Edmund T.

    2004-01-01

    The orbitofrontal cortex contains the secondary taste cortex, in which the reward value of taste is represented. It also contains the secondary and tertiary olfactory cortical areas, in which information about the identity and also about the reward value of odours is represented. The orbitofrontal cortex also receives information about the sight…

  6. The Functions of the Orbitofrontal Cortex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rolls, Edmund T.

    2004-01-01

    The orbitofrontal cortex contains the secondary taste cortex, in which the reward value of taste is represented. It also contains the secondary and tertiary olfactory cortical areas, in which information about the identity and also about the reward value of odours is represented. The orbitofrontal cortex also receives information about the sight

  7. Probabilistic and single-subject retinotopic maps reveal the topographic organization of face patches in the macaque cortex.

    PubMed

    Janssens, Thomas; Zhu, Qi; Popivanov, Ivo D; Vanduffel, Wim

    2014-07-30

    Face perception is crucial to survival among social primates. It has been suggested that a group of extrastriate cortical regions responding more strongly to faces than to nonface objects is critical for face processing in primates. It is generally assumed that these regions are not retinotopically organized, as with human face-processing areas, showing foveal bias but lacking any organization with respect to polar angle. Despite many electrophysiological studies targeting monkey face patches, the retinotopic organization of these patches remains largely unclear. We have examined the relationship between cortical face patches and the topographic organization of extrastriate cortex using biologically relevant, phase-encoded retinotopic mapping stimuli in macaques. Single-subject fMRI results indicated a gradual shift from highly retinotopic to no topographic organization from posterior to anterior face patches in inferotemporal cortex. We also constructed a probabilistic retinotopic atlas of occipital and ventral extrastriate visual cortex. By comparing this probabilistic map to the locations of face patches at the group level, we showed that a previously identified posterior lateral temporal face patch (PL) is located within the posterior inferotemporal dorsal (PITd) retinotopic area. Furthermore, we identified a novel face patch posterior PL, which is located in retinotopically organized transitional area V4 (V4t). Previously published coordinates of human PITd coincide with the group-level occipital face area (OFA), according to a probabilistic map derived from a large population, implying a potential correspondence between monkey PL/PITd and human OFA/PITd. Furthermore, the monkey middle lateral temporal face patch (ML) shows consistent foveal biases but no obvious polar-angle structure. In contrast, middle fundus temporal (MF), anterior temporal and prefrontal monkey face patches lacked topographic organization. PMID:25080579

  8. γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) concentration inversely correlates with basal perfusion in human occipital lobe

    PubMed Central

    Donahue, Manus J; Rane, Swati; Hussey, Erin; Mason, Emily; Pradhan, Subechhya; Waddell, Kevin W; Ally, Brandon A

    2014-01-01

    Commonly used neuroimaging approaches in humans exploit hemodynamic or metabolic indicators of brain function. However, fundamental gaps remain in our ability to relate such hemo-metabolic reactivity to neurotransmission, with recent reports providing paradoxical information regarding the relationship among basal perfusion, functional imaging contrast, and neurotransmission in awake humans. Here, sequential magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) measurements of the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA+macromolecules normalized by the complex N-acetyl aspartate-N-acetyl aspartyl glutamic acid: [GABA+]/[NAA–NAAG]), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements of perfusion, fractional gray-matter volume, and arterial arrival time (AAT) are recorded in human visual cortex from a controlled cohort of young adult male volunteers with neurocognitive battery-confirmed comparable cognitive capacity (3 T; n=16; age=23±3 years). Regression analyses reveal an inverse correlation between [GABA+]/[NAA–NAAG] and perfusion (R=−0.46; P=0.037), yet no relationship between AAT and [GABA+]/[NAA–NAAG] (R=−0.12; P=0.33). Perfusion measurements that do not control for AAT variations reveal reduced correlations between [GABA+]/[NAA–NAAG] and perfusion (R=−0.13; P=0.32). These findings largely reconcile contradictory reports between perfusion and inhibitory tone, and underscore the physiologic origins of the growing literature relating functional imaging signals, hemodynamics, and neurotransmission. PMID:24398941

  9. Rescaling retinal size into perceived size: evidence for an occipital and parietal bottleneck.

    PubMed

    Kreutzer, Sylvia; Weidner, Ralph; Fink, Gereon R

    2015-07-01

    The spatial and temporal context of an object influence its perceived size. Two visual illusions illustrate this nicely: the size adaptation effect and the Ebbinghaus illusion. Whereas size adaptation affects size rescaling of a target circle via a previously presented, differently sized adaptor circle, the Ebbinghaus illusion alters perceived size by virtue of surrounding circles. In the classical Ebbinghaus setting, the surrounding circles are shown simultaneously with the target. However, size underestimation persists when the surrounding circles precede the target. Such a temporal separation of inducer and target circles in both illusions permits the comparison of BOLD signals elicited by two displays that, although objectively identical, elicit different percepts. The current study combined both illusions in a factorial design to identify a presumed common central mechanism involved in rescaling retinal into perceived size. At the behavioral level, combining both illusions did not affect perceived size further. At the neural level, however, this combination induced functional activation beyond that induced by either illusion separately: An underadditive activation pattern was found within left lingual gyrus, right supramarginal gyrus, and right superior parietal cortex. These findings provide direct behavioral and functional evidence for the presence of a neural bottleneck in rescaling retinal into perceived size, a process vital for visual perception. PMID:25603028

  10. The controversial existence of the human superior fronto-occipital fasciculus: Connectome-based tractographic study with microdissection validation.

    PubMed

    Meola, Antonio; Comert, Ayhan; Yeh, Fang-Cheng; Stefaneanu, Lucia; Fernandez-Miranda, Juan C

    2015-12-01

    The superior fronto-occipital fasciculus (SFOF), a long association bundle that connects frontal and occipital lobes, is well-documented in monkeys but is controversial in human brain. Its assumed role is in visual processing and spatial awareness. To date, anatomical and neuroimaging studies on human and animal brains are not in agreement about the existence, course, and terminations of SFOF. To clarify the existence of the SFOF in human brains, we applied deterministic fiber tractography to a template of 488 healthy subjects and to 80 individual subjects from the Human Connectome Project (HCP) and validated the results with white matter microdissection of post-mortem human brains. The imaging results showed that previous reconstructions of the SFOF were generated by two false continuations, namely between superior thalamic peduncle (STP) and stria terminalis (ST), and ST and posterior thalamic peduncle. The anatomical microdissection confirmed this finding. No other fiber tracts in the previously described location of the SFOF were identified. Hence, our data suggest that the SFOF does not exist in the human brain. Hum Brain Mapp 36:4964-4971, 2015. 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26435158

  11. Rapid, high-frequency, and theta-coupled gamma oscillations in the inferior occipital gyrus during face processing.

    PubMed

    Sato, Wataru; Kochiyama, Takanori; Uono, Shota; Matsuda, Kazumi; Usui, Keiko; Inoue, Yushi; Toichi, Motomi

    2014-11-01

    Neuroimaging studies have found greater activation in the inferior occipital gyrus (IOG), or occipital face area, in response to faces relative to non-facial stimuli. However, the temporal, frequency, and functional profiles of IOG activity during face processing remain unclear. Here, this issue was investigated by recording intracranial field potentials in the IOG during the presentation of faces, mosaics, and houses in upright and inverted orientations. Time-frequency statistical parametric mapping analyses revealed greater gamma-band activation in the IOG beginning at 110 msec and covering 40-300 Hz in response to upright faces relative to upright houses and mosaics. Phase-amplitude cross-frequency coupling analyses revealed more evident theta-gamma couplings at 115-256 msec during the processing of upright faces as compared with that of upright houses and mosaics. Comparable gamma-band activity was observed during the processing of inverted and upright faces at about 100-200 msec, but weaker activity and different coupling with theta-band activity after 200 msec. These patterns of activity were more evident in the right than in the left IOG. These results, together with other evidence on neural communication, suggest that broadband gamma oscillations in the right IOG conduct rapid and multistage (i.e., both featural and configural) face processing in collaboration with theta oscillations transmitted from other brain regions. PMID:24745564

  12. [Evaluation of the changes occurring in the vertical direction of the face in cases treated with activator + occipital headgear combination].

    PubMed

    Altu?, Z; I?eri, H; Bayazit, Z; Ggen, H

    1989-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the vertical skeletal and dentoalveolar changes in the Class II Division 1 cases treated with the activator + occipital headgear combination. The present study was performed on 40 subjects and comprised 20 subjects who had undergone activator + occipital headgear therapy and 20 control subjects who had received no orthodontic treatment. 15 linear and angular measurements were performed on 80 lateral cephalometric films of 40 subjects. By comparing the treatment and control groups, the changes related to growth was eliminated and following results were obtained: SNA and ANB angles were reduced in treatment group (p less than 0.01) and the difference between treatment and control groups were statistically significant (p less than 0.01). Jarabak ratio did not show any change in the treatment group but decreased in the control group (p less than 0.05) and the difference between treatment and control groups was statistically significant (p less than 0.05). The growth of lower anterior alveolar height was inhibited by treatment when compared to control group (p less than 0.01). PMID:2489156

  13. [Cerebellar cyst associated with cytoarchitectonic abnormalities in the cerebellar cortex].

    PubMed

    Okamoto, J; Takase, K; Fukami, T; Matsumoto, K; Ii, K

    1983-07-01

    The patient, 64-year-old female, had episode of sudden attack of severe vertigo, headache, nausea, and vomiting which lasted for about twenty minutes on May 20th in 1980. She had hypertension, polyp of stomach, diverticuli of duodenum in her past history. Neurological examination on her admission revealed fine horizontal nystagmus on bilateral gaze and slight clumsy movement on left F-N test. On plain skull and cervical X-P, atlanto-occipital fusion and Klippel-Feil syndrome (C2-C3 fusion) were seen. Plain CT scanning revealed a large cystic lesion which extended from the vermis to the left cerebellar hemisphere. No enhanced area was seen. The forth ventricle was seemed to be enlarged. And the left-sided dorsal part of the forth ventricle attached to the cyst. Metrizamide CT cisternogram showed there was no direct communication between them. Angiographically, the vertebrobasilar arteries were noted sclerotic changes and poor vascularities in the left cerebellar hemisphere was noted. On opening the dura during surgery, the left cerebellar hemisphere appeared bulging state and the bilateral cerebellar tonsils were hypoplastic. Outer thin membrane of the cyst was removed. The cyst has no communication with the subarachnoid space as well as with the forth ventricle. The cystic fluid was slightly yellowish, but had no Froin's sign. Reddish-gray color nodular area, which seemed to be similar to mural nodule macroscopically, was noted in the area of inner surface of the cyst. This part was removed. Histological findings of this area showed abnormal architecture with malarranged layer of cerebellar cortex.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6626388

  14. Prefrontal cortex white matter tracts in prodromal Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Joy T; Vaidya, Jatin G; Wassermann, Demian; Kim, Regina Eunyoung; Magnotta, Vincent A; Johnson, Hans J; Paulsen, Jane S

    2015-10-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is most widely known for its selective degeneration of striatal neurons but there is also growing evidence for white matter (WM) deterioration. The primary objective of this research was to conduct a large-scale analysis using multisite diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) tractography data to quantify diffusivity properties along major prefrontal cortex WM tracts in prodromal HD. Fifteen international sites participating in the PREDICT-HD study collected imaging and neuropsychological data on gene-positive HD participants without a clinical diagnosis (i.e., prodromal) and gene-negative control participants. The anatomical prefrontal WM tracts of the corpus callosum (PFCC), anterior thalamic radiations (ATRs), inferior fronto-occipital fasciculi (IFO), and uncinate fasciculi (UNC) were identified using streamline tractography of DWI. Within each of these tracts, tensor scalars for fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, radial diffusivity, and axial diffusivity coefficients were calculated. We divided prodromal HD subjects into three CAG-age product (CAP) groups having Low, Medium, or High probabilities of onset indexed by genetic exposure. We observed significant differences in WM properties for each of the four anatomical tracts for the High CAP group in comparison to controls. Additionally, the Medium CAP group presented differences in the ATR and IFO in comparison to controls. Furthermore, WM alterations in the PFCC, ATR, and IFO showed robust associations with neuropsychological measures of executive functioning. These results suggest long-range tracts essential for cross-region information transfer show early vulnerability in HD and may explain cognitive problems often present in the prodromal stage. Hum Brain Mapp 36:3717-3732, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26179962

  15. Impaired synaptic plasticity in the visual cortex of mice lacking ?7-nicotinic receptor subunit.

    PubMed

    Criscuolo, C; Accorroni, A; Domenici, L; Origlia, N

    2015-05-21

    The primary visual cortex (V1) is the first step in visual information processing and its function may be modulated by acetylcholine through nicotinic receptors (nAChRs). Since our previous work demonstrated that visual acuity and cortical spatial resolution limit were significantly reduced in ?7 knock-out (KO) mice in the absence of retinal alterations, we decided to characterize the contribution of homomeric ?7 nicotinic receptors (?7nAChRs) to visual information processing at the cortical level. We evaluated long-term forms of synaptic plasticity in occipital slices containing V1 from ?7 KO mice and in wild-type (WT) slices perfused with nAChRs selective blocking agents. In ?7 KO mice slices, electrophysiological recordings demonstrated the absence of long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) in layer II/III after the stimulation of different intracortical pathways (layer IV or II/III). Furthermore, the acute and selective blockade of ?7nAChRs in slices from WT mice with either ?-bungarotoxin or methyllycaconitine did not alter the expression of LTP and LTD. Conversely, the perfusion with the unspecific nAChRs antagonist mecamylamine impaired LTP and LTD. Our results suggest the presence of impaired synaptic plasticity in the V1 of ?7 KO mice and indicate a different contribution of nAChRs to visual cortex function. PMID:25797465

  16. Functional Mapping of Face-Selective Regions in the Extrastriate Visual Cortex of the Marmoset

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Chia-Chun; Yen, Cecil C.; Ciuchta, Jennifer L.; Papoti, Daniel; Bock, Nicholas A.; Leopold, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The cerebral cortex of humans and macaques has specialized regions for processing faces and other visual stimulus categories. It is unknown whether a similar functional organization exists in New World monkeys, such as the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus), a species of growing interest as a primate model in neuroscience. To address this question, we measured selective neural responses in the brain of four awake marmosets trained to fix their gaze upon images of faces, bodies, objects, and control patterns. In two of the subjects, we measured high gamma-range field potentials from electrocorticography arrays implanted over a large portion of the occipital and inferotemporal cortex. In the other two subjects, we measured BOLD fMRI responses across the entire brain. Both techniques revealed robust, regionally specific patterns of category-selective neural responses. We report that at least six face-selective patches mark the occipitotemporal pathway of the marmoset, with the most anterior patches showing the strongest preference for faces over other stimuli. The similar appearance of these patches to previous findings in macaques and humans, including their apparent arrangement in two parallel pathways, suggests that core elements of the face processing network were present in the common anthropoid primate ancestor living ∼35 million years ago. The findings also identify the marmoset as a viable animal model system for studying specialized neural mechanisms related to high-level social visual perception in humans. PMID:25609630

  17. Human vestibular cortex as identified with caloric stimulation in functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Fasold, Oliver; von Brevern, Michael; Kuhberg, Marc; Ploner, Christoph J; Villringer, Arno; Lempert, Thomas; Wenzel, Rüdiger

    2002-11-01

    Anatomic and electrophysiological studies in monkeys have yielded a detailed map of cortex areas receiving vestibular afferents. In contrast, comparatively little is known about the cortical representation of the human vestibular system. In this study we applied caloric stimulation and fMRI to further characterize human cortical vestibular areas and to test for hemispheric dominance of vestibular information processing. For caloric vestibular stimulation we used cold nitrogen to avoid susceptibility artifacts induced by water calorics. Right and left side vestibular stimulation was repetitively performed inducing a nystagmus for at least 90 s after the end of the stimulation in all subjects. Only the first 60 s of this nystagmus period was included for statistical analysis and compared with the baseline condition. Activation maps revealed a cortical network with right hemispheric dominance, which in all subjects comprised the temporoparietal junction extending into the posterior insula and, furthermore, the anterior insula, pre- and postcentral gyrus, areas in the parietal lobe, the ventrolateral portion of the occipital lobe, and the inferior frontal gyrus extending into the inferior part of the precentral sulcus. In conclusion, caloric stimulation in fMRI reveals a widespread cortical network involved in vestibular signal processing corresponding to the findings from animal experiments and previous functional imaging studies in humans. Furthermore, this study demonstrates a strong right hemispheric dominance of vestibular cortex areas regardless of the stimulated side, consistent with the current view of a rightward asymmetrical cortical network for spatial orientation. PMID:12414278

  18. Right hemispheric dominance of visual phenomena evoked by intracerebral stimulation of the human visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Jacques; Frismand, Solne; Vignal, Jean-Pierre; Colnat-Coulbois, Sophie; Koessler, Laurent; Vespignani, Herv; Rossion, Bruno; Maillard, Louis

    2014-07-01

    Electrical brain stimulation can provide important information about the functional organization of the human visual cortex. Here, we report the visual phenomena evoked by a large number (562) of intracerebral electrical stimulations performed at low-intensity with depth electrodes implanted in the occipito-parieto-temporal cortex of 22 epileptic patients. Focal electrical stimulation evoked primarily visual hallucinations with various complexities: simple (spot or blob), intermediary (geometric forms), or complex meaningful shapes (faces); visual illusions and impairments of visual recognition were more rarely observed. With the exception of the most posterior cortical sites, the probability of evoking a visual phenomenon was significantly higher in the right than the left hemisphere. Intermediary and complex hallucinations, illusions, and visual recognition impairments were almost exclusively evoked by stimulation in the right hemisphere. The probability of evoking a visual phenomenon decreased substantially from the occipital pole to the most anterior sites of the temporal lobe, and this decrease was more pronounced in the left hemisphere. The greater sensitivity of the right occipito-parieto-temporal regions to intracerebral electrical stimulation to evoke visual phenomena supports a predominant role of right hemispheric visual areas from perception to recognition of visual forms, regardless of visuospatial and attentional factors. PMID:24733699

  19. Training transfers the limits on perception from parietal to ventral cortex.

    PubMed

    Chang, Dorita H F; Mevorach, Carmel; Kourtzi, Zoe; Welchman, Andrew E

    2014-10-20

    Visually guided behavior depends on (1) extracting and (2) discriminating signals from complex retinal inputs, and these perceptual skills improve with practice. For instance, training on aerial reconnaissance facilitated World War II Allied military operations; analysts pored over stereoscopic photographs, becoming expert at (1) segmenting pictures into meaningful items to break camouflage from (noisy) backgrounds, and (2) discriminating fine details to distinguish V-weapons from innocuous pylons. Training is understood to optimize neural circuits that process scene features (e.g., orientation) for particular purposes (e.g., judging position). Yet learning is most beneficial when it generalizes to other settings and is critical in recovery after adversity, challenging understanding of the circuitry involved. Here we used repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to infer the functional organization supporting learning generalization in the human brain. First, we show dissociable contributions of the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) versus lateral occipital (LO) circuits: extracting targets from noise is disrupted by PPC stimulation, in contrast to judging feature differences, which is affected by LO rTMS. Then, we demonstrate that training causes striking changes in this circuit: after feature training, identifying a target in noise is not disrupted by PPC stimulation but instead by LO stimulation. This indicates that training shifts the limits on perception from parietal to ventral brain regions and identifies a critical neural circuit for visual learning. We suggest that generalization is implemented by supplanting dynamic processing conducted in the PPC with specific feature templates stored in the ventral cortex. PMID:25283780

  20. Individual attentional selection capacities are reflected in interhemispheric connectivity of the parietal cortex.

    PubMed

    Vossel, Simone; Weidner, Ralph; Moos, Katharina; Fink, Gereon R

    2016-04-01

    Modelling psychophysical data using the Theory of Visual Attention (TVA) allows for a quantification of attentional sub-processes, such as the resolution of competition amongst multiple stimuli by top-down control signals for target selection (TVA-parameter α). This fMRI study investigated the neural correlates of α by comparing activity differences and changes of effective connectivity between conditions where a target was accompanied by a distractor or by a second target. Twenty-five participants performed a partial report task inside the MRI scanner. The left angular gyrus (ANG), medial frontal, and posterior cingulate cortex showed higher activity when a target was accompanied by a distractor as opposed to a second target. The reverse contrast yielded activation of a bilateral fronto-parietal network, the anterior insula, anterior cingulate cortex, and left inferior occipital gyrus. A psychophysiological interaction analysis revealed that the connectivity between left ANG and the left and right supramarginal gyrus (SMG), left anterior insula, and right putamen was enhanced in the target-distractor condition in participants with worse attentional top-down control. Dynamic causal modelling suggested that the connection from left ANG to right SMG during distractor presence was modulated by α. Our data show that interindividual differences in attentional processing are reflected in changes of effective connectivity without significant differences in activation strength of network nodes. PMID:26827815

  1. Effect of transcranial magnetic stimulation on single-unit activity in the cat primary visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Moliadze, Vera; Zhao, Yongqiang; Eysel, Ulf; Funke, Klaus

    2003-12-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has become a well established procedure for testing and modulating the neuronal excitability of human brain areas, but relatively little is known about the cellular processes induced by this rather coarse stimulus. In a first attempt, we performed extracellular single-unit recordings in the primary visual cortex (area 17) of the anaesthetised and paralysed cat, with the stimulating magnetic field centred at the recording site (2 x 70 mm figure-of-eight coil). The effect of single biphasic TMS pulses, which induce a lateral-to-medial electric current within the occipital pole of the right hemisphere, was tested for spontaneous as well as visually evoked activity. For cat visual cortex we found that a single TMS pulse elicited distinct episodes of enhanced and suppressed activity: in general, a facilitation of activity was found during the first 500 ms, followed thereafter by a suppression of activity lasting up to a few seconds. Strong stimuli exceeding 50 % of maximal stimulator output could also lead to an early suppression of activity during the first 100-200 ms, followed by stronger (rebound) facilitation. Early suppression and facilitation of activity may be related to a more or less direct stimulation of inhibitory and excitatory interneurons, probably with different thresholds. The late, long-lasting suppression is more likely to be related to metabotropic or metabolic processes, or even vascular responses. The time course of facilitation/inhibition may provide clues regarding the action of repetitive TMS application. PMID:12963791

  2. Visual cortex of congenitally blind individuals responds to symbolic number.

    PubMed

    Kanjlia, Shipra; Lane, Connor; Feigenson, Lisa; Bedny, Marina

    2015-09-01

    Numerical processing is considered to be a highly visual capacity. Like other early visual features, numerosity is susceptible to visual adaptation. Numerosity-selective neurons naturally emerge in the dorsal visual stream of monkeys. Math abilities are predicted by both visual numerical estimation abilities and visuospatial abilities. Math calculation also activates the intraparietal sulcus (IPS), which responds to visual numerosity. Do numerical processing abilities depend on visual experience? We asked whether the cortical circuits involved in numerical processing develop normally in individuals who are blind from birth. While undergoing fMRI, 17 blind and 19 sighted participants heard pairs of equations (e.g. X-2=5, X-4=3) and judged whether the value of "X" was the same. Equations were either simple (single-digit, e.g. X-2=7) or complex (double-digit, e.g. X-12=17). In a control task, participants judged whether pairs of sentences had the same meaning. In a second experiment, participants heard syntactically simple and complex sentences and answered yes/no questions about them. Just as in sighted individuals, the IPS in blind individuals responds more to math than sentences and is sensitive to math complexity. In blind individuals the typical IPS activity extended posteriorly into "visual" occipital cortex. We found responses to auditory number symbols in the anatomical territory of dorsal V1 to V3. The response profile of this "visual" number area was similar to the IPS: 1) it responded more to math than sentences 2) was sensitive to math difficulty and 3) was not sensitive to syntactic complexity. We find that blind individuals develop typical IPS responses to number. This suggests that numerical representations in the IPS are not tied to visual processing abilities. Blind but not sighted individuals also activate "visual" cortical areas during numerical tasks. Together with prior data from our lab, these results suggest that higher cognitive functions expand into deafferented visual cortex of humans. Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015. PMID:26325882

  3. Dynamics of EEG rhythms support distinct visual selection mechanisms in parietal cortex: a simultaneous transcranial magnetic stimulation and EEG study.

    PubMed

    Capotosto, Paolo; Spadone, Sara; Tosoni, Annalisa; Sestieri, Carlo; Romani, Gian Luca; Della Penna, Stefania; Corbetta, Maurizio

    2015-01-14

    Using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), we have recently shown a functional anatomical distinction in human parietal cortex between regions involved in maintaining attention to a location [ventral intraparietal sulcus (vIPS)] and a region involved in shifting attention between locations [medial superior parietal lobule (mSPL)]. In particular, while rTMS interference over vIPS impaired target discrimination at contralateral attended locations, interference over mSPL affected performance following shifts of attention regardless of the visual field (Capotosto et al., 2013). Here, using rTMS interference in conjunction with EEG recordings of brain rhythms during the presentation of cues that indicate to either shift or maintain spatial attention, we tested whether this functional anatomical segregation involves different mechanisms of rhythm synchronization. The transient inactivation of vIPS reduced the amplitude of the expected parieto-occipital low-α (8-10 Hz) desynchronization contralateral to the cued location. Conversely, the transient inactivation of mSPL, compared with vIPS, reduced the high-α (10-12 Hz) desynchronization induced by shifting attention into both visual fields. Furthermore, rTMS induced a frequency-specific delay of task-related modulation of brain rhythms. Specifically, rTMS over vIPS or mSPL during maintenance (stay cues) or shifting (shift cues) of spatial attention, respectively, caused a delay of α parieto-occipital desynchronization. Moreover, rTMS over vIPS during stay cues caused a delay of δ (2-4 Hz) frontocentral synchronization. These findings further support the anatomo-functional subdivision of the dorsal attention network in subsystems devoted to shifting or maintaining covert visuospatial attention and indicate that these mechanisms operate in different frequency channels linking frontal to parieto-occipital visual regions. PMID:25589765

  4. Endoscopic-assisted interhemispheric parieto-occipital transtentorial approach for microsurgical resection of a pineal region tumor: operative video and technical nuances.

    PubMed

    Liu, James K

    2016-01-01

    The angle of the straight sinus and tentorium cerebelli can often influence the choice of surgical approach to the pineal region. The supracerebellar infratentorial approach can be technically challenging and a relative contraindication in cases where the angle of the straight sinus and tentorium is very steep. Similarly, an occipital transtentorial approach, which uses a low occipital craniotomy at the junction of the superior sagittal sinus and transverse sinus, may not provide the best trajectory to the pineal region in patients with a steep tentorium. In addition, this approach often necessitates retraction on the occipital lobe to access the tentorial incisura and pineal region, which can increase the risk of visual compromise. In this operative video, the author demonstrates an alternative route using an endoscopic-assisted interhemispheric parieto-occipital transtentorial approach to a pineal region tumor in a patient with a steep straight sinus and tentorium. The approach provided a shorter route and more direct trajectory to the tumor at the tentorial incisura, and avoided direct fixed retraction on the occipital lobe when performed using the lateral position, thereby minimizing visual complications. This video atlas demonstrates the operative technique and surgical nuances, including the application of endoscopic-assisted microsurgical resection and operative pearls for preservation of the deep cerebral veins. In summary, the parieto-occipital transtentorial approach with endoscopic assistance is an important approach in the armamentarium for surgical management of pineal region tumors. The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/Ph4veG14aTk . PMID:26722692

  5. Multimap formation in visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Rishabh; Millin, Rachel; Mel, Bartlett W.

    2015-01-01

    An extrastriate visual area such as V2 or V4 contains neurons selective for a multitude of complex shapes, all sharing a common topographic organization. Simultaneously developing multiple interdigitated maps—hereafter a “multimap”—is challenging in that neurons must compete to generate a diversity of response types locally, while cooperating with their dispersed same-type neighbors to achieve uniform visual field coverage for their response type at all orientations, scales, etc. Previously proposed map development schemes have relied on smooth spatial interaction functions to establish both topography and columnar organization, but by locally homogenizing cells' response properties, local smoothing mechanisms effectively rule out multimap formation. We found in computer simulations that the key requirements for multimap development are that neurons are enabled for plasticity only within highly active regions of cortex designated “learning eligibility regions” (LERs), but within an LER, each cell's learning rate is determined only by its activity level with no dependence on location. We show that a hybrid developmental rule that combines spatial and activity-dependent learning criteria in this way successfully produces multimaps when the input stream contains multiple distinct feature types, or in the degenerate case of a single feature type, produces a V1-like map with “salt-and-pepper” structure. Our results support the hypothesis that cortical maps containing a fine mixture of different response types, whether in monkey extrastriate cortex, mouse V1 or elsewhere in the cortex, rather than signaling a breakdown of map formation mechanisms at the fine scale, are a product of a generic cortical developmental scheme designed to map cells with a diversity of response properties across a shared topographic space. PMID:26641946

  6. Multimap formation in visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rishabh; Millin, Rachel; Mel, Bartlett W

    2015-12-01

    An extrastriate visual area such as V2 or V4 contains neurons selective for a multitude of complex shapes, all sharing a common topographic organization. Simultaneously developing multiple interdigitated maps-hereafter a "multimap"-is challenging in that neurons must compete to generate a diversity of response types locally, while cooperating with their dispersed same-type neighbors to achieve uniform visual field coverage for their response type at all orientations, scales, etc. Previously proposed map development schemes have relied on smooth spatial interaction functions to establish both topography and columnar organization, but by locally homogenizing cells' response properties, local smoothing mechanisms effectively rule out multimap formation. We found in computer simulations that the key requirements for multimap development are that neurons are enabled for plasticity only within highly active regions of cortex designated "learning eligibility regions" (LERs), but within an LER, each cell's learning rate is determined only by its activity level with no dependence on location. We show that a hybrid developmental rule that combines spatial and activity-dependent learning criteria in this way successfully produces multimaps when the input stream contains multiple distinct feature types, or in the degenerate case of a single feature type, produces a V1-like map with "salt-and-pepper" structure. Our results support the hypothesis that cortical maps containing a fine mixture of different response types, whether in monkey extrastriate cortex, mouse V1 or elsewhere in the cortex, rather than signaling a breakdown of map formation mechanisms at the fine scale, are a product of a generic cortical developmental scheme designed to map cells with a diversity of response properties across a shared topographic space. PMID:26641946

  7. Right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex involvement in the integration of emotional processing: Parametric mediation analysis of fMRI.

    PubMed

    Kida, Ikuhiro; Hoshi, Yoko

    2016-02-26

    Emotion plays an important role in goal-directed behavior. Although numerous neuroimaging studies have been conducted, the neural mechanisms behind emotion generation and regulation are still elusive. This is partly explained by large individual variations in emotional responses in addition to the fact that emotion is a complex process. The present functional magnetic resonance imaging study aimed firstly to specify valence-dependent brain activation, and secondly to clarify the interactions between the regions underlying emotional processing. We measured brain activation in 12 healthy adults while passively viewing affective pictures. The individual valence ratings were negatively correlated with activation in the frontal, parietal, occipital lobes, and in the subcortical regions including the amygdalae. The parametric mediation analysis performed on these regions showed that the right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (Brodmann area 47) was main mediator of the valence ratings with other regions. Interestingly, there was no mediator region for the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex. These results indicated the possibility that the right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex mainly participated in the integration of visually induced emotional processes in the valence dimension. PMID:26797654

  8. Top-down modulation in the infant brain: Learning-induced expectations rapidly affect the sensory cortex at 6 months.

    PubMed

    Emberson, Lauren L; Richards, John E; Aslin, Richard N

    2015-08-01

    Recent theoretical work emphasizes the role of expectation in neural processing, shifting the focus from feed-forward cortical hierarchies to models that include extensive feedback (e.g., predictive coding). Empirical support for expectation-related feedback is compelling but restricted to adult humans and nonhuman animals. Given the considerable differences in neural organization, connectivity, and efficiency between infant and adult brains, it is a crucial yet open question whether expectation-related feedback is an inherent property of the cortex (i.e., operational early in development) or whether expectation-related feedback develops with extensive experience and neural maturation. To determine whether infants' expectations about future sensory input modulate their sensory cortices without the confounds of stimulus novelty or repetition suppression, we used a cross-modal (audiovisual) omission paradigm and used functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) to record hemodynamic responses in the infant cortex. We show that the occipital cortex of 6-month-old infants exhibits the signature of expectation-based feedback. Crucially, we found that this region does not respond to auditory stimuli if they are not predictive of a visual event. Overall, these findings suggest that the young infant's brain is already capable of some rudimentary form of expectation-based feedback. PMID:26195772

  9. Top-down modulation in the infant brain: Learning-induced expectations rapidly affect the sensory cortex at 6 months

    PubMed Central

    Emberson, Lauren L.; Richards, John E.; Aslin, Richard N.

    2015-01-01

    Recent theoretical work emphasizes the role of expectation in neural processing, shifting the focus from feed-forward cortical hierarchies to models that include extensive feedback (e.g., predictive coding). Empirical support for expectation-related feedback is compelling but restricted to adult humans and nonhuman animals. Given the considerable differences in neural organization, connectivity, and efficiency between infant and adult brains, it is a crucial yet open question whether expectation-related feedback is an inherent property of the cortex (i.e., operational early in development) or whether expectation-related feedback develops with extensive experience and neural maturation. To determine whether infants’ expectations about future sensory input modulate their sensory cortices without the confounds of stimulus novelty or repetition suppression, we used a cross-modal (audiovisual) omission paradigm and used functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) to record hemodynamic responses in the infant cortex. We show that the occipital cortex of 6-month-old infants exhibits the signature of expectation-based feedback. Crucially, we found that this region does not respond to auditory stimuli if they are not predictive of a visual event. Overall, these findings suggest that the young infant’s brain is already capable of some rudimentary form of expectation-based feedback. PMID:26195772

  10. Sensory-specific anomic aphasia following left occipital lesions: Data from free oral descriptions of concrete word meanings

    PubMed Central

    Mårtensson, F.; Roll, M.; Lindgren, M.; Apt, P.; Horne, M.

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated hierarchical lexical semantic structure in oral descriptions of concrete word meanings produced by a subject (ZZ) diagnosed with anomic aphasia due to left occipital lesions. The focus of the analysis was production of a) nouns at different levels of semantic specificity (e.g., “robin”–“bird”–“animal”) and b) words describing sensory or motor experiences (e.g., “blue,” “soft,” “fly”). Results show that in contrast to healthy and aphasic controls, who produced words at all levels of specificity and mainly vision-related sensory information, ZZ produced almost exclusively nouns at the most non-specific levels and words associated with sound and movement. PMID:23425233

  11. 13C MRS of occipital and frontal lobes at 3 T using a volume coil for stochastic proton decoupling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shizhe; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Shumin; Araneta, Maria Ferraris; Johnson, Christopher S.; Xiang, Yun; Innis, Robert B.; Shen, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Previously, we devised a novel strategy for in vivo 13C MRS using [2-13C]glucose infusion and low-power proton decoupling, and proposed that this strategy could be used to acquire 13C MR spectra from the frontal lobe of the human brain. Here, we demonstrate, for the first time, in vivo 13C MRS of human frontal lobe acquired at 3 T. Because the primary metabolites of [2-13C]glucose can be decoupled using very-low-radiofrequency power, we used a volume coil for proton decoupling in this study. The homogeneous B1 field of the volume coil was found to significantly enhance the decoupling efficiency of the stochastic decoupling sequence. Detailed specific absorption rates inside the human head were analyzed using the finite difference time domain method to ensure experimental safety. In vivo 13C spectra from the occipital and frontal lobes of the human brain were obtained. At a decoupling power of 30 W (time-averaged power, 2.45 W), the spectra from the occipital lobe showed well-resolved spectral resolution and excellent signal-to-noise ratio. Although frontal lobe 13C spectra were affected by local B0 field inhomogeneity, we demonstrated that the spectral quality could be improved using post-acquisition data processing. In particular, we showed that the frontal lobe glutamine C5 at 178.5 ppm and aspartate C4 at 178.3 ppm could be spectrally resolved with effective proton decoupling and B0 field correction. Because of its large spatial coverage, volume coil decoupling provides the potential to acquire 13C MRS from more than one brain region simultaneously. PMID:20878974

  12. Paleoneurology of two new neandertal occipitals from El Sidrn (asturias, Spain) in the context of homo endocranial evolution.

    PubMed

    Pea-Melin, Angel; Rosas, Antonio; Garca-Tabernero, Antonio; Bastir, Markus; De La Rasilla, Marco

    2011-08-01

    The endocranial surface description and comparative analyses of two new neandertal occipital fragments (labelled SD-1149 and SD-370a) from the El Sidrn site (Asturias, Spain) reveal new aspects of neandertal brain morphological asymmetries. The dural sinus drainage pattern, as observed on the sagittal-transverse system, as well as the cerebral occipito-petalias, point out a slightly differential configuration of the neandertal brain when compared to other Homo species, especially H. sapiens. The neandertal dural sinus drainage pattern is organized in a more asymmetric mode, in such a way that the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) drains either to the right or to the left transverse sinuses, but in no case in a confluent mode (i.e. simultaneous continuation of SSS with both right (RTS) and left (LTS) transverse sinuses). Besides, the superior sagittal sinus shows an accentuated deviation from of the mid-sagittal plane in its way to the RTS in 35% of neandertals. This condition, which increases the asymmetry of the system, is almost nonexistent neither in the analyzed Homo fossil species sample nor in that of anatomically modern humans. Regarding the cerebral occipito-petalias, neandertals manifest one of the lowest percentages of left petalia of the Homo sample (including modern H. sapiens). As left occipito-petalia is the predominant pattern in hominins, it seems as if neandertals would have developed a different pattern of brain hemispheres asymmetry. Finally, the relief and position of the the cerebral sulci and gyri impressions observed in the El Sidrn occipital specimens look similar to those observed in modern H. sapiens. PMID:21714107

  13. Frontal cortex, timing and memory.

    PubMed

    Olton, D S

    1989-01-01

    Two sets of experiments examine the psychological functions and neural organization of the frontal lobes. The first set investigates the effects of lesions of the frontal cortex (FC) on the ability to perform temporal discriminations, using the techniques and theoretical framework of scalar timing theory. FC lesions changed the reference memory for the expected time of reinforcement, so that rats expected reinforcement later than it actually occurred. These results demonstrate that the FC modulates temporal memory. The second set of experiments examined the behavioral effects of lesions in the nucleus basalis magnocellularis (NBM), an area in the basal forebrain that has a significant projection to the frontal cortex. NBM lesions produced impairments in many different tasks assessing both recent and long-term memory. A comparison of the behavioral and neurochemical effects of different types of lesions in the NBM examines the role of cholinergic and noncholinergic neurotransmitters in these behavioral deficits. These data demonstrate that a "frontal syndrome" can follow selective lesions in the NBM, and indicate that the NBM must have a strong role in frontal lobe function. PMID:2651964

  14. Abnormal Anatomical Connectivity between the Amygdala and Orbitofrontal Cortex in Conduct Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Passamonti, Luca; Fairchild, Graeme; Fornito, Alex; Goodyer, Ian M.; Nimmo-Smith, Ian; Hagan, Cindy C.; Calder, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Previous research suggested that structural and functional abnormalities within the amygdala and orbitofrontal cortex contribute to the pathophysiology of Conduct Disorder (CD). Here, we investigated whether the integrity of the white-matter pathways connecting these regions is abnormal and thus may represent a putative neurobiological marker for CD. Methods Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) was used to investigate white-matter microstructural integrity in male adolescents with childhood-onset CD, compared with healthy controls matched in age, sex, intelligence, and socioeconomic status. Two approaches were employed to analyze DTI data: voxel-based morphometry of fractional anisotropy (FA), an index of white-matter integrity, and virtual dissection of white-matter pathways using tractography. Results Adolescents with CD displayed higher FA within the right external capsule relative to controls (T = 6.08, P<0.05, Family-Wise Error, whole-brain correction). Tractography analyses showed that FA values within the uncinate fascicle (connecting the amygdala and orbitofrontal cortex) were abnormally increased in individuals with CD relative to controls. This was in contrast with the inferior frontal-occipital fascicle, which showed no significant group differences in FA. The finding of increased FA in the uncinate fascicle remained significant when factoring out the contribution of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms. There were no group differences in the number of streamlines in either of these anatomical tracts. Conclusions These results provide evidence that CD is associated with white-matter microstructural abnormalities in the anatomical tract that connects the amygdala and orbitofrontal cortex, the uncinate fascicle. These results implicate abnormal maturation of white-matter pathways which are fundamental in the regulation of emotional behavior in CD. PMID:23144970

  15. Understanding the topography of face and body selectivity in human ventral temporal cortex.

    PubMed

    Chan, Annie; Silson, Edward; Baker, Chris

    2015-09-01

    Faces and body-parts are amongst the most salient visual stimuli in our environment. Research from human and non-human primates has reported multiple clusters of selectivity for faces and body-parts in the ventral visual pathway. Body-selective regions are often found close to face-selective regions, suggesting some sort of organizational principle. However, the nature of this organizational principle is not well established. Here, we investigated the topographical organization and specificity of body- and face-selective regions in visual temporal cortex at high resolution (1.2 mm isotropic voxels) using a 7T MRI scanner. First, we identified regions selective for faces and body-parts. Given prior reports of a body-part topography in lateral occipital cortex, we separately tested both hands and feet, which might be expected to have the most distinct representations. Second, we mapped population receptive fields in each participant to determine the extent to which the location of face- and body-selectivity reflect underlying retinotopic biases. Third, we tested the representational structure in face- and body-selective regions in a condition-rich event-related experiment. As expected, we found that faces elicited strong responses along the mid fusiform sulcus, in a region that has often been referred to as the Fusiform Face Area. This face selectivity coincided with a foveal representation of the visual field, while hands and feet produced robust responses adjacent and lateral to the face selectivity. We found little evidence for alternating patches of face and limb selectivity. Instead, we observed parallel streams of limb and face selectivity, extending from lateral to medial areas of the ventral cortex. Further, analysis of the representational structure of limb and face selective regions revealed striking differences. Our findings highlight the fine-grained organizational structure in ventral temporal and the importance of underlying retinotopic biases. Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015. PMID:26326311

  16. Noradrenalin and dopamine receptors both control cAMP-PKA signaling throughout the cerebral cortex

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Shinobu; Bouhadana, Maud; Morel, Carole; Faure, Philippe; Cauli, Bruno; Lambolez, Bertrand; Hepp, Rgine

    2014-01-01

    Noradrenergic fibers innervate the entire cerebral cortex, whereas the cortical distribution of dopaminergic fibers is more restricted. However, the relative functional impact of noradrenalin and dopamine receptors in various cortical regions is largely unknown. Using a specific genetic label, we first confirmed that noradrenergic fibers innervate the entire cortex whereas dopaminergic fibers were present in all layers of restricted medial and lateral areas but only in deep layers of other areas. Imaging of a genetically encoded sensor revealed that noradrenalin and dopamine widely activate PKA in cortical pyramidal neurons of frontal, parietal and occipital regions with scarce dopaminergic fibers. Responses to noradrenalin had higher amplitude, velocity and occurred at more than 10-fold lower dose than those elicited by dopamine, whose amplitude and velocity increased along the antero-posterior axis. The pharmacology of these responses was consistent with the involvement of Gs-coupled beta1 adrenergic and D1/D5 dopaminergic receptors, but the inhibition of both noradrenalin and dopamine responses by beta adrenergic antagonists was suggestive of the existence of beta1-D1/D5 heteromeric receptors. Responses also involved Gi-coupled alpha2 adrenergic and D2-like dopaminergic receptors that markedly reduced their amplitude and velocity and contributed to their cell-to-cell heterogeneity. Our results reveal that noradrenalin and dopamine receptors both control cAMP-PKA signaling throughout the cerebral cortex with moderate regional and laminar differences. These receptors can thus mediate widespread effects of both catecholamines, which are reportedly co-released by cortical noradrenergic fibers beyond the territory of dopaminergic fibers. PMID:25191229

  17. An analysis of von Economo neurons in the cerebral cortex of cetaceans, artiodactyls, and perissodactyls.

    PubMed

    Raghanti, Mary Ann; Spurlock, Linda B; Treichler, F Robert; Weigel, Sara E; Stimmelmayr, Raphaela; Butti, Camilla; Thewissen, J G M Hans; Hof, Patrick R

    2015-07-01

    Von Economo neurons (VENs) are specialized projection neurons with a characteristic spindle-shaped soma and thick basal and apical dendrites. VENs have been described in restricted cortical regions, with their most frequent appearance in layers III and V of the anterior cingulate cortex, anterior insula, and frontopolar cortex of humans, great apes, macaque monkeys, elephants, and some cetaceans. Recently, a ubiquitous distribution of VENs was reported in various cortical areas in the pygmy hippopotamus, one of the closest living relatives of cetaceans. That finding suggested that VENs might not be unique to only a few species that possess enlarged brains. In the present analysis, we assessed the phylogenetic distribution of VENs within species representative of the superordinal clade that includes cetartiodactyls and perissodactyls, as well as afrotherians. In addition, the distribution of fork cells that are often found in close proximity to VENs was also assessed. Nissl-stained sections from the frontal pole, anterior cingulate cortex, anterior insula, and occipital pole of bowhead whale, cow, sheep, deer, horse, pig, rock hyrax, and human were examined using stereologic methods to quantify VENs and fork cells within layer V of all four cortical regions. VENs and fork cells were found in each of the species examined here with species-specific differences in distributions and densities. The present results demonstrated that VENs and fork cells were not restricted to highly encephalized or socially complex species, and their repeated emergence among distantly related species seems to represent convergent evolution of specialized pyramidal neurons. The widespread phylogenetic presence of VENs and fork cells indicates that these neuron morphologies readily emerged in response to selective forces,whose variety and nature are yet to be identified. PMID:24852852

  18. Investigating Representations of Facial Identity in Human Ventral Visual Cortex with Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Gilaie-Dotan, Sharon; Silvanto, Juha; Schwarzkopf, Dietrich S.; Rees, Geraint

    2010-01-01

    The occipital face area (OFA) is face-selective. This enhanced activation to faces could reflect either generic face and shape-related processing or high-level conceptual processing of identity. Here we examined these two possibilities using a state-dependent transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) paradigm. The lateral occipital (LO) cortex which is activated non-selectively by various types of objects served as a control site. We localized OFA and LO on a per-participant basis using functional MRI. We then examined whether TMS applied to either of these regions affected the ability of participants to decide whether two successively presented and physically different face images were of the same famous person or different famous people. TMS was applied during the delay between first and second face presentations to investigate whether neuronal populations in these regions played a causal role in mediating the behavioral effects of identity repetition. Behaviorally we found a robust identity repetition effect, with shorter reaction times (RTs) when identity was repeated, regardless of the fact that the pictures were physically different. Surprisingly, TMS applied over LO (but not OFA) modulated overall RTs, compared to the No-TMS condition. But critically, we found no effects of TMS to either area that were modulated by identity repetition. Thus, we found no evidence to suggest that OFA or LO contain neuronal representations selective for the identity of famous faces which play a causal role in identity processing. Instead, these brain regions may be involved in the processing of more generic features of their preferred stimulus categories. PMID:20631842

  19. Microstructural Changes of the Baboon Cerebral Cortex during Gestational Development Reflected in MRI Diffusion Anisotropy

    PubMed Central

    Kroenke, Christopher D.; Van Essen, David C.; Inder, Terrie E.; Rees, Sandra; Bretthorst, G. Larry; Neil, Jeffrey J.

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral cortical development involves complex changes in cellular architecture and connectivity that occur at regionally varying rates. Using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DTI) to analyze cortical microstructure, previous studies have shown that cortical maturation is associated with a progressive decline in water diffusion anisotropy. We applied high-resolution DTI to fixed postmortem fetal baboon brains and characterized regional changes in diffusion anisotropy using surface-based visualization methods. Anisotropy values vary within the thickness of the cortical sheet, being higher in superficial layers. At a regional level, anisotropy at embryonic day E90 (0.5 term; gestation lasts 185 days in this species) is low in allocortical and periallocortical regions near the frontotemporal junction and is uniformly high throughout isocortex. At E125 (0.66 term), regions having relatively low anisotropy (greater maturity) include cortex in and near the Sylvian fissure and the precentral gyrus. By E146 (0.8 term), cortical anisotropy values are uniformly low and show less regional variation. Expansion of cortical surface area does not occur uniformly in all regions. Measured using surface-based methods, cortical expansion over E125–E146 was larger in parietal, medial occipital, and lateral frontal regions than in inferior temporal, lateral occipital, and orbitofrontal regions. However, the overall correlation between the degree of cortical expansion and cortical anisotropy is modest. These results extend our understanding of cortical development revealed by histologic methods. The approach presented here can be applied in vivo to the study of normal brain development and its disruption in human infants and experimental animal models. PMID:18003829

  20. Learning and Recognition of a Non-conscious Sequence of Events in Human Primary Visual Cortex.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Clive R; Andrews, Samantha K; Antoniades, Chrystalina A; Kennard, Christopher; Soto, David

    2016-03-21

    Human primary visual cortex (V1) has long been associated with learning simple low-level visual discriminations [1] and is classically considered outside of neural systems that support high-level cognitive behavior in contexts that differ from the original conditions of learning, such as recognition memory [2, 3]. Here, we used a novel fMRI-based dichoptic masking protocol-designed to induce activity in V1, without modulation from visual awareness-to test whether human V1 is implicated in human observers rapidly learning and then later (15-20 min) recognizing a non-conscious and complex (second-order) visuospatial sequence. Learning was associated with a change in V1 activity, as part of a temporo-occipital and basal ganglia network, which is at variance with the cortico-cerebellar network identified in prior studies of "implicit" sequence learning that involved motor responses and visible stimuli (e.g., [4]). Recognition memory was associated with V1 activity, as part of a temporo-occipital network involving the hippocampus, under conditions that were not imputable to mechanisms associated with conscious retrieval. Notably, the V1 responses during learning and recognition separately predicted non-conscious recognition memory, and functional coupling between V1 and the hippocampus was enhanced for old retrieval cues. The results provide a basis for novel hypotheses about the signals that can drive recognition memory, because these data (1) identify human V1 with a memory network that can code complex associative serial visuospatial information and support later non-conscious recognition memory-guided behavior (cf. [5]) and (2) align with mouse models of experience-dependent V1 plasticity in learning and memory [6]. PMID:26948883

  1. Evidence of Ferrichromite of Extraterrestrial Origin by Means of Rock Magnetic Studies from the LOC-9 Drill Core (lockne Crater, Sweden)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melero Asensio, I.; Martin Hernandez, F.; rmo, J.; Guerrero-Suarez, S.

    2011-12-01

    The Lockne (456 Ma) marine-target impact structure is a concentric with a 7.5 km wide inner crater in the crystalline basement, and an up to 3.5 km wide brim where the sedimentary target succession is partially or completely removed. Much of the crater is covered by sediments deposited during the resurge of seawater, as well as by secular sediments. The LOC-9 core is 31.04m long and was drilled into the crystalline crater brim and the proximal ejecta flap of the inner crater. The ejecta flap at this location is mainly brecciated basalt with some blending of dark shale just at the contact with the more intact granitic basement. Published studies of the resurge deposits by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) show the presence of ferrichromite particles interpreted to be meteoritic material. Here we combine complete rock magnetic characterization of the magnetic signal along the core with the characterization of the ferrichromite phase. Rock magnetic analysis includes low-field magnetic susceptibility, hysteresis loops, isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) acquisition curves, coercivity spectra derived from IRM acquisition curves, back field IRM demagnetization curves and thermomagnetic curves. Additionally, a compositional analysis of a magnetic extract with SEM-EDX was done in order to identify the dominant magnetic fraction. Magnetite and titanomagnetite with different Ti content are identified as the main carriers of the magnetic signal along the core, based on the thermomagnetic curves, the saturation magnetization measured in the hysteresis loops, and the IRM acquisition curves. Pyrite is indicated by the thermomagnetic curve at one location in the core. A high coercivity phase is also observed in some samples. The coercivity spectral analysis shows one single population of magnetic minerals that dominates the magnetic signal at a level where the magnetic susceptibility is particularly high. The median destructive field is consistent with values reported at positions in the core with lower susceptibility and the dispersion parameter is well constrained with average values suggesting no significant diagenesis. The level immediately above the brecciated basement is composed of a relatively high amount of target material. At this depth, thermomagnetic curves reveal the presence of a magnetic phase with low Curie unblocking temperature ( 100 C). No evidence of transformation of goethite into hematite is noted, which suggests the ferrichromite to be of extraterrestrial origin. This exotic phase is characterized by rock magnetic parameters derived from thermomagnetic curves, IRM acquisition curves, and hysteresis loops. The estimated Curie temperature is also consistent with a 50% content Cr, as reported by previous SEM studies of material from the Lockne crater. We conclude that rock magnetic studies complement other methods in the detection of potential extraterrestrial component in impactites.

  2. Uniplanar Nystagmus Associated with Perceptual and Cognitive Visual Dysfunction due to Presumed Focal Ischemic Occipital Cortical Atrophy: A Missed Diagnosis and New Observation

    PubMed Central

    Philip, Swetha Sara; Dutton, Gordon N.; Dorris, Liam

    2012-01-01

    Uniplanar nystagmus has been described in relation to pathology of the brain stem, retina, optic nerve, sensory visual deprivation, periventricular leucomalacia, and drug toxicity. This paper describes a case of uniplanar nystagmus associated with features of higher visual dysfunction and a presumed focal insult to the occipital lobes following an episode of neonatal apnea. PMID:23056980

  3. Progressive Cognitive Impairment Evolving to Dementia Parallels Parieto-Occipital and Temporal Enlargement in Idiopathic Chronic Hydrocephalus: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Missori, Paolo; Curr, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Little is known regarding progressive enlargement of the ventricular system in symptomatic patients or asymptomatic subjects. Before eventual surgical treatment, we evaluated the clinical and radiological features of an extremely rare group of patients with idiopathic chronic hydrocephalus (ICH) and cognitive impairment evolving to dementia (n?=?11), and an extremely rare group of asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic adults (AMSA) with ventricular enlargement (n?=?10). We quantified changes over time in the ventricular frontal, occipital, and temporal horns by measuring the Evans index plus a parieto-occipital ratio and a temporal ratio, and their percentage of progression. Cerebral ventricles expanded over very long term in both demented patients with ICH and in AMSA. In AMSA, frontal enlargement predominated, whereas demented patients showed predominant parieto-occipital (p?=?0.00) and temporal (p?=?0.00) enlargement that progressed faster than in AMSA (p?=?0.00). In ICH, progression of cognitive impairment parallels ventricular parieto-occipital and temporal horn enlargement. Limitations of this study are the retrospective nature, the non-uniform use of neuropsychological tests, the reduced sample size due to the extremely stringent enrollment criteria, the inability to determine the precise rate of progression. PMID:25759681

  4. Progressive cognitive impairment evolving to dementia parallels parieto-occipital and temporal enlargement in idiopathic chronic hydrocephalus: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Missori, Paolo; Curr, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Little is known regarding progressive enlargement of the ventricular system in symptomatic patients or asymptomatic subjects. Before eventual surgical treatment, we evaluated the clinical and radiological features of an extremely rare group of patients with idiopathic chronic hydrocephalus (ICH) and cognitive impairment evolving to dementia (n?=?11), and an extremely rare group of asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic adults (AMSA) with ventricular enlargement (n?=?10). We quantified changes over time in the ventricular frontal, occipital, and temporal horns by measuring the Evans' index plus a parieto-occipital ratio and a temporal ratio, and their percentage of progression. Cerebral ventricles expanded over very long term in both demented patients with ICH and in AMSA. In AMSA, frontal enlargement predominated, whereas demented patients showed predominant parieto-occipital (p?=?0.00) and temporal (p?=?0.00) enlargement that progressed faster than in AMSA (p?=?0.00). In ICH, progression of cognitive impairment parallels ventricular parieto-occipital and temporal horn enlargement. Limitations of this study are the retrospective nature, the non-uniform use of neuropsychological tests, the reduced sample size due to the extremely stringent enrollment criteria, the inability to determine the precise rate of progression. PMID:25759681

  5. Mapping Prefrontal Cortex Functions in Human Infancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossmann, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    It has long been thought that the prefrontal cortex, as the seat of most higher brain functions, is functionally silent during most of infancy. This review highlights recent work concerned with the precise mapping (localization) of brain activation in human infants, providing evidence that prefrontal cortex exhibits functional activation much…

  6. Mapping Prefrontal Cortex Functions in Human Infancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossmann, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    It has long been thought that the prefrontal cortex, as the seat of most higher brain functions, is functionally silent during most of infancy. This review highlights recent work concerned with the precise mapping (localization) of brain activation in human infants, providing evidence that prefrontal cortex exhibits functional activation much

  7. Subspecialization in the human posterior medial cortex

    PubMed Central

    Bzdok, Danilo; Heeger, Adrian; Langner, Robert; Laird, Angela R.; Fox, Peter T.; Palomero-Gallagher, Nicola; Vogt, Brent A.; Zilles, Karl; Eickhoff, Simon B.

    2014-01-01

    The posterior medial cortex (PMC) is particularly poorly understood. Its neural activity changes have been related to highly disparate mental processes. We therefore investigated PMC properties with a data-driven exploratory approach. First, we subdivided the PMC by whole-brain coactivation profiles. Second, functional connectivity of the ensuing PMC regions was compared by task-constrained meta-analytic coactivation mapping (MACM) and task-unconstrained resting-state correlations (RSFC). Third, PMC regions were functionally described by forward/reverse functional inference. A precuneal cluster was mostly connected to the intraparietal sulcus, frontal eye fields, and right temporo-parietal junction; associated with attention and motor tasks. A ventral posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) cluster was mostly connected to the ventromedial prefrontal cortex and middle left inferior parietal cortex (IPC); associated with facial appraisal and language tasks. A dorsal PCC cluster was mostly connected to the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, anterior/posterior IPC, posterior midcingulate cortex, and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex; associated with delay discounting. A cluster in the retrosplenial cortex was mostly connected to the anterior thalamus and hippocampus. Furthermore, all PMC clusters were congruently coupled with the default mode network according to task-constrained but not task-unconstrained connectivity. We thus identified distinct regions in the PMC and characterized their neural networks and functional implications. PMID:25462801

  8. Dissociating motor cortex from the motor

    PubMed Central

    Schieber, Marc H

    2011-01-01

    Abstract During closed-loop control of a braincomputer interface, neurons in the primary motor cortex can be intensely active even though the subject may be making no detectable movement or muscle contraction. How can neural activity in the primary motor cortex become dissociated from the movements and muscles of the native limb that it normally controls? Here we examine circumstances in which motor cortex activity is known to dissociate from movement including mental imagery, visuo-motor dissociation and instructed delay. Many such motor cortex neurons may be related to muscle activity only indirectly. Furthermore, the integration of thousands of synaptic inputs by individual ?-motoneurons means that under certain circumstances even cortico-motoneuronal cells, which make monosynaptic connections to ?-motoneurons, can become dissociated from muscle activity. The natural ability of motor cortex neurons under voluntarily control to become dissociated from bodily movement may underlie the utility of this cortical area for controlling braincomputer interfaces. PMID:22005673

  9. Useful signals from motor cortex

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Andrew B

    2007-01-01

    Historically, the motor cortical function has been explained as a funnel to muscle activation. This invokes the idea that motor cortical neurons, or ‘upper motoneurons’, directly cause muscle contraction just like spinal motoneurons. Thus, the motor cortex and muscle activity are inextricably entwined like a puppet master and his marionette. Recently, this concept has been challenged by current experimentation showing that many behavioural aspects of action are represented in motor cortical activity. Although this activity may still be related to muscle activation, the relation between the two is likely to be indirect and complex, whereas the relation between cortical activity and kinematic parameters is simple and robust. These findings show how to extract useful signals that help explain the underlying process that generates behaviour and to harness these signals for potentially therapeutic applications. PMID:17255162

  10. The HOCS paradigm shift from disciplinary knowledge (LOCS)--to interdisciplinary evaluative, system thinking (HOCS): what should it take in science-technology-environment-society oriented courses, curricula and assessment?

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Zoller U; Scholz RW

    2004-01-01

    Given the current world state of affairs, striving for sustainability and the consequent paradigm shift: growth-to-sustainable development, correction-to-prevention and options selection-to-options generation: the corresponding paradigm shift in science-technology-environment-society (STES) education is unavoidable. Accordingly, the essence of the current reform in STES education, worldwide, is a purposed effort to develop students' higher-order cognitive skills (HOCS) capability; i.e., question-asking, critical system thinking, decision making and problem solving, at the expense of the "delivery" of lower-order cognitive skills (LOCS)-oriented knowledge. This means a paradigm shift from the contemporary prevalent LOCS algorithmic teaching to HOCS evaluative learning and HOCS-promoting courses, curricula, teaching strategies and assessment methodologies, leading, hopefully to evaluative thinking and transfer. Following the formulation of selected relevant axioms, major paradigm shift in STES research and education for sustainability have been identified. The consequent shift, in the STES context, from disciplinary to inter- and transdisciplinary learning, in science technology and environmental engineering education is discussed, followed by selected examples of successfully implemented HOCS-promoting courses, and assessment methodologies. It is argued, that transferable "HOCS learning" for sustainability can and should be done.

  11. The HOCS paradigm shift from disciplinary knowledge (LOCS)--to interdisciplinary evaluative, system thinking (HOCS): what should it take in science-technology-environment-society oriented courses, curricula and assessment?

    PubMed

    Zoller, U; Scholz, R W

    2004-01-01

    Given the current world state of affairs, striving for sustainability and the consequent paradigm shift: growth-to-sustainable development, correction-to-prevention and options selection-to-options generation: the corresponding paradigm shift in science-technology-environment-society (STES) education is unavoidable. Accordingly, the essence of the current reform in STES education, worldwide, is a purposed effort to develop students' higher-order cognitive skills (HOCS) capability; i.e., question-asking, critical system thinking, decision making and problem solving, at the expense of the "delivery" of lower-order cognitive skills (LOCS)-oriented knowledge. This means a paradigm shift from the contemporary prevalent LOCS algorithmic teaching to HOCS evaluative learning and HOCS-promoting courses, curricula, teaching strategies and assessment methodologies, leading, hopefully to evaluative thinking and transfer. Following the formulation of selected relevant axioms, major paradigm shift in STES research and education for sustainability have been identified. The consequent shift, in the STES context, from disciplinary to inter- and transdisciplinary learning, in science technology and environmental engineering education is discussed, followed by selected examples of successfully implemented HOCS-promoting courses, and assessment methodologies. It is argued, that transferable "HOCS learning" for sustainability can and should be done. PMID:15193091

  12. The similarities between the hallucinations associated with the partial epileptic seizures of the occipital lobe and ball lightning observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooray, G. K.; Cooray, V.

    2007-12-01

    Ball Lightning was seen and described since antiquity and recorded in many places. Ball lightning is usually observed during thunderstorms but large number of ball lightning observations is also reported during fine weather without any connection to thunderstorms or lightning. However, so far no one has managed to generate them in the laboratory. It is photographed very rarely and in many cases the authenticity of them is questionable. It is possible that many different phenomena are grouped together and categorized simply as ball lightning. Indeed, the visual hallucinations associated with simple partial epileptic seizures, during which the patient remains conscious, may also be categorized by a patient unaware of his or her condition as ball lightning observation. Such visual hallucinations may occur as a result of an epileptic seizure in the occipital, temporo-occipital or temporal lobes of the cerebrum [1,2,3]. In some cases the hallucination is perceived as a coloured ball moving horizontally from the periphery to the centre of the vision. The ball may appear to be rotating or spinning. The colour of the ball can be red, yellow, blue or green. Sometimes, the ball may appear to have a solid structure surrounded by a thin glow or in other cases the ball appears to generate spark like phenomena. When the ball is moving towards the centre of the vision it may increase its intensity and when it reaches the centre it can 'explode' illuminating the whole field of vision. During the hallucinations the vision is obscured only in the area occupied by the apparent object. The hallucinations may last for 5 to 30 seconds and rarely up to a minute. Occipital seizures may spread into other regions of the brain giving auditory, olfactory and sensory sensations. These sensations could be buzzing sounds, the smell of burning rubber, pain with thermal perception especially in the arms and the face, and numbness and tingling sensation. In some cases a person may experience only one seizure during lifetime and may not be aware of the reason for the experience. Being of good health otherwise, the person may categorize the experience as a ball lightning encounter. If, as described above, the seizure spread into other regions of the brain the resulting experience may appear as electrical effects (the smell, heat sensation, tingling feeling etc.) of ball lightning. Epileptic seizures are a common and important medical problem, with about one in eleven persons experiencing at least one seizure at some point. Thus some of the ball lightning encounters presented in the literature could very well be associated with the experiences of persons who had an epileptic seizure with visual hallucinations. [1] Blom, S. et al., Epilepsy, Neurology, Edited by S-M Aquilonius and J. Fagius, Liber, 2000. [2] Panayiotopoulos, C. P., J. Neorl. Neurosurg. Psychiatry, 66, 536-540, 1999. [3] Bien et al, Brain,123, 244-253, 2000.

  13. Vocalization Induced CFos Expression in Marmoset Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Cory T.; DiMauro, Audrey; Pistorio, Ashley; Hendry, Stewart; Wang, Xiaoqin

    2010-01-01

    All non-human primates communicate with conspecifics using vocalizations, a system involving both the production and perception of species-specific vocal signals. Much of the work on the neural basis of primate vocal communication in cortex has focused on the sensory processing of vocalizations, while relatively little data are available for vocal production. Earlier physiological studies in squirrel monkeys had shed doubts on the involvement of primate cortex in vocal behaviors. The aim of the present study was to identify areas of common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) cortex that are potentially involved in vocal communication. In this study, we quantified cFos expression in three areas of marmoset cortex frontal, temporal (auditory), and medial temporal under various vocal conditions. Specifically, we examined cFos expression in these cortical areas during the sensory, motor (vocal production), and sensorymotor components of vocal communication. Our results showed an increase in cFos expression in ventrolateral prefrontal cortex as well as the medial and lateral belt areas of auditory cortex in the vocal perception condition. In contrast, subjects in the vocal production condition resulted in increased cFos expression only in dorsal premotor cortex. During the sensorymotor condition (antiphonal calling), subjects exhibited cFos expression in each of the above areas, as well as increased expression in perirhinal cortex. Overall, these results suggest that various cortical areas outside primary auditory cortex are involved in primate vocal communication. These findings pave the way for further physiological studies of the neural basis of primate vocal communication. PMID:21179582

  14. R + C Factors and Sacro Occipital Technique Orthopedic Blocking: a pilot study using pre and post VAS assessment

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Charles L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The concept of a systematic or predictive relationship between distant vertebral levels distinct from accumulative functional compensatory mechanisms, such as in scoliosis, has been perpetuated within chiropractic technique systems based on clinical observation and experience. This study seeks to investigate this relationship between the cervical and lumbar vertebrae. Methods: Patients (experimental group n=26 and control group n=12) were selected from the patient base of one office, and were limited to patients that had sensitivity at specific cervical reflex points. Using a pre and post outcome measurement and sacro occipital technique R + C protocols, the related lumbar vertebra was adjusted in the direction indicated by the cervical vertebral sensitivity. Results: Statistical analysis revealed there was a statistically significant difference between pre- and post-VAS measurements and found that the notable difference in mean change in VAS scores were statistically significantly different between the experimental and control groups (p < .001). Conclusion: The findings of this study suggest that further research into cervical and lumbar vertebra interrelationships, and the efficacy of orthopedic block treatment, may be warranted. Further studies are needed to confirm whether a causal relationship exists between lumbar manipulation and decreased cervical spine sensitivity. PMID:26136605

  15. Effect of Visual Feedback on the Occipital-Parietal-Motor Network in Parkinson’s Disease with Freezing of Gait

    PubMed Central

    Velu, Priya D.; Mullen, Tim; Noh, Eunho; Valdivia, Matthew C.; Poizner, Howard; Baram, Yoram; de Sa, Virginia R.

    2014-01-01

    Freezing of gait (FOG) is an elusive phenomenon that debilitates a large number of Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients regardless of stage of disease, medication status, or deep brain stimulation implantation. Sensory feedback cues, especially visual feedback cues, have been shown to alleviate FOG episodes or even prevent episodes from occurring. Here, we examine cortical information flow between occipital, parietal, and motor areas during the pre-movement stage of gait in a PD-with-FOG patient that had a strong positive behavioral response to visual cues, one PD-with-FOG patient without any behavioral response to visual cues, and age-matched healthy controls, before and after training with visual feedback. Results for this case study show differences in cortical information flow between the responding PD-with-FOG patient and the other two subject types, notably, an increased information flow in the beta range. Tentatively suggesting the formation of an alternative cortical sensory-motor pathway during training with visual feedback, these results are proposed as subject for further verification employing larger cohorts of patients. PMID:24409167

  16. Spatial perspective and coordinate systems in autoscopy: a case report of a "fantome de profil" in occipital brain damage.

    PubMed

    Bolognini, Nadia; Ldavas, Elisabetta; Farn, Alessandro

    2011-07-01

    Autoscopic phenomena refer to complex experiences involving the illusory reduplication of one's own body. Here we report the third long-lasting case of autoscopy in a patient with right occipital lesion. Instead of the commonly reported frontal mirror view (fantme spculaire), the patient saw her head and upper trunk laterally in side view (fantme de profil). We found that the visual appearance and completeness of the autoscopic image could be selectively modulated by active and passive movements, without being influenced by imagining the same movements or by tactile and auditory stimulation. Eyes closure did not disrupt either the perception of the autoscopic body or the effects of the motor stimulation. Moreover, the visual body reduplication was coded neither in purely eye-centered nor in head-centered frames of reference, suggesting the involvement of egocentric coordinate systems (eyes and head centered). A follow-up examination highlighted the stability of the visual characteristics of the body reduplication and its shift induced by displacement of both head and eyes. These findings support the view that autoscopic phenomena have a multisensory motor origin and proprioceptive signals may play an important role in modulating the illusory visual reduplication of the patient's own body, most likely via cross-modal modulation of extrastriate areas involved in body and face perception. PMID:20807051

  17. Redundancy gains in retinotopic cortex

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yuhong V.; Kanwisher, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    It is widely claimed that interactions among simultaneously presented visual stimuli are suppressive and that these interactions primarily occur when stimuli fall within the same receptive field (Desimone and Duncan 1995). Here, we show evidence for a novel form of interaction between simultaneously presented but distant stimuli that does not fit either pattern. To examine interactions between simultaneously presented stimuli, we measure the response to a single stimulus as a function of whether or not other stimuli are also presented simultaneously, and we further ask how the response to a given stimulus is affected by whether the simultaneously present stimuli are identical or different from each other. Our method reveals a new phenomenon of redundancy gain: the visual response to a stimulus is higher when accompanied by identical stimuli than when that stimulus is presented alone, even though the stimuli are displayed in separate visual quadrants. This pattern is observed throughout the visual hierarchy, including V1 and V2, and we show that it is distinct from the well-known simultaneous suppression effect (Kastner et al. 1998). We propose that the redundancy gain in early retinotopic cortex results from feedback from higher visual areas and may underlie perceptual averaging and other ensemble coding phenomena observed behaviorally. PMID:23904496

  18. Multisensory maps in parietal cortex.

    PubMed

    Sereno, Martin I; Huang, Ruey-Song

    2014-02-01

    Parietal cortex has long been known to be a site of sensorimotor integration. Recent findings in humans have shown that it is divided up into a number of small areas somewhat specialized for eye movements, reaching, and hand movements, but also face-related movements (avoidance, eating), lower body movements, and movements coordinating multiple body parts. The majority of these areas contain rough sensory (receptotopic) maps, including a substantial multisensory representation of the lower body and lower visual field immediately medial to face VIP. There is strong evidence for retinotopic remapping in LIP and face-centered remapping in VIP, and weaker evidence for hand-centered remapping. The larger size of the functionally distinct inferior parietal default mode network in humans compared to monkeys results in a superior and medial displacement of middle parietal areas (e.g., the saccade-related LIP's). Multisensory superior parietal areas located anterior to the angular gyrus such as AIP and VIP are less medially displaced relative to macaque monkeys, so that human LIP paradoxically ends up medial to human VIP. PMID:24492077

  19. Somatosensory responses in a human motor cortex

    PubMed Central

    Donoghue, John P.; Hochberg, Leigh R.

    2013-01-01

    Somatic sensory signals provide a major source of feedback to motor cortex. Changes in somatosensory systems after stroke or injury could profoundly influence brain computer interfaces (BCI) being developed to create new output signals from motor cortex activity patterns. We had the unique opportunity to study the responses of hand/arm area neurons in primary motor cortex to passive joint manipulation in a person with a long-standing brain stem stroke but intact sensory pathways. Neurons responded to passive manipulation of the contralateral shoulder, elbow, or wrist as predicted from prior studies of intact primates. Thus fundamental properties and organization were preserved despite arm/hand paralysis and damage to cortical outputs. The same neurons were engaged by attempted arm actions. These results indicate that intact sensory pathways retain the potential to influence primary motor cortex firing rates years after cortical outputs are interrupted and may contribute to online decoding of motor intentions for BCI applications. PMID:23343902

  20. Distinct illusory own-body perceptions caused by damage to posterior insula and extrastriate cortex.

    PubMed

    Heydrich, Lukas; Blanke, Olaf

    2013-03-01

    Recent research in cognitive neuroscience using virtual reality, robotic technology and brain imaging has linked self-consciousness to the processing and integration of multisensory bodily signals. This work on bodily self-consciousness has implicated the temporo-parietal, premotor and extrastriate cortex and partly originated in work on neurological patients with different disorders of bodily self-consciousness. One class of such disorders is autoscopic phenomena, which are defined as illusory own-body perceptions, during which patients experience the visual illusory reduplication of their own body in extrapersonal space. Three main forms of autoscopic phenomena have been defined. During autoscopic hallucinations, a second own body is seen without any changes in bodily self-consciousness. During out-of-body experiences, the second own body is seen from an elevated perspective and location associated with disembodiment. During heautoscopy, subjects report strong self-identification with the second own body, often associated with the experience of existing at and perceiving the world from two places at the same time. Although it has been proposed that each autoscopic phenomenon is associated with different impairments of bodily self-consciousness, past research on neurological patients and the development of experimental paradigms for the study of bodily self-consciousness has focused on out-of-body experiences and the association with temporo-parietal cortex. Here, we performed quantitative lesion analysis in the-to date-largest group of patients with autoscopic hallucination and heautoscopy and compared the location of brain damage with those of control patients suffering from complex visual hallucinations. We found that heautoscopy was associated with lesions to the left posterior insula, and that autoscopic hallucinations were associated with damage to the right occipital cortex. Autoscopic hallucination and heautoscopy were further associated with distinct symptoms and deficits. The present data suggest that the autoscopic hallucination is a visuo-somatosensory deficit implicating extrastriate cortex and is, despite the visual hallucination of the own body, not associated with major deficits in bodily self-consciousness. Based on the symptoms and deficits in patients with heautoscopy and the implication of the left posterior insula, we suggest that abnormal bodily self-consciousness during heautoscopy is caused by a breakdown of self-other discrimination regarding affective somatosensory experience due to a disintegration of visuo-somatosensory signals with emotional (and/or interoceptive) bodily signals. These brain mechanisms are distinct from those described for out-of-body experiences. The present data extend previous models of autoscopic phenomena and provide clinical evidence for the importance of emotional and interoceptive signal processing in the posterior insula in relation to bodily self-consciousness. PMID:23423672

  1. Medial perirhinal cortex disambiguates confusable objects

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Lorraine K.; Monsch, Andreas U.; Taylor, Kirsten I.

    2012-01-01

    Our brain disambiguates the objects in our cluttered visual world seemingly effortlessly, enabling us to understand their significance and to act appropriately. The role of anteromedial temporal structures in this process, particularly the perirhinal cortex, is highly controversial. In some accounts, the perirhinal cortex is necessary for differentiating between perceptually and semantically confusable objects. Other models claim that the perirhinal cortex neither disambiguates perceptually confusable objects nor plays a unique role in semantic processing. One major hurdle to resolving this central debate is the fact that brain damage in human patients typically encompasses large portions of the anteromedial temporal lobe, such that the identification of individual substructures and precise neuroanatomical locus of the functional impairments has been difficult. We tested these competing accounts in patients with Alzheimer’s disease with varying degrees of atrophy in anteromedial structures, including the perirhinal cortex. To assess the functional contribution of each anteromedial temporal region separately, we used a detailed region of interest approach. From each participant, we obtained magnetic resonance imaging scans and behavioural data from a picture naming task that contrasted naming performance with living and non-living things as a way of manipulating perceptual and semantic confusability; living things are more similar to one another than non-living things, which have more distinctive features. We manually traced neuroanatomical regions of interest on native-space cortical surface reconstructions to obtain mean thickness estimates for the lateral and medial perirhinal cortex and entorhinal cortex. Mean cortical thickness in each region of interest, and hippocampal volume, were submitted to regression analyses predicting naming performance. Importantly, atrophy of the medial perirhinal cortex, but not lateral perirhinal cortex, entorhinal cortex or hippocampus, significantly predicted naming performance on living relative to non-living things. These findings indicate that one specific anteromedial temporal lobe region—the medial perirhinal cortex—is necessary for the disambiguation of perceptually and semantically confusable objects. Taken together, these results support a hierarchical account of object processing, whereby the perirhinal cortex at the apex of the ventral object processing system is required to bind properties of not just perceptually, but also semantically confusable objects together, enabling their disambiguation from other similar objects and thus comprehension. Significantly, this model combining a hierarchical object processing architecture with a semantic feature statistic account explains why category-specific semantic impairments for living things are associated with anteromedial temporal lobe damage, and pinpoints the root of this syndrome to perirhinal cortex damage. PMID:23250887

  2. A layered network model of sensory cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, B.J.

    1986-01-01

    An integrated computational approach to modeling sensory systems which couples realistic layered neural models of sensory cortex and midbrain nuclei to detailed models of the sense organs (e.g., retina or cochlea) is described. The approach is applied to the auditory system. Through an exercise of the model, it is shown that spatial location of sounds may be a natural consequence of the way cochlear response is mapped onto the cortex. 31 refs., 23 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. The motor cortex communicates with the kidney.

    PubMed

    Levinthal, David J; Strick, Peter L

    2012-05-01

    We used retrograde transneuronal transport of rabies virus from the rat kidney to identify the areas of the cerebral cortex that are potential sources of central commands for the neural regulation of this organ. Our results indicate that multiple motor and nonmotor areas of the cerebral cortex contain output neurons that indirectly influence kidney function. These cortical areas include the primary motor cortex (M1), the rostromedial motor area (M2), the primary somatosensory cortex, the insula and other regions surrounding the rhinal fissure, and the medial prefrontal cortex. The vast majority of the output neurons from the cerebral cortex were located in two cortical areas, M1 (68%) and M2 (15%). If the visceromotor functions of M1 and M2 reflect their skeletomotor functions, then the output to the kidney from each cortical area could make a unique contribution to autonomic control. The output from M1 could add precision and organ-specific regulation to descending visceromotor commands, whereas the output from M2 could add anticipatory processing which is essential for allostatic regulation. We also found that the output from M1 and M2 to the kidney originates predominantly from the trunk representations of these two cortical areas. Thus, a map of visceromotor representation appears to be embedded within the classic somatotopic map of skeletomotor representation. PMID:22573695

  4. [Motor Cortex Functional Mapping Using Electrocorticography].

    PubMed

    Fu, Qionglin; Jiang, Tao; Huang, Yueshan

    2015-08-01

    The main shortcomings of using electrocortical stimulation (ECS) in identifying the motor functional area around the focus in neurosurgery are certainly time-consuming, possibly cerebral cortex injuring and perhaps triggering epilepsy. To solve these problems, we in our research presented an intraoperative motor cortex functional mapping based on electrocorticography (ECoG). At first, using power spectrum estimation, we analyzed the characteristic of ECoG which was related to move task, and selected Mu rhythm as the move-related feature. Then we extracted the feature from original ECoG by multi-resolution wavelet analysis. By calculating the sum value of feature in every channel and observing the distribution of these sum values, we obtained the correlation between the cortex area under the electrode and motor cortex functional area. The results showed that the distribution of the relationship between the cortex under the electrode and motor cortex functional area was almost consistent with those identified by ECS which was called as the gold-standard. It indicated that this method was basically feasible, and it just needed five minutes totally. In conclusion, ECoG-based and passive identification of motor cortical function may serve as a useful adjunct to ECS in the intraoperative mapping. PMID:26710463

  5. Ultrasonographic percutaneous anatomy of the atlanto-occipital region and indirect ultrasound-guided cisternal puncture in the dog and the cat.

    PubMed

    Etienne, A-L; Audigié, F; Peeters, D; Gabriel, A; Busoni, V

    2015-04-01

    Cisternal puncture in dogs and cats is commonly carried out. This article describes the percutaneous ultrasound anatomy of the cisternal region in the dog and the cat and an indirect technique for ultrasound-guided cisternal puncture. Ultrasound images obtained ex vivo and in vivo were compared with anatomic sections and used to identify the landmarks for ultrasound-guided cisternal puncture. The ultrasound-guided procedure was established in cadavers and then applied in vivo in seven dogs and two cats. The anatomic landmarks for the ultrasound-guided puncture are the cisterna magna, the spinal cord, the two occipital condyles on transverse images, the external occipital crest and the dorsal arch of the first cervical vertebra on longitudinal images. Using these ultrasound anatomic landmarks, an indirect ultrasound-guided technique for cisternal puncture is applicable in the dog and the cat. PMID:24712312

  6. Occipital Condyle Fracture with Accompanying Meningeal Spinal Cysts as a result of Cervical Spine Injury in 15-Year-Old Girl.

    PubMed

    Wiktor, ?ukasz; Tomaszewski, Ryszard

    2015-01-01

    The occipital condyle fracture is rare injury of the craniocervical junction. Meningeal spinal cysts are rare tumors of the spinal cord. Depending on location, these lesions may be classified as extradural and subdural, but extradural spinal cysts are more common. We present the case of a 15-year-old girl who suffered from avulsion occipital condyle fracture treated with use of "halo-vest" system. We established that clinical effect after completed treatment is very good. Control MRI evaluation was performed 12 months after removal of "halo-vest" traction, and clinically silent extradural meningeal spinal cysts were detected at the ventral side of the spinal cord in the cervical segment of the spine. Due to clinically silent course of the disease, we decided to use the conservative treatment. The patient remains under control of our department. PMID:26543656

  7. Occipital Condyle Fracture with Accompanying Meningeal Spinal Cysts as a result of Cervical Spine Injury in 15-Year-Old Girl

    PubMed Central

    Wiktor, ?ukasz; Tomaszewski, Ryszard

    2015-01-01

    The occipital condyle fracture is rare injury of the craniocervical junction. Meningeal spinal cysts are rare tumors of the spinal cord. Depending on location, these lesions may be classified as extradural and subdural, but extradural spinal cysts are more common. We present the case of a 15-year-old girl who suffered from avulsion occipital condyle fracture treated with use of halo-vest system. We established that clinical effect after completed treatment is very good. Control MRI evaluation was performed 12 months after removal of halo-vest traction, and clinically silent extradural meningeal spinal cysts were detected at the ventral side of the spinal cord in the cervical segment of the spine. Due to clinically silent course of the disease, we decided to use the conservative treatment. The patient remains under control of our department. PMID:26543656

  8. [Anesthetic Management Using Frontal Nerve, Greater Occipital Nerve, and Superficial Cervical Plexus Block for Posterior Cervical Spinal Fusion in a Patient with Athetoid Cerebral Palsy].

    PubMed

    Matsunami, Sayuri; Komasawa, Nobuyasu; Fujiwara, Shunsuke; Fujitate, Yasutaka; Soen, Masako; Minami, Toshiaki

    2015-05-01

    Here, we report successful anesthetic management of posterior cervical spinal fusion utilizing block of the frontal nerve, the greater occipital nerve, and the superficial cervical plexus in a patient with athetoid cerebral palsy. A 69-year-old woman (height 157 cm; weight 33 kg) with athetoid cerebral palsy was scheduled to undergo posterior cervical spinal fusion for cervical spondylotic myelopathy. After induction of general anesthesia, we performed tracheal intubation using the Pentax-AWS Airwayscope with a thin Intlock. After tracheal intubation, we used ropivacaine for the frontal nerve, greater occipital nerve, and superficial cervical plexus block. Anesthetic maintenance was performed with total intravenous anesthesia utilizing propofol and remifentanil. Continuous administration of dexmedetomidine was started during operation. Following surgery, smooth spontaneous ventilation was observed following uneventful extubation. No significant pain and no athetoid movement were observed under continuous administration of dexmedetomidine. PMID:26422967

  9. Downregulation of growth hormone 1 gene in the cerebellum and prefrontal cortex of rats with depressive-like behavior.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yuta; Ueyama, Takashi; Ito, Takao; Tsuruo, Yoshihiro

    2015-05-01

    Depressive-like behaviors in animals are usually assessed by standardized behavioral tests such as the forced swimming test (FST). However, individual variation in test performance may obscure group differences and thereby hinder the discovery of genes responsible for depression. Few reports have shown the influence of individual variability in identifying the genes associated with depressive-like behaviors. In this study, we conducted microarray analysis to identify genes differentially expressed in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and cerebellum of rats stratified by FST immobility ratio (% immobility in 5 min) into a control group [immobility ratio: -1 to +1 standard deviation (SD) from the mean] and a depressive group (immobility ratio: +1 to +2 SDs above the mean). Genes differentially expressed in both the cerebellum and PFC of the depressive group were Alas2, Gh1, Hba-a2, Hbb, Hbb-b1, Hbe2, LOC689064, Mrps10, Mybpc, Olf6415, and Pfkb1. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis identified Gh1 as a hub gene in the networks of differentially expressed genes in both brain regions. This study indicates that the depressive-like behavior may be related to the decrease of Gh1 expression in the cerebellum and PFC. PMID:25716693

  10. Grid alignment in entorhinal cortex.

    PubMed

    Si, Bailu; Kropff, Emilio; Treves, Alessandro

    2012-10-01

    The spatial responses of many of the cells recorded in all layers of rodent medial entorhinal cortex (mEC) show mutually aligned grid patterns. Recent experimental findings have shown that grids can often be better described as elliptical rather than purely circular and that, beyond the mutual alignment of their grid axes, ellipses tend to also orient their long axis along preferred directions. Are grid alignment and ellipse orientation aspects of the same phenomenon? Does the grid alignment result from single-unit mechanisms or does it require network interactions? We address these issues by refining a single-unit adaptation model of grid formation, to describe specifically the spontaneous emergence of conjunctive grid-by-head-direction cells in layers III, V, and VI of mEC. We find that tight alignment can be produced by recurrent collateral interactions, but this requires head-direction (HD) modulation. Through a competitive learning process driven by spatial inputs, grid fields then form already aligned, and with randomly distributed spatial phases. In addition, we find that the self-organization process is influenced by any anisotropy in the behavior of the simulated rat. The common grid alignment often orients along preferred running directions (RDs), as induced in a square environment. When speed anisotropy is present in exploration behavior, the shape of individual grids is distorted toward an ellipsoid arrangement. Speed anisotropy orients the long ellipse axis along the fast direction. Speed anisotropy on its own also tends to align grids, even without collaterals, but the alignment is seen to be loose. Finally, the alignment of spatial grid fields in multiple environments shows that the network expresses the same set of grid fields across environments, modulo a coherent rotation and translation. Thus, an efficient metric encoding of space may emerge through spontaneous pattern formation at the single-unit level, but it is coherent, hence context-invariant, if aided by collateral interactions. PMID:22892761

  11. Enhanced connectivity between visual cortex and other regions of the brain in autism: a REM sleep EEG coherence study.

    PubMed

    Léveillé, Cathy; Barbeau, Elise B; Bolduc, Christianne; Limoges, Elyse; Berthiaume, Claude; Chevrier, Elyse; Mottron, Laurent; Godbout, Roger

    2010-10-01

    Functional interregional neural coupling was measured as EEG coherence during REM sleep, a state of endogenous cortical activation, in 9 adult autistic individuals (21.1±4.0 years) and 13 typically developed controls (21.5±4.3 years) monitored for two consecutive nights in a sleep laboratory. Spectral analysis was performed on 60 s of artefact-free EEG samples distributed equally throughout the first four REM sleep periods of the second night. EEG coherence was calculated for six frequency bands (delta, theta, alpha, sigma, beta, and total spectrum) using a 22-electrode montage. The magnitude of coherence function was computed for intra- and interhemispheric pairs of recording sites. Results were compared by Multivariate Analysis of Variance (MANOVA). Each time the autistic group showed a greater EEG coherence than the controls; it involved intrahemispheric communication among the left visual cortex (O1) and other regions either close to or distant from the occipital cortex. In contrast, lower coherence values involved frontal electrodes in the right hemisphere. No significant differences between groups were found for interhemispheric EEG coherence. These results show that the analysis of EEG coherence during REM sleep can disclose patterns of cortical connectivity that can be reduced or increased in adults with autism compared to typically developed individuals, depending of the cortical areas studied. Superior coherence involving visual perceptual areas in autism is consistent with an enhanced role of perception in autistic brain organization. PMID:20717953

  12. The cerebral cortex of Albert Einstein: a description and preliminary analysis of unpublished photographs.

    PubMed

    Falk, Dean; Lepore, Frederick E; Noe, Adrianne

    2013-04-01

    Upon his death in 1955, Albert Einstein's brain was removed, fixed and photographed from multiple angles. It was then sectioned into 240 blocks, and histological slides were prepared. At the time, a roadmap was drawn that illustrates the location within the brain of each block and its associated slides. Here we describe the external gross neuroanatomy of Einstein's entire cerebral cortex from 14 recently discovered photographs, most of which were taken from unconventional angles. Two of the photographs reveal sulcal patterns of the medial surfaces of the hemispheres, and another shows the neuroanatomy of the right (exposed) insula. Most of Einstein's sulci are identified, and sulcal patterns in various parts of the brain are compared with those of 85 human brains that have been described in the literature. To the extent currently possible, unusual features of Einstein's brain are tentatively interpreted in light of what is known about the evolution of higher cognitive processes in humans. As an aid to future investigators, these (and other) features are correlated with blocks on the roadmap (and therefore histological slides). Einstein's brain has an extraordinary prefrontal cortex, which may have contributed to the neurological substrates for some of his remarkable cognitive abilities. The primary somatosensory and motor cortices near the regions that typically represent face and tongue are greatly expanded in the left hemisphere. Einstein's parietal lobes are also unusual and may have provided some of the neurological underpinnings for his visuospatial and mathematical skills, as others have hypothesized. Einstein's brain has typical frontal and occipital shape asymmetries (petalias) and grossly asymmetrical inferior and superior parietal lobules. Contrary to the literature, Einstein's brain is not spherical, does not lack parietal opercula and has non-confluent Sylvian and inferior postcentral sulci. PMID:23161163

  13. The cerebral cortex of Albert Einstein: a description and preliminary analysis of unpublished photographs

    PubMed Central

    Lepore, Frederick E.; Noe, Adrianne

    2013-01-01

    Upon his death in 1955, Albert Einstein’s brain was removed, fixed and photographed from multiple angles. It was then sectioned into 240 blocks, and histological slides were prepared. At the time, a roadmap was drawn that illustrates the location within the brain of each block and its associated slides. Here we describe the external gross neuroanatomy of Einstein’s entire cerebral cortex from 14 recently discovered photographs, most of which were taken from unconventional angles. Two of the photographs reveal sulcal patterns of the medial surfaces of the hemispheres, and another shows the neuroanatomy of the right (exposed) insula. Most of Einstein’s sulci are identified, and sulcal patterns in various parts of the brain are compared with those of 85 human brains that have been described in the literature. To the extent currently possible, unusual features of Einstein’s brain are tentatively interpreted in light of what is known about the evolution of higher cognitive processes in humans. As an aid to future investigators, these (and other) features are correlated with blocks on the roadmap (and therefore histological slides). Einstein’s brain has an extraordinary prefrontal cortex, which may have contributed to the neurological substrates for some of his remarkable cognitive abilities. The primary somatosensory and motor cortices near the regions that typically represent face and tongue are greatly expanded in the left hemisphere. Einstein’s parietal lobes are also unusual and may have provided some of the neurological underpinnings for his visuospatial and mathematical skills, as others have hypothesized. Einstein’s brain has typical frontal and occipital shape asymmetries (petalias) and grossly asymmetrical inferior and superior parietal lobules. Contrary to the literature, Einstein’s brain is not spherical, does not lack parietal opercula and has non-confluent Sylvian and inferior postcentral sulci. PMID:23161163

  14. Anticipating action effects recruits audiovisual movement representations in the ventral premotor cortex.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, Matthias; Zentgraf, Karen; Pilgramm, Sebastian; Stark, Rudolf; Krüger, Britta; Munzert, Jörn

    2014-10-29

    When table tennis players anticipate the course of the ball while preparing their motor responses, they not only observe their opponents striking the ball but also listen to events such as the sound of racket-ball contact. Because visual stimuli can be detected more easily when accompanied by a sound, we assumed that complementary sensory audiovisual information would influence the anticipation of biological motion, especially when the racket-ball contact is not presented visually, but has to be inferred from continuous movement kinematics and an abrupt sound. Twenty-six observers were examined with fMRI while watching point-light displays (PLDs) of an opposing table tennis player. Their task was to anticipate the resultant ball flight. The sound was presented complementary to the veracious event or at a deviant time point in its kinematics. Results showed that participants performed best in the complementary condition. Using a region-of-interest approach, fMRI data showed that complementary audiovisual stimulation elicited higher activation in the left temporo-occipital middle temporal gyrus (MTGto), the left primary motor cortex, and the right anterior intraparietal sulcus (aIPS). Both hemispheres also revealed higher activation in the ventral premotor cortex (vPMC) and the pars opercularis of the inferior frontal gyrus (BA 44). Ranking the behavioral effect of complementary versus conflicting audiovisual information over participants revealed an association between the complementary information and higher activation in the right vPMC. We conclude that the recruitment of movement representations in the auditory and visual modalities in the vPMC can be influenced by task-relevant cross-modal audiovisual interaction. PMID:25463138

  15. Combined bi-occipital suboccipital transsinus transtentorial approach for resection of a pineal region falcotentorial meningioma: operative video and technical nuances.

    PubMed

    Liu, James K

    2016-01-01

    Large deep-seated meningiomas of the falcotentorial region present a formidable surgical challenge. In this operative video, the author demonstrates the combined bi-occipital suboccipital transsinus transtentorial approach for microsurgical resection of a large falcotentorial meningioma. This approach involves division of the less dominant transverse sinus after assessment of the venous pressure before and after clipping of the sinus with continuous neurophysiologic monitoring. Mild retraction of the occipital lobe and cerebellum results in a wide supra- and infratentorial exposure of extensive pineal region tumors. This video atlas demonstrates the operative technique and surgical nuances, including patient positioning, supra- and infratentorial craniotomy, transsinus transtentorial incision, and tumor removal with preservation of the vein of Galen complex. In summary, the combined bi-occipital suboccipital transsinus transtentorial approach provides a wide supra- and infratentorial surgical corridor for removal of select falcotentorial meningiomas. The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/3aD8h2uwBAo . PMID:26722686

  16. Phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial DNA in patients with an occipital stroke. Evaluation of mutations by using sequence data on the entire coding region.

    PubMed

    Finnil, S; Hassinen, I E; Majamaa, K

    2001-06-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroup U, defined by the polymorphism 12308A>G, may constitute a risk factor for an occipital stroke in migraine. We therefore identified 14 patients with an occipital stroke and with 12308A>G. We determined complete mtDNA coding region sequence for the patients and for population controls by conformation sensitive gel electrophoresis (CSGE) and direct sequencing. Sequence information was used to construct a phylogenetic network of mtDNA haplogroups U and K, which was found to be composed of subclusters U2, U4, U5 and a new subcluster U7, as well as cluster K. Five patients with a migrainous stroke belonged to subcluster U5 (P=0.006; Fisher's exact test). Many unique mutations were found among the patients with an occipital stroke including two tRNA mutations that have previously been suggested to be pathogenic. Analysis of mtDNA sequences by CSGE and comparison of the sequences through phylogenetic analysis greatly enhances the identification of mtDNA clusters in population and detection of mtDNA mutations in patients. PMID:11406419

  17. Testing the dual-pathway model for auditory processing in human cortex.

    PubMed

    Zndorf, Ida C; Lewald, Jrg; Karnath, Hans-Otto

    2016-01-01

    Analogous to the visual system, auditory information has been proposed to be processed in two largely segregated streams: an anteroventral ("what") pathway mainly subserving sound identification and a posterodorsal ("where") stream mainly subserving sound localization. Despite the popularity of this assumption, the degree of separation of spatial and non-spatial auditory information processing in cortex is still under discussion. In the present study, a statistical approach was implemented to investigate potential behavioral dissociations for spatial and non-spatial auditory processing in stroke patients, and voxel-wise lesion analyses were used to uncover their neural correlates. The results generally provided support for anatomically and functionally segregated auditory networks. However, some degree of anatomo-functional overlap between "what" and "where" aspects of processing was found in the superior pars opercularis of right inferior frontal gyrus (Brodmann area 44), suggesting the potential existence of a shared target area of both auditory streams in this region. Moreover, beyond the typically defined posterodorsal stream (i.e., posterior superior temporal gyrus, inferior parietal lobule, and superior frontal sulcus), occipital lesions were found to be associated with sound localization deficits. These results, indicating anatomically and functionally complex cortical networks for spatial and non-spatial auditory processing, are roughly consistent with the dual-pathway model of auditory processing in its original form, but argue for the need to refine and extend this widely accepted hypothesis. PMID:26388552

  18. Structure of the cerebral cortex of the humpback whale, Megaptera novaeangliae (Cetacea, Mysticeti, Balaenopteridae).

    PubMed

    Hof, Patrick R; Van der Gucht, Estel

    2007-01-01

    Cetaceans diverged from terrestrial mammals between 50 and 60 million years ago and acquired, during their adaptation to a fully aquatic milieu, many derived features, including echolocation (in odontocetes), remarkable auditory and communicative abilities, as well as a complex social organization. Whereas brain structure has been documented in detail in some odontocetes, few reports exist on its organization in mysticetes. We studied the cerebral cortex of the humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) in comparison to another balaenopterid, the fin whale, and representative odontocetes. We observed several differences between Megaptera and odontocetes, such as a highly clustered organization of layer II over the occipital and inferotemporal neocortex, whereas such pattern is restricted to the ventral insula in odontocetes. A striking observation in Megaptera was the presence in layer V of the anterior cingulate, anterior insular, and frontopolar cortices of large spindle cells, similar in morphology and distribution to those described in hominids, suggesting a case of parallel evolution. They were also observed in the fin whale and the largest odontocetes, but not in species with smaller brains or body size. The hippocampal formation, unremarkable in odontocetes, is further diminutive in Megaptera, contrasting with terrestrial mammals. As in odontocetes, clear cytoarchitectural patterns exist in the neocortex of Megaptera, making it possible to define many cortical domains. These observations demonstrate that Megaptera differs from Odontoceti in certain aspects of cortical cytoarchitecture and may provide a neuromorphologic basis for functional and behavioral differences between the suborders as well as a reflection of their divergent evolution. PMID:17441195

  19. Determinants of Global Color-Based Selection in Human Visual Cortex.

    PubMed

    Bartsch, Mandy V; Boehler, Carsten N; Stoppel, Christian M; Merkel, Christian; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Schoenfeld, Mircea A; Hopf, Jens-Max

    2015-09-01

    Feature attention operates in a spatially global way, with attended feature values being prioritized for selection outside the focus of attention. Accounts of global feature attention have emphasized feature competition as a determining factor. Here, we use magnetoencephalographic recordings in humans to test whether competition is critical for global feature selection to arise. Subjects performed a color/shape discrimination task in one visual field (VF), while irrelevant color probes were presented in the other unattended VF. Global effects of color attention were assessed by analyzing the response to the probe as a function of whether or not the probe's color was a target-defining color. We find that global color selection involves a sequence of modulations in extrastriate cortex, with an initial phase in higher tier areas (lateral occipital complex) followed by a later phase in lower tier retinotopic areas (V3/V4). Importantly, these modulations appeared with and without color competition in the focus of attention. Moreover, early parts of the modulation emerged for a task-relevant color not even present in the focus of attention. All modulations, however, were eliminated during simple onset-detection of the colored target. These results indicate that global color-based attention depends on target discrimination independent of feature competition in the focus of attention. PMID:24770709

  20. Perirhinal cortex and temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Biagini, Giuseppe; D'Antuono, Margherita; Benini, Ruba; de Guzman, Philip; Longo, Daniela; Avoli, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    The perirhinal cortexwhich is interconnected with several limbic structures and is intimately involved in learning and memoryplays major roles in pathological processes such as the kindling phenomenon of epileptogenesis and the spread of limbic seizures. Both features may be relevant to the pathophysiology of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy that represents the most refractory adult form of epilepsy with up to 30% of patients not achieving adequate seizure control. Compared to other limbic structures such as the hippocampus or the entorhinal cortex, the perirhinal area remains understudied and, in particular, detailed information on its dysfunctional characteristics remains scarce; this lack of information may be due to the fact that the perirhinal cortex is not grossly damaged in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and in models mimicking this epileptic disorder. However, we have recently identified in pilocarpine-treated epileptic rats the presence of selective losses of interneuron subtypes along with increased synaptic excitability. In this review we: (i) highlight the fundamental electrophysiological properties of perirhinal cortex neurons; (ii) briefly stress the mechanisms underlying epileptiform synchronization in perirhinal cortex networks following epileptogenic pharmacological manipulations; and (iii) focus on the changes in neuronal excitability and cytoarchitecture of the perirhinal cortex occurring in the pilocarpine model of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Overall, these data indicate that perirhinal cortex networks are hyperexcitable in an animal model of temporal lobe epilepsy, and that this condition is associated with a selective cellular damage that is characterized by an age-dependent sensitivity of interneurons to precipitating injuries, such as status epilepticus. PMID:24009554

  1. Auditory connections and functions of prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Plakke, Bethany; Romanski, Lizabeth M.

    2014-01-01

    The functional auditory system extends from the ears to the frontal lobes with successively more complex functions occurring as one ascends the hierarchy of the nervous system. Several areas of the frontal lobe receive afferents from both early and late auditory processing regions within the temporal lobe. Afferents from the early part of the cortical auditory system, the auditory belt cortex, which are presumed to carry information regarding auditory features of sounds, project to only a few prefrontal regions and are most dense in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC). In contrast, projections from the parabelt and the rostral superior temporal gyrus (STG) most likely convey more complex information and target a larger, widespread region of the prefrontal cortex. Neuronal responses reflect these anatomical projections as some prefrontal neurons exhibit responses to features in acoustic stimuli, while other neurons display task-related responses. For example, recording studies in non-human primates indicate that VLPFC is responsive to complex sounds including vocalizations and that VLPFC neurons in area 12/47 respond to sounds with similar acoustic morphology. In contrast, neuronal responses during auditory working memory involve a wider region of the prefrontal cortex. In humans, the frontal lobe is involved in auditory detection, discrimination, and working memory. Past research suggests that dorsal and ventral subregions of the prefrontal cortex process different types of information with dorsal cortex processing spatial/visual information and ventral cortex processing non-spatial/auditory information. While this is apparent in the non-human primate and in some neuroimaging studies, most research in humans indicates that specific task conditions, stimuli or previous experience may bias the recruitment of specific prefrontal regions, suggesting a more flexible role for the frontal lobe during auditory cognition. PMID:25100931

  2. Elastic instabilities in a layered cerebral cortex: a revised axonal tension model for cortex folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manyuhina, O. V.; Mayett, David; Schwarz, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    We model the elasticity of the cerebral cortex as a layered material with bending energy along the layers and elastic energy between them in both planar and polar geometries. The cortex is also subjected to axons pulling from the underlying white matter. Above a critical threshold force, a flat cortex configuration becomes unstable and periodic undulations emerge, i.e. a buckling instability occurs. These undulations may indeed initiate folds in the cortex. We identify analytically the critical force and the critical wavelength of the undulations. Both quantities are physiologically relevant values. Our model is a revised version of the axonal tension model for cortex folding, with our version taking into account the layered structure of the cortex. Moreover, our model draws a connection with another competing model for cortex folding, namely the differential growth-induced buckling model. For the polar geometry, we study the relationship between brain size and the critical force and wavelength to understand why small mice brains exhibit no folds, while larger human brains do, for example. Finally, an estimate of the bending rigidity constant for the cortex can be made based on the critical wavelength.

  3. Altered Structural and Functional Connectivity in Late Preterm Preadolescence: An Anatomic Seed-Based Study of Resting State Networks Related to the Posteromedial and Lateral Parietal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Degnan, Andrew J.; Wisnowski, Jessica L.; Choi, SoYoung; Ceschin, Rafael; Bhushan, Chitresh; Leahy, Richard M.; Corby, Patricia; Schmithorst, Vincent J.; Panigrahy, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Objective Late preterm birth confers increased risk of developmental delay, academic difficulties and social deficits. The late third trimester may represent a critical period of development of neural networks including the default mode network (DMN), which is essential to normal cognition. Our objective is to identify functional and structural connectivity differences in the posteromedial cortex related to late preterm birth. Methods Thirty-eight preadolescents (ages 9–13; 19 born in the late preterm period (≥32 weeks gestational age) and 19 at term) without access to advanced neonatal care were recruited from a low socioeconomic status community in Brazil. Participants underwent neurocognitive testing, 3-dimensional T1-weighted imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging and resting state functional MRI (RS-fMRI). Seed-based probabilistic diffusion tractography and RS-fMRI analyses were performed using unilateral seeds within the posterior DMN (posterior cingulate cortex, precuneus) and lateral parietal DMN (superior marginal and angular gyri). Results Late preterm children demonstrated increased functional connectivity within the posterior default mode networks and increased anti-correlation with the central-executive network when seeded from the posteromedial cortex (PMC). Key differences were demonstrated between PMC components with increased anti-correlation with the salience network seen only with posterior cingulate cortex seeding but not with precuneus seeding. Probabilistic tractography showed increased streamlines within the right inferior longitudinal fasciculus and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus within late preterm children while decreased intrahemispheric streamlines were also observed. No significant differences in neurocognitive testing were demonstrated between groups. Conclusion Late preterm preadolescence is associated with altered functional connectivity from the PMC and lateral parietal cortex to known distributed functional cortical networks despite no significant executive neurocognitive differences. Selective increased structural connectivity was observed in the setting of decreased posterior interhemispheric connections. Future work is needed to determine if these findings represent a compensatory adaptation employing alternate neural circuitry or could reflect subtle pathology resulting in emotional processing deficits not seen with neurocognitive testing. PMID:26098888

  4. Downstream targets of methyl CpG binding protein 2 and their abnormal expression in the frontal cortex of the human Rett syndrome brain

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The Rett Syndrome (RTT) brain displays regional histopathology and volumetric reduction, with frontal cortex showing such abnormalities, whereas the occipital cortex is relatively less affected. Results Using microarrays and quantitative PCR, the mRNA expression profiles of these two neuroanatomical regions were compared in postmortem brain tissue from RTT patients and normal controls. A subset of genes was differentially expressed in the frontal cortex of RTT brains, some of which are known to be associated with neurological disorders (clusterin and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1) or are involved in synaptic vesicle cycling (dynamin 1). RNAi-mediated knockdown of MeCP2 in vitro, followed by further expression analysis demonstrated that the same direction of abnormal expression was recapitulated with MeCP2 knockdown, which for cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 was associated with a functional respiratory chain defect. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis showed that MeCP2 associated with the promoter regions of some of these genes suggesting that loss of MeCP2 function may be responsible for their overexpression. Conclusions This study has shed more light on the subset of aberrantly expressed genes that result from MECP2 mutations. The mitochondrion has long been implicated in the pathogenesis of RTT, however it has not been at the forefront of RTT research interest since the discovery of MECP2 mutations. The functional consequence of the underexpression of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 indicates that this is an area that should be revisited. PMID:20420693

  5. Tuning of temporo-occipital activity by frontal oscillations during virtual mirror exposure causes erroneous self-recognition.

    PubMed

    Serino, Andrea; Sforza, Anna Laura; Kanayama, Noriaki; van Elk, Michiel; Kaliuzhna, Mariia; Herbelin, Bruno; Blanke, Olaf

    2015-10-01

    Self-face recognition, a hallmark of self-awareness, depends on 'off-line' stored information about one's face and 'on-line' multisensory-motor face-related cues. The brain mechanisms of how on-line sensory-motor processes affect off-line neural self-face representations are unknown. This study used 3D virtual reality to create a 'virtual mirror' in which participants saw an avatar's face moving synchronously with their own face movements. Electroencephalographic (EEG) analysis during virtual mirror exposure revealed mu oscillations in sensory-motor cortex signalling on-line congruency between the avatar's and participants' movements. After such exposure and compatible with a change in their off-line self-face representation, participants were more prone to recognize the avatar's face as their own, and this was also reflected in the activation of face-specific regions in the inferotemporal cortex. Further EEG analysis showed that the on-line sensory-motor effects during virtual mirror exposure caused these off-line visual effects, revealing the brain mechanisms that maintain a coherent self-representation, despite our continuously changing appearance. PMID:26215485

  6. The functions of the orbitofrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Rolls, Edmund T

    2004-06-01

    The orbitofrontal cortex contains the secondary taste cortex, in which the reward value of taste is represented. It also contains the secondary and tertiary olfactory cortical areas, in which information about the identity and also about the reward value of odours is represented. The orbitofrontal cortex also receives information about the sight of objects from the temporal lobe cortical visual areas, and neurons in it learn and reverse the visual stimulus to which they respond when the association of the visual stimulus with a primary reinforcing stimulus (such as taste) is reversed. This is an example of stimulus-reinforcement association learning, and is a type of stimulus-stimulus association learning. More generally, the stimulus might be a visual or olfactory stimulus, and the primary (unlearned) positive or negative reinforcer a taste or touch. A somatosensory input is revealed by neurons that respond to the texture of food in the mouth, including a population that responds to the mouth feel of fat. In complementary neuroimaging studies in humans, it is being found that areas of the orbitofrontal cortex are activated by pleasant touch, by painful touch, by taste, by smell, and by more abstract reinforcers such as winning or losing money. Damage to the orbitofrontal cortex can impair the learning and reversal of stimulus-reinforcement associations, and thus the correction of behavioural responses when there are no longer appropriate because previous reinforcement contingencies change. The information which reaches the orbitofrontal cortex for these functions includes information about faces, and damage to the orbitofrontal cortex can impair face (and voice) expression identification. This evidence thus shows that the orbitofrontal cortex is involved in decoding and representing some primary reinforcers such as taste and touch; in learning and reversing associations of visual and other stimuli to these primary reinforcers; and in controlling and correcting reward-related and punishment-related behavior, and thus in emotion. The approach described here is aimed at providing a fundamental understanding of how the orbitofrontal cortex actually functions, and thus in how it is involved in motivational behavior such as feeding and drinking, in emotional behavior, and in social behavior. PMID:15134840

  7. Motor Cortex Neuroplasticity Following Brachial Plexus Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Dimou, Stefan; Biggs, Michael; Tonkin, Michael; Hickie, Ian B.; Lagopoulos, Jim

    2013-01-01

    In the past decade, research has demonstrated that cortical plasticity, once thought only to exist in the early stages of life, does indeed continue on into adulthood. Brain plasticity is now acknowledged as a core principle of brain function and describes the ability of the central nervous system to adapt and modify its structural organization and function as an adaptive response to functional demand. In this clinical case study we describe how we used neuroimaging techniques to observe the functional topographical expansion of a patch of cortex along the sensorimotor cortex of a 27-year-old woman following brachial plexus transfer surgery to re-innervate her left arm. We found bilateral activations present in the thalamus, caudate, insula as well as across the sensorimotor cortex during an elbow flex motor task. In contrast we found less activity in the sensorimotor cortex for a finger tap motor task in addition to activations lateralized to the left inferior frontal gyrus and thalamus and bilaterally for the insula. From a pain perspective the patient who had experienced extensive phantom limb pain (PLP) before surgery found these sensations were markedly reduced following transfer of the right brachial plexus to the intact left arm. Within the context of this clinical case the results suggest that functional improvements in limb mobility are associated with increased activation in the sensorimotor cortex as well as reduced PLP. PMID:23966938

  8. The neural response to facial attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Anjan; Thomas, Amy; Smith, Sabrina E; Aguirre, Geoffrey K

    2009-03-01

    What are the neural correlates of attractiveness? Using functional MRI (fMRI), the authors addressed this question in the specific context of the apprehension of faces. When subjects judged facial beauty explicitly, neural activity in a widely distributed network involving the ventral occipital, anterior insular, dorsal posterior parietal, inferior dorsolateral, and medial prefrontal cortices correlated parametrically with the degree of facial attractiveness. When subjects were not attending explicitly to attractiveness, but rather were judging facial identity, the ventral occipital region remained responsive to facial beauty. The authors propose that this region, which includes the fusiform face area (FFA), the lateral occipital cortex (LOC), and medially adjacent regions, is activated automatically by beauty and may serve as a neural trigger for pervasive effects of attractiveness in social interactions. PMID:19254086

  9. Feedforward and feedback projections of caudal belt and parabelt areas of auditory cortex: refining the hierarchical model

    PubMed Central

    Hackett, Troy A.; de la Mothe, Lisa A.; Camalier, Corrie R.; Falchier, Arnaud; Lakatos, Peter; Kajikawa, Yoshinao; Schroeder, Charles E.

    2014-01-01

    Our working model of the primate auditory cortex recognizes three major regions (core, belt, parabelt), subdivided into thirteen areas. The connections between areas are topographically ordered in a manner consistent with information flow along two major anatomical axes: core-belt-parabelt and caudal-rostral. Remarkably, most of the connections supporting this model were revealed using retrograde tracing techniques. Little is known about laminar circuitry, as anterograde tracing of axon terminations has rarely been used. The purpose of the present study was to examine the laminar projections of three areas of auditory cortex, pursuant to analysis of all areas. The selected areas were: middle lateral belt (ML); caudomedial belt (CM); and caudal parabelt (CPB). Injections of anterograde tracers yielded data consistent with major features of our model, and also new findings that compel modifications. Results supporting the model were: (1) feedforward projection from ML and CM terminated in CPB; (2) feedforward projections from ML and CPB terminated in rostral areas of the belt and parabelt; and (3) feedback projections typified inputs to the core region from belt and parabelt. At odds with the model was the convergence of feedforward inputs into rostral medial belt from ML and CPB. This was unexpected since CPB is at a higher stage of the processing hierarchy, with mainly feedback projections to all other belt areas. Lastly, extending the model, feedforward projections from CM, ML, and CPB overlapped in the temporal parietal occipital area (TPO) in the superior temporal sulcus, indicating significant auditory influence on sensory processing in this region. The combined results refine our working model and highlight the need to complete studies of the laminar inputs to all areas of auditory cortex. Their documentation is essential for developing informed hypotheses about the neurophysiological influences of inputs to each layer and area. PMID:24795550

  10. Altered structure and function in the hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex in patients with burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shariq A; Keaser, Michael L; Meiller, Timothy F; Seminowicz, David A

    2014-08-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a debilitating, idiopathic chronic pain condition. For many BMS patients, burning oral pain begins in late morning and becomes more intense throughout the day, peaking by late afternoon or evening. We investigated brain gray matter volume (GMV) with voxel-based morphometry (VBM), white matter fractional anisotropy (FA) with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and functional connectivity in resting state functional MRI (rsfMRI) in a tightly screened, homogeneous sample of 9 female, postmenopausal/perimenopausal BMS patients and 9 matched healthy control subjects. Patients underwent 2 scanning sessions in the same day: in the morning, when ongoing pain/burning was low, and in the afternoon, when pain/burning was significantly higher. Patients had increased GMV and lower FA in the hippocampus (Hc), and decreased GMV in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). rsfMRI revealed altered connectivity patterns in different states of pain/burning, with increased connectivity between mPFC (a node in the default mode network) and anterior cingulate cortex, occipital cortex, ventromedial PFC, and bilateral Hc/amygdala in the afternoon compared with the morning session. Furthermore, mPFC-Hc connectivity was higher in BMS patients than control subjects for the afternoon but not the morning session. mPFC-Hc connectivity was related to Beck depression inventory scores both between groups and between burning states within patients, suggesting that depression and anxiety partially explain pain-related brain dysfunction in BMS. Overall, we provide multiple lines of evidence supporting aberrant structure and function in the mPFC and Hc, and implicate a circuit involving the mPFC and Hc in regulating mood and depressive symptoms in BMS. PMID:24769366

  11. Inferior-frontal cortex phase synchronizes with the temporal-parietal junction prior to successful change detection.

    PubMed

    Micheli, Cristiano; Kaping, Daniel; Westendorff, Stephanie; Valiante, Taufik A; Womelsdorf, Thilo

    2015-10-01

    The inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ) are believed to be core structures of human brain networks that activate when sensory top-down expectancies guide goal directed behavior and attentive perception. But it is unclear how activity in IFG and TPJ coordinates during attention demanding tasks and whether functional interactions between both structures are related to successful attentional performance. Here, we tested these questions in electrocorticographic (ECoG) recordings in human subjects using a visual detection task that required sustained attentional expectancy in order to detect non-salient, near-threshold visual events. We found that during sustained attention the successful visual detection was predicted by increased phase synchronization of band-limited 15-30 Hz beta band activity that was absent prior to misses. Increased beta-band phase alignment during attentional engagement early during the task was restricted to inferior and lateral prefrontal cortex, but with sustained attention it extended to long-range IFG-TPJ phase synchronization and included superior prefrontal areas. In addition to beta, a widely distributed network of brain areas comprising the occipital cortex showed enhanced and reduced alpha band phase synchronization before correct detections. These findings identify long-range phase synchrony in the 15-30 Hz beta band as the mesoscale brain signal that predicts the successful deployment of attentional expectancy of sensory events. We speculate that localized beta coherent states in prefrontal cortex index 'top-down' sensory expectancy whose coupling with TPJ subregions facilitates the gating of relevant visual information. PMID:26119023

  12. Intracranial spectral amplitude dynamics of perceptual suppression in fronto-insular, occipito-temporal, and primary visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, Juan R.; Perrone-Bertolotti, Marcela; Kahane, Philippe; Lachaux, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    If conscious perception requires global information integration across active distant brain networks, how does the loss of conscious perception affect neural processing in these distant networks? Pioneering studies on perceptual suppression (PS) described specific local neural network responses in primary visual cortex, thalamus and lateral prefrontal cortex of the macaque brain. Yet the neural effects of PS have rarely been studied with intracerebral recordings outside these cortices and simultaneously across distant brain areas. Here, we combined (1) a novel experimental paradigm in which we produced a similar perceptual disappearance and also re-appearance by using visual adaptation with transient contrast changes, with (2) electrophysiological observations from human intracranial electrodes sampling wide brain areas. We focused on broadband high-frequency (50–150 Hz, i.e., gamma) and low-frequency (8–24 Hz) neural activity amplitude modulations related to target visibility and invisibility. We report that low-frequency amplitude modulations reflected stimulus visibility in a larger ensemble of recording sites as compared to broadband gamma responses, across distinct brain regions including occipital, temporal and frontal cortices. Moreover, the dynamics of the broadband gamma response distinguished stimulus visibility from stimulus invisibility earlier in anterior insula and inferior frontal gyrus than in temporal regions, suggesting a possible role of fronto-insular cortices in top–down processing for conscious perception. Finally, we report that in primary visual cortex only low-frequency amplitude modulations correlated directly with perceptual status. Interestingly, in this sensory area broadband gamma was not modulated during PS but became positively modulated after 300 ms when stimuli were rendered visible again, suggesting that local networks could be ignited by top–down influences during conscious perception. PMID:25642199

  13. Pushing the Boundaries of Fine-Grained Object Classification with fMRI Decoding in Human Occipito-Temporal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Fannjiang, Clara; Iordan, Marius Catalin; Beck, Diane; Fei-Fei, Li

    2015-09-01

    Multi-voxel pattern analysis or 'decoding' has become a widespread tool for investigating how much object and scene category information is linearly readable from fMRI response patterns. Previous studies have compared the performance of various classifiers on this task (Laconte et al., 2005; Misaki et al., 2010; Yourganov et al., 2014), however, with the fundamental limitation that comparisons are made on simple, often binary classification problems. Arguably, as questions probed by fMRI experiments become more complex, they demand methods that can expose subtle distinctions between large sets of categories. To address this issue, we performed the first evaluation of multivariate classifiers on fine-grained object categorization. We tested several commonly used classifiers: correlation classifier (CC), linear support vector machine (SVM), and linear discriminant analysis (LDA). For the latter, we employed two regularization schemes: principal components (LDA-PC) and ridge regression (LDA-RR). We benchmarked these classifiers on three passive-viewing, block-design fMRI datasets comprising 16, 27, and 32 fine-grained object categories, respectively. To assess the classification tasks, we selected several regions of interest (ROI) across visual cortex: early visual areas (V1, V2, V3v, hV4), scene- (PPA, TOS, RSC), face- (FFA), and object-selective regions (LOC). We evaluated the classifiers on the following criteria: mean decoding accuracy, number of categories decoded significantly above chance, and robustness of decoding accuracy to ROI size. Our comparisons on these challenging fine-grained datasets showed that, while all classifiers could decode category above chance across multiple regions, LDA-RR consistently outperformed the others across most ROIs on both mean decoding accuracy and number of categories decoded above chance. We reached a peak classification accuracy of 16% on 32-way categorization in LOC. Thus, despite the current popularity of CC and SVM in fMRI studies, our results suggest that LDA-RR should be the tool of choice for experimental questions involving complex, fine-grained category distinctions. Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015. PMID:26326855

  14. The Age of Human Cerebral Cortex Neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Bhardwaj, R D; Curtis, M A; Spalding, K L; Buchholz, B A; Fink, D; Bjork-Eriksson, T; Nordborg, C; Gage, F H; Druid, H; Eriksson, P S; Frisen, J

    2006-04-06

    The traditional static view of the adult mammalian brain has been challenged by the realization of continuous generation of neurons from stem cells. Based mainly on studies in experimental animals, adult neurogenesis may contribute to recovery after brain insults and decreased neurogenesis has been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurological and psychiatric diseases in man. The extent of neurogenesis in the adult human brain has, however, been difficult to establish. We have taken advantage of the integration of {sup 14}C, generated by nuclear bomb tests during the Cold War, in DNA to establish the age of neurons in the major areas of the human cerebral cortex. Together with the analysis of the cortex from patients who received BrdU, which integrates in the DNA of dividing cells, our results demonstrate that whereas non-neuronal cells turn over, neurons in the human cerebral cortex are not generated postnatally at detectable levels, but are as old as the individual.

  15. Mapping receptive fields in primary visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Ringach, Dario L

    2004-01-01

    Nearly 40 years ago, in the pages of this journal, Hubel and Wiesel provided the first description of receptive fields in the primary visual cortex of higher mammals. They defined two classes of cortical cells, simple and complex, based on neural responses to simple visual stimuli. The notion of a hierarchy of receptive fields, where increasingly intricate receptive fields are constructed from more elementary ones, was introduced. Since those early days we have witnessed the birth of quantitative methods to map receptive fields and mathematical descriptions of simple and complex cell function. Insights gained from these models, along with new theoretical concepts, are refining our understanding of receptive field structure and the underlying cortical circuitry. Here, I provide a brief historical account of the evolution of receptive field mapping in visual cortex along with the associated conceptual advancements, and speculate on the shape novel theories of the cortex may take as a result these measurements. PMID:15155794

  16. Spatial updating in human parietal cortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merriam, Elisha P.; Genovese, Christopher R.; Colby, Carol L.

    2003-01-01

    Single neurons in monkey parietal cortex update visual information in conjunction with eye movements. This remapping of stimulus representations is thought to contribute to spatial constancy. We hypothesized that a similar process occurs in human parietal cortex and that we could visualize it with functional MRI. We scanned subjects during a task that involved remapping of visual signals across hemifields. We observed an initial response in the hemisphere contralateral to the visual stimulus, followed by a remapped response in the hemisphere ipsilateral to the stimulus. We ruled out the possibility that this remapped response resulted from either eye movements or visual stimuli alone. Our results demonstrate that updating of visual information occurs in human parietal cortex.

  17. Progenitor genealogy in the developing cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Laguesse, Sophie; Peyre, Elise; Nguyen, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian cerebral cortex is characterized by a complex histological organization that reflects the spatio-temporal stratifications of related stem and neural progenitor cells, which are responsible for the generation of distinct glial and neuronal subtypes during development. Some work has been done to shed light on the existing filiations between these progenitors as well as their respective contribution to cortical neurogenesis. The aim of the present review is to summarize the current views of progenitor hierarchy and relationship in the developing cortex and to further discuss future research directions that would help us to understand the molecular and cellular regulating mechanisms involved in cerebral corticogenesis. PMID:25141969

  18. Keynote Address: Revaluing the Orbital Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    DOLAN, R. J.

    2010-01-01

    The importance of orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) in human behavioral regulation is no longer a matter of dispute, though its precise role remains a matter of ongoing investigation. It is ironic that this revaluation of OFC required a major departure from a historical nadir, during which it was viewed as redundant or silent cortex, a situation that prevailed even up to the latter half of the 20th century. The increasing wealth of data from diverse fields within neuroscience now provides an unambiguous testament to the importance of this cortical region in behavioral regulation and cognition in general. PMID:17846153

  19. The anterior cingulate cortex and pain processing

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Perry N.; Peng, Yuan Bo; Boyette-Davis, Jessica A.; Uhelski, Megan L.

    2014-01-01

    The neural network that contributes to the suffering which accompanies persistent pain states involves a number of brain regions. Of primary interest is the contribution of the cingulate cortex in processing the affective component of pain. The purpose of this review is to summarize recent data obtained using novel behavioral paradigms in animals based on measuring escape and/or avoidance of a noxious stimulus. These paradigms have successfully been used to study the nature of the neuroanatomical and neurochemical contributions of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) to higher order pain processing in rodents. PMID:24829554

  20. Increased activities of Na+/K+-ATPase and Ca2+/Mg2+-ATPase in the frontal cortex and cerebellum of autistic individuals

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Lina; Chauhan, Abha; Brown, W. Ted; Chauhan, Ved

    2009-01-01

    Aims Na+/K+-ATPase and Ca2+/Mg2+-ATPase are enzymes known to maintain intracellular gradients of ions that are essential for signal transduction. The aim of this study was to compare the activities of Na+/K+-ATPase and Ca2+/Mg2+-ATPase in post-mortem brain samples from the cerebellum and frontal, temporal, parietal, and occipital cortices from autistic and age-matched control subjects. Main methods The frozen postmortem tissues from different brain regions of autistic and control subjects were homogenized. The activities of Na+/K+-ATPase and Ca2+/Mg2+-ATPase were assessed in the brain homogenates by measuring inorganic phosphorus released by the action of Na+/K+- and Ca2+/Mg2+- dependent hydrolysis of ATP. Key findings In the cerebellum, the activities of both Na+/K+-ATPase and Ca2+/Mg2+-ATPase were significantly increased in the autistic samples compared with their age-matched controls. The activity of Na+/K+-ATPase but not Ca2+/Mg2+-ATPase was also significantly increased in the frontal cortex of the autistic samples as compared to the age-matched controls. In contrast, in other regions, i.e., the temporal, parietal and occipital cortices, the activities of these enzymes were similar in autism and control groups. Significance The results of this study suggest brain-region specific increases in the activities of Na+/K+-ATPase and Ca2+/Mg2+-ATPase in autism. Increased activity of these enzymes in the frontal cortex and cerebellum may be due to compensatory responses to increased intracellular calcium concentration in autism. We suggest that altered activities of these enzymes may contribute to abnormal neuronal circuit functioning in autism. PMID:19863947

  1. Lateral prefrontal cortex: architectonic and functional organization

    PubMed Central

    Petrides, Michael

    2005-01-01

    A comparison of the architecture of the human prefrontal cortex with that of the macaque monkey showed a very similar architectonic organization in these two primate species. There is no doubt that the prefrontal cortical areas of the human brain have undergone considerable development, but it is equally clear that the basic architectonic organization is the same in the two species. Thus, a comparative approach to the study of the functional organization of the primate prefrontal cortex is more likely to reveal the essential aspects of the various complex control processes that are the domain of frontal function. The lateral frontal cortex appears to be functionally organized along both a rostral–caudal axis and a dorsal–ventral axis. The most caudal frontal region, the motor region on the precentral gyrus, is involved in fine motor control and direct sensorimotor mappings, whereas the caudal lateral prefrontal region is involved in higher order control processes that regulate the selection among multiple competing responses and stimuli based on conditional operations. Further rostrally, the mid-lateral prefrontal region plays an even more abstract role in cognitive control. The mid-lateral prefrontal region is itself organized along a dorsal–ventral axis of organization, with the mid-dorsolateral prefrontal cortex being involved in the monitoring of information in working memory and the mid-ventrolateral prefrontal region being involved in active judgments on information held in posterior cortical association regions that are necessary for active retrieval and encoding of information. PMID:15937012

  2. The Piriform Cortex and Human Focal Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, David N.; Jackson, Graeme D.

    2014-01-01

    It is surprising that the piriform cortex, when compared to the hippocampus, has been given relatively little significance in human epilepsy. Like the hippocampus, it has a phylogenetically preserved three-layered cortex that is vulnerable to excitotoxic injury, has broad connections to both limbic and cortical areas, and is highly epileptogenic – being critical to the kindling process. The well-known phenomenon of early olfactory auras in temporal lobe epilepsy highlights its clinical relevance in human beings. Perhaps because it is anatomically indistinct and difficult to approach surgically, as it clasps the middle cerebral artery, it has, until now, been understandably neglected. In this review, we emphasize how its unique anatomical and functional properties, as primary olfactory cortex, predispose it to involvement in focal epilepsy. From recent convergent findings in human neuroimaging, clinical epileptology, and experimental animal models, we make the case that the piriform cortex is likely to play a facilitating and amplifying role in human focal epileptogenesis, and may influence progression to epileptic intractability. PMID:25538678

  3. Developmental Outcomes after Early Prefrontal Cortex Damage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eslinger, Paul J.; Flaherty-Craig, Claire V.; Benton, Arthur L.

    2004-01-01

    The neuropsychological bases of cognitive, social, and moral development are minimally understood, with a seemingly wide chasm between developmental theories and brain maturation models. As one approach to bridging ideas in these areas, we review 10 cases of early prefrontal cortex damage from the clinical literature, highlighting overall clinical

  4. Hierarchical error representation in medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Zarr, Noah; Brown, Joshua W

    2016-01-01

    The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is reliably activated by both performance and prediction errors. Error signals have typically been treated as a scalar, and it is unknown to what extent multiple error signals may co-exist within mPFC. Previous studies have shown that lateral frontal cortex (LFC) is arranged in a hierarchy of abstraction, such that more abstract concepts and rules are represented in more anterior cortical regions. Given the close interaction between lateral and medial prefrontal cortex, we explored the hypothesis that mPFC would be organized along a similar rostro-caudal gradient of abstraction, such that more abstract prediction errors are represented further anterior and more concrete errors further posterior. We show that multiple prediction error signals can be found in mPFC, and furthermore, these are arranged in a rostro-caudal gradient of abstraction which parallels that found in LFC. We used a task that requires a three-level hierarchy of rules to be followed, in which the rules changed without warning at each level of the hierarchy. Task feedback indicated which level of the rule hierarchy changed and led to corresponding prediction error signals in mPFC. Moreover, each identified region of mPFC was preferentially functionally connected to correspondingly anterior regions of LFC. These results suggest the presence of a parallel structure between lateral and medial prefrontal cortex, with the medial regions monitoring and evaluating performance based on rules maintained in the corresponding lateral regions. PMID:26343320

  5. Excitatory neuronal connectivity in the barrel cortex

    PubMed Central

    Feldmeyer, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Neocortical areas are believed to be organized into vertical modules, the cortical columns, and the horizontal layers 16. In the somatosensory barrel cortex these columns are defined by the readily discernible barrel structure in layer 4. Information processing in the neocortex occurs along vertical and horizontal axes, thereby linking individual barrel-related columns via axons running through the different cortical layers of the barrel cortex. Long-range signaling occurs within the neocortical layers but also through axons projecting through the white matter to other neocortical areas and subcortical brain regions. Because of the ease of identification of barrel-related columns, the rodent barrel cortex has become a prototypical system to study the interactions between different neuronal connections within a sensory cortical area and between this area and other cortical as well subcortical regions. Such interactions will be discussed specifically for the feed-forward and feedback loops between the somatosensory and the somatomotor cortices as well as the different thalamic nuclei. In addition, recent advances concerning the morphological characteristics of excitatory neurons and their impact on the synaptic connectivity patterns and signaling properties of neuronal microcircuits in the whisker-related somatosensory cortex will be reviewed. In this context, their relationship between the structural properties of barrel-related columns and their function as a module in vertical synaptic signaling in the whisker-related cortical areas will be discussed. PMID:22798946

  6. Microglia in the Cerebral Cortex in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tetreault, Nicole A.; Hakeem, Atiya Y.; Jiang, Sue; Williams, Brian A.; Allman, Elizabeth; Wold, Barbara J.; Allman, John M.

    2012-01-01

    We immunocytochemically identified microglia in fronto-insular (FI) and visual cortex (VC) in autopsy brains of well-phenotyped subjects with autism and matched controls, and stereologically quantified the microglial densities. Densities were determined blind to phenotype using an optical fractionator probe. In FI, individuals with autism had…

  7. Microglia in the Cerebral Cortex in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tetreault, Nicole A.; Hakeem, Atiya Y.; Jiang, Sue; Williams, Brian A.; Allman, Elizabeth; Wold, Barbara J.; Allman, John M.

    2012-01-01

    We immunocytochemically identified microglia in fronto-insular (FI) and visual cortex (VC) in autopsy brains of well-phenotyped subjects with autism and matched controls, and stereologically quantified the microglial densities. Densities were determined blind to phenotype using an optical fractionator probe. In FI, individuals with autism had

  8. Motor Cortex Reorganization across the Lifespan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plowman, Emily K.; Kleim, Jeffrey A.

    2010-01-01

    The brain is a highly dynamic structure with the capacity for profound structural and functional change. Such neural plasticity has been well characterized within motor cortex and is believed to represent one of the neural mechanisms for acquiring and modifying motor behaviors. A number of behavioral and neural signals have been identified that

  9. The insular cortex: a comparative perspective.

    PubMed

    Butti, Camilla; Hof, Patrick R

    2010-06-01

    The human insular cortex is involved in a variety of viscerosensory, visceromotor, and interoceptive functions, and plays a role in complex processes such as emotions, music, and language. Across mammals, the insula has considerable morphologic variability. We review the structure and connectivity of the insula in laboratory animals (mouse, domestic cat, macaque monkey), and we present original data on the morphology and cytoarchitecture of insular cortex in less common species including a large carnivore (the Atlantic walrus, Odobenus rosmarus), two artiodactyls (the pigmy hippopotamus, Hexaprotodon liberiensis, and the Western bongo, Tragelaphus eurycerus), two cetaceans (the beluga whale, Delphinapterus leucas, and the minke whale, Balaenoptera acutorostrata), and a sirenian (the Florida manatee, Trichechus manatus latirostris). The insula shows substantial variability in shape, extent, and gyral and sulcal patterns, as well as differences in laminar organization, cellular specialization, and structural association with the claustrum. Our observations reveal that the insular cortex is extremely variable among mammals. These differences could be related to the role exerted by specific and selective pressures on cortical structure during evolution. We conclude that it is not possible to identify a general model of organization for the mammalian insular cortex. PMID:20512368

  10. Cholecystokinin from the entorhinal cortex enables neural plasticity in the auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao; Yu, Kai; Zhang, Zicong; Sun, Wenjian; Yang, Zhou; Feng, Jingyu; Chen, Xi; Liu, Chun-Hua; Wang, Haitao; Guo, Yi Ping; He, Jufang

    2014-03-01

    Patients with damage to the medial temporal lobe show deficits in forming new declarative memories but can still recall older memories, suggesting that the medial temporal lobe is necessary for encoding memories in the neocortex. Here, we found that cortical projection neurons in the perirhinal and entorhinal cortices were mostly immunopositive for cholecystokinin (CCK). Local infusion of CCK in the auditory cortex of anesthetized rats induced plastic changes that enabled cortical neurons to potentiate their responses or to start responding to an auditory stimulus that was paired with a tone that robustly triggered action potentials. CCK infusion also enabled auditory neurons to start responding to a light stimulus that was paired with a noise burst. In vivo intracellular recordings in the auditory cortex showed that synaptic strength was potentiated after two pairings of presynaptic and postsynaptic activity in the presence of CCK. Infusion of a CCKB antagonist in the auditory cortex prevented the formation of a visuo-auditory association in awake rats. Finally, activation of the entorhinal cortex potentiated neuronal responses in the auditory cortex, which was suppressed by infusion of a CCKB antagonist. Together, these findings suggest that the medial temporal lobe influences neocortical plasticity via CCK-positive cortical projection neurons in the entorhinal cortex. PMID:24343575

  11. Maps of optical differential pathlength factor of human adult forehead, somatosensory motor and occipital regions at multi-wavelengths in NIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Huijuan; Tanikawa, Yukari; Gao, Feng; Onodera, Yoichi; Sassaroli, Angelo; Tanaka, Kenji; Yamada, Yukio

    2002-06-01

    The optical differential pathlength factor (DPF) is an important parameter for physiological measurement using near infrared spectroscopy, but for the human adult head it has been available only for the forehead. Here we report measured DPF results for the forehead, somatosensory motor and occipital regions from measurements on 11 adult volunteers using a time-resolved optical imaging system. The optode separation was about 30 mm and the wavelengths used were 759 nm, 799 nm and 834 nm. Measured DPFs were 7.25 for the central forehead and 6.25 for the temple region at 799 nm. For the central somatosensory and occipital areas (10 mm above the inion), DPFs at 799 nm are 7.5 and 8.75, respectively. Less than 10% decreases of DPF for all these regions were observed when the wavelength increased from 759 nm to 834 nm. To compare these DPF maps with the anatomical structure of the head, a Monte Carlo simulation was carried out to calculate DPF for these regions by using a two-layered semi-infinite model and assuming the thickness of the upper layer to be the sum of the thicknesses of scalp and skull, which was measured from MRI images of a subject's head. The DPF data will be useful for quantitative monitoring of the haemodynamic changes occurring in adult heads.

  12. Quantitative Analyses of Postmortem Heat Shock Protein mRNA Profiles in the Occipital Lobes of Human Cerebral Cortices: Implications in Cause of Death

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Ukhee; Seo, Joong-Seok; Kim, Yu-Hoon; Son, Gi Hoon; Hwang, Juck-Joon

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative RNA analyses of autopsy materials to diagnose the cause and mechanism of death are challenging tasks in the field of forensic molecular pathology. Alterations in mRNA profiles can be induced by cellular stress responses during supravital reactions as well as by lethal insults at the time of death. Here, we demonstrate that several gene transcripts encoding heat shock proteins (HSPs), a gene family primarily responsible for cellular stress responses, can be differentially expressed in the occipital region of postmortem human cerebral cortices with regard to the cause of death. HSPA2 mRNA levels were higher in subjects who died due to mechanical asphyxiation (ASP), compared with those who died by traumatic injury (TI). By contrast, HSPA7 and A13 gene transcripts were much higher in the TI group than in the ASP and sudden cardiac death (SCD) groups. More importantly, relative abundances between such HSP mRNA species exhibit a stronger correlation to, and thus provide more discriminative information on, the death process than does routine normalization to a housekeeping gene. Therefore, the present study proposes alterations in HSP mRNA composition in the occipital lobe as potential forensic biological markers, which may implicate the cause and process of death. PMID:23135635

  13. [The Role of Insular Cortex in Autonomic Control].

    PubMed

    Aleksandrov, V G; Aleksandrova, N P

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review experimental data proving that the insular cortex is involved in the regulation of visceral systems: respiratory, cardiovascular and gastrointestinal systems. The paper deals with the data on the structure of the insular cortex, the pathways in brain by which visceral information ascend to the insular cortex, the results of neurophysiological experiments and clinical observations. The experimental evidence of viscerotopical organization of not only sensor, but also motor representation of visceral systems in the insular cortex is discussed. On the basis of these data the insular cortex is defined as sensorimotor visceral cortex. It is demonstrated that one of the mechanisms of influence of the insular cortex on the regulation of internal organs is the modulation of reflex reactions which take place at the bulbar level. PMID:26601415

  14. The auditory representation of speech sounds in human motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Connie; Hamiton, Liberty S; Johnson, Keith; Chang, Edward F

    2016-01-01

    In humans, listening to speech evokes neural responses in the motor cortex. This has been controversially interpreted as evidence that speech sounds are processed as articulatory gestures. However, it is unclear what information is actually encoded by such neural activity. We used high-density direct human cortical recordings while participants spoke and listened to speech sounds. Motor cortex neural patterns during listening were substantially different than during articulation of the same sounds. During listening, we observed neural activity in the superior and inferior regions of ventral motor cortex. During speaking, responses were distributed throughout somatotopic representations of speech articulators in motor cortex. The structure of responses in motor cortex during listening was organized along acoustic features similar to auditory cortex, rather than along articulatory features as during speaking. Motor cortex does not contain articulatory representations of perceived actions in speech, but rather, represents auditory vocal information. PMID:26943778

  15. The role of prefrontal cortex in psychopathy

    PubMed Central

    Koenigs, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Psychopathy is a personality disorder characterized by remorseless and impulsive antisocial behavior. Given the significant societal costs of the recidivistic criminal activity associated with the disorder, there is a pressing need for more effective treatment strategies, and hence, a better understanding of the psychobiological mechanisms underlying the disorder. The prefrontal cortex (PFC) is likely to play an important role in psychopathy. In particular, the ventromedial and anterior cingulate sectors of PFC are theorized to mediate a number of social and affective decision-making functions that appear to be disrupted in psychopathy. This article provides a critical summary of human neuroimaging data implicating prefrontal dysfunction in psychopathy. A growing body of evidence associates psychopathy with structural and functional abnormalities in ventromedial PFC and anterior cingulate cortex. Although this burgeoning field still faces a number of methodological challenges and outstanding questions that will need to be resolved by future studies, the research to date has established a link between psychopathy and PFC. PMID:22752782

  16. Anterior Insular Cortex and Emotional Awareness

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Xiaosi; Hof, Patrick R.; Friston, Karl J.; Fan, Jin

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the foundation for a role of the human anterior insular cortex (AIC) in emotional awareness, defined as the conscious experience of emotions. We first introduce the neuroanatomical features of AIC and existing findings on emotional awareness. Using empathy, the awareness and understanding of other peoples emotional states, as a test case, we then present evidence to demonstrate: 1) AIC and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) are commonly coactivated as revealed by a meta-analysis, 2) AIC is functionally dissociable from ACC, 3) AIC integrates stimulus-driven and top-down information, and 4) AIC is necessary for emotional awareness. We propose a model in which AIC serves two major functions: integrating bottom-up interoceptive signals with top-down predictions to generate a current awareness state and providing descending predictions to visceral systems that provide a point of reference for autonomic reflexes. We argue that AIC is critical and necessary for emotional awareness. PMID:23749500

  17. Elastic instabilities in a model cerebral cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayett, David; Manyuhina, Oksana; Schwarz, J. M.

    2014-03-01

    Soft and biological systems exhibit elastic instabilities, such as buckling, folding and wrinkling, in the presence of external loads, growth, or both. The modeling of such systems calls for a continuum approach to account for the interplay between local elastic stresses and global growth profiles. It is this interplay that can lead to non-trivial geometries. We propose a model of the cerebral cortex, described as an anisotropic multi-layered material with two basic components (white matter and grey matter) undergoing differential growth. We explore the nature of buckling instabilities, assuming a compatibility between the growth and geometric deformation, by solving a nonlinear variational problem with a free interface. We expect that this simplified approach, based on a combination of geometry and elasticity, could give insight into the formation and splitting of folds observed during the development of the cerebral cortex.

  18. Monkey cortex through fMRI glasses

    PubMed Central

    Vanduffel, Wim; Zhu, Qi; Orban, Guy A.

    2015-01-01

    In 1998 several groups reported the feasibility of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiments in monkeys, with the goal to bridge the gap between invasive nonhuman primate studies and human functional imaging. These studies yielded critical insights in the neuronal underpinnings of the BOLD signal. Furthermore, the technology has been successful in guiding electrophysiological recordings and identifying focal perturbation targets. Finally, invaluable information was obtained concerning human brain evolution. We here provide a comprehensive overview of awake monkey fMRI studies mainly confined to the visual system. We review the latest insights about the topographic organization of monkey visual cortex and discuss the spatial relationships between retinotopy and category and feature selective clusters. We briefly discuss the functional layout of parietal and frontal cortex and continue with a summary of some fascinating functional and effective connectivity studies. Finally, we review recent comparative fMRI experiments and speculate about the future of nonhuman primate imaging. PMID:25102559

  19. Speed cells in the medial entorhinal cortex.

    PubMed

    Kropff, Emilio; Carmichael, James E; Moser, May-Britt; Moser, Edvard I

    2015-07-23

    Grid cells in the medial entorhinal cortex have spatial firing fields that repeat periodically in a hexagonal pattern. When animals move, activity is translated between grid cells in accordance with the animal's displacement in the environment. For this translation to occur, grid cells must have continuous access to information about instantaneous running speed. However, a powerful entorhinal speed signal has not been identified. Here we show that running speed is represented in the firing rate of a ubiquitous but functionally dedicated population of entorhinal neurons distinct from other cell populations of the local circuit, such as grid, head-direction and border cells. These 'speed cells' are characterized by a context-invariant positive, linear response to running speed, and share with grid cells a prospective bias of ?50-80 ms. Our observations point to speed cells as a key component of the dynamic representation of self-location in the medial entorhinal cortex. PMID:26176924

  20. How do barrels form in somatosensory cortex?

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong; Crair, Michael C.

    2011-01-01

    The somatosensory cortex of many rodents, lagomorphs, and marsupials contain distinct cytoarchitectonic features named barrels that reflect the pattern of large facial whiskers on the snout. Barrels are composed of clustered thalamocortical afferents relaying sensory information from one whisker surrounded by cell dense walls or barrels in layer 4 of the cortex. In many ways, barrels are a simple and relatively accessible canonical cortical column, making them a common model system for the examination of cortical development and function. Despite their experimental accessibility and popularity, we still lack a basic understanding of how and why barrels form in the first place. In this review, we will examine what is known about mechanisms of barrel development, focusing specifically on the recent literature utilizing the moleculargenetic power of mice as a model system for examining brain development. PMID:21534999

  1. Propagating Waves in Human Motor Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Kazutaka; Saleh, Maryam; Penn, Richard D.; Hatsopoulos, Nicholas G.

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies in non-human primates (NHPs) have shown that beta oscillations (1530 Hz) of local field potentials (LFPs) in the arm/hand areas of primary motor cortex (MI) propagate as traveling waves across the cortex. These waves exhibited two stereotypical features across animals and tasks: (1) The waves propagated in two dominant modal directions roughly 180 apart, and (2) their propagation speed ranged from 10 to 35 cm/s. It is, however, unknown if such cortical waves occur in the human motor cortex. This study shows that the two properties of propagating beta waves are present in MI of a tetraplegic human patient while he was instructed to perform an instruction delay center-out task using a cursor controlled by the chin. Moreover, we show that beta waves are sustained and have similar properties whether the subject was engaged in the task or at rest. The directions of the successive sustained waves both in the human subject and a NHP subject tended to switch from one dominant mode to the other, and at least in the NHP subject the estimated distance traveled between successive waves traveling into and out of the central sulcus is consistent with the hypothesis of wave reflection between the border of motor and somatosensory cortices. Further, we show that the occurrence of the beta waves is not uniquely tied to periods of increased power in the beta frequency band. These results demonstrate that traveling beta waves in MI are a general phenomenon occurring in human as well as NHPs. Consistent with the NHP data, the dominant directions of the beta LFP waves in human aligned to the proximal to distal gradient of joint representations in MI somatotopy. This consistent finding of wave propagation may imply the existence of a hardwired organization of motor cortex that mediates this spatiotemporal pattern. PMID:21629859

  2. Attentional modulation in human primary olfactory cortex.

    PubMed

    Zelano, Christina; Bensafi, Moustafa; Porter, Jess; Mainland, Joel; Johnson, Brad; Bremner, Elizabeth; Telles, Christina; Khan, Rehan; Sobel, Noam

    2005-01-01

    Central to the concept of attention is the fact that identical stimuli can be processed in different ways. In olfaction, attention may designate the identical flow of air through the nose as either respiration or olfactory exploration. Here we have used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to probe this attentional mechanism in primary olfactory cortex (POC). We report a dissociation in POC that revealed attention-dependent and attention-independent subregions. Whereas a temporal subregion comprising temporal piriform cortex (PirT) responded equally across conditions, a frontal subregion comprising frontal piriform cortex (PirF) and the olfactory tubercle responded preferentially to attended sniffs as opposed to unattended sniffs. In addition, a task-specific anticipatory response occurred in the attention-dependent region only. This dissociation was consistent across two experimental designs: one focusing on sniffs of clean air, the other focusing on odor-laden sniffs. Our findings highlight the role of attention at the earliest cortical levels of olfactory processing. PMID:15608635

  3. Amodal processing in human prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Tamber-Rosenau, Benjamin J; Dux, Paul E; Tombu, Michael N; Asplund, Christopher L; Marois, Ren

    2013-07-10

    Information enters the cortex via modality-specific sensory regions, whereas actions are produced by modality-specific motor regions. Intervening central stages of information processing map sensation to behavior. Humans perform this central processing in a flexible, abstract manner such that sensory information in any modality can lead to response via any motor system. Cognitive theories account for such flexible behavior by positing amodal central information processing (e.g., "central executive," Baddeley and Hitch, 1974; "supervisory attentional system," Norman and Shallice, 1986; "response selection bottleneck," Pashler, 1994). However, the extent to which brain regions embodying central mechanisms of information processing are amodal remains unclear. Here we apply multivariate pattern analysis to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data to compare response selection, a cognitive process widely believed to recruit an amodal central resource across sensory and motor modalities. We show that most frontal and parietal cortical areas known to activate across a wide variety of tasks code modality, casting doubt on the notion that these regions embody a central processor devoid of modality representation. Importantly, regions of anterior insula and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex consistently failed to code modality across four experiments. However, these areas code at least one other task dimension, process (instantiated as response selection vs response execution), ensuring that failure to find coding of modality is not driven by insensitivity of multivariate pattern analysis in these regions. We conclude that abstract encoding of information modality is primarily a property of subregions of the prefrontal cortex. PMID:23843526

  4. Amodal Processing in Human Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Dux, Paul E.; Tombu, Michael N.; Asplund, Christopher L.; Marois, Ren

    2013-01-01

    Information enters the cortex via modality-specific sensory regions, whereas actions are produced by modality-specific motor regions. Intervening central stages of information processing map sensation to behavior. Humans perform this central processing in a flexible, abstract manner such that sensory information in any modality can lead to response via any motor system. Cognitive theories account for such flexible behavior by positing amodal central information processing (e.g., central executive, Baddeley and Hitch, 1974; supervisory attentional system, Norman and Shallice, 1986; response selection bottleneck, Pashler, 1994). However, the extent to which brain regions embodying central mechanisms of information processing are amodal remains unclear. Here we apply multivariate pattern analysis to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data to compare response selection, a cognitive process widely believed to recruit an amodal central resource across sensory and motor modalities. We show that most frontal and parietal cortical areas known to activate across a wide variety of tasks code modality, casting doubt on the notion that these regions embody a central processor devoid of modality representation. Importantly, regions of anterior insula and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex consistently failed to code modality across four experiments. However, these areas code at least one other task dimension, process (instantiated as response selection vs response execution), ensuring that failure to find coding of modality is not driven by insensitivity of multivariate pattern analysis in these regions. We conclude that abstract encoding of information modality is primarily a property of subregions of the prefrontal cortex. PMID:23843526

  5. Parietal cortex signals come unstuck in time.

    PubMed

    Cook, Erik P; Pack, Christopher C

    2012-01-01

    Humans and other animals are surprisingly adept at estimating the duration of temporal intervals, even without the use of watches and clocks. This ability is typically studied in the lab by asking observers to indicate their estimate of the time between two external sensory events. The results of such studies confirm that humans can accurately estimate durations on a variety of time scales. Although many brain areas are thought to contribute to the representation of elapsed time, recent neurophysiological studies have linked the parietal cortex in particular to the perception of sub-second time intervals. In this Primer, we describe previous work on parietal cortex and time perception, and we highlight the findings of a study published in this issue of PLOS Biology, in which Schneider and Ghose characterize single-neuron responses during performance of a novel "Temporal Production" task. During temporal production, the observer must track the passage of time without anticipating any external sensory event, and it appears that the parietal cortex may use a unique strategy to support this type of measurement. PMID:23118615

  6. Functional neuroimaging studies of human somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    McGlone, Francis; Kelly, Edward F; Trulsson, Mats; Francis, Susan T; Westling, Gran; Bowtell, Richard

    2002-09-20

    Two studies were carried out to assess the applicability of echoplanar fMRI at 3.0 T to the analysis of somatosensory mechanisms in humans. Vibrotactile stimulation of the tips of digits two and five reliably generated significant clusters of activation in primary (SI) and secondary (SII) somatosensory cortex, area 43, the pre-central gyrus, posterior insula, posterior parietal cortex and posterior cingulate. Separation of these responses by digit in SI was possible in all subjects and the activation sites reflected the known lateral position of the representation of digit 2 relative to that of digit 5. A second study employed microneurographic techniques in which individual median-nerve mechanoreceptive afferents were isolated, physiologically characterized, and microstimulated in conjunction with fMRI. Hemodynamic responses, observed in every case, were robust, focal, and physiologically orderly. These techniques will enable more detailed studies of the representation of the body surface in human somatosensory cortex, the relationship of that organization to short-term plasticity in responses to natural tactile stimuli, and effects of stimulus patterning and unimodal/cross-modal attentional manipulations. They also present unique opportunities to investigate the basic physiology of the BOLD effect, and to optimize the operating characteristics of two important human functional neuroimaging modalities-high-field fMRI and high-resolution EEG-in an unusually specific and well-characterized neurophysiological setting. PMID:12356445

  7. Human prefrontal cortex: evolution, development, and pathology.

    PubMed

    Teffer, Kate; Semendeferi, Katerina

    2012-01-01

    The prefrontal cortex is critical to many cognitive abilities that are considered particularly human, and forms a large part of a neural system crucial for normal socio-emotional and executive functioning in humans and other primates. In this chapter, we survey the literature regarding prefrontal development and pathology in humans as well as comparative studies of the region in humans and closely related primate species. The prefrontal cortex matures later in development than more caudal regions, and some of its neuronal subpopulations exhibit more complex dendritic arborizations. Comparative work suggests that the human prefrontal cortex differs from that of closely related primate species less in relative size than it does in organization. Specific reorganizational events in neural circuitry may have taken place either as a consequence of adjusting to increases in size or as adaptive responses to specific selection pressures. Living in complex environments has been recognized as a considerable factor in the evolution of primate cognition. Normal frontal lobe development and function are also compromised in several neurological and psychiatric disorders. A phylogenetically recent reorganization of frontal cortical circuitry may have been critical to the emergence of human-specific executive and social-emotional functions, and developmental pathology in these same systems underlies many psychiatric and neurological disorders, including autism and schizophrenia. PMID:22230628

  8. Chemical and biological differentiation of Cortex Phellodendri Chinensis and Cortex Phellodendri Amurensis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Meng-Li; Xian, Yan-Fang; Ip, Siu-Po; Tsai, Sam-Hip; Yang, Ji-Yong; Che, Chun-Tao

    2010-10-01

    The Chinese herbal drug Cortex Phellodendri is derived from two species of PHELLODENDRON, P. CHINENSIS Schneid. and P. AMURENSE Rupr. Traditionally, Cortex Phellodendri Chinensis (CPC) and Cortex Phellodendri Amurensis (CPA) are used interchangeably because they are believed to share the same clinical efficacy. Berberine has been believed to be the active ingredient of the herbs. However, recent studies have shown that the content of berberine is much higher in CPC than in CPA. Interestingly, the majority of researches deal with CPA, the one with lower content of berberine. These observations provoke us to reconsider the active ingredients of Cortex Phellodendri. In this study, two traditional usages (antidiarrheal and antibacterial) of Cortex Phellodendri were compared with the chemical analysis of the two herb species used in its formulation. The results suggest that berberine is one of the active ingredients responsible for the antidiarrheal and antibacterial activities of the herbs, but that other chemical ingredients are also involved in regulating the biological actions of the herbal drug. These chemical ingredients may have the same or the opposite effect as berberine. The effectiveness of the herbs is more likely to correlate to the content of total alkaloids rather than to the content of berberine. PMID:20354951

  9. Flexible Reference Frames for Grasp Planning in Human Parietofrontal Cortex1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Leoné, Frank T. M.; Monaco, Simona; Henriques, Denise Y. P.; Toni, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Reaching to a location in space is supported by a cortical network that operates in a variety of reference frames. Computational models and recent fMRI evidence suggest that this diversity originates from neuronal populations dynamically shifting between reference frames as a function of task demands and sensory modality. In this human fMRI study, we extend this framework to nonmanipulative grasping movements, an action that depends on multiple properties of a target, not only its spatial location. By presenting targets visually or somaesthetically, and by manipulating gaze direction, we investigate how information about a target is encoded in gaze- and body-centered reference frames in dorsomedial and dorsolateral grasping-related circuits. Data were analyzed using a novel multivariate approach that combines classification and cross-classification measures to explicitly aggregate evidence in favor of and against the presence of gaze- and body-centered reference frames. We used this approach to determine whether reference frames are differentially recruited depending on the availability of sensory information, and where in the cortical networks there is common coding across modalities. Only in the left anterior intraparietal sulcus (aIPS) was coding of the grasping target modality dependent: predominantly gaze-centered for visual targets and body-centered for somaesthetic targets. Left superior parieto-occipital cortex consistently coded targets for grasping in a gaze-centered reference frame. Left anterior precuneus and premotor areas operated in a modality-independent, body-centered frame. These findings reveal how dorsolateral grasping area aIPS could play a role in the transition between modality-independent gaze-centered spatial maps and body-centered motor areas. PMID:26464989

  10. Feedforward and quick recurrent processes in early visual cortex revealed by TMS?

    PubMed

    de Graaf, Tom A; Goebel, Rainer; Sack, Alexander T

    2012-07-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) can be applied to occipital cortex to abolish (conscious) perception of visual stimuli. TMS research has revealed several time windows of masking relative to visual stimulus onset, most consistently a time window around 100ms post-stimulus. However, the exact nature of visual processing in this 'classical' time window, e.g. whether it represents the feedforward processing of the visual information, or rather a feedback projection from higher visual areas, remains unclear. Here, we used TMS to mask in the same participants two types of stimuli of different complexities (orientation Gratings and Faces) over different time windows. Interestingly, the masking functions were not the same for both stimulus types. We found an earlier peak masking latency for orientation stimuli, and a slower recovery for Faces. In a second, follow-up experiment, we superimposed both types of stimuli to create one composite stimulus set. Depending on the instruction, participants could then perform orientation or face discrimination tasks on the exact same stimuli. In addition, for each participant, stimuli were calibrated to equate task difficulties. The peak masking latency was now identical for both tasks, but the masking function revealed again a slower recovery during the face discrimination task, suggesting top-down (recurrent) effects in the second half of the masking function. Hence, rather than this masking window reflecting either feedforward or feedback processing, the early part of what is traditionally considered one masking window may reflect feedforward processing, while the latter part may already reflect recurrent processing. These findings shed new light on recurrent models of vision and related theoretical accounts of visual awareness. PMID:22032946

  11. fMRI evidence for sensorimotor transformations in human cortex during smooth pursuit eye movements.

    PubMed

    Kimmig, H; Ohlendorf, S; Speck, O; Sprenger, A; Rutschmann, R M; Haller, S; Greenlee, M W

    2008-01-01

    Smooth pursuit eye movements (SP) are driven by moving objects. The pursuit system processes the visual input signals and transforms this information into an oculomotor output signal. Despite the object's movement on the retina and the eyes' movement in the head, we are able to locate the object in space implying coordinate transformations from retinal to head and space coordinates. To test for the visual and oculomotor components of SP and the possible transformation sites, we investigated three experimental conditions: (I) fixation of a stationary target with a second target moving across the retina (visual), (II) pursuit of the moving target with the second target moving in phase (oculomotor), (III) pursuit of the moving target with the second target remaining stationary (visuo-oculomotor). Precise eye movement data were simultaneously measured with the fMRI data. Visual components of activation during SP were located in the motion-sensitive, temporo-parieto-occipital region MT+ and the right posterior parietal cortex (PPC). Motor components comprised more widespread activation in these regions and additional activations in the frontal and supplementary eye fields (FEF, SEF), the cingulate gyrus and precuneus. The combined visuo-oculomotor stimulus revealed additional activation in the putamen. Possible transformation sites were found in MT+ and PPC. The MT+ activation evoked by the motion of a single visual dot was very localized, while the activation of the same single dot motion driving the eye was rather extended across MT+. The eye movement information appeared to be dispersed across the visual map of MT+. This could be interpreted as a transfer of the one-dimensional eye movement information into the two-dimensional visual map. Potentially, the dispersed information could be used to remap MT+ to space coordinates rather than retinal coordinates and to provide the basis for a motor output control. A similar interpretation holds for our results in the PPC region. PMID:18394660

  12. A model of surface depth and orientation predicts BOLD responses in human scene-selective cortex.

    PubMed

    Lescroart, Mark; Gallant, Jack

    2015-01-01

    A network of areas in the human brain-including the Parahippocampal Place Area (PPA), the Occipital Place Area (OPA), and the Retrosplenial Cortex (RSC)-represent visual scenes. However, it is still unclear whether these areas represent high-level features (such as local scene structure or scene category), or low-level features (such as high spatial frequencies and rectilinear corners). To better characterize the representation of visual features in PPA, OPA, and RSC, we define several feature spaces hypothesized to be represented in scene-selective areas, and use them to predict brain activity. The feature spaces we define reflect scene structure (3D orientation of large surfaces), scene expanse (distance from visible surfaces to the virtual camera), and local spatial frequency (Gabor wavelet transformations) of each rendered scene. We fit each feature space to BOLD fMRI data recorded while human subjects viewed movies of a virtual world rendered using 3D graphics software. The graphics software allows us to quantify scene structure and expanse with continuous parameters instead of categorical labels such as "open" or "closed". We fit models for all feature spaces using L2-regularized regression, and evaluate each model based on how much response variance it predicts in a withheld data set. The scene structure model explains more response variance in our data than the scene expanse and local spatial frequency models. A hybrid model that combines surface orientation and distance from the virtual camera explains still more variance. These results are consistent whether subjects attend to the size of each scene or to the number of objects in each scene. Together, these results suggest that PPA, OPA, and RSC represent conjunctions of the depth and orientation of walls, ceilings, and other large objects in scenes. Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015. PMID:26326261

  13. Reduced Haemodynamic Response in the Ageing Visual Cortex Measured by Absolute fNIRS.

    PubMed

    Ward, Laura McKernan; Aitchison, Ross Thomas; Tawse, Melisa; Simmers, Anita Jane; Shahani, Uma

    2015-01-01

    The effect of healthy ageing on visual cortical activation is still to be fully explored. This study aimed to elucidate whether the haemodynamic response (HDR) of the visual cortex altered as a result of ageing. Visually normal (healthy) participants were presented with a simple visual stimulus (reversing checkerboard). Full optometric screening was implemented to identify two age groups: younger adults (n = 12, mean age 21) and older adults (n = 13, mean age 71). Frequency-domain Multi-distance (FD-MD) functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS) was used to measure absolute changes in oxygenated [HbO] and deoxygenated [HbR] haemoglobin concentrations in the occipital cortices. Utilising a slow event-related design, subjects viewed a full field reversing checkerboard with contrast and check size manipulations (15 and 30 minutes of arc, 50% and 100% contrast). Both groups showed the characteristic response of increased [HbO] and decreased [HbR] during stimulus presentation. However, older adults produced a more varied HDR and often had comparable levels of [HbO] and [HbR] during both stimulus presentation and baseline resting state. Younger adults had significantly greater concentrations of both [HbO] and [HbR] in every investigation regardless of the type of stimulus displayed (p<0.05). The average variance associated with this age-related effect for [HbO] was 88% and [HbR] 91%. Passive viewing of a visual stimulus, without any cognitive input, showed a marked age-related decline in the cortical HDR. Moreover, regardless of stimulus parameters such as check size, the HDR was characterised by age. In concurrence with present neuroimaging literature, we conclude that the visual HDR decreases as healthy ageing proceeds. PMID:25909849

  14. Patterns of neural activity in the human ventral premotor cortex reflect a whole-body multisensory percept.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Giovanni; Bjrnsdotter, Malin; Petkova, Valeria I; Abdulkarim, Zakaryah; Ehrsson, H Henrik

    2015-04-01

    Previous research has shown that the integration of multisensory signals from the body in fronto-parietal association areas underlies the perception of a body part as belonging to one's physical self. What are the neural mechanisms that enable the perception of one's entire body as a unified entity? In one behavioral and one fMRI multivoxel pattern analysis experiment, we used a full-body illusion to investigate how congruent visuo-tactile signals from a single body part facilitate the emergence of the sense of ownership of the entire body. To elicit this illusion, participants viewed the body of a mannequin from the first-person perspective via head-mounted displays while synchronous touches were applied to the hand, abdomen, or leg of the bodies of the participant and the mannequin; asynchronous visuo-tactile stimuli served as controls. The psychometric data indicated that the participants perceived ownership of the entire artificial body regardless of the body segment that received the synchronous visuo-tactile stimuli. Based on multivoxel pattern analysis, we found that the neural responses in the left ventral premotor cortex displayed illusion-specific activity patterns that generalized across all tested pairs of body parts. Crucially, a tripartite generalization analysis revealed the whole-body specificity of these premotor activity patterns. Finally, we also identified multivoxel patterns in the premotor, intraparietal, and lateral occipital cortices and in the putamen that reflected multisensory responses specific to individual body parts. Based on these results, we propose that the dynamic formation of a whole-body percept may be mediated by neuronal populations in the ventral premotor cortex that contain visuo-tactile receptive fields encompassing multiple body segments. PMID:25583608

  15. Reduced Visual Cortex Gray Matter Volume and Thickness in Young Adults Who Witnessed Domestic Violence during Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Tomoda, Akemi; Polcari, Ann; Anderson, Carl M.; Teicher, Martin H.

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to interparental violence is associated with negative outcomes, such as depression, post-traumatic stress disorder and reduced cognitive abilities. However, little is known about the potential effects of witnessing domestic violence during childhood on gray matter volume (GMV) or cortical thickness. High-resolution 3.0 T volumetric scans (Siemens Trio Scanner) were obtained on 52 subjects (1825 years) including 22 (6 males/16 females) with a history of visually witnessing episodes of domestic violence, and 30 (8 males/22 females) unexposed control subjects, with neither a current nor past DSM-IV Axis I or II disorder. Potential confounding effects of age, gender, level of parental verbal aggression, parental education, financial stress, full scale IQ, and total GMV, or average thickness were modeled using voxel based morphometry and FreeSurfer. Witnessing domestic violence subjects had a 6.1% GMV reduction in the right lingual gyrus (BA18) (P?=?0.029, False Discovery Rate corrected peak level). Thickness in this region was also reduced, as was thickness in V2 bilaterally and left occipital pole. Theses regions were maximally sensitive to exposure to witnessing domestic violence between 1113 years of age. Regional reductions in GMV and thickness were observed in both susceptible and resilient witnessing domestic violence subjects. Results in subjects witnessing domestic violence were similar to previously reported results in subjects with childhood sexual abuse, as the primary region affected was visual cortex. Brain regions that process and convey the adverse sensory input of the abuse may be specifically modified by this experience, particularly in subjects exposed to a single type of maltreatment. Exposure to multiple types of maltreatment is more commonly associated with morphological alterations in corticolimbic regions. These findings fit with preclinical studies showing that visual cortex is a highly plastic structure. PMID:23300699

  16. Parametric responses to rotation symmetry in mid-level visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Kohler, Peter; Yakovleva, Alexandra; Clarke, Alasdair; Liu, Yanxi; Norcia, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Symmetry is a fundamental principle of perceptual organization that contributes to multiple aspects of vision, running the gamut from judgments of aesthetics and mate selection, to shape processing and surface orientation. Crystallographic group theory categorizes all possible two-dimensional repetitive patterns into 17 wallpaper groups, as unique combinations of the four fundamental symmetries: mirror reflection, translation, rotation and glide reflection (Liu et al., 2010). We have developed an algorithm that can generate a near-infinite number of well-controlled exemplars belonging to each of the 17 wallpaper groups. Here, we focus on four wallpaper groups that all contain rotation symmetry exclusively - only differing in the maximum order of rotation symmetry found in each group. We use an fMRI block design that isolates the symmetry-specific BOLD response by alternating group exemplar images with matched control images. Using scalp EEG, we have previously shown that the neural responses to the groups increase linearly with maximum order of rotation symmetry (Kohler et al., VSS 2014), indicating that rotation is represented parametrically. Our fMRI experiment (n=12) localizes this parametric effect in several extra-striate areas of human visual cortex (V4, VO1, LOC), while other visual areas have little response to rotation symmetry (e.g. MT). Interestingly, the parametric response is also seen in V3, an area that has previously been found to have little or no response to mirror symmetry (Sasaki et al 2005). The fact that V1 and V2 do not show the effect suggests a functional distinction between V3 and earlier visual areas. Neurons in intermediate-level visual areas like V4 have complex and diverse response properties (Roe et al., 2012) that are difficult to characterize systematically (Gallant et al., 1996). These results present a novel, well-defined stimulus set, the wallpaper groups, that can drive V4 and other mid-level visual areas in a robust and systematic way. Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015. PMID:26326810

  17. Spreading and synchronization of intrinsic signals in visual cortex of macaque monkey evoked by a localized visual stimulus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guang Bin; Zhang, Ying; Pettigrew, John Douglas; Xu, Wei Feng; Li, Chao-Yi

    2003-09-19

    Spatio-temporal maps of the occipital cortex of macaque monkeys were analyzed using optical imaging of intrinsic signals. The images obtained during localized visual stimulation (IS) were compared with the images obtained on presentation of a blank screen (IB). We first investigated spontaneous variations of the intrinsic signals by analyzing the 100 IBs for each of the three cortical areas. Slow periodical activation was observed in alternation over the cortical areas. Cross-correlation analysis indicated that synchronization of spontaneous activation only took place within each cortical area, but not between them. When a small, drifting grating (2 degrees x 2 degrees ) was presented on the fovea, a dark spot appeared in the optical image at the cortical representation of this retinal location. It spread bilaterally along the border between V1 and V2, continuing as a number of parallel dark bands covering a large area of the lateral surface of V1. Cross-correlation analysis showed that during visual stimulation the intrinsic signals over all of the three cortical areas were synchronized, with in-phase activation of V1 and V2 and anti-phase activation of V4 and V1/V2. The significance of these extensive synergistic and antagonistic interactions between different cortical areas is discussed. PMID:12957364

  18. Inhibitory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex modulates early affective processing.

    PubMed

    Zwanzger, Peter; Steinberg, Christian; Rehbein, Maimu Alissa; Bröckelmann, Ann-Kathrin; Dobel, Christian; Zavorotnyy, Maxim; Domschke, Katharina; Junghöfer, Markus

    2014-11-01

    The dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) has often been suggested as a key modulator of emotional stimulus appraisal and regulation. Therefore, in clinical trials, it is one of the most frequently targeted regions for non-invasive brain stimulation such as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). In spite of various encouraging reports that demonstrate beneficial effects of rTMS in anxiety disorders, psychophysiological studies exploring the underlying neural mechanisms are sparse. Here we investigated how inhibitory rTMS influences early affective processing when applied over the right dlPFC. Before and after rTMS or sham stimulation, subjects viewed faces with fearful or neutral expressions while whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG) was recorded. Due to the disrupted functioning of the right dlPFC, visual processing in bilateral parietal, temporal, and occipital areas was amplified starting at around 90 ms after stimulus onset. Moreover, increased fear-specific activation was found in the right TPJ area in a time-interval between 110 and 170 ms. These neurophysiological effects were reflected in slowed reaction times for fearful, but not for neutral faces in a facial expression identification task while there was no such effect on a gender discrimination control task. Our study confirms the specific and important role of the dlPFC in regulation of early emotional attention and encourages future clinical research to use minimal invasive methods such as transcranial magnetic (TMS) or direct current stimulation (tDCS). PMID:25019678

  19. Chiari I Malformation Associated with Atlanto-Occipital Assimilation Presenting as Orthopnea and Cough Syncope: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Mangubat, Erwin Zeta; Wilson, Tom; Mitchell, Brian A.; Byrne, Richard W.

    2013-01-01

    Although it is not uncommon for patients with Chiari I malformations to present with respiratory complaints, cough syncope is a rare presenting symptom. We report an adult patient who harbored both a Chiari I malformation and atlanto-occipital assimilation who complained of cough syncope, orthopnea, and central sleep apnea. The patient underwent decompressive craniectomy of the posterior fossa and cervical level 2 laminectomy. However, due to a possible initial underappreciation of the profound narrowing of the foramen magnum as a result of these concomitant pathologies, the patient may have had continued impaired cerebrospinal fluid flow, leading to a symptomatic pseudomeningocele and requiring a more extensive decompression that included a cervical level 3 laminectomy as well as a temporary lumbar drain. On 2-year follow-up, he has remained asymptomatic. PMID:25083365

  20. Ictal Generalized EEG Attenuation (IGEA) and hypopnea in a child with occipital type 1 cortical dysplasia Is it a biomarker for SUDEP?

    PubMed Central

    Chaitanya, Ganne; Santosh, N. Subbareddy; Velmurugan, Jayabal; Arivazhagan, Arima; Bharath, Rose D.; Mahadevan, Anita; Nagappa, Madhu; Bindu, Parayil S; Rao, Malla Bhaskara; Taly, Arun B.; Satishchandra, Parthasarathy; Sinha, Sanjib

    2015-01-01

    An interesting association of ictal hypopnea and ictal generalized EEG attenuation (IGEA) as possible marker of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is reported. We describe a 5-years-old girl with left focal seizures with secondary generalization due to right occipital cortical dysplasia presenting with ictal hypopnea and IGEA. She had repeated episodes of the ictal apnoea in the past requiring ventilator support and intensive care unit (ICU) admission during episodes of status epilepticus. The IGEA lasted for 0.26-4.68 seconds coinciding with the ictal hypopnea during which both clinical seizure and electrical epileptic activity stopped. Review of literature showed correlation between post-ictal apnoea and post ictal generalized EEG suppression and increased risk for SUDEP. The report adds to the growing body of literature on peri-ictal apnea, about its association with IGEA might be considered as a marker for SUDEP. She is seizure free for 4 months following surgery. PMID:25745325

  1. Chiari I malformation associated with atlanto-occipital assimilation presenting as orthopnea and cough syncope: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Mangubat, Erwin Zeta; Wilson, Tom; Mitchell, Brian A; Byrne, Richard W

    2014-08-01

    Although it is not uncommon for patients with Chiari I malformations to present with respiratory complaints, cough syncope is a rare presenting symptom. We report an adult patient who harbored both a Chiari I malformation and atlanto-occipital assimilation who complained of cough syncope, orthopnea, and central sleep apnea. The patient underwent decompressive craniectomy of the posterior fossa and cervical level 2 laminectomy. However, due to a possible initial underappreciation of the profound narrowing of the foramen magnum as a result of these concomitant pathologies, the patient may have had continued impaired cerebrospinal fluid flow, leading to a symptomatic pseudomeningocele and requiring a more extensive decompression that included a cervical level 3 laminectomy as well as a temporary lumbar drain. On 2-year follow-up, he has remained asymptomatic. PMID:25083365

  2. Ictal Generalized EEG Attenuation (IGEA) and hypopnea in a child with occipital type 1 cortical dysplasia - Is it a biomarker for SUDEP?

    PubMed

    Chaitanya, Ganne; Santosh, N Subbareddy; Velmurugan, Jayabal; Arivazhagan, Arima; Bharath, Rose D; Mahadevan, Anita; Nagappa, Madhu; Bindu, Parayil S; Rao, Malla Bhaskara; Taly, Arun B; Satishchandra, Parthasarathy; Sinha, Sanjib

    2015-01-01

    An interesting association of ictal hypopnea and ictal generalized EEG attenuation (IGEA) as possible marker of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is reported. We describe a 5-years-old girl with left focal seizures with secondary generalization due to right occipital cortical dysplasia presenting with ictal hypopnea and IGEA. She had repeated episodes of the ictal apnoea in the past requiring ventilator support and intensive care unit (ICU) admission during episodes of status epilepticus. The IGEA lasted for 0.26-4.68 seconds coinciding with the ictal hypopnea during which both clinical seizure and electrical epileptic activity stopped. Review of literature showed correlation between post-ictal apnoea and post ictal generalized EEG suppression and increased risk for SUDEP. The report adds to the growing body of literature on peri-ictal apnea, about its association with IGEA might be considered as a marker for SUDEP. She is seizure free for 4 months following surgery. PMID:25745325

  3. The Role of Parieto-Occipital Junction in the Interaction between Dorsal and Ventral Streams in Disparity-Defined Near and Far Space Processing

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ming; Chen, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Neuropsychological and functional MRI data suggest that two functionally and anatomically dissociable streams of visual processing exist: a ventral perception-related stream and a dorsal action-related stream. However, relatively little is known about how the two streams interact in the intact brain during the production of adaptive behavior. Using functional MRI and a virtual three-dimensional paradigm, we aimed at examining whether the parieto-occipital junction (POJ) acts as an interface for the integration and processing of information between the dorsal and ventral streams in the near and far space processing. Virtual reality three-dimensional near and far space was defined by manipulating binocular disparity, with -68.76 arcmin crossed disparity for near space and +68.76 arcmin uncrossed disparity for near space. Our results showed that the POJ and bilateral superior occipital gyrus (SOG) showed relative increased activity when responded to targets presented in the near space than in the far space, which was independent of the retinotopic and perceived sizes of target. Furthermore, the POJ showed the enhanced functional connectivity with both the dorsal and ventral streams during the far space processing irrespective of target sizes, supporting that the POJ acts as an interface between the dorsal and ventral streams in disparity-defined near and far space processing. In contrast, the bilateral SOG showed the enhanced functional connectivity only with the ventral stream if retinotopic sizes of targets in the near and far spaces were matched, which suggested there was a functional dissociation between the POJ and bilateral SOG. PMID:26999674

  4. The Role of Parieto-Occipital Junction in the Interaction between Dorsal and Ventral Streams in Disparity-Defined Near and Far Space Processing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Aijun; Li, You; Zhang, Ming; Chen, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Neuropsychological and functional MRI data suggest that two functionally and anatomically dissociable streams of visual processing exist: a ventral perception-related stream and a dorsal action-related stream. However, relatively little is known about how the two streams interact in the intact brain during the production of adaptive behavior. Using functional MRI and a virtual three-dimensional paradigm, we aimed at examining whether the parieto-occipital junction (POJ) acts as an interface for the integration and processing of information between the dorsal and ventral streams in the near and far space processing. Virtual reality three-dimensional near and far space was defined by manipulating binocular disparity, with -68.76 arcmin crossed disparity for near space and +68.76 arcmin uncrossed disparity for near space. Our results showed that the POJ and bilateral superior occipital gyrus (SOG) showed relative increased activity when responded to targets presented in the near space than in the far space, which was independent of the retinotopic and perceived sizes of target. Furthermore, the POJ showed the enhanced functional connectivity with both the dorsal and ventral streams during the far space processing irrespective of target sizes, supporting that the POJ acts as an interface between the dorsal and ventral streams in disparity-defined near and far space processing. In contrast, the bilateral SOG showed the enhanced functional connectivity only with the ventral stream if retinotopic sizes of targets in the near and far spaces were matched, which suggested there was a functional dissociation between the POJ and bilateral SOG. PMID:26999674

  5. Long-Term Potentiation in the Motor Cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iriki, Atsushi; Pavlides, Constantine; Keller, Asaf; Asanuma, Hiroshi

    1989-09-01

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) is a model for learning and memory processes. Tetanic stimulation of the sensory cortex produces LTP in motor cortical neurons, whereas tetanization of the ventrolateral nucleus of the thalamus, which also projects to the motor cortex, does not. However, after simultaneous high-frequency stimulation of both the sensory cortex and the ventrolateral nucleus of the thalamus, LTP of thalamic input to motor cortical neurons is induced. This associative LTP occurs only in neurons in the superficial layers of the motor cortex that receive monosynaptic input from both the sensory cortex and the ventrolateral nucleus of the thalamus. Associative LTP in the motor cortex may constitute a basis for the retention of motor skills.

  6. Connectivity changes underlying neurofeedback training of visual cortex activity.

    PubMed

    Scharnowski, Frank; Rosa, Maria Joao; Golestani, Narly; Hutton, Chloe; Josephs, Oliver; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Rees, Geraint

    2014-01-01

    Neurofeedback based on real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a new approach that allows training of voluntary control over regionally specific brain activity. However, the neural basis of successful neurofeedback learning remains poorly understood. Here, we assessed changes in effective brain connectivity associated with neurofeedback training of visual cortex activity. Using dynamic causal modeling (DCM), we found that training participants to increase visual cortex activity was associated with increased effective connectivity between the visual cortex and the superior parietal lobe. Specifically, participants who learned to control activity in their visual cortex showed increased top-down control of the superior parietal lobe over the visual cortex, and at the same time reduced bottom-up processing. These results are consistent with efficient employment of top-down visual attention and imagery, which were the cognitive strategies used by participants to increase their visual cortex activity. PMID:24609065

  7. Interhemispheric inhibition of the human motor cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Ferbert, A; Priori, A; Rothwell, J C; Day, B L; Colebatch, J G; Marsden, C D

    1992-01-01

    1. Using two magnetic stimulators, we investigated the effect of a conditioning magnetic stimulus over the motor cortex of one hemisphere on the size of EMG responses evoked in the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle by a magnetic test stimulus given over the opposite hemisphere. 2. A single conditioning shock to one hemisphere produced inhibition of the test response evoked from the opposite hemisphere when the conditioning-test interval was 5-6 ms or longer. We shall refer to this as interhemispheric inhibition. However, the minimum latency of inhibition observed using surface EMG responses may have underestimated the true interhemispheric conduction time. Single motor unit studies suggested values 4-7 ms longer than the minimum interval observed with surface EMG. 3. Interhemispheric inhibition was seen when the test muscle was active or relaxed. Increasing the intensity of the conditioning stimulus increased the duration of inhibition: increasing the intensity of the test stimulus reduced the depth of inhibition. 4. The conditioning coil had to be placed on the appropriate area of scalp for inhibition to occur. The effect of the conditioning stimulus was maximal when it was applied over the hand area of motor cortex, and decreased when the stimulus was moved medial or lateral to that point. 5. The inhibitory effect on the test stimulus probably occurred at the level of the cerebral cortex. In contrast to the inhibition of test responses evoked by magnetic test stimuli, test responses evoked in active FDI by a small anodal electric shock were not significantly inhibited by a contralateral magnetic conditioning stimulus. Similarly, H reflexes in relaxed forearm flexor muscles were unaffected by conditioning stimuli to the ipsilateral hemisphere. However, inhibition was observed if the experiment was repeated with the muscles active. PMID:1464843

  8. Apraxia, pantomime and the parietal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Niessen, E.; Fink, G.R.; Weiss, P.H.

    2014-01-01

    Apraxia, a disorder of higher motor cognition, is a frequent and outcome-relevant sequel of left hemispheric stroke. Deficient pantomiming of object use constitutes a key symptom of apraxia and is assessed when testing for apraxia. To date the neural basis of pantomime remains controversial. We here review the literature and perform a meta-analysis of the relevant structural and functional imaging (fMRI/PET) studies. Based on a systematic literature search, 10 structural and 12 functional imaging studies were selected. Structural lesion studies associated pantomiming deficits with left frontal, parietal and temporal lesions. In contrast, functional imaging studies associate pantomimes with left parietal activations, with or without concurrent frontal or temporal activations. Functional imaging studies that selectively activated parietal cortex adopted the most stringent controls. In contrast to previous suggestions, current analyses show that both lesion and functional studies support the notion of a left-hemispheric fronto-(temporal)-parietal network underlying pantomiming object use. Furthermore, our review demonstrates that the left parietal cortex plays a key role in pantomime-related processes. More specifically, stringently controlled fMRI-studies suggest that in addition to storing motor schemas, left parietal cortex is also involved in activating these motor schemas in the context of pantomiming object use. In addition to inherent differences between structural and functional imaging studies and consistent with the dedifferentiation hypothesis, the age difference between young healthy subjects (typically included in functional imaging studies) and elderly neurological patients (typically included in structural lesion studies) may well contribute to the finding of a more distributed representation of pantomiming within the motor-dominant left hemisphere in the elderly. PMID:24967158

  9. Ictus emeticus and the insular cortex.

    PubMed

    Fiol, M E; Leppik, I E; Mireles, R; Maxwell, R

    1988-01-01

    A 30-year-old man had a long history of seizures that began with feelings of tightness in his throat and fear, followed by projectile vomiting and head and eye deviation to the left. These episodes were not completely controlled by antiepileptic medications. Video EEG monitoring confirmed his clinical description. Corticography was performed before and after temporal lobectomy and revealed residual spikes in the unresectable tissue of the insula. Three years postoperatively he has had no seizures with vomiting but has occasional 'auras' of throat tightening and fear. The case suggests that the insula may be a trigger area for emesis but requires anterior-mesial temporal cortex for completion. PMID:3197686

  10. Somatic sensory cortex of llama (Lama glama).

    PubMed

    Welker, W I; Adrian, H O; Lifshitz, W; Kaulen, R; Caviedes, E; Gutman, W

    1976-01-01

    The somatic sensory cortex (SI and SII) was mapped in llamas using microelectrode mapping methods developed earlier in a study of SI of the slow loris. Projections to SI from the llama's prehensile browsing lips were differentially enlarged when compared to those reported for sheep. In llama, SII was reversed in its mediolatreal pattern from that reported for SII in most other mammals. Fissural landmarks reliably demarcated different projections within SI, between SI and SII and between SI or SII and other surrounding nonsensory areas. The use of microelectrode mapping methods in different mammals to determine gyral and fissural homologies is discussed. PMID:990910

  11. Parietal cortex: from sight to action.

    PubMed

    Rizzolatti, G; Fogassi, L; Gallese, V

    1997-08-01

    Recent findings have altered radically our thinking about the functional role of the parietal cortex. According to this view, the parietal lobe consists of a multiplicity of areas with specific connections to the frontal lobe. These areas, together with the frontal areas to which they are connected, mediate distinct sensorimotor transformations related to the control of hand, arm, eye or head movements. Space perception is not unitary, but derives from the joint activity of the fronto-parietal circuits that control actions requiring space computation. PMID:9287198

  12. Dissociable roles for lateral orbitofrontal cortex and lateral prefrontal cortex during preference driven reversal learning.

    PubMed

    Hampshire, Adam; Chaudhry, Amir M; Owen, Adrian M; Roberts, Angela C

    2012-02-15

    One of the archetypal task manipulations known to depend on frontal-lobe function is reversal learning, where a dominant response must be overridden due to changes in the contingencies relating stimuli, responses, and environmental feedback. Previous studies have indicated that the lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC), the lateral orbitofrontal cortex (LOFC), the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), and the caudate nucleus (CN) all contribute to reversal learning. However, the exact contributions that they make during this cognitively complex task remain poorly defined. Here, using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we examine which of the cognitive processes that contribute to the performance of a reversal best predicts the pattern of activation within distinct sub-regions of the frontal lobes. We demonstrate that during reversal learning the LOFC is particularly sensitive to the implementation of the reversal, whereas the LPFC is recruited more generally during attentional control. By contrast, the ACC and CN respond when new searches are initiated regardless of whether the previous response is available, whilst medial orbitofrontal cortex (MOFC) activity is correlated with the positive affect of feedback. These results accord well with the hypothesis that distinct components of adaptable behaviour are supported by anatomically distinct components of the executive system. PMID:22075266

  13. Activity in prelimbic cortex subserves fear memory reconsolidation over time

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Cristina A.J.; Gazarini, Lucas; Vanvossen, Ana C.; Hames, Mayara S.; Bertoglio, Leandro J.

    2014-01-01

    The prelimbic cortex has been implicated in the consolidation of previously learned fear. Herein, we report that temporarily inactivating this medial prefrontal cortex subregion with the GABAA agonist muscimol (4.0 nmol in 0.2 μL per hemisphere) was able to equally disrupt 1-, 7-, and 21-d-old contextual fear memories after their brief retrieval in rats. In all cases, this effect was prevented when memory reactivation was omitted. These results indicate that recent and remote fear memories are susceptible to reconsolidation blockade induced by prelimbic cortex inactivation. It was also demonstrated that the disrupting effect of prelimbic cortex inactivation on fear memory persisted over 11 d, and did not show extinction-related features, such as reinstatement. Infusing the same dose and volume of muscimol bilaterally into the infralimbic cortex after brief retrieval/reactivation of the fear memory did not disrupt it, as seen in prelimbic cortex-inactivated animals. The expression of Zif268/Egr1, the product of an immediate early gene related to memory reconsolidation, was also less pronounced in the infralimbic cortex than in prelimbic cortex following memory retrieval/reactivation. Altogether, the present findings highlight that activity in the prelimbic cortex may reestablish reactivated aversive memories and, therefore, contribute to their maintenance over time. PMID:24344180

  14. Haptic shape processing in visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Snow, Jacqueline C; Strother, Lars; Humphreys, Glyn W

    2014-05-01

    Humans typically rely upon vision to identify object shape, but we can also recognize shape via touch (haptics). Our haptic shape recognition ability raises an intriguing question: To what extent do visual cortical shape recognition mechanisms support haptic object recognition? We addressed this question using a haptic fMRI repetition design, which allowed us to identify neuronal populations sensitive to the shape of objects that were touched but not seen. In addition to the expected shape-selective fMRI responses in dorsal frontoparietal areas, we observed widespread shape-selective responses in the ventral visual cortical pathway, including primary visual cortex. Our results indicate that shape processing via touch engages many of the same neural mechanisms as visual object recognition. The shape-specific repetition effects we observed in primary visual cortex show that visual sensory areas are engaged during the haptic exploration of object shape, even in the absence of concurrent shape-related visual input. Our results complement related findings in visually deprived individuals and highlight the fundamental role of the visual system in the processing of object shape. PMID:24345179

  15. Dynamic cortex stripping for vertebra evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stieger, James; Burns, Joseph E.; Yao, Jianhua; Summers, Ronald M.

    2015-03-01

    Vertebral cortex removal through cancellous bone reconstruction (CBR) algorithms on CT has been shown to enhance the detection rate of bone metastases by radiologists and reduce average reading time per case. Removal of the cortical bone provides an unobstructed view of the inside of vertebrae without any anomalous distractions. However, these algorithms rely on the assumption that the cortical bone of vertebrae can be removed without the identification of the endosteal cortical margin. We present a method for the identification of the endosteal cortical margin based on vertebral models and CT intensity information. First, triangular mesh models are created using the marching cubes algorithm. A search region is established along the normal of the surface and the image gradient is calculated at every point along the search region. The location with the greatest image gradient is selected as the corresponding point on the endosteal cortical margin. In order to analyze the strength of this method, ground truth and control models were also created. Our method was shown to have a significantly reduce the average error from 0.80 mm +/- 0.14 mm to 0.65 mm +/- 0.17 mm (p <0.0001) when compared to erosion. This method can potentially improve CBR algorithms, which improve visualization of cancellous bone lesions such as metastases, by more accurately identifying the inner wall of the vertebral cortex.

  16. Vibrissae motor cortex unit activity during whisking

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Wendy A.; Zeigler, H. Philip

    2012-01-01

    Rats generate stereotyped exploratory (512 Hz) vibrissa movements when navigating through their environment. Like other rhythmic behaviors, the production of whisking relies on a subcortical pattern generator. However, the relatively large vibrissae representation in motor cortex (vMCx) suggests that cortex also contributes to the control of whisker movements. The goal of this study was to examine the relationship between neuronal activity in vMCx and the kinematics of vibrissae movements. We recorded multiunit activity (MUA) and single units in the rhythmic region of vMCx while measuring vibrissa position in awake, head-restrained rats. The rats were engaged in one of two behavioral tasks where they were rewarded for either 1) producing noncontact whisking epochs that met specified criteria (epochs ?4 Hz, whisks >5 mm) or 2) whisking to contact an object. There was significant coherence between the frequency of MUA and vibrissae movements during free-air whisking but not when animals were using their vibrissae to contact an object. Spike rate in vMCx was most frequently correlated with the amplitude of vibrissa movements; correlations with movement frequency did not exceed chance levels. These findings suggest that the specific parameter under cortical control may be the amplitude of whisker movements. PMID:21994257

  17. The role of prefrontal cortex in psychopathy.

    PubMed

    Koenigs, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Psychopathy is a personality disorder characterized by remorseless and impulsive antisocial behavior. Given the significant societal costs of the recidivistic criminal acti\\xadvity associated with the disorder, there is a pressing need for more effective treatment strategies and, hence, a better understanding of the psychobiological mechanisms underlying the disorder. The prefrontal cortex (PFC) is likely to play an important role in psychopathy. In particular, the ventromedial and anterior cingulate sectors of PFC are theorized to mediate a number of social and affective decision-making functions that appear to be disrupted in psychopathy. This article provides a critical summary of human neuroimaging data implicating prefrontal dysfunction in psychopathy. A growing body of evidence associates psychopathy with structural and functional abnormalities in ventromedial PFC and anterior cingulate cortex. Although this burgeoning field still faces a number of methodological challenges and outstanding questions that will need to be resolved by future studies, the research to date has established a link between psychopathy and PFC. PMID:22752782

  18. Electrophysiological correlates of stimulus-driven reorienting deficits after interference with right parietal cortex during a spatial attention task: a TMS-EEG study.

    PubMed

    Capotosto, Paolo; Corbetta, Maurizio; Romani, Gian Luca; Babiloni, Claudio

    2012-12-01

    TMS interference over right intraparietal sulcus (IPS) causally disrupts behaviorally and EEG rhythmic correlates of endogenous spatial orienting before visual target presentation [Capotosto, P., Babiloni, C., Romani, G. L., & Corbetta, M. Differential contribution of right and left parietal cortex to the control of spatial attention: A simultaneous EEG-rTMS study. Cerebral Cortex, 22, 446-454, 2012; Capotosto, P., Babiloni, C., Romani, G. L., & Corbetta, M. Fronto-parietal cortex controls spatial attention through modulation of anticipatory alpha rhythms. Journal of Neuroscience, 29, 5863-5872, 2009]. Here we combine data from our previous studies to examine whether right parietal TMS during spatial orienting also impairs stimulus-driven reorienting or the ability to efficiently process unattended stimuli, that is, stimuli outside the current focus of attention. Healthy volunteers (n = 24) performed a Posner spatial cueing task while their EEG activity was being monitored. Repetitive TMS (rTMS) was applied for 150 msec simultaneously to the presentation of a central arrow directing spatial attention to the location of an upcoming visual target. Right IPS-rTMS impaired target detection, especially for stimuli presented at unattended locations; it also caused a modulation of the amplitude of parieto-occipital positive ERPs peaking at about 480 msec (P3) post-target. The P3 significantly decreased for unattended targets and significantly increased for attended targets after right IPS-rTMS as compared with sham stimulation. Similar effects were obtained for left IPS stimulation albeit in a smaller group of volunteers. We conclude that disruption of anticipatory processes in right IPS has prolonged effects that persist during target processing. The P3 decrement may reflect interference with postdecision processes that are part of stimulus-driven reorienting. Right IPS is a node of functional interaction between endogenous spatial orienting and stimulus-driven reorienting processes in human vision. PMID:22905824

  19. Prefrontal connections of the parabelt auditory cortex in macaque monkeys.

    PubMed

    Hackett, T A; Stepniewska, I; Kaas, J H

    1999-01-30

    In the present study, we determined connections of three newly defined regions of auditory cortex with regions of the frontal lobe, and how two of these regions in the frontal lobe interconnect and connect to other portions of frontal cortex and the temporal lobe in macaque monkeys. We conceptualize auditory cortex as including a core of primary areas, a surrounding belt of auditory areas, a lateral parabelt of two divisions, and adjoining regions of temporal cortex with parabelt connections. Injections of several different fluorescent tracers and wheat germ agglutinin conjugated to horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) were placed in caudal (CPB) and rostral (RPB) divisions of the parabelt, and in cortex of the superior temporal gyrus rostral to the parabelt with parabelt connections (STGr). Injections were also placed in two regions of the frontal lobe that were labeled by a parabelt injection in the same case. The results lead to several major conclusions. First, CPB injections label many neurons in dorsal prearcuate cortex in the region of the frontal eye field and neurons in dorsal prefrontal cortex of the principal sulcus, but few or no neurons in orbitofrontal cortex. Fine-grain label in these same regions as a result of a WGA-HRP injection suggests that the connections are reciprocal. Second, RPB injections label overlapping prearcuate and principal sulcus locations, as well as more rostral cortex of the principal sulcus, and several locations in orbitofrontal cortex. Third, STGr injections label locations in orbitofrontal cortex, some of which overlap those of RPB injections, but not prearcuate or principal sulcus locations. Fourth, injections in prearcuate and principal sulcus locations labeled by a CPB injection labeled neurons in CPB and RPB, with little involvement of the auditory belt and no involvement of the core. In addition, the results indicated that the two frontal lobe regions are densely interconnected. They also connect with largely separate regions of the frontal pole and more medial premotor and dorsal prefrontal cortex, but not with the extensive orbitofrontal region which has RPB and STGr connections. The results suggest that both RPB and CPB provide the major auditory connections with the region related to directing eye movements towards stimuli of interest, and the dorsal prefrontal cortex for working memory. Other auditory connections to these regions of the frontal lobe appear to be minor. RPB has connections with orbitofrontal cortex, important in psychosocial and emotional functions, while STGr primarily connects with orbital and polar prefrontal cortex. PMID:9889315

  20. Stimulus rate dependence of regional cerebral blood flow in human striate cortex, demonstrated by positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, P.T.; Raichle, M.E.

    1984-05-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the relationship between the repetition rate of a simple sensory stimulus and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in the human brain. Positron emission tomography (PET), using intravenously administered H/sub 2/(/sup 15/)O as the diffusible blood-flow tracer, was employed for all CBF measurements. The use of H/sub 2/(/sup 15/)O with PET allowed eight CBF measurements to be made in rapid sequence under multiple stimulation conditions without removing the subject from the tomograph. Nine normal volunteers each underwent a series of eight H2(/sup 15/)O PET measurements of CBF. Initial and final scans were made during visual deprivation. The six intervening scans were made during visual activation with patterned-flash stimuli given in random order at 1.0-, 3.9-, 7.8-, 15.5-, 33.1-, and 61-Hz repetition rates. The region of greatest rCBF increase was determined. Within this region the rCBF was determined for every test condition and then expressed as the percentage change from the value of the initial unstimulated scan (rCBF% delta). In every subject, striate cortex rCBF% delta varied systematically with stimulus rate. Between 0 and 7.8 Hz, rCBF% delta was a linear function of stimulus repetition rate. The rCBF response peaked at 7.8 Hz and then declined. The rCBF% delta during visual stimulation was significantly greater than that during visual deprivation for every stimulus rate except 1.0 Hz. The anatomical localization of the region of peak rCBF response was determined for every subject to be the mesial occipital lobes along the calcarine fissure, primary visual cortex. Stimulus rate is a significant determinant of rCBF response in the visual cortex. Investigators of brain responses to selective activation procedures should be aware of the potential effects of stimulus rate on rCBF and other measurements of cerebral metabolism.

  1. Ultrastructural features of human cerebral cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Cragg, B G

    1976-01-01

    Neuronal and glial elements have been examined in the temporal or frontal cortex of four brains with normal parenchyma. The identifying features recognized in animal brains have been found valid in human cortex for stellate and pyramidal neurons and their dendrites, spines, synapses, initial segments of axons, nodes of Ranvier and axon terminals; also for astrocytes, oligodendrocytes of various electron densities, pericytes, blood vessels and basement lamina, and for the relation of subarachnoid space to arterioles. However, most microglial cells have unexpectedly sparse and pale cytoplasm with few organelles, and the distribution of glial nuclear chromatin is not entirely in accordance with that described in animal brains. Fusiform neurons have been identified, and their cytoplasm resembles that of stellate cells. Peculiarities of human cortex include a nuclear inclusion that is present in stellate neurons only. Two neuronal cell-body profiles were myelinated, and a blood capillary was seen to penetrate a neuron. Somatic spines were found occasionally with or without synapses. Ribosomes can be present in axons, espicially at nodes of Ranvier, and a small portion of axon terminals contain a variety of dense bodies of which some are derived from mitochondria. Endoplasmic reticulum can occur in a compressed stack in neurons, and an unusual vesicular organelle has been seen in dendrites, axons and somata. Astrocytes as well as oligodendrocytes and occasional microglial cells act as satellites to neurons, and the exchange of a membrane-bound body between a neuron and asatellite glial cell is illustrated. Some dark pycnotic neurons were present, and it was remarkable that a closely apposed neuron could be entirely normal. These findings are compared with published descriptions of cortical ultrastructure in the brains of laboratory animals. Images Figs. 1-5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Figs. 9-10 Figs. 11-13 Figs. 14-16 Fig. 17 Figs. 18-19 Figs. 20-21 Fig. 22 Fig. 23 Fig. 24 Fig. 25 Fig. 26 Fig. 27 Fig. 28 Fig. 29 Fig. 30 Fig. 31 Fig. 32 Figs. 33-34 Figs. 35-36 Figs. 37-40 Figs. 41-44 Figs. 45-47 Fig. 48 Fig. 49 Figs. 50-52 Fig. 53 Fig. 54 Fig. 55 PMID:179969

  2. Metaphorically Feeling: Comprehending Textural Metaphors Activates Somatosensory Cortex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacey, Simon; Stilla, Randall; Sathian, K.

    2012-01-01

    Conceptual metaphor theory suggests that knowledge is structured around metaphorical mappings derived from physical experience. Segregated processing of object properties in sensory cortex allows testing of the hypothesis that metaphor processing recruits activity in domain-specific sensory cortex. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging…

  3. Insular Cortex Is Involved in Consolidation of Object Recognition Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bermudez-Rattoni, Federico; Okuda, Shoki; Roozendaal, Benno; McGaugh, James L.

    2005-01-01

    Extensive evidence indicates that the insular cortex (IC), also termed gustatory cortex, is critically involved in conditioned taste aversion and taste recognition memory. Although most studies of the involvement of the IC in memory have investigated taste, there is some evidence that the IC is involved in memory that is not based on taste. In

  4. Olfactocentric Paralimbic Cortex Morphology in Adolescents with Bipolar Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Fei; Kalmar, Jessica H.; Womer, Fay Y.; Edmiston, Erin E.; Chepenik, Lara G.; Chen, Rachel; Spencer, Linda; Blumberg, Hilary P.

    2011-01-01

    The olfactocentric paralimbic cortex plays a critical role in the regulation of emotional and neurovegetative functions that are disrupted in core features of bipolar disorder. Adolescence is thought to be a critical period in both the maturation of the olfactocentric parali