Sample records for occupational accidents

  1. Occupational accidents aboard merchant ships

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, H; Nielsen, D; Frydenberg, M

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the frequency, circumstances, and causes of occupational accidents aboard merchant ships in international trade, and to identify risk factors for the occurrence of occupational accidents as well as dangerous working situations where possible preventive measures may be initiated. Methods: The study is a historical follow up on occupational accidents among crew aboard Danish merchant ships in the period 1993–7. Data were extracted from the Danish Maritime Authority and insurance data. Exact data on time at risk were available. Results: A total of 1993 accidents were identified during a total of 31 140 years at sea. Among these, 209 accidents resulted in permanent disability of 5% or more, and 27 were fatal. The mean risk of having an occupational accident was 6.4/100 years at sea and the risk of an accident causing a permanent disability of 5% or more was 0.67/100 years aboard. Relative risks for notified accidents and accidents causing permanent disability of 5% or more were calculated in a multivariate analysis including ship type, occupation, age, time on board, change of ship since last employment period, and nationality. Foreigners had a considerably lower recorded rate of accidents than Danish citizens. Age was a major risk factor for accidents causing permanent disability. Change of ship and the first period aboard a particular ship were identified as risk factors. Walking from one place to another aboard the ship caused serious accidents. The most serious accidents happened on deck. Conclusions: It was possible to clearly identify work situations and specific risk factors for accidents aboard merchant ships. Most accidents happened while performing daily routine duties. Preventive measures should focus on workplace instructions for all important functions aboard and also on the prevention of accidents caused by walking around aboard the ship. PMID:11850550

  2. Occupational Mental Health, Labor Accidents and Occupational Diseases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naveillan, F. Pedro

    1973-01-01

    The article discusses the relationship between mental health and labor accidents as it pertains to accident prevention, treatment of accident victims, and their rehabilitation. It also comments briefly on mental health and occupational diseases and the scope of the field of occupational mental health from a Chilean perspective. (AG)

  3. Serious occupational accidents in the construction industry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Simo Salminen

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine three hypotheses based on the review of literature concerning occupational accidents in the construction industry. The data concern 102 victims of 99 serious occupational accidents. Of these 102 victims, 35 worked in the construction industry. The first hypothesis assuming the higher risk-taking tendency among victims of construction accidents than among victims from

  4. Longitudinal relationship between economic development and occupational accidents in China.

    PubMed

    Song, Li; He, Xueqiu; Li, Chengwu

    2011-01-01

    The relativity between economic development and occupational accidents is a debated topic. Compared with the development courses of both economic development and occupational accidents in China during 1953-2008, this paper used statistic methods such as Granger causality test, cointegration test and impulse response function based on the vector autoregression model to investigate the relativity between economic development and occupational accidents in China from 1953 to 2008. Owing to fluctuation and growth scale characteristics of economic development, two dimensions including economic cycle and economic scale were divided. Results showed that there was no relationship between occupational accidents and economic scale during 1953-1978. Fatality rate per 10(5) workers was a conductive variable to gross domestic product per capita during 1979-2008. And economic cycle was an indicator to occupational accidents during 1979-2008. Variation of economic speed had important influence on occupational accidents in short term. Thus it is necessary to adjust Chinese occupational safety policy according to tempo variation of economic growth. PMID:21094300

  5. UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO ACCIDENT/INCIDENT/OCCUPATIONAL DISEASE REPORT FOR EMPLOYEES

    E-print Network

    Kronzucker, Herbert J.

    UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO ACCIDENT/INCIDENT/OCCUPATIONAL DISEASE REPORT FOR EMPLOYEES RELEVANT SECTIONS OCCUPATIONAL DISEASE B: EMPLOYEE INFORMATION LAST NAME: ___________________________________ FIRST NAME: ACCIDENT/OCCUPATIONAL DISEASE DETAILS-STATE EXACTLY (attach letter if required) 1. DESCRIBE THE INJURY

  6. Eyewitness Testimony in Occupational Accident Investigations: Towards a Research Agenda

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Kevin Kelloway; Veronica Stinson; Carla MacLean

    2004-01-01

    Accident investigation is frequently cited as the cornerstone of an effective occupational health and safety program. We suggest that the literature on accident investigation is based on a model of witnesses as neutral and accurate recording devices. The literature on eyewitness testimony and criminal investigation offers strikingly different conclusions. We review these findings and point to their implication for research

  7. Corporate cost of occupational accidents: an activity-based analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pall M. Rikhardsson; Martin Impgaard

    2004-01-01

    The systematic accident cost analysis (SACA) project was carried out during 2001 by The Aarhus School of Business and PricewaterhouseCoopers Denmark with financial support from The Danish National Working Environment Authority. Its focused on developing and testing a method for evaluating occupational costs of companies for use by occupational health and safety professionals. The method was tested in nine Danish

  8. Psychological Distress and Post-Traumatic Symptoms Following Occupational Accidents

    PubMed Central

    Ghisi, Marta; Novara, Caterina; Buodo, Giulia; Kimble, Matthew O.; Scozzari, Simona; Di Natale, Arianna; Sanavio, Ezio; Palomba, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Depression and post-traumatic stress disorder frequently occur as a consequence of occupational accidents. To date, research has been primarily focused on high-risk workers, such as police officers or firefighters, and has rarely considered individuals whose occupational environment involves the risk of severe, but not necessarily life-threatening, injury. Therefore, the present study was aimed at assessing the psychological consequences of accidents occurring in several occupational settings (e.g., construction and industry). Thirty-eight victims of occupational accidents (injured workers) and 38 gender-, age-, and years of education-matched workers who never experienced a work accident (control group) were recruited. All participants underwent a semi-structured interview administered by a trained psychologist, and then were requested to fill in the questionnaires. Injured workers reported more severe anxious, post-traumatic and depressive symptoms, and poorer coping skills, as compared to controls. In the injured group low levels of resilience predicted post-traumatic symptomatology, whereas the degree of physical injury and the length of time since the accident did not play a predictive role. The results suggest that occupational accidents may result in a disabling psychopathological condition, and that a brief psychological evaluation should be included in the assessment of seriously injured workers. PMID:25379258

  9. Work-related accidents and occupational diseases in veterinarians and their staff

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Albert Nienhaus; Christoph Skudlik; Andreas Seidler

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: We assessed the occupational hazards in veterinary practice by analysing accident insurance data in order to stimulate strategies to prevent occupational accidents and diseases in veterinarians and their staff. Methods: Approximately 10,000 veterinary practices comprising about 27,500 veterinarians and their staff are covered by the Institution of Statutory Accident Insurance of the Health and Welfare Service (BGW). Each year

  10. Occupational accidents in professional dance with focus on gender differences

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Classical dance comprises gender specific movement tasks. There is a lack of studies which investigate work related traumatic injuries in terms of gender specific differences in detail. Objective To define gender related differences of occupational accidents. Methods Basis for the evaluation were occupational injuries of professional dancers from three (n?=?785; f: n?=?358, m: n?=?427) state theatres. Results The incidence rate (0.36 per year) was higher in males (m: 0.45, f: 0.29). There were gender specific differences as to the localizations of injuries, particularly the spine region (m: 17.3%, f: 9.8%, p?=?0.05) and ankle joint (m: 23.7%, f: 35.5%, p?=?0.003). Compared to male dancers, females sustained more injuries resulting from extrinsic factors. Significant differences could specifically be observed with dance floors (m: 8.8%, f: 15.1%, p?=?0.02). There were also significant gender differences observed with movement vocabulary. Conclusion The clearly defined gender specific movement activities in classical dance are reflected in occupational accidents sustained. Organisational structures as well as work environment represent a burden likewise to male and female dancers. The presented differences support the development of gender specific injury prevention measures. PMID:24341391

  11. Epidemiology of Occupational Accidents in Iran Based on Social Security Organization Database

    PubMed Central

    Mehrdad, Ramin; Seifmanesh, Shahdokht; Chavoshi, Farzaneh; Aminian, Omid; Izadi, Nazanin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Background: Today, occupational accidents are one of the most important problems in industrial world. Due to lack of appropriate system for registration and reporting, there is no accurate statistics of occupational accidents all over the world especially in developing countries. Objectives: The aim of this study is epidemiological assessment of occupational accidents in Iran. Materials and Methods: Information of available occupational accidents in Social Security Organization was extracted from accident reporting and registration forms. In this cross-sectional study, gender, age, economic activity, type of accident and injured body part in 22158 registered accidents during 2008 were described. Results: The occupational accidents rate was 253 in 100,000 workers in 2008. 98.2% of injured workers were men. The mean age of injured workers was 32.07 ± 9.12 years. The highest percentage belonged to age group of 25-34 years old. In our study, most of the accidents occurred in basic metals industry, electrical and non-electrical machines and construction industry. Falling down from height and crush injury were the most prevalent accidents. Upper and lower extremities were the most common injured body parts. Conclusion: Due to the high rate of accidents in metal and construction industries, engineering controls, the use of appropriate protective equipment and safety worker training seems necessary. PMID:24719699

  12. Accident patterns and prevention measures for fatal occupational falls in the construction industry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chia-Fen Chi; Tin-Chang Chang; Hsin-I Ting

    2005-01-01

    Contributing factors to 621 occupational fatal falls have been identified with respect to the victim's individual factors, the fall site, company size, and cause of fall. Individual factors included age, gender, experience, and the use of personal protective equipment (PPE). Accident scenarios were derived from accident reports. Significant linkages were found between causes for the falls and accident events. Falls

  13. [Trends in incidence and mortality due to occupational accidents in Brazil, 1998-2008].

    PubMed

    Almeida, Flávia Souza e Silva de; Morrone, Luiz Carlos; Ribeiro, Karina Braga

    2014-09-01

    The objective was to evaluate trends in incidence and mortality due to occupational accidents in Brazil from 1998 to 2008. This was a time-trend series study that included cases of occupational accidents recorded in official Federal government statistics. The authors calculated annual percentage changes (APC) in incidence and mortality rates with the Joinpoint method using the calendar year as a regressor variable. There was a significant downward trend in incidence rates of occupational accidents, and the same trend was observed in typical occupational accidents. However, the number of cases increased during this period. There was a statistically significant upward trend in the incidence and number of cases of commuting accidents. The number of deaths and mortality rates showed a downward trend. Several factors may have contributed to the decline in incidence and mortality rates for occupational accidents, including improvement in working conditions, a shift in the economy from industry to services, underreporting of occupational accidents, and outsourcing of services. The increase in commuting accidents suggests the influence of violence in urban areas. PMID:25317524

  14. [Restructuring of production and occupational accidents in Brazil: structure and trends].

    PubMed

    Wünsch Filho, V

    1999-01-01

    During the last two decades, incidence rates of occupational accidents have been decreasing in Brazil. Mortality has also decreased, but not as sharply as incidence. Changes in reporting of occupational accidents have been the main argument used to explain such trends. This time-series study covering occupational accidents from 1970 to 1995 clearly shows the link between occupational accidents and social and economical determinants. Comparing 14 Brazilian States, a positive linear regression (r=0.80) was detected between proportion of workers in industrial production and accidents. In the 1980s, Brazil's economic recession led to an increase in unemployment. The decline in industrial jobs - those with a higher risk of accidents ( was accented by the restructuring of production and increased use of computer and robotics technologies in various manufacturing sectors. The result was a heavy shift of the work force from industry to commerce and services - jobs entailing lower risk of accidents. These factors influenced trends in occupational accidents in Brazil during this 25-year period. PMID:10203445

  15. Biomechanical analysis of occupant kinematics in rollover motor vehicle accidents: dynamic spit test.

    PubMed

    Sances, Anthony; Kumaresan, Srirangam; Clarke, Richard; Herbst, Brian; Meyer, Steve

    2005-01-01

    A better understanding of occupant kinematics in rollover accidents helps to advance biomechanical knowledge and to enhance the safety features of motor vehicles. While many rollover accident simulation studies have adopted the static approach to delineate the occupant kinematics in rollover accidents, very few studies have attempted the dynamic approach. The present work was designed to study the biomechanics of restrained occupants during rollover accidents using the steady-state dynamic spit test and to address the importance of keeping the lap belt fastened. Experimental tests were conducted using an anthropometric 50% Hybrid III dummy in a vehicle. The vehicle was rotated at 180 degrees/second and the dummy was restrained using a standard three-point restraint system. The lap belt of the dummy was fastened either by using the cinching latch plate or by locking the retractor. Three configurations of shoulder belt harness were simulated: shoulder belt loose on chest with cinch plate, shoulder belt under the left arm and shoulder belt behind the chest. In all tests, the dummy stayed within the confinement of the vehicle indicating that the securely fastened lap belt holds the dummy with dynamic movement of 3 1/2" to 4". The results show that occupant movement in rollover accidents is least affected by various shoulder harness positions with a securely fastened lap belt. The present study forms a first step in delineating the biomechanics of occupants in rollover accidents. PMID:15850090

  16. Psychosocial work characteristics as risk factors for being injured in an occupational accident.

    PubMed

    Swaen, G M H; van Amelsvoort, L P G M; Bültmann, U; Slangen, J J M; Kant, I J

    2004-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between psychosocial work characteristics and the risk for being injured in an occupational accident. We performed this study within the framework of the Maastricht Cohort Study of Fatigue at Work, a prospective cohort study on employees (n = 7051) from a wide range of companies and organizations. One hundred eight workers reported being injured in an occupational accident for which the subject consulted a physician or physiotherapist. Adjustments were made for work environment and demographic variables. High psychologic job demands were a risk factor for being injured in an occupational accident. Low decision latitude had a crude relative risk for being injured in an occupational accident of 2.02 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.23-3.39). This relationship almost completely disappeared after adjustment for the confounders mentioned here. Coworker and supervisor support were inversely related to the risk of being injured in an occupational accident but did not reach statistical significance. Other psychosocial work characteristics that had a significant effect on the risk for being injured in an occupational accident were conflicts with the supervisor (relative risk [RR] = 2.49; 95% CI = 1.42-4.37) or colleagues (RR = 2.62; 95% CI = 1.58-4.35), job satisfaction (RR = 1.43; 95% CI = 1.08-1.91), and high emotional demands (RR = 2.45; 95% CI = 1.52-3.94). We conclude that after adjustment for demographic variables, fatigue, and factors that describe the type of work environment that high psychologic job demands, emotional demands, and conflicts with the supervisor and/or colleagues are risk factors for being injured in an occupational accident. PMID:15213513

  17. [Nursing accidents at the workplace and their relation with the security and occupational health status].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Sánchez, Mario H; Martínez Lugo, Miguel E; Andújar Rojas, Carlos A

    2003-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the accidents and incidents that take place in the workplace and their relationship with the occupational health and safety climate. The sample for this study was chosen by convenience and was composed of 154 professional nurses. The Occupational Health and Safety Climate Scale. (Roduguez et al., 2000) was used for the research. The results of the study reveal that the variables that contribute to understanding the determinants of the occupational health and safety climate are the individual's relationships with peers and supervisors, the number of trainings in the area of occupational health and safety and the number of accidents that the individual has experienced. PMID:14768506

  18. Risk Perception and Occupational Accidents: A Study of Gas Station Workers in Southern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Cezar-Vaz, Marta Regina; Rocha, Laurelize Pereira; Bonow, Clarice Alves; da Silva, Mara Regina Santos; Vaz, Joana Cezar; Cardoso, Letícia Silveira

    2012-01-01

    The present study aimed to identify the perceptions of gas station workers about physical, chemical, biological and physiological risk factors to which they are exposed in their work environment; identify types of occupational accidents involving gas station workers and; report the development of a socioenvironmental intervention as a tool for risk communication to gas station workers. A quantitative study was performed with 221 gas station workers in southern Brazil between October and December 2010. Data collection was performed between October to December 2010 via structured interviews. The data were analyzed using SPSS 19.0. The participants identified the following risk types: chemical (93.7%), physical (88.2%), physiological (64.3%) and biological (62.4%). In this sample, 94.1% of gas station workers reported occupational accidents, and 74.2% reported fuel contact with the eyes (p < 0.05). It is concluded that workers perceive risks, and that they tend to relate risks with the occurrence of occupational accidents as an indicator of the dangerous nature of their work environment. PMID:22851948

  19. Individual characteristics in occupational accidents due to imbalance: a case-control study of the employees of a railway company

    PubMed Central

    Gauchard, G; Chau, N; Touron, C; Benamghar, L; Dehaene, D; Perrin, P.; Mur, J

    2003-01-01

    Background: Falls are frequent occupational accidents, and are responsible for a significant amount of lost working time and, more importantly, for a high mortality. The factors involved in falling mechanisms can be of external or individual origin, the latter being less well identified. Aims: To assess the relations between certain individual characteristics and occupational accidents due to imbalance. Methods: A total of 427 male employees, who had been victims of at least one occupational accident with sick leave due to imbalance (cases) and 427 controls were recruited among the employees of a large French railway company. A standardised questionnaire on life conditions and professional factors, and a description of the accidents was filled in by an occupational physician for each subject. Results: Some job categories were more affected by a specific release mechanism of work related falls. Certain individual characteristics such as smoking, alcohol consumption, inactivity, sleep disorders, and request for a job change were correlated with the occurrence of occupational accidents. Sick leaves of eight days or over were more frequent in older and overweight injured workers. Some lesions were linked with the specific fall released mechanisms. Conclusions: Individual characteristics can increase the risk of occupational accidents, especially falling. This study identified subjects most at risk on whom prevention related to working conditions and falls could be focused. PMID:12709517

  20. [Accidents at work and occupational diseases trend in agriculture insurance management. The contribution of INAIL data's for the knowledge of a worrying phenomenon].

    PubMed

    Calandriello, Luigi; Goggiamani, Angela; Ienzi, Emanuela; Naldini, Silvia; Orsini, Dario

    2013-01-01

    The author's describe accidents at work and occupational diseases outcome's measure in Agricolture insurance management acquired through statistical approach based on data processing provided by INAIL Bank data. Accident's incidence in Agricolture is compared to main insurance managements, using frequency index of accidents appearance selected on line of work and type of consequence. Concerning occupational diseases the authors describes the complaints and compensation with the comparison referring the analysis to statistical general data. The data define a worrying phenomenon. PMID:24303724

  1. Aviation occupant survival factors: an empirical study of the SQ006 accident.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Hern; Yang, Hui-Hua

    2010-03-01

    We present an empirical study of Singapore Airline (SIA) flight SQ006 to illustrate the critical factors that influence airplane occupant survivability. The Fuzzy Delphi Method was used to identify and rank the survival factors that may reduce injury and fatality in potentially survivable accidents. This is the first attempt by a group from both the public and private sectors in Taiwan to focus on cabin-safety issues related to survival factors. We designed a comprehensive survey based on our discussions with aviation safety experts. We next designed an array of important cabin-safety dimensions and then investigated and selected the critical survival factors for each dimension. Our findings reveal important cabin safety and survivability information that should provide a valuable reference for developing and evaluating aviation safety programs. We also believe that the results will be practical for designing cabin-safety education material for air travelers. Finally, the major contribution of this research is that it has identified 47 critical factors that influence accident survivability; therefore, it may encourage improvements that will promote more successful cabin-safety management. PMID:20159096

  2. Vertebral fractures in motor vehicle accidents - a medical and technical analysis of 33,015 injured front-seat occupants.

    PubMed

    Müller, Christian W; Otte, Dietmar; Decker, Sebastian; Stübig, Timo; Panzica, Martin; Krettek, Christian; Brand, Stephan

    2014-05-01

    Spinal injuries pose a considerable risk to life and quality of life. In spite of improvements in active and passive safety of motor vehicles, car accidents are regarded as a major cause for vertebral fractures. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the current incidence of vertebral fractures among front-seat occupants in motor vehicle accidents, and to identify specific risk factors for sustaining vertebral fractures in motor vehicle accidents. Data from an accident research unit were accessed to collect collision details, preclinical data, and clinical data. We included all data on front-seat occupants. Hospital records were retrieved, and radiological images were evaluated. We analysed 33,015 front-seat occupants involved in motor vehicle accidents over a 24-year period. We identified 126 subjects (0.38%) with cervical spine fractures, 78 (0.24%) with thoracic fractures, and 99 (0.30%) with lumbar fractures. The mean relative collision speeds were 48, 39, and 40 kph in subjects with cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine fractures, respectively, while it was 17.3 kph in the whole cohort. Contrary to the overall cohort, these patients typically sustained multiple hits rather than simple front collisions. Occupants with vertebral fractures frequently showed numerous concomitant injuries; for example, additional vertebral fractures. The incidence of vertebral fractures corresponded with collision speed. Safety belts were highly effective in the prevention of vertebral fractures. Apart from high speed, complex injury mechanisms as multiple collisions or rollovers were associated with vertebral fractures. Additional preventive measures should focus on these collision mechanisms. PMID:24486770

  3. Sleep Apnea: Traffic and Occupational Accidents – Individual Risks, Socioeconomic and Legal Implications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel Rodenstein

    2009-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea has been associated with a high risk for motor vehicle accidents, probably the highest of all risks due to medical conditions. Treatment of sleep apnea with nasal continuous positive airway pressure appears to reduce the risk of traffic accidents to the one of the general population. The risk for accidents may also be increased in untreated patients

  4. Social care and changes in occupational accidents and diseases - the situation in Eastern Europe in general and for skin diseases in particular

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background As a consequence of the disintegration of the state systems and the expansion of the European Union, there have been marked changes in the political and social affiliations of the countries of Eastern Europe. Of the 22 countries in Northeastern, Centraleastern, Southeastern and Eastern Europe, 12 are now members and 10 are "new" neighbours of the European Union. The accident insurance systems and changes in occupational accidents and occupational diseases in eastern European countries are described. Changes since EU and visible differences from non-EU countries are analysed. Special emphasis is given to occupational skin diseases. Methods The available data from the European Union (MISSOC and MISSCEEC Studies on the Social Protection Systems), the database "Social Security Worldwide" (SSW) of the International Social Security Association (ISSA), the International Labour Office Database (LABORSTA), the World Health Organization (WHO) and the annual statistical reports of the different countries were analysed with respect to changes in occupational accidents and occupational diseases. To find missing data, 128 ministries and authorities in the 22 countries in eastern Europe were researched and 165 persons contacted. Results The social insurance systems were very different in the different countries and some were better established than others. Moreover, not all data were available. For these reasons, detailed comparison was not always possible. The occupational accident rates are decreasing in more than half the countries. In contrast, the fatal accident rates have increased in half the countries. The number of newly registered occupational diseases is decreasing in more than half the countries. The rates for occupational skin diseases in 2006 were particularly high in the Czech Republic, Poland and Slovakia. In half the countries (four out of eight), the number of occupational skin diseases is decreasing. A reliable analysis of any correlation between EU membership and the rates of occupational accidents and occupational diseases was not possible, because of missing current data. Conclusion Comparison of the social insurance systems and changes in occupational accidents and occupational diseases in 22 countries in eastern Europe makes it clear that further effort is needed to develop registration and notification procedures. Only then will it be possible to analyse changes, to map successes and problems and perhaps to initiate necessary improvements. Standardisation of the documents must also be improved, to allow international comparisons between the systems. PMID:19922633

  5. Occupational hazards in hospitals: accidents, radiation, exposure to noxious chemicals, drug addiction and psychic problems, and assault.

    PubMed Central

    Gestal, J J

    1987-01-01

    Except for infectious diseases all the main occupational hazards affecting health workers are reviewed: accidents (explosions, fires, electrical accidents, and other sources of injury); radiation (stochastic and non-stochastic effects, protective measures, and personnel most at risk); exposure to noxious chemicals, whose effects may be either local (allergic eczema) or generalised (cancer, mutations), particular attention being paid to the hazards presented by formol, ethylene oxide, cytostatics, and anaesthetic gases; drug addiction (which is more common among health workers than the general population) and psychic problems associated with promotion, shift work, and emotional stress; and assault (various types of assault suffered by health workers, its causes, and the characterisation of the most aggressive patients). PMID:3307896

  6. ECONOMIC IMPACT OF OCCUPATIONAL ACCIDENTS: RESOURCE ALLOCATION FOR AUVA'S PREVENTION PROGRAMS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MARION S. RAUNER; PAUL HARPER; ARJAN SHAHANI; BERNHARD SCHWARZ

    2005-01-01

    Occupational injuries are a great burden on health care costs worldwide. We present the first detailed analysis of the total direct and indirect costs of individual occupational injury claims for a given year covering costs for: a general injury insurance company, the AUVA, employers, and the Austrian economy. We calculated total lifetime costs discounted by 3% of 543, 228, and

  7. [Characteristics of occupational accidents in the building industry and public works in Senegal].

    PubMed

    Mbaye, I; Fall, M C; Sarr, E H; Ouatara, B; Sow, M L

    2001-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to appreciate the magnitude of work accidents in a building construction sector, to specify their type and characteristics. A retrospective study was undergone in a big building construction industry in Senegal. Data were collected from records of accidents reported to the Social Security Administration between 1994--1996. We looked for characteristics of accidents as well as workers involved in accident. 244 accidents were collected in a three years period, i e 81.5/year, 132 work injuries involved temporaryworkers. 55.73% occurred in chantiers, and 1/3 in working room. Moving and handle objects generated most accidents (36,47%). Wounds and contusions were the most frequent lesion (51,62.%). Arms and feets were concerned in 51.63%, and ocular lesions were noticed in 13.94%. These accidents generate an overall number of 3055 days lost. Work injuries in the building construction sector in Senegal are identical to those described in othercountries. Prevention measures requires improvement of working conditions, education of workers and availability of personal protective equipment's. PMID:15773178

  8. Factors Associated with Fatal Occupational Accidents among Mexican Workers: A National Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Delgado, Mery; Gómez-Dantés, Héctor; Fernández-Niño, Julián Alfredo; Robles, Eduardo; Borja, Víctor H.; Aguilar, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify the factors associated with fatal occupational injuries in Mexico in 2012 among workers affiliated with the Mexican Social Security Institute. Methods Analysis of secondary data using information from the National Occupational Risk Information System, with the consequence of the occupational injury (fatal versus non-fatal) as the response variable. The analysis included 406,222 non-fatal and 1,140 fatal injuries from 2012. The factors associated with the lethality of the injury were identified using a logistic regression model with the Firth approach. Results Being male (OR=5.86; CI95%: 4.22-8.14), age (OR=1.04; CI95%: 1.03-1.06), employed in the position for 1 to 10 years (versus less than 1 year) (OR=1.37; CI95%: 1.15-1.63), working as a facilities or machine operator or assembler (OR: 3.28; CI95%: 2.12- 5.07) and being a worker without qualifications (OR=1.96; CI95%: 1.18-3.24) (versus an office worker) were associated with fatality in the event of an injury. Additionally, companies classified as maximum risk (OR=1.90; CI 95%: 1.38-2.62), workplace conditions (OR=7.15; CI95%: 3.63-14.10) and factors related to the work environment (OR=9.18; CI95%:4.36-19.33) were identified as risk factors for fatality in the event of an occupational injury. Conclusions Fatality in the event of an occupational injury is associated with factors related to sociodemographics (age, sex and occupation), the work environment and workplace conditions. Worker protection policies should be created for groups with a higher risk of fatal occupational injuries in Mexico. PMID:25790063

  9. Mortality from occupational accidents to United Kingdom fishermen 1961-80.

    PubMed Central

    Reilly, M S

    1985-01-01

    After the catastrophic losses of three Hull deep sea trawlers in 1968, the Committee of Inquiry into Trawler Safety (CITS) was established. Fourteen months later, CITS reported on factors affecting the safety of deep sea trawlers and their crews. Pre-CITS (1961-70) and post-CITS (1971-80) crude mortality rates for accidents at work are compared for "deep sea" fishermen (those working on vessels greater than or equal to 24.4 m (80 feet) registered length) and "inshore" fishermen (those working on vessels less than 24.4 m). The ratio of deep sea to inshore fishermen had changed from 1:1.5 (1961) to 1:7.0 (1980), reflecting the radical restructuring of the fishing fleet that began in the early 1970s. Between 1961 and 1980, there were 909 recorded deaths at sea of United Kingdom fishermen. Of these, 711 (78%) were due to accidents (either from vessel losses or personal accidents) and 198 (22%) were due to unspecified disease, homicide, and suicide. Comparison of pre-CITS and post-CITS mean death rates showed an increase (+39%) for deep sea fishermen, a decrease (-4%) for inshore fisherman, and an increase (+2%) for both combined. For deep sea fishermen, there were synchronous increases in mortality from vessel losses (+32%) and from personal accidents (+49%, p less than 0.05) whereas the overall rate for inshore fishermen reflected a decrease (-33%, p less than 0.01) in deaths from personal accidents but an increase (+52%) in deaths from vessel losses. Although pre-CITS mortality rates exhibited no statistically significant difference between deep sea fisherman was significantly greater (p< 0.02). Compared with coal miners, fishermen were, on average, four times more likely to die from accidents at work. If CITS had reasonable cause for concern in 1969, the grounds for similar concern did not diminish because the evidence suggests that deep sea fishermen were at no lesser risk of death from accidents after CITS reported than before. Overall, both groups of fishermen experienced an accident mortality rate between 1961 and 1980 that showed no indication of improvement. PMID:4074652

  10. Prospective audit of the pattern, severity and circumstances of injury sustained by vehicle occupants as a result of road traffic accidents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A Bradbury; C Robertson

    1993-01-01

    The pattern and severity of injuries sustained by 174 vehicle occupants consecutively admitted to the Accident and Emergency Department of the Edinburgh Royal Infirmary were prospectively documented. Drivers (DR) accounted for 66% of the patients, 20% were front seat passengers (FSP) and 14% were rear seat passengers (RSP). Injured patients were more likely to be male, young, intoxicated and not

  11. The Relationship Between Safety Attitudes and Occupational Accidents: The Role of Safety Climate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. M. Tomás; A. Cheyne; A. Oliver

    2011-01-01

    This research provides empirical evidence on the relationships between employee attitudes to safety issues and accident indicators in a Spanish context. The research attempts to review to what degree those attitudes reflect a collective, or shared, climate for safety within a number of organizations. Data were gathered from workers in a number of industries in Valencia (Spain) by questionnaire. A

  12. Seat Belt Usage in Injured Car Occupants: Injury Patterns, Severity and Outcome After Two Main Car Accident Mechanisms in Kashan, Iran, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadzadeh, Mahdi; Paravar, Mohammad; Mirzadeh, Azadeh Sadat; Mohammadzadeh, Javad; Mahdian, Soroush

    2015-01-01

    Background: Road traffic accidents (RTAs) are the main public health problems in Iran. The seat belts, which are vehicle safety devices, are imperative to reduce the risk of severe injuries and mortality. Objectives: The aim of the study was to evaluate injury patterns, severity and outcome among belted and unbelted car occupants who were injured in car accidents. Patients and Methods: This cross-sectional prospective study was performed on all car occupants injured in RTAs (n = 822) who were transported to hospital and hospitalized for more than 24 hours from March 2012 to March 2013. Demographic profile of the patients, including age, gender, position in the vehicle, the use of seat belts, type of car crashes, injured body regions, revised trauma score (RTS), Glasgow coma score (GCS), duration of hospital stay and mortality rate were analyzed by descriptive analysis, chi-square and independent t-test. P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: A total of 560 patients used seat belts (68.1%). The unbelted occupants were younger (28 years vs. 38 years) and had more frequently sustained head, abdomen and multiple injuries (P = 0.01, P = 0.01 and P = 0.009, respectively). Also, these patients had significantly lower GCS and elongated hospitalization and higher death rate (P = 0.001, P = 0.001 and P = 0.05, respectively). Tendency of severe head trauma and low RTS and death were increased in unbelted occupants in car rollover accident mechanisms (P = 0.001, P = 0.01 and P = 0.008, respectively). Conclusions: During car crashes, especially car rollover, unbelted occupants are more likely to sustain multiple severe injuries and death. Law enforcement of the seat belt usage for all occupants (front and rear seat) is obligatory to reduce severe injuries sustained as a result of car accidents, especially in vehicles with low safety.

  13. Effect of Occupational Health and Safety Management System on Work-Related Accident Rate and Differences of Occupational Health and Safety Management System Awareness between Managers in South Korea's Construction Industry

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Seok J.; Lin, Hsing K.; Chen, Gang; Yi, Shinjea; Choi, Jeawook; Rui, Zhenhua

    2013-01-01

    Background The study was conducted to investigate the current status of the occupational health and safety management system (OHSMS) in the construction industry and the effect of OHSMS on accident rates. Differences of awareness levels on safety issues among site general managers and occupational health and safety (OHS) managers are identified through surveys. Methods The accident rates for the OHSMS-certified construction companies from 2006 to 2011, when the construction OHSMS became widely available, were analyzed to understand the effect of OHSMS on the work-related injury rates in the construction industry. The Korea Occupational Safety and Health Agency 18001 is the certification to these companies performing OHSMS in South Korea. The questionnaire was created to analyze the differences of OHSMS awareness between site general managers and OHS managers of construction companies. Results The implementation of OHSMS among the top 100 construction companies in South Korea shows that the accident rate decreased by 67% and the fatal accident rate decreased by 10.3% during the period from 2006 to 2011. The survey in this study shows different OHSMS awareness levels between site general managers and OHS managers. The differences were motivation for developing OHSMS, external support needed for implementing OHSMS, problems and effectiveness of implementing OHSMS. Conclusion Both work-related accident and fatal accident rates were found to be significantly reduced by implementing OHSMS in this study. The differences of OHSMS awareness between site general managers and OHS managers were identified through a survey. The effect of these differences on safety and other benefits warrants further research with proper data collection. PMID:24422176

  14. Clinical interpretation of "occupational therapy goal achievement for persons with postacute cerebrovascular accident in an on-campus student clinic".

    PubMed

    James, A B

    2001-01-01

    Occupational therapy practitioners, educators, and researchers can gain important information from Lavelle and Tomlin's study for initiating programs that meet the needs of a population of persons who typically cannot access occupational therapy services. The study provides evidence of the effectiveness of occupational therapy for persons with postacute CVA for clinicians seeking alternative funding for community-based practice. The study also suggests that the free university clinic in which Lavelle and Tomlin's research took place was providing a valuable service to persons living near the university, creating important links between the university and the community in which it resides. Lastly, the study raises intriguing questions that provide research opportunities for occupational therapy practitioners, educators, and students that can enhance our understanding of the impact of occupational therapy services on persons long after a CVA. PMID:11216365

  15. Trends in gender differences in accidents mortality

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ingrid Waldron; Christopher McCloskey; Inga Earle

    2005-01-01

    This study tests five hypotheses concerning trends in gender differences in accidents mortality and accident-related behavior, using data for the US, UK, France, Italy, and Japan, 1950-98. As predicted by the Convergence Hypothesis, gender differences have decreased for amount of driving, motor vehicle accidents mortality, and occupational accidents mortality. However, for many types of accidents mortality, gender differences were stable

  16. Occupational asthma.

    PubMed

    Brooks, S M

    1995-12-01

    Occupational asthma is an important occupational respiratory disorder, both in terms of morbidity, disability and in the total number of cases. The two types of occupational asthma are classified on the basis of their temporal relationship to onset. Occupational asthma with latency reflects allergic occupational asthma and is a condition characterized by a preceding latent period of workplace exposure during which allergic sensitization to a material present at the work site occurs. It is characterized biochemically by immunologic alterations and physiologically by variable and work-related airflow limitation with the presence of both specific and nonspecific airway hyperresponsiveness. In contrast, occupational asthma without latency is an asthmatic condition that develops suddenly and without a preceding latent period, as epitomized by the reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS). RADS is distinguished physiologically by chronic, persistent nonspecific airway hyperresponsiveness and usually occurs after a single brief high-level exposure to an irritant gas, vapor of fume; new information suggests that a more prolonged irritant exposure, in certain susceptible persons with a pre-existing allergic predisposition, can also lead to the initiation of new-onset asthma. The factors that may be influential in the pathogenesis of occupational asthma include: exposure characteristics, industrial factors, job attributes, geographic and climatic conditions, economic considerations and personal or host conditions, such as atopy and cigarette smoking. Preventive measures and opportunities for intervention are essential and must address plans for reducing or eliminating accidents and spills, as well as plans for engineering control methods and proper and effective local exhaust ventilation. Medical surveillance programs are the keystone for prevention and should identify persons who are at an increased risk for developing occupational asthma, as well as detecting asthma at an early stage when intervention options are likely to be successful. For sensitized workers, the best preventive option is completed removal from the work environment. PMID:8597082

  17. Occupancy Agreement Occupancy Agreement

    E-print Network

    Botea, Adi

    and conditions of this Agreement. Full Occupancy Fee (Tariff)* http://rcc.anu.edu.au/fees.php Room Deposit The amount notified to the Occupant in the letter of offer. *The Full Occupancy Fee (Tariff) represents the market or standard occupancy fee (tariff) for a particular room type. The parties agree as follows #12

  18. Occupational Clusters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pottawattamie County School System, Council Bluffs, IA.

    The 15 occupational clusters (transportation, fine arts and humanities, communications and media, personal service occupations, construction, hospitality and recreation, health occupations, marine science occupations, consumer and homemaking-related occupations, agribusiness and natural resources, environment, public service, business and office…

  19. [Expert opinions in German statutory accident insurance].

    PubMed

    Widder, B; Gaidzik, P W

    2012-02-01

    German statutory accident insurance covers employees and trainees against occupational accidents, employers bear the inherent charges. Expert opinion is obtained, in particular, for discussing causality questions and for rating accidental health disorders. Causality has to be estimated based on the "theory of essential condition", health disorders have to be substantiated without any reasonable doubt. Reduction in earning capacity due to an accident may not consider the individual kind of occupation and has to be rated by an abstract approach. PMID:22161230

  20. Human body modelling for traffic accident analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Krašna; I. Prebil; M. Hribernik

    2007-01-01

    A traffic accident is a complex phenomenon with vehicles and human beings involved. During a collision, the vehicle occupant is exposed to substantial loads, which can cause the occupant injuries that depend on the level of passive safety, as well as on the occupant's individual characteristics. Correct estimation of injury severity demands a validated human body model and known impact

  1. 48 CFR 652.236-70 - Accident Prevention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...authority having jurisdiction over occupational health and safety issues...or (viii) Hazardous noise levels. (b) Records...maintain an accurate record of exposure data on all accidents incident...death, traumatic injury, occupational disease, or damage to...

  2. Trends in gender differences in accidents mortality: Relationships to changing gender roles and other societal trends

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ingrid Waldron; Christopher McCloskey; Inga Earle

    2005-01-01

    This study tests five hypotheses concerning trends in gender differences in accidents mortality and accident-related behavior, using data for the US, UK, France, Italy, and Japan, 1950-98. As predicted by the Convergence Hypothesis, gender differences have decreased for amount of driving, motor vehicle accidents mortality, and occupational accidents mortality. However, for many types of accidents mortality, gender differences were stable

  3. Helicopter accident survivability.

    PubMed

    Vyrnwy-Jones, P; Thornton, R

    1984-10-01

    Army Air Corps accident and fatality rates have now reached levels which compare favourably with data from other civilian and military sources. This improvement is the result of enhanced helicopter design and parallel progress in aircrew training. The introduction of new generations of turbine powered rotor craft has largely eliminated mechanical failure as the cause of accident. As a result 75% of Army Air Corps accidents are due to pilot error. This contribution is likely to increase in the future as the pilot's task is made more difficult by the incumberance of personal equipment. Methods whereby occupant protection and aircraft crashworthiness can be improved are reviewed and it is concluded that it would make sound economic sense to implement some of these well proven design features. PMID:6527344

  4. Decapitation due to car accident.

    PubMed

    Ausania, Francesco; Cittadini, Francesca; Cascini, Fidelia; Polacco, Matteo; Pascali, Vincenzo L; Oliva, Antonio

    2011-12-01

    The occurrence of complete decapitation as a consequence of car accident is an extremely rare event. This fatality is generally seen in pedestrians run over by trains and also in motorcyclists who impact against the tailboard of trucks. Moreover, complete transection of pedestrians and occupants of cars has been described in road accidents especially in case of vehicles traveling at a high speed. We present a case of decapitation with complete degloving injury of the neck in a patient involved in a traffic accident, and we briefly discuss the possible mechanisms producing this injury. PMID:21897196

  5. Reflection on a model of accident reporting to help to implement efficient prevention strategies

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    worldwide (e.g. around 1 fatality every 20 seconds) divided in 1.7 million due to occupational diseases to deliver the relevant action plan especially to control occupational accidents. The aim of the article is to present our approach to analyze the classical Heinrich's model of occupational accidents and the classical

  6. Accident reduction through stress management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lawrence R. Murphy; David DuBois; Joseph J. Hurrell

    1986-01-01

    The deleterious effects of occupational stress on worker health and well-being have been described in numerous reports for a wide range of work groups. Work overload (and underload), deadline pressures, role Stressors, underutilization of abilities, and physical discomfort have been identified as work factors associated with increased stress symptom reporting. The relationship between work stress and accident\\/injury occurrences is less

  7. Risk and protection factors in fatal accidents.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Emmanuelle; Martensen, Heike; Papadimitriou, Eleonora; Yannis, George

    2010-03-01

    This paper aims at addressing the interest and appropriateness of performing accident severity analyses that are limited to fatal accident data. Two methodological issues are specifically discussed, namely the accident-size factors (the number of vehicles in the accident and their level of occupancy) and the comparability of the baseline risk. It is argued that - although these two issues are generally at play in accident severity analyses - their effects on, e.g., the estimation of survival probability, are exacerbated if the analysis is limited to fatal accident data. As a solution, it is recommended to control for these effects by (1) including accident-size indicators in the model, (2) focusing on different sub-groups of road-users while specifying the type of opponent in the model, so as to ensure that comparable baseline risks are worked with. These recommendations are applied in order to investigate risk and protection factors of car occupants involved in fatal accidents using data from a recently set up European Fatal Accident Investigation database (Reed and Morris, 2009). The results confirm that the estimated survival probability is affected by accident-size factors and by type of opponent. The car occupants' survival chances are negatively associated with their own age and that of their vehicle. The survival chances are also lower when seatbelt is not used. Front damage, as compared to other damaged car areas, appears to be associated with increased survival probability, but mostly in the case in which the accident opponent was another car. The interest of further investigating accident-size factors and opponent effects in fatal accidents is discussed. PMID:20159090

  8. Occupational and environmental medicine in Sweden

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Ahlborg Jr

    2000-01-01

    Great changes have taken place in the fields of occupational and environmental medicine in Sweden during the past decade.\\u000a Unemployment, work stress, and indoor climate problems have become increasingly common. Chemical exposures in industry and\\u000a serious work accidents have continued to decrease. State subsidies to occupational health services have been withdrawn and\\u000a the legislation concerning, for example, occupational diseases has

  9. MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY PSY 992 Occupational Health and Safety

    E-print Network

    Liu, Taosheng

    -being. Specific topics covered include occupational stress and burnout, workplace safety and accidentsMICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY PSY 992 Occupational Health and Safety Spring 2011 Thursday 1:50pm ­ 4 of employee assistance programs, the interface of work and non-work factors in maintaining occupational health

  10. Bicycle accidents.

    PubMed

    Lind, M G; Wollin, S

    1986-01-01

    Information concerning 520 bicycle accidents and their victims was obtained from medical records and the victims' replies to questionnaires. The analyzed aspects included risk of injury, completeness of accident registrations by police and in hospitals, types of injuries and influence of the cyclists' age and sex, alcohol, fatigue, hunger, haste, physical disability, purpose of cycling, wearing of protective helmet and other clothing, type and quality of road surface, site of accident (road junctions, separate cycle paths, etc.) and turning manoeuvres. PMID:3461642

  11. Occupational health in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Werner, A F

    2000-07-01

    Argentina is within the denominated "new industrialised countries", with the characteristic of having high contrasts in the urban population, based on service and industry, and in the rural population, based on agriculture and cattle, still the main sources of wealth in the country. The process of globalisation and the need to compete hard in international markets have provoked high unemployment and the transfer of workers from a formal market to an informal one. Legislation on occupational health is old and it is in the process of being updated. The system of prevention, assistance and compensation for accidents at work and for occupational illnesses has changed from being optative for employers, to the compulsory hiring of private insurance companies. The Government keeps the role of supervisor of the system. There are enough professionals in occupational health, hygiene and safety but not occupational nurses. The teaching is given by many universities and professional associations, some of which have an active profile in the occupational health of the country. PMID:10963410

  12. Occupational Myths

    E-print Network

    Ritzer, George

    1971-04-01

    myths at points of occupational stress and the myths are used by workers to cope with the stress. Six broad occupational types are discussed in this paper: pro fessions, semi-professions, managers, white collar clerical workers, low status employees... of the occupation to cope with the stressful situation. In the following discussion, six broad oc cupational types are considered: the professions, semi-professions, managers, white collar clerical workers, low status employees, and deviant occupations. For each...

  13. Occupational Employment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2010

    2010-01-01

    When choosing a career, jobseekers often want to know which occupations offer the best prospects. Generally, occupations that have rapid job growth, many new jobs, or many job openings--and good wages--promise better opportunities. This article shows how employment in particular occupations is projected to change over the 2008-2018 decade. The…

  14. Occupational Employment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2012

    2012-01-01

    When choosing a career, jobseekers often want to know which occupations offer the best prospects. Generally, occupations that have rapid job growth, many new jobs, or many job openings--and good wages--promise better opportunities. This paper shows how employment in particular occupations is projected to change from 2010 to 2020. It presents…

  15. Nuclear accidents

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Iowa Public Television. Explore More Project

    2004-01-01

    Accidents at nuclear power plants can be especially devastating to people and the environment. This article, part of a series about the future of energy, introduces students to nuclear accidents at Chernobyl, Three Mile Island, and Tokaimura. Students explore the incidents by examining possible causes, environmental impacts, and effects on life.

  16. Nuclear accidents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mobley

    1982-01-01

    A nuclear accident with radioactive contamination can happen anywhere in the world. Because expert nuclear emergency teams may take several hours to arrive at the scene, local authorities must have a plan of action for the hours immediately following an accident. The site should be left untouched except to remove casualties. Treatment of victims includes decontamination and meticulous wound debridement.

  17. Occupational Psychiatric Disorders in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seong-Kyu

    2010-01-01

    We searched databases and used various online resources to identify and systematically review all articles on occupational psychiatric disorders among Korean workers published in English and Korean before 2009. Three kinds of occupational psychiatric disorders were studied: disorders related to job stress and mental illness, psychiatric symptoms emerging in victims of industrial injuries, and occupational psychiatric disorders compensated by Industrial Accident Compensation Insurance (IACI). Korea does not maintain official statistical records for occupational psychiatric disorders, but several studies have estimated the number of occupational psychiatric disorders using the Korea Workers' Compensation and Welfare Service (COMWEL, formerly KLWC) database. The major compensated occupational psychiatric disorders in Korea were "personality and behavioral disorders due to brain disease, damage, and dysfunction", "other mental disorders due to brain damage and dysfunction and to physical diseases", "reactions to severe stress and adjustment disorders", and "depressive episodes". The most common work-related psychiatric disorders, excluding accidents, were "neurotic, stress-related, and somatoform disorders" followed by "mood disorders". PMID:21258596

  18. A ENFERMAGEM FRENTE A ACIDENTES DE TRABALHO COM MATERIAL POTENCIALMENTE CONTAMINADO NA ERA DO HIV * THE NURSING TEAM AND OCCUPATIONAL ACCIDENTS WITH POTENTIALLY CONTAMINATED MATERIAL IN THE ERA OF HIV

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elucir Gir; Fabiana Prado; Potiens Costa; Adriana Maria da Silva

    This investigation was carried out in order to: identify the occurrence of professional accidents with perforate cutting potentially contaminated material among nurses and nursing auxiliaries that work in a general teaching hospital in the interior of the state of São Paulo. The other objectives were: to associate the occurrence of accident with the professional category and period of work; to

  19. 28 CFR 345.62 - Inmate accident compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...shall be paid lost-time wages while hospitalized or confined to quarters due to work-related injuries (including occupational disease or illnesses directly caused by the worker's job assignments) as specified by the Inmate Accident...

  20. Stress and accidents in the offshore oil and gas industry

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, V.J.; Cooper, C.L.

    1991-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive analysis of occupational stress and accidents among personnel working in the European offshore oil and gas industry. Identifies sources of stress and predicts stressor outcomes. Examines job dissatisfaction, mental well-being and their relation to accidents. Also explores the differences within occupational status (operator versus contractor) and type of installation (drilling rigs versus fixed production platforms). Conclusions presented include the growing need for extensive management involvement, responsibility, and understanding in this exceptionally high environmental stress industry.

  1. Case study of a frontal car accident involving three fatally injured children

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Florian Feist; Wolfgang Sinz; Heinz Hoschopf; Christoph Mottl; Ernst Tomasch

    2011-01-01

    Rear occupants are generally considered to sustain less severe injuries in frontal car impacts compared with front occupants. Contrary to this thesis, in 2009, in a serious accident involving two passenger cars took place in Austria in which three children seated in the rear were fatally injured in a frontal collision. Based on this car accident, the present study was

  2. Case study of a frontal car accident involving three fatally injured children

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Florian Feist; Wolfgang Sinz; Heinz Hoschopf; Christoph Mottl; Ernst Tomasch

    2012-01-01

    Rear occupants are generally considered to sustain less severe injuries in frontal car impacts compared with front occupants. Contrary to this thesis, in 2009, in a serious accident involving two passenger cars took place in Austria in which three children seated in the rear were fatally injured in a frontal collision. Based on this car accident, the present study was

  3. Decapitation in road traffic accident—a case report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ravi Rautji; A Rudra; V Dixit; D. N Bhardwaj; T. D Dogra

    2003-01-01

    A 20-year-old girl along with four of her friends, all in their early 20s, met with a fatal accident in the early hours of the day. Their car was hit by a speeding truck at a crossing. All the occupants of the car sustained multiple injuries and died on the spot. The girl was decapitated in the accident. Her head

  4. Occupational Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, Dean

    1982-01-01

    Bronchospasm is a common cause of morbidity in the workplace. More than 100 agents are now recognized as occupational causes of asthma and numerous agents can cause exacerbations of preexisting asthma. Because of the large number of potential causative agents and the complexity of modern industrial processes, knowledge of the characteristic clinical features of occupational asthma is the key to recognizing this disease. Early diagnosis of occupational asthma is important in preventing long-term morbidity. Present evidence that prolonged exposure to some work-encountered agents can cause asthma that persists for years after the end of exposure suggests that avoidance is the only acceptable countermeasure against this disease. PMID:7164429

  5. Fatal traffic accidents in the Turkish construction industry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ugur Müngen; G. Emre Gürcanli

    2005-01-01

    Occupational safety as well as highway traffic safety has a poor performance record in Turkey. Especially in the construction industry figures are dramatic. Falls, contact with electricity and accidents involving heavy equipment are the three foremost causes of occupational fatalities in the construction sector. In Turkey, the majority of companies are small or middle sized contractors; and due to the

  6. Nuclear accident

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Mathews; S. Agrest; G. Borger; M. Lord; W. D. Marbach; W. J. Cook; M. Sheils

    1979-01-01

    A malfunctioning valve at the Three Mile Island power plant in Pennsylvania was the prelude to the worst nuclear accident in U.S. history. Despite assurances that radiation leaked from the plant posed no immediate threat, the population around the plant dwindled as unforced weekend evacuations grew common. Radiation at the power plant site reached 30 mrem\\/hr on March 30. While

  7. Occupational Health

    MedlinePLUS

    Occupational health problems occur at work or because of the kind of work you do. These problems can include ... by exposure to radiation Exposure to germs in health care settings Good job safety and prevention practices ...

  8. Occupational Therapists

    MedlinePLUS

    ... patients’ schedules. <- How to Become One Job Outlook -> Job Outlook About this section Occupational Therapists Percent change ... will need to cover once reforms are implemented. Job Prospects Job opportunities should be good for licensed ...

  9. Transport aircraft accident dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cominsky, A.

    1982-01-01

    A study was carried out of 112 impact survivable jet transport aircraft accidents (world wide) of 27,700 kg (60,000 lb.) aircraft and up extending over the last 20 years. This study centered on the effect of impact and the follow-on events on aircraft structures and was confined to the approach, landing and takeoff segments of the flight. The significant characteristics, frequency of occurrence and the effect on the occupants of the above data base were studied and categorized with a view to establishing typical impact scenarios for use as a basis of verifying the effectiveness of potential safety concepts. Studies were also carried out of related subjects such as: (1) assessment of advanced materials; (2) human tolerance to impact; (3) merit functions for safety concepts; and (4) impact analysis and test methods.

  10. Fatal occupational falls in the Taiwan construction industry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yen-Hui Lin; Chih-Yong Chen; Teng-Wei Wang

    2011-01-01

    This study examined fatal occupational falls in the Taiwan construction industry. Data extracted from 1062 work-related accident reports filed in the years 1996–2007 in annual reports by the Council of Labor Affairs (CLA) were analyzed in terms of gender, age, and work experience of the accident victim as well as activity at the time of the incident, personal protective equipment

  11. Occupational deaths and injuries in the construction industry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Byung Yong Jeong

    1998-01-01

    This study concerned with the characteristics of occupational deaths and injuries in the construction industry of South Korea. The national statistics of industrial accidents in the years 1991–1994 were extracted from the annual publications of the Ministry of Labor. These data were analyzed in terms of the size of company, age of injured person, work experience, accident type, injury type,

  12. Fatal occupational falls in the Taiwan construction industry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yen-Hui Lin; Chih-Yong Chen; Teng-Wei Wang

    2012-01-01

    This study examined fatal occupational falls in the Taiwan construction industry. Data extracted from 1062 work-related accident reports filed in the years 1996–2007 in annual reports by the Council of Labor Affairs (CLA) were analyzed in terms of gender, age, and work experience of the accident victim as well as activity at the time of the incident, personal protective equipment

  13. NIH POLICY MANUAL 1340 -NIH Occupational Safety and Health Management

    E-print Network

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    in property damage and human resources due to accident, injury, or illness; and #12;Comply with Public Law 91 in the safest possible manner and report hazards, accidents, injuries and illnesses to the appropriate NIH Programs for Federal Employees 2. Public Law 91-596, Williams-Steiger Occupational Safety and Health Act

  14. Data mining for occupational injuries in the Taiwan construction industry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chia-Wen Liao; Yeng-Horng Perng

    2008-01-01

    There is a higher rate of occupational injury in the construction industry than most other industries on average. However, steps can be taken to reduce worker risk through effective injury prevention strategies. In this article, association rule mining is employed in identifying the characteristics of occupational injuries in the construction industry. Accident reports during the period 1999–2004 are extracted from

  15. [Snowboarding accidents].

    PubMed

    Müller, R; Brügger, O; Mathys, R; Stüssi, E

    2000-12-01

    The present review summarises the related literature of the last ten years with request to snowboarding accidents. Sport accident statistics of snowboarding show high and increasing numbers of injuries. Already snowboarding ranks third of all sport accidents in Switzerland. According to the literature the injury risk in snowboarding is twice that of skiing, although the injuries are less serious. About 50% of the injured snowboarders are beginners. Beginners have a higher risk of injury than more advanced snowboarders. Additionally, and a relative large part of them are injured the first day of their snowboard career. The pattern of injury has changed over the last years. Today, injuries to the lower extremities account no longer for more than 50% but are now decreased to about 25%. Nowadays, wrist, knee, ankle, and shoulder are the most frequently injured body parts. It is the authors opinion that with up-to-date protectors, release bindings, and training of falling techniques the numbers and seriousness of injuries could be reduced, in particular injuries to the wrist and ankle. PMID:11199401

  16. Applying data mining techniques to explore factors contributing to occupational injuries in Taiwan's construction industry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ching-Wu Cheng; Sou-Sen Leu; Ying-Mei Cheng; Tsung-Chih Wu; Chen-Chung Lin

    Construction accident research involves the systematic sorting, classification, and encoding of comprehensive databases of injuries and fatalities. The present study explores the causes and distribution of occupational accidents in the Taiwan construction industry by analyzing such a database using the data mining method known as classification and regression tree (CART). Utilizing a database of 1542 accident cases during the period

  17. Occupational therapist.

    PubMed

    Coad, C P

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the application of the skills of the occupational therapist in a position as coordinator of a special vocational training program in a community college district. Duties described include program for limited-English-proficient adults. A major reason for a specialized educational approach for limited-English-speaking adults came from the large influx of non-native English speaking immigrants and refugees into the community college district, many of them without job skills. The resulting vocational linguistic program involves counseling, job-skill training and vocational English instruction. A summary of the procedures involved in evaluating language proficiency and vocational skills from enrollment to job-ready status is presented and explained. This role of the occupational therapist follows the trend to incorporate the generic skills of occupational therapy into new areas of practice. PMID:23952121

  18. On scene injury severity prediction (OSISP) algorithm for car occupants.

    PubMed

    Buendia, Ruben; Candefjord, Stefan; Fagerlind, Helen; Bálint, András; Sjöqvist, Bengt Arne

    2015-08-01

    Many victims in traffic accidents do not receive optimal care due to the fact that the severity of their injuries is not realized early on. Triage protocols are based on physiological and anatomical criteria and subsequently on mechanisms of injury in order to reduce undertriage. In this study the value of accident characteristics for field triage is evaluated by developing an on scene injury severity prediction (OSISP) algorithm using only accident characteristics that are feasible to assess at the scene of accident. A multivariate logistic regression model is constructed to assess the probability of a car occupant being severely injured following a crash, based on the Swedish Traffic Accident Data Acquisition (STRADA) database. Accidents involving adult occupants for calendar years 2003-2013 included in both police and hospital records, with no missing data for any of the model variables, were included. The total number of subjects was 29128, who were involved in 22607 accidents. Partition between severe and non-severe injury was done using the Injury Severity Score (ISS) with two thresholds: ISS>8 and ISS>15. The model variables are: belt use, airbag deployment, posted speed limit, type of accident, location of accident, elderly occupant (>55 years old), sex and occupant seat position. The area under the receiver operator characteristic curve (AUC) is 0.78 and 0.83 for ISS>8 and ISS>15, respectively, as estimated by 10-fold cross-validation. Belt use is the strongest predictor followed by type of accident. Posted speed limit, age and accident location contribute substantially to increase model accuracy, whereas sex and airbag deployment contribute to a smaller extent and seat position is of limited value. These findings can be used to refine triage protocols used in Sweden and possibly other countries with similar traffic environments. PMID:26005884

  19. Fatal Car Occupant Injuries after Car Lorry Collisions

    PubMed Central

    Gissane, William; Bull, John

    1973-01-01

    All deaths from road accidents in certain areas and periods were studied. Analysis of 224 deaths to car occupants from collisions between cars and lorries showed that such accidents were the commonest cause of death for car occupants on motorways and link roads. The impacts were such that relatively poor protection could be given by occupant restraint systems. Collisions of cars into the rear of lorries caused the most severe injuries; most of these accidents occurred at night. The traffic characteristics of cars and lorries are largely incompatible and increase the likelihood of collisions and of extremely severe injuries to car occupants. Some reduction in deaths may be expected from making lorries more conspicuous and eliminating the rear overhang. More fundamental measures are segregation of lorries from cars and return of traffic to railways. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3 PMID:20791870

  20. OCCUPATIONAL ENDORSEMENTS

    E-print Network

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    human services), then the credits you earn from each UA institution will be counted toward fulfillment residency requirements are the minimum number of credits you must earn from the campus where you earn occupational training in a specific field. These programs are 9 ­ 30 credit hours and will be posted

  1. OCCUPATIONAL ENDORSEMENTS

    E-print Network

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    human services), then the credits you earn from each UA institution will be counted toward fulfillment residency requirements are the minimum number of credits you must earn from the campus where you earn occupational training in a specific field. These programs are 9­29 credit hours and will be posted

  2. Radiation accidents.

    PubMed

    Saenger, E L

    1986-09-01

    It is essential that emergency physicians understand ways to manage patients contaminated by radioactive materials and/or exposed to external radiation sources. Contamination accidents require careful surveys to identify the metabolic pathway of the radionuclides to guide prognosis and treatment. The level of treatment required will depend on careful surveys and meticulous decontamination. There is no specific therapy for the acute radiation syndrome. Prophylactic antibodies are desirable. For severely exposed patients treatment is similar to the supportive care given to patients undergoing organ transplantation. For high-dose extremity injury, no methods have been developed to reverse the fibrosing endarteritis that eventually leads to tissue death so frequently found with this type of injury. Although the Three Mile Island episode of March 1979 created tremendous public concern, there were no radiation injuries. The contamination outside the reactor building and the release of radioiodine were negligible. The accidental fuel element meltdown at Chernobyl, USSR, resulted in many cases of acute radiation syndrome. More than 100,000 people were exposed to high levels of radioactive fallout. The general principles outlined here are applicable to accidents of that degree of severity. PMID:3526994

  3. Radiation accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Saenger, E.L.

    1986-09-01

    It is essential that emergency physicians understand ways to manage patients contaminated by radioactive materials and/or exposed to external radiation sources. Contamination accidents require careful surveys to identify the metabolic pathway of the radionuclides to guide prognosis and treatment. The level of treatment required will depend on careful surveys and meticulous decontamination. There is no specific therapy for the acute radiation syndrome. Prophylactic antibodies are desirable. For severely exposed patients treatment is similar to the supportive care given to patients undergoing organ transplantation. For high-dose extremity injury, no methods have been developed to reverse the fibrosing endarteritis that eventually leads to tissue death so frequently found with this type of injury. Although the Three Mile Island episode of March 1979 created tremendous public concern, there were no radiation injuries. The contamination outside the reactor building and the release of radioiodine were negligible. The accidental fuel element meltdown at Chernobyl, USSR, resulted in many cases of acute radiation syndrome. More than 100,000 people were exposed to high levels of radioactive fallout. The general principles outlined here are applicable to accidents of that degree of severity.

  4. Chronic cough due to occupational factors

    PubMed Central

    Groneberg, David A; Nowak, Dennis; Wussow, Anke; Fischer, Axel

    2006-01-01

    Within the large variety of subtypes of chronic cough, either defined by their clinical or pathogenetic causes, occupational chronic cough may be regarded as one of the most preventable forms of the disease. Next to obstructive airway diseases such as asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, which are sometimes concomitant with chronic cough, this chronic airway disease gains importance in the field of occupational medicine since classic fiber-related occupational airway diseases will decrease in the future. Apart from acute accidents and incidental exposures which may lead to an acute form of cough, there are numerous sources for the development of chronic cough within the workplace. Over the last years, a large number of studies has focused on occupational causes of respiratory diseases and it has emerged that chronic cough is one of the most prevalent work-related airway diseases. Best-known examples of occupations related to the development of cough are coal miners, hard-rock miners, tunnel workers, or concrete manufacturing workers. As chronic cough is often based on a variety of non-occupational factors such as tobacco smoke, a distinct separation into either occupational or personally -evoked can be difficult. However, revealing the occupational contribution to chronic cough and to the symptom cough in general, which is the commonest cause for the consultation of a physician, can significantly lead to a reduction of the socioeconomic burden of the disease. PMID:16722562

  5. Reducing commercial vehicle accidents through accident databases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Will Murray; Tony Whiteing

    1995-01-01

    Commercial vehicle accidents impose very significant costs on industry and society but for a variety of reasons the full costs are often poorly understood. Advocates that vehicle operators should undertake a full and systematic analysis of accident levels, causes and costs. Introduces the CCSM model of vehicle accident reduction. By undertaking analysis based on this approach, most vehicle operators should

  6. Increased occupational radiation doses: nuclear fuel cycle.

    PubMed

    Bouville, André; Kryuchkov, Victor

    2014-02-01

    The increased occupational doses resulting from the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident that occurred in Ukraine in April 1986, the reactor accident of Fukushima that took place in Japan in March 2011, and the early operations of the Mayak Production Association in Russia in the 1940s and 1950s are presented and discussed. For comparison purposes, the occupational doses due to the other two major reactor accidents (Windscale in the United Kingdom in 1957 and Three Mile Island in the United States in 1979) and to the main plutonium-producing facility in the United States (Hanford Works) are also covered but in less detail. Both for the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident and the routine operations at Mayak, the considerable efforts made to reconstruct individual doses from external irradiation to a large number of workers revealed that the recorded doses had been overestimated by a factor of about two.Introduction of Increased Occupational Exposures: Nuclear Industry Workers. (Video 1:32, http://links.lww.com/HP/A21). PMID:24378501

  7. Accident information needs

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, D.J.; Arcieri, W.C.; Ward, L.W.

    1992-12-31

    A Five-step methodology has been developed to evaluate information needs for nuclear power plants under accident conditions and the availability of plant instrumentation during severe accidents. Step 1 examines the credible accidents and their relationships to plant safety functions. Step 2 determines the information personnel involved in accident management will need to understand plant behavior. Step 3 determines the capability of the instrumentation to function properly under severe accident conditions. Step 4 determines the conditions expected during the identified severe accidents. Step 5 compares the instrument capabilities and the severe accident conditions to evaluate the availability of the instrumentation to supply needed plant information.

  8. Accident information needs

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, D.J.; Arcieri, W.C.; Ward, L.W.

    1992-01-01

    A Five-step methodology has been developed to evaluate information needs for nuclear power plants under accident conditions and the availability of plant instrumentation during severe accidents. Step 1 examines the credible accidents and their relationships to plant safety functions. Step 2 determines the information personnel involved in accident management will need to understand plant behavior. Step 3 determines the capability of the instrumentation to function properly under severe accident conditions. Step 4 determines the conditions expected during the identified severe accidents. Step 5 compares the instrument capabilities and the severe accident conditions to evaluate the availability of the instrumentation to supply needed plant information.

  9. Epidemiology of Accidents in Tile Factories of Mangalore City in Karnataka

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, S Ganesh; Rathnakar, UP; Harsha Kumar, HN

    2010-01-01

    Background: Occupational accidents are a major point of concern in industries. The academic community should take the first step to address the long-neglected concerns of occupational safety. Objective: To assess the prevalence and pattern of occupational accidents. Materials and Methods: A record-based, cross-sectional study was done in three tile factories of Mangalore city, in Karnataka. A total of 416 workers were analyzed for the year 2004, and data regarding age, sex, job duration, type and nature of injury, body parts involved, and time of injury were collected in a prestructured proforma. Statistical Analysis: Proportions, Chi-square test, Univariate and Multivariate analysis. Results: The overall prevalence rate of accidents was found to be 18.5%. It was found that almost around 86% of the accidents had affected the limbs (upper limb 24.7%, lower limb 61%), around half (52%) of the injuries were contributed by superficial injuries, 40% of accidents were due to stepping/striking against objects and while handling. Hand tools and machinery in motion contributed to around 20% of the accidents. Accidents were more common among the younger age group and less-experienced workers. Multiple logistic regression analyses revealed that the age group of 30-39 years had an independent significant association with accidents (OR = 0.21, P = 0.04). Conclusion: Accidents in tile industries are an important occupational health problem in this area of the country. There is a need for proper safety training of the workers. PMID:20606926

  10. 76 FR 589 - Proposed Extension of Existing Information Collection; Mine Accident, Injury, Illness, Mine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-05

    ...efforts of MSHA and the mining industry. Accident, injury, and illness data, when correlated with...effectively using historical data. The information collected...reliable occupational data available concerning the mining industry. Section...

  11. The influence of occupation on lumbar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Videman, T; Battié, M C

    1999-06-01

    In many countries, back problems have been defined as occupational injuries. The belief underlying this injury model is that back symptoms are caused primarily by work-related mechanical factors that damage the structures of the spine, either through a single incident or repeated loading. Although the etiopathogenesis of degenerative findings in the disc and their relation to pain are poorly understood, changes in the disc are suspected of underlying many back symptoms. The focus of this article is on examining the relation between occupational factors and disc degeneration. Occupational factors suspected of accelerating spinal degeneration include accident-related trauma; heavy physical loading and materials handling, including lifting, bending, and twisting; prolonged sitting; and sustained nonneutral work postures and vehicular driving. There is evidence to suggest that occupational exposures have an effect on disc degeneration. However, these factors explain little of the variability in degeneration found in the adult population. Furthermore, the lack of a clear dose-response relation between time spent in various occupational loading conditions and degenerative findings adds to doubts about a strong causal link. The contribution of suspected occupational risk factors appears to be particularly modest when compared with familial influences, which reflect the combined effects of genes and early childhood environment. These findings challenge the dominant role assumed for occupational loading in disc degeneration and associated back problems, and suggest a more complex etiology. PMID:10361670

  12. Occupational Classification System Manual

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Researchers may gain insight into the Bureau of Labor Statistics and Census Bureau occupational codes via the Occupational Classification System Manual (OCSM). A list of Major Occupation Group titles (MOGs) is provided as well as links to the Census Occupation Index--an alphabetical list of approximately 30,000 occupational titles. Further guidance in locating the proper occupation classification for research queries is outlined in the articles "Using the OCSM" and "Using the Census Index."

  13. Developing an Occupational Health Program: The Team Approach

    PubMed Central

    Prossin, Albert

    1985-01-01

    Occupational health and safety programs involve professionals in occupational medicine and nursing, industrial hygiene, safety and accident prevention, psychology, sociology and health physics. Occupational health programs should allow regular health evaluations of workers, and the recognition, evaluation, and control of environmental hazards. When designing in-plant medical facilities, accommodation should be made for possible future expansion, disabled people, and an access route for an ambulance. Treatment and prevention facilities should be separate. Patients' records must be complete and kept confidential. The occupational health program must also be evaluated regularly. Education of management and the work force is necessary to ensure that the environment is safe and to prevent accidents. Special programs may be introduced, based on the particular risks, toxicants, and problems in different industries. Imagesp1912-a PMID:21274204

  14. Occupational health hazards of mine workers*

    PubMed Central

    Cho, K. S.; Lee, S. H.

    1978-01-01

    Mining has always been among the most hazardous of occupations, and with the increasing demand for coal and minerals safety in mines assumes even greater importance. This article describes the present situation with regard to conditions in mines, the diseases and disabilities resulting from them, and measures that can be taken to prevent or treat them. The hazards covered are: accidents, dust (including poisoning by certain ores), high temperature and humidity, noise and vibration, toxic gases, and miscellaneous other hazards. PMID:307452

  15. Shift work and employee fatigue: implications for occupational health nursing.

    PubMed

    Yumang-Ross, Doreen J; Burns, Candace

    2014-06-01

    Long work hours and irregular shifts are part of the nation's 24-hour society and contribute to employee fatigue. Factors affecting employee fatigue are circadian rhythm, sleep quality and quantity, individual health, the environment, and work tasks. Employee fatigue contributes to accidents and injuries, and affects occupational performance, safety, and health. These findings should be used by occupational health nurses to address fatigue management and develop comprehensive fatigue management programs. PMID:24971821

  16. [Monitoring occupational hazards and farm machinery injuries].

    PubMed

    Larrat, Jean-Paul; Chrétien, Jean-Claude; Viarouge, Nicolas

    2007-06-15

    The Mutualité Sociale Agricole (MSA--French social security agency) closely examines the circumstances and consequences of the accidents and diseases occurring in agriculture as part of the professional activity of farmers and their employees. During work as such, identified as being the first source of accidents, approximately 35,000 and 70,000 accidents occur each year, respectively to farmers and employees. In both populations, the accident frequency is around 60 out of every 1,000 insured persons. The evolution is positive for employees, but serious, non-fatal accidents remain a major area of concern. Accidents to and from work mainly involve employees. Their number has markedly decreased and the anualy frequency is close to 3 out of every 1,000 employers. The number of occupational diseases is constantly increasing, mainly as the consequence of the recognition of periarticular diseases. This article also summarizes the main conclusions of a French survey conducted in 2003 among 50,000 wage earners in the agricultural sector, as part of the medical monitoring of professional risks (SUMER). PMID:17708089

  17. Designing an Experimental "Accident"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Picker, Lester

    1974-01-01

    Describes an experimental "accident" that resulted in much student learning, seeks help in the identification of nematodes, and suggests biology teachers introduce similar accidents into their teaching to stimulate student interest. (PEB)

  18. Interpreting Accident Statistics

    E-print Network

    Ferreira, Joseph Jr.

    Accident statistics have often been used to support the argument that an abnormally small proportion of drivers account for a large proportion of the accidents. This paper compares statistics developed from six-year data ...

  19. Selected Health Service Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Arthur D.

    Prepared by an occupational analyst of the Utah Department of Employment Security, this manual provides job guides for 39 health service occupations concerned mainly with doctors, nurses, and related hospital-medical-health consultants and services. Classified according to "The Dictionary of Occupational Titles," each occupational description…

  20. [History of the radiation damage in occupations].

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Ryuji

    2014-03-01

    In the year following Röntgen`s discovery of X-rays in 1895, approximately 60 cases of hand dermatitis and hair loss induced by radiation were reported. People using X-rays in their occupation, including X-ray tube manufacturers, physicians, and engineers, experienced chronic radiation dermatitis and were the first to be diagnosed with occupational radiation exposure. Reports of later appearing disorders, including skin cancer, suffered by doctors and engineers, were regarded as serious occupational diseases. In the 1910's, blood disorders, including leukemia, in people with occupational exposure to radiation came into focus. Dial painters applying radium to watches with a luminous dial clock face suffered osteomyelitis from about 1914. Other radiation damage reports include radiation death and carcinogenesis in the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident in 1986, and radiation death in the Tokai-mura JCO accident in 1999. The details of radiation damage in the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in 2011 have not yet been reported, but must be followed in the future. PMID:24633182

  1. Managed occupational health care in an HMO.

    PubMed

    Feldstein, A; Marino, G

    1997-12-01

    This paper describes the efforts of an HMO to improve its delivery of occupational health services. Customer needs identification, occupational health structure, data systems, case management, clinical guidelines, and quality management are outlined. Our experience suggests that high-quality occupational health services can be integrated into managed care systems thereby offering cost-effective care to large numbers of workers. Comparing 1991 to 1995, physician authorization of total disability days was reduced 17.9% per disability case (p < .0001). Based on July 1994 to June 1995 Oregon State Accident Insurance Fund (SAIF Corporation) data, HMO average total claim cost was $916/claim representing respectively, a 21% and a 20% reduced cost compared to two PPO model programs (MCO 00 and MCO 01). Patient satisfaction data indicated that 90% of patients were satisfied or very satisfied with the physician they saw. The savings appear to be due to cost-effective treatment and rapid return to work. PMID:10176517

  2. Distributed Vision-Based Accident Management for Assisted Living

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hamid K. Aghajan; Juan Carlos Augusto; Chen Wu; Paul J. Mccullagh; Julie-ann Walkden

    2007-01-01

    We consider the problem of assisting vulnerable people and their carers to reduce the occurrence, and concomitant consequences, of accidents in the home. A wireless sensor network employing multiple sensing and event detection modalities and distributed processing is pro- posed for smart home monitoring applications. Distributed vision-based analysis is used to detect occupant's posture, and features from multiple cameras are

  3. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear fuel cycle and non-fuel cycle facilities following postulated accidents. Main report. Volume 1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elder

    1985-01-01

    Technical requirements, costs and safety are conceptually evaluated for the post-accident cleanup and decommissioning of fuel cycle and non-fuel cycle facilities that have experienced a significant accident. Accident cleanup is postulated to include (1) initial decontamination of building surfaces to reduce the subsequent occupational dose to cleanup and decommissioning workers and (2) management of the resulting wastes. Decommissioning is assumed

  4. Drudgery, accidents and injuries in Indian agriculture.

    PubMed

    Nag, Pranab Kumar; Nag, Anjali

    2004-04-01

    The Indian farming employs 225 million workforce to cover 140 million hectares of total cultivated land. In spite of rapid farm mechanization (e.g., 149 million farm machinery), the vast resource-poor family farming has primary dependence on traditional methods (e.g., 520 million hand tools and 37 million animal-drawn implements are in operation). The work drudgery, the traumatic accidents and injuries are the major concerns to examine options for ergonomics intervention and betterment of work in crop production activities. This review summarizes human energy expenditure in crop production activities, to assess the job severity, tools and machinery, and formulate the basis to reorganize work and work methods. While the farm mechanization is more in the northern India, the accidents were more in the villages in southern India. On average of the four regions, the tractor incidents (overturning, falling from the tractor, etc.) were highest (27.7%), followed by thresher (14.6%), sprayer/duster (12.2%), sugarcane crusher (8.1%) and chaff cutter (7.8%) accidents. Most of the fatal accidents resulted from the powered machinery, with the annual fatality rate estimated as 22 per 100,000 farmers. The hand tools related injuries (8% of the total accidents) were non-fatal in nature. In spite of the enactment of legislation, the shortcomings in production and monitoring of the machinery in field use may be responsible for the high rate of accidents (e.g., 42 thresher accidents/1,000 mechanical threshers/year in southern India). Due to the lack of technical capability of the local artisans, adhering to safety and design standards is impractical to the implements fabricated in the rural areas. The analysis emphasizes that the effective safety and health management may be possible through legislative enabling of the local infra-structure, such as block development authority and primary health services, to permeate occupational health and safe work practices in the farming sector. PMID:15128164

  5. The Chernobyl Accident: About the Accident

    Cancer.gov

    On April 26, 1986 an accident occurred at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine. The accident happened during a routine test, intended to demonstrate how long the turbines would spin after a power loss. Prior to the test, the automatic shutdown mechanisms were disabled. Coolant water was reduced and the power output was increased. The operator tried to shut down the reactor but a flaw in the design caused a large power surge.

  6. Occupational Clusters. Occupational Investigation Guide. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    East Texas State Univ., Commerce. Occupational Curriculum Lab.

    This occupational investigation guide contains learning activities for instruction in fifteen occupational clusters: (1) agribusiness and natural resources, (2) business and office, (3) communications and media, (4) construction, (5) consumer and homemaking, (6) environment, (7) fine arts and humanities, (8) health, (9) hospitality and recreation,…

  7. Occupational Radiation Exposures

    Cancer.gov

    DCEG researchers are studying cancer risks among populations who are occupationally exposed to radiation. Chernobyl Clean-up Workers Mayak Nuclear Facility Workers U.S. Radiologic Technologists Interventional Fluoroscopists Print This Page Occupational

  8. Rehabilitation Services Sample Occupations

    E-print Network

    Ronquist, Fredrik

    Rehabilitation Services Sample Occupations Sample Work Settings Child & Day Care Centers Clinics Facilities/ Agencies Non-Profit Rehabilitation Director Employee Assistant Counselor Employment Agency Worker Rehabilitation Companies Schools for People with Disabilities Schools/Colleges Occupational Specialist (FL

  9. Accident mortality among children

    PubMed Central

    Swaroop, S.; Albrecht, R. M.; Grab, B.

    1956-01-01

    The authors present statistics on mortality from accidents, with special reference to those relating to the age-group 1-19 years. For a number of countries figures are given for the proportional mortality from accidents (the number of accident deaths expressed as a percentage of the number of deaths from all causes) and for the specific death-rates, per 100 000 population, from all causes of death, from selected causes, from all causes of accidents, and from various types of accident. From these figures it appears that, in most countries, accidents are becoming relatively increasingly prominent as a cause of death in childhood, primarily because of the conquest of other causes of death—such as infectious and parasitic diseases, which formerly took a heavy toll of children and adolescents—but also to some extent because the death-rate from motor-vehicle accidents is rising and cancelling out the reduction in the rate for other causes of accidental death. In the authors' opinion, further epidemiological investigations into accident causation are required for the purpose of devising quicker and more effective methods of accident prevention. PMID:13383361

  10. [Accidents with the "paraglider"].

    PubMed

    Lang, T H; Dengg, C; Gabl, M

    1988-09-01

    With a collective of 46 patients we show the details and kinds of accidents caused by paragliding. The base for the casuistry of the accidents was a questionnaire which was answered by most of the injured persons. These were questions about the theoretical and practical training, the course of the flight during the different phases, and the subjective point of view of the course of the accident. The patterns of the injuries showed a high incidence of injuries of the spinal column and high risks for the ankles. At the end, we give some advice how to prevent these accidents. PMID:3242158

  11. Occupation and Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aschebrook-Kilfoy, Briseis; Ward, Mary H.; Valle, Curt T. Della; Friesen, Melissa C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Numerous occupational and environmental exposures have been shown to disrupt thyroid hormones, but much less is known about their relationships with thyroid cancer. Here we review the epidemiology studies of occupations and occupational exposures and thyroid cancer incidence to provide insight into preventable risk factors for thyroid cancer. Methods The published literature was searched using the Web of Knowledge database for all articles through August 2013 that had in their text “occupation” “job” ”employment” or “work” and “thyroid cancer”. After excluding 10 mortality studies and 4 studies with less than 5 exposed incident cases, we summarized the findings of 30 articles that examined thyroid cancer incidence in relation to occupations or occupational exposure. The studies were grouped by exposure/occupation category, study design, and exposure assessment approach. Where available, gender stratified results are reported. Results The most studied (19 of 30 studies) and the most consistent associations were observed for radiation-exposed workers and health care occupations. Suggestive, but inconsistent, associations were observed in studies of pesticide-exposed workers and agricultural occupations. Findings for other exposures and occupation groups were largely null. The majority of studies had few exposed cases and assessed exposure based on occupation or industry category, self-report, or generic (population-based) job exposure matrices. Conclusion The suggestive, but inconsistent findings for many of the occupational exposures reviewed here indicate that more studies with larger numbers of cases and better exposure assessment are necessary, particularly for exposures known to disrupt thyroid homeostasis. PMID:24604144

  12. Occupational medicine and toxicology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David A Groneberg; Axel Fischer

    2006-01-01

    This editorial is to announce the Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology, a new Open Access, peer-reviewed, online journal published by BioMed Central. Occupational medicine and toxicology belong to the most wide ranging disciplines of all medical specialties. The field is devoted to the diagnosis, prevention, management and scientific analysis of diseases from the fields of occupational and environmental medicine

  13. OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY and HEALTH

    E-print Network

    Weaver, Harold A. "Hal"

    MARYLAND OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY and HEALTH ACT safety and health protection on the job STATE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS, AND OTHER APPLICABLE REGULATIONS MAY BE OBTAINED FROM 19106-3309 The Maryland Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1973 provides job safety and health

  14. Health Occupations Cluster Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    Intended to assist the vocational teacher in designing and implementing a cluster program in health occupations, this guide suggests ideas for teaching the specific knowledge and skills that qualify students for entry-level employment in the health occupations field. The knowledge and skills are applicable to 12 occupations: dental assistant;…

  15. Occupational Employment Statistics

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    US occupations are featured in this information-rich resources from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The 1996 Occupational Employment Statistics Survey differs from previous surveys in that it includes wage data by occupation for the first time. The site contains a description of the survey and complete national and state data for 760 occupations in seven major areas. Included are occupation title, number of employees, hourly mean and median wage, and an OES code number that provides information about the occupation and its employment distribution by wage range where surveyed (distribution is for the national survey only). An occupational search engine is forthcoming. The site also contains information about previous OES surveys back to 1988.

  16. Anatomy of an Accident.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mobley, Michael

    1984-01-01

    The findings of industrial safety engineers in the areas of accident causation and prevention are wholly applicable to adventure programs. Adventure education instructors can use safety engineering concepts to assess the risk in a particular activity, understand factors that cause accidents, and intervene to minimize injuries and damages if…

  17. The Tokaimura Nuclear Accident

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Michael E. Ryan

    2001-09-01

    The 1999 accident at the Tokaimura nuclear fuel processing plant near Tokyo is the context for a student discussion on nuclear power and the consequences of a nuclear accident. The case covers issues ranging from chemical process safety to risk management

  18. Accidents on hospital wards.

    PubMed Central

    Levene, S; Bonfield, G

    1991-01-01

    Eight hospitals reported 781 non-iatrogenic accidents occurring to patients and visitors under 16 years of age during an 18 month period up to October 1989. Accidents more often involved boys and children aged 3 to 5 years old. Falls from a height, slips, and striking accidents were common by day and falls by night. A total of 41% of accidents to inpatients occurred when parents were present. Only three accidents were serious. Altogether 27% involved beds and cots, and only one consequent injury was more than minor. Data collected routinely in case of medicolegal action can be presented in a form that may facilitate preventative work. Potentially remediable causes for concern include falls from beds and cots and the use of makeshift equipment. PMID:1929510

  19. Participatory analysis of accidents and incidents as a tool for increasing safety behaviour in fishermen. A pilot intervention study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mats Eklöf; Marianne Törner

    2005-01-01

    Although occupational accidents are common in fishery, safety work is often not given priority by the fishermen. The aims of this study were to test a group-based intervention for increased activity in safety work through group discussion of accident\\/incident experience; to study occurred incidents\\/accidents and how such events were managed; and to study intervention effects on activity in safety work,

  20. UNIVERSITY OF TRENTO ACCIDENT INSURANCE

    E-print Network

    1 UNIVERSITY OF TRENTO ACCIDENT INSURANCE POLICY This document reflects the contractual conditions; · accidents resulting from popular uproars, acts of terrorism, malicious damages, act of violence, kidnaps

  1. Occupational health in Australia.

    PubMed

    Phoon, W O

    1998-09-01

    Australia is a developed country in the Asia-Pacific Region with a large land area but a small population. Its main economic activities are mining, agriculture and manufacturing, with its service and high-technology industries being the fastest growing sectors in recent years. The regulation and enforcement of Occupational Health and Safety policies are mainly administered by the Industrial Relations Departments of eight State and Territory jurisdictions in the country. A National Occupational Health and Safety Commission coordinates occupational health and safety at the Commonwealth level. In 1987 the six occupational health and safety priorities in Australia were listed as occupational back pain, management of chemicals used at work, occupational noise-induced hearing loss, occupational skin disorders, occupational cancer and mechanical equipment injury. Australia has probably the highest incidence of malignant mesothelioma in the world, although the use of asbestos has been largely phased out. There was an almost explosive "epidemic" of repetition strain injury in the 1980s. Approximately 500 work-related fatalities and 10,000 work-related injuries are notified for workers' compensation every year. In addition, it is estimated that there are several thousand cases of work-related diseases every year, many of which go unreported. Occupational physicians undergo 4 years of specialisation training. Occupational hygienists, nurses and ergonomists receive training supervised by their respective professional organisations. PMID:9766909

  2. Occupational Safety Review of High Technology Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Lee Cadwallader

    2005-01-31

    This report contains reviews of operating experiences, selected accident events, and industrial safety performance indicators that document the performance of the major US DOE magnetic fusion experiments and particle accelerators. These data are useful to form a basis for the occupational safety level at matured research facilities with known sets of safety rules and regulations. Some of the issues discussed are radiation safety, electromagnetic energy exposure events, and some of the more widespread issues of working at height, equipment fires, confined space work, electrical work, and other industrial hazards. Nuclear power plant industrial safety data are also included for comparison.

  3. Persistence of airline accidents.

    PubMed

    Barros, Carlos Pestana; Faria, Joao Ricardo; Gil-Alana, Luis Alberiko

    2010-10-01

    This paper expands on air travel accident research by examining the relationship between air travel accidents and airline traffic or volume in the period from 1927-2006. The theoretical model is based on a representative airline company that aims to maximise its profits, and it utilises a fractional integration approach in order to determine whether there is a persistent pattern over time with respect to air accidents and air traffic. Furthermore, the paper analyses how airline accidents are related to traffic using a fractional cointegration approach. It finds that airline accidents are persistent and that a (non-stationary) fractional cointegration relationship exists between total airline accidents and airline passengers, airline miles and airline revenues, with shocks that affect the long-run equilibrium disappearing in the very long term. Moreover, this relation is negative, which might be due to the fact that air travel is becoming safer and there is greater competition in the airline industry. Policy implications are derived for countering accident events, based on competition and regulation. PMID:20618386

  4. Workers' compensation for occupational respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    Park, So-young; Kim, Hyoung-Ryoul; Song, Jaechul

    2014-06-01

    The respiratory system is one of the most important body systems particularly from the viewpoint of occupational medicine because it is the major route of occupational exposure. In 2013, there were significant changes in the specific criteria for the recognition of occupational diseases, which were established by the Enforcement Decree of the Industrial Accident Compensation Insurance Act (IACIA). In this article, the authors deal with the former criteria, implications of the revision, and changes in the specific criteria in Korea by focusing on the 2013 amendment to the IACIA. Before the 2013 amendment to the IACIA, occupational respiratory disease was not a category because the previous criteria were based on specific hazardous agents and their health effects. Workers as well as clinicians were not familiar with the agent-based criteria. To improve these criteria, a system-based structure was added. Through these changes, in the current criteria, 33 types of agents and 11 types of respiratory diseases are listed under diseases of the respiratory system. In the current criteria, there are no concrete guidelines for evaluating work-relatedness, such as estimating the exposure level, latent period, and detailed examination methods. The results of further studies can support the formulation of detailed criteria. PMID:25006324

  5. [Analisys of work-related accidents and incidents in an oil refinery in Rio de Janeiro].

    PubMed

    de Souza, Carlos Augusto Vaz; de Freitas, Carlos Machado

    2003-01-01

    Accidents in the chemical industry can have serious consequences for workers, communities, and the environment and are thus highly relevant to public health. This article is the result of an occupational surveillance project involving several public institutions. We analyze 800 work-related accidents that resulted in injuries, environmental damage, or loss of production in 1997 in an oil refinery located in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The methodology was based on managerial and organizational approaches to accident investigation, with the European Union reporting system as the reference. The results highlight various limitations in the process of reporting and investigating accidents, as well as a certain hierarchy of accidents, with more attention given to accidents involving loss of production and less to those resulting in injuries, particularly among outsourced workers. PMID:14666211

  6. Paternal occupation and anencephaly

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. D. Brender; L. Suarez

    1990-01-01

    It has been suggested that paternal occupational exposures to pesticides and solvents increase the risk of neural tube defects in offspring. With the use of Texas livebirth, fetal death, and linked livebirth-death records, the authors conducted a population-based case-control study among 1981-1986 Texas births to examine the association between paternal occupation and anencephalic births. Fathers employed in occupations associated with

  7. Occupational lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Cone, J.E.

    1987-04-01

    The author addresses the attribution of lung cancer to cigarette smoking and the problems of confounding synergistic effects of occupational and other carcinogenic risk factors, as well as the divergent trends of declining smoking rates and increasing rates of lung cancer. He also reviews the existing literature to document associations between lung cancer and occupational exposures. Finally, interventions for prevention of occupational lung cancer are discussed.

  8. Teacher's Guide to Occupational Orientation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Evaluation Systems, Inc., Amherst, MA.

    This guide is specifically designed to accompany materials developed for occupational orientation (particularly in Illinois) in the following five cluster areas: Applied biological and agricultural occupations; personal and public service occupations; health occupations; business, marketing, and management occupations; and industrial oriented…

  9. FATAL ACCIDENT REPORTING SYSTEM (FARS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Fatal Accident Reporting System (FARS) database consist of three relational tables, containing data on automobile accidents on public U.S. roads that resulted in the death of one or more people within 30 days of the accident. Truck and trailer accidents are also included....

  10. The Chernobyl Accident: Oversight

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to Main Content at the National Institutes of Health | www.cancer.gov What's Inside Home About the Accident Studies Ukrainian Thyroid Study Belarusian Thyroid Study Leukemia Study Dosimetry Selected Publications Research Staff Collaborators Oversight Research

  11. Accident resistant transport container

    DOEpatents

    Andersen, John A. (Albuquerque, NM); Cole, James K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1980-01-01

    The invention relates to a container for the safe air transport of plutonium having several intermediate wood layers and a load spreader intermediate an inner container and an outer shell for mitigation of shock during a hypothetical accident.

  12. Accident patterns for construction-related workers: a cluster analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Chia-Wen; Tyan, Yaw-Yauan

    2012-01-01

    The construction industry has been identified as one of the most hazardous industries. The risk of constructionrelated workers is far greater than that in a manufacturing based industry. However, some steps can be taken to reduce worker risk through effective injury prevention strategies. In this article, k-means clustering methodology is employed in specifying the factors related to different worker types and in identifying the patterns of industrial occupational accidents. Accident reports during the period 1998 to 2008 are extracted from case reports of the Northern Region Inspection Office of the Council of Labor Affairs of Taiwan. The results show that the cluster analysis can indicate some patterns of occupational injuries in the construction industry. Inspection plans should be proposed according to the type of construction-related workers. The findings provide a direction for more effective inspection strategies and injury prevention programs.

  13. Accident patterns for construction-related workers: a cluster analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Chia-Wen; Tyan, Yaw-Yauan

    2011-12-01

    The construction industry has been identified as one of the most hazardous industries. The risk of constructionrelated workers is far greater than that in a manufacturing based industry. However, some steps can be taken to reduce worker risk through effective injury prevention strategies. In this article, k-means clustering methodology is employed in specifying the factors related to different worker types and in identifying the patterns of industrial occupational accidents. Accident reports during the period 1998 to 2008 are extracted from case reports of the Northern Region Inspection Office of the Council of Labor Affairs of Taiwan. The results show that the cluster analysis can indicate some patterns of occupational injuries in the construction industry. Inspection plans should be proposed according to the type of construction-related workers. The findings provide a direction for more effective inspection strategies and injury prevention programs.

  14. Hang-gliding accidents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R Margreiter; L J Lugger

    1978-01-01

    Seventy-five known hang-gliding accidents causing injury to the pilot occurred in the Tyrol during 1973-6. Most occurred in May, June, or September and between 11 am and 3 pm, when unfavourable thermic conditions are most likely. Thirty-four accidents happened during launching, 13 during flight, and 28 during landing, and most were caused by human errors--especially deficient launching technique; incorrect estimation

  15. Accident management information needs

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, D.J.; Ward, L.W.; Nelson, W.R.; Meyer, O.R. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

    1990-04-01

    In support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Accident Management Research Program, a methodology has been developed for identifying the plant information needs necessary for personnel involved in the management of an accident to diagnose that an accident is in progress, select and implement strategies to prevent or mitigate the accident, and monitor the effectiveness of these strategies. This report describes the methodology and presents an application of this methodology to a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) with a large dry containment. A risk-important severe accident sequence for a PWR is used to examine the capability of the existing measurements to supply the necessary information. The method includes an assessment of the effects of the sequence on the measurement availability including the effects of environmental conditions. The information needs and capabilities identified using this approach are also intended to form the basis for more comprehensive information needs assessment performed during the analyses and development of specific strategies for use in accident management prevention and mitigation. 3 refs., 16 figs., 7 tabs.

  16. Occupations, U. S. A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geneva Area City Schools, OH.

    The booklet divides job titles, selected from the Dictionary of Occupational Titles, into 15 career clusters: agribusiness and natural resources, business and office education, communication and media, construction, consumer and home economics, fine arts and humanities, health occupations, hospitality and recreation, manufacturing, marine science,…

  17. The Heath Occupational Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, William E.

    1990-01-01

    Career development programs must identify occupational needs of adults. A model based on Maslow's hierarchy develops occupational questions related to individual motivations (physiology, safety, love, esteem, and self-actualization). Individual needs are then compared with characteristics and benefits of proposed jobs, companies, or careers. (SK)

  18. Metropolitan Occupational Medicine

    E-print Network

    Emmons, Scott

    Metropolitan Occupational Medicine Conference October 18-19, 2014 New Brunswick, NJ Travel, lodging! The New York State Occupational and Environmental Medicine Association (NYOEMA) is joining with its sister medicine. To encourage medical students and residents to explore this field more thoroughly, NYOEMA

  19. Compensation for occupational cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Inah; Kim, Eun-A; Kim, Jae Young

    2014-06-01

    The legal scope and criteria for occupational cancer in Korea was out of date. The aim of this study was to review the current criteria for occupational cancer and amend the existent criteria on the basis of recent scientific evidence. The scientific evidence and the legal list of occupational cancer were analyzed to identify the causes of occupational cancer on a global scale. The relationship between compensated occupational cancer cases and carcinogen exposure in Korea was examined. The factors associated with specific causes and target cancers were determined to produce additional criteria. Five-hundred and nineteen cases of 2,468 were awarded compensation for occupational cancer including lung, malignant mesothelioma, lymphohematopoietic, and liver cancers from January 2000 to October 2012. Between 1996 and 2005, benzene accounted for 84.4% of cases, and between 1999 and 2005, asbestos was associated with 62.3% of cases. Fourteen novel causative agents and 12 additional target cancers were identified and the final guidelines were amended to include 23 causative agents and 21 target cancers. This amendment of the criteria for occupational cancer represents the widest change in Korean history and is expected to improve the understanding of occupational cancer by providing an up-to-date and accurate reference guide. PMID:25006323

  20. Bricklayer. Occupational Analyses Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cap, Orest; Cap, Ihor; Semenovych, Viktor

    This analysis covers tasks performed by a bricklayer, an occupational title some provinces and territories of Canada have also identified as bricklayer-mason, brick and stone mason, and mason. A guide to analysis discusses development, structure, and validation method; scope of the occupation; trends; and safety. To facilitate understanding the…

  1. Occupational Stress among Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albertson, Larry M.; Kagan, Dona M.

    1987-01-01

    Two studies were conducted to investigate the degree to which occupational stress among teachers could be attributed to personal characteristics of the individuals themselves. The first study developed dispositional stress scales. The second examined correlations between these scales, occupational stress scales, and teachers' attitudes toward…

  2. Mental Health Occupational Therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gary Kielhofner; Roann Barris

    1984-01-01

    This article briefly reviews the history of ideas and practice in psychosocial occupational therapy. It then reports the results of two studies which examined present-day perspectives as reflected in occupational therapy literature and the actural practices of psychosocial therapists. The first study was based on a review of mental health-related articles in AJOT and OTMH; the second represented secondary analyses

  3. Canadian Occupational Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conger, D. Stuart

    Based upon the structure of Canadian Classification and Dictionary of Occupations, the volume presents highly condensed descriptions of classification clusters representing the universe of occupational groups in the Canadian economy. It is a useful tool for vocational counselors, students, and clients. Each cluster is assigned a number; the…

  4. OCCUPATION EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS ANALYSIS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GRIEST, JEANNE; MORSCH, WILLIAM C.

    THE OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS ANALYSIS (OERA) SYSTEM IS A RESEARCH EFFORT DESIGNED TO DEVELOP A FEASIBLE METHOD OF PROJECTING VOCATIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS THAT WILL SATISFY LABOR MARKET NEEDS. THE OUTPUTS OF THE OERA WILL BE ANNUAL PROJECTIONS OF EMPLOYMENT DEMANDS IN OCCUPATIONS CLASSIFIED BY VOCATIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS. THESE…

  5. [Market oriented occupational medicine].

    PubMed

    Rurik, Imre; Cseh, Károly

    2012-09-01

    The history and the recent state of occupational medicine in Hungary, and its relation with governmental labor organizations are analyzed. In the past 20 years, large "socialist" factories were replaced by smaller companies employing fewer workers. They have been forced to establish contract with occupational health providers. Many of them offer primary care services, whereas family physicians having a board examination in occupational medicine are allowed to work in this field as well. The market of occupational medicine is less regulated, and ethical rules are not always considered. Undercutting prices is a common practice. The recent system could be improved by some regulations which should be respected. There is no reason to make rough changes establishing a new market for profit oriented insurance companies, and to allow employees and employers to work without specification neglecting international agreements. Occupational medicine should be supervised again by the health authorities instead of economists who have quite different, short-term priorities. PMID:22951411

  6. Occupational infection in Korea.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yun Kyung; Ahn, Yeon-Soon; Jeong, Jae Sim

    2010-12-01

    Occupational infection is a human disease caused by work-associated exposure to microbial agents through human and environmental contact. According to the literature, occupational infection was the third leading cause of occupational disease (861 cases, 8.0%), and health care, agricultural, forestry, and fishery workers were risk groups in Korea. In addition, most high-risk groups have not been protected by workers' compensation, which could lead to underestimation of the exact spectrum and magnitude of the problem, and may also result in a lack of development and implementation of occupational infection management. Through a review of national guidelines and documentations on prevention and control of occupational infection, a management strategy would promote adherence to worker safety regulations if it is explicit with regard to the agent and mode of infection in each of the high-risk groups. PMID:21258592

  7. Risk assessment of maintenance operations: the analysis of performing task and accident mechanism.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Castrillo, Jesús A; Rubio-Romero, Juan Carlos; Guadix, Jose; Onieva, Luis

    2014-09-01

    Maintenance operations cover a great number of occupations. Most small and medium-sized enterprises lack the appropriate information to conduct risk assessments of maintenance operations. The objective of this research is to provide a method based on the concepts of task and accident mechanisms for an initial risk assessment by taking into consideration the prevalence and severity of the maintenance accidents reported. Data were gathered from 11,190 reported accidents in maintenance operations in the manufacturing sector of Andalusia from 2003 to 2012. By using a semi-quantitative methodology, likelihood and severity were evaluated based on the actual distribution of accident mechanisms in each of the tasks. Accident mechanisms and tasks were identified by using those variables included in the European Statistics of Accidents at Work methodology. As main results, the estimated risk of the most frequent accident mechanisms identified for each of the analysed tasks is low and the only accident mechanisms with medium risk are accidents when lifting or pushing with physical stress on the musculoskeletal system in tasks involving carrying, and impacts against objects after slipping or stumbling for tasks involving movements. The prioritisation of public preventive actions for the accident mechanisms with a higher estimated risk is highly recommended. PMID:25179119

  8. Occupational health impacts: offshore crane lifts in life cycle assessment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Johan Pettersen; Edgar G. Hertwich

    2008-01-01

    Background, Aim, and Scope  The identification and assessment of environmental tradeoffs is a strongpoint of life cycle assessment (LCA). A tradeoff made\\u000a in many product systems is the exchange of potential for occupational accidents with the additional use of energy and materials.\\u000a Net benefits of safety measures with respect to human health are best illustrated if the consequences avoided and health

  9. [Healthcare occupations are "different"].

    PubMed

    Heubel, F

    2014-08-01

    Healthcare requires careful coordination of several occupations. In order to attain the best possible result, including effectiveness and cost-efficiency, the specific expertise of each of these occupations must be clearly defined. Healthcare occupations, physicians and nurses, are indeed professions as opposed to mere "jobs". They are concerned with living but ill human beings and not with things. Reliance on a personal capacity of judgment is a decisive aspect of professions. Healthcare professionals perform best if they are granted specific independence relative to their work. PMID:24902534

  10. [Scabies as an occupational disease].

    PubMed

    Lukács, J; Schliemann, S; Elsner, P

    2015-03-01

    Scabies is an infectious skin disease caused by the human itch mite (Sarcoptes scabiei var. hominis). It is mainly transmitted by direct skin-to-skin contact. The spread of scabies can cause major difficulties in healthcare institutions, particularly in residential homes for the elderly. The disease is characterized by intense nocturnal itching, erythematous papules arranged in a linear order, and scratching resulting in excoriations. The diagnosis is confirmed by identification of the mite or by finding one or more mite tunnels in the skin. An individually occurring case does not need to be reported. If two or more cases occur in the same institution, the company physician and the appropriate public health department are to be informed in Germany. In case of a suspected scabies infection in medical personnel due to exposure in their work setting, medical notification to the statutory occupational accidents' insurance (Nr. 3101) is to be issued in accordance with § 202, Volume VII of the German Social Code. First line treatment is topical therapy with 5?% permethrin. If scabies control is required in an institution, systemic treatment with ivermectin may be considered. In the case of a scabies outbreak, all patients, contact persons, and staff must be treated simultaneously. PMID:25676574

  11. [Travel and accidents].

    PubMed

    Cha, Olivier

    2015-04-01

    Traumatic pathologies are the most frequent medical events to be observed among French travellers. Accidents on the public highway by lack of respect of the fundamental rules of road security, particularly abroad, traffic conditions in bad repair in numerous emergent countries, usually the destination of mass tourism and underdeveloped organization of health care and local urgency help. Sports activities are also a source of accidents. A good physical training is essential. Drowning is a real plague, especially among children due to a lack of vigilance. Preventive measures are simple, keep them constantly in mind and apply them carefully so as to have beautiful memories of our trip back home. PMID:26058199

  12. How Occupation Emerges in the Practices of Experienced Occupational Therapists

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pollie Price

    2006-01-01

    Occupation has reemerged as the central heuristic for occupational therapy practice (AOTA, 2002). However, there is currently little agreement on a definition of occupation-based practice. Some scholars have theorized that occupation-based practice occurs when therapists provide intervention in the individual’s natural context, using the individual’s occupations as therapeutic interventions (Fidler, 2000; Hocking, 2001; Pierce, 2003). Other scholars have empirically demonstrated

  13. A field evaluation of real-life motor vehicle accidents: Presence of unrestrained objects and their association with distribution and severity of patient injuries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Torsten Eken; Trond Boye Hansen; Petter Andreas Steen; Signe Søvik

    Moving objects may pose an added threat to car occupants in motor vehicle accidents (MVAs). However, to our knowledge, there have only been two case studies published on the subject. For the present study, accident reports and photo documentation from MVAs were collected on-scene by dedicated paramedics. Emergency medical service personnel on-scene were interviewed as necessary. Potentially harmful unrestrained objects

  14. Occupational Therapy (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... appropriate for that age group. According to the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA), in addition to dealing with an someone's physical well-being, OT practitioners address psychological, social, and environmental factors that can affect functioning ...

  15. New and Emerging Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosby, Olivia

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how new and emerging occupations develop, why they are hard to identify, what risks and rewards vanguard workers face, and how to find a cutting-edge job. Describes strategies researchers use to identify emerging careers. (JOW)

  16. Paternal occupation and anencephaly

    SciTech Connect

    Brender, J.D.; Suarez, L. (Texas Department of Health, Austin (USA))

    1990-03-01

    It has been suggested that paternal occupational exposures to pesticides and solvents increase the risk of neural tube defects in offspring. With the use of Texas livebirth, fetal death, and linked livebirth-death records, the authors conducted a population-based case-control study among 1981-1986 Texas births to examine the association between paternal occupation and anencephalic births. Fathers employed in occupations associated with solvent exposure were more likely to have offspring with anencephaly (odds ratio (OR) = 2.53), with painters having the highest risk (OR = 3.43). A lesser association was found for fathers employed in occupations involving pesticide exposure (OR = 1.28). Further studies are indicated to clarify these associations.

  17. Occupational health in China.

    PubMed

    Christiani, David C; Tan, Xiaodong; Wang, Xiaorong

    2002-01-01

    China has been experiencing rapid industrialization and economic growth, resulting in a transformed industrial structure and expansion of the labor force. Occupational health and safety services, nonexistent before 1949, have made remarkable advances over the past decades. However, these services face greater challenges, consisting of both traditional and new occupational health problems. Poorly regulated work environments often lacking health services in recently developed and thriving small-scale industries and joint venture enterprises have created increasing risks for occupational diseases and work-related injuries. A special strategy based on cooperation among and contributions from the legal, administrative, social, economic, and scientific communities is critical to achieving the ultimate goal of control and prevention of these occupational health problems. PMID:12028948

  18. Occupational Analysis and Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shears, Arthur E.

    1985-01-01

    A form of occupational analysis called DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) and its advantages in course development and performance assessment are discussed and specific suggestions on conducting a DACUM session are provided. (CT)

  19. Occupational lung cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. B. Coultas; J. M. Samet

    1992-01-01

    The overall importance of occupational agents as a cause of lung cancer has been a controversial subject since the 1970s. A federal report, released in the late 1970s, projected a surprisingly high burden of occupational lung cancer; for asbestos and four other agents, from 61,000 to 98,000 cases annually were attributed to these agents alone. Many estimates followed, some much

  20. Occupational Contact Dermatitis: Hairdressers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Heidi Søsted

    \\u000a Occupational contact dermatitis occurs in about half of all hairdressers and makes hairdressers susceptible to most skin diseases.\\u000a The clinical manifestations are typically seen as hand eczema. The hand eczema starts often at the time of hairdressing apprenticeship,\\u000a and protective gloves are very important for preventing eczema in this occupation. Persulfates are (almost) always used in\\u000a bleaching procedures in hairdressing

  1. Occupational cancer in Spain.

    PubMed Central

    González, C A; Agudo, A

    1999-01-01

    The knowledge of specific problems of occupational cancer in Spain is scarce. The environment of the workplace has improved over the last few years after a long period distinguished by bad working conditions, incomplete legislation, and insufficient safety measures and control. It has been estimated that 3,083,479 workers (25.4% of employees) were exposed to carcinogens. The most common occupational exposures to carcinogenic agents were solar radiation, environmental tobacco smoke, silica, and wood dust. The highest number of employees were exposed to silica crystalline (404,729), diesel engine exhaust (274,321), rubber products (99,804), benzene (89,932), ethylene dibromide (81,336), agents used in furniture and cabinet making (72,068), and formaldehyde (71,189). The percentage of total cancer deaths attributed to occupational exposure was 4% (6% in men, 0.9% in women). Compared with other European countries, the incidence of lung cancer and leukemia in Spain are one of the lowest, but it is rapidly increasing. The incidence of urinary bladder and larynx cancer, on the contrary, are one of the highest. Few studies on occupational cancer have been conducted in Spain. The main problems are the availability of death certificates and the quality of the information on occupation in mortality of statistics. It is necessary to improve methods of assessment of exposures using expert hygienists and biologic markers of exposure and diseases. Reduction of cancer by limiting or avoiding exposure to known occupational carcinogens is still necessary. PMID:10350510

  2. Accident reconstruction methods

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hermann Steffan

    2009-01-01

    While reconstructing a car accident, there are several questions that must be answered, such as the movement of all the vehicles involved or of other people involved, or of objects from the point of first visual contact to their rest positions. Time history of velocities, positions as well as crash-related data such as velocity changes, deformation energies, or passenger loads

  3. The Chernobyl Accident: Studies

    Cancer.gov

    The Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident in the former Soviet Union in 1986 exposed large numbers of people in Ukraine, Belarus and Russia to radioactive iodines, principally I-131 which concentrates in the thyroid gland (Hatch, et al. 2005; Cardis and Hatch, 2011).

  4. Physics in Auto Accidents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    George Barnes

    1960-01-01

    This article concerns a particular application of the fundamentals of physics with which most physicists have little contact. Some elementary physics commonly used by our law enforcement officers in the reconstruction of automobile accidents is reviewed. In particular, formulas for the determination of (a) vehicle speed through skid marks, (b) minimum speed for a vehicle skidding off-course while turning a

  5. Physics in Accident Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brake, Mary L.

    1981-01-01

    Describes physics formulas which can be used by law enforcement officials to determine the possible velocity of vehicles involved in traffic accidents. These include, among others, the slide to stop-level road, slide to stop-sloping roadway, and slide to stop-two different surfaces formulas. (JN)

  6. Managing nuclear accidents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Golding; J. X. Kasperson; R. E. Kasperson; R. Goble; J. E. Seley; G. Thompson; C. P. Wolf

    1992-01-01

    An accident at a nuclear power plant can pose a serious threat to surrounding populations. If people and their government are poorly prepared, as was the case at Windscale, England in 1957, Three Mile Island (TMI) in the United States in 1979, and Chernobyl in the Soviet Union in 1986, substantial exposure to radiation could occur. Much has been done

  7. Psychiatrists' Perceptions of Occupational Therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jessica Schnoes Pottebaum; Amy Svinarich

    2005-01-01

    Objective: This study investigated the relationship of psychiatrists' knowledge about occupational therapy and the number of referrals to occupational therapy.Method: Thirty-four psychiatrists in the Omaha area were surveyed about their knowledge of occupational therapy and the number of referrals they write for occupational therapy services.Results: A positive relationship was found between the lack of knowledge regarding occupational therapy and the

  8. EPR accident scenarios and provisions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dietmar Bittermann; Ulrich Krugmann; Garo Azarian

    2001-01-01

    For the EPR an improved defence-in-depth concept is applied. In an evolutionary way, accident control is developed from existing French and German PWR designs, thereby achieving a high safety level quantified by probabilistic safety assessment. Independent of that, severe accidents are considered in the design. By a robust containment and severe accident mitigation measures, the need for offsite emergency response

  9. Occup Environ Med . Author manuscript Occupational asthma and occupational rhinitis: the united airways disease

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    national occupational disease surveillance and­ prevention network, using a standardized form includingOccup Environ Med . Author manuscript Page /1 8 Occupational asthma and occupational rhinitis: the united airways disease model revisited Jacques Ameille 1 2 * , Karine Hamelin 2 , Pascal Andujar 3

  10. Safety Performance Indicator for alcohol in road accidents—International comparison, validity and data quality

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Terje Assum; Michael Sørensen

    2010-01-01

    Safety Performance Indicators, SPIs, are developed for various areas within road safety such as speed, car occupant protection, alcohol and drugs, vehicle safety, etc. SPIs can be used to indicate the road safety situation and to compare road safety performance between countries and over time and to understand the process leading to accidents, helping to select the measures to reduce

  11. Injuries associated with cycle rickshaws accidents

    PubMed Central

    Meena, Sanjay; Barwar, Nilesh; Rastogi, Devarshi; Sharma, Vineet

    2014-01-01

    Context: Cycle rickshaw is an important means of transportation in Urban India. Pedestrians, rickshaw users, rickshaw pullers, two wheeled vehicle users and cyclists are among the most vulnerable road user groups in terms of injuries and fatalities resulting from road traffic accidents in India. Our objectives were to study characteristics of crashes and nature of injuries associated with cycle rickshaw. Patients and Methods: Between August 2008 to July 2009, a hospital based observational study was done of patients who presented to King George medical college trauma center with injury sustained due to cycle rickshaw in emergency department. Age, time of trauma, mode of trauma, contributing factors and type of injury were recorded. Results: The mean age of the patient was 32.1. Seventeen patients were rickshaw pullers and the rest were occupants of the rickshaw. Overloading with more than two passengers was found in 24 cases (28.5%). Most common cause of injury was collision with a moving vehicle (56 patients, %) followed by fall from rickshaw. The most common contributing factor was the overloading of rickshaw. On arrival to the hospital, the mean Injury severity score (ISS) was 3.5 ± 2.2 and the mean Glasgow coma scale (GCS) was 13.4 ± 4.3. Nine patients were admitted to ICU (Intensive care unit). The median ICU stay was 4 (1-24 days). Six of the ICU admitted patients had head injury. Conclusion: Rickshaw pullers and occupants are vulnerable to road traffic accidents. Urgent preventive measures targeted towards this group are needed to reduce the morbidity and mortality resulting from injuries involving rickshaws. The need for improved understanding of the risk characteristics of cycle rickshaw is emphasized. PMID:24812450

  12. Accident externality and vehicle size

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lina Jonsson; Gunnar Lindberg

    2009-01-01

    Vehicle mass is a crucial factor for the distribution of injuries between occupants in involved vehicles in a two-vehicle crash. A larger vehicle mass protects the occupants in the vehicle while on the same time inflicts a higher injury risk on the occupants in the collision partner. This mass externality can be internalized to reach a situation where the drivers

  13. [Heliogeophysical factors and aviation accidents].

    PubMed

    Komarov, F I; Oraevski?, V N; Sizov, Iu P; Tsirul'nik, L B; Kanonidi, Kh D; Ushakov, I B; Shalimov, P M; Kimlyk, M V; Glukhov, D V

    1998-01-01

    It was shown by two independent methods that there is a certain correlation between the number of aviation accidents and heliogeophysical factors. The statistical and spectral analyses of time series of heliogeomagnetic factors and the number of aviation accidents in 1989-1995 showed that, of 216 accidents, 58% are related to sudden geomagnetic storms. A similar relation was revealed for aviation catastrophes (64% out of 86 accidents) and emergencies (54% out of 130 accidents) that coincided in time with heliogeomagnetic storms. General periodicities of the series were revealed by the method of spectral analysis, namely, cycles of 30, 42, 46, 64, 74, 83, 99, 115, 143, 169, 339 days, which confirms the causative relation between the number of aviation accidents and heliogeomagnetic factors. It is assumed that some aviation accidents that coincided in time with geomagnetic storms, are due to changes in professional abilities of pilots that were in the zone of storms. PMID:9783079

  14. The Chernobyl Accident: Collaborators

    Cancer.gov

    A special note is made of the extraordinary leadership of the late Dr. Elaine Ron, who helped shape and oversee the conduct of the NCI-Chernobyl program. The late Dr. Geoffrey Howe of Columbia University also made invaluable contributions to this research. We also wish to acknowledge Drs. Gilbert Beebe, Jacob Robbins, and Terry Thomas, who were involved from the earliest days following the accident and continued to provide scientific input until the time of their respective deaths.

  15. Chronic Illnesses and Injuries: An Evaluation of their Impact on Occupation and Revenues1

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Chronic Illnesses and Injuries: An Evaluation of their Impact on Occupation and Revenues1 illnesses and injuries have a significant impact on the individual's performance in the labor market. We use illnesses and accidents on labor market participation and earnings. We find that both health events have

  16. Type A Behavior and Occupational Stress: A Cross-Cultural Study of Blue-Collar Workers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gary W. Evans; Madan N. Palsane; Sybil Carrere

    1987-01-01

    Psychophysiological, archival, unobtrusive observation, and self-report data were compared for Type A and Type B male bus drivers in the United States and India. Type A bus drivers in comparison with their Type B counterparts have more accidents, absenteeism, official reprimands, and self-reports of occupational stress. In India, but not in the United States, Type A drivers brake, pass, and

  17. Student manual, Book 2: Orientation to occupational safety compliance in DOE

    SciTech Connect

    Colley, D.L.

    1993-10-01

    This is a student hand-book an Occupational Safety Compliance in DOE. Topics include the following: Electrical; materials handling & storage; inspection responsibilities & procedures; general environmental controls; confined space entry; lockout/tagout; office safety, ergonomics & human factors; medical & first aid, access to records; construction safety; injury/illness reporting system; and accident investigation procedures.

  18. Occupational Cohort Time Scales

    PubMed Central

    Roth, H. Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study explores how highly correlated time variables (occupational cohort time scales) contribute to confounding and ambiguity of interpretation. Methods: Occupational cohort time scales were identified and organized through simple equations of three time scales (relational triads) and the connections between these triads (time scale web). The behavior of the time scales was examined when constraints were imposed on variable ranges and interrelationships. Results: Constraints on a time scale in a triad create high correlations between the other two time scales. These correlations combine with the connections between relational triads to produce association paths. High correlation between time scales leads to ambiguity of interpretation. Conclusions: Understanding the properties of occupational cohort time scales, their relational triads, and the time scale web is helpful in understanding the origins of otherwise obscure confounding bias and ambiguity of interpretation. PMID:25647318

  19. Occupation and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Raj, A; Mayberry, J; Podas, T

    2003-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a cause of significant morbidity and mortality. There are several risk factors, with occupation emerging as one of these. There is considerable evidence that occupations in coal and tin mining, metal processing, particularly steel and iron, and rubber manufacturing industries lead to an increased risk of gastric cancer. Other "dusty" occupations—for example, wood processing, or work in high temperature environments have also been implicated but the evidence is not strong. The mechanism of pathogenesis of gastric cancer is unclear and the identification of causative agents can be difficult. Dust is thought to be a contributor to the pathological process, but well known carcinogens such as N-nitroso compounds have been detected in some environments. Further research on responsible agents is necessary and screening for detection of precursor gastric cancer lesions at the workplace merits consideration. PMID:12782770

  20. Occupational Prestige and Occupational Aspirations of Nigerian Adolescent Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owuamanam, Donatus O.

    1982-01-01

    Nigerian secondary school students considered engineering, medicine, and university teaching to be highly prestigious occupations. Males had higher occupational aspirations than females, and urban adolescents chose higher careers than rural adolescents. (Author/MJL)

  1. Occupational lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Coultas, D.B.; Samet, J.M. (Department of Medicine, University of New Mexico School of Medicine, Albuquerque (United States))

    1992-06-01

    The overall importance of occupational agents as a cause of lung cancer has been a controversial subject since the 1970s. A federal report, released in the late 1970s, projected a surprisingly high burden of occupational lung cancer; for asbestos and four other agents, from 61,000 to 98,000 cases annually were attributed to these agents alone. Many estimates followed, some much more conservative. For example, Doll and Peto estimated that 15% of lung cancer in men and 5% in women could be attributed to occupational exposures. A number of population-based case-control studies also provide relevant estimates. In a recent literature review, Vineis and Simonato cited attributable risk estimates for occupation and lung cancer that ranged from 4% to 40%; for asbestos alone, the estimates ranged from 1% to 5%. These estimates would be expected to vary across locations and over time. Nevertheless, these recent estimates indicate that occupation remains an important cause of lung cancer. Approaches to Prevention. Prevention of lung cancer mortality among workers exposed to agents or industrial processes that cause lung cancer may involve several strategies, including eliminating or reducing exposures, smoking cessation, screening, and chemo-prevention. For example, changes in industrial processes that have eliminated or reduced exposures to chloromethyl ethers and nickel compounds have provided evidence of reduced risk of lung cancer following these changes. Although occupational exposures are important causes of lung cancer, cigarette smoking is the most important preventable cause of lung cancer. For adults, the work site offers an important location to target smoking cessation efforts. In fact, the work site may be the only place to reach many smokers.

  2. [Diagnosis and treatment of diving accidents : New German guidelines for diving accidents 2014-2017].

    PubMed

    Jüttner, B; Wölfel, C; Liedtke, H; Meyne, K; Werr, H; Bräuer, T; Kemmerer, M; Schmeißer, G; Piepho, T; Müller, O; Schöppenthau, H

    2015-06-01

    In 2015 the German Society for Diving and Hyperbaric Medicine (GTÜM) and the Swiss Underwater and Hyperbaric Medical Society (SUHMS) published the updated guidelines on diving accidents 2014-2017. These multidisciplinary guidelines were developed within a structured consensus process by members of the German Interdisciplinary Association for Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine (DIVI), the Sports Divers Association (VDST), the Naval Medical Institute (SchiffMedInst), the Social Accident Insurance Institution for the Building Trade (BG BAU), the Association of Hyperbaric Treatment Centers (VDD) and the Society of Occupational and Environmental Medicine (DGAUM). This consensus-based guidelines project (development grade S2k) with a representative group of developers was conducted by the Association of Scientific Medical Societies in Germany. It provides information and instructions according to up to date evidence to all divers and other lay persons for first aid recommendations to physician first responders and emergency physicians as well as paramedics and all physicians at therapeutic hyperbaric chambers for the diagnostics and treatment of diving accidents. To assist in implementing the guideline recommendations, this article summarizes the rationale, purpose and the following key action statements: on-site 100?% oxygen first aid treatment, still patient positioning and fluid administration are recommended. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) recompression remains unchanged the established treatment in severe cases with no therapeutic alternatives. The basic treatment scheme recommended for diving accidents is hyperbaric oxygenation at 280 kPa. For quality management purposes there is a need in the future for a nationwide register of hyperbaric therapy. PMID:26025255

  3. Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy Faculty of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Sokolowski, Marla

    on occupational science and focused on building evidence-based practice competencies. Through your academic-centred, evidence-based therapeutic relationships between practicing occupational therapists and their clients as one of the top three entry-level occupational therapy programs in North America. The program is based

  4. Occupational Orientation: Applied Biological and Agricultural Occupations. Experimental Curriculum Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Office of Education, Springfield.

    These experimental curriculum materials, from one of five clusters developed for the occupational orientation program in Illinois, include a series of learning activity packages (LAPs) designed to acquaint the student with the wide range of occupational choices available in the applied biological and agricultural occupations. The 30 LAPs, each…

  5. Occupational Orientation: Personal and Public Service Occupations. Experimental Curriculum Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Office of Education, Springfield.

    These experimental curriculum materials for one of five clusters developed for the occupational orientation program in Illinois include a series of learning activity packages (LAPs) designed to acquaint the student with the wide range of occupational choices available in the personal and public service occupations field. The 29 LAPS, each focusing…

  6. Recent advances in occupational health research in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seong-Kyu; Ahn, Yeon-Soon; Kim, Kwang-Jong

    2004-04-01

    Korea has a short history in research on occupational health like as short history of industrialization. During last four decades, however, Korea has experienced what developed countries have experienced for more than a hundred year. Research on occupational health in Korea has also drastically developed. Since industrialization in 1970s, many workers were exposed to hazardous working environment and suffered from occupational accidents and diseases. The main research topics were pneumoconiosis, noise-induced hearing loss and some chemical poisoning. However, improving working condition was not the top priority until the late 1980s. Carbon disulfide poisoning gave a big impact to the society. It made the government take many actions to improve working condition through regulation, enforcement, supporting academia, raising research fund, and establishing a research institute. Recently, classical occupational diseases have decreased and the interest from researchers has also reduced. Many claims for stress-related cardio-cerebrovascular diseases brought much concern and research on job stress. Work-related musculoskeletal disease became a major issue. Many workers are interested in quality of life, such as health promotion. Therefore, research on health promotion, job stress, and psychological problem from work organization would be the main research topics in the future, although research on occupational diseases, such as asthma, cancer and various diseases caused by chemicals are still attractive to researchers. PMID:15128157

  7. Sample Occupations Sample Work Settings

    E-print Network

    Ronquist, Fredrik

    Therapist Assistant Optometric Assistant Physical Therapist Asst Physician Assistant NURSES Dental NurseHealth Sample Occupations Sample Work Settings Ambulance Service Assisted Living Facilities Blood Opportunities in Occupational Therapy Careers........... IIB 29­1122 A2 PHYSICIANS Acupuncturist Allergist

  8. Occupational Disease in Connecticut, 2011

    E-print Network

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    1 Occupational Disease in Connecticut, 2011 This report covers data for 2009 and was prepared under, as part of the Occupational Disease Surveillance Program, operated in cooperation with the Connecticut...............................................................................................16 Infectious Diseases

  9. Occupational Disease in Connecticut, 2014

    E-print Network

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Occupational Disease in Connecticut, 2014 This report covers data for 2012 and was prepared under, as part of the Occupational Disease Surveillance Program, operated in cooperation with the Connecticut...............................................................................................18 Infectious Diseases

  10. Graduate Diploma in Occupational Safety &

    E-print Network

    of Public Health, Physiotherapy and Population Science GRADUATE Understanding your Degree: This programme: · Safety and Health Legislation · Health and Safety Management · OSH Research Literature ReviewGraduate Diploma in Occupational Safety & Health/MSc in Occupational Safety & Health UCD School

  11. [On psychologic profile of locomotive crew workers in Russian Railways JSC and its role in accidents prevention].

    PubMed

    Mendelevich, V D; Makaricheva, E V; Serikov, V V; Dmitrieva, E V; Zakrevskaia, A A; Ozhogina, O A; Alpaev, D V

    2015-01-01

    The article covers personality characters of locomotive crew workers of Russian Railways JSC, and specifying a block of methods for psychologic support of these workers' occupational activities. According to the results obtained, the authors presented a thorough description of characterologic, motivational personality traits characterizing a select of locomotive crew workers, and analyzed a relationship between the traits and levels of accidents in the workers' occupational activity. PMID:25826879

  12. Occupational medicine for policing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A Trottier; J Brown

    1995-01-01

    A wide variety of medical conditions may be associated with police work. Unlike other occupations where a specific link can be traced between an exposure or an action and a specific pathology, the link between police work and disease is more problematic.The medical conditions which seem to be associated with police work are all conditions for which numerous other risk

  13. Occupational Hazards of Farming

    PubMed Central

    White, Gill; Cessna, Allan

    1989-01-01

    A number of occupational hazards exist for the farmer and farm worker. They include the hazards of farm machinery, biologic and chemical hazards, and social and environmental stresses. Recognizing of these hazards will help the family physician care for farmers and their families. PMID:21248929

  14. Occupational Literacy Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rush, R. Timothy; And Others

    Intended for teachers of adult basic education as well as teachers in job retraining programs, this book focuses on the development of written and oral language competencies required in occupational and training settings. The first four chapters offer a concise synthesis of recent research on adult learning and on workplace literacy for ten…

  15. Occupational diseases in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seong-Kyu; Kim, Eun A

    2010-12-01

    Korea has industrialized since the 1970s. Pneumoconiosis in coal miners was the most common occupational disease in the 1970s to 1980s. With the industrialization, the use of many chemicals have increased since the 1970s. As a consequence, there were outbreaks of occupational diseases caused by poisonous chemicals, such as heavy metal poisoning, solvent poisoning and occupational asthma in the late 1980s and early 1990s with civil movement for democracy. Many actions have been taken for prevention by the government, employers and employees or unions. In the 1990s most chemical related diseases and pneumoconiosis have rapidly decreased due to improving work environment. In the late 1990s, cerebro-cardiovascular diseases related to job stress or work overloads have abruptly increased especially after the economic crisis in 1998. After the year 2000, musculoskeletal disorders became a major problem especially in assembly lines in the manufacturing industry and they were expanded to the service industry. Mental diseases related to job stress have increased. Infectious diseases increased in health care workers and afforestation workers. Occupational cancers are increasing because of their long latency, although the use of carcinogenic substances are reduced, limited, and even banned. PMID:21258589

  16. Foodservice Occupations Cluster Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    Intended to assist vocational teachers in developing and implementing a cluster program in food service occupations, this guide contains sections on cluster organization and implementation and instructional emphasis areas. The cluster organization and implementation section covers goal-based planning and includes a proposed cluster curriculum, a…

  17. Occupational stress in nursing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. McGrath; N. Reid; J. Boore

    2003-01-01

    This article reports the results of a study of occupational stress undertaken with a large sample of Northern Ireland nurses, including qualified staff (both community and hospital based) up to and including sister\\/charge nurses. This study formed part of a wider interprofessional study of nurses, social workers and teachers. Publications for the latter two professions, along with interprofessional comparisons, are

  18. Coping With Occupational Stress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Dianne Boswell

    1981-01-01

    Ways of reducing occupational stress include: (1) avoiding the stressful situation; (2) changing the response to the stress; and (3) changing the environment. Administrators can help teachers manage stress by developing communication techniques, steering committees, and support groups. A second part of this article will be published in the January…

  19. Occupational Diseases in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun A

    2010-01-01

    Korea has industrialized since the 1970s. Pneumoconiosis in coal miners was the most common occupational disease in the 1970s to 1980s. With the industrialization, the use of many chemicals have increased since the 1970s. As a consequence, there were outbreaks of occupational diseases caused by poisonous chemicals, such as heavy metal poisoning, solvent poisoning and occupational asthma in the late 1980s and early 1990s with civil movement for democracy. Many actions have been taken for prevention by the government, employers and employees or unions. In the 1990s most chemical related diseases and pneumoconiosis have rapidly decreased due to improving work environment. In the late 1990s, cerebro-cardiovascular diseases related to job stress or work overloads have abruptly increased especially after the economic crisis in 1998. After the year 2000, musculoskeletal disorders became a major problem especially in assembly lines in the manufacturing industry and they were expanded to the service industry. Mental diseases related to job stress have increased. Infectious diseases increased in health care workers and afforestation workers. Occupational cancers are increasing because of their long latency, although the use of carcinogenic substances are reduced, limited, and even banned. PMID:21258589

  20. Hospitality Occupations. Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Bureau of Homemaking Education.

    This curriculum guide on the hospitality occupations was developed to help secondary and postsecondary home economics teachers prepare individuals for entry-level jobs in the hospitality industry. The content is in seven sections. The first section presents organizational charts of a medium-size hotel, food and beverage division, housekeeping and…

  1. Predicting occupational diseases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eva Suarthana; Evert Meijer; Diederick E Grobbee; Dick Heederik

    2009-01-01

    Prediction research is relatively new in the occupational health field, although it is well established in clinical medicine. Prediction models are developed to estimate the individual probability of the presence (diagnostic model) or future occurrence (prognostic model) of an outcome (ie, disease). As an example from clinical practice, Wells and colleagues demonstrated that a diagnostic model (comprised of the patient’s

  2. Cause of occupational disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D C Muir

    1995-01-01

    The concept of causality is reviewed with special emphasis on occupational diseases. Separate approaches from the philosophical, scientific, and legal points of view are identified. There is controversy over the methodology of logical causality; inductive and deductive methods are described and reference is made to the verification or refutation approach. Application of the methods to epidemiology are reviewed. It is

  3. Theoretical Conceptualizations of Occupational Therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lela A. Llorens

    1984-01-01

    A descriptive chronology of occupational therapists' conceptualizations of occupational therapy is presented. Major theoretical frames of reference and common theory bases underlying occupational therapy practice are identified. The question of the apparent lack of theoretical conceptualizations of practice based on biomechanical approaches is raised.

  4. Occupational Therapy for Chronic Pain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rebecca Liggan Gusich

    1984-01-01

    The patient with chronic pain presents a dilemma for physical as well as psychiatric health care. Usually coming to the attention of mental health professionals after limited or no successful treatment with medical specialties, these patients present with a variety of factors that disrupt occupational functioning. Occupational therapy is the health profession qualified to analyze occupational function and dysfunction for

  5. Janet Craig Occupational Health Manager

    E-print Network

    Schnaufer, Achim

    medicine," publishes his first book on occupational diseases, De Morbis Artificum Diatriba (The Diseases diseases. 1994 The University of Edinburgh commenced a health surveillance compliance based occupational20/02/2014 1 Janet Craig Occupational Health Manager RGN BSc RSCPHN(OH) 1556 1700 Bauer 1494

  6. Nuclear accident dosimetry intercomparison studies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. S. Sims

    1989-01-01

    Twenty-two nuclear accident dosimetry intercomparison studies utilizing the fast-pulse Health Physics Research Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been conducted since 1965. These studies have provided a total of 62 different organizations a forum for discussion of criticality accident dosimetry, an opportunity to test their neutron and gamma-ray dosimetry systems under a variety of simulated criticality accident conditions,

  7. Credible investigation of air accidents.

    PubMed

    Smart, K

    2004-07-26

    Within the United Kingdom the Air Accidents Investigation Branch (AAIB) has been used as a model for the other transport modes accident investigation bodies. Government Ministers considered that the AAIB's approach had established the trust of the public and the aviation industry in its ability to conduct independent and objective investigations. The paper will examine the factors that are involved in establishing this trust. They include: the investigation framework; the actual and perceived independence of the accident investigating body; the aviation industry's safety culture; the qualities of the investigators and the quality of their liaison with bereaved families those directly affected by the accidents they investigate. PMID:15231355

  8. Reflections on a Renaissance of Occupation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiteford, Gail; Townsend, Elizabeth; Hocking, Clare

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the renaissance of occupation in occupational therapy and occupational science. Suggests that postmodern ideas and social practices have helped create a societal context in which a renaissance of occupation is welcome. Considers what such a renaissance means for occupational therapists and occupational scientists in the 21st century.…

  9. Optimization of public and occupational radiation protection at nuclear power plants. A review of occupational dose assessment considerations in current probabilistic risk assessments and cost-benefit analyses. Vol. 1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lobner

    1984-01-01

    This report reviews current value-impact analysis and probabilistic risk assessment methods and discusses the manner and degree to which these methods consider occupational radiation exposure that may form a variety of in-plant activities, including: (1) normal operation and maintenance, (2) repair, (3) retrofit, (4) minor incidents and cleanup, (5) major accidents, and (6) decommissioning. Value-impact analysis methods which include occupational

  10. Accident characterization methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Camp, A.L.; Harper, F.T.

    1986-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is preparing NUREG-1150 to examine the risk from a selected group of nuclear power plants. NUREG-1150 will provide technical bases for comparison of NRC research to industry results and resolution of numerous severe accident issues. In support of NUREG-1150, Sandia National Laboratories has directed the production of Level 3 Probabilistic Risk Assessments (PRAs) for the Surry, Sequoyah, Peach Bottom, and Grand Gulf nuclear power plants. The Accident Sequence Evaluation Program (ASEP) at Sandia has been responsible for the Level 1 portion of the analyses, which includes estimation of core damage frequency and characterization of the dominant sequences. The ASEP analyses are being documented in NUREG/CR-4550. The purpose of this paper is to briefly describe and evaluate the methodology utilized in these analyses. The methodology will soon be published in more detail as Reference 5. The results produced for NUREG/CR-4550 using this methodology are summarized in another paper to be presented at this conference.

  11. 28 CFR 301.106 - Repetitious accidents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Repetitious accidents. 301.106 Section 301.106 Judicial Administration FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES, INC., DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INMATE ACCIDENT COMPENSATION General § 301.106 Repetitious accidents. If an inmate...

  12. 28 CFR 301.106 - Repetitious accidents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Repetitious accidents. 301.106 Section 301.106 Judicial Administration FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES, INC., DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INMATE ACCIDENT COMPENSATION General § 301.106 Repetitious accidents. If an inmate...

  13. Industry program needed for nuclear accident management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Klopp

    1989-01-01

    This paper addresses the need for a management program for nuclear power accidents. According to the author, the tools and technology for severe accident management exist. The need for a clear, realistic definition of nuclear accident program requirements is discussed.

  14. Impact of the accident at the Three Mile Island on the behavior and well-being of nuclear workers. Part II. Job tension, psychophysiological symptoms, and indices of distress

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. V. Kasl; R. F. Chisholm; B. Eskenazi

    1981-01-01

    Three Mile Island (TMI) workers experienced much greater job tension and lower occupational self-esteem (supervisors only) in comparison with workers interviewed at the Peach Bottom Plant. At the time of the accident, TMI workers reported experiencing more periods of anger, extreme worrry and extreme upset, and more psychophysiological symptoms. Six months after the accident, some persistence of these feelings and

  15. First Responders and Criticality Accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Valerie L. Putman; Douglas M. Minnema

    2005-11-01

    Nuclear criticality accident descriptions typically include, but do not focus on, information useful to first responders. We studied these accidents, noting characteristics to help (1) first responders prepare for such an event and (2) emergency drill planners develop appropriate simulations for training. We also provide recommendations to help people prepare for such events in the future.

  16. German aircraft accident statistics, 1930

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weitzmann, Ludwig

    1932-01-01

    The investigation of all serious accidents, involving technical defects in the airplane or engine, is undertaken by the D.V.L. in conjunction with the imperial traffic minister and other interested parties. All accidents not clearly explained in the reports are subsequently cleared up.

  17. Occupation and pregnancy outcome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A D McDonald; J C McDonald; B Armstrong; N Cherry; C Delorme; A D-Nolin; D Robert

    1987-01-01

    Over a two year period, 1982-4, 56067 women, delivered or treated for a spontaneous abortion in 11 Montreal hospitals covering 90% of such admissions, were interviewed in detail regarding their occupational, social, and personal characteristics in their most recent and past pregnancies--104,649 in all. These data were analysed in relation to four main adverse outcomes--spontaneous abortion, stillbirth (without defect), congenital

  18. ETHNIC OCCUPATIONAL STATUSES

    E-print Network

    Mennerick, Lewis A.

    1968-04-01

    statuses have an ethnic counterpart. Chemists, engineers, and skilled laborers, for example, usually do not seek to possess and display auxiliary ethnic traits. While Italian- ~Americans may occupy the status of chemist, they are not usually thought...IS ethnic occupational status primarily because his qualifications are not strong enough to enable him to compete outside of the ethnic community or because his participation in the larger system is restricted by out-group persons who are in positions...

  19. Industrial accidents triggered by lightning.

    PubMed

    Renni, Elisabetta; Krausmann, Elisabeth; Cozzani, Valerio

    2010-12-15

    Natural disasters can cause major accidents in chemical facilities where they can lead to the release of hazardous materials which in turn can result in fires, explosions or toxic dispersion. Lightning strikes are the most frequent cause of major accidents triggered by natural events. In order to contribute towards the development of a quantitative approach for assessing lightning risk at industrial facilities, lightning-triggered accident case histories were retrieved from the major industrial accident databases and analysed to extract information on types of vulnerable equipment, failure dynamics and damage states, as well as on the final consequences of the event. The most vulnerable category of equipment is storage tanks. Lightning damage is incurred by immediate ignition, electrical and electronic systems failure or structural damage with subsequent release. Toxic releases and tank fires tend to be the most common scenarios associated with lightning strikes. Oil, diesel and gasoline are the substances most frequently released during lightning-triggered Natech accidents. PMID:20817399

  20. Analysis of traffic accidents on rural highways using Latent Class Clustering and Bayesian Networks.

    PubMed

    de Oña, Juan; López, Griselda; Mujalli, Randa; Calvo, Francisco J

    2013-03-01

    One of the principal objectives of traffic accident analyses is to identify key factors that affect the severity of an accident. However, with the presence of heterogeneity in the raw data used, the analysis of traffic accidents becomes difficult. In this paper, Latent Class Cluster (LCC) is used as a preliminary tool for segmentation of 3229 accidents on rural highways in Granada (Spain) between 2005 and 2008. Next, Bayesian Networks (BNs) are used to identify the main factors involved in accident severity for both, the entire database (EDB) and the clusters previously obtained by LCC. The results of these cluster-based analyses are compared with the results of a full-data analysis. The results show that the combined use of both techniques is very interesting as it reveals further information that would not have been obtained without prior segmentation of the data. BN inference is used to obtain the variables that best identify accidents with killed or seriously injured. Accident type and sight distance have been identify in all the cases analysed; other variables such as time, occupant involved or age are identified in EDB and only in one cluster; whereas variables vehicles involved, number of injuries, atmospheric factors, pavement markings and pavement width are identified only in one cluster. PMID:23182777

  1. An Examination of Aviation Accidents Associated with Turbulence, Wind Shear and Thunderstorm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Joni K.

    2013-01-01

    The focal point of the study reported here was the definition and examination of turbulence, wind shear and thunderstorm in relation to aviation accidents. NASA project management desired this information regarding distinct subgroups of atmospheric hazards, in order to better focus their research portfolio. A seven category expansion of Kaplan's turbulence categories was developed, which included wake turbulence, mountain wave turbulence, clear air turbulence, cloud turbulence, convective turbulence, thunderstorm without mention of turbulence, and low altitude wind shear, microburst or turbulence (with no mention of thunderstorms).More than 800 accidents from flights based in the United States during 1987-2008 were selected from a National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) database. Accidents were selected for inclusion in this study if turbulence, thunderstorm, wind shear or microburst was considered either a cause or a factor in the accident report, and each accident was assigned to only one hazard category. This report summarizes the differences between the categories in terms of factors such as flight operations category, aircraft engine type, the accident's geographic location and time of year, degree of injury to aircraft occupants, aircraft damage, age and certification of the pilot and the phase of flight at the time of the accident.

  2. Columbia Accident Investigation Board

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Columbia Accident Investigation Board gathers for a second day for its third public hearing, held in Cape Canaveral, Florida. The CAIB was set up to examine STS-107 and analyze exploratory tests. Navy Admiral Harold W. 'Hal' Gehman Jr. was designated as the Chairman of the Board. From left to right in this photo sit Board Members Steven B. Wallace, Scott Hubbard, Dr. John Logsdon, Rear Admiral Stephen Turcotte, Hal Gehman, General Duane Deal, Dr. Douglas Osheroff, and Maj. General Kenneth W. Hess. Not shown are Maj. General John Barry, Dr. James N. Hallock, Roger Tetrault, Dr. Sheila Widnall, and Dr. Sally Ride. For more information on STS-107, please see GRIN Columbia General Explanation

  3. If you are actively employed by a CHEIBA Trust Member employer and have an accident while traveling for college-approved business, this Travel Accident Insurance Plan protects you with

    E-print Network

    while traveling for college-approved business, this Travel Accident Insurance Plan protects you with benefit payments to you or your beneficiary. Coverage 24-Hour Business Travel Hijacking or Skyjacking Belt & Occupant Device Coverage ­ 10% each to a maximum of $50,000 Travel Assistance Services & ID

  4. Accident/Incident Reporting Form & Investigation Report FAX COMPLETED FORM (Within 24 hours) TO: 519-661-2079 (82079)

    E-print Network

    Lennard, William N.

    Accident/Incident Reporting Form & Investigation Report FAX COMPLETED FORM (Within 24 hours) TO NO ________________________________________________________________________________________________ CLEAR FORM #12;SECTION #2 ­ Investigation Report PART D Immediately investigate if any of the following occur: Fatalities, Critical Injuries, Lost Time, Occupational Illness, Property Damage, Fire

  5. [Occupational risks among public safety and security forces].

    PubMed

    Candura, S M; Verni, P; Minelli, C M; Rosso, G L; Cappelli, M I; Strambi, S; Martellosio, V

    2006-01-01

    The present paper tries to identify the occupational risk factors (physical, chemical, biological, psychological), variable depending on jobs and tasks, to which the heterogeneous public safety/security workers are exposed. The fight against criminality and public order maintenance imply (sometimes fatal) traumatic risks, and expose to psychophysical and sensorial tiring, unfavourable macro- and microclimatic conditions, the risk of baropathy (air navigation, underwater activities), noise (generated by firearms and several other sources), vibrations and shakings (automatic weapons, transport vehicles), the risk of electric injury, ionizing (X and gamma rays) and non-inonizing (ultraviolet rays, microwaves and radiofrequencies, electromagnetic fields) radiations. Chemical hazards include carbon monoxide and other combustion products (fires, urban traffic), substances released in chemical accidents, tear gases, lead (firing grounds, metal works, environmental pollution), solvents, lubrificants and cutting oils (mechanic repair and maintenance), laboratory materials and reagents, irritant and/or sensitizing agents contained in gloves. The main biological risks are tetanus, blood-borne diseases (viral hepatitis, AIDS), aerogenous diseases (e.g., tuberculosis, Legionnaire's disease, epidemic cerebrospinal meningitis), dog- or horse-transmitted zoonosis. Finally, emotional, psychosomatic and behavioural stress-related disorders (e.g., burn-out syndrome, post-traumatic stress disorder) are typically frequent. The presence of numerous and diversified hazards among public safety/security forces imposes the adoption of occupational medicine measures, including risk assessment, health education, technical and environmental prevention, personal protective devices, sanitary surveillance and biological monitoring, clinical interventions (diagnosis, therapy and rehabilitation of occupational accidents and illnesses), prompt medico-legal evaluation of occupational-related compensation claims. PMID:16705889

  6. Dose - response relationship between noise exposure and the risk of occupational injury.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jin-Ha; Hong, Jeong-Suk; Roh, Jaehoon; Kim, Chi-Nyon; Won, Jong-Uk

    2015-01-01

    Many workers worldwide experience fatality and disability caused by occupational injuries. This study examined the relationship between noise exposure and occupational injuries at factories in Korea. A total of 1790 factories located in northern Gyeonggi Province, Korea was evaluated. The time-weighted average levels of dust and noise exposure were taken from Workplace Exposure Assessment data. Apart occupational injuries, sports events, traffic accidents, and other accidents occurring outside workplaces were excluded. The incidences of occupational injury in each factory were calculated by data from the Korea Workers' Compensation and Welfare Services. Workplaces were classified according to the incidence of any occupational injuries (incident or nonincident workplaces, respectively). Workplace dust exposure was classified as <1 or ? 1 mg/m³ , and noise exposure as <80, 80-89, or >90 dB. Workplaces with high noise exposure were significantly associated with being incident workplaces, whereas workplaces with high dust exposure were not. The odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) derived from a logistic regression model were 1.68 (1.27-2.24) and 3.42 (2.26-5.17) at 80-89 dB and ? 90 dB versus <80 dB. These associations remained significant when in a separate analysis according to high or low dust exposure level. Noise exposure increases the risk of occupational injury in the workplace. Furthermore, the risk of occupational injury increases with noise exposure level in a dose-response relationship. Therefore, strategies for reducing noise exposure level are required to decrease the risk of occupational injury. PMID:25599757

  7. 49 CFR 382.303 - Post-accident testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...the vehicle, if the accident involved the loss of...local law for a moving traffic violation arising from the accident, if the accident involved...local law for a moving traffic violation arising from the accident, if the accident...

  8. Occupational asthma and occupational rhinitis: The united airways disease model revisited

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Occupational asthma and occupational rhinitis: The united airways disease model revisited Jacques number: +33147107754; Fax number:+33147107768 Key words: occupational asthma, occupational rhinitis, high) Objectives: Whereas accumulating evidence indicates close associations between rhinitis and asthma, little

  9. Occupational Health for Healthcare Providers

    MedlinePLUS

    ... prevention practices. They can reduce your risk of health problems. Use protective equipment, follow infection control guidelines, ... manage stress. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health

  10. Occupational Sex Segregation

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Theodore Fuller

    This activity is used in a Sociology class for undergraduate students. This activity looks as gender and occupation over time in the United States. This activity uses one customized data sets made from combining census information from 1970-1990. It guides students through data manipulation using WebCHIP software found at DataCounts!. To open WebCHIP with the dataset for the activity, please see instructions and links in the exercise documents under teaching materials. For more information on how to use WebCHIP, see the How To section on DataCounts!

  11. [Occupational allergies to papain].

    PubMed

    van Kampen, V; Merget, R; Brüning, T

    2005-06-01

    Occupational exposure against dusts of plant, bacterial, mould, and animal enzymes is long known to be associated with a high risk of specific sensitization. The present evaluation of literature data confirms that this is also true for papain. This frequently used industrial protease is derived from papaya (Carica papaya). Several cases of specific airway sensitization caused by papain are verified by a number of case reports and cross sectional studies. As symptoms, results of skin prick tests, detection of specific IgE-antibodies and results of specific bronchoprovocation tests are consistent, an immunologic mechanism can be assumed. PMID:15991076

  12. Precision Machining Technologies. Occupational Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Occupational Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP), which is one of a series of OCAPs developed to identify the skills that Ohio employers deem necessary to entering a given occupation/occupational area, lists the occupational, academic, and employability skills required of individuals entering the occupation of precision machinist. The…

  13. The 2010 Ruth Zemke Lecture in Occupational Science Occupational Therapy\\/Occupational Science\\/Occupational Justice: Moral Commitments and Global Assemblages

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gelya Frank

    2011-01-01

    Twenty years have passed since occupational science was founded. It is time to reassess the relationship of occupational science to its roots in occupational therapy and also to reopen a discussion of some foundational assumptions. In particular, we need to situate the profession, occupational therapy, and the discipline, occupational science, in relation to the phenomenon of globalization. The internationalization of

  14. The 2010 Ruth Zemke Lecture in Occupational Science Occupational Therapy\\/Occupational Science\\/Occupational Justice: Moral Commitments and Global Assemblages

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gelya Frank

    2012-01-01

    Twenty years have passed since occupational science was founded. It is time to reassess the relationship of occupational science to its roots in occupational therapy and also to reopen a discussion of some foundational assumptions. In particular, we need to situate the profession, occupational therapy, and the discipline, occupational science, in relation to the phenomenon of globalization. The internationalization of

  15. [Prevention of bicycle accidents].

    PubMed

    Zwipp, H; Barthel, P; Bönninger, J; Bürkle, H; Hagemeister, C; Hannawald, L; Huhn, R; Kühn, M; Liers, H; Maier, R; Otte, D; Prokop, G; Seeck, A; Sturm, J; Unger, T

    2015-04-01

    For a very precise analysis of all injured bicyclists in Germany it would be important to have definitions for "severely injured", "seriously injured" and "critically injured". By this, e.g., two-thirds of surgically treated bicyclists who are not registered by the police could become available for a general analysis. Elderly bicyclists (>?60 years) are a minority (10?%) but represent a majority (50?%) of all fatalities. They profit most by wearing a helmet and would be less injured by using special bicycle bags, switching on their hearing aids and following all traffic rules. E-bikes are used more and more (145?% more in 2012 vs. 2011) with 600,000 at the end of 2011 and are increasingly involved in accidents but still have a lack of legislation. So even for pedelecs 45 with 500?W and a possible speed of 45?km/h there is still no legislative demand for the use of a protecting helmet. 96?% of all injured cyclists in Germany had more than 0.5?‰ alcohol in their blood, 86?% more than 1.1?‰ and 59?% more than 1.7?‰. Fatalities are seen in 24.2?% of cases without any collision partner. Therefore the ADFC calls for a limit of 1.1?‰. Some virtual studies conclude that integrated sensors in bicycle helmets which would interact with sensors in cars could prevent collisions or reduce the severity of injury by stopping the cars automatically. Integrated sensors in cars with opening angles of 180° enable about 93?% of all bicyclists to be detected leading to a high rate of injury avoidance and/or mitigation. Hanging lamps reduce with 35?% significantly bicycle accidents for children, traffic education for children and special trainings for elderly bicyclists are also recommended as prevention tools. As long as helmet use for bicyclists in Germany rates only 9?% on average and legislative orders for using a helmet will not be in force in the near future, coming up campaigns seem to be necessary to be promoted by the Deutscher Verkehrssicherheitsrat as, e.g., "Helmets are cool". Also, spots in TV should be broadcasted like "The 7th sense" or "Traffic compass", which were warning car drivers many years ago of moments of danger but now they could be used to warn bicyclists of life-threatening situations in traffic. PMID:25874397

  16. Professional Development for Occupational Specialist: Occupational Competency Testing. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN.

    The organization, scope, and activities of the Indiana Occupational Competency Testing Center were expanded to accommodate the requirements of the new Occupational Specialist Certificate for secondary vocational teacher credentialling. A pilot project involved three regional sites in the state. The director of the host area site acted as area…

  17. Instructional Support System--Occupational Education. Building Industries Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abramson, Theodore; And Others

    The modules which make up the bulk of this report are the result of a two-week workshop at which thirteen building industries occupations teachers worked toward the development of a student outcome oriented curriculum. These modules are divided into the following occupational units: (1) carpentry (containing hand tools; portable power tools;…

  18. Rough set approach for accident chains exploration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jinn-Tsai Wong; Yi-Shih Chung

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a novel non-parametric methodology – rough set theory – for accident occurrence exploration. The rough set theory allows researchers to analyze accidents in multiple dimensions and to model accident occurrence as factor chains. Factor chains are composed of driver characteristics, trip characteristics, driver behavior and environment factors that imply typical accident occurrence. A real-world database (2003 Taiwan

  19. 49 CFR 229.17 - Accident reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Accident reports. 229.17 Section 229.17...General § 229.17 Accident reports. (a) In the case of an accident due to a...the locomotive shall immediately report the accident by toll free...

  20. Nuclear fuel cycle facility accident analysis handbook

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. E. Ayer; A. T. Clark; P. Loysen; M. Y. Ballinger; J. Mishima; P. C. Owczarski; W. S. Gregory; B. D. Nichols

    1988-01-01

    The Accident Analysis Handbook (AAH) covers four generic facilities: fuel manufacturing, fuel reprocessing, waste storage\\/solidification, and spent fuel storage; and six accident types: fire, explosion, tornado, criticality, spill, and equipment failure. These are the accident types considered to make major contributions to the radiological risk from accidents in nuclear fuel cycle facility operations. The AAH will enable the user to

  1. Occupational allergies and asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Tarlo, S. M.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review aspects of occupational allergies and asthma for primary care physicians recognizing, diagnosing, and managing patients with these conditions. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Studies in the medical literature mainly provide level 2 evidence, that is, from at least one well-designed clinical trial without randomization, from cohort or case-control analytical studies, from multiple time series, or from dramatic results in uncontrolled experiments. MAIN MESSAGE: Occupational allergies and asthma have the best prognosis with an early, accurate diagnosis and subsequent avoidance of exposure to the relevant sensitizer. These diagnoses can normally be suspected from the clinical history. Primary care physicians can also initiate investigations to make an objective diagnosis, can assess workplace exposure agents from the history, and can review appropriate data sheets on material safety. Specialist evaluation is likely to be needed for skin tests, however, and for other specialized tests (such as pulmonary function assessments at work and off work or specific challenges with the suspected workplace agent). Patients with a confirmed diagnosis need appropriate medical management of their allergic manifestations or asthma, but also often require psychosocial support during the period of investigation and management, especially in relation to required changes in their work and to compensation or insurance claims. CONCLUSIONS: Consider workplace exposure as a source of patients' allergies or asthma and aim to make an early, accurate diagnosis. PMID:10386216

  2. Environmental and occupational allergies.

    PubMed

    Peden, David; Reed, Charles E

    2010-02-01

    Airborne allergens are the major cause of allergic rhinitis and asthma. Daily exposure comes from indoor sources, chiefly at home but occasionally at schools or offices. Seasonal exposure to outdoor allergens, pollens, and molds is another important source. Exposure to unusual substances at work causes occupational asthma, accounting for about 5% of asthma in adults. Indoor and outdoor air pollutants trigger airway inflammation and increase the severity of asthma. Diesel exhaust particles increase the production of IgE antibodies. Identification and reduction of exposure to allergens is a very important part of the management of respiratory allergic diseases. The first section of this chapter discusses domestic allergens, arthropods (mites and cockroaches), molds, and mammals (pets and mice). Indoor humidity and water damage are important factors in the production of mite and mold allergens, and discarded human food items are important sources of proliferation of cockroaches and mice. Means of identifying and reducing exposure are presented. The second section discusses outdoor allergens: pollens and molds. The particular plants or molds and the amount of exposure to these allergens is determined by the local climate, and local pollen and mold counts are available to determine the time and amount of exposure. Climate change is already having an important effect on the distribution and amount of outdoor allergens. The third section discusses indoor and outdoor air pollution and methods that individuals can take to reduce indoor pollution in addition to eliminating cigarette smoking. The fourth section discusses the diagnosis and management of occupational asthma. PMID:20176257

  3. The Chernobyl Accident: Contact Us

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to Main Content at the National Institutes of Health | www.cancer.gov What's Inside Home About the Accident Studies Ukrainian Thyroid Study Belarusian Thyroid Study Leukemia Study Dosimetry Selected Publications Research Staff Collaborators Oversight Research

  4. The Chernobyl Accident: Research Staff

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to Main Content at the National Institutes of Health | www.cancer.gov What's Inside Home About the Accident Studies Ukrainian Thyroid Study Belarusian Thyroid Study Leukemia Study Dosimetry Selected Publications Research Staff Collaborators Oversight Research

  5. An Exploration of the Role of Occupation in School-Based Occupational Therapy Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Jeryl DiSanti

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the role of occupation in school-based occupational therapy practice. The research questions were (1) How do school-based occupational therapists describe the role of occupation during intervention? (2) Which theories of occupation do school-based occupational therapists associate with their own practice?…

  6. Cerebrovascular accident clinical pathway.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, G; Parcell, M; MacDonald, A

    2000-01-01

    The cerebrovascular accident (CVA) clinical pathway project was selected to complement the work already underway within the West Moreton Health Services District such as the development of a continuum of care model, revision of work practices to complement the new hospital redevelopment and encouraging team and evidence-based approaches to problem solving. Specific objectives were set for the project along with a detailed evaluation plan. A steering group was convened to run the project and a full time project officer was appointed. At the end of the 12 month period all the objectives were met. Specific achievements included a reduction in the overall average length of stay for those patients who experience CVA, improved clinical outcomes and a more effective use of resources. Quality of care has been improved through the preparation of specialized clinical pathway documentation, education packages, patient surveys, focus groups, independent reviews and benchmarking. Complementing these measures has been a series of process changes and environmental modifications. Furthermore, good working relationships have been established with private sector providers of health care and other external bodies. The development of the CVA clinical pathway at the Ipswich Hospital has meant timely referrals and a streamlined assessment and referral process to get patients into rehabilitation sooner. It has promoted good communication between, and recognition of, the professional roles of various team members and has put the patient back at the centre of the care process. PMID:11057994

  7. Columbia Accident Probe Widens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Covault, Craig

    2003-01-01

    The Columbia Accident Investigation Board has identified about a dozen shuttle program safety concerns it will address in its final report, in addition to foam shedding from the Lockheed Martin external tank-believed by many board members to be the direct cause for the loss of Columbia and her crew. As new evidence narrows the location of Columbia's left-wing breach to a lower corner of reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) Panel 8 and its adjoining T-seal, the board is broadening its penetration of other shuttle safety issues. As the board works in Houston, United Space Alliance technicians here at Kennedy last week sent the first six of 22 RCC panels from the orbiter Atlantis left wing to Vought Aircraft Industries Inc. in Dallas for extensive testing to assess their integrity. The move is a key step toward both returning the shuttle to flight with Atlantis and obtaining more data on RCC panels subjected to fewer flights, and less exposure to the weather, than the older panels used on Columbia.

  8. Spine Immobilizer for Accident Victims

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vykukal, H. C.; Lampson, K.

    1983-01-01

    Proposed conformal bladder filled with tiny spheres called "microballoons," enables spine of accident victim to be rapidly immobilized and restrained and permit victim to be safely removed from accident scene in extremely short time after help arrives. Microballoons expand to form rigid mass when pressure within bladder is less than ambient. Bladder strapped to victim is also strapped to rescue chair. Void between bladder and chair is filled with cloth wedges.

  9. Paragliding accidents in remote areas.

    PubMed

    Fasching, G; Schippinger, G; Pretscher, R

    1997-08-01

    Paragliding is an increasingly popular hobby, as people try to find new and more adventurous activities. However, there is an increased and inherent danger with this sport. For this reason, as well as the inexperience of many operators, injuries occur frequently. This retrospective study centers on the helicopter rescue of 70 individuals in paragliding accidents. All histories were examined, and 43 patients answered a questionnaire. Nineteen (42%) pilots were injured when taking off, 20 (44%) during the flight, and six (13%) when landing. Routine and experience did not affect the prevalence of accident. Analysis of the causes of accident revealed pilot errors in all but three cases. In 34 rescue operations a landing of the helicopter near the site of the accident was possible. Half of the patients had to be rescued by a cable winch or a long rope fixed to the helicopter. Seven (10%) of the pilots suffered multiple trauma, 38 (54%) had injuries of the lower extremities, and 32 (84%) of them sustained fractures. Injuries to the spine were diagnosed in 34 cases with a fracture rate of 85%. One patient had an incomplete paraplegia. Injuries to the head occurred in 17 patients. No paraglider pilot died. The average hospitalization was 22 days, and average time of working inability was 14 weeks. Fourteen (34%) patients suffered from a permanent damage to their nerves or joints. Forty-three percent of the paragliders continued their sport despite the accident; two of them had another accident. An improved training program is necessary to lower the incidence of paragliding accidents. Optimal equipment to reduce injuries in case of accidents is mandatory. The helicopter emergency physician must perform a careful examination, provide stabilization of airways and circulation, give analgesics, splint fractured extremities, and transport the victim on a vacuum mattress to the appropriate hospital. PMID:11990151

  10. Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics Occupational Health

    E-print Network

    Shoubridge, Eric

    Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health Student Handbook Regulations contained in this brochure pertain to the Graduate Programs in Epidemiology, Biostatistics, Public Health & Occupational Health 2014/2015 #12;Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health 2014-2015 Student

  11. Occupational therapy for multiple sclerosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. M. J. Steultjens; J. Dekker; L. M. Bouter; M. Cardol; J. C. M. van de Nes; C. H. M. van den Ende

    2003-01-01

    Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) patients are referred to occupational therapy with complaints about fatigue, limb weakness, alteration of upper extremity fine motor coordination, loss of sensation and spasticity that causes limitations in performance of activities of daily living and social participation. The primary purpose of occupational therapy is to enable individuals to participate in self-care, work and leisure activities that

  12. Agricultural Occupations Program Planning Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemp, Paul E.; Mayer, Leon

    The major program objectives of agricultural occupations courses are (1) to develop agricultural competencies needed by individuals engaged in or preparing to engage in production agriculture, and in agricultural occupations other than production agriculture; (2) to develop an understanding of the career opportunities in agriculture; (3) to…

  13. New Roles for Occupational Instructors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Dale F.

    Changes in the future role of occupational instructors which will be brought about by advances in educational technology are illustrated by the description of the Advanced Instructional System (AIS), a complex approach to occupational training which permits large-scale application of individualized instruction through the use of computer-assisted…

  14. NATIONAL TRAUMATIC OCCUPATIONAL FATALITIES (NTOF)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Traumatic Occupational Fatalities (NTOF) surveillance system is a death certificate-based census of occupational injury deaths. Death certificates are obtained from the 50 States, New York City, and the District of Columbia for decedent's ages 16 years or older with ...

  15. Carpentry. Occupational Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Occupational Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP) contains a competency list verified by expert workers and developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives from Ohio. This OCAP identifies the occupational, academic, and employability skills (competencies)…

  16. CAREER GUIDE FOR DEMAND OCCUPATIONS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LEE, E.R.; WELCH, JOHN L.

    THIS PUBLICATION UPDATES THE "CAREER GUIDE FOR DEMAND OCCUPATIONS" PUBLISHED IN 1959 AND PROVIDES COUNSELORS WITH INFORMATION ABOUT OCCUPATIONS IN DEMAND IN MANY AREAS WHICH REQUIRE PREEMPLOYMENT TRAINING. IT PRESENTS, IN COLUMN FORM, THE EDUCATION AND OTHER TRAINING USUALLY REQUIRED BY EMPLOYERS, HIGH SCHOOL SUBJECTS OF PARTICULAR PERTINENCE TO…

  17. Business Financial Occupations: Skill Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vocational Technical Education Consortium of States, Decatur, GA.

    This report organizes the information provided by 71 individuals in finance-related occupations in 11 states into skills inventories for persons in these jobs. The skills inventories contain the following sections: (1) occupation-specific knowledge (communication, mathematics, science); (2) workplace behaviors (work ethics, interpersonal…

  18. Occupational Licensing of Tower Climbers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael S. Landa

    There is a renewed push for occupational licensing in the tower industry; proponents cite improved quality, improved safety and a number of other benefits that would result from licensing. The problem is previous and exhaustive occupational licensing research has proven these \\

  19. Situating Dignity in Occupational Science

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Abbey L. Marterella

    2007-01-01

    Dignity is an important concept in the everyday lives of human beings, yet its meaning remains elusive in occupational science and related scientific discourse. Occupations are believed to promote dignity and the humanistic nature of our science compels us to preserve it (Peloquin, 2005; Yerxa et al., 1989). For continued success in defining our discipline as one committed to human

  20. NATIONAL OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE SURVEY (NOES)

    EPA Science Inventory

    From 1981 to 1983, NIOSH conducted the National Occupational Exposure Survey (NOES) that collected data on potential occupational exposures to chemical, physical, and biological agents. The survey involved on-site visits to 4,490 establishments in 522 industry types [OMB 1972] em...

  1. Occupational Health Research in India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Habibullah N SAIYED; Rajnarayan R TIWARI

    2004-01-01

    India being a developing nation is faced with traditional public health problems like communicable diseases, malnutrition, poor environmental sanitation and inadequate medical care. However, globalization and rapid industrial growth in the last few years has resulted in emergence of occupational health related issues. Agriculture (cultivators i.e. land owners+ agriculture labourers) is the main occupation in India giving employment to about

  2. A Model for Occupational Therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anne Cronin Mosey

    1980-01-01

    A model for occupational therapy, presented in this paper, is an elaboration on the biopsychosocial model outlined by the author in 1974. The conceptualization of this model is an attempt to provide a holistic approach to the philosophical and scientific foundation of the practice of occupational therapy. The structure of a model for the health profession is suggested, followed by

  3. [Occupational diseases in instrumental musicians].

    PubMed

    Zuskin, Eugenija; Mustajbegovi?, Jadranka; Zavali?, Marija; Bogadi-Sare, Ana; Pavlovi?, Mladen; Turci?, Nada

    2003-01-01

    Occupational diseases, work-related diseases and occupational stigma in professional musicians are discussed. Predominant diseases and symptoms related to various organic systems, such as musculoskeletal, neuromuscular, respiratory system, skin, mouth and teeth diseases, as well as the effect of noise and psychological stress, have been listed. The preventive measures in order to promote health of musicians are described in particular. PMID:12812021

  4. Career and Occupational Development Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Commission of the States, Denver, CO. National Assessment of Educational Progress.

    The career and occupational development items contained in this document are part of a kit consisting of four documents which bring together different types of items that measure a number of career and occupational development (COD) objectives developed by the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). (NAEP--which completed a national…

  5. Occupational Analysis of Educational Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braden, Paul V.; Paul, Krishan

    The book deals comprehensively with occupational analysis, which is defined as the means for identifying and organizing that part of instructional content which is relevant to targeted performance situations. Occupational analysis yields useful information for instructional needs and helps to determine critical performance aspects warranting…

  6. Severe accident analysis using dynamic accident progression event trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakobyan, Aram P.

    In present, the development and analysis of Accident Progression Event Trees (APETs) are performed in a manner that is computationally time consuming, difficult to reproduce and also can be phenomenologically inconsistent. One of the principal deficiencies lies in the static nature of conventional APETs. In the conventional event tree techniques, the sequence of events is pre-determined in a fixed order based on the expert judgments. The main objective of this PhD dissertation was to develop a software tool (ADAPT) for automated APET generation using the concept of dynamic event trees. As implied by the name, in dynamic event trees the order and timing of events are determined by the progression of the accident. The tool determines the branching times from a severe accident analysis code based on user specified criteria for branching. It assigns user specified probabilities to every branch, tracks the total branch probability, and truncates branches based on the given pruning/truncation rules to avoid an unmanageable number of scenarios. The function of a dynamic APET developed includes prediction of the conditions, timing, and location of containment failure or bypass leading to the release of radioactive material, and calculation of probabilities of those failures. Thus, scenarios that can potentially lead to early containment failure or bypass, such as through accident induced failure of steam generator tubes, are of particular interest. Also, the work is focused on treatment of uncertainties in severe accident phenomena such as creep rupture of major RCS components, hydrogen burn, containment failure, timing of power recovery, etc. Although the ADAPT methodology (Analysis of Dynamic Accident Progression Trees) could be applied to any severe accident analysis code, in this dissertation the approach is demonstrated by applying it to the MELCOR code [1]. A case study is presented involving station blackout with the loss of auxiliary feedwater system for a pressurized water reactor. The specific plant analyzed is the Zion Nuclear Power Plant, which is a Westinghouse-designed system that has been decommissioned.

  7. Achieving Quality in Occupational Health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Donnell, Michele (Editor); Hoffler, G. Wyckliffe (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    The conference convened approximately 100 registered participants of invited guest speakers, NASA presenters, and a broad spectrum of the Occupational Health disciplines representing NASA Headquarters and all NASA Field Centers. Centered on the theme, "Achieving Quality in Occupational Health," conferees heard presentations from award winning occupational health program professionals within the Agency and from private industry; updates on ISO 9000 status, quality assurance, and information technologies; workshops on ergonomics and respiratory protection; an overview from the newly commissioned NASA Occupational Health Assessment Team; and a keynote speech on improving women's health. In addition, NASA occupational health specialists presented 24 poster sessions and oral deliveries on various aspects of current practice at their field centers.

  8. On-site radiation exposure in severe reactor accidents: Scoping study

    SciTech Connect

    Warman, E.A.; Karahalios, P.; Celnick, J.; McInall, S.; Frank, S. (Stone and Webster Engineering Corp., Boston, MA (USA))

    1990-09-01

    The results of a scoping study of onsite radiation exposures which could take place in each of three types of postulated reactor accidents are presented. The accident types are (1) a fuel handling accident at a Mark III BWR; an interfacing system LOCA or V sequence at a PWR; and and Anticipated Transient Without Scram (ATWS) at a Mark I BWR. Both external and internal dose pathways are considered. The results of the study indicate the prohibitively high radiation doses could be received in some plant areas if personnel were to remain there. However, times of the order of a few minutes to a few hours, depending on the type of accident, would be available before life-threatening doses would be accumulated assuming that the provided full face respiratory protection equipment were used promptly. Special attention was given radiation doses possibly received by control room personnel for several control room air in-leakage assumptions. For occupancy during severe accidents it would be advisable for control room personnel to use self-contained apparatus (SCBA) to limit exposure via inhalation. The results of this study will be useful to individuals responsible for accident management procedures. It is indicated that it will be important for each plant to develop estimates of the time of onset of prohibitively high radiation levels in various important plant areas. It is concluded that respiratory protection is a major factor owing to the large inhalation doses which might otherwise be encountered. 20 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs.

  9. [Accidents of fulguration].

    PubMed

    Virenque, C; Laguerre, J

    1976-01-01

    Fulguration, first electric accident in which the man was a victim, is to day better known. A clap of thunder is decomposed in two elements: lightning, and thunder. Lightning is caused by an electrical discharge, either within a cloud, or between two clouds, or, above all, between a cloud and the surface of the ground. Experimental equipments owned by the French Electricity Company and by the Atomic Energy Commission, have allowed to photograph lightnings and to measure certain physical characteristics (Intensity variable between 25 to 100 kA, voltage variable between 20 to 1 000 kV). The frequency of storms was learned: the isokeraunic level, in France, is about 20, meaning that thunder is heard twenty days during one year. Man may be stricken by thunder by direct hit, by sudden bursting, by earth current, or through various conductors. The electric charge which reached him may go to the earth directly by contact with the ground or may dissipate in the air through a bony promontory (elbow). The total number of victims, "wounded" or deceased, is not now known by statistics. Death comes by insulation breakdown of one of several anatomic cephalic formations: skull, meninx, brain. Many various lesions may happen in survivors: loss of consciousness, more or less long, sensorial or motion deficiencies. All these signs are momentary and generally reversible. Besides one may observe much more intense lesions on the skin: burns and, over all, characteristic aborescence (skin effect by high frequency current). The heart is protected, contrarily to what happens with industrial electrocution. The curative treatment is merely symptomatic : reanimation, surgery for burns or associated traumatic lesions. A prevention is researched to help the lonely man, in the country or in the mountains in the houses (lightning conductor, Faraday cage), in vehicles (aircraft, cars, ships). The mysterious and unforseeable character of lightning still stays, leaving a door opened for numerous investigations. PMID:1008283

  10. 24 CFR 582.315 - Occupancy agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...SECRETARY FOR COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY FACILITIES SHELTER PLUS CARE Program Requirements § 582.315 Occupancy agreements. (a) Initial occupancy agreement....

  11. 24 CFR 582.315 - Occupancy agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...SECRETARY FOR COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY FACILITIES SHELTER PLUS CARE Program Requirements § 582.315 Occupancy agreements. (a) Initial occupancy agreement....

  12. 24 CFR 582.315 - Occupancy agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...SECRETARY FOR COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY FACILITIES SHELTER PLUS CARE Program Requirements § 582.315 Occupancy agreements. (a) Initial occupancy agreement....

  13. 24 CFR 582.315 - Occupancy agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...SECRETARY FOR COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY FACILITIES SHELTER PLUS CARE Program Requirements § 582.315 Occupancy agreements. (a) Initial occupancy agreement....

  14. 24 CFR 582.315 - Occupancy agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...SECRETARY FOR COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY FACILITIES SHELTER PLUS CARE Program Requirements § 582.315 Occupancy agreements. (a) Initial occupancy agreement....

  15. Occupational ergonomics in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stramler, J.

    1992-01-01

    Ergonomics is often defined simply as the study of work. Related or synonymous terms include human factors, human engineering, engineering psychology, and others. Occupational ergonomics is a term that has been proposed to describe the study of the working environment, including the physical consequences resulting from having an improperly designed workplace. The routine space working environment presents some problems not found in the typical Earthbound workplace. These include radiation, intravehicular contamination/pollution, temperature extremes, impact with other objects, limited psychosocial relationships, sensory deprivation, and reduced gravity. These are important workplace considerations, and may affect astronauts either directly at work or at some point during their life as a result of their work under these conditions. Some of the major issues associated with each of these hazards are presented.

  16. Occupational cancer in Britain

    PubMed Central

    Hutchings, Sally J; Rushton, Lesley

    2012-01-01

    An approach using the attributable fraction (AF) has been developed to estimate the current burden of occupational cancer in Britain. The AF combines the relative risk (RR) associated with exposure with the proportion exposed. For each cancer–exposure pairing, the RR is selected from key epidemiological literature such as an industry, or population-based study, meta-analysis or review. The CARcinogen EXposure (CAREX) database provides point estimates for the number of workers exposed to a range of carcinogens; alternative sources are national surveys such as the Labour Force Survey and Census of Employment. The number of workers exposed are split between high and low exposure levels matched to appropriate RRs from the literature. The relevant period for cancer development during which exposure occurred is defined as the risk exposure period (REP). Estimation of the numbers ever exposed over the REP takes into account the changes in the number of people employed in primary and manufacturing industry and service sectors in Britain where appropriate, and adjustment is made for staff turnover over the period and for life expectancy. National estimates of the population ever of working age during the REP are used for the proportion denominator. Strategies have been developed to combine exposure AFs correctly while avoiding double counting and minimising bias. The AFs are applied to national cancer deaths and registrations to obtain occupation-attributable cancer numbers. The methods are adaptable for other diseases and other geographies, and are also adaptable to more sophisticated modelling if better exposure and dose–response data are available. PMID:22710683

  17. A discussion of occupational health and safety management for the catering industry in China.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Chen; Chow, Wan Ki

    2007-01-01

    The catering industry is developing rapidly in China. Statistics in 2002 indicated that there were over 3.5 million dining places in China, hiring over 18 million people. However, the accident rate was high. Occupational health and safety (OHS) has to be watched more carefully. It is proposed to develop an OHS management system for the catering industry and to integrate it with an ongoing management system by referring to OHSAS 18001:1999. The first step is risk identification and evaluating the major factors concerned by referring to the codes in China, the list of occupational diseases, operation rules, requirements of the law, and records of past incidents. The technological aspect has to be considered in working out the safety strategies. This includes technical measures in accident prevention at the workplace. The kitchen is the main area to be focused on. Methods for hazard identification and risk assessment of dangerous factors in kitchens are proposed in this paper. PMID:17888241

  18. Occupational seafood allergy: a review

    PubMed Central

    Jeebhay, M; Robins, T; Lehrer, S; Lopata, A

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Recent years have seen increased levels of production and consumption of seafood, leading to more frequent reporting of allergic reactions in occupational and domestic settings. This review focuses on occupational allergy in the fishing and seafood processing industry.?REVIEW—Workers involved in either manual or automated processing of crabs, prawns, mussels, fish, and fishmeal production are commonly exposed to various constituents of seafood. Aerosolisation of seafood and cooking fluid during processing are potential occupational situations that could result in sensitisation through inhalation. There is great variability of aerosol exposure within and among various jobs with reported allergen concentrations ranging from 0.001 to 5.061(µg/m3). Occupational dermal exposure occurs as a result of unprotected handling of seafood and its byproducts. Occupational allergies have been reported in workers exposed to arthropods (crustaceans), molluscs, pisces (bony fish) and other agents derived from seafood. The prevalence of occupational asthma ranges from 7% to 36%, and for occupational protein contact dermatitis, from 3% to 11%. These health outcomes are mainly due to high molecular weight proteins in seafood causing an IgE mediated response. Cross reactivity between various species within a major seafood grouping also occurs. Limited evidence from dose-response relations indicate that development of symptoms is related to duration or intensity of exposure. The evidence for atopy as a risk factor for occupational sensitisation and asthma is supportive, whereas evidence for cigarette smoking is limited. Disruption of the intact skin barrier seems to be an important added risk factor for occupational protein contact dermatitis.?CONCLUSION—The range of allergic disease associated with occupational exposure to crab is well characterised, whereas for other seafood agents the evidence is somewhat limited. There is a need for further epidemiological studies to better characterise this risk. More detailed characterisation of specific protein antigens in aerosols and associated establishment of dose-response relations for acute and chronic exposure to seafood; the respective roles of skin contact and inhalational exposure in allergic sensitisation and cross reactivity; and the contribution of host associated factors in the development of occupational seafood allergies are important areas for future research.???Keywords: occupational seafood allergy; occupational asthma; protein contact dermatitis PMID:11511741

  19. Narrative text analysis of accident reports with tractors, self-propelled harvesting machinery and materials handling machinery in Austrian agriculture from 2008 to 2010 - a comparison.

    PubMed

    Mayrhofer, Hannes; Quendler, Elisabeth; Boxberger, Josef

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was the identification of accident scenarios and causes by analysing existing accident reports of recognized agricultural occupational accidents with tractors, self-propelled harvesting machinery and materials handling machinery from 2008 to 2010. As a result of a literature-based evaluation of past accident analyses, the narrative text analysis was chosen as an appropriate method. A narrative analysis of the text fields of accident reports that farmers used to report accidents to insurers was conducted to obtain detailed information about the scenarios and causes of accidents. This narrative analysis of reports was made the first time and yielded first insights for identifying antecedents of accidents and potential opportunities for technical based intervention. A literature and internet search was done to discuss and confirm the findings. The narrative text analysis showed that in more than one third of the accidents with tractors and materials handling machinery the vehicle rolled or tipped over. The most relevant accident scenarios with harvesting machinery were being trapped and falling down. The direct comparison of the analysed machinery categories showed that more than 10% of the accidents in each category were caused by technical faults, slippery or muddy terrain and incorrect or inappropriate operation of the vehicle. Accidents with tractors, harvesting machinery and materials handling machinery showed similarities in terms of causes, circumstances and consequences. Certain technical and communicative measures for accident prevention could be used for all three machinery categories. Nevertheless, some individual solutions for accident prevention, which suit each specific machine type, would be necessary. PMID:24738521

  20. The TMI-2 accident evaluation program

    SciTech Connect

    Osetek, D.J.; Broughton, J.M.; Hobbins, R.R.

    1989-01-01

    The accident at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor, now 10 years old, remains as the United States' worst commercial nuclear reactor accident. Although the consequences of the accident were restricted primarily to the plant itself, the potential consequences of the accident, should it have progressed further, are large enough to warrant close scrutiny of all aspects of the event. TMI-2 accident research is being conducted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to provide the basis for more accurate calculations of source terms for postulated severe accidents. Research objectives supporting this goal include developing a comprehensive and consistent understanding of the mechanisms that controlled the progression of core damage and subsequent fission product behavior during the TMI-2 accident, and applying that understanding to the resolution of important severe accident safety issues. Developing a best-estimate scenario of the core melt progression during the accident is the focal point of the research and involves analytical work to interpret and integrate: (1) data recorded during the accident from plant instrumentation, (2) the post-accident state of the core, (3) results of the examination of material from the damaged core, and (4) related severe-accident research results. This paper summarizes the TMI-2 Accident Evaluation Program that is being conducted for the USDOE and briefly describes the important results that have been achieved. The Program is divided into four parts: Sample Acquisition and Plant Examination, Accident Scenario, Standard Problem Exercise, and Information and Industry Coordination.

  1. A CANDU Severe Accident Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Negut, Gheorghe; Catana, Alexandru [Institute for Nuclear Research, 1, Compului Str., Mioveni, PO Box 78, 0300 Pitesti (Romania); Prisecaru, Ilie [University Politehnica Bucharest (Romania)

    2006-07-01

    As interest in severe accident studies has increased in the last years, we have developed a set of simple models to analyze severe accidents for CANDU reactors that should be integrated in the EU codes. The CANDU600 reactor uses natural uranium fuel and heavy water (D2O) as both moderator and coolant, with the moderator and coolant in separate systems. We chose to analyze accident development for a LOCA with simultaneous loss of moderator cooling and the loss of emergency core cooling system (ECCS). This type of accident is likely to modify the reactor geometry and will lead to a severe accident development. When the coolant temperatures inside a pressure tube reaches 10000 deg C, a contact between pressure tube and calandria tube occurs and the residual heat is transferred to the moderator. Due to the lack of cooling, the moderator eventually begins to boil and is expelled, through the calandria vessel relief ducts, into the containment. Therefore the calandria tubes (fuel channels) will be uncovered, then will disintegrate and fall down to the calandria vessel bottom. After all the quantity of moderator is vaporized and expelled, the debris will heat up and eventually boil. The heat accumulated in the molten debris will be transferred through the calandria vessel wall to the shield tank water, which normally surrounds the calandria vessel. The phenomena described above are modelled, analyzed and compared with the existing data. The results are encouraging. (authors)

  2. The impact of the accident at the Three Mile Island on the behavior and well-being of nuclear workers: Part II: job tension, psychophysiological symptoms, and indices of distress.

    PubMed

    Kasl, S V; Chisholm, R F; Eskenazi, B

    1981-05-01

    TMI workers experienced much greater job tension and lower occupational self-esteem (supervisors only). At the time of the accident, TMI workers reported experiencing more periods of anger, extreme worry and extreme upset, and more psychophysiological symptoms. Six months after the accident, some persistence of these feelings and symptoms was evident. Demoralization was greater primarily among TMI non-supervisory workers. The impact of the accident was not greater among TMI workers living closer to the plant. Presence of a preschool child at home enhanced the impact of the accident, but primarily among TMI supervisors. PMID:7212136

  3. Severe accident source term reassessment

    SciTech Connect

    Hazzan, M.J.; Gardner, R.; Warman, E.A.; Jacobs, S.B.

    1988-01-01

    This paper summarizes the status of the reassessment of severe reactor accident source terms, which are defined as the quantity, type, and timing of fission product releases from such accidents. Concentration is on the major results and conclusions of analyses with modern methods for both pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and boiling water reactors (BWRs), and the special case of containment bypass. Some distinctions are drawn between analyses for PWRs and BWRs. In general, the more the matter is examined, the consequences, or probability of serious consequences, seem to be less.

  4. Electrical Trades. Occupational Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Occupational Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP), which is one of a series of OCAPs developed to identify the skills that Ohio employers deem necessary to entering a given occupation/occupational area, lists the occupational, academic, and employability skills required of individuals entering the electrical trades. The introduction explains…

  5. Occupational Stress and Coping among Nurses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Purvi Parikh; Atish Taukari; Tanmay Bhattacharya

    2004-01-01

    This paper explores nurses’ occupational stressors and coping mechanisms. In nurses occupational stress appears to vary according to individual and job characteristics, and work-family conflict. Common occupational stressors among nurses are workload, role ambiguity, interpersonal relationships, and death and dying concerns. Emotional distress, burnout and psychological morbidity could also result from occupational stress. Nurses’ common coping mechanisms include problem solving,

  6. Children's Sextyped Views of Traditional Occupational Roles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnhart, Ruth S.

    1983-01-01

    Examined children's views of traditional occupations in a study of 300 elementary school students who viewed photographs of 18 occupations. Results showed for most of the 18 occupational roles, students chose a traditional male or female role. The occupations of homemaker and firefighter received the most stereotyped scores. (JAC)

  7. A Participant Observer of Occupational Therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gary M. Katz

    1981-01-01

    This paper outlines the observations and experiences of a clinical psychologist who viewed occupational therapy from the perspective of educating occupational therapy students and who, prior to this experience, had relatively little contact with or understanding of occupational therapy. These observations result from the first year of experiences of being an assistant professor in a department of occupational therapy. This

  8. [Occupational morbidity of railway transport workers].

    PubMed

    Karetskaia, T D; Pfaf, V F; Chernov, O E

    2015-01-01

    The authors present results of medical social monitoring of occupationalhazards that are the most prevalent in railway occupations workers, statistic data on occupational morbidity of railway transport workers over last 10 years. The article covers major causes of unfavorable effects resulting from occupational hazards in various workers categories. Dynamics of occupational morbidity parameters and its structure concerning separate nosologic entities are analyzed. PMID:25826875

  9. Occupational Information 1990/91. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nebraska Univ., Lincoln. Nebraska Career Information System.

    The Nebraska Occupational Information books (volumes I and II) contain information about 386 different occupations in the state and answer questions about specific occupations in detail. The descriptions are arranged according to a U.S. Department of Labor classification system, with occupational titles clustered in general groups of selected…

  10. Emergy of the Occupations. Chapter 43

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this paper we calculated the emergy contributed to the economy of the United States in the work done by the workers of 558 occupations in 2008. We determined the empower (semj/yr) delivered by an individual engaged in each occupation, the transformity of the occupation?s work ...

  11. Environmental Occupational Health Protection Laws

    E-print Network

    Ashford, Nicholas

    2008-01-01

    The manufacturing, processing, and use of chemicals and materials in industrial, workplaces are often accompanied by environmental, health, and safety hazards and risks. Occupational and environmental factors cause or ...

  12. Occupational Therapist Assistants and Aides

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a high school diploma or equivalent. Education and Training People interested in becoming an occupational therapy assistant ... all workers was $34,750. On-the-job Training Additional training needed (postemployment) to attain competency in ...

  13. Policy perspectives on occupational stress.

    PubMed

    O'Keefe, Louise C; Brown, Kathleen C; Christian, Becky J

    2014-10-01

    Occupational stress is a major physical and mental hazard for many workers and has been found to contribute to cardiovascular disease, musculoskeletal disorders, mood disturbances, workplace injuries, and mental health problems. Health care utilization related to these physical and mental health problems costs employers billions of dollars annually. To combat this problem, employers should adopt a preventive approach and institute organizational and administrative changes that require the participation of both management and workers. This article reviews policies that could impact the quality of work life and influence organizational changes needed to achieve occupational health and safety. Occupational health nurses play a vital role in designing and implementing policies to improve work environments and reduce occupational stress. [Workplace Health Saf 2014;62(10):432-438.]. PMID:25139784

  14. 2014OCCUPATIONAL & ENVIRONMENTAL MEDICINE SYMPOSIUM

    E-print Network

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    Endowment Occupational Hearing Loss: Practical Approaches to Evaluation and Management Rodney C. Diaz, MD UC Health System Prevention of Infectious Disease in Health Care Workers Craig F. Conlon, MD, PhD Kaiser

  15. Environmental Studies & Ecology Sample Occupations

    E-print Network

    Ronquist, Fredrik

    Biologist Animal Occupations Biologist Business Owner Chemical Technician Chemist Civil Engineer Lawyer Environment Policy Analyst Environmental Specialist Field Chemist Fish & Game Warden Fish Farmer Opportunities in Civil Engineering Careers .....IIB 17-2051 H3 Opportunities in Energy Careers

  16. [Occupational hazard related to ionizing radiation and surveillance of exposed people].

    PubMed

    Gérard, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    In France, around 400,000 persons are occupationaly exposed to ionizing radiations especially in the field of medicine or industry (nuclear plant or other). Outside of accident the effective doses received are low and below the natural annual exposure dose in Paris (2,5 mSv). Epidemiological studies show that in the occupational environment the excess risk of cancexer leukemia related to ionizing radiations is negligible. Doctors performing interventional radiology if not taking safety measures may receive doses above 20 mSv responsible for lens opacity. In case of nuclear plant accident the emergency workers and liquidators may receive life-threatening whole body doses. In general industry accident may be responsible for high local dose and severe radiation necrosis which required a highly sophisticated treatment. Strict observance of radiation safety rules under the responsibility of the head of the company or institution must provide a safe professional environment. PMID:25842444

  17. Severe accident analysis using dynamic accident progression event trees

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Aram P. Hakobyan

    2006-01-01

    In present, the development and analysis of Accident Progression Event Trees (APETs) are performed in a manner that is computationally time consuming, difficult to reproduce and also can be phenomenologically inconsistent. One of the principal deficiencies lies in the static nature of conventional APETs. In the conventional event tree techniques, the sequence of events is pre-determined in a fixed order

  18. [Project of the historical monograph on the "Origins of Occupational Medicine Associations in the world"].

    PubMed

    Grieco, A; Porro, A; Berti, Giuseppina Bock; Marri, G

    2003-01-01

    The present contribution regards the project of the historical monograph on the Origins of OH associations in 23 countries, and in particular the chapter on the Origins of the Italian Society of Occupational Health. The Italian chapter is aimed at studying the foundation of the Italian Society of Occupational Health (Naples, October 12, 1929, within the 8th National Congress of Occupational Health) and the first decades of its activity. On account of the complexity and variety of the scientific and social context as well as the particular political period considered, the contribution is divided into 4 different parts. The first deals with the foundation of the Italian Society of Occupational Health and its statutory organization. The second part treats the role and presence of the discipline in the university world as well as the relationships with other cultural institutions such as academies. The third part concerns the law frame (specially as to accidents and work-related diseases) within which the activity of the Italian Society of Occupational Health has started and developed. The fourth part analyses the fascist corporative system and the role played by the trade unions in promoting better life and working conditions, with common issues also with the programmes of the Italian Society of Occupational Health. Finally, some closing remarks and references are provided. PMID:14582260

  19. 1998-99 Occupational Outlook Handbook

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    United States. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

    1998-01-01

    US occupations are featured in this information-rich resource from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The 1998-9 Occupational Outlook Handbook provides the latest edition of a guide to 250 occupations from able seaman to zoologist. Users can browse an alphabetical index or any of eleven occupational clusters, or search the resource by keyword. Each occupation contains a thumbnail sketch of important features as well as information about the nature of the work, working conditions, employment, training, the job outlook, earnings, and related occupations. This is an excellent source of relevant, condensed occupational information.

  20. Cytogenetic Analysis and Occupational Health

    Microsoft Academic Search

    RADIM J. SRAM; Pavel Rössner

    This chapter summarizes the experiences of the Czech Hygiene Service from the mid-1970s until the present time, using cytogenetic\\u000a analysis as a biomarker of exposure. During this period, the method has proved its ability to detect an occupational hazard.\\u000a We observed a significant association between the increased frequency of aberrant cells and occupational exposure to carcinogens\\u000a and mutagens at a

  1. Occupational Stress Among Canadian Orthodontists

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen F. Roth; Giseon Heo; Connie Varnhagen; Kenneth E. Glover; Paul W. Major

    2003-01-01

    The occupational stress associated with many professions, including general dentistry, has been well researched. An anonymous, self-administered, mail-out survey was distributed to Canadian orthodontists. The survey included 67 potential stressors, an overall occupational stress score, an overall job satisfaction scale, and items addressing various characteristics of the respondents. The response rate was 51.2% (335\\/654). Pronounced differences were found between the

  2. Occupational stress among university teachers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Arlene Gray Blix; Robert J. Cruise; Bridgit McBeth Mitchell; Glen G. Blix

    1994-01-01

    The Person?Environment Fit model was used to analyse the lack of fit (misfit) between motivational style and job rewards as a contributing factor in developing occupational stress symptoms in university teachers. Three motivational styles and corresponding job rewards were measured using instruments derived from Porter's motivational theory in a questionnaire mailed to 400 randomly selected tenure?track university teachers.Occupational stress symptoms

  3. Radiology of occupational chest disease

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, A. (Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel)); Kreel, L.

    1989-01-01

    Radiologic manifestations of occupational lung disease are summarized and classified in this book according to the ILO system. The interpretation of chest roentgenograms outlines the progression of each disease and is accompanied with clinically-oriented explanations. Some of the specific diseases covered include asbestosis, coal worker's pneumoconiosis, silicosis, non-mining inhalation of silica and silicates, beryllium induced disease, inhalation of organics and metallics, and occupationally induced asthma.

  4. Creating 3D animations to reconstruct transportation accidents: illustrating aviation accidents using Air Midwest flight 5481 takeoff accident

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christy Spangler; Alice Park; Abdullah Kakar

    2004-01-01

    The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) uses 3D animation to reconstruct and illustrate accident sequences so that the public can visualize and better understand the events leading up to an accident, the determination of probable cause, and the identification of safety issues. These animations factually and faithfully present the accident sequence based on measured, recorded, and calculated data. The purpose

  5. Fathers' occupation and pregnancy outcome.

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, A D; McDonald, J C; Armstrong, B; Cherry, N M; Nolin, A D; Robert, D

    1989-01-01

    Findings from a survey of 56,067 women in Montreal on maternal occupation and pregnancy outcome have been reported. Paternal occupation recorded in the same survey was analysed for spontaneous abortion in 24 occupational groups retaining the six main sectors of maternal occupation and allowing, by means of logistic regression, for seven potentially confounding variables. In only one of the 24 fathers' occupational groups was there a statistically significant excess of spontaneous abortions--mechanics, repairers, and certain assemblers (O/E = 1.10, 90% CI = 1.02-1.20); subdivision of this group suggested that this excess was mainly attributable to the large group of motor vehicle mechanics (O/E = 1.17). No significant excess of known chromosomally determined defects was found in any of the 24 occupational groups. An association of developmental defects was found with food and beverage processing (18 defects observed compared with 8.02 expected; p less than 0.05); however, there was no specificity in type of food, beverage, or congenital defect, and no obvious explanatory mechanism. PMID:2751931

  6. Occupational Respiratory Cancer in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyoung Ryoul

    2010-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma and lung cancer are representative examples of occupational cancer. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death, and the incidence of malignant mesothelioma is expected to increase sharply in the near future. Although information about lung carcinogen exposure is limited, it is estimated that the number of workers exposed to carcinogens has declined. The first official case of occupational cancer was malignant mesothelioma caused by asbestos exposure in the asbestos textile industry in 1992. Since then, compensation for occupational respiratory cancer has increased. The majority of compensated lung cancer was due to underlying pneumoconiosis. Other main causative agents of occupational lung cancer included asbestos, hexavalent chromium, and crystalline silica. Related jobs included welders, foundry workers, platers, plumbers, and vehicle maintenance workers. Compensated malignant mesotheliomas were associated with asbestos exposure. Epidemiologic studies conducted in Korea have indicated an elevated risk of lung cancer in pneumoconiosis patients, foundry workers, and asbestos textile workers. Occupational respiratory cancer has increased during the last 10 to 20 yr though carcinogen-exposed population has declined in the same period. More efforts to advance the systems for the investigation, prevention and management of occupational respiratory cancer are needed. PMID:21258597

  7. Analysis of accidents during flashing operations 

    E-print Network

    Obermeyer, Michael Edward

    1993-01-01

    occurred at intersections under flashing operation compared to those operating in the normal mode. A statistical analysis was conducted to determine the safety of flashing signal operation. No significant increases in accidents or accident severity were...

  8. Time Slows Down during Accidents.

    PubMed

    Arstila, Valtteri

    2012-01-01

    The experienced speed of the passage of time is not constant as time can seem to fly or slow down depending on the circumstances we are in. Anecdotally accidents and other frightening events are extreme examples of the latter; people who have survived accidents often report altered phenomenology including how everything appeared to happen in slow motion. While the experienced phenomenology has been investigated, there are no explanations about how one can have these experiences. Instead, the only recently discussed explanation suggests that the anecdotal phenomenology is due to memory effects and hence not really experienced during the accidents. The purpose of this article is (i) to reintroduce the currently forgotten comprehensively altered phenomenology that some people experience during the accidents, (ii) to explain why the recent experiments fail to address the issue at hand, and (iii) to suggest a new framework to explain what happens when people report having experiences of time slowing down in these cases. According to the suggested framework, our cognitive processes become rapidly enhanced. As a result, the relation between the temporal properties of events in the external world and in internal states becomes distorted with the consequence of external world appearing to slow down. That is, the presented solution is a realist one in a sense that it maintains that sometimes people really do have experiences of time slowing down. PMID:22754544

  9. Emergency and Post Accident Managementi

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G N Kelly; C Rojas Palma

    Almost two decades after Chernobyl, off site nuclear emergency management does not occupy the forefront of political debate or public attention, and this has a direct implication in its longer term funding. Furthermore, the safety of nuclear installations is the subject of continuous improvements, with consequential reductions in the risk of an accident, which in turn has led some to

  10. Updating outdated predictive accident models.

    PubMed

    Wood, A G; Mountain, L J; Connors, R D; Maher, M J; Ropkins, K

    2013-06-01

    Reliable predictive accident models (PAMs) (also referred to as safety performance functions (SPFs)) are essential to design and maintain safe road networks however, ongoing changes in road and vehicle design coupled with road safety initiatives, mean that these models can quickly become dated. Unfortunately, because the fitting of sophisticated PAMs including a wide range of explanatory variables is not a trivial task, available models tend to be based on data collected many years ago and seem unlikely to give reliable estimates of current accidents. Large, expensive studies to produce new models are likely to be, at best, only a temporary solution. This paper thus seeks to develop a practical and efficient methodology to allow currently available PAMs to be updated to give unbiased estimates of accident frequencies at any point in time. Two principal issues are examined: the extent to which the temporal transferability of predictive accident models varies with model complexity; and the practicality and efficiency of two alternative updating strategies. The models used to illustrate these issues are the suites of models developed for rural dual and single carriageway roads in the UK. These are widely used in several software packages in spite of being based on data collected during the 1980s and early 1990s. It was found that increased model complexity by no means ensures better temporal transferability and that calibration of the models using a scale factor can be a practical alternative to fitting new models. PMID:23510788

  11. The Physics of Traffic Accidents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Peter

    1975-01-01

    Shows how physics can be used to analyze and prevent traffic accidents by determining critical speeds on curves, the behavior of motor cycles and stability of articulated vehicles, and the visibility that is needed to make a minor road junction safe. (MLH)

  12. [Phlebopathies and occupation].

    PubMed

    Sancini, A; Tomei, G; Schifano, M P; Nardone, N; Andreozzi, G; Scimitto, L; Fiaschetti, M; De Sio, S; Scala, B; Capozzella, A; Suppi, A; Cetica, C; Tomei, F; Ciarrocca, M

    2012-01-01

    Chronic venous disorder is a public health problem that affects the western industrialized countries. The aim of this study is to evaluate the etiology and prevalence of venous disease of the lower limb in workers, and to identify some risk factors using a detailed and systematic analysis of the literature from 1964 to 2011. There is an important relationship between standing position at work and venous disease. The prolonged orthostatic position of the body implies: venostasis, high pressure and risks of blood clots and thrombosis; in standing workers there is an overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) with oxidation of the components of cell membranes, endothelial damage and increase in vascular permeability. Other risk factors were investigated: sitting during work time, weight lifting-moving and exposure to heat sources, the data suggest that this risk factors are less important than orthostatic body position. Age, sex and familiarity are relevant as the extra-occupational risk factors. For a more accurate study of the role of the prolonged orthostatic position on the development of venous disease in the lover limb all authors should define exactly the population, the role and the length of standing time at work. They should also set a universal language to define the correct standing position (ie. within 1 m2 or steps) and time (ie. one hour or 50%-70% of work time). Attention should be given to prevention, to use early therapeutic measures in view of mortality as a consequence of venous disease, of the high social costs related to the loss of working days, of medical care and of residual disability. PMID:22755500

  13. Occupant Protection at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somers, Jeffrey; Granderson, Brad; Scheuring, Rick

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews NASA's efforts to arrive at protection of occupants of the ORION space craft on landing. An Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) has been developed, it is an anatomically-based, consensus-derived, global severity scoring system that classifies each injury by body region according to its relative importance on a 6-point ordinal scale. It reviews an Operationmally Relevant Injury Scale (ORIS), a classification methodology, and shows charts that detail the results of applying this ORIS to the injury databases. One chart uses NASCAR injury classification. It discusses providing a context for the level of risk inherent in the Orion landings in terms that people understand and have a sense for. For example is the risk of injury during an Orion landing roughly the same, better or worse than: An aircraft carrier landing, a NASCAR crash, or a helicopter crash, etc? The data for NASCAR and Indy Racing league (IRL) racing crash and injury data was reviewed. The risk from the Air Force, Navy, and Army injury data was also reviewed. Past NASA and the Soyuz programs injury risks are also reviewed. The work is an attempt to formulate a recommendation to the Orion Project for an acceptable level of injury risk associated with Nominal and Off-Nominal landing cases. The presentation also discusses the data mining and use of the data to Validate NASA Operationally-Relevant Injury Scale (NORIS) / Military Operationally-Relevant Injury Scale (MORIS), developing injury risk criteria, the types of data that are required, NASCAR modeling techniques and crash data, and comparison with the Brinkley model. The development of injury risk curves for each biodynamic response parameter is discussed. One of the main outcomes of this work is to establish an accurate Automated Test Dummy (ATD) that can be used to measure human tolerances.

  14. Occupational exposure in MRI

    PubMed Central

    Mcrobbie, D W

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews occupational exposure in clinical MRI; it specifically considers units of exposure, basic physical interactions, health effects, guideline limits, dosimetry, results of exposure surveys, calculation of induced fields and the status of the European Physical Agents Directive. Electromagnetic field exposure in MRI from the static field B0, imaging gradients and radiofrequency transmission fields induces electric fields and currents in tissue, which are responsible for various acute sensory effects. The underlying theory and its application to the formulation of incident and induced field limits are presented. The recent International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) Bundesministerium für Arbeit und Soziales and Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers limits for incident field exposure are interpreted in a manner applicable to MRI. Field measurements show that exposure from movement within the B0 fringe field can exceed ICNIRP reference levels within 0.5 m of the bore entrance. Rate of change of field dB/dt from the imaging gradients is unlikely to exceed the new limits, although incident field limits can be exceeded for radiofrequency (RF) exposure within 0.2–0.5 m of the bore entrance. Dosimetric surveys of routine clinical practice show that staff are exposed to peak values of 42±24% of B0, with time-averaged exposures of 5.2±2.8 mT for magnets in the range 0.6–4 T. Exposure to time-varying fields arising from movement within the B0 fringe resulted in peak dB/dt of approximately 2 T s?1. Modelling of induced electric fields from the imaging gradients shows that ICNIRP-induced field limits are unlikely to be exceeded in most situations; however, movement through the static field may still present a problem. The likely application of the limits is discussed with respect to the reformulation of the European Union (EU) directive and its possible implications for MRI. PMID:22457400

  15. The Chernobyl Accident and its Consequences

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. Saenko; V. Ivanov; A. Tsyb; T. Bogdanova; M. Tronko; Yu. Demidchik; S. Yamashita

    2011-01-01

    The accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant was the worst industrial accident of the last century that involved radiation. The unprecedented release of multiple different radioisotopes led to radioactive contamination of large areas surrounding the accident site. The exposure of the residents of these areas was varied and therefore the consequences for health and radioecology could not be reliably

  16. Development of severe accident procedures for Ringhals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. J. Lutz; E. Frantz; S. R. Prokopovich; R. Bastien

    1988-01-01

    Symptom based procedures have been developed for Ringhals to improve the ability of nuclear power plant operators to respond to severe accident transients leading to core melt and reactor vessel failure. These severe accident procedures, together with the existing Ringhals emergency operating procedures, constitute an integrated package of consistent operator actions for dealing with severe accidents in both the short

  17. NASA Medical Response to Human Spacecraft Accidents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patlach, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Manned space flight is risky business. Accidents have occurred and may occur in the future. NASA's manned space flight programs, with all their successes, have had three fatal accidents, one at the launch pad and two in flight. The Apollo fire and the Challenger and Columbia accidents resulted in a loss of seventeen crewmembers. Russia's manned space flight programs have had three fatal accidents, one ground-based and two in flight. These accidents resulted in the loss of five crewmembers. Additionally, manned spacecraft have encountered numerous close calls with potential for disaster. The NASA Johnson Space Center Flight Safety Office has documented more than 70 spacecraft incidents, many of which could have become serious accidents. At the Johnson Space Center (JSC), medical contingency personnel are assigned to a Mishap Investigation Team. The team deploys to the accident site to gather and preserve evidence for the Accident Investigation Board. The JSC Medical Operations Branch has developed a flight surgeon accident response training class to capture the lessons learned from the Columbia accident. This presentation will address the NASA Mishap Investigation Team's medical objectives, planned response, and potential issues that could arise subsequent to a manned spacecraft accident. Educational Objectives are to understand the medical objectives and issues confronting the Mishap Investigation Team medical personnel subsequent to a human space flight accident.

  18. No Silver Bullet Essence and Accidents

    E-print Network

    North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

    No Silver Bullet Essence and Accidents of Software Engineering TR86-020 September 1986 Frederick P. #12;No Silver Bullet Essence and Accidents of Software Engineering September, 1986 Doc. 860905 fpb TR Hill, North Carolina 27514 #12;NO SILVER BULLET - ESSENCE AND ACCIDENTS OF SOFTWARE ENGINEERING

  19. Perception of road accident causes.

    PubMed

    Vanlaar, Ward; Yannis, George

    2006-01-01

    A theoretical two-dimensional model on prevalence and risk was developed. The objective of this study was to validate this model empirically to answer three questions: How do European drivers perceive the importance of several causes of road accidents? Are there important differences in perceptions between member states? Do these perceptions reflect the real significance of road accident causes? Data were collected from 23 countries, based on representative national samples of at least 1000 respondents each (n=24,372). Face-to-face interviews with fully licensed, active car drivers were conducted using a questionnaire containing closed answer questions. Respondents were asked to rate 15 causes of road accidents, each using a six-point ordinal scale. The answers were analyzed by calculating Kendall's tau for each pair of items to form lower triangle similarity matrices per country and for Europe as a whole. These matrices were then used as the input files for an individual difference scaling to draw a perceptual map of the 15 items involved. The hypothesized model on risk and prevalence fits the data well and enabled us to answer the three questions of concern. The subject space of the model showed that there are no relevant differences between the 23 countries. The group space of the model comprises four quadrants, each containing several items (high perceived risk/low perceived prevalence items; high perceived risk/high perceived prevalence items; low perceived risk/high perceived prevalence items and low perceived risk/low perceived prevalence items). Finally, perceptions of the items driving under the influence of alcohol, drugs and medicines and driving using a handheld or hands-free mobile phone are discussed with regard to their real significance in causing road accidents. To conclude, individual difference scaling offers some promising possibilities to study drivers' perception of road accident causes. PMID:16191426

  20. FILE WITHIN 5 DAYS OF INCIDENT. (In the event of a serious or fatal injury or illness, notify within 24 hours. It is the supervisors responsibility to report lost time due to an occupational injury or disease. Failure to do so

    E-print Network

    within 24 hours. It is the supervisors responsibility to report lost time due to an occupational injury or disease. Failure to do so immediately may result in departmental fines. NOTE: PLEASE FILL IN EACH BLANK) OCCUPATIONAL ACCIDENT OR ILLNESS REPORT Name

  1. Measurement of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant criticality accident alarm

    SciTech Connect

    Tayloe, R.W. Jr. (Battelle Columbus (USA)); McGinnis, B. (Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Piketon, OH (USA))

    1990-08-31

    Measurements of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant's nuclear criticality accident radiation alarm signal response time, sound wave frequency, and sound volume levels were made to demonstrate compliance with ANSI/ANS-8.3-1986. A steady-state alarm signal is produced within one-half second of obtaining a two-out-of-three detector trip. The fundamental alarm sound wave frequency is 440 hertz. The sound volume levels are greater than 10 decibels above background and ranged from 100 to 125 A-weighted decibels. The requirements of the standard were met; however the recommended maximum sound volume level of 115 dBA was exceeded. Emergency procedures require immediate evacuation upon initiation of a facility's radiation alarm. Comparison with standards for allowable time of exposure at different noise levels indicate that the elevated noise level at this location does not represent an occupational injury hazard. 8 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Fatal accidents among car and truck drivers: effects of fatigue, age, and alcohol consumption.

    PubMed

    Summala, H; Mikkola, T

    1994-06-01

    Fatigue increases the risk of an accident if the driver, on recognizing symptoms of fatigue, does not stop driving. We studied whether a tendency to continue the current activity and complete the task especially affects younger drivers, who are more susceptible to motivational pressures at the wheel in general. The data consisted of Finnish in-depth studies on 586 single-vehicle and 1357 multiple-vehicle accidents in which at least one vehicle occupant died. When excluding alcohol-related cases, the results showed that, first, trailer-truck drivers who either fell asleep or were tired to a degree that contributed to the accident were younger than those involved in the other fatalities. For car drivers, the proportion of fatigue-related cases was approximately constant in each age group, but a variation was seen when studied according to the time of day of the accident, mainly resulting from two distinct peaks. The first was in young drivers 18 to 20 years old between midnight and 6:00 a.m. The other occurred in drivers 56 years and older during the late afternoon hours. These data also indicate that in terms of fatal accidents, fatigue and alcohol seem to be less of a problem for truckers than for car drivers. PMID:8070795

  3. Uncovering your hidden occupancy costs.

    PubMed

    Apgar, M

    1993-01-01

    Senior managers at large companies may not believe that they can have much impact on the "bricks and mortar" of their cost structure. They may even think that occupancy costs are too insignificant to worry about, too technical to analyze, and too fixed to control. But as real estate consultant Mahlon Apgar argues, occupancy costs can hurt a company's earnings, share value, and overall performance. On the other hand, every dollar saved drops straight to the bottom line. Shearson Lehman Brothers, for example, has found that it can save as much as $20 million annually by reducing occupancy costs in its branch offices and headquarters. Managing occupancy costs isn't easy. But it is timely. As companies strive to improve productivity by consolidating functions and downsizing staff, they are saddled with excess office space. Expansions abroad present completely different market conditions that put a premium on reducing occupancy costs. At the same time, the changing nature of work is challenging deeply held beliefs about the workplace, and, consequently, traditional expectations of office space are giving way to innovations that are less costly and more productive. To manage occupancy costs, managers must be able to identify their components, measure their impact, understand what drives them, and develop options to change them. Four basic tools help diagnose problems: a cost history, a loss analysis, a component analysis, and a lease aging profile. Understanding cost drivers like leasing, location, and layout can give executives the insights they need to reduce occupancy costs while improving the effectiveness of facilities to support day-to-day operations. PMID:10126151

  4. Historical perspectives of occupational cancer.

    PubMed

    Bogovski, P

    1980-01-01

    Three topics are discussed in this review, which is not intended to give even a short description of the history of occupational cancer. First, the present state and possible future trends of occupational cancer are examined. Such factors as rapid industrialization, increasing amounts of chemical compounds in the environment, and discoveries of new occupational carcinogens such as asbestos and vinyl chloride indicate that occupational cancer is likely to become more frequent in the future. The controversial issue of the proportion of cancers related to occupation is briefly considered. The upward trend of estimates of various authors during a quarter of a century indicates a growing proportion of occupational cancers in the overall incidence of cancer. Second, some lessons from the past are considered. Careful observations and alertness of physicians and proper documentation of occupational cancer cases are pointed out. Interdisciplinary teamwork and international cooperation have been useful in the past and continue to be desirable. Some details of the studies of skin cancer caused by mineral oil are informative. Individual susceptibility, whether genetically determined or due to pathological conditions, needs further study. As an example of the predictive value of animal experiments, skin cancer related to the oil shale industry in Estonia is discussed. The third topic--input from experimental cancer research--deals mainly with the problem of modifying factors. Experimental data on such factors could facilitate investigations of life-style effects, using the proposed classification of modifying factors. The problem of nasal cancer in woodworkers may be easier to solve by taking into account some experimental data on tannin-containing material. Some possibilities for future action and suggestions for further research are outlined. PMID:7007658

  5. Domestic accidents: their cause and prevention

    PubMed Central

    Mackessack-Leitch, K.

    1978-01-01

    The study of domestic accidents, which includes accidents in and around the home and in institutions, is of increasing importance. The mortality statistics are shown in Table 1. In 1974, 18,335 people died from accidents in the UK (RoSPA, 1974) equivalent to the population of a reasonably sized town. Accidents form one of the four main causes of death in this country and have become relatively more common in recent years. Analysis of the causes of home accidents make it possible to plan ways of preventing them. General practitioners and their colleagues in the primary health care team have the principal responsibility. PMID:553168

  6. Fitting and interpreting occupancy models.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Alan H; Lindenmayer, David B; Donnelly, Christine F

    2013-01-01

    We show that occupancy models are more difficult to fit than is generally appreciated because the estimating equations often have multiple solutions, including boundary estimates which produce fitted probabilities of zero or one. The estimates are unstable when the data are sparse, making them difficult to interpret, and, even in ideal situations, highly variable. As a consequence, making accurate inference is difficult. When abundance varies over sites (which is the general rule in ecology because we expect spatial variance in abundance) and detection depends on abundance, the standard analysis suffers bias (attenuation in detection, biased estimates of occupancy and potentially finding misleading relationships between occupancy and other covariates), asymmetric sampling distributions, and slow convergence of the sampling distributions to normality. The key result of this paper is that the biases are of similar magnitude to those obtained when we ignore non-detection entirely. The fact that abundance is subject to detection error and hence is not directly observable, means that we cannot tell when bias is present (or, equivalently, how large it is) and we cannot adjust for it. This implies that we cannot tell which fit is better: the fit from the occupancy model or the fit ignoring the possibility of detection error. Therefore trying to adjust occupancy models for non-detection can be as misleading as ignoring non-detection completely. Ignoring non-detection can actually be better than trying to adjust for it. PMID:23326323

  7. Prevention of occupational Back Pain.

    PubMed

    Al-Otaibi, Sultan T

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews scientific research on occupational back pain and focuses on prevention of this problem. It discusses some of the challenges of translating the evidence of this multi-factorial condition into policy. Medical science is currently unable to clearly distinguish between back pain caused by work and that possibly due to other causes but which affects the individual's capacity to work. Back pain affects the vast majority of people at some point in their lives and is very costly to both the health care system and the industry. Evidence suggests that heavy lifting, driving, and vibration of the whole body are linked to occupational back pain. Once the risk factors for occupational back pain are identified, an otherwise chronic and disabling condition can be prevented in the majority of patients. As explained in this article, three levels of prevention for occupational back pain have been reported as effective. Failure to implement preventive measures may lead to a high incidence of occupational back pain. PMID:25983601

  8. Malignant lymphomas and occupational exposures.

    PubMed

    Persson, B; Dahlander, A M; Fredriksson, M; Brage, H N; Ohlson, C G; Axelson, O

    1989-08-01

    The effects of potential risk factors for Hodgkin's disease (HD) and for non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) were evaluated in a case-referent study encompassing 54 cases of HD, 106 cases of NHL, and 275 referents, all alive. Exposure information was obtained by questionnaires posted to the subjects. Crude rate ratios were increased for various occupational exposures including solvents, welding, wood preservatives, phenoxy acids, and fresh wood (sawmill workers, lumberjacks, paper pulp workers). After further analyses based on logistic regression occupational exposures to welding and creosote remained as significant risk factors for HD. For NHL, occupational exposures to solvents, phenoxy acids, and creosote but also work as carpenter or cabinet maker and contacts with pets (other than dogs, cats, and birds) were associated with significantly increased risks. PMID:2775671

  9. Occupant restraint use in Canada.

    PubMed

    Boase, Paul; Jonah, Brian A; Dawson, Nancy

    2004-01-01

    Legislation regarding seat belt use in Canada is a provincial/territorial responsibility. Each of the 13 jurisdictions has enacted legislation and set the penalties regarding non-use of seat belts and appropriate child restraint systems. The federal government regulates occupant restraint systems and child restraints. In addition, Transport Canada (TC) gathers annual survey data on the use of seat belts and child restraints on Canadian roads and provides research support. National coordination toward the Canadian Road Safety Vision 2010 goal of a 40% reduction in fatalities and serious injuries related to non-belt/child restraint use and a 95% restraint usage rate is provided by the Canadian Council of Motor Transport Administrators' (CCMTA) National Occupant Restraint Program (NORP). The paper examines the history of legislation, provincial/territorial penalties, NORP, and TC involvement in promoting the use of occupant restraints. PMID:15178242

  10. Pinning of Fermionic Occupation Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilling, Christian; Gross, David; Christandl, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    The Pauli exclusion principle is a constraint on the natural occupation numbers of fermionic states. It has been suspected since at least the 1970s, and only proved very recently, that there is a multitude of further constraints on these numbers, generalizing the Pauli principle. Here, we provide the first analytic analysis of the physical relevance of these constraints. We compute the natural occupation numbers for the ground states of a family of interacting fermions in a harmonic potential. Intriguingly, we find that the occupation numbers are almost, but not exactly, pinned to the boundary of the allowed region (quasipinned). The result suggests that the physics behind the phenomenon is richer than previously appreciated. In particular, it shows that for some models, the generalized Pauli constraints play a role for the ground state, even though they do not limit the ground-state energy. Our findings suggest a generalization of the Hartree-Fock approximation.

  11. Occupational therapy and rehabilitation engineering.

    PubMed

    Gordon, R E; Kozole, K P

    1984-01-01

    Occupational therapists in clinical settings are often challenged with difficult problems in the selection, application and modification of complex mechanical, electrical or structural aids for persons with severe disability who wish to improve their levels of independence. At the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, solutions to such situations are facilitated by interaction between the occupational therapist and the rehabilitation engineer. In this paper, following the identification of the population served and their specialized needs, the working relationship between the occupational therapist and rehabilitation engineer will be discussed through presentation of two case studies. Various commercially available equipment will be considered along with modifications possible, and finally, customer design solutions will be given for some problems. Given the growing store of resources for assisting clients who have special needs, many creative systems can be developed in therapists and engineers combine their respective knowledge and skills in problem solving. PMID:23952160

  12. Occupational physicians and environmental medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Ducatman, A.M. (West Virginia Univ. School of Medicine, Morgantown (United States))

    1993-03-01

    Physicians who practice environmental medicine seek to identify and to prevent patient and population exposures that cause adverse human health outcomes. Epidemiologic, toxicologic, clinical, and public health skills essential to this enterprise are indistinguishable from those of the occupational physician. Several important controversies illustrate the essential role of occupational physicians in environmental health science and policy, including environmental asbestos, dioxin, electromagnetic fields, and carcinogenicity testing. Our continuing involvement in environmental issues is predicted by three conditions, each unlikely to change. The human remains the animal of greatest interest; the natural experiment will have been performed (however unwittingly); and the work site will continue to provide that first and clearest setting for measuring the outcome. Therefore, residency training must be expanded so that future occupational and environmental physicians will recognize their fundamental role in environmental health. The results of our industry cross factory walls with ease. So must our efforts.

  13. [Multicenter paragliding accident study 1990].

    PubMed

    Lautenschlager, S; Karli, U; Matter, P

    1992-01-01

    During the period from 1.1.90 until 31.12.90, 86 injuries associated with paragliding were analyzed in a prospective study in 12 different Swiss hospitals with reference to causes, patterns, and frequencies. The injuries showed a mean score of over 2 and were classified as severe. Most frequent spine injuries (36%) and lesions of the lower extremity (35%) with a high risk of the ankles were diagnosed. One accident was fatal. 60% of the accidents happened during landing, 26% during launching and 14% during flight. Half of the pilots were affected during their primary training course. Most accidents were caused by inflight error of judgement--especially incorrect estimation of wind conditions--and further the choice of unfavourable landing sites. In contrast to previous injury-reports, only one equipment failure could be noted, but often the equipment was not corresponding with the experience and the weight of the pilot. To reduce the frequency of paragliding-injuries an accurate choice of equipment and an increased attention to environmental factors is mandatory. Furthermore an education-program regarding the attitude and intelligence of the pilot should be included in training courses. PMID:1467020

  14. J Occup Health 2003; 45: 382391 Occupational Health

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    . It was concluded that job, sex, young age, smoking habit, excess alcohol use, overweight, psychotropic drug use workers, smokers, alcohol users, overweight workers and in individuals with a disease or psychosomatic, Diseased people, Smoking habit, Alcohol use, Psychotropic drug use, Employed people Occupational injuries

  15. Relations of Occupational Stress to Occupational Class in Japanese Civil Servants-Analysis by Two Occupational Stress Models

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mariko KAWAHARADA; Yasuaki SAIJO; Eiji YOSHIOKA; Tetsuro SATO; Hirokazu SATO; Reiko KISHI

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify relations between occupational stress and occupational class in Japanese civil servants, using two occupational stress models—the Effort- Reward Imbalance (ERI) Model and the Job Demand-Control (JDC) Model. The subjects were employees of three local public organizations. We distributed self-administered questionnaires and assessed occupational stress by ERI and JDC. We used seven

  16. [Occupational nursing specialization: proposed change of paradigm].

    PubMed

    Mauro, M Y

    1998-01-01

    The course of Labour Nursing aimed at preparing nurses for companies security and workers health. It started in 1974 as a result of the efforts of DESP/EEAN/UFRJ and ABEn close to the Ministry of Labour in Rio de Janeiro and based on the Resolution 112/59--OMS/OIT. Later, this course was spread out to other Universities and Brazil's regions and 13 courses have been provided until 1985. In the beginning, the courses follwed the orientation and control of FUNDACENTRO, until 1996 and were directed to the industry. From this time on, these courses register was sent to CORENs and accomplished independently at Nursing Schools, based on Resolution 12/86--MEC, Rec. 161/93--OIT. Instructions from the Ministry of Labour and Ministry of Health. At the EEAN, up to 1995, 11 Specialisation Courses have been accomplished, based on ANENT orientations and fundamental by the subjects: Scientific Investigation Methodology, Methodology of Nursing Teaching and Education for Health; Worker's Health Politics; Labour Organisational and Social Sciences; Environment Sanitation; Work Safety and Hygiene and Human Ecology; Ergonomy; Labour Process; Occupational Risks; Labour Accidents and Illnesses; Labour Legislation; Labour Nursing; Technical Visits and Practice in Workers Health Services at Companies Programmes and Public Health. The course enables nurses of essential, educative, managing and investigative activities and their formation culminates with a dissertation that has as a study object, emerging problems of nursing practice for workers. This programme has been studied by the author herself aiming at a better adjustment for these professionals insertion into the work market. PMID:10776288

  17. [[Occupational differences in life expectancy: 1989

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, A

    1991-01-01

    Differential mortality by occupation and sex is analyzed for Japan for the year 1989 using official data. The results show that the employed live longer than those without regular occupations. PMID:12283828

  18. Non-occupational exposure to silica dust

    PubMed Central

    Bhagia, L. J.

    2012-01-01

    Occupational exposure to silica occurs at workplaces in factories like quartz crushing facilities (silica flour milling), agate, ceramic, slate pencil, glass, stone quarries and mines, etc., Non-occupational exposure to silica dust can be from industrial sources in the vicinity of the industry as well as non-industrial sources. Recently, public concern regarding non-occupational or ambient exposure to crystalline silica has emerged making it important to gather information available on non-occupational exposures to silica dust and non-occupational silicosis. This paper reviews various non-occupational exposures reported in literature including some studies by the author. Methodology used in assessment of non-occupational exposures, standards for non-occupational exposures to silica dust and indirect estimation of cumulative risk % are also discussed. PMID:23776316

  19. Association of work-related accidents with noise exposure in the workplace and noise-induced hearing loss based on the experience of some 240,000 person-years of observation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michel Picard; Serge André Girard; Marc Simard; Richard Larocque; Tony Leroux; Fernand Turcotte

    2008-01-01

    This retrospective study explores the association between occupational noise exposure at the time of hearing tests, permanent noise-induced hearing loss and work-related accident risk. Log-binomial analysis was used to first ascertain the association between study variables according to activity sector (North American Industry Classification System, NAICS) and accident context while controlling for age. Second part of the paper estimates the

  20. Values and work environment: Mapping 32 occupations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ariel Knafo; Lilach Sagiv

    2004-01-01

    The study addresses the relationship between values and occupations. Israeli workers (N=652; mean age=47; 43% male) in 32\\u000a occupations reported their values using the Portrait Value Questionnaire (Schwartz, Melech, Lehmann, Burgess, Harris, & Owens,\\u000a 2001), and value scores were aggregated within occupations. Occupations were classified according to the Holland (1985) typology.\\u000a Enterprising work environments correlated negatively with universalism values. Social

  1. [Occupational hygiene topics in ferroalloys production].

    PubMed

    Kudriashov, I N; Fedoruk, A A

    2014-01-01

    Hygienic evaluation covered work conditions of main occupations in ferroalloys production on a plant in Ural regions. The occupations are: ferroalloy furnace operator, ferroalloy furnace worker and crane operator. The findings proved that the workers are exposed to a complex of occupational hazards among which dust and unfavorable microclimate play major role. At the enterprise, occupational dust disease cases (silicosis from exposure to silicon-containing dust) are registered, with average development duration of 28.7 +/- 6.2 years. PMID:25282808

  2. Air and Water Transportation Occupations. Reprinted from the Occupational Outlook Handbook, 1978-79 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Labor Statistics (DOL), Washington, DC.

    Focusing on air and water transportation occupations, this document is one in a series of forty-one reprints from the Occupational Outlook Handbook providing current information and employment projections for individual occupations and industries through 1985. The specific occupations covered in this document include civil aviation workers, air…

  3. Protective and Related Service Occupations. Reprinted from the Occupational Outlook Handbook, 1978-79 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Labor Statistics (DOL), Washington, DC.

    Focusing on protective and related service occupations, this document is one in a series of forty-one reprints from the Occupational Outlook Handbook providing current information and employment projections for individual occupations and industries through 1985. The specific occupations covered in this document include correction officers,…

  4. Railroad Occupations. Reprinted from the Occupational Outlook Handbook, 1978-79 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Labor Statistics (DOL), Washington, DC.

    Focusing on railroad occupations, this document is one in a series of forty-one reprints from the Occupational Outlook Handbook providing current information and employment projections for individual occupations and industries through 1985. The specific occupations covered in this document include brake operators, conductors, locomotive engineers,…

  5. Construction Occupations--Finishing. Reprinted from the Occupational Outlook Handbook, 1978-79 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Labor Statistics (DOL), Washington, DC.

    Focusing on finishing construction occupations, this document is one in a series of forty-one reprints from the Occupational Outlook Handbook providing current information and employment projections for individual occupations and industries through 1985. The specific occupations covered in this document include air…

  6. Medical and occupational preconditions for vibration-induced spinal disorders: occupational disease no. 2110 in Germany

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Heinrich Dupuis

    1994-01-01

    The current state of scientific knowledge of the biodynamic behaviour of the vertebral column under the influence of whole-body vibration whilst sitting and results from epidemiological studies caused the medical board of experts on occupational health of the Federal Ministry of Labour in Germany to add a new occupational disease to the official list of occupational diseases. The occupational disease

  7. Food Merchandising Occupations. Reprinted from the Occupational Outlook Handbook, 1978-79 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Labor Statistics (DOL), Washington, DC.

    Focusing on food merchandising occupations, this document is one in a series of forty-one reprints from the Occupational Outlook Handbook providing current information and employment projections for individual occupations and industries through 1985. The specific occupations covered in this document include bartenders, cooks and chefs, dining room…

  8. Agricultural Occupations Programs Planning Guides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stitt, Thomas R.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    A set of program planning guides that include seven areas (1) Agricultural Production, (2) Agricultural Supplies and Services, (3) Agricultural Mechanics, (4) Agricultural Products, (5) Ornamental Horticulture, (6) Agricultural Resources, and (7) Forestry, were developed and introduced to high school applied biological and agricultural occupations

  9. Curriculum Guide for Health Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Board of Education, Salem. Div. of Community Colleges and Career Education.

    Developed by teachers and representatives of the health service industries, this curriculum guide outlines the basic skills and knowledge necessary for entry-level competencies in the health field or for entrance into a post-high school or university programs. Section 1, Occupational and Instructional Data, provides manpower data and an analysis…

  10. Pathways to STEMM Support Occupations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solberg, V. Scott; Kimmel, Linda G.; Miller, Jon D.

    2012-01-01

    The preceding articles in this issue of the "Peabody Journal of Education" have focused on preparation for and entry into professional positions in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and medicine (STEMM). This article shifts the focus from professional positions to STEMM support occupations, focusing on the preparation necessary for…

  11. Post Occupancy Evaluation in Scotland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Chris; Thomson, Keith

    2004-01-01

    The Scottish Executive, the devolved government for Scotland, is engaging with stakeholders to achieve excellence in the school estate through Post Occupancy Evaluation (POE). Design of the school environment has a direct impact on teaching and learning, activities which can be supported or frustrated by many building elements. Through a…

  12. Occupational asthma by Anisakis simplex

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Armentia; M. Lombardero; A. Callejo; J. M. Martín Santos; F. J. Martín Gil; J. Vega; M. L. Arranz; C. Martínez

    1998-01-01

    Background: No cases of occupational asthma caused by the inhalation of antigens from Anisakis simplex have been published. Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the possibility that A simplex can play a role in the asthma experienced by 2 workers when handling fish and fish flour. Methods: Skin prick and bronchial challenge tests with A simplex were

  13. Occupational Neurotoxic Diseases in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chi-Hung; Huang, Chu-Yun

    2012-01-01

    Occupational neurotoxic diseases have become increasingly common in Taiwan due to industrialization. Over the past 40 years, Taiwan has transformed from an agricultural society to an industrial society. The most common neurotoxic diseases also changed from organophosphate poisoning to heavy metal intoxication, and then to organic solvent and semiconductor agent poisoning. The nervous system is particularly vulnerable to toxic agents because of its high metabolic rate. Neurological manifestations may be transient or permanent, and may range from cognitive dysfunction, cerebellar ataxia, Parkinsonism, sensorimotor neuropathy and autonomic dysfunction to neuromuscular junction disorders. This study attempts to provide a review of the major outbreaks of occupational neurotoxins from 1968 to 2012. A total of 16 occupational neurotoxins, including organophosphates, toxic gases, heavy metals, organic solvents, and other toxic chemicals, were reviewed. Peer-reviewed articles related to the electrophysiology, neuroimaging, treatment and long-term follow up of these neurotoxic diseases were also obtained. The heavy metals involved consisted of lead, manganese, organic tin, mercury, arsenic, and thallium. The organic solvents included n-hexane, toluene, mixed solvents and carbon disulfide. Toxic gases such as carbon monoxide, and hydrogen sulfide were also included, along with toxic chemicals including polychlorinated biphenyls, tetramethylammonium hydroxide, organophosphates, and dimethylamine borane. In addition we attempted to correlate these events to the timeline of industrial development in Taiwan. By researching this topic, the hope is that it may help other developing countries to improve industrial hygiene and promote occupational safety and health care during the process of industrialization. PMID:23251841

  14. Drafting. Occupational Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Drafting Occupational Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP) is one of a series of competency lists, verified by expert workers, that have evolved from a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) job analysis process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives from throughout Ohio. This OCAP identifies the…

  15. Occupational Perceptions of Academic Disciplines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonough, Joan E.; Wagstaff, Graham F.

    1983-01-01

    Investigated how 485 English high school students viewed various academic disciplines with respect to their specificity (their relationship to all occupations) and their utility (the extent to which each facilitates finding employment). Results suggested most students who choose a high specificity major are in effect choosing a career. (JAC)

  16. The Occupational Therapist as Counselor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunning, R. Edward

    1973-01-01

    This paper describes humanistic-existentialism as a philosophy which generates a theory of counseling and suggests how this theory can apply to the practice of an occupational therapist in the clinical setting of a community health center. (Editors/JA)

  17. Travel Agent. Occupational Simulation Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Wayne

    This career exploration instructional booklet on the travel agent's occupation is one of several resulting from the rural southwestern Colorado CEPAC Project (Career Education Process of Attitude Change). Based on a job analysis and utilizing a programed instructional format, the following content is included: A brief description of what a travel…

  18. Is occupation relevant in suicide?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Outi Koskinen; Kaisa Pukkila; Helinä Hakko; Jari Tiihonen; Erkki Väisänen; Terttu Särkioja; Pirkko Räsänen

    2002-01-01

    Background: The seasonality of suicide rates and methods of suicide may be related to changes in weather and conditions of employment. Particularly the amount of occupational outdoor exposure could show differences in the distribution of suicides by season and the selection of suicide method, in addition to age at the time of death. Methods: The data consisted of all death

  19. Family Occupations in Later Life

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bette R. Bonder

    2006-01-01

    Literature on famiiy interactions of older adults suggests that famiiies vary widely, and that many families have reciprocai sodal, emotional, and instrumental exchanges. Research disproportionately emphasizes elders as redpients of care, and lacks darity abont the precise occupations in which elders and families engage together. This stndy reports on interviews with 26 well, commnnity-residing older adults to determine how they

  20. Occupational Analysis and Work Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dippo, Don

    1988-01-01

    Assesses the potential of occupational analysis to redefine the aims of work education to afford students increased participation in the social and economic changes characterizing contemporary work. Faults the prevalence of "social efficiency" over "social growth" in educational objectives, advocating instructional emphasis on interrelations…

  1. Occupational Therapy in Mental Health

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anne Cusick; Tracey Demattia; Sharon Doyle

    1993-01-01

    Previous studies have identified a low preference for mental health careers among students and practitioners in occupational therapy. Factors implicated include the social stigma of mental health in the community, fieldwork experience, academic preparation, and work setting factors such as role ambiguity and chronicity of clients. Of these factors, fieldwork may be the most important influence. A survey was administered

  2. Occupational Tedium among Prison Officers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shamir, Boaz; Drory, Amos

    1982-01-01

    Studied sources of occupational stress in the prison officer's job and investigated their relationships with tedium (defined as a general experience of physical, emotional, and attitudinal exhaustion). Found the variables making the largest unique contributions to the variance in tedium are role overload, management support, and societal support.…

  3. Occupational Safety and Health Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wash, Pat

    1975-01-01

    The growing concern for safety in both the workplace and in consumer products will create many new jobs through the mid-1980's--especially in private industry. The largest number of safety professionals are safety engineers; others include fire protection engineers, industrial hygienists, loss control and occupational health consultants, and…

  4. [Hanggliding accidents. Distribution of injuries and accident analysis].

    PubMed

    Ballmer, F T; Jakob, R P

    1989-12-01

    Paragliding--a relatively new sport to Switzerland--brought 23 patients with 48 injuries (38% lower limb and 29% spinal) within a period of 8 months to the Inselspital University hospital in Berne. The aim of the study in characterizing these injuries is to formulate some guidelines towards prevention. With over 90% of accidents occurring at either take off or landing, emphasis on better training for the beginner is proposed with strict guidelines for the more experienced pilot flying in unfavourable conditions. PMID:2617285

  5. [Occupationally mediated morbidity in aviation specialists].

    PubMed

    Soldatov, S K; Bukhtiiarov, I V; Zinkin, V N; Swidowy?, V I; Palishkina, E E

    2010-01-01

    General hygienic evaluation covered workplaces of aviation engineers and technicians and showed that work conditions of these occupations are characterized mainly by exposure to noise and infrasound, that are assigned to hazardous (3.4) and jeopardized (4) classes. Analysis of periodic medical examinations results helped to justify evidence based occupational and occupationally mediated diseases. PMID:21089440

  6. Illinois Occupational Skill Standards: Administrative Support Cluster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Occupational Skill Standards and Credentialing Council, Carbondale.

    This document, which is intended for workforce preparation program providers, details the Illinois Occupational Skill Standards for programs preparing students for administrative support occupations. The document begins with overviews of the Illinois perspective on occupational skill standards and credentialing, the process used to develop the…

  7. Occupancy estimation and the closure assumption

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christopher T. Rota; Robert J. Fletcher Jr; Robert M. Dorazio; Matthew G. Betts

    2009-01-01

    Summary 1. Recent advances in occupancy estimation that adjust for imperfect detection have provided sub- stantial improvements over traditional approaches and are receiving considerable use in applied ecology. To estimate and adjust for detectability, occupancy modelling requires multiple surveys at a site and requires the assumption of 'closure' between surveys, i.e. no changes in occupancy between surveys. Violations of this

  8. Home Economics Education Guide for Occupational Foods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Looney, Era F.

    Designed to assist home economics teachers in providing a training program to prepare high school students for jobs in foods occupations, this curriculum guide contains a two-year course of study in occupational foods. The first-year program consists of nineteen units, as follow: (1) introduction to food service occupations; (2) sanitation; (3)…

  9. Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute

    E-print Network

    Neimark, Alexander V.

    areas of occupational and environmental health, toxicology and risk assessment. EOHSI members are activeEnvironmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute Annual Report 2008 EOHIS is a joint;1 The Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute With its broad and multidisciplinary faculty base

  10. Insulator (Heat and Frost). Occupational Analyses Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McRory, Aline; Ally, Mohamed

    This analysis covers tasks performed by an insulator, an occupational title some provinces and territories of Canada have also identified as heat and frost insulator. A guide to analysis discusses development, structure, and validation method; scope of the occupation; trends; and safety. To facilitate understanding the nature of the occupation,…

  11. Illinois Occupational Skill Standards: Architectural Drafting Cluster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Occupational Skill Standards and Credentialing Council, Carbondale.

    This document, which is intended as a guide for work force preparation program providers, details the Illinois occupational skill standards for programs preparing students for employment in occupations in the architectural drafting cluster. The document begins with a brief overview of the Illinois perspective on occupational skill standards and…

  12. Illinois Occupational Skill Standards: Mechanical Drafting Cluster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Occupational Skill Standards and Credentialing Council, Carbondale.

    This document, which is intended as a guide for work force preparation program providers, details the Illinois occupational skill standards for programs preparing students for employment in occupations in the mechanical drafting cluster. The document begins with a brief overview of the Illinois perspective on occupational skill standards and…

  13. 0 Occupational Asthma February 13, 2013

    E-print Network

    deYoung, Brad

    - 0 Occupational Asthma WEBINAR February 13, 2013 10:0 a.m. ­ 11:30 p.m. P W SREVENTION ORKSHOP ERIES February 2013 Occupational Asthma Webinar PARTICIPANT REGISTRATION FORM I would like to receive notification of future workshops by e-mail. How did you hear about the Occupational Asthma webinar? newspaper e

  14. Introduction: Occupational Stress and Its Management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dianna T. Kenny; Cary L. Cooper

    2003-01-01

    In this introduction to the special issue, the current key issues in the area of occupational stress and its management are summarized. These include the link between stress and ill health, job stressors and strain outcomes, work-life balance and individual worker characteristics and the experience of occupational stress. The editors argue that the concept of occupational stress and its corollary,

  15. AGRICULTURAL OCCUPATIONS OTHER THAN FARMING IN MISSOURI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GRIFFITH, WARREN L.

    THE OBJECTIVES OF THIS STUDY WERE TO--(1) IDENTIFY PRESENT AND EMERGING OFF-FARM AGRICULTURAL OCCUPATIONS, (2) DETERMINE EMPLOYMENT TRENDS, (3) RELATE TYPES OF OCCUPATIONS TO STATE REGIONS, (4) DETERMINE CHARACTERISTICS OF THESE OCCUPATIONS, AND (5) DETERMINE CHARACTERISTICS OF AGRICULTURAL BUSINESSES. A SURVEY OF 3,315 FIRMS IN RURAL AREAS OF THE…

  16. Vertical occupational mobility and its measurement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shirley Dex; Joanne Lindley; Kelly Ward

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a number of alternative approaches to devising a vertical occupational scale and compares the outcomes of different scales on calculations of occupational mobility. The paper describes the conceptual issues relevant to calculating occupational mobility and documents the measurement error embedded in the choice of measure, as applied to different data sets. The ranking schemes used include SOC

  17. Prestige and Occupational Therapy in Mental Health

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Janet Falk-Kessler; Peter Ruopp

    1993-01-01

    The prestige of occupational therapy in mental health was studied in relationship to the prestige held by other mental health professions. One hundred fifty four mental health professionals, representing members of a psychiatric treatment team, were surveyed. Although all professionals agreed that occupational therapists held a moderate amount of prestige when considered apart from other disciplines, occupational therapists received the

  18. The Occupational Therapy Elder Abuse Checklist

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mary Jean Lafata; Christine A. Helfrich

    2001-01-01

    Occupational therapists encounter elder abuse in society and in clinical practice; however, the occupational therapy literature is void of information and tools for assessing and treating individuals at risk. Occupational therapists are in a unique position to identify elder abuse. Definitions of elder abuse, signs and symptoms of elder abuse, and reporting practices required of professionals coming in contact with

  19. Illinois Occupational Skill Standards. Meeting Professional Cluster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Occupational Skill Standards and Credentialing Council, Carbondale.

    This document, which is intended as a guide for workforce preparation program providers, details the Illinois occupational skill standards for programs preparing students for employment in the meeting professional occupational cluster. It begins with a brief overview of the Illinois perspective on occupational skill standards and credentialing,…

  20. Animal Management Technician. Occupational Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Occupational Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP) for animal management technician (AMT) is a competency list verified by expert workers that evolved from a job analysis. It identifies occupational, academic, and employability competencies needed to enter the occupation; lists and clusters them into broader units; and details the competency…

  1. Occupational Licensing: Questions a Legislator Should Ask.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shimberg, Benjamin; Roederer, Doug

    The problems, issues, concerns, and preferred solutions concerning occupational licensing are discussed in this guide designed for state policymakers confronting decisions regarding the credentialing of various occupations and professions. Chapter 1 focuses on the guidelines for occupational regulation. Three issues are discussed: deciding whether…

  2. Occupational Wages and Benefits in Department Stores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Personick, Martin E.

    1975-01-01

    The article summarizes the findings from the September 1973 Bureau of Labor Statistics' first occupational wage survey of department stores in over 20 years, covering full-and part-time nonsupervisory workers in 17 occupations. Occupational wage levels varied widely with top pay levels reported in New York, San Francisco, and Seattle. (MW)

  3. 29 CFR 570.61 - Occupations in the operation of power-driven meat-processing machines and occupations involving...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Occupations in the operation of power-driven meat-processing machines and occupations involving slaughtering, meat and poultry packing, processing, or rendering...Occupations in the operation of power-driven meat-processing machines and occupations...

  4. MSHA releases data on CM crushing accidents

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    2007-02-15

    The US Mine Safety and Health Administration (MHSA) recently formed a committee to identify norms and trends in remote control continuous miner crushing accidents. The final report found that these types of accidents commonly happen to experienced miners during routine mining activities, with the majority occurring while moving the miner from one face to another, place changing. Another common aspect of the accidents is that many of the victims are experienced miners who are newly employed at the mine where the accident occurred. Training all employees to stay outside the turning radius of an energized remote control continuous miner, establishing this as a safe operating procedure, and consistently enforcing this practice among miners will reduce these types of accidents. This article was excerpted from the 'Remote Control Continuous Mining Machine Crushing Accident Data Study' published in May 2006. The report may be found from the website: www.msha.gov. 4 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Frequencies of occupational allergic diseases and gender differences in Finland

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lasse Kanerva; Riitta Jolanki; Jouni Toikkanen

    1994-01-01

    In Finland occupational diseases are registered by diagnosis, causative agent, age, occupation, field of work, and gender. This report analyzes in detail the 1991 statistics on gender differences in occupational allergic diseases. A total of 1314 cases of occupational allergic diseases were reported, comprising 14.2% of all registered occupational diseases. The following allergic occupational diseases were encountered: allergic contact dermatitis

  6. Accident cost saving and highway attributes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David J. Forkenbrock; Norman S. J. Foster

    1997-01-01

    Two semi-logarithmic regression models are developed to estimate accident rates and accident costs, respectively, for rural non-interstate highways in the state of Iowa. Data on 21,224 accidents occurring between 1989 and 1991 on 17,767 road segments are used in the analysis. Seven road attributes of these road segments are included as predictor variables. Applying the resulting regression models to a

  7. Chainat: a case study in occupational health and safety promotion for farmers.

    PubMed

    Arphorn, Sara; Brooks, Richard; Permsirivanich, Panupun

    2006-01-01

    The high rates of occupationally related injuries, accidents, and deaths in rural Thailand are of particular concern to public health officials, as well as the residents and workers living in these areas. In response to specific concerns raised by local residents and local health officials in Chainat Province, Thailand, the Work Improvement in Neighborhood Development (WIND) programme was introduced and implemented by means of the local Primary Care Unit (PCU). The objective was to improve farmers' knowledge of methods to improve occupational safety and to reduce the occurrence of occupationally related injuries, accidents, and deaths in the area. Local farmers, public health officers, and health volunteers from the PCU played a primary role in the programme, serving as trainers in the initial training of trainer session. Major activities included visiting a local farm to carry out a check-list improvement activity and active discussion among participants about potential improvements. Following the implementation of WIND in Chainat, a number of significant improvements in work conditions were noted, including construction of resting corners, plans to build toilets in the fields, improved knowledge about the dangers of chemical fertilizers and pesticides, and increased use of personal protective equipment. Furthermore, participants began making organic fertilizer and had independently developed an organic anti-snail pesticide. This integrative approach, achieved by including many different members of the community, in combination with government support and diligent follow-up, has proved to be particularly successful. PMID:16610542

  8. Public and occupational risks of the Nevada (USA) Test Site.

    PubMed

    Inhaber, H

    2001-10-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS), north of Las Vegas, was the scene of hundreds of nuclear weapons tests over four decades, both above- and below ground. There is considerable interest, both in neighboring communities and elsewhere, in the risks it poses. Overall, the greatest risks are nonradioactive in origin, with occupational risks to employees and accident risks in transporting low-level nuclear wastes to the NTS from other Department of Energy (DOE) sites ranking highest. For radiation risks, that to workers handling radioactive materials is much higher than that to the surrounding population, either present or future. Overall, annual risks are small, with all fatalities approximately 0.008% of total Nevada deaths. At the NTS, the government spends about 5000 times more on radiation as opposed to nonradiation deaths. This suggests that at least some resources may be misallocated towards cleanup of public risks and that the occupational risk of cleanup may be much higher than the public risk. Thus risk may be multiplied by well-meaning programs. PMID:11494069

  9. Calculation notes that support accident scenario and consequence development for the subsurface leak remaining subsurface accident

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, G.W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-12

    This document supports the development and presentation of the following accident scenario in the TWRS Final Safety Analysis Report: Subsurface Leak Remaining Subsurface. The calculations needed to quantify the risk associated with this accident scenario are included within.

  10. Calculation notes that support accident scenario and consequence development for the subsurface leak remaining subsurface accident

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, G.W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-09-19

    This document supports the development and presentation of the following accident scenario in the TWRS Final Safety Analysis Report: Subsurface Leak Remaining Subsurface. The calculations needed to quantify the risk associated with this accident scenario are included within.

  11. General situation of radiation accidents in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhou; Wenyi, Zhang; Liang'an, Zhang

    2007-01-01

    Information on radiation accidents in China compiled by the health authorities was collected. About 468 accidents were reported in 1988-2004. Detailed data from 1988 to 1998 were analysed. As to the 332 accidents reported in 1988-98, 77.7% of the cases are related to lost sources, 84.64% are liability accidents and five persons died owing to the cases occurring in the application of gamma irradiators. It is essential to improve the data bank to manage radiation sources, and to make sure that the relevant laws, together with professional theory and technical knowledge, are disseminated well and learned by professionals. PMID:17561521

  12. Thermal hydraulic features of the TMI accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolman, B.

    1985-10-01

    The Three Mile island (TMI)-2 accident resulted in extensive core damage and recent data confirms that the reactor vessel was challenged from molten core materials. A hypothesized TMI accident scenario is presented that consistently explains the TMI data and is also consistent with research findings from independent severe fuel damage experiments. The TMI data will prove useful in confirming our understanding of severe core damage accidents under realistic reactor systems conditions. This understanding will aid in addressing safety and regulatory issues related to severe core damage accidents in light water reactors.

  13. Aircraft Loss-of-Control Accident Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcastro, Christine M.; Foster, John V.

    2010-01-01

    Loss of control remains one of the largest contributors to fatal aircraft accidents worldwide. Aircraft loss-of-control accidents are complex in that they can result from numerous causal and contributing factors acting alone or (more often) in combination. Hence, there is no single intervention strategy to prevent these accidents. To gain a better understanding into aircraft loss-of-control events and possible intervention strategies, this paper presents a detailed analysis of loss-of-control accident data (predominantly from Part 121), including worst case combinations of causal and contributing factors and their sequencing. Future potential risks are also considered.

  14. Accident selection methodology for TA-55 FSAR

    SciTech Connect

    Letellier, B.C.; Pan, P.Y.; Sasser, M.K. [and others

    1995-07-01

    In the past, the selection of representative accidents for refined analysis from the numerous scenarios identified in hazards analyses (HAs) has involved significant judgment and has been difficult to defend. As part of upgrading the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) for the TA-55 plutonium facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, an accident selection process was developed that is mostly mechanical and reproducible in nature and fulfills the requirements of the Department of Energy (DOE) Standard 3009 and DOE Order 5480.23. Among the objectives specified by this guidance are the requirements that accident screening (1) consider accidents during normal and abnormal operating conditions, (2) consider both design basis and beyond design basis accidents, (3) characterize accidents by category (operational, natural phenomena, etc.) and by type (spill, explosion, fire, etc.), and (4) identify accidents that bound all foreseeable accident types. The accident selection process described here in the context of the TA-55 FSAR is applicable to all types of DOE facilities.

  15. The determinants of fishing vessel accident severity.

    PubMed

    Jin, Di

    2014-05-01

    The study examines the determinants of fishing vessel accident severity in the Northeastern United States using vessel accident data from the U.S. Coast Guard for 2001-2008. Vessel damage and crew injury severity equations were estimated separately utilizing the ordered probit model. The results suggest that fishing vessel accident severity is significantly affected by several types of accidents. Vessel damage severity is positively associated with loss of stability, sinking, daytime wind speed, vessel age, and distance to shore. Vessel damage severity is negatively associated with vessel size and daytime sea level pressure. Crew injury severity is also positively related to the loss of vessel stability and sinking. PMID:24473412

  16. Summer activities: incidents and accidents.

    PubMed

    Krau, Stephen D

    2013-06-01

    Summer invites activities and sports that are unique to this time of year. Although safety is a priority, there are commonly accidents and incidents that occur while individuals are participating in these activities. The prevalence and incidence of several types of injuries and trauma related to water activities, camping, caving, backpacking, and hiking are discussed. Treatment of nonfatal drowning is discussed, along with the pathophysiologic process that must be corrected for optimal outcomes. Summer is a time for outdoor cooking, campfires, and the traditional Fourth of July firework pastimes, which can result in admissions to critical care areas. PMID:23692945

  17. Occupational Outlook Handbook 2000-2001

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The latest edition of this biannual handbook from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (last reviewed in the March 20, 1998 Scout Report) offers a wealth of career information for a wide range of occupations, including a brief review of important features and "what workers do on the job, working conditions, the training and education needed, earnings, and expected job prospects." Users can access this information (offered in HTML and .pdf formats) in three ways: by conducting a keyword search for a specific occupation, by browsing an "occupational cluster," or by browsing a listing of all occupations in alphabetical order. The Handbook remains an excellent source of relevant, condensed, and updated occupational information.

  18. Radiation occupational health interventions offered to radiation workers in response to the complex catastrophic disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

    PubMed Central

    Shimura, Tsutomu; Yamaguchi, Ichiro; Terada, Hiroshi; Okuda, Kengo; Svendsen, Erik Robert; Kunugita, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) 1 was severely damaged from the chain reaction of the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami on 11 March 2011, and the consequent meltdown and hydrogen gas explosions. This resulted in the worst nuclear accident since the Chernobyl accident of 1986. Just as in the case of Chernobyl, emergency workers were recruited to conduct a wide range of tasks, including disaster response, rescuing activities, NPP containment, and radiation decontamination. This paper describes the types and efficacy of the various occupational health interventions introduced to the Fukushima NPP radiation workers. Such interventions were implemented in order to prevent unnecessary radiation overexposure and associated adverse health effects and work injuries. Less than 1% of all emergency workers were exposed to external radiation of >100 mSv, and to date no deaths or health adversities from radiation have been reported for those workers. Several occupational health interventions were conducted, including setting of new regulatory exposure limits, improving workers' radiation dosimetry, administration of stable iodine, running an occupational health tracking system, and improving occupational medicine and preventative care. Those interventions were not only vital for preventing unnecessary radiation, but also for managing other general health issues such as mental health, heat illness and infectious diseases. Long-term administration of the aforementioned occupational health interventions is essential to ensure the ongoing support and care for these workers, who were put under one of the most severe occupational health risk conditions ever encountered. PMID:25413928

  19. Radiation occupational health interventions offered to radiation workers in response to the complex catastrophic disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant.

    PubMed

    Shimura, Tsutomu; Yamaguchi, Ichiro; Terada, Hiroshi; Okuda, Kengo; Svendsen, Erik Robert; Kunugita, Naoki

    2015-05-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) 1 was severely damaged from the chain reaction of the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami on 11 March 2011, and the consequent meltdown and hydrogen gas explosions. This resulted in the worst nuclear accident since the Chernobyl accident of 1986. Just as in the case of Chernobyl, emergency workers were recruited to conduct a wide range of tasks, including disaster response, rescuing activities, NPP containment, and radiation decontamination. This paper describes the types and efficacy of the various occupational health interventions introduced to the Fukushima NPP radiation workers. Such interventions were implemented in order to prevent unnecessary radiation overexposure and associated adverse health effects and work injuries. Less than 1% of all emergency workers were exposed to external radiation of >100 mSv, and to date no deaths or health adversities from radiation have been reported for those workers. Several occupational health interventions were conducted, including setting of new regulatory exposure limits, improving workers' radiation dosimetry, administration of stable iodine, running an occupational health tracking system, and improving occupational medicine and preventative care. Those interventions were not only vital for preventing unnecessary radiation, but also for managing other general health issues such as mental health, heat illness and infectious diseases. Long-term administration of the aforementioned occupational health interventions is essential to ensure the ongoing support and care for these workers, who were put under one of the most severe occupational health risk conditions ever encountered. PMID:25413928

  20. Self-mutilations in private-accident-insurance cases.

    PubMed

    Dotzauer, G; Iffland, R

    1976-04-21

    Self-inflicted injuries can be classified in groups. One group deals with the simulation of illness, another with the occurrence itself and the application of chemical, thermic or mechanical methods. One sector concerns self-mutilation, which, from a psychiatrist's point of view, is interesting. At this time we are more concerned with the problems of proving it. In wartime and even during military service in peace-time soldiers inflict mutilating injuries on themselves. They are motivated by the notion that they will gain benefit from their action. Economic gain plays a role in the case of people who have taken out private accident insurance: self mutilation to simulate the result of an accident. Our investigation into self-mutilation started with an analysis under the following aspects of 123 cases: age, sex, occupation, place of residence, place and time of deed, method employed (weapon used), localisation, single or multiple wound, direction of injury, position of fingers, nature of edges of wound. Whether or not an injury was suffered voluntarily or involuntarily can only be determined with the help of auxiliary facts. It must be clarified whether or not the information given by the injured person ties in with facts concerning the place where the injury was sustained, its position and its direction. The medico-legal expert should not interpret medical findings without relating them to the facts of the case. Indeed, he should start by examining the claimant's account of the accident. To some extent it almost requires the work of a general staff to compare the findings of a careful medical investigation with the injuries themselves. If the injury was inflicted by a certain tool information must be available regarding, for example, the "accident with the saw" together with an assessment of the wounds sustained (utilization of clinical material). Sometimes tests on corpses need to be carried out because these can provide information on mechanical and physical problems. When the direction of the wound is being clarified together with an appraisal of any traces found electron scanning and microscopic tests should also be incorporated into the examination in addition to medical and X-ray tests. At the slightest suspicion that a wound might have been self-inflicted appropriate tests should be carried out immediately. Conclusions should only be drawn by someone who has made an intensive study of this special field which is of such great forensic interest. PMID:983349

  1. Biomechanical injury evaluation of laminated side door windows and sunroof during rollover accidents.

    PubMed

    Sances, Anthony; Kumaresan, Srirangam; Carlin, Fred; Friedman, Keith; Meyer, Steve

    2003-01-01

    Significantly more fatalities and serious injuries occur due to ejection in roll over accidents. The present study was conducted to determine the occupant retention and head-neck injury potential aspects of laminated glass in side door windows and sunroofs during roll over accidents. The test protocol for this study was based on National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) studies for advanced glazing. The impact study of 18 kg with head-neck form was conducted on laminated glass of side doors and sunroofs from production vehicles. The drop speed was varied from 11 to 16 kph. The Hybrid III 50% male dummy head-neck form was impacted on the approximately center of the glass portion of the windows. The head injury criteria, head resultant acceleration, and neck loads and moments were quantified. A series of drop tests were conducted on roll down side windows with laminated glass. The head-neck biomechanical parameters were well below the critical value injury tolerance limits. Results indicated that the glass contained the dummy assembly and the head-neck biomechanical parameters were below the critical value injury tolerance limits in simulated rollover accidents. The present study demonstrates that head-neck injury is unlikely due to laminated glass side windows and sunroof laminated glass used in production vehicles during rollover accidents and that the dummy is contained by the laminated glazing. PMID:12724901

  2. [Occupational bio hazards: current issues].

    PubMed

    Dutkiewicz, Jacek

    2004-01-01

    Over the last decade, there was noted a large advancement of knowledge on living organisms and their products posing a potential occupational risk. Novel risk factors, often new to science, were identified, the role and significance of already known factors better comprehended, and occupational groups endangered by biological hazards more thoroughly recognized. Novel viruses and prions, emerging in different parts of the world, may pose a particular threat to health and life of health care workers, agriculture workers and veterinarians. A new coronavirus (SCoV) that evoked a rapid outbreak of disease described as severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in the first half of 2003 may serve as an example. The disease was particularly common among health care workers. Previously discovered zoonotic viruses, Nipah virus in pigs and Hendra virus in horses, may be a cause of fatal encephalitis in animal farmers. Hantaviruses (Puumala, Hantaan, Sin Nombre and others) infecting field rodents may be a cause of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) or pulmonary syndrome (HPS) in farmers and laboratory workers. Prions responsible for inducing a zoonotic variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) are considered to be a potential cause of work-related infections in agricultural and health care workers, however, this assumption has not as yet been supported by any conclusive evidence. In many countries, blood-borne occupational infections with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the major epidemiological problem among health care workers, mostly because no vaccine against this virus has been produced to date. Vaccinations effectively restricted the number of occupational infections with hepatitis B virus (HBV), and work-related infections with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) causing acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) are very rare. Hazardous bioserosols, occurring in many work environments, pose an occupational health hazard of particular importance. Many new biological factors present in organic dusts that may induce work-related allergic and immunotoxic diseases among farmers and workers of the agricultural and wood industries have been identified. Droplet aerosols, which are generated from water, oils, oil-water emulsions and other liquids in various work environments, may contain infectious agents (Legionella spp.) as well as allergic and/or toxic agents. It has been shown that allergens and endotoxins produced by Gram-negative bacteria occurring in oil mist from metalworking fluids may cause occupational respiratory diseases in workers of the metallurgic industry. PMID:15156765

  3. Does occupational health nursing exist in India?

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Rajnarayan R.; Sharma, Anjali; Zodpey, Sanjay P.; Khandare, Shobha M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Occupational health services are important to develop healthy and productive work forces, which should be delivered through occupational health team. Occupational health nurse (OHN) is an important member of this team and is required to apply nursing principles in conserving the health of workers in occupational settings. Purpose: This article attempts to map the occupational health nursing courses in India and design competencies and curriculum for such a course. Materials and Methods: Information through the Internet, printed journals, and perspectives of the key stakeholders were the principal sources of data. Discussion: In India, there is a need to initiate a course on occupational health nursing to provide occupational health services for the organized and unorganized sector workforce. A certificate course for occupational health nursing for 3–4 months duration offered through contact session mode can be an opportune beginning. However, to cater employed nurses an online course can be another effective alternative. The theoretical part should essentially include modules on occupational diseases, industrial hygiene, and occupational health legislation, whereas the modules on practical aspects can include visits to industries. Taking into account the existing norms of Indian Factories Act for hazardous units of organized sector an estimated 1,34,640 OHNs are required. Conclusion: There is a need–supply gap in the number of occupational health nursing manpower in India, which can be attributed to the absence of any course to train such manpower. PMID:25598615

  4. Enabling occupational performance: optimal experiences in therapy.

    PubMed

    Rebeiro, K L; Polgar, J M

    1999-02-01

    Occupational therapists believe that engagement in occupation contributes to health through an individually balanced use of time, a positive focus for one's physical and mental energy, and the provision of a sense of purpose. Flow is a construct which describes optimal experiences or enjoyment in everyday activities. A review of the literature suggests that the theory of optimal experience is complementary to occupational therapy beliefs and that an understanding of the flow experience may contribute to our understanding of human occupation. Specifically, flow may be useful in understanding those aspects of the occupation, environment and person that contribute to a "just right" challenge, and to enabling occupational performance through enjoyable, structured and purposeful activity. Occupational therapists are encouraged to explore whether optimal experiences facilitate occupational performance for individuals with a disability. Future research could explore whether the occupational opportunities available to persons with a disability provide the degree of challenge required to elicit the optimal experience. Finally, research could explore whether the client-driven selection of meaningful occupation, and therapist enablement of the "just right" challenge, influences optimal experience, occupational performance, and life satisfaction for those with a disability. PMID:10462878

  5. Industrial Fungal Enzymes: An Occupational Allergen Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Green, Brett J.; Beezhold, Donald H.

    2011-01-01

    Occupational exposure to high-molecular-weight allergens is a risk factor for the development and pathogenesis of IgE-mediated respiratory disease. In some occupational environments, workers are at an increased risk of exposure to fungal enzymes used in industrial production. Fungal enzymes have been associated with adverse health effects in the work place, in particular in baking occupations. Exposure-response relationships have been demonstrated, and atopic workers directly handling fungal enzymes are at an increased risk for IgE-mediated disease and occupational asthma. The utilization of new and emerging fungal enzymes in industrial production will present new occupational exposures. The production of antibody-based immunoassays is necessary for the assessment of occupational exposure and the development of threshold limit values. Allergen avoidance strategies including personal protective equipment, engineering controls, protein encapsulation, and reduction of airborne enzyme concentrations are required to mitigate occupational exposure to fungal enzymes. PMID:21747869

  6. Occupational Health in Eastern Europe

    PubMed Central

    Malan, R. M.

    1963-01-01

    Progress may be fostered as much by spreading information as by research. The aim of this review is to add to the existing knowledge of the pattern of occupational health services in the socialist countries of Eastern Europe. The work consists of two main parts. Part I is based on official information issued by government departments or typewritten reports prepared by government officials, and relates mostly to the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics and to Czechoslovakia. Part II is largely based on direct observation, discussion, and comparison of the occupational health services in Czechoslovakia, of which I have more extensive knowledge than of the other countries of Eastern Europe. This part embodies a number of conclusions and is followed by a list of bibliographical references. Throughout the review I have endeavoured to show how problems which exist all over the world are dealt with in Eastern Europe. PMID:13932439

  7. Job load and hazard analysis: a method for the analysis of workplace conditions for occupational health care.

    PubMed

    Mattila, M K

    1985-10-01

    One requirement for successful occupational health care is reliable information on occupational hazards. The aim of this study was to develop a simple, standardised method for workplace investigations for use in occupational health care. The theoretical framework of the method comprises the stress-strain model, the hazard-danger model, and risk behaviour theory. The new method, termed job load and hazard analysis, includes four stages: identification of hazards, their evaluation, conclusions and proposals, and follow up. Different methods are available for hazard identification. The identification starts with a rough analysis of five factors, chemical hazards, physical hazards, physical load, mental stress, and accident risk. Hazards and stress factors are assessed with an ordinal scale. Specialised methods are used if all hazards cannot otherwise be identified. The analytical procedure comprises: detection of hazards through observations and interviews at the workplace and with a questionnaire; assessment of findings as teamwork; and evaluation of the results of these assessments to yield conclusions and proposals made by occupational health care personnel. A data processing system has been developed for data storage and future use. The method has functioned in practice, improving the contents of the occupational health care programme and generating preventive measures. The method offers many new possibilities for controlling occupational hazards and studying relations between working conditions and workers' health. PMID:4041383

  8. The Ocean and Occupational Health

    PubMed Central

    Prossin, Albert

    1983-01-01

    With the increase in offshore industrial operations, more needs to be known about health and safety of workers in such industries. Some general principles of occupational health apply; some special situations, such as depth diving, demand special knowledge and facilities. Equipment used also brings its own hazards. This article outlines the scope of health and safety concerns for those physicians whose patients work on or in the ocean. Imagesp1137-a PMID:21283297

  9. Occupational exposure and malignant lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Persson, B

    1996-01-01

    The incidence of malignant lymphoma, especially non-Hodgkin's lymphoma has increased over the last few decades. This statement is true despite the fact that methods for diagnosing malignant lymphoma have changed and misclassification has become a problem. The present review is mainly concerned with occupational aspects of malignant lymphoma. Several subsequent studies have dealt with malignant lymphoma among woodworkers and pulp and paper mill workers pointing to increased risks. Exposure to phenoxy herbicides have provided reasonable evidence to be connected with an increased risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, whereas there is limited information regarding Hodgkin's disease. The relationship between solvent exposure and malignant lymphoma has been observed in a great number of studies. It is, however, still hard to identify specific solvent compounds responsible for the increased risk. Other occupational exposures i.e. wood preservatives, welding, asbestos, hair dyes and exposure to animal viruses among meatworkers and veterinarians have also been studied in relation to malignant lymphoma. This review shows that occupational factors, especially exposure to solvents and phenoxy herbicides and also to wood, play a role in the epidemiology of malignant lymphoma. PMID:9117190

  10. Occupational Hearing Loss in Korea

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In this article, current status of noise exposure in workplaces, trend of workers with noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL), and prevalence of NIHL in workers by industry and job category in Korea were reviewed. In addition, trends of research on the audiological effects such as hearing loss from noise and occupational hearing loss from non-noise in Korea were addressed through reports in industrial audiology. Though noise exposure level has improved, noise still shows the highest rate of cases exceeding exposure limit among workplace hazards. NIHL is the most common occupational disease except work-related disease such as musculoskeletal disorders and cerebrovascular diseases, and NIHL prevalence is thought to be much higher than reported in official publications. Noise affecting hearing comes from various sources such as workplaces, military settings, areas with exposure to high noise, and specific noise sources. There is also occupational hearing loss by non-noise including chemicals such as organic solvents and heavy metals, barotrauma, and trauma due to welding spark. Noise affects daily life through audiological effects such as hearing loss and tinnitus, non-audiological physical effects (e.g., cardiovascular), and psychosocial and behavioral effects. Development of systematic and comprehensive hearing conservation programs for lowering the noise level in workplaces and preventing the NIHL, and preparation of technological, administrative system for its settlement at workplace are urgently needed. PMID:21258593

  11. Occupational Lymphohematopoietic Cancer in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Won Jin; Son, Mia; Kang, Seong-Kyu

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to review the existing studies on lymphohematopoietic (LHP) cancer in Korea, estimate the prevalence of workers exposed to carcinogens, and determine the population attributable fraction (PAF) of leukemia. Two case series and 4 case reports were reviewed. Using official statistics, the prevalence of benzene exposure and ionizing radiation exposure was estimated. Based on the prevalence of exposure and the relative risk, The PAF of leukemia was calculated. Between 1996 and 2005, 51 cases of LHP cancer were reported from the compensation system. Greater than 50% of occupational LHP cancer was leukemia, and the most important cause was benzene. In a cohort study, the standardized incidence ratio was 2.71 (95% CI, 0.56-7.91). The prevalence of exposure was 2.5% and 2.2% in 1995 and 2000, respectively. Using the 1995 prevalence, 3.6-4.8% and 0.1% of cases with leukemia were attributable to benzene and ionizing radiation exposure, respectively, which resulted in 39.7-51.4 cases per year. Benzene is the most important cause of occupational leukemia in Korea. Considering the estimated PAF in this study, the annual number of occupational LHP cancer (51 cases during 10-yr period), might be underreported within the compensation system. PMID:21258598

  12. Fatal accident distribution by age, gender and head injury, and death probability at accident scene in Mashhad, Iran, 2006-2009.

    PubMed

    Zangooei Dovom, Hossein; Shafahi, Yousef; Zangooei Dovom, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have investigated road traffic deaths, but few have compared by road user type. Iran, with an estimated 44 road traffic deaths per 100,000 population in 2002 had higher road traffic deaths than any other country for which reliable estimates can be made. So, the present study was conducted on road death data and identified fatal accident distribution by age, gender and head injury as well as the influences of age and gender on deaths at accident scenes for all road user groups. Data used in this study are on fatal road accidents recorded by forensic medicine experts of the Khorasan Razavi province in Mashhad, the capital of the province, the second largest city and the largest place of pilgrimage, immigration and tourism in Iran. Chi-square test and odds ratio were used to identify the relation of death place with age and gender in 2495 fatal road accidents from 2006 to 2009. The t-test and analysis of variance were employed for continues variable, age, to compare males' and females' mean age for all road user categories. For two genders, all three groups of fatalities (pedestrian, motorcyclist and motor vehicle occupant) had a peak at the ages of 21-30. The youngest were male motorcyclists (mean age = 28). Old pedestrians were included in road deaths very much, too. Male/female overall ratio was 3.41 and the highest male/female ratio was related to motorcyclists (14). The overall ratio of head injury to other organ injuries (torso and underbody) was 2.51 and pedestrians had the largest amount of head injury (38.2%). Regarding death at accident scene, for all road users, gender did not have any significant relation with death at the scene (P-value > 0.1); on the contrary, age had significant relation (P-value < 0.05). Females were more vulnerable at accident scenes (male/female ratio at accident sense < 1). Pedestrians aged 21-30, motorcyclists 41-50 and motor vehicle occupants 31-40 died the most at accident scenes. Identifying the most endangered groups of road accident fatalities, which was conducted in this study, is invaluable for the appropriate design of prevention strategies and allocation of financial resources for each group of road user fatalities - since in developing nations, there are insufficient financial resources to traffic safety and we should consider superiorities, i.e. the most risky groups. Steps which may contribute to safety promotion for local conditions include suitable facilities for old pedestrians, a training course before obtaining motorcycle license for motorcyclists, informing young road users by provincial media about death risk of road users and improving management of the head-injured patients. Finally, suggestions for future researches were made. PMID:22681408

  13. 36 CFR 4.4 - Report of motor vehicle accident.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Report of motor vehicle accident. 4.4 Section 4.4...THE INTERIOR VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC SAFETY § 4.4 Report of motor vehicle accident. (a) The operator of a motor vehicle involved in an accident resulting in property...

  14. 32 CFR 636.13 - Traffic accident investigation reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Traffic accident investigation reports. 636...Stewart, Georgia § 636.13 Traffic accident investigation reports. In...Airfield installations will record traffic accident investigations on DA Form...

  15. 32 CFR 636.13 - Traffic accident investigation reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Traffic accident investigation reports. 636...Stewart, Georgia § 636.13 Traffic accident investigation reports. In...Airfield installations will record traffic accident investigations on DA Form...

  16. 36 CFR 1004.4 - Report of motor vehicle accident.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Report of motor vehicle accident. 1004.4 Section 1004...PRESIDIO TRUST VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC SAFETY § 1004.4 Report of motor vehicle accident. (a) The operator of a motor vehicle involved in an accident resulting in property...

  17. 32 CFR 634.29 - Traffic accident investigation reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Traffic accident investigation reports. 634...Traffic Supervision § 634.29 Traffic accident investigation reports. ...enforcement officials will record traffic accident investigations on...

  18. 36 CFR 1004.4 - Report of motor vehicle accident.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Report of motor vehicle accident. 1004.4 Section 1004...PRESIDIO TRUST VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC SAFETY § 1004.4 Report of motor vehicle accident. (a) The operator of a motor vehicle involved in an accident resulting in property...

  19. 36 CFR 4.4 - Report of motor vehicle accident.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Report of motor vehicle accident. 4.4 Section 4.4...THE INTERIOR VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC SAFETY § 4.4 Report of motor vehicle accident. (a) The operator of a motor vehicle involved in an accident resulting in property...

  20. Risk Advisor for Car Accidents Javier Larrosa

    E-print Network

    Larrosa, Javier

    Risk Advisor for Car Accidents Javier Larrosa LSI­UPC 1 Description of the Problem The purpose of this project is to design a Bayesian Network modeling the risk of having a car accident, when planing a trip. -- Distance of the trip. -- Road conditions. -- Weather -- Car age -- Car equipment -- Car type -- Driver

  1. Traumatic aortic incompetence following road traffic accident

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. B. Irving

    1974-01-01

    This case report describes the presentation and treatment of a case of aortic incompetence, resulting from a road traffic accident. The relevant literature is briefly reviewed.Aortic incompetence due to trauma has been described following non-penetrating chest injuries, such as kicks from horses (Barie, 1881), falls from heights and crushing accidents (Kissane, Koons and Clark, 1948; Levine, Roberts and Morrow, 1962).

  2. Bayesian networks and traffic accident reconstruction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gary A. Davis; Jianping Pei

    2003-01-01

    The attempt to draw rational conclusions about a road accident can be viewed as a problem in uncertain reasoning about a particular event, to which developments in the modeling of uncertain reasoning for artificial intelligence can be applied. Physical principles can be used to develop a structural model for the accident, and this model can then be combined with an

  3. Does Daylight Savings Time Affect Traffic Accidents?

    E-print Network

    Deen, Sophia 1988-

    2012-04-20

    This paper studies the effect of changes in accident pattern due to Daylight Savings Time (DST). The extension of the DST in 2007 provides a natural experiment to determine whether the number of traffic accidents is affected by shifts in hours...

  4. Injury reduction by the airbag in accidents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. H. Kuner; W. Schlickewei; D. Oltmanns

    1996-01-01

    Today an increasing number of automobiles are being equipped with additional passive safety devices: driver and passenger airbags. To examine the efficiency of the airbag in real road traffic accidents, a collective study was conducted from 181 traumatology centres throughout Germany. The inquiry was answered by 81 per cent of the medical centres contacted. From the evaluation of 122 accident

  5. Assessing the Effects of a Nuclear Accident

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Colin Norman

    1985-01-01

    Studies prompted by the accident at Three Mile Island which indicate that radiation released by a severe accident may be less than expected could have implications for nuclear regulation, emergency planning, and nuclear reactor design, but critics are not convinced. They contend that uncertainties in estimates of what would happen due to the diversity of plant designs are too great

  6. Truck accident involving unirradiated nuclear fuel

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. W. Carlson; L. E. Fischer

    1992-01-01

    In the early morning of Dec. 16, 1991, a severe accident occurred when a passenger vehicle traveling in the wrong direction collided with a tractor trailer carrying 24 nuclear fuel assemblies in 12 containers on Interstate 1-91 in Springfield, Massachusetts. This paper documents the mechanical circumstances of the accident and the physical environment to which the containers were exposed and

  7. Accident risks in nuclear-power plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Strupczewski

    2003-01-01

    The paper presents the results of estimates of nuclear-power plant safety based on probabilistic safety analyses and discusses the means used to decrease core damage factors, large release frequency and cancer deaths due to nuclear accidents. Estimates made for new nuclear power plants show that these risks are negligibly small. The radiological effects of the Chernobyl accident are discussed and

  8. Squeal Those Tires! Automobile-Accident Reconstruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caples, Linda Griffin

    1992-01-01

    Methods use to reconstruct traffic accidents provide settings for real life applications for students in precalculus, mathematical analysis, or trigonometry. Described is the investigation of an accident in conjunction with the local Highway Patrol Academy integrating physics, vector, and trigonometry. Class findings were compared with those of…

  9. Characterization of a nuclear accident dosimeter

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Burrows

    1995-01-01

    The 23rd nuclear accident dosimetry intercomparison was held during the week of June 12--16, 1995 at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This report presents the results of this event, referred to as NAD 23, as related to the performance of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) personal nuclear accident dosimeter (PNAD). Two separate critical assemblies, SHEBA and Godiva, were used to generate seven

  10. NASA Occupant Protection Standards Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somers, Jeffrey T.; Gernhardt, Michael A.; Lawrence, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Current National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) occupant protection standards and requirements are based on extrapolations of biodynamic models, which were based on human tests performed under pre-Space Shuttle human flight programs where the occupants were in different suit and seat configurations than is expected for the Multi Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) and Commercial Crew programs. As a result, there is limited statistical validity to the occupant protection standards. Furthermore, the current standards and requirements have not been validated in relevant spaceflight suit, seat configurations or loading conditions. The objectives of this study were to develop new standards and requirements for occupant protection and rigorously validate these new standards with sub-injurious human testing. To accomplish these objectives we began by determining which critical injuries NASA would like to protect for. We then defined the anthropomorphic test device (ATD) and the associated injury metrics of interest. Finally, we conducted a literature review of available data for the Test Device for Human Occupant Restraint New Technology (THOR-NT) ATD to determine injury assessment reference values (IARV) to serve as a baseline for further development. To better understand NASA s environment, we propose conducting sub-injurious human testing in spaceflight seat and suit configurations with spaceflight dynamic loads, with a sufficiently high number of subjects to validate no injury during nominal landing loads. In addition to validate nominal loads, the THOR-NT ATD will be tested in the same conditions as the human volunteers, allowing correlation between human and ATD responses covering the Orion nominal landing environment and commercial vehicle expected nominal environments. All testing will be conducted without the suit and with the suit to ascertain the contribution of the suit to human and ATD responses. In addition to the testing campaign proposed, additional data analysis is proposed to mine existing human injury and response data from other sources, including military volunteer testing, automotive Crash Injury Research Engineering Network (CIREN), and IndyCar impact and injury data. These data sources can allow a better extrapolation of the ATD responses to off-nominal conditions above the nominal range that can safely be tested. These elements will be used to develop injury risk functions for each of the injury metrics measured from the ATD. These risk functions would serve as the basis for the NASA standards. Finally, we propose defining standard test methodology for evaluating future spacecraft designs against the IARVs, including developing a star-rating system to allow crew safety comparisons between vehicles.

  11. Human Factors in Cabin Accident Investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chute, Rebecca D.; Rosekind, Mark R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Human factors has become an integral part of the accident investigation protocol. However, much of the investigative process remains focussed on the flight deck, airframe, and power plant systems. As a consequence, little data has been collected regarding the human factors issues within and involving the cabin during an accident. Therefore, the possibility exists that contributing factors that lie within that domain may be overlooked. The FAA Office of Accident Investigation is sponsoring a two-day workshop on cabin safety accident investigation. This course, within the workshop, will be of two hours duration and will explore relevant areas of human factors research. Specifically, the three areas of discussion are: Information transfer and resource management, fatigue and other physical stressors, and the human/machine interface. Integration of these areas will be accomplished by providing a suggested checklist of specific cabin-related human factors questions for investigators to probe following an accident.

  12. Pilot-error accidents: male vs female.

    PubMed

    Vail, G J; Ekman, L G

    1986-12-01

    In this study, general aviation accident records from the files of the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB), have been analysed by gender to observe the number and rate of pilot-error related accidents from 1972 to 1981 inclusive. If both females and males have no difference in performance, then data would have indicated similarities of accident rates and types of injuries. Males had a higher rate of accidents than females, and a higher portion of the male accidents resulted in fatalities or serious injuries than for females. Type of certificate, age, total flight time, flight time in type of aircraft, phase of operation, category of flying, degree of injury, specific cause factors, cause factor miscellaneous acts/conditions were analysed, taking the total number of United States Active Civilian General Aviation Pilots into consideration. The data did indicate a difference in all variables. PMID:15676598

  13. Occupational exposure to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)--how can we reduce the risk?

    PubMed

    Leszczyszyn-Pynka, Magdalena; K?ys-Rachwalska, Ma?gorzata; Sacharczuk, Beata; Boro?-Kaczmarska, Anna

    2004-01-01

    We analyzed occupational exposure to potentially infectious body fluids among health care workers (HCWs). Nurses were the most common exposed category of HCWs. In 73.6% cases needle sticks had been the reason of exposure. Recapping a needle was the cause of exposure in 6.9% accidents. Among 189 registered HCWs, 66 (34.9%) performed invasive procedures without any personal protective equipment. Prophylaxis with antiretroviral drugs was necessary in 43 (22.8%) cases. As many as 60.3% of exposure incidents to potentially infectious material result from non-compliance with the relevant recommendations. Continuous education and training is critically needed to prevent occupational exposure to blood-borne infections among health care workers. PMID:15598365

  14. [Occupational medicine in Morocco: analysis of practices and proposition of action].

    PubMed

    Laraqui, C H; Echinard, N L; Belamallem, I; Harourate, K; Laraqui, O; Verger, C

    1998-12-01

    With the aim of a better knowledge of their activities of training and information of workers, a survey has been conducted through questionnaires sent to 582 occupational health physicians in Morocco. Among the 48% of physicians who accepted to answer the questionnaire, over half was effectively working in companies. This study revealed many problems in prevention of professional hazards. Workers information about professional risks and measures of prevention was systematically given by 56% of physicians during pre-employment examination and 51% during systematic visit. During "third time", 49% of physicians were informing workers of professional risks and 54% of measures of prevention. With regards to meetings of information, only 26% of physicians were organising such meetings and teaching workers first aid. Consequently, we propose the implementation of protocols "Safety in companies". Informing and teaching the workers about safety, are the mandatory first steps to reduce and prevent professional diseases and accidents; occupational medicine, despite various obstacles should promote it. PMID:10065009

  15. Occupational and environmental health problems of the developing oil shale industry: a review.

    PubMed

    Rom, W N; Lee, J S; Craft, B F

    1981-01-01

    The American oil shale industry is on the threshold of commercial industrial development. Potential occupational hazards include shalosis or oil shale pneumoconiosis, dermatoses, cancer of the skin, lung, and possibly other sites, and accidents. Air, water, and solid waste pollution problems are complicated by the aridity of the Green River oil shale formation located in Utah, Colorado, and Wyoming. The region currently lacks the schools, health facilities, community services, and skilled labor required for large-scale development. The oil shale industry faces an opportunity and a challenge of prudently assessing and controlling exposures and contributing to the social development of the region. PMID:6285698

  16. The effect of roof strength on reducing occupant injury in rollovers.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Brian; Forrest, Steve; Orton, Tia; Meyer, Steven E; Sances, Anthony; Kumaresan, Srirangam

    2005-01-01

    Roof crush occurs and potentially contributes to serious or fatal occupant injury in 26% of rollovers. It is likely that glazing retention is related to the degree of roof crush experienced in rollover accidents. Occupant ejection (including partial ejection) is the leading cause of death and injury in rollover accidents. In fatal passenger car accidents involving ejection, 34% were ejected through the side windows. Side window glass retention during a rollover is likely to significantly reduce occupant ejections. The inverted drop test methodology is a test procedure to evaluate the structural integrity of roofs under loadings similar to those seen in real world rollovers. Recent testing on many different vehicle types indicates that damage consistent with field rollover accidents can be achieved through inverted drop testing at very small drop heights. Drop test comparisons were performed on 16 pairs of vehicles representing a large spectrum of vehicle types. Each vehicle pair includes a production vehicle and a vehicle with a reinforced roof structure dropped under the same test conditions. This paper offers several examples of post-production reinforcements to roof structures that significantly increase the crush resistance of the roof as measured by inverted drop tests. These modifications were implemented with minimal impact on vehicle styling, interior space and visual clearances. The results of these modifications indicate that roof crush can be mitigated by nearly an order of magnitude, as roof crush was reduced by 44-91% with only a 1-2.3% increase in vehicle weight. Additionally, this paper analyzes the glazing breakage patterns in the moveable tempered side windows on the side adjacent to the vehicle impact point in the inverted drop tests. A comparison is made between the production vehicles and the reinforced vehicles in order to determine if the amount roof crush is related to glazing integrity in the side windows. Lastly, two drop test pairs, performed with Hybrid III test dummies, indicates that the reduction of roof crush resulted in a direct reduction in neck loading and therefore an increase in occupant protection. PMID:15850089

  17. Accident prevention in SME using ORM

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Jørgensen; N. J. Duijm; H. Troen

    2010-01-01

    The occupational risk model (ORM) developed by the Dutch workgroup occupational risk model WORM has been transferred to a Danish context, with the aim of creating a more simple system, particularly for SMEs. The ORM identifies the activities in a person’s daily work that contribute most to the person’s risk and also identifies which conditions need to be changed in

  18. Occupational injuries in Italy: risk factors and long term trend (1951-98)

    PubMed Central

    Fabiano, B; Curro, F; Pastorino, R

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Trends in the rates of total injuries and fatal accidents in the different sectors of Italian industries were explored during the period 1951-98. Causes and dynamics of injury were also studied for setting priorities for improving safety standards.?METHODS—Data on occupational injuries from the National Organisation for Labour Injury Insurance were combined with data from the State Statistics Institute to highlight the interaction between the injury frequency index trend and the production cycle—that is, the evolution of industrial production throughout the years. Multiple regression with log transformed rates was adopted to model the trends of occupational fatalities for each industrial group.?RESULTS—The ratios between the linked indices of injury frequency and industrial production showed a good correlation over the whole period. A general decline in injuries was found across all sectors, with values ranging from 79.86% in the energy group to 23.32% in the textile group. In analysing fatalities, the trend seemed to be more clearly decreasing than the trend of total injuries, including temporary and permanent disabilities; the fatalities showed an exponential decrease according to multiple regression, with an annual decline equal to 4.42%.?CONCLUSIONS—The overall probability of industrial fatal accidents in Italy tended to decrease exponentially by year. The most effective actions in preventing injuries were directed towards fatal accidents. By analysing the rates of fatal accident in the different sectors, appropriate targets and priorities for increased strategies to prevent injuries can be suggested. The analysis of the dynamics and the material causes of injuries showed that still more consideration should be given to human and organisational factors.???Keywords: labour injuries; severity; regression model PMID:11303083

  19. Pseudoxanthoma elasticum with cerebrovascular accident.

    PubMed

    Kumar, G Nanda; Ragi, K V; Nair, Pradeep S

    2007-01-01

    A 65-year-old male presented with right hemiparesis and skin lesions. On examination, the patient had multiple, discrete, skin-colored papules on the neck and upper chest with wrinkling of the skin. The lateral part of the trunk and medial aspect of both upper arms showed atrophic plaques. A computerized tomography scan of the head showed dilatation of the basilar artery with a frontoparietal infarct. Funduscopic examination showed characteristic angioid streaks. Skin biopsy of the papule and atrophic plaques showed epidermal atrophy, calcium deposits in the mid-dermis and basophilic clumped and fragmented elastic fibers in the mid- and lower dermis, all findings consistent with pseudoxanthoma elasticum. We are reporting here a case of pseudoxanthoma elasticum with cerebrovascular accident. PMID:17558055

  20. Diving injuries are (usually) no accident.

    PubMed

    Buzzacott, Peter

    2015-03-01

    When recently submitting a manuscript to DHM, I noticedthat three of our keywords contain the word accident, namely 'accidents', 'diving accidents' and 'scuba accidents'. 'Accident' is most strictly defined in the legal sense thus: "… the word accident is used only for events that occur without the intervention of a human being. This kind of accident also may be called an act of God. It is an event that no person caused or could have prevented - such as a tornado, a tidal wave, or an ice storm." In a review of cave diving fatalities, the medical examiner's cause of death in each case (n = 368) was considered and, from these and their extensive case files, case histories were traced back through the disabling injury to the triggering event. In the majority of cases there was a clear breach of established safe procedures. The number of 'accidents' where, for example, a cave unexpectedly collapsed was rare, by far the exception. Including these words in our approved list is at odds with the stable of British Medical Journal publications, (e.g., Injury Prevention) which have dissuaded use of the word 'accident' since 1993 and banned the word since 2001. Since 2004, at considerable expense, many former NHS hospital accident and emergency wards in the UK have steadily been renamed emergency departments. The Journal of Accident and Emergency Medicine has been renamed Emergency Medicine Journal and, as recently as last year, the New York Police Department changed the name of their Accident Investigation Squad to Collision Investigation Squad. They also no longer use the word 'accident' in their reports, following the lead of the US Department of Transportation's National Highway Traffic Safety Administration which stopped using the word in all its printed material in 1997, claiming it "…promotes the concept that these events are outside of human influence or control."(p.1.) There are many such examples of this subtle yet important change that is overtaking both western medicine and, in particular, public health. Rather than 'accident' the current trend is to accurately describe the cause of an injury. To illustrate, a submission formerly entitled 'Hot water accidents in Welsh children' would now more likely be titled 'Hot water burns in Welsh children'. The difference should be obvious; hot water burns in children are largely avoidable, (as are diving injuries). Therefore, I respectfully request we remove these key words from our journal's list. Hopefully this would not inconvenience some of our European colleagues for whom English is a second language, and this should be considered. In France, for example, decompression sickness (DCS) is known as an "accident de desaturation" and decompression illness (DCI, including arterial gas embolism), is initially described in French as an accident de decompression (ADD). After all signs and symptoms are identified, commonly at around 24 h, then the injury is termed a "maladie de decompression" (MDD). The Canadian Government department responsible for aviation, Transports Canada, also refer to DCS/DCI as MDD. The BMJ makes exceptions, e.g., if the word appears in a formal title such as Child Accident Prevention Trust. Regarding ADD however, may I respectfully suggest to my French colleagues they consider adopting "blessure de décompression" (BDD)? In diving research at least, the leading hypothesis is that DCS may be prevented through better understanding of the mechanisms of this protean disease. That DCS is an 'accident' is the null hypothesis. PMID:25964042

  1. Why work kills. A brief history of occupational safety and health in the United States.

    PubMed

    Berman, D M

    1977-01-01

    In the early 20th century, U.S. monopoly corporations responded to the movement against work accidents by setting up a business-controlled "compensation-safety establishment," which kept down compensation costs but did little to improve working conditions. The "establishment" was able to keep the issue of occupational safety and health out of public debate until the late 1960's through its control of research, education, compensation, and government appointments in the area, and by creating the public impression that the problems of occupational disease were almost nonexistent. Despite the occurrence of sporadic rank-and-file uprisings, unions have been seriously involved in health and safety only since the late 1960's, when they mobilized in an effort to pass the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. The passage of the OSHA law was made possible by the help of progressive professionals, worker dissatisfaction, the new environmental consciousness, and a general climate of social unrest. Although the corporate elite, through the "compensation-safety establishment," has been able to dominate the operation of the federal institutions created by the new law, the question of occupational health and safety is now on the permanent agenda of workers, unions, and the public. PMID:137881

  2. [A study on fall accident].

    PubMed

    Lee, H S; Kim, M J

    1997-01-01

    The study was conducted from November 1995 to May 1996 at the one general hospital in Seoul. The total subjects of this study were 412 patients who have the experience of fall accident, among them 31 was who have fallen during hospitalization and 381 was who visited emergency room and out patient clinic. The purposes of this study were to determine the characteristics, risk factors and results of fall accident and to suggest the nursing strategies for prevention of fall. Data were collected by reviewing the medical records and interviewing with the fallers and their family members. For data analysis spss/pc+ program was utilized for descriptive statistics, adjusted standardized X2-test. The results of this study were as follows: 1) Total subjects were 412 fallers, of which 245 (59.5%) were men and 167 (40.5%) were women. Age were 0-14 years 79 (19.2%), 15-44 years 125 (30.4%), 45-64 years 104 (25.2%), over 65 years 104 (25.2%). 2) There was significant association between age and the sexes (X2 = 39.17, P = 0.00). 3) There was significant association between age and history of falls (X2 = 44.41, P = .00). And history of falls in the elderly was significantly associated with falls. 4) There was significant association with age and medical diagnosis (X2 = 140.66, P = .00), chief medical diagnosis were hypertension (34), diabetes mellitus (22), arthritis (11), stroke (8), fracture (7), pulmonary tuberculosis (6), dementia (5) and cataract (5). 5) There was significant association between age and intrinsic factors: cognitive impairment, mobility impairment, insomnia, emotional problems, urinary difficulty, visual impairments, hearing impairments, use of drugs (sedatives, antihypertensive drugs, diuretics, antidepressants) (P < 0.05). But there was no significant association between age and dizziness (X2 = 2.87, P = .41). 6) 15.3% of total fallers were drunken state when they were fallen. 7) Environmental factors of fall accident were unusual posture (50.9%), slips (35.2%), trips (9.5%) and collision (4.4%). 8) Most of falls occurred during the day time, peak frequencies of falls occurred from 1 pm to 6 pm and 7 am to 12 am. 9) The places of fall accident were roads (22.6%), house-stairs (16.7%), rooms, floors, kitchen (11.2%), the roof-top, veranda, windows (10.9%), hospital (7.5%), ice or snowy ways (5.8%), bathroom (4.9%), playground, park (4.9%), subway-stairs (4.4%) and public-bathrooms (2.2%). 10) Activities at the time of fall accident were walking (37.6%), turning around or reaching for something (20.9%), going up or down stairs (19.2%), exercise, working (17.4%), up or down from a bed (2.7%), using wheelchair or walking aids, standing up or down from a chair (2.2%) and standing still (2.2%). 11) Anatomical locations of injuries by falls were head, face, neck (31.3%), lower extremities (29.9%), upper extremities (20.6%), spine, thorax, abdomen or pelvic contents (11.4%) and unspecified (2.9%). 12) Types of injures were fracture (47.6%), bruises (13.8%), laceration (13.3%), sprains (9.0%), headache (6.6%), abrasions (2.9%), intracranial hemorhage (2.4%) and burns (0.5%). 13) 41.5% of the fallers were hospitalized and average of hospitalization was 22.3 days. 14) The six fallers (1.46%) died from fall injuries. The two fallers died from intracranial hemorhage and the four fallers died of secondary infection; pneumonia (2), sepsis (1) and cellulitis (1). It is suggested that 1) Further study is needed with larger sample size to identify the fall risk factors. 2) After the fall accident, comprehensive nursing care and regular physical exercise should be emphasized for the elderly person. 3) Safety education and safety facilities of the public place and home is necessary for fall prevention. PMID:10437605

  3. Characterization of women's occupational musculoskeletal exposures.

    PubMed

    Landry, Lynette G

    2007-09-01

    Although women are often characterized as having "safe" occupations, they are at risk of experiencing occupational musculoskeletal injuries. This cross-sectional study examined the health status, occupations, and job tasks of a random sample of working women (N = 123) to characterize their risk of occupational injury. The women had been employed, most full-time, in the 12 months prior to administration of the telephone survey. The women tended to cluster into two types of occupational exposures. Overall, the women rated their health as excellent. However, those with diagnosed musculoskeletal disorders had significantly worse scores on two scales of the Short Form Health Survey than those without musculoskeletal disorders. Women are exposed to occupational musculoskeletal stressors that increase their risk of experiencing musculoskeletal injuries. PMID:17896649

  4. Occupational Trajectories and Immigrant Worker Health

    PubMed Central

    Crollard, Allison; de Castro, A. B.; Tsai, Jenny Hsin-Chun

    2013-01-01

    During their initial years in the receiving country, many immigrants experience occupational downgrading. Downgrading is a loss of occupational status between one’s last job in the home country and first job in the receiving country, often resulting in overeducation or overqualification. Although the extent and determinants of such occupational trajectories have been characterized, the connection to immigrant worker health has not been widely examined. However, an emerging body of knowledge indicates that negative health outcomes are associated with overeducation and overqualification in general worker populations, suggesting similar experiences by immigrant workers. This article provides an overview of the magnitude and conceptualization of occupational downgrading, overeducation, and overqualification and discusses implications for immigrant worker health. Occupational health professionals should spearhead research efforts on occupational downgrading, raise public awareness about the issue, and serve as advocates for immigrant workers’ rights. PMID:23092177

  5. Use of videotape in occupational therapy.

    PubMed

    Daniels, L E

    1977-07-01

    The use and production of videotapes in occupational therapy are expected to increase in the future. A survey of 54 occupational therapy curricula and 59 hospital-clinics showed that 71 percent of the respondents use videotapes. Of that group, 70 percent produce videotapes for occupational therapy. Forty-six percent of the producers of occupational therapy videotapes make them available to others. Ninety-two percent of the respondents indicated a need for reviews of films and videotapes pertinent to occupational therapy, either in a directory--or a directory, with monthly reviews of new materials in the Occupational Therapy Newspaper or AJOT. A listing of subject areas most needed in a videotape format was also compiled. PMID:879253

  6. 1998 annual report Office of Occupational Medicine and Medical Surveillance

    SciTech Connect

    Gebus, George R.

    1999-06-10

    the mission of EH-61 is the prevention of worker illness by fostering outstanding occupational medicine and medical surveillance programs within the DOE complex. The EH-61 annual report for 1998 describes our major activities and achievements as we have worked toward realizing this mission through our main program lines (1) Surveillance; (2) policy(Field SUppOti; (3) Information/Communication; and (4) Research. Some of our major 1998 accomplishments are highlighted below for more details, please consult the corresponding sections of this report. The FORMER BERYLLIUM WORKERS MEDICAL SURVEILLANCE PROGRAM identifies and locates former employees exposed to beryllium and provides enhanced medical monitoring for early identification of chronic beryllium disease (CBD). Over Z0,000 current and former workers have been contacted to date, and there have been about 8,8oo responders. More than 100 cases of CBD have been detected. The DOE FORMER WORKERS PROGRAM (FWP) is targeted primarily to former workers who have either retired or left DOE facilities. In FY 1998, there were 10 pilot projects operating at 9 sites. These pilots will validate approaches for medical screening of former employees and health risk communication efforts. When completed in FY 2002, the information gained from the pilots will serve as a basis for projecting funding and resources needed for the FWP in the years ahead. We have helped develop health-related POLICIES/GUIDANCE, that will promote the health of the contractor workforce by addressing current and emerging issues related to occupational health. The RADIATION EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE CENTER/TRAINING SITE (REAC/TS) is supported by EH-61 and assists DOE by maintaining state-of-the-art expertise in radiation medicine and biodosimetry. This support provides DOE with a national and international 24-hour response capability for evaluating and managing victims of radiation accidents occurring at its facilities or among the general public. In collaboration with site occupational medical programs and operations offices, we have enhanced medical surveillance efforts by completing the development of the MEDICAL SURVEILLANCE INFORMATION SYSTEM (MSIS), which will enhance the ability of both Headquarters and site occupational medical clinics to evaluate site-wide/DOE-wide trends, as well as health issues related to specific worker cohorts. We have achieved the first linkup to a major site. We have helped improve worker risk communication by developing and disseminating a model WORKER RISK COMMUNICATION PROGRAM for beryllium workers.

  7. [The human accidents and their implications for functional communication: opinions of teachers and students about higher education].

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Edinalva Neves; Gimeniz-Paschoal, Sandra Regina

    2008-12-01

    This study aimed to verify the opinion of speech-language pathology teachers and undergraduate students about human accidents and investigate if they are seeking for knowledge and competence in this area. Fifty-two teachers and 95 students from 3 public and 3 private universities in São Paulo took part in this study. Data were collected by means of a questionnaire. According to the participants, accidents are unexpected events that cause physical, functional, emotional and social consequences. Inattentiveness, incaution as well as mental and physical fatigue are factors that contribute to accidents. The speech-language therapist, the physical therapist, the occupational therapist and the physicians were considered the most indicated professionals for correcting the sequels caused by external aggressions. They were also considered the most indicated for carrying out educational actions for the prevention of accidents in form of orientation and lectures for the population of the educational and health units. Teachers and students recognize the importance of the subject, a fact that will help optimizing the educational actions toward accident prevention and introducing new actions and research projects in the universities for improving the competences in this field of knowledge. PMID:19039412

  8. Occupation Dynamics: Contesting Hearts and Minds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Keven Ruby; David L. Sallach; Charles M. Macal; Veena S. Mellarkod; Alexander Wendt

    As the U.S. experience in Vietnam and Iraq attests, occupation by a foreign power can generate counterproductive conflict dynamics. Winning hearts and minds is the key to the long-term success of occupations, and both occupation forces and resistance movements employ a mix of coercive and non-coercive strategies (punishments and rewards) to shape support within the occupied public. The resulting cross-cutting

  9. Online resources for occupational health physicians

    PubMed Central

    Zodpey, Sanjay P.; Negandhi, Himanshu N.; Tiwari, Rajnarayan R.

    2011-01-01

    Periodic retraining ensures that experts are updated in the advances in the science and methods of their profession. Such periodic retraining is sparsely accessible to Indian occupational health physicians and researchers. However, there is significant material that is available online in occupational health and related fields. This information is open-source and is freely available. It does not require any special subscription on the client's part. This information can supplement the efforts of motivated occupational health practitioners in India. PMID:21808493

  10. Marital satisfaction and occupational interest similarity

    E-print Network

    Rouse, Lawrence W

    1980-01-01

    the occupational interest research of Hanson (1974) and Prediger (1976). Hanson (1974) has developed an occupational interest inventory designed to help people identify careers in which they would be satisfied. It is based on the concept that interests are a... in their relative position to the two dimensions. The result was a circular pattern or career map related to Holland's hexagon. Vsed in conjunction Hanson's interest inventory and Prediger's career map can show an individual's occupational preferences among...

  11. Interventions: The Occupational Therapist Enables Recovery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ingrid Söderback

    \\u000a This chapter surveys the occupational therapy interventions in which the occupational therapist (OT) enables the clients’\\u000a activity, with the aim of resuming engagement in occupations. The OT’s role is clarified. The interaction between the client\\u000a and the activity is illustrated by two cases. Commonly used therapeutic media, such as arts and crafts, leisure and recreational\\u000a activities, progressive relaxation, horticulture therapy,

  12. Occupational noise exposure limits for developing countries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. H Shaikh

    1999-01-01

    Occupational noise is one of the major environmental problems in industrial plants. Therefore, in order to limit high level occupational noise, maximum permissible occupational noise exposure limit in the range of 90–85dB(A) Leq for 8h\\/day (40h\\/week) have been allowed by the International Standards Organization (ISO), EEC and other developed countries. But in developing countries, most of the industrial plants work

  13. Old and new causes of occupational asthma.

    PubMed

    Quirce, Santiago; Bernstein, Jonathan A

    2011-11-01

    International reviews suggest that the median proportion of adult cases of asthma attributable to occupational exposure is between 10% and 15%. Therefore, it is essential that clinicians have a broad knowledge of the various causes associated with occupational asthma. Occupational asthmagens are categorized as low-molecular-weight (LMW, ?1000 kd) and high-molecular-weight (HMW, ?1000 kd) antigens. The purpose of this article is to review the most common representative LMW and HMW causes of occupational asthma over the past 70 years, with specific emphasis on newer causes reported over the past 5 years. PMID:21978851

  14. Imaging of occupational and environmental lung diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Akira, M. [Kinki Cuo Chest Medical Center, Osaka (Japan)

    2008-03-15

    The chest radiograph is the basic tool for identifying occupational and environmental lung diseases; however, its sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of occupational and environmental lung diseases are low. High-resolution CT is the optimal method of recognizing parenchymal abnormalities in occupational and environmental disease. With the exception of pleural plaques, the CT findings of occupational and environmental lung diseases are nonspecific. Therefore, correlation of imaging features with history of exposure, other clinical features, and sometimes pathology is needed for the diagnosis of pneumoconiosis.

  15. Italian occupational health: concepts, conflicts, implications.

    PubMed Central

    Reich, M R; Goldman, R H

    1984-01-01

    This paper examines Italy's worker-based model for occupational health, especially its key concepts and its relation to social conflict. It briefly reviews the history of three approaches to occupational health in Italy: university-based, industry-based, and government-based. It then analyzes the worker-based approach, which emerged in the late 1960s and early 1970s as worker groups and trade unions mobilized around new concepts of occupational health. Five key concepts are discussed: the workers' homogeneous group; workers' subjectivity; the use of contract language; the development of local occupational health institutions; and the use of occupational hazard risk maps. The analysis illustrates how the social processes of mobilization and institutionalization affected the ideas and structures of Italian occupational health. Worker mobilization in Italy produced ideological changes in the nation's occupational health system, institutional changes in universities and governments, and legislative changes at national and local levels. The institutionalization of reforms, however, created new conflicts and problems and tended to restrict worker participation and promote expert intervention. The paper concludes with a brief outline of the history of occupational health approaches in the United States and then discusses the implications of the five Italian concepts for US occupational health policy. PMID:6380322

  16. Occupational asthma following kapok exposure.

    PubMed

    Kern, D G; Kohn, R

    1994-01-01

    Whether a distinct kapok allergen exists or whether the fiber's allergenicity is due to contamination by other allergens has never been resolved. Several years ago, we evaluated a patient who appeared to develop occupational asthma to kapok. We performed an environmental assessment, cross-shift spirometric testing of the patient's co-workers, and the first reported bronchoprovocation challenge with kapok. The disappearance of the patient's asthma following cessation of kapok exposure, with now 7 years of follow-up, our inability to incriminate any other agent, and the patient's positive specific bronchoprovocation challenge strengthen the evidence, but do not prove definitively, that kapok fiber itself is allergenic. PMID:8040150

  17. Explicit and Implicit Methods in Psychosocial Occupational Therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mona Eklund

    2002-01-01

    Sometimes the goal of a psychosocial occupational therapy intervention is not obvious for someone observing the process, and this may lead to misunderstandings as to the targeted outcomes for various occupational therapy methods. Summarizing features found in psychosocial occupational therapy practice, in textbooks, and in occupational therapy models, this paper proposes a simple structure for characterizing psychosocial occupational therapy interventions

  18. Warning: accident at Three Mile Island

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, M.; Rosen, I.

    1982-01-01

    A reporter and an engineer reconstruct the events leading up to and following the March, 1979 accident at the Three Mile Island Reactor Number Two. They begin with the compromises and work pace required in designing, siting, and building a nuclear reactor and the warnings from incidents involving other reactors. The authors give a chronological report of the events and responses during the days following the accident. They view Three Mile Island as a warning that all the safety systems may not work in a future accident. 7 figures. (DCK)

  19. A Comparison of Occupational Therapists' and Certified Occupational Therapy Assistants' Mobility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, William C.; Wilson, Linda

    1990-01-01

    Compares the mobility patterns of 1,092 occupational therapists with those of 1,840 occupational therapy assistants to determine the relationship between academic degree and distance individuals live from the institution at which they received their occupational therapy education. Concludes that mobility is not an important enough criterion to…

  20. EAP OCCUPATIONAL STRESS PROGRAMS 2013 The sequence of occupational stress programs will

    E-print Network

    Taylor, Jerry

    EAP OCCUPATIONAL STRESS PROGRAMS ­ 2013 The sequence of occupational stress programs will occur Work ­ Life Balance ­ February 5, 2013, Eyler Room Managing Occupational Role Stress ­ March 5, 2013-session sequence of educational and promotional programs designed to enhance managerial knowledge of stress

  1. Occupational Injury Service (OIS) 2 Occupational Injury Service (OIS) -Worker Guide

    E-print Network

    de Leon, Alex R.

    Occupational Injury Service (OIS) Worker OIS Guide #12;2 Occupational Injury Service (OIS) - Worker Guide Occupational Injury Service Same-day access to treatment helps recovery By: Jacqueline Varga T HE, hitting his head and left shoulder on the ground. As if that wasn't bad enough, the box then fell on top

  2. External dose assessment in the Ukraine following the Chernobyl accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frazier, Remi Jordan Lesartre

    While the physiological effects of radiation exposure have been well characterized in general, it remains unclear what the relationship is between large-scale radiological events and psychosocial behavior outcomes in individuals or populations. To investigate this, the National Science Foundation funded a research project in 2008 at the University of Colorado in collaboration with Colorado State University to expand the knowledge of complex interactions between radiation exposure, perception of risk, and psychosocial behavior outcomes by modeling outcomes for a representative sample of the population of the Ukraine which had been exposed to radiocontaminant materials released by the reactor accident at Chernobyl on 26 April 1986. In service of this project, a methodology (based substantially on previously published models specific to the Chernobyl disaster and the Ukrainian population) was developed for daily cumulative effective external dose and dose rate assessment for individuals in the Ukraine for as a result of the Chernobyl disaster. A software platform was designed and produced to estimate effective external dose and dose rate for individuals based on their age, occupation, and location of residence on each day between 26 April 1986 and 31 December 2009. A methodology was developed to transform published 137Cs soil deposition contour maps from the Comprehensive Atlas of Caesium Deposition on Europe after the Chernobyl Accident into a geospatial database to access these data as a radiological source term. Cumulative effective external dose and dose rate were computed for each individual in a 703-member cohort of Ukrainians randomly selected to be representative of the population of the country as a whole. Error was estimated for the resulting individual dose and dose rate values with Monte Carlo simulations. Distributions of input parameters for the dose assessment methodology were compared to computed dose and dose rate estimates to determine which parameters were driving the computed results. The mean external effective dose for all individuals in the cohort due to exposure to radiocontamination from the Chernobyl accident between 26 April 1986 and 31 December 2009 was found to be 1.2 mSv; the geometric mean was 0.84 mSv with a geometric standard deviation of 2.1. The mean value is well below the mean external effective dose expected due to typical background radiation (which in the United States over this time period would be 12.0 mSv). Sensitivity analysis suggests that the greatest driver of the distribution of individual dose estimates is lack of specific information about the daily behavior of each individual, specifically the portion of time each individual spent indoors (and shielded from radionuclides deposited on the soil) versus outdoors (and unshielded).

  3. An Application of CICCT Accident Categories to Aviation Accidents in 1988-2004

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Joni K.

    2007-01-01

    Interventions or technologies developed to improve aviation safety often focus on specific causes or accident categories. Evaluation of the potential effectiveness of those interventions is dependent upon mapping the historical aviation accidents into those same accident categories. To that end, the United States civil aviation accidents occurring between 1988 and 2004 (n=26,117) were assigned accident categories based upon the taxonomy developed by the CAST/ICAO Common Taxonomy Team (CICTT). Results are presented separately for four main categories of flight rules: Part 121 (large commercial air carriers), Scheduled Part 135 (commuter airlines), Non-Scheduled Part 135 (on-demand air taxi) and Part 91 (general aviation). Injuries and aircraft damage are summarized by year and by accident category.

  4. Proposal for computer investigation of LMFBR core meltdown accidents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. E. Boudreau; F. H. Harlow; W. H. Reed; J. F. Barnes

    1974-01-01

    The environmental consequences of an LMFBR accident involving breach of ; containment are so severe that such accidents must not be allowed to happen. ; Present methods for analyzing hypothetical core disruptive accidents like a loss ; of flow with failure to scram cannot show conclusively that such accidents do not ; lead to a rupture of the pressure vessel.

  5. Use of Human Factors Analysis for Wildland Fire Accident Investigations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michelle Ryerson; Chuck Whitlock

    2005-01-01

    Accident investigators at any level are challenged with identifying causal factors and making preventative recommendations. This task can be particularly complicated considering that 70-80% of accidents are associated with human error. Due to complexities of the wildland fire environment, this is especially challenging when investigating a wildland fire-related accident. Upon reviewing past accident investigations within the United States Federal wildland

  6. Probabilistic Approach to Analysis of Death Traffic Accidents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Evgenia Suzdaleva; Ivan Nagy

    The paper is devoted to analysis of data related to traffic accidents at one of the roads in Czech Republic. The data sets are available as discrete-valued variables providing results of traffic accident (with death or not) as well as conditions under which the accident has happened (weather, visibility, speed etc). Situation of a traffic accident is modeled within state-space

  7. Considerations in the development of severe-accident strategies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. J. Jr. Lutz; R. Prior; R. Bastien

    1990-01-01

    A set of proceduralized severe-accident strategies was developed for Ringhals pressurized water reactor units (beyond emergency response guidelines (BERGs)) to provide guidance in the event of an accident that progresses to core damage. The development of the ringhals severe-accident guidance was a three-phase program: Phase 1 - development of the fundamental strategy for dealing with severe accidents; Phase 2 -

  8. Traffic Accident Treatment Expert System Based on Integrated Reasoning

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bing Xu; Wen-hua Yan

    2009-01-01

    In order to handle the traffic accidents timely and accurately and draw conclusions from them to formulate measures of preventing similar accidents, an expert system with integrated reasoning method is put forward and applied to traffic accident treatment according to the characteristics of traffic accidents. This method adopts an integrated reasoning approach in which the CBR (case-based reasoning) is the

  9. Accidents in the chemical industry: are they foreseeable?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter J. M. Sonnemans; Patrick M. W. Körvers

    2006-01-01

    Accidents recur,’ which is what Kletz [Kletz T. (1993). Lessons from disasters, how organisations have no memory and accidents recur. UK: Institution of Chemical Engineers] wrote in 1993. Indeed, despite all measures taken accidents may re-occur, but ‘disruptions’ in a process reoccur much more frequently. If a disruption occurs it may lead to an accident. If the same disruption reoccurs

  10. General model of accident rate growth in the construction industry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bozena Hola

    2007-01-01

    The accident level in sectors of the national economy is estimated from such data as: the number of persons employed in the analysed sector, the number of victims of accidents at work and the frequency and seriousness of the accidents. The data have a static character: they inform about the accident level in the analysed period but not about its

  11. Characterization of a nuclear accident dosimeter 

    E-print Network

    Burrows, Ronald Allen

    1995-01-01

    National Laboratories' (SNL) personal nuclear accident dosimeter (PNAD). Two separate critical assemblies, SHEBA and Godiva, were used to generate seven separate neutron spectra for use in dose comparisons. SNL's PNAD measured absorbed doses that were...

  12. 32 CFR 644.532 - Reporting accidents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Clearance of Explosive Hazards and Other Contamination from Proposed Excess Land and Improvements § 644.532 Reporting accidents. Immediately upon receipt of...

  13. 32 CFR 644.532 - Reporting accidents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Clearance of Explosive Hazards and Other Contamination from Proposed Excess Land and Improvements § 644.532 Reporting accidents. Immediately upon receipt of...

  14. [Severe parachuting accident. Analysis of 122 cases].

    PubMed

    Krauss, U; Mischkowsky, T

    1993-06-01

    Based on a population of 122 severely injured patients the causes of paragliding accidents and the patterns of injury are analyzed. A questionnaire is used to establish a sport-specific profile for the paragliding pilot. The lower limbs (55.7%) and the lower parts of the spine (45.9%) are the most frequently injured parts of the body. There is a high risk of multiple injuries after a single accident because of the tremendous axial power. The standard of equipment is good in over 90% of the cases. Insufficient training and failure to take account of geographical and meteorological conditions are the main determinants of accidents sustained by paragliders, most of whom are young. Nevertheless, 80% of our patients want to continue paragliding. Finally some advice is given on how to prevent paragliding accidents and injuries. PMID:8342057

  15. Containment leakage during severe accident conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmayer, C.H.; Bagchi, G.; Noonan, V.S.

    1984-01-01

    An alternate to the THRESHOLD model used in most severe accident risk assessments has been investigated. One reference plant for each of six containment types has been studied to determine the magnitude of containment leakage that would result from the pressures and temperatures associated with severe accident conditions. Containment penetrations having the greatest potential for early containment leakage are identified. The studies indicate that containment leakage through penetrations prior to reaching containment threshold pressures (currently reported containment shell failure pressures) should be considered in severe accident risk assessments. Failure of non-metallic seals for containment penetrations can be a significant source of containment leakage under severe accident pressure and temperature conditions. Although studies of containment types are useful in identifying sources of containment leakage, final conclusions may need to be plant specific. Recommendations concerning future studies to better develop the use of continuous leakage models are provided. 9 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  16. [Occupational health risk assessment for workers in pipe rolling production].

    PubMed

    Martin, S V; Rosly?, O F

    2014-01-01

    Certification of workplaces, monitoring of work conditions, information on number and occupational morbidity in 42 occupations at 10 occupational areas in pipe rolling workshop helped to evaluate occupational risk for the workers' health. Prior estimate based on integral evaluation of work conditions revealed 5 risk categories--from minor to extremely high. Unbearable occupational risk was determined mostly by the workers' exposure to occupational noise. The occupations of extremely high risk were characterized by prevalent exposure to one of the factors corresponding to class 4, and by combined exposure to several factors with high hazard degree with working conditions classes 3.4-4. Posterior estimate demonstrated occupations with proven risk of neurosensory deafness and registered medium occupational risk of dust diseases. In the course of occupational risk evaluation, the authors revealed the occupations necessitating complex programs and specific measures to lower occupational risk. PMID:25282809

  17. 20 CFR 638.504 - Occupational exploration program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 2010-04-01 false Occupational exploration program. 638.504 Section 638.504...Operations § 638.504 Occupational exploration program. An occupational exploration program shall be provided by all centers...

  18. 10 CFR 20.1201 - Occupational dose limits for adults.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...false Occupational dose limits for adults. 20.1201 Section 20.1201...1201 Occupational dose limits for adults. (a) The licensee shall control the occupational dose to individual adults, except for planned special...

  19. 10 CFR 20.1201 - Occupational dose limits for adults.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...false Occupational dose limits for adults. 20.1201 Section 20.1201...1201 Occupational dose limits for adults. (a) The licensee shall control the occupational dose to individual adults, except for planned special...

  20. 10 CFR 20.1207 - Occupational dose limits for minors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Occupational dose limits for minors. 20.1207 Section 20...FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Occupational Dose Limits § 20.1207 Occupational dose limits for minors. The annual...

  1. 10 CFR 20.1207 - Occupational dose limits for minors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Occupational dose limits for minors. 20.1207 Section 20...FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Occupational Dose Limits § 20.1207 Occupational dose limits for minors. The annual...

  2. 10 CFR 20.2104 - Determination of prior occupational dose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...false Determination of prior occupational dose. 20.2104 Section 20.2104 Energy...2104 Determination of prior occupational dose. (a) For each individual who is likely to receive an annual occupational dose requiring monitoring under §...

  3. 10 CFR 20.2104 - Determination of prior occupational dose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...false Determination of prior occupational dose. 20.2104 Section 20.2104 Energy...2104 Determination of prior occupational dose. (a) For each individual who is likely to receive an annual occupational dose requiring monitoring under §...

  4. 10 CFR 20.2104 - Determination of prior occupational dose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...false Determination of prior occupational dose. 20.2104 Section 20.2104 Energy...2104 Determination of prior occupational dose. (a) For each individual who is likely to receive an annual occupational dose requiring monitoring under §...

  5. 10 CFR 20.1207 - Occupational dose limits for minors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Occupational dose limits for minors. 20.1207 Section 20...FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Occupational Dose Limits § 20.1207 Occupational dose limits for minors. The annual...

  6. 10 CFR 835.207 - Occupational dose limits for minors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Occupational dose limits for minors. 835.207 Section 835...and External Exposure § 835.207 Occupational dose limits for minors. The dose limits for minors occupationally exposed to...

  7. 10 CFR 835.207 - Occupational dose limits for minors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Occupational dose limits for minors. 835.207 Section 835...and External Exposure § 835.207 Occupational dose limits for minors. The dose limits for minors occupationally exposed to...

  8. 10 CFR 20.1201 - Occupational dose limits for adults.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Occupational dose limits for adults. 20.1201 Section 20...FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Occupational Dose Limits § 20.1201 Occupational dose limits for adults. (a) The licensee...

  9. 10 CFR 20.1207 - Occupational dose limits for minors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Occupational dose limits for minors. 20.1207 Section 20...FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Occupational Dose Limits § 20.1207 Occupational dose limits for minors. The annual...

  10. 10 CFR 20.2104 - Determination of prior occupational dose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...false Determination of prior occupational dose. 20.2104 Section 20.2104 Energy...2104 Determination of prior occupational dose. (a) For each individual who is likely to receive an annual occupational dose requiring monitoring under §...

  11. 10 CFR 835.207 - Occupational dose limits for minors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Occupational dose limits for minors. 835.207 Section 835...and External Exposure § 835.207 Occupational dose limits for minors. The dose limits for minors occupationally exposed to...

  12. 10 CFR 20.1207 - Occupational dose limits for minors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Occupational dose limits for minors. 20.1207 Section 20...FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Occupational Dose Limits § 20.1207 Occupational dose limits for minors. The annual...

  13. 10 CFR 20.1201 - Occupational dose limits for adults.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Occupational dose limits for adults. 20.1201 Section 20...FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Occupational Dose Limits § 20.1201 Occupational dose limits for adults. (a) The licensee...

  14. 10 CFR 20.1201 - Occupational dose limits for adults.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Occupational dose limits for adults. 20.1201 Section 20...FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Occupational Dose Limits § 20.1201 Occupational dose limits for adults. (a) The licensee...

  15. 10 CFR 835.207 - Occupational dose limits for minors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Occupational dose limits for minors. 835.207 Section 835...and External Exposure § 835.207 Occupational dose limits for minors. The dose limits for minors occupationally exposed to...

  16. 10 CFR 835.207 - Occupational dose limits for minors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Occupational dose limits for minors. 835.207 Section 835...and External Exposure § 835.207 Occupational dose limits for minors. The dose limits for minors occupationally exposed to...

  17. 29 CFR 570.71 - Occupations involved in agriculture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Occupations involved in agriculture. 570.71 Section 570.71 Labor...INTERPRETATION 1-Occupations in Agriculture Particularly Hazardous for the Employment...570.71 Occupations involved in agriculture. (a) Findings and...

  18. 29 CFR 570.71 - Occupations involved in agriculture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Occupations involved in agriculture. 570.71 Section 570.71 Labor...INTERPRETATION 1-Occupations in Agriculture Particularly Hazardous for the Employment...570.71 Occupations involved in agriculture. (a) Findings and...

  19. 29 CFR 570.71 - Occupations involved in agriculture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Occupations involved in agriculture. 570.71 Section 570.71 Labor...INTERPRETATION 1-Occupations in Agriculture Particularly Hazardous for the Employment...570.71 Occupations involved in agriculture. (a) Findings and...

  20. 29 CFR 570.71 - Occupations involved in agriculture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Occupations involved in agriculture. 570.71 Section 570.71 Labor...INTERPRETATION 1-Occupations in Agriculture Particularly Hazardous for the Employment...570.71 Occupations involved in agriculture. (a) Findings and...