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Sample records for occurring retirement community

  1. Identifying Naturally Occurring Retirement Communities: A Spatial Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Hernandez, Maricruz; Yamashita, Takashi; Kinney, Jennifer M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Guided by the concept of “aging in place” and potential policy implications, the study analyzed naturally occurring retirement communities (NORCs; 40% or greater house owners and renters aged 65 years and older) and whether there were spatiotemporal patterns in Ohio between 2000 and 2010. Method Data were derived from the 2000 and 2010 census tracts. Geovisualization was used to visually examine the distribution of NORCs in 2000 and 2010. Global Moran’s I was used to quantify the spatial distribution of NORCs in Ohio and Local Moran’s I was used to identify clusters of NORCs (i.e., hot spots). Results The number of NORCs slightly decreased despite the overall increase of the older population from 2000 to 2010. NORCs were identified in one of the 3 most populous counties (i.e., Cuyahoga) and its neighboring counties. A number of hot spots were identified in Cuyahoga County (among Ohio’s most populous and NORC-rich counties), both in 2000 and 2010. There were different patterns including emerging, disappearing, and enduring NORCs and disproportionate distributions of NORCs across the state between 2000 and 2010. Discussion Locating NORCs could aid governments to create “aging in place” sensitive policies to address issues of independence, social care, health care, volunteerism, and community participation. PMID:24958694

  2. The Case of an In-Home Recreation Program for an Older Adult in a Naturally Occurring Retirement Community (NORC).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chow, Yvette

    2002-01-01

    Describes the implementation of an in-home therapeutic recreation (TR) program with an elderly woman living in a naturally occurring retirement community (NORC) by a fourth-year TR student. The program helped meet her physical, social, and cognitive needs and re-stimulate her interests. Results suggest that in-home TR can be beneficial, and TR…

  3. Recruiting Older Adults into a Physical Activity Promotion Program: "Active Living Every Day" Offered in a Naturally Occurring Retirement Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hildebrand, Mary; Neufeld, Peggy

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This article explores recruitment strategies based on the transtheoretical model (TTM) with older adults living in a naturally occurring retirement community (NORC) to encourage enrollment in a physical activity promotion program, "Active Living Every Day" (ALED). Reasons for participation or nonparticipation are identified. Design and…

  4. Creating a therapeutic milieu in retirement communities.

    PubMed

    Bekhet, Abir; Zauszniewski, Jaclene A

    2011-01-01

    Elderly persons' relocation to retirement communities is a stressful event that requires person-milieu adjustment. Research has shown differences in relocation adjustment for elders residing in different retirement communities. A secondary analysis used findings from a study of relocated elders in order to determine whether certain therapeutic factors were lacking in retirement communities where elders had difficulty in adjusting. Study participants were 104 elders who relocated to six retirement communities in Northeast Ohio. This study analyzed qualitative data from the researchers' observations and field notes and narratives obtained from the elders who participated in the original study. The analysis focused on data that described the environmental characteristics of retirement communities where elders reported less successful adjustment. These environmental characteristics were evaluated for consistency with the characteristics of Shives' therapeutic milieu. Most retirement communities in the study did not fulfill all eight dimensions of a therapeutic milieu as defined by Shives. For example, individualized treatment programs were lacking in most of the retirement communities and the activities offered were not based on individual assessment and did not contribute to personal growth. The findings point to the need to create a more therapeutic milieu in retirement communities in order to facilitate successful readjustment for relocated elders. PMID:21574846

  5. Choosing a Retirement Community: Ask These 10 Physical Activity Questions

    MedlinePlus

    ... NIH www.nia.nih.gov/Go4Life Choosing a Retirement Community Ask These 10 Physical Activity Questions As you visit potential retirement communities, consider their physical activity offerings. If you’ ...

  6. Social Interaction and Alcohol Use in Retirement Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Francesca; Duff, Robert W.

    1988-01-01

    Surveyed 260 residents of three retirement communities. Found regular drinking more common in these communities than in general population of older adults. Drinking was associated with social activity rather than with isolation or stresses of aging. Concluded that drinking was integral part of communities' leisure subculture and that social and…

  7. The Critical Impact of Impending Retirements on Community College Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shults, Christopher

    A synthesis of recent research efforts, including the 2001 American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) Leadership Survey, this paper highlights trends that have placed community college leadership in peril. Two major issues have combined to create a crisis: (1) community college presidents have been retiring at a high rate--a trend that is…

  8. Baby Boomers in an Active Adult Retirement Community: Comity Interrupted

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Erin G.; Keimig, Lynn; Rubinstein, Robert L.; Morgan, Leslie; Eckert, J. Kevin; Goldman, Susan; Peeples, Amanda D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: This article explores a clash between incoming Baby Boomers and older residents in an active adult retirement community (AARC). We examine issues of social identity and attitudes as these groups encounter each other. Design and Methods: Data are drawn from a multiyear ethnographic study of social relations in senior housing.…

  9. Attitudinal Development toward Retirement in a Religious Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, W. Dean

    The approach to retirement in the Religious Community is discussed as related to the Sister derived from her work as a teacher, nurse, homemaker, or administrator. The problem of aging and philosophies of many who are involved in the field of gerontology are presented. (DB)

  10. Retirement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carp, Frances M., Ed.

    This comprehensive look at retirement as a transitional life stage was instituted by the Federal Government in order to initiate theory building in this much neglected area. Conferences participated in by experts were held at intervals so as to maximize interactive thinking. Following this give and take, participants formulated theoretical models…

  11. Resident Medical Care Utilization Patterns in Continuing Care Retirement Communities

    PubMed Central

    Ruchlin, Hirsch S.; Morris, Shirley; Morris, John N.

    1993-01-01

    This article presents the findings of an evaluation of medical care service utilization by two elderly cohorts one living in continuing care retirement communities (CCRCs) and the other living in traditional community settings. CCRC residents' overall use of Medicare-covered medical services did not differ significantly from that of the traditional community-residing elders. Both groups incurred annual per capita expenditures of approximately $2,000. In their last year of life, however, CCRC residents displayed significantly lower expenditures for hospital care ($3,854 versus $7,268) but higher expenditures for Medicare or non-Medicare-covered nursing home care ($5,565 versus $3,533). PMID:10133107

  12. Promoting walking among older adults living in retirement communities.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Dori E; Kerr, Jacqueline; Sallis, James F; Norman, Gregory J; Calfas, Karen; Patrick, Kevin

    2012-07-01

    The authors tested the feasibility and acceptability, and explored the outcomes, of 2 walking interventions based on ecological models among older adults living in retirement communities. An enhanced intervention (EI) was compared with a standard walking intervention (SI) among residents in 4 retirement facilities (N = 87 at baseline; mean age = 84.1 yr). All participants received a walking intervention including pedometers, printed materials, and biweekly group sessions. EI participants also received phone counseling and environmental-awareness components. Measures included pedometer step counts, activities of daily living, environment-related variables, physical function, depression, cognitive function, satisfaction, and adherence. Results indicated improvements among the total sample for step counts, neighborhood barriers, cognitive function, and satisfaction with walking opportunities. Satisfaction and adherence were high. Both walking interventions were feasible to implement among facility-dwelling older adults. Future studies can build on this multilevel approach. PMID:22186798

  13. Leadership Enhancement for the Active Retired: A Community Leadership Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Carol M., Ed.; Olson, Philip, Ed.

    Developed for program facilitators in rural communities, Leadership Enhancement for the Active Retired (LEAR) is a training model that builds on the leadership skills and expertise of people who are retired from full-time employment, but are still willing to share their time and talent to benefit their community. Although other formats for the…

  14. Relations between retired agricultural land, water quality, and aquatic-community health, Minnesota River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christensen, Victoria G.; Lee, Kathy E.; McLees, James M.; Niemela, Scott L.

    2012-01-01

    The relative importance of agricultural land retirement on water quality and aquatic-community health was investigated in the Minnesota River Basin. Eighty-two sites, with drainage areas ranging from 4.3 to 2200 km2, were examined for nutrient concentrations, measures of aquatic-community health (e.g., fish index of biotic integrity [IBI] scores), and environmental factors (e.g., drainage area and amount of agricultural land retirement). The relation of proximity of agricultural land retirement to the stream was determined by calculating the land retirement percent in various riparian zones. Spearman's rho results indicated that IBI score was not correlated to the percentage of agricultural land retirement at the basin scale (p = 0.070); however, IBI score was correlated to retired land percentage in the 50- to 400-m riparian zones surrounding the streams (p < 0.05), indicating that riparian agricultural land retirement may have more influence on aquatic-community health than does agricultural land retirement in upland areas. Multivariate analysis of covariance and analysis of covariance models indicated that other environmental factors (such as drainage area and lacustrine and palustrine features) commonly were correlated to aquatic-community health measures, as were in-stream factors (standard deviation of water depth and substrate type). These results indicate that although agricultural land retirement is significantly related to fish communities as measured by the IBI scores, a combination of basin, riparian, and in-stream factors act together to influence IBI scores.

  15. Retirement Community Residents’ Physical Activity, Depressive Symptoms, and Functional Limitations

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Lorraine J.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the types of physical activity (PA) retirement community residents report and the effects of PA and depressive symptoms on functional limitations. Elders (N = 38) enrolled in a 2-year sensor technology study in senior housing completed regular assessments of functional limitations and depressive symptoms with the Short Physical Performance Battery and Geriatric Depression Scale, respectively. Evaluation of reported PA using the Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly coincided with 12-month functional limitation testing. Subjects were 69% female with mean age of 85 years. Individuals reporting greater PA had significantly fewer functional limitations at 12 months. In multiple regression analysis, baseline functional limitations explained 66% of the variance in 12-month functional limitations, while current PA explained an additional 5%. Although PA explained a small amount of variance in 12-month functional limitations, as a modifiable behavior, PA should be championed and supported to help ameliorate functional limitations in older adults. PMID:24532671

  16. Aging in Place in a Retirement Community: 90+ Year Olds

    PubMed Central

    Paganini-Hill, Annlia

    2014-01-01

    Aging in place, an image of growing old in one’s home and maintaining one’s daily routine, is desired by most older adults. To identify variables promoting such independent living in the oldest-old, we examined the association between living situation of a population-based cohort of 90+ year olds with health and lifestyle variables. Of 1485 participants, 53% still lived in their home at a retirement community designed to foster wellness. Those living at home tended to be healthier, with smaller proportions having chronic diseases or hospitalizations in the preceding year and a greater proportion having normal functional ability. Dementia was the chronic disease most significantly related to living situation. In addition to not having dementia, not using a wheelchair or bath aid, receiving meals on wheels, and being married were jointly related to living at home. With the help of family and friends and with a medical and social support system, many 90+ year olds can age in place. This is often because they have a caregiving spouse or paid caregiver. PMID:25288828

  17. Intergenerational Perspectives on Autonomy Following a Transition to a Continuing Care Retirement Community.

    PubMed

    Ayalon, Liat

    2016-02-01

    The study evaluated the concept of autonomy from the perspective of older adults and their adult children following a transition of the older adult to a continuing care retirement community (CCRC). Overall, 70 interviews (with older adults and their adult children; 34 dyads) were analyzed, using a line-by-line open coding, followed by dyadic analysis. Autonomy was not portrayed as a uniform, homogenous construct, but rather encompassed four different domains: (a) the focus of one's attention or concerns: on others, on self, or not at all; (b) the ability to exercise decisions and make independent choices; (c) the degree of physical functioning and ability of the older adult; and (d) the financial ability of the older adult. The duality in the relationships between older adults and their adult children is discussed in relation to the give and take of autonomy that occur following a transition to a CCRC. PMID:25749736

  18. The Role Exit Process of Community College Faculty: A Study of Faculty Retirement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Allatia; Prentice, Mary

    2004-01-01

    Between 1965 and 1975, over 500 community colleges opened across the United States. Thirty-five years later, the founding faculty has begun to retire. This study was designed to reveal the experiences of veteran community college faculty as they left their teaching role. The study examined the role exit experience of faculty, comparing the…

  19. Patterns of Adjustment: What Happens to Community College Presidents Following Termination or Forced Retirement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heimer, Muriel Kay; And Others

    A study was conducted by the Presidents Academy of the American Association of Community and Junior Colleges to examine problems faced by community college presidents following termination or forced retirement from their positions. Interviews were conducted with 12 former presidents who had been officially dismissed by their governing boards or…

  20. Community College Administrative Roles in Identifying Faculty for Future Management Positions: A Phenomenological Study of Retired Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knirk, Brian Doyle

    2013-01-01

    The community college system is beginning to see waves of retirements at all levels of the administrative structure. These retirements, in conjunction with expected growth in administrative positions, will result in system-wide administrative vacancies. Community colleges not already seeking new leaders are likely to find themselves in the midst…

  1. Proposal for an Early Retirement Incentive Program at Mercer County Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Arthur E.

    A project was undertaken to evaluate existing models of early retirement incentive programs (ERIPs) and recommend an ERIP for New Jersey's Mercer County Community College (MCCC). The following categories of ERIPs were reviewed: state plans for New York and Minnesota; K-12 school districts plans at the Castro Valley Unified School District and 48…

  2. Aging Well in an Upscale Retirement Community: The Relationships among Perceived Stress, Mattering, and Wellness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Jane E.; Degges-White, Suzanne

    2007-01-01

    Residents (N = 142) of a southeastern, upscale retirement community completed measures of wellness, perceived stress, and mattering. Participants scored higher than did a group of adults under age 60 on 4 of 5 second-order wellness factors and Total Wellness, with medium to large effect sizes. Implications for counselors are discussed. (Contains 2…

  3. Retirement and relevant contemplation.

    PubMed

    Khan, H U; Latif, S A

    2010-01-01

    Retirement literally means withdrawing from the service. The retirement age varies from country to country, generally between 55 and 70 years. There are many effects of retirement upon retirees. The physical and mental health may be disrupted or decline or may remain unaffected. Early retirement have an increased mortality than those who retired lately. Mandatory retirement is applicable to certain occupation like military personnel and airline pilot. Life after retirement from service may have many options like retired community, charities, tourism, and care for grand children or devote to a hobby or sports. The responsibilities of the Government, family and society are the key for the betterment of retired persons. Staying healthy, maintaining social support, spiritual life, good finance and making daily routine prevent stress after retirement. PMID:20046191

  4. Grief in the initial adjustment process to the continuing care retirement community.

    PubMed

    Ayalon, Liat; Green, Varda

    2012-12-01

    This paper examined the transition to continuing care retirement communities (CCRCs) within the framework of anticipatory and disenfranchised grief. Qualitative interviews with 29 residents and 19 adult children were conducted. Three major thematic categories emerged from the data. The first theme reflected ambivalence, dialectics or uncertainty about the CCRC as manifested by the various names assigned to it by respondents. The second theme reflected the acknowledgement of present and anticipatory losses and grief in response to the move. The final theme reflected respondents' disenfranchisement of their grief and loss and their view of the transition in a positive light. In their early adjustment period, residents and adult children are ambivalent about the transition, but often refrain from acknowledging their losses openly because of the image of the CCRC as a status symbol. Open acknowledgement of losses associated with the transition might be beneficial. PMID:22939535

  5. Ah, Retirement! Hmm, Retirement?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vance, Jack O.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses the disadvantages of compulsory retirement at age 65 for senior business executives and suggests several possible ways companies can make good use of the experience and expertise of retirement-age executives. (Available from Business Horizons, School of Business, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47401; $2.50, single copy) (JG)

  6. Applying the Ecological Model of Behavior Change to a Physical Activity Trial in Retirement Communities: Description of the study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Jacqueline; Rosenberg, Dori; Nathan, Andrea; Millstein, Rachel; Carlson, Jordan; Crist, Katie; Wasilenko, Kari; Bolling, Khalisa; Castro, Cynthia M; Buchner, David M.; Marshall, Simon

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To describe the intervention protocol for the first multilevel ecological intervention for physical activity in retirement communities that addresses individual, interpersonal and community influences on behavior change. DESIGN A cluster randomized controlled trial design was employed with two study arms: a physical activity intervention and an attention control successful aging condition. SETTING Sixteen continuing care retirement communities in San Diego County. PARTICIPANTS Three hundred twenty older adults, aged 65 years and older, are being recruited to participate in the trial. In addition, peer leaders are being recruited to lead some study activities, especially to sustain the intervention after study activities ceased. INTERVENTION Participants in the physical activity trial receive individual, interpersonal and community intervention components. The individual level components include pedometers, goal setting and individual phone counseling. The interpersonal level components include group education sessions and peer-led activities. The community level components include resource audits and enumeration, tailored walking maps, and community improvement projects. The successful aging group receives individual and group attention about successful aging topics. MEASUREMENTS The main outcome is light to moderate physical activity, measured objectively by accelerometry. Other objective outcomes included physical functioning, blood pressure, physical fitness, and cognitive functioning. Self report measures include depressive symptoms and health related quality of life. RESULTS The intervention is being delivered successfully in the communities and compliance rates are high. CONCLUSION Ecological Models call for interventions that address multiple levels of the model. Previous studies have not included components at each level and retirement communities provide a model environment to demonstrate how to implement such an intervention. PMID:22921641

  7. Drinking behavior among older adults at a continuing care retirement community: affective and motivational influences

    PubMed Central

    Sacco, Paul; Burruss, Karen; Smith, Cristan A.; Kuerbis, Alexis; Harrington, Donna; Moore, Alison A.; Resnick, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this pilot study was to describe patterns of alcohol consumption among continuing care retirement community(CCRC) residents and to explore the role of drinking motives and affective states on drinking context and consumption. Method We utilized a phone-based daily diary approach to survey older adults about their daily alcohol consumption, context of drinking (e.g. drinking alone), positive and negative affect, and their motives for drinking. Data were analyzed descriptively, and regression models were developed to examine associations between sociodemographic factors, affect, drinking context and motives, and alcohol consumption. Results CCRC residents drank most frequently at home and were alone almost half of drinking days on average, although the context of drinking varied considerably by participant. Problem alcohol use was rare, but hazardous use due to specific comorbidities, symptoms and medications, and the amount of alcohol consumption was common. Respondents endorsed higher social motives for drinking and lower coping motives. Social motives were associated with decreased likelihood of drinking alone, but negative affect was associated with decreased likelihood of drinking outside one’s home. Coping and social motives were associated with greater consumption, and higher positive affect was associated with lower consumption. Conclusion Among CCRC residents, alcohol use may be socially motivated rather than motivated by coping with negative affect. Future research should examine other motives for drinking in older adulthood. Evaluation of older adults living in CCRCs should include attention to health factors beyond problem use as other forms of hazardous use may be common in CCRCs. PMID:25010351

  8. [A Program to Prepare Older Workers for Retirement and Interest Community Groups in Pre-Retirement Planning.] Second Annual Report, September 1, 1968 to August 31, 1969. Drake University Pre-Retirement Planning Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake Univ., Des Moines, IA. Pre-Retirement Planning Center.

    The project was designed to develop, and evaluate the effectiveness of a pre-retirement planning program. The project, in its second year of operation, has had 575 participants who attended a seven-week series of programs covering the topics of employment after retirement, estate planning, company fringe benefits, continuing education,…

  9. Preparing for asset retirement.

    PubMed

    Luecke, Randall W; Reinstein, Alan

    2003-04-01

    Statement of Financial Accounting Standards (SFAS) No. 143 requires organizations to recognize a liability for an asset retirement obligation when it is incurred--even if that occurs far in advance of the asset's planned retirement. For example, organizations must recognize future costs associated with medical equipment disposal that carries hazardous material legal obligations. PMID:12735191

  10. Disability retirement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eck, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    Eligibility for disability retirement is discussed. General guidelines and a few standards are given. Usually the same basic medical principles apply to the evaluation of claims for disability retirement as apply to determining medical suitability for initial employment.

  11. Retiring Lives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnell, Eileen, Ed.; Lodge, Caroline, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "Retiring Lives" presents fourteen personal real life stories from people at various stages of retiring. Each author recounts their own story about retiring, bringing together many aspects of the experiences: the social, psychological and practical. These inspirational and illustrated stories will encourage the reader to hold up these experiences…

  12. Engagement in Retirement: An Evaluation of the Effect of Active Mentoring on Engagement of Older Adults with Intellectual Disability in Mainstream Community Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chng, J. P. L.; Stancliffe, R. J.; Wilson, N. J.; Anderson, K.

    2013-01-01

    Background: As adults with intellectual disability age, retirement options need to be explored. One option is to attend a mainstream community group for retirees. Support within these groups could come from group members who are trained to act as mentors for the older adults with intellectual disability. This research evaluated a support training…

  13. Gender and Age Differences in Hourly and Daily Patterns of Sedentary Time in Older Adults Living in Retirement Communities

    PubMed Central

    Bellettiere, John; Carlson, Jordan A.; Rosenberg, Dori; Singhania, Anant; Natarajan, Loki; Berardi, Vincent; LaCroix, Andrea Z.; Sears, Dorothy D.; Moran, Kevin; Crist, Katie; Kerr, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Background Total sedentary time varies across population groups with important health consequences. Patterns of sedentary time accumulation may vary and have differential health risks. The purpose of this study is to describe sedentary patterns of older adults living in retirement communities and illustrate gender and age differences in those patterns. Methods Baseline accelerometer data from 307 men and women (mean age = 84±6 years) who wore ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometers for ≥ 4 days as part of a physical activity intervention were classified into bouts of sedentary time (<100 counts per minute). Linear mixed models were used to account for intra-person and site-level clustering. Daily and hourly summaries were examined in mutually non-exclusive bouts of sedentary time that were 1+, 5+, 10+, 20+, 30+, 40+, 50+, 60+, 90+ and 120+ minutes in duration. Variations by time of day, age and gender were explored. Results Men accumulated more sedentary time than women in 1+, 5+, 10+, 20+, 30+, 40+, 50+ and 60+ minute bouts; the largest gender-differences were observed in 10+ and 20+ minute bouts. Age was positively associated with sedentary time, but only in bouts of 10+, 20+, 30+, and 40+ minutes. Women had more daily 1+ minute sedentary bouts than men (71.8 vs. 65.2), indicating they break up sedentary time more often. For men and women, a greater proportion of time was spent being sedentary during later hours of the day than earlier. Gender differences in intra-day sedentary time were observed during morning hours with women accumulating less sedentary time overall and having more 1+ minute bouts. Conclusions Patterns identified using bouts of sedentary time revealed gender and age differences in the way in which sedentary time was accumulated by older adults in retirement communities. Awareness of these patterns can help interventionists better target sedentary time and may aid in the identification of health risks associated with sedentary behavior. Future studies

  14. Active Aging for Individuals with Intellectual Disability: Meaningful Community Participation through Employment, Retirement, Service, and Volunteerism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fesko, Sheila Lynch; Hall, Allison Cohen; Quinlan, Jerrilyn; Jockell, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    As individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities become more engaged in community employment, it will be critical to consider how their employment experience changes as they age. Similar to other seniors, individuals will need to consider whether they want to maintain their employment, reduce their work commitment, or retire…

  15. Retired, on Campus, and at Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffer, Jerry; Bram, Leslie

    2003-01-01

    Describes the retirement community supported by the University of Florida in Gainesville. The Oak Hammock facility is to be an integrated community in which retirees are active participants in the university campus community. The various university colleges will play different roles in the retirement community, whether in health care or…

  16. Modified Therapeutic Community Treatment for Offenders with Co-Occurring Disorders: Mental Health Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Christopher J.; Sacks, Stanley; McKendrick, Karen; Banks, Steven; Sacks, Joann Y.; Stommel, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines outcomes 12 months post-prison release for offenders with co-occurring disorders (n = 185) randomly assigned to either a mental health control treatment (C) or a modified therapeutic community (E). Significant between-group differences were not found for mental health measures, although improvements were observed for each…

  17. Wetland defense: naturally occurring pesticide resistance in zooplankton populations protects the stability of aquatic communities.

    PubMed

    Bendis, Randall J; Relyea, Rick A

    2016-06-01

    Anthropogenic stressors are ubiquitous and have been implicated in worldwide declines of terrestrial and aquatic species. Pesticides are one such stressor that can have profound effects on aquatic communities by directly affecting sensitive species and indirectly affecting other species via trophic cascades, which can alter ecosystem function. However, there is growing evidence that non-target species can evolve increased resistance. When such species are important drivers of the food web, then evolved resistance should help buffer communities from the effects of pesticides. To examine this possibility, we cultured four populations of the common zooplankton Daphnia pulex that we previously demonstrated were either sensitive or resistant to a common insecticide (i.e., chlorpyrifos) due to their proximity to agriculture. Using outdoor mesocosms that contained identical aquatic communities of phytoplankton, periphyton, and leopard frog tadpoles (Lithobates pipiens), we manipulated four D. pulex populations and four insecticide concentrations. As we monitored the communities for nearly 3 months, we found that the insecticide caused direct mortality of D. pulex in communities containing sensitive populations, and this led to a bloom of phytoplankton. In contrast, the insecticide caused much less direct mortality in communities containing resistant D. pulex populations, and the trophic cascade was prevented under low to moderate insecticide concentrations. Across all insecticide treatments, survivorship of leopard frogs was approximately 72 % in communities with resistant D. pulex but only 35 % in communities with sensitive D. pulex. To our knowledge, this is one of the first studies to use naturally occurring population variation in insecticide resistance to show that the evolution of pesticide resistance in zooplankton can mitigate the effects of insecticide-induced trophic cascades, and that this outcome can have far-reaching community effects. PMID:26875187

  18. Eliminating Mandatory Retirement: Effects on Retirement Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Karen C.; Hansen, W. Lee

    1989-01-01

    Uncapping the mandatory retirement age is unlikely to alter retirement age by much, but it will lead to substantially higher pensions for faculty members who continue to work. Institutions must monitor retirement-age behavior in order to restructure pension and other benefits appropriately to meet income and retirement objectives. (Author/MSE)

  19. Spatial and Temporal Variation of Cultivable Communities of Co-occurring Endophytes and Pathogens in Wheat.

    PubMed

    Comby, Morgane; Lacoste, Sandrine; Baillieul, Fabienne; Profizi, Camille; Dupont, Joëlle

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the diversity of endogenous microbes from wheat (Triticum aestivum) and to study the structure of its microbial communities, with the ultimate goal to provide candidate strains for future evaluation as potential biological control agents against wheat diseases. We sampled plants from two wheat cultivars, Apache and Caphorn, showing different levels of susceptibility to Fusarium head blight, a major disease of wheat, and tested for variation in microbial diversity and assemblages depending on the host cultivar, host organ (aerial organs vs. roots) or host maturity. Fungi and bacteria were isolated using a culture dependent method. Isolates were identified using ribosomal DNA sequencing and we used diversity analysis to study the community composition of microorganisms over space and time. Results indicate great species diversity in wheat, with endophytes and pathogens co-occurring inside plant tissues. Significant differences in microbial communities were observed according to host maturity and host organs but we did not find clear differences between host cultivars. Some species isolated have not yet been reported as wheat endophytes and among all species recovered some might be good candidates as biological control agents, given their known effects toward plant pathogens. PMID:27065969

  20. Spatial and Temporal Variation of Cultivable Communities of Co-occurring Endophytes and Pathogens in Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Comby, Morgane; Lacoste, Sandrine; Baillieul, Fabienne; Profizi, Camille; Dupont, Joëlle

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the diversity of endogenous microbes from wheat (Triticum aestivum) and to study the structure of its microbial communities, with the ultimate goal to provide candidate strains for future evaluation as potential biological control agents against wheat diseases. We sampled plants from two wheat cultivars, Apache and Caphorn, showing different levels of susceptibility to Fusarium head blight, a major disease of wheat, and tested for variation in microbial diversity and assemblages depending on the host cultivar, host organ (aerial organs vs. roots) or host maturity. Fungi and bacteria were isolated using a culture dependent method. Isolates were identified using ribosomal DNA sequencing and we used diversity analysis to study the community composition of microorganisms over space and time. Results indicate great species diversity in wheat, with endophytes and pathogens co-occurring inside plant tissues. Significant differences in microbial communities were observed according to host maturity and host organs but we did not find clear differences between host cultivars. Some species isolated have not yet been reported as wheat endophytes and among all species recovered some might be good candidates as biological control agents, given their known effects toward plant pathogens. PMID:27065969

  1. Sharing rotting wood in the shade: ectomycorrhizal communities of co-occurring birch and hemlock seedlings.

    PubMed

    Poznanovic, Sarah K; Lilleskov, Erik A; Webster, Christopher R

    2015-02-01

    Coarse woody debris (CWD) is an important nursery environment for many tree species. Understanding the communities of ectomycorrhizal fungi (ECMF)and the effect of ECMF species on tree seedling condition in CWD will elucidate the potential for ECMF-mediated effects on seedling dynamics. In hemlock-dominated stands, we characterized ECMF communities associated with eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carr) and yellow birch (Betula alleghaniensis Britt) seedling pairs growing on CWD. Seedling foliage and CWD were analyzed chemically, and seedling growth, canopy cover, and canopy species determined. Thirteen fungal taxa, 12 associated with birch, and 6 with hemlock, were identified based on morphology and ITS sequencing. Five species were shared by co-occurring birch and hemlock, representing 75% of ectomycorrhizal root tips. Rarified ECMF taxon richness per seedling was higher on birch than hemlock. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling revealed significant correlations between ordination axes, the mutually exclusive ECMF Tomentella and Lactarius spp., foliar N and K, CWD pH, and exchangeable Ca and Mg. Seedlings colonized by Lactarius and T. sublilacina differed significantly in foliar K and N, and CWD differed in exchangeable Ca and Mg. CWD pH and nutrient concentrations were low but foliar macro-nutrient concentrations were not. We hypothesize that the dominant ECMF are adapted to low root carbohydrate availability typical in shaded environments but differ in their relative supply of different nutrients. PMID:25091153

  2. Modified Therapeutic Community for Co-Occurring Disorders: Single Investigator Meta Analysis

    PubMed Central

    SACKS, STANLEY; MCKENDRICK, KAREN; SACKS, JOANN Y; CLELAND, CHARLES M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a meta-analysis for a single investigator examining the effectiveness of the modified therapeutic community (MTC) for clients with co-occurring substance use and mental disorders (COD). The flexibility and utility of meta-analytic tools are described, although their application in this context is atypical. The analysis includes four comparisons from three studies (retrieved N=569) for various groups of clients with COD (homeless persons, offenders, and outpatients) in substance abuse treatment, comparing clients assigned either to an MTC or a control condition of standard services. An additional study is included in a series of sensitivity tests. The overall findings increase the research base of support for the MTC program for clients with COD, as results of the meta-analysis indicate significant MTC treatment effects for 5 of the 6 outcome domains across the four comparisons. Limitations of the approach are discussed. Independent replications, clinical trials, multiple outcome domains and additional meta-analyses should be emphasized in future research. Given the need for research-based approaches, program and policy planners should consider the MTC when designing programs for co-occurring disorders. PMID:20687003

  3. Financing Retirement: Rural and Urban Preferences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFadden, Joan R.; Makela, Carole J.

    Current income and anticipated income are important considerations in people's preretirement planning for when and where to retire. Community characteristics, suitable and affordable housing, utility costs, and natural resources may be weighed when decisions about where and when to retire are under consideration. If pre-retirees are to carry out…

  4. An Introduction to NCOA's Retirement Planning Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzpatrick, Edmund W.

    1980-01-01

    Describes the National Council on the Aging (NCOA)-Industry Consortium Retirement Planning Program, which consists of eight modules corresponding to eight major areas of retirement planning: life-style planning, financial planning, new careers, leisure time, health, interpersonal relationships, living arrangements, and community services. (SK)

  5. Transition to Retirement Jobs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iams, Howard M.

    Many retired persons return to work, to some extent, following their retirement. Data from the 1982 New Beneficiary Survey (NBS) of 4,212 women and 5,307 men were examined to determine the employment of retired-worker beneficiaries who were working 18-30 months after first receiving retired-worker benefits. According to the NBS data, over…

  6. The Association between Sleep Problems, Sleep Medication Use, and Falls in Community-Dwelling Older Adults: Results from the Health and Retirement Study 2010

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. Very few studies have assessed the impact of poor sleep and sleep medication use on the risk of falls among community-dwelling older adults. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between sleep problems, sleep medication use, and falls in community-dwelling older adults. Methods. The study population comprised a nationally representative sample of noninstitutionalized older adults participating in the 2010 Health and Retirement Study. Proportion of adults reporting sleep problems, sleep medication use, and fall was calculated. Multiple logistic regression models were constructed to examine the impact of sleep problems and sleep medication use on the risk of falls after controlling for covariates. Results. Among 9,843 community-dwelling older adults, 35.8% had reported a fall and 40.8% had reported sleep problems in the past two years. Sleep medication use was reported by 20.9% of the participants. Older adults who do have sleep problems and take sleep medications had a significant high risk of falls, compared to older adults who do not have sleep problems and do not take sleep medications. The other two groups also had significantly greater risk for falls. Conclusion. Sleep problems added to sleep medication use increase the risk of falls. Further prospective studies are needed to confirm these observed findings. PMID:27547452

  7. Pseudo-nitzschia Challenged with Co-occurring Viral Communities Display Diverse Infection Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Michael C. G.; McCary, Nicolette D.; Leach, Terence S.; Rocap, Gabrielle

    2016-01-01

    Viruses are catalysts of biogeochemical cycling, architects of microbial community structure, and terminators of phytoplankton blooms. Viral lysis of diatoms, a key group of eukaryotic phytoplankton, has the potential to impact carbon export and marine food webs. However, the impact of viruses on diatom abundance and community composition is unknown. Diatom-virus dynamics were explored by sampling every month at two coastal and estuarine locations in Washington state, USA resulting in 41 new isolates of the pennate diatom Pseudo-nitzschia and 20 environmental virus samples. We conducted a total of 820 pair-wise crosses of the Pseudo-nitzschia isolates and viral communities. Viral communities infected Pseudo-nitzschia isolates in 8% of the crosses overall and 16% of crosses when the host and viral communities were isolated from the same sample. Isolates ranged in their permissivity to infection with some isolates not infected by any viral samples and others infected by up to 10 viral communities. Isolates that were infected by the most viral communities also had the highest maximum observed viral titers (as high as 16000 infectious units ml-1). Titers of the viral communities were host dependent, as titers for one viral sample on eight different hosts spanned four orders of magnitude. Sequencing of the Pseudo-nitzschia Internal Transcribed Spacer 1 (ITS1) of the revealed multiple subgroups of hosts with 100% ITS1 identities that were infected by different viral communities. Indeed, we repeatedly isolated groups of isolates with identical ITS1 sequences from the same water sample that displayed different viral infection phenotypes. The interactions between Pseudo-nitzschia and the viral communities highlight the diversity of diatoms and emphasize the complexity and variability of diatom-virus dynamics in the ocean. PMID:27148216

  8. Pseudo-nitzschia Challenged with Co-occurring Viral Communities Display Diverse Infection Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Michael C G; McCary, Nicolette D; Leach, Terence S; Rocap, Gabrielle

    2016-01-01

    Viruses are catalysts of biogeochemical cycling, architects of microbial community structure, and terminators of phytoplankton blooms. Viral lysis of diatoms, a key group of eukaryotic phytoplankton, has the potential to impact carbon export and marine food webs. However, the impact of viruses on diatom abundance and community composition is unknown. Diatom-virus dynamics were explored by sampling every month at two coastal and estuarine locations in Washington state, USA resulting in 41 new isolates of the pennate diatom Pseudo-nitzschia and 20 environmental virus samples. We conducted a total of 820 pair-wise crosses of the Pseudo-nitzschia isolates and viral communities. Viral communities infected Pseudo-nitzschia isolates in 8% of the crosses overall and 16% of crosses when the host and viral communities were isolated from the same sample. Isolates ranged in their permissivity to infection with some isolates not infected by any viral samples and others infected by up to 10 viral communities. Isolates that were infected by the most viral communities also had the highest maximum observed viral titers (as high as 16000 infectious units ml(-1)). Titers of the viral communities were host dependent, as titers for one viral sample on eight different hosts spanned four orders of magnitude. Sequencing of the Pseudo-nitzschia Internal Transcribed Spacer 1 (ITS1) of the revealed multiple subgroups of hosts with 100% ITS1 identities that were infected by different viral communities. Indeed, we repeatedly isolated groups of isolates with identical ITS1 sequences from the same water sample that displayed different viral infection phenotypes. The interactions between Pseudo-nitzschia and the viral communities highlight the diversity of diatoms and emphasize the complexity and variability of diatom-virus dynamics in the ocean. PMID:27148216

  9. Chemical Characterization and Source Apportionment of Indoor and Outdoor Fine Particulate Matter (PM2.5) in Retirement Communities of the Los Angeles Basin

    PubMed Central

    Hasheminassab, Sina; Daher, Nancy; Shafer, Martin M.; Schauer, James J.; Delfino, Ralph J.; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2014-01-01

    Concurrent indoor and outdoor measurements of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) were conducted at three retirement homes in the Los Angeles Basin during two separate phases (cold and warm) between 2005 and 2006. Indoor-to-outdoor relationships of PM2.5 chemical constituents were determined and sources of indoor and outdoor PM2.5 were evaluated using a molecular marker-based chemical mass balance (MM-CMB) model. Indoor levels of elemental carbon (EC) along with metals and trace elements were found to be significantly affected by outdoor sources. EC, in particular, displayed very high indoor-to-outdoor (I/O) mass ratios accompanied by strong I/O correlations, illustrating the significant impact of outdoor sources on indoor levels of EC. Similarly, indoor levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), hopanes, and steranes were strongly correlated with their outdoor components and displayed I/O ratios close to unity. On the other hand, concentrations of n-alkanes and organic acids inside the retirement communities were dominated by indoor sources (e.g. food cooking and consumer products), as indicated by their I/O ratios, which exceeded unity. Source apportionment results revealed that vehicular emissions were the major contributor to both indoor and outdoor PM2.5, accounting for 39 and 46% of total mass, respectively. Moreover, the contribution of vehicular sources to indoor levels was generally comparable to its corresponding outdoor estimate. Other water-insoluble organic matter (other WIOM), which accounts for emissions from uncharacterized primary biogenic sources, displayed a wider range of contributions, varying from 2 to 73% of PM2.5, across all sites and phases of the study. Lastly, higher indoor than outdoor contribution of other water-soluble organic matter (other WSOM) was evident at some of the sites, suggesting the production of secondary aerosols as well as direct emissions from primary sources (including cleaning or other consumer products) at the

  10. The King Pre-Retirement Checklist: Assessing Differences in Pre-Retirement Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zitzow, Darryl; King, Donald N.

    In an effort to assess the retirement preparedness of Midwestern populations above the age of 28, the King Pre-Retirement Checklist was administered to a sampling of 458 persons randomly selected and proportionally stratified by geographic location and community size. Factors examined were financial, social, family cohesion, mobility/health,…

  11. Symbiont dynamics during ecosystem succession: co-occurring plant and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities.

    PubMed

    García de León, David; Moora, Mari; Öpik, Maarja; Neuenkamp, Lena; Gerz, Maret; Jairus, Teele; Vasar, Martti; Bueno, C Guillermo; Davison, John; Zobel, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Although mycorrhizas are expected to play a key role in community assembly during ecological succession, little is known about the dynamics of the symbiotic partners in natural systems. For instance, it is unclear how efficiently plants and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi disperse into early successional ecosystems, and which, if either, symbiotic partner drives successional dynamics. This study describes the dynamics of plant and AM fungal communities, assesses correlation in the composition of plant and AM fungal communities and compares dispersal limitation of plants and AM fungi during succession. We studied gravel pits 20 and 50 years post abandonment and undisturbed grasslands in Western Estonia. The composition of plant and AM fungal communities was strongly correlated, and the strength of the correlation remained unchanged as succession progressed, indicating a stable dependence among mycorrhizal plants and AM fungi. A relatively high proportion of the AM fungal taxon pool was present in early successional sites, in comparison with the respective fraction of plants. These results suggest that AM fungi arrived faster than plants and may thus drive vegetation dynamics along secondary vegetation succession. PMID:27162183

  12. The Case Against Retirement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fallon, Berlie J.

    1976-01-01

    For those who accept retirement as we now know it in America, the system awaits with all its entrapments. For those who are against retirement, there are many attractive alternatives worth the struggle of swimming upstream. (Author)

  13. 45 CFR 2553.11 - What is the Retired and Senior Volunteer Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What is the Retired and Senior Volunteer Program... FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE THE RETIRED AND SENIOR VOLUNTEER PROGRAM General § 2553.11 What is the Retired and Senior Volunteer Program? The Retired and Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP)...

  14. 45 CFR 2553.11 - What is the Retired and Senior Volunteer Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What is the Retired and Senior Volunteer Program... FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE THE RETIRED AND SENIOR VOLUNTEER PROGRAM General § 2553.11 What is the Retired and Senior Volunteer Program? The Retired and Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP)...

  15. 45 CFR 2553.11 - What is the Retired and Senior Volunteer Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false What is the Retired and Senior Volunteer Program... FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE THE RETIRED AND SENIOR VOLUNTEER PROGRAM General § 2553.11 What is the Retired and Senior Volunteer Program? The Retired and Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP)...

  16. 45 CFR 2553.11 - What is the Retired and Senior Volunteer Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false What is the Retired and Senior Volunteer Program... FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE THE RETIRED AND SENIOR VOLUNTEER PROGRAM General § 2553.11 What is the Retired and Senior Volunteer Program? The Retired and Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP)...

  17. Using naturally occurring radionuclides to determine drinking water age in a community water system

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Waples, James T.; Bordewyk, Jason K.; Knesting, Kristina M.; Orlandini, Kent A.

    2015-07-22

    Drinking water quality in a community water system is closely linked to the age of water from initial treatment to time of delivery. However, water age is difficult to measure with conventional chemical tracers; particularly in stagnant water, where the relationship between disinfectant decay, microbial growth, and water age is poorly understood. Using radionuclides that were naturally present in source water, we found that measured activity ratios of 90Y/90Sr and 234Th/238U in discrete drinking water samples of known age accurately estimated water age up to 9 days old (σest: ± 3.8 h, P < 0.0001, r2 = 0.998, n =more » 11) and 25 days old (σest: ± 13.3 h, P < 0.0001, r2 = 0.996, n = 12), respectively. Moreover, 90Y-derived water ages in a community water system (6.8 × 104 m3 d–1 capacity) were generally consistent with water ages derived from an extended period simulation model. Radionuclides differ from conventional chemical tracers in that they are ubiquitous in distribution mains and connected premise plumbing. The ability to measure both water age and an analyte (e.g., chemical or microbe) in any water sample at any time allows for new insight into factors that control drinking water quality.« less

  18. Using naturally occurring radionuclides to determine drinking water age in a community water system

    SciTech Connect

    Waples, James T.; Bordewyk, Jason K.; Knesting, Kristina M.; Orlandini, Kent A.

    2015-07-22

    Drinking water quality in a community water system is closely linked to the age of water from initial treatment to time of delivery. However, water age is difficult to measure with conventional chemical tracers; particularly in stagnant water, where the relationship between disinfectant decay, microbial growth, and water age is poorly understood. Using radionuclides that were naturally present in source water, we found that measured activity ratios of 90Y/90Sr and 234Th/238U in discrete drinking water samples of known age accurately estimated water age up to 9 days old (σest: ± 3.8 h, P < 0.0001, r2 = 0.998, n = 11) and 25 days old (σest: ± 13.3 h, P < 0.0001, r2 = 0.996, n = 12), respectively. Moreover, 90Y-derived water ages in a community water system (6.8 × 104 m3 d–1 capacity) were generally consistent with water ages derived from an extended period simulation model. Radionuclides differ from conventional chemical tracers in that they are ubiquitous in distribution mains and connected premise plumbing. The ability to measure both water age and an analyte (e.g., chemical or microbe) in any water sample at any time allows for new insight into factors that control drinking water quality.

  19. A Longitudinal Study of Work After Retirement: Examining Predictors of Bridge Employment, Continued Career Employment, and Retirement.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Misty M; Beehr, Terry A; Lepisto, Lawrence R

    2016-09-01

    Older employees are increasingly accepting bridge employment, which occurs when older workers take employment for pay after they retire from their main career. This study examined predictors of workers' decisions to engage in bridge employment versus full retirement and career employment. A national sample of 482 older people in the United States was surveyed regarding various work-related and nonwork related predictors of retirement decisions, and their retirement status was measured 5 years later. In bivariate analyses, both work-related variables (career goal achievement and experienced pressure to retire) and nonwork-related variables (psychological distress and traditional gender role orientation) predicted taking bridge employment, but in multinomial logistic regression, only nonwork variables had unique effects. Few predictors differentiated the bridge employed and fully retired groups. Nonwork variables were salient in making the decision to retire, and bridge employment may be conceptually more similar to full retirement than to career employment. PMID:27284203

  20. Retirement and wealth.

    PubMed

    Gustman, A L; Steinmeier, T L

    The decision to retire is related to the decision to save and to a number of other decisions, including decisions of when to claim Social Security benefits and what share of assets to hold as pensions, Social Security, and in other forms. This article explores the relationships among these various decisions and then explains why it is important to take them into account when attempting to understand the effects of changing Social Security and related policies on retirement outcomes. To understand how Social Security benefits affect retirement behavior, and the implications of changing such features as the Social Security early retirement age, the Social Security Administration and others have begun to estimate and use single-equation models of retirement. We explain why the kind of simple model they use is likely to provide a misleading guide for policy. Even if one's primary interest is in the relationship between Social Security policy and the decision to retire, it is important to incorporate other key decisions into the analysis. These simple models relate the probability of retiring to measures of changes in the value of Social Security benefits when retirement is postponed. The basic problem is that because the omitted factors are related systematically both to retirement outcomes and to the measured reward to postponing retirement, a simple retirement equation credits the effects of the omitted factors to the included measures of changes in Social Security benefits. New policies will change the relationship between retirement and the increase in the value of Social Security benefits with postponed retirement, resulting in incorrect predictions of the effects of new policies. When we fit single-equation retirement models, we find a variety of evidence that important behaviors have been omitted. These models include variables measuring the age of the respondent. These age variables suggest there is a sharp increase in the probability of retirement at age 62

  1. Metatranscriptomic evidence for co-occurring top-down and bottom-up controls on toxic cyanobacterial communities.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Morgan M; Belisle, B Shafer; Watson, Sue B; Boyer, Gregory L; Bourbonniere, Richard A; Wilhelm, Steven W

    2015-05-01

    Little is known about the molecular and physiological function of co-occurring microbes within freshwater cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms (cHABs). To address this, community metatranscriptomes collected from the western basin of Lake Erie during August 2012 were examined. Using sequence data, we tested the hypothesis that the activity of the microbial community members is independent of community structure. Predicted metabolic and physiological functional profiles from spatially distinct metatranscriptomes were determined to be ≥90% similar between sites. Targeted analysis of Microcystis aeruginosa, the historical causative agent of cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms over the past ∼20 years, as well as analysis of Planktothrix agardhii and Anabaena cylindrica, revealed ongoing transcription of genes involved in microcystin toxin synthesis as well as the acquisition of both nitrogen and phosphorus, nutrients often implicated as independent bottom-up drivers of eutrophication in aquatic systems. Transcription of genes involved in carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration and metabolism also provided support for the alternate hypothesis that high-pH conditions and dense algal biomass result in CO2-limiting conditions that further favor cyanobacterial dominance. Additionally, the presence of Microcystis-specific cyanophage sequences provided preliminary evidence of possible top-down virus-mediated control of cHAB populations. Overall, these data provide insight into the complex series of constraints associated with Microcystis blooms that dominate the western basin of Lake Erie during summer months, demonstrating that multiple environmental factors work to shape the microbial community. PMID:25662977

  2. Metatranscriptomic Evidence for Co-Occurring Top-Down and Bottom-Up Controls on Toxic Cyanobacterial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Steffen, Morgan M.; Belisle, B. Shafer; Watson, Sue B.; Boyer, Gregory L.; Bourbonniere, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the molecular and physiological function of co-occurring microbes within freshwater cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms (cHABs). To address this, community metatranscriptomes collected from the western basin of Lake Erie during August 2012 were examined. Using sequence data, we tested the hypothesis that the activity of the microbial community members is independent of community structure. Predicted metabolic and physiological functional profiles from spatially distinct metatranscriptomes were determined to be ≥90% similar between sites. Targeted analysis of Microcystis aeruginosa, the historical causative agent of cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms over the past ∼20 years, as well as analysis of Planktothrix agardhii and Anabaena cylindrica, revealed ongoing transcription of genes involved in microcystin toxin synthesis as well as the acquisition of both nitrogen and phosphorus, nutrients often implicated as independent bottom-up drivers of eutrophication in aquatic systems. Transcription of genes involved in carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration and metabolism also provided support for the alternate hypothesis that high-pH conditions and dense algal biomass result in CO2-limiting conditions that further favor cyanobacterial dominance. Additionally, the presence of Microcystis-specific cyanophage sequences provided preliminary evidence of possible top-down virus-mediated control of cHAB populations. Overall, these data provide insight into the complex series of constraints associated with Microcystis blooms that dominate the western basin of Lake Erie during summer months, demonstrating that multiple environmental factors work to shape the microbial community. PMID:25662977

  3. Early retirement and mortality in Germany.

    PubMed

    Kühntopf, Stephan; Tivig, Thusnelda

    2012-02-01

    Differences in mortality by retirement age have an important impact on the financing of pension insurance, yet no clear-cut results for Germany exist so far. We calculate mortality rates by retirement age from microdata on all German old-age pensioners and 1.84 million deceases. The life expectancies and survival probabilities at age 65 are estimated for population subgroups according to creditable periods because of disease and pension income. Early-retired men who reach the age of 65 years live significantly longer the later early retirement occurs; the life expectancy at age 65 ranges from 13 to 17.8 years. For each retirement age, mortality of men is higher the more periods of disease are credited in the pension insurance system. For a given length of credited periods of disease, mortality of early retirees decreases with the retirement age. 'Healthy worker selection effects' operating in the labour market may contribute to these results. The 'work longer, live longer'-result is found for each pension income quintile, which resolves the J-curve pattern found in the literature. The mortality of female old-age pensioners varies little with retirement age. PMID:22350223

  4. Early Retirement Payoff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzpatrick, Maria D.; Lovenheim, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    As public budgets have grown tighter over the past decade, states and school districts have sought ways to control the growth of spending. One increasingly common strategy employed to rein in costs is to offer experienced teachers with high salaries financial incentives to retire early. Although early retirement incentive (ERI) programs have been…

  5. Faculty Emeriti: Retirement Reframed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishman, Seth Matthew

    2010-01-01

    With the graying of the professoriate continuing and the massive number of baby boomers entering retirement age, universities and college administrations need to adequately prepare for retirement. This is beginning to cause some staffing shortages in the faculty pipeline as well as the loss of institutional history and professional knowledge.…

  6. Ways We Retire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maloney, Wendi A.

    2007-01-01

    This article talks about the retired faculty members from different types of institutions around the country that were interviewed to find out how well their preparations for retirement are serving them now. Like other state employees in California, faculty members at public institutions participate in the California Public Employees' Retirement…

  7. What People Want, Why They Move, and What Happens After They Move: A Summary of Research in Retirement Housing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parr, Joyce; And Others

    This document presents an overview of research in retirement housing which focuses on studying individuals' adaptation to retirement housing, consulting on the design of retirement housing, and conducting community surveys to assess the interest in living options for older persons. The terms congregate housing, continuing care retirement centers,…

  8. Preparation for Retirement; A New Guide to Program Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Retired Persons, Washington, DC.

    This handbook on preparation for retirement is intended to serve the needs of the program sponsoring agency--governmental agencies, business, and industry; it may also be used in programs jointly sponsored with unions, employee organizations, or community groups. It is a sequel to "Preparation for Retirement in the Federal Government." The first…

  9. Culture and molecular-based profiles show shifts in bacterial communities of the upper respiratory tract that occur with age

    PubMed Central

    Stearns, Jennifer C; Davidson, Carla J; McKeon, Suzanne; Whelan, Fiona J; Fontes, Michelle E; Schryvers, Anthony B; Bowdish, Dawn M E; Kellner, James D; Surette, Michael G

    2015-01-01

    The upper respiratory tract (URT) is a crucial site for host defense, as it is home to bacterial communities that both modulate host immune defense and serve as a reservoir of potential pathogens. Young children are at high risk of respiratory illness, yet the composition of their URT microbiota is not well understood. Microbial profiling of the respiratory tract has traditionally focused on culturing common respiratory pathogens, whereas recent culture-independent microbiome profiling can only report the relative abundance of bacterial populations. In the current study, we used both molecular profiling of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene and laboratory culture to examine the bacterial diversity from the oropharynx and nasopharynx of 51 healthy children with a median age of 1.1 years (range 1–4.5 years) along with 19 accompanying parents. The resulting profiles suggest that in young children the nasopharyngeal microbiota, much like the gastrointestinal tract microbiome, changes from an immature state, where it is colonized by a few dominant taxa, to a more diverse state as it matures to resemble the adult microbiota. Importantly, this difference in bacterial diversity between adults and children accompanies a change in bacterial load of three orders of magnitude. This indicates that the bacterial communities in the nasopharynx of young children have a fundamentally different structure from those in adults and suggests that maturation of this community occurs sometime during the first few years of life, a period that includes ages at which children are at the highest risk for respiratory disease. PMID:25575312

  10. 78 FR 33911 - Phased Retirement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-05

    ...The Office of Personnel Management (OPM) is proposing to implement phased retirement, a new human resources tool that allows full-time employees to work a part-time schedule while beginning to draw retirement benefits. Section 100121 of the ``Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act,'' or ``MAP-21,'' authorizes phased retirement under the Civil Service Retirement System and the......

  11. A Research Study of Retirement Preparation Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Frances G.; And Others

    A five-year study was undertaken to investigate the relative effectiveness of pre-retirement education (PRE) programs. Project staff identified for study three methodologies (the lecture series, the discussion group, and the "facilitated interaction" model) and four contexts for sponsor-settings (the employer, the education, the community agency,…

  12. Elevated Concentrations of U and Co-occurring Metals in Abandoned Mine Wastes in a Northeastern Arizona Native American Community.

    PubMed

    Blake, Johanna M; Avasarala, Sumant; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Ali, Abdul-Mehdi S; Brearley, Adrian J; Shuey, Christopher; Robinson, Wm Paul; Nez, Christopher; Bill, Sadie; Lewis, Johnnye; Hirani, Chris; Pacheco, Juan S Lezama; Cerrato, José M

    2015-07-21

    The chemical interactions of U and co-occurring metals in abandoned mine wastes in a Native American community in northeastern Arizona were investigated using spectroscopy, microscopy and aqueous chemistry. The concentrations of U (67-169 μg L(-1)) in spring water samples exceed the EPA maximum contaminant limit of 30 μg L(-1). Elevated U (6,614 mg kg(-1)), V (15,814 mg kg(-1)), and As (40 mg kg(-1)) concentrations were detected in mine waste solids. Spectroscopy (XPS and XANES) solid analyses identified U (VI), As (-I and III) and Fe (II, III). Linear correlations for the release of U vs V and As vs Fe were observed for batch experiments when reacting mine waste solids with 10 mM ascorbic acid (∼pH 3.8) after 264 h. The release of U, V, As, and Fe was at least 4-fold lower after reaction with 10 mM bicarbonate (∼pH 8.3). These results suggest that U-V mineral phases similar to carnotite [K2(UO2)2V2O8] and As-Fe-bearing phases control the availability of U and As in these abandoned mine wastes. Elevated concentrations of metals are of concern due to human exposure pathways and exposure of livestock currently ingesting water in the area. This study contributes to understanding the occurrence and mobility of metals in communities located close to abandoned mine waste sites. PMID:26158204

  13. Elevated concentrations of U and co-occurring metals in abandoned mine wastes in a northeastern Arizona Native American community

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, Johanna M.; Avasarala, Sumant; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Ali, Abdul -Mehdi S.; Brearley, Adrian J.; Shuey, Christopher; Robinson, Wm. Paul; Nez, Christopher; Bill, Sadie; Lewis, Johnnye; Hirani, Chris; Pacheco, Juan S. Lezama; Cerrato, José M.

    2015-07-09

    The chemical interactions of U and co-occurring metals in abandoned mine wastes in a Native American community in northeastern Arizona were investigated using spectroscopy, microscopy and aqueous chemistry. The concentrations of U (67–169 μg L–1) in spring water samples exceed the EPA maximum contaminant limit of 30 μg L–1. Elevated U (6,614 mg kg–1), V (15,814 mg kg–1), and As (40 mg kg–1) concentrations were detected in mine waste solids. Spectroscopy (XPS and XANES) solid analyses identified U (VI), As (-I and III) and Fe (II, III). Linear correlations for the release of U vs V and As vs Fe were observed for batch experiments when reacting mine waste solids with 10 mM ascorbic acid (~pH 3.8) after 264 h. The release of U, V, As, and Fe was at least 4-fold lower after reaction with 10 mM bicarbonate (~pH 8.3). These results suggest that U–V mineral phases similar to carnotite [K2(UO2)2V2O8] and As–Fe-bearing phases control the availability of U and As in these abandoned mine wastes. Elevated concentrations of metals are of concern due to human exposure pathways and exposure of livestock currently ingesting water in the area. This study contributes to understanding the occurrence and mobility of metals in communities located close to abandoned mine waste sites.

  14. Elevated concentrations of U and co-occurring metals in abandoned mine wastes in a northeastern Arizona Native American community

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Blake, Johanna M.; Avasarala, Sumant; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Ali, Abdul -Mehdi S.; Brearley, Adrian J.; Shuey, Christopher; Robinson, Wm. Paul; Nez, Christopher; Bill, Sadie; Lewis, Johnnye; et al

    2015-07-09

    The chemical interactions of U and co-occurring metals in abandoned mine wastes in a Native American community in northeastern Arizona were investigated using spectroscopy, microscopy and aqueous chemistry. The concentrations of U (67–169 μg L–1) in spring water samples exceed the EPA maximum contaminant limit of 30 μg L–1. Elevated U (6,614 mg kg–1), V (15,814 mg kg–1), and As (40 mg kg–1) concentrations were detected in mine waste solids. Spectroscopy (XPS and XANES) solid analyses identified U (VI), As (-I and III) and Fe (II, III). Linear correlations for the release of U vs V and As vs Femore » were observed for batch experiments when reacting mine waste solids with 10 mM ascorbic acid (~pH 3.8) after 264 h. The release of U, V, As, and Fe was at least 4-fold lower after reaction with 10 mM bicarbonate (~pH 8.3). These results suggest that U–V mineral phases similar to carnotite [K2(UO2)2V2O8] and As–Fe-bearing phases control the availability of U and As in these abandoned mine wastes. Elevated concentrations of metals are of concern due to human exposure pathways and exposure of livestock currently ingesting water in the area. This study contributes to understanding the occurrence and mobility of metals in communities located close to abandoned mine waste sites.« less

  15. Leadership and Licensure for Drug Treatment and the Implementation of Co-Occurring Disorder Treatment in Community Mental Health Centers.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Erick G; Padwa, Howard; Lengnick-Hall, Rebecca; Kong, Yinfei; Perrigo, Judith L

    2015-07-01

    Using a random sample of 48 outpatient mental health programs in low-income and racial and ethnic minority communities, this study examined directorial leadership, drug treatment licensure, and implementation of evidence-based protocols and practices to address co-occurring mental health and substance abuse disorders (COD). Understanding of findings was enhanced with focus groups at six clinics. Most programs (81 %) offered COD treatment. Directorial leadership was positively associated with COD treatment (β = 0.253, p = 0.047, 95 % CI 0.003, 0.502) and COD supervision and training (β = 0.358, p = 0.002, 95 % CI 0.142, 0.575). Licensure was negatively associated with COD treatment (β = -0.235, p = 0.041, 95 % CI -0.460, -0.010) and COD supervision and training (β = -0.195, p = 0.049, 95 % CI -0.389, -0.001). Although lack of financial integration may limit the effect of licensing on COD treatment implementation, the response of leaders to regulation, funding, and human resources issues may encourage COD treatment practices. Implications for leadership interventions and policy are discussed in the context of health care reform. PMID:25982830

  16. Leadership and Licensure for Drug Treatment and the Implementation of Co-Occurring Disorder Treatment in Community Mental Health Centers

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Erick G.; Padwa, Howard; Lengnick-Hall, Rebecca; Kong, Yinfei; Perrigo, Judith L.

    2015-01-01

    Using a random sample of 48 outpatient mental health programs in low-income and racial and ethnic minority communities, this study examined directorial leadership, drug treatment licensure, and implementation of evidence-based protocols and practices to address co-occurring mental health and substance abuse disorders (COD). Understanding of findings was enhanced with focus groups at six clinics. Most programs (81%) offered COD treatment. Directorial leadership was positively associated with COD treatment (β = 0.253, p = .047, 95% CI = 0.003, 0.502) and COD supervision and training (β = 0.358, p = .002, 95% CI = 0.142, 0.575). Licensure was negatively associated with COD treatment (β = −0.235, p = .041, 95% CI = −0.460, −0.010) and COD supervision and training (β = −0.195, p = .049, 95% CI = −0.389, −0.001). Although lack of financial integration may limit the effect of licensing on COD treatment implementation, the response of leaders to regulation, funding, and human resources issues may encourage COD treatment practices. Implications for leadership interventions and policy are discussed in the context of health care reform. PMID:25982830

  17. Does retirement age impact mortality?

    PubMed

    Hernaes, Erik; Markussen, Simen; Piggott, John; Vestad, Ola L

    2013-05-01

    The relationship between retirement and mortality is studied with a unique administrative data set covering the full population of Norway. A series of retirement policy changes in Norway reduced the retirement age for a group of workers but not for others. Difference-in-differences estimation based on monthly birth cohorts and treatment group status show that the early retirement programme significantly reduced the retirement age; this holds true also when we account for programme substitution, for example into the disability pension. Instrumental variables estimation results show no effect on mortality of retirement age; neither do estimation results from a hazard rate model. PMID:23542020

  18. Comparative genomics in acid mine drainage biofilm communities reveals metabolic and structural differentiation of co-occurring archaea

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Metal sulfide mineral dissolution during bioleaching and acid mine drainage (AMD) formation creates an environment that is inhospitable to most life. Despite dominance by a small number of bacteria, AMD microbial biofilm communities contain a notable variety of coexisting and closely related Euryarchaea, most of which have defied cultivation efforts. For this reason, we used metagenomics to analyze variation in gene content that may contribute to niche differentiation among co-occurring AMD archaea. Our analyses targeted members of the Thermoplasmatales and related archaea. These results greatly expand genomic information available for this archaeal order. Results We reconstructed near-complete genomes for uncultivated, relatively low abundance organisms A-, E-, and Gplasma, members of Thermoplasmatales order, and for a novel organism, Iplasma. Genomic analyses of these organisms, as well as Ferroplasma type I and II, reveal that all are facultative aerobic heterotrophs with the ability to use many of the same carbon substrates, including methanol. Most of the genomes share genes for toxic metal resistance and surface-layer production. Only Aplasma and Eplasma have a full suite of flagellar genes whereas all but the Ferroplasma spp. have genes for pili production. Cryogenic-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and tomography (cryo-ET) strengthen these metagenomics-based ultrastructural predictions. Notably, only Aplasma, Gplasma and the Ferroplasma spp. have predicted iron oxidation genes and Eplasma and Iplasma lack most genes for cobalamin, valine, (iso)leucine and histidine synthesis. Conclusion The Thermoplasmatales AMD archaea share a large number of metabolic capabilities. All of the uncultivated organisms studied here (A-, E-, G-, and Iplasma) are metabolically very similar to characterized Ferroplasma spp., differentiating themselves mainly in their genetic capabilities for biosynthesis, motility, and possibly iron oxidation. These results indicate that

  19. Health and Retirement: Do Changes in Health Affect Retirement Expectations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGarry, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    Health plays a vital role in the decision making process of retirement for an employee. The changes in retirement expectations are driven to a much greater degree by change in health rather than change in income or wealth.

  20. Hearing Impairment and Retirement

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Mary E; Cruickshanks, Karen J; Pinto, Alex; Klein, Barbara E K; Klein, Ronald; Dalton, Dayna S

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Many factors influence the decision to retire including age, insurance and pension availability along with physical and mental health. Hearing impairment may be one such factor. PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to compare the 15 year retirement rate among subjects with and without hearing impairment. RESEARCH DESIGN Prospective, population-based study STUDY SAMPLE Subjects were participants in the Epidemiology of Hearing Loss Study (EHLS), a longitudinal investigation of age-related hearing loss. Participants who were working full- or part-time in 1993–1995 were included (n=1410, mean age=57.8 years). DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS Data from four EHLS phases (1993–1995, 1998–2000, 2003–2005, and 2009–2010) were analyzed in 2010–2012. Hearing impairment was defined as a pure tone threshold average (at 0.5,1,2 and 4 kHz) greater than 25 dB HL in the worse ear. Employment status was determined at each of the four phases. Kaplan-Meier estimates of the cumulative incidence of retirement were calculated and Cox discrete-time modeling was used to determine the effect of hearing impairment on the rate of retirement. RESULTS The cumulative incidence of retirement was significantly (p < 0.02) higher in those with a hearing impairment (77%) compared to those without a hearing impairment (74%). After adjustment for age, gender, self-reported health, and history of chronic disease, there was no significant difference in the rate of retirement between those with and without a hearing impairment (Hazard Ratio (HR) = 0.9, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) = 0.7, 1.1). Similar results were observed when hearing aid users were excluded, when hearing impairment was based on the better ear thresholds, and when analyses were restricted to those less than 65 years of age and working full-time at baseline. Participants with a hearing impairment were less likely to state that the main reason for retirement was that the time seemed right. CONCLUSIONS Hearing impairment

  1. Pre-Retirement Rehearsal Project: Money to Retire On.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellenberg, Donna

    This sixth in a series of six packages of instructional materials developed by the Pre-Retirement Rehearsal Project contains a student's pre-retirement booklet specifically intended for adults with limited reading ability and teacher's guide, which consider financial planning for retirement, including such topics as types of income, Social…

  2. Views of Retirement by Active and Retired Protestant Ministers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Barbara; Brewer, Earl D. C.

    The Protestant ministers' occupational characteristics affect their retirement experience. Unlike most retirees, Protestant ministers tend to experience residential and church moves. A national study was conducted to examine the effects of retirement experienced by retired ministers and anticipated by active ministers of the Presbyterian Church in…

  3. To Retire or Not to Retire? That Is the Question

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Janet R.

    2013-01-01

    During the 1960s, there was extensive hiring of college and university faculty members. This large group of professors are now at or nearing retirement age. Concerns about the economy, the availability of good health insurance, increased life expectancy, and removal of mandatory retirement laws may influence decisions about when to retire.…

  4. Effects of Exposure to Community Violence on Internalizing Symptoms: Does Desensitization to Violence Occur in African American Youth?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaylord-Harden, Noni K.; Cunningham, Jamila A.; Zelencik, Brett

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine the linear and curvilinear associations of exposure to community violence to internalizing symptoms in 251 African American adolescents (mean age = 12.86, SD = 1.28). Participants reported on exposure to community violence, anxiety symptoms, and depressive symptoms. Regression analyses were used to…

  5. Reaching Out in Retirement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghezzi, Patti

    2007-01-01

    This article reports that across the country, retired superintendents are finding fulfillment as mentors, either formally or informally, spontaneously or planned. Some are paid, but most are volunteers who remember their first year running a school district and want to ease the transition for others. Some want to focus on leadership development.…

  6. Planning Your Retirement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Retired Persons, Washington, DC.

    This guidebook raises important issues for older workers to think about in planning for retirement. Sections of the book explore such areas as the following: changing roles and relationships; health and fitness; meaningful use of time, with a sampler of activities from which one may choose; working options, including a brief description of a…

  7. The Retirement Planning Specialty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennis, Helen

    2002-01-01

    Workplace changes and increased longevity have heightened the need for retirement planning specialists. Specialists are beginning to focus more holistically on life planning and addressing the challenges of technology and the needs of low-income adults. (Contains 15 references.) (SK)

  8. Planning Your Retirement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Retired Persons, Washington, DC.

    This guidebook on retirement planning helps potential retirees by raising important issues in such areas as changing roles and relationships, health and fitness, meaningful use of time, working options, financial and estate planning, and housing and lifestyle. The first section, on attitude and role adjustments, discusses support systems, changing…

  9. Java Tool Retirement

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... 08:00 am EDT Event Impact:  The ASDC Java Order Tool was officially retired on Wednesday, May 14, 2014.  The HTML Order Tool and additional options are available from our Order Data Page .  Please update all bookmarks.     ...

  10. Retirement: The Challenge of Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, E. Michael, Ed.

    Intended for persons in their 50s and 60s who are seriously thinking about retirement and younger people who want to learn about aging and retirement, this book was developed as a companion piece to the training program offered to business and nonprofit organizations by the University of Southern Maine retirement planning team. Most of the…

  11. Retirement Preparation: Growing Corporate Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aging and Work: A Journal on Age, Work and Retirement, 1980

    1980-01-01

    A survey of the nation's largest corporations on their attitudes toward retirement and older workers revealed a heightened awareness of inflation's effect on retirees and of the need for retirement planning programs. Though few such programs presently exist, interest in employer-employee cooperation in retirement preparation is rising. (SK)

  12. The Trend toward Retirement Jobs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buddy, Juanita Warren

    2008-01-01

    Many library media specialists are deciding to return to the workplace after retiring from full-time employment. This article focuses on general information about the trend of retirees acquiring retirement jobs, how and why retired library media specialists return to work, their perceptions of challenges facing library media programs, and advice…

  13. International retirement migration in Europe.

    PubMed

    King, R; Warnes, A M; Williams, A M

    1998-06-01

    "This paper presents a review and prospectus of international retirement migration (IRM), dealing mainly with European evidence but also referring to some analogous trends in North America. The paper is in three main parts. It first makes the case for regarding IRM as a significant aspect of population geography and of migration studies; in certain areas of Mediterranean Europe, IRM also has effects on regional economic geography. The second section of the paper discusses some of the early findings from a comparative study of British elderly residents in Tuscany, Malta, the Costa del Sol and the Algarve.... The final part of the article offers further reflections on why IRM is important--for the individual migrants themselves, for the host communities, and for public policy." PMID:12348629

  14. Relationship between Perceived Needs and Assessed Needs for Services in Community-Dwelling Older Persons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen-Mansfield, Jiska; Frank, Julia

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: We examine the relationship between the perceived needs and assessed needs of community-dwelling seniors. Design and Methods: Trained research assistants administered the Naturally Occurring Retirement Community Baseline Survey to 268 community-dwelling older adults in suburban Maryland. Perceived and assessed needs were measured in the…

  15. [Costs of early retirement--the case of schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Clouth, Johannes

    2004-11-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe psychic disorder that occurs at young age and often leads to a work disability. The disease not only induces direct costs in the health care system but also indirect costs that show up in the social security system. In this study, we apply statistics from the social security administration on early retirement due to disability. Over 6000-males and females per year retire with the diagnosis schizophrenia (classified as 295, ICD-9). The average retirement age is 39 for males and 42 for females. Schizophrenia is the most important single reason for early retirement before age 40. Of all male cases of disability retirement under the age of 40, 14.7 % are due to schizophrenia. The present discounted value of pensions paid out before the standard retirement age of 65 is 215 000 Euro for an average male. Moreover, the revenue loss in income taxes and payroll contributions amounts to 345 000 Euro. In the year 2000, a total of 125 000 persons under the age of 65, who originally entered retirement with the diagnosis schizophrenia, are estimated to be receiving a pension. The corresponding annual expenditures of the social security system reach 1.3 Billion Euro; the revenue loss (pay-roll plus income taxes) reaches 2 Billion Euro. Since only two thirds of the working age population is covered by the social security system, the costs of early retirement due to schizophrenia are underestimated by a factor of at least one third. PMID:15586317

  16. Retirement as Meaningful: Positive Retirement Stereotypes Associated with Longevity

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Reuben; Allore, Heather G.; Monin, Joan K.; Levy, Becca R.

    2016-01-01

    Studies examining the association between retirement and health have produced mixed results. This may be due to previous studies treating retirement as merely a change in job status rather than a transition associated with stereotypes or societal beliefs (e.g., retirement is a time of mental decline or retirement is a time of growth). To examine whether these stereotypes are associated with health, we studied retirement stereotypes and survival over a 23-year period among 1,011 older adults. As predicted by stereotype embodiment theory, it was found that positive stereotypes about physical health during retirement showed a survival advantage of 4.5 years (hazard ratio = 0.88, p = .022) and positive stereotypes about mental health during retirement tended to show a survival advantage of 2.5 years (hazard ratio = 0.87, p = .034). Models adjusted for relevant covariates such as age, gender, race, employment status, functional health, and self-rated health. These results suggest that retirement preparation could benefit from considering retirement stereotypes. PMID:27346893

  17. Optimal Retirement with Increasing Longevity*

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, David E.; Canning, David; Moore, Michael

    2014-01-01

    We develop an optimizing life-cycle model of retirement with perfect capital markets. We show that longer healthy life expectancy usually leads to later retirement, but with an elasticity less than unity. We calibrate our model using data from the US and find that, over the last century, the effect of rising incomes, which promote early retirement, has dominated the effect of rising lifespans. Our model predicts continuing declines in the optimal retirement age, despite rising life expectancy, provided the rate of real wage growth remains as high as in the last century. PMID:24954970

  18. Retirement Planning Revisited: Retirement Plans Must Be Reviewed Periodically.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knopf, Winfield G.

    1994-01-01

    A number of economic and social factors suggest that this is an appropriate time for colleges and universities to review employee retirement plans. Information that employees should have for retirement planning is reviewed, and basic principles for institutions to use in selecting a pension company are outlined. (MSE)

  19. The Myth of Employee Planning for Retirement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Malcolm H.

    1975-01-01

    A survey of male hourly-wage earners indicates employees face serious problems in planning for income security in retirement. Retirement preparation programs that supply information and technical planning expertise are needed to assist employees in realistic retirement planning. (EA)

  20. Working Women, Marriage, and Retirement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapkoff, Shelley; Fierst, Edith

    Women are at a disadvantage under both Social Security and private employee pension plans because the retirement systems were set up at a time when most women were non-working spouses of employed men, a condition that no longer exists. Today women workers, divorcees, and widows of retirees often find themselves with inadequate retirement benefits…

  1. The Gift Package of Retirement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draayer, Donald R.

    2007-01-01

    The hunger for significance in life never ends. What changes in one's retirement is how one fills that need. For most school administrators, introspection and investigation into possibilities for post-retirement years begin prior to one's resignation; however, the intensity of thought, feeling, and deliberation moves to a much higher plane once…

  2. Retirement Planning with a Difference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merikangas, Marilyn

    1983-01-01

    Points out that retirement planning seminars often are designed to impart the economic and pragmatic aspects while neglecting feelings that accompany this and other major life transitions. Indicates that consideration must be given to the social and psychological implications of retirement. (JOW)

  3. Retirement as a Learning Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodkinson, Phil; Ford, Geoff; Hodkinson, Heather; Hawthorn, Ruth

    2008-01-01

    This article draws upon a major qualitative empirical research investigation in Great Britain to explore the relationships between retirement and learning. Though retirement is frequently viewed as an event leading to a life stage, our data show that it can perhaps be best understood as a lengthy process. This process begins well before actual…

  4. Retirement Patterns and Income Inequality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fasang, Anette Eva

    2012-01-01

    How do social policies shape life courses, and which consequences do different life course patterns hold for individuals? This article engages the example of retirement in Germany and Britain to analyze life course patterns and their consequences for income inequality. Sequence analysis is used to measure retirement trajectories. The liberal…

  5. Psychological Aspects of Retirement

    PubMed Central

    Harris, David J.

    1983-01-01

    Retirement is a normal phenomenon which is not a crisis for most people. However, those who have previously had difficulty coping with major life events may be expected to experience difficulties at this time of life. Some will experience mild symptoms of anxiety, as part of an adjustment reaction to late life. A minority will suffer a significant depressive reaction. In most of these cases, however, other significant life events and factors will have triggered breakdown. In the milder cases psychotherapy is the main treatment of choice, either individually or conjointly with the spouse. Antidepressant drugs and other physical treatments may have a part to play in some cases. Imagesp529-a PMID:21283348

  6. Migration of Retirement-Age Blacks to Nonmetropolitan Areas in the 1990s

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beale, Calvin L.; Fuguitt, Glenn V.

    2011-01-01

    Older blacks migrated to nonmetropolitan (nonmetro) communities in the 1990s to a degree not true of the past. Some of the nonmetro counties that attracted them are well-known retirement areas also favored by other retirees, mostly whites. Two-thirds of black retirement counties, however, are areas in the Old South that are not attracting other…

  7. Differences in Attitudes Toward Retirement Among Male and Female Faculty and Other University Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Kim; And Others

    The effect of gender on retirement attitudes among college faculty and other university professionals were studied, and variables that might affect attitudes toward retirement were investigated. A 35-item questionnaire was mailed to all faculty and nonteaching professionals at a university center, a four-year college, and a community college of…

  8. 20 CFR 404.1088 - Retirement payment to retired partners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... financial obligations to you (in his or her capacity as a partner) except to make the retirement payments... set out in 26 CFR 1.1402(a)-(17) and the conditions in paragraph (b) of this section are met....

  9. 20 CFR 404.1088 - Retirement payment to retired partners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... set out in 26 CFR 1.1402(a)-(17) and the conditions in paragraph (b) of this section are met. The... partner in the DEF partnership, retired from the partnership as of December 31, 1976. The taxable year...

  10. Retirement and Activity Restrictions Following Concussion.

    PubMed

    Laker, Scott R; Meron, Adele; Greher, Michael R; Wilson, Julie

    2016-05-01

    Sport-related concussion is prevalent at all levels of play. Increased attention from sports media and scientific and medical communities has prompted players and physicians to explore the long-term effects of concussion and ask the questions of when and how players should begin to mitigate their concussion risk. The authors evaluate their risks from the perspective of epidemiology, symptomatology, neuropsychological performance, and biomechanics. The authors propose that there is not a set number of concussions that necessitates retirement in athletes and, aside from a few absolute contraindications to return to collision sport, return to play should be an individualized process. PMID:27154858

  11. Predictors of Perceptions of Involuntary Retirement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szinovacz, Maximiliane E.; Davey, Adam

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Retirement is often treated as a voluntary transition, yet selected circumstances can restrict choice in retirement decision processes. We investigated conditions under which retirees perceive their retirement as "forced" rather than "wanted." Methods: Analyses relied on Waves 1-4 of the Health and Retirement Survey (N = 1,160; 572 men…

  12. 5 CFR 842.212 - Deferred retirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... this section, an employee or Member who has not attained the minimum retirement age, and who, after... following the date on which the individual attains the minimum retirement age or, if later, (ii) A date the... retirement age, and is reemployed before filing an application for retirement based on that separation,...

  13. Plan Now to Prepare for Your Retirement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kersten, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01

    For teachers, in particular, the importance of early retirement investing has never been more critical. The reality is that, decades from now, when teachers arrive at retirement age, their current state teacher retirement plan may have changed substantially. As a result, they do not want to reach retirement and regret that they never considered…

  14. Metaphors for Retirement: Unshackled from Schedules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sargent, Leisa D.; Bataille, Christine D.; Vough, Heather C.; Lee, Mary Dean

    2011-01-01

    This study uses metaphor analysis to examine the meanings of retirement for a group of 35 retired Canadian executives and managers. Our analysis identified eight metaphors relating to the meanings of retirement. The findings provide us with a range of insights into the experience of retirement, from loss of purpose and identity to liberation from…

  15. Does Stock Market Performance Influence Retirement Intentions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goda, Gopi Shah; Shoven, John B.; Slavov, Sita Nataraj

    2012-01-01

    Media reports predicted that the stock market decline in October 2008 would cause changes in retirement intentions, due to declines in retirement assets. We use panel data from the Health and Retirement Study to investigate the relationship between stock market performance and retirement intentions during 1998-2008, a period that includes the…

  16. Back to School for Retired Baby Boomers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bumgardner, Stan

    2009-01-01

    Across the nation, schools increasingly are tapping into a vast resource pool--retired educators. The potential effects of the retirement boom--baby boomers reaching retirement age--have been well documented. An April 2009 "New York Times" article estimates that by 2013, more than one-third of the nation's 3.2 million teachers could retire. One…

  17. From the Vantage of Retirement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veatch, Jeannette

    1996-01-01

    Discusses four areas of reading instruction that the author (a retired distinguished educator) believes have been neglected or misunderstood: Sylvia Ashton-Warner's Key Vocabulary, the Alphabetic Principle, transmogrification of spoken to written language, and individualized reading. (SR)

  18. Preparing for Time after Retirement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernau, C.

    1983-01-01

    One important area of activities for which retiring workers could be prepared is undoubtedly that which lies in the field of social services in which trade unions everywhere are increasingly engaged. (SSH)

  19. HEALTH AND RETIREMENT STUDY (HRS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    HRS is a national panel study based on biennial interviews. The study provides a portrait of an aging America's physical and mental health, insurance coverage, financial status, family support systems, labor market status, and retirement planning.

  20. Retiring the central executive.

    PubMed

    Logie, Robert H

    2016-10-01

    Reasoning, problem solving, comprehension, learning and retrieval, inhibition, switching, updating, or multitasking are often referred to as higher cognition, thought to require control processes or the use of a central executive. However, the concept of an executive controller begs the question of what is controlling the controller and so on, leading to an infinite hierarchy of executives or "homunculi". In what is now a QJEP citation classic, Baddeley [Baddeley, A. D. (1996). Exploring the central executive. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 49A, 5-28] referred to the concept of a central executive in cognition as a "conceptual ragbag" that acted as a placeholder umbrella term for aspects of cognition that are complex, were poorly understood at the time, and most likely involve several different cognitive functions working in concert. He suggested that with systematic empirical research, advances in understanding might progress sufficiently to allow the executive concept to be "sacked". This article offers an overview of the 1996 article and of some subsequent systematic research and argues that after two decades of research, there is sufficient advance in understanding to suggest that executive control might arise from the interaction among multiple different functions in cognition that use different, but overlapping, brain networks. The article concludes that the central executive concept might now be offered a dignified retirement. PMID:26821744

  1. An adapted mindfulness-based stress reduction program for elders in a continuing care retirement community: quantitative and qualitative results from a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Moss, Aleezé S; Reibel, Diane K; Greeson, Jeffrey M; Thapar, Anjali; Bubb, Rebecca; Salmon, Jacqueline; Newberg, Andrew B

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility and effectiveness of an adapted 8-week Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) program for elders in a continuing care community. This mixed-methods study used both quantitative and qualitative measures. A randomized waitlist control design was used for the quantitative aspect of the study. Thirty-nine elderly were randomized to MBSR (n = 20) or a waitlist control group (n = 19), mean age was 82 years. Both groups completed pre-post measures of health-related quality of life, acceptance and psychological flexibility, facets of mindfulness, self-compassion, and psychological distress. A subset of MBSR participants completed qualitative interviews. MBSR participants showed significantly greater improvement in acceptance and psychological flexibility and in role limitations due to physical health. In the qualitative interviews, MBSR participants reported increased awareness, less judgment, and greater self-compassion. Study results demonstrate the feasibility and potential effectiveness of an adapted MBSR program in promoting mind-body health for elders. PMID:25492049

  2. 76 FR 20243 - Retired and Senior Volunteer Program Amendments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-12

    ...The Corporation for National and Community Service (Corporation) is issuing a final rule that sets forth a competitive process for selecting grant recipients for the Retired and Service Volunteer Program (RSVP), including performance measurement requirements, as required by the Domestic Volunteer Service Act (DVSA), as amended by the Edward M. Kennedy Serve America Act (Serve America Act)......

  3. Retirement In-Migration Study: Attractive Features, Economic & Social Impacts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Wayne; And Others

    This study helps local leaders to identify attractions that entice people to relocate upon retirement, and to estimate the potential economic and social impact of in-migrating retirees. A group of 249 retirees from communities in Arkansas, Oklahoma, and eastern Texas completed questionnaires between June 1992 and February 1993. Although income and…

  4. Do Species-specific Hydraulic Traits Predict Ecosystem Response and Community Structure? Evidence From Co-occurring Bryophytes of a Sloping Wetland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lintz, H. E.; Russell, M. C.; Hardman, A. C.

    2007-12-01

    Ecosystems comprise a complex assortment species, and each species has a unique set of physiological and anatomical characteristics or traits. Landscape-level forecasts of ecosystem response to climate change can benefit by accounting for species-specific traits. Here, we demonstrate how a hydraulic trait can be quantified and aggregrated to community and ecosystem levels using a model life form and system, bryophytes in a sloping wetland. Growth and reproduction of bryophytes depend on the quantity of external water held, which varies by species. Wetlands provide a soil substrate that supplies either an unlimited amount of water, or at minimum, a shallow water table for part of the year. We hypothesized and confirmed that external water holding capacity of bryophyte species (measured in the laboratory) corresponded to bryophyte community structure along a hydrology gradient in the wetland. In addition, we demonstrated that water holding capacity by species can be aggregated to the level of the wetland ecosystem to reveal an emergent community property, water holding capacity of the bryophyte mat. Our results support ecological theory presented by Paul Keddy (1999) that co-occurring organisms show similarity in resource acquisition along gradients of resource limitation. We promote a conceptual framework that incorporates species-specific traits as modeling currency that can bridge scales.

  5. Barriers and Facilitators in Providing Community Mental Health Care to Returning Veterans with a History of Traumatic Brain Injury and Co-occurring Mental Health Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Matarazzo, Bridget B; Signoracci, Gina M; Brenner, Lisa A; Olson-Madden, Jennifer H

    2016-02-01

    As Veterans from recent conflicts return from deployments, increasing numbers are seeking care for physical (e.g., history of traumatic brain injury) and mental health (e.g., depression, anxiety) symptoms. Data suggest that only about half of recent Veterans are seeking care within the Veterans Health Administration. As such, providers within the community are likely to require additional training to meet the unique needs of these Veterans and their families. Towards this end, meetings were held with administrators and clinicians at Colorado Community Mental Health Centers (CMHCs) to identify current barriers and facilitators, as they relate to working with Veterans with a history of TBI and co-occurring mental health conditions. On-whole, CMHC employees had limited experience with providing care to the cohort of interest. Additional training will assist with increasing capacity and a web-based toolkit was developed to facilitate the transfer of knowledge ( www.mirecc.va.gov/visn19/tbi_toolkit ). PMID:26308836

  6. Forensic continuum of care with Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) for persons recovering from co-occurring disabilities: long-term outcomes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Ronald J; Jennings, Jerry L; Cimino, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    This study presents the long-term outcomes of a continuum of care program for co-occurring psychiatric disabilities and chemical dependency that has been recognized as a best practice model by the American Psychological Association's Committee for the Advancement of Professional Practice's Task Force on Serious Mental Illness and Severe Emotional Disturbance (APA/CAPP, 2007). Since publication of the initial positive outcomes for 18 men in 2002, this innovative recovery program continued to successfully reintegrate a total of 91 men and women with severe co-occurring disabilities who had been acquitted of violent crimes by reason of insanity (NGRI). This follow-up study showed continued positive outcomes for an additional 73 program graduates in terms of non-reoffending, psychiatric stability, substance abuse abstinence, stable housing and meaningful activity. In contrast to other studies that have applied Assertive Community Treatment and Intensive Case Management to populations with forensic issues and failed to reduce criminal recidivism, this continuum of care recovery model had strong results in preventing criminal recidivism in addition to achieving improved mental health, abstinence and quality of life. PMID:20061257

  7. Aging in Sweden, Part 1: Retirement Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skoglund, John

    1980-01-01

    Explores the relationship between retirement planning and demographic and attitudinal factors. One-third of the sample had planned for retirement. Planning was more common among males and high-status individuals. (Author)

  8. Timing of Retirement: Including a Delay Discounting Perspective in Retirement Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bidewell, John; Griffin, Barbara; Hesketh, Beryl

    2006-01-01

    This research examined the influence of delay and anticipated health and enjoyment on the amount of retirement savings sacrificed for early retirement. In addition to testing and supporting predictions that willingness to sacrifice retirement savings would be less with shorter delays to retirement, greater anticipated health, and greater…

  9. Reconceptualizing Retirement for Black Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Rose C.

    1987-01-01

    Examined subsample of nonworking older Black Americans (N=295) from the National Survey of Black Americans sample. Found four factors contributed significantly to respondents' unretired-retired status: indistinct line between lifetime and old age work patterns, view that occasional work is necessary, income from other than private pensions, and…

  10. Alternative Approaches to Retirement Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flanagan, John C.

    It has been proposed that the same type of aptitude and ability tests required for initial job entry be used to indicate whether an individual can continue to perform effectively in that job. A review of the nature of such tests indicates that they would be inappropriate for use in retirement decisions. A proficiency test of the kind used at the…

  11. Early and Late Retirement Exits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brougham, Ruby R.; Walsh, David A.

    2009-01-01

    The current study proposes that personal need fulfillment (relatedness, generativity, identity, growth, and finances) predicts early and late retirement intentions. The personal needs of 160 full-time older employees were measured by personal goals, job satisfactions, job characteristics, and intrinsic motivation. Results suggest that the personal…

  12. Retirement Planning the Easy Way.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Cheryl D.

    1996-01-01

    Options available to college faculty for planning their retirement benefits are described, including defined benefit plans, defined contribution plans, and methods for customizing a pension plan. Data for 1993 on American households owning interest-earning assets (passbook savings, money market deposit accounts, certificates of deposit, checking…

  13. Retirement: An Ego Alien View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, Helen

    1977-01-01

    Since knowledge of ego development can be used in professional work, a needed classification of attitudes toward the work ethic is advanced. A radical departure from our retirement policy towards those over 65 years of age requires additional competence on the part of counselors in the field of aging. (Author)

  14. Retirement: When, Why, and How?

    PubMed Central

    Beck, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Retirement from a career in Colon and Rectal Surgery is usually a personal decision. The details of when, why, and how are individually specific and are shaped by life experience, desires, personal and family commitments, as well as financial considerations. PMID:22654572

  15. The Issue of Mandatory Retirement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheppard, Harold L.

    1978-01-01

    The emerging issue will center on costs to the total economy of early retirement for a growing population whose life expectancy is continuing to rise. Available from The American Academy of Political and Social Science, 3937 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104; $18.00 annually. (Author/IRT)

  16. An Evaluation of Mandatory Retirement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Givens, Harrison, Jr.

    1978-01-01

    This paper discusses the issues raised by mandatory retirement, the meaning of the new law, the law's specifics, and the uncertainties still ahead. Available from the The American Academy of Political and Social Science, 3937 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104; $18.00 annually. (Author)

  17. Phased Retirement: The European Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swank, Constance

    This report provides United States corporate and union policymakers with practical information on one alternative work pattern for older employees--phased retirement--from European colleagues who already have implemented or negotiated specific phasing programs. An introduction provides details on the collection of information from companies in…

  18. 78 FR 68981 - Electronic Retirement Processing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-18

    ...The Office of Personnel Management (OPM) is adopting its proposed regulations applicable to electronic benefits processing under the Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS), the Federal Employees' Retirement System (FERS), the Federal Employees' Group Life Insurance (FEGLI), the Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB), and the Retired Federal Employee Health Benefits (RFEHB) Programs. These......

  19. Psychosocial Implications of Women and Retirement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, Kathleen

    1992-01-01

    Explores retirement and women, many of whom are economically insecure when they retire. Argues that, because of prevailing myth among women that they will be cared for in old age and fear of aging, women often do not aggressively plan for retirement. Contends that women's movement should begin to advocate for women's preparation for realities of…

  20. Learning to Work No Longer: Exploring "Retirement"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodkinson, Heather

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore learning for and through retirement from the workplace. Design/methodology/approach: First, "retirement" is considered in the light of the existing literature, demonstrating a complex concept. The paper describes the research project from which a theme of retirement as a learning process has…

  1. Women's Caregiving Careers and Retirement Financial Insecurity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orel, Nancy A.; Landry-Meyer, Laura; Spence, Maria A. S.

    2007-01-01

    Providing the essential care for children and aged relatives has immediate and long-term financial consequences for women, particularly financial insecurity in retirement. Women's caregiving careers are examined in relationship to the impact on retirement. The need for career and retirement education and counseling aimed at women who assume…

  2. 5 CFR 842.206 - Involuntary retirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Involuntary retirement. 842.206 Section... (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES RETIREMENT SYSTEM-BASIC ANNUITY Eligibility § 842.206 Involuntary retirement... separates from the service involuntarily after completing 25 years of service, or after becoming age 50...

  3. Retirement Can Be Golden for Your Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... a 2014 Gallup poll. Ding said the average retirement age in Australia is just over 63 years. "I think it is important to plan for retired life with a positive mindset," she said. "Some people get anxious about retirement because they may lose a sense of purpose." ...

  4. Changing Retirement Age: Ups and Downs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiatrowski, William J.

    2001-01-01

    In recent years, legislative changes, new types of retirement plans, and increases in life expectancy have led to differences in retirement ages. More older adults continue to work. The traditional model of social security, savings, and employer retirement benefits is changing. (Contains 31 notes and references.) (SK)

  5. The Ever-Changing Meanings of Retirement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McVittie, Chris; Goodall, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Shultz and Wang (April 2011) drew attention to the ways in which understandings of retirement have changed over time, both in terms of the place of retirement in the lives of individuals and in terms of how retirement can no longer usefully be taken to comprise a single defining event. As the authors pointed out, psychological research has…

  6. Early Retirement: The Cost to Canadian Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jefferson, Anne L.

    A study examined effects of early retirement plans (ERP) at Canadian Universities. In response to current conditions within Canadian universities and a Canadian Supreme Court decision upholding mandatory retirement requirements, many universities have sought to encourage faculty retirement through ERPs. In order to study the cost of such programs,…

  7. Psychological Effects of the Transition to Retirement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborne, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Psychological effects of disengagement from a work life and the transition to retirement are discussed. These effects include partial identity disruption, decision paralysis, diminished self trust, experience of a post retirement void, the search for meaningful engagement in society, development of a retirement/life structure, the confluence of…

  8. The Current State of Retirement Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennis, Helen

    1989-01-01

    The author (1) identifies groups involved in retirement planning, (2) describes recent accomplishments within the field, (3) recommends ways to address unmet needs, and (4) identifies emerging trends. Trends in retirement planning include early retirement, differentiation between married and single prospective retirees, and competition for…

  9. Heterogeneity in spending change at retirement

    PubMed Central

    Hurd, Michael D.; Rohwedder, Susann

    2014-01-01

    The simple one-good model of life-cycle consumption requires that consumption be continuous over retirement; yet prior research based on partial measures of consumption or on synthetic panels indicates that spending drops at retirement, a result that has been called the retirement-consumption puzzle. Using panel data on total spending, nondurable spending and food spending, we find that spending declines at small rates at retirement, rates that could be explained by mechanisms such as the cessation of work-related expenses, unexpected retirement due to a health shock or by the substitution of time for spending. We find substantial heterogeneity in spending change at retirement: in the upper half of the wealth distribution spending increased. In the low-wealth population where spending did decline at higher rates, the main explanation for the decline appears to be early retirement due to poor health, possibly augmented by a short planning horizon by a minority of the population. PMID:24524026

  10. Retirement effects on health in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Coe, Norma B.; Zamarro, Gema

    2013-01-01

    What are the health impacts of retirement? As talk of raising retirement ages in pensions and social security schemes continues around the world, it is important to know both the costs and benefits for the individual, as well as the governments’ budgets. In this paper we use the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) dataset to address this question in a multi-country setting. We use country-specific early and full retirement ages as instruments for retirement behavior. These statutory retirement ages clearly induce retirement, but are not related to an individual’s health. Exploiting the discontinuities in retirement behavior across countries, we find significant evidence that retirement has a health-preserving effect on overall general health. Our estimates indicate that retirement leads to a 35 percent decrease in the probability of reporting to be in fair, bad, or very bad health, and an almost one standard deviation improvement in the health index. While the self-reported health seems to be a temporary impact, the health index indicates there are long-lasting health differences. PMID:21183235

  11. Reconceptualizing retirement: A status-based approach.

    PubMed

    Hershenson, David B

    2016-08-01

    The one thing on which essentially all retirement scholars agree is that there is no generally accepted definition of the term "retirement." Hence, it is not surprising that a plethora of competing models of the stages of retirement has been generated. To cut this Gordian knot, this paper proposes that the concept of statuses, which are not necessarily mutually exclusive or sequential, replace the idea of stages. Statuses better reflect observed human behavior and are more open to multicultural application, thus facilitating retirement research and clinical practice. The retirement statuses proposed here, which can exist in any combination or sequence, are retrenchment, exploration, try-out, involvement, reconsideration, and exiting (forming the acronym RETIRE). PMID:27531447

  12. Did the Great Recession influence retirement plans?

    PubMed

    Szinovacz, Maximiliane E; Davey, Adam; Martin, Lauren

    2015-04-01

    The recent recession constitutes one of the macro forces that may have influenced workers' retirement plans. We evaluate a multilevel model that addresses the influence of macro-, meso-, and micro-level factors on retirement plans, changes in these plans, and expected retirement age. Using data from Waves 8 and 9 of the Health and Retirement Study (N=2,618), we find that individuals with defined benefit plans are more prone to change toward plans to stop work before the stock market declined, whereas the opposite trend holds for those without pensions. Debts, ability to reduce work hours, and firm unionization also influenced retirement plans. Findings suggest retirement planning education may be particularly important for workers without defined pensions, especially in times of economic volatility. PMID:25651572

  13. Retaining nursing faculty beyond retirement age.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Marvel L; Cook, Linda; Salmeron, Lois; Burton, Denise

    2010-01-01

    The number of nursing faculty planning to retire by 2020 is alarming. To develop strategies for retaining faculty, researchers asked: What factors influence the decision by nursing faculty to stay in the workforce past retirement age? What barriers could be removed that would encourage faculty to stay longer? Using Giorgi's analysis method, findings from 6 faculty teaching past retirement age revealed key meaning units and grand themes that match Maslow's Hierarchy of Inborn Needs. PMID:20548182

  14. 45 CFR 2553.11 - What is the Retired and Senior Volunteer Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE THE RETIRED AND SENIOR VOLUNTEER PROGRAM General § 2553.11 What is... grants to qualified agencies and organizations for the dual purpose of: engaging persons 55 and older in volunteer service to meet critical community needs; and to provide a high quality experience that...

  15. Influence of host species on ectomycorrhizal communities associated with two co-occurring oaks (Quercus spp.) in a tropical cloud forest.

    PubMed

    Morris, Melissa H; Pérez-Pérez, Miguel A; Smith, Matthew E; Bledsoe, Caroline S

    2009-08-01

    Interactions between host tree species and ectomycorrhizal fungi are important in structuring ectomycorrhizal communities, but there are only a few studies on host influence of congeneric trees. We investigated ectomycorrhizal community assemblages on roots of deciduous Quercus crassifolia and evergreen Quercus laurina in a tropical montane cloud forest, one of the most endangered tropical forest ecosystems. Ectomycorrhizal fungi were identified by sequencing internal transcribed spacer and partial 28S rRNA gene. We sampled 80 soil cores and documented high ectomycorrhizal diversity with a total of 154 taxa. Canonical correspondence analysis indicated that oak host was significant in explaining some of the variation in ectomycorrhizal communities, despite the fact that the two Quercus species belong to the same red oak lineage (section Lobatae). A Tuber species, found in 23% of the soil cores, was the most frequent taxon. Similar to oak-dominated ectomycorrhizal communities in temperate forests, Thelephoraceae, Russulaceae and Sebacinales were diverse and dominant. PMID:19508503

  16. 5 CFR 838.611 - Identifying the retirement system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... retirement system, such as military retired pay, Foreign Service retirement benefits or Central Intelligence... §§ 838.303(b)(1) and 838.502(b)(1). (c) A court order affecting military retired pay, even when military retired pay has been waived for inclusion in CSRS annuities, does not award a former spouse a portion...

  17. Managing Your TIAA-CREF Retirement Accounts. Investment Strategies To Maximize Retirement Income.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodall, Leonard E.; Corney, William J.

    This book offers investment strategies for participants in the primary retirement organization for universities and nonprofit organizations, the Teachers Insurance and Annuity-College Retirement Equities Fund (TIAA-CREF). The investment principles outlined also apply to retirement funds offered by other investment companies. The book's scope…

  18. Extending the Integrated Model of Retirement Adjustment: Incorporating Mastery and Retirement Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donaldson, Tarryn; Earl, Joanne K.; Muratore, Alexa M.

    2010-01-01

    Extending earlier research, this study explores individual (e.g. demographic and health characteristics), psychosocial (e.g. mastery and planning) and organizational factors (e.g. conditions of workforce exit) influencing retirement adjustment. Survey data were collected from 570 semi-retired and retired men and women aged 45 years and older.…

  19. The Retirement Equity Act, Survivor Benefits Protections, and Public Employee Retirement Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liebig, Phoebe S.

    The Retirement Equity Act (REA) sets out requirements for joint and survivor annuity coverage for married individuals who participate in federally regulated retirement plans. REA-mandated provisions do not apply to state and local government retirement systems. Because state and local government employees constitute a significant part of the work…

  20. Promoting and maintaining physical activity in the transition to retirement: a systematic review of interventions for adults around retirement age.

    PubMed

    Baxter, S; Johnson, M; Payne, N; Buckley-Woods, H; Blank, L; Hock, E; Daley, A; Taylor, A; Pavey, T; Mountain, G; Goyder, E

    2016-01-01

    It has been argued that transition points in life, such as the approach towards, and early years of retirement present key opportunities for interventions to improve the health of the population. Research has also highlighted inequalities in health status in the retired population and in response to interventions which should be addressed. We aimed to conduct a systematic review to synthesise international evidence on the types and effectiveness of interventions to increase physical activity among people around the time of retirement. A systematic review of literature was carried out between February 2014 and April 2015. Searches were not limited by language or location, but were restricted by date to studies published from 1990 onwards. Methods for identification of relevant studies included electronic database searching, reference list checking, and citation searching. Systematic search of the literature identified 104 papers which described study populations as being older adults. However, we found only one paper which specifically referred to their participants as being around the time of retirement. The intervention approaches for older adults encompassed: training of health care professionals; counselling and advice giving; group sessions; individual training sessions; in-home exercise programmes; in-home computer-delivered programmes; in-home telephone support; in-home diet and exercise programmes; and community-wide initiatives. The majority of papers reported some intervention effect, with evidence of positive outcomes for all types of programmes. A wide range of different measures were used to evaluate effectiveness, many were self-reported and few studies included evaluation of sedentary time. While the retirement transition is considered a significant point of life change, little research has been conducted to assess whether physical activity interventions at this time may be effective in promoting or maintaining activity, or reducing health

  1. Planning for Retirement with a Tax-Sheltered Mutual Fund.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnee, Edward J.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Greater attention has been focused on the role that employer-sponsored retirement plans and individual savings must play in ensuring retirement income security. Alternative tax retirement planning opportunities currently available to college personnel are explored. (MLW)

  2. Second Wind: Handbook for Happy Retirement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Philip J.

    Reflecting 10 years of actual retirement experience, the author attempts to prove that older people can live interesting dynamic lives right to the last moment. The book, with its conversational, step-by-step style, has been written for anybody over 50. It presents retirement as a "stepping out" rather than a "stepping down"; the solid realities…

  3. Retirement Plan Consortium Structures for K-12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kevin, John

    2012-01-01

    As school districts continue to seek administrative efficiencies and cost reductions in the wake of severe budget pressures, the resources they devote to creating or expanding retirement plan consortia is increasing. Understanding how to structure a retirement plan consortium is paramount to successfully achieving the many objectives of…

  4. Retirement Systems of the American Teacher.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmid, W. William

    The descriptive-analytical detail of this study provides confirmation of the generality that, if teachers continue with the profession long enough, they will retire with allowance payments close to or even below poverty levels. The research reviews most aspects of teacher retirement including: (1) historical and philosophical background; (2)…

  5. 20 CFR 404.1050 - Retirement payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... or annuities) on account of your retirement for age are not excluded from wages unless— (a) The... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Retirement payments. 404.1050 Section 404.1050 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND...

  6. Retirement Policy. Overview. ERIC Digest No. 38.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkfield, Patricia Worthy

    While the Federal Government has been involved in the care of the elderly since the depression, a comprehensive and unified national retirement policy has never been established. Federal programs for the aged have avoided cutbacks, but adaptations in present retirement policy are required to meet the needs of young and old alike. Although public…

  7. Older Workers and Bridge Employment: Redefining Retirement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ulrich, Lorene B.; Brott, Pamelia E.

    2005-01-01

    The authors present a qualitative study that explored the transition experiences of older workers who retired from long-term careers and who were working in bridge jobs (i.e., transitional work between career employment and retirement). Using grounded theory methodology, the authors interviewed 24 older workers to learn why they decided to pursue…

  8. 78 FR 14233 - Electronic Retirement Processing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-05

    ... Regulations, by updating the regulations previously published at 72 FR 73573 (December 28, 2007). OPM is... OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT 5 CFR Part 850 RIN 3206-AM45 Electronic Retirement Processing AGENCY: Office... electronic recordkeeping and automated retirement processing improvements being deployed by OPM,...

  9. Leisure and the Retired Professor: Occupation Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorfman, Lorraine; Kolarik, Douglas

    2005-01-01

    Little attention has been given to the leisure activities of retired professors, whose activity patterns in retirement may be different from those of other occupational groups because of their lifetime commitment to work. This interview study uses both quantitative and qualitative data to investigate: (a) the leisure and professional activities of…

  10. 22 CFR 20.4 - Retirement benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Retirement benefits. 20.4 Section 20.4 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PERSONNEL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN FORMER SPOUSES § 20.4 Retirement benefits. (a) Type of benefits. (1) A former spouse who meets the qualification requirements of § 20.3 is entitled...

  11. 20 CFR 633.306 - Retirement benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Retirement benefits. 633.306 Section 633.306 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR MIGRANT AND SEASONAL FARMWORKER PROGRAMS Program Design and Administrative Procedures § 633.306 Retirement benefits. No...

  12. The Future of Retirement in Canadian Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flanagan, Thomas

    1984-01-01

    There is a strong movement toward legal abolition of fixed-age retirement in Canada. Several factors justify the existing practice, but these arguments are unlikely to prevail, and institutions should consider administrative measures such as facilitation of early retirement, modified benefit plans, and more systematic faculty assessment throughout…

  13. Are You Planning and Saving for Retirement?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yakoboski, Paul

    2007-01-01

    In 2005, TIAA-CREF sponsored its first-ever "Retirement Confidence Survey of College and University Faculty" to discover the answer to this question: How well are faculty members taking advantage of employer-sponsored pension plans and saving for retirement? An additional objective of the project was to compare the survey's findings for higher…

  14. Retirement Planning Strategies for Midlife Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenna, Judy; Nickols, Sharon Y.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses factors that influence women in their daily living (economic and demographic factors, feelings about mathematics ability, risk taking, and locus of control), retirement planning concerns of midlife women, retirement planning strategies and the role of educators in this planning, and social-psychological strategies. (CT)

  15. The Retirement Problem: A Positive Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    AGB Reports, 1978

    1978-01-01

    A TIAA-CREF task force reports that there are steps an institution can take in dealing with the new mandatory retirement laws (not before age 70). They include preretirement counseling, provision of "Sweeteners," severance plans, a phased retirement program, and a continuing relationship with the college for retirees. (Author/LBH)

  16. 22 CFR 20.4 - Retirement benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Retirement benefits. 20.4 Section 20.4 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PERSONNEL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN FORMER SPOUSES § 20.4 Retirement benefits. (a) Type of benefits. (1) A former spouse who meets the qualification requirements of § 20.3 is entitled...

  17. 22 CFR 20.4 - Retirement benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Retirement benefits. 20.4 Section 20.4 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PERSONNEL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN FORMER SPOUSES § 20.4 Retirement benefits. (a) Type of benefits. (1) A former spouse who meets the qualification requirements of § 20.3 is entitled...

  18. 20 CFR 633.306 - Retirement benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Retirement benefits. 633.306 Section 633.306 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR MIGRANT AND SEASONAL FARMWORKER PROGRAMS Program Design and Administrative Procedures § 633.306 Retirement benefits. No...

  19. 22 CFR 20.4 - Retirement benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Retirement benefits. 20.4 Section 20.4 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PERSONNEL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN FORMER SPOUSES § 20.4 Retirement benefits. (a) Type of benefits. (1) A former spouse who meets the qualification requirements of § 20.3 is entitled...

  20. 22 CFR 20.4 - Retirement benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Retirement benefits. 20.4 Section 20.4 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PERSONNEL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN FORMER SPOUSES § 20.4 Retirement benefits. (a) Type of benefits. (1) A former spouse who meets the qualification requirements of § 20.3 is entitled...

  1. 20 CFR 633.306 - Retirement benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Retirement benefits. 633.306 Section 633.306 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR MIGRANT AND SEASONAL FARMWORKER PROGRAMS Program Design and Administrative Procedures § 633.306 Retirement benefits. No...

  2. Youth Individual Development Accounts: Retirement Planning Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shobe, Marcia A.; Sturm, Stephanie L.

    2007-01-01

    Given the growing interest in a privatized Social Security system and the lack of adequate retirement planning among many people in the United States, many households are often ill prepared for retirement. The outlook for low-income populations is even bleaker because they are often not privy to the same financial education and asset-building…

  3. Socioeconomic Determinants of Early Retirement in Canada.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, P. Lynn; Wanner, Richard A.

    1984-01-01

    This study attempts to determine the main socioeconomic factors influencing the decision to retire before age 65 among Canadian men and women. The study concludes that early retirees tend to be single men and married women employed by others who are better educated and whose nonearned income is higher than those who retire at a later age.…

  4. Retirement Plans of Instructional Faculty and Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chronister, Jay L.; Baldwin, Roger G.

    1996-01-01

    This analysis of the retirement plans of college and university faculty and staff used data from the 1993 National Study of Postsecondary Faculty. It first determined the proportion of faculty who are age 55 or older by institutional type, discipline, gender, and minority/nonminority status and then analyzed their retirement plans using the same…

  5. How Senior Psychodynamic Psychiatrists Regard Retirement.

    PubMed

    Ingram, Douglas H; Stine, John

    2016-01-01

    The variety of personal experiences and attitudes about professional work among psychodynamic psychiatrists who have attained retirement age are explored through semi-structured interviews. Of 21 members of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis and Dynamic Psychiatry interviewed, 6 report fulltime engagement in professional activity, 10 partial reduction, and 5 full retirement from practice. Through direct quotations from the respondents' interviews several matters are considered including the concept of retirement, structural changes in practice, health concerns, dream experience, spirituality and matters of legacy, how others have influenced attitudes toward continued work, and how fears of retirement are manifest among those currently in practice. Among the conclusions is the suggestion that the sense of self-regard and personal satisfaction of those who do retire is far greater than anticipated by those still in active practice. PMID:27200463

  6. Retired Matches Among Male Professional Tennis Players

    PubMed Central

    Breznik, Kristijan

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the effect of characteristics of various games and players on the proportion of retired tennis matches in the Open Era of tennis. The data included over 420,000 matches played among 17,553 tennis players in the period from 1968 to the end of 2010. The influence of the surface type was clearly confirmed, with the proportion of retired matches being higher on hard and clay courts compared to grass and carpet surfaces. Similarly, more retired matches were observed in outdoor venues than in indoor ones. The impact of other variables, tournament types, rounds at which the game was played and both players' ranks, is more ambiguous. Our interpretation of the obtained results is presented in the paper. Network analytic methods were applied to extract players with the most retired matches in their careers. Eventually, we defined a group of top tennis players and gave a more precise insight into retired matches in that group. Correspondence analysis was used to visually display the two-mode network of top players and the proportion of retired matches by surface type. Key pointsThe proportion of retired matches among professional tennis players has been increasing recently.Clay and hard courts are the most risky surfaces in relation to retired matches, particularly if the match is played at an outdoor venue.The difference in rankings of both players is proportional to the number/proportion of retired matches in professional tennis.Network analytic techniques could serve as an effective method to ascertain (a) group(s) of tennis players with the highest number of retired matches played among them. PMID:24149200

  7. Mythbusters: The Case for Retirement Income in DC Plans.

    PubMed

    Austin, Ron; Shepherd, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Myths persist about retirement income solutions in defined contribution (DC) plans. The authors put six common myths to the test: (1) that few plans offer a retirement income option, (2) that retirement is solely a product decision, (3) that retirement income options lack fiduciary clarity, (4) that it's difficult to implement a retirement income option, (5) that retirement income options can be viewed similarly to an asset class and (6) that retirement solutions are too difficult to communicate to participants. They explain why some chatter on the topic of retirement income solutions in DC plans is unfounded. PMID:27017796

  8. Cost-effectiveness of assertive community treatment versus standard case management for persons with co-occurring severe mental illness and substance use disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, R E; Teague, G B; Ricketts, S K; Bush, P W; Xie, H; McGuire, T G; Drake, R E; McHugo, G J; Keller, A M; Zubkoff, M

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the cost-effectiveness of Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) in comparison to Standard Case Management (SCM) for persons with severe mental illness and substance use disorders. DATA SOURCES AND STUDY SETTING: Original data on the effectiveness and social costs of ACT and SCM that were collected between 1989 and 1995. Seven community mental health centers in New Hampshire provided both types of treatment. STUDY DESIGN: Persons with schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, or bipolar disorder and a concurrent substance use disorder were randomly assigned to ACT or SCM and followed for three years. The primary variables assessed were substance use, psychiatric symptoms, functioning, quality of life, and social costs. DATA COLLECTION METHODS: Effectiveness data were obtained from interviews at six-month intervals with persons enrolled in treatment and with their service providers. Social cost and service utilization data came from client reports; interviews with informal caregivers; provider information systems and Medicaid claims; law enforcement agencies; courts; and community service providers. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Participants in both groups showed significant reductions in substance use over time. Focusing on quality of life and substance use outcomes, ACT and SCM were not significantly different in cost-effectiveness over the entire three-year study period. Longitudinal analyses showed that SCM tended to be more efficient during the first two years but that ACT was significantly more efficient than SCM during the final year of the study. CONCLUSIONS: In an adequately funded system, ACT is not more cost-effective than SCM. However, ACT efficiency appears to improve over time. PMID:9865221

  9. An overview of the Railroad Retirement program.

    PubMed

    Whitman, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    In the 1930s, amidst concern about the ability of existing pension programs to provide former railroad workers with adequate assistance in old age, Congress established a national Railroad Retirement system. This system is primarily administered by the Railroad Retirement Board (RRB), which is an independent federal agency charged with providing benefits to eligible employees of the railroad industry and their families. Today, the Railroad Retirement program is closely tied to the far better-known Social Security program, and although the Railroad Retirement program and Social Security share a number of common elements, key differences also exist between the two in areas such as funding and benefit structure. This article aims to increase awareness and understanding of the Railroad Retirement program and its relationship with Social Security by examining the parallel development of these two retirement programs while illuminating areas where the two diverge. The history of the Railroad Retirement program, the benefits provided by the program, and RRB's financial operations are reviewed, using elements of the Social Security system as points of reference. PMID:19102137

  10. Are Your Employees Retirement-Ready?

    PubMed

    Vorchheiner, Alan H; Zaleta, Cynthia O

    2016-01-01

    Much of the discussion on the decumulation phase of retirement savings has focused on the lack of any lifetime annuities. But there is a whole range of options sponsors can employ to facilitate the generation of retirement income and bolster financial wellness. As U.S. employers show no sign of substantially increasing spending on compensation or benefits, it is imperative that human resources professionals help employees--particularly the retiring baby boomers--to maximize what they have saved. This article presents five first-step ideas toward achieving that goal. PMID:27017793

  11. Characterisation of the Bacterial and Fungal Communities Associated with Different Lesion Sizes of Dark Spot Syndrome Occurring in the Coral Stephanocoenia intersepta

    PubMed Central

    Sweet, Michael; Burn, Deborah; Croquer, Aldo; Leary, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The number and prevalence of coral diseases/syndromes are increasing worldwide. Dark Spot Syndrome (DSS) afflicts numerous coral species and is widespread throughout the Caribbean, yet there are no known causal agents. In this study we aimed to characterise the microbial communities (bacteria and fungi) associated with DSS lesions affecting the coral Stephanocoenia intersepta using nonculture molecular techniques. Bacterial diversity of healthy tissues (H), those in advance of the lesion interface (apparently healthy AH), and three sizes of disease lesions (small, medium, and large) varied significantly (ANOSIM R  = 0.052 p<0.001), apart from the medium and large lesions, which were similar in their community profile. Four bacteria fitted into the pattern expected from potential pathogens; namely absent from H, increasing in abundance within AH, and dominant in the lesions themselves. These included ribotypes related to Corynebacterium (KC190237), Acinetobacter (KC190251), Parvularculaceae (KC19027), and Oscillatoria (KC190271). Furthermore, two Vibrio species, a genus including many proposed coral pathogens, dominated the disease lesion and were absent from H and AH tissues, making them candidates as potential pathogens for DSS. In contrast, other members of bacteria from the same genus, such as V. harveyii were present throughout all sample types, supporting previous studies where potential coral pathogens exist in healthy tissues. Fungal diversity varied significantly as well, however the main difference between diseased and healthy tissues was the dominance of one ribotype, closely related to the plant pathogen, Rhytisma acerinum, a known causal agent of tar spot on tree leaves. As the corals’ symbiotic algae have been shown to turn to a darker pigmented state in DSS (giving rise to the syndromes name), the two most likely pathogens are R. acerinum and the bacterium Oscillatoria, which has been identified as the causal agent of the colouration in Black

  12. Retirement of J. Gary Eden as Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagadish, Chennupati; Jelinkova, Helena; Fainman, Yeshaiahu; Dawson, Martin; Ermers, Ysabel

    2016-01-01

    After nine years of dedicated service as Editor-in-Chief of Progress in Quantum Electronics (PQE), J. Gary Eden has retired at the end of December 2015. During his term as the Editor-in-Chief, PQE has grown significantly in size and quality and he has given generously of his time in advising authors, referees, editors, and the journal staff. Gary is an exceptional scientist and a generous individual who has given so much to the community. He is always very positive in every situation, and has created positive environment and supported people with utmost enthusiasm.

  13. Work and Nonwork Predictors of Employees' Retirement Ages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beehr, Terry A.; Glazer, Sharon; Nielson, Norma L.; Farmer, Suzanne J.

    2000-01-01

    Three analyses of data from 197 older employees and their spouses identified work and nonwork factors influencing age of retirement. Finances predicted retirement but health and gender did not. Being tired of working and expecting to work for pay after retirement predicted earlier retirement. (SK)

  14. Attitudes toward Retirement and Preretirement Education Among Nigerian Bank Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogunbameru, Olakunle; Bamiwuye, Sina

    2004-01-01

    Retirement is viewed as a passage that can result in psychological, physiological, and economic problems among some retirees. Adequate preparation for retirement through preretirement education, as practiced in the Western-European societies, has been found to ease transition into retirement and adjustment in retirement. Preretirement education is…

  15. Attitudes toward Retirement and Preretirement Education among Nigerian Bank Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogunbameru, Olakunle A.; Bamiwuye, Sina

    2004-01-01

    Retirement is viewed as a passage that can result in psychological, physiological, and economic problems among some retirees. Adequate preparation for retirement through preretirement education, as practiced in the Western-European societies, has been found to ease transition into retirement and adjustment in retirement. Preretirement education is…

  16. 5 CFR 831.1207 - Withdrawal of disability retirement applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Withdrawal of disability retirement...) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT Disability Retirement § 831.1207 Withdrawal of disability retirement applications. (a) OPM will honor, without question, an applicant's request to...

  17. 5 CFR 831.1204 - Filing disability retirement applications: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Filing disability retirement applications...) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT Disability Retirement § 831.1204 Filing disability... application for disability retirement is timely only if it is filed with the employing agency before...

  18. 5 CFR 831.1204 - Filing disability retirement applications: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Filing disability retirement applications...) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT Disability Retirement § 831.1204 Filing disability... application for disability retirement is timely only if it is filed with the employing agency before...

  19. 5 CFR 831.1207 - Withdrawal of disability retirement applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Withdrawal of disability retirement...) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT Disability Retirement § 831.1207 Withdrawal of disability retirement applications. (a) OPM will honor, without question, an applicant's request to...

  20. 5 CFR 831.1207 - Withdrawal of disability retirement applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Withdrawal of disability retirement...) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT Disability Retirement § 831.1207 Withdrawal of disability retirement applications. (a) OPM will honor, without question, an applicant's request to...

  1. 5 CFR 831.1204 - Filing disability retirement applications: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Filing disability retirement applications...) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT Disability Retirement § 831.1204 Filing disability... application for disability retirement is timely only if it is filed with the employing agency before...

  2. 5 CFR 831.1204 - Filing disability retirement applications: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Filing disability retirement applications...) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT Disability Retirement § 831.1204 Filing disability... application for disability retirement is timely only if it is filed with the employing agency before...

  3. 5 CFR 831.1207 - Withdrawal of disability retirement applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Withdrawal of disability retirement...) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT Disability Retirement § 831.1207 Withdrawal of disability retirement applications. (a) OPM will honor, without question, an applicant's request to...

  4. A Three-Phase Model of Retirement Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Daniel C.; Beehr, Terry A.

    2011-01-01

    The present article organizes prominent theories about retirement decision making around three different types of thinking about retirement: imagining the possibility of retirement, assessing when it is time to let go of long-held jobs, and putting concrete plans for retirement into action at present. It also highlights important directions for…

  5. 20 CFR 221.2 - Railroad Retirement Board jurisdiction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Railroad Retirement Board jurisdiction. 221.2 Section 221.2 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT JURISDICTION DETERMINATIONS § 221.2 Railroad Retirement Board jurisdiction. (a) Life cases. The Board...

  6. 20 CFR 221.2 - Railroad Retirement Board jurisdiction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Railroad Retirement Board jurisdiction. 221.2 Section 221.2 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT JURISDICTION DETERMINATIONS § 221.2 Railroad Retirement Board jurisdiction. (a) Life cases. The Board...

  7. 20 CFR 221.2 - Railroad Retirement Board jurisdiction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2014-04-01 2012-04-01 true Railroad Retirement Board jurisdiction. 221.2 Section 221.2 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT JURISDICTION DETERMINATIONS § 221.2 Railroad Retirement Board jurisdiction. (a) Life cases. The Board...

  8. 20 CFR 221.2 - Railroad Retirement Board jurisdiction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Railroad Retirement Board jurisdiction. 221.2 Section 221.2 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT JURISDICTION DETERMINATIONS § 221.2 Railroad Retirement Board jurisdiction. (a) Life cases. The Board...

  9. 20 CFR 221.2 - Railroad Retirement Board jurisdiction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Railroad Retirement Board jurisdiction. 221.2 Section 221.2 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT JURISDICTION DETERMINATIONS § 221.2 Railroad Retirement Board jurisdiction. (a) Life cases. The Board...

  10. Psychological Perspectives on the Changing Nature of Retirement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shultz, Kenneth S.; Wang, Mo

    2011-01-01

    The concept and the process of retirement are rapidly evolving. As a result, psychologists are in a unique position to understand and explain the dynamics behind the changing face of retirement. We begin this article with a brief overview of the history of retirement and then note the various definitions used when studying retirement. We then…

  11. 5 CFR 838.911 - Identifying the retirement system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Former Spouse Survivor Annuities Identification of Benefits § 838.911 Identifying the retirement system... military retired pay, Foreign Service retirement benefits and Central Intelligence Agency retirement.... Such a court order satisfies the requirements of § 838.804(b)(1). (c) A court order affecting...

  12. 5 CFR 838.911 - Identifying the retirement system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Former Spouse Survivor Annuities Identification of Benefits § 838.911 Identifying the retirement system... military retired pay, Foreign Service retirement benefits and Central Intelligence Agency retirement.... Such a court order satisfies the requirements of § 838.804(b)(1). (c) A court order affecting...

  13. 5 CFR 838.911 - Identifying the retirement system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Former Spouse Survivor Annuities Identification of Benefits § 838.911 Identifying the retirement system... military retired pay, Foreign Service retirement benefits and Central Intelligence Agency retirement.... Such a court order satisfies the requirements of § 838.804(b)(1). (c) A court order affecting...

  14. 5 CFR 838.911 - Identifying the retirement system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Former Spouse Survivor Annuities Identification of Benefits § 838.911 Identifying the retirement system... military retired pay, Foreign Service retirement benefits and Central Intelligence Agency retirement.... Such a court order satisfies the requirements of § 838.804(b)(1). (c) A court order affecting...

  15. 5 CFR 831.1204 - Filing disability retirement applications: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Filing disability retirement applications...) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT Disability Retirement § 831.1204 Filing disability... application for disability retirement is timely only if it is filed with the employing agency before...

  16. 5 CFR 831.1207 - Withdrawal of disability retirement applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Withdrawal of disability retirement...) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT Disability Retirement § 831.1207 Withdrawal of disability retirement applications. (a) OPM will honor, without question, an applicant's request to...

  17. CHALLENGES POSED BY RETIRED RUSSIAN NUCLEAR SUBMARINES

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolph, Dieter; Kroken, Ingjerd; Latyshev, Eduard; Griffith, Andrew

    2003-02-27

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the challenges posed by retired Russian nuclear submarines, review current U.S. and International efforts and provide an assessment of the success of these efforts.

  18. Senior academic physicians and retirement considerations.

    PubMed

    Moss, Arthur J; Greenberg, Henry; Dwyer, Edward M; Klein, Helmut; Ryan, Daniel; Francis, Charles; Marcus, Frank; Eberly, Shirley; Benhorin, Jesaia; Bodenheimer, Monty; Brown, Mary; Case, Robert; Gillespie, John; Goldstein, Robert; Haigney, Mark; Krone, Ronald; Lichstein, Edgar; Locati, Emanuela; Oakes, David; Thomsen, Poul Erik Bloch; Zareba, Wojciech

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of academic senior physicians are approaching their potential retirement in good health with accumulated clinical and research experience that can be a valuable asset to an academic institution. Considering the need to let the next generation ascend to leadership roles, when and how should a medical career be brought to a close? We explore the roles for academic medical faculty as they move into their senior years and approach various retirement options. The individual and institutional considerations require a frank dialogue among the interested parties to optimize the benefits while minimizing the risks for both. In the United States there is no fixed age for retirement as there is in Europe, but European physicians are initiating changes. What is certain is that careful planning, innovative thinking, and the incorporation of new patterns of medical practice are all part of this complex transition and timing of senior academic physicians into retirement. PMID:23621971

  19. An Argument for Early Retirement Incentive Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baenen, Leonard B.; Ernest, Robert C.

    1982-01-01

    Early retirement incentive programs are discussed as a humanitarian way of reducing payroll costs and rewarding long-tenured employees. The incentives to be considered, program communication, and problems found in incentive programs are addressed. (Author/MLF)

  20. Advice from working women with retired partners.

    PubMed

    Cooley, Eileen L; Adorno, Gail

    2016-01-01

    in the 21st century, as more women are employed full-time and couples increasingly share egalitarian values, more women continue employment after their partners have voluntarily retired. However, we know very little about the experiences of this growing population of women. We asked working women with retired partners to share their advice for other women who may face this developmental transition. Open-ended responses from 97 women were analyzed to identify pertinent issues and themes. Four primary content areas were identified: time management, division of household labor, financial planning, and communication. Communication between partners was both a topic of concern as well as the solution suggested to resolve conflicts or differences that may arise when women live with a retired partner. It is expected that future changes in the workforce and improvements in the gender balance within relationships will continue to impact experiences for working women with retired partners. PMID:26933760

  1. Retirement Can Be Golden for Your Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... machine: "I am out enjoying my retirement." Rachel Johnson is a professor of nutrition at the University ... to spend time being more physically active," said Johnson, who is also chair of the American Heart ...

  2. Preparation à la retraite - Preparing for retirement

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    Retirement implies an important change from a working environment to a new lifestyle. Every individual copes with this transition in his own way. In this video, registered already a few years ago, Dr. Sartorius from WHO addresses some of his colleagues close to retirement and explains what situations they can expect to encounter. We make this video available to CERN personnel to stimulate their own thinking on the subject.

  3. A randomized controlled trial of contingency management for psycho-stimulant use in community mental health outpatients with co-occurring serious mental illness

    PubMed Central

    McDonell, Michael G.; Srebnik, Debra; Angelo, Frank; McPherson, Sterling; Lowe, Jessica M.; Sugar, Andrea; Short, Robert A.; Roll, John M.; Ries, Richard K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The primary objective of this study was to determine if contingency management was associated with increased stimulant drug abstinence in community mental health outpatients with serious mental illness and stimulant dependence. Secondary objectives were to determine if contingency management was associated with reductions in use of other substances, psychiatric symptoms, HIV-risk behavior, and inpatient service utilization. Method A randomized controlled design compared outcomes of 176 outpatients with serious mental illness and stimulant dependence. Participants were randomized to three months of contingency management for stimulant abstinence plus treatment-as-usual or treatment-as-usual with reinforcement for study participation only. Urine drug tests, self-report, clinician-report, and service utilization outcomes were assessed during three-month treatment and three-month follow-up periods. Results While participants in the contingency management condition were less likely to complete the treatment period (n=38; 42%) than those assigned to the control condition (n=55; 65%), X2(1)=9.8, p=0.02; those assigned to the contingency management condition were 2.4 (CI=1.9-3.0) times more likely to submit a stimulant-negative urine test during treatment. Participants assigned to contingency management experienced significantly lower levels of alcohol use, injection drug use, psychiatric symptoms, and were five times less likely than those assigned to the control condition to be admitted for psychiatric hospitalization, X2(1)=5.4, p=0.02. Contingency management participants reported significantly fewer days of stimulant drug use, relative to controls during the three-month follow-up. Conclusions When added to treatment-as-usual, contingency management is associated with large reductions in stimulant, injection drug, and alcohol use. Reductions in psychiatric symptoms and hospitalizations were important secondary benefits. PMID:23138961

  4. Retirement Plan Participation in an Era of Change: The Case of a Rural Region

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitaker, Elizabeth A.; Bokemeier, Janet L.; Loveridge, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Individual savings are critical for retirement as government and employer-based provisions fade or become less secure. Rural communities are vulnerable given their higher proportion of elderly and more who rely on Social Security. Using a telephone survey of working-age residents in Michigan's rural Upper Peninsula, this research investigates…

  5. INDIVIDUAL PARTICLE ANALYSIS OF INDOOR, OUTDOOR, AND PERSONAL SAMPLES FROM THE 1998 BALTIMORE RETIREMENT HOME STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Particle sampling was conducted outdoors, indoors, in apartment residences, and on individual residents (i.e., personal samples) at a retirement center in the Towson area of northern Baltimore County. Concurrent particle sampling was conducted at a central community site closer...

  6. Focusing on Nutrition, Housing and Health Care: Retirement. High School Teaching Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuecher, Ron; Myers, John

    These teaching units, designed for use at the high school level, focus on nutrition, housing, health care, and retirement. The purpose of the unit on nutrition, housing, and health care is to provide an inquiry approach by which the student may become more aware of certain problems of the aged members of the community. The student, upon completion…

  7. Retirement plans, personal saving, and saving adequacy.

    PubMed

    Yakoboski, P

    2000-03-01

    This Issue Brief addresses three questions raised by recent trends in personal saving: How are national savings measured and what is the meaning of the trends in measured personal saving rates, given what is included and what is not included in those measures? What is the effect of retirement saving programs--in particular, 401(k) plans and individual retirement accounts (IRAs)--on personal saving levels? What are the implications of existing saving behavior for the retirement income security of today's workers? The National Income and Product Accounts (NIPA), the most commonly referenced gauge of personal saving, is a widely misunderstood measure. One could argue that a complete measure of saving would include increases in wealth through capital gains, but NIPA does not factor accrued and realized capital gains on stocks and other assets into the saving rate. By one measure, accounting for capital gains results in an aggregate personal saving rate of 33 percent--more than double the rate of four decades ago. A major policy question is the impact of tax-qualified retirement saving plans (i.e., IRAs and 401(k) plans) on personal saving rates. Empirical analysis of this issue is extremely challenging and findings have been contradictory. These programs now represent an enormous store of retirement-earmarked wealth in tax-deferred vehicles: Combined, such tax-deferred retirement accounts currently have assets of about $4 trillion. Ninety percent of IRA contributions are now the result of "rollovers" as employees leave employer plans, like 401(k) plans. While leakage from the system remains a challenge, the majority of the assets in the system can be expected to be available to fund workers' retirements. One could argue that, from a retirement income security perspective, workers in general are better off because IRA and 401(k) programs exist. Surely, many of the dollars in these programs would have been saved even without the programs; but they would not necessarily

  8. Pre-Retirement Rehearsal Project: A Bibliography of Pre-Retirement Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellenberg, Donna

    This bibliography cites title, source/publisher, availability, and cost for information and materials on various aspects of pre-retirement planning. Materials may be specifically for the elderly/retired person or of general interest. Bibliographies and periodicals are included. These materials and information are listed under twenty-three…

  9. Is pre-retirement planning always good? An exploratory study of retirement adjustment among Hong Kong Chinese retirees.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Dannii Y

    2013-01-01

    The impacts of four types of pre-retirement planning activities (financial, health, social life, and psychological planning) on retirement adjustment were investigated in a sample of Chinese retirees residing in Hong Kong. This study consisted of two phases of data collection, pre-retirement and post-retirement phases. Pre-retirement planning behaviors and psychological health (including attitudes toward retirement, adjustment to retirement, anxiety toward retirement, psychological well-being (PWB), and psychological distress) six months before and after retirement were measured. The final sample consisted of 90 Hong Kong Chinese retirees. Compared with the pre-retirement phase, retirees exhibited more positive attitudes toward retirement and better adjustment after they had actually retired, whereas their level of anxiety and psychological distress remained low over time. Pre-retirement planning was found to be predictive of changes in psychological health, though its impact was not always positive depending on the type of planning activities. In particular, greater psychological planning was associated with positive attitudes toward retirement and better PWB, whereas more social life planning activities were associated with greater psychological distress. In addition to financial and health planning, psychological planning activities should also be prompted to facilitate a smooth adjustment to retirement. PMID:23072256

  10. Tax reform options: promoting retirement security.

    PubMed

    VanDerhei, Jack

    2011-11-01

    TAX PROPOSALS: Currently, the combination of worker and employer contributions in a defined contribution plan is capped by the federal tax code at the lesser of $49,000 per year or 100 percent of a worker's compensation (participants over age 50 can make additional "catch-up" contributions). As part of the effort to lower the federal deficit and reduce federal "tax expenditures," two major reform proposals have surfaced that would change current tax policy toward retirement savings: A plan that would end the existing tax deductions for 401(k) contributions and replace them with a flat-rate refundable credit that serves as a matching contribution into a retirement savings account. The so-called "20/20 cap," included by the National Commission on Fiscal Responsibility and Reform in their December 2010 report, "The Moment of Truth," which would limit the sum of employer and worker annual contributions to the lower of $20,000 or 20 percent of income, the so-called "20/20 cap." IMPACT OF PERMANENTLY MODIFYING THE EXCLUSION OF EMPLOYEE CONTRIBUTIONS FOR RETIREMENT SAVINGS PLANS FROM TAXABLE INCOME: If the current exclusion of worker contributions for retirement savings plans were ended in 2012 and the total match remains constant, the average reductions in 401(k) accounts at Social Security normal retirement age would range from a low of 11.2 percent for workers currently ages 26-35 in the highest-income groups, to a high of 24.2 percent for workers in that age range in the lowest-income group. IMPACT OF "20/20 CAP": Earlier EBRI analysis of enacting the 20/20 cap starting in 2012 showed it would, as expected, most affect those with high income. However, EBRI also found the cap would cause a significant reduction in retirement savings by the lowest-income workers as well, and younger cohorts would experience larger reductions given their increased exposure to the proposal. IMPORTANCE OF EMPLOYER-SPONSORED RETIREMENT PLANS AND AUTO-ENROLLMENT: A key factor in future

  11. The 2012 Retirement Confidence Survey: job insecurity, debt weigh on retirement confidence, savings.

    PubMed

    Helman, Ruth; Copeland, Craig; VanDerhei, Jack

    2012-03-01

    Americans' confidence in their ability to retire comfortably is stagnant at historically low levels. Just 14 percent are very confident they will have enough money to live comfortably in retirement (statistically equivalent to the low of 13 percent measured in 2011 and 2009). Employment insecurity looms large: Forty-two percent identify job uncertainty as the most pressing financial issue facing most Americans today. Worker confidence about having enough money to pay for medical expenses and long-term care expenses in retirement remains well below their confidence levels for paying basic expenses. Many workers report they have virtually no savings and investments. In total, 60 percent of workers report that the total value of their household's savings and investments, excluding the value of their primary home and any defined benefit plans, is less than $25,000. Twenty-five percent of workers in the 2012 Retirement Confidence Survey say the age at which they expect to retire has changed in the past year. In 1991, 11 percent of workers said they expected to retire after age 65, and by 2012 that has grown to 37 percent. Regardless of those retirement age expectations, and consistent with prior RCS findings, half of current retirees surveyed say they left the work force unexpectedly due to health problems, disability, or changes at their employer, such as downsizing or closure. Those already in retirement tend to express higher levels of confidence than current workers about several key financial aspects of retirement. Retirees report they are significantly more reliant on Social Security as a major source of their retirement income than current workers expect to be. Although 56 percent of workers expect to receive benefits from a defined benefit plan in retirement, only 33 percent report that they and/or their spouse currently have such a benefit with a current or previous employer. More than half of workers (56 percent) report they and/or their spouse have not tried

  12. Retirement plan funding: how has legislation affected it?

    PubMed

    Smith, D

    1988-10-01

    Because of the changes in tax laws, accounting guidelines, and economic conditions, the "shelf life" of many retirement plans has expired. Financial managers need to examine the effects these changes have had on retirement plan funding, especially the effects the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1987 has produced. By using an evaluation method that examines the basic issues involved in retirement plan funding, financial managers can determine whether or not their retirement programs can continue to meet hospital objectives. This is the last article in a series on retirement plans. The first article in this series discussed the issues that affect the design of retirement plans. PMID:10302737

  13. Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Coronary Atherosclerosis in Retired National Football League Players

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Alice Y.; FitzGerald, Shannon J.; Cannaday, John; Zhang, Song; Patel, Amit; Palmer, M. Dean; Reddy, Gautham P.; Ordovas, Karen G.; Stillman, Arthur E; Janowitz, Warren; Radford, Nina B.; Roberts, Arthur J.; Levine, Benjamin D.

    2013-01-01

    A high prevalence of obesity exists among National Football League (NFL) players as determined by body mass index (BMI). It is not established whether elevated BMI is associated with a greater prevalence of CV risk factors or coronary atherosclerosis in former NFL players as in non-athletes. This study compared cardiovascular (CV) risk factors and coronary atherosclerosis among retired NFL players and two groups of community controls, the population-based Dallas Heart Study and the preventive medicine cohort, the Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study. Retired NFL players (n=201) were matched for ethnicity, age and BMI (Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study, age only). CV risk factors were assessed by survey and screening visit. Coronary atherosclerosis was measured by computed tomography as coronary artery calcium (CAC). Compared to population-based controls, retired NFL players had a significantly lower prevalence of diabetes, hypertension, sedentary lifestyle and the metabolic syndrome, yet a higher prevalence of impaired fasting glucose and hyperlipidemia. However, there was no significant difference in the prevalence of detectable CAC (46 v 48.3%, p=0.69) or distribution of CAC (0-10, 10-100, 100-400, 400+, p=0.11). Comparing retired NFL players to the physically active preventive medicine controls, there was no difference in the amount of CAC. Among retired NFL players, age and hyperlipidemia, not body size, were the most significant predictors of CAC. In conclusion, despite their large body size, retired NFL players do not have a greater prevalence of CV risk factors or amount of CAC than community controls. PMID:19733715

  14. Early Retirement Incentives and Student Achievement

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Maria D.

    2014-01-01

    Early retirement incentives (ERIs) are increasingly prevalent in education as districts seek to close budget gaps by replacing expensive experienced teachers with lower-cost newer teachers. Combined with the aging of the teacher workforce, these ERIs are likely to change the composition of teachers dramatically in the coming years. We use exogenous variation from an ERI program in Illinois in the mid-1990s to provide the first evidence in the literature of the effects of large-scale teacher retirements on student achievement. We find the program did not reduce test scores; likely, it increased them, with positive effects most pronounced in lower-SES schools. PMID:25436038

  15. Respiratory impairment and symptoms as predictors of early retirement with disability in US underground coal miners

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, R.G.; Trent, R.B.

    1984-08-01

    A five-year prospective study of 1,394 United States underground coal miners was undertaken to study the effects of respiratory impairment on the rate of early retirement with disability (ERD). Using a logistic regression analysis, ERD was found to be related to reported persistent phlegm after adjustment was made for other respiratory symptoms, respiratory function measurements, cigarette smoking, and some demographic characteristics. No prediction of ERD occurred for spirometrically determined measures of respiratory function. The data thus give limited support to the hypothesis that early retirement with disability in underground coal miners can be predicted prospectively by measures of respiratory symptoms.

  16. Career and Retirement Theories: Relevance for Older Workers Across Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Lytle, Megan C.; Foley, Pamela F.; Cotter, Elizabeth W.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews selected career development theories as well as theories specifically focused on retirement, with an emphasis on their application to retirement decisions and vocational behavior in multicultural populations. Theories are evaluated based on whether: (a) retirement was considered a stage of working life, (b) work satisfaction, motivation, and other work variables at retirement age were addressed, (c) work choices at retirement age were included, and (d) cultural and other minority status issues were either directly considered in the work/retirement decision or if the model could be reasonably applied to retirement across cultures. We provide specific recommendations for research and practice with the aim of helping practitioners and scholars conceptualize the current concerns older adults face in their working lives and during retirement planning. PMID:26101455

  17. Images of Retirement: Finding the Purpose and the Passion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savishinsky, Joel

    2001-01-01

    Compares cultural stereotypes and images of retirement with the life choices of actual adults. Finds that centrality of purpose and a sense of passion are basic to these adults' image of life in retirement. (SK)

  18. Mandatory Retirement at 70: Separating Substance from Politics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pati, Gopal C.; Jacobs, Randall C.

    1979-01-01

    Examines the conflict over mandatory retirement and the implications the Mandatory Retirement Act will have for personnel directors who will need to formulate new decision rules for the treatment and handling of older workers. (IRT)

  19. Cohort profile: the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yaohui; Hu, Yisong; Smith, James P; Strauss, John; Yang, Gonghuan

    2014-02-01

    The China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS) is a nationally representative longitudinal survey of persons in China 45 years of age or older and their spouses, including assessments of social, economic, and health circumstances of community-residents. CHARLS examines health and economic adjustments to rapid ageing of the population in China. The national baseline survey for the study was conducted between June 2011 and March 2012 and involved 17 708 respondents. CHARLS respondents are followed every 2 years, using a face-to-face computer-assisted personal interview (CAPI). Physical measurements are made at every 2-year follow-up, and blood sample collection is done once in every two follow-up periods. A pilot survey for CHARLS was conducted in two provinces of China in 2008, on 2685 individuals, who were resurveyed in 2012. To ensure the adoption of best practices and international comparability of results, CHARLS was harmonized with leading international research studies in the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) model. Requests for collaborations should be directed to Dr Yaohui Zhao (yhzhao@nsd.edu.cn). All data in CHARLS are maintained at the National School of Development of Peking University and will be accessible to researchers around the world at the study website. The 2008 pilot data for CHARLS are available at: http://charls.ccer.edu.cn/charls/. National baseline data for the study are expected to be released in January 2013. PMID:23243115

  20. Cohort Profile: The China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS)

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yaohui; Hu, Yisong; Smith, James P; Strauss, John; Yang, Gonghuan

    2014-01-01

    The China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS) is a nationally representative longitudinal survey of persons in China 45 years of age or older and their spouses, including assessments of social, economic, and health circumstances of community-residents. CHARLS examines health and economic adjustments to rapid ageing of the population in China. The national baseline survey for the study was conducted between June 2011 and March 2012 and involved 17 708 respondents. CHARLS respondents are followed every 2 years, using a face-to-face computer-assisted personal interview (CAPI). Physical measurements are made at every 2-year follow-up, and blood sample collection is done once in every two follow-up periods. A pilot survey for CHARLS was conducted in two provinces of China in 2008, on 2685 individuals, who were resurveyed in 2012. To ensure the adoption of best practices and international comparability of results, CHARLS was harmonized with leading international research studies in the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) model. Requests for collaborations should be directed to Dr Yaohui Zhao (yhzhao@nsd.edu.cn). All data in CHARLS are maintained at the National School of Development of Peking University and will be accessible to researchers around the world at the study website. The 2008 pilot data for CHARLS are available at: http://charls.ccer.edu.cn/charls/. National baseline data for the study are expected to be released in January 2013. PMID:23243115

  1. Employment, Retirement, and Morale Among Older Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaslow, Philip

    1976-01-01

    This study constitutes an effort to apply to females the role-theoretical orientation to work and retirement in old age which has often been applied to men. Cross-sectional data are used to test the hypothesis that older working women have better morale than those not working. Results are discussed. (Author)

  2. Post Retirement: Is There Life after Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb-Lupo, Anita

    1992-01-01

    Issues concerning college faculty/staff retirement and coping with changes in lifestyle are discussed, including financial planning, psychological adjustment, relocating vs. maintaining current housing, planning for travel, health care, health and life insurance needs, maintenance of an acceptable standard of living, protecting resources against…

  3. [Adapting physical activities for an active retirement].

    PubMed

    Renaudie, François

    2016-01-01

    The benefits of doing adapted physical exercise for elderly people have been proven. For more than thirty years, the French Federation for an Active Retirement has been striving to help people age well by proposing multiple activities to remain in good health after the age of 50. Doctors, activity leaders and federal instructors are attentive to each individual's capacities. PMID:27449307

  4. Occupational influences on retirement, disability, and death.

    PubMed

    Hayward, M D; Grady, W R; Hardy, M A; Sommers, D

    1989-08-01

    This research examines the alternative mechanisms by which occupations influence the nature and timing of older men's labor force withdrawal. We specifically assess the extent to which occupational factors operate directly and indirectly on exiting events and whether occupations constrain traditional determinants of labor force participation. Based on a discrete-time hazard modeling approach, the results substantiate that the occupational task activities--substantive complexity and physical demands--are key elements of the work environment that are evaluated against nonwork alternatives. In the case of retirement, these aspects of occupational attractiveness function as a dominant and direct force in retirement decision making. With regard to disability, the occupational attribute of substantive complexity operates as an indirect advantage (through higher wages) by reducing the risk of disability. Indicators of career continuity also influence retirement among older workers. Finally, the results suggest that financial characteristics and health problems are central to the distribution of older workers across the alternative destination statuses of retirement, disability, and death. PMID:2529146

  5. Retirement Age Declines Again in 1990s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gendell, Murray

    2001-01-01

    The average retirement age continued to decline in the 1990s after having leveled off during the preceding 10-15 years. The resumption of the decline is attributed largely to a rise in the labor force participation rate of older men and women between the mid-1980s and 2000. (Author/JOW)

  6. Wisdom in a Learning in Retirement Institute

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farquhar, Lynn

    2010-01-01

    Seven men and women with an average age of 77 were interviewed regarding the role of wisdom in their experience of attending a Learning in Retirement Institute (LRI) in southern Ontario, Canada. A finding is that for wisdom gains to be an outcome of LRI education, older adult students need outward expression of their acquired learnings. A…

  7. 76 FR 4244 - Hybrid Retirement Plans

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 RIN 1545-BG36 Hybrid Retirement Plans Correction In rule document 2010-25941 beginning on page 64123 in the issue of Tuesday, October 19, 2010, make the...

  8. 75 FR 81456 - Hybrid Retirement Plans; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-28

    ... were published in the Federal Register on Tuesday, October 19, 2010 (75 FR 64123) providing guidance relating to certain provisions of the Internal Revenue Code that apply to hybrid defined benefit pension... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 RIN 1545-BG36 Hybrid Retirement Plans; Correction AGENCY:...

  9. 77 FR 66149 - Retirement of FASTforward Technology

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-02

    ... proposed rule in the Federal Register (77 FR 53830) to retire FASTforward technology. We received no formal... FASTforward Technology AGENCY: Postal Service TM . ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Postal Service will revise... terminate the use of FASTforward TM technology as a Move Update option for commercial First-Class...

  10. The Cornell Staff Retirement Incentive Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whelan, Kenneth T.; Ehrenberg, Ronald G.; Hallock, Kevin F.; Seeber, Ronald L.

    2011-01-01

    We evaluate potential determinants of enrollment in an early retirement incentive program for non-tenure-track employees at a large university. Using administrative records on the eligible, population of employees not covered by collective bargaining agreements, historical employee count and layoff data by budget units, and public information on…