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Sample records for occupational medical aspects

  1. Legal aspects of medical confidentiality in the occupational setting.

    PubMed

    Annas, G J

    1976-08-01

    The law of confidentiality of medical information in the occupational setting is undeveloped and subject to change. Nevertheless, when a physician-patient relationship is established, all of the traditional trappings, including the duty to maintain confidences, go along with it. In other settings, such as preemployment physicals, examinees implicitly consent for their "fitness' for the job to be disclosed, but do not assume that specific findings will be disclosed without their informed and written consent. To promote physician automony and worker confidence in the occupational physician, an explicit policy of confidentiality should be developed and agreed to by both management and workers. This policy should spell out the conditions under which specific information will be made available to the employer and should guarantee the confidentiality of all other medical information. Workers should also be given routine access to their medical files, and offered the chance to refute and have amended information in them that they can demonstrate is inaccurate. In short, workers in the occupational setting should, in general, be treated like private patients. Such a policy will satisfy both the law and the ethical standards of physicians, and will promote worker trust in the occupational physician. PMID:956937

  2. [The notion of occupational skin disease. Medical and legal aspects].

    PubMed

    Elsner, P; Schliemann, S

    2015-03-01

    The different definitions of skin disease in medicine and in law are frequently confusing for dermatologists. While a skin disease may be defined medically referring to the definition of health by the WHO as a pathological condition of the skin leading to a disruption of the physical, mental and social well-being of the individual, legal definitions vary depending on the field of insurance law that is referred to. In the law of private health insurance, a skin disease is defined as an anomalous condition of the skin requiring medical treatment that exists independently of the subjective judgement of the insured person and needs to be objectively confirmed by a medical evaluation. In contrast, in the law of the social health insurance, the Federal Court of Social Justice defines disease as irregular physical or mental condition, deviating from the perception of a healthy human being that requires medical treatment or leads to inability to work. Substantial bodily disfigurement may be regarded as an irregular physical condition. In the law of the statutory accident insurance, occupational skin diseases are defined under clause 5101 of the occupational disease regulation as serious or repeatedly relapsing skin diseases that have forced a person to refrain from any work activities causal for the development, the aggravation or the recurrence of the disease. The Federal Court of Social Justice interprets the term "skin disease" from the protective purpose of the law, i.e. the protection against the economic and health consequences of the exposure to harmful agents and a thereby forced change of profession. This broad interpretation of the term "skin disease" leads to the recognition of diseases of the conjunctiva of the eye or diseases of the blood vessels of the skin due to cold damage as skin diseases according to clause 5101. For the correct treatment and possibly notification of occupational skin diseases in collaboration with various insurance carriers

  3. Twenty year development of occupational diseases in the Czech Republic: medical and geographical aspects.

    PubMed

    Jarolímek, Jan; Urban, Pavel

    2014-12-01

    The study analysed occupational diseases in the Czech Republic from the viewpoint of occupational medicine and medical geography. It used a dataset consisting of 32,646 cases of occupational diseases reported during the period of 1994-2013. The descriptive part of the study analysed occupational diseases according to their spatial distribution, occurrence in different branches of economic activities, employees' gender, and according to chapters of the List of occupational diseases. The incidence of occupational diseases showed an overall decreasing trend, which can be related to several factors--transformation of the national economy (shift from heavy industry to manufacturing industry and services), an improvement in access to occupational healthcare services, increased responsibility of employers for safe working conditions, but also a concealment of health problems by employees for fear of losing job. An exception to the decreasing trend is the automotive industry, in which the upward trend in occupational diseases occurrence was noted. The analytical part of the study focused on the relation between unemployment and occupational diseases incidence rates in different regions of the Czech Republic. In most regions, a statistically significant inverse association was shown between the rate of unemployment and occupational disease incidence. The situation is described in more detail for the Moravia-Silesia and Ustí nad Labem Regions and the Capital City of Prague, wherein a statistically significant inverse association was shown between the rate of unemployment and occupational disease incidence. The theory of marginal utility can explain the phenomenon. To certain degree of health problems, employees tend to prefer employment stability, especially if the unemployment is on rise in their region. On the other hand, if losing their job, they often try to claim benefits connected with occupational diseases. PMID:25622483

  4. Occupational Medical Program

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1993-12-08

    The Occupational Medical Program (OMP) oversees all Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) health care, and provides services to all managing and operating (M&O) contractors at the INEL and for the Department of Energy Idaho Office (DOE-ID). The evolution of the automated OMP at the INEL is guided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) directives and regulations. The OMP is developing a multiyear plan for the computerization of patient and demographics, epidemiology, medical records, andmore » surveillance. This plan will require the following six development phases: Employee Demographic Phase, Patient Surveillance Certification and Restrictions Phase, Electronic Notification Phase, Epidemiology-Industrial Hygiene/Radiation Exposure/OMP Integration Phase, Medical Scheduling Phase, and Medical Records Phase.« less

  5. Medical Aspects of Surfing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renneker, Mark

    1987-01-01

    The medical aspects of surfing include ear and eye injuries and sprains and strains of the lower back and neck, as well as skin cancer from exposure to the sun. Treatment, rehabilitation, and prevention of these problems are discussed. Surfing is recommended as part of an exercise program for reasonably healthy people. (Author/MT)

  6. [Clinical aspects of occupational asthma].

    PubMed

    Bessot, J C; Pauli, G; Lenz, D; Roegel, E

    1984-01-01

    Although on the increase overall, the actual prevalence of occupational asthma is difficult to assess because of variations seen according to periods, countries, jobs, and the agents responsible. In the authors' experience, this prevalence is slightly less than 10%. Three principal mechanisms, sometimes present together, not always elucidated: immunological, reflex and irritative, are responsible for such asthma. Whilst a positive diagnosis raises few problems, the aetiological diagnosis is difficult and involves two stages: recognition of the occupational characteristic of the asthma and attribution of this asthma to an allergen or substance in the occupational environment. Skin tests and in vitro tests, but above all exposure tests, make an important diagnostic contribution. Personal examples are used to illustrate the principal aetiological factors in occupational asthma of animal, vegetable or chemical origin. PMID:6729340

  7. [Contact allergies in medical occupations].

    PubMed

    Rustemeyer, T; Pilz, B; Frosch, P J

    1994-12-01

    Based on reports in the literature, data from the information network of German dermatology centres (Informationsverbund Dermatologischer Kliniken) and the authors own findings, a review is presented on prevalence, clinical picture and causative agents of contact allergic dermatoses in health care professions. In 1991 the proportion of suspected occupational diseases in the health care professions (including hairdressers) represented by cases of dermatitis, as reported to the responsible insurance institution, reached 72% of the total for the year (7287 out of 10127). Every 20th to 40th case was recognized as an occupational dermatosis according to German law. Accurate figures on incidence are scarce; for dentists an incidence of 0.11% has been calculated. The risk of developing occupational hand eczema has been shown to be at least three times higher for nurses than for other so-called dry professions. For persons engaged in the personal care of the ill and the elderly, relevant occupational allergens were found to be benzalkonium chloride and aldehydes in disinfectants, as well as rubber accelerators such as thiuram mix. Latex contact urticaria has increasing significance for medical personnel, with prevalence rates of sensitization between 4.5% and 10.7%. Among physicians, contact allergies to thiuram mix were found to be dominant (12.9%). For surgeons and orthopaedic surgeons, methyl methacrylate as a constituent of bone cement is of great importance. Various esters of acrylic acid and methacrylic acid are important sensitizers in the dental professions, particularly in heavily exposed dental laboratory technicians. Only a few gloves protect against these types of sensitizers. Sensitizations by medicaments can be avoided in most cases by reducing direct skin contact, as practiced with penicillin or ispaghula powder. Strategies of prevention include information of atopics regarding the increase in occupational dermatitis, the regular use of barrier creams

  8. [Medical aspects of fasting].

    PubMed

    Gavrankapetanović, F

    1997-01-01

    Fasting (arabic-savm) was proclaimed through islam, and thus it is an obligation for Holly Prophet Muhammad s.a.v.s.-Peace be to Him-in the second year after Hijra (in 624 after Milad-born of Isa a.s.). There is a month of fasting-Ramadan-each lunar (hijra) year. So, it was 1415th fasting this year. Former Prophets have brought obligative messages on fasting to their people; so there are also certain forms of fasting with other religions i.e. with Catholics, Jews, Orthodox. These kinds of fasting above differ from muslim fasting, but they also appear obligative. All revelations have brought fasting as obligative. From medical point of view, fasting has two basical components: psychical and physical. Psychical sphere correlate closely with its fundamental ideological message. Allah dz.s. says in Quran: "... Fasting is obligative for you, as it was obligative to your precedents, as to avoid sins; during very few days (II, II, 183 & 184)." Will strength, control of passions, effort and self-discipline makes a pure faithfull person, who purify its mind and body through fasting. Thinking about The Creator is more intensive, character is more solid; and spirit and will get stronger. We will mention the hadith saying: "Essaihune humus saimun!" That means: "Travellers at the Earth are fasters (of my ummet)." The commentary of this hadith, in the Collection of 1001 hadiths (Bin bir hadis), number 485, says: "There are no travelling dervishs or monks in islam; thus there is no such a kind of relligousity in islam. In stead, it is changed by fasting and constant attending of mosque. That was proclaimed as obligation, although there were few cases of travelling in the name of relligousity, like travelling dervishs and sheichs." In this paper, the author discusses medical aspects of fasting and its positive characteristics in the respect of healthy life style and prevention of many sicks. The author mentions positive influence of fasting to certain system and organs of human

  9. Current aspects of occupational chemical carcinogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lassiter, D.

    1975-01-01

    The history of measures to control occupational exposure to carcinogenic substances is reviewed. Health hazards associated with exposure to a certain chemical substance must be considered not only from the aspects of its acute or chronic toxicity, but also from its potential to produce tumors (latent effect). There can be no clear distinction between classic toxicity and oncogenesis until the mechanisms of both are completely understood for a given chemical substance. The assessment of carcinogenic potential for a specific substance must include the consideration of published information, monitoring and control data from the affected industry, and the in-depth epidemiologic experience of affected employees.

  10. Analysis of the Medical Assisting Occupation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keir, Lucille; And Others

    The occupational analysis contains a brief job description, presenting for the occupation of medical assistant 113 detailed task statements which specify job duties (tools, equipment, materials, objects acted upon, performance knowledge, safety consideration/hazards, decisions, cues, and errors) and learning skills (science, mathematics/number…

  11. [Medical decision making: some aspects].

    PubMed

    Steurer, J

    2004-09-22

    Three main aspects of medical decision making will be shortly described in this article. Comprehensible information is required to make decisions. The question is, how much information is needed to make decisions, and a third aspect in this article concerns the decision maker. Research in the field of information transfer has shown that medical information, as presented in most journals, is difficult to understand. According to the classic decision theory, decisions are taken after collecting all available information. More recent research in decision making proves the hypothesis that human beings are able to decide correctly with much less information than presumed earlier. In medicine the patient is the decision maker, and the primary task of physicians is to inform the patient about his health status and enable him to reach a conclusion. PMID:15500244

  12. Health Occupations Education: Medical Assistant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sloan, Jamee Reid

    These medical assistant instructional materials include 28 instructional units organized into sections covering orientation; anatomy and physiology, related disorders, disease, and skills; office practices; and clinical practices. Each unit includes eight basic components: performance objectives, suggested activities for teachers, information…

  13. Medical Aspects of Scuba Diving

    PubMed Central

    Suke, Ralph

    1985-01-01

    Scuba divers may encounter dangerous levels of stress, due to increased ambient pressures and hostile environments. Divers therefore require a high level of mental and cardiorespiratory fitness. They must be informed of specific contraindications to diving. Family physicians with a basic knowledge of the medical aspects of scuba diving are in a very good position to examine and advise sports divers. Screening mainly involves an assessment of emotional stability and cardiorespiratory fitness, and an ear, nose and throat examination. Common problems suffered by scuba divers are discussed, as are temporary and permanent contraindications to diving. PMID:21274131

  14. Medical Terminology: Prefixes. Health Occupations Education Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This module on medical terminology (prefixes) is one of 17 modules designed for individualized instruction in health occupations education programs at both the secondary and postsecondary levels. This module consists of an introduction to prefixes, a list of resources needed, and three learning experiences. Each learning experience contains an…

  15. Task Analysis for Health Occupations. Cluster: Medical Assisting. Occupation: Medical Assistant. Education for Employment Task Lists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lathrop, Janice

    Task analyses are provided for two duty areas for the occupation of medical assistant in the medical assisting cluster. Five tasks for the duty area "providing therapeutic measures" are as follows: assist with dressing change, apply clean dressing, apply elastic bandage, assist physician in therapeutic procedure, and apply topical ointment. The…

  16. 10 CFR 712.34 - Site Occupational Medical Director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Site Occupational Medical Director. 712.34 Section 712.34 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY HUMAN RELIABILITY PROGRAM Medical Standards § 712.34 Site Occupational Medical Director. (a) The SOMD must nominate a physician to serve as the Designated Physician and...

  17. 10 CFR 712.34 - Site Occupational Medical Director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Site Occupational Medical Director. 712.34 Section 712.34 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY HUMAN RELIABILITY PROGRAM Medical Standards § 712.34 Site Occupational Medical Director. (a) The SOMD must nominate a physician to serve as the Designated Physician and...

  18. 10 CFR 712.34 - Site Occupational Medical Director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Site Occupational Medical Director. 712.34 Section 712.34 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY HUMAN RELIABILITY PROGRAM Medical Standards § 712.34 Site Occupational Medical Director. (a) The SOMD must nominate a physician to serve as the Designated Physician and...

  19. [Role of obligatory medical insurance in insuring victims of occupational accidents and patients with occupational diseases].

    PubMed

    Bykovskaia, T Iu

    2005-01-01

    The author described current system insuring victims of occupational accidents and patients with occupational diseases, with participation of all off-budget funds and health service budget, with consideration of work conditions and occupational morbidity in Rostov region. Analysis covered experience and efficiency of Obligatory Medical Insurance System (unique in this country, which participated in insuring occupational victims) in insuring victims of occupational accidents in the region. PMID:16315583

  20. Medical aspects of sport diving.

    PubMed

    Bove, A A

    1996-05-01

    Medical issues in sport diving include illnesses that are caused by diving, and medical disorders that compromise safety. Cerebral air embolism and decompression sickness of the brain and spinal cord can result from diving. Sport divers may manifest a spectrum of symptoms from air embolism, which can range from unconsciousness to minimal symptoms, which include fatigue, personality change, poor concentration, irritability, and changes in vision. The physician must search for these minor symptoms in divers who are suspected of pulmonary barotrauma. Medical disorders of concern in diving include diseases of the lungs, the heart, the brain, and the endocrine system, particularly diabetes. Other factors involved in diving safety are exercise capacity and training. Clinical practice standards usually prohibit diving by individuals who have a seizure disorder that requires continuous medication. In the United States, we will not approve diving for individuals who have insulin-dependent diabetes or severe asthma. Some divers can return to diving after myocardial infarction or bypass surgery if they demonstrate good exercise tolerance and no ischemia on a graded exercise test, which simulates the physical activity needed for safe diving. PMID:9148089

  1. Some medical aspects of radionuclide intakes

    SciTech Connect

    Poda, G A

    1983-01-01

    In the field of medicine, particularly industrial medicine, the radiation aspect of the practice probably takes about 1/10 of 1% of our time. All the health physicist's tools of principles of internal dosimetry, lung models, mathematics, chemistry, etc. have little meaning until applied to an individual who has had an intake. This article discusses some of the medical aspects of internal dosimetry.

  2. Client-Centered Advocacy: Every Occupational Therapy Practitioner's Responsibility to Understand Medical Necessity.

    PubMed

    Stover, Alyson D

    2016-01-01

    Occupational therapy practitioners must advocate for clients in multiple ways. The Occupational Therapy Practice Framework: Domain and Process as well as the Occupational Therapy Code of Ethics lend support to advocacy. Recognizing one's responsibility to provide advocacy for clients is different from knowing how to provide that advocacy. One aspect of health care affected by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) is the definition and implementation of medical necessity. This article outlines some major concepts around medical necessity, particularly in relation to the passage of the ACA, and outlines guidance on how to advocate effectively to meet both individual and community needs. PMID:27548855

  3. 10 CFR 712.34 - Site Occupational Medical Director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Site Occupational Medical Director. 712.34 Section 712.34 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY HUMAN RELIABILITY PROGRAM Medical Standards § 712.34 Site Occupational... Manager to the Director, Office of Health and Safety or his or her designee. Each nomination must...

  4. 10 CFR 712.34 - Site Occupational Medical Director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Site Occupational Medical Director. 712.34 Section 712.34 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY HUMAN RELIABILITY PROGRAM Medical Standards § 712.34 Site Occupational... Manager to the Director, Office of Health and Safety or his or her designee. Each nomination must...

  5. Medical Aspects of Ambulance Design

    PubMed Central

    Snook, Roger

    1972-01-01

    Various observations have shown that the interior layout of many ambulances leaves much to be desired. The lighting levels are inadequate, heat loss could be prevented, vehicle identification and passage through traffic could be improved, and measurable differences exist between the ride characteristics of commercially available ambulances, a prototype purpose-built ambulance, and a private car. Moreover the condition of some patients may be affected by the motion of the vehicle either directly or indirectly. Even though they form a small percentage of the total number carried, they represent a very considerable financial risk. A personally conducted survey of ambulance chief officers showed a deep interest and involvement in the upgrading of the service with a general dissatisfaction with many of the vehicles currently available. Hence there is a market for the purpose-built ambulance, which would benefit the patient and the ambulanceman alike. The inadequacies of many vehicles currently in use as ambulances have been shown to work against the interests of the patient requiring life support treatment, and it is suggested that this warrants urgent attention and action. A more extensive research project involving medical observations on the supine sick and injured, attendant task performance, and instrumentation analysis of linear and angular vehicle motions should enable the harmful effects of ride motion to be identified. None of these investigations, however, will be of any value unless they are used in developing future ambulances. Such development must also parallel an increase in the awareness of the importance of ambulance design and its relation to the increased comfort and chance of survival of the patients carried. ImagesFIG. 2FIG. 4 PMID:5069643

  6. Gender Portrayal in Veterinary Medical Advertising: Implications For Occupational Segregation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christopher, Mary M.; Drew, Debra L.

    1995-01-01

    Evaluates the portrayal of males and females in advertisements in veterinary medical journals. Uses multivariate Chi-square tests to explore gender, occupation or role, practice type, text, and product. Contains 33 references. (DDR)

  7. Medical graduates' knowledge of bloodborne viruses and occupational exposures.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Nicole; Vujovic, Olga; Dendle, Claire; McMenamin, Christine

    2014-02-01

    A survey of medical graduates commencing employment as junior doctors was performed to investigate knowledge of bloodborne viruses and occupational exposure management, coupled with their experience of occupational exposures. There was a mismatch between general knowledge (excellent) and knowledge of postexposure management (poor), and graduates had commonly experienced an occupational exposure and not reported it. The knowledge deficit regarding postexposure management and history of poor practice (ie, nonreporting) following an exposure implies that the transition period from student to junior doctor may be associated with increased occupational health and safety risk. PMID:24360355

  8. [Three aspects of the medical ethos].

    PubMed

    Saraga, Michael; Marion-Veyron, Régis; Stiefel, Friedrich; Bourquin, Céline

    2016-02-10

    For many years, a major focus of interest has been the patient, in the context of a constantly changing society and increasingly complex medical practices. We propose to shift this focus on the physician, who is entangled in a similar, but less evident way. In these three articles, we explore, in succession, the lived experience of the contemporary physician, the ethos which brings together the medical community, and the education of the future physician, using research projects currently under way within the Service of Liaison Psychiatry at Lausanne University Hospital. Here, we describe three aspects of the medical ethos shaping medicine and the physicians: pragmatism, scientific rationality, and the individualistic embodiment of clinical practice. PMID:27039440

  9. Rural Allied Medical Business Occupations (RAMBO). Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Gloria

    A partnership was formed to address the crisis that rural health care facilities in rural Nebraska face in attracting and hiring trained health care workers. The Rural Allied Medical Business Occupations (RAMBO) project trained economically disadvantaged individuals in high technology medical fields. Five objectives were outlined in the project:…

  10. Current aspects of hearing loss from occupational and leisure noise

    PubMed Central

    Plontke, S.; Zenner, H.-P.

    2004-01-01

    Hearing loss from occupational and leisure noise numbers amongst the most frequent causes of an acquired sensorineural hearing loss. Here we present a review of up-to-date findings on the pathophysiology of acoustic injury to the inner ear, with special attention being paid to its molecular-biological and genetic aspects. Epidemiological aspects shall also be dealt with, as shall the roles of lacking recovery from occupational noise due to additional exposure by leisure noise and the combined exposure of noise and chemicals. Based on the epidemiological and pathophysiological findings and against the background of published animal-experimental, pre-clinical and clinical findings, the various approaches for prevention, protection and therapeutic intervention with acoustic trauma are discussed. Pharmacological strategies involving anti-oxidative, anti-excitotoxic and anti-apoptotic substances as well as non-pharmacological strategies like "sound conditioning" are given attention. Furthermore, systemic and local substance application as well as the therapy of acute acoustic trauma and chronic hearing problems (including modern therapy forms for comorbidities such as tinnitus) shall be delved into. PMID:22073048

  11. [Taking Care of Asylum Seekers: Occupational Health Aspects with a Special Focus on Vaccination].

    PubMed

    Kolb, S; Hörmansdorfer, S; Ackermann, N; Höller, C; Brenner, B; Herr, C

    2016-04-01

    Employees and volunteers often feel insecure about the potential transmission of infectious diseases when taking care of asylum seekers. It could be shown that overall only a minor risk of infection emanates from asylum seekers. However, aspects of occupational health and vaccination should be kept in mind.Besides the standard vaccination the Standing Committee on Vaccination (STIKO) recommends for occupational indication, which is given for employees and volunteers in asylum facilities, vaccination against hepatitis A, hepatitis B, polio (if the last vaccination was more than 10 years before) as well as influenza (seasonal).According to the German Occupational Safety and Health Act taking care of the employer has to determine which exposures might occur at the workplace (risk assessment) and define necessary protection measures. Depending on task and exposure when taking care of asylum seekers different acts (e. g. biological agents regulation) and technical guidelines for the handling biological agents (e. g. TRBA 250 or TRBA 500) have to be applied.The Bavarian Health and Food Safety Authority (LGL) has published several information sheets regarding "asylum seekers and health management" for employees and volunteers from the non-medical as well as the medical area (www.lgl.bayern.de search term "Asylbewerber"). With theses publications insecurities in taking care of asylum seekers should be prevented. Furthermore the employer gets support in the implementation of legal obligations to ensure occupational safety for the employees. PMID:27078829

  12. Medical Physicists and Health Physicists: Radiation Occupations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaPointe, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Physics is the study of matter and energy and the ways in which the two interact. Some physicists use their expertise in physics to focus on radiation. These specialists, called medical physicists and health physicists, work to help people or protect the environment. Medical physicists work with physicians, assisting patients who need imaging…

  13. Malpractice aspects of medically prescribed exercise.

    PubMed

    Sagall, E L

    1975-01-01

    Stress exercise testing of suspected or known cardiacs and medical recommendations to patients to undertake physical fitness conditioning exercise programs constitute medical treatment in the eyes of the law and as such render the prescribing and supervising physicians legally responsible for harmful consequences to the patient to the same degree and under the same legal principles applicable for other medically prescribed diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. The physician who employs a stress exercise test or who recommends that a patient engage in exercise as part of a prophylactic, rehabilitative, or therapeutic program must be alert to those aspects of his recommendations which possess potential malpractice hazards. In particular, he should direct his attention to recognized indications and contraindications of exercise test and exercise programs. Furthermore, he should perform an adequate preexercise screening examination and he must make sure that the exercise is properly monitored; that it is immediately terminated upon onset of signs or symptoms of impending serious reactions; that adequate advance preparations have been made for the treatment of foreseeable emergencies, particularly those requiring cardiopulmonary resuscitation and advanced life support; and that such treatment is in full accord with generally accepted and proper medical standards. Finally, the physician must make certain that he adequately informs the patient of the potential risks and hazards associated with exercise stress testing and exercise programs so that the consent to such procedures can be classified legally as valid and "informed". PMID:1221239

  14. Occupational Exposure to Nanoparticles and Medical Safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brochard, Patrick; Bloch, Daniel; Pairon, Jean-Claude

    The problem of occupational exposure to nanoparticles (NP) has raised many questions which remain unanswered today: When airborne NPs, either dissociated or more commonly in the form of aggregates, are inhaled by humans, will they produce a biological and/or tissular response where they are deposited, i.e., in the respiratory tract, or at some distance from the deposition area, i.e., an indirect effect secondary to the inflammatory response of the respiratory tract or a direct effect due to translocation of nanoparticles through the biological membranes?

  15. [Strengthening the medical aspect of addiction care].

    PubMed

    van Brussel, G H

    2003-08-23

    The Dutch Association for Addiction Medicine and the umbrella organisation GGZ Nederland (sector organisation for mental health and addiction care) have compiled a report entitled 'Strengthening medical care in the addiction care sector'. The report argues why medical care needs to be strengthened and provides guidance as to how the present shortcomings in quality and quantity can be dealt with. Addiction is now considered to be a medical condition with patients instead of clients. This means that the care, including the financial aspects, needs to be organised in the same way as all other forms of regular health care. Furthermore, the training in addiction medicine needs to be given a clearer status in the form of departments, professorships, training institutes and certification. Within the context of this report the responsibility of addiction centres needs to be emphasised. Vacancies in the many forms of social work could be exchanged for well-trained nurses and physicians, without the need for extra financial assistance. PMID:12966626

  16. [Good practice for medical surveillance by occupational physicians].

    PubMed

    Roscelli, F; Frigeri, G; Quercia, A; De Rosa, A

    2006-01-01

    Society--employers, workers, trade unions, public--demands the highest standards of professional competence and ethical conduct from occupational physicians. However, defining what exactly constitutes good medical practice and acceptable standards of professional competence and conduct is not so easily done. Good practice in occupational medicine should be aimed not only at improving the effectiveness of preventive action in the strict sense, but also at constantly adopting rigorous methodologies based on evidence and procedures breaking loose from rigid formats, which must be as uniform as possible throughout the country. It's essential, therefore, to develop consensus documents on workers' health surveillance, meeting with approval of occupational health physicians both operating in a free market context or within the framework of public sector health service. PMID:17144422

  17. 1998 annual report Office of Occupational Medicine and Medical Surveillance

    SciTech Connect

    Gebus, George R.

    1999-06-10

    the mission of EH-61 is the prevention of worker illness by fostering outstanding occupational medicine and medical surveillance programs within the DOE complex. The EH-61 annual report for 1998 describes our major activities and achievements as we have worked toward realizing this mission through our main program lines (1) Surveillance; (2) policy(Field SUppOti; (3) Information/Communication; and (4) Research. Some of our major 1998 accomplishments are highlighted below for more details, please consult the corresponding sections of this report. The FORMER BERYLLIUM WORKERS MEDICAL SURVEILLANCE PROGRAM identifies and locates former employees exposed to beryllium and provides enhanced medical monitoring for early identification of chronic beryllium disease (CBD). Over Z0,000 current and former workers have been contacted to date, and there have been about 8,8oo responders. More than 100 cases of CBD have been detected. The DOE FORMER WORKERS PROGRAM (FWP) is targeted primarily to former workers who have either retired or left DOE facilities. In FY 1998, there were 10 pilot projects operating at 9 sites. These pilots will validate approaches for medical screening of former employees and health risk communication efforts. When completed in FY 2002, the information gained from the pilots will serve as a basis for projecting funding and resources needed for the FWP in the years ahead. We have helped develop health-related POLICIES/GUIDANCE, that will promote the health of the contractor workforce by addressing current and emerging issues related to occupational health. The RADIATION EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE CENTER/TRAINING SITE (REAC/TS) is supported by EH-61 and assists DOE by maintaining state-of-the-art expertise in radiation medicine and biodosimetry. This support provides DOE with a national and international 24-hour response capability for evaluating and managing victims of radiation accidents occurring at its facilities or among the general public. In collaboration

  18. [Ethics, medical ethics, and occupational medicine: is their dialogue possible?].

    PubMed

    Buzzi, Elisa

    2016-01-01

    Today's medicine faces some critical moral challenges, yet the medical class suffers from an increasingly evident malaise: a growing dissatisfaction with an ethical demand often perceived as a cumbersome burden of rules and prohibitions, which risk to erode the fiduciary relations with patients. Such a negative appraisal is partly due to a narrow interpretation of the meaning of ethics, a misconception whose roots are in the positivistic stance that permeates our culture, and in its almost exclusively technological bent. This radical orientation of our culture shows itself in the vanishing of the idea of an intrinsic ethical dimension of medicine and consequent eclipse of traditional medical ethics, currently all but assimilated by bioethics. Maintaining a clear distinction between medical ethics and bioethics is a fundamental condition for guaranteeing an original ethical reflection in medicine, thereby fostering a constructive dialogue between philosophical and medical ethics. In this sense, occupational medicine holds a very propitious position, at the cross-roads to some of the most important dimensions in human life and society: health, work, environment. In a milieu which is too often inclined to efface the living human being and the deepest needs of humanity, the moral commitment of medical profession to the care of the integral reality of the embodied human person is one of the most important ethical challenges facing occupational medicine and a most valuable contribution to the current ethical debate. PMID:26822241

  19. Medical surveillance for the emerging occupational and environmental respiratory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Weissman, David N.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review To highlight the important issues to consider in deciding whether to pursue and how to conduct medical surveillance for the emerging occupational and environmental respiratory diseases. It provides several recent examples illustrating implementation and usefulness of medical surveillance and the lessons learned from these experiences. Recent findings Medical surveillance conducted after sentinel outbreaks of constrictive bronchiolitis in microwave popcorn and flavoring production plants have shown the usefulness of this approach in documenting the burden of disease, identifying particular problem areas as targets for preventive interventions, and in tracking the progress. They have also identified the usefulness of longitudinal spirometry, which allows comparison of the individuals’ results to their own previous tests. The importance of recognizing a sentinel outbreak needing greater investigation is demonstrated by the cluster of cases of constrictive bronchiolitis recognized in military veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan. The World Trade Center disaster has demonstrated the importance of having baseline lung function data for future comparison and the importance of rapidly identifying exposed populations at greatest risk for health effects, and thus potentially having the greatest benefit from medical surveillance. Summary When used appropriately, medical surveillance is a useful tool in addressing the emerging occupational and environmental respiratory diseases by facilitating improvements in primary prevention and enabling interventions to help individuals through secondary prevention. PMID:24500294

  20. [Cardiopulmonary exercise testing in occupational medical fitness examination and assessment].

    PubMed

    Preisser, A M; Ochmann, U

    2011-11-01

    Medical expert opinion by occupational physicians and pneumologists has two main objectives: making a diagnosis with probability bordering on certainty and clarifying a causal relationship to a present or former occupational exposure to irritant toxic, allergenic or fibrosing dusts, gases, welding fumes or mineral fibres. Especially for conditions that are associated with exertional dyspnea, the diagnosis at rest using spirometry, body plethysmography, pulmonary function test, blood gas analysis, electrocardiogram and echocardiography is of limited use. This paper identifies the indications for cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) in occupational medicine, explains the related measurements and their differential diagnostic value with special consideration of the flow-volume curve under exercise as well as the alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient. Diagnostic statements on the relevance of oxygen uptake measured at continuous and peak load compared to the wattage ascertained on the bicycle ergometer are presented. Characteristic CPET findings are explained in terms of their differential diagnostic significance. Furthermore, the importance of CPET for the assessment of occupational disease-related functional loss (clinical proportions in the reduction of working capacity) is shown. PMID:22083292

  1. Occupational Medical Trends in the 70's from Industrial View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamson, S. M.

    1970-01-01

    Industrial health measures to ensure worker productivity constitute physical examinations as well as environmental control systems. Considered are automatic record keeping facilities for case histories, preventive medical and mental counselling, development of safety standards, and health insurance and disability benefit plans. Cooperation of industry health programs with community health aspects is required to eliminate the loss of manpower capability through alcoholism or mental disease.

  2. Clinical aspects of medication overuse headaches.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, Arnaldo Neves; Lake, Alvin E

    2014-01-01

    Medication overuse headache (MOH) is a subset of chronic daily headache, occurring from overuse of 1 or more classes of migraine abortive medication. Acetaminophen, combination analgesics (caffeine combinations), opioids, barbiturates (butalbital), non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and triptans are the main classes of drugs implicated in the genesis of MOH. Migraine seems to be the most common diagnosis leading to MOH. The development of MOH is associated with both frequency of use of medication and behavioral predispositions. MOH is not a unitary concept. The distinction between simple (type 1) vs complex (type 2) forms is based on both the class of overused medication and behavioral factors, including psychopathology and psychological drug dependence. MOH is a challenging disorder causing decline in the quality of life and causing physical symptoms, such as daily and incapacitating headaches, insomnia, and non-restorative sleep, as well as psychological distress and reduced functioning. MOH is associated with biochemical, structural, and functional brain changes. Relapse after detoxification is a challenge, but can be addressed if the patient is followed over a prolonged period of time with a combination of prophylactic pharmacotherapy, use of abortive medication with minimal risk of MOH, withholding previously overused medication, and providing psychological (cognitive-behavioral) therapy. PMID:24116964

  3. Occupational safety and health aspects of voice and speech professions.

    PubMed

    Vilkman, Erkki

    2004-01-01

    A well-functioning voice is an essential tool for one third of the labour force. Vocal demands vary to a great extent between the different voice and speech professions. In professions with heavy vocal loading (e.g. school and kindergarten teachers), occupational voice disorders threatening working ability are common. Vocal loading is a combination of prolonged voice use and additional loading factors (e.g. background noise, acoustics, air quality) affecting the fundamental frequency, type and loudness of phonation or the vibratory characteristics of the vocal folds as well as the external frame of the larynx. The prevention and treatment of occupational voice disorders calls for improved occupational safety and health (OSH) arrangements for voice and speech professionals. On the basis of epidemiological and acoustic-physiological research, the presence of risk to vocal health can be substantiated. From the point of view of the physical load on the vocal apparatus, loading-related physiological changes (adaptation) may play a role in the occupational risk. Environmental factors affect vocal loading changes. In teaching professions, the working environment is shared with children, who benefit from amendments of OSH legislation concerning their teachers. PMID:15258436

  4. Transferred Jobs: A Neglected Aspect of Migration and Occupational Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sell, Ralph R.

    1983-01-01

    Based on the 1973 and 1977 Annual Housing Surveys of the United States, about 800,000 household heads were relocated annually by their employers. Income and education levels associated with relocated heads indicated that job transfers are most likely to occur among the higher socioeconomic status occupations but nonetheless appear to be frequent…

  5. [Medical professionalism: historical and religious aspects].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez P, José Adolfo

    2006-03-01

    The essence of the medical profession resides in the medical act, whereupon a sick human being meets another with the power to heal him or her. The source of this power has evolved from the divinity itself through magic to science or acquired knowledge. This power implies acknowledgement of values that are inherent to the profession as well as responsibility toward one's own conscience and toward society, elements considered constitutive of what we now call professionalism. From antiquity these principles have evolved into behavioral codes containing variable components according to the different ages and cultures, but also permenent core values such as respect for life, altruism, and honesty, among others. Scientific and technological advances have magnified medical power but at the same time they have required that the philosophical and ethical principles that ought to inform professional practice be made explicit. This happens at a time when certitudes are questioned or abandoned, relativism and secularism pervade culture, and traditional medical values are challenged. Therefore, consensus attainment appears for some as the only legitimation of the ethics of professional medical acts, while for others the ancestral principles and values of medicine have permanent validity as objective goods based on the dignity of the human person. PMID:16676114

  6. Medical and Scientific Aspects of Cycling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Edmund R., Ed.; Newsom, Mary M., Ed.

    The 24 contributions to this volume were written by coaches, sport scientists, and medical authorities who surveyed recent research on biomechanics, physiology, psychology, nutrition, treatment of injuries, and training techniques for cyclists. There are four sections: (1) biomechanics and physiology; (2) research: techniques and results; (3)…

  7. [Aspects of communication regarding medical malpractice suits].

    PubMed

    Pilling, János; Erdélyi, Kamilla

    2016-04-24

    Due to problems experienced in health care, there is an increased amount of malpractice suits nowadays. Nevertheless, some physicians are more likely to be sued, or more frequently sued, than others. Numerous studies indicate that this phenomenon fundamentally results from a lack of interpersonal and communication skills on the part of the sued doctor, namely, deficiencies in questioning the patient, listening, conveying information, etc. Communication is of pivotal importance in patient care vis-à-vis medical errors as well. The majority of physicians aim to conceal the error, albeit this may lead to further deterioration of the patient's condition. In institutions where open communication regarding errors was introduced within the medical team and toward the patient and their family alike, the number of malpractice suits decreased. It is crucial to establish a means of support for doctors, and to promote communication trainings, as well as a supportive legal environment. PMID:27084438

  8. The History, Biology and Medical Aspects of Leprosy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichman, Phillip

    1999-01-01

    Presents information about the history, biology, and medical aspects of leprosy, including its description in historical documents, its cause and effects, statistics on its prevalence, and various attempts at treatment. Notes that leprosy is one of the few infectious diseases that, although treatable with medication, remains incurable. Contains 30…

  9. [Assisted suicide - medical, legal, and ethical aspects].

    PubMed

    Bosshard, G

    2012-02-01

    Unlike in most European countries, assisted suicide is not illegal in Switzerland. The number of assisted suicides procured by right-to-die organisations such as Exit or Dignitas has sharply increased in the last twenty years. Central part of the doctor's involvement is the prescription of a lethal dose of sodium pentobarbital. In doing so, the doctor has to apply to the rules of medical due care. A proper examination of the patient is required, who must be informed about his diagnosis, about the expected prognosis, and about different treatment options. Verification of the patient's decisional capacity is crucial. In general, a staff member of the organisation but not the doctor is present during suicide. Following death, the assisted suicide has to be reported to the police as an extraordinary death case. PMID:22294304

  10. [Sport as a profession: medical and social aspects].

    PubMed

    Izmerov, N F

    2011-01-01

    The author analyses possible use of methods and achievements of industrial medicine in solving problems of acme in sports. The article covers theoretic, methodologic and practical basis for possible integration of industrial medicine and sports medicine. Mechanisms of such interdisciplinary integration include current legal basis, scientific research (mostly, concept of occupational risk, norm and pathology concept, doctrine of preventive medicine, etc), practical experience accumulated in this country and abroad. Some aspects of public health preservation in contemporary Russia are also tackled. PMID:21614797

  11. Medical aspects of the hazardous waste problem.

    PubMed

    Ozonoff, D

    1982-12-01

    Although no one knows exactly how much toxic material continues to be released into our environment, most observers believe the amount is substantial. In the last few years, in the state of Massachusetts alone, 22 communities have had their municipal water supplies seriously compromised by chemical contamination, (1) causing alarm and dismay among water users. Nation-wide, public concern has reached the point that in some opinion polls, hazardous waste ranks second only behind inflation as a cause of serious worry. Despite widespread anxiety, shared by public health officials, few studies have shown conclusive evidence of health consequences from toxic materials in the environment. Even in the case of such gross contamination as in the Love Canal area of Niagara Falls, New York, health effects have been difficult to establish. (2) This is partly due to intrusion of the adversary process in cases where liability is involved; it is also a result, however, of inherent technical problems that plague any determination of health hazard. This paper reviews some of these problems, considers some current risk assessment approaches, and touches on medicolegal and regulatory aspects of the hazardous waste problem. PMID:7165025

  12. Medical aspects of the hazardous waste problem

    SciTech Connect

    Ozonoff, D.

    1982-12-01

    Although no one knows exactly how much toxic material continues to be released into our environment, most observers believe the amount is substantial. In the last few years, in the state of Massachusetts alone, 22 communities have had their municipal water supplies seriously compromised by chemical contamination, causing alarm and dismay among water users. Nation-wide, public concern has reached the point that in some opinion polls, hazardous waste ranks second only behind inflation as a cause of serious worry. Despite widespread anxiety, shared by public health officials, few studies have shown conclusive evidence of health consequences from toxic materials in the environment. Even in the case of such gross contamination as in the Love Canal area of Niagara Falls, New York, health effects have been difficult to establish. This is partly due to intrusion of the adversary process in cases where liability is involved; it is also a result, however, of inherent technical problems that plague any determination of health hazard. This paper reviews some of these problems, considers some current risk assessment approaches, and touches on medicolegal and regulatory aspects of the hazardous waste problem.

  13. A Primer on Aspects of Cognition for Medical Informatics

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Vimla L.; Arocha, José F.; Kaufman, David R.

    2001-01-01

    As a multidisciplinary field, medical informatics draws on a range of disciplines, such as computer science, information science, and the social and cognitive sciences. The cognitive sciences can provide important insights into the nature of the processes involved in human– computer interaction and help improve the design of medical information systems by providing insight into the roles that knowledge, memory, and strategies play in a variety of cognitive activities. In this paper, the authors survey literature on aspects of medical cognition and provide a set of claims that they consider to be important in medical informatics. PMID:11418539

  14. Occupational exposure to formaldehyde in a medical center autopsy service

    SciTech Connect

    Coldiron, V.R.; Ward, J.B. Jr.; Trieff, N.M.; Janssen, H.E. Jr.; Smith, J.H.

    1983-07-01

    The formaldehyde exposures occurring in the autopsy service of a medical complex were evaluated as part of a study to detect genetically harmful effects of chemical exposures. Determination of time-weighted average (TWA) exposures and characterization of the patterns of exposure experienced by individuals with different work responsibilities in this occupational setting were sought. Both general area and breathing zone samples were evaluated. Estimated weekly time-weighted average exposures for pathologists, residents and technicians were determined to be between 0.61 and 1.32 parts per million with little difference between work roles. While the averages were similar, the patterns of exposure of technicians and physicians were different. Technicians were exposed to a baseline level of formaldehyde for a prolonged period of time. In contrast, physicians were exposed for shorter times but experienced higher levels during specific tasks, particularly tissue-sectioning and examination. Evaluations of work procedures and environmental conditions in autopsy services are recommended to reduce personnel exposure to formaldehyde vapor.

  15. Progeria: Medical Aspects, Psychosocial Perspectives, and Intervention Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livneh, Hanoch; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Discusses progeria (or Hutchinson-Gilford syndrome), a rare childhood disorder that invariably results in death during adolescence. Describes the major medical aspects of progeria, and discusses the psychosocial implications of the disorder with particular emphasis on grief-triggered reactions. Presents an overview of psychosocial intervention…

  16. Occupational Safety and Health Symposia (37th American Medical Association Congress on Occupational Health. St. Louis, Missouri, 1977).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglass, Bruce E.; And Others

    The papers compiled here were presented at the fourth symposium in a series designed to provide a continuing introduction to current aspects of occupational safety and health. The papers represent eight topics: (1) special health programs, (2) degenerative disease and injury of the back, (3) job stress and work performance, (4) role of industry in…

  17. Medical Asepsis. Kit No. 302. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Learning Activity Guide. Health Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Gloria

    This instructor's manual and student learning guide comprise a module on medical asepsis for a secondary-level health occupations program. The six activities in the module cover medical asepsis terms; ways organisms spread; types of medical asepsis; aseptic equipment care; proper handwashing; and procedures for using masks, gloves, and gowns.…

  18. Pre-Travel Medical Preparation of Business and Occupational Travelers

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Nomana M.; Jentes, Emily S.; Brown, Clive; Han, Pauline; Rao, Sowmya R.; Kozarsky, Phyllis; Hagmann, Stefan H.F.; LaRocque, Regina C.; Ryan, Edward T.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to understand more about pre-travel preparations and itineraries of business and occupational travelers. Methods: De-identified data from 18 Global TravEpiNet clinics from January 2009 to December 2012 were analyzed. Results: Of 23,534 travelers, 61% were non-occupational and 39% occupational. Business travelers were more likely to be men, had short times to departure and shorter trip durations, and commonly refused influenza, meningococcal, and hepatitis B vaccines. Most business travelers indicated that employers suggested the pre-travel health consultation, whereas non-occupational travelers sought consultations because of travel health concerns. Conclusions: Sub-groups of occupational travelers have characteristic profiles, with business travelers being particularly distinct. Employers play a role in encouraging business travelers to seek pre-travel consultations. Such consultations, even if scheduled immediately before travel, can identify vaccination gaps and increase coverage. PMID:26479857

  19. [Medical and psychological aspects of safety measures maintenance among nuclear and power station personnel].

    PubMed

    Ipatov, P L; Sorokin, A V; Basov, V I

    2004-01-01

    The article deals with 15-year experience of medical and psychophysiologic service in Medical and Sanitary Establishment No. 156 and Balakovo nuclear power station on providing reliability of occupational activities for the station personnel. PMID:15124389

  20. LIMITING OCCUPATIONAL MEDICAL EVALUATIONS UNDER THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT AND THE GENETIC INFORMATION NONDISCRIMINATION ACT.

    PubMed

    Rothstein, Mark A; Roberts, Jessica; Guidotti, Tee L

    2015-01-01

    Although medical care delivery by one's personal physician is the paradigmatic American healthcare arrangement, in the workplace setting, many Americans undergo medical evaluations to assess their fitness for duty or degree of impairment. This Article explores the complex and evolving legal status of occupational medical evaluations. Beginning with the legal and ethical frameworks of occupational medical practice, the Article then examines the effects of increasingly detailed legal regulation under the Americans with Disabilities Act and the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act on employees, employers, and physicians. PMID:26863849

  1. Social accountability of medical education: aspects on global accreditation.

    PubMed

    Lindgren, Stefan; Karle, Hans

    2011-01-01

    Medical doctors constitute a profession which embraces trust from and accountability to society. This responsibility extends to all medical educational institutions. Social accountability of medical education means a willingness and ability to adjust to the needs of patients and health care systems both nationally and globally. But it also implies a responsibility to contribute to the development of medicine and society through fostering competence for research and improvement. Accreditation is a process by which a statutory body evaluates and recognises an educational institution and/or its programme with respect to meeting approved criteria. It is a means for quality assurance, but also a strong power to reinforce the need for improvement and reforms. It must be performed through internationally recognised and transparent standards and should foremost promote quality development. The social accountability of medical education must be included in all accreditation processes at all levels. The global standards programme by World Federation for Medical Education (WFME) provides tools for national or regional accreditation but also guidance for reforms and quality improvement. The standards are used worldwide and have been adopted to local needs in most parts of the world. They are framed to specify attainment at two levels: basic standards or minimum requirements and standards for quality development. The concept of social accountability is embedded in all parts of the WFME standards documents. In 2011, a revision of the standards for undergraduate education has been instituted. Strengthening of aspects on social accountability of medical education will be a particular concern. PMID:21774655

  2. Health Track System—An Automated Occupational Medical System

    PubMed Central

    Compton, Jack E.; Hartridge, Anne D.; Maluish, Andrew G.

    1980-01-01

    The development of an automated occupational health and hazards system is being undertaken at the Department of Energy by Electronic Data Systems. This system, called the Health Track System (HTS), involves the integration and collection of data from the fields of occupational medicine, industrial hygiene, health physics, safety and personnel. This in itself is an exciting prospect, however, the scope of the system calls for it to be installed throughout DOE and contractor organizations across the country, which is even more exciting. Presented here are the main ideas behind the system, and how state of the art technology can be applied to this task.

  3. Lead Poisoning: Historical Aspects of a Paradigmatic "Occupational and Environmental Disease"

    PubMed Central

    Lafranconi, Alessandra; D'Orso, Marco Italo; Cesana, Giancarlo

    2012-01-01

    Lead poisoning is one of the earliest identified and most known occupational disease. Its acute effects have been recognized from antiquity when this condition principally afflicted manual workers and slaves, actually scarcely considered by the medicine of that time. The Industrial Revolution caused an epidemic of metal intoxication, urging scientists and physician of that period to study and identify specific symptoms and organ alterations related to chronic lead poisoning. During the 20th century, the acknowledgment of occupational and environmental toxicity of lead fostered public awareness and legislation to protect health. More recently, the identification of sub-clinical effects have greatly modified the concept of lead poisoning and the approaches of medicine towards this condition. Nowadays, lead poisoning is rarely seen in developed countries, but it still represents a major environmental problem in certain areas. Consequently, it may appear as a paradigm of "occupational and environmental disease," and the history of this condition seems to parallel the historical development of modern "Occupational and Environmental Health" as a more complete medical discipline. PMID:22953225

  4. Medical aspects of drug use in the gym.

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    Use of performance-enhancing drugs by athletes and bodybuilders appears to be common in the UK. Although there are no comprehensive national figures, there is evidence that such drugs are also widely used in sections of the general and gym-using populations, in the expectation of physical and cosmetic benefits. Use of performance-enhancing drugs often takes place with little knowledge or acceptance of potential harmful effects, and clinicians in many settings may see patients who are experiencing problems related to such (usually covert) use. Here we consider medical aspects of performance-enhancing drugs. PMID:14768297

  5. Operation Desert Shield: Medical aspects of weapons of mass destruction

    SciTech Connect

    Knudson, G.B. )

    1991-06-01

    The authors concern over possible use of weapons of mass destruction against U.S. forces in the Middle East has increased because Iraq has violated the Geneva Protocol of 1925 and the 1972 Biological Weapons Convention, attempted to acquire nuclear capability and delivery systems, and is reported to be developing biological weapons. The Army Medical Department has had no experience, since World War I, in the management and treatment of mass casualties contaminated by chemical agents, and has never treated casualties resulting from the use of nuclear or biological weapons used against our soldiers. Management and diagnosis of casualties will be complicated by their possible exposure to a mixture of chemical warfare and biological warfare agents. Triage is an essential aspect in the management of mass casualties since the number of injured patients will exceed the maximum medical capability to treat each patient on arrival. All levels of medical support must be prepared to protect themselves, their equipment and supplies, and their patients from contamination. In contaminated operations on the integrated battlefield, it will be of utmost importance to incorporate flexibility and innovation to match the medical and tactical situation.

  6. Operational and design aspects of accelerators for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schippers, Jacobus Maarten; Seidel, Mike

    2015-03-01

    Originally, the typical particle accelerators as well as their associated beam transport equipment were designed for particle and nuclear physics research and applications in isotope production. In the past few decades, such accelerators and related equipment have also been applied for medical use. This can be in the original physics laboratory environment, but for the past 20 years also in hospital-based or purely clinical environments for particle therapy. The most important specific requirements of accelerators for radiation therapy with protons or ions will be discussed. The focus will be on accelerator design, operational, and formal aspects. We will discuss the special requirements to reach a high reliability for patient treatments as well as an accurate delivery of the dose at the correct position in the patient using modern techniques like pencil beam scanning. It will be shown that the technical requirements, safety aspects, and required reliability of the accelerated beam differ substantially from those in a nuclear physics laboratory. It will be shown that this difference has significant implications on the safety and interlock systems. The operation of such a medical facility should be possible by nonaccelerator specialists at different operating sites (treatment rooms). The organization and role of the control and interlock systems can be considered as being the most crucially important issue, and therefore a special, dedicated design is absolutely necessary in a facility providing particle therapy.

  7. [Occupational risk factors and medical prevention in corrections officers].

    PubMed

    Mennoial, Nunzio Valerio; Napoli, Paola; Battaglia, Andrea; Candura, Stefano M

    2014-01-01

    In Italy, the Law n. 395/1990 defines the tasks and attributions of prison officers. According to the article 25 of the Legislative Decree n. 81/2008, the occupational physician should participate to risk assessment, and carry out the sanitary surveillance. This report analyzes the various tasks of prison staff, identifies the risk factors, and discusses the preventive strategies, including workers formation and education. Biological agents and work-related stress are the main risk factors, as a consequence of prison overcrowding, personnel shortage and work organization complexity. In his preventive action, and particularly in formulating the judgment on work fitness, the occupational physician often clashes with inadequate ministerial funding. PMID:25558744

  8. Occupational Health Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naval Medical Training Inst., Bethesda, MD.

    This manual is designed to be used for "Administrative Aspects of Occupational Medicine," one of two officer correspondence courses offered by the Naval Medical Training Institute. Part one comprises guidelines for setting up occupational health clinics, covering the areas of staffing, layout, equipment, other services, and records maintenance.…

  9. Torture in a democratic country, 1989. Medical aspects.

    PubMed

    Petersen, H D

    1990-12-01

    After a period of unrest in Caracas, Venezuela, in February/March 1989, Amnesty International (AI) received information about torture applied by security forces to people thought to have participated in or organised riots and lootings. In May 1989 a delegation from AI went to Caracas to collect and appraise testimonies of human rights abuses. The delegation consisted of two staff members from the AI International Secretariat, one lawyer and one physician. The primary task of the latter was to assess the validity of the testimonies about torture. A full report (1) including a legal analysis has been published by AI. This paper describes some of the medical aspects of the mission. PMID:2073858

  10. Occupational radiation monitoring at a large medical center in Japan.

    PubMed

    ALMasri, Hussein Y; Kakinohana, Yasumasa; Yogi, Tadashi

    2014-07-01

    Occupational radiation dose monitoring is a method of ensuring that radiation levels are within the regulatory limits. Our objective in this study was to evaluate the radiation doses experienced by personnel at a radiology facility between 2001 and 2010. Overall, 2418 annual dose records for workers who were categorized into four occupational groups were analyzed. The groups included: (1) radiologists, (2) radiologic technologists, (3) nurses, and (4) other workers, who belong to other hospital departments, but who participate partially in some radiologic procedures. The dose distribution was found to be skewed, with 76 % of personnel having received no measurable doses and almost 2 % having received doses of more than 2 mSv. The weighted-average annual doses ranged from 0.13 to 0.57, 0.9 to 2.12, 0.01 to 0.19, and 0.01 to 0.09 mSv for the radiologists, radiologic technologists, nurses, and the other workers, respectively. The radiologic technologists received the highest radiation exposure among the four groups. It was found that the average annual doses were decreasing over time for the radiologists, radiologic technologists, and others, whereas they were increasing for the nurses. Nurses play an important role in assisting radiologists and patients during various radiologic procedures, which might have increased their average annual dose. During the 10-year period of this study, there was no incidence of a dose exceeding the annual dose limit of 20 mSv. Furthermore, there was no detectable neutron exposure. PMID:24570292

  11. An Occupational Health Nursing Computer Application in Medical Care: An Army Approach

    PubMed Central

    McKenna, Mary K.

    1983-01-01

    Occupational health nursing has become an increasingly important specialty in the field of nursing during this century. In the broadest concept, occupational health is concerned with all factors which influence the health of people at work. Nurses, as well as other health care professionals, are attempting to apply the evolving technology of the computer to direct client care applications in the workplace. One such relevant use of the computer has been that of targeted disease surveillance in an occupational health setting. This paper will address the process utilized by community health nurses to assess, plan, implement and evaluate a computerized disease surveillance program in an occupational health setting. The program was a joint effort between the United States Army Medical Department Activity, Fort Irwin, California and the Epidemiology Consultant Service of the Division of Preventive Medicine, the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Washington, DC. (WRAIR).

  12. Allied Health Occupations II. Medical Laboratory Assistant Component. Student Learning Guide. Middletown Public Schools Curriculum Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middletown Public Schools, CT.

    This volume outlines the requirements and content of a second-year course in allied health occupations education that is intended to provide students with a practical understanding of the work done by medical laboratory technicians and technologists. Addressed in the individual units of the course are the following topics: the value of…

  13. The embodied liminalities of occupational overuse syndrome: Medical anthropology quarterly.

    PubMed

    Jaye, Chrystal; Fitzgerald, Ruth

    2012-06-01

    Drawing on interviews with sufferers of OOS (occupational overuse syndrome) in Aoteraoa/New Zealand, this article explores the liminalities associated with OOS and the ways in which this liminality is embodied. While successful rehabilitation could lead back to employment, the respondents' fragility while living with OOS and its accompanying social stigma render such rehabilitation both literally and symbolically "out of reach". Their situations reveal social isolation, loss of identities, pain, and functional disability that have been incorporated into renegotiated identities and biographies in which respondents have become exquisitely self-absorbed, exercising constant bodily surveillance and discipline in order to manage their symptoms. We suggest that this problematic extends beyond biographical disruption to encompass the concept of injury to an embodied sense of integrity for people who were notable prior to their affliction for their reputations as extremely competent and conscientious workers. The embodied meaning of OOS in this environment is not so much to have fallen "out of culture" as Hilbert (Ewan et al. 1991) suggests, but to be liminal in Turner's sense of "threshold people" (Turner 1969:56) "ground down to a uniform condition to be fashioned anew." PMID:22905437

  14. [Multi-occupational description of medical cooperation during a disaster].

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Noriko

    2014-01-01

    On April 10, 2011, the author was sent to Yugakukan, a general shelter in Ishinomaki, as member of the first Primary Care for All Team (PCAT) mission, which was composed of medical and welfare service-specialists. Although various volunteers, government officials, and local organizations were gathered there, the situation was under control, and individuals cooperated under common goals. In order for all the organizations to cooperate and unify their purpose, PCAT identified all the key individuals and established the importance of conducting advanced meetings. The target of PCAT was to provide continued support until the shelter regained its capabilities as a local medical, welfare, and healthcare facility. We helped convert Yugakukan into a welfare shelter from a general one, with consideration for the needs of the entire disaster-stricken area. Likewise, we planned for the reduction of incidence by the local staff. As a team of pharmacists, we cooperated with the local key pharmacist, Mr. Yoshirou Tanno, to plan how the local pharmacy could be made more useful for revival. I concentrated on the production of a system for three weeks. During this period, I probed into the importance of the connection among people. Sharing information, building cooperation, and organization collaboration facilitated the smooth operations and development of the shelter. The experience of serving at Yugakukan can be used as indicator of pharmacists' role in the comprehensive care system, including supporting the elderly, whose population is currently rising. PMID:24389608

  15. [Occupational fitness examination of individuals directly connected with train operation].

    PubMed

    Chernov, O E; Pfaf, V F

    2015-01-01

    The article covers psychophysiologic aspects of work conditions and work safety in train operator occupations of railway transport. The authors consider problems of medical examination, occupational fitness analysis in these individuals if in various diseases or functional disorders. PMID:25826876

  16. Military Medical Students' Awareness and Practice Concerning Occupational Health and Safety.

    PubMed

    Babayigit, Mustafa Alparslan; Ilhan, Mustafa Necmi; Oysul, Fahrettin Guven

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate the awareness and practices of military medical students concerning occupational health and safety. In this cross-sectional study, a questionnaire composed of 20 open- and closed-ended questions was administered to medical students of the Gulhane Military Medical Faculty (n = 754). The response rate of the questionnaire was 82.4% (n = 622/754). The mean age of the participants was 21.5 ± 1.84 years, and the majority of participants were male (94.1%). A substantial number of participants (41.1%) described their level of awareness and practice as "low/very low," although 95.0% and 76.7% of them had never acquired any occupational disease or had any work accidents, respectively. In total, 28.1% of all students had at least one vaccination, and 5th- and 6th-year students were 92 times and 63 times more likely to have been vaccinated than 1st-year students, respectively (odds ratio = 92.66, 95% confidence interval = 26.70-321.59; odds ratio = 63.01, 95% confidence interval = 17.96-221.01). The knowledge and practice level of medical students concerning occupational health and safety appeared to be increasing by the grades of medical faculty, however students expressed themselves as insufficient about their knowledge and practice level. PMID:27612358

  17. Skylab mission report, second visit. [postflight analysis of engineering, experimentation, and medical aspects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    An evaluation is presented of the operational and engineering aspects of the second Skylab flight. Other areas described include: the performance of experimental hardware; the crew's evaluation of the flight; medical aspects; and hardware anomalies.

  18. Estimation of annual occupational effective doses from external ionizing radiation at medical institutions in Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korir, Geoffrey; Wambani, Jeska; Korir, Ian

    2011-04-01

    This study details the distribution and trends of doses due to occupational radiation exposure among radiation workers from participating medical institutions in Kenya, where monthly dose measurements were collected for a period of one year ranging from January to December in 2007. A total of 367 medical radiation workers were monitored using thermoluminescent dosemeters. They included radiologists (27%), oncologists (2%), dentists (4%), Physicists (5%), technologists (45%), nurses (4%), film processor technicians (3%), auxiliary staff (4%), and radiology office staff (5%). The average annual effective dose of all categories of staff was found to range from 1.19 to 2.52 mSv. This study formed the initiation stage of wider, comprehensive and more frequent monitoring of occupational radiation exposures and long-term investigations into its accumulation patterns in our country.

  19. A cost-effectiveness analysis of an in-house corporate occupational medical department.

    PubMed

    Fitko, J; Kalina, C M; Fisher, A M; Mitchell, J H

    1994-02-01

    There is a current trend for corporations to switch from in-house medical departments to outside contract organizations for provision of occupational health services. Although this may be driven by a desire to reduce expenses, there is little objective data on which to base this decision. This study compares the costs to a corporation of an in-house medical department with the costs for the same services if rendered by outside providers. Costs of the in-house department were obtained from company records. Prevailing charges for outside provider services were determined by an invoice survey and from other sources. We found that the cost for the in-house medical department was 42% less than that of the outside providers at the prevailing rates. Thus, the in-house medical department is more cost-effective than the outside providers. We also discuss other advantages of an in-house department that are more difficult to quantify. PMID:8176514

  20. Survey on low-dose medical radiation exposure in occupational workers: the effect on hematological change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, J. K.; Cho, S. M.; Cho, J. H.; Dong, K. R.; Chung, W. K.; Lee, J. W.

    2013-03-01

    This study examined the changes in the hematological index caused by low-dose medical radiation exposure in workers in a medical radiation-exposed environment. The cumulative dose was obtained using thermoluminescent dosimeters over a 9-year period, and the changes in hematological index count (red blood cells (RBCs), hemoglobin, platelets, white blood cells (WBCs), monocytes, lymphocytes, neutrophils, basophils, and eosinophils) were examined in both the occupational workers and controls. In total, 370 occupational workers and 335 controls were compared. The analysis led to the following observations: (1) The average cumulative dose in males and females was 9.65±15.2 and 4.82±5.55 mSv, respectively. (2) In both males and females, there was a very low correlation between the occupation period and the cumulative dose (r<±0.25). (3) When the occupation period was longer, the WBC counts both decreased and increased in the male workers and the RBC counts were lower in the workers than in the control group (p<0.05). In females, the WBC counts both decreased and increased in the workers and the eosinophil counts were lower in the workers than in the control group (p<0.01). (4) When the cumulative dose was large, the lymphocyte counts decreased in male workers and the platelet count was lower in the workers than in the control group (p<0.05). In females, the lymphocyte count and RBC count were lower in the workers than in the control group (p<0.05). Abnormal distributions of some blood indices were observed in the occupational radiation workers compared with the controls. Attempts were made to limit radiation exposure to personnel, but the employees did not always follow the preset rules. Actually, the adverse effects of low-level radiation were attributed to probability. Overall, workers should obey the radiation protection regulations provided by the government and a national system of radiation protection is needed.

  1. Health Occupations. Medical Technologists, Technicians, and Assistants; Dispensing Opticians; Ophthalmic Laboratory Technicians; Medical Record Personnel. Reprinted from the Occupational Outlook Handbook, 1978-79 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Labor Statistics (DOL), Washington, DC.

    Focusing on health occupations, this document is one in a series of forty-one reprints from the Occupational Outlook Handbook providing current information and employment projections for individual occupations and industries through 1985. The specific occupations covered in this document include dispensing opticians, electrocardiograph…

  2. [Forensic-medical aspects of injuries inflicted by nonlethal arms].

    PubMed

    Babakhanian, A R; Babakhanian, R B; Isakov, V D

    2005-01-01

    Special literature (surgical, forensic-medical and criminalistic) is reviewed on classification, mechanisms of a harmful action and characteristics of injuries inflicted by non-lethal arms. Some details of such arms construction and damaging action are given. PMID:16130323

  3. Medical Aspects of the Westward Migrations, 1830-60 *

    PubMed Central

    Pizer, Irwin H.

    1965-01-01

    The exodus to the West which occurred in 1830-60, partly due to the discovery of gold in California in 1849, is examined from a medicohistorical viewpoint. The motivations of the emigrants, their medical emergencies, problems, and practices, and the state of the medical arts in the Western settlements are discussed in terms of the prevailing systems of therapeutics, the availability of supplies and equipment, and the presence or absence of professional doctors. Images PMID:14223735

  4. Legal aspects of cases of medical malpractice in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Segest, E

    1993-01-01

    A survey has been carried out of court rulings during the last decade in cases regarding patients' complaints about alleged medical malpractice. The character of the cases is described, both penal code/disciplinary cases and cases regarding compensation. A number of main themes is evaluated: the availability of case records to the patient; the possibility for patients to choose medical advisers; the lessening of the burden on patients to prove that physicians have been negligent; and the relaxation of the burden on patients to prove causality between the injury and the medical treatment given. These main themes are evaluated over time. The investigation should be seen in the light of the fact that Denmark has recently introduced a patient insurance scheme, and the study will be the starting point for a later evaluation of the importance of this scheme, with particular reference to an improvement in patients' rights. PMID:8183069

  5. [Medical and environmental aspects of the drinking water supply crisis].

    PubMed

    Él'piner, L I

    2013-01-01

    Modern data determining drinking water supply crisis in Russia have been considered. The probability of influence of drinking water quality used by population on current negative demographic indices was shown. The necessity of taking into account interests of public health care in the process of formation of water management decisions was grounded. To achieve this goal the application of medical ecological interdisciplinary approach was proposed Its use is mostly effective in construction of goal-directed medical ecological sections for territorial schemes of the rational use and protection of water resources. Stages of the elaboration of these sections, providing the basing of evaluation and prognostic medical and environmental constructions on similar engineering studies of related disciplinary areas (hydrological, hydrogeological, hydrobiological, hydrochemical, environmental, socio-economic, technical and technological) were determined. PMID:24624819

  6. Seizures and Teens: The Practical Aspects of Managing Seizure Medications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shafer, Patricia Osborne; Israel, Beth

    2007-01-01

    Medications are the primary treatment for epilepsy, yet many teens and their families have problems managing seizure medicines. Fear of side effects, difficulties remembering to take medicines and figuring out how to take them are common challenges. Unfortunately, not taking medicine as prescribed can lead to breakthrough seizures, which in turn…

  7. Elder Specialists: Psychosocial Aspects of Medical Education in Geriatric Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCann-Stone, Nancy; Robinson, Sherry B.; Rull, Gary; Rosher, Richard B.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes an Elder Specialist Program developed by one school of medicine to sensitize medical students to geriatric psychosocial issues. Elder Specialists participate in panel discussions as part of each geriatric session. As an alternative to traditional senior mentoring programs, the Elder Specialist Program provides all students a…

  8. Radiation protection aspects of EMITEL Encyclopaedia of Medical Physics.

    PubMed

    Stoeva, M; Tabakov, S; Lewis, C; Tabakova, V; Thurston, J; Smith, P

    2015-07-01

    The Encyclopaedia of Medical Physics EMITEL was developed under the EU pilot project European Medical Imaging Technology e-Encyclopaedia for Lifelong Learning. This large reference material includes 3400 articles on 2100 pages supported by thousands of illustrations. All materials are available free at the website, www.emitel2.eu. The articles are grouped in seven categories--physics of: X-ray diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine, radiotherapy, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound imaging, radiation protection and general terms. The radiation protection part of EMITEL includes 450 articles. These were organised in several sub-groups including: nuclear and atomic physics; ionizing radiation interactions and biological effects; radiation detection and measurement; dosimetric quantities and units; and general radiation protection and international bodies. EMITEL project was developed over 3 y and attracted as contributors 250+ senior specialists from 35 countries. After its successful launching, EMITEL is actively used by thousands of professionals around the world. PMID:25848099

  9. [Intercultural aspects of medical care for undocumented migrants].

    PubMed

    Cerda-Hegerl, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    In view of the cultural diversity in German society today, the time has long since come when medical care must adjust to its new clientele. This article provides an overview for doctors, medical personnel and psychologists of approaches, backgrounds and networks of migration to Germany, in particular over the little known undocumented migration. This migration has steadily increased in recent years. The author deals with the circumstances which create psychological problems for migrants and what happens when migrants living in this shadow world fall ill. In addition, the article offers an agenda for interculturally competent action in caring for documented and undocumented migrants. Dimensions of cultural differences such as collectivism versus individualism (most of the countries of origin of these migrants in Germany with or without documents are collectivistic) are explained along with differences in styles of communication. The following styles with their impact in actual practice are analyzed: indirect versus direct communication; emotional control versus expressiveness; functionalism versus relationship orientation. PMID:18421653

  10. Doctor-patient dialogue--basic aspect of medical consultation.

    PubMed

    Murariu-Brujbu, Isabella Cristina; Macovei, Luana Andreea

    2013-01-01

    Family medicine is the specialty that provides ongoing primary medical care and improves the health status of the individual, of the family and of the community through preventive, educational, therapeutic and rehabilitation measures. The family doctor often makes the interdisciplinary synthesis, in a flexible manner, either alone or in most cases with interdisciplinary consultation. In the latter case, the family doctor initiates the team work and makes the final evaluation by using the longitudinal follow-up of the disease. The doctor-patient encounter represents the "confrontation" with the greatest moral weight, due to the complexity of the values involved, the status of the doctor in a society, and patient's involvement in decision making. The patient is a person who should be treated with respect, honesty, professionalism and loyalty, whatever the clinical status, severity of illness, mental competence or incompetence. A focus, on an international scale, is represented by the characteristics of a good doctor, family physician included, as the latter is the first link in the network of health services. Each model of consultation varies in a more or less subtle way in priorities assignment, and suggests slight differences regarding the role played by doctor and patient in their collaboration. The qualities of a good family physician include not only the strictly professional competences, that also apply to other medical specialties, but also duties, such as, clearly explaining to patients issues concerning their health, informing them about all the possible preventive measures of diseases, making a diagnosis, initiating and supervising a therapy. Medical responsibility lies at the crossroads between medical science and the conscience of the doctor. PMID:24505902

  11. 76 FR 37154 - Covidien, Formerly Aspect Medical, R & MS Division, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Kelly...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ... Employment and Training Administration Covidien, Formerly Aspect Medical, R & MS Division, Including On- Site..., 2011, applicable to workers of Covidien, formerly Aspect Medical, R & MS Division, including on-site...-site at the Norwood, Massachusetts location of Covidien, formerly Aspect Medical, R & MS Division....

  12. Human Genetics and Islam: Scientific and Medical Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Ghareeb, Bilal A.A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To relate diverse aspects of genetics and its applications to concepts in the Glorious Qur’an and the ḥadīth. Study Design: The author compared passages from the Glorious Qur’an and ḥadīth with modern concepts in genetics, such as recessive inheritance, genetic counseling, genetic variation, cytoplasmic inheritance, sex chromosomes, genetics-environment interactions, gender determination, and the hypothesis of “pairing in the universe.” Conclusions: A fresh understanding of Islamic scripture reveals references to principles of genetics that predate contemporary discoveries. This highlights the need for further exploration of possible links between science and religion. PMID:23610491

  13. Medical aspects of the Battle of Waterloo: the battle.

    PubMed

    Crumplin, Mick

    2015-06-01

    The Duke of Wellington's polyglot army assembled for the Waterloo campaign was hastily aggregated and the Army Medical Department was somewhat short of staff and not entirely of the calibre of the department serving latterly in the Peninsular campaigns. The casualty rates during the battles of this campaign were high and the regimental and hospital staff struggled with the large number of casualties. Lack of stretcher bearers and transport were significant problems, which were compounded by the high density of the casualties. Three quarters of the surviving wounded rejoined their units. PMID:25525203

  14. Advising Japan on Medical Aspects of Radiation Exposure | ORAU

    SciTech Connect

    Wiley, Al; Sugarman, Steve

    2015-03-08

    Because of Japan's March 11, 2011, earthquake and tsunami, the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant suffered catastrophic damage—ultimately leaking dangerously high amounts of radiation that led to the evacuation of more than 80,000 Japanese citizens within a 12-mile radius of the crippled plant. Responding agencies were concerned about the medical impacts of radiation exposure, the effect upon food and water safety and what actions individuals could take to protect themselves. To provide advice and consultation, the physicians and health physicists at REAC/TS were on-call 24/7 and responded to more than 700 inquiries in the days and weeks that followed.

  15. Modeled occupational exposures to gas-phase medical laser-generated air contaminants.

    PubMed

    Lippert, Julia F; Lacey, Steven E; Jones, Rachael M

    2014-01-01

    Exposure monitoring data indicate the potential for substantive exposure to laser-generated air contaminants (LGAC); however the diversity of medical lasers and their applications limit generalization from direct workplace monitoring. Emission rates of seven previously reported gas-phase constituents of medical laser-generated air contaminants (LGAC) were determined experimentally and used in a semi-empirical two-zone model to estimate a range of plausible occupational exposures to health care staff. Single-source emission rates were generated in an emission chamber as a one-compartment mass balance model at steady-state. Clinical facility parameters such as room size and ventilation rate were based on standard ventilation and environmental conditions required for a laser surgical facility in compliance with regulatory agencies. All input variables in the model including point source emission rates were varied over an appropriate distribution in a Monte Carlo simulation to generate a range of time-weighted average (TWA) concentrations in the near and far field zones of the room in a conservative approach inclusive of all contributing factors to inform future predictive models. The concentrations were assessed for risk and the highest values were shown to be at least three orders of magnitude lower than the relevant occupational exposure limits (OELs). Estimated values do not appear to present a significant exposure hazard within the conditions of our emission rate estimates. PMID:24762065

  16. [In vitro fertilization and intracytoplasmic sperm injection: current medical aspects].

    PubMed

    Kentenich, H; Sibold, C; Tandler-Schneider, A

    2013-12-01

    Since the delivery of the first baby conceived via in vitro fertilization (IVF) in 1978, IVF has become a standard procedure in sterility treatment. In Germany, 78,000 IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) cycles are performed annually with a delivery rate per embryo transfer of about 20 %. The cumulative delivery rate after three trials is more than 50 %. The main medical problems are the high rates of multiple pregnancies of more than 20 %, which carry an increased risk for mothers (preeclampsia) and children (preterm delivery, lung immaturity, brain problems). Also singleton babies after IVF are more often too small (small for gestational age, SGA) and delivered preterm. As a result, proper counselling is necessary. New laboratory methods have increased the success rate. Cryopreservation techniques such as vitrification are standard for freezing oocytes, pronuclear-stage oocytes and embryos if they are not needed during the current treatment cycle. Continuous observation of embryos by time-lapse imaging helps to identify the best embryos for transfer. The current legislation in the German embryo protection act (Embryonenschutzgesetz) is the main problem. It is unclear how many fertilized oocytes can be cultured to achieve a transfer of one to three embryos. The prohibition of oocyte donation and surrogacy are not comprehensible from a medical, psychological, and ethical point of view. Reimbursement of publicly insured patients is restricted in comparison with other European countries. Married couples receive half of the payment for three IVF/ICSI cycles; non-married couples receive no payment at all. PMID:24337127

  17. Depression as a psychosocial consequence of occupational injury in the US working population: findings from the medical expenditure panel survey

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Empirical evidence describing the psychosocial consequences of occupational injury is still limited. The effect of occupational injury on depression might pose unique challenges in workers compared with other kinds of injury. This study aimed to assess the differential impact of workplace injury compared with non-workplace injury on depression over time, and to identify the potential risk factors associated with post-injury depression in the US working population. Methods Using pooled panel data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey 2000–2006, a total of 35,155 workers aged 18–64 years who had been followed for about 18 months in each panel were analyzed. Injuries in the 4–5 months before baseline, and subsequent depression incidence during follow-up, were identified using ICD-9 codes for the medical conditions captured in personal interviews. A discrete time-proportional odds model was used. Results A total of 5.5% of workers with occupational injury at baseline reported depression at follow-up, compared with 4.7% of workers with non-occupational injury and 3.1% of workers without injuries. Those with occupational injuries had more severe injuries and required longer treatment, compared with those with non-occupational injuries. Only 39% of workers with workplace injuries were paid Workers’ Compensation (WC). The association between injury and depression appeared to be stronger for workplace injury, and the adjusted odds ratio for depression was 1.72 for those with occupational injury (95% CI: 1.27–2.32), and 1.36 for those with non-occupational injury (95% CI: 1.07–1.65) compared with the no-injury group, after controlling for relevant covariates. Occupational injury was associated with higher odds of developing depression over time. WC as a source of medical payment was associated with 33% higher odds of developing depression (95% CI: 1.01–1.74). Part-time work, shorter job tenure, and long working hours were independently

  18. Shoulder function and work disability after decompression surgery for subacromial impingement syndrome: a randomised controlled trial of physiotherapy exercises and occupational medical assistance

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Surgery for subacromial impingement syndrome is often performed in working age and postoperative physiotherapy exercises are widely used to help restore function. A recent Danish study showed that 10% of a nationwide cohort of patients retired prematurely within two years after surgery. Few studies have compared effects of different postoperative exercise programmes on shoulder function, and no studies have evaluated workplace-oriented interventions to reduce postoperative work disability. This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of physiotherapy exercises and occupational medical assistance compared with usual care in improving shoulder function and reducing postoperative work disability after arthroscopic subacromial decompression. Methods/Design The study is a mainly pragmatic multicentre randomised controlled trial. The trial is embedded in a cohort study of shoulder patients referred to public departments of orthopaedic surgery in Central Denmark Region. Patients aged ≥18–≤63 years, who still have shoulder symptoms 8–12 weeks after surgery, constitute the study population. Around 130 participants are allocated to: 1) physiotherapy exercises, 2) occupational medical assistance, 3) physiotherapy exercises and occupational medical assistance, and 4) usual care. Intervention manuals allow individual tailoring. Primary outcome measures include Oxford Shoulder Score and sickness absence due to symptoms from the operated shoulder. Randomisation is computerised with allocation concealment by randomly permuted block sizes. Statistical analyses will primarily be performed according to the intention-to-treat principle. Discussion The paper presents the rationale, design, methods, and operational aspects of the Shoulder Intervention Project (SIP). SIP evaluates a new rehabilitation approach, where physiotherapy and occupational interventions are provided in continuity of surgical episodes of care. If successful, the project may serve as a model

  19. Soldier load carriage: historical, physiological, biomechanical, and medical aspects.

    PubMed

    Knapik, Joseph J; Reynolds, Katy L; Harman, Everett

    2004-01-01

    This study reviews historical and biomedical aspects of soldier load carriage. Before the 18th century, foot soldiers seldom carried more than 15 kg while on the march, but loads have progressively risen since then. This load increase is presumably due to the weight of weapons and equipment that incorporate new technologies to increase protection, firepower, communications, and mobility. Research shows that locating the load center of mass as close as possible to the body center of mass results in the lowest energy cost and tends to keep the body in an upright position similar to unloaded walking. Loads carried on other parts of the body result in higher energy expenditures: each kilogram added to the foot increases energy expenditure 7% to 10%; each kilogram added to the thigh increases energy expenditure 4%. Hip belts on rucksacks should be used whenever possible as they reduce pressure on the shoulders and increase comfort. Low or mid-back load placement might be preferable on uneven terrain but high load placement may be best for even terrain. In some tactical situations, combat load carts can be used, and these can considerably reduce energy expenditure and improve performance. Physical training that includes aerobic exercise, resistance training targeted at specific muscle groups, and regular road marching can considerably improve road marching speed and efficiency. The energy cost of walking with backpack loads increases progressively with increases in weight carried, body mass, walking speed, or grade; type of terrain also influences energy cost. Predictive equations have been developed, but these may not be accurate for prolonged load carriage. Common injuries associated with prolonged load carriage include foot blisters, stress fractures, back strains, metatarsalgia, rucksack palsy, and knee pain. Load carriage can be facilitated by lightening loads, improving load distribution, optimizing load-carriage equipment, and taking preventive action to reduce

  20. Occupational health aspects of the arsenic extractive industry in Britain (1868-1925).

    PubMed Central

    Harper, M

    1988-01-01

    A historical survey into the occupational hazards of mining and refining arsenic is presented together with the measures adopted for their control. The industry is placed in the social perspective of its time and it is suggested that this experience could be of value to those who may encounter similar problems where arsenic is extracted elsewhere in the world. PMID:3052570

  1. U.S. Department of Energy Office of Occupational Medicine and Medical Surveillance 1995--1997 triannual report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-08-01

    From 1995 through 1997 the Office of Occupational Medicine and Medical Surveillance (EH-61) has made numerous achievements that have enhanced the performance of the office and more importantly, the Department of Energy (DOE). This report provides specific information about program activities and accomplishments, as well as individual contacts for each program. The mission of EH-61 is the prevention of worker illness by fostering outstanding occupational medicine and medical surveillance programs within the DOE complex. This mission is being realized as a result of efforts in four main business lines: (1) Surveillance; (2) Research, (3) Policy/Technical Support; and (4) Information/Communication.

  2. Occupational Sleep Medicine.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Philip; Drake, Christopher

    2016-03-01

    Sleep and circadian rhythms significantly impact almost all aspects of human behavior and are therefore relevant to occupational sleep medicine, which is focused predominantly around workplace productivity, safety, and health. In this article, 5 main factors that influence occupational functioning are reviewed: (1) sleep deprivation, (2) disordered sleep, (3) circadian rhythms, (4) common medical illnesses that affect sleep and sleepiness, and (5) medications that affect sleep and sleepiness. Consequences of disturbed sleep and sleepiness are also reviewed, including cognitive, emotional, and psychomotor functioning and drowsy driving. PMID:26972034

  3. Physicians' and nurses' reactions to electronic medical records. Managerial and occupational implications.

    PubMed

    Darr, Asaf; Harrison, Michael I; Shakked, Leora; Shalom, Nira

    2003-01-01

    Aims to understand the managerial implications of the perceptions hospital physicians and nurses hold toward the introduction of electronic medical records (EMRS). In-depth interviews were used with 18 hospital physicians and eight nurses from several different hospital wards at a large government-run, university-affiliated hospital in Israel, where EMRs were gradually introduced over the last 20 years. Physicians identified six different domains of impact. Senior physicians, most of whom held managerial roles, tended to emphasise managerial outcomes and to view these as positively affecting their organisations. Junior doctors emphasised mostly negative occupational effects of the EMR on their work--including limits to professional autonomy, heavier administrative burdens, and reinforcement of existing professional hierarchies. Nurses identified different domains and saw benefits for quality and administration of patient care. PMID:14628488

  4. [The clinical aspects of occupational sensorineural impairment of hearing of the acoustic origin].

    PubMed

    Zinkin, V N; Sheshegov, P M; Chistov, S D

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to elucidate the specific clinical features of occupational sensorineural impairment of hearing (OSNHI) depending on the origin of this pathology, viz. noise, infrasound and/or their combination. The review of research concerning this problem made it possible to systematize variants of ODNHI based on the clinical signs taking into consideration the influence of these physical factors. Pathophysiological features of the exposure of the organs of hearing to infrasound are described. PMID:27006983

  5. Manganese in occupational arc welding fumes--aspects on physiochemical properties, with focus on solubility.

    PubMed

    Taube, Fabian

    2013-01-01

    Physicochemical properties, such as particle sizes, composition, and solubility of welding fumes are decisive for the bioaccessibility of manganese and thereby for the manganese cytotoxic and neurotoxic effects arising from various welding fumes. Because of the diverse results within the research on welding fume solubility, this article aims to review and discuss recent literature on physicochemical properties of gas metal arc welding, shielded metal arc welding, and flux-cored arc welding fumes, with focus on solubility properties. This article also presents a short introduction to the literature on arc welding techniques, health effects from manganese, and occupational exposure to manganese among welders. PMID:22997412

  6. Occupational health aspects of unusual work schedules: a review of Exxon's experiences

    SciTech Connect

    Brief, R.S.; Scala, R.A.

    1986-04-01

    Today more than 300,000 persons in the US work unusually long shifts (longer than eight hours per day) during which they are exposed to airborne toxicants. This paper reviews Exxon's experience in managing the various potential occupational health problems associated with such work schedules. A review of mathematical approaches to modifying exposure limits for such shifts is included; special emphasis is placed on the potential role of circadian rhythm effects as they serve to affect the physiological adjustment of workers to these schedules. A listing of the kinds of physical ailments which have been associated with unusual work schedules is included also. A fairly thorough list of references accompanies the text.

  7. ACCUMULATION AND DISPOSAL OF LEFTOVER MEDICATIONS: A KEY ASPECT OF PHARMECOVIGILANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this paper, we focus on one of the aspects of pharmEcovigilance that has been receiving growing attention, especially in the U.S. — the accumulation and disposal of unwanted, leftover medications. The magnitude of drug stockpiling and accumulation, and eventual disposal of lef...

  8. Feedback from Patients as a Means of Teaching Nontechnological Aspects of Medical Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brody, David S.

    1980-01-01

    A project to improve hospital house officers' recognition of important behavioral, psychological, and social aspects involved in medical care of chronically ill ambulatory patients and an evaluation of its effectiveness are reported. The procedure involved the use of feedback from patient interviews regarding patient satisfaction, medication…

  9. The Surgeon General's Policy Statement on Medical Aspects of Childhood Lead Poisoning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinfeld, Jesse L.

    This document is a policy statement written by the Bureau of Community Environmental Management and approved by the Surgeon General of the U.S. Public Health Service. Its purpose is to assist in the development and implementation of programs for the control of lead poisoning in children. Information included covers the medical aspects of…

  10. The Right to Prevention, Early Detection and Medical Rehabilitation under National and International Aspects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greza, Gerhard

    1987-01-01

    Important aspects of legislation establishing the right of individuals to health protection and health promotion are highlighted. Examples from the Federal Republic of Germany are used to illustrate efforts to implement systematic measures for the prevention, early detection, early treatment, and medical rehabilitation of disabilities. (Author/JDD)

  11. [Current aspects of war surgery. From the trauma center to precarious medical care].

    PubMed

    Houdelette, P

    1997-01-01

    War, said Carl von Clausewitz, is a cameleon. In this century, each armed conflict has proved to be unique, particularly in its medical aspects, with its own features and teaching its won lessons. As recent events show, no conflict is a fact of the past. Medical care delivered to war casualties depend on the circumstances of the war, on the medical resources available, but also on the price that cultures or circumstances place on it. Everything separates these two paradigms; on the one hand the "precious" casualty of western armies whose medical support is organized in a concept (forward medical and surgical care, ultra-rapid medical evacuation) tailored to each case, and as close as possible to the medical care of a civilian trauma patient whose models remains the North-American ballistic wound managed in trauma centers; on the other hand, civilian victims, in large numbers, in poor and disorganized countries, often abandoned to their own fate or sorted by "epidemiological" triage, which guarantees a distribution, as efficient as possible, of limited medical care. In war, advanced medical care and precarious medicine may work side by side according to two logics which do not exclude one another and constantly improve. PMID:9297902

  12. Integration of gender-specific aspects into medical curricula - status quo und future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Pfleiderer, Bettina; Burghaus, Désirée; Bayer, Gudrun; Kindler-Röhrborn, Andrea; Heue, Matthias; Becker, Jan Carl

    2012-01-01

    The consideration of gender aspects in clinical routine is of high importance towards an individualized patient care and a starting point of diversity medicine. Gender-specific awareness is an indispensable basis for an optimized medical treatment. A current study at the medical faculties of Muenster and Duisburg-Essen University (Germany) revealed an insufficient knowledge among students and lecturers in this area. An interdisciplinary, international workshop took place in Muenster (Germany) in May 2012 on the topic how to integrate gender aspects into medical curricula in the future aiming at a better health care for both sexes in long term. This position paper summarizes the conclusions. It was suggested to teach gender-specific contents from the first semester comprehensively – using standardized definitions and a gender-neutral language, since it is crucial not to increase the students’ workload any further. The key to success is to implement gender aspects by using meaningful examples on a regular basis – ideally in a longitudinal manner. The content of teaching should be selected by the lecturers and full professors and be considered within students´ exams. To reach these goals, an absolute support of the respective medical faculties as well as the integration of these gender-specific learning objectives into the national competence-based learning catalogue for medical education (NKLM) is obligatory. PMID:23255960

  13. [Electronic medical records: medical and legal aspects, privacy, safety, and legal validity].

    PubMed

    Ravizza, P; Pasini, E

    2001-03-01

    Medical records must collect all data concerning in-hospital management of patients: data have to be verified and easily retrievable. Clinicians are responsible for both format and content of medical records. Respect of patient's privacy must be made sure both during on-line management and long-term storage of records. Computerization can offer many advantages to clinicians, but needs some significant adjustments: training and motivation of operators, arrangement of clinical processes and of administrative rules to technological developments. Nevertheless, some important results can be afforded: standardization of procedures, distribution of univocal, verified and ubiquitous data to all concerned operators, protection against undesired retrieval, reliability of effective reports. Preliminary condition is a clinical local area network, widespread into the institution. Database implementation must follow well accepted methodology: flow chart design of data dictionary, standardization of data coding, input of verified data, effective reporting. Access to data must be controlled by sophisticated and sure password system. Back-up of data must be automatically available with adequate timing and methodology. Respect of rules on patient's privacy must be realized whenever possible. Complex clinical records should be made available, containing data, signals and images (both single frames and dynamic sequences), due to continuous technical progress of diagnostic tools. Medical records must be available for long periods of time: database engine and managing tools must be selected among well accepted and largely available producers; informatic assistance must be assured for management and evolution of systems over the years. PMID:11307785

  14. Occupational health aspects of the resource recovery of municipal solid wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Mansdorf, S.Z.

    1983-01-01

    A comprehensive industrial hygiene study of seven representative municipal solid waste processing facilities was conducted to determine the level of worker exposures to physical, chemical and microbiological hazards of the processes studied. Two mass burn incineration, four waste processing to fuel, and one combined waste processing to steam plant were evaluated. Samples were collected to determine particulate, general organic vapor, pesticide, polychlorinated biphenyl, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon, carbon monoxide, hydrogen chloride, hydrogen cyanide, bacteria, fungi, human pathogenic virus, and noise exposures. Hazard evaluations were then made based on a comparison of the results of the sampling with currently required or recommended standards for occupational exposures. Examination of the particulate matter from airborne dust samples indicated a wide range of heteromorphic particles and fibers. A size fractionation of these particulates showed that a significant portion of most of the dusts were respirable (<15 ..mu..m aerodynamic diameter). High levels of welding fume exposure at two facilities and area noise levels above 90 dBA in all facilities were found. Total bacteria, fecal coliforms, Salmonella enteritidis, Klebsielly sp., Staphylococcus aureus, Streptomyces sp., Aspergillus fumigutas, Aspergillus flavus, and mycobacterium sp. were recovered from the workplace air. The implications of worker inhalation exposures to these mixed microbial contaminants are unknown.

  15. Technical, occupational health and environmental aspects of metal degreasing with aqueous cleaners.

    PubMed

    Lavoué, Jérôme; Bégin, Denis; Géerin, Michel

    2003-08-01

    Aqueous cleaners used for metal degreasing are detergent formulations containing surfactants (such as linear alkylbenzene sulphonates, alkylphenol ethoxylates or alcohol ethoxylates), builders (such as hydroxides, phosphates or silicates), sequestrants (such as EDTA or NTA), anti-corrosive agents (such as ethanolamines), solvents (such as glycol ethers or d-limonene) and other specialty additives. Generally sold as concentrates, they are typically diluted between 3 and 20 times in water, leading to solutions containing only a few per cent active products. The cleaning efficiency depends on physicochemical phenomena such as wetting, solubilization, emulsification, dispersion, sequestration and saponification, and is enhanced by thermal and mechanical energy. Cleaning equipment is based on spraying or immersion of the parts and may include drying and rinsing steps. Because of the complexity and variability of the mixtures, the occupational health and environmental evaluation of aqueous cleaners is based on the study of their components. Aqueous cleaners are generally believed to present a low risk to workers' health and to the environment. However, some anionic surfactants and strong alkalis are skin and eye irritants, ethanolamines are allergenic and several glycol ethers of the ethylene glycol family are proven systemic toxicants that are easily absorbed through the skin. Although most components of aqueous cleaners are biodegradable and of low ecotoxicity, alkylphenol ethoxylates degrade into persistent and toxic compounds. Phosphates, if released directly into the environment, may cause eutrophication of rivers and lakes. Waste recycling or treatment by specialized facilities is usually required for spent solutions containing contaminants such as oils and heavy metals. From a technical, toxicological and environmental standpoint, aqueous cleaners can be used successfully to replace traditional organic solvents used in metal degreasing. PMID:12890654

  16. The Relevance of Occupational Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Bailus

    1982-01-01

    As the burden-of-illness profile has shifted significantly in recent years, more attention is focused on occupational factors in disease, not only because of past developments and future aspects but mainly because of the numerous practical and theoretical implications and the involvement of many medical and social features. PMID:7120472

  17. Occupational health and safety aspects of animal handling in dairy production.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, Cecilia; Lundqvist, Peter; Hagevoort, G Robert; Lunner Kolstrup, Christina; Douphrate, David I; Pinzke, Stefan; Grandin, Temple

    2013-01-01

    Livestock handling in dairy production is associated with a number of health and safety issues. A large number of fatal and nonfatal injuries still occur when handling livestock. The many animal handling tasks on a dairy farm include moving cattle between different locations, vaccination, administration of medication, hoof care, artificial insemination, ear tagging, milking, and loading onto trucks. There are particular problems with bulls, which continue to cause considerable numbers of injuries and fatalities in dairy production. In order to reduce the number of injuries during animal handling on dairy farms, it is important to understand the key factors in human-animal interactions. These include handler attitudes and behavior, animal behavior, and fear in cows. Care when in close proximity to the animal is the key for safe handling, including knowledge of the flight zone, and use of the right types of tools and suitable restraint equipment. Thus, in order to create safe working conditions during livestock handling, it is important to provide handlers with adequate training and to establish sound safety management procedures on the farm. PMID:23844794

  18. Physicians' occupational stress, depressive symptoms and work ability in relation to their working environment: a cross-sectional study of differences among medical residents with various specialties working in German hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Bernburg, Monika; Vitzthum, Karin; Groneberg, David A; Mache, Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to analyse and compare differences in occupational stress, depressive symptoms, work ability and working environment among residents working in various medical specialties. Methods 435 German hospital residents in medical training working in 6 different medical specialties participated in a cross-sectional survey study. Physicians were asked about their working conditions and aspects of mental health and work ability. The Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire, the Work Ability Index, the ICD-10 Symptom Rating and the Perceived Stress Questionnaire were used to measure working conditions, mental health and work ability. Results Results show that up to 17% of the physicians reported high levels of occupational distress and 9% reported high levels of depressive symptoms. 11% of the hospital physicians scored low in work ability. Significant differences between medical specialties were demonstrated for occupational distress, depressive symptoms, work ability, job demands and job resources. Surgeons showed consistently the highest levels of perceived distress but also the highest levels of work ability and lowest scores for depression. Depressive symptoms were rated with the highest levels by anaesthesiologists. Significant associations between physicians’ working conditions, occupational distress and mental health-related aspects are illustrated. Conclusions Study results demonstrated significant differences in specific job stressors, demands and resources. Relevant relations between work factors and physicians' health and work ability are discussed. These findings should be reinvestigated in further studies, especially with a longitudinal study design. This work suggests that to ensure physicians' health, hospital management should plan and implement suitable mental health promotion strategies. In addition, operational efficiency through resource planning optimisation and work process improvements should be focused by hospital management

  19. International occupational health.

    PubMed

    LaDou, Joseph

    2003-08-01

    Working conditions for the majority of the world's workers do not meet the minimum standards and guidelines set by international agencies. Occupational health and safety laws cover only about 10 percent of the population in developing countries, omitting many major hazardous industries and occupations. With rare exception, most countries defer to the United Nations the responsibility for international occupational health. The UN's international agencies have had limited success in bringing occupational health to the industrializing countries. The International Labor Organization (ILO) conventions are intended to guide all countries in the promotion of workplace safety and in managing occupational health and safety programs. ILO conventions and recommendations on occupational safety and health are international agreements that have legal force only if they are ratified by ILO member states. The most important ILO Convention on Occupational Safety and Health has been ratified by only 37 of the 175 ILO member states. Only 23 countries have ratified the ILO Employment Injury Benefits Convention that lists occupational diseases for which compensation should be paid. The World Health Organization (WHO) is responsible for the technical aspects of occupational health and safety, the promotion of medical services and hygienic standards. Limited WHO and ILO funding severely impedes the development of international occupational health. The U.S. reliance on international agencies to promote health and safety in the industrializing countries is not nearly adequate. This is particularly true if occupational health continues to be regarded primarily as an academic exercise by the developed countries, and a budgetary triviality by the international agencies. Occupational health is not a goal achievable in isolation. It should be part of a major institutional development that touches and reforms every level of government in an industrializing country. Occupational health and safety

  20. Indiana Health Occupations Education: Student Modules for Administration of Medications for Unlicensed Nursing Personnel. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bilger, Phyllis; And Others

    These learning modules are designed to provide health care workers involved with medications with basic information about the nature and administration of medications. The 30 modules are organized into six units. An overview of preparation and administration of medicines, principles of medication therapy, and medication fundamentals are presented…

  1. The professional structure of Soviet medical care: the relationship between personal characteristics, medical education, and occupational setting for Estonian physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Barr, D A

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. Using the Estonian example, this study provides data to describe the ways in which personal, educational, and occupational factors interacted to determine the professional structure of the Soviet health care system. METHODS. The study analyzes data gathered from a survey of 20% of the physicians in Estonia. It measures the frequencies of pertinent personal and occupational factors, and uses multivariate analysis to explore relationships between these factors. RESULTS. Most physicians in Estonia are women and work in urban settings. About half of the physicians work in hospitals, and one third work in large outpatient clinics called polyclinics. About one third work in primary care. Gender affects education, specialty, type of workplace, and administrative duties; nationality affects education and administrative duties. CONCLUSIONS. The Soviet system of health care derived its professional structure from a combination of personal and occupational factors. Those considering options for reform of the health care systems of the newly independent states that once constituted the Soviet Union should appreciate the nature of these structural forces. PMID:7892922

  2. Marines, medics, and machismo: lack of fit with masculine occupational stereotypes discourages men's participation.

    PubMed

    Peters, Kim; Ryan, Michelle K; Haslam, S Alexander

    2015-11-01

    Women have made substantial inroads into some traditionally masculine occupations (e.g., accounting, journalism) but not into others (e.g., military, surgery). Evidence suggests the latter group of occupations is characterized by hyper-masculine 'macho' stereotypes that are especially disadvantageous to women. Here, we explore whether such macho occupational stereotypes may be especially tenacious, not just because of their impact on women, but also because of their impact on men. We examined whether macho stereotypes associated with marine commandos and surgeons discourage men who feel that they are 'not man enough'. Study 1 demonstrates that male new recruits' (N = 218) perceived lack of fit with masculine commandos was associated with reduced occupational identification and motivation. Study 2 demonstrates that male surgical trainees' (N = 117) perceived lack of fit with masculine surgeons was associated with reduced identification and increased psychological exit a year later. Together, this suggests that macho occupational stereotypes may discourage the very men who may challenge them. PMID:25469571

  3. [Chronic migraine and work: occupational risks and prevention].

    PubMed

    Vicente-Herrero, M T; Ramírez Iñiguez de la Torre, M V; Capdevila García, L M; López-González, Á A; Terradillos García, M J

    2013-09-01

    Chronic migraine is a clinically difficult to manage primary headache which affects the quality of life of the patients. This impact is important in the occupational world, where along with the clinical aspects of the disease, the therapies used for the control of the symptoms or preventive aspects, must be assessed. The side effects of the drugs and the limitations associated with their symptoms are aspects to highlight in occupational health, especially in individual workplaces, where there is a high risk of work-related injuries. The medical officer must assess the occupational risks of particular importance in the progression of this disease, as well as preventive actions, within the ambit of the current Spanish legislation, that may be favorable for both the company and the worker. The coordinated medical intervention and knowledge of these occupational aspects can provide clinically relevant tools, andoccupational and social optimization in the use of available resources. PMID:24034760

  4. [ISHAM-WG Symposium: Introduction of Medical Phycology, Retrospective Overview, and Prospective Aspect].

    PubMed

    Kano, Rui; Matsumoto, Tadahiko

    2015-01-01

    Protothecosis is an emerging infectious zoonotic disease caused by species of the genus Prototheca (Trebouxiophyceae, Chlorophyta), which are classified as achlorophyllous algae closely related to the green algal genus Chlorella. Prototheca lost the ability to photosynthesize and are widely distributed throughout the natural world in sewage, soil, lakes, and marshes. It is therefore necessary to build an interdisciplinary network connecting human medicine, veterinary medicine, microbiological taxonomy, clinical microbiology, and environmental microbiology to increase knowledge in this area. We have established the working group "Medical Phycology : Protothecosis and Chlorellosis" (approved on May 4, 2014) under the umbrella of the International Society for Human and Animal Mycology (ISHAM) to support all scientific aspects dealing with this topic. We report the current circumstances and future prospects of this working group for the group to become better known by scientists. PMID:26329375

  5. Civilian nuclear incidents: An overview of historical, medical, and scientific aspects

    PubMed Central

    Rojavin, Yuri; Seamon, Mark J; Tripathi, Ravi S; Papadimos, Thomas J; Galwankar, Sagar; Kman, Nicholas; Cipolla, James; Grossman, Michael D; Marchigiani, Raffaele; Stawicki, Stanislaw P A

    2011-01-01

    Given the increasing number of operational nuclear reactors worldwide, combined with the continued use of radioactive materials in both healthcare and industry, the unlikely occurrence of a civilian nuclear incident poses a small but real danger. This article provides an overview of the most important historical, medical, and scientific aspects associated with the most notable nuclear incidents to date. We have discussed fundamental principles of radiation monitoring, triage considerations, and the short- and long-term management of radiation exposure victims. The provision and maintenance of adequate radiation safety among first responders and emergency personnel are emphasized. Finally, an outline is included of decontamination, therapeutic, and prophylactic considerations pertaining to exposure to various radioactive materials. PMID:21769214

  6. The occupation of trawl fishing and the medical aid available to the Grimsby deep sea fisherman1

    PubMed Central

    Moore, S. R. W.

    1969-01-01

    Moore, S. R. W. (1969).Brit. J. industr. Med.,26, 1-24. The occupation of trawl fishing and the medical aid available to the Grimsby deep sea fisherman. The mortality of fishermen is twice that of coalminers. Because of the method of fishing the mortality of the trawlerman is probably higher. Outside the industry little is known about the occupation of trawl fishing. Its size, the number of men employed, and the number and distribution of trawlers are therefore described, with particular reference to the port of Grimsby. As near, middle, and deep water trawlers sail from Grimsby, its industry gives a good representation of conditions in the industry as a whole. The port and the fishing grounds are described. The composition of the trawler crew, their conditions of work, accommodation, and remuneration are explained. A description is given of the trawl apparatus, fishing operations, and the hazards involved, and extracts from the writer's diary of a fishing voyage are appended. The United Kingdom has ratified the Accommodation of Crews (Fishermen) Convention 1966 of the International Labour Organisation, and an informal survey of a modern trawler fleet showed that it fell short of the requirements of this Convention. Accommodation is confined and the crew live and work in close proximity and in conditions of physical discomfort. Trawlermen work for long hours under conditions which would not be tolerated by the shore worker. The method of payment is such that trawlermen may take unnecessary risks. Earnings depend on team work so that illness and injury are often not reported with consequent deterioration of the condition. Physical fatigue and lack of sleep contribute to an increased accident rate. It is therefore recommended that more men per trawler should be employed to allow shorter working hours. As the skipper and mate are paid wholly on a share basis, the remainder of the crew receiving, in addition, a basic wage, it `pays' the trawlermen to take risks. A

  7. Selected Health Service Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Arthur D.

    Prepared by an occupational analyst of the Utah Department of Employment Security, this manual provides job guides for 39 health service occupations concerned mainly with doctors, nurses, and related hospital-medical-health consultants and services. Classified according to "The Dictionary of Occupational Titles," each occupational description…

  8. Human immunodeficiency virus postexposure prophylaxis for occupational exposure in a medical school hospital in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Hiransuthikul, N; Hiransuthikul, P; Kanasuk, Y

    2007-12-01

    This is a retrospective review of occupational exposure to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and subsequent postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) among healthcare workers (HCWs) in King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital (KCMH), Bangkok, Thailand. From January 2002 to December 2004, data were collected from incident reports, the hospital's infectious diseases unit and the emergency department. There were 315 reported episodes of occupational exposure among 306 HCWs. Nurses (34.0%) were the HCWs most frequently exposed and percutaneous injury (91.4%) was the most common type of exposure. One-third of the source patients tested were infected with HIV. PEP was initiated following 200 (63.5%) of the 315 exposures and was started within 24h in >95% of cases. The most commonly prescribed PEP regimen was zidovudine, lamivudine and nelfinavir. Fifty-six percent of HCWs given PEP completed a four-week course but the remainder discontinued PEP prematurely due to side-effects, or after negative results from the source, or following informed risk reassessment or from their own accord. No exposed HCW acquired HIV during the study period. Appropriate counselling and careful risk assessment are important in achieving effective HIV PEP among HCWs. PMID:18023920

  9. Occupational Rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Grammer, Leslie C

    2016-05-01

    Occupational rhinitis (OR) involves nasal congestion, rhinorrhea, nasal itching, and/or sneezing resulting from workplace exposures. OR can have a significant negative effect on quality of life and productivity. OR can be divided into allergic or nonallergic subgroups based on the underlying pathogenesis. Certain occupational exposures place employees at greater risk for developing disease. Primary treatment is avoidance of implicated exposures. Antihistamines, saline rinses, and nasal steroids may be useful. OR can coexist with occupational asthma, and rhinitis symptoms have been reported to precede those of the lower respiratory tract. OR is has both medical and socioeconomic implications. PMID:27083106

  10. A Guide for Planning Facilities for Occupational Preparation Programs for Medical Secretaries. Research Series No. 33.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macconnell, James D., And Others

    The major purpose of this facility planning guide is to develop the necessary information for the writing of educational specifications to house medical secretary programs by (1) assisting planners in the formation of creative housing solutions for desired programs, (2) preventing important considerations from being overlooked in the planning…

  11. Assessment of occupational radiation exposure among medical staff in health-care facilities in the Eastern Province, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Khaled Fikry; AlObireed, Abdulrahman; AlBagawi, Mohammed; AlSufayan, Yuosef; AlSerheed, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Radiation exposure poses hazards for health-care providers as well as patients in health-care facilities (HCFs). Radiographic imaging is extremely valuable as a diagnostic tool in medicine, but ionizing radiation and computed tomography (CT) scan carry well-known potential risks. Personnel and radiation safety monitoring is an important safety precaution in the practice of radiography. Aim: The study aimed to assess the occupational radiation exposure and safety protection among medical staff in HCFs in the Eastern Province, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). Materials and Methods: Total of 4 HCFs with radiological services were randomly selected for the study in the period from January to April 2013. The radiation survey has been carried out by the measurement of radiation in the x-ray and CT-scan room at different points of the diagnostic, imaging, and waiting rooms of different hospitals. The radiation safety was assessed by using a questionnaire Results: The results of our study are surprising and alarming. Data revealed that there are a significant association between the levels of radiation exposure in all selected hospitals concerning imaging and waiting X-ray and CT-scan operating room (P < 0.01). For radiation safety, most hospitals have lead aprons and thyroid shields in place, but only about 50% have lead glasses and lead shields, showing that many hospitals still lack essential equipment. Moreover, actual utilization rate of radiation dosimeters are 57.7% and 68.9%, respectively. Conclusion: All medical staff as well as patients are at risk of exposure to x-ray and CT-scan radiation exposure, and the levels are exceeding the standard guidelines. Many hospitals still lack safety protection tools and there is a complete absence of radiation protection equipment. Further studies should be conducted to highlight different aspects of radiation exposure dose and safety protection tools. PMID:27390475

  12. Remuneration of Graduates, as at 1 July 1994. Medical and Health Science Occupations = Vergoeding van Gegradueerdes, soos op 1 Julie 1994. Mediese en Gesondheidsdiensberoepe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Johan

    This document, which is based on data gathered during a September 1994 mail survey of 215,284 South African graduates that elicited a total response rate of 18.3%, details the remuneration of graduates (as of July 1, 1994) in the following occupational categories: medical professions; dental professions; veterinary professions; pharmaceutical…

  13. Assessment of annual whole-body occupational radiation exposure in medical practice in Ghana (2000-09).

    PubMed

    Hasford, F; Owusu-Banahene, J; Amoako, J K; Otoo, F; Darko, E O; Emi-Reynolds, G; Yeboah, J; Arwui, C C; Adu, S

    2012-05-01

    Occupational exposure to radiation in medical practice in Ghana has been analysed for a 10-y period between 2000 and 2009. Monitored dose data in the medical institution in Ghana from the Radiation Protection Institute's database were extracted and analysed in terms of three categories: diagnostic radiology, radiotherapy and nuclear medicine. One hundred and eighty medical facilities were monitored for the 10-y period, out of which ~98% were diagnostic radiology facilities. Only one nuclear medicine and two radiotherapy facilities have been operational in the country since 2000. During the 10-y study period, monitored medical facilities increased by 18.8%, while the exposed workers decreased by 23.0%. Average exposed worker per entire medical institution for the 10-y study period was 4.3. Annual collective dose received by all the exposed workers reduced by a factor of 4 between 2000 and 2009. This is seen as reduction in annual collective doses in diagnostic radiology, radiotherapy and nuclear medicine facilities by ~76, ~72 and ~55%, respectively, for the 10-y period. Highest annual collective dose of 601.2 man mSv was recorded in 2002 and the least of 142.6 man mSv was recorded in 2009. Annual average values for dose per institution and dose per exposed worker decreased by 79 and 67.6%, respectively between 2000 and 2009. Average dose per exposed worker for the 10-y period was least in radiotherapy and highest in diagnostic radiology with values 0.14 and 1.05 mSv, respectively. Nuclear medicine however recorded average dose per worker of 0.72 mSv. Correspondingly, range of average effective doses within the diagnostic radiology, radiotherapy and nuclear medicine facilities were 0.328-2.614, 0.383-0.728 and 0.448-0.695 mSv, respectively. Throughout the study period, an average dose per medical institution of 3 mSv and an average dose per exposed worker of 0.69 mSv were realised. Exposed workers in diagnostic radiology primarily received most of the individual

  14. An Overview of Multiple Sclerosis: Medical, Psychosocial, and Vocational Aspects of a Chronic and Unpredictable Neurological Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rumrill, Phillip D., Jr.; Roessler, Richard T.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents an overview of multiple sclerosis (MS), one of the most common neurological disorders in the western hemisphere. Medical and psychosocial aspects of the disease such as causes and risk factors, diagnosis, incidence and prevalence, symptoms, courses, and treatment are described. Existing research regarding the employment…

  15. Evaluation of the medical and occupational shielding in cerebral angiography using Monte Carlo simulations and virtual anthropomorphic phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, William S.; Neves, Lucio P.; Perini, Ana P.; Caldas, Linda V. E.; Maia, Ana F.

    2015-12-01

    Cerebral angiography exams may provide valuable diagnostic information for the patients with suspect of cerebral diseases, but it may also deliver high doses of radiation to the patients and medical staff. In order to evaluate the medical and occupational expositions from different irradiation conditions, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were employed. Virtual anthropomorphic phantoms (MASH) were used to represent the patient and the physician inside a typical fluoroscopy room, also simulated in details, incorporated in the MCNPX 2.7.0 MC code. The evaluation was carried out by means of dose conversion coefficients (CCs) for equivalent (H) and effective (E) doses normalized by the air kerma-area product (KAP). The CCs for the surface entrance dose of the patient (ESD) and equivalent dose for the eyes of the medical staff were determined, because CA exams present higher risks for those organs. The tube voltage was 80 kVp, and Al filters with thicknesses of 2.5 mm, 3.5 mm and 4.0 mm were positioned in the beams. Two projections were simulated: posterior-anterior (PA) and right-lateral (RLAT). In all situations there was an increase of the CC values with the increase of the Al filtration. The highest dose was obtained for a RLAT projection with a 4.0 mm Al filter. In this projection, the ESD/KAP and E/KAP values to patient were 11 (14%) mGy/Gy cm2 and 0.12 (0.1%) mSv/Gy cm2, respectively. For the physician, the use of shield lead glass suspended and lead curtain attached to the surgical table resulted in a significant reduction of the CCs. The use of MC simulations proved to be a very important tool in radiation protection dosimetry, and specifically in this study several parameters could be evaluated, which would not be possible experimentally.

  16. Safeguarding the Health of the NASA Astronaut Community: the Need for Expanded Medical Monitoring for Former NASA Astronauts Under the Astronaut Occupational Health Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossi, Meredith; Lee, Lesley; Wear, Mary; Van Baalen, Mary; Rhodes, Bradley

    2016-01-01

    The astronaut community is unique, and may be disproportionately exposed to occupational hazards not commonly seen in other communities. The extent to which the demands of the astronaut occupation and exposure to spaceflight-related hazards affect the health of the astronaut population over the life course is not completely known. Provision of health screening services to active and former astronauts ensures individual, mission, and community health and safety. Currently, the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) Flight Medicine Clinic (FMC) provides extensive medical monitoring to active astronauts throughout their careers. Upon retirement, astronauts may voluntarily return to the JSC FMC for an annual preventive exam. However, current retiree monitoring includes only selected screening tests, representing an opportunity for augmentation. The potential latent health effects of spaceflight demand an expanded framework of testing for former astronauts. The need is two-fold: screening tests widely recommended for other aging communities are necessary for astronauts to rule out conditions resulting from the natural aging process (e.g., colonoscopy, mammography), as opposed to conditions resulting directly from the astronaut occupation; and increased breadth of monitoring services will improve the understanding of occupational health risks and longitudinal health of the astronaut community, past, present, and future. To meet this need, NASA has begun an extensive exploration of the overall approach, cost, and policy implications of expanding existing medical monitoring under the Astronaut Occupational Health program for former NASA astronauts.

  17. [Modern aspects of organization of medical support for the Armed Forces].

    PubMed

    Stavila, A G; Krasavin, K D; Levchenko, V N; Lemeshko, A L; Roenko, A S

    2015-09-01

    The challenges that medical service of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation faces cannot be solved without a new qualitative approach to military and medical support. In order to create a complete organizational system of the medical support, consisting of united process of material flow management and management of accompanying elements, the. structure of the medical support and its equipment must correspond to performed tasks. The article describes a set of activities that are performed in the system of military-medical support and offers some promising approaches, which are supposed to solve assigned tasks imposed upon the center of pharmacy and medical technology and its interaction with superior body control, maintainable and third party organizations. PMID:26827520

  18. Medical complications of anorexia nervosa and their treatments: an update on some critical aspects.

    PubMed

    Brown, Carrie; Mehler, Philip S

    2015-12-01

    Anorexia nervosa has the highest mortality rate of any psychiatric disorder. Many of the deaths are attributable to medical complications which arise as the malnutrition and weight loss worsens. Every body system may be adversely affected by anorexia nervosa. Yet, remarkably, most of the medical complications of anorexia nervosa are treatable and reversible with optimal medical care, as part of a multidisciplinary team who are often involved in the care of these patients. Herein, we will describe the medical complications of anorexia nervosa and their treatments. PMID:26138740

  19. Self-Reported Adherence to Medications in a Pediatric Renal Clinic: Psychological Aspects

    PubMed Central

    L. Vasylyeva, Tetyana; Singh, Ruchi; Sheehan, Christopher; Chennasamudram, Sudha P.; Hernandez, Anne P.

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronically ill children and adolescents comprise a vulnerable population that requires specific considerations in order to positively impact their treatment outcome. Pediatric renal patients can be non-compliant and also forgetful in taking their medications. Objective The objectives of the study were to (a) assess medication adherence and (b) to identify emotionality and variables that influence non-adherence by use of “The Child & Adolescent Adherence to Medication Questionnaire” (CAAMQ), which was constructed at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center. Methods Pediatric renal patients from 10 to 21 years-of-age, taking three or more medications, for longer than a three-month period, were eligible to complete the CAAMQ. Results Thirty-four patients participated in the study. Many of the respondents had problems remembering to take their medications on weekends (P = 0.021). The majority of the patients stated that they were not bothered about having to take their medications (70.6%); and that taking pills did not interfere with their daily activities (85.3%). Open-ended questions in the CAAMQ identified patients’ feelings of sadness, distress, and the importance of strong family support systems. The study participants reported that they preferred to take their medications at school, in the nurses’ office or in a place where privacy was assured. The results indicated that Prednisone was the most disliked of all of the medications. Female patients were more reactive and secretive than males regarding peers knowing about their disease and medication schedules (P<0.017). Conclusions Non-adherence in pediatric patients is a complex and serious problem, which ultimately affects the patients’ health. Privacy and daily routine were found to impact the patients’ adherence to medications. Creative and individualized reminders for teenagers need to be developed and validated. Further studies that take into consideration developmental and

  20. Medical physics aspects of cancer care in the Asia Pacific region

    PubMed Central

    Kron, T; Cheung, KY; Dai, J; Ravindran, P; Soejoko, D; Inamura, K; Song, JY; Bold, L; Srivastava, R; Rodriguez, L; Wong, TJ; Kumara, A; Lee, CC; Krisanachinda, A; Nguyen, XC; Ng, KH

    2008-01-01

    Medical physics plays an essential role in modern medicine. This is particularly evident in cancer care where medical physicists are involved in radiotherapy treatment planning and quality assurance as well as in imaging and radiation protection. Due to the large variety of tasks and interests, medical physics is often subdivided into specialties such as radiology, nuclear medicine and radiation oncology medical physics. However, even within their specialty, the role of radiation oncology medical physicists (ROMPs) is diverse and varies between different societies. Therefore, a questionnaire was sent to leading medical physicists in most countries/areas in the Asia/Pacific region to determine the education, role and status of medical physicists. Answers were received from 17 countries/areas representing nearly 2800 radiation oncology medical physicists. There was general agreement that medical physicists should have both academic (typically at MSc level) and clinical (typically at least 2 years) training. ROMPs spent most of their time working in radiotherapy treatment planning (average 17 hours per week); however radiation protection and engineering tasks were also common. Typically, only physicists in large centres are involved in research and teaching. Most respondents thought that the workload of physicists was high, with more than 500 patients per year per physicist, less than one ROMP per two oncologists being the norm, and on average, one megavoltage treatment unit per medical physicist. There was also a clear indication of increased complexity of technology in the region with many countries/areas reporting to have installed helical tomotherapy, IMRT (Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy), IGRT (Image Guided Radiation Therapy), Gamma-knife and Cyber-knife units. This and the continued workload from brachytherapy will require growing expertise and numbers in the medical physics workforce. Addressing these needs will be an important challenge for the future

  1. Medical and Social Aspects of Syphilis in the Balkans from the mid-19th Century to the Interwar.

    PubMed

    Tsiamis, Costas; Vrioni, Georgia; Poulakou-Rebelakou, Effie; Gennimata, Vasiliki; Murdjeva, Mariana А; Tsakris, Athanasios

    2016-03-01

    The current study presents some aspects of syphilis in the Balkan Peninsula from the 19th century until the Interwar. Ever since the birth of modern Balkan States (Greece, Bulgaria, Turkey and Serbia), urbanization, poverty and the frequent wars have been considered the major factors conducive to the spread of syphilis. The measures against sex work and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) were taken in two aspects, one medical and the other legislative. In this period, numerous hospitals for venereal diseases were established in the Balkan countries. In line with the international diagnostic approach and therapeutic standards, laboratory examinations in these Balkan hospitals included spirochete examination, Wassermann reaction, precipitation reaction and cerebrospinal fluid examination. Despite the strict legislation and the adoption of relevant laws against illegal sex work, public health services were unable to curb the spread of syphilis. Medical and social factors such as poverty, citizen's ignorance of STDs, misguided medical perceptions, lack of sanitary control of prostitution and epidemiological studies, are highlighted in this study. These factors were the major causes that helped syphilis spread in the Balkan countries during the 19th and early 20th century. The value of these aspects as a historic paradigm is diachronic. Failure to comply with the laws and the dysfunction of public services during periods of war or socioeconomic crises are both factors facilitating the spread of STDs. PMID:27383872

  2. [Occupational eczema].

    PubMed

    Lachapelle, J M

    1998-05-01

    Cases of occupational allergic contact dermatitis are less frequent nowadays than in the past: for instance the prevalence of allergic contact dermatitis to cement chromates is decreasing steadily among building workers. On the other hand, new haptens do occur in our environment, due to the diversification of industrial techniques; e.g. methylchloro- and methylisothiazolinone (MCI/MI) present as a preservative in paints or varnishes, acrylates and methacrylates, or, at the hospital, glutaraldehyde, propacetamol or various antibiotics. A new entity has been clinically characterized: protein contact dermatitis. The prevention of occupational allergic contact dermatitis is multidisciplinary. It includes all aspects of prevention: primary, secondary and tertiary. PMID:11767354

  3. [Recent findings on the epidemiological and experimental aspects of the measurement of serum bile acids in occupational exposure to xenobiotics].

    PubMed

    Franco, G; Fonte, R; Lorena, M

    1989-11-01

    The functional activity of the liver and the variety of its responses to injury makes the choice of appropriate tests a difficult task. However, because of the highly efficient uptake of bile acids by the normal hepatocyte, the determination of serum bile acids (SBA) concentration has been proposed as a test to detect early changes of liver function not associated to cytotoxicity. Several studies of biomonitoring subjects occupationally exposed to hepatotoxic substances have been carried out by evaluating total SBA or primary SBA, as indicators of early liver dysfunction. Even though these studies are not completely comparable because of the different protocols adopted, most of them reveal a significant increase of SBA concentrations among the exposed subjects in respect of unexposed controls. Furthermore, higher prevalences of subjects exposed to organic solvents mixture with abnormal SBA concentrations in respect of controls have been observed. Increased serum bile acids concentrations among the subjects exposed to a variety of xenobiotics have been explained as a change in hepatocyte function, particularly in one of the steps involved in bile acids transport. However, the lack of any relationship between the indices of doses and SBA concentrations remains an important point to clarify. This fact could be interpreted as a consequence of the delayed biological effect responsible for increased serum bile acids during the exposure. As regards the nature of the mechanisms involved in the increase of SBA concentrations, recent observations pointed out that some chlorinated aliphatics were able to inhibit cell membrane ATPases.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2562752

  4. [Xenophobia and anti-Semitism in the medical milieu during the Occupation as seen through the journal "Concours Médical"].

    PubMed

    Halioua, Bruno

    2003-01-01

    Analysis of a well-known medical journal, the Concours Médical reveals the attitude among the French medical corps between 1940 and 1944. This journal kept its readers informed of the various stages of xenophobia and anti-Semitism under the Vichy government. It provided the decisions adopted, and the application of measures prohibiting foreign and Jewish physicians to practice, regularly publishing lists. Analysis of the editions published under the occupation clearly shows the xenophobia and anti-Semitism that existed among a certain population of French practitioners. PMID:12836199

  5. Half-century archives of occupational medical data on French nuclear workers: a dusty warehouse or gold mine for epidemiological research?

    PubMed

    Garsi, Jerome-Philippe; Samson, Eric; Chablais, Laetitia; Zhivin, Sergey; Niogret, Christine; Laurier, Dominique; Guseva Canu, Irina

    2014-12-01

    This article discusses the availability and completeness of medical data on workers from the AREVA NC Pierrelatte nuclear plant and their possible use in epidemiological research on cardiovascular and metabolic disorders related to internal exposure to uranium. We created a computer database from files on 394 eligible workers included in an ongoing nested case-control study from a larger cohort of 2897 French nuclear workers. For each worker, we collected records of previous employment, job positions, job descriptions, medical visits, and blood test results from medical history. The dataset counts 9,471 medical examinations and 12,735 blood test results. For almost all of the parameters relevant for research on cardiovascular risk, data completeness and availability is over 90%, but it varies with time and improves in the latest time period. In the absence of biobanks, collecting and computerising available good-quality occupational medicine archive data constitutes a valuable alternative for epidemiological and aetiological research in occupational health. Biobanks rarely contain biological samples over an entire worker's carrier and medical data from nuclear industry archives might make up for unavailable biomarkers that could provide information on cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. PMID:25720028

  6. Practice Makes Perfect: Emergency Medical Technicians and the Social Negotiation of a Skilled Occupational Identity. EQW Working Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelsen, Bonalyn J.; Barley, Stephen R.

    Most scholars adopt one of two orientations when explaining why some occupations are more skilled than others: realism or constructionism; both views would benefit from a consideration of interactionism. No occupations are more likely to have to negotiate their status than those that emerge from amateur or voluntary work. Members of such…

  7. [Medical aspects of current flight safety concept of air forces of the Russian Federation].

    PubMed

    Blaginin, A A; Lizogub, I N

    2012-12-01

    Issues of medical supply of aviation operations, that is part of general system of flight safety are analyzed in this article. One of the main issues is development of the system of vocational preparation of medical personnel, taking part in organization and carrying flights. This issue consists of several themes: formation of united system of education from primary to post graduate; formation of modern training facility; assurance of high potential in academic and teaching staff and providing of good basic training and high learning motivation of applicants, who wants to become a air medical officer. Fundamental principles of developed concept of medical supply of flight safety are presented. It is shown that the essential condition of good implementation of the given concept is informaltion support of all its structures. PMID:23479904

  8. Medical and radiological aspects of emergency preparedness and response at SevRAO facilities.

    PubMed

    Savkin, M N; Sneve, M K; Grachev, M I; Frolov, G P; Shinkarev, S M; Jaworska, A

    2008-12-01

    Regulatory cooperation between the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority and the Federal Medical Biological Agency (FMBA) of the Russian Federation has the overall goal of promoting improvements in radiation protection in Northwest Russia. One of the projects in this programme has the objectives to review and improve the existing medical emergency preparedness capabilities at the sites for temporary storage of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste. These are operated by SevRAO at Andreeva Bay and in Gremikha village on the Kola Peninsula. The work is also intended to provide a better basis for regulation of emergency response and medical emergency preparedness at similar facilities elsewhere in Russia. The purpose of this paper is to present the main results of that project, implemented by the Burnasyan Federal Medical Biophysical Centre. The first task was an analysis of the regulatory requirements and the current state of preparedness for medical emergency response at the SevRAO facilities. Although Russian regulatory documents are mostly consistent with international recommendations, some distinctions lead to numerical differences in operational intervention criteria under otherwise similar conditions. Radiological threats relating to possible accidents, and related gaps in the regulation of SevRAO facilities, were also identified. As part of the project, a special exercise on emergency medical response on-site at Andreeva Bay was prepared and carried out, and recommendations were proposed after the exercise. Following fruitful dialogue among regulators, designers and operators, special regulatory guidance has been issued by FMBA to account for the specific and unusual features of the SevRAO facilities. Detailed sections relate to the prevention of accidents, and emergency preparedness and response, supplementing the basic Russian regulatory requirements. Overall it is concluded that (a) the provision of medical and sanitary components of emergency

  9. Antecedents of the people and organizational aspects of medical informatics: review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lorenzi, N M; Riley, R T; Blyth, A J; Southon, G; Dixon, B J

    1997-01-01

    People and organizational issues are critical in both implementing medical informatics systems and in dealing with the altered organizations that new systems often create. The people and organizational issues area--like medical informatics itself--is a blend of many disciplines. The academic disciplines of psychology, sociology, social psychology, social anthropology, organizational behavior and organizational development, management, and cognitive sciences are rich with research with significant potential to ease the introduction and on-going use of information technology in today's complex health systems. These academic areas contribute research data and core information for better understanding of such issues as the importance of and processes for creating future direction; managing a complex change process; effective strategies for involving individuals and groups in the informatics effort; and effectively managing the altered organization. This article reviews the behavioral and business referent disciplines that can potentially contribute to improved implementations and on-going management of change in the medical informatics arena. PMID:9067874

  10. Medical aspects of drug misuse during one year in a rehabilitation unit

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Robert T.A.

    1986-01-01

    The medical work in a voluntary drug rehabilitation unit near Glasgow was examined. During one year 174 residents were admitted of whom 103 (59%) developed illnesses which required medical treatment. The need for drug misusers to receive general medical services during and after drug misuse was confirmed. Although withdrawal from barbiturate misuse required the prescription of controlled drugs, opiate and other withdrawals were satisfactorily managed with psychological support and general care; substances which could be abused were not prescribed. Blood testing of 129 residents showed that 114 (88%) had evidence of previous hepatitis B infection, while only two had human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody. The low prevalence of HIV antibody compared with the high prevalence that has been reported in Edinburgh suggests that the opportunity exists at the moment to limit the spread of acquired immune deficiency syndrome among Glasgow drug misusers. PMID:3656269

  11. Medical physics aspects of cancer care in the Asia Pacific region: 2011 survey results

    PubMed Central

    Kron, T; Azhari, HA; Voon, EO; Cheung, KY; Ravindran, P; Soejoko, D; Inamura, K; Han, Y; Ung, NM; Bold, L; Win, UM; Srivastava, R; Meyer, J; Farrukh, S; Rodriguez, L; Kuo, M; Lee, JCL; Kumara, A; Lee, CC; Krisanachinda, A; Nguyen, XC; Ng, KH

    2012-01-01

    Background: Medical physicists are essential members of the radiation oncology team. Given the increasing complexity of radiotherapy delivery, it is important to ensure adequate training and staffing. The aim of the present study was to update a similar survey from 2008 and assess the situation of medical physicists in the large and diverse Asia Pacific region. Methods: Between March and July 2011, a survey on profession and practice of radiation oncology medical physicists (ROMPs) in the Asia Pacific region was performed. The survey was sent to senior physicists in 22 countries. Replies were received from countries that collectively represent more than half of the world’s population. The survey questions explored five areas: education, staffing, work patterns including research and teaching, resources available, and job satisfaction. Results and discussion: Compared to a data from a similar survey conducted three years ago, the number of medical physicists in participating countries increased by 29% on average. This increase is similar to the increase in the number of linear accelerators, showing that previously identified staff shortages have yet to be substantially addressed. This is also highlighted by the fact that most ROMPs are expected to work overtime often and without adequate compensation. While job satisfaction has stayed similar compared to the previous survey, expectations for education and training have increased somewhat. This is in line with a trend towards certification of ROMPs. Conclusion: As organisations such as the International Labour Organization (ILO) start to recognise medical physics as a profession, it is evident that despite some encouraging signs there is still a lot of work required towards establishing an adequately trained and resourced medical physics workforce in the Asia Pacific region. PMID:22970066

  12. Orientation of Medical Residents to the Psychosocial Aspects of Primary Care: Influence of Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenthal, Sherman; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A survey of 63 general medical residents found most accepted the psychosocial role of the primary care physician, found it most appropriate in ambulatory care settings, felt ambivalent about their ability to perform it, and assigned it secondary priority in patient care. More attention by training programs to ambulatory care and psychosocial…

  13. [Medical aspects and driving history of drivers with higher class automobile driver's licenses].

    PubMed

    Maag, F

    1982-02-01

    In the medical part of our paper we have shown the chauffeurs are a high-risk group with respect to hypertension, lumbar pain, and overweight. The analysis of drivers' offenses, yearly kilometers driven and years of driving in the three groups of taxi, lorry and coach drivers shows that coach chauffeurs have significantly better driving records. PMID:6461985

  14. Medical physics aspects of cancer care in the Asia Pacific region: 2014 survey results.

    PubMed

    Kron, Tomas; Azhari, H A; Voon, E O; Cheung, K Y; Ravindran, P; Soejoko, D; Inamura, K; Han, Y; Ung, N M; TsedenIsh, Bolortuya; Win, U M; Srivastava, R; Marsh, S; Farrukh, S; Rodriguez, L; Kuo, Men; Baggarley, S; DilipKumara, A H; Lee, C C; Krisanachinda, A; Nguyen, X C; Ng, K H

    2015-09-01

    It was the aim of this work to assess and track the workload, working conditions and professional recognition of radiation oncology medical physicists (ROMPs) in the Asia Pacific region over time. In this third survey since 2008, a structured questionnaire was mailed in 2014 to 22 senior medical physicists representing 23 countries. As in previous surveys the questionnaire covered seven themes: 1 education, training and professional certification, 2 staffing, 3 typical tasks, 4 professional organisations, 5 resources, 6 research and teaching, and 7 job satisfaction. The response rate of 100% is a result of performing a survey through a network, which allows easy follow-up. The replies cover 4841 ROMPs in 23 countries. Compared to 2008, the number of medical physicists in many countries has doubled. However, the number of experienced ROMPs compared to the overall workforce is still small, especially in low and middle income countries. The increase in staff is matched by a similar increase in the number of treatment units over the years. Furthermore, the number of countries using complex techniques (IMRT, IGRT) or installing high end equipment (tomotherapy, robotic linear accelerators) is increasing. Overall, ROMPs still feel generally overworked and the professional recognition, while varying widely, appears to be improving only slightly. Radiation oncology medical physics practice has not changed significantly over the last 6 years in the Asia Pacific Region even if the number of physicists and the number and complexity of treatment techniques and technologies have increased dramatically. PMID:26346030

  15. NELMA project. I. Objectives of the methodical aspects. [Nuclear Energy Laboratory of Medical and Agricultural Sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Madueme, G.C.

    1980-09-01

    The significance of the NELMA Project is presented. The main aim is to inject new and useful frontiers into the medical care facilities in Nigeria and to provide broader scopes for applying excited nuclear probes to research in bio-agricultural economics as well as in nuclear and solid state physics.

  16. Legal aspects of administrating antipsychotic medications to jail and prison inmates.

    PubMed

    Dlugacz, Henry; Wimmer, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    The administration of antipsychotic medications to jail and prison inmates involves two related components: conducting the informed consent process in a coercive environment and, where consent is not obtained, forcible administration of medication if needed. In the United States, both involve common law, statutory, and constitutional principles. Obtaining informed consent in correctional institutions is complicated. Patients in correctional institutions lack access to alternate sources of information, and depend on the correctional system completely - a system which they may distrust. This may influence the patient's view of the administering physician. Where consent cannot be obtained, forcible administration may be legally permissible for two primary reasons: to restore a criminal defendant to competency in order to stand trial and to ameliorate severe symptoms of mental disability, particularly when they threaten the safety of self, others, or in some instances, property. The interests at stake for the individual and the government, and the legal standards developed to balance these interests, differ between the two situations. When considering challenges to forcible medication of inmates serving a prison sentence, the United States Supreme Court has treated the interest of the institution in maintaining security as paramount. By contrast, when considering challenges to forcible medication of pretrial detainees, the Court's concern for the fair trial rights guaranteed by the Sixth Amendment has seemingly led it to moderate its emphasis on security. However, this distinction is not stable and may in fact be breaking down, as the recent case of Jared Loughner demonstrates. This article discusses the various federal, state, and international legal standards applicable to both informed consent and forcible medication, and their implementation in the correctional setting, focusing on issues related to the United States. PMID:23683884

  17. Occupational Clusters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pottawattamie County School System, Council Bluffs, IA.

    The 15 occupational clusters (transportation, fine arts and humanities, communications and media, personal service occupations, construction, hospitality and recreation, health occupations, marine science occupations, consumer and homemaking-related occupations, agribusiness and natural resources, environment, public service, business and office…

  18. Health aspects of Arctic exploration – Alaska’s medical history based on the research files of Dr. Robert Fortuine

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    Background Robert Fortuine provided basic medical care to Alaska Native people, chronicled the Health Aspects of Arctic Exploration and through a number of influential publications, was the first to thoroughly document and analyse Alaska’s Medical History. This overview of his published work will provide the reader with a detailed overview, so that they can begin to explore Dr. Fortuine’s many published works in more detail. Objective This review will explore Alaska’s Medical History and the Health Aspects of Arctic Exploration through the research files and the 10 most significant publications of Dr. Robert Fortuine. Design Review of Dr. Fortuine’s major works and the master bibliography has over 3,000 references and 81 subjects. The master bibliography is a merger of 55 separate bibliographies, which provides a wealth of bibliographic information. This paper will describe his 10 most significant publications, 2 of which began as a journal issue. Results Dr. Fortuine was a prolific writer throughout his career, publishing 134 articles and books. He wrote papers and books on Alaska’s medical history, tuberculosis and health care delivery from Russian–America through the Public Health Service efforts in the territory and then the State of Alaska. The master bibliography has over 3,000 references and 81 subjects. This list has a significant number of entries for tuberculosis with almost one-third of the entries including this heading. Others dwell on the history of “pre-contact” health, the history of Alaska Native health care, the history of the Alaska Department of Health, especially the tuberculosis programme, the role of the US Public Health Service and traditional medicine. He completely reviewed every Governors’ and the US Surgeon General’s reports in regard to Alaska content. This paper describes his 10 most significant publications. Conclusions Robert Fortuine’s published works offer a wealth of information and insight into Alaska

  19. Occupational allergies and asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Tarlo, S. M.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review aspects of occupational allergies and asthma for primary care physicians recognizing, diagnosing, and managing patients with these conditions. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Studies in the medical literature mainly provide level 2 evidence, that is, from at least one well-designed clinical trial without randomization, from cohort or case-control analytical studies, from multiple time series, or from dramatic results in uncontrolled experiments. MAIN MESSAGE: Occupational allergies and asthma have the best prognosis with an early, accurate diagnosis and subsequent avoidance of exposure to the relevant sensitizer. These diagnoses can normally be suspected from the clinical history. Primary care physicians can also initiate investigations to make an objective diagnosis, can assess workplace exposure agents from the history, and can review appropriate data sheets on material safety. Specialist evaluation is likely to be needed for skin tests, however, and for other specialized tests (such as pulmonary function assessments at work and off work or specific challenges with the suspected workplace agent). Patients with a confirmed diagnosis need appropriate medical management of their allergic manifestations or asthma, but also often require psychosocial support during the period of investigation and management, especially in relation to required changes in their work and to compensation or insurance claims. CONCLUSIONS: Consider workplace exposure as a source of patients' allergies or asthma and aim to make an early, accurate diagnosis. PMID:10386216

  20. Medical and social aspects of sexual assault of males: a survey of 100 victims.

    PubMed Central

    Hillman, R J; O'Mara, N; Taylor-Robinson, D; Harris, J R

    1990-01-01

    Sexual assault of males is an infrequently reported and a poorly understood phenomenon. Details of 100 victims who sought assistance from a nationwide agency set up specifically to provide help for such individuals are reported here. Twenty eight victims were aged 16 years or over at the time of assault. The assailants were known by 72 of the victims and were perceived by the victim to have a heterosexual orientation in 72% of these cases. Attacks were often multiple and in 33 cases involved disruption of skin or mucous membranes. Twenty victims received threats about the possibility of transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus and 17 victims sought medical advice following the assault, most commonly from their general practitioner. It is suggested that greater opportunities for medical and psychological support should be given to male victims of sexual assault. PMID:2282228

  1. Epidemiologic Aspects of Medical Retirement from the Republic of Korea Army due to Visual Impairment

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This study was done to report the epidemiologic characteristics of medical retirement from the Republic of Korea (ROK) Army due to visual impairment and to suggest a practical screening system for the draft. The medical records of 423 eyes of 301 patients who retired from the ROK Army due to visual impairment were reviewed retrospectively between January 2010 and December 2014. The patients were grouped by the presence of trauma, and each group was subdivided by military rank. We analyzed demographic and ophthalmic data, including the etiology of ophthalmologic disease. The etiology was classified into 5 anatomical categories (ocular surface, lens, retina, optic nerve and extraocular visual pathway, and extraocular muscle and orbit), which were then subdivided into the type of disease. The mean age was 24.5 years, and non-traumatic mechanisms accounted for 81.1% (343/423 eyes) of medical retirements. Visual acuity was better in patients without trauma. In enlisted soldiers, disease in the optic nerve and extraocular visual pathway was the most common anatomical category (40.5%), and primary open angle glaucoma (30.8%), retinal dystrophy (18.3%), congenital cataract (14.5%), and retinal detachment (9.7%) were the four most common diseases. Most medical retirements due to visual impairment resulted from non-traumatic mechanisms, even though patients were young. The fundus examination and visual field test would be more useful tools than a conventional vision test for large-scale draft screening for the most common two disease types: primary open angle glaucoma and retinal dystrophy. PMID:27051249

  2. Epidemiologic Aspects of Medical Retirement from the Republic of Korea Army due to Visual Impairment.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jae Hoon; Chun, Yeoun Sook; Park, Ki Ho

    2016-04-01

    This study was done to report the epidemiologic characteristics of medical retirement from the Republic of Korea (ROK) Army due to visual impairment and to suggest a practical screening system for the draft. The medical records of 423 eyes of 301 patients who retired from the ROK Army due to visual impairment were reviewed retrospectively between January 2010 and December 2014. The patients were grouped by the presence of trauma, and each group was subdivided by military rank. We analyzed demographic and ophthalmic data, including the etiology of ophthalmologic disease. The etiology was classified into 5 anatomical categories (ocular surface, lens, retina, optic nerve and extraocular visual pathway, and extraocular muscle and orbit), which were then subdivided into the type of disease. The mean age was 24.5 years, and non-traumatic mechanisms accounted for 81.1% (343/423 eyes) of medical retirements. Visual acuity was better in patients without trauma. In enlisted soldiers, disease in the optic nerve and extraocular visual pathway was the most common anatomical category (40.5%), and primary open angle glaucoma (30.8%), retinal dystrophy (18.3%), congenital cataract (14.5%), and retinal detachment (9.7%) were the four most common diseases. Most medical retirements due to visual impairment resulted from non-traumatic mechanisms, even though patients were young. The fundus examination and visual field test would be more useful tools than a conventional vision test for large-scale draft screening for the most common two disease types: primary open angle glaucoma and retinal dystrophy. PMID:27051249

  3. Medical aspects of environmental pollution. Environmental incidents in the Netherlands 1980-1984.

    PubMed

    Sangster, B; Cohen, H

    1985-01-01

    In the Netherlands since 1980, 16 situations have been identified in which man might be exposed to environmental pollutants. This paper provides an overview of these incidents and describes how health risk assessments, public studies and provision of individual medical toxicological care are dealt with. The importance of involving general practitioners and other primary health care personnel at an early stage is stressed. PMID:4057326

  4. Medical Information on the Internet: A Tool for Measuring Consumer Perception of Quality Aspects

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Most of adult Internet users have searched for health information on the Internet. The Internet has become one of the most important sources for health information and treatment advice. In most cases, the information found is not verified with a medical doctor, but judged by the “online-diagnosers” independently. Facing this situation, public health authorities raise concern over the quality of medical information laypersons can find on the Internet. Objective The objective of the study was aimed at developing a measure to evaluate the credibility of websites that offer medical advice and information. The measure was tested in a quasi-experimental study on two sleeping-disorder websites of different quality. Methods There were 45 survey items for rating the credibility of websites that were tested in a quasi-experimental study with a random assignment of 454 participants to either a high- or a low-quality website exposure. Using principal component analysis, the original items were reduced to 13 and sorted into the factors: trustworthiness, textual deficits of the content, interferences (external links on the Web site), and advertisements. The first two factors focus more on the provided content itself, while the other two describe the embedding of the content into the website. The 45 survey items had been designed previously using exploratory observations and literature research. Results The final scale showed adequate power and reliability for all factors. The loadings of the principal component analysis ranged satisfactorily (.644 to .854). Significant differences at P<.001 were found between the low- and high-quality groups. Advertisements on the website were rated as disturbing in both experimental conditions, meaning that they do not differentiate between good and bad information. Conclusions The scale reliably distinguished high- and low-quality of medical advice given on websites. PMID:25835333

  5. Stem cells: An insight into the therapeutic aspects from medical and dental perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Sivakumar, Muniapillai; Dineshshankar, Janardhanam; Sunil, P. M.; Nirmal, R. Madhavan; Sathiyajeeva, J.; Saravanan, Balasubramanian; Senthileagappan, A. R.

    2015-01-01

    The recent advancements in the field of stem cell (SC) biology have increased the hope of achieving the definitive treatments for the diseases which are now considered incurable such as diabetes, Parkinson's disease and other chronic long standing conditions. To achieve this possibility, it is necessary to understand the basic concepts of SC biology to utilize in various advanced techniques of regenerative medicine including tissue engineering and gene therapy. This article highlights the types of SCs available and their therapeutic capacity in regenerative medical and dental fields. PMID:26538878

  6. Stem cells: An insight into the therapeutic aspects from medical and dental perspectives.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, Muniapillai; Dineshshankar, Janardhanam; Sunil, P M; Nirmal, R Madhavan; Sathiyajeeva, J; Saravanan, Balasubramanian; Senthileagappan, A R

    2015-08-01

    The recent advancements in the field of stem cell (SC) biology have increased the hope of achieving the definitive treatments for the diseases which are now considered incurable such as diabetes, Parkinson's disease and other chronic long standing conditions. To achieve this possibility, it is necessary to understand the basic concepts of SC biology to utilize in various advanced techniques of regenerative medicine including tissue engineering and gene therapy. This article highlights the types of SCs available and their therapeutic capacity in regenerative medical and dental fields. PMID:26538878

  7. [Medical aspects of the environmental sanitation of workplaces in compressed air work in Japan].

    PubMed

    Mano, Y; Shibayama, M

    1987-01-01

    Actual follow-up investigations were made for a period of 5 yr and 10 months since February 1980 on 55 places of caisson and shield work. The maximum bottom pressure in caisson work was 3.6 kg/cm2 (4.6 ATA) and that of shield work was 1.6 kg/cm2. The number of exposures of workers was 23,737 in caisson work and 75,244 in shield work. The items of geomedical measurements were temperature (degrees C), humidity, dust, illumination, noise, oxygen, carbonic acid gas and others. In compressed air work, it is most important to prevent decompression sickness (bends) from the view of occupational health. The incidence of bends has decreased in recent years because of strict control by regulations. Environmental hygiene, however, has seldom been discussed in this field and little geomedical control has been made on compressed air work. In view of this situation, we have, therefore, studied, observed, and measured the hygienic factors of this work during the past five years. This investigation is without doubt the first of its kind in Japan and the areas covered most of the regions where compressed air works have been made in the past. From these results, it can be concluded as follows: The working temperature was controlled, but humidity was too high (nearly 90%). Illumination was insufficient. Dust was a problem, but high humidity played an important role in decreasing the volume. The environment was noisy. It is therefore natural that environmental studies should be continued and hygienic consideration be further emphasized in compressed air work. PMID:3613254

  8. The limits of social justice as an aspect of medical professionalism.

    PubMed

    Huddle, Thomas S

    2013-08-01

    Contemporary accounts of medical ethics and professionalism emphasize the importance of social justice as an ideal for physicians. This ideal is often specified as a commitment to attaining the universal availability of some level of health care, if not of other elements of a "decent minimum" standard of living. I observe that physicians, in general, have not accepted the importance of social justice for professional ethics, and I further argue that social justice does not belong among professional norms. Social justice is a norm of civic rather than professional life; professional groups may demand that their members conform to the requirements of citizenship but ought not to require civic virtues such as social justice. Nor should any such requirements foreclose reasonable disagreement as to the content of civic norms, as requiring adherence to common specifications of social justice would do. Demands for any given form of social justice among physicians are unlikely to bear fruit as medical education is powerless to produce this virtue. PMID:23856476

  9. The use of stimulant medications for non-core aspects of ADHD and in other disorders.

    PubMed

    Sinita, Eugenia; Coghill, David

    2014-12-01

    Psychostimulants play a central role in the management of ADHD. Here we review the evidence pertaining to the use of methylphenidate, dexamphetamine and related amphetamine salts, the prodrug lisdexamfetamine and modafinil for the management of comorbid ADHD and non-ADHD indications. There is a growing consensus that stimulant medications are helpful at improving the emotional dysregulation and lability, and oppositional and conduct symptoms that are often associated with ADHD. There is some evidence that psychostimulants may improve outcomes in those with treatment resistant depression, reduce negative symptoms and improve cognitive performance in schizophrenia, and that methylphenidate may reduce binge eating in those with bulimia nervosa. In general medicine, whilst the evidence is at times contradictory, psychostimulants have been shown in some studies to be effective treatments for chronic fatigue and narcolepsy, and to improve outcomes post stroke, post head injury, in dementia and various cancers. It seems likely that these effects often result from a combination of, reduction in fatigue, improvements in concentration and cognitive functioning and a lifting of mood which may be a direct or indirect consequence of the medication. Further studies seem warranted and these should focus on efficacy, effectiveness and long term safety. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'CNS Stimulants'. PMID:24951855

  10. Longitudinal PBL in Undergraduate Medical Education Develops Lifelong-Learning Habits and Clinical Competencies in Social Aspects.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Yumiko; Matsushita, Susumu; Takakuwa, Yuichi; Yoshioka, Toshimasa; Nitta, Kosaku

    2016-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is popular in medical education in Japan. We wished to understand the influence of PBL on the clinical competence of medical residents, using self-assessment and observer assessment. Tokyo Women's Medical University (TWMU) implemented PBL longitudinally (long-time) for four years, and on this basis we analyzed whether long-time PBL education is useful for clinical work. A self-assessment questionnaire was sent to junior and senior residents who were alumni of several schools, and an observation-based assessment questionnaire to senior doctors instructing them. Respondents were asked if they had used the PBL process in daily clinical tasks, and if so in what processes. Senior doctors were asked whether TWMU graduates perform differently from graduates of other schools. TWMU graduates answered "used a lot" and "used a little" with regard to PBL at significantly higher rates than other graduates. As useful points of PBL, they mentioned extracting clinical problems, solving clinical problems, self-directed leaning, positive attitude, collaboration with others, presentation, doctor-patient relations, self-assessment, and share the knowledge with doctors at lower levels and students. Observer assessments of TWMU graduates by senior doctors represented them as adaptive, good at presenting, good at listening to others' opinions, practical, selfish, and eager in their instructional practice. Longitudinal PBL can be a good educational method to develop lifelong-learning habits and clinical competencies especially in terms of the social aspect. PMID:26725844

  11. [Medical aspects of diving in otorhinolaryngology. I. Barotrauma and decompression sickness].

    PubMed

    Dieler, R; Shehata-Dieler, W E

    2000-12-01

    Recreational scuba diving has become immensely popular in recent years and is no longer restricted to individualists or adventurers. During a dive, the human body with its gas-filled cavities is exposed to an increased ambient pressure. In the present review article, aspects of diving and hyperbaric medicine related to the otolaryngology field are presented. The basics of physics, physiology and pathophysiology that are essential to understand the effects of an increased and varying ambient pressure are reviewed. Barotrauma of the outer, middle and inner ear, the paranasal sinuses, face, teeth and larynx are explained and classified in those during the compression and decompression phase. This is followed by a discussion of inner ear decompression sickness. The present article will provide a background and foundation for both, an adequate treatment of these diseases and a critical and responsible health education of the diver. PMID:11199465

  12. [Actual sanitary, epidemiological and hygienic aspects of a dietitian's activities in stationary medical institutions].

    PubMed

    Sukhanov, B P; Kerimoval, M G; Elizarova, E V; Petrenko, A S

    2015-01-01

    The article shows the relevance of the main areas of dietitians' training to sanitary and epidemiological and hygienic issues of organization of clinical nutrition in stationary medical institutions (MIs) at training and refresher courses on dietetics. The attention is focused on the new legislative, policy and regulatory instruments, sanitary and epidemiological and hygienic requirements, providing high quality, safety and efficacy of nutritional therapy in MIs. The role of dietitian in the organization of clinical nutrition is highlighted. There were set out rights and responsibilities of a dietitian as a representative of MI under inspections by Rospotrebnadzor bodies; the demands, put forward by these bodies to the tested object, and actions, taken by them. PMID:26863804

  13. [Medical and legal aspects of genital mutilation and circumcision part I: female genital mutilation (FGM)].

    PubMed

    Dettmeyer, Reinhard; Laux, Johannes; Friedl, Hannah; Zedler, Barbara; Bratzke, Hansjürgen; Parzeller, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Female genital mutilation (FGM) is considered to be against the law and against morality not only in Western countries, although a woman of age and able to consent may sometimes think differently. The procedure may have serious physical and emotional consequences for the girl or woman. Nevertheless there are attempts to justify the procedure with medical and hygienic pseudoarguments, ideology, freedom of religion, cultural identity and social adequacy. Outside the Western world, some people claim that religion and culture alone justify the practice. In Germany, parents can lose the right to determine the residence of their daughter, if she is faced with the risk of genital mutilation in order to prevent that the child or girl is taken to her home country. Genital mutilation as a gender-specific threat is recognized as a reason to grant asylum or prevent deportation. Proposals to make genital mutilation a separate punishable offence are presently discussed by the legislator. PMID:21404547

  14. [Medical and sociocultural aspects of alcoholism in Chile, Colombia and Mexico (1)].

    PubMed

    Rojas Mackenzie, R; Riquelme, H

    1985-12-01

    The consumption of alcohol by the population becomes a theme of medical-social relevance in so far as the excessive or problematic habit of drinking alcohol leads to the syndrome of alcoholism and may affect substantially the mental health of the population. This paper tries to introduce the theoretical and practical study of the psychocultural development of the alcohol drinking behaviour, based on some exemplary cases of Chile, Columbia and Mexico, in Latin America. Essential themes are: Which kind of relations does exist between the socio-economic conditions and the alcohol consumption behaviour in each particular case? Which are the social and/or age groups with greater propensity towards problematic drinking habits? Which of the autochthnous cultural elements are available for preventive activities inside the community? PMID:3835816

  15. [Aspects of the mind-body relationship in the perspective of medical history].

    PubMed

    Andersen, Lars Ole

    2009-01-01

    In the article three kinds of history writing about the mind-body relationship are presented: History as a puzzle, history as a connection of important pieces into meaningful narrative traditions and history as an investigation into the changing importance and meaning of concepts and discussions in medical history. In particular, ideas behind "Begriffsgeschichte" are presented in detail. The history of imagination is given as an example of the usefulness of tracing concepts and discussions back in time and looking for modern representations. Discussions on the power of imagination initiated the first clinical trials in the 18th century. Emphasis on the power of the mind, self-efficacy and self-care has today substituted earlier discussions on the power of imagination. PMID:20509455

  16. Medical and psychological aspects of infertility and assisted reproductive technology for the primary care provider.

    PubMed

    Van Horn, A S; Reed, S A

    2001-11-01

    Couples attempting to conceive are requiring more assisted reproductive technology. Infertility may be associated with delayed onset of marriage and childbearing, smoking and alcohol excess, physiological factors such as endometriosis and varicocele, or a cause that is not identified. The psychological needs of couples, however, are often overlooked. Primary care providers can serve as the initial information source and guide for the couple struggling with infertility. In a managed care environment, a primary care provider can provide a considerable amount of education, referral for stress management and counseling, and a small portion of the medical evaluation before referring to a reproductive specialist. This overview is intended to help primary care providers and couples achieve an educated and less stressful assisted reproductive technology experience. It is not meant to circumvent the need for immediate referral to a reproductive specialist for evaluation and treatment of this very complex intervention. PMID:11725314

  17. [Human health in the space rocket-making areas: medical and environmental aspects].

    PubMed

    Sidorov, P I; Skrebtsova, N V; Sovershaeva, S L

    2006-01-01

    The paper deals with the problems of medical and ecological escorts of space rocket-making activities. The properties of one of the highly toxic components of propellant - asymmetric dimethylhydrazine as a substance assigned to a class of ecological toxicants, are considered. The data obtained on implementing the program for a study of the health status in the population living not far from the asymmetric dimethylhydrazine-polluted areas are presented. The authors propose to consider a package of measures that can apply the systems approach to securing the safety of the population to live and work in areas under space-rocket making activities, which is based on the prevention principle provided by the Rio de Janeiro Environment and Development Declaration. PMID:16808395

  18. [Medical, psychological, social and gender aspects of aging in modern Russia].

    PubMed

    Miakotnykh, V S; Sidenkova, A P; Borovkova, T A; Berezina, D A

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the authors considered controversial issues ambiguous attitude to the aging process of the population of the Russian Federation on the basis of a number of individual differences--psychological, social, sexual, and medical. The thesis is that, unfortunately, the fight against aging appears rather to be more a struggle with an already existing old age, and you need to develop preventive measures against aging much earlier than is currently done. Submissions own research confirm this position. The system of training, adjustment to a new level of life, to the new conditions associated with aging process, in the form of a special kind of multidisciplinary centers that carry out the tasks of improving health and young is proposed. PMID:25306663

  19. The Case of Pharmacological Neuroenhancement: Medical, Judicial and Ethical Aspects from a German Perspective.

    PubMed

    Franke, A G; Northoff, R; Hildt, E

    2015-11-01

    Pharmacological neuroenhancement (PN) describes the use of psychoactive drugs for the purpose of enhancing cognition (e. g., fatigue, concentration, memory etc.) by healthy subjects without medical need. Drugs used for this purpose can be divided into freely available, over-the-counter drugs (e. g., methylxanthines such as caffeine), prescription drugs (e. g., antidementia drugs, methylphenidate) and illicit drugs (e. g., illicit amphetamines). Clinical studies have shown that the aforementioned substances only have limited pro-cognitive effects and have considerable safety risks and side effects.The German judicial perspective shows legal differences between substances (drugs, food, food supplements, fortified food) that can be bought in a supermarket, drugs that can be bought in a pharmacy as over-the-counter- (OTC-) drugs, drugs with or without the need for a prescription and illicit drugs. Supermarket drugs and fortified food can be sold freely and follow the general rules of civil and penal law; regarding acquisition, parents are responsible for their children. OTC drugs require special information about therapy. Regarding prescription drugs, there are legal problems caused by an off-label use and the non-medical purposes of PN drugs. Furthermore, prescription stimulants for PN are governed by the specialized law for narcotics, and their use might be punished. Beyond the general lack of rules for regulation for PN drug use there are specific needs for prevention (e. g., control of the black market, etc.).Possible future policy will depend, among others, on the probability with which effective PN drugs with an acceptable risk-benefit ratio will be available, on individual and societal implications, and on public opinion towards PN. While 4 different general policy scenarios can be identified, it is important to advance a broad societal debate on PN to collect relevant empirical data and to address enhancement-related conceptual issues. PMID:26252723

  20. Health hazards from fine asbestos dusts. An analysis of 70,656 occupational preventive medical investigations from 1973 to the end of 1986.

    PubMed

    Raithel, H J; Weltle, D; Bohlig, H; Valentin, H

    1989-01-01

    For the period from 1973 to the end of 1986, 70,656 data sets on occupational preventive medical examinations in employees exposed occupationally to asbestos dust (G 1.2) were made available to us by the Central Registry for Employees Exposed to Asbestos Dust (ZAS). On the basis of this data, an analysis of asbestosis risk was to be made in relation to specific areas of work, taking into consideration the beginning and duration of exposure. Proceedings for declaratory appraisal in accordance with occupational disease no. 4103 were instituted in 1760 cases in the report period. In accordance with the character of the available data, the X-ray findings in the lungs were available from the persons investigated as parameters of possible asbestosis risk on the basis of coding consistent with the International Pneumoconiosis Classification (ILO U/C 1971 and/or ILO 1980 West Germany). The major result of the statistical analyses on the mainframe macrocomputer of the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg was that the relatively highest risk of asbestosis was present in persons whose exposure began before 1955. On the other hand, with increasing duration of exposure, an unequivocal rise of the asbestosis risk could not be detected on the basis of the overall population. In relation to the individual fields of work, the relatively highest risk of asbestosis was shown to be in the asbestos textile and paper industry, as well as in the asbestos cement industry. No detectable risk of asbestosis was present in the fields of mining, traffic and health service and for women in the industrial sectors of building material, gas and water, catering trade, building, commerce as well as banking and insurance. Accordingly, it can be assumed that certain fields of work are or were exposed to such a small extent or not at all that a risk of asbestosis which is relevant in terms of occupational medicine is no longer to be assumed or was not to be assumed. This applies above all to certain work

  1. Lag Times in Reporting Injuries, Receiving Medical Care, and Missing Work: Associations With the Length of Work Disability in Occupational Back Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Besen, Elyssa; Harrell, Mason; Pransky, Glenn

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to examine the associations between lag times following occupational low back injury and the length of work disability. Methods: In a retrospective cohort study using workers’ compensation claims, random effects Tobit models were used to explore how disability length relates to three lag times: the number of days from the date of injury to reporting the injury, the number of days from the date of injury to medical care, and the number of days from the date of injury to initiating work disability. Results: In general, shorter lag times for each of the different lags were related to shorter lengths of disability. Conclusions: Decreasing the length of the lag times in reporting injuries, receiving medical care, and missing work may help to decrease the length of work disability for workers after low back injury. PMID:26445030

  2. Physiological and Medical Aspects That Put Women Soldiers at Increased Risk for Overuse Injuries.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Yoram; Fleischmann, Chen; Yanovich, Ran; Heled, Yuval

    2015-11-01

    Anthropometric and physiological factors place female soldiers at a disadvantage relative to male soldiers in most aspects of physical performance. Average aerobic and anaerobic fitness levels are lower in women than in men. Thus, women have a lower overall work capacity and must exert themselves more than men to achieve the same output. The lower weight and fat-free mass and the higher body fat of women are associated with lower muscle strength and endurance, placing them at a disadvantage compared with men in performing military tasks such as lifting and carrying weights, or marching with a load. Working at a higher percentage of their maximal capacity to achieve the same performance levels as men, women tire earlier. Their smaller size, skeletal anatomy, and different bone geometry also predispose women to a higher incidence of exercise-related injuries. Consequently, the attrition rate of female soldiers in combat units is higher than that of their male counterparts. This review summarizes the literature on gender-related physiological and anatomical differences that put female soldiers at an increased risk of exercise-related injuries. PMID:26506172

  3. Occupational Survival Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leach, James A.; Nelson, Robert E.

    1978-01-01

    The author describes a set of twelve curriculum modules called "Occupational Survival Skills" relating to the "human" aspects of work organizations. The modules were based on information from opinion surveys of workers, students, parents, and teachers on what occupational survival skills are and how to teach them. (MF)

  4. Medical History, Lifestyle, Family History, and Occupational Risk Factors for Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma/Waldenström’s Macroglobulinemia: The InterLymph Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Subtypes Project

    PubMed Central

    Landgren, Ola; McMaster, Mary L.; Slager, Susan L.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Smith, Alex; Staines, Anthony; Dogan, Ahmet; Ansell, Stephen M.; Sampson, Joshua N.; Morton, Lindsay M.; Linet, Martha S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma/Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia (LPL/WM), a rare non-Hodgkin lymphoma subtype, shows strong familial aggregation and a positive association with chronic immune stimulation, but evidence regarding other risk factors is very limited. Methods The International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium (InterLymph) pooled data from 11 predominantly population-based case–control studies from North America, Europe, and Australia to examine medical history, lifestyle, family history, and occupational risk factors for LPL/WM. Age-, sex-, race/ethnicity-, and study-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using logistic regression for a total of 374 LPL/WM cases and 23 096 controls. Results In multivariate analysis including all putative risk factors, LPL/WM risk was associated with history of Sjögren’s syndrome (OR = 14.0, 95% CI = 3.60 to 54.6), systemic lupus erythematosus (OR = 8.23, 95% CI = 2.69 to 25.2), hay fever (OR = 0.73, 95% CI = 0.54 to 0.99), positive hepatitis C serology (OR = 2.51, 95% CI = 1.03 to 6.17), hematologic malignancy in a first-degree relative (OR = 1.64, 95% CI = 1.02 to 2.64), adult weight (OR = 0.61, 95% CI = 0.44 to 0.85 for highest vs. lowest quartile), duration of cigarette smoking (OR = 1.46, 95% CI = 1.04 to 2.05 for ≥ 40 years vs. nonsmokers), and occupation as a medical doctor (OR = 5.54, 95% CI = 2.19 to 14.0). There was no association with other medical conditions, lifestyle factors, or occupations. Conclusions This pooled analysis confirmed associations with immune conditions and family history of hematologic malignancy, and identified new associations with hay fever, weight, smoking, and occupation, and no association with other lifestyle factors. These findings offer clues to LPL/WM biology and prevention. PMID:25174029

  5. Knowledge and attitudes of non-occupational HIV post-exposure prophylaxis amongst first- and second-year medical students at Stellenbosch University in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Meintjes, Willem A.J.; Chola, Lumbwe

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is a worldwide problem, with 68% of infected people residing in sub-Saharan Africa. Antiretroviral therapy is used as post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) to prevent infection in cases of occupational exposure, and use has recently been expanded to non-occupational exposure. Studies have demonstrated a lack of awareness of non-occupational PEP (NO-PEP) in the general population. Aim The aim of this study was to evaluate knowledge and attitudes towards availability of, access to and use of NO-PEP amongst first- and second-year medical students. Setting Participants were medical undergraduates of Stellenbosch University in the Western Cape of South Africa who were registered in 2013. Methods A descriptive cross-sectional study of 169 students was performed. Data were collected using self-administered questionnaires handed out in a classroom in August 2013. Self-reported knowledge and attitudes towards NO-PEP and barriers to access to and use of NO-PEP were analysed using frequency tables. Associations between self-reported and objective knowledge of NO-PEP were analysed by odds ratios. Results Over 90% of students had good knowledge on HIV transmission, and about 75% knew how it can be prevented. Twenty eight per cent (n = 47) of students reported knowledge of NO-PEP; 67% reported hearing about it from lecturers, whilst 1% reported hearing about it from their partner. Students who knew the correct procedure to take when a dose is forgotten were 2.4 times more likely to report knowledge of NO-PEP than those who did not know what to do when a dose is forgotten (p = 0.029). No other associations were statistically significant. Conclusion Students had positive attitudes towards the use of NO-PEP and also identified barriers to its use. Despite good knowledge of HIV prevention and transmission, knowledge on NO-PEP was poor. PMID:26245421

  6. Medical physics aspects of the synchrotron radiation therapies: Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) and synchrotron stereotactic radiotherapy (SSRT).

    PubMed

    Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Adam, Jean-Francois; Alagoz, Enver; Bartzsch, Stefan; Crosbie, Jeff; DeWagter, Carlos; Dipuglia, Andrew; Donzelli, Mattia; Doran, Simon; Fournier, Pauline; Kalef-Ezra, John; Kock, Angela; Lerch, Michael; McErlean, Ciara; Oelfke, Uwe; Olko, Pawel; Petasecca, Marco; Povoli, Marco; Rosenfeld, Anatoly; Siegbahn, Erik A; Sporea, Dan; Stugu, Bjarne

    2015-09-01

    Stereotactic Synchrotron Radiotherapy (SSRT) and Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) are both novel approaches to treat brain tumor and potentially other tumors using synchrotron radiation. Although the techniques differ by their principles, SSRT and MRT share certain common aspects with the possibility of combining their advantages in the future. For MRT, the technique uses highly collimated, quasi-parallel arrays of X-ray microbeams between 50 and 600 keV. Important features of highly brilliant Synchrotron sources are a very small beam divergence and an extremely high dose rate. The minimal beam divergence allows the insertion of so called Multi Slit Collimators (MSC) to produce spatially fractionated beams of typically ∼25-75 micron-wide microplanar beams separated by wider (100-400 microns center-to-center(ctc)) spaces with a very sharp penumbra. Peak entrance doses of several hundreds of Gy are extremely well tolerated by normal tissues and at the same time provide a higher therapeutic index for various tumor models in rodents. The hypothesis of a selective radio-vulnerability of the tumor vasculature versus normal blood vessels by MRT was recently more solidified. SSRT (Synchrotron Stereotactic Radiotherapy) is based on a local drug uptake of high-Z elements in tumors followed by stereotactic irradiation with 80 keV photons to enhance the dose deposition only within the tumor. With SSRT already in its clinical trial stage at the ESRF, most medical physics problems are already solved and the implemented solutions are briefly described, while the medical physics aspects in MRT will be discussed in more detail in this paper. PMID:26043881

  7. The Indigenous and Exogenous Aspects of Moral Education: A Comparative Analysis of the U.S. Military Occupation in Japan and Germany after World War II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shibata, Masako

    During the U.S. military occupation of Japan after World War II, few sectors of Japanese society were left untouched. Reforms during the occupation included education, religion, moral values, and gender relations. By contrast, in Germany, except in the Soviet-controlled zone, no radical changes were introduced in the education system during the…

  8. Radiation Physics for Medical Physicists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgorsak, Ervin B.

    This book summarizes the radiation physics knowledge that professionals working in medical physics need to master for efficient and safe dealings with ionizing radiation. It contains eight chapters, each chapter covering a specific group of subjects related to radiation physics and is intended as a textbook for a course in radiation physics in medical-physics graduate programs. However, the book may also be of interest to the large number of professionals, not only medical physicists, who in their daily occupations deal with various aspects of medical physics and find a need to improve their understanding of radiation physics.

  9. Research trends in biomimetic medical materials for tissue engineering: 3D bioprinting, surface modification, nano/micro-technology and clinical aspects in tissue engineering of cartilage and bone.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cen; Bang, Sumi; Cho, Younghak; Lee, Sahnghoon; Lee, Inseop; Zhang, ShengMin; Noh, Insup

    2016-01-01

    This review discusses about biomimetic medical materials for tissue engineering of bone and cartilage, after previous scientific commentary of the invitation-based, Korea-China joint symposium on biomimetic medical materials, which was held in Seoul, Korea, from October 22 to 26, 2015. The contents of this review were evolved from the presentations of that symposium. Four topics of biomimetic medical materials were discussed from different research groups here: 1) 3D bioprinting medical materials, 2) nano/micro-technology, 3) surface modification of biomaterials for their interactions with cells and 4) clinical aspects of biomaterials for cartilage focusing on cells, scaffolds and cytokines. PMID:27148455

  10. Technical aspects of boron neutron capture therapy at the BNL Medical Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, N.E.; Rorer, D.C.; Patti, F.J.; Liu, H.B.; Reciniello, R.; Chanana, A.D.

    1997-07-01

    The Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor, BMRR, is a 3 MW heterogeneous, tank-type, light water cooled and moderated, graphite reflected reactor, which was designed for biomedical studies. Early BNL work in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) used a beam of thermal neutrons for experimental treatment of brain tumors. Research elsewhere and at BNL indicated that higher energy neutrons would be required to treat deep seated brain tumors. Epithermal neutrons would be thermalized as they penetrated the brain and peak thermal neutron flux densities would occur at the depth of brain tumors. One of the two BMRR thermal port shutters was modified in 1988 to include plates of aluminum and aluminum oxide to provide an epithermal port. Lithium carbonate in polyethylene was added in 1991 around the bismuth port to reduce the neutron flux density coming from outside the port. To enhance the epithermal neutron flux density, the two vertical thimbles A-3 (core edge) and E-3 (in core) were replaced with fuel elements. There are now four fuel elements of 190 grams each and 28 fuel elements of 140 grams each for a total of 4.68 kg of {sup 235}U in the core. The authors have proposed replacing the epithermal shutter with a fission converter plate shutter. It is estimated that the new shutter would increase the epithermal neutron flux density by a factor of seven and the epithermal/fast neutron ratio by a factor of two. The modifications made to the BMRR in the past few years permit BNCT for brain tumors without the need to reflect scalp and bone flaps. Radiation workers are monitored via a TLD badge and a self-reading dosimeter during each experiment. An early concern was raised about whether workers would be subject to a significant dose rate from working with patients who have been irradiated. The gamma ray doses for the representative key personnel involved in the care of the first 12 patients receiving BNCT are listed. These workers did not receive unusually high exposures.

  11. The Adult Patient with Eisenmenger Syndrome: A Medical Update After Dana Point Part I: Epidemiology, Clinical Aspects and Diagnostic Options

    PubMed Central

    Kaemmerer, Harald; Mebus, Siegrun; Schulze-Neick, Ingram; Eicken, Andreas; Trindade, Pedro T; Hager, Alfred; Oechslin, Erwin; Niwa, Koichiro; Lang, Irene; Hess, John

    2010-01-01

    Eisenmenger syndrome is the most severe form of pulmonary arterial hypertension and arises on the basis of congenital heart disease with a systemic-to-pulmonary shunt. Due to the chronic slow progressive hypoxemia with central cyanosis, adult patients with the Eisenmenger syndrome suffer from a complex and multisystemic disorder including coagulation disorders (bleeding complications and paradoxical embolisms), renal dysfunction, hypertrophic osteoarthropathy, heart failure, reduced quality of life and premature death. For a long time, therapy has been limited to symptomatic options or lung or combined heart-lung transplantation. As new selective pulmonary vasodilators have become available and proven to be beneficial in various forms of pulmonary arterial hypertension, this targeted medical treatment has been expected to show promising effects with a delay of deterioration also in Eisenmenger patients. Unfortunately, data in Eisenmenger patients suffer from small patient numbers and a lack of randomized controlled studies. To optimize the quality of life and the outcome, referral of Eisenmenger patients to spezialized centers is required. In such centers, specific interdisciplinary management strategies of physicians specialized on congenital heart diseases and PAH should be warranted. This medical update emphasizes the current diagnostic and therapeutic options for Eisenmenger patients with particularly focussing on epidemiology, clinical aspects and specific diagnostic options. PMID:22043211

  12. GPs’ thoughts on prescribing medication and evidence-based knowledge: The benefit aspect is a strong motivator

    PubMed Central

    Skoglund, Ingmarie; Segesten, Kerstin; Björkelund, Cecilia

    2007-01-01

    Objective To describe GPs’ thoughts of prescribing medication and evidence-based knowledge (EBM) concerning drug therapy. Design Tape-recorded focus-group interviews transcribed verbatim and analysed using qualitative methods. Setting GPs from the south-eastern part of Västra Götaland, Sweden. Subjects A total of 16 GPs out of 178 from the south-eastern part of the region strategically chosen to represent urban and rural, male and female, long and short GP experience. Methods Transcripts were analysed using a descriptive qualitative method. Results The categories were: benefits, time and space, and expert knowledge. The benefit was a merge of positive elements, all aspects of the GPs’ tasks. Time and space were limitations for GPs’ tasks. EBM as a constituent of expert knowledge should be more customer adjusted to be able to be used in practice. Benefit was the most important category, existing in every decision-making situation for the GP. The core category was prompt and pragmatic benefit, which was the utmost benefit. Conclusion GPs’ thoughts on evidence-based medicine and prescribing medication were highly related to reflecting on benefit and results. The interviews indicated that prompt and pragmatic benefit is important for comprehending their thoughts. PMID:17497487

  13. A Ferromagnetic Foreign Body at the Lateral Aspect of the Mandibular Ramus in a Medically Compromised Patient.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Nakayama, Y; Yamamoto, I; Matsusue, Y; Shimotsuji, H; Kirita, T

    2016-01-01

    A case of a ferromagnetic foreign body in a medically compromised patient was reported. The patient was a 45-year-old male who consulted our department complaining of a foreign body accidentally impacted in the right cheek. X-ray examination revealed a foreign body at the lateral aspect of the right mandibular ramus. The removal of the foreign body was scheduled, but the patient did not return for the procedure. After 8 years he revisited our department for the removal of the foreign body, because it had been found to be ferromagnetic and a barrier to MRI examination. X-ray examination confirmed the foreign body was located at the same site as 8 years prior. Although the patient was suffering from liver cirrhosis with thrombocytopenia and leukopenia, the foreign body was successfully removed under general anesthesia. The foreign body was 12 × 5 × 1 mm, weighed 0.48 g, and was ferromagnetic. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful. X-ray examination confirmed the removal of the foreign body. Since the surgery, the patient has been in generally stable condition with no complications. This case was a rare example of a foreign body that needed to be removed for medical examination. PMID:27583049

  14. A Ferromagnetic Foreign Body at the Lateral Aspect of the Mandibular Ramus in a Medically Compromised Patient

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, K; Nakayama, Y; Yamamoto, I; Matsusue, Y; Shimotsuji, H; Kirita, T

    2016-01-01

    A case of a ferromagnetic foreign body in a medically compromised patient was reported. The patient was a 45-year-old male who consulted our department complaining of a foreign body accidentally impacted in the right cheek. X-ray examination revealed a foreign body at the lateral aspect of the right mandibular ramus. The removal of the foreign body was scheduled, but the patient did not return for the procedure. After 8 years he revisited our department for the removal of the foreign body, because it had been found to be ferromagnetic and a barrier to MRI examination. X-ray examination confirmed the foreign body was located at the same site as 8 years prior. Although the patient was suffering from liver cirrhosis with thrombocytopenia and leukopenia, the foreign body was successfully removed under general anesthesia. The foreign body was 12 × 5 × 1 mm, weighed 0.48 g, and was ferromagnetic. The patient’s postoperative course was uneventful. X-ray examination confirmed the removal of the foreign body. Since the surgery, the patient has been in generally stable condition with no complications. This case was a rare example of a foreign body that needed to be removed for medical examination. PMID:27583049

  15. [Training needs and role of general practitioners for preventing measures and medical surveillance of ex-exposed to occupational carcinogens].

    PubMed

    Iavicoli, S; Della Porta, G; Natali, E; Persechino, B; Petyx, M; Rondinone, B; Pira, E

    2005-01-01

    The study was aimed at investigating in a sample of general medicine practitioners the level of epidemiologic and law knowledge as well as the degree of sensitivity to the topic of subjects formerly affected by occupational cancer. From the research, carried out on a sample of 745 practitioners from two northern Italy highly industrialized regions, come out the need for training and information on the problems associated with identification and management of subjects formerly exposed to professional cancer. PMID:16240577

  16. A Review of Supplementary Medical Aspects of Post-Cold War UN Peacekeeping Operations: Trends, Lessons Learned, Courses of Action, and Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Ralph J

    2015-01-01

    Post-Cold War United Nations Peace Keeping Operations (UN PKOs) have been increasingly involved in dangerous areas with ill-defined boundaries, harsh and remote geographies, simmering internecine armed conflict, and disregard on the part of some local parties for peacekeepers' security and role. In the interest of force protection and optimizing operations, a key component of UN PKOs is healthcare and medical treatment. The expectation is that UN PKO medical support will adjust to the general intent and structure of UN PKOs. To do so requires effective policies and planning informed by a review of all medical aspects of UN PKO operations, including those considered supplementary, that is, less crucial but contributing nonetheless. Medical aspects considered paramount and key to UN PKOs have received relatively thorough treatment elsewhere. The intent of this article is to report on ancillary and supplemental medical aspects practical to post-Cold War UN PKO operations assembled through an iterative inquiry of open-source articles. Recommendations are made about possible courses of action in terms of addressing trends found in such medical aspects of PKOs and relevance of US/NATO/European Union models and research. PMID:26606413

  17. Attitude of Iranian Medical Oncologists Toward Economic Aspects, and Policy-making in Relation to New Cancer Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Daroudi, Rajabali; Mirzania, Mehrzad; Zendehdel, Kazem

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although medical oncologists can have an important role in controlling the cost of cancer treatment, there is little information about their attitudes toward the cost of cancer treatment and the impact of cost on their treatment recommendations, especially in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). In this study, we assessed the attitude of Iranian medical oncologists toward some economic aspects of new cancer drugs. Methods: We translated a questionnaire that was used in similar studies in the United States and Canada into Persian and modified it according to the local setting in Iran. The face and content validity of the questionnaire were assessed by oncologists before being used in the survey. We distributed the questionnaire and collected the data from 80 oncologists who participated in the 13th Annual Congress of the Iranian Society of Medical Oncology and Hematology (ISMOH). Results: Fifty-two oncologists participated in our study (a response rate of 65%). The majority of oncologists stated that drug costs and patient out-of-pocket (OOP) costs influence their treatment recommendations (92% and 94%, respectively). Most oncologists (70%) felt that they are ready enough to use cost-effectiveness information in their treatment decisions, and 74% believed that patients should only have access to cancer treatments that are cost-effective. Most oncologists agree that the government should have control over drug prices, and more use of cost‐effectiveness data is required for decision-making about cancer drug coverage. Ninety-one percent of oncologists said that they always or frequently discuss cancer treatment costs with their patients. Oncologists believed that academic groups (research centers and scientific societies) (81%) and the Ministry of Health (MoH) (43%) are the most eligible groups for determining whether a drug provides good value. Conclusion: Iranian medical oncologists are ready to participate in the health technology assessment and

  18. French good practice guidelines for medical and occupational surveillance of the low back pain risk among workers exposed to manual handling of loads.

    PubMed

    Petit, Audrey; Fassier, Jean-Baptiste; Rousseau, Sandrine; Mairiaux, Philippe; Roquelaure, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Several clinical practice guidelines related to the assessment and management of low back pain (LBP) have been published with varied scopes and methods. This paper summarises the first French occupational guidelines for management of work-related LBP (October 2013). There main originality is to treat all the three stages of primary, secondary and tertiary prevention of work-related LBP. The guidelines were written by a multidisciplinary working group of 24 experts, according to the Clinical Practice Guidelines method proposed by French National Health Authority, and reviewed by a multidisciplinary peer review committee of 50 experts. Recommendations were based on a large systematic review of the literature carried out from 1990 to 2012 and rated as strong (Level A), moderate (B), limited (C) or based on expert consensus (D) according to their level of evidence. It is recommended to deliver reassuring and consistent information concerning LBP prognosis (Level B); to perform a clinical examination looking for medical signs of severity related to LBP (Level A), encourage continuation or resumption of physical activity (Level A), identify any changes in working conditions and evaluate the occupational impact of LBP (Level D). In case of persistent/recurrent LBP, assess prognostic factors likely to influence progression to chronic LBP, prolonged disability and delayed return to work (Level A). In case of prolonged/repeated sick leave, evaluate the pain, functional disability and their impact and main risk factors for prolonged work disability (Level A), promote return to work measures and inter professional coordination (Level D). These good practice guidelines are primarily intended for professionals of occupational health but also for treating physicians and paramedical personnel participating in the management of LBP, workers and employers. PMID:26213629

  19. Myasthenia Gravis: Medical Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Zeldowicz, Ludmila R.; Buckler, William St. John

    1965-01-01

    The diagnosis of myasthenia gravis is often difficult and calls for a broader use of pharmacological and electrodiagnostic tests. The decamethonium-edrophonium test, which has proved superior to other procedures for this purpose, is based on neurophysiological principles and depicts the behaviour of the neuromuscular junction. A state of resistance to depolarizing agents in the limited form of myasthenia and a state of a non-depolarizing (competitive) block in advanced cases has been shown. This test has demonstrated that the neuromuscular defect exists throughout the skeletal musculature, including muscles clinically unaffected. It produced no false-positive results either in normal or neurasthenic persons or in patients with neurological diseases with myasthenic symptoms. In a patient with botulism and in a patient with ocular palsies from brain-stem encephalitis the edrophonium test gave a false-positive result, while the decamethonium-edrophonium test was negative. Diagnosis, treatment and management of myasthenic emergencies are described. PMID:14323662

  20. Medical Aspects of Lightning

    MedlinePlus

    ... FORECAST Local Graphical Aviation Marine Rivers and Lakes Hurricanes Severe Weather Fire Weather Sun/Moon Long Range ... Safety Campaigns Air Quality Drought Floods Fog Heat Hurricanes Lightning Rip Currents Safe Boating Space Weather Tornadoes, ...

  1. Medical, psychological and socioeconomic aspects of aging in Poland: assumptions and objectives of the PolSenior project.

    PubMed

    Bledowski, Piotr; Mossakowska, Malgorzata; Chudek, Jerzy; Grodzicki, Tomasz; Milewicz, Andrzej; Szybalska, Aleksandra; Wieczorowska-Tobis, Katarzyna; Wiecek, Andrzej; Bartoszek, Adam; Dabrowski, Andrzej; Zdrojewski, Tomasz

    2011-12-01

    Both descriptive and longitudinal studies of aging are nowadays a subject of growing interest in different countries worldwide. However, in Poland and other Central-Eastern European countries, such comprehensive, nationally representative, multidimensional studies were never performed in the past in elderly population. The present paper describes the PolSenior project including its objectives, sample selection and structure, methods, fieldwork procedures and study flow. The aim of the project was to examine medical, psychological and socioeconomic aspects of aging in Poland. The research sample included 5695 respondents (2899 males and 2796 females) split into six equally sized age groups of elderly individuals (65-69 years, 70-74 years, 75-79 years, 80-84 years, 85-89 years, 90+years) and one group of subjects just about to enter old age (55-59 years). Subjects were recruited using three stage stratified, proportional draw. The response rate was 42% and ranged from 32% to 61% between provinces. The study consisted of three visits performed by trained nurses including questionnaire survey, comprehensive geriatric assessment and blood and urine sampling. The questionnaire consisted of medical and specific socioeconomic questions. The comprehensive geriatric assessment included blood pressure and anthropometric measurements, as well as selected scales and tests routinely used in the examination of elderly subjects. Blood and urine samples were collected from 4737 and 4526 individuals, respectively. More than 50 biochemical parameters were measured, and DNA was isolated and banked. In a selected group of 1018 subjects, a medical examination by a physician was performed. The self-rated health was lower in females than in males in age groups 70-84, but similar in individuals of both sexes aged 65-69 and 85 years. Besides providing data on health and functioning of elderly population, the PolSenior project aims to analyze interrelationships between different elements of

  2. Federal environmental and occupational toxicology regulations and reporting requirements: a practical approach to what the medical toxicologist needs to know, part 2.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Michael D; Dell'Aglio, Damon M; Nickle, Richard; Hornsby-Myers, Jennifer

    2014-12-01

    Toxicologists are often called upon to assist in environmental, industrial, occupational and public health assessments. Accordingly, medical toxicologists may find it prudent to be aware of applicable federal toxicological regulations and reporting requirements and of the roles of relevant federal agencies. These regulations are numerous, complex, and have evolved and expanded over time, making it difficult for toxicologists to sustain a current knowledge base. This article reviews the pertinent federal toxicological reporting requirements with regards to the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), the Atomic Energy Act (AEA), the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the Clean Air Act, the Clean Water Act, the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), the Emergency Planning and Community Right to Know Act (EPCRA), the Occupational Safety and Health Act, the Department of Transportation, and information about the National Response Center. We reference internet-based government resources and offer direct links to applicable websites in an attempt to offer rapid and current sources of practical information. The format of the article is a series of hypothetical scenarios followed by commentary. Discussions of the Safe Drinking Water Act and the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act are beyond the scope of this paper. For those desiring a more in depth discussion of the relevant federal environmental laws and statutes, and applicable case law, the reader is directed to resources such as the Environmental Law Handbook, the websites of individual laws found at www.epa.gov and the decisions of individual courts of appeal. It is our hope that this article provides not only useful practical information for the practicing toxicologist, but also serves as a key reference for Medical Toxicology core content on environmental

  3. Federal environmental and occupational toxicology regulations and reporting requirements: a practical approach to what the medical toxicologist needs to know, part 1.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Michael D; Dell'Aglio, Damon M; Nickle, Richard; Hornsby-Myers, Jennifer

    2014-09-01

    Toxicologists are often called upon to assist in environmental, industrial, occupational and public health assessments. Accordingly, medical toxicologists may find it prudent to be aware of applicable federal toxicological regulations and reporting requirements and of the roles of relevant federal agencies. These regulations are numerous, complex, and have evolved and expanded over time, making it difficult for toxicologists to sustain a current knowledge base. This article reviews the pertinent federal toxicological reporting requirements with regard to the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), the Atomic Energy Act (AEA), the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the Clean Air Act, the Clean Water Act, the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), the Emergency Planning and Community Right to Know Act (EPCRA), the Occupational Safety and Health Act, the Department of Transportation, and information about the National Response Center. We reference internet-based government resources and offer direct links to applicable websites in an attempt to offer rapid and current sources of practical information. The format of the article is a series of hypothetical scenarios followed by commentary. Discussions of the Safe Drinking Water Act, the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, and the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act are beyond the scope of this paper. For those desiring a more in-depth discussion of the relevant federal environmental laws and statutes and applicable case law, the reader is directed to resources such as the Environmental Law Handbook, the websites of individual laws found at www.epa.gov and the decisions of individual courts of appeal. It is our hope that this article provides not only useful practical information for the practicing toxicologist but also serves as a key reference for medical toxicology core content on environmental laws and

  4. Medical Aspects of Deafness. Proceedings of National Forum IV, Council of Organizations Serving the Deaf (Atlantic City, New Jersey, March 3-5, 1971).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks, Doin, Ed.

    Medical aspects of deafness discussed are physicians, prevention, diagnosis, and habilitation. In speeches on physicians, Louis Z. Cooper expresses need for services for deaf victims of the 1964 rubella epidemic; Jerald M. Jordan discusses the doctor-deaf patient relationship; and Hilde S. Schlesinger critically views prevention, diagnosis, and…

  5. Use of the Medical Research Council Framework to Develop a Complex Intervention in Pediatric Occupational Therapy: Assessing Feasibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missiuna, Cheryl; Pollock, Nancy; Campbell, Wenonah N.; Bennett, Sheila; Hecimovich, Catherine; Gaines, Robin; DeCola, Cindy; Cairney, John; Russell, Dianne; Molinaro, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    The United Kingdom Medical Research Council recommends use of a conceptual framework for designing and testing complex therapeutic interventions. "Partnering for Change" (P4C) is an innovative school-based intervention for children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) that was developed by an interdisciplinary team who were guided by…

  6. OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURES TO BODY FLUIDS AND BEHAVIORS REGARDING THEIR PREVENTION AND POST-EXPOSURE AMONG MEDICAL AND NURSING STUDENTS AT A BRAZILIAN PUBLIC UNIVERSITY

    PubMed Central

    de Souza-Borges, Fernanda Ribeiro Fagundes; Ribeiro, Larissa Araújo; de Oliveira, Luiz Carlos Marques

    2014-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted to assess the frequencies and characteristics of occupational exposures among medical and nursing students at a Brazilian public university, in addition to their prevention and post-exposure behavior. During the second semester of 2010, a self-administered semi-structured questionnaire was completed by 253/320 (79.1%) medical students of the clinical course and 149/200 (74.5%) nursing students who were already performing practical activities. Among medical students, 53 (20.9%) suffered 73 injuries, which mainly occurred while performing extra-curricular activities (32.9%), with cutting and piercing objects (56.2%), in the emergency room (39.7%), and as a result of lack of technical preparation or distraction (54.8%). Among nursing students, 27 (18.1%) suffered 37 injuries, which mainly occurred with hollow needles (67.6%) in the operating room or wards (72.2%), and as a result of lack of technical preparation or distraction (62.1%). Among medical and nursing students, respectively, 96.4% and 48% were dissatisfied with the instructions on previously received exposure prevention; 48% and 18% did not always use personal protective equipment; 67.6% and 16.8% recapped used needles; 49.3% and 35.1% did not bother to find out the source patient's serological results post-exposure; and 1.4% and 18.9% officially reported injuries. In conclusion, this study found high frequencies of exposures among the assessed students, inadequate practices in prevention and post-exposure, and, consequently, the need for training in “standard precautions” to prevent such exposures. PMID:24626419

  7. Occupational asthma

    MedlinePlus

    Asthma - occupational exposure; Irritant-induced reactive airways disease ... the workplace can trigger asthma symptoms, leading to occupational asthma. The most common triggers are wood dust, grain ...

  8. United Kingdom: Medical Laboratory Science, Occupational Therapy, Physiotherapy. A Study of These Programs and a Guide to the Academic Placement of Students from These Programs in Educational Institutions of the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Margolis, Alan M.; Monahan, Thomas J.

    Medical laboratory science, occupational therapy, and physiotherapy programs in the United Kingdom (U.K.) are described, and guidelines concerning the academic placement of students from these programs who wish to study in U.S. institutions are provided. For each of the programs, attention is directed to the relevant professional bodies, career…

  9. [Occupational morbidity of railway transport workers].

    PubMed

    Karetskaia, T D; Pfaf, V F; Chernov, O E

    2015-01-01

    The authors present results of medical social monitoring of occupationalhazards that are the most prevalent in railway occupations workers, statistic data on occupational morbidity of railway transport workers over last 10 years. The article covers major causes of unfavorable effects resulting from occupational hazards in various workers categories. Dynamics of occupational morbidity parameters and its structure concerning separate nosologic entities are analyzed. PMID:25826875

  10. [Occupational rhinitis].

    PubMed

    Endre, László

    2010-06-01

    Occupational rhinitis (OR) is an inflammatory disease of the nose, which is characterized by intermittent or persistent symptoms, arising out of causes and conditions attributable to a particular work environment and not to stimuli encountered outside the workplace. Its clinical symptoms (nasal congestion, sneezing, rhinorrhea, itching, nasal airflow limitation) are very similar with the symptoms of the allergic rhinitis caused by other (classical) agents. According to the 27/1996 NM Departmental Order, OR in Hungary is a notifiable disease. Despite, between year 1997 and 2009, not even a single case was reported in Hungary. In the last 20 years the only Hungarian reference in this field was published in 2004, in the Textbook of Occupational Medicine, edited by Ungváry. This disease is not unknown in other European countries. It can be produced by both high and low molecular weight agents. For example, according to the publications, its prevalence among bakers can be 18-29%, and among workers with diisocyanates (painters, urethane mould workers) 36-42%. Risk factors are atopy, high concentration and multiple irritant agents in the air of workplace. Atopy has been associated with an increased risk of specific sensitization to a variety of HMW agents. Beside of the clinical and occupational history, objective investigations have to be used as well, for the diagnosis of OR. The gold standard for confirming the diagnosis of OR is the nasal provocation test. Objective methods that can be used for assessing nasal patency during the investigation of OR include rhinomanometry, acoustic rhinometry, peak nasal inspiratory flow, and gravimetry of the nasal secret. The management of the OR needs environmental interventions. These are: increasing the ventilation, decreasing the time of exposure, substitution of the irritant agent, investigation of possible asthma in all workers with OR. Medical treatments are: oral antihistamines, local (nasal) corticosteroids, combined

  11. Frequency of hepatitis B immunity and occupational exposures to body fluids among Brazilian medical students at a public university.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Luiz Carlos Marques de; Pontes, João Paulo Jordão

    2010-01-01

    In the present study the frequencies of immunity against hepatitis B (HB) and of potentially contaminating accidents among medical students of a Brazilian public university were evaluated. Of all the 400 students who should have been immunized, 303 (75.7%), 66.3% of whom were women, answered an anonymous, self-administered questionnaire. Serum anti-HBs were determined in 205 of them and titers ≥ 10 UI/L were considered to be protective. A total of 86.8% of students had received three doses of HB vaccine. The frequency of immunity among women (96.4%) was higher (p = 0.04) than that among men (87.7%). Among those who did not have immunity, 12/13 (92.3%) had been vaccinated before entering medical school. Only 11% of the students with complete vaccination had previously verified serological response to the vaccine. A total of 23.6% reported having been somehow exposed to blood or secretions. Among final-year students, this frequency was 45.0%, being similar among men (47.8%) and women (43.2%). Of all these accidents, 57.7% were due to body fluids coming in contact with mucosa and 42.3% due to cut and puncture accidents. The results from this study show that: 1) the frequency of immunity against HB is high among the evaluated medical students, although verification of response to vaccination is not a concern for them; 2) anti-HBs titers should be verified after complete vaccination and on a regular basis, especially by men; and 3) the frequency of potentially contaminating accidents is high. PMID:21049228

  12. Periods of History of the Lviv Medical University and Criminal Repressions During the Nazi Occupation and Stalinist Era.

    PubMed

    Hanitkevych, Yaroslav

    2012-12-01

    This article covers the history of the Lviv Medical University from the period of Austria-Hungarian rule until the modern period of independent Ukraine. Its functioning has been conditioned by the different periods of foreign rule, whether Austrian, Hungarian, Polish, German or Soviet Union.This story covers well known scientists-professors as well as other Ukrainian teachers and students.We record the arrests and murders of physicians by Stalin's followers and Hitler's soldiers against the background of prevailing conditions in the city of Lviv. PMID:26255387

  13. Medical History, Lifestyle, Family History, and Occupational Risk Factors for Mycosis Fungoides and Sézary Syndrome: The InterLymph Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Subtypes Project

    PubMed Central

    Aschebrook-Kilfoy, Briseis; Cocco, Pierluigi; La Vecchia, Carlo; Chang, Ellen T.; Vajdic, Claire M.; Kadin, Marshall E.; Spinelli, John J.; Morton, Lindsay M.; Kane, Eleanor V.; Sampson, Joshua N.; Kasten, Carol; Feldman, Andrew L.; Wang, Sophia S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome (MF/SS) are rare cutaneous T-cell lymphomas. Their etiology is poorly understood. Methods A pooled analysis of 324 MF/SS cases and 17217 controls from 14 case–control studies from Europe, North America, and Australia, as part of the International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium (InterLymph) Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL) Subtypes Project, was carried out to investigate associations with lifestyle, medical history, family history, and occupational risk factors. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to calculate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results We found an increased risk of MF/SS associated with body mass index equal to or larger than 30kg/m2 (OR = 1.57, 95% CI = 1.03 to 2.40), cigarette smoking for 40 years or more (OR = 1.55, 95% CI = 1.04 to 2.31), eczema (OR = 2.38, 95% CI = 1.73 to 3.29), family history of multiple myeloma (OR = 8.49, 95% CI = 3.31 to 21.80), and occupation as crop and vegetable farmers (OR = 2.37, 95% CI = 1.14 to 4.92), painters (OR = 3.71, 95% CI = 1.94 to 7.07), woodworkers (OR = 2.20, 95% CI = 1.18 to 4.08), and general carpenters (OR = 4.07, 95% CI = 1.54 to 10.75). We also found a reduced risk of MF/SS associated with moderate leisure time physical activity (OR = 0.46, 95% CI = 0.22 to 0.97). Conclusions Our study provided the first detailed analysis of risk factors for MF/SS and further investigation is needed to confirm these findings in prospective data and in other populations. PMID:25174030

  14. Medical History, Lifestyle, Family History, and Occupational Risk Factors for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia/Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma: The InterLymph Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Subtypes Project

    PubMed Central

    Benavente, Yolanda; Blair, Aaron; Vermeulen, Roel; Cerhan, James R.; Costantini, Adele Seniori; Monnereau, Alain; Nieters, Alexandra; Clavel, Jacqueline; Call, Timothy G.; Maynadié, Marc; Lan, Qing; Clarke, Christina A.; Lightfoot, Tracy; Norman, Aaron D.; Sampson, Joshua N.; Casabonne, Delphine; Cocco, Pierluigi; de Sanjosé, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL) are two subtypes of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. A number of studies have evaluated associations between risk factors and CLL/SLL risk. However, these associations remain inconsistent or lacked confirmation. This may be due, in part, to the inadequate sample size of CLL/SLL cases. Methods We performed a pooled analysis of 2440 CLL/SLL cases and 15186 controls from 13 case-control studies from Europe, North America, and Australia. We evaluated associations of medical history, family history, lifestyle, and occupational risk factors with CLL/SLL risk. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results We confirmed prior inverse associations with any atopic condition and recreational sun exposure. We also confirmed prior elevated associations with usual adult height, hepatitis C virus seropositivity, living or working on a farm, and family history of any hematological malignancy. Novel associations were identified with hairdresser occupation (OR = 1.77, 95% CI = 1.05 to 2.98) and blood transfusion history (OR = 0.79, 95% CI = 0.66 to 0.94). We also found smoking to have modest protective effect (OR = 0.9, 95% CI = 0.81 to 0.99). All exposures showed evidence of independent effects. Conclusions We have identified or confirmed several independent risk factors for CLL/SLL supporting a role for genetics (through family history), immune function (through allergy and sun), infection (through hepatitis C virus), and height, and other pathways of immune response. Given that CLL/SLL has more than 30 susceptibility loci identified to date, studies evaluating the interaction among genetic and nongenetic factors are warranted. PMID:25174025

  15. Occupational health in Egypt.

    PubMed

    El-Ata, Gehad Ahmed Abo; Arnaout, Said N

    2002-01-01

    This review aims to evaluate current occupational health services (OHS) in Egypt. The authors begin with a background on the geography, population, and economy, and then briefly describe the labor force. They discuss the legislative aspects of OHS (including health insurance) and the environment; OHS training and education; and activities such as research, inspection, environmental monitoring, and management of occupational diseases. Occupational accidents and diseases, registered during 2000, are analyzed. Problems with OHS administration in Egypt are presented, along with relevant countermeasures. Various promotion and support measures for administrative policy are prioritized and discussed. PMID:12028958

  16. [Concept of occupational pathology service development in Kazakhstan].

    PubMed

    Amanbekova, A U; Sakiev, K Z; Dzhakupbekova, G M; Ibrayeva, L K

    2015-01-01

    Improvement of occupational medical care management is aimed to preserve workers' health through better prevention, early diagnosis and rehabilitation of occupational diseases. Strategic directions of occupational pathology service development are improvement of legislation base on occupational diseases, modernization of occupational pathology service, development of personnel resources system, advancement of research activity in medical ecology, industrial hygiene and occupational pathology and increased efficiency of intra-sectoral and inter-agency interactions about workers' health preservation. PMID:26470471

  17. Occupational asthma.

    PubMed

    Kenyon, Nicholas J; Morrissey, Brian M; Schivo, Michael; Albertson, Timothy E

    2012-08-01

    Occupational asthma is the most common occupational lung disease. Work-aggravated asthma and occupational asthma are two forms of asthma causally related to the workplace, while reactive airways dysfunction syndrome is a separate entity and a subtype of occupational asthma. The diagnosis of occupational asthma is most often made on clinical grounds. The gold standard test, specific inhalation challenge, is rarely used. Low molecular weight isocyanates are the most common compounds that cause occupational asthma. Workers with occupational asthma secondary to low molecular weight agents may not have elevated specific IgE levels. The mechanisms of occupational asthma associated with these compounds are partially described. Not all patients with occupational asthma will improve after removal from the workplace. PMID:21573916

  18. The purpose of occupational medicine.

    PubMed Central

    Raffle, P A

    1975-01-01

    The purposes of occupational medicine are described in terms of its clinical medical, environmental medical, research, and administrative content. Each of these components is essential in different proportions in comprehensive occupational health services for different industries, and can only be satisfactorily provided by occupational physicians and occupational health nurses who are an integral part of their organizations. Two-thirds of the working population in the United Kingdom are without the benefits of occupational medicine. The reorganization of the National Health Service and of local government presents the opportunity to extend occupational health services to many more workers who need them. It is suggested that area health authorities should provide occupational health services for all National Health Service staff and, on an agency basis, for local government and associated services, eventually extending to local industry. Such area health authority based services, merged with the Employment Medical Advisory Service, could conveniently then be part of the National Health Service, as recommended by the British Medical Association, the Society of Occupational Medicine, and the Medical Services Review Committee. PMID:1131336

  19. Medical History, Lifestyle, Family History, and Occupational Risk Factors for Adult Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia: The InterLymph Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Subtypes Project

    PubMed Central

    Slager, Susan L.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Lightfoot, Tracy; Sampson, Joshua N.; Morton, Lindsay M.; Weisenburger, Dennis D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma (ALL) in adults is a rare malignancy with a poor clinical outcome, and few reported etiologic risk factors. Methods We performed an exploratory pooled study of 152 ALL cases and 23096 controls from 16 case–control studies to investigate the role of medical history, lifestyle, family history, and occupational risk factors and risk of ALL. Age- race/ethnicity-, sex-, and study-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using logistic regression. Results An increased risk of ALL was found in those with a family history of a hematological malignancy (OR = 2.6, 95% CI = 1.22 to 5.54) and in leather (OR = 3.91, 95% CI = 1.35 to 11.35) and sewing/embroidery workers (OR = 2.92, 95% CI = 1.00 to 8.49). Consumers of alcohol had an increased risk of B-cell ALL (OR = 2.87, 95% CI = 1.18 to 6.95). Conclusions The small number of statistically significant risk factors identified out of the 112 variables examined could be chance findings and will require further replication to assess their role in the etiology of adult ALL. PMID:25174033

  20. Occupational safety and health aspects of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in Japanese companies listed on the Tokyo Stock Exchange (TSE) first section.

    PubMed

    Kawashita, Futoshi; Taniyama, Yukari; Hwi, Song You; Fujisaki, Takeshi; Kameda, Takashi; Mori, Koji

    2005-11-01

    Recently, corporate social responsibility (CSR) is becoming widely recognized as an issue for Japanese companies. Corporate responsibility for employees is considered important by various stakeholders, and occupational safety and health is regarded as one of these responsibilities. The present authors examined this issue from the viewpoint of corporate management by analysis of statements found in CSR-related reports. For companies listed on the First Section of the Tokyo Stock Exchange (TSE), we searched for CSR-related reports, and titles and contents, based on two established guidelines: the GRI Sustainability Reporting Guidelines 2002 as the international reference and the Environmental Reporting Guidelines of the Ministry of the Environment, Government of Japan, as the domestic reference. Corporations that published CSR reports were 26.3% (416/1,581) of the total, and large differences were recognized by type of industry. Comparing the numbers of pages for various contents, more concern was shown about the environment than about social activity, indicating the environment to be the main issue of CSR in Japan. In the items included in the guidelines, many matters about occupational accidents were mentioned, but it was found that statements regarding HIV/AIDS, which is not of such strong social concern in Japan, and statements regarding the costs of safety that are difficult to calculate were few. However, statements regarding mental health, which is of high interest socially, were many, even though this issue is not included in the two guidelines used. In revising the guidelines, these matters should be reviewed. In the future, continuance of analysis of CSR-related reports with regard to changes and comparisons with overseas reports will help improve occupational safety and health. PMID:16369117

  1. Occupational Employment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2012

    2012-01-01

    When choosing a career, jobseekers often want to know which occupations offer the best prospects. Generally, occupations that have rapid job growth, many new jobs, or many job openings--and good wages--promise better opportunities. This paper shows how employment in particular occupations is projected to change from 2010 to 2020. It presents…

  2. Occupational Employment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2010

    2010-01-01

    When choosing a career, jobseekers often want to know which occupations offer the best prospects. Generally, occupations that have rapid job growth, many new jobs, or many job openings--and good wages--promise better opportunities. This article shows how employment in particular occupations is projected to change over the 2008-2018 decade. The…

  3. Teaching Occupational Health to Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wegman, David H.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    A comprehensive training program is described that prepares students to identify and prevent occupational disease, emphasizing public health. Content areas include epidemiology and biostatistics, toxicology, industrial hygiene, safety and ergonomics, policy issues, administration, and clinical aspects. (Author/LBH)

  4. Occupational cancer in France: epidemiology, toxicology, prevention, and compensation.

    PubMed Central

    Aubrun, J C; Binet, S; Bozec, C; Brochard, P; Dimerman, S; Fontaine, B; Guénel, P; Luce, D; Martinet, Y; Moulin, J J; Mur, J M; Pietruszynski, M; Vallayer, C

    1999-01-01

    This article is a description of the current situation in France with regard to occupational cancer: research, prevention, and occupation. Toxicologic experiments are carried out using (italic)in vitro(/italic) and (italic)in vivo(/italic) tests, particularly using transgenic mice. Several epidemiologic studies have been conducted over the last decades: population-based case-control studies; mortality studies and cancer incidence studies carried out in historical cohorts of workers employed in the industry; and case-control studies nested in occupational cohorts. French ethical aspects of toxicologic and epidemiologic studies are described. The results thus obtained are used to establish regulations for the prevention and the compensation of cancers attributable to occupational exposure. This French regulation for prevention of occupational cancer involves several partners: (italic)a(/italic)) the states authorities, including labor inspectors, responsible for preparing and implementing the labor legislation and for supervising its application, particularly in the fields of occupational health and safety and working conditions; (italic)b(/italic)) the Social Security Organisation for the analysis of present or potential occupational risks based on tests, visits in plants, complaints or requests from various sources, and statistics. These activities are performed within the framework of the general French policy for the prevention of occupational cancer. This organization includes the National Institute for Research and Safety, particularly involved in research in the various fields of occupational risks--animal toxicology, biologic monitoring, exposure measurements epidemiology, psychology, ergonomy, electronic systems and machineries, exposure to chemicals, noise, heat, vibration, and lighting; and (italic)c(/italic)) companies where the regulation defines the role of the plant manager, the occupational physician, and the Health, Safety and Working Conditions

  5. Mechanisms of occupational asthma.

    PubMed

    Maestrelli, Piero; Boschetto, Piera; Fabbri, Leonardo M; Mapp, Cristina E

    2009-03-01

    Inhalation of agents in the workplace can induce asthma in a relatively small proportion of exposed workers. Like nonoccupational asthma, occupational asthma is probably the result of multiple genetic, environmental, and behavioral influences. It is important that occupational asthma be recognized clinically because it has serious medical and socioeconomic consequences. Environmental factors that can affect the initiation of occupational asthma include the intrinsic characteristics of causative agents as well as the influence of the level and route of exposure at the workplace. The identification of host factors, polymorphisms, and candidate genes associated with occupational asthma may improve our understanding of mechanisms involved in asthma. High-molecular-weight compounds from biological sources and low-molecular-weight chemicals cause occupational asthma after a latent period of exposure. Although the clinical, functional, and pathologic features of occupational asthma caused by low-molecular-weight agents resemble those of allergic asthma, the failure to detect specific IgE antibodies against most low-molecular-weight agents has resulted in a search for alternative or complementary physiopathologic mechanisms leading to airway sensitization. Recent advances have been made in the characterization of the immune response to low-molecular-weight agents. In contrast, the mechanism of the type of occupational asthma that occurs without latency after high-level exposure to irritants remains undetermined. PMID:19281901

  6. Marketing occupational therapy.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, K

    1987-05-01

    Marketing is emerging as an important aspect of the delivery of health care services, including occupational therapy. An understanding of marketing and a knowledge of how to apply its principles will permit therapists to keep pace with the changing health care environment. This article introduces terminology, strategies, and applications of marketing. PMID:3688145

  7. Medical-Information-Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterescu, Sidney; Friedman, Carl A.; Frankowski, James W.

    1989-01-01

    Medical Information Management System (MIMS) computer program interactive, general-purpose software system for storage and retrieval of information. Offers immediate assistance where manipulation of large data bases required. User quickly and efficiently extracts, displays, and analyzes data. Used in management of medical data and handling all aspects of data related to care of patients. Other applications include management of data on occupational safety in public and private sectors, handling judicial information, systemizing purchasing and procurement systems, and analyses of cost structures of organizations. Written in Microsoft FORTRAN 77.

  8. Legislative and ethical aspects of introducing new technologies in medical care for senior citizens in developed countries

    PubMed Central

    Kacetl, Jaroslav; Maresova, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The majority of developed countries are currently experiencing demographic aging. The most frequently expressed concerns related to the changing age structure are the increased costs of social and medical care, a lack of labor force in the job market, and financial sustainability of the pension system. These concerns are often based on the pessimistic view of population aging. This view understands aging as a prolonged period of illness and suffering. On the other hand, optimists believe that a longer life span is a result of increased quality of life and better health care. The quality of life may be improved not only by medicaments, but also by rapidly developing area of medical devices, which allow better care for seniors in many areas. Aim This contribution aims to assess the legislative environment and ethical questions related to the use of medical devices, especially medical devices, in medical care for senior citizens. Methods The methods used in this study are literature reviews of legislative and ethical environment in the European Union (EU) and the US. Results Main findings of this study result from assessing the state of medical device regulations in Europe and the US. Namely, the US regulation seems to be better arranged, which is probably due to the fact that there is only one responsible body – the US Food and Drug Administration, which is responsible for all medical device regulations. On the other hand, in the EU, talks about new legislation are led by ministers from all the EU member states and it may take a long time before all the EU countries come to an agreement. PMID:27499618

  9. An Internet-based exercise as a component of an overall training program addressing medical aspects of radiation emergency management.

    PubMed

    Levy, K; Aghababian, R V; Hirsch, E F; Screnci, D; Boshyan, A; Ricks, R C; Samiei, M

    2000-01-01

    The use of ionizing radiation and radioactive materials continues to increase worldwide in industry, medicine, agriculture, research, electrical power generation, and nuclear weaponry. The risk of terrorism using weapons of mass destruction or simple radiological devices also has increased, leading to heightened concerns. Radiation accidents occur as a consequence of errors in transportation of radionuclides, use of radiation in medical diagnosis and therapy, industrial monitoring and sterilization procedures, and rarely, nuclear power generation. Compared to other industries, a small number of serious radiation accidents have occurred over the last six decades with recent cases in the Republic of Georgia, Peru, Japan, and Thailand. The medical, psychological, and political consequences of such accidents can be considerable. A number of programs designed to train medical responders in the techniques of radiation accident management have been developed and delivered in many countries. The low frequency of serious radiation accidents requires constant re-training, as skills are lost and medical staff turnover occurs. Not all of the training involves drills or exercises in which responders demonstrate learning or communication over the broad spectrum of medical response capabilities. Medical preparedness within the context of a total emergency response program is lacking in many parts of the world, particularly in Central and Eastern Europe and the Newly Independent States. This paper describes an effort to enhance medical preparedness in the context of a total program of international cooperation and conventions facilitated by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The paper concludes that novel application of telecommunications technology as part of a training activity in radiation accident preparedness can help address gaps in training in this field in which preparedness is essential but experience and practical field exercises are lacking. PMID:11183457

  10. Aspects of Spirituality in Medical Doctors and Their Relation to Specific Views of Illness and Dealing with Their Patients' Individual Situation

    PubMed Central

    Büssing, Arndt; Hirdes, Almut Tabea; Baumann, Klaus; Hvidt, Niels Christian; Heusser, Peter

    2013-01-01

    We intended to analyse which aspects of spirituality are of relevance for medical doctors in a mostly secular society and how their spiritual/religious attitudes are related to specific views of illness, their dealing with patients' individual situation, and finally physicians' life satisfaction. Data from an anonymous survey enrolling 237 medical doctors from Germany (mean age 45.7 ± 9.6, 58% male, 42% female) indicated that secular forms of spirituality scored highest, while specific religious orientation had the lowest scores. Physicians with a specific specialization in complementary/alternative medicine (CAM) or anthroposophic medicine differed from their conventional counterparts with respect to specific aspects of spirituality; however, the specific views associated with these specialisations were only weakly to moderately correlated with physicians' view on the meaning of illness and how they assume that they would deal with their patients' individual situation. Of interest, the specific aspects of spirituality were negatively correlated with the view of “illness as a meaningless interruption” of life, indicating that physicians with a spiritual attitude would see illness also as a chance for an “individual development” and associated with a “biographical meaning” rather than just a “useless interruption” of life. PMID:23956779

  11. Medical History, Lifestyle, Family History, and Occupational Risk Factors for Mantle Cell Lymphoma: The InterLymph Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Subtypes Project

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, Joshua N.; Turner, Jennifer J.; Slager, Susan L.; Maynadié, Marc; Roman, Eve; Habermann, Thomas M.; Flowers, Christopher R.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Bracci, Paige M.; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Weisenburger, Dennis D.; Morton, Lindsay M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The etiology of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), a distinctive subtype accounting for 2%–10% of all non-Hodgkin lymphoma, is not known. Methods We investigated associations with self-reported medical history, lifestyle, family history, and occupational risk factors in a pooled analysis of 557 patients with MCL and 13766 controls from 13 case–control studies in Europe, North America, and Australia. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) associated with each exposure were examined using multivariate logistic regression models. Results The median age of the MCL patients was 62 years and 76% were men. Risk of MCL was inversely associated with history of hay fever (OR = 0.63, 95% CI = 0.48 to 0.82), and the association was independent of other atopic diseases and allergies. A hematological malignancy among first-degree relatives was associated with a twofold increased risk of MCL (OR = 1.99, 95% CI = 1.39 to 2.84), which was stronger in men (OR = 2.21, 95% CI = 1.44 to 3.38) than women (OR = 1.61, 95% CI = 0.82 to 3.19). A modestly increased risk of MCL was also observed in association with ever having lived on a farm (OR = 1.40, 95% CI = 1.03 to 1.90). Unlike some other non-Hodgkin lymphoma subtypes, MCL risk was not statistically significantly associated with autoimmune disorders, tobacco smoking, alcohol intake, body mass index, or ultraviolet radiation. Conclusions The novel observations of a possible role for atopy and allergy and farm life in risk of MCL, together with confirmatory evidence of a familial link, suggest a multifactorial etiology of immune-related environmental exposures and genetic susceptibility. These findings provide guidance for future research in MCL etiology. PMID:25174028

  12. Medical History, Lifestyle, Family History, and Occupational Risk Factors for Sporadic Burkitt Lymphoma/Leukemia: The Interlymph Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Subtypes Project

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Lindsay M.; Sampson, Joshua N.; Chang, Ellen T.; Costas, Laura; de Sanjosé, Silvia; Lightfoot, Tracy; Kelly, Jennifer; Friedberg, Jonathan W.; Cozen, Wendy; Marcos-Gragera, Rafael; Slager, Susan L.; Birmann, Brenda M.; Weisenburger, Dennis D.

    2014-01-01

    Background The etiologic role of medical history, lifestyle, family history, and occupational risk factors in sporadic Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is unknown, but epidemiologic and clinical evidence suggests that risk factors may vary by age. Methods We investigated risk factors for sporadic BL in 295 cases compared with 21818 controls in a pooled analysis of 18 case–control studies in the International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium (InterLymph). Cases were defined to include typical BL or Burkitt-like lymphoma. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for associations were calculated separately for younger (<50 years) and older (≥50 years) BL using multivariate logistic regression. Results Cases included 133 younger BL and 159 older BL (age was missing for three cases) and they were evenly split between typical BL (n = 147) and Burkitt-like lymphoma (n = 148). BL in younger participants was inversely associated with a history of allergy (OR = 0.58; 95% CI = 0.32 to 1.05), and positively associated with a history of eczema among individuals without other atopic conditions (OR = 2.54; 95% CI = 1.20 to 5.40), taller height (OR = 2.17; 95% CI = 1.08 to 4.36), and employment as a cleaner (OR = 3.49; 95% CI = 1.13 to 10.7). BL in older participants was associated with a history of hepatitis C virus seropositivity (OR = 4.19; 95% CI = 1.05 to 16.6) based on three exposed cases. Regardless of age, BL was inversely associated with alcohol consumption and positively associated with height. Conclusions Our data suggest that BL in younger and older adults may be etiologically distinct. PMID:25174031

  13. HIV medical providers’ perceptions of the use of antiretroviral therapy as non-occupational post- exposure prophylaxis (nPEP) in two major metropolitan areas

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Allan; Castel, Amanda D.; Parish, Carrigan L.; Willis, Sarah; Feaster, Daniel J.; Kharfen, Michael; Cardenas, Gabriel A.; Villamizar, Kira; Kolber, Michael; Vázquez-Rivera, Liliana; Metsch, Lisa R.

    2013-01-01

    Intro In 2005, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention expanded its recommendation of post exposure prophylaxis (PEP) use in the workplace to include non-occupational exposures (nPEP). The availability and extensive use of nPEP has not achieved widespread acceptance among health care providers of high-risk populations, and public health and primary care agencies have been sparse in their implementation of nPEP promotion, protocols, and practices. Methods We conducted a survey of HIV providers (n=142, response rate = 61%) in Miami-Dade County (Florida) and the District of Columbia (DC) that focused on their knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and practices related to the delivery of nPEP. We then analyzed differences in survey responses by site and by history of prescribing nPEP using bivariate and multivariate logistic regression. Results More DC providers (59.7%) reported ever prescribing nPEP than in Miami (39.5%%, p < 0.048). The majority of practices in both cities did not have a written nPEP protocol and rarely or never had patients request nPEP. Multivariable analysis for history of prescribing nPEP was dominated by having patients request nPEP (OR = 21.53) and the belief that nPEP would lead to antiretroviral resistance (OR = 0.14), as well as having an nPEP written protocol (OR = 7.49). Discussion Our findings are consistent with earlier studies showing the underuse of nPEP as a prevention strategy. The significance of having an nPEP written protocol and of patient requests for nPEP speaks to the importance of using targeted strategies to promote widespread awareness of the use of HIV antiretroviral medications as a prevention intervention. PMID:24126450

  14. Sick-listed employees with severe medically unexplained physical symptoms: burden or routine for the occupational health physician? A cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The two primary objectives of this study were to the assess consultation load of occupational health physicians (OHPs), and their difficulties and needs with regard to their sickness certification tasks in sick-listed employees with severe medical unexplained physical symptoms (MUPS). Third objective was to determine which disease-, patient-, doctor- and practice-related factors are associated with the difficulties and needs of the OHPs. Methods In this cross-sectional study, 43 participating OHPs from 5 group practices assessed 489 sick-listed employees with and without severe MUPS. The OHPs filled in a questionnaire about difficulties concerning sickness certification tasks, consultation time, their needs with regard to consultation with or referral to a psychiatrist or psychologist, and communication with GPs. The OHPs also completed a questionnaire about their personal characteristics. Results OHPs only experienced task difficulties in employees with severe MUPS in relation to their communication with the treating physician. This only occured in cases in which the OHP attributed the physical symptoms to somatoform causes. If they attributed the physical symptoms to mental causes, the OHPs reported a need to consultate a psychiatrist about the diagnosis and treatment. Conclusions OHPs experience few difficulties with their sickness certification tasks and consultation load concerning employees with severe MUPS. However, they encounter problems if the diagnostic uncertainties of the treating physician interfere with the return to work process. OHPs have a need for psychiatric expertise whenever they are uncertain about the psychiatric causes of a delayed return to work process. We recommend further training programs for OHPs. They should also have more opportunity for consultation and referral to a psychiatrist, and their communication with treating physicians should be improved. PMID:21059232

  15. Occupational Consciousness

    PubMed Central

    Ramugondo, Elelwani L.

    2015-01-01

    Occupational consciousness refers to ongoing awareness of the dynamics of hegemony and recognition that dominant practices are sustained through what people do every day, with implications for personal and collective health. The emergence of the construct in post-apartheid South Africa signifies the country’s ongoing struggle with negotiating long-standing dynamics of power that were laid down during colonialism, and maintained under black majority rule. Consciousness, a key component of the new terminology, is framed from post-colonial perspectives – notably work by Biko and Fanon – and grounded in the philosophy of liberation, in order to draw attention to continuing unequal intersubjective relations that play out through human occupation. The paper also draws important links between occupational consciousness and other related constructs, namely occupational possibilities, occupational choice, occupational apartheid, and collective occupation. The use of the term ‘consciousness’ in sociology, with related or different meanings, is also explored. Occupational consciousness is then advanced as a critical notion that frames everyday doing as a potentially liberating response to oppressive social structures. This paper advances theorizing as a scholarly practice in occupational science, and could potentially expand inter or transdisciplinary work for critical conceptualizations of human occupation. PMID:26549984

  16. Occupational asthma in Japan.

    PubMed

    Dobashi, Kunio

    2012-07-01

    Research into occupational asthma (OA) in Japan has been led by the Japanese Society of Occupational and Environmental Allergy. The first report about allergic OA identified konjac asthma. After that, many kinds of OA have been reported. Cases of some types of OA, such as konjac asthma and sea squirt asthma, have been dramatically reduced by the efforts of medical personnel. Recently, with the development of new technologies, chemical antigen-induced asthma has increased in Japan. Due to advances in anti-asthma medication, control by medical treatment tends to be emphasized and the search for causative antigens seems to be neglected. Furthermore, we do not have a Japanese guideline for diagnosis and management of OA. This article discusses the current state of OA in Japan. PMID:22872819

  17. [Occupational asthma in Hungary].

    PubMed

    Endre, László

    2015-05-10

    Occupational asthma belongs to communicable diseases, which should be reported in Hungary. During a 24-year period between January 1990 and December 2013, 180 occupational asthma cases were reported in Hungary (52 cases between 1990 and 1995, 83 cases between 1996 and 2000, 40 cases between 2001 and 2006, and 5 cases between 2007 and 2013). These data are unusual, because according to the official report of the National Korányi Pulmonology Institute in Budapest, at least 14,000 new adult asthma cases were reported in every year between 2000 and 2012 in Hungary. Also, international data indicate that at least 2% of adult patients with asthma have occupational asthma and at least 50 out of 1 million employees develop occupational asthma in each year. In 2003, 631 new occupational asthma patients were reported in the United Kingdom, but only 7 cases in Hungary. Because it is unlikely that the occupational environment in Hungary is much better than anywhere else in the world, it seems that not all new occupational asthma cases are reported in Hungary. Of the 180 reported cases in Hungary, 55 were bakers or other workers in flour mills. There were 11 metal-workers, 10 health care assistants, 9 workers dealing with textiles (tailors, dressmakers, workers in textile industry) and 9 employees worked upon leather and animal fur. According to international data, the most unsafe profession is the animal keeper in scientific laboratories, but only 4 of them were reported as having occupational asthma during the studied 24 years in Hungary. Interestingly, 3 museologists with newly-diagnosed occupational asthma were reported in 2003, but not such cases occurred before or after that year. In this paper the Hungarian literature of occupational asthma is summarized, followed by a review on the classification, pathomechanism, clinical presentation, predisposing factors, diagnostics and therapeutic aspects of the disease. Epidemiological data of adult asthma in Hungary and data from

  18. Oxygen/ozone as a medical gas mixture. A critical evaluation of the various methods clarifies positive and negative aspects

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Besides oxygen, several other gases such as NO, CO, H2, H2S, Xe and O3 have come to age over the past few years. With regards to O3, its mechanisms of action in medicine have been clarified during the last two decades so that now a comprehensive framework for understanding and recommending ozone therapy in various pathologies is available. O3 used within the determined therapeutic window is absolutely safe and more effective than golden standard medications in numerous pathologies, like vascular diseases. However, ozone therapy is mostly in practitioners' hands and some recent developments for increasing cost effectiveness and speed of treatment are neither standardized, nor evaluated toxicologically. Hence, the aim of this article is to emphasize the need to objectively assess the pros and cons of oxygen/ozone as a medical gas mixture in the hope that ozone therapy will be accepted by orthodox medicine in the near future. PMID:22146387

  19. [Modern aspects of combat maxillofacial trauma (review of foreign scientific-medical publications during 2012-2013)].

    PubMed

    Grebnev, G A; Bolekhan, V N; Golota, A S; Ivchenko, E V; Krassiĭ, A B; Nagibovich, O A; Parfenov, V D; Rezvantsev, M V

    2013-04-01

    The current article is dedicated to the modern aspects of combat maxillofacial trauma as they have been presented in 2012-2013 scientific publications. It has been shown that due to employment of more and more powerful explosive devices the facial trauma over the last decade has occurred more frequently and become more severe. Some new methods of facial injuries treatment are being tested now, among them KSL-W antimicrobial decapeptide, new bone regenerative biocompatible materials, scar-healing mesenchymal and adipose-derived stem cells, and a custom automated face dressing platform. PMID:24000612

  20. Medical History, Lifestyle, Family History, and Occupational Risk Factors for Follicular Lymphoma: The InterLymph Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Subtypes Project

    PubMed Central

    Vajdic, Claire M.; Morton, Lindsay M.; de Roos, Anneclaire J.; Skibola, Christine F.; Boffetta, Paolo; Cerhan, James R.; Flowers, Christopher R.; de Sanjosé, Silvia; Monnereau, Alain; Cocco, Pierluigi; Kelly, Jennifer L.; Smith, Alexandra G.; Weisenburger, Dennis D.; Clarke, Christina A.; Blair, Aaron; Bernstein, Leslie; Zheng, Tongzhang; Miligi, Lucia; Clavel, Jacqueline; Benavente, Yolanda; Chiu, Brian C. H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Follicular lymphoma (FL) has been linked with cigarette smoking and, inconsistently, with other risk factors. Methods We assessed associations of medical, hormonal, family history, lifestyle, and occupational factors with FL risk in 3530 cases and 22639 controls from 19 case–control studies in the InterLymph consortium. Age-, race/ethnicity-, sex- and study-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using logistic regression. Results Most risk factors that were evaluated showed no association, except for a few modest or sex-specific relationships. FL risk was increased in persons: with a first-degree relative with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (OR = 1.99; 95% CI = 1.55 to 2.54); with greater body mass index as a young adult (OR = 1.15; 95% CI = 1.04 to 1.27 per 5kg/m2 increase); who worked as spray painters (OR = 2.66; 95% CI = 1.36 to 5.24); and among women with Sjögren syndrome (OR = 3.37; 95% CI = 1.23 to 9.19). Lower FL risks were observed in persons: with asthma, hay fever, and food allergy (ORs = 0.79–0.85); blood transfusions (OR = 0.78; 95% CI = 0.68 to 0.89); high recreational sun exposure (OR = 0.74; 95% CI = 0.65 to 0.86, fourth vs first quartile); who worked as bakers or millers (OR = 0.51; 95% CI = 0.28 to 0.93) or university/higher education teachers (OR = 0.58; 95% CI = 0.41 to 0.83). Elevated risks specific to women included current and longer duration of cigarette use, whereas reduced risks included current alcohol use, hay fever, and food allergies. Other factors, including other autoimmune diseases, eczema, hepatitis C virus seropositivity, hormonal drugs, hair dye use, sun exposure, and farming, were not associated with FL risk. Conclusions The few relationships observed provide clues suggesting a multifactorial etiology of FL but are limited in the extent to which they explain FL occurrence. PMID:25174024

  1. Health Occupations Cluster. Secondary Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Bruce; And Others

    This curriculum guide was designed for use in secondary health occupations education programs in Georgia. It provides a model for organizing vocational instructional content in health occupations, such as nurse, dental assistant, medical lab technician, radiologic technician, emergency medical technician, respiratory therapy assistant, medical…

  2. Occupational health in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Bedrikow, B; Algranti, E; Buschinelli, J T; Morrone, L C

    1997-01-01

    Brazil is a recently industrialised country with marked contrasts in social and economic development. The availability of public/private services in its different regions also varies. Health indicators follow these trends. Occupational health is a vast new field, as in other developing countries. Occupational medicine is a required subject in graduation courses for physicians. Specialisation courses for university graduated professionals have more than 700 hours of lectures and train occupational health physicians, safety engineers and nursing staff. At the technical level, there are courses with up to 1300 hours for the training of safety inspectors. Until 1986 about 19,000 occupational health physicians, 18,000 safety engineers and 51,000 safety inspectors had been officially registered. Although in its infancy, postgraduation has attracted professionals at university level, through residence programmes as well as masters and doctors degrees, whereby at least a hundred good-quality research studies have been produced so far. Occupational health activities are controlled by law. Undertakings with higher risks and larger number of employees are required to hire specialised technical staff. In 1995 the Ministry of Labour demanded programmes of medical control of occupational health (PCMSO) for every worker as well as a programme of prevention of environmental hazards (PPRA). This was considered as a positive measure for the improvement of working conditions and health at work. Physicians specialising in occupational medicine are the professionals more often hired by the enterprises. Reference centres (CRSTs) for workers' health are connected to the State or City Health Secretariat primary health care units. They exist in more populated areas and are accepted by workers as the best way to accomplish the diagnosis of occupational diseases. There is important participation by the trade unions in the management of these reference centres. For 30 years now employers

  3. Instructional Analysis for Health Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    East Texas State Univ., Commerce. Occupational Curriculum Lab.

    This instructional analysis centers on identifying the skills, related knowledge, teacher activities, and student activities that are central to teaching various topics included in the core curriculum for health occupations courses. Addressed in the volume are the following instructional areas: first aid; medical terminology; medical asepsis;…

  4. ["Is there a doctor on board?" - legal aspects of medical care in emergency situations during spare time].

    PubMed

    Lindner, Christina; Lindner, Gregor; Exadaktylos, Aristomenis K

    2013-12-11

    Medical emergencies on international flights are not uncommon. In these situations the question often arises whether physicians are obliged to render first aid and whether omission leads to legal consequences. The general obligation to aid those in need applies to everyone, not only to physicians. Evading this duty makes liable to prosecution for omittance of defence of a third person in line with Art. 128 of the Swiss Penal Code, punishable by custodial sentence up to three years or an equivalent punitive fine. Vocational and professional law extend the duty to aid for physicians to urgent cases. Although resulting from the performance of a legal obligation, malpractice occurred in the course of first aid can lead to claims for compensation - even from foreign patients, and that according to their own domestic law. PMID:24326050

  5. [Occupational epidemiology in Italy].

    PubMed

    Assennato, G; Bisceglia, L

    2003-01-01

    The development of Occupational Epidemiology in Italy is closely correlated with the political and social awareness of the needs of preventive strategies in the workplace. In the late '60s the Trade Unions supported a model of intervention based on the involvement of the so-called "Homogeneous group of workers" in the validation of the preventive measures taken on the workplace. In spite of the shortcomings of the model, it was extremely effective resulting in enhanced perception of the priority of preventive strategies and in the formation within the National Health Service of the Occupational Health Services. In Italy over the period 1973-2002 there has been an impressive trend of research in field of occupational epidemiology (a search on Medline shows an increasing trend over the years and, in terms of international comparison, higher figures than in Germany, France and Spain). Occupational Epidemiology is now present in the activities of the local Occupational Health Services and in the teaching activities of the Medical Schools throughout the country. PMID:14582235

  6. Embracing the Sparse, Noisy, and Interrelated Aspects of Patient Demographics for use in Clinical Medical Record Linkage

    PubMed Central

    Ash, Stephen M.; Ip-Lin, King

    2015-01-01

    Duplicate patient records in health information systems have received increased attention in recent time due to regulatory incentives to integrate the healthcare enterprise. Historically, most patient record matching systems have been limited to simple applications of the Fellegi-Sunter theory of record linkage with edit distance based string similarity measurements. String similarity approaches ignore the rich semantic information present by reducing it to a simple syntactic comparison of characters. This work describes an updated approach to building clinical medical record linkage systems, which embraces the unavoidable problems present in real-world patient matching. Using a ground truth dataset of a real patient population, we demonstrate that systems built in this fashion improve recall by 76% with little reduction in precision. This result empirically demonstrates the size of the gap between sophisticated systems and naïve approaches. Additionally, it accentuates the difficulty in estimating the false negative error in this setting as previous research has reported much higher levels of recall, due, in part, to measuring from biased samples. PMID:26306279

  7. Embracing the Sparse, Noisy, and Interrelated Aspects of Patient Demographics for use in Clinical Medical Record Linkage.

    PubMed

    Ash, Stephen M; Ip-Lin, King

    2015-01-01

    Duplicate patient records in health information systems have received increased attention in recent time due to regulatory incentives to integrate the healthcare enterprise. Historically, most patient record matching systems have been limited to simple applications of the Fellegi-Sunter theory of record linkage with edit distance based string similarity measurements. String similarity approaches ignore the rich semantic information present by reducing it to a simple syntactic comparison of characters. This work describes an updated approach to building clinical medical record linkage systems, which embraces the unavoidable problems present in real-world patient matching. Using a ground truth dataset of a real patient population, we demonstrate that systems built in this fashion improve recall by 76% with little reduction in precision. This result empirically demonstrates the size of the gap between sophisticated systems and naïve approaches. Additionally, it accentuates the difficulty in estimating the false negative error in this setting as previous research has reported much higher levels of recall, due, in part, to measuring from biased samples. PMID:26306279

  8. Occupational Skin Diseases in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Gi

    2010-01-01

    Skin disease is the most common occupational disease, but the reported number is small in Korea due to a difficulty of detection and diagnosis in time. We described various official statistics and data from occupational skin disease surveillance system, epidemiological surveys and cases published in scientific journals. Until 1981, 2,222 cases of occupational skin disease were reported by Korean employee's regular medical check-up, accounting for 4.9% of the total occupational diseases. There was no subsequent official statistics to figure out occupational skin diseases till 1998. From 1999, the Korea Occupational Safety and Health Agency (KOSHA) published the number of occupational skin diseases through the statistics of Cause Investigation for Industrial Accidents. A total of 301 cases were reported from 1999 to 2007. Recent one study showed the figures of compensated occupational skin diseases. Many of them belonged to daily-paid workers in the public service, especially forestry workers. Also, it described the interesting cases such as vitiligo and trichloroethylene-induced Stevens-Johnson Syndrome. Skin diseases are still important though the number of cases has decreased, and therefore it is recommended to grasp the status of occupational skin diseases through continuous surveillance system and to make policy protecting high-risk group. PMID:21258591

  9. [Current trends in occupational dermatology].

    PubMed

    Skudlik, Christoph; Geier, Johannes; John, Swen Malte

    2014-11-01

    In clinical practice occupational skin diseases usually present as hand dermatitis. Occupationally acquired contact allergies are of eminent relevance in many work place products e.g. skin care products, dyes and paints, epoxy resins or protective gloves. However, not infrequently, a range of other dermatoses of different etiology and localization can be occupationally induced and, at least in Germany, thus be medically treated and--if necessary--compensated for with full coverage by the statutory employers' liability insurance. Examples regarding non-eczematous skin diseases triggered by external factors are psoriatic lesions, cutaneous type-1-allergies, occupationally acquired infections, and dermatoses in other localizations which are occupationally exposed to irritant influences (e.g. feet in workers wearing occlusive safety boots). Moreover, outdoor workers deserve specific attention by the dermatologist if squamous cell carcinomas including precursor lesions like actinic keratoses or Bowen disease have occurred. In Germany, recently the scientific advisory committee to the Ministry of Labor has recommended including these skin cancers caused by occupational solar UV exposure in the national list of occupational diseases. The framework for dermatological preventive care of occupationally-induced inflammatory dermatoses has been continuously improved in the last years. The aim is to reach a similar level of care and preventive measures for patients with occupational skin cancer, including primary preventive workers' education. PMID:25359544

  10. Occupational Health

    MedlinePlus

    Occupational health problems occur at work or because of the kind of work you do. These problems can include ... by exposure to radiation Exposure to germs in health care settings Good job safety and prevention practices ...

  11. Achieving Quality in Occupational Health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Donnell, Michele (Editor); Hoffler, G. Wyckliffe (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    The conference convened approximately 100 registered participants of invited guest speakers, NASA presenters, and a broad spectrum of the Occupational Health disciplines representing NASA Headquarters and all NASA Field Centers. Centered on the theme, "Achieving Quality in Occupational Health," conferees heard presentations from award winning occupational health program professionals within the Agency and from private industry; updates on ISO 9000 status, quality assurance, and information technologies; workshops on ergonomics and respiratory protection; an overview from the newly commissioned NASA Occupational Health Assessment Team; and a keynote speech on improving women's health. In addition, NASA occupational health specialists presented 24 poster sessions and oral deliveries on various aspects of current practice at their field centers.

  12. Emergency Medical Technician.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of emergency medical technician, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 18 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 4 units specific to the occupation of emergency medical technician. The following…

  13. Medical Laboratory Technician.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of medical laboratory technician, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 18 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 8 units specific to the occupation of medical laboratory technician. The following…

  14. [Current states and future aspects of graduate schools for adult graduate students: experiences of the master's course as a medical technologist].

    PubMed

    Obara, Takehiro; Suwabe, Akira

    2012-12-01

    The educational system for medical technologists (MTs) has gradually shifted from a three-year technical school system to a four-year university system. It is worthwhile for MTs to advance to a graduate school, in order to improve their routine-work skills, performances, and also to advance their own research as well as to learn how to direct younger MTs. Recently, MTs who advance to the graduate school as adult graduate students are increasing. In this article, the current states and future aspects of the graduate school of Iwate Medical University are reported. In our Department of Central Clinical Laboratory in Iwate Medical University Hospital, three of my colleagues have completed the master's course of the graduate school as adult graduate students, and three are currently attending the school. Nevertheless, none of them has advanced to the doctor's course yet. The primary reason why they do not advance is the heavy burden on any adult graduate students physically, mentally, and financially to study in the graduate school and carry out routine duties at the same time. Thus, in order to encourage MTs to go or to graduate school education, it is important to arrange systems which will enable MTs to advance to the graduate school as adult graduate students. I believe there are three key elements to make this possible. Firstly, prepare easier access to curriculums for MTs to study special fields and learn special skills. Secondly, arrange an increase in the salary scheme depending on the degree attained from the graduate school. Thirdly, provide financial support for graduate school expenses. In conclusion, it is expected that a large number of MTs will advance to the graduate school if these changes for a better educational environment are made. PMID:23427697

  15. [Occupational and non-occupational factors influencing health state of small and medium business workers].

    PubMed

    Fasikov, R M; Khuzhakhmetova, I B; Stepanov, E G

    2010-01-01

    Complex study of work conditions and health parameters of workers engaged into small and medium business proved that preserved and better health of these workers, prevention of occupational and occupationally mediated diseases necessitate federal and regional complex system of measures including legal basis, database on work conditions and their influence on small and medium business workers' health, occupational medicine training for employers and employees, more active involvement of medical institutioins into screening for occupational diseases. PMID:20734853

  16. Toxicological, medical and industrial hygiene aspects of glutaraldehyde with particular reference to its biocidal use in cold sterilization procedures.

    PubMed

    Ballantyne, B; Jordan, S L

    2001-01-01

    showed inflammatory changes in the anterior nasal cavity but no neoplasms or systemic toxicity. In vitro genotoxicity studies--bacterial mutagenicity, forward gene mutation (HGPRT and TK loci), sister chromatid exchange, chromosome aberration, UDS and DNA repair tests--have given variable results, ranging from no effect through to weak positive. In vivo genotoxicity studies--micronucleus, chromosome aberration, dominant lethal and Drosophila tests--generally have shown no activity but one mouse intraperitoneal study showed bone marrow cell chromosome aberrations. Developmental toxicity studies show GA not to be teratogenic, and a two-generation study showed no adverse reproductive effects. Percutaneous pharmacokinetic studies showed low skin penetration, with lowest values measured in vitro in rats and human skin. Overexposure of humans produces typical sensory irritant effects on the eye, skin and respiratory tract. Some reports have described an asthmatic-like reaction by overexposure to GA vapor. In most cases this resembles reactive airways dysfunction syndrome, and the role of immune mechanisms is uncertain. Local mucosal effects may occur if medical instruments or endoscopes are not adequately decontaminated. Protection of individuals from the potential adverse effects of GA exposure requires that there be adequate protection of the skin, eyes and respiratory tract. The airborne concentration of GA vapor should be kept below the recommended safe exposure level (e.g. the threshold limit value) by the use of engineering controls. Those who work with GA should, through a training program, be aware of the properties of GA, its potential adverse effects, how to handle the material safely and how to deal with accidental situations involving GA. If effects develop in exposed workers, the reasons should be determined immediately and corrective methods initiated. (c) 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:11288136

  17. [Occupational epidemiology].

    PubMed

    Ahrens, W; Behrens, T; Mester, B; Schmeisser, N

    2008-03-01

    The aim of occupational epidemiology is to describe workplace-related diseases and to identify their underlying causes. Its primary goal is to protect workers from hazardous effects of the working process by applying work-related primary and secondary prevention measures. To assess health risks different study designs and a wide array of complex study instruments and methods are frequently employed that cannot be replaced by toxicological investigations. This paper primarily addresses health risks by agent exposures. In this context a central task of occupational epidemiology is careful assessment of exposure. Different data sources, such as work site measurements, register data, archive material, experts' opinion, and the workers' personal estimates of exposure may be used during this process. In addition, biological markers can complement exposure assessment. Since thorough occupational epidemiologic studies allow assessment of disease risks under realistic exposure conditions, their results should be more frequently used to derive workplace-related threshold limit values. PMID:18311483

  18. Proceedings from the 1998 Occupational Health Conference: Benchmarking for Excellence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffler, G. Wyckliffe (Editor); O'Donnell, Michele D. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The theme of the 1998 NASA Occupational Health Conference was "Benchmarking for Excellence." Conference participants included NASA and contractor Occupational Health professionals, as well as speakers from NASA, other Federal agencies and private companies. Addressing the Conference theme, speakers described new concepts and techniques for corporate benchmarking. They also identified practices used by NASA, other Federal agencies, and by award winning programs in private industry. A two-part Professional Development Course on workplace toxicology and indoor air quality was conducted a day before the Conference. A program manager with the International Space Station Office provided an update on station activities and an expert delivered practical advice on both oral and written communications. A keynote address on the medical aspects of space walking by a retired NASA astronaut highlighted the Conference. Discipline breakout sessions, poster presentations, and a KSC tour complemented the Conference agenda.

  19. Occupational Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, William R.

    Although fiscal support for occupational programs in California Community Colleges is provided primarily by state and local district taxes, about ten percent of the total support is provided through federal sources. Federal regulations under the Vocational Education Act (VEA) require the recipients of federal funds to provide consultative,…

  20. [Occupational asthma].

    PubMed

    Pauli, G; Bessot, J C; Gourdon, C

    1992-12-01

    The diagnosis of occupational asthma requires the integration of a multiplicity of data; the history, cutaneous skin tests, biological tests, respiratory function tests and non-specific tests of bronchial hyperreactivity and specific bronchial provocation test. The history search for the presence of an atopic state, the occurrence of similar disorders in members of the same firm and also the timing of symptoms in relation to the occupational activities. Cutaneous tests are particularly helpful in IgE-mediated asthma in relation to the inhalation of animal or vegetable materials of glycoprotein origin. For haptens, the need for their prior coupling to a protein carrier causes problems which have not been entirely resolved. Laboratory tests run into the same snags. Respiratory function and non-specific bronchial provocation tests, confirm the diagnosis of asthma and enable the medium and long term prognostic to be assessed. Specific bronchial provocation tests are the most appropriate tests to establish an aetiological diagnosis in occupational asthma. Different technical methods are possible: quantitative administration of allergen aerosols, realistic tests, and tests using exposure chambers to achieve true test doses. The products responsible for occupational asthma are multiple. The different substances are characterised in a simplified manner: first animal matter (mammalian and arthropod allergens), secondly substances of vegetable origin (roots, leaves, flowers, grain and flour, wood and its derivates) and finally chemical products. The chemical products are primarily from the pharmaceutical and metal industries and above all from the plastics industry. PMID:1296320

  1. Health Occupations

    MedlinePlus

    ... care industry is one of largest providers of jobs in the United States. Many health jobs are in hospitals. Others are in nursing homes, ... clinics and laboratories. To work in a health occupation, you often must have special training. Some, like ...

  2. The Medical Aspects of Obesity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichold, Samuel

    Obesity is one of the leading public health problems in the United States. It is associated with drug abuse and increased mortality. In seeking to differentiate between overweight and obese individuals, it may be said that obesity exists in those individuals who are 40% or more above normal weight as determined on commonly used height and weight…

  3. Medical aspects of supersonic travel.

    PubMed

    Preston, F S

    1975-08-01

    During the 1950s, military aircraft in France and the United Kingdom developed along almost identical lines in that supersonic fighters were developed together with delta-plan research aircraft capable of speeds twice the speed of sound (Mach 2). At the end of the decade, discussions between the British Aircraft Corp. (BAC) and Sub-Aviation of France (SUD) resulted in suggested designs for a supersonic transport (SST) aircraft. With official backing from both governments, the Anglo-French Concorde Agreement was signed in 1962. At first, the development costs were estimated to be between 150 and 170 million, the costs to be equally divided between both nations. The total costs for research and development are now expected to exceed 1065 million! PMID:1164343

  4. Medical Aspects Of Bush Exploration

    PubMed Central

    Armour, W. E.

    1979-01-01

    Travelling in primitive conditions demands considerable forethought in terms of preventing morbidity. This article describes the measures and supplies taken on a summer trip to central Labrador. Attempts were made to culture for pathogens at the beginning and end of the trip. PMID:20469309

  5. Current medical aspects of pantethine.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Zoltán; Vécsei, László

    2009-07-30

    Pantethine, the stable disulfide form of pantetheine, is the major precursor of coenzyme A, which plays a central role in the metabolism of lipids and carbohydrates. Coenzyme A is a cofactor in over 70 enzymatic pathways, including fatty acid oxidation, carbohydrate metabolism, pyruvate degradation, amino acid catabolism, haem synthesis, acetylcholine synthesis, phase II detoxification, acetylation, etc. Pantethine has beneficial effects in vascular disease, it able to decrease the hyperlipidaemia, moderate the platelet function and prevent the lipid-peroxidation. Moreover its neuro-endocrinological regulating role, its good influence on cataract and cystinosis are also proved. This molecule is a well-tolerated therapeutic agent; the frequency of its side-effect is very low and mild. Based on these preclinical and clinical data, it could be recommended using this compound as adjuvant therapy. PMID:19685700

  6. [Vaccines and exposed occupations].

    PubMed

    Gendrel, Dominique

    2007-04-01

    The use of safe and efficacious vaccines in occupational settings to protect workers from diseases to which they may be exposed is obvious and has been included in the employment law. Healthcare workers are particular exposed. Immunization has two purposes : protect the worker from contracting a disease, but also prevent him from disseminating the disease to weakened patients. It is important not only to take into account existing recommendations for immunization, but also to envisage their extension to teachers and staff of nurseries and primary schools. Routine vaccination against whooping cough, varicella, measles and hepatitis A is particularly warranted in these categories. Recommendations should also extend to medical students who are too often poorly protected and insufficiently warned against potential occupational exposure to pathogens and dissemination to their patients. PMID:17433233

  7. Handbook of occupational safety and health

    SciTech Connect

    Slote, L.

    1987-01-01

    With a practical approach valuable to the non-specialist and professional alike, this book delivers up-to-date information on all aspects of the field, with detailed surveys of ergonomics, occupational safety and health management, analytical techniques, occupational safety and health economics, safety and the law, and information resources. Both manufacturing and service industries are discussed in detail.

  8. New developments in occupational dermatology.

    PubMed

    Diepgen, Thomas L

    2016-09-01

    Occupational skin diseases according to BK No. 5101 - "severe or recurrent skin diseases which have forced the person to discontinue all occupational activities that caused or could cause the development, worsening, or recurrence of the disease" - is the most commonly reported notifiable occupational diseases in Germany. Following the optimization of measures of primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention, today most individuals affected are able to continue their profession. With the revision of the German ordinance on occupational diseases (BKV) in January 2015, skin cancer caused by UV irradiation was added to the list of occupational diseases. The new occupational disease (BK) 5103 is defined as "squamous cell carcinoma or multiple actinic keratoses of the skin caused by natural UV irradiation". In this context, "multiple" signifies the occurrence of either more than five individual actinic keratosis lesions over the course of 12 months or the presence of field cancerization of > 4 cm(2) . In the following review, important aspects of this new occupational disease will be highlighted and discussed. PMID:27607027

  9. Role of Sonographic Imaging in Occupational Therapy Practice

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Occupational therapy practice is grounded in the delivery of occupation-centered, patient-driven treatments that engage clients in the process of doing to improve health. As emerging technologies, such as medical imaging, find their way into rehabilitation practice, it is imperative that occupational therapy practitioners assess whether and how these tools can be incorporated into treatment regimens that are dually responsive to the medical model of health care and to the profession’s foundation in occupation. Most medical imaging modalities have a discrete place in occupation-based intervention as outcome measures or for patient education; however, sonographic imaging has the potential to blend multiple occupational therapy practice forms to document treatment outcomes, inform clinical reasoning, and facilitate improved functional performance when used as an accessory tool in direct intervention. Use of medical imaging is discussed as it relates to occupational foundations and the professional role within the context of providing efficient, effective patient-centered rehabilitative care. PMID:25871607

  10. Occupational asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Chan-Yeung, M.; Grzybowski, S.

    1976-01-01

    Occupational asthma is probably much more common than is generally realized. Though many causes have been described, undoubtedly many more are yet to be recognized. One of the diagnostic difficulties lies in the fact that in most forms of this disease a late asthmatic reaction occurs in the evening rather than at work. The pathogenetic mechanisms differ in various forms of occupational asthma. In some, an immunologic mechanism is likely; in others, a "pharmacologic" action of the offending agent is implicated. Asthma due to inhalation of dusts of western red cedar, isocyanates, detergent enzymes and textiles is considered in detail. Periodic examination of workers at risk is of value for early diagnosis and prevention of irrversible airway obstruction. PMID:766943

  11. [The German occupation and health services].

    PubMed

    Gogstad, A C

    1990-12-10

    It was of considerable importance for the German occupants and their Norwegian collaborators, and for the Resistance Movement, to maintain a satisfactory status of health in the civilian population. Thus it was of common interest to keep the health services intact. Health aspects were also important elements of the nazi ideology. Recent studies of German archives reveal that the German civilian administration, Reichskommissariat, played a central role in the nazi revolution of the health services. But certain disagreements arose at an early stage between the German and Norwegian occupation administration concerning strategies of health policy. The collaborator party, Nasjonal Samling, tried to gain control over the professional organizations, but met great resistance. The Norwegian Medical Association lost 85% of its members and was reduced to an appendix of the Ministry. However, the health services were still kept under strict German control. A deterioration of the health services took place from 1944, mainly due to lack of resources because of increased German military needs. PMID:2281452

  12. Literature Searches: Audio-Visual Aids and Computer Assisted and Programmed Instruction In: Medical Education, Nursing Education, Allied Health Occupation Education, and Dental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowak, Geraldine D.

    Four computer-generated bibliographies were produced by the Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System (MEDLARS) of the National Library of Medicine (NLM). The bibliographies, prepared on the basis of selections of significant current interest of the subject matter for substantial audience, covered subsets of the general topic area of…

  13. Does occupational health nursing exist in India?

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Rajnarayan R.; Sharma, Anjali; Zodpey, Sanjay P.; Khandare, Shobha M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Occupational health services are important to develop healthy and productive work forces, which should be delivered through occupational health team. Occupational health nurse (OHN) is an important member of this team and is required to apply nursing principles in conserving the health of workers in occupational settings. Purpose: This article attempts to map the occupational health nursing courses in India and design competencies and curriculum for such a course. Materials and Methods: Information through the Internet, printed journals, and perspectives of the key stakeholders were the principal sources of data. Discussion: In India, there is a need to initiate a course on occupational health nursing to provide occupational health services for the organized and unorganized sector workforce. A certificate course for occupational health nursing for 3–4 months duration offered through contact session mode can be an opportune beginning. However, to cater employed nurses an online course can be another effective alternative. The theoretical part should essentially include modules on occupational diseases, industrial hygiene, and occupational health legislation, whereas the modules on practical aspects can include visits to industries. Taking into account the existing norms of Indian Factories Act for hazardous units of organized sector an estimated 1,34,640 OHNs are required. Conclusion: There is a need–supply gap in the number of occupational health nursing manpower in India, which can be attributed to the absence of any course to train such manpower. PMID:25598615

  14. Occupational Sex Roles and Occupational Prestige.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simerly, D. Emily; Ruback, R. Barry

    Past studies on the sex-typing of occupations have used a single bipolar scale, ranging from masculinity to femininity. An empirical examination of both occupational sex roles and occupational prestige was conducted using two unipolar scales to assess masculinity and femininity. College students (N=183) rated 94 occupations, which were then…

  15. Medical History, Lifestyle, Family History, and Occupational Risk Factors for Marginal Zone Lymphoma: The InterLymph Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Subtypes Project

    PubMed Central

    Benavente, Yolanda; Turner, Jennifer J.; Paltiel, Ora; Slager, Susan L.; Vajdic, Claire M.; Norman, Aaron D.; Cerhan, James R.; Chiu, Brian C. H.; Becker, Nikolaus; Cocco, Pierluigi; Dogan, Ahmet; Nieters, Alexandra; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Kane, Eleanor V.; Smedby, Karin E.; Maynadié, Marc; Spinelli, John J.; Roman, Eve; Glimelius, Bengt; Wang, Sophia S.; Sampson, Joshua N.; Morton, Lindsay M.; de Sanjosé, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Background Marginal zone lymphoma (MZL), comprised of nodal, extranodal, and splenic subtypes, accounts for 5%–10% of non-Hodgkin lymphoma cases. A detailed evaluation of the independent effects of risk factors for MZL and its subtypes has not been conducted. Methods Data were pooled from 1052 MZL cases (extranodal [EMZL] = 633, nodal [NMZL] = 157, splenic [SMZL] = 140) and 13766 controls from 12 case–control studies. Adjusted unconditional logistic regression was used to compute odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results Novel findings for MZL subtypes include increased risk for B-cell activating autoimmune conditions (EMZL OR = 6.40, 95% CI = 4.24 to 9.68; NMZL OR = 7.80, 95% CI = 3.32 to 18.33; SMZL OR = 4.25, 95% CI = 1.49 to 12.14), hepatitis C virus seropositivity (EMZL OR = 5.29, 95% CI = 2.48 to 11.28), self-reported peptic ulcers (EMZL OR = 1.83, 95% CI = 1.35 to 2.49), asthma without other atopy (SMZL OR = 2.28, 95% CI = 1.23 to 4.23), family history of hematologic cancer (EMZL OR = 1.90, 95% CI = 1.37 to 2.62) and of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NMZL OR = 2.82, 95% CI = 1.33 to 5.98), permanent hairdye use (SMZL OR = 6.59, 95% CI = 1.54 to 28.17), and occupation as a metalworker (NMZL OR = 3.56, 95% CI = 1.67 to 7.58). Reduced risks were observed with consumption of any alcohol (EMZL fourth quartile OR = 0.48, 95% CI = 0.28 to 0.82) and lower consumption of wine (NMZL first to third quartile ORs < 0.45) compared with nondrinkers, and occupation as a teacher (EMZL OR = 0.58, 95% CI = 0.37 to 0.88). Conclusion Our results provide new data suggesting etiologic heterogeneity across MZL subtypes although a common risk of MZL associated with B-cell activating autoimmune conditions was found. PMID:25174026

  16. [The occupational physician in France].

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Shinya

    2013-10-01

    The French Labor law defines the role and its allocation criteria of the occupational physician (OP) the same as in Japan. In France, occupational medicine is one of the medical specialties. The OP resident must follow the 4 years clinical training before certification. After having finished their residency, they are entitled to work for the occupational health service office of a company or company association (in the case of small and medium sized companies). The most important characteristics of the French system is that they cover all workers regardless of company size. The main role of the OP is prevention of work related diseases and accidents. They are not allowed to do clinical services except for emergency cases. Their main activities are health examinations, health education, patrol and advice for better working condition. Formerly, it was rather difficult to attract the medical students for OP resident course because of its prevention oriented characteristics. A growing concern about the importance of health management at the work site, however, has changed the situation. Now, the number of candidates for OP resident course is increasing. Their task has expanded to cover mental health and other life style related diseases. The 2011 modification of law redefines the role of the OP as a director of an occupational health service office who has a total responsibility of multidisciplinary services. The French and Japanese occupational health systems have many of similarities. A comparative study by researchers of UOEH is expected to yield useful information. PMID:24107336

  17. Health and Human Services. Occupational Analyses. Worker Task Lists and Supplementary Information for Selected Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henrico County Public Schools, Glen Allen, VA. Virginia Vocational Curriculum and Resource Center.

    This publication contains worker task lists and supplementary information for eight occupations in the health and human services cluster: (1) criminal justice; (2) protective services; (3) dental assistant; (4) dental hygienist; (5) diagnostic medical sonographer; (6) medical office assistant; (7) fire medic; and (8) parks and recreation manager.…

  18. Medical History, Lifestyle, Family History, and Occupational Risk Factors for Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma: The InterLymph Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Subtypes Project

    PubMed Central

    Kricker, Anne; Paltiel, Ora; Flowers, Christopher R.; Wang, Sophia S.; Monnereau, Alain; Blair, Aaron; Maso, Luigino Dal; Kane, Eleanor V.; Nieters, Alexandra; Foran, James M.; Miligi, Lucia; Clavel, Jacqueline; Bernstein, Leslie; Rothman, Nathaniel; Slager, Susan L.; Sampson, Joshua N.; Morton, Lindsay M.; Skibola, Christine F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although risk factors for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) have been suggested, their independent effects, modification by sex, and association with anatomical sites are largely unknown. Methods In a pooled analysis of 4667 cases and 22639 controls from 19 studies, we used stepwise logistic regression to identify the most parsimonious multivariate models for DLBCL overall, by sex, and for selected anatomical sites. Results DLBCL was associated with B-cell activating autoimmune diseases (odds ratio [OR] = 2.36, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.80 to 3.09), hepatitis C virus seropositivity (OR = 2.02, 95% CI = 1.47 to 2.76), family history of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (OR = 1.95, 95% CI = 1.54 to 2.47), higher young adult body mass index (OR = 1.58, 95% CI = 1.12 to 2.23, for 35+ vs 18.5 to 22.4 kg/m2), higher recreational sun exposure (OR = 0.78, 95% CI = 0.69 to 0.89), any atopic disorder (OR = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.76 to 0.89), and higher socioeconomic status (OR = 0.86, 95% CI = 0.79 to 0.94). Additional risk factors for women were occupation as field crop/vegetable farm worker (OR = 1.78, 95% CI = 1.22 to 2.60), hairdresser (OR = 1.65, 95% CI = 1.12 to 2.41), and seamstress/embroider (OR = 1.49, 95% CI = 1.13 to 1.97), low adult body mass index (OR = 0.46, 95% CI = 0.29 to 0.74, for <18.5 vs 18.5 to 22.4 kg/m2), hormone replacement therapy started age at least 50 years (OR = 0.68, 95% CI = 0.52 to 0.88), and oral contraceptive use before 1970 (OR = 0.78, 95% CI = 0.62 to 1.00); and for men were occupation as material handling equipment operator (OR = 1.58, 95% CI = 1.02 to 2.44), lifetime alcohol consumption (OR = 0.57, 95% CI = 0.44 to 0.75, for >400kg vs nondrinker), and previous blood transfusion (OR = 0.69, 95% CI = 0.57 to 0.83). Autoimmune disease, atopy, and family history of non-Hodgkin lymphoma showed similar associations across selected anatomical sites, whereas smoking was associated with central nervous system, testicular and cutaneous DLBCLs

  19. Medical History, Lifestyle, and Occupational Risk Factors for Hairy Cell Leukemia: The InterLymph Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Subtypes Project

    PubMed Central

    Slager, Susan L.; Hughes, Ann Maree; Smith, Alex; Glimelius, Bengt; Habermann, Thomas M.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Staines, Anthony; Norman, Aaron D.; Cerhan, James R.; Sampson, Joshua N.; Morton, Lindsay M.; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    Background Little is known about the etiology of hairy cell leukemia (HCL), a rare B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder with marked male predominance. Our aim was to identify key risk factors for HCL. Methods A pooled analysis of individual-level data for 154 histologically confirmed HCL cases and 8834 controls from five case–control studies, conducted in Europe and Australia, was undertaken. Age-, race and/or ethnicity-, sex-, and study-adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using unconditional logistic regression. Results The usual patterns for age and sex in HCL were observed, with a median age of 55 years and sex ratio of 3.7 males to females. Cigarette smoking was inversely associated with HCL (OR = 0.51, 95% CI = 0.37 to 0.71) with dose–response relationships observed for duration, frequency, and lifetime cigarette smoking (P trend < .001). In contrast, occupation as a farmer was positively associated with HCL (OR = 2.34, 95% CI = 1.36 to 4.01), with a dose–response relationship observed for duration (OR = 1.82, 95% CI = 0.85 to 3.88 for ≤10 years vs never; and OR = 2.98, 95% CI = 1.50 to 5.93 for >10 years vs never; P trend = .025). Adult height was also positively associated with HCL (OR = 2.69, 95% CI = 1.39 to 5.29 for upper vs lower quartile of height). The observed associations remained consistent in multivariate analysis. Conclusions Our observations of an increased risk of HCL from farming exposures and decreased risk from smoking exposures, independent of one another, support a multifactorial origin and an etiological specificity of HCL compared with other non-Hodgkin lymphoma subtypes. The positive association with height is a novel finding that needs replication. PMID:25174032

  20. Medical insurance claims and surveillance for occupational disease: analysis of respiratory, cardiac, and cancer outcomes in auto industry tool grinding operations.

    PubMed

    Park, R M

    2001-04-01

    To evaluate medical insurance claims for chronic disease investigation, claims from eight automotive machining plants (1984 to 1993) were linked with work histories (1967 to 1993), and associations with respiratory, cardiac, and cancer conditions were investigated, in a case-control design analyzed with logistic regression. The primary focus was tool grinding, but other important processes examined were metal-working, welding, forging, heat treat, engine testing, and diverse-skilled trades work. Considerable variability in claim-derived incidence rates across plants was not explained by age or known exposure differences. Asthma incidence increased in tool grinding (at mean cumulative duration: odds ratio [OR], 3.0; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.90 to 10.0), as did non-ischemic heart disease (cardiomyopathy, cor pulmonale, rheumatic heart disease, or hypertension; OR, 3.1; 95% CI, 1.26 to 7.6). These trends appeared in models with deficits (OR < 1.0) for those ever exposed to tool grinding because of exposure-response miss-specification, demographic confounding, or removal of high-risk workers from the exposed group. The apparent cancer rates identified from claims greatly exceeded the expected rates from a cancer registry, suggesting that diagnostic, "rule-out," and surveillance functions were contributing. This study supports the epidemiologic use of medical insurance records in surveillance and, possibly, etiologic investigation and identifies issues requiring special attention or resolution. PMID:11322094

  1. Orientation to Health Occupations: Curriculum Guide for Health Occupations, Phase 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benedict, Mary; And Others

    The document outlines a curriculum designed to teach appropriate nursing skills to students and to prepare them for career opportunities available in health occupations. It is presented in 10 units offering basic information under the headings of: overview of health occupations; communications; medical terminology; fundamental principles of human…

  2. Level of Occupational Aspiration: An Empirical Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haller, Archibald; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Data from 34,118 American high school students were used to determine patterns of responses to an indicator of level of occupational aspiration (LOA). LOA was found to be a general dimension composed of idealistic-realistic goal-region aspects and of short-and long-term temporal aspects. LOA response patterns were essentially the same for both…

  3. Occupational asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Chan-Yeung, M

    1995-01-01

    Many toxic compounds found in air emissions may induce bronchoconstriction. In the workplace, workers are exposed to these compounds, often in much higher concentrations. Some of these compounds act as sensitizers. Of these, some compounds induce asthma by producing specific IgE antibodies to the compound or its protein conjugate, while others induce asthma through yet unidentified immunologic mechanisms. Some compounds, when inhaled in high concentrations, act as irritants and produce bronchoconstriction probably by inducing acute airway inflammation. The latter condition is called Reactive Airways Dysfunction Syndrome (RADS) or irritant-induced asthma. Occupational asthma is an excellent model to study the pathogenesis and the natural history of adult onset asthma because the responsible agent can be identified, complete avoidance is possible, and exposure can be measured or estimated. PMID:8549481

  4. Occupational diseases in Poland, 2001.

    PubMed

    Pepłońska, Beata; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila

    2002-01-01

    The Central Register of Occupational Diseases keeps the records of all reported and certified occupational diseases in Poland. In this paper the incidence of occupational diseases in Poland in 2001 is discussed on the basis of the data provided by the Register. The changes in the incidence pattern over the recent 30 years are also shown. In 2001, 6,007 cases of occupational diseases were registered, with the incidence rate of 63.2 per 100,000 employees. The highest incidence rates were noted for seven categories of diseases: the vocal organ diseases, noise-induced hearing loss, pneumoconioses, contagious and invasive diseases, dermatoses, chronic diseases of bronchi, and vibration syndrome. Altogether these diseases covered 5,239 cases (87.2% of all registered cases). Mining and quarrying, agriculture, hunting and forestry, education, health and social works were the economy activities with the highest incidence of occupational diseases. The majority of occupational diseases (93.9%) have developed after a long-term (over 10 years) exposure to particular harmful factors. As much as 58.5% of cases were recorded in males. The predominant occupational diseases in males were occupational hearing lesions, while in females chronic vocal organ diseases, most common in teachers, were most frequently recognized. In Poland, the diseases of the vocal organ poses a serious problem from the medical and socio-economic points of view. These pathologies show the highest dynamics of the incidence among all registered occupational diseases. Over the last five years the vocal organ diseases have moved upwards to the top in the ranking, both with respect to the number of cases and the incidence rate. Since 1998, the incidence of occupational diseases has been continuously showing a downward tendency. Four categories of occupational diseases have accounted mostly for this decline: noise-induced hearing loss, chronic diseases of vocal organ, contagious and invasive diseases, and

  5. Occupational hepatic disorders in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyoung Ryoul; Kim, Tae Woo

    2010-12-01

    Occupational hepatic disorders are classified into toxic hepatitis, viral hepatitis, and chemical-induced malignancy in Korea. Toxic hepatitis cases were reported in workers who were exposed to dimethylformamide, dimethylacetamide, or trichloroethylene. Pre-placement medical examination and regular follow-up are necessary to prevent the development of toxic hepatitis. Viral hepatitis was chiefly reported among health care workers such as doctors, nurses and clinical pathology technicians who could easily be exposed to blood. Preventive measures for these groups therefore include vaccination and serum monitoring programs. Hepatic angiosarcoma caused by vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) exposure is a very well known occupational disease and it has not been officially reported in Korea yet. Some cases of hepatocellular carcinoma were legally approved for compensation as an occupational disease largely by overwork and stress, but not supported by enough scientific evidence. Effort to find the evidence of its causal relationship is needed. PMID:21258588

  6. Knowledges Commonly Useful in Twelve Allied Health Occupations. Report No. 25. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallenstien, Robert J.

    Forty-eight instructors and forty-one practitioners representing 12 occupations (dental assistant, dental laboratory technician, inhalation therapist, medical assistant, medical records technician, associate degree nurse, practical nurse, occupational therapist, physical therapist, X-ray technician, medical secretary, and medical laboratory…

  7. [Ethics and occupational physicians: ethics and mission required for occupational physicians].

    PubMed

    Fujino, Akihiro

    2013-10-01

    The ethics of occupational physicians are considered from the following three viewpoints: (1) their legal standing and ethics in job execution; (2) ethics in research in occupational medicine; and (3) ethics in the 21st century and fundamental issues. We discuss: in (1), the contract types of occupational physicians and their independency and neutrality, the protection of health information and privacy, and the use of authority and the security measures; in (2), ethical standards of medical research in Japanese and international organizations, the significance and role of ethics committees, and issues characteristic of occupational health research; and in (3), occupational physicians and politic ethics, the practical abilities and ethics necessary for occupational physicians, and the practice and philosophy of occupational medicine as an art. These considerations suggest that occupational physicians, who have a special status based on the governmental policy of the occupational physician system, should develop an ethical consciousness at the core of their duties and perform their mission with responsibility to employees and employers, all of whom are Japanese citizens. Finally, we propose that the ultimate mission of occupational physicians is "to practice occupational medicine as a branch of the humanities." PMID:24107330

  8. Occupational anaphylaxis--an EAACI task force consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Siracusa, A; Folletti, I; Gerth van Wijk, R; Jeebhay, M F; Moscato, G; Quirce, S; Raulf, M; Ruëff, F; Walusiak-Skorupa, J; Whitaker, P; Tarlo, S M

    2015-02-01

    Anaphylaxis is a systemic allergic reaction, potentially life-threatening that can be due to nonoccupational or, less commonly, to occupational triggers. Occupational anaphylaxis (OcAn) could be defined as anaphylaxis arising out of triggers and conditions attributable to a particular work environment. Hymenoptera stings and natural rubber latex are the commonest triggers of OcAn. Other triggers include food, medications, insect/mammal/snake bites, and chemicals. The underlying mechanisms of anaphylactic reactions due to occupational exposure are usually IgE-mediated and less frequently non-IgE-mediated allergy or nonallergic. Some aspects of work-related allergen exposure, such as route and frequency of exposure, type of allergens, and cofactors may explain the variability of symptoms in contrast to the nonoccupational setting. When assessing OcAn, both confirmation of the diagnosis of anaphylactic reaction and identification of the trigger are required. Prevention of further episodes is important and is based on removal from further exposure. Workers with a history of OcAn should immediately be provided with a written emergency management plan and an adrenaline auto-injector and educated to its use. Immunotherapy is recommended only for OcAn due to Hymenoptera stings. PMID:25369880

  9. Prevention of occupational Back Pain.

    PubMed

    Al-Otaibi, Sultan T

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews scientific research on occupational back pain and focuses on prevention of this problem. It discusses some of the challenges of translating the evidence of this multi-factorial condition into policy. Medical science is currently unable to clearly distinguish between back pain caused by work and that possibly due to other causes but which affects the individual's capacity to work. Back pain affects the vast majority of people at some point in their lives and is very costly to both the health care system and the industry. Evidence suggests that heavy lifting, driving, and vibration of the whole body are linked to occupational back pain. Once the risk factors for occupational back pain are identified, an otherwise chronic and disabling condition can be prevented in the majority of patients. As explained in this article, three levels of prevention for occupational back pain have been reported as effective. Failure to implement preventive measures may lead to a high incidence of occupational back pain. PMID:25983601

  10. Prevention of occupational Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Al-Otaibi, Sultan T.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews scientific research on occupational back pain and focuses on prevention of this problem. It discusses some of the challenges of translating the evidence of this multi-factorial condition into policy. Medical science is currently unable to clearly distinguish between back pain caused by work and that possibly due to other causes but which affects the individual's capacity to work. Back pain affects the vast majority of people at some point in their lives and is very costly to both the health care system and the industry. Evidence suggests that heavy lifting, driving, and vibration of the whole body are linked to occupational back pain. Once the risk factors for occupational back pain are identified, an otherwise chronic and disabling condition can be prevented in the majority of patients. As explained in this article, three levels of prevention for occupational back pain have been reported as effective. Failure to implement preventive measures may lead to a high incidence of occupational back pain. PMID:25983601

  11. The medicolegal and forensic aspects of fires.

    PubMed

    Eckert, W G

    1981-12-01

    Fires, their consequences and their investigations, continue to provide forensic scientists, especially those involved in medicolegal investigation (the medical examiner or forensic pathologist), with constant work and variations in problems. The recent history of mass disasters involving high-rise buildings, transport accidents, and arson-related accidents in nightclubs and prisons has emphasized the necessity for corrective and preventive means to ensure safety to the occupants of any of these areas. Problems presented by fires include the determination of the cause of the fire, the identification of the victims, and the cause and manner of their deaths. The motivation of the fire setter and the settlement by the insurance company or legal means are also aspects to be considered. The imperceptible effects of the fires include many other aspects, among which loss of loved ones and family providers and loss of industrial revenue and job potential are all felt. The most frightening development of all, however, is the insidious surfacing of arson as a possible factor in many major fires. The most recent tragedies involving the Stouffer Inn fire and the Hilton International Hotel fire were both related to arsonous acts. The scope of this article is to review the subject as it affects the forensic medical practitioner directly or indirectly so that his or her investigation may be brought to completion in conjunction with other authorities involved in the case. PMID:7340512

  12. Occupational health in fairy tales.

    PubMed

    Rivolta, Alice; Arienti, Federica; Smith, Derek R; Cesana, Giancarlo; Riva, Michele A

    2016-05-01

    Myths and folklore, as expressions of popular beliefs, provide valuable information on medical knowledge in earlier times. Fairy tales have often recounted occupational maladies throughout the ages and also provide some insight into the toxic effects of certain metals, such as mercury. Much historical information can be gleaned from unexpected sources, and as such, fairy tales should be more carefully scrutinized by contemporary researchers with an interest in the historical origins of workplace injury and disease. PMID:26756526

  13. [The diagnosis of diseases due to occupation].

    PubMed

    Romano, C; Giachino, G M; Pira, E

    2010-01-01

    Occupational diseases are essentially defined by aetiological characteristics, and not by nosological characteristics, because the latter in most cases are not specific. This is particularly so for "work-related" diseases but still stays true for most "occupational" diseases. This implies that the diagnostic path for occupational diseases must include one additional step as compared to the standard procedure typical of non occupational medicine. The last is satisfactory after a suitable history and clinical-instrumental phase and thus a nosological definition are completed. The former includes an additional mandatory third phase, the one defining a reliable causal relationship taking into account a reasonable relationship between, on one side, the qualitative, quantitative and temporal aspects of the specific risk, and, on the other side, the observed "effect". These items must be systematically looked for (unless they are practically unobtainable) if a correct diagnosis of an occupational disease has to be reached. PMID:21438312

  14. Occupational medicine programs for animal research facilities.

    PubMed

    Wald, Peter H; Stave, Gregg M

    2003-01-01

    Occupational medicine is a key component of a comprehensive occupational health and safety program in support of laboratory animal research and production facilities. The mission of the department is to maximize employee health and productivity utilizing a population health management approach, which includes measurement and analysis of health benefits utilization. The department works in close cooperation with other institutional health and safety professionals to identify potential risks from exposure to physical, chemical, and biological hazards in the workplace. As soon as exposures are identified, the department is responsible for formulating and providing appropriate medical surveillance programs. Occupational medicine is also responsible for targeted delivery of preventive and wellness services; management of injury, disease, and disability; maintenance of medical information; and other clinic services required by the institution. Recommendations are provided for the organization and content of occupational medicine programs for animal research facilities. PMID:12473831

  15. Health Occupations Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willett, Lynn H.

    A survey was conducted to determine the need for health occupations personnel in the Moraine Valley Community College district, specifically to: (1) describe present employment for selected health occupations; (2) project health occupation employment to 1974; (3) identify the supply of applicants for the selected occupations; and (4) identify…

  16. Occupant Protection Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bopp, Genie; Somers, Jeff; Granderson, Brad; Gernhardt, Mike; Currie, Nancy; Lawrence, Chuck

    2010-01-01

    Topics include occupant protection overview with a focus on crew protection during dynamic phases of flight; occupant protection collaboration; modeling occupant protection; occupant protection considerations; project approach encompassing analysis tools, injury criteria, and testing program development; injury criteria update methodology, unique effects of pressure suits and other factors; and a summary.

  17. Occupational Therapy Assistant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of occupational therapy assistant, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 16 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general as well as those specific to the occupation of occupational therapy assistant. The…

  18. Occupational cyanide poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Amizet, Loic; Pruvot, Gauthier; Remy, Sophie; Kfoury, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Cyanide poisoning has existed for centuries. In most cases, cyanide is combined with other toxic substances; for example with carbon monoxide in fire smoke. Cases of pure cyanide poisoning are rare, and usually due to accidental exposure. Their treatment is based on oxygenation and the infusion of hydroxocobalamin. The seriousness of this type of poisoning calls for a rapid and specific response, which demonstrates the usefulness of non-hospital based medical treatment. The authors report here the case of a man who was the victim of occupational poisoning with sodium cyanide and who was treated at the workplace by fire-fighters and the Service Mobile d’Urgence et Reanimation emergency ambulance service. PMID:22674698

  19. Occupational Stress: Preventing Suffering, Enhancing Wellbeing †

    PubMed Central

    Quick, James Campbell; Henderson, Demetria F.

    2016-01-01

    Occupational stress is a known health risk for a range of psychological, behavioral, and medical disorders and diseases. Organizations and individuals can mitigate these disorders through preventive stress management and enhanced wellbeing. This article addresses, first, the known health risk evidence related to occupational stress; second, the use of preventive stress management in organizations as the framework for intervention; and third, the emerging domain of enhancing wellbeing, which strengthens the individual. Premature death and disability along with chronic suffering from occupational stress are not inevitable, despite being known outcome risks. PMID:27136575

  20. ["...such refuges are the collections and museums, which represent the current aspects of science, and prepare for its future". Social aspects of anatomy and the collections of the Vienna medical faculty, 1790 - 1840].

    PubMed

    Oppenauer, Markus

    2014-01-01

    This paper arises out of my research which I have been conducting in the context of my dissertation project. It explores the relationship between teaching, research and collecting practices in Viennese anatomy during the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century. In a time in which Viennese medicine tried to reinvent itself through both the creation of a new curriculum and several other institutional measures the practice of establishing comparative and human anatomical collections can be seen as a strategic key field of action. By concentrating on scientific journals, popular texts, catalogues, correspondences and specimens this paper aims at revealing specific social systems which must be understood as parts of the 'social history' of Viennese anatomy. By looking closely at these social aspects of anatomical teaching and research, this work tries to contribute to recent discussions addressed by historians of science and medicine. PMID:25007447

  1. [The essentials of workplace analysis for examining occupational disability claims].

    PubMed

    Wachholz, St

    2015-12-01

    The insurance branch that covers the risk of occupational disability ranks among the most important private entities for offering security as far as the limitation or loss of one's ability to work is concerned. The financial risk of the insurer, the existential concerns and expectations of the claimant, as well as the legal framework and the need for a careful interdisciplinary evaluation, necessitate a professional review and assessment of the facts conducted with a sense of both responsibility and sensitivity. Carefully deliberated and sustainable decisions benefit both insurers and the insured. In order to achieve this, an opinion is required in many--and especially the more complex--cases from an external medical expert, which in turn can only be plausible and conclusive when based on a comprehensive review of the claimant's working environment and its particular (and often unique) requirements. This article is intended to increase the reader's understanding of the coherencies of workplace analysis and medical assessments, as required by insurance law and legislation. In addition, the article delivers valuable clues and guidance, both for medical experts and claims managers at insurance companies. Primarily, the claimant's occupation, as conceived in the terms and conditions of the insurance companies, is explained. The reader is then introduced to the various criteria to be considered when a claimant has several jobs at the same time, is self-employed, could be transferred to another job, is simply unable to commute to the workplace, or is prevented from working due to legal restrictions related to an illness. The article goes on to address the crucial aspect of how the degree of disability is to be measured under different circumstances, namely using the quantitative and the qualitative approach. As a reliable method for obtaining the essential data regarding the claimant's specific working conditions, which are required by both the medical expert and the

  2. Physicians: Choosing Your Medical Specialty

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Text size Email How to Choose a Medical Specialty Choosing a medical specialty is a career- ... most challenging aspects of patient care. “Choosing a Medical Specialty”—A Guide on What to Expect from ...

  3. Dose level of occupational exposure in China.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuan; Zhang, Liang'an; Ju, Yongjian

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses the dose level of Chinese occupational exposures during 1986-2000. Data on occupational exposures from the main categories in nuclear fuel cycle (uranium enrichment and conversion, fuel fabrication, reactor operation, waste management and research activity, except for uranium mining and milling because of the lack of data), medical uses of radiation (diagnostic radiation, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy) and industrial uses of radiation (industrial radiography and radioisotope production) are presented and summarised in detail. These are the main components of occupational exposures in China. In general, the average annual effective doses show a steady decreasing trend over periods: from 2.16 to 1.16 mSv in medical uses of radiation during 1990-2000; from 1.92 to 1.18 mSv in industrial radiography during 1990-2000; from 8.79 to 2.05 mSv in radioisotope production during the period 1980-2000. Almost all the average annual effective doses in discussed occupations were lower than 5 mSv in recent years (except for well-logging: 6.86 mSv in 1999) and no monitored workers were found to have received the occupational exposure exceeding 50 mSv in a single year or 100 mSv in a five-year period. So the Chinese protection status of occupation exposure has been improved in recent years. However, the average annual effective doses in some occupations, such as diagnostic radiology and coal mining, were still much higher than that of the whole world. There are still needs for further improvement and careful monitoring of occupational exposure to protect every worker from excessive occupational exposure, especially for the workers who were neglected before. PMID:17878147

  4. Occupational Injury Rate Estimates in Magnetic Fusion Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    cadwallader, lee

    2006-11-01

    In nuclear facilities, there are two primary aspects of occupational safety. The first aspect is radiological safety, which has rightly been treated in detail in nuclear facilities. Radiological exposure data have been collected from the existing tokamaks to serve as forecasts for ITER radiation safety. The second aspect of occupational safety, “traditional” industrial safety, must also be considered for a complete occupational safety program. Industrial safety data on occupational injury rates from the JET and TFTR tokamaks, three accelerators, and U.S. nuclear fission plants have been collected to set industrial safety goals for the ITER operations staff. The results of this occupational safety data collection and analysis activity are presented here. The data show that an annual lost workday case rate of 0.3 incidents per 100 workers is a conceivable goal for ITER operations.

  5. Occupational Clusters. Occupational Investigation Guide. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    East Texas State Univ., Commerce. Occupational Curriculum Lab.

    This occupational investigation guide contains learning activities for instruction in fifteen occupational clusters: (1) agribusiness and natural resources, (2) business and office, (3) communications and media, (4) construction, (5) consumer and homemaking, (6) environment, (7) fine arts and humanities, (8) health, (9) hospitality and recreation,…

  6. Illinois Occupational Skill Standards: Medical Office Cluster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Occupational Skill Standards and Credentialing Council, Carbondale.

    These skill standards, developed through a consortium of educational and industry partners in Illinois, serve as guides to workforce preparation program providers to define content for their programs and to employers to establish the skills and standards necessary for job acquisition and performance. The skill standards include the following…

  7. Evaluating Aspects of Online Medication Safety in Long-Term Follow-Up of 136 Internet Pharmacies: Illegal Rogue Online Pharmacies Flourish and Are Long-Lived

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A growing number of online pharmacies have been established worldwide. Among them are numerous illegal websites selling medicine without valid medical prescriptions or distributing substandard or counterfeit drugs. Only a limited number of studies have been published on Internet pharmacies with regard to patient safety, professionalism, long-term follow-up, and pharmaceutical legitimacy verification. Objective In this study, we selected, evaluated, and followed 136 Internet pharmacy websites aiming to identify indicators of professional online pharmacy service and online medication safety. Methods An Internet search was performed by simulating the needs of potential customers of online pharmacies. A total of 136 Internet pharmacy websites were assessed and followed for four years. According to the LegitScript database, relevant characteristics such as longevity, time of continuous operation, geographical location, displayed contact information, prescription requirement, medical information exchange, and pharmaceutical legitimacy verification were recorded and evaluated. Results The number of active Internet pharmacy websites decreased; 23 of 136 (16.9%) online pharmacies ceased operating within 12 months and only 67 monitored websites (49.3%) were accessible at the end of the four-year observation period. However, not all operated continuously, as about one-fifth (31/136) of all observed online pharmacy websites were inaccessible provisionally. Thus, only 56 (41.2%) Internet-based pharmacies were continuously operational. Thirty-one of the 136 online pharmacies (22.8%) had not provided any contact details, while only 59 (43.4%) displayed all necessary contact information on the website. We found that the declared physical location claims did not correspond to the area of domain registration (according to IP address) for most websites. Although the majority (120/136, 88.2%) of the examined Internet pharmacies distributed various prescription

  8. Using Career-Related Aspects to Assess Person-Environment Fit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gati, Itamar; And Others

    1996-01-01

    The relation between person and environment fit, defined on the basis of career-related aspects and occupational satisfaction, was examined. The characteristics of 12 occupations along 36 career-related aspects were elicited from 12 career counselors. Thirty professionals in each of the 12 occupations reported their preferences in the same set of…

  9. An anatomy of occupational medicine1

    PubMed Central

    Lee, W. R.

    1973-01-01

    Lee, W. R. (1973).British Journal of Industrial Medicine,30, 111-117. An anatomy of occupational medicine. Previous writers have attempted to describe occupational medicine by considering the functions of a doctor working in industry. In different communities, and even in the same community at different times, a doctor working in industry may have different functions. `Occupational medicine', so described, would therefore not be a discipline but would merely be medicine practised in a certain area. Furthermore, such an approach leaves out other aspects of occupational medicine such as recompense for injury at work and statutory supervision of workplaces, and any interaction between these two. Men think in terms of conceptual models which predetermine to a greater or less extent their approach to future problems. The present essay attempts to formulate a coherent intellectual framework of occupational medicine. The conceptual model proposed here is based on the globe proposed by Himsworth (1970) as a model representing the structure of scientific knowledge. Using this, a place for occupational medicine can be determined related to medicine, industry, and the `basic' sciences. Occupational medicine is thus seen as a coherent entity. The argument is supported by a comparison of some of the provisions for occupational medicine in this country and in France. In this comparison the underlying components are distinguished from the mechanisms set up to deal with them. It is these components which go to make up the structure of occupational medicine and it is the coherence and close relationship of them which must be studied to find and describe an entity to be called occupational medicine. PMID:4270047

  10. Key Elements of the Occupational History for the General Physician

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Charles E.

    1982-01-01

    Taking a medical history is an art that requires skill, experience and practice. There is now increasing recognition of the importance of workplace and environmental factors in causing or aggravating common medical conditions. Because of limited training in evaluating workplace and environmental hazards, general physicians may find it difficult to target a general medical history to detect essential occupational details. PMID:7164437

  11. Observations regarding the Development of Occupational/Skill Clusters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCage, Ronald D.

    This paper presents an overview and suggestions about the development of occupational and skill clusters by the Vocational-Technical Education Consortium of States (V-TECS), based on the observations of the executive director of the organization. Aspects reviewed include the following: development of occupational and skill clusters; classification…

  12. Predicting Adult Occupational Environments from Gender and Childhood Personality Traits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Stephen A.; Hampson, Sarah E.

    2010-01-01

    To test aspects of a theory of the role of personality and gender on the development of vocational interests and their subsequent effects on adult occupational choices, the authors of this study examined associations among childhood personality traits, gender, and occupational environments more than 40 years later. Participants (N = 587) were…

  13. Health Occupations Cluster Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    Intended to assist the vocational teacher in designing and implementing a cluster program in health occupations, this guide suggests ideas for teaching the specific knowledge and skills that qualify students for entry-level employment in the health occupations field. The knowledge and skills are applicable to 12 occupations: dental assistant;…

  14. Mexico, maquiladoras, and occupational medicine training.

    PubMed

    Cordes, D H; Rea, D F; Schwartz, I; Rea, J

    1989-01-01

    Industrialization and its concomitant social and environmental effects in developing countries are considered in this paper. Mexico offers one example of economic progress achieved through the promotion of industrial growth. Recognising the need for trained experts with global experience in occupational health, the University of Arizona (UA) has begun a programme to train occupational and preventive medicine residents in international aspects of occupational health in the nearby industrialized border regions of Mexico. By using the maquiladora (assembly plant) industries and the resources of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social with the State of Sonora, residents observe existing problems in occupational safety and health in addition to adding to their understanding of the need for worldwide cooperation for research and reform in this field. PMID:2719874

  15. Occupational Health and Safety Program at Metropolitan State College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewey, Fred M.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews various aspects of the Occupational Health and Safety (OH&S) Program at Metropolitan State College, Denver, including the historical development of the program, its curriculum, continuing education courses, and resources for the OH&S Program. (CS)

  16. Medical Terminology of the Musculoskeletal System. Medical Records. Instructional Unit for the Medical Transcriber.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gosman, Minna L.

    Following an analysis of the task of transcribing as practiced in a health facility, this study guide was developed to teach the knowledge and skills required of a medical transcriber. The medical record department was identified as a major occupational area, and a task inventory for medical records was developed and used as a basis for a…

  17. Medical Terminology of the Circulatory System. Medical Records. Instructional Unit for the Medical Transcriber.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gosman, Minna L.

    Developed as a result of an analysis of the task of transcribing as practiced in a health facility, this study guide was designed to teach the knowledge and skills required of a medical transcriber. The medical record department was identified as a major occupational area, and a task inventory for medical records was developed and used as a basis…

  18. New aspects of the German 'scientific nursing' movement before World War I: Florence Nightingale's Notes on nursing disguised as part of a medical tradition.

    PubMed

    Schweikardt, Christoph

    2006-12-01

    A group of German physicians propagated 'scientific nursing' in the 1890s in order to establish it as a medical specialty. Martin Mendelsohn (1860-1930) emerged as the figurehead of this movement. One of his earliest key publications on this topic appeared in 1890, with a second edition in 1892. It was entitled The comfort of the sick (Der Comfort des Kranken). The comparison with Florence Nightingale's (1820-1910) Notes on nursing led to the conclusion that Mendelsohn's book constitutes a hitherto unknown and unacknowledged reception of her ideas. Mendelsohn took great pains to demonstrate a medical tradition of 'scientific nursing' dating from antiquity. However, chapters 2-8 distinctly show a large number of passages that correspond to the Notes on nursing. Acknowledging Florence Nightingale would not have served Mendelsohn's interests. In his view, the role assigned to nurses was much more restricted than in the Notes on nursing and entailed merely carrying out physicians' orders. Consequently, the development of nursing in England was not an example to be followed. Although the 'scientific nursing' movement failed, its ideas on the role of nurses were incorporated into the regulations of the Prussian state nursing examination of 1907. PMID:17100800

  19. Development of a biomedical data base on the medical aspects of chemical defense. Annual report, 19 November 1987-31 October 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Landry, L.A.

    1988-12-01

    This report documents a one-year period of activities encompassing the further development and maintenance of the automated information system known as the Chemical Agent Retrieval System (CARS) for the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense (USAMRICD). During the period 19 November 1987 through 31 December 1988, Associate Consultants, Inc. (ACI), creator of the prototype system, expanded the database with relevant research articles taken from USAMRICD research reports and CRDEC holdings, medical and scientific libraries within the Washington area, and on-line searches of machine-readable databases containing citations from the worldwide literature. Within the 12-month period, ACI also succeeded in modifying the CARS Thesaurus by making key revisions. The CARS Thesaurus now includes a faceted structure using general biomedical index terms and tree structures. Significant automation with the Automated Citation Tracking System (CITES) and the CARS Update Tracking System (CUTS) significantly increased the efficiency and level of production while providing reduced costs to the government.

  20. Occupational health and safety issues in military field hospitals.

    PubMed

    Bricknell, M C

    2001-10-01

    This paper considers the occupational health and safety issues that apply within a military field hospital. It considers NHS occupational health and safety activities and examines how these might be applied within an Army Medical Services unit. Areas that are unique to field hospitals are highlighted in comparison with a static NHS hospital. Some issues for future work are also considered. PMID:11766206

  1. Occupational asthma in a national disability survey

    SciTech Connect

    Blanc, P.

    1987-10-01

    The contribution of workplace exposures to the prevalence of asthma in adults has been minimized in the epidemiology of this illness. Analysis of the 1978 Social Security Disability Survey provides a population-based assessment as a novel approach utilizing self-attributed, occupationally related asthma as a measure of disease. Of 6063 respondents, 468 (7.7 percent) identified asthma as a personal medical condition; 72 (1.2 percent (15.4 percent of all those with asthma)) attributed it to workplace exposures. These subjects were older and included more men and cigarette smokers than groups of both asthmatic and nonasthmatic subjects. The relative risk for occupationally attributed asthma was elevated among industrial and agricultural workers as compared with white collar and service occupations. Analysis of disability benefit status did not indicate that this introduced major reporting bias in this survey. This study suggests that occupational factors may have a greater role in adult asthma than previously thought.

  2. Recent Trends in Occupational Contact Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Wiszniewska, Marta; Walusiak-Skorupa, Jolanta

    2015-07-01

    Occupational contact dermatitis (OCD) remains prevalent among workers and impacts quality of life and workability. The purpose of this review is to summarize the recent advances in occupational contact dermatitis as well as potential hazardous agents in the workplaces causing OCD. The review covers new developments in the epidemiology, etiology, diagnosis, and management of occupational contact dermatitis. This article also provides updated information on the prevalence of work-related skin symptoms and on new contact allergens among working population. It is emphasized that in the context of prevention of OCD, special attention should be focused on the identified high-risk occupational groups, especially healthcare workers and hairdressers starting with the apprentices. Current approaches include working out the standards and guidelines to improve the education, knowledge, diagnosis, and management of OCD based on a multidisciplinary team of medical specialists and an employer. PMID:26143395

  3. [Medical aspect of the winter march of the Fifth Regiment of the Eighth Military Division in the winter of 1902 - particularly concerning the cause of Major Yamaguchi's death].

    PubMed

    Matsuki, A

    1993-09-01

    Two hundred and ten military soldiers of the Fifth Regiment of the Eighth Division of the Japan Imperial Army joined a marching practice in the end of January, 1902, but 193 soldiers out of 210 died due to severe frost-bite during stormy weather and only seventeen, including Major Yamaguchi, were rescued to survive and brought to the Veteran's Administration Hospital at Aomori. This accident was most tragic and world-shaking for the Japanese people as well as for the Japanese Imperial Army. In December of 1991, an admission record of the Veteran's Administration Hospital at Aomori was found in the residence of Dr. Murakami of Aomori City. Judging from its handwriting, this record was written by a military physician Ki-ichi Murakami, Dr. Murakami's uncle. The record describes the details of seventeen patients, most of whom were severely injured and frost-bitten during the winter march. The content of this newly discovered record is similar to the report written by the military physicians of the Fifth Regiment which appeared in the Japan Imperial Military Medical Journal, but a more detailed description about Major Yamaguchi's vital signs, and symptoms of his frost-bite were found in the former. In the journal, Major Yamaguchi was reported to have died because of sudden cardiac arrest but Jiro Nitta described in his novel "Death March on Mount Hakkoda" that he committed suicide using his gun. However, this record strongly tells us that both of his hands, as well as both lower extremities, were severely frost-bitten and swollen and that he could not pull the trigger of his gun with his fingers. Since Jiro Nitta's novel has been published, it is widely accepted that Major Yamaguchi committed suicide with his gun. But we do not have any definite proof to substantiate his suicide. The present detailed survey on the medical references strongly suggests that he could not have pulled his gun's trigger by himself. PMID:11639765

  4. Educational Statistics for Selected Health Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Donald W.; Holz, Frank M.

    Detailed statistics on education are provided for a number of health occupations. Data are given as far back as 1950-1951 for medical and dental schools, while for schools of public health, the data begin in 1975-1976. Complete 1980 data are provided only for dentistry, pharmacy, and veterinary medicine. Statistical tables are included on the…

  5. Health Occupations Education--A Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clanton, Kaye Reames

    Developed to provide curriculum materials that secondary Health Occupations Education (HOE) teachers/coordinators can use in organizing their individual programs, this curriculum guide contains performance-based units covering the majority of a four-semester program of study in HOE. The following topics are covered: medical ethics, law, and…

  6. The structure of expert diagnostic knowledge in occupational medicine.

    PubMed

    Harber, P; McCoy, J M; Shimozaki, S; Coffman, P; Bailey, K

    1991-01-01

    Development of an artificial intelligence expert system for diagnosing occupational lung disease requires explicit specification of the structure of knowledge necessary in clinical occupational medicine independent of the process by which the knowledge is utilized. Furthermore, explicit recognition of sources of uncertainty is necessary. Seven categories of knowledge define the diagnostic knowledge base in occupational pulmonary medicine. These include four objects (jobs, industries, exposures, and diseases) and three relationships between pairs of objects. This analysis demonstrates some of the unique aspects of occupational medicine expertise. PMID:1989431

  7. Organisational Communication and Its Relationships with Occupational Stress of Primary School Staff in Western Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Nobile, John

    2016-01-01

    Occupational stress is an important issue for most occupations and often arises when the demands of the workplace become excessive or aspects of work are unpleasant. If left unmanaged occupational stress can lead to a range of outcomes that can cost organisations dearly, including burnout, physical sickness, absenteeism and turnover. Some aspects…

  8. Occupational Well-Being of School Staff Members: A Structural Equation Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saaranen, Terhi; Tossavainen, Kerttu; Turunen, Hannele; Kiviniemi, Vesa; Vertio, Harri

    2007-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a theoretical basis for the promotion of school staff's occupational well-being. The "Content Model for the Promotion of School Community Staff's Occupational Well-being" describes the four aspects of the promotion of occupational well-being ("working conditions", "worker and work", "working community" and "professional…

  9. Legal aspects.

    PubMed

    Escher, A

    1975-01-01

    The manufacture, application, use and disposal of fluorescent whitening agents (FWAs) may give rise to legal questions relating mainly to environmental protection and the effects on man and animals. In addition to legal aspects, certain commercial aspects such as the law of competition and the obligations of industry, including compensation for damage caused by FWAs, are discussed. PMID:1064546

  10. Listing Occupational Carcinogens

    PubMed Central

    Siemiatycki, Jack; Richardson, Lesley; Straif, Kurt; Latreille, Benoit; Lakhani, Ramzan; Campbell, Sally; Rousseau, Marie-Claude; Boffetta, Paolo

    2004-01-01

    The occupational environment has been a most fruitful one for investigating the etiology of human cancer. Many recognized human carcinogens are occupational carcinogens. There is a large volume of epidemiologic and experimental data concerning cancer risks in different work environments. It is important to synthesize this information for both scientific and public health purposes. Various organizations and individuals have published lists of occupational carcinogens. However, such lists have been limited by unclear criteria for which recognized carcinogens should be considered occupational carcinogens, and by inconsistent and incomplete information on the occupations and industries in which the carcinogenic substances may be found and on their target sites of cancer. Based largely on the evaluations published by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, and augmented with additional information, the present article represents an attempt to summarize, in tabular form, current knowledge on occupational carcinogens, the occupations and industries in which they are found, and their target organs. We have considered 28 agents as definite occupational carcinogens, 27 agents as probable occupational carcinogens, and 113 agents as possible occupational carcinogens. These tables should be useful for regulatory or preventive purposes and for scientific purposes in research priority setting and in understanding carcinogenesis. PMID:15531427

  11. 20 CFR 10.116 - What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... based on occupational disease? 10.116 Section 10.116 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION... of Proof § 10.116 What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease? (a) The... occupational diseases. The medical report should also include the information specified on the checklist...

  12. 20 CFR 10.116 - What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... based on occupational disease? 10.116 Section 10.116 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION... of Proof § 10.116 What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease? (a) The... occupational diseases. The medical report should also include the information specified on the checklist...

  13. 20 CFR 10.116 - What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... based on occupational disease? 10.116 Section 10.116 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION... of Proof § 10.116 What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease? (a) The... particular occupational diseases. The medical report should also include the information specified on...

  14. 20 CFR 10.116 - What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... based on occupational disease? 10.116 Section 10.116 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION... of Proof § 10.116 What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease? (a) The... particular occupational diseases. The medical report should also include the information specified on...

  15. 20 CFR 10.116 - What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... based on occupational disease? 10.116 Section 10.116 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION... of Proof § 10.116 What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease? (a) The... particular occupational diseases. The medical report should also include the information specified on...

  16. Conducting the Medical History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkel, Martin A.; Alexander, Randell A.

    2011-01-01

    A key portion of the medical evaluation of child sexual abuse is the medical history. This differs from interviews or histories obtained by other professionals in that it is focuses more on the health and well-being of the child. Careful questions should be asked about all aspects of the child's medical history by a skilled, compassionate,…

  17. Occupational lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Cone, J E

    1987-01-01

    The author addresses the attribution of lung cancer to cigarette smoking and the problems of confounding synergistic effects of occupational and other carcinogenic risk factors, as well as the divergent trends of declining smoking rates and increasing rates of lung cancer. He also reviews the existing literature to document associations between lung cancer and occupational exposures. Finally, interventions for prevention of occupational lung cancer are discussed. PMID:3303381

  18. Occupational lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Cone, J.E.

    1987-04-01

    The author addresses the attribution of lung cancer to cigarette smoking and the problems of confounding synergistic effects of occupational and other carcinogenic risk factors, as well as the divergent trends of declining smoking rates and increasing rates of lung cancer. He also reviews the existing literature to document associations between lung cancer and occupational exposures. Finally, interventions for prevention of occupational lung cancer are discussed.

  19. Study on a model for future occupational health: proposal for an occupational health service model in Japan.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Toshiaki

    2006-10-01

    submit reports on risk evaluation and improvement measures; (2) establishment of the obligation to prepare a report on results of medical examinations in all sizes of businesses. 4. Introduction of a merit system into businesses in establishment of a new system: the application of the special merit system of the workers' compensation insurance shall be revised to add occupational health activities, cover business with 20 or more to 100 or less employees and expand the period of application for three years under the present laws to five years. 5. Ensuring of international coordination: harmonization of standards of individual countries for occupational health and safety; thorough (1) ensuring of international agreement on high-level specialist qualifications; (2) mutual recognition of qualifications of occupational physician, nurse, occupational hygienist, ergonomist, and counselor; (3) preparation of guidelines for occupations relating to occupational health businesses. PMID:17085915

  20. Estimation of an Occupational Choice Model when Occupations Are Misclassified

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Paul

    2009-01-01

    This paper develops an empirical occupational choice model that corrects for misclassification in occupational choices and measurement error in occupation-specific work experience. The model is used to estimate the extent of measurement error in occupation data and quantify the bias that results from ignoring measurement error in occupation codes…

  1. Occupational influences on retirement, disability, and death.

    PubMed

    Hayward, M D; Grady, W R; Hardy, M A; Sommers, D

    1989-08-01

    This research examines the alternative mechanisms by which occupations influence the nature and timing of older men's labor force withdrawal. We specifically assess the extent to which occupational factors operate directly and indirectly on exiting events and whether occupations constrain traditional determinants of labor force participation. Based on a discrete-time hazard modeling approach, the results substantiate that the occupational task activities--substantive complexity and physical demands--are key elements of the work environment that are evaluated against nonwork alternatives. In the case of retirement, these aspects of occupational attractiveness function as a dominant and direct force in retirement decision making. With regard to disability, the occupational attribute of substantive complexity operates as an indirect advantage (through higher wages) by reducing the risk of disability. Indicators of career continuity also influence retirement among older workers. Finally, the results suggest that financial characteristics and health problems are central to the distribution of older workers across the alternative destination statuses of retirement, disability, and death. PMID:2529146

  2. Occupational cancer in Italy.

    PubMed Central

    Merler, E; Vineis, P; Alhaique, D; Miligi, L

    1999-01-01

    This article is a discussion of occupational cancer in Italy. The introduction provides the necessary context of Italian industrialization and occupational health regulation. This is followed by a review of Italian epidemiologic studies of occupational cancer risks considered in terms of relative measures of risk and attributable risk of carcinogenic agents or exposure circumstances. We attempt to establish the number of workers exposed to carcinogens in Italy and the intensity of their exposures. Finally, the Italian system of compensation for occupational cancer is discussed. Several cohort and case-control studies have addressed the issue of occupational risks, mostly among male workers. The results of these studies suggest that the growing incidence of and mortality by mesothelioma is explained by the widespread and intense exposure to asbestos in some Italian industrial settings. A high attributable risk of lung tumors among male populations in industrial areas of northern Italy is explained by occupational exposures. However, insufficient data are available for clear definition of the extent and intensity of occupational exposure to carcinogenic substances. In Italy, we must prioritize and maximize resources in occupational cancer epidemiology and revitalize the role of national institutions. Recent legislation has established new regulations on the handling of carcinogenic substances in industrial settings, a new list of occupational diseases, and a national registry of mesothelioma linked to asbestos exposure. These legislative changes are expected to have positive effects. PMID:10350509

  3. Minimizing Occupational Exposure to Antineoplastic Agents.

    PubMed

    Polovich, Martha

    2016-01-01

    The inherent toxicity of antineoplastic drugs used for the treatment of cancer makes them harmful to healthy cells as well as to cancer cells. Nurses who prepare and/or administer the agents potentially are exposed to the drugs and their negative effects. Knowledge about these drugs and the precautions aimed at reducing exposure are essential aspects of infusion nursing practice. This article briefly reviews the mechanisms of action of common antineoplastic drugs, the adverse outcomes associated with exposure, the potential for occupational exposure from preparation and administration, and recommended strategies for minimizing occupational exposure. PMID:27598070

  4. Occupational Health Update: Focus on Preventing the Acquisition of Infections with Pre-exposure Prophylaxis and Postexposure Prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Weber, David J; Rutala, William A

    2016-09-01

    Health care personnel are commonly exposed to infectious agents via sharp injuries (eg, human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B virus, and hepatitis C virus), direct patient care (eg, pertussis and meningococcus), and the contaminated environment (eg, Clostridium difficile). An effective occupational program is a key aspect of preventing acquisition of an infection by offering the following: (1) education of health care personnel regarding proper handling of sharps, early identification and isolation of potentially infectious patients, and hand hygiene; (2) assuring immunity to vaccine-preventable diseases; and, (3) immediate availability of a medical evaluation after a nonprotected exposure to an infectious disease. PMID:27515145

  5. Occupational health in the People's Republic of China.

    PubMed Central

    Christiani, D C

    1984-01-01

    China's drive to modernize its economy will produce new occupational health problems even as it resolves earlier ones. Well aware of this, Chinese occupational health experts are intensifying efforts to improve workers' health and establish a modern occupational health program. Occupational lung disease, occupational cancer, heavy metal poisoning, industrial chemical poisoning, and physical factor-induced diseases (noise and heat) have all been targeted for expanded research which will serve as a basis for standard setting. Hazard control efforts include engineering controls, particularly in new construction, limited use of personal protective equipment, and expansion of environmental and medical monitoring. Worker education and professional activities have been expanded. International exchanges have been initiated and will prove occupational health a promising area of scientific cooperation. PMID:6228153

  6. Medical Information Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterescu, S.; Hipkins, K. R.; Friedman, C. A.

    1979-01-01

    On-line interactive information processing system easily and rapidly handles all aspects of data management related to patient care. General purpose system is flexible enough to be applied to other data management situations found in areas such as occupational safety data, judicial information, or personnel records.

  7. 29 CFR 1910.151 - Medical services and first aid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Medical services and first aid. 1910.151 Section 1910.151 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Medical and First Aid § 1910.151 Medical services and first aid. (a) The employer shall...

  8. 29 CFR 1910.151 - Medical services and first aid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Medical services and first aid. 1910.151 Section 1910.151 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Medical and First Aid § 1910.151 Medical services and first aid. (a) The employer shall...

  9. 29 CFR 1910.151 - Medical services and first aid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Medical services and first aid. 1910.151 Section 1910.151 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Medical and First Aid § 1910.151 Medical services and first aid. (a) The employer shall...

  10. [Lung Cancer as an Occupational Disease].

    PubMed

    Baur, X; Woitowitz, H-J

    2016-08-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most frequently encountered cancer types. According to the latest WHO data, about 10 % of this disease are due to occupational exposure to cancerogens. Asbestos is still the number one carcinogen. Further frequent causes include quarz and ionizing radiation (uranium mining). Probable causes of the disease can be identified only with the help of detailed occupational history taken by a medical specialist and qualified exposure assessment. Without clarifying the cause of the disease, there is neither a correct insurance procedure nor compensation for the victim, and furthermore, required preventive measures cannot be initiated. PMID:27512930

  11. Teacher's Guide to Occupational Orientation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Evaluation Systems, Inc., Amherst, MA.

    This guide is specifically designed to accompany materials developed for occupational orientation (particularly in Illinois) in the following five cluster areas: Applied biological and agricultural occupations; personal and public service occupations; health occupations; business, marketing, and management occupations; and industrial oriented…

  12. Welding. Occupational Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Occupational Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP), which is one of a series of OCAPs developed to identify the skills that Ohio employers deem necessary to entering a given occupation/occupational area, lists the occupational, academic, and employability skills required of individuals entering the occupation of welder. The introduction explains…

  13. Occupation and Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aschebrook-Kilfoy, Briseis; Ward, Mary H.; Valle, Curt T. Della; Friesen, Melissa C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Numerous occupational and environmental exposures have been shown to disrupt thyroid hormones, but much less is known about their relationships with thyroid cancer. Here we review the epidemiology studies of occupations and occupational exposures and thyroid cancer incidence to provide insight into preventable risk factors for thyroid cancer. Methods The published literature was searched using the Web of Knowledge database for all articles through August 2013 that had in their text “occupation” “job” ”employment” or “work” and “thyroid cancer”. After excluding 10 mortality studies and 4 studies with less than 5 exposed incident cases, we summarized the findings of 30 articles that examined thyroid cancer incidence in relation to occupations or occupational exposure. The studies were grouped by exposure/occupation category, study design, and exposure assessment approach. Where available, gender stratified results are reported. Results The most studied (19 of 30 studies) and the most consistent associations were observed for radiation-exposed workers and health care occupations. Suggestive, but inconsistent, associations were observed in studies of pesticide-exposed workers and agricultural occupations. Findings for other exposures and occupation groups were largely null. The majority of studies had few exposed cases and assessed exposure based on occupation or industry category, self-report, or generic (population-based) job exposure matrices. Conclusion The suggestive, but inconsistent findings for many of the occupational exposures reviewed here indicate that more studies with larger numbers of cases and better exposure assessment are necessary, particularly for exposures known to disrupt thyroid homeostasis. PMID:24604144

  14. Utilization of occupational therapy in combat stress control during the Persian Gulf War.

    PubMed

    Ellsworth, P D; Sinnott, M W; Laedtke, M E; McPhee, S D

    1993-06-01

    This article chronicles the deployment and subsequent utilization of occupational therapy personnel in support of combat stress control operations during the Persian Gulf War. It presents a discussion of occupational therapy's military history, evolving doctrine, and selected training experiences which led to the attachment of occupational therapy personnel to the 528th Medical Detachment (Psychiatric OM Team). A description of roles, functions, methods of operation, and lessons learned help to clarify the direction of occupational therapy in its future wartime mission. PMID:8361595

  15. Occupational asthma: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Lombardo, L J; Balmes, J R

    2000-01-01

    Occupational asthma is the most common form of occupational lung disease in the developed world at the present time. In this review, the epidemiology, pathogenesis/mechanisms, clinical presentations, management, and prevention of occupational asthma are discussed. The population attributable risk of asthma due to occupational exposures is considerable. Current understanding of the mechanisms by which many agents cause occupational asthma is limited, especially for low-molecular-weight sensitizers and irritants. The diagnosis of occupational asthma is generally established on the basis of a suggestive history of a temporal association between exposure and the onset of symptoms and objective evidence that these symptoms are related to airflow limitation. Early diagnosis, elimination of exposure to the responsible agent, and early use of inhaled steroids may play important roles in the prevention of long-term persistence of asthma. Persistent occupational asthma is often associated with substantial disability and consequent impacts on income and quality of life. Prevention of new cases is the best approach to reducing the burden of asthma attributable to occupational exposures. Future research needs are identified. PMID:10931788

  16. Counselling for Occupational Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nwamuo, P. A.; Ugonna, C. E.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to ascertain the general attitude which senior secondary school students display towards counselling for occupational development while determining gender difference in students' attitude towards occupational information. It is also aimed at discovering whether these students seek vocational guidance in their choice of…

  17. Testosterone and Occupational Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dabbs, James M., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Archival data on 4,462 military veterans linked higher levels of serum testosterone to lower-status occupations. A structural equation model was supported in which higher testosterone, mediated through lower intellectual ability, greater antisocial behavior, and lower education, leads away from white-collar occupations. Contains 49 references.…

  18. Occupational Assimilation of Refugees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finnan, Christine Robinson

    1981-01-01

    Presents a model explaining how refugee communities help their members accept the downward occupational mobility usually associated with refugee resettlement. Describes how refugees shape an image of themselves consistent with the occupational role, while shaping an image of the role consistent with their self-image. (Author MK)

  19. Bricklayer. Occupational Analyses Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cap, Orest; Cap, Ihor; Semenovych, Viktor

    This analysis covers tasks performed by a bricklayer, an occupational title some provinces and territories of Canada have also identified as bricklayer-mason, brick and stone mason, and mason. A guide to analysis discusses development, structure, and validation method; scope of the occupation; trends; and safety. To facilitate understanding the…

  20. Cabinetmaker. Occupational Analysis Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chinien, Chris; Boutin, France

    This document contains the analysis of the occupation of cabinetmaker, or joiner, that is accepted by the Canadian Council of Directors as the national standard for the occupation. The front matter preceding the analysis includes exploration of the development of the analysis, structure of the analysis, validation method, scope of the cabinetmaker…

  1. Barriers to Occupational Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurman, Ernest B.

    The under-representation of women in prestigious occupations and the lower average pay women earn has been of concern for many years. This study investigated two alternative explanations for this under-representation of females in prestigious and higher paying occupations. The first explanation was external barriers such as discrimination, and the…

  2. Characteristics of Occupational Entrants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, Max L.

    1989-01-01

    The United States is mobile society, and mobility is evident in the jobs people hold. From one year to the next, almost 1 worker in 5 enters or returns to an occupation that he/she did not work in 12 months earlier. A worker's age, sex, race, and ethnicity influence likelihood of changing occupations. (Contains detailed data tables.) (JOW)

  3. Occupations and the Farm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewert-Krocker, Laurie

    2001-01-01

    Describes "occupation" as a Montessori term, which the Hershey Montessori Farm School, in Huntsburg, Ohio, has adopted for any task arising from the needs of the farm that then generates a scientific or historic study. Includes lists of occupations pursued during 2000-2001 and samples of record forms students used to manage their work. (Author/KB)

  4. Occupations, U. S. A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geneva Area City Schools, OH.

    The booklet divides job titles, selected from the Dictionary of Occupational Titles, into 15 career clusters: agribusiness and natural resources, business and office education, communication and media, construction, consumer and home economics, fine arts and humanities, health occupations, hospitality and recreation, manufacturing, marine science,…

  5. Perspectives in Occupational Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Mathias, C. G. Toby; Maibach, Howard I.

    1982-01-01

    Because large surface areas of the skin are exposed directly to the environment, skin is an organ particularly vulnerable to occupationally induced disease. Statistics show that, excluding accidental injury, nearly half of all occupational illnesses occur in this organ; a fourth of all workers suffering from occupational skin disease lose an average of 10 to 12 workdays. The constant evolution of new industrial chemicals and methods of manufacture continue to bring new skin hazards and disease into the workplace. Occupational health physicians and practitioners, who usually have minimal training in dermatology, must diagnose and treat unfamiliar diseases in a setting of even less familiar, often overwhelming, technology. A thorough understanding of cutaneous defense mechanisms, clinical patterns of occupational skin disease and methods for establishing accurate diagnoses is essential. PMID:6219498

  6. Impact of medical informatics on medical education.

    PubMed

    Hou, S M

    1999-11-01

    In recent years, medical informatics has become a well-recognized branch of medicine. It is a multidisciplinary science that combines information technology and various specialties of medicine. The impact of medical informatics on medical education is advancing along with the rapid developments in computer science. Departments of medical informatics or similar divisions have appeared in schools of medicine in Taiwan in the past 5 years. At National Taiwan University College of Medicine, we offer curricula in basic computer concepts, network concepts, operating systems, word processing, database and data processing, computer media resources, multimedia computer statistics, intelligent health information systems, medical diagnostic support systems, and electronic medical record systems. Distance learning has also been favorably accepted on this campus. Recently, we proposed the concept of a virtual medical campus, which will break the physical barriers of time and space. We expect this revolution to influence every aspect of medicine, especially medical education. PMID:10705693

  7. Model Occupational Therapy Practice Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 1975

    1975-01-01

    The Model Occupational Therapy Practice Act has been assembled by the Government Affairs Department, American Occupational Therapy Association, for use as a guide for affiliate organizations concerned with developing legislation to regulate the practice of occupational therapy. (Author/JA)

  8. Occupations: Military--Civilian Occupational Source Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armed Forces Vocational Testing Group, Universal City, TX.

    Information on enlisted military occupations is offered in the source book to arrive at a comprehensive statement of job tasks in the military service and their similarities to jobs in civilian life. Basic information about five areas of the U.S. military services (Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard) focuses on their military…

  9. The Occupations of Literacy: Occupational Therapy's Role

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frolek Clark, Gloria

    2016-01-01

    Nationally, student proficiency in reading and writing is very low and requires ongoing focus from state and local agencies. With almost 25% of occupational therapists working in early intervention and school settings (AOTA, 2015), their role of facilitating literacy (e.g., reading, writing, speaking and listening) is critical. Occupational…

  10. MIMS - MEDICAL INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankowski, J. W.

    1994-01-01

    MIMS, Medical Information Management System is an interactive, general purpose information storage and retrieval system. It was first designed to be used in medical data management, and can be used to handle all aspects of data related to patient care. Other areas of application for MIMS include: managing occupational safety data in the public and private sectors; handling judicial information where speed and accuracy are high priorities; systemizing purchasing and procurement systems; and analyzing organizational cost structures. Because of its free format design, MIMS can offer immediate assistance where manipulation of large data bases is required. File structures, data categories, field lengths and formats, including alphabetic and/or numeric, are all user defined. The user can quickly and efficiently extract, display, and analyze the data. Three means of extracting data are provided: certain short items of information, such as social security numbers, can be used to uniquely identify each record for quick access; records can be selected which match conditions defined by the user; and specific categories of data can be selected. Data may be displayed and analyzed in several ways which include: generating tabular information assembled from comparison of all the records on the system; generating statistical information on numeric data such as means, standard deviations and standard errors; and displaying formatted listings of output data. The MIMS program is written in Microsoft FORTRAN-77. It was designed to operate on IBM Personal Computers and compatibles running under PC or MS DOS 2.00 or higher. MIMS was developed in 1987.

  11. Voluntary reporting system for occupational disease: pilot project, evaluation.

    PubMed Central

    Seixas, N S; Rosenman, K D

    1986-01-01

    For 18 months (1983-84), a pilot program was set up to promote the reporting of occupational disease by physicians to a local health agency. The objectives of the program were to increase the awareness among physicians of occupational disease in their practice, assist physicians in the diagnosis and management of the cases, and to provide a mechanism for public health intervention in hazardous working conditions. After discussions with leaders in the medical community, the program was initiated by a letter from the State Health Commissioner to physicians in the pilot county. A single-page reporting form was included with the letter. A bimonthly newsletter to primary care physicians was also begun. Additional educational activity included presentation of grand rounds and a one-day medical conference on the recognition of occupational disease at the single hospital in the county. All physicians reporting occupational disease received copies of all industrial hygiene reports as well as relevant medical literature from the industrial hygienist assigned to investigate all reports by physicians. Only six reports of occupational disease were received. However, three of the six reports resulted in significant intervention. A questionnaire evaluation of the program indicated that there was resistance to involvement in reporting occupational disease, although physicians do recognize occupational disease in their practices regularly. PMID:3086920

  12. Management of medical waste in Tanzanian hospitals.

    PubMed

    Manyele, S V; Anicetus, H

    2006-09-01

    A survey was conducted to study the existing medical waste management (MWM) systems in Tanzanian hospitals during a nationwide health-care waste management-training programme conducted from 2003 to 2005. The aim of the programme was to enable health workers to establish MWM systems in their health facilities aimed at improving infection prevention and control and occupational health aspects. During the training sessions, a questionnaire was prepared and circulated to collect information on the MWM practices existing in hospitals in eight regions of the Tanzania. The analysis showed that increased population and poor MWM systems as well as expanded use of disposables were the main reasons for increased medical wastes in hospitals. The main disposal methods comprised of open pit burning (50%) and burying (30%) of the waste. A large proportion (71%) of the hospitals used dust bins for transporting waste from generation points to incinerator without plastic bags. Most hospitals had low incineration capacity, with few of them having fire brick incinerators. Most of the respondents preferred on-site versus off-site waste incineration. Some hospitals were using untrained casual labourers in medical waste management and general cleanliness. The knowledge level in MWM issues was low among the health workers. It is concluded that hospital waste management in Tanzania is poor. There is need for proper training and management regarding awareness and practices of medical waste management to cover all carders of health workers in the country. PMID:18254511

  13. The medical alumni story.

    PubMed

    Lim, K H

    2005-07-01

    The Medical Alumni is unique in being the oldest alumni association with medical, dental and pharmacy graduates from our seminal medical school, that has now evolved into the faculties of medicine in 2 countries, namely Malaysia and Singapore. Founded in 1923, the medical alumni association has undergone several name changes with its evolution and activism. After the Japanese Occupation, it was given its present name in 1947, comprising 3 branches working under a common Constitution operating in 2 separate countries. It is also unique in being the only association recognised by the Registrar of Societies with membership in 2 countries. Following the development of medical professional and academic bodies, the medical alumni wound down its medico-political activities to concentrate on providing social and mutual support for its members and its alma mater. PMID:16010406

  14. Occupational cancer in Britain

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yiqun; Osman, John

    2012-01-01

    Although only a relatively small proportion of cancer is attributable to occupational exposure to carcinogenic agents, the estimated number of deaths due to occupational cancer is high when compared to other deaths due to work-related ill health and injury. However, risk from occupational exposure to carcinogens can be minimised through proportionate but effective risk management. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is the regulator of workplace health and safety in Great Britain. As part of its aim to reduce ill health arising from failures to control properly exposure to hazards at work, HSE commissioned the research presented elsewhere in this supplement to enable it to identify priorities for preventing occupational cancer. The research has shown that occupational cancer remains a key health issue and that low-level exposure of a large number of workers to carcinogens is important. The finding that a small number of carcinogens have been responsible for the majority of the burden of occupational cancer provides key evidence in the development of priorities for significant reduction of occupational cancer. Although the research presented in this supplement reflects the consequences of past exposures to carcinogens, occupational cancer remains a problem. The potential for exposure to the agents considered in this research is still present in the workplace and the findings are relevant to prevention of future disease. In this article, the principle approaches for risk reduction are described. It provides supporting information on some of the initiatives already being undertaken, or those being put in place, to reduce occupational cancer in Great Britain. The need also for systematic collection of exposure information and the importance of raising awareness and changing behaviours are discussed. PMID:22710673

  15. Effects of occupational stress on the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Huerta-Franco, María-Raquel; Vargas-Luna, Miguel; Tienda, Paola; Delgadillo-Holtfort, Isabel; Balleza-Ordaz, Marco; Flores-Hernandez, Corina

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide a general overview of the relationship between occupational stress and gastrointestinal alterations. The International Labour Organization suggests occupational health includes psychological aspects to achieve mental well-being. However, the definition of health risks for an occupation includes biological, chemical, physical and ergonomic factors but does not address psychological stress or other affective disorders. Nevertheless, multiple investigations have studied occupational stress and its physiological consequences, focusing on specific risk groups and occupations considered stressful. Among the physiological effects of stress, gastrointestinal tract (GIT) alterations are highly prevalent. The relationship between occupational stress and GIT diseases is evident in everyday clinical practice; however, the usual strategy is to attack the effects but not the root of the problem. That is, in clinics, occupational stress is recognized as a source of GIT problems, but employers do not ascribe it enough importance as a risk factor, in general, and for gastrointestinal health, in particular. The identification, stratification, measurement and evaluation of stress and its associated corrective strategies, particularly for occupational stress, are important topics to address in the near future to establish the basis for considering stress as an important risk factor in occupational health. PMID:24244879

  16. Occupational Asthma in a Cable Manufacturing Company

    PubMed Central

    Attarchi, Mirsaeed; Dehghan, Faezeh; Yazdanparast, Taraneh; Mohammadi, Saber; Golchin, Mahdie; Sadeghi, Zargham; Moafi, Masoud; Seyed Mehdi, Seyed Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background: During the past decade, incidence of asthma has increased, which might have been due to environmental exposures. Objectives: Considering the expansion of cable manufacturing industry in Iran, the present study was conducted to evaluate the prevalence of occupational asthma in a cable manufacturing company in Iran as well as its related factors. Patients and Methods: This study was conducted on employees of a cable manufacturing company in Yazd, Iran, in 2012. The workers were divided into two groups of exposure (to toluene diisocyanate, polyvinyl chloride, polyethylene or polypropylene) and without exposure. Diagnosis of occupational asthma was made based on the subjects’ medical history, spirometry and peak flowmetry, and its frequency was compared between the two groups. Results: The overall prevalence of occupational asthma was 9.7%. This rate was 13.8% in the exposed group. Logistic regression analysis showed that even after adjustment for confounding factors, a significant correlation existed between the frequency of occupational asthma and exposure to the produced dust particles (P < 0.05). In addition, age, work experience, body mass index, cigarette smoking and shift work had significant correlations with the prevalence of occupational asthma (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Considering the high prevalence of occupational asthma among cable manufacturing company workers in Iran, this issue needs to be addressed immediately in addition to reduction of exposure among subjects. Reduction in work shift duration, implementation of tobacco control and cessation programs for the personnel, and performing spirometry tests and respiratory examinations in shorter periods may be among effective measures for reducing the incidence of occupational asthma in this industry. PMID:25558389

  17. The Atlantic Seaduck Project: Medical Aspects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olsen, G.H.; Perry, M.C.; Wells, A.M.; Lohnes, E.J.R.; Osenton, P.C.

    2005-01-01

    Some populations of seaducks, especially scoters along the Atlantic Coast, have been declining over recent decades. A joint US-Canadian tearn has been working to capture and surgically implant satellite radio transmitters in these ducks. Black scoters (Melanitta nigra) captured on the Restigouche River in New Brunswick, Canada and surf scoters (M. perspicilata) captured on Chesapeake Bay, Maryland, USA have been tracked by the use of Argos/NOAA polar orbiting operational environmental satellites to their breeding and molting areas and back south to their wintering ranges. Successful capture techniques included night-lighting and a capture net gun. A captive colony of seaducks has been maintained for feeding habits and nutritional studies. Veterinary medicine has played a key role in the surgical implantation of the satellite transmitters and in developing heath procedures for the captive seaduck colony.

  18. [Medical aspects of diving in the tropics].

    PubMed

    Muth, C M; Müller, P; Kemmer, A

    2005-07-01

    Scuba diving vacations in tropical surroundings belong to the repertoire of most divers. In addition to carefully making travel plans and taking care of the necessary vaccinations and appropriate malaria prophylaxis, the following points also must be observed. The flight itself affects diving safety. In particular, a too short time interval between diving and the return flight can lead to decompression problems. Because most of the diving areas are reached by ship, many divers need a prophylaxis against motion sickness. Moreover, external otitis occurs more frequently while diving in the tropics. Finally, there is potential danger from the sea inhabitants, primarily from scorpion fishes, Portuguese Man-of-Wars, box jellyfishes as well as cone snails. PMID:16041936

  19. Mapping the literature of occupational therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Reed, K L

    1999-01-01

    Occupational therapy, formally organized in the United States in 1917, is considered an allied health field. Mapping occupational therapy literature is part of a bibliometric project of the Medical Library Association's Nursing and Allied Health Resources Section's project for mapping the literature of allied health. Three core journals were selected from the years 1995 and 1996 and a determination was made of the extent to which the cited journal references were covered by standard indexing sources. Using Bradford's Law of Scattering three zones were created, each containing approximately one-third of the cited journal references. The results showed that three journals made up the first zone, 117 journals the second, and 657 the third. The most cited journal was the American Journal of Occupational Therapy. In the second zone, journals from twelve disciplines were identified. While MEDLINE provided the best overall indexing, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) was the only database that indexed the three most cited journals plus nine of the currently active titles in occupational therapy. MEDLINE could improve its coverage of occupational therapy by indexing the journals of the British, Canadian, and Australian national associations. PMID:10427431

  20. Occupational Titles Including Job Descriptions for Health Occupations Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    East Texas State Univ., Commerce. Occupational Curriculum Lab.

    This alphabetical compilation of 80 occupational titles for health occupations education is taken from the Dictionary of Occupational Titles, (DOT), 4th edition, 1977. An index shows the arrangement of the occupational titles (together with instructional program and DOT code) according to the United States Office of Education code numbers. For…

  1. Medicine on Mars: Remote medical care and the space exploration initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, S. C.; Billica, R. D.

    1992-01-01

    Mars exploration missions as described in the Synthesis Group report will involve extended exposures of crew members to remote, hazardous environments for up to 100 days. Maintenance of crew health and performance will be critical to ensure mission success. Because of the great distances between the Earth and Mars, round trip telecommunication will take from seven to forty minutes and immediate return to Earth will not be feasible: an autonomous medical care system that integrates preventive, occupational, and environmental aspects of health care and provides diagnostic and treatment capabilities will be necessary. Providing medical care for Mars explorers will pose some unique technical and engineering challenges. Medical care equipment will need to be designed to be modular and portable to ensure that it is interchangeable between vehicle and planetary surface elements. Miniaturization will be necessary to reduce mass and volume. Computerized systems that automatically acquire and manage medical information and provide medical references (literature), decision support, and automated medical record keeping will be a crucial part of a Martian medical care system. Medical care will also rely on remote consultation with Earth-based specialists. This presentation will provide an overview of the health and medical concerns associated with Mars exploration missions and will describe some specific concepts for Mars medical care systems.

  2. [Psychological aspects of induced abortion].

    PubMed

    Mouniq, C; Moron, P

    1982-06-01

    Results are presented of a literature review to identify social and psychological aspects of abortion. The literature does not provide a true profile of women requesting abortions, but some characteristics emerge. Reasons for requesting abortion include economic problems, difficult previous pregnancies, general medical contraindications to pregnancy, marital conflicts, feelings of loneliness, professional aspirations, problems with existing children, and feelings of insecurity about the future. However, the same feelings are found among women carrying their pregnancies to term. Unplanned pregnancies are more common during periods of depression. Most authors have found about 1/2 of women seeking abortions to be single and about 1/2 to be under 25 years old. Religion does not appear to be a determining factor. 1 study of psychological factors in abortion seekers found that a large number of single women seeking abortion had suffered traumatic experiences in childhood and were seeking security in inappropriate amorous relationships. Helene Deutsch stressed the destructive impulses latent in all pregnancies. Others have cited the ambivalence of the desire for pregnancy and feelings of loss after abortion. Studies published after legalization of abortion in the US and France however have stressed the nearly total absence of moderate or severe psychiatric symptoms after abortion. Responses immediately after the abortion may include feelings of relief, guilt, indifference, or ambivalence. Secondary affects appear minor to most authors. Psychological effects do not appear to be influenced by age, marital status, parity, intelligence, occupation, existence of a later pregnancy, or concommitant sterilization. "Premorbidity" and coercion by spouse or family were most closely associated with psychological symptoms. Numerous authors have found about twice as many negative reactions among women undergoing abortion for medical reasons. Most patients undergoing abortions for

  3. Occupational Therapy (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ones & When? Smart School Lunches Emmy-Nominated Video "Cerebral Palsy: Shannon's Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & ... traumatic amputations cancer severe hand injuries multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy , and other chronic illnesses Occupational therapists might: help ...

  4. Paternal occupation and anencephaly

    SciTech Connect

    Brender, J.D.; Suarez, L. )

    1990-03-01

    It has been suggested that paternal occupational exposures to pesticides and solvents increase the risk of neural tube defects in offspring. With the use of Texas livebirth, fetal death, and linked livebirth-death records, the authors conducted a population-based case-control study among 1981-1986 Texas births to examine the association between paternal occupation and anencephalic births. Fathers employed in occupations associated with solvent exposure were more likely to have offspring with anencephaly (odds ratio (OR) = 2.53), with painters having the highest risk (OR = 3.43). A lesser association was found for fathers employed in occupations involving pesticide exposure (OR = 1.28). Further studies are indicated to clarify these associations.

  5. Occupational Noise Exposure

    MedlinePlus

    ... OF LABOR Occupational Safety and Health Administration 200 Constitution Ave., NW, Washington, DC 20210 800-321-6742 (OSHA) TTY www.OSHA.gov FEDERAL GOVERNMENT White House Affordable Care Act Disaster Recovery ...

  6. Occupational health in China.

    PubMed

    Christiani, David C; Tan, Xiaodong; Wang, Xiaorong

    2002-01-01

    China has been experiencing rapid industrialization and economic growth, resulting in a transformed industrial structure and expansion of the labor force. Occupational health and safety services, nonexistent before 1949, have made remarkable advances over the past decades. However, these services face greater challenges, consisting of both traditional and new occupational health problems. Poorly regulated work environments often lacking health services in recently developed and thriving small-scale industries and joint venture enterprises have created increasing risks for occupational diseases and work-related injuries. A special strategy based on cooperation among and contributions from the legal, administrative, social, economic, and scientific communities is critical to achieving the ultimate goal of control and prevention of these occupational health problems. PMID:12028948

  7. Occupational health in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Carreón, Tania; Santos-Burgoa, Carlos; Baron, Sherry; Hernández, Sendy

    2002-01-01

    The authors discuss the maquiladoras and child labor, and offer an overview of the history of occupational safety and health in Mexico that covers laws and regulations, social security, unions, and enforcement of legislation. The organization and structure of the various institutions responsible for occupational safety and health (OSH), as well as administrative procedures, are described. This article concludes with a list of the new challenges for OSH in Mexico. PMID:12028953

  8. Occupational health in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Rampal, Krishna Gopal; Aw, Tar-Ching; Jefferelli, Shamsul Bahrin

    2002-01-01

    This article provides a detailed examination of Malaysian occupational health agencies and their roles in formulating and enforcing standards, promoting occupational health and safety (OSH), and providing advisory services. Available OSH training is described, and the need for policies and personnel in various industries is outlined. Further, the authors discuss how international models and collaboration have influenced Malaysian OSH, and how some successes can be repeated and failures remedied. PMID:12028951

  9. New Consultant Joins Occupational Health Services’ Team | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    One of Occupational Health Services’ (OHS') most valuable resources is new medical consultant Anusha Belani, M.D., chief of epidemiology at Frederick Memorial Hospital (FMH). Belani graduated from the University of Delhi and received her medical degree from Lady Hardinge Medical College in 1979. She is currently the only physician in Frederick County who specializes in infectious diseases. After completing her residency at Sinai Hospital, Belani established her own practice in Frederick in January of 1987.

  10. Indoor Chemistry: Materials, Ventilation Systems, and Occupant Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, G.C.; Corsi, R.L.; Destaillats, H.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Wells, J.R.

    2006-05-01

    Chemical processes taking place in indoor environments can significantly alter the nature and concentrations of pollutants. Exposure to secondary contaminants generated in these reactions needs to be evaluated in association with many aspects of buildings to minimize their impact on occupant health and well-being. Focusing on indoor ozone chemistry, we describe alternatives for improving indoor air quality by controlling chemical changes related to building materials, ventilation systems, and occupant activities.

  11. Occupational cancer in Spain.

    PubMed Central

    González, C A; Agudo, A

    1999-01-01

    The knowledge of specific problems of occupational cancer in Spain is scarce. The environment of the workplace has improved over the last few years after a long period distinguished by bad working conditions, incomplete legislation, and insufficient safety measures and control. It has been estimated that 3,083,479 workers (25.4% of employees) were exposed to carcinogens. The most common occupational exposures to carcinogenic agents were solar radiation, environmental tobacco smoke, silica, and wood dust. The highest number of employees were exposed to silica crystalline (404,729), diesel engine exhaust (274,321), rubber products (99,804), benzene (89,932), ethylene dibromide (81,336), agents used in furniture and cabinet making (72,068), and formaldehyde (71,189). The percentage of total cancer deaths attributed to occupational exposure was 4% (6% in men, 0.9% in women). Compared with other European countries, the incidence of lung cancer and leukemia in Spain are one of the lowest, but it is rapidly increasing. The incidence of urinary bladder and larynx cancer, on the contrary, are one of the highest. Few studies on occupational cancer have been conducted in Spain. The main problems are the availability of death certificates and the quality of the information on occupation in mortality of statistics. It is necessary to improve methods of assessment of exposures using expert hygienists and biologic markers of exposure and diseases. Reduction of cancer by limiting or avoiding exposure to known occupational carcinogens is still necessary. PMID:10350510

  12. Secondary Health Occupations Education Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matzen, Shelley; Muhl, V. Jane

    This color coded curriculum guide for secondary health occupations in Iowa provides units for the first phase of the curriculum, career exploration of the health occupations. The nine units cover the following topics: (1) introduction to health occupations; (2) health occupations career exploration; (3) communication skills; (4) self-care and…

  13. Investing in Prospective Cohorts for Etiologic Study of Occupational Exposures

    PubMed Central

    Blair, A.; Hines, C.J.; Thomas, K.W.; Alavanja, M.C.R.; Beane Freeman, L.E.; Hoppin, J.A.; Kamel, F.; Lynch, C.F.; Lubin, J.H.; Silverman, D.T.; Whelan, E.; Zahm, S. H.; Sandler, D. P.

    2015-01-01

    Prospective cohorts have played a major role in understanding the contribution of diet, physical activity, medical conditions, and genes to the development of many diseases, but have not been widely used for occupational exposures. Studies in agriculture are an exception. We draw upon our experience using this design to study agricultural workers to identify conditions that might foster use of prospective cohorts to study other occupational settings. Prospective cohort studies are perceived by many as the strongest epidemiologic design. It allows updating of information on exposure and other factors, collection of biologic samples before disease diagnosis for biomarker studies, assessment of effect modification by genes, lifestyle, and other occupational exposures, and evaluation of a wide range of health outcomes. Increased use of prospective cohorts would be beneficial in identifying hazardous exposures in the workplace. Occupational epidemiologists should seek opportunities to initiate prospective cohorts to investigate high priority, occupational exposures. PMID:25603935

  14. Teachers' Occupational Well-Being and Quality of Instruction: The Important Role of Self-Regulatory Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klussman, Uta; Kunter, Mareike; Trautwein, Ulrich; Ludtke, Oliver; Baumert, Jurgen

    2008-01-01

    Teachers' occupational well-being (level of emotional exhaustion and job satisfaction) and quality of instruction are two key aspects of research on teaching that have rarely been studied together. The role of occupational engagement and resilience as two important work-related self-regulatory dimensions that predict occupational well-being and…

  15. Developing space occupancy - Perspectives on NASA future space programme planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Puttkamer, J.

    1976-01-01

    NASA planning aspects of potential future manned space flight missions are examined and the necessity of long-range planning is pointed out. A listing of desirable future activities is considered, taking into account the permanent occupancy of near-earth orbit space, the permanent occupancy of earth-moon space, the full self-sufficiency of man in geolunar space, and the permanent occupancy of heliocentric space. The technological requirements for the considered activities are discussed, giving attention to transportation, habitation, engineering technology, life sciences, operations technology, and advanced management concepts. A description of future program phasing and advanced studies requirements is also given.

  16. The occupational impact of sleep quality and insomnia symptoms.

    PubMed

    Kucharczyk, Erica R; Morgan, Kevin; Hall, Andrew P

    2012-12-01

    While the importance of assessing the occupational consequences of insomnia is emphasized in clinical nosologies and research guidelines, there is little consensus on which aspects of occupational performance should be assessed, the most methodologically justifiable measures of insomnia and work performance, and how outcomes should be reported. The present review was designed to summarize and methodologically critique the assessment of those aspects of occupational performance most impacted by (or most frequently associated with) insomnia symptoms. The 30 studies which met the review inclusion criteria broadly addressed six domains of occupational functioning: absenteeism; workplace accidents; productivity; punctuality; job satisfaction and career progression. Collectively, study outcomes support the conclusions that insomnia symptoms: are consistently associated with excess absenteeism; elevate accident risk in the workplace; reduce subjectively experienced workplace productivity (at least in the shorter term); inhibit career progression; and can degrade job satisfaction. Study outcomes do not support the conclusion that people with insomnia are significantly less punctual than other workers. The overall value of the occupational sleep-health literature, however, is limited by a lack of comparability among studies. In particular, there is a clear need to standardize definitions of sleep and occupational outcomes, and to recognize the confounding influence of health variables on occupational performance and sleep. PMID:22401983

  17. An overview of the medical informatics curriculum in medical schools.

    PubMed Central

    Espino, J. U.; Levine, M. G.

    1998-01-01

    As medical schools incorporate medical informatics into their curriculum the problems of implementation arise. Because there are no standards regarding a medical informatics curriculum, medical schools are implementing the subjects in various ways. A survey was undertaken to amass an overview of the medical informatics curriculum nationally. Of the responding schools, most have aspects of medical informatics incorporated into current courses and utilize existing faculty. Literature searching, clinical decision-making, and Internet are the basic topics in the current curricula. The trend is for medical informatics to be incorporated throughout all four years of medical school. Barriers are the difficulties in faculty training, and slow implementation. PMID:9929263

  18. Occupational health training in India: Need for a competency-driven approach

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Rajnarayan R.; Sharma, Anjali; Zodpey, Sanjay P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In order to cater to the changing business scenario, employment and education profiles of labor, newer occupations, and emerging occupational health challenges, it is time to improve the performance of occupational health professionals by adapting core professional competencies while drawing on global knowledge. Objective: To delineate the competencies required for medical graduates, medical postgraduates, and Masters in Public Health (MPH) graduates practicing occupational health in India. Materials and Methods: First, offline and online literature searches were carried out to enlist the core competencies for occupational health. A draft template was prepared for the identified competencies and stakeholders were asked to rank the listed competencies on a three-point scale stating must, desirable, and not required for each of the three categories of professionals, i.e., medical graduates, medical postgraduates, and MPH graduates. Results: Through the extensive literature search, 23 competencies were identified for occupational health practitioners. According to stakeholders, five competencies were a must, nine were desirable, and nine were not required by a medical graduate. Similarly for a medical postgraduate, except the ability to judge the ergonomic design of the workplace and working tools, which is considered desirable, all other competencies were considered a must while for an MPH graduate all the enlisted 23 competencies were considered a must by the stakeholders. Conclusion: The framework of occupational health competencies developed through this research can be used to strengthen the training of occupational health professionals in India. PMID:27387856

  19. Medical tourism.

    PubMed

    Reed, Christie M

    2008-11-01

    Searches of the literature or Internet using the term "medical tourism" produce two sets of articles: travel for the purpose of delivering health care or travel for the purpose of seeking health care. The first usage primarily appears in the medical literature and is beyond the scope of this article, which focuses on travel to seek health care. Still, there are some aspects these two topics have in common: both are affected by ease and speed of international travel and communication associated with globalization, and both raise questions about continuity of care as well as issues related to cultural, language, and legal differences; both also raise questions about ethics. This article describes some of the motivating factors, contributing elements, and challenges in elucidating trends, as well as implications for clinicians who provide pretravel advice and those who care for ill returning travelers. PMID:19061760

  20. Neurodegenerative diseases: occupational occurrence and potential risk factors, 1982 through 1991.

    PubMed Central

    Schulte, P A; Burnett, C A; Boeniger, M F; Johnson, J

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To identify potential occupational risk factors, this study examined the occupational occurrence of various neurodegenerative diseases. METHODS: Death certificates from 27 states in the National Occupational Mortality Surveillance System were evaluated for 1982 to 1991. Proportionate mortality ratios were calculated by occupation for presenile dementia, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and motor neuron disease. RESULTS: Excess mortality was observed for all four categories in the following occupational categories: teachers; medical personnel; machinists and machine operators; scientists; writers/designers/entertainers; and support and clerical workers. Clusters of three neurodegenerative diseases were also found in occupations involving pesticides, solvents, and electromagnetic fields and in legal, library, social, and religious work. Early death from motor neuron disease was found for firefighters, janitors, military personnel, teachers, excavation machine operators, and veterinarians, among others. CONCLUSIONS: Neurodegenerative disease occurs more frequently in some occupations than in others, and this distribution, which may indicate occupational risk factors, should be further investigated. PMID:8806381

  1. [The new regulations for diagnostics of occupational hearing impairment].

    PubMed

    Pankova, V B

    2014-01-01

    The author presents information about the new regulations for diagnostics of occupational hearing impairment included in the technical documentation of the Russian Ministry of Health and Social Development and Ministry of Health governing provision of medical assistance to the subjects suffering from occupational hearing impairment and establishing the new rules for the compulsory prophylactic examination (preliminary and periodic) of the candidates for employment in the noisy environment. In addition, the newly-established criteria for the estimation of hearing impairment and occupational fitness of the subjects presenting with this condition are considered. The advantages of the new regulations are discussed along with their drawbacks that require further correction. PMID:24781171

  2. Does a Corresponding Set of Variables for Explaining Voluntary Organizational Turnover Transfer to Explaining Voluntary Occupational Turnover?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blau, Gary

    2007-01-01

    This study proposed and tested corresponding sets of variables for explaining voluntary organizational versus occupational turnover for a sample of medical technologists. This study is believed to be the first test of the Rhodes and Doering (1983) occupational change model using occupational turnover data. Results showed that corresponding job…

  3. [The practical theory of occupational health planning: Part One--The theoretical background of the target population setting and needs assessment procedures (OPST research report 2)].

    PubMed

    Jahng, D J; Hashimoto, H; Furuki, K

    1996-09-01

    The OPSS is an 8 stage program which was developed as a practical tool for occupational health services planning. This paper examines the theoretical aspects of the first two stages. The OPSS is a planning tool with a theoretical grounding in OHP (The practical theory of Occupational Health Planning). The target population setting has two functions. The first is to establish the physician's first-hypothesis to design a program. The other is deciding the group which has an occupational health problem in a company. The Needs Assessment helps to clarify the physician's hypothesis, which may be weak due to the limited knowledge of various demands of the employees and senior management. On the other hand, the risks and needs vary according to what kind of expert looks at a situation. To date, occupational physicians have been limited to their medical background in determining only risks and needs. However, understanding the various stakeholders in a particular environment means that any project will be more relevant to all concerned. Another limitation of the occupational physicians hypothesis can be the lack of objective data to support it. This makes it difficult to persuade senior management to sign on to a program. The Needs Assessment procedure with OHQ steps is useful in a number of ways. The Observation step allows for finding risks and needs from various situations in the company from the occupational physician's viewpoint (prehypothesis setting). Hearing is for understanding the subject's demands and finding common themes in the company (final hypothesis setting). Finally, the questionnaire step is for providing objectivity of these common themes and quantitative data for the next Priority Setting procedure. The BITOP (Budget, Information, Time, Order, key Person) has been proposed as a way to diagnose the structural and functional aspects of an organization's procedures. Budget tracks the financial flow through the organization, while Information identifies

  4. Emergency Medical Technician Series. Duty Task List.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This document contains the occupational duty/task lists for 12 duties in the occupation of emergency medical technician. Each duty is divided into a number of tasks. A separate page for each duty lists the task with its code number and columns to indicate whether that particular duty has been taught and to provide space for comments. The 12 duties…

  5. [Hospital infection--ethical aspects].

    PubMed

    Hossne, W S

    1995-01-01

    The author focuses the question of hospital infection, analysing the background on which the control committees were created. The hospital infection is discussed under bioethical principles and the Medical Ethics Code, examining the aspects related to the government, the Hospital Directorship, the Committee and the Control Service of Hospital Infection, and the assisting physician. A closer integration between the activities of the Program of Control of Hospital Infections and those of the Medical Ethics Committee is proposed, aiming at the patient and at the community, "targets of total medical attention". PMID:7550409

  6. Occupational health in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Werner, A F

    2000-07-01

    Argentina is within the denominated "new industrialised countries", with the characteristic of having high contrasts in the urban population, based on service and industry, and in the rural population, based on agriculture and cattle, still the main sources of wealth in the country. The process of globalisation and the need to compete hard in international markets have provoked high unemployment and the transfer of workers from a formal market to an informal one. Legislation on occupational health is old and it is in the process of being updated. The system of prevention, assistance and compensation for accidents at work and for occupational illnesses has changed from being optative for employers, to the compulsory hiring of private insurance companies. The Government keeps the role of supervisor of the system. There are enough professionals in occupational health, hygiene and safety but not occupational nurses. The teaching is given by many universities and professional associations, some of which have an active profile in the occupational health of the country. PMID:10963410

  7. Diagnostic Medical Sonographers: Seeing with Sound.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacey, Alan

    2001-01-01

    Explains how diagnostic medical sonographers use special equipment to direct high frequency sound waves into areas of a patient's body. Describes specialties within the occupation, working conditions, employment and outlook, earnings, and necessary training and qualifications. (JOW)

  8. Occupants' satisfaction toward building environmental quality: structural equation modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Kamaruzzaman, Syahrul Nizam; Egbu, C O; Zawawi, Emma Marinie Ahmad; Karim, Saipol Bari Abd; Woon, Chen Jia

    2015-05-01

    It is accepted that occupants who are more satisfied with their workplace's building internal environment are more productive. The main objective of the study was to measure the occupants' level of satisfaction and the perceived importance of the design or refurbishment on office conditions. The study also attempted to determine the factors affecting the occupants' satisfaction with their building or office conditions. Post-occupancy evaluations were conducted using a structured questionnaire developed by the Built Environment Research Group at the University of Manchester, UK. Our questionnaires incorporate 22 factors relating to the internal environment and rate these in terms of "user satisfaction" and "degree of importance." The questions were modified to reflect the specific setting of the study and take into consideration the local conditions and climate in Malaysia. The overall mean satisfaction of the occupants toward their office environment was 5.35. The results were measured by a single item of overall liking of office conditions in general. Occupants were more satisfied with their state of health in the workplace, but they were extremely dissatisfied with the distance away from a window. The factor analysis divided the variables into three groups, namely intrusion, air quality, and office appearance. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was then used to determine which factor had the most significant influence on occupants' satisfaction: appearance. The findings from the study suggest that continuous improvement in aspects of the building's appearance needs to be supported with effective and comprehensive maintenance to sustain the occupants' satisfaction. PMID:25864077

  9. Medical Assistants

    MedlinePlus

    ... 900 [ XLSX ] <- Pay State & Area Data -> State & Area Data About this section Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) The ... the major industries employing the occupation. State & Area Data The State and Area Data tab provides links ...

  10. The occupational stress of judges.

    PubMed

    Rogers, J M; Freeman, S J; LeSage, P

    1991-06-01

    This paper reports the results of what is believed to be the first systematic survey of the Canadian judiciary about work-related stress. County and District Court judges from four provinces who were attending an educational event on two successive years (N = 104) reported in writing, anonymously, their perceptions of the most stressful aspects of being a judge. A similar survey of their spouses (N = 48) added another perspective to the findings. The overwhelming majority of respondents reported aspects of the work itself (for example, sentencing, child custody cases, judgements, decision-making, and jury trials) as being their primary source of occupational stress. This is not in keeping with the results of most studies, which find that workers view job factors such as role conflict, employer/employee relationships, and career decisions as being more stressful than the actual work they perform. Qualitative material from individual and group interviews suggests that additional preparation and training for the bench and mechanisms for reducing isolation and improving communication might alleviate the stress experienced by judges, while helping them to cope more effectively with their increasingly complex and difficult roles. PMID:1884331

  11. 29 CFR 1926.50 - Medical services and first aid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Medical services and first aid. 1926.50 Section 1926.50 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Occupational Health and Environmental Controls § 1926.50 Medical services...

  12. 29 CFR 1926.50 - Medical services and first aid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Medical services and first aid. 1926.50 Section 1926.50 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Occupational Health and Environmental Controls § 1926.50 Medical services...

  13. Occupation and gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Raj, A; Mayberry, J F; Podas, T

    2003-05-01

    Gastric cancer is a cause of significant morbidity and mortality. There are several risk factors, with occupation emerging as one of these. There is considerable evidence that occupations in coal and tin mining, metal processing, particularly steel and iron, and rubber manufacturing industries lead to an increased risk of gastric cancer. Other "dusty" occupations-for example, wood processing, or work in high temperature environments have also been implicated but the evidence is not strong. The mechanism of pathogenesis of gastric cancer is unclear and the identification of causative agents can be difficult. Dust is thought to be a contributor to the pathological process, but well known carcinogens such as N-nitroso compounds have been detected in some environments. Further research on responsible agents is necessary and screening for detection of precursor gastric cancer lesions at the workplace merits consideration. PMID:12782770

  14. Occupational Cohort Time Scales

    PubMed Central

    Roth, H. Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study explores how highly correlated time variables (occupational cohort time scales) contribute to confounding and ambiguity of interpretation. Methods: Occupational cohort time scales were identified and organized through simple equations of three time scales (relational triads) and the connections between these triads (time scale web). The behavior of the time scales was examined when constraints were imposed on variable ranges and interrelationships. Results: Constraints on a time scale in a triad create high correlations between the other two time scales. These correlations combine with the connections between relational triads to produce association paths. High correlation between time scales leads to ambiguity of interpretation. Conclusions: Understanding the properties of occupational cohort time scales, their relational triads, and the time scale web is helpful in understanding the origins of otherwise obscure confounding bias and ambiguity of interpretation. PMID:25647318

  15. Occupational lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Coultas, D.B.; Samet, J.M. )

    1992-06-01

    The overall importance of occupational agents as a cause of lung cancer has been a controversial subject since the 1970s. A federal report, released in the late 1970s, projected a surprisingly high burden of occupational lung cancer; for asbestos and four other agents, from 61,000 to 98,000 cases annually were attributed to these agents alone. Many estimates followed, some much more conservative. For example, Doll and Peto estimated that 15% of lung cancer in men and 5% in women could be attributed to occupational exposures. A number of population-based case-control studies also provide relevant estimates. In a recent literature review, Vineis and Simonato cited attributable risk estimates for occupation and lung cancer that ranged from 4% to 40%; for asbestos alone, the estimates ranged from 1% to 5%. These estimates would be expected to vary across locations and over time. Nevertheless, these recent estimates indicate that occupation remains an important cause of lung cancer. Approaches to Prevention. Prevention of lung cancer mortality among workers exposed to agents or industrial processes that cause lung cancer may involve several strategies, including eliminating or reducing exposures, smoking cessation, screening, and chemo-prevention. For example, changes in industrial processes that have eliminated or reduced exposures to chloromethyl ethers and nickel compounds have provided evidence of reduced risk of lung cancer following these changes. Although occupational exposures are important causes of lung cancer, cigarette smoking is the most important preventable cause of lung cancer. For adults, the work site offers an important location to target smoking cessation efforts. In fact, the work site may be the only place to reach many smokers.

  16. [Scabies as an occupational disease].

    PubMed

    Lukács, J; Schliemann, S; Elsner, P

    2015-03-01

    Scabies is an infectious skin disease caused by the human itch mite (Sarcoptes scabiei var. hominis). It is mainly transmitted by direct skin-to-skin contact. The spread of scabies can cause major difficulties in healthcare institutions, particularly in residential homes for the elderly. The disease is characterized by intense nocturnal itching, erythematous papules arranged in a linear order, and scratching resulting in excoriations. The diagnosis is confirmed by identification of the mite or by finding one or more mite tunnels in the skin. An individually occurring case does not need to be reported. If two or more cases occur in the same institution, the company physician and the appropriate public health department are to be informed in Germany. In case of a suspected scabies infection in medical personnel due to exposure in their work setting, medical notification to the statutory occupational accidents' insurance (Nr. 3101) is to be issued in accordance with § 202, Volume VII of the German Social Code. First line treatment is topical therapy with 5 % permethrin. If scabies control is required in an institution, systemic treatment with ivermectin may be considered. In the case of a scabies outbreak, all patients, contact persons, and staff must be treated simultaneously. PMID:25676574

  17. Occupational medicine for one and all.

    PubMed Central

    Schilling, R S

    1991-01-01

    In the 1930s in Britain, industrial medicine was a clinical discipline, the main purposes of which were to diagnose disability in applicants for work, to identify industrial disease in the dangerous trades, and to provide first aid treatment for those injured or taken sick in the workplace. Following rapid developments in epidemiology and occupational hygiene and with more emphasis on "group health" and less on "individual care", occupational medicine has tended to become less of a clinical discipline; yet clinical skills are needed to assess fitness for work, to identify adverse effects of work, and to undertake consultations on a variety of health problems. Although care of the individual worker is a major task, an occupational health service has a responsibility for the health of the workforce as a whole, using epidemiology to plan and administer health care, to identify and control work related disorders, and to promote health by identifying positive factors in the organisation that induce a sense of well being; and by health screening and education programmes. Academic occupational health should not lose its identity as a clinical discipline in any merger with environmental health. Medical skills are needed to assess fitness for work and to identify human responses to adverse factors in the environment and to evaluate control measures. PMID:1854647

  18. Regulatory aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Arthur M.

    1986-07-01

    At this time, there is no US legislation that is specifically aimed at regulating the environmental release of genetically engineered organisms or their modified components, either during the research and development stage or during application. There are some statutes, administered by several federal agencies, whose language is broad enough to allow the extension of intended coverage to include certain aspects of biotechnology. The one possible exception is FIFRA, which has already brought about the registration of several natural microbial pesticides but which also has provision for requiring the registration of “strain improved” microbial pesticides. Nevertheless, there may be gaps in coverage even if all pertinent statutes were to be actively applied to the control of environmental release of genetically modified substances. The decision to regulate biotechnology under TSCA was justified, in part, on the basis of its intended role as a gap-filling piece of environmental legislation. The advantage of regulating biotechnology under TSCA is that this statute, unlike others, is concerned with all media of exposure (air, water, soil, sediment, biota) that may pose health and environmental hazards. Experience may show that extending existing legislation to regulate biotechnology is a poor compromise compared to the promulgation of new legislation specifically designed for this purpose. It appears that many other countries are ultimately going to take the latter course to regulate biotechnology.

  19. Occupational asthma and related respiratory disorders.

    PubMed

    Bardana, E J

    1995-03-01

    Occupational rhinitis is a common but generally underreported entity. Although it may occur alone, it is frequently associated with occupational asthma. Occupational asthma may have one of several presentations that are difficult to distinguish from non-work conditions. The respiratory tract acts as the final common pathway for all inhaled environmental pollutants, whether encountered in the home or at work. More than 200 chemicals have been incriminated as a cause of work-related asthma. It is said that about 2% of the 10 million Americans who have asthma acquired it as a result of some chemical irritant or immunogen in their work environment. A number of predisposing factors facilitate the development of work-related asthma. These include industrial conditions, climatic factors, atopic predisposition, smoking, recreational drug use, viral infection, nonspecific bronchial hyperreactivity, and a variety of miscellaneous factors. Pathogenetically, occupational asthma may be immunologic or nonimmunologic in nature. The immunologic variants involve sensitization to a variety of large-molecular-weight constituents. The major nonimmune variant is referred to as inflammatory bronchoconstriction or reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS). There are well-defined criteria for the diagnosis of immunologic and nonimmunologic asthma. The several clinical variations of occupational asthma can be difficult to distinguish from nonindustrial disorders. The most common presentation in practice involves the worker with preexistent asthma who has been adversely affected by work exposures. Occasionally these industrial exposures precipitate permanent impairment. It is clear, however, that occupational asthma is not a single, simple, or homogeneous entity, even when a single specific causal factor can be identified in the workplace. Therefore the physician must be aware of the patient's entire medical history and the precise occupational exposures and must have convincing

  20. General Aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höfle, Gerhard

    Epothilone is a microbial product, and thus its history may be traced back to the discovery of the respective microbe, Sorangium cellulosum, a bacterium belonging to the taxonomic group of myxobacteria, which originally has been described by Roland Thaxter in 1892 (1). Today this group of organisms comprises around 40 species, one of which is Sorangium cellulosum. For a long time, myxobacteria were only known for their gliding motility and sophisticated life cycle, although it had been occasionally speculated that they might produce secondary metabolites like actinomycetes or bacilli (2). In 1975 Hans Reichenbach and his group at the German Centre for Biotechnology (GBF; now called the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research) set out to isolate strains of myxobacteria from soil samples collected all over the world, and to examine their secondary metabolism. In 1978, while work was already ongoing, I joined them and took over the chemistry part. In the same year the first structure of a myxobacterial metabolite, ambruticin, was published by a group from Warner-Lambert (3) making us very confident of being on the right track. Ambruticin had been isolated from a Sorangium cellulosum strain, and was identified as a unique cyclopropane polyketide structure exhibiting potentially useful antifungal properties. Ambruticin and its derivatives had been developed for medical application for some time, and recently gained new interest (4).

  1. Occupational Orientation: Applied Biological and Agricultural Occupations. Experimental Curriculum Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Office of Education, Springfield.

    These experimental curriculum materials, from one of five clusters developed for the occupational orientation program in Illinois, include a series of learning activity packages (LAPs) designed to acquaint the student with the wide range of occupational choices available in the applied biological and agricultural occupations. The 30 LAPs, each…

  2. British Communicator Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tunstall, Jeremy

    Occupations and organizations within the British press and broadcasting systems are examined in this paper. Its sections summarize recent British research on media communicators and discuss characteristics of craft unions and other media organizations; the historical development of the British press; the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) and…

  3. Hospitality Occupations. Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Bureau of Homemaking Education.

    This curriculum guide on the hospitality occupations was developed to help secondary and postsecondary home economics teachers prepare individuals for entry-level jobs in the hospitality industry. The content is in seven sections. The first section presents organizational charts of a medium-size hotel, food and beverage division, housekeeping and…

  4. Occupational Diseases in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun A

    2010-01-01

    Korea has industrialized since the 1970s. Pneumoconiosis in coal miners was the most common occupational disease in the 1970s to 1980s. With the industrialization, the use of many chemicals have increased since the 1970s. As a consequence, there were outbreaks of occupational diseases caused by poisonous chemicals, such as heavy metal poisoning, solvent poisoning and occupational asthma in the late 1980s and early 1990s with civil movement for democracy. Many actions have been taken for prevention by the government, employers and employees or unions. In the 1990s most chemical related diseases and pneumoconiosis have rapidly decreased due to improving work environment. In the late 1990s, cerebro-cardiovascular diseases related to job stress or work overloads have abruptly increased especially after the economic crisis in 1998. After the year 2000, musculoskeletal disorders became a major problem especially in assembly lines in the manufacturing industry and they were expanded to the service industry. Mental diseases related to job stress have increased. Infectious diseases increased in health care workers and afforestation workers. Occupational cancers are increasing because of their long latency, although the use of carcinogenic substances are reduced, limited, and even banned. PMID:21258589

  5. Evaluating Occupational Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, James P.

    1987-01-01

    Stresses the importance of evaluating occupational programs on a regular basis. Offers a brief explanation of the approaches to program evaluation taken at the Dallas County Community College District (TX), South Puget Sound Community College (WA), and Triton College (IL). Offers a list of references on program evaluation. (CBC)

  6. Occupational Literacy Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rush, R. Timothy; And Others

    Intended for teachers of adult basic education as well as teachers in job retraining programs, this book focuses on the development of written and oral language competencies required in occupational and training settings. The first four chapters offer a concise synthesis of recent research on adult learning and on workplace literacy for ten…

  7. Occupational skin disease.

    PubMed

    Peate, W E

    2002-09-15

    Contact dermatitis, the most common occupational skin disease, is characterized by clearly demarcated areas of rash at sites of exposure. The rash improves on removal of the offending agent. In allergic contact dermatitis, even minute exposures to antigenic substances can lead to a skin rash. Common sensitizing agents include nickel and members of the Rhus genus (e.g., poison ivy, poison oak). Severe skin irritants tend to cause immediate red blisters or burns, whereas weaker irritants produce eczematous skin changes over time. An occupational cause should be suspected when rash occurs in areas that are in contact with oil, grease, or other substances. Direct skin testing (patch or scratch) or radioallergosorbent testing may help to identify a specific trigger. Skin cancer can have an occupational link in workers with prolonged exposure to sunlight and certain chemicals, although it can take decades for lesions to develop. In workers with occupational skin disease, workplace changes and protective measures are important to prevent future exposure. PMID:12358214

  8. Occupational diseases in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seong-Kyu; Kim, Eun A

    2010-12-01

    Korea has industrialized since the 1970s. Pneumoconiosis in coal miners was the most common occupational disease in the 1970s to 1980s. With the industrialization, the use of many chemicals have increased since the 1970s. As a consequence, there were outbreaks of occupational diseases caused by poisonous chemicals, such as heavy metal poisoning, solvent poisoning and occupational asthma in the late 1980s and early 1990s with civil movement for democracy. Many actions have been taken for prevention by the government, employers and employees or unions. In the 1990s most chemical related diseases and pneumoconiosis have rapidly decreased due to improving work environment. In the late 1990s, cerebro-cardiovascular diseases related to job stress or work overloads have abruptly increased especially after the economic crisis in 1998. After the year 2000, musculoskeletal disorders became a major problem especially in assembly lines in the manufacturing industry and they were expanded to the service industry. Mental diseases related to job stress have increased. Infectious diseases increased in health care workers and afforestation workers. Occupational cancers are increasing because of their long latency, although the use of carcinogenic substances are reduced, limited, and even banned. PMID:21258589

  9. Occupational Clothing Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Annette J.

    Designed to provide individualized, hands-on experience for secondary or postsecondary students in gainful homemaking programs, this occupational clothing curriculum contains eight learning modules. The following topics are covered in the modules: plant production for the needle trades (needle trade structure and operation, terminology, history,…

  10. Occupational Training in Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stromsdorfer, Ernst W.; Barclay, Suzanne

    A significant amount of on-the-job occupational training is occurring in the private sector, though the data on its extent and nature are extremely sketchy. Estimates of total economic costs in the 1974-75 period range from a crude measure of 100 billion dollars to one that is somewhat more reliable of about 40 to 50 billion dollars. Most of this…

  11. Occupational Burnout among Librarians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haack, Mary; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Outlines stages of occupational burnout (enthusiasm, stagnation, frustration, apathy) and begins empirical assessment of burnout syndrome among librarians and other information professionals. Results of pilot survey conducted at one-day conference on reference service using two measures (Staff Burnout Scale for Health Professionals, projective…

  12. Pharmacist. Occupational Simulation Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsley, Nancy

    This career exploration instructional booklet on the pharmacist's occupation is one of several resulting from the rural southwestern Colorado CEPAC Project (Career Education Process of Attitude Change). Based on a job analysis and utilizing a programed instructional format, the following content is included: A brief description of two real…

  13. Marketing Occupations. Cluster Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    This cluster guide, which is designed to show teachers what specific knowledge and skills qualify high school students for entry-level employment (or postsecondary training) in marketing occupations, is organized into three sections: (1) cluster organization and implementation, (2) instructional emphasis areas, and (3) assessment. The first…

  14. Occupational Hazards of Farming

    PubMed Central

    White, Gill; Cessna, Allan

    1989-01-01

    A number of occupational hazards exist for the farmer and farm worker. They include the hazards of farm machinery, biologic and chemical hazards, and social and environmental stresses. Recognizing of these hazards will help the family physician care for farmers and their families. PMID:21248929

  15. Foodservice Occupations Cluster Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    Intended to assist vocational teachers in developing and implementing a cluster program in food service occupations, this guide contains sections on cluster organization and implementation and instructional emphasis areas. The cluster organization and implementation section covers goal-based planning and includes a proposed cluster curriculum, a…

  16. Nursing. Occupational Simulation Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robb, Mary Kaye

    This career exploration instructional booklet on nursing as an occupation is one of several resulting from the rural southwestern Colorado CEPAC Project (Career Education Process of Attitude Change). Based on a job analysis and utilizing a programed instructional format, the following content is included: A brief description of what nursing is; 14…

  17. Health Occupations. Nursing Assistant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Megow, Joye G.

    Materials contained in this package are designed for use with students interested in the occupation of nurses aide. The package has two sections, one which looks closely at the job and the student, and the other--the curriculum phase--which concerns actual student use of learning activity packages (LAPs). These two components together form a "job…

  18. Health Occupations Cluster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walraven, Catherine; And Others

    These instructional materials consist of a series of curriculum worksheets that cover tasks to be mastered by students in health occupations cluster programs. Covered in the curriculum worksheets are diagnostic procedures; observing/recording/reporting/planning; safety; nutrition/elimination; hygiene/personal care/comfort;…

  19. Is a diagnosis of occupational post-traumatic schizophrenia possible?

    PubMed

    Marchevsky, S; Baram, E

    1992-01-01

    We present the case of a man who became ill with schizophrenia at the age of 44 after he had been subjected to a series of investigations at his place of work. This case illustrates the issue of the development of schizophrenia as a result of trauma or stress. In our presentation we go into a detailed history of the case and the relevant legal and medical aspects, referring to the legal theory of microtrauma and the theory behind stress-vulnerability, in an attempt to contribute to the understanding of schizophrenia. We consider the legal definitions of 'occupational damage' and the 'common illness'. As to qualifying medical terms, medical science looks upon illnesses as resulting from the reciprocity between the organism and the environment. While the organism forever tends to maintain its equilibrium, environmental factors threaten to upset it. Considering mental illnesses in general and schizophrenia in particular, we discuss the theory of 'stress-vulnerability hypothesis'. We convey our opinion on how it is possible to bridge the gap between the law and medical science. Bringing together the two disciplines and their terms is not simple. The most significant question is whether vulnerability, or to be more precise, vulnerability or a genetic tendency, constitutes a natural morbidity process which is aggravated by the traumatic factor, or whether an individual who bears a 'vulnerability' is healthy until he comes into contact with the environmental factor. It is our opinion that one must not attach too much importance to this theory and must not consider it as fact, but rather confine one's judgment to cases where a latent 'vulnerability' has a clear-cut clinical expression. If we rely on a prevalent medical theory as if it were an evident reality we may miss the truth and may attach too much importance to a matter which is as yet solely theoretical. Our aim is to do justice to human beings. It is better to rely on facts than to trust the existence of latent

  20. Occupational cancer in Britain

    PubMed Central

    Van Tongeren, Martie; Jimenez, Araceli S; Hutchings, Sally J; MacCalman, Laura; Rushton, Lesley; Cherrie, John W

    2012-01-01

    To estimate the current occupational cancer burden due to past exposures in Britain, estimates of the number of exposed workers at different levels are required, as well as risk estimates of cancer due to the exposures. This paper describes the methods and results for estimating the historical exposures. All occupational carcinogens or exposure circumstances classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer as definite or probable human carcinogens and potentially to be found in British workplaces over the past 20–40 years were included in this study. Estimates of the number of people exposed by industrial sector were based predominantly on two sources of data, the CARcinogen EXposure (CAREX) database and the UK Labour Force Survey. Where possible, multiple and overlapping exposures were taken into account. Dose–response risk estimates were generally not available in the epidemiological literature for the cancer–exposure pairs in this study, and none of the sources available for obtaining the numbers exposed provided data by different levels of exposure. Industrial sectors were therefore assigned using expert judgement to ‘higher'- and ‘lower'-exposure groups based on the similarity of exposure to the population in the key epidemiological studies from which risk estimates had been selected. Estimates of historical exposure prevalence were obtained for 41 carcinogens or occupational circumstances. These include exposures to chemicals and metals, combustion products, other mixtures or groups of chemicals, mineral and biological dusts, physical agents and work patterns, as well as occupations and industries that have been associated with increased risk of cancer, but for which the causative agents are unknown. There were more than half a million workers exposed to each of six carcinogens (radon, solar radiation, crystalline silica, mineral oils, non-arsenical insecticides and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin); other agents to which a large

  1. Occupational Roles in Children's Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillman, Judith Stevinson

    1976-01-01

    Compares children's literature of the 1930s and that of recent times in terms of occupational roles and sex typing. Little change was found in number or type of women's occupations despite the recent political, social and economic changes. (MS)

  2. Occupational Therapist Assistants and Aides

    MedlinePlus

    ... 700 [ XLSX ] <- Pay State & Area Data -> State & Area Data About this section Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) The ... the major industries employing the occupation. State & Area Data The State and Area Data tab provides links ...

  3. Identifying Occupationally Specific Affective Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pucel, David J.

    1993-01-01

    Data from two groups of cosmetology instructors (n=15) and two groups of machinist instructors (n=17) validated the Occupational Affective Behavior Analysis instrument as capable of identifying affective behaviors viewed as important to success in a given occupation. (SK)

  4. Ototoxic Medications (Medication Effects)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Toggle navigation Careers Certification Publications Events Advocacy Continuing Education Practice Management Research Home / Information for the Public / Hearing and Balance Ototoxic Medications ( ...

  5. Occupational exposure in Portugal in 1999.

    PubMed

    Alves, J G; Martins, M B; Amaral, E M

    2001-01-01

    This study reports the occupational radiation doses for external exposure received in 1999 by the radiation workers monitored by the Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety Department (DPRSN) in Portugal. Occupational exposures arise from conventional industry, research laboratories, the health or medical sector, and mining. There are no nuclear power plants in the country. There are two dosimetry systems running simultaneously at DPRSN, one based on film dosimetry and the other on thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD). In 1999, 8400 persons were monitored, 3100 with film and 5300 with TLD and the data presented in this report were obtained by using both technologies. The annual mean effective doses received from external radiation in the different fields of activity and the distribution of the annual effective dose by dose intervals are presented. The collective annual dose by field of activity is estimated and the contribution to the total annual collective dose is determined. PMID:11586752

  6. 29 CFR 1910.151 - Medical services and first aid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Medical services and first aid. 1910.151 Section 1910.151..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Medical and First Aid § 1910.151 Medical services and first aid. (a) The employer shall ensure the ready availability of medical personnel...

  7. 29 CFR 1910.151 - Medical services and first aid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Medical services and first aid. 1910.151 Section 1910.151..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Medical and First Aid § 1910.151 Medical services and first aid. (a) The employer shall ensure the ready availability of medical personnel...

  8. Occupation-Based Intervention for Addictive Disorders: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Wasmuth, Sally; Pritchard, Kevin; Kaneshiro, Kellie

    2016-03-01

    Addictive disorders disrupt individuals' occupational lives, suggesting that occupational therapists can play a crucial role in addiction rehabilitation. Occupation-based interventions are those in which an occupation is performed, and occupations are defined as those activities a person engages in to structure time and create meaning in one's life. This review asked: In persons with addictive disorders, are occupation-based interventions more effective than treatment as usual in improving short and long-term recovery outcomes? A systematic literature search was performed by a medical librarian in Ovid MEDLINE, PsychINFO, Social Work Abstracts, OTSeeker, HealthSTAR, CINAHL, and ACPJournalClub. Authors screened 1095 articles for inclusion criteria (prospective outcome studies examining the effectiveness of an occupation-based intervention with a sample primarily consisting of a diagnosis of a substance-related or addictive disorder and with at least five participants), and two authors appraised the resulting 66 articles using a standard appraisal tool, yielding 26 articles for qualitative synthesis and 8 with shared outcome measures for quantitative analysis. Occupation-based interventions in the areas of work, leisure, and social participation were found to have been used to treat addictive disorders. Occupation-based interventions in the area of social participation all elicited better outcomes than their respective control/comparison groups. Not all occupation-based interventions in the area of leisure elicited better outcomes than their comparison group, but in the eight articles with shared outcome measures, quantitative analysis demonstrated leisure interventions produced larger effect sizes than social participation interventions. PMID:26738639

  9. Palestinian Continuing Education under Occupation:Images of Distress and Possibilities for Hope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Howard

    2010-01-01

    This study examines how aspects of a militarily enforced occupation have influenced continuing education at Palestinian universities. It focuses on three influences: the impact of the politics of occupation on the history of continuing education; the effect of travel restriction, violence, and a damaged economy on participation; and the influence…

  10. Relationally Oriented Masculinity, Gender Nontraditional Interests, and Occupational Traditionality of Employed Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jome, LaRae M.; Surething, Nicole A.; Taylor, Kari K.

    2005-01-01

    This study explores the degree to which emotional and relationally oriented aspects of masculinity and gender nontraditional vocational interests predict the gender traditionality of employed men's occupations. Participants include 166 men employed in a range of occupations from gender nontraditional (i.e., female dominated) to gender neutral to…

  11. Occupational Employment Projections through 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silvestri, George T.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Presents current and projected occupational employment estimates that were developed by industry and are part of a national industry-occupational employment matrix. The data from this matrix will be the basis of the information in the 1984-85 education of the Occupational Outlook Handbook to be issued in the Spring of 1984. (NRJ)

  12. A Functional Classification of Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinlay, Donald Bruce

    The need for more and better manpower information is hampered by the lack of adequate occupational data classification systems. The diversity of interests in occupations probably accounts for the absence of consensus regarding either the general outlines or the specific details of a standardized occupational classification system which would…

  13. Masonry. Occupational Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Occupational Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP) for masonry occupations contains a competency list verified by expert workers and developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives from Ohio. This OCAP identifies the occupational, academic, and employability…

  14. A survey of Canadian occupational therapy private practice.

    PubMed

    Bridle, M; Hawkes, B

    1990-06-01

    This descriptive study provides an overview of the business structure and function of occupational therapy private practitioners in Canada. Aspects covered include basic demographic information, practice issues defining operational aspects of the business, financial issues including initial investment and fee structures, and other miscellaneous business issues. Some implications for the national and provincial professional organizations arose from the results and are presented in the discussion. PMID:10105436

  15. [Dry eye syndrome. Occupational risk factors, valuation and prevention].

    PubMed

    Vicente-Herrero, M T; Ramírez-Iñiguez de la Torre, M V; Terradillos-García, M J; López González, Á A

    2014-03-01

    Dry eye syndrome in the workplace is associated with new ways of working, with increasing use of screens and electronic devices and environmental conditions encountered in modern office designs and other environments. Also affect occupational exposure to ionizing radiation, chemicals or atmospheric dust with increased ocular dryness. The study of pathophysiological aspects and laboral causality of the dry eye, must be to develop joint task in Occupational Health, Public Health in coordination with and responsible for the national health system, which would involve primary and secondary preventive measures more effective and proper diagnosis, control and monitoring of the disease, A better knowledge of occupational hazards and actions agreed and coordinated between occupational physicians, preventers, primary care physicians and specialist physicians, such as ophthalmology, will get results much more effective when earlier and optimize available resources. PMID:23993023

  16. Rethinking the medical in the medical humanities.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Desmond; Jenkins, Elinor; Mawhinney, Rebecca; Cosgrave, Ellen; O'Mahony, Sarah; Guest, Clare; Moss, Hilary

    2016-06-01

    To clinicians there are a number of striking features of the ever-evolving field of the medical humanities. The first is a perception of a predominantly unidirectional relationship between medicine and the humanities, generally in terms of what the arts and humanities have to offer medicine. The second is the portrayal of medical practice in terms of problems and negativities for which the medical humanities are seen to pose the solution rather than viewing medicine as an active and positive contributor to an interdisciplinary project. Paradigms that fail to recognise the contributions of medicine and its practitioners (including students) to the medical humanities, this paper argues, will continue to struggle with definition and acceptance. This paper explores the possibilities for advancing the medical humanities through recognition of the contribution of medicine to the humanities and the importance of engaging with the arts, culture and leisure pursuits of doctors and medical students. Our research shows the richness of cultural engagement of medical students, their broad range of cultural interests and their ability to contribute to research and scholarship in the medical humanities. Mutual recognition of strengths, weaknesses and differences of scholarly approach is critical to successful development of the enterprise. Recognising and building on the interests, sympathies and contributions of medicine and its practitioners to the medical humanities is a fundamental component of this task. Future directions might include introductory courses for humanities scholars in aspects of healthcare and medicine. PMID:26944516

  17. Apollo 11 impact on the occupational medicine program, NASA Manned Spacecraft Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, P. E.

    1969-01-01

    Requirements and development of standards for occupational medicine support of personnel in the Lunar Receiving Laboratory (LRL) are outlined. Considered are proper personnel performance and exclusion of people prone to develop a serious illness within the quarantine area. Occupational medicine report for the LRL consists of examination procedures covering laboratory work, periodic examinations, immunizations, health maintenance, preventive practices, medical standards, and waiver authority.

  18. The Dark Side of Workers' Compensation: Burdens and Benefits in Occupational Disease Coverage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robblee, Richard

    1978-01-01

    The imposition of legal proof requirements to detect occupational disease and the burden that this places on compensation claimants and the medical profession are examined, along with various court decisions, present legislation, and revision proposals to improve disease diagnosis and the legal treatment of occupationally disabled workers. (MF)

  19. An Annotated Bibliography for Health Occupations: A Guide for Teachers and Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solon, Lindy

    The bibliography is designed to assist teachers and students at the secondary level in selecting printed and audiovisual materials related to health occupations. The 115 items relate to the following occupations: dental assistant, medical laboratory aide, practical nurse, nurse assistant, rehabilitation aide, physical therapy aide, radiologic…

  20. Developing an Occupational Health Program: The Team Approach

    PubMed Central

    Prossin, Albert

    1985-01-01

    Occupational health and safety programs involve professionals in occupational medicine and nursing, industrial hygiene, safety and accident prevention, psychology, sociology and health physics. Occupational health programs should allow regular health evaluations of workers, and the recognition, evaluation, and control of environmental hazards. When designing in-plant medical facilities, accommodation should be made for possible future expansion, disabled people, and an access route for an ambulance. Treatment and prevention facilities should be separate. Patients' records must be complete and kept confidential. The occupational health program must also be evaluated regularly. Education of management and the work force is necessary to ensure that the environment is safe and to prevent accidents. Special programs may be introduced, based on the particular risks, toxicants, and problems in different industries. Imagesp1912-a PMID:21274204

  1. [Vaccination against hepatitis A among occupational risk groups].

    PubMed

    Mukomolov, S L; Levakova, I A

    2014-01-01

    The study was aimed to evaluate vaccine prevention of hepatitis A in occupational risk groups in Russian Federation over 2011-2013. Epidemiologic analysis method was used. Data array for the analysis included information about 1,162,619 individuals vaccinated against hepatitis A throughout the country. Findings are that during the studied period a total of 470,278 adults over 18 years were vaccinated (i.e., 0,4% of all population of this age). Among occupational risk groups subjected to anti-hepatitis A vaccination within immunization calendar on epidemic indications, major (29%) share was presented by catering enterprises workers and individuals engaged into food trade and supply. Other occupational risk groups (workers maintaining water supply systems and sewerage system, medical staff, preschool institution teachers, etc) demonstrated significantly lower levels of being vaccinated. Vaccination against hepatitis Ain occupational risk groups should be in a focus of prophylactic measures, as will help to control over hepatitis A spread. PMID:25881392

  2. Occupational mortality among women in England and Wales.

    PubMed Central

    Roman, E; Beral, V; Inskip, H

    1985-01-01

    Occupational mortality in women who died in England and Wales from 1970 to 1972 was analysed. Many of the associations found were consistent with those that have been described for men, with high mortality ratios for cirrhosis in barmaids and publicans, for suicide in the medical and allied professions, and for respiratory disease in textile workers. Parity is a determinant of patterns of disease in working women, and the relative excess of cancer of the breast, ovary, and uterine body in professional and clerical workers probably reflected the high proportion of nulliparous women in these groups. Other associations may have reflected true occupational hazards; one observation requiring further attention was the high proportional mortality ratio for anaemia in textile and clothing workers. The description of the occupational mortality among women in England and Wales is hampered by the incomplete recording of information about women's occupations at registration of death. As women now constitute 40% of the workforce, often have their own specific occupations, and possibly also have their own diseases related to specific occupations it is time for the registrar's guidelines on the recording of women's occupation--last reviewed at the beginning of this century--to be revised. PMID:3926119

  3. Occupational asthma. Practical points for diagnosis and management.

    PubMed Central

    Kuschner, W G; Chitkara, R K; Sarinas, P S

    1998-01-01

    Asthma is a common chronic illness characterized by episodes of reversible airflow obstruction. A cornerstone of asthma management is identifying and avoiding agents that cause bronchospasm. The workplace is an important potential source of respirable exposures that can cause or trigger asthma. Identification of an occupational factor in asthma is important: early diagnosis and removal of the worker from the exposure is associated with improved prognosis; the diagnosis of occupational asthma may lead to compensation for work-related impairment and disability; and the diagnosis of occupational asthma is a Sentinel Health Event with implications for public health and prevention. In this article, we review specific causes of occupational asthma and general settings in which an occupational factor should be suspected and explored as part of the management of the worker with asthma. We also review specific and simple elements of history and pulmonary function testing that can be easily assessed by most health care practitioners and may be sufficient to establish a diagnosis of occupational asthma. Finally, we review the medical-legal implications of occupational asthma. Images Figure 1. PMID:9866431

  4. 5 CFR 293.505 - Establishment and protection of Employee Medical Folder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... the employee leaves the employing agency and occupational medical records for that employee exist... able to ascertain from agency implementing instructions the location of all of their medical records...) Neither the original occupational medical record nor duplicates are to be retained in the OPF. Prior...

  5. 5 CFR 293.505 - Establishment and protection of Employee Medical Folder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... the employee leaves the employing agency and occupational medical records for that employee exist... able to ascertain from agency implementing instructions the location of all of their medical records...) Neither the original occupational medical record nor duplicates are to be retained in the OPF. Prior...

  6. Principles and Practices of Occupational Safety and Health: Administrator's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Safety and Health Administration, Washington, DC.

    The manual guides an instructor in conducting a training course for first-line supervisors to familiarize them with six aspects relating to the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970: (1) requirements of the Act, (2) compliance with its standards, (3) identification of health and safety hazards, (4) correction of adverse conditions, (5) record…

  7. 49 CFR 214.321 - Exclusive track occupancy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... roadway worker in charge, or (3) The roadway worker in charge causing fixed signals at each entrance to... authority for exclusive track occupancy while the authority for the working limits is in effect. (3) The... limits; (2) A fixed signal that displays an aspect indicating “Stop”; (3) A station shown in the...

  8. Westside Area Career Occupations Project. Evaluation Report 1975-76.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glur, John

    Evaluation of the Westside Area Career Occupations Project (WACOP) focused on (1) examining what aspects of the Arizona career education effort had the most significant impact on students, and (2) measuring specific outcomes related to the students' knowledge about the world of work, using the Arizona Careers Test. System implementation and…

  9. Career Education Resource Bibliography: Delaware's Occupational-Vocational Education Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milford Special School District, DE.

    This bibliography lists professional books and instructional materials, concerning aspects of career education, for Delaware's Occupational-Vocational Education Model, at Milford, Delaware. Entries are arranged alphabetically by title under these categories: (1) Educational Theory, including theories relating to career development, child…

  10. Biographical factors of occupational independence.

    PubMed

    Müller, G F

    2001-10-01

    The present study examined biographical factors of occupational independence including any kind of nonemployed profession. Participants were 59 occupationally independent and 58 employed persons of different age (M = 36.3 yr.), sex, and profession. They were interviewed on variables like family influence, educational background, occupational role models, and critical events for choosing a particular type of occupational career. The obtained results show that occupationally independent people reported stronger family ties, experienced fewer restrictions of formal education, and remembered fewer negative role models than the employed people. Implications of these results are discussed. PMID:11783553

  11. Occupational health in Cuba.

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, M R

    1981-01-01

    Health and safety regulation, training, and research were practically non-existent in Cuba before the Revolution in 1959. Since that time important advances have been made. Specialized inspectors, occupational physicians, and other such personnel are now trained in Cuba. An Occupational Health Institute, founded in 1976, provides training and specialized technical services, and conducts research. In 1978, a far reaching "Work Safety and Health Law" was enacted which defines the rights and responsibility of government agencies, workplace administrators, unions, and workers. Comprehensive control of toxic substances in workplaces, still at an early stage, is likely to increase in light of the new law, the growing availability of qualified personnel, and the mounting concern of public health authorities with the increasingly "developed" health profile of the population. PMID:7212141

  12. Occupation and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Raj, A; Mayberry, J; Podas, T

    2003-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a cause of significant morbidity and mortality. There are several risk factors, with occupation emerging as one of these. There is considerable evidence that occupations in coal and tin mining, metal processing, particularly steel and iron, and rubber manufacturing industries lead to an increased risk of gastric cancer. Other "dusty" occupations—for example, wood processing, or work in high temperature environments have also been implicated but the evidence is not strong. The mechanism of pathogenesis of gastric cancer is unclear and the identification of causative agents can be difficult. Dust is thought to be a contributor to the pathological process, but well known carcinogens such as N-nitroso compounds have been detected in some environments. Further research on responsible agents is necessary and screening for detection of precursor gastric cancer lesions at the workplace merits consideration. PMID:12782770

  13. Occupational Contact Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Occupational contact dermatitis accounts for 90% of all cases of work-related cutaneous disorders. It can be divided into irritant contact dermatitis, which occurs in 80% of cases, and allergic contact dermatitis. In most cases, both types will present as eczematous lesions on exposed parts of the body, notably the hands. Accurate diagnosis relies on meticulous history taking, thorough physical examination, careful reading of Material Safety Data Sheets to distinguish between irritants and allergens, and comprehensive patch testing to confirm or rule out allergic sensitization. This article reviews the pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of occupational contact dermatitis and provides diagnostic guidelines and a rational approach to management of these often frustrating cases. PMID:20525126

  14. Human occupancy detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, David A.

    1994-10-01

    In the area of security and surveillance technologies, the problem of the arrival in Canada of illegal and undesirable ship and truck cargo loads is steadily increasing. As the volumes of cargo arrivals increase so do the Immigration and Customs problems related to the determination of the validity of those cargo contents. Of special concern to Immigration Control Authorities around the world is the emerging and increasing trend of illegal smuggling of human beings hidden inside of shipping containers. Beginning in 1992, Immigration Control Authorities in Canada observed an escalation of alien people smuggling through the use of cargo shipping containers arriving in the Port of Montreal. This paper will present to the audience the recently completed Immigration Canada Human Occupancy Detection project by explaining the design, development and testing of human occupancy detectors. The devices are designed to electronically detect the presence of persons hiding inside of shipping containers, without the requirement of opening the container doors. The human occupancy detection concepts are based upon the presence of carbon dioxide or other human waste characteristics commonly found inside of shipping containers.

  15. Prognosis of occupational asthma.

    PubMed

    Paggiaro, P L; Vagaggini, B; Bacci, E; Bancalari, L; Carrara, M; Di Franco, A; Giannini, D; Dente, F L; Giuntini, C

    1994-04-01

    Several studies on the prognosis of occupational asthma have shown that a significant proportion of patients continue to experience asthmatic symptoms and nonspecific bronchial hyperresponsiveness after cessation of work. The determinants of this unfavourable prognosis of asthma are: long duration of exposure before the onset of asthma; long duration of symptoms before diagnosis; baseline airway obstruction; dual response after specific challenge test; and the persistence of markers of airway inflammation in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and bronchial biopsy. The relevance of immunological markers in the outcome of occupational asthma has not yet been assessed. Further occupational exposure in sensitized subjects leads to persistence and sometimes to progressive deterioration of asthma, irrespective of the reduction of exposure to the specific sensitizer, and only the use of particular protective devices effectively prevents the progression of the disease. A long-term follow-up study of toluene diisocyanate (TDI)-induced asthma showed that the improvement in bronchial hyperresponsiveness to methacholine occurred in a small percentage of subjects and only a long time after work cessation. Bronchial sensitivity to TDI may disappear, but non-specific bronchial hyperresponsiveness often persists unchanged, suggesting a permanent deregulation of airway tone. Steroid treatment significantly reduces nonspecific bronchial hyperresponsiveness only when started immediately after diagnosis. PMID:8005260

  16. Investing in Prospective Cohorts for Etiologic Study of Occupational Exposures

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prospective cohorts have played a major role in understanding the role of diet, physical activity, medical conditions, and genes in the development of many diseases, but have not been widely used in the study of occupational exposures. Studies in agriculture are an exception. W...

  17. Teacher's Guide for Competency Based Core Curriculum for Health Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meckley, Richard; And Others

    This teacher's guide is intended to acompany the Competency Based Core Curriculum for Health Occupations student materials--see note. Contents include suggested tests and answer keys for student evaluation and a tool and equipment list. A comprehensive bibliography is organized into these topics: dental hygiene, medical laboratory technology,…

  18. Nursing III. A Course of Study. Health Occupations Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Helen V.

    This curriculum guide for instructors provides a course of study (Nursing III) requisite for the third and concluding portion of a 1-year practical nursing curriculum designed to continue opportunities for career mobility in the health occupations. Content is in three sections: (1) Medical Surgical Nursing II, (2) Mental Health Nursing, and (3)…

  19. Medical Transcriptionists

    MedlinePlus

    ... equipment or software that is connected to their computer. However, technological advances have changed the way medical ... this section Medical transcriptionists must be comfortable using computers. Medical transcriptionists typically need postsecondary education. Prospective medical ...

  20. Medical marijuana

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000899.htm Medical marijuana To use the sharing features on this page, ... have legalized marijuana for medical use. How Does Medical Marijuana Work? Medical marijuana may be: Smoked Vaporized Eaten ...

  1. Medical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, D.

    1996-09-01

    There are a number of medically related imaging programs at synchrotron facilities around the world. The most advanced of these are the dual energy transvenous coronary angiography imaging programs, which have progressed to human imaging for some years. The NSLS facility will be discussed and patient images from recent sessions from the NSLS and HASYLAB will be presented. The effort at the Photon Factory and Accumulator Ring will also be briefly covered, as well as future plans for the new facilities. Emphasis will be on the new aspects of these imaging programs; this includes imaging with a peripheral venous injection of the iodine contrast agent, imaging at three photon energies, and the potential of a hospital-based compact source. Other medical programs to be discussed, are the multiple energy computed tomography (MECT) project at the NSLS and plans for a MECT program at the ESRF. Recently, experiments performed at the NSLS to image mammography phantoms using monochromatic beam have produced very promising results. This program will be discussed as well as some new results from imaging a phantom using a thin Laue crystal analyzer after the object to eliminate scatter onto the detector. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Regulatory aspects on nanomedicines.

    PubMed

    Sainz, Vanessa; Conniot, João; Matos, Ana I; Peres, Carina; Zupancic, Eva; Moura, Liane; Silva, Liana C; Florindo, Helena F; Gaspar, Rogério S

    2015-12-18

    Nanomedicines have been in the forefront of pharmaceutical research in the last decades, creating new challenges for research community, industry, and regulators. There is a strong demand for the fast development of scientific and technological tools to address unmet medical needs, thus improving human health care and life quality. Tremendous advances in the biomaterials and nanotechnology fields have prompted their use as promising tools to overcome important drawbacks, mostly associated to the non-specific effects of conventional therapeutic approaches. However, the wide range of application of nanomedicines demands a profound knowledge and characterization of these complex products. Their properties need to be extensively understood to avoid unpredicted effects on patients, such as potential immune reactivity. Research policy and alliances have been bringing together scientists, regulators, industry, and, more frequently in recent years, patient representatives and patient advocacy institutions. In order to successfully enhance the development of new technologies, improved strategies for research-based corporate organizations, more integrated research tools dealing with appropriate translational requirements aiming at clinical development, and proactive regulatory policies are essential in the near future. This review focuses on the most important aspects currently recognized as key factors for the regulation of nanomedicines, discussing the efforts under development by industry and regulatory agencies to promote their translation into the market. Regulatory Science aspects driving a faster and safer development of nanomedicines will be a central issue for the next years. PMID:26260323

  3. Occupational asthma and occupational rhinitis: the united airways disease model revisited

    PubMed Central

    Ameille, Jacques; Hamelin, Karine; Andujar, Pascal; Bensefa-Colas, Lynda; Bonneterre, Vincent; Dupas, Dominique; Garnier, Robert; Loddé, Brice Alain; Rinaldo, Mickael; Descatha, Alexis; Lasfargues, Gérard; Pairon, Jean-Claude

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Whereas accumulating evidence indicates close associations between rhinitis and asthma, little is known about the relationships between occupational rhinitis (OR) and occupational asthma (OA). This study analyses the prevalence of OR associated with OA, globally and according to the various causal agents, and investigates the temporal relationships between these two conditions. Methods Data on incident cases of OA (2008–2010) were collected through the French national occupational disease surveillance and prevention network, using a standardized form including information on occupation, causal agents, presence of OR, and respective dates of occurrence of rhinitis and asthma. Results Among the 596 reported OA cases with latency period, 555 could be attributed to identified agents: high molecular weight (HMW) agents (n=174); low molecular weight (LMW) agents (n=381). Overall, OR was associated with OA in 324 (58.4%) cases. The frequency of association was significantly higher for HMW agents than for LMW agents (72.2% vs 51.5%, p<0.001). OR occurred before OA significantly more frequently for HMW agents than for LMW agents (p<0.01). Conclusions These results show that OR is frequently associated with OA, especially when HMW agents are involved. They are consistent with the hypothesis that OR, in conjunction with OA, is more likely to be caused by sensitizers that cause disease via IgE-mediated mechanisms and suggest that symptoms of OR should be taken into account in the medical surveillance of workers exposed to HMW agents. PMID:23390199

  4. Occupational Burns Treated in Emergency Departments

    PubMed Central

    Reichard, Audrey A.; Konda, Srinivas; Jackson, Larry L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite reported declines, occupational burn injuries remain a workplace safety concern. More severe burns may result in costly medical treatment and long-term physical and psychological consequences. Methods We used the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System—Occupational Supplement to produce national estimates of burns treated in emergency departments (EDs). We analyzed data trends from 1999 to 2008 and provided detailed descriptions of 2008 data. Results From 1999 to 2008 there were 1,132,000 (95% CI: ±192,300) nonfatal occupational burns treated in EDs. Burn numbers and rates declined approximately 40% over the 10 years. In 2008, men and younger workers 15–24 years old had the highest rates. Scalds and thermal burns accounted for more than 60% of burns. Accommodation and food service, manufacturing, and construction industries had the largest number of burns. Conclusions Despite declining burn rates, emphasis is needed on reducing burn hazards to young food service workers and using job specific hazard analyses to prevent burns. PMID:25678457

  5. Occupational lead exposure aboard a tall ship

    SciTech Connect

    Landrigan, P.J.; Straub, W.E.

    1985-01-01

    To evaluate occupational exposures to lead in shipfitters cutting and riveting lead-painted iron plates aboard an iron-hulled sailing vessel, the authors conducted an environmental and medical survey. Lead exposures in seven personal (breathing zone) air samples ranged from 108 to 500 micrograms/mT (mean 257 micrograms/mT); all were above the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standard of 50 micrograms/mT. In two short-term air samples obtained while exhaust ventilation was temporarily disconnected, mean lead exposure rose to 547 micrograms/mT. Blood lead levels in ten shipfitters ranged from 25 to 53 micrograms/dl. Blood lead levels in shipfitters were significantly higher than in other shipyard workers. Smoking shipfitters had significantly higher lead levels than nonsmokers. Lead levels in shipfitters who wore respirators were not lower than in those who wore no protective gear. Four shipfitters had erythrocyte protoporphyrin (EP) concentrations above the adult upper normal limit of 50 micrograms/dl. A close correlation was found between blood lead and EP levels. Prevalence of lead-related symptoms was no higher in shipfitters than in other workers. These data indicate that serious occupational exposure to lead can occur in a relatively small boatyard.

  6. Legal aspects of satellite teleconferencing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. D.

    1971-01-01

    The application of satellite communications for teleconferencing purposes is discussed. The legal framework within which such a system or series of systems could be developed is considered. The analysis is based on: (1) satellite teleconferencing regulation, (2) the options available for such a system, (3) regulatory alternatives, and (4) ownership and management aspects. The system is designed to provide a capability for professional education, remote medical diagnosis, business conferences, and computer techniques.

  7. The occupational history in the primary care setting

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, D.A.; Wakefield, D.S.; Fieselmann, J.F.; Berger-Wesley, M.; Zeitler, R. )

    1991-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the need for services in occupational medicine, we determined the prevalence of reported occupational exposures in patients seen in the primary care setting. In addition, we evaluated the validity of our survey instrument. All patients (n = 1,112) seen over a 3-month period of time in the Primary Care Clinic at the Iowa City Veterans Affairs Medical Center were considered eligible for this study. A survey instrument was developed to obtain specific information regarding occupational exposures. The questionnaire was administered to 534 or 48% of all eligible patients. The validity of the survey instrument was evaluated by comparing chest radiographs in subjects with a history of exposure to asbestos, coal dust, or silica to those in patients who were not exposed to any of these agents. We found that almost 75% of the patients reported prior occupational exposure to at least one potentially toxic agent, and over 30% claimed exposure to at least four potentially toxic agents. The validation study indicated that the reported exposure history for asbestos, coal dust, and silica is significantly associated with anticipated changes on chest radiographs. These findings suggest that this easily administered survey instrument is valid for pneumoconiotic dust exposures and may also be valid for other potentially toxic exposures. Data from our study indicate that patients seen in the ambulatory care setting may have clinically significant occupational exposures that are relevant to their medical condition.

  8. Occupational arsine gas exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Pullen-James, Shayla; Woods, Scott E.

    2006-01-01

    Arsine gas exposure is a rare occupational event and can be completely prevented with the use of appropriate protective gear. Exposure often occurs when arsine gas is generated while arsenic-containing crude ores or metals are treated with acid. Cases of toxicity require an index of suspicion and a good history. In particular, it should be in the differential diagnosis in patients who present acutely with red/bronze skin and hemoglobinuria. Treatment is supportive and may include transfusions and dialysis in severe cases. Clinical severity is proportionate to the level of exposure, and severity is directly related to the onset of symptoms. Images Figure 2 PMID:17225850

  9. Medication and skilled work.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, A N

    1990-04-12

    There is increasing interest in the way in which drugs impair performance. This has arisen because some may impair day-to-day skills of those whose occupations demand vigilance and motor skill, and of those who are involved in decision making or where interpersonal relations are crucial. For many years the position was adopted, at least in certain occupations where impaired performance could be a danger to others, that the use of any drug should preclude employment. However, recent advances in therapeutics and a greater understanding of drug action in man has made this rather uncomplicated view of life less tenable, and there is now an increasing desire that advances in therapy should, if at all possible, be available to occupational groups, such as airline pilots. In this way the adverse effect which a drug may have on performance has become an important aspect of its clinical profile. Hypnotics appropriate for transient insomnia, which may arise from the irregularity of rest inherent in many occupations, need to be free of residual effects, antihistamines that are sedative must be avoided, and drugs used in the management of mild hypertension, often during the important years of middle life, must be as free as possible from central effects. And it must be emphasized that these drugs are often used by active, healthy or near healthy individuals. The issues involved in the safe use of a particular drug by a particular individual are complex, and as with all aspects of therapeutics it is sometimes necessary to balance efficacy and adverse effects. PMID:1970897

  10. Predicting Adult Occupational Environments from Gender and Childhood Personality Traits

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Stephen A.; Hampson, Sarah E.

    2010-01-01

    To test aspects of a theory of the role of personality and gender on the development of vocational interests, and their subsequent effects on adult occupational choices, this study examined associations between childhood personality traits, gender, and occupational environments over 40 years later. Participants (N = 587) were assessed on the Big Five by their teachers when aged 6–12 years. In middle-age (late 40’s) they reported their occupation. Holland’s RIASEC vocational types (Realistic, Investigative, Artistic, Social, Enterprising, Conventional) were used to characterize the job environments of reported occupations. Childhood Openness/Intellect and Conscientiousness, but no other Big Five traits, were associated with occupational environments. For the most strongly sex-typed work environments, associations with Openness/Intellect were moderated by gender. Discussion of these findings suggested that the roots of the strongest gender stereotyping effects in occupations may be found not only in the social factors associated with gender, but also in the individual differences of children related to Openness/Intellect. PMID:20822206

  11. The Relationship Between Burnout and Occupational Stress in Genetic Counselors.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Brittney; Kaiser, Amy; Injeyan, Marie C; Sappleton, Karen; Chitayat, David; Stephens, Derek; Shuman, Cheryl

    2016-08-01

    Burnout represents a critical disruption in an individual's relationship with work, resulting in a state of exhaustion in which one's occupational value and capacity to perform are questioned. Burnout can negatively affect an individual's personal life, as well as employers in terms of decreased work quality, patient/client satisfaction, and employee retention. Occupational stress is a known contributor to burnout and occurs as a result of employment requirements and factors intrinsic to the work environment. Empirical research examining genetic counselor-specific burnout is limited; however, existing data suggests that genetic counselors are at increased risk for burnout. To investigate the relationship between occupational stress and burnout in genetic counselors, we administered an online survey to members of three genetic counselor professional organizations. Validated measures included the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey (an instrument measuring burnout on three subscales: exhaustion, cynicism, and professional efficacy) and the Occupational Stress Inventory-Revised (an instrument measuring occupational stress on 14 subscales). Of the 353 respondents, more than 40 % had either considered leaving or left their job role due to burnout. Multiple regression analysis yielded significant predictors for burnout risk. The identified sets of predictors account for approximately 59 % of the variance in exhaustion, 58 % of the variance in cynicism, and 43 % of the variance in professional efficacy. Our data confirm that a significant number of genetic counselors experience burnout and that burnout is correlated with specific aspects of occupational stress. Based on these findings, practice and research recommendations are presented. PMID:27228983

  12. Office of Occupational Medicine. FY 1993, Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    To date, we have assessed every DOE site at least once, many twice. With the information collected during these visits, EH-43 is developing a solid understanding of the occupational medical program activities at each site and will be better able to monitor progress. The assessment staff provided more specific technical assistance than in the past, especially in the area of compliance. In addition, the cardiovascular medical guidelines are near completion and the personnel assurance, firefighters, and protective force personnel medical guidelines are ready for the concurrence process.

  13. Occupational Health for Healthcare Providers

    MedlinePlus

    ... prevention practices. They can reduce your risk of health problems. Use protective equipment, follow infection control guidelines, ... manage stress. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health

  14. [Peculiarity of the occupational physician].

    PubMed

    Pagliaro, G; Simonini, S; del Bufalo, P; Serra, A; Ramistella, E

    2011-01-01

    Aim of this contribution is to consider, although in a concise way, the peculiarity of the Occupational Physician's activity operating in Health care sector, that employs about 5% of Italian workers. Particularly, we bring into focus the global roll that the Occupational Physician must fulfil in a reality where he is the protagonist towards the safeguard of the worker's safe, already submitted to several occupational risks, and about the safety of the third parties, which is more important than in other sectors. Shared elaboration in this article shows that Occupational Physician of the Health care sector has the same problems and expectations everywhere, in our Country. PMID:23393851

  15. Occupational medicine: toward a worker/patient empowerment approach to occupational illness.

    PubMed

    Lax, Michael B

    2002-01-01

    Clinicians practicing occupational medicine are increasingly confronted with patients who have complex illnesses with chronic nonspecific symptoms. Most clinicians use the traditional tools of biomedicine to diagnose and treat the illness, determine etiology, and assess disability. This article argues that the biomedical approach is inadequate to effectively evaluate and treat occupational illness. After reviewing several critiques of biomedicine, including biopsychosocial, feminist, class, and critical theory/postmodern perspectives, the author offers an alternative approach that builds on aspects of these perspectives as well as the "popular education" work of Paulo Freire. Constraints on, and possibilities for, the development of an alternative approach that attempts to build patients' capacities for transformative action are explored. PMID:12211291

  16. Medical image file formats.

    PubMed

    Larobina, Michele; Murino, Loredana

    2014-04-01

    Image file format is often a confusing aspect for someone wishing to process medical images. This article presents a demystifying overview of the major file formats currently used in medical imaging: Analyze, Neuroimaging Informatics Technology Initiative (Nifti), Minc, and Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (Dicom). Concepts common to all file formats, such as pixel depth, photometric interpretation, metadata, and pixel data, are first presented. Then, the characteristics and strengths of the various formats are discussed. The review concludes with some predictive considerations about the future trends in medical image file formats. PMID:24338090

  17. Occupational therapy in alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Rotert, D A

    1989-01-01

    Gorski describes "abstinence plus a full return to biopsychosocial functioning as the indicator of successful recovery," and "relapse ... as the process of becoming dysfunctional in recovery." Occupational therapy supports a biopsychosocial premise in assisting the alcoholic to establish a sober lifestyle for recovery as a part of treatment. Adolph Meyer said, "If the goal of alcoholism treatment is abstinence, then the alcoholic patient must be instructed and guided to organize his time and build up habits of work and leisure which are free of alcohol." In order to attain satisfaction in recovery, the alcoholic must develop a balanced lifestyle. This balanced lifestyle will be for competent role performance in all roles. Sobriety can restore something the alcoholic has lost. The alcoholic can be a contributing member of society; have feelings of self respect; participate in relationships with family, friends, and coworkers; and return to work, social, and leisure environments. Zackon identified lifestyle rehabilitation as the second track of recovery. He also listed the key tasks of secondary recovery as deaddiction, learning new pleasures, social integration, and creating new goals. It is in these key tasks that occupational therapy can provide significant input and feedback to the alcoholic. PMID:2658155

  18. Occupational mononeuropathies in industry.

    PubMed

    Bonfiglioli, Roberta; Mattioli, Stefano; Violante, Francesco S

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries have the potential to cause significant disability and can be commonly associated with recreational and occupational activities. Acute nerve injuries are mainly related to violent trauma, while repeated mechanical trauma due to external forces or repetitive motions can produce chronic nerve compression injury. This chapter will present a narrative review of the existing evidence of the association between peripheral compressive nerve disorders and work-related risk factors. Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common peripheral neuropathy in the general population and in working populations employed in manual repetitive and forceful activities. The work-relatedness of CTS is essentially based on epidemiologic evidence and the results of experimental studies showing the capability of repetitive wrist extreme postures, associated with hand-wrist forceful exertions, to increase the pressure inside the carpal tunnel and to compress the median nerve. Assembly industry, food processing and packaging, hand-arm vibrating tools, and jobs involving high-repetition, high-force tasks put workers at risk for CTS. Less strong evidence exists of the association between ulnar elbow neuropathy and manual tasks or repetitive stretch on squatting and peroneal nerve neuropathy at the fibular head. Very few reports are available about the association between occupation and other compressive peripheral nerve injuries. PMID:26563800

  19. Systemic lupus erythematosus: Clinical and experimental aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Smolen, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    This text covers questions related to the history, etiology, pathogenesis, clinical aspects and therapy of systematic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Both animal models and human SLE are considered. With regard to basic science, concise information on cellular immunology, autoantibodies, viral aspects and molecular biology in SLE is provided. Clinical topics then deal with medical, dermatologic, neurologic, radiologic, pathologic, and therapeutic aspects. The book not only presents the most recent information on clinical and experimental insights, but also looks at future aspects related to the diagnosis and therapy of SLE.

  20. Instructional Support System--Occupational Education. Building Industries Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abramson, Theodore; And Others

    The modules which make up the bulk of this report are the result of a two-week workshop at which thirteen building industries occupations teachers worked toward the development of a student outcome oriented curriculum. These modules are divided into the following occupational units: (1) carpentry (containing hand tools; portable power tools;…