Science.gov

Sample records for ocean freshwater export

  1. Modeling the variability of the liquid freshwater export from the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahn, Alexandra

    In this thesis an analysis of the variability of the liquid freshwater (FW) export from the Arctic Ocean on annual and seasonal timescales is presented. Due to missing long-term observations, the variability of the liquid FW export is not well known or understood. Model simulations are therefore currently the only way to study the variability of the FW export from the Arctic. To investigate the role of the atmospheric forcing for the variability of the liquid FW export, a model simulation for 1950--2007 from the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model (UVic ESCM) is analyzed. It is shown that large-scale atmospheric circulation changes generally control the variability of the FWexport through changes in the FW storage in the Beaufort Gyre. These changes have a large influence on the variability of the FW export through the Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA), whereas the Fram Strait FW export is also influenced by changes in the FW storage in the Eurasian basin. In order to better understand the differences between the mechanisms driving the export variability through Fram Strait and the CAA, passive dye tracers are added to the ocean module of a state-of-the-art global general circulation model, the Community Climate System Model Version 3 (CCSM3). These tracers allow the identification of FW from different sources, and therefore the individual investigation of the export variability of FW from individual sources. It is shown that the Fram Strait FW export is made up mainly of Eurasian runoff and Pacific FW, whereas the FW exported through the CAA comes primarily from Pacific FW and North American runoff. The variability of the FW exports from individual sources is largely in phase in the CAA, as the CAA FW export is mainly driven by velocity anomalies, not FW concentration anomalies. In Fram Strait on the other hand, FW concentration anomalies contribute as much to the FW export variability as velocity anomalies. The variability of the Fram Strait FW concentrations from the two main FW sources is not in phase, as Pacific FW and Eurasian runoff have different pathways to Fram Strait and their variability is governed by different mechanisms. Whereas the Eurasian runoff export depends strongly on the release of FW from the Eurasian shelf during years with an anticyclonic circulation anomaly (negative Vorticity index), the variability of the Pacific export is mainly controlled by changes in the Pacific FW stored in the Beaufort Gyre, with increased export during years with a cyclonic circulation anomaly (positive Vorticity index). A high vertical resolution of the ocean model is found to be important to resolve the role of FW concentration changes for the Fram Strait FW export variability. The model simulation also shows that in contrast to the interannual variability, the seasonal variability of the Fram Strait FW export is driven almost entirely by the seasonal cycle of sea-ice melt, with a smaller influence of velocity changes or advected FW concentration changes. The disappearance of the summer sea-ice cover in the Arctic during the 21st century might therefore affect the seasonal cycle of the Fram Strait FW export.

  2. Freshwater and its role in the Arctic Marine System: Sources, disposition, storage, export, and physical and biogeochemical consequences in the Arctic and global oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmack, E. C.; Yamamoto-Kawai, M.; Haine, T. W. N.; Bacon, S.; Bluhm, B. A.; Lique, C.; Melling, H.; Polyakov, I. V.; Straneo, F.; Timmermans, M.-L.; Williams, W. J.

    2016-03-01

    The Arctic Ocean is a fundamental node in the global hydrological cycle and the ocean's thermohaline circulation. We here assess the system's key functions and processes: (1) the delivery of fresh and low-salinity waters to the Arctic Ocean by river inflow, net precipitation, distillation during the freeze/thaw cycle, and Pacific Ocean inflows; (2) the disposition (e.g., sources, pathways, and storage) of freshwater components within the Arctic Ocean; and (3) the release and export of freshwater components into the bordering convective domains of the North Atlantic. We then examine physical, chemical, or biological processes which are influenced or constrained by the local quantities and geochemical qualities of freshwater; these include stratification and vertical mixing, ocean heat flux, nutrient supply, primary production, ocean acidification, and biogeochemical cycling. Internal to the Arctic the joint effects of sea ice decline and hydrological cycle intensification have strengthened coupling between the ocean and the atmosphere (e.g., wind and ice drift stresses, solar radiation, and heat and moisture exchange), the bordering drainage basins (e.g., river discharge, sediment transport, and erosion), and terrestrial ecosystems (e.g., Arctic greening, dissolved and particulate carbon loading, and altered phenology of biotic components). External to the Arctic freshwater export acts as both a constraint to and a necessary ingredient for deep convection in the bordering subarctic gyres and thus affects the global thermohaline circulation. Geochemical fingerprints attained within the Arctic Ocean are likewise exported into the neighboring subarctic systems and beyond. Finally, we discuss observed and modeled functions and changes in this system on seasonal, annual, and decadal time scales and discuss mechanisms that link the marine system to atmospheric, terrestrial, and cryospheric systems.

  3. Arctic freshwater export: Status, mechanisms, and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haine, Thomas W. N.; Curry, Beth; Gerdes, Rüdiger; Hansen, Edmond; Karcher, Michael; Lee, Craig; Rudels, Bert; Spreen, Gunnar; de Steur, Laura; Stewart, Kial D.; Woodgate, Rebecca

    2015-02-01

    Large freshwater anomalies clearly exist in the Arctic Ocean. For example, liquid freshwater has accumulated in the Beaufort Gyre in the decade of the 2000s compared to 1980-2000, with an extra ≈ 5000 km3 - about 25% - being stored. The sources of freshwater to the Arctic from precipitation and runoff have increased between these periods (most of the evidence comes from models). Despite flux increases from 2001 to 2011, it is uncertain if the marine freshwater source through Bering Strait for the 2000s has changed, as observations in the 1980s and 1990s are incomplete. The marine freshwater fluxes draining the Arctic through Fram and Davis straits are also insignificantly different. In this way, the balance of sources and sinks of freshwater to the Arctic, Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA), and Baffin Bay shifted to about 1200 ± 730 km3 yr- 1 freshening the region, on average, during the 2000s. The observed accumulation of liquid freshwater is consistent with this increased supply and the loss of freshwater from sea ice. Coupled climate models project continued freshening of the Arctic during the 21st century, with a total gain of about 50,000 km3 for the Arctic, CAA, and Baffin Bay (an increase of about 50%) by 2100. Understanding of the mechanisms controlling freshwater emphasizes the importance of Arctic surface winds, in addition to the sources of freshwater. The wind can modify the storage, release, and pathways of freshwater on timescales of O(1-10) months. Discharges of excess freshwater through Fram or Davis straits appear possible, triggered by changes in the wind, but are hard to predict. Continued measurement of the fluxes and storage of freshwater is needed to observe changes such as these.

  4. Changing Arctic Ocean freshwater pathways.

    PubMed

    Morison, James; Kwok, Ron; Peralta-Ferriz, Cecilia; Alkire, Matt; Rigor, Ignatius; Andersen, Roger; Steele, Mike

    2012-01-01

    Freshening in the Canada basin of the Arctic Ocean began in the 1990s and continued to at least the end of 2008. By then, the Arctic Ocean might have gained four times as much fresh water as comprised the Great Salinity Anomaly of the 1970s, raising the spectre of slowing global ocean circulation. Freshening has been attributed to increased sea ice melting and contributions from runoff, but a leading explanation has been a strengthening of the Beaufort High--a characteristic peak in sea level atmospheric pressure--which tends to accelerate an anticyclonic (clockwise) wind pattern causing convergence of fresh surface water. Limited observations have made this explanation difficult to verify, and observations of increasing freshwater content under a weakened Beaufort High suggest that other factors must be affecting freshwater content. Here we use observations to show that during a time of record reductions in ice extent from 2005 to 2008, the dominant freshwater content changes were an increase in the Canada basin balanced by a decrease in the Eurasian basin. Observations are drawn from satellite data (sea surface height and ocean-bottom pressure) and in situ data. The freshwater changes were due to a cyclonic (anticlockwise) shift in the ocean pathway of Eurasian runoff forced by strengthening of the west-to-east Northern Hemisphere atmospheric circulation characterized by an increased Arctic Oscillation index. Our results confirm that runoff is an important influence on the Arctic Ocean and establish that the spatial and temporal manifestations of the runoff pathways are modulated by the Arctic Oscillation, rather than the strength of the wind-driven Beaufort Gyre circulation. PMID:22222749

  5. Atmospheric and oceanic freshwater transport during weak Atlantic overturning circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohmann, Gerrit

    2003-10-01

    Oceanic and atmospheric freshwater transports are analyzed in a numerical experiment where induced freshwater in the North Atlantic slowed the thermohaline circulation (THC). During times of weak Atlantic overturning circulation, it is found that the Intertropical Convergence Zone moves southward and trade winds at tropical latitudes increase, resulting in enhanced water vapor export out of the Atlantic catchment area. The experiment reveals furthermore that the oceanic freshwater transport amounts to a stabilizing effect of similar magnitude to the atmospheric effect. It is argued that the modeled response can be used as a fingerprint for the detection of THC changes documented in the paleoclimatic record or related recent climate change.

  6. Evaluation and control mechanisms of volume and freshwater export through the Canadian Arctic Archipelago in a high-resolution pan-Arctic ice-ocean model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGeehan, Timothy; Maslowski, Wieslaw

    2012-03-01

    This study examined the 1979-2004 volume and freshwater fluxes through the Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA) and into the Labrador Sea using a high resolution (˜9 km) coupled ice-ocean model of the pan-Arctic region to provide a reference, compare with limited observational estimates, and investigate control mechanisms of this exchange. The 26-year mean volume and freshwater fluxes through Nares Strait were 0.77 Sv ± 0.17 Sv and 10.38 mSv ± 1.67 mSv respectively, while those through Lancaster Sound amounted to 0.76 Sv ± 0.12 Sv and 48.45 mSv ± 7.83 mSv respectively. The 26-year mean volume and freshwater fluxes through Davis Strait were 1.55 Sv ± 0.29 Sv and 62.66 mSv ± 11.67 mSv while the modeled Fram Strait branch provided very little (˜2%) freshwater into the Labrador Sea compared to the total CAA input. Compared to available observations, the model provides reasonable volume and freshwater fluxes, as well as sea ice thickness and concentration in the CAA. In Nares Strait and Lancaster Sound, volume flux anomalies were controlled by the sea surface height (SSH) gradient anomalies along the straits and freshwater anomalies were highly correlated with the volume anomalies. At least half of the variance in the time series of SSH gradient anomaly was due to SSH anomalies in northern Baffin Bay. The West Greenland Current (WGC) exhibits seasonality, with cross shelf flow (into the Labrador Sea) peaking in January/February/March, while reducing the northward flow across eastern Davis Strait. We hypothesize that the eddy-reduced northward flow of WGC results in the lower volume and SSH in Baffin Bay. This maximizes the SSH gradients between the Arctic Ocean and Baffin Bay, leading to maximum winter volume fluxes through Nares Strait and Lancaster Sound. Model limitations include the insufficient spatial resolution of atmospheric forcing (especially to account for the effects of local topography), the representation of river runoff into Hudson Bay and coastal buoyancy currents, low mobility of modeled ice, and incomplete depiction of ice arching. Many of these issues are expected to be resolved with increased model grid cell resolution, improved sea ice and ocean models and more realistic atmospheric forcing.

  7. Arctic Ocean basin liquid freshwater storage trend 1992-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabe, B.; Karcher, M.; Kauker, F.; Schauer, U.; Toole, J. M.; Krishfield, R. A.; Pisarev, S.; Kikuchi, T.; Su, J.

    2014-02-01

    Freshwater in the Arctic Ocean plays an important role in the regional ocean circulation, sea ice, and global climate. From salinity observed by a variety of platforms, we are able, for the first time, to estimate a statistically reliable liquid freshwater trend from monthly gridded fields over all upper Arctic Ocean basins. From 1992 to 2012 this trend was 600±300 km3 yr-1. A numerical model agrees very well with the observed freshwater changes. A decrease in salinity made up about two thirds of the freshwater trend and a thickening of the upper layer up to one third. The Arctic Ocean Oscillation index, a measure for the regional wind stress curl, correlated well with our freshwater time series. No clear relation to Arctic Oscillation or Arctic Dipole indices could be found. Following other observational studies, an increased Bering Strait freshwater import to the Arctic Ocean, a decreased Davis Strait export, and enhanced net sea ice melt could have played an important role in the freshwater trend we observed.

  8. The Role of River Runoff in the Freshwater Budget of the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rennermalm, A.; Wood, E.; Dery, S.; Weaver, A.

    2005-12-01

    The freshwater export through the Fram Strait is important in governing the strength of the thermohaline circulation in the North Atlantic. Here we address the role of river runoff in the Arctic Ocean freshwater budget and how it in turn may affect the climate system on a larger scale though effects on the thermohaline circulation and sea ice cover. The role of runoff may be important in this regard because the riverine freshwater input is of similar magnitude as the freshwater export through the Fram Strait. An intermediate complexity general climate model (UVic ESCM) is used to conduct a series of experiments examining the role of the large rivers draining into the Arctic Ocean. In addition to studying the sensitivity caused by rivers draining into the Arctic Ocean we also study the rivers draining into Hudson Bay, the freshwater export through the Canadian Archipelago and finally freshwater import through Bering Strait Observations from the last few decades indicate that river runoff has increased into the Arctic Ocean and decreased into Hudson Bay. Our study contributes to understanding the implications of future changes in river runoff into the Arctic Ocean and Hudson Bay, and in better quantifying the importance of freshwater flow through Bering Strait and the Canadian Archipelago.

  9. The response of the central Arctic Ocean stratification to freshwater perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pemberton, P.; Nilsson, J.

    2016-01-01

    Using a state-of-the-art coupled ice-ocean-circulation model, we perform a number of sensitivity experiments to examine how the central Arctic Ocean stratification responds to changes in river runoff and precipitation. The simulations yield marked changes in the cold halocline and the Arctic Atlantic layer. Increased precipitation yields a warming of the Atlantic layer, which primarily is an advective signal, propagated through the St. Anna Trough, reflecting air-sea heat flux changes over the Barents Sea. As the freshwater supply is increased, the anticyclonic Beaufort Gyre is weakened and a greater proportion of the Arctic Ocean freshwater is exported via the Fram Strait, with nearly compensating export decreases through the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. The corresponding reorganization of the freshwater pool appears to be controlled by advective processes, rather than by the local changes in the surface freshwater flux. A simple conceptual model of the Arctic Ocean, based on a geostrophically controlled discharge of the low-salinity water, is introduced and compared with the simulations. Key predictions of the conceptual model are that the halocline depth should decrease with increasing freshwater input and that the Arctic Ocean freshwater storage should increase proportionally to the square root of the freshwater input, which are in broad qualitative agreement with the sensitivity experiments. However, the model-simulated rate of increase of the freshwater storage is weaker, indicating that effects related to wind forcing and rerouting of the freshwater-transport pathways play an important role for the dynamics of the Arctic Ocean freshwater storage.

  10. Arctic Ocean Freshwater: How Robust are Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahn, A.; Aksenov, Y.; deCuevas, B. A.; deSteur, L.; Haekkinen, S.; Hansen, E.; Herbaut, C.; Houssais, M.-N.; Karcher, M.; Kauker, F.; Lique, C.; Nguyen, A.; Pemberton, P.; Worthen, D.; Zhang, J.

    2012-01-01

    The Arctic freshwater (FW) has been the focus of many modeling studies, due to the potential impact of Arctic FW on the deep water formation in the North Atlantic. A comparison of the hindcasts from ten ocean-sea ice models shows that the simulation of the Arctic FW budget is quite different in the investigated models. While they agree on the general sink and source terms of the Arctic FW budget, the long-term means as well as the variability of the FW export vary among models. The best model-to-model agreement is found for the interannual and seasonal variability of the solid FW export and the solid FW storage, which also agree well with observations. For the interannual and seasonal variability of the liquid FW export, the agreement among models is better for the Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA) than for Fram Strait. The reason for this is that models are more consistent in simulating volume flux anomalies than salinity anomalies and volume-flux anomalies dominate the liquid FW export variability in the CAA but not in Fram Strait. The seasonal cycle of the liquid FW export generally shows a better agreement among models than the interannual variability, and compared to observations the models capture the seasonality of the liquid FW export rather well. In order to improve future simulations of the Arctic FW budget, the simulation of the salinity field needs to be improved, so that model results on the variability of the liquid FW export and storage become more robust.

  11. Export of nutrients from the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Valdés, Sinhué; Tsubouchi, Takamasa; Bacon, Sheldon; Naveira-Garabato, Alberto C.; Sanders, Richards; McLaughlin, Fiona A.; Petrie, Brian; Kattner, Gerhard; Azetsu-Scott, Kumiko; Whitledge, Terry E.

    2013-04-01

    study provides the first physically based mass-balanced transport estimates of dissolved inorganic nutrients (nitrate, phosphate, and silicate) for the Arctic Ocean. Using an inverse model-generated velocity field in combination with a quasi-synoptic assemblage of hydrographic and hydrochemical data, we quantify nutrient transports across the main Arctic Ocean gateways: Davis Strait, Fram Strait, the Barents Sea Opening (BSO), and Bering Strait. We found that the major exports of all three nutrients occur via Davis Strait. Transports associated with the East Greenland Current are almost balanced by transports associated with the West Spitsbergen Current. The most important imports of nitrate and phosphate to the Arctic occur via the BSO, and the most important import of silicate occurs via Bering Strait. Oceanic budgets show that statistically robust net silicate and phosphate exports exist, while the net nitrate flux is zero, within the uncertainty limits. The Arctic Ocean is a net exporter of silicate (-15.7 ± 3.2 kmol s-1) and phosphate (-1.0 ± 0.3 kmol s-1; net ± 1 standard error) to the North Atlantic. The export of excess phosphate (relative to nitrate) from the Arctic, calculated at -1.1 ± 0.3 kmol s-1, is almost twice as large as previously estimated. Net transports of silicate and phosphate from the Arctic Ocean provide 12% and 90%, respectively, of the net southward fluxes estimated at 47°N in the North Atlantic. Additional sources of nutrients that may offset nutrient imbalances are explored, and the relevance and the pathway of nutrient transports to the North Atlantic are discussed.

  12. Changes in Arctic freshwater export: a new proxy from 30 years of hydrographic surveys in the Labrador Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florindo-Lopez, Cristian; Holliday, N. Penny; Bacon, Sheldon; Aksenov, Yevgeny

    2015-04-01

    The Arctic Ocean is the most rapidly changing environment in the globe. One of the observed changes is a significant increase in the freshwater storage at the region. It is believed that a large and rapid export of this freshwater into the North Atlantic could potentially affect high-latitude dense water formation, the overturning circulation and climate. However, Arctic freshwater fluxes to the Labrador Sea are poorly known and observational time series are not available beyond the last decade. We present a new insight in Labrador shelf dynamics, which allows us to connect locally-observed property variability to net Arctic freshwater exports west of Greenland. By combining the high-resolution (1/12 degree) NEMO model and hydrographic observations at the Labrador Shelf, we describe two major components of the shelf circulation. On the one hand the Labrador Current fills the shelf with Arctic originated waters. On the other hand, the Hudson Strait Outflow generates a very distinctive inshore buoyancy-driven flow. This newly described current is geographically and dynamically independent of the Labrador Current, and we are able to separate it from the waters of Arctic origin which flow further offshore. We apply this methodology to a Labrador hydrographic time series of over 30 years in length, allowing us to generate a proxy that we can use to assess the variability of Arctic freshwater export west of Greenland for over 30 years. We show that on decadal timescales, periods of decreased freshwater export on the Labrador Shelf coincide with periods of increased Arctic freshwater content.

  13. Scales and structure of frontal adjustment and freshwater export in a region of freshwater influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Joanne; Polton, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    Sea surface temperature satellite imagery and a regional hydrodynamic model are used to investigate the variability and structure of the Liverpool Bay thermohaline front. A statistically based water mass classification technique is used to locate the front in both data sets. The front moves between 5 and 35 km in response to spring-neap changes in tidal mixing, an adjustment that is much greater than at other shelf-sea fronts. Superimposed on top of this fortnightly cycle are semi-diurnal movements of 5-10 km driven by flood and ebb tidal currents. Seasonal variability in the freshwater discharge and the density difference between buoyant inflow and more saline Irish Sea water give rise to two different dynamical regimes. During winter, when cold inflow reduces the buoyancy of the plume, a bottom-advected front develops. Over the summer, when warm river water provides additional buoyancy, a surface-advected plume detaches from the bottom and propagates much larger distances across the bay. Decoupled from near-bed processes, the position of the surface front is more variable. Fortnightly stratification and re-mixing over large areas of Liverpool Bay is a potentially important mechanism by which freshwater, and its nutrient and pollutant loads, are exported from the coastal plume system. Based on length scales estimated from model and satellite data, the erosion of post-neap stratification is estimated to be responsible for exporting approximately 19% of the fresh estuarine discharge annually entering the system. Although the baroclinic residual circulation makes a more significant contribution to freshwater fluxes, the episodic nature of the spring-neap cycle may have important implications for biogeochemical cycles within the bay.

  14. Deep-ocean origin of the freshwater eels

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Jun G.; Miya, Masaki; Miller, Michael J.; Sado, Tetsuya; Hanel, Reinhold; Hatooka, Kiyotaka; Aoyama, Jun; Minegishi, Yuki; Nishida, Mutsumi; Tsukamoto, Katsumi

    2010-01-01

    Of more than 800 species of eels of the order Anguilliformes, only freshwater eels (genus Anguilla with 16 species plus three subspecies) spend most of their lives in freshwater during their catadromous life cycle. Nevertheless, because their spawning areas are located offshore in the open ocean, they migrate back to their specific breeding places in the ocean, often located thousands of kilometres away. The evolutionary origin of such enigmatic behaviour, however, remains elusive because of the uncertain phylogenetic position of freshwater eels within the principally marine anguilliforms. Here, we show strong evidence for a deep oceanic origin of the freshwater eels, based on the phylogenetic analysis of whole mitochondrial genome sequences from 56 species representing all of the 19 anguilliform families. The freshwater eels occupy an apical position within the anguilliforms, forming a highly supported monophyletic group with various oceanic midwater eel species. Moreover, reconstruction of the growth habitats on the resulting tree unequivocally indicates an origination of the freshwater eels from the midwater of the deep ocean. This shows significant concordance with the recent collection of mature adults of the Japanese eel in the upper midwater of the Pacific, suggesting that they have retained their evolutionary origin as a behavioural trait in their spawning areas. PMID:20053660

  15. Plankton networks driving carbon export in the oligotrophic ocean.

    PubMed

    Guidi, Lionel; Chaffron, Samuel; Bittner, Lucie; Eveillard, Damien; Larhlimi, Abdelhalim; Roux, Simon; Darzi, Youssef; Audic, Stephane; Berline, Léo; Brum, Jennifer R; Coelho, Luis Pedro; Espinoza, Julio Cesar Ignacio; Malviya, Shruti; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Dimier, Céline; Kandels-Lewis, Stefanie; Picheral, Marc; Poulain, Julie; Searson, Sarah; Stemmann, Lars; Not, Fabrice; Hingamp, Pascal; Speich, Sabrina; Follows, Mick; Karp-Boss, Lee; Boss, Emmanuel; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Pesant, Stephane; Weissenbach, Jean; Wincker, Patrick; Acinas, Silvia G; Bork, Peer; de Vargas, Colomban; Iudicone, Daniele; Sullivan, Matthew B; Raes, Jeroen; Karsenti, Eric; Bowler, Chris; Gorsky, Gabriel

    2016-04-28

    The biological carbon pump is the process by which CO2 is transformed to organic carbon via photosynthesis, exported through sinking particles, and finally sequestered in the deep ocean. While the intensity of the pump correlates with plankton community composition, the underlying ecosystem structure driving the process remains largely uncharacterized. Here we use environmental and metagenomic data gathered during the Tara Oceans expedition to improve our understanding of carbon export in the oligotrophic ocean. We show that specific plankton communities, from the surface and deep chlorophyll maximum, correlate with carbon export at 150 m and highlight unexpected taxa such as Radiolaria and alveolate parasites, as well as Synechococcus and their phages, as lineages most strongly associated with carbon export in the subtropical, nutrient-depleted, oligotrophic ocean. Additionally, we show that the relative abundance of a few bacterial and viral genes can predict a significant fraction of the variability in carbon export in these regions. PMID:26863193

  16. New Production Regulates Export Stoichiometry in the Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Tamelander, Tobias; Reigstad, Marit; Olli, Kalle; Slagstad, Dag; Wassmann, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The proportion in which carbon and growth-limiting nutrients are exported from the oceans productive surface layer to the deep sea is a crucial parameter in models of the biological carbon pump. Based on >400 vertical flux observations of particulate organic carbon (POC) and nitrogen (PON) from the European Arctic Ocean we show the common assumption of constant C:N stoichiometry not to be met. Exported POC:PON ratios exceeded the classical Redfield atomic ratio of 6.625 in the entire region, with the largest deviation in the deep Central Arctic Ocean. In this part the mean exported POC:PON ratio of 9.7 (a:a) implies c. 40% higher carbon export compared to Redfield-based estimates. When spatially integrated, the potential POC export in the European Arctic was 1030% higher than suggested by calculations based on constant POC:PON ratios. We further demonstrate that the exported POC:PON ratio varies regionally in relation to nitrate-based new production over geographical scales that range from the Arctic to the subtropics, being highest in the least productive oligotrophic Central Arctic Ocean and subtropical gyres. Accounting for variations in export stoichiometry among systems of different productivity will improve the ability of models to resolve regional patterns in carbon export and, hence, the oceans contribution to the global carbon cycle will be predicted more accurately. PMID:23342065

  17. Southern Ocean exports carbon less efficiently than previously thought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2013-07-01

    The Southern Ocean is a major source of gas exchange between the atmosphere and the ocean, accounting for almost 20% of global ocean carbon dioxide (CO2) uptake. Phytoplankton fix CO2, converting it to other carbon compounds, and some of this biogenic carbon sinks to the deeper ocean, where it is effectively removed from the atmosphere. Better understanding of the rate of export of carbon particulate matter from the upper ocean is key to improving uncertainties in models that include the Southern Ocean's role in the carbon cycle.

  18. Freshwater transport in the coupled ocean-atmosphere system: a passive ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, David; Marshall, John

    2015-07-01

    Conservation of water demands that meridional ocean and atmosphere freshwater transports (FWT) are of equal magnitude but opposite in direction. This suggests that the atmospheric FWT and its associated latent heat (LH) transport could be thought of as a "coupled ocean/atmosphere mode." But what is the true nature of this coupling? Is the ocean passive or active? Here, we analyze a series of simulations with a coupled ocean-atmosphere-sea ice model employing highly idealized geometries but with markedly different coupled climates and patterns of ocean circulation. Exploiting streamfunctions in specific humidity coordinates for the atmosphere and salt coordinates for the ocean to represent FWT in their respective medium, we find that atmospheric FWT/LH transport is essentially independent of the ocean state. Ocean circulation and salinity distribution adjust to achieve a return freshwater pathway demanded of them by the atmosphere. So, although ocean and atmosphere FWTs are indeed coupled by mass conservation, the ocean is a passive component acting as a reservoir of freshwater.

  19. Mass, heat and freshwater fluxes in the South Indian Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, Lee-Lueng

    1986-01-01

    Six hydrographic sections were used to examine the circulation and property fluxes in the South Indian Ocean from 10 to 32 deg S. The calculations were made by applying an inverse method to the data. In the interior of the South Indian Ocean, the geostrophic flow is generally northward. At 18 deg S, the northward interior mass flux is balanced by the southward Ekman mass flux at the surface, whereas at 32 deg S the northward interior mass flux is balanced by the southward mass flux of the Agulhas Current. There is a weak, southward mass flux of 6 x 10 to the 9th kg/s in the Mozambique Channel. The rate of water exchange between the Pacific Ocean and the Indian Ocean is dependent on the choice of the initial reference level used in the inverse calculation. The choice of 1500 m, the depth of the deep oxygen minimum, has led to a flux of water from the Pacific Ocean to the Indian Ocean at a rate of 6.6 x 10 to the 9th kg/s. Heat flux calculations indicate that the Indian Ocean is exporting heat to the rest of the world's oceans at a rate of -0.69 x 10 to the 15th W at 18 deg S and -0.25 x 10 to the 15th W at 32 deg S (negative values being southward).

  20. Dissolved organic carbon pools and export from the coastal ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrón, Cristina; Duarte, Carlos M.

    2015-10-01

    The distribution of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration across coastal waters was characterized based on the compilation of 3510 individual estimates of DOC in coastal waters worldwide. We estimated the DOC concentration in the coastal waters that directly exchange with open ocean waters in two different ways, as the DOC concentration at the edge of the shelf break and as the DOC concentration in coastal waters with salinity close to the average salinity in the open ocean. Using these estimates of DOC concentration in the coastal waters that directly exchange with open ocean waters, the mean DOC concentration in the open ocean and the estimated volume of water annually exchanged between coastal and open ocean, we estimated a median ± SE (and average ± SE) global DOC export from coastal to open ocean waters ranging from 4.4 ± 1.0 Pg C yr-1 to 27.0 ± 1.8 Pg C yr-1 (7.0 ± 5.8 Pg C yr-1 to 29.0 ± 8.0 Pg C yr-1) depending on the global hydrological exchange. These values correspond to a median and mean median (and average) range between 14.7 ± 3.3 to 90.0 ± 6.0 (23.3 ± 19.3 to 96.7 ± 26.7) Gg C yr-1 per km of shelf break, which is consistent with the range between 1.4 to 66.1 Gg C yr-1 per km of shelf break of available regional estimates of DOC export. The estimated global DOC export from coastal to open ocean waters is also consistent with independent estimates of the net metabolic balance of the coastal ocean. The DOC export from the coastal to the open ocean is likely to be a sizeable flux and is likely to be an important term in the carbon budget of the open ocean, potentially providing an important subsidy to support heterotrophic activity in the open ocean.

  1. On the relationship between Nd isotopic composition and ocean overturning circulation in idealized freshwater discharge events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rempfer, Johannes; Stocker, Thomas F.; Joos, Fortunat; Dutay, Jean-Claude

    2012-09-01

    Using a cost-efficient climate model, the effect of changes in overturning circulation on neodymium isotopic composition,?Nd, is systematically examined for the first time. Idealized sequences of abrupt climate changes are induced by the application of periodic freshwater fluxes to the North Atlantic (NA) and the Southern Ocean (SO), thus mainly affecting either the formation of North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) or Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW). Variations in ?Nd reflect weakening and strengthening of the formation of NADW and AABW, changes in ?Ndof end-members are relatively small. Relationships between?Nd and the strength of NADW or AABW are more pronounced for AABW than for NADW. Atlantic patterns of variations in ?Nd systematically differ between NA and SO experiments. Additionally, the signature of changes in ?Nd in the Atlantic and the Pacific is alike in NA but opposite in SO experiments. Discrimination between NA and SO experiments is therefore possible based on the Atlantic pattern of variations in ?Nd and the contrariwise behavior of ?Nd in the Atlantic and the Pacific. In further experiments we examined the effect of variations in magnitudes of particle export fluxes. Within the examined range, and although settling particles represent the only sink of Nd, their effects on ?Nd are relatively small. Our results confirm the large potential of ?Nd as a paleocirculation tracer but also indicate its limitations of quantitative reconstructions of changes in the Atlantic Meridional Ocean Circulation.

  2. An assessment of the Arctic Ocean in a suite of interannual CORE-II simulations. Part II: Liquid freshwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang; Ilicak, Mehmet; Gerdes, Rüdiger; Drange, Helge; Aksenov, Yevgeny; Bailey, David A.; Bentsen, Mats; Biastoch, Arne; Bozec, Alexandra; Böning, Claus; Cassou, Christophe; Chassignet, Eric; Coward, Andrew C.; Curry, Beth; Danabasoglu, Gokhan; Danilov, Sergey; Fernandez, Elodie; Fogli, Pier Giuseppe; Fujii, Yosuke; Griffies, Stephen M.; Iovino, Doroteaciro; Jahn, Alexandra; Jung, Thomas; Large, William G.; Lee, Craig; Lique, Camille; Lu, Jianhua; Masina, Simona; Nurser, A. J. George; Rabe, Benjamin; Roth, Christina; Salas y Mélia, David; Samuels, Bonita L.; Spence, Paul; Tsujino, Hiroyuki; Valcke, Sophie; Voldoire, Aurore; Wang, Xuezhu; Yeager, Steve G.

    2016-03-01

    The Arctic Ocean simulated in 14 global ocean-sea ice models in the framework of the Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiments, phase II (CORE-II) is analyzed in this study. The focus is on the Arctic liquid freshwater (FW) sources and freshwater content (FWC). The models agree on the interannual variability of liquid FW transport at the gateways where the ocean volume transport determines the FW transport variability. The variation of liquid FWC is induced by both the surface FW flux (associated with sea ice production) and lateral liquid FW transport, which are in phase when averaged on decadal time scales. The liquid FWC shows an increase starting from the mid-1990s, caused by the reduction of both sea ice formation and liquid FW export, with the former being more significant in most of the models. The mean state of the FW budget is less consistently simulated than the temporal variability. The model ensemble means of liquid FW transport through the Arctic gateways compare well with observations. On average, the models have too high mean FWC, weaker upward trends of FWC in the recent decade than the observation, and low consistency in the temporal variation of FWC spatial distribution, which needs to be further explored for the purpose of model development.

  3. Arctic sea ice and freshwater sensitivity to the treatment of the atmosphere-ice-ocean surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, François; Chevallier, Matthieu; Smith, Gregory C.; Dupont, Frédéric; Garric, Gilles; Lemieux, Jean-François; Lu, Youyu; Davidson, Fraser

    2015-06-01

    Global simulations are presented focusing on the atmosphere-ice-ocean (AIO) surface layer (SL) in the Arctic. Results are produced using an ocean model (NEMO) coupled to two different sea ice models: the Louvain-La-Neuve single-category model (LIM2) and the Los Alamos multicategory model (CICE4). A more objective way to adjust the sea ice-ocean drag is proposed compared to a coefficient tuning approach. The air-ice drag is also adjusted to be more consistent with the atmospheric forcing data set. Improving the AIO SL treatment leads to more realistic results, having a significant impact on the sea ice volume trend, sea ice thickness, and the Arctic freshwater (FW) budget. The physical mechanisms explaining this sensitivity are studied. Improved sea ice drift speeds result in less sea ice accumulation in the Beaufort Sea, correcting a typical ice thickness bias. Sea ice thickness and drag parameters affect how atmospheric stress is transferred to the ocean, thereby influencing Ekman transport and FW retention in the Beaufort Gyre (BG). Increasing sea ice-ocean roughness reduces sea ice growth in winter by reducing ice deformation and lead fractions in the BG. It also increases the total Arctic FW content by reducing sea ice export through Fram Strait. Similarly, increasing air-ice roughness increases the total Arctic FW content by increasing FW retention in the BG.

  4. Methods for freshwater riverine input into regional ocean models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzfeld, M.

    2015-06-01

    The input of freshwater at the coast in regional models is a non-trivial exercise that has been studied extensively in the past. Several issues are of relevance; firstly, estuaries process water properties along their length, so that while freshwater may enter at the estuary head, it is no longer fresh at the mouth. Secondly, models create a numerical response that results in excessive upstream or offshore transport compared to what is typically observed. The cause of this has been traced to the lack of landward flow at the coast where freshwater is input. In this study we assess the performance of various methods of freshwater input in coarse resolution regional models where the estuary cannot be explicitly resolved, and present a formulation that attempts to account for upstream flow in the salt wedge and in-estuary mixing that elevates salinity at the mouth.

  5. On the proportion of ballast versus non-ballast associated carbon export in the surface ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Moigne, Frédéric A. C.; Sanders, Richard J.; Villa-Alfageme, María; Martin, Adrian P.; Pabortsava, Katsiaryna; Planquette, Hélène; Morris, Paul J.; Thomalla, Sandy J.

    2012-08-01

    The role of biominerals in driving carbon export from the surface ocean is unclear. We compiled surface particulate organic carbon (POC), and mineral ballast export fluxes from 55 different locations in the Atlantic and Southern Oceans. Substantial surface POC export accompanied by negligible mineral export was recorded implying that association with mineral phases is not a precondition for organic export to occur. The proportion of non-mineral associated sinking POC ranged from 0 to 80% and was highest in areas previously shown to be dominated by diatoms. This is consistent with previous estimates showing that transfer efficiency in such regions is low. However we propose that, rather than the low transfer efficiency arising from diatom blooms being inherently characterized by poorly packaged aggregates which are efficiently exported but which disintegrate readily in mid water, it is due to such environments having very high levels of unballasted organic C export.

  6. High Biomass Low Export Regimes in the Southern Ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, Phoebe J.; Bishop, James K.B.

    2006-01-27

    This paper investigates ballasting and remineralization controls of carbon sedimentation in the twilight zone (100-1000 m) of the Southern Ocean. Size-fractionated (<1 {micro}m, 1-51 {micro}m, >51 {micro}m) suspended particulate matter was collected by large volume in-situ filtration from the upper 1000 m in the Subantarctic (55 S, 172 W) and Antarctic (66 S, 172 W) zones of the Southern Ocean during the Southern Ocean Iron Experiment (SOFeX) in January-February 2002. Particles were analyzed for major chemical constituents (POC, P, biogenic Si, CaCO3), and digital and SEM image analyses of particles were used to aid in the interpretation of the chemical profiles. Twilight zone waters at 66 S in the Antarctic had a steeper decrease in POC with depth than at 55 S in the Subantarctic, with lower POC concentrations in all size fractions at 66 S than at 55 S, despite up to an order of magnitude higher POC in surface waters at 66 S. The decay length scale of >51 {micro}m POC was significantly shorter in the upper twilight zone at 66 S ({delta}{sub e}=26 m) compared to 55 S ({delta}{sub e}=81 m). Particles in the carbonate-producing 55 S did not have higher excess densities than particles from the diatom-dominated 66 S, indicating that there was no direct ballast effect that accounted for deeper POC penetration at 55 S. An indirect ballast effect due to differences in particle packaging and porosities cannot be ruled out, however, as aggregate porosities were high ({approx}97%) and variable. Image analyses point to the importance of particle loss rates from zooplankton grazing and remineralization as determining factors for the difference in twilight zone POC concentrations at 55 S and 66 S, with stronger and more focused shallow remineralization at 66 S. At 66 S, an abundance of large (several mm long) fecal pellets from the surface to 150 m, and almost total removal of large aggregates by 200 m, reflected the actions of a single or few zooplankton species capable of grazing diatoms in the euphotic zone, coupled with a more diverse particle feeding zooplankton community immediately below. Surface waters with high biomass levels and high proportion of biomass in the large size fraction were associated with low particle loading at depth, with all indications implying conditions of low export. The 66 S region exhibits this 'High Biomass, Low Export' (HBLE) condition, with very high >51 {micro}m POC concentrations at the surface ({approx}2.1 {micro}M POC), but low concentrations below 200 m (<0.07 {micro}M POC). The 66 S region remained HBLE after iron fertilization. Iron addition at 55 S caused a ten fold increase in >51 {micro}m biomass concentrations in the euphotic zone, bringing surface POC concentrations to levels found at 66 S ({approx}3.8 {micro}M), and a concurrent decrease in POC concentrations below 200 m. The 55 S region, which began with moderate levels of biomass and stronger particle export, transitioned to being HBLE after iron fertilization. We propose that iron addition to already HBLE waters will not cause mass sedimentation events. The stability of an iron-induced HBLE condition is unknown. Better understanding of biological pump processes in non-HBLE Subantarctic waters is needed.

  7. The Annual Cycle of Arctic Ice and Ocean Heat and Freshwater Fluxes, Measured and Modelled

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacon, S.; Aksenov, Y.; Tsubouchi, T.

    2014-12-01

    Paucity of measurements means that quantifying and evaluating the Arctic thermal and hydrological cycles is problematic. For example: atmospheric reanalyses are not well constrained by observations; for river runoff measurements, there are un-gauged flows to consider; and until the relatively recent advent of autonomous measurement systems, ocean measurements outside the summer melt season were rare. We have assembled a complete and continuous Arctic Ocean boundary measurement array from moored installations in four ocean gateways: Fram, Davis and Bering Straits, and the Barents Sea Opening. Occasionally "patching" with coupled ice-ocean general circulation model (GCM) output is required; if so, the output water properties are validated and calibrated against climatology. This approach enables application of inverse modeling methods through the use of conservation constraints, and consequent generation of a set of 12 monthly-mean ocean (including sea ice) fluxes of freshwater and heat spanning a full calendar year. We will present results from a single annual cycle (2005-6). We have also transferred the design of the Arctic Ocean Boundary Array to the GCM environment, where we have calculated the mean annual cycles (from ca. 30-year model runs) both of net surface fluxes (atmosphere-ocean and land-ocean, including sea ice) and equivalent ice and ocean boundary fluxes of freshwater and heat, at two model resolutions (1/4 degree and 1/12 degree global mean) and for two different surface forcing data sets. We will show the resulting comparisons of the mean annual cycles of measured and modeled Arctic freshwater and heat fluxes, and also show the modeled mean annual cycle of heat and freshwater storage. We believe that the integral boundary array formed by sustained measurements in the four named ocean gateways should be a cornerstone of any Arctic environmental monitoring system.

  8. Hydrographic changes in the Lincoln Sea in the Arctic Ocean with focus on an upper ocean freshwater anomaly between 2007 and 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steur, L.; Steele, M.; Hansen, E.; Morison, J.; Polyakov, I.; Olsen, S. M.; Melling, H.; McLaughlin, F. A.; Kwok, R.; Smethie, W. M.; Schlosser, P.

    2013-09-01

    Hydrographic data from the Arctic Ocean show that freshwater content in the Lincoln Sea, north of Greenland, increased significantly from 2007 to 2010, slightly lagging changes in the eastern and central Arctic. The anomaly was primarily caused by a decrease in the upper ocean salinity. In 2011 upper ocean salinities in the Lincoln Sea returned to values similar to those prior to 2007. Throughout 2008-2010, the freshest surface waters in the western Lincoln Sea show water mass properties similar to fresh Canada Basin waters north of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. In the northeastern Lincoln Sea fresh surface waters showed a strong link with those observed in the Makarov Basin near the North Pole. The freshening in the Lincoln Sea was associated with a return of a subsurface Pacific Water temperature signal although this was not as strong as observed in the early 1990s. Comparison of repeat stations from the 2000s with the data from the 1990s at 65°W showed an increase of the Atlantic temperature maximum which was associated with the arrival of warmer Atlantic water from the Eurasian Basin. Satellite-derived dynamic ocean topography of winter 2009 showed a ridge extending parallel to the Canadian Archipelago shelf as far as the Lincoln Sea, causing a strong flow toward Nares Strait and likely Fram Strait. The total volume of anomalous freshwater observed in the Lincoln Sea and exported by 2011 was close to 1100±250km3, approximately 13% of the total estimated FW increase in the Arctic in 2008.

  9. What causes the inverse relationship between primary production and export efficiency in the Southern Ocean?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Moigne, Frédéric A. C.; Henson, Stephanie A.; Cavan, Emma; Georges, Clément; Pabortsava, Katsiaryna; Achterberg, Eric P.; Ceballos-Romero, Elena; Zubkov, Mike; Sanders, Richard J.

    2016-05-01

    The ocean contributes to regulating atmospheric CO2 levels, partly via variability in the fraction of primary production (PP) which is exported out of the surface layer (i.e., the e ratio). Southern Ocean studies have found that contrary to global-scale analyses, an inverse relationship exists between e ratio and PP. This relationship remains unexplained, with potential hypotheses being (i) large export of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in high PP areas, (ii) strong surface microbial recycling in high PP regions, and/or (iii) grazing-mediated export that varies inversely with PP. We find that the export of DOC has a limited influence in setting the negative e ratio/PP relationship. However, we observed that at sites with low PP and high e ratios, zooplankton-mediated export is large and surface microbial abundance low suggesting that both are important drivers of the magnitude of the e ratio in the Southern Ocean.

  10. 3D Dynamics of Freshwater Lenses in the Near-Surface Layer of the Tropical Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, Alexander; Dean, Cayla

    2015-04-01

    Convective rains in the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) produce lenses of freshened water on the ocean surface. These lenses are localized in space and typically involve both salinity and temperature anomalies. Due to significant density anomalies, strong pressure gradients develop, which result in lateral spreading of freshwater lenses in a form resembling gravity currents. Gravity currents inherently involve three-dimensional dynamics. As a type of organized structure, gravity currents in the upper layer of the ocean may also interact with, and be shaped by, the ambient oceanic environment and atmospheric conditions. Among the important factors are the background stratification, wind stress, wind/wave mixing and spatially coherent organized motions in the near-surface layer of the ocean. Under certain conditions, a resonant interaction between a propagating freshwater lens and internal waves in the underlying pycnocline (e.g., barrier layer) may develop, whereas interaction with wind stress may produce an asymmetry in the freshwater lens and associated mixing. These two types of interactions working in concert may explain the series of sharp frontal interfaces, which have been observed in association with freshwater lenses during TOGA COARE. In this work, we have conducted a series of numerical experiments using computational fluid dynamics tools. These numerical simulations were designed to elucidate the relationship between vertical mixing and horizontal advection of salinity under various environmental conditions and potential impact on the Aquarius and SMOS satellite image formation. Available near-surface data from field experiments served as a guidance for numerical simulations. The results of this study indicate that 3D dynamics of freshwater lenses are essential within a certain range of wind/wave conditions and the freshwater influx in the surface layer of the ocean.

  11. Heat and freshwater budgets of the Nordic seas computed from atmospheric reanalysis and ocean observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segtnan, O. H.; Furevik, T.; Jenkins, A. D.

    2011-11-01

    The heat and freshwater budgets of the Nordic seas are computed from atmospheric reanalysis data and ocean observations, mainly taken during the period 1990-1999. The total heat loss is 198 TW and the freshwater gain 52 mSv (1 Sv = 106 m3 s-1), with residuals equal to 1 TW and 3 mSv, respectively. Budgets are also computed for three subregions within the Nordic seas: the Norwegian Sea, the Barents Sea and the Greenland/Iceland Sea. Without accounting for transfer of heat and freshwater across the Arctic Front, which separates the Greenland/Iceland Sea from the Norwegian Sea, the residuals of the heat and freshwater budgets range from -36 TW to 34 TW and from -16 mSv to 19 mSv, respectively. To close the budgets of all subregions cross-frontal fluxes of -35 TW and 17 mSv, caused either by eddy shedding along the Arctic Front or ocean currents not accounted for, must be included. Combined with observations of the average temperature and salinity on both sides of the Arctic Front these values indicate a rate of cross-frontal water exchange of approximately 4 Sv. The most intense water mass modifications occur in the Norwegian Sea, where ocean heat loss and freshwater input are equal to 119 TW and 41 mSv, respectively.

  12. A realistic freshwater forcing protocol for ocean-coupled climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berk, J.; Drijfhout, S. S.

    2014-09-01

    A high-end scenario of polar ice loss from the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheet is presented with separate projections for different mass-loss sites up to the year 2100. For each large ice sheet three potential sources of freshwater release to the ocean are considered: run-off from surface melt, basal melt through heat exchange with the ocean, and iceberg calving and subsequent mass loss through melt of drifting icebergs. The location and relative magnitude of freshwater forcing due to drifting icebergs is calculated from a separate iceberg drift simulation. We assume fixed annual spatial patterns with magnitudes varying in time. These magnitudes are based on a severe warming scenario based on expert elicitation. The resultant freshwater forcing is applied to a global climate model and the effects on sea-level rise are discussed. The simulations show strong sea level rise on the Antarctic continental shelves. The effect on the Atlantic overturning circulation is very small, however.

  13. Trends in Arctic Ocean bottom pressure, sea surface height and freshwater content using GRACE and the ice-ocean model PIOMAS from 2008-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peralta-Ferriz, Cecilia; Morison, James; Zhang, Jinlun; Bonin, Jennifer

    2014-05-01

    The variability of ocean bottom pressure (OBP) in the Arctic is dominated by the variations in sea surface height (SSH) from daily to monthly timescales. Conversely, OBP variability is dominated by the changes in the steric pressure (StP) at inter-annual timescales, particularly off the continental shelves. The combination of GRACE-derived ocean bottom pressure and ICESat altimetry-derived sea surface height variations in the Arctic Ocean have provided new means of identifying inter-annual trends in StP (StP = OBP-SSH) and associated freshwater content (FWC) of the Arctic region (Morison et al., 2012). Morison et al. (2012) showed that from 2004 to 2008, the FWC increased in the Beaufort Gyre and decreased in the Siberian and Central Arctic, resulting in a relatively small net basin-averaged FWC change. In this work, we investigate the inter-annual trends from 2008 to 2012 in OBP from GRACE, SSH from the state-of-the-art pan-Arctic ocean model PIOMAS -validated with tide and pressure gauges in the Arctic-, and compute the trends in StP and FWC from 2008-2012. We compare these results with the previous trends from 2005-2008 described in Morison et al. (2012). Our initial findings suggest increased salinity in the entire Arctic basin (relative to the climatological seasonal variation) from 2008-2012, compared to the preceding four years (2005-2008). We also find that the trends in OBP, SSH and StP from 2008-2012 present a different behavior during the spring-summer and fall-winter, unlike 2005-2008, in which the trends were generally consistent through all months of the year. It seems since 2009, when the Beaufort Gyre relaxed and the export of freshwater from the Canada Basin into the Canadian Archipelago and Fram Strait, via the Lincoln Sea, was anomalously large (de Steur et al., 2013), the Arctic Ocean has entered a new circulation regime. The causes of such changes in the inter-annual trends of OBP, SSH and StP -hence FWC-, associated with the changes in the shape and strength of the Arctic Oscillation (AO) and the wind patterns, as well as with the changes in sea ice conditions will be explored. References: Morison, J., R. Kwok, C. Peralta-Ferriz, M. Alkire, I. Rigor, R. Andersen, and M. Steele, Changing Arctic Ocean Freshwater Pathways Measured With ICESat and GRACE, Nature, 481, 66-70, DOI: 10.1038/nature10705, 2012. de Steur, L., et al. (2013), Hydrographic changes in the Lincoln Sea in the Arctic Ocean with focus on an upper ocean freshwater anomaly between 2007 and 2010, J. Geophys. Res. Oceans, 118, 4699-4715, doi:10.1002/jgrc.20341.

  14. Mesoscale eddies drive increased silica export in the subtropical Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Benitez-Nelson, Claudia R; Bidigare, Robert R; Dickey, Tommy D; Landry, Michael R; Leonard, Carrie L; Brown, Susan L; Nencioli, Francesco; Rii, Yoshimi M; Maiti, Kanchan; Becker, Jamie W; Bibby, Thomas S; Black, Wil; Cai, Wei-Jun; Carlson, Craig A; Chen, Feizhou; Kuwahara, Victor S; Mahaffey, Claire; McAndrew, Patricia M; Quay, Paul D; Rappé, Michael S; Selph, Karen E; Simmons, Melinda P; Yang, Eun Jin

    2007-05-18

    Mesoscale eddies may play a critical role in ocean biogeochemistry by increasing nutrient supply, primary production, and efficiency of the biological pump, that is, the ratio of carbon export to primary production in otherwise nutrient-deficient waters. We examined a diatom bloom within a cold-core cyclonic eddy off Hawaii. Eddy primary production, community biomass, and size composition were markedly enhanced but had little effect on the carbon export ratio. Instead, the system functioned as a selective silica pump. Strong trophic coupling and inefficient organic export may be general characteristics of community perturbation responses in the warm waters of the Pacific Ocean. PMID:17510362

  15. Global patterns in efficiency of particulate organic carbon export and transfer to the deep ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henson, Stephanie A.; Sanders, Richard; Madsen, Esben

    2012-03-01

    The ocean's biological carbon pump is a key component of the global carbon cycle. Only a small fraction of the carbon fixed by primary production is exported to the deep ocean, yet this flux sets to first order the efficiency with which carbon is sequestered out of further contact with the atmosphere on long time scales. Here we examine global patterns in particle export efficiency (PEeff), the proportion of primary production that is exported from the surface ocean, and transfer efficiency (Teff), the fraction of exported organic matter that reaches the deep ocean. Previous studies have found a positive correlation between Teff and deep ocean calcite fluxes recovered from sediment traps, implying that ballasting by calcium carbonate may play an important role in regulating Teff. An alternative explanation is that this correlation is not causative, as regions where the dominant biomineral phase is calcite tend to be subtropical systems, which are hypothesized to produce sinking aggregates highly resistant to degradation. We attempt to distinguish between these alternative hypotheses on the control of Teff by examining the relationship between Teff and biomineral phases exported from the upper ocean, rather than those collected in deep traps. Global scale estimates derived from satellite data show, in keeping with earlier studies, that PEeff is high at high latitudes and low at low latitudes, but that Teff is low at high latitudes and high at low latitudes. However, in contrast to the relationship observed for deep biomineral fluxes in previous studies, we find that Teff is strongly negatively correlated with opal export flux from the upper ocean, but uncorrelated with calcium carbonate export flux. We hypothesize that the underlying factor governing the spatial patterns observed in Teff is ecosystem function, specifically the degree of recycling occurring in the upper ocean, rather than the availability of calcium carbonate for ballasting.

  16. Innate immune responses to gut microbiota differ between oceanic and freshwater threespine stickleback populations.

    PubMed

    Milligan-Myhre, Kathryn; Small, Clayton M; Mittge, Erika K; Agarwal, Meghna; Currey, Mark; Cresko, William A; Guillemin, Karen

    2016-02-01

    Animal hosts must co-exist with beneficial microbes while simultaneously being able to mount rapid, non-specific, innate immune responses to pathogenic microbes. How this balance is achieved is not fully understood, and disruption of this relationship can lead to disease. Excessive inflammatory responses to resident microbes are characteristic of certain gastrointestinal pathologies such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The immune dysregulation of IBD has complex genetic underpinnings that cannot be fully recapitulated with single-gene-knockout models. A deeper understanding of the genetic regulation of innate immune responses to resident microbes requires the ability to measure immune responses in the presence and absence of the microbiota using vertebrate models with complex genetic variation. Here, we describe a new gnotobiotic vertebrate model to explore the natural genetic variation that contributes to differences in innate immune responses to microbiota. Threespine stickleback, Gasterosteus aculeatus, has been used to study the developmental genetics of complex traits during the repeated evolution from ancestral oceanic to derived freshwater forms. We established methods to rear germ-free stickleback larvae and gnotobiotic animals monoassociated with single bacterial isolates. We characterized the innate immune response of these fish to resident gut microbes by quantifying the neutrophil cells in conventionally reared monoassociated or germ-free stickleback from both oceanic and freshwater populations grown in a common intermediate salinity environment. We found that oceanic and freshwater fish in the wild and in the laboratory share many intestinal microbial community members. However, oceanic fish mount a strong immune response to residential microbiota, whereas freshwater fish frequently do not. A strong innate immune response was uniformly observed across oceanic families, but this response varied among families of freshwater fish. The gnotobiotic stickleback model that we have developed therefore provides a platform for future studies mapping the natural genetic basis of the variation in immune response to microbes. PMID:26681746

  17. Innate immune responses to gut microbiota differ between oceanic and freshwater threespine stickleback populations

    PubMed Central

    Milligan-Myhre, Kathryn; Small, Clayton M.; Mittge, Erika K.; Agarwal, Meghna; Currey, Mark; Cresko, William A.; Guillemin, Karen

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Animal hosts must co-exist with beneficial microbes while simultaneously being able to mount rapid, non-specific, innate immune responses to pathogenic microbes. How this balance is achieved is not fully understood, and disruption of this relationship can lead to disease. Excessive inflammatory responses to resident microbes are characteristic of certain gastrointestinal pathologies such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The immune dysregulation of IBD has complex genetic underpinnings that cannot be fully recapitulated with single-gene-knockout models. A deeper understanding of the genetic regulation of innate immune responses to resident microbes requires the ability to measure immune responses in the presence and absence of the microbiota using vertebrate models with complex genetic variation. Here, we describe a new gnotobiotic vertebrate model to explore the natural genetic variation that contributes to differences in innate immune responses to microbiota. Threespine stickleback, Gasterosteus aculeatus, has been used to study the developmental genetics of complex traits during the repeated evolution from ancestral oceanic to derived freshwater forms. We established methods to rear germ-free stickleback larvae and gnotobiotic animals monoassociated with single bacterial isolates. We characterized the innate immune response of these fish to resident gut microbes by quantifying the neutrophil cells in conventionally reared monoassociated or germ-free stickleback from both oceanic and freshwater populations grown in a common intermediate salinity environment. We found that oceanic and freshwater fish in the wild and in the laboratory share many intestinal microbial community members. However, oceanic fish mount a strong immune response to residential microbiota, whereas freshwater fish frequently do not. A strong innate immune response was uniformly observed across oceanic families, but this response varied among families of freshwater fish. The gnotobiotic stickleback model that we have developed therefore provides a platform for future studies mapping the natural genetic basis of the variation in immune response to microbes. PMID:26681746

  18. Ocean export production and foraminiferal stable isotopes in the Antarctic Southern Ocean across the mid-Pleistocene transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasenfratz, A. P.; Martinez-Garcia, A.; Jaccard, S.; Hodell, D. A.; Vance, D.; Bernasconi, S. M.; Greaves, M.; Haug, G. H.

    2014-12-01

    Changes in buoyancy forcing in the Antarctic Zone (AZ) of the Southern Ocean are believed to play an instrumental role in modulating atmospheric CO2 concentrations during glacial cycles by regulating the transfer of carbon between the ocean interior and the atmosphere. Indeed, a million-year-spanning high-resolution excess Barium record from the AZ of the South Atlantic (ODP 1094), which traces changes in export production, shows decreased export production during cold periods suggesting decreased overturning. Here, we extend this AZ export production record back to 1.6 Myr. In addition, we present new carbon and oxygen isotope records of benthic and planktic foraminifera from the same site, complemented by Mg/Ca measurements in some intervals. The interpretation of these new data in the context of other South Atlantic records contributes to a better understanding of Southern Ocean hydrography and its role in modulating glacial/interglacial cycles over the past 1.6 Myr.

  19. Seasonal heat and freshwater cycles in the Arctic Ocean in CMIP5 coupled models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yanni; Carton, James A.; Chepurin, Gennady A.; Steele, Michael; Hakkinen, Sirpa

    2016-04-01

    This study examines the processes governing the seasonal response of the Arctic Ocean and sea ice to surface forcings as they appear in historical simulations of 14 Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 coupled climate models. In both models and observations, the seasonal heat budget is dominated by a local balance between net surface heating and storage in the heat content of the ocean and in melting/freezing of sea ice. Observations suggest ocean heat storage is more important than sea ice melt, while in most of these models, sea ice melt dominates. Seasonal horizontal heat flux divergence driven by the seasonal cycle of volume transport is only important locally. In models and observations, the dominant terms in the basin-average seasonal freshwater budget are the storages of freshwater between the ocean and sea ice, and the exchange between the two. The largest external source term is continental discharge in early summer, which is an order of magnitude smaller. The appearance of sea ice (extent and volume) and also ocean stratification in both the heat and freshwater budgets provides two links between the budgets and provides two mechanisms for feedback. One consequence of such an interaction is the fact that models with strong/weak seasonal surface heating also have strong/weak seasonal haline and temperature stratification.

  20. Coralline algal barium as indicator for 20th century northwestern North Atlantic surface ocean freshwater variability.

    PubMed

    Hetzinger, S; Halfar, J; Zack, T; Mecking, J V; Kunz, B E; Jacob, D E; Adey, W H

    2013-01-01

    During the past decades climate and freshwater dynamics in the northwestern North Atlantic have undergone major changes. Large-scale freshening episodes, related to polar freshwater pulses, have had a strong influence on ocean variability in this climatically important region. However, little is known about variability before 1950, mainly due to the lack of long-term high-resolution marine proxy archives. Here we present the first multidecadal-length records of annually resolved Ba/Ca variations from Northwest Atlantic coralline algae. We observe positive relationships between algal Ba/Ca ratios from two Newfoundland sites and salinity observations back to 1950. Both records capture episodical multi-year freshening events during the 20th century. Variability in algal Ba/Ca is sensitive to freshwater-induced changes in upper ocean stratification, which affect the transport of cold, Ba-enriched deep waters onto the shelf (highly stratified equals less Ba/Ca). Algal Ba/Ca ratios therefore may serve as a new resource for reconstructing past surface ocean freshwater changes. PMID:23636135

  1. Coralline algal Barium as indicator for 20th century northwestern North Atlantic surface ocean freshwater variability

    PubMed Central

    Hetzinger, S.; Halfar, J.; Zack, T.; Mecking, J. V.; Kunz, B. E.; Jacob, D. E.; Adey, W. H.

    2013-01-01

    During the past decades climate and freshwater dynamics in the northwestern North Atlantic have undergone major changes. Large-scale freshening episodes, related to polar freshwater pulses, have had a strong influence on ocean variability in this climatically important region. However, little is known about variability before 1950, mainly due to the lack of long-term high-resolution marine proxy archives. Here we present the first multidecadal-length records of annually resolved Ba/Ca variations from Northwest Atlantic coralline algae. We observe positive relationships between algal Ba/Ca ratios from two Newfoundland sites and salinity observations back to 1950. Both records capture episodical multi-year freshening events during the 20th century. Variability in algal Ba/Ca is sensitive to freshwater-induced changes in upper ocean stratification, which affect the transport of cold, Ba-enriched deep waters onto the shelf (highly stratified equals less Ba/Ca). Algal Ba/Ca ratios therefore may serve as a new resource for reconstructing past surface ocean freshwater changes. PMID:23636135

  2. Sensitivity of the Tropical Pacific Ocean to Precipitation Induced Freshwater Flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Song; Lau, K.-M.; Schopf, Paul S.

    1999-01-01

    We have performed a series of experiments using an ocean model to study the sensitivity of tropical Pacific Ocean to variations in precipitation induced freshwater fluxes. Variations in these fluxes arise from natural causes on all time scales. In addition, estimates of these fluxes are uncertain because of differences among measurement techniques. The model used is a quasi-isopycnal model, covering the Pacific from 40 S to 40 N. The surface forcing is constructed from observed wind stress, evaporation, precipitation, and surface temperature (SST) fields. The heat flux is produced with an iterative technique so as to maintain the model close to the observed climatology, but with only a weak damping to that climatology. Climatological estimates of evaporation are combined with various estimates of precipitation to determine the net surface freshwater flux. Results indicate that increased freshwater input decreases salinity as expected, but increases temperatures in the upper ocean. Using the freshwater flux estimated from the Microwave Sounding Unit leads to a warming of up to 0.6 C in the western Pacific over a case with zero net freshwater flux. SST is sensitive to the discrepancies among different precipitation observations, with root-mean-square differences in SST on the order of 0.2-0.3 C. The change in SST is more pronounced in the eastern Pacific, with differences of over 1 C found among the various precipitation products. Interannual variation in precipitation during El Nino events leads to increased warming. During the winter of 1982-83, freshwater flux accounts for about 0.4 C (approximately 10-15% of the maximum warming) of the surface warming in the central-eastern Pacific. Thus, the error of SST caused by the discrepancies in precipitation products is more than half of the SST anomaly produced by the interannual variability of observed precipitation. Further experiments, in which freshwater flux anomalies are imposed in the western, central, and eastern Pacific, show that the influence of net freshwater flux is also spatially dependent. The imposition of freshwater flux in the far western Pacific leads to a trapping of salinity anomaly to the surface layers near the equator. An identical flux imposed in the central Pacific produces deeper and off-equatorial salinity anomalies. The contrast between these two simulations is consistent with other simulations of the western Pacific barrier layer information.

  3. Variability in under-ice export fluxes of biogenic matter in the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalande, Catherine; Nöthig, Eva-Maria; Somavilla, Raquel; Bauerfeind, Eduard; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Okolodkov, Yuri

    2014-05-01

    A critical question regarding the organic carbon cycle in the Arctic Ocean is whether the decline in ice extent and thickness and the associated increase in solar irradiance in the upper ocean will result in increased primary production and particulate organic carbon (POC) export. To assess spatial and temporal variability in POC export, under-ice export fluxes were measured with short-term sediment traps in the northern Laptev Sea in July-August-September 1995, north of the Fram Strait in July 1997, and in the Central Arctic in August-September 2012. Sediment traps were deployed at 2-5 m and 20-25 m under ice for periods ranging from 8.5 to 71 h. In addition to POC fluxes, total particulate matter, chlorophyll a, biogenic particulate silica, phytoplankton, and zooplankton fecal pellet fluxes were measured to evaluate the amount and composition of the material exported in the upper Arctic Ocean. Whereas elevated export fluxes observed on and near the Laptev Sea shelf were likely the combined result of high primary production, resuspension, and release of particulate matter from melting ice, low export fluxes above the central basins despite increased light availability during the record minimum ice extent of 2012 suggest that POC export was limited by nutrient supply during summer. These results suggest that the ongoing decline in ice cover affects export fluxes differently on Arctic shelves and over the deep Arctic Ocean and that POC export is likely to remain low above the central basins unless additional nutrients are supplied to surface waters.

  4. Export of dissolved inorganic nutrients to the northern Indian Ocean from the Indian monsoonal rivers during discharge period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, M. S.; Prasad, M. H. K.; Rao, D. B.; Viswanadham, R.; Sarma, V. V. S. S.; Reddy, N. P. C.

    2016-01-01

    Coastal regions are highly productive due to the nutrients largely supplied by rivers. To examine the contribution of dissolved inorganic nutrients (DIN) by Indian rivers to coastal waters, data were collected near the freshwater heads of 27 monsoonal rivers of peninsular India during three weeks in late July to mid-August, the middle of the principal runoff period of the southwest monsoon of 2011. Twelve researchers in four groups, equipped with car and portable laboratory equipment, sampled mid-stream of each estuary using mechanized boat, and filtered and partly analyzed the water in the evening. The estimated exports were 0.22 ± 0.05, 0.11 ± 0.03, and 1.03 ± 0.26 Tg yr-1 for dissolved inorganic nitrogen, phosphorus and silicate, respectively. Higher amounts of DIN reach the Bay of Bengal than the Arabian Sea due to the higher volume (∼76%) of discharge to the former. In contrast, the export of dissolved inorganic nitrogen is almost same to the Bay of Bengal (0.12 ± 0.03 Tg yr-1) and Arabian Sea (0.10 ± 0.02 Tg yr-1) principally due to the polluted Narmada and Tapti rivers in the northwest. Including input from the glacial rivers, Ganges, Brahmaputra and Indus, it is estimated that the northern Indian Ocean receives ∼1.84 ± 0.46, 0.28 ± 0.07 and 3.58 ± 0.89 Tg yr-1 of nitrate, phosphate and silicate, respectively, which are significantly lower than the earlier estimates of DIN export from the Indian rivers based on DIN measured in the mid or upstream rivers. Such low fluxes in this study were attributed to efficient retention/elimination of DIN (∼91%) before reaching the coastal ocean. Hence, this study suggests that the importance of sampling locations for estimating nutrient fluxes to the coastal ocean. Riverine DIN export of 1.84 ± 0.46 Tg yr-1 would support 12.2 ± 3.1 Tg C yr-1 of new production in coastal waters of the northern Indian Ocean that results in a removal of 12.2 ± 3.1 Tg atmospheric CO2 yr-1.

  5. Export Production in the Southern Ocean Estimated from Satellite Ocean Color Data and Seasonal Variations in Atmospheric Potential Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevison, C. D.; Keeling, R. F.; Kahru, M.; Manizza, M.; Charette, M. A.; Maiti, K.

    2010-12-01

    A quantitative estimate of export production is important for understanding the global carbon cycle and the role of the oceanic “biological pump” in sequestering anthropogenic carbon dioxide. In the important Southern Ocean region, export production takes place predominantly during the spring and summer. Since each mole of photosynthetically-fixed carbon that is exported from the mixed layer leaves behind a stoichiometric amount of oxygen, which is available for release to the atmosphere, it has long been hypothesized that seasonal variations in Atmospheric Potential Oxygen (APO ~ O2/N2 + 1.1 CO2) can be used to constrain oceanic Net Community Production (NCP), which approximately balances export production in a steady-state system. However, the seasonal cycle of APO reflects three seasonally-varying ocean processes: NCP, deep water ventilation and thermal in and outgassing, and one must account for the two latter terms in order to estimate the signal in APO data due to NCP. This study attempts to resolve the three components of the APO seasonal cycle using a variety of independent approaches: 1) estimating the ventilation signal based on atmospheric nitrous oxide data and inferring the production signal as a residual, 2) estimating the production signal based on satellite ocean color data and inferring the ventilation signal as a residual, 3) decomposing the oxygen cycle using an ocean general circulation biogeochemistry model. Method 2 unavoidably requires the intervention of an atmospheric transport model, which introduces substantial uncertainties, to translate satellite-based sea-to-air fluxes into an atmospheric signal. In contrast, Method 1 in principle can be based entirely on atmospheric data, if a new method involving the atmospheric argon/nitrogen ratio is used to estimate the thermal signal in APO. However, uncertainties in the auxiliary atmospheric data, including nitrous oxide and argon, limit confidence in Method 1 at present. Within the uncertainties, all three methods converge on a similar solution when applied to Southern Ocean APO data. This convergence advances our understanding of the APO seasonal cycle and its component signals. In particular, our results suggest that a) APO data, while confirming that current satellite ocean color-based estimates of Southern Ocean export flux are reasonable in phase and amplitude, cannot at present provide a strong quantitative constraint on these estimates, and b) APO data, corrected for thermal signals, provide a reasonable estimate of the seasonal signal of deep ventilation from the critical Southern Ocean region, after subtracting a production signal estimated from satellite ocean color data.

  6. Mercury export to the Arctic Ocean from the Mackenzie River, Canada.

    PubMed

    Emmerton, Craig A; Graydon, Jennifer A; Gareis, Jolie A L; St Louis, Vincent L; Lesack, Lance F W; Banack, Janelle K A; Hicks, Faye; Nafziger, Jennifer

    2013-07-16

    Circumpolar rivers, including the Mackenzie River in Canada, are sources of the contaminant mercury (Hg) to the Arctic Ocean, but few Hg export studies exist for these rivers. During the 2007-2010 freshet and open water seasons, we collected river water upstream and downstream of the Mackenzie River delta to quantify total mercury (THg) and methylmercury (MeHg) concentrations and export. Upstream of the delta, flow-weighted mean concentrations of bulk THg and MeHg were 14.6 ± 6.2 ng L(-1) and 0.081 ± 0.045 ng L(-1), respectively. Only 11-13% and 44-51% of bulk THg and MeHg export was in the dissolved form. Using concentration-discharge relationships, we calculated bulk THg and MeHg export into the delta of 2300-4200 kg yr(-1) and 15-23 kg yr(-1) over the course of the study. Discharge is not presently known in channels exiting the delta, so we assessed differences in river Hg concentrations upstream and downstream of the delta to estimate its influence on Hg export to the ocean. Bulk THg and MeHg concentrations decreased 19% and 11% through the delta, likely because of particle settling and other processes in the floodplain. These results suggest that northern deltas may be important accumulators of river Hg in their floodplains before export to the Arctic Ocean. PMID:23800098

  7. Coastal Downscaling Experiments: Can CESM Fields Successfully Force Regional Coastal Ocean Simulations with Strong Freshwater Forcing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacCready, P.; Bryan, F.; Tseng, Y. H.; Whitney, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    The coastal ocean accounts for about half of the global fish harvest, but is poorly resolved in global climate models (a one-degree grid barely sees the continental shelf). Moreover, coastal ocean circulation is strongly modified by river freshwater sources, often coming from estuarine systems that are completely unresolved in the coarse grid. River freshwater input in CESM is added in a practical but ad hoc way, by imposing a surface salinity sink over a region of the ocean approximating the plume area of a given river. Here we present results from a series of model experiments using a high-resolution (1.5 km) ROMS model of the NE Pacific, including the Columbia River and the inland waters of Puget Sound. The base model does multi-year hindcasts using the best available sources of atmospheric (MM5/WRF), ocean (NCOM), river (USGS), and tidal forcing. It has been heavily validated against observations of all sorts, and performs well, so it is an ideal test bed for downscaling experiments. The model framework also does biogeochemistry, including oxygen, and carbon chemistry is being added to make forecasts of Ocean Acidification.This high-resolution ROMS model is systematically run in downscaling experiments for the year 2005 with combinations of CESM forcing (CAM, POP, and rivers) swapped in. Skill is calculated using observations. It is found that the runs with CESM forcing generally retain much of the skill of the base model. A compact metric of response to freshwater forcing is used, which is the mechanical energy required to destratify a shallow coastal volume. This, along with the average temperature and salinity of the volume, are used to characterize and compare runs, including the original CESM-POP fields. Finally the model is run with projected CESM simulation forcing at the end of 21st century based on a set of RCP scenarios, and the compact metrics are used to quantify differences from 2005.

  8. Carbon export and transfer to depth across the Southern Ocean Great Calcite Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosengard, S. Z.; Lam, P. J.; Balch, W. M.; Auro, M. E.; Pike, S.; Drapeau, D.; Bowler, B.

    2015-02-01

    Sequestration of carbon by the marine biological pump depends on the processes that alter, remineralize and preserve particulate organic carbon (POC) during transit to the deep ocean. Here, we present data collected from the Great Calcite Belt, a calcite-rich band across the Southern Ocean surface, to compare the transformation of POC in the euphotic and mesopelagic zones of the water column. The 234Th-derived export fluxes and size-fractionated concentrations of POC, particulate inorganic carbon (PIC), and biogenic silica (BSi) were measured from the upper 1000 m of 27 stations across the Atlantic and Indian sectors of the Great Calcite Belt. POC export out of the euphotic zone was correlated with BSi export. PIC export was not, but did correlate positively with POC flux transfer efficiency. Moreover, regions of high BSi concentrations, which corresponded to regions with proportionally larger particles, exhibited higher attenuation of >51 μm POC concentrations in the mesopelagic zone. The interplay among POC size partitioning, mineral composition and POC attenuation suggests a more fundamental driver of POC transfer through both depth regimes in the Great Calcite Belt. In particular, we argue that diatom-dominated communities produce large and labile POC aggregates, which generate high export fluxes but also drive more remineralization in the mesopelagic zone. We observe the opposite in communities with smaller calcifying phytoplankton, such as coccolithophores. We hypothesize that these differences are influenced by inherent differences in the lability of POC exported by different phytoplankton communities.

  9. Carbon export and transfer to depth across the Southern Ocean Great Calcite Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosengard, S. Z.; Lam, P. J.; Balch, W. M.; Auro, M. E.; Pike, S.; Drapeau, D.; Bowler, B.

    2015-07-01

    Sequestration of carbon by the marine biological pump depends on the processes that alter, remineralize, and preserve particulate organic carbon (POC) during transit to the deep ocean. Here, we present data collected from the Great Calcite Belt, a calcite-rich band across the Southern Ocean surface, to compare the transformation of POC in the euphotic and mesopelagic zones of the water column. The 234Th-derived export fluxes and size-fractionated concentrations of POC, particulate inorganic carbon (PIC), and biogenic silica (BSi) were measured from the upper 1000 m of 27 stations across the Atlantic and Indian sectors of the Great Calcite Belt. POC export out of the euphotic zone was correlated with BSi export. PIC export was not, but did correlate positively with POC flux transfer efficiency. Moreover, regions of high BSi concentrations, which corresponded to regions with proportionally larger particles, exhibited higher attenuation of > 51 μm POC concentrations in the mesopelagic zone. The interplay among POC size partitioning, mineral composition, and POC attenuation suggests a more fundamental driver of POC transfer through both depth regimes in the Great Calcite Belt. In particular, we argue that diatom-rich communities produce large and labile POC aggregates, which not only generate high export fluxes but also drive more remineralization in the mesopelagic zone. We observe the opposite in communities with smaller calcifying phytoplankton, such as coccolithophores. We hypothesize that these differences are influenced by inherent differences in the lability of POC exported by different phytoplankton communities.

  10. Carbon export mediated by mesopelagic fishes in the northeast Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davison, P. C.; Checkley, D. M.; Koslow, J. A.; Barlow, J.

    2013-09-01

    The role of fishes in the global carbon cycle is poorly known and often neglected. We show that the biomass of mesopelagic fishes off the continental USA west to longitude 141°W is positively related to annual net primary productivity, and averages 17 g m-2. We estimate the export of carbon out of the epipelagic ocean mediated by mesopelagic fishes (“fish-mediated export”; FME) with individual-based metabolic modeling using the catch from 77 mesopelagic trawls distributed over the study area. FME was 15-17% (22-24 mg C m-2 d-1) of the total carbon exported in the study area (144 mg C m-2 d-1), as estimated from satellite data. FME varies spatially in both magnitude and relative importance. Although the magnitude of FME increases with increasing total export, the ratio of FME to total export decreases. FME exceeds 40% of the total carbon export in the oligotrophic North Pacific Subtropical Gyre, but forms <10% of the total export in the most productive waters of the California Current. Because the daytime residence depth of these fishes is below the depths where most remineralization of sinking particles occurs, FME is approximately equal to the passive transport at a depth of 400 m. The active transport of carbon by mesopelagic fishes and zooplankton is similar in magnitude to the gap between estimates of carbon export obtained with sediment traps and by other methods. FME should be considered in models of the global carbon cycle.

  11. Modeling dissolved organic carbon and carbon export in the equatorial Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Na; Zeng, Lili; Li, Yizhen; Xiu, Peng

    2015-04-01

    The newly built CoSiNE-31 ecosystem model developed for the Pacific Ocean is employed here to evaluate carbon cycling in the equatorial Pacific upwelling region. This model explicitly includes 31 state variables capable of reproducing key biogeochemical features in this region, such as high-nutrient low-chlorophyll conditions. In the so-called Wyrtki Box (5S-5N, 90-180W), the modeled area-averaged carbon export data show the predominance of the particulate organic carbon flux. This is consistent with observations, and amounts to 7.88 mmol C m-2 day-1 at the bottom of the euphotic zone (120 m water depth). Nearly as important is the dissolved organic carbon export flux, at 6.62 mmol C m-2 day-1. The modeled particulate inorganic carbon (PIC) export flux of 2.07 mmol C m-2 day-1 is much higher than the global average, indicating a key role of PIC sedimentation in the study region. The modeled carbon-to-nitrogen export ratio for particulate organic matter (POM) is 7.8, which is consistent with the Redfield ratio. The export ratio increases to 13.8 for dissolved organic matter (DOM). By implication, carbon export is markedly more efficient via DOM than via POM. This is the case also under simulated iron enrichment conditions, although there are measurable increases in carbon export efficiency for both DOM and POM.

  12. The Arctic Mediterranean Sea - Deep convection, oceanic heat transport and freshwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudels, Bert

    2014-05-01

    The speculations about the driving forces behind the oceanic meridional circulation and the importance of the northward transports of oceanic heat for the ice conditions in the Arctic Ocean have a long history, but only after the Fram expedition 1893-1896 and from the studies by Nansen, Helland-Hansen and Sandström in the early 1900s did these speculations attain observational substance. In the late 1970s and onward these questions have again risen to prominence. A study of deep convection in the Greenland Sea, then assumed to drive the global thermohaline circulation, started with the Greenland Sea Project (GSP), while the investigation of the exchanges of volume and heat through Fram Strait had a more hesitant start in the Fram Strait Project (FSP). Not until 1997 with the EC project VEINS (Variation of Exchanges in the Northern Seas) was a mooring array deployed across Fram Strait. This array has been maintained and has measured the exchanges ever since. Eberhard Fahrbach was closely involved in these studies, as a secretary for the GSP and as the major driving force behind the Fram Strait array. Here we shall examine the legacy of these projects; How our understanding of these themes has evolved in recent years. After the 1980s no convective bottom water renewal has been observed in the Greenland Sea, and the Greenland Sea deep waters have gradually been replaced by warmer, more saline deep water from the Arctic Ocean passing through Fram Strait. Small-scale convective events penetrating deeper than 2500m but there less dense than their surroundings were, however, observed in the early 2000s. The Fram Strait exchanges have proven difficult to estimate due to strong variability, high barotropic and baroclinic eddy activity and short lateral coherence scales. The fact that the mass transports through Fram Strait do not balance complicates the assessment of the heat transport through Fram Strait into the Arctic Ocean and mass (volume) and salt (freshwater) balances for the entire Arctic Ocean are needed. The waters exiting the Arctic Ocean through Fram Strait are colder than those entering and with reasonable assumptions about the origin of the waters providing the net outflow it is possible to deduce the amount of the entering oceanic heat going to the atmosphere (>50%), to ice melt (20%). Almost all of this heat loss occurs in the Nansen Basin. The rest of the heat is used for heating the net outflow. It also becomes clear that freshwater, with its phase changes and its multiple transport pathways, plays a crucial role in the climate, not just of the Arctic Ocean but of the Arctic as a whole.

  13. Definitional mission: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion, Republic of the Marshall Islands. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, S.R.; Ross, J.M.

    1990-09-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the commercial viability of an Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) electric power plant at the Majuro Atoll in the Marshall Islands. It was concluded that various technology improvements and economic factors have converged to present a feasible opportunity. United States industrial and research organizations are technically capable of developing a commercial OTEC industry for domestic and export markets. It is estimated that 100% of OTEC equipment and services could be supplied by United States firms. However, Japan has aggressively pursued OTEC development with an apparent goal of dominating the export market.

  14. Response Of Ocean Carbon Export To Different Model Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caglar Yumruktepe, Veli; Salihoglu, Baris; Kideys, Ahmet E.

    2013-04-01

    Effects of climate change on the biological carbon pump (BCP) and vice-versa, and the influence of change in ecosystem structure on the dynamics of BCP are vital topics to understand the role of oceans in the global carbon cycle and sequestration of greenhouse gases. Construction of a complete carbon budget, requires better understanding of air-sea exchanges and the processes controlling the vertical and horizontal transport of carbon in the ocean, particularly the biological carbon pump. Improved parameterization of carbon sequestration within ecosystem models is vital to better understand and predict changes in the global carbon cycle. However, due to the complexity of processes controlling particle aggregation, sinking and decomposition, existing ecosystem models necessarily parameterize carbon sequestration using simple algorithms. For this reason, the primary aim of this study is to provide new parameterizations of the downward flux of organic carbon, suitable for inclusion in numerical models. The study area was chosen to be the North Atlantic Basin (NA) and the surrounding shelf seas. In the scope of this study, first, the skill of existing models in representing particle fluxes were compared theoretically. The unique algorithms used in three state-of-the art ecosystem models ERSEM, PISCES and MEDUSA have been compared and tested against observational data collected at the PAP mooring site. For testing purposes, algorithms were inserted into a common 1D pelagic ecosystem model. Following comparison of existing algorithms, new experimental results obtained from targeted mesocosm experiments and open ocean observations, will be utilized to develop improved formulations. New algorithms will be compared to existing model formulations using a standard validation data set complied within the framework of BASIN. In order to assess algorithm response under differing hydrographic environments, each set of algorithms will be tested within a 1D framework at three sites in the N Atlantic (PAP, ESTOC and BATS). Ultimately it is intended to feed improved algorithms to the 3D modelling community, for inclusion in coupled numerical models.

  15. Southern Ocean overturning, export production and climate variability over the past 1 Myr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaccard, S.; Hayes, C. T.; Martinez Garcia, A.; Galbraith, E. D.; Anderson, R. F.; Sigman, D. M.; Haug, G. H.

    2011-12-01

    Recently developed XRF core-scanning methods permit paleoceanographic reconstructions on time-scales similar to ice core temperature and atmospheric carbon dioxide measurements. We have investigated distribution of carbonate and biogenic barium (bioBa) - a proxy for integrated organic carbon export - in a sedimentary archive retrieved from the deep South Atlantic (ODP 1094, 53°S, 6°E, 2807 m) covering the past 1 Myr. These measurements are complemented with high-resolution, 230Th-normalized opal, bioBa and chlorin flux determinations spanning the last 150 kyrs. Our multi-proxy approach reveals that export production and biogenic carbonate preservation were tightly linked to atmospheric pCO2 reconstructions over the last 1 Myr. In particular, lukewarm interglacials (i.e. MIS 13-19) show generally lower organic matter export and reduced carbonate preservation when compared to more recent interglacials. This supports the critical contribution of Southern Ocean deglacial upwelling to modulate the partitioning of CO2 between the ocean interior and the atmosphere over the last million years, and immediately suggests that the moderate pCO2 increases during the lukewarm interglacials were due to a reduced dynamic range of Southern Ocean overturning. Changes in the vertical structure of the Southern Ocean water-column do not only prove to be crucial for the transitions from glacial to interglacial climate states. The decrease in upwelling following peak interglacial conditions leads the climate system to progressively converge towards colder, glacial conditions. Once a pCO2 threshold value of about 225 ppmv is reached, export production tends to stabilize around very low values, consistent with more strongly stratified conditions. This threshold also marks the abrupt inception of iron-rich mineral dust generation and deposition downwind of major South American dust sources, thereby catalyzing export production in the Subantarctic Zone of the Southern Ocean, to the north of ODP site 1094. New evidence from ODP site 1090 (42°S, 9°E, 3700 m) shows that iron fertilization in the SAZ would have permitted to sequester additional remineralized carbon in the ocean interior, forcing the climate system to reach full glacial conditions. This mechanism was only effective when the Southern Ocean lid was already sealed, precluding the sequestered CO2 to evade through the Antarctic valve. The threshold persisted throughout the lukewarm interval, suggesting that processes taking place in the Antarctic Zone of the Southern Ocean were responsible for the observed reduced interglacial pCO2 levels.

  16. Strong hemispheric coupling of glacial climate through freshwater discharge and ocean circulation.

    PubMed

    Knutti, R; Flückiger, J; Stocker, T F; Timmermann, A

    2004-08-19

    The climate of the last glacial period was extremely variable, characterized by abrupt warming events in the Northern Hemisphere, accompanied by slower temperature changes in Antarctica and variations of global sea level. It is generally accepted that this millennial-scale climate variability was caused by abrupt changes in the ocean thermohaline circulation. Here we use a coupled ocean-atmosphere-sea ice model to show that freshwater discharge into the North Atlantic Ocean, in addition to a reduction of the thermohaline circulation, has a direct effect on Southern Ocean temperature. The related anomalous oceanic southward heat transport arises from a zonal density gradient in the subtropical North Atlantic caused by a fast wave-adjustment process. We present an extended and quantitative bipolar seesaw concept that explains the timing and amplitude of Greenland and Antarctic temperature changes, the slow changes in Antarctic temperature and its similarity to sea level, as well as a possible time lag of sea level with respect to Antarctic temperature during Marine Isotope Stage 3. PMID:15318212

  17. Utilizing chromophoric dissolved organic matter measurements to derive export and reactivity of dissolved organic carbon exported to the Arctic Ocean: A case study of the Yukon River, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spencer, R.G.M.; Aiken, G.R.; Butler, K.D.; Dornblaser, M.M.; Striegl, R.G.; Hernes, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    The quality and quantity of dissolved organic matter (DOM) exported by Arctic rivers is known to vary with hydrology and this exported material plays a fundamental role in the biogeochemical cycling of carbon at high latitudes. We highlight the potential of optical measurements to examine DOM quality across the hydrograph in Arctic rivers. Furthermore, we establish chromophoric DOM (CDOM) relationships to dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and lignin phenols in the Yukon River and model DOC and lignin loads from CDOM measurements, the former in excellent agreement with long-term DOC monitoring data. Intensive sampling across the historically under-sampled spring flush period highlights the importance of this time for total export of DOC and particularly lignin. Calculated riverine DOC loads to the Arctic Ocean show an increase from previous estimates, especially when new higher discharge data are incorporated. Increased DOC loads indicate decreased residence times for terrigenous DOM in the Arctic Ocean with important implications for the reactivity and export of this material to the Atlantic Ocean. Citation: Spencer, R. G. M., G. R. Aiken, K. D. Butler, M. M. Dornblaser, R. G. Striegl, and P. J. Hernes (2009), Utilizing chromophoric dissolved organic matter measurements to derive export and reactivity of dissolved organic carbon exported to the Arctic Ocean: A case study of the Yukon River, Alaska, Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L06401, doi:10.1029/ 2008GL036831. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  18. Seasonal Variation, Export Dynamics and Consumption of Freshwater Invertebrates in an Estuarine Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, D. D.; Williams, N. E.

    1998-03-01

    In the Aber Estuary, North Wales, significant numbers of freshwater benthic invertebrates occurred in the tidal freshwater area. Distinct seasonal patterns were observed in their longitudinal zonation which appeared to be unrelated to variations in tidal inundation. The December extension downstream of freshwater taxa is hypothesized to be in response to decreasing water temperatures. In April, larvae/nymphs of the Trichoptera (caddisflies), Ephemeroptera (mayflies) and Plecoptera (stoneflies) ranged as far as a site inundated by 80·9% of all high tides, and larval Elmidae and Chironomidae (midges) occurred at the most marine site (inundated twice daily by all high tides). In July, with the exception of the Chironomidae, the range of most aquatic insects had contracted to the upper estuary. Although, in general, densities of aquatic insects decreased towards the lower estuary, significant densities persisted there. For example, maxima of 3514 chironomid larvae and 48 caddisfly larvae m -2were recorded at the 80·9% inundation site. An estimated 31×10 6freshwater invertebrates (weighing 62·6 kg), per annum, passed from fresh water into salt water across any given transect along the estuary. In comparison, the annual influx of invertebrates carried upstream by incoming tides was estimated to be 1·9×10 6(6·2%; weighing 2·5 kg). Predominant in the downstream drift were the larvae/nymphs and/or pupae of chironomids, mayflies, stoneflies and caddisflies. The ' reverse ' drift comprised mainly copepods, ostracods, amphipods and oligochaetes. Mites and the brackishwater amphipod Gammarus zaddachicommonly moved in both directions. Highest drift densities occurred in July, whereas the lowest densities occurred in late autumn and winter. Multiple regression analysis showed no relationship between total drift or ' reverse ' drift densities and any of the measured environmental variables. Many of the freshwater invertebrates appeared not to die upon passing into tidal sections but resumed a benthic existence by virtue of varying degrees of salt tolerance. Of the three fish species common in the estuary, eel, common goby and flounder, the last two preyed measurably on freshwater taxa. Whereas gobies tended to be opportunistic feeders, depending on the section of estuary that they occupied, flounder were more restricted to the upper estuary where they fed selectively on chironomid larvae. On the latter diet, between March and September, the mean wet weight of flounders increased by more than 100 times (from 5 to 540 mg). Gobies were more numerous in the estuary from September to February, and although they ate insects their primary prey was G. zaddachi.

  19. Carbon export efficiency and phytoplankton community composition in the Atlantic sector of the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moigne, Frédéric A. C.; Poulton, Alex J.; Henson, Stephanie A.; Daniels, Chris J.; Fragoso, Glaucia M.; Mitchell, Elaine; Richier, Sophie; Russell, Benjamin C.; Smith, Helen E. K.; Tarling, Geraint A.; Young, Jeremy R.; Zubkov, Mike

    2015-06-01

    Arctic primary production is sensitive to reductions in sea ice cover, and will likely increase into the future. Whether this increased primary production (PP) will translate into increased export of particulate organic carbon (POC) is currently unclear. Here we report on the POC export efficiency during summer 2012 in the Atlantic sector of the Arctic Ocean. We coupled 234-thorium based estimates of the export flux of POC to onboard incubation-based estimates of PP. Export efficiency (defined as the fraction of PP that is exported below 100 m depth: ThE-ratio) showed large variability (0.09 ± 0.19-1.3 ± 0.3). The highest ThE-ratio (1.3 ± 0.3) was recorded in a mono-specific bloom of Phaeocystis pouchetii located in the ice edge. Blooming diatom dominated areas also had high ThE-ratios (0.1 ± 0.1-0.5 ± 0.2), while mixed and/or prebloom communities showed lower ThE-ratios (0.10 ± 0.03-0.19 ± 0.05). Furthermore, using oxygen saturation, bacterial abundance, bacterial production, and zooplankton oxygen demand, we also investigated spatial variability in the degree to which this sinking material may be remineralized in the upper mesopelagic (<300 m). Our results suggest that blooming diatoms and P. pouchetii can export a significant fraction of their biomass below the surface layer (100 m) in the open Arctic Ocean. Also, we show evidence that the material sinking from a P. pouchetii bloom may be remineralized (>100 m) at a similar rate as the material sinking from diatom blooms in the upper mesopelagic, contrary to previous findings.

  20. The uptake and export of silicon and nitrogen in HNLC waters of the NE Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitney, Frank A.; Crawford, David W.; Yoshimura, Takeshi

    2005-04-01

    The high-nitrate, low-chlorophyll (HNLC) waters of the Gulf of Alaska tend towards silicate rather than nitrate depletion as phytoplankton utilize nutrients during summer. This tendency is enhanced when iron supply is elevated through natural inputs such as from coastally generated mesoscale eddies or through artificial enrichment as was carried out in an in situ experiment in July 2002. However, ship-board incubations with iron enrichment demonstrate nitrate rather than silicate depletion for these waters. The difference between in situ and in vitro experiments occurs at least in part because deck incubations do not allow export of particulate Si and N. Due to the more efficient recycling of nitrogen and carbon, export favours the removal of silicon from the upper ocean (the Si pump). Previous measurements at Ocean Station Papa (50N, 145W) show that 25% of the Si, but only 7% of the C and 4% of the N utilized during spring growth, is exported to a depth of 200 m. These results in the Gulf of Alaska agree with the present understanding of phytoplankton controls in other HNLC regions and show that any estimates of carbon export from iron enrichment should be based on Si- rather than N-limitation.

  1. A probabilistic assessment of calcium carbonate export and dissolution in the modern ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, Gianna; Steinacher, Marco; Joos, Fortunat

    2016-05-01

    The marine cycle of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) is an important element of the carbon cycle and co-governs the distribution of carbon and alkalinity within the ocean. However, CaCO3 export fluxes and mechanisms governing CaCO3 dissolution are highly uncertain. We present an observationally constrained, probabilistic assessment of the global and regional CaCO3 budgets. Parameters governing pelagic CaCO3 export fluxes and dissolution rates are sampled using a Monte Carlo scheme to construct a 1000-member ensemble with the Bern3D ocean model. Ensemble results are constrained by comparing simulated and observation-based fields of excess dissolved calcium carbonate (TA*). The minerals calcite and aragonite are modelled explicitly and ocean-sediment fluxes are considered. For local dissolution rates, either a strong or a weak dependency on CaCO3 saturation is assumed. In addition, there is the option to have saturation-independent dissolution above the saturation horizon. The median (and 68 % confidence interval) of the constrained model ensemble for global biogenic CaCO3 export is 0.90 (0.72-1.05) Gt C yr-1, that is within the lower half of previously published estimates (0.4-1.8 Gt C yr-1). The spatial pattern of CaCO3 export is broadly consistent with earlier assessments. Export is large in the Southern Ocean, the tropical Indo-Pacific, the northern Pacific and relatively small in the Atlantic. The constrained results are robust across a range of diapycnal mixing coefficients and, thus, ocean circulation strengths. Modelled ocean circulation and transport timescales for the different set-ups were further evaluated with CFC11 and radiocarbon observations. Parameters and mechanisms governing dissolution are hardly constrained by either the TA* data or the current compilation of CaCO3 flux measurements such that model realisations with and without saturation-dependent dissolution achieve skill. We suggest applying saturation-independent dissolution rates in Earth system models to minimise computational costs.

  2. Diverse patterns of ocean export productivity change across the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary: New insights from biogenic barium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, Pincelli M.; Norris, Richard D.

    2011-09-01

    One of the best-studied aspects of the K-Pg mass extinction is the decline and subsequent recovery of open ocean export productivity (e.g., the flux of organic matter from the surface to deep ocean). Some export proxies, including surface-to-deep water δ13C gradients and carbonate sedimentation rates, indicate a global decline in export productivity triggered by the extinction. In contrast, benthic foraminiferal and other geochemical productivity proxies suggest spatially and temporally heterogeneous K-Pg boundary effects. Here we address these conflicting export productivity patterns using new and compiled measurements of biogenic barium. Unlike a previous synthesis, we find that the boundary effect on export productivity and the timing of recovery varied considerably between different oceanic sites. The northeast and southwest Atlantic, Southern Ocean, and Indian Ocean records saw export production plummet and remain depressed for 350 thousand to 2 million years. Biogenic barium and other proxies in the central Pacific and some upwelling or neritic Atlantic sites indicate the opposite, with proxies recording either no change or increased export production in the early Paleocene. Our results suggest that widespread declines in surface-to-deep ocean δ13C do not record a global decrease in export productivity. Rather, independent proxies, including barium and other geochemical proxies, and benthic community structure, indicate that some regions were characterized by maintained or rapidly recovered organic flux from the surface ocean to the deep seafloor, while other regions had profound reductions in export productivity that persisted long into the Paleocene.

  3. A linkage between Asian dust, dissolved iron and marine export production in the deep ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yongxiang; Zhao, Tianliang; Song, Lianchun; Fang, Xiaomin; Yin, Yan; Deng, Zuqin; Wang, Suping; Fan, Shuxian

    2011-08-01

    Iron-addition experiments have revealed that iron supply exerts controls on biogeochemical cycles in the ocean and ultimately influences the Earth's climate system. The iron hypothesis in its broad outlines has been proved to be correct. However, the hypothesis needs to be verified with an observable biological response to specific dust deposition events. Plankton growth following the Asian dust storm over Ocean Station PAPA (50°N, 145°W) in the North Pacific Ocean in April 2001 was the first supportive evidence of natural aeolian iron inputs to ocean; The data were obtained through the SeaWiFS satellite and robot carbon explorers by Bishop et al. Using the NARCM modeling results in this study, the calculated total dust deposition flux was 35 mg m -2 per day in PAPA region from the dust storm of 11-13 April, 2001 into 0.0615 mg m -2 d -1 (about 1100 nM) soluble iron in the surface layer at Station PAPA. It was enough for about 1100 nM to enhance the efficiency of the marine biological pump and trigger the rapid increase of POC and chlorophyll. The iron fertilization hypothesis therefore is plausible. However, even if this specific dust event can support the iron fertilization hypothesis, long-term observation data are lacking in marine export production and continental dust. In this paper, we also conducted a simple correlation analysis between the diatoms and foraminifera at about 3000 m and 4000 m at two subarctic Pacific stations and the dust aerosol production from China's mainland. The correlation coefficient between marine export production and dust storm frequency in the core area of the dust storms was significantly high, suggesting that aerosols generated by Asian dust storm are the source of iron for organic matter fixation in the North Pacific Ocean. These results suggest that there could be an interlocking chain for the change of atmospheric dust aerosol-soluble iron-marine export production.

  4. A global perspective on riverine export of terrestrial organic carbon to the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galy, V.; Ehrenbrink, B. P. E.; Eglinton, T. I.

    2014-12-01

    The atmosphere is a small reservoir of carbon compared to rocks, the biosphere and the ocean. As such, its size is sensitive to small imbalance of C exchange with and between larger reservoirs. Over long timescales, the continental biosphere is mostly at equilibrium with the atmosphere, most of the net photosynthetic primary production being quickly returned to the atmosphere via respiration. However, rivers deliver particulate organic carbon (OC) from continental to oceanic reservoirs, where OC can be buried and stored over long timescales. This "leak" of biospheric carbon away from the biosphere-atmosphere loop represents a net sequestration of atmospheric C. Rivers also transfer OC from the rock reservoir (petrogenic C) to marine sediments, thereby transferring C between two reservoirs disconnected from the atmosphere. During this transfer, oxidation of petrogenic C represents another "leak'' of C, in this case towards the atmosphere. Riverine export of OC to the ocean thus fundamentally affects the atmospheric C inventory, over both long and short timescales. Nevertheless, global riverine OC export to and burial in marine sediments has heretofore remained poorly constrained and the respective fluxes of biospheric and petrogenic C have simply been unknown. Even more importantly, the mechanisms controlling OC export and burial have remained poorly defined, impeding our ability to make quantitative predictions of OC fluxes under forcing scenarios. Based on bulk, ramped-pyrolysis and molecular level 14C dating of OC in modern river sediments we present: 1) an evaluation of the global delivery of petrogenic and biospheric OC to the ocean and, 2) a characterization of the dominant drivers of petrogenic and biospheric OC delivery the ocean.

  5. Does Saharan dust deposition influence the export of particle fluxes in the tropical North Atlantic Ocean?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korte, Laura; van der Does, Michèlle; Munday, Chris; Brummer, Geert-Jan; Stuut, Jan-Berend

    2015-04-01

    Every year over 200 million tons of Saharan dust are blown over the Atlantic Ocean towards the Caribbean. On its journey most of the dust is removed from the atmosphere by either dry or wet deposition and is ending up in the ocean. Its input potentially stimulates phytoplankton growth and possibly also drags down organic matter through the water column to the sea floor. The role of dust as a means to export organic carbon from the surface ocean to the deep is still controversially discussed. However, aggregation plays a critical role in carbon export since sinking velocities depend amongst others on particle constituents, size and shape, porosity and way of formation. Higher sinking velocities lead to less degradation and remineralization, or, in other words: fresher material. Here we present particle fluxes from one year (October 2012 until November 2013) collected by three sediment traps at 1200 m depth along a profile across the tropical North Atlantic Ocean. Average total mass fluxes vary between 40 and 111 mg/m2/d depending on the location in the ocean. Peak fluxes of 230 and 270 mg/m2/d in the second half of April and by the end of October/start of November 2013 in the western tropical ocean are worth mentioning since they differ in nature; carbonaceous material dominate fluxes in spring and biogenic opal in autumn. The calculated rest fractions, which we interpret as wind-blown dust, vary between 41 mg/m2/d closest to the African coast, and 10 to 18 mg/m2/d to the western open ocean. Total organic carbon (TOC) and biogenic opal are related to the rest fraction for two traps; this relation improves with distance to the source. Unexpectedly, the rest fraction of the sediment trap closest to the African coast, do neither show a relation to organic matter nor to biogenic opal. Same findings hold true for the 15Ntot values of the material: they correlate negatively with the rest fraction, indicating fresher material. These correlations become stronger to the West Atlantic Ocean. Nevertheless, we speculate that Saharan dust deposition might influence the export and freshness of particles in the North Atlantic Ocean.

  6. Climate change increases riverine carbon outgassing while export to the ocean remains uncertain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langerwisch, F.; Walz, A.; Rammig, A.; Tietjen, B.; Thonicke, K.; Cramer, W.

    2015-08-01

    Carbon fluxes in the Amazon Basin are considerably influenced by annual flooding during which terrigenous organic material is imported to the river. This regular interaction affects carbon pools within the riverine system, terrestrial carbon, and carbon exported to the ocean and released to the atmosphere. The processes of generation, conversion, and transport of organic carbon in this coupled terrigenous-riverine system strongly interact and are climate-sensitive, yet their response to climate change is still largely unknown. To quantify climate change effects on carbon pools and on carbon fluxes within the river and to the ocean and the atmosphere, we developed the riverine carbon model RivCM, which is directly coupled to the well-established dynamic vegetation and hydrology model LPJmL. We show here that RivCM successfully reproduces observed values in exported carbon and riverine carbon concentration. We evaluate future changes in riverine carbon by applying RivCM for climate forcing from five climate models and three CO2 emission scenarios (SRES). We find that climate change causes a doubling of riverine organic carbon in the Southern and Western basin while reducing it by 20 % in the eastern and northern parts. In contrast, the amount of riverine inorganic carbon shows a 2- to 3-fold increase in the entire basin, independent of the SRES scenario. The export of carbon to the atmosphere increases as well with an average of about 30 %. In contrast, changes in future export of organic carbon to the Atlantic Ocean depend on the SRES scenario and are projected to either decrease by about 8.9 % (SRES A1B) or increase by about 9.1 % (SRES A2). Such changes in the terrigenous-riverine system could have local and regional impacts on the carbon budget of the whole Amazon Basin and parts of the Atlantic Ocean. Changes in the riverine carbon could lead to a shift in the riverine nutrient supply and pH, while changes in the exported carbon to the ocean leads to changes in the supply of organic material that acts as food source in the Atlantic. On the larger scale the increased outgassing of CO2 could turn the Amazon Basin from a sink of carbon to a considerable source. Therefore we propose that the coupling of terrestrial and riverine carbon budget should be included in subsequent analysis of the future regional carbon budget.

  7. Shallow Carbon Export from an Iron fertilised Plankton Bloom in the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, R.; Pollard, R.; Morris, P.; Statham, P.; Moore, C. M. M.; Lucas, M.

    2009-04-01

    Some regions of the global ocean, notably the Southern Ocean, have high levels of macronutrients yet low levels of chlorophyll (the high nutrient, low chlorophyll or HNLC condition). Numerous artificial iron fertilization experiments conducted in the Southern Ocean have resulted in enhanced phytoplankton biomass and macronutrient drawdown. However the subsequent long-term biogeochemical consequences of such iron fertilization are unclear due in part to the limited size and duration of such experiments. An alternative way to assess the affect of iron over the Southern Ocean biological carbon pump is to observe the evolution of plankton production in regions of the Southern Ocean where shallow topography and Ocean currents interact to promote to release terrestrial iron into HNLC waters. During 2004-5 RRS Discovery conduced a complex programme of observations in such a region around the Crozet Islands in the SW Indian Ocean. The results of this programme, focussing on a quantitative estimate of carbon export per unit iron addition, will be presented.

  8. A probabilistic assessment of calcium carbonate export and dissolution in the modern ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, G.; Steinacher, M.; Joos, F.

    2015-12-01

    The marine cycle of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) is an important element of the carbon cycle and co-governs the distribution of carbon and alkalinity within the ocean. However, CaCO3 fluxes and mechanisms governing CaCO3 dissolution are highly uncertain. We present an observationally-constrained, probabilistic assessment of the global and regional CaCO3 budgets. Parameters governing pelagic CaCO3 export fluxes and dissolution rates are sampled using a Latin-Hypercube scheme to construct a 1000 member ensemble with the Bern3D ocean model. Ensemble results are constrained by comparing simulated and observation-based fields of excess dissolved calcium carbonate (TA*). The minerals calcite and aragonite are modelled explicitly and ocean-sediment fluxes are considered. For local dissolution rates either a strong, a weak or no dependency on CaCO3 saturation is assumed. Median (68 % confidence interval) global CaCO3 export is 0.82 (0.67-0.98) Gt PIC yr-1, within the lower half of previously published estimates (0.4-1.8 Gt PIC yr-1). The spatial pattern of CaCO3 export is broadly consistent with earlier assessments. Export is large in the Southern Ocean, the tropical Indo-Pacific, the northern Pacific and relatively small in the Atlantic. Dissolution within the 200 to 1500 m depth range (0.33; 0.26-0.40 Gt PIC yr-1) is substantially lower than inferred from the TA*-CFC age method (1 ± 0.5 Gt PIC yr-1). The latter estimate is likely biased high as the TA*-CFC method neglects transport. The constrained results are robust across a range of diapycnal mixing coefficients and, thus, ocean circulation strengths. Modelled ocean circulation and transport time scales for the different setups were further evaluated with CFC11 and radiocarbon observations. Parameters and mechanisms governing dissolution are hardly constrained by either the TA* data or the current compilation of CaCO3 flux measurements such that model realisations with and without saturation-dependent dissolution achieve skill. We suggest to apply saturation-independent dissolution rates in Earth System Models to minimise computational costs.

  9. Correlations Between Sea-Surface Salinity Tendencies and Freshwater Fluxes in the Pacific Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Zhen; Adamec, David

    2007-01-01

    Temporal changes in sea-surface salinity (SSS) from 21 years of a high resolution model integration of the Pacific Ocean are correlated with the freshwater flux that was used to force the integration. The correlations are calculated on a 1 x10 grid, and on a monthly scale to assess the possibility of deducing evaporation minus precipitation (E-P) fields from the salinity measurements to be taken by the upcoming Aquarius/SAC-D mission. Correlations between the monthly mean E-P fields and monthly mean SSS temporal tendencies are mainly zonally-oriented, and are highest where the local precipitation is relatively high. Nonseasonal (deviations from the monthly mean) correlations are highest along mid-latitude storm tracks and are relatively small in the tropics. The response of the model's surface salinity to surface forcing is very complex, and retrievals of freshwater fluxes from SSS measurements alone will require consideration of other processes, including horizontal advection and vertical mixing, rather than a simple balance between the two.

  10. Oceanic Fluxes of Mass, Heat and Freshwater: A Global Estimate and Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacDonald, Alison Marguerite

    1995-01-01

    Data from fifteen globally distributed, modern, high resolution, hydrographic oceanic transects are combined in an inverse calculation using large scale box models. The models provide estimates of the global meridional heat and freshwater budgets and are used to examine the sensitivity of the global circulation, both inter and intra-basin exchange rates, to a variety of external constraints provided by estimates of Ekman, boundary current and throughflow transports. A solution is found which is consistent with both the model physics and the global data set, despite a twenty five year time span and a lack of seasonal consistency among the data. The overall pattern of the global circulation suggested by the models is similar to that proposed in previously published local studies and regional reviews. However, significant qualitative and quantitative differences exist. These differences are due both to the model definition and to the global nature of the data set.

  11. Magnitude of the Freshwater Turtle Exports from the US: Long Term Trends and Early Effects of Newly Implemented Harvest Management Regimes

    PubMed Central

    Mali, Ivana; Vandewege, Michael W.; Davis, Scott K.; Forstner, Michael R. J.

    2014-01-01

    Unregulated commercial harvest remains a major threat for turtles across the globe. Due to continuing demand from Asian markets, a significant number of turtles are exported from the United States of America (US). Beginning in 2007, several southeastern states in the US implemented restrictions on the commercial harvest of turtles, in order to address the unsustainable take. We have summarized freshwater turtle exports from the US between 2002 and 2012 and demonstrated that the magnitude of turtle exports from the US remained high although the exports decreased throughout the decade. Louisiana and California were the major exporters. The majority of exports were captive bred, and from two genera, Pseudemys and Trachemys. We review the changes over the decade and speculate that the increase in export of wild turtles out of Louisiana after 2007 could be a consequence of strict regulations in surrounding states (e.g., Alabama, Florida). We suggest that if wild turtle protection is a goal for conservation efforts, then these states should work together to develop comprehensive regulation reforms pertaining to the harvest of wild turtles. PMID:24475128

  12. Magnitude of the freshwater turtle exports from the US: long term trends and early effects of newly implemented harvest management regimes.

    PubMed

    Mali, Ivana; Vandewege, Michael W; Davis, Scott K; Forstner, Michael R J

    2014-01-01

    Unregulated commercial harvest remains a major threat for turtles across the globe. Due to continuing demand from Asian markets, a significant number of turtles are exported from the United States of America (US). Beginning in 2007, several southeastern states in the US implemented restrictions on the commercial harvest of turtles, in order to address the unsustainable take. We have summarized freshwater turtle exports from the US between 2002 and 2012 and demonstrated that the magnitude of turtle exports from the US remained high although the exports decreased throughout the decade. Louisiana and California were the major exporters. The majority of exports were captive bred, and from two genera, Pseudemys and Trachemys. We review the changes over the decade and speculate that the increase in export of wild turtles out of Louisiana after 2007 could be a consequence of strict regulations in surrounding states (e.g., Alabama, Florida). We suggest that if wild turtle protection is a goal for conservation efforts, then these states should work together to develop comprehensive regulation reforms pertaining to the harvest of wild turtles. PMID:24475128

  13. Annual cycles of deep-ocean biogeochemical export fluxes in subtropical and subantarctic waters, southwest Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nodder, Scott D.; Chiswell, Stephen M.; Northcote, Lisa C.

    2016-04-01

    The annual cycles of particle fluxes derived from moored sediment trap data collected during 2000-2012 in subtropical (STW) and subantarctic waters (SAW) east of New Zealand are presented. These observations are the most comprehensive export flux time series from temperate Southern Hemisphere latitudes to date. With high levels of variability, fluxes in SAW were markedly lower than in STW, reflecting the picophytoplankton-dominated communities in the iron-limited, high nutrient-low chlorophyll SAW. Austral spring chlorophyll blooms in surface STW were near synchronous with elevated fluxes of bio-siliceous, carbonate, and organic carbon-rich materials to the deep ocean, probably facilitated by diatom and/or coccolithophorid sedimentation. Lithogenic fluxes were also high in STW, compared to SAW, reflecting proximity to the New Zealand landmass. In contrast, the highest biogenic fluxes in SAW occurred in spring when surface chlorophyll concentrations were low, while highest annual chlorophyll concentrations were in summer with no associated flux increase. We hypothesize that the high spring export in SAW results from subsurface chlorophyll accumulation that is not evident from remote-sensing satellites. This material was also rich in biogenic silica, perhaps related to the preferential export of diatoms and other silica-producing organisms, such as silicoflagellates and radiolarians. Organic carbon fluxes in STW are similar to that of other mesotrophic to oligotrophic waters (˜6-7 mg C m-2 d-1), whereas export from SAW is below the global average (˜3 mg C m-2 d-1). Regional differences in flux across the SW Pacific and Tasman region reflect variations in physical processes and ecosystem structure and function.

  14. 234Th-Based Carbon Export around Free-Drifting Icebergs in the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, T. J.; Smith, K. L., Jr.; Hexel, C. R.; Dudgeon, Rebekkah; Sherman, Alana D.; Vernet, M.; Kaufmann, R. S.

    2011-06-01

    The impact of free-drifting icebergs on the efficiency of carbon export from the upper water column was measured using the disequilibrium of 234Th and its parent 238U. The study addressed the null hypothesis that free-drifting icebergs do not alter 234Th deficiency and carbon export compared to surrounding waters. Upper-water-column inventories of 234Th were measured at six stations in the Weddell Sea concurrently with four deployments of Lagrangian Sediment Traps (LSTs) during a cruise in March/April 2009. Four stations were sampled ranging from 0.3 km to <20 km of the edge of a large free-drifting iceberg (C-18a) and two were sampled at distances >60 km from C-18a. Temperature and salinity anomalies indicated enhanced upwelling and turbulent mixing extending downstream of the iceberg to a minimum of ˜20 km from the iceberg edge. Separate studies of the impact of C-18a on water column physical properties were used to define the extent of the iceberg's influence on surrounding waters. The largest upper-water-column deficiencies in the inventories of 234Th were measured in close proximity and downstream of the iceberg and extending to below 100 m depth. A steady-state model was used to estimate the export of 234Th from the upper water column. Organic carbon export was calculated using C/Th from the concurrent LST collections. Comparison of stations within the iceberg's influence (close proximity and downstream to within 20 km of the iceberg) and far-field (greater than 60 km) measurements showed a factor of 3 increase in organic carbon export near the iceberg. The factor correlated well with the results from the near- and far-field LST measurements. Differences in the magnitude of carbon export at 100 and 600 m indicate that ˜90 percent of the exported material is regenerated by 600 m depth. This study confirms that the increased abundance of large free-drifting icebergs in the Southern Ocean can contribute to the drawdown of atmospheric CO 2 through increased organic carbon export.

  15. Interannual and Spatial Variability of Global Ocean Heat/Freshwater Content Identified from GTSPP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, P. C.; Sun, C.

    2013-12-01

    Global Temperature and Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) is a cooperative international project since 1990. The GTSPP handles all temperature and salinity profile data including XBT, CTDs, thermistor chain data, and Argo observations. Near-real time gridded (T, S) dataset was established from GTSPP since 1990 with horizontal resolution of (1o×1o) and temporal increment of 1 month using the recently developed optimal spectral decomposition (OSD) method. With this new monthly varying gridded dataset, the upper ocean (surface to 300 m depth) heat content OHC300 and freshwater content FWC300 were calculated at each horizontal grid point. The empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis was conducted on the temporally varying global 2D OHC300 anomaly relative to its seasonal variation. A new phenomenon, global ocean tripole, was discovered. The EOF-1 mode (44.2% variance) represents the classical El Nino/La Nina phenomenon. The EOF-2 mode (14.6%) represents the Indian Ocean Dipole mode and the El Nino Modoki. Its features and connection to climate variability is also discussed. The empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis was conducted on the temporally varying global 2D FWC300 anomaly relative to its seasonal variation. The EOF-1 mode (73.7% variance) represents near global-scale variability with the largest anomaly appearing in the Indian Ocean near southeast of Africa. The first principal component (PC1) shows decadal variability. The temporal-spatial variability represented by the EOF-1 mode shows rapid increasing of global FWC300 from 1999 to 2005 and sustaining the high values after 2005. Interpretations of the observational results to recent global warming will also be presented.

  16. Increased ocean carbon export in the Sargasso Sea is countered by its enhanced mesopelagic attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomas, M. W.; Steinberg, D. K.; Dickey, T.; Carlson, C. A.; Nelson, N. B.; Condon, R. H.; Bates, N. R.

    2009-10-01

    Photosynthetic CO2 uptake by oceanic phytoplankton and subsequent export of particulate organic carbon (POC) to the ocean interior comprises a globally significant biological carbon pump, controlled in part by the composition of the planktonic community. The strength and efficiency of this pump depends upon the balance of particle production in the euphotic zone and remineralization of those particles in the mesopelagic (defined here as depths between 150 and 300 m), but how these processes respond to climate-driven changes in the physical environment is not completely understood. In the Sargasso Sea, from 1996-2007, we have observed a decade-long >50% increase in euphotic zone integrated autotrophic biomass (estimated from chlorophyll TChl-a from the surface ocean, prokaryotic phytoplankton, primary production and shallow (150 m) POC export coinciding with a shift in the mean phase of the winter North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) from consistently positive to neutral but variable. During this same period mesopelagic POC flux attenuation has doubled such that carbon sequestration below 300 m, the maximum winter/spring ventilation depth, has not changed. The increased mesopelagic POC attenuation appears mediated by changes in plankton community composition and metabolic activity in both the euphotic and mesopelagic zones which are counter to extant hypotheses regarding inter-relationships between phytoplankton community composition, productivity and carbon export, and have significant impacts on how the Sargasso Sea ecosystem, at least, is modeled. Moreover, these time-series observations suggest that processes in the euphotic zone and mesopelagic are tightly coupled and should be considered together in future research.

  17. Simulating the natural variability of the freshwater budget of the Arctic ocean from the mid to late Holocene using LOVECLIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, F. J.; Goosse, H.; Renssen, H.

    2012-04-01

    The influence of freshwater on the long term climatic variability of the Arctic region is currently of significant interest. Alterations to the natural variability of the oceanic, terrestrial and atmospheric sources of freshwater to the Arctic ocean, caused by anthropogenic induced warming, are likely to have far reaching effects on oceanic processes and climate. A number of these changes are already observable, such as an intensification of the hydrological cycle, a 7% increase in Eurasian river runoff (1936-1999), a 9% reduction of sea-ice extent per decade (1979-2006), a 120km northward migration of permafrost in Northern Canada (1968-1994), and air temperatures 6°C warmer, in parts, from 2007 to 2010, when compared to the 1958-1996 average. All of these changes add another layer of complexity to understanding the role of the freshwater budget, and this makes it difficult to say with any certainty how these future changes will impact freshwater fluxes of the Arctic gateways, such as the Bering Strait, Fram Strait, Canadian Arctic Archipelago and the Barents Sea inflow. Despite these difficulties, there have been studies that have integrated the available data, from both in situ measurements and modelling studies, and used this as a basis to form a picture of the current freshwater budget, and then project upon these hypotheses for the future (Holland et al., 2007). However, one particular aspect of these future projections that is lacking is the accountability of how much future variance is attributable to both natural variability and anthropogenic influences. Here we present results of a mid to late (6-0ka) Holocene transient simulation, using the earth model of intermediate complexity, LOVECLIM (Goosse et al., 2010). The model is forced with orbital and greenhouse gas forcings appropriate for the time period. The results will highlight the natural variability of the oceanic, terrestrial and atmospheric components of the freshwater budget, over decadal and centennial timescales. When computing the freshwater budget for the period, where in situ measurements are available, LOVECLIM has been shown to perform reasonably well. The intention here is not to present a fully quantitative assessment of the freshwater budget of the Arctic Ocean as such, but to highlight the natural variability of the freshwater budget and its individual components. We hope that this inspires other modelling groups to take a similar approach and work towards understanding the natural variability of the freshwater budget over timescales longer than current measurements allow, and modelling studies have previously attempted. Goosse, H., Brovkin, V., Fichefet, T., Haarsma, R., Huybrechts, P., Jongma, J., Mouchet, A., Selten, F., Barriat, P-Y., Campin, J-M., Deleersnijder, E., Driesschaert, E., Goelzer, H., Janssens, I., Loutre, M-F., Morales Maqueda, M.A., Opsteegh, T., Mathieu, P-P., Munhoven, G., Pettersson, E.J., Renssen, H., Roche, D.M., Schaeffer, M., Tartinville, B., Timmermann, A., Weber, S.L. (2010) Description of the Earth System Model of Intermediate Complexity LOVECLIM Version 1.2, Geoscientific Model Development, 3:603-633 doi: 10.5194/gmd-3-603-2010. Holland, M.M., Finnis, J., Barrett, A.P., Serreze, M.C. (2007) Projected Changes in Arctic Ocean Freshwater Budgets, Journal of Geophysical Research, 112, G04S55, doi:10.1029/2006JG000354, 2007

  18. Plutonium and americium export to the north-east Pacific Ocean by Columbia River runoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beasley, T. M.; Ball, L. A.; Blakesley, B. A.

    1981-12-01

    Between July 1978 and July 1979, monthly samples of water collected near the mouth of the Columbia River were analyzed for Pu and Am to budget the annual quantity of these radionuclides exported to the adjacent coastal zone. During this period, approximately 70mCi of 239, 240Pu and 17 mCi of 241Am were carried by the river to the ocean. From the depositional history of a fine-grained sediment core raised from within the Columbia River estuary, an estimated 4-8 Ci of 239, 240Pu and 1-2 Ci of 241Am have entered the north-east Pacific Ocean by river transport since the late 1950s. This input would have increased the transuranic inventories in adjacent coastal sediments by at most 25 times those expected as a result of direct atmospheric fallout.

  19. Export fluxes in a naturally iron-fertilized area of the Southern Ocean - Part 2: Importance of diatom resting spores and faecal pellets for export

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rembauville, M.; Blain, S.; Armand, L.; Quéguiner, B.; Salter, I.

    2015-06-01

    The biological composition of the material exported to a moored sediment trap located under the winter mixed layer of the naturally fertilized Kerguelen Plateau in the Southern Ocean was studied over an annual cycle. Despite iron availability in spring, the annual particulate organic carbon (POC) export (98.2 mmol m-2) at 289 m was low, but annual biogenic silica export was significant (114 mmol m-2). This feature was related to the abundance of empty diatom cells and the ratio of full to empty cells exerted a first-order control in BSi : POC export stoichiometry of the biological pump. Chaetoceros Hyalochaete spp. and Thalassiosira antarctica resting spores were responsible for more than 60% of the annual POC flux that occurred during two very short export events of < 14 days in spring-summer. Relatively low diatom fluxes were observed over the remainder of the year. Faecal pellet contribution to annual carbon flux was lower (34%) and reached its seasonal maximum in autumn and winter (> 80%). The seasonal progression of faecal pellet types revealed a clear transition from small spherical shapes (small copepods) in spring, to larger cylindrical and ellipsoid shapes in summer (euphausiids and large copepods) and finally to large tabular shapes (salps) in autumn and winter. We propose in this high-biomass, low-export (HBLE) environment that small but highly silicified and fast-sinking resting spores are able to bypass the intense grazing pressure and efficient carbon transfer to higher trophic levels that are responsible for the low fluxes observed the during the remainder of the year. More generally our study also provides a statistical framework linking the ecological succession of diatom and zooplankton communities to the seasonality of carbon and silicon export within an iron-fertilized bloom region in the Southern Ocean.

  20. Climate change decouples oceanic primary and export productivity and organic carbon burial

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Cristina; Kucera, Michal; Mix, Alan C.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding responses of oceanic primary productivity, carbon export, and burial to climate change is essential for model-based projection of biological feedbacks in a high-CO2 world. Here we compare estimates of productivity based on the composition of fossil diatom floras with organic carbon burial off Oregon in the Northeast Pacific across a large climatic transition at the last glacial termination. Although estimated primary productivity was highest during the Last Glacial Maximum, carbon burial was lowest, reflecting reduced preservation linked to low sedimentation rates. A diatom size index further points to a glacial decrease (and deglacial increase) in the fraction of fixed carbon that was exported, inferred to reflect expansion, and contraction, of subpolar ecosystems that today favor smaller plankton. Thus, in contrast to models that link remineralization of carbon to temperature, in the Northeast Pacific, we find dominant ecosystem and sea floor control such that intervals of warming climate had more efficient carbon export and higher carbon burial despite falling primary productivity. PMID:25453073

  1. Climate change decouples oceanic primary and export productivity and organic carbon burial.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Cristina; Kucera, Michal; Mix, Alan C

    2015-01-13

    Understanding responses of oceanic primary productivity, carbon export, and burial to climate change is essential for model-based projection of biological feedbacks in a high-CO2 world. Here we compare estimates of productivity based on the composition of fossil diatom floras with organic carbon burial off Oregon in the Northeast Pacific across a large climatic transition at the last glacial termination. Although estimated primary productivity was highest during the Last Glacial Maximum, carbon burial was lowest, reflecting reduced preservation linked to low sedimentation rates. A diatom size index further points to a glacial decrease (and deglacial increase) in the fraction of fixed carbon that was exported, inferred to reflect expansion, and contraction, of subpolar ecosystems that today favor smaller plankton. Thus, in contrast to models that link remineralization of carbon to temperature, in the Northeast Pacific, we find dominant ecosystem and sea floor control such that intervals of warming climate had more efficient carbon export and higher carbon burial despite falling primary productivity. PMID:25453073

  2. Satellite-based global-ocean mass balance estimates of interannual variability and emerging trends in continental freshwater discharge

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Tajdarul H.; Famiglietti, James S.; Chambers, Don P.; Willis, Josh K.; Hilburn, Kyle

    2010-01-01

    Freshwater discharge from the continents is a key component of Earth’s water cycle that sustains human life and ecosystem health. Surprisingly, owing to a number of socioeconomic and political obstacles, a comprehensive global river discharge observing system does not yet exist. Here we use 13 years (1994–2006) of satellite precipitation, evaporation, and sea level data in an ocean mass balance to estimate freshwater discharge into the global ocean. Results indicate that global freshwater discharge averaged 36,055 km3/y for the study period while exhibiting significant interannual variability driven primarily by El Niño Southern Oscillation cycles. The method described here can ultimately be used to estimate long-term global discharge trends as the records of sea level rise and ocean temperature lengthen. For the relatively short 13-year period studied here, global discharge increased by 540 km3/y2, which was largely attributed to an increase of global-ocean evaporation (768 km3/y2). Sustained growth of these flux rates into long-term trends would provide evidence for increasing intensity of the hydrologic cycle. PMID:20921364

  3. Controls on and variability in particle export and flux attenuation in the ocean's twilight zone (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buesseler, K.; Boyd, P. W.

    2010-12-01

    Pelagic foodwebs drive a flux of >10 Gt C yr-1 that exits surface waters, mostly via sinking particles through the ocean’s “biological pump”. Most of this particle flux is remineralized in the poorly studied waters of the twilight zone, i.e. the layer underlying the euphotic zone and extending to 1000 m. Changes in the the magnitude of this pump and the length scales of remineralization will impact oceanic CO2 uptake. It has been difficult to compare the strength and efficiency of the biological pump in the twilight zone between oceanic provinces/regions due to: 1) variability in methods (traps, radionuclides, other budgets/models), 2) a lack of data (fluxes and supporting process information), especially covering seasonal/annual time-scales, and 3) the metrics used to parameterize export efficiency and flux attenuation. This was the motivation behind a reanalysis of selected twilight zone data that led to a new conceptual framework which can be used to compare the strength and efficiency of the biological pump between different regions and seasons (Buesseler and Boyd, L&O, v54(4), 2009, 1210-1232). This analysis confirms that we need to be more careful in our consideration of regional variability in euphotic zone depths when we compare biological pump efficiencies and the processes that control these differences. To this end, we compare the ratio of POC flux at the base of the euphotic zone (Ez) to net primary production, called the Ez-ratio, to distinguish it from depth normalized flux export ratios (e-ratios). In addition, conventional curve fitting of particle flux data vs. depth (i.e. Martin et al., 1987) can skew our interpretation of twilight zone processes, and thus attenuation below Ez is parameterized by the ratio of POC flux 100 m below Ez to the flux at Ez. This transfer efficiency, T100, varies from <20% to 100%. These new metrics are used to separate the ocean into regions and times of high and low surface export and subsurface attenuation. This presentation will review our knowledge of flux variabiltiy and attenuation in the twilight zone and expand the analyses presented in Buesseler and Boyd (2009) to other sites and using other flux methods. What is also important to consider, are the spatial scales of net primary production and export, which likely differ and hence introduce another level of uncertainty in our ability to understand oceanic CO2 uptake and C export. At present, we have a poorly constrained estimate of carbon sequestration via the biological pump, which, along with our limited understanding of the processes that control its magnitude, hinders our ability to predict the strength of oceanic uptake of CO2 and how this will be altered by a changing climate.

  4. Comparative Analysis of Japanese Three-Spined Stickleback Clades Reveals the Pacific Ocean Lineage Has Adapted to Freshwater Environments while the Japan Sea Has Not

    PubMed Central

    Ravinet, Mark; Takeuchi, Naoko; Kume, Manabu; Mori, Seiichi; Kitano, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Divergent selection and adaptive divergence can increase phenotypic diversification amongst populations and lineages. Yet adaptive divergence between different environments, habitats or niches does not occur in all lineages. For example, the colonization of freshwater environments by ancestral marine species has triggered adaptive radiation and phenotypic diversification in some taxa but not in others. Studying closely related lineages differing in their ability to diversify is an excellent means of understanding the factors promoting and constraining adaptive evolution. A well-known example of the evolution of increased phenotypic diversification following freshwater colonization is the three-spined stickleback. Two closely related stickleback lineages, the Pacific Ocean and the Japan Sea occur in Japan. However, Japanese freshwater stickleback populations are derived from the Pacific Ocean lineage only, suggesting the Japan Sea lineage is unable to colonize freshwater. Using stable isotope data and trophic morphology, we first show higher rates of phenotypic and ecological diversification between marine and freshwater populations within the Pacific Ocean lineage, confirming adaptive divergence has occurred between the two lineages and within the Pacific Ocean lineage but not in the Japan Sea lineage. We further identified consistent divergence in diet and foraging behaviour between marine forms from each lineage, confirming Pacific Ocean marine sticklebacks, from which all Japanese freshwater populations are derived, are better adapted to freshwater environments than Japan Sea sticklebacks. We suggest adaptive divergence between ancestral marine populations may have played a role in constraining phenotypic diversification and adaptive evolution in Japanese sticklebacks. PMID:25460163

  5. Comparative analysis of Japanese three-spined stickleback clades reveals the Pacific Ocean lineage has adapted to freshwater environments while the Japan Sea has not.

    PubMed

    Ravinet, Mark; Takeuchi, Naoko; Kume, Manabu; Mori, Seiichi; Kitano, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Divergent selection and adaptive divergence can increase phenotypic diversification amongst populations and lineages. Yet adaptive divergence between different environments, habitats or niches does not occur in all lineages. For example, the colonization of freshwater environments by ancestral marine species has triggered adaptive radiation and phenotypic diversification in some taxa but not in others. Studying closely related lineages differing in their ability to diversify is an excellent means of understanding the factors promoting and constraining adaptive evolution. A well-known example of the evolution of increased phenotypic diversification following freshwater colonization is the three-spined stickleback. Two closely related stickleback lineages, the Pacific Ocean and the Japan Sea occur in Japan. However, Japanese freshwater stickleback populations are derived from the Pacific Ocean lineage only, suggesting the Japan Sea lineage is unable to colonize freshwater. Using stable isotope data and trophic morphology, we first show higher rates of phenotypic and ecological diversification between marine and freshwater populations within the Pacific Ocean lineage, confirming adaptive divergence has occurred between the two lineages and within the Pacific Ocean lineage but not in the Japan Sea lineage. We further identified consistent divergence in diet and foraging behaviour between marine forms from each lineage, confirming Pacific Ocean marine sticklebacks, from which all Japanese freshwater populations are derived, are better adapted to freshwater environments than Japan Sea sticklebacks. We suggest adaptive divergence between ancestral marine populations may have played a role in constraining phenotypic diversification and adaptive evolution in Japanese sticklebacks. PMID:25460163

  6. Enhanced Particulate Organic Carbon Export at Eddy Edges in the Oligotrophic Western North Pacific Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Yung-Yen; Hung, Chin-Chang; Gong, Gwo-Ching; Chung, Wan-Chen; Wang, Yu-Huai; Lee, I-Huan; Chen, Kuo-Shu; Ho, Chuang-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Mesoscale eddies in the subtropical oligotrophic ocean are ubiquitous and play an important role in nutrient supply and oceanic primary production. However, it is still unclear whether these mesoscale eddies can efficiently transfer CO2 from the atmosphere to deep waters via biological pump because of the sampling difficulty due to their transient nature. In 2007, particulate organic carbon (POC) fluxes, measured below the euphotic zone at the edge of warm eddy were 136–194 mg-C m−2 d−1 which was greatly elevated over that (POC flux = 26–35 mg-C m−2 d−1) determined in the nutrient-depleted oligotrophic waters in the Western North Pacific (WNP). In 2010, higher POC fluxes (83–115 mg-C m−2 d−1) were also observed at the boundary of mesoscale eddies in the WNP. The enhanced POC flux at the edge of eddies was mainly attributed to both large denuded diatom frustules and zooplankton fecal pellets based on scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination. The result suggests that mesoscale eddies in the oligotrophic waters in the subtropical WNP can efficiently increase the oceanic carbon export flux and the eddy edge is a crucial conduit in carbon sequestration to deep waters. PMID:26171611

  7. Enhanced Particulate Organic Carbon Export at Eddy Edges in the Oligotrophic Western North Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Shih, Yung-Yen; Hung, Chin-Chang; Gong, Gwo-Ching; Chung, Wan-Chen; Wang, Yu-Huai; Lee, I-Huan; Chen, Kuo-Shu; Ho, Chuang-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Mesoscale eddies in the subtropical oligotrophic ocean are ubiquitous and play an important role in nutrient supply and oceanic primary production. However, it is still unclear whether these mesoscale eddies can efficiently transfer CO2 from the atmosphere to deep waters via biological pump because of the sampling difficulty due to their transient nature. In 2007, particulate organic carbon (POC) fluxes, measured below the euphotic zone at the edge of warm eddy were 136-194 mg-C m-2 d-1 which was greatly elevated over that (POC flux = 26-35 mg-C m-2 d-1) determined in the nutrient-depleted oligotrophic waters in the Western North Pacific (WNP). In 2010, higher POC fluxes (83-115 mg-C m-2 d-1) were also observed at the boundary of mesoscale eddies in the WNP. The enhanced POC flux at the edge of eddies was mainly attributed to both large denuded diatom frustules and zooplankton fecal pellets based on scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination. The result suggests that mesoscale eddies in the oligotrophic waters in the subtropical WNP can efficiently increase the oceanic carbon export flux and the eddy edge is a crucial conduit in carbon sequestration to deep waters. PMID:26171611

  8. Chloropigment nitrogen isotopes: new insights on export production during oceanic anoxic events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, M. B.; Robinson, R. S.; Pearson, A.

    2011-12-01

    The Mesozoic is marked by several widespread occurrences of intense organic matter burial, corresponding to proposed Oceanic Anoxic Events (OAEs). Sediments from the largest of these events, the Cenomanian-Turonian OAE 2, are characterized by lower nitrogen isotope ratios than are seen in modern marine settings. We use a high-resolution porphyrin nitrogen isotope record through OAE 2 to interpret nitrogen isotope depletion that is common during OAEs. Nitrogen isotope values of sedimentary chloropigments reflect a diagenetically unaltered signal of surface water nitrogen sources. Additionally, due to taxonomic differences in chlorophyll nitrogen fractionation, the nitrogen isotopic offset between chloropigments and bulk nitrogen can be used to estimate the relative contribution of cyanobacteria and eukaryotic algae to export production. Our porphyrin data show that eukaryotes contributed the quantitative majority of export production throughout OAE 2, suggesting that any explanation for the OAE nitrogen cycle and its isotopic values be consistent with a eukaryote-dominated ecosystem. We propose that new production during OAE 2 primarily was driven by direct assimilation of upwelled NH4+, supplemented by diazotrophy. A marine nitrogen reservoir dominated by NH4+, in combination with known kinetic isotope effects, could lead to eukaryotic biomass depleted in 15N.

  9. New Biomarker Approaches for Investigating Export Productivity in the Post-K/Pg Living Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pancost, R.; Taylor, K. W.; Hollis, C. J.

    2012-12-01

    The long-term consequences of the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K/Pg) boundary event on the Earth system have been the subject of much scrutiny. Postulated climate events include a brief period of global cooling induced by sulphate aerosols (the so-called 'impact winter') and an interval of gradual warming caused by impact-induced CO2 release, as well as longer-term climatic oscillations during the subsequent 1 to 3Myr, including periods of sustained cooling. Associated with these were putative changes in the biogeochemical cycle, including suggestions that export production was much reduced and brought about a decrease in the deep to shallow water carbon isotope gradient. In this study we develop new biomarker-based climate and biogeochemical records for the mid-Waipara River section, NZ. We have used these to confirm hypotheses that: a) the post-K/Pg interval was characterised by a negative carbon isotope excursion, documented by both algal and higher plant biomarkers; b) that dramatic fluctuations in ocean temperature followed the K/Pg in the SW Pacific but that there was an overall cooling compared to the Late Cretaceous; c) that the terrestrial biosphere was affected bringing about decreased higher plant inputs to marginal marine sediments; and d) that the biological pump was less efficient during the first ca. 1 to 3 Myr of the Danian. Here we focus on the final aspect, proposing that the distribution of glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGT) can be used not only as an ocean temperature proxy but to evaluate export production dynamics. We have shown that the ratio of GDGT-2/GDGT-3 (where numerals denote number of cyclopentyl moieties) increases with water column depth in modern and ancient oceans. In Waipara sediments spanning nearly 25 million years, 2/3 ratios are uniformly low (2-3); the only exception is the interval following the K/Pg boundary, during which they markedly increase to values of 6 to 10. We argue that this is evidence for a less efficient biological pump, i.e. the putative bias of GDGT export towards shallow waters was absent such that deeper waters represented a more prominent contribution to underlying sediments. This interpretation is consistent with a decrease in TOC contents and algal biomarker d13C values. We note, however, that there is little evidence for an algal extinction as a range of C27 to C30 sterols continued to be deposited throughout the entire section. Hence, we favour the 'Living Ocean' model for the SW Pacific during the interval following the K/Pg (as opposed to the more extreme 'Strangelove Ocean'), in which the biological pump was less effective but primary productivity was sustained.

  10. Export production and its regulating factors in the West Antarctica Peninsula region of the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kuan; Ducklow, Hugh; Vernet, Maria; Cassar, Nicolas; Bender, Michael L.

    2012-06-01

    In connection with the Palmer LTER program, mixed layer water samples were collected during the cruise of the L.M. Gould in Jan., 2008 at 49 stations on a 20 × 100 km grid in the West Antarctica Peninsula (WAP) region of the Southern Ocean. In this study, [O2]/[Ar] ratios and the triple isotope composition of dissolved O2 were measured, and were used to estimate net community O2 production (NCP) and gross primary O2production (GPP), respectively. These estimates are further converted to carbon export production, primary production and the f-ratio. Our measurements give NCP ranging from -3 to 76 mmol O2 m-2 day-1 (-25 to 650 mg C m-2 day-1), and GPP from 40 to 220 mmol O2 m-2 day-1 (180 to 1010 mg C m-2 day-1). The O2 NCP/GPP ratios range from -0.04 to 0.43, corresponding to f-ratios of -0.08 to 0.83. NCP and the NCP/GPP ratio are highest in the northern coastal areas, and decrease to lower values toward the southern coastal area and the open ocean. The inshore-offshore gradient appears to be regulated primarily by iron availability, as supported by the positive correlation between NCP and Fv/Fm ratios (r2 = 0.22, p < 0.05). Mixed layer depth (MLD) is inversely correlated with NCP (r2 = 0.21, p < 0.002) and NCP/GPP (r2 = 0.21, p < 0.02), and highest NCP occurred in the fresh water lenses probably formed from melted coastal glaciers. These results suggest that export production and the f-ratio increase where water stratification is intensified by input of fresh meltwater, and that mixed layer stratification is the major factor regulating NCP in the inner-shelf and coastal regions. Along-shelf variability of phytoplankton community composition is highly correlated with NCP, i.e., NCP increases when the diatom-dominated community in the south transitions to the cryptophyte-dominated one in the north. A high correlation is also observed between NCP and the logarithm of the surface chlorophyll concentration (r2 = 0.72, p < 0.0001) , which makes it possible to estimate carbon export as a function of Chl a concentration in this region.

  11. Bistability of the Atlantic overturning circulation in a global climate model and links to ocean freshwater transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, E.; Smith, R. S.; Allison, L. C.; Gregory, J. M.; Woollings, T. J.; Pohlmann, H.; de Cuevas, B.

    2011-05-01

    The possibility of a rapid collapse in the strength of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC), with associated impacts on climate, has long been recognized. The suggested basis for this risk is the existence of two stable regimes of the AMOC (‘on’ and ‘off’), and such bistable behaviour has been identified in a range of simplified climate models. However, up to now, no state-of-the-art atmosphere-ocean coupled global climate model (AOGCM) has exhibited such behaviour, leading to the interpretation that the AMOC is more stable than simpler models indicate. Here we demonstrate AMOC bistability in the response to freshwater perturbations in the FAMOUS AOGCM - the most complex AOGCM to exhibit such behaviour to date. The results also support recent suggestions that the direction of the net freshwater transport at the southern boundary of the Atlantic by the AMOC may be a useful physical indicator of the existence of bistability. We also present new estimates for this net freshwater transport by the AMOC from a range of ocean reanalyses which suggest that the Atlantic AMOC is currently in a bistable regime, although with large uncertainties. More accurate observational constraints, and an improved physical understanding of this quantity, could help narrow uncertainty in the future evolution of the AMOC and to assess the risk of a rapid AMOC collapse.

  12. Persistent export of 231Pa from the deep central Arctic Ocean over the past 35,000 years.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Sharon S; McManus, Jerry F; Curry, William B; Brown-Leger, L Susan

    2013-05-30

    The Arctic Ocean has an important role in Earth's climate, both through surface processes such as sea-ice formation and transport, and through the production and export of waters at depth that contribute to the global thermohaline circulation. Deciphering the deep Arctic Ocean's palaeo-oceanographic history is a crucial part of understanding its role in climatic change. Here we show that sedimentary ratios of the radionuclides thorium-230 ((230)Th) and protactinium-231 ((231)Pa), which are produced in sea water and removed by particle scavenging on timescales of decades to centuries, respectively, record consistent evidence for the export of (231)Pa from the deep Arctic and may indicate continuous deep-water exchange between the Arctic and Atlantic oceans throughout the past 35,000 years. Seven well-dated box-core records provide a comprehensive overview of (231)Pa and (230)Th burial in Arctic sediments during glacial, deglacial and interglacial conditions. Sedimentary (231)Pa/(230)Th ratios decrease nearly linearly with increasing water depth above the core sites, indicating efficient particle scavenging in the upper water column and greater influence of removal by lateral transport at depth. Although the measured (230)Th burial is in balance with its production in Arctic sea water, integrated depth profiles for all time intervals reveal a deficit in (231)Pa burial that can be balanced only by lateral export in the water column. Because no enhanced sink for (231)Pa has yet been found in the Arctic, our records suggest that deep-water exchange through the Fram strait may export (231)Pa. Such export may have continued for the past 35,000 years, suggesting a century-scale replacement time for deep waters in the Arctic Ocean since the most recent glaciation and a persistent contribution of Arctic waters to the global ocean circulation. PMID:23719461

  13. ENSO Modulations due to Interannual Variability of Freshwater Forcing and Ocean Biology-induced Heating in the Tropical Pacific

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rong-Hua; Gao, Chuan; Kang, Xianbiao; Zhi, Hai; Wang, Zhanggui; Feng, Licheng

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have identified clear climate feedbacks associated with interannual variations in freshwater forcing (FWF) and ocean biology-induced heating (OBH) in the tropical Pacific. The interrelationships among the related anomaly fields are analyzed using hybrid coupled model (HCM) simulations to illustrate their combined roles in modulating the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). The HCM-based supporting experiments are performed to isolate the related feedbacks, with interannually varying FWF and OBH being represented individually or collectively, which allows their effects to be examined in a clear way. It is demonstrated that the interannual freshwater forcing enhances ENSO variability and slightly prolongs the simulated ENSO period, while the interannual OBH reduces ENSO variability and slightly shortens the ENSO period, with their feedback effects tending to counteract each other. PMID:26678931

  14. ENSO Modulations due to Interannual Variability of Freshwater Forcing and Ocean Biology-induced Heating in the Tropical Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rong-Hua; Gao, Chuan; Kang, Xianbiao; Zhi, Hai; Wang, Zhanggui; Feng, Licheng

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies have identified clear climate feedbacks associated with interannual variations in freshwater forcing (FWF) and ocean biology-induced heating (OBH) in the tropical Pacific. The interrelationships among the related anomaly fields are analyzed using hybrid coupled model (HCM) simulations to illustrate their combined roles in modulating the El Nio-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). The HCM-based supporting experiments are performed to isolate the related feedbacks, with interannually varying FWF and OBH being represented individually or collectively, which allows their effects to be examined in a clear way. It is demonstrated that the interannual freshwater forcing enhances ENSO variability and slightly prolongs the simulated ENSO period, while the interannual OBH reduces ENSO variability and slightly shortens the ENSO period, with their feedback effects tending to counteract each other.

  15. ENSO Modulations due to Interannual Variability of Freshwater Forcing and Ocean Biology-induced Heating in the Tropical Pacific.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rong-Hua; Gao, Chuan; Kang, Xianbiao; Zhi, Hai; Wang, Zhanggui; Feng, Licheng

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have identified clear climate feedbacks associated with interannual variations in freshwater forcing (FWF) and ocean biology-induced heating (OBH) in the tropical Pacific. The interrelationships among the related anomaly fields are analyzed using hybrid coupled model (HCM) simulations to illustrate their combined roles in modulating the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). The HCM-based supporting experiments are performed to isolate the related feedbacks, with interannually varying FWF and OBH being represented individually or collectively, which allows their effects to be examined in a clear way. It is demonstrated that the interannual freshwater forcing enhances ENSO variability and slightly prolongs the simulated ENSO period, while the interannual OBH reduces ENSO variability and slightly shortens the ENSO period, with their feedback effects tending to counteract each other. PMID:26678931

  16. Particulate Ba and U in the Southern Ocean: Links with Exported Carbon and Surface Biogeochemical Processes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andre, L.; Cardinal, D.; Dehairs, F.

    2002-12-01

    Particulate excess Ba (Baxs, total Ba corrected from the lithogenic fraction) in the water column can be used as a tracer of exported and mineralized carbon (Dehairs et al., 1990, 1997). It is also known reported that inorganic geochemistry of marine particles can provide other important insights on physical (such as advection), chemical (redox) and biogenic processes in the water column (Sherrell and Boyle, 1992; Tachikawa et al., 1999; Cardinal et al., 2001). In this study we report on the distribution of particulate trace (Ba, Sr, U, light REE...) and major elements (Ca, P, Al, Mn, Ti...) during the CLIVAR SR3 Repeat cruise in the Southern Ocean (R/V Aurora Australis, Nov-Dec 2001). Seven stations were sampled from 0 to 1000 m water depth along a transect at ~ 142°E between 47° and 65°S, hence successively crossing the Sub Antarctic Zone and Front (SAZ, SAF), the Polar Front Zone (PFZ), the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) and the Seasonal Ice Zone (SIZ). The SAF, ACC and SIZ stations were re-sampled on the way back with a time lag of 30, 17 and 11 days, respectively. Mesopelagic Baxs (150-450m) increases continuously from the SAZ (150 pmol l-1) to the ACC (450 pmol l-1 at 57°S), to decrease again further southward (250 pmol l-1 at 65°S). This trend is remarkably consistent with the Baxs results from the SAZ'98 cruise to the same area in March 1998, during which SAZ, SAF and PFZ were studied (Cardinal et al., 2001). However, as a result, probably, of early season conditions (spring) during CLIVAR SR3, the meso-Baxs contents are systematically lower than during SAZ'98 (late summer). The SIZ station replicated 11 days later exhibits a dramatic increase of meso-Baxs up to 500 pmol l-1, whereas the SAZ station does not show higher meso-Baxs contents after one month. These differences clearly evidence the delays occurring at this season between the SIZ and SAZ in term of export production. The mixed layer particulate Uxs contents are also very consistent with those observed during the 1998 cruise, and have the same North-South trend than meso- Baxs. Although U has a complex cycle in the ocean (e.g., Zheng et al., 2002), its particulate profiles may provide valuable information concerning mechanisms linked with surface water biological activity. Taking into account the system dynamics (progress of growth season; presence/absence of sea-ice), we will discuss Uxs and Baxs profiles using the other trace and major element data, aiming at the quantification of export / remineralization of C in different zones of the Southern Ocean. Cardinal et al., 2001. J. Geophys. Res., 106, 31,637-31,656. Dehairs et al., 1990. Global Biogeochem. Cy., 4, 85-102. Dehairs et al., 1997. Deep-Sea Res., II, 44, 497-516. Sherrell and Boyle, 1992. Earth Planet. Sc. Lett., 111, 155-174. Tachikawa et al., 1999. Deep-Sea Res. I, 46, 733-755. Zheng et al., 2002. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 66, 3085-3092.

  17. Silicon pool dynamics and biogenic silica export in the Southern Ocean, inferred from Si-isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fripiat, F.; Cavagna, A.-J.; Dehairs, F.; Speich, S.; Andr, L.; Cardinal, D.

    2011-03-01

    Water column silicon isotopic signatures (?30Si) of silicic acid (Si(OH)4) in the Southern Ocean were measured along a meridional transect from South Africa (Subtropical Zone) down to 57 S (northern Weddell Gyre). These data are the first reported for a summer transect across the whole Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). ?30Si variations are large in the upper 1000 m, reflecting the effect of the silica pump superimposed upon meridional transfer across the ACC: the transport of Antarctic surface waters northward by a net Ekman drift and their convergence and mixing with warmer upper-ocean Si-depleted waters to the north. Using Si isotopic signatures, we determined different mixing interfaces between ACC water masses: the Antarctic Surface Water (AASW), the Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW), and the thermoclines in the low latitude areas. The residual silicic acid concentrations of end-members control the ?30Si alteration of the mixing products. With the exception of AASW, all mixing interfaces have a highly Si-depleted mixed layer end-member. These processes deplete the silicic acid AASW concentration across the different interfaces northward without significantly changing the AASW ?30Si. By comparing our new results with a previous study in the Australian sector we show that during the circumpolar transport of the ACC eastward, there is a slight but significant Si-isotopic lightening of the silicic acid pools from the Atlantic to the Australian sectors. This results either from the dissolution of biogenic silica in the deeper layers and/or from an isopycnal mixing with the deep water masses in the different oceanic basins: North Atlantic Deep Water in the Atlantic, and Indian Ocean deep water in the Indo-Australian sector. This eastward lightening is further transmitted to the subsurface waters, representing mixing interfaces between the surface and deeper layers. Using the Si-isotopic constraint, we estimate for the Greenwich Meridian a net biogenic silica production which should be representative of the annual export, at 4.5 1.1 and 1.5 0.4 mol Si m-2 for the Antarctic Zone and Polar Front Zone, respectively, in agreement with previous estimations. The summertime Si-supply into the mixed layer via vertical mixing was also assessed at 1.5 0.4 and 0.1 0.5 mol Si m-2, respectively.

  18. Silicon pool dynamics and biogenic silica export in the Southern Ocean inferred from Si-isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fripiat, F.; Cavagna, A.-J.; Dehairs, F.; Speich, S.; Andr, L.; Cardinal, D.

    2011-09-01

    Silicon isotopic signatures (?30Si) of water column silicic acid (Si(OH)4) were measured in the Southern Ocean, along a meridional transect from South Africa (Subtropical Zone) down to 57 S (northern Weddell Gyre). This provides the first reported data of a summer transect across the whole Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). ?30Si variations are large in the upper 1000 m, reflecting the effect of the silica pump superimposed upon meridional water transfer across the ACC: the transport of Antarctic surface waters northward by a net Ekman drift and their convergence and mixing with warmer upper-ocean Si-depleted waters to the north. Using Si isotopic signatures, we determine different mixing interfaces: the Antarctic Surface Water (AASW), the Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW), and thermoclines in the low latitude areas. The residual silicic acid concentrations of end-members control the ?30Si alteration of the mixing products and with the exception of AASW, all mixing interfaces have a highly Si-depleted mixed layer end-member. These processes deplete the silicic acid AASW concentration northward, across the different interfaces, without significantly changing the AASW ?30Si composition. By comparing our new results with a previous study in the Australian sector we show that during the circumpolar transport of the ACC eastward, the ?30Si composition of the silicic acid pools is getting slightly, but significantly lighter from the Atlantic to the Australian sectors. This results either from the dissolution of biogenic silica in the deeper layers and/or from an isopycnal mixing with the deep water masses in the different oceanic basins: North Atlantic Deep Water in the Atlantic, and Indian Ocean deep water in the Indo-Australian sector. This isotopic trend is further transmitted to the subsurface waters, representing mixing interfaces between the surface and deeper layers. Through the use of ?30Si constraints, net biogenic silica production (representative of annual export), at the Greenwich Meridian is estimated to be 5.2 1.3 and 1.1 0.3 mol Si m-2 for the Antarctic Zone and Polar Front Zone, respectively. This is in good agreement with previous estimations. Furthermore, summertime Si-supply into the mixed layer of both zones, via vertical mixing, is estimated to be 1.6 0.4 and 0.1 0.5 mol Si m-2, respectively.

  19. Arctic-HYCOS: a Large Sample observing system for estimating freshwater fluxes in the drainage basin of the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietroniro, Al; Korhonen, Johanna; Looser, Ulrich; Hardardóttir, Jórunn; Johnsrud, Morten; Vuglinsky, Valery; Gustafsson, David; Lins, Harry F.; Conaway, Jeffrey S.; Lammers, Richard; Stewart, Bruce; Abrate, Tommaso; Pilon, Paul; Sighomnou, Daniel; Arheimer, Berit

    2015-04-01

    The Arctic region is an important regulating component of the global climate system, and is also experiencing a considerable change during recent decades. More than 10% of world's river-runoff flows to the Arctic Ocean and there is evidence of changes in its fresh-water balance. However, about 30% of the Arctic basin is still ungauged, with differing monitoring practices and data availability from the countries in the region. A consistent system for monitoring and sharing of hydrological information throughout the Arctic region is thus of highest interest for further studies and monitoring of the freshwater flux to the Arctic Ocean. The purpose of the Arctic-HYCOS project is to allow for collection and sharing of hydrological data. Preliminary 616 stations were identified with long-term daily discharge data available, and around 250 of these already provide online available data in near real time. This large sample will be used in the following scientific analysis: 1) to evaluate freshwater flux to the Arctic Ocean and Seas, 2) to monitor changes and enhance understanding of the hydrological regime and 3) to estimate flows in ungauged regions and develop models for enhanced hydrological prediction in the Arctic region. The project is intended as a component of the WMO (World Meteorological Organization) WHYCOS (World Hydrological Cycle Observing System) initiative, covering the area of the expansive transnational Arctic basin with participation from Canada, Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Russian Federation, Sweden and United States of America. The overall objective is to regularly collect, manage and share high quality data from a defined basic network of hydrological stations in the Arctic basin. The project focus on collecting data on discharge and possibly sediment transport and temperature. Data should be provisional in near-real time if available, whereas time-series of historical data should be provided once quality assurance has been completed. The initial stages of the project will focus on collecting data on discharge and revise station selection criteria. For monitoring freshwater flow to oceans, stations close to the mouths of rivers and immediately inland for back-up purposes will be preferred. For studies of change emphasis is placed on hydrological regime stations located in headwaters small sub-catchments, including pristine basins. Stations outside the Arctic Ocean basin, such as at the mouth of the Yukon River, Baltic Sea and Hudson Bay, can also be considered to allow a better understanding of hydrological processes occurring in the general region. Countries shall facilitate, to the extent possible, access to their data currently published online, and also access to those not yet regularly published on the web. At a later stage data exchange standards such as WaterML2.0 will be implemented. The project will also perform pan-Arctic hydrological modelling (geo-statistical, deterministic and probabilistic methods) for the assessment and integration of observational and modelled data to improve estimates of ungauged discharge and the overall estimates of freshwater flux to the Arctic Ocean, as well as understanding of hydrological processes.

  20. Dominant eukaryotic export production during ocean anoxic events reflects the importance of recycled NH4+.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Meytal B; Robinson, Rebecca S; Husson, Jonathan M; Carter, Susan J; Pearson, Ann

    2012-02-14

    The Mesozoic is marked by several widespread occurrences of intense organic matter burial. Sediments from the largest of these events, the Cenomanian-Turonian Oceanic Anoxic Event (OAE 2) are characterized by lower nitrogen isotope ratios than are seen in modern marine settings. It has remained a challenge to describe a nitrogen cycle that could achieve such isotopic depletion. Here we use nitrogen-isotope ratios of porphyrins to show that eukaryotes contributed the quantitative majority of export production throughout OAE 2, whereas cyanobacteria contributed on average approximately 20%. Such data require that any explanation for the OAE nitrogen cycle and its isotopic values be consistent with a eukaryote-dominated ecosystem. Our results agree with models that suggest the OAEs were high-productivity events, supported by vigorous upwelling. Upwelling of anoxic deep waters would have supplied reduced N species (i.e., NH(4)(+)) to primary producers. We propose that new production during OAE 2 primarily was driven by direct NH(4)(+)-assimilation supplemented by diazotrophy, whereas chemocline denitrification and anammox quantitatively consumed NO(3)(−) and NO(2)(−). A marine nitrogen reservoir dominated by NH(4)(+), in combination with known kinetic isotope effects, could lead to eukaryotic biomass depleted in (15)N. PMID:22315397

  1. Potential role of Atlantic Warm Pool-induced freshwater forcing in the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation: ocean-sea ice model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liping; Wang, Chunzai; Lee, Sang-Ki

    2014-07-01

    Recent studies have indicated that the multidecadal variations of the Atlantic Warm Pool (AWP) can induce a significant freshwater change in the tropical North Atlantic Ocean. In this paper, the potential effect of the AWP-induced freshwater flux on the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) is studied by performing a series of ocean-sea ice model experiments. Our model experiments demonstrate that ocean response to the anomalous AWP-induced freshwater flux is primarily dominated by the basin-scale gyre circulation adjustments with a time scale of about two decades. The positive (negative) freshwater anomaly leads to an anticyclonic (cyclonic) circulation overlapping the subtropical gyre. This strengthens (weakens) the Gulf Stream and the recirculation in the interior ocean, thus increases warm (cold) water advection to the north and decreases cold (warm) water advection to the south, producing an upper ocean temperature dipole in the midlatitude. As the freshwater (salty water) is advected to the North Atlantic deep convection region, the AMOC and its associated northward heat transport gradually decreases (increases), which in turn lead to an inter-hemispheric SST seesaw. In the equilibrium state, a comma-shaped SST anomaly pattern develops in the extratropical region, with the largest amplitude over the subpolar region and an extension along the east side of the basin and into the subtropical North Atlantic. Based on our model experiments, we argue that the multidecadal AWP-induced freshwater flux can affect the AMOC, which plays a negative feedback role that acts to recover the AMOC after it is weakened or strengthened. The sensitivity of AMOC response to the AWP-induced freshwater forcing amplitude is also examined and discussed.

  2. Oceanic spawning ecology of freshwater eels in the western North Pacific.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Katsumi; Chow, Seinen; Otake, Tsuguo; Kurogi, Hiroaki; Mochioka, Noritaka; Miller, Michael J; Aoyama, Jun; Kimura, Shingo; Watanabe, Shun; Yoshinaga, Tatsuki; Shinoda, Akira; Kuroki, Mari; Oya, Machiko; Watanabe, Tomowo; Hata, Kazuhiro; Ijiri, Shigeho; Kazeto, Yukinori; Nomura, Kazuharu; Tanaka, Hideki

    2011-01-01

    The natural reproductive ecology of freshwater eels remained a mystery even after some of their offshore spawning areas were discovered approximately 100 years ago. In this study, we investigate the spawning ecology of freshwater eels for the first time using collections of eggs, larvae and spawning-condition adults of two species in their shared spawning area in the Pacific. Ovaries of female Japanese eel and giant mottled eel adults were polycyclic, suggesting that freshwater eels can spawn more than once during a spawning season. The first collection of Japanese eel eggs near the West Mariana Ridge where adults and newly hatched larvae were also caught shows that spawning occurs during new moon periods throughout the spawning season. The depths where adults and newly hatched larvae were captured indicate that spawning occurs in shallower layers of 150-200 m and not at great depths. This type of spawning may reduce predation and facilitate reproductive success. PMID:21285957

  3. Export fluxes in a naturally iron-fertilized area of the Southern Ocean - Part 1: Seasonal dynamics of particulate organic carbon export from a moored sediment trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rembauville, M.; Salter, I.; Leblond, N.; Gueneugues, A.; Blain, S.

    2015-06-01

    A sediment trap moored in the naturally iron-fertilized Kerguelen Plateau in the Southern Ocean provided an annual record of particulate organic carbon and nitrogen fluxes at 289 m. At the trap deployment depth, current speeds were typically low (~ 10 cm s-1) and primarily tidal-driven (M2 tidal component). Although advection was weak, the sediment trap may have been subject to hydrodynamical and biological (swimmer feeding on trap funnel) biases. Particulate organic carbon (POC) flux was generally low (< 0.5 mmol m-2 d-1), although two episodic export events (< 14 days) of 1.5 mmol m-2 d-1 were recorded. These increases in flux occurred with a 1-month time lag from peaks in surface chlorophyll and together accounted for approximately 40% of the annual flux budget. The annual POC flux of 98.2 ± 4.4 mmol m-2 yr-1 was low considering the shallow deployment depth but comparable to independent estimates made at similar depths (~ 300 m) over the plateau, and to deep-ocean (> 2 km) fluxes measured from similarly productive iron-fertilized blooms. Although undertrapping cannot be excluded in shallow moored sediment trap deployment, we hypothesize that grazing pressure, including mesozooplankton and mesopelagic fishes, may be responsible for the low POC flux beneath the base of the winter mixed layer. The importance of plankton community structure in controlling the temporal variability of export fluxes is addressed in a companion paper.

  4. Identification of types of businesses with potential interest in operating and/or exporting ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-09-01

    This study describes the characteristics of three selected Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)-based lines of business, examines other lines of business and identifies those with similar characteristics, and indicates the types of businesses/corporations that could be expected to have potential interest in operating and/or exporting OTEC plants. An OTEC line of business model is developed to assist companies in making an internal corporate assessment as to whether OTEC should be in their business plan.

  5. Trace element behaviour at cold seeps and the potential export of dissolved iron to the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaitre, Nolwenn; Bayon, Germain; Ondréas, Hélène; Caprais, Jean-Claude; Freslon, Nicolas; Bollinger, Claire; Rouget, Marie-Laure; de Prunelé, Alexis; Ruffine, Livio; Olu-Le Roy, Karine; Sarthou, Géraldine

    2014-10-01

    Seawater samples were collected by submersible above methane seeps in the Gulf of Guinea (Regab and Baboon pockmarks) in order to investigate the behaviour of iron (Fe), manganese (Mn) and rare earth elements (REE) during fluid seepage. Our aim was to determine whether cold seeps may represent potential sources of dissolved chemical species to the ocean. Dissolved (<0.45 μm filtered samples) and total dissolvable (unfiltered samples) concentrations were determined over ∼50 m long vertical transects above the seafloor and at various discrete locations within the pockmarks. We show that substantial amounts of Fe and Mn are released into seawater during seepage of methane-rich fluids. Mn is exported almost quantitatively in the dissolved form (more than 90% of total Mn; mean MnDISS∼12±11 nmol/kg). Although a significant fraction of Fe is bound to particulate phases, the dissolved iron pool still accounts on average for approximately 20 percent of total iron flux at vent sites (mean FeDISS∼22±11 nmol/kg). This dissolved Fe fraction also appears to remain stable in the water column. In contrast, there was no evidence for any significant benthic fluxes of pore water REE associated with fluid seepage at the studied sites. Overall, our results point towards distinct trace element behaviour during fluid seepage, with potential implications for the marine geochemical budget. The absence of any dissolved REE enrichments in bottom waters clearly indicates effective removal in sub-surface sediments. Most likely, precipitation of authigenic mineral phases at cold seeps (i.e. carbonates) represents a net sink for these elements. While Mn appears to behave near-conservatively during fluid seepage, the observed relative stability of dissolved Fe in the water column above seepage sites could be explained by complexation with strong organic ligands and/or the presence of Fe-bearing sulfide nanoparticles, as reported previously for submarine hydrothermal systems. Considering the ubiquitous occurrence of methane vents at ocean margins, cold seeps could represent a previously unsuspected source of dissolved Fe to the deep ocean.

  6. Carbon export in the naturally iron-fertilized Kerguelen area of the Southern Ocean based on the 234Th approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planchon, F.; Ballas, D.; Cavagna, A.-J.; Bowie, A. R.; Davies, D.; Trull, T.; Laurenceau-Cornec, E. C.; Van Der Merwe, P.; Dehairs, F.

    2015-06-01

    This study examined upper-ocean particulate organic carbon (POC) export using the 234Th approach as part of the second KErguelen Ocean and Plateau compared Study expedition (KEOPS2). Our aim was to characterize the spatial and the temporal variability of POC export during austral spring (October-November 2011) in the Fe-fertilized area of the Kerguelen Plateau region. POC export fluxes were estimated at high productivity sites over and downstream of the plateau and compared to a high-nutrient low-chlorophyll (HNLC) area upstream of the plateau in order to assess the impact of iron-induced productivity on the vertical export of carbon. Deficits in 234Th activities were observed at all stations in surface waters, indicating early scavenging by particles in austral spring. 234Th export was lowest at the reference station R-2 and highest in the recirculation region (E stations) where a pseudo-Lagrangian survey was conducted. In comparison 234Th export over the central plateau and north of the polar front (PF) was relatively limited throughout the survey. However, the 234Th results support that Fe fertilization increased particle export in all iron-fertilized waters. The impact was greatest in the recirculation feature (3-4 fold at 200 m depth, relative to the reference station), but more moderate over the central Kerguelen Plateau and in the northern plume of the Kerguelen bloom (~2-fold at 200 m depth). The C : Th ratio of large (>53 μm) potentially sinking particles collected via sequential filtration using in situ pumping (ISP) systems was used to convert the 234Th flux into a POC export flux. The C : Th ratios of sinking particles were highly variable (3.1 ± 0.1 to 10.5 ± 0.2 μmol dpm-1) with no clear site-related trend, despite the variety of ecosystem responses in the fertilized regions. C : Th ratios showed a decreasing trend between 100 and 200 m depth suggesting preferential carbon loss relative to 234Th possibly due to heterotrophic degradation and/or grazing activity. C : Th ratios of sinking particles sampled with drifting sediment traps in most cases showed very good agreement with ratios for particles collected via ISP deployments (>53 μm particles). Carbon export production varied between 3.5 ± 0.9 and 11.8 ± 1.3 mmol m-2 d-1 from the upper 100 m and between 1.8 ± 0.9 and 8.2 ± 0.9 mmol m-2 d-1 from the upper 200 m. The highest export production was found inside the PF meander with a range of 5.3 ± 1.0 to 11.8 ± 1.1 mmol m-2 d-1 over the 19-day survey period. The impact of Fe fertilization is highest inside the PF meander with 2.9-4.5-fold higher carbon flux at 200 m depth in comparison to the HNLC control station. The impact of Fe fertilization was significantly less over the central plateau (stations A3 and E-4W) and in the northern branch of the bloom (station F-L) with 1.6-2.0-fold higher carbon flux compared to the reference station R. Export efficiencies (ratio of export to primary production and ratio of export to new production) were particularly variable with relatively high values in the recirculation feature (6 to 27 %, respectively) and low values (1 to 5 %, respectively) over the central plateau (station A3) and north of the PF (station F-L), indicating spring biomass accumulation. Comparison with KEOPS1 results indicated that carbon export production is much lower during the onset of the bloom in austral spring than during the peak and declining phases in late summer.

  7. Southern-ocean and glaciogenic nutrients control diatom export production on the Chile margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chase, Zanna; McManus, James; Mix, Alan C.; Muratli, Jesse

    2014-09-01

    Biogenic particle flux was reconstructed using 230-Thorium normalization at two sites on the southern Chile margin. ODP Site 1233 at 41°S, 838 m depth, is at the southern limit of the Peru-Chile upwelling system, where the northern extent of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current impinges on the South American continental margin. ODP Site 1234, at 36°S, 1014 m depth, is located within the core of the coastal upwelling system near the mouths of the Bio Bio and Itata Rivers. At 41°S, opal, lithogenic and carbonate fluxes are greatest during the Last Glacial interval (26-20 ka), carbonate has a secondary peak during the mid Holocene (˜8 ka) and organic carbon fluxes increase slightly from 17 ka to the present. At 36°S, large lithogenic fluxes are observed both during the Last Glacial interval and the Holocene, and a maximum in organic carbon flux is observed during the late Holocene (˜5 ka) without an accompanying peak in opal flux. These reconstructed fluxes at 36°S and 41°S fit within a larger latitudinal pattern of a poleward increase in the magnitude of opal flux during the glacial period. The pattern of normalized opal flux, opal mass accumulation rate and opal:carbonate ratios is consistent with either i) enhanced supply of Si from the Southern Ocean, as proposed by the Silicic Acid Leakage Hypothesis or ii) enhanced Si and Fe delivery from land, driven by glacial erosion. The pattern of reconstructed export production supports our view that the appearance of more reducing conditions in the sediments upon deglaciation was most likely driven by decreased ventilation, rather than increased local productivity.

  8. The freshwater lens of Benjamín Aceval, Chaco, Paraguay: a terrestrial analogue of an oceanic island lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houben, Georg; Noell, Ursula; Vassolo, Sara; Grissemann, Christoph; Geyh, Mebus; Stadler, Susanne; Dose, Eduardo J.; Vera, Sofia

    2014-12-01

    The occurrence of a freshwater lens in the Paraguayan Chaco, 900 km away from the ocean, is reported. It is located underneath sandstone hills, surrounded by lowlands with predominantly saline groundwater. Its geometry was delineated using geoelectrical and electromagnetic investigations. The unusual height of the fresh groundwater level can be attributed to the presence of a confining layer at depth. The lens receives its recharge exclusively from rainfall during the hot and humid summer months. It predominantly contains water predating the atmospheric atomic bomb tests, some of it probably up to a thousand or more years old. The water balance shows that extraction currently does not exceed recharge in normal years. However, the available volume of groundwater leaves little room for a further increase of extraction in the future. Recharge is augmented by return flow from thousands of latrines and cess pits, and this has lead to widespread contamination of the groundwater by faecal bacteria.

  9. Diatom resting spore ecology drives enhanced carbon export from a naturally iron-fertilized bloom in the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salter, Ian; Kemp, Alan E. S.; Moore, C. Mark; Lampitt, Richard S.; Wolff, George A.; Holtvoeth, Jens

    2012-03-01

    Southern Ocean Island systems sustain phytoplankton blooms induced by natural iron fertilization that are important for the uptake of atmospheric carbon dioxide and serve as analogues for past and future climate change. We present data on diatom flux assemblages and the biogeochemical properties of sinking particles to explain the enhanced particulate organic carbon (POC) export fluxes observed in response to natural iron supply in the Crozet Islands region (CROZeX). Moored deep-ocean sediment traps (>2000 m) were located beneath a naturally fertilized island bloom and beneath an adjacent High Nutrient Low Chlorophyll (HNLC) control site. Deep-ocean carbon flux from the naturally-fertilized bloom area was tightly correlated (R = 0.83, n = 12, P < 0.0006) with the resting spore flux of a single island-associated diatom species,Eucampia antarctica var. antarctica. The unusually well preserved state of the Eucampia-associated carbon flux, determined by amino acid studies of organic matter degradation, was likely influenced by their ecology, since diatom resting spores are adapted to settle rapidly out of the surface ocean preserving viable cells. The naturally fertilized bloom enhanced carbon flux and the resulting Si/C and Si/N ratios were 2.0-3.4-fold and 2.2-3.5-fold lower than those measured in the adjacent HNLC control area. The enhanced carbon export and distinctive stoichiometry observed in naturally fertilized systems is therefore largely not attributable to iron relief of open ocean diatoms, but rather to the advection and growth of diatom species characteristic of island systems and the subsequent flux of resting spores. Carbon export estimates from current natural iron fertilization studies therefore represent a highly specific response of the island systems chosen as natural laboratories and may not be appropriate analogues for the larger Southern Ocean response. The broader implications of our results emphasize the role of phytoplankton diversity and ecology and highlight the need for a species-centered approach in order to understand the regulation of biogeochemical fluxes.

  10. The annual cycle of gross primary production, net community production, and export efficiency across the North Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palevsky, Hilary I.; Quay, Paul D.; Lockwood, Deirdre E.; Nicholson, David P.

    2016-02-01

    We measured triple oxygen isotopes and oxygen/argon dissolved gas ratios as nonincubation-based geochemical tracers of gross oxygen production (GOP) and net community production (NCP) on 16 container ship transects across the North Pacific from 2008 to 2012. We estimate rates and efficiency of biological carbon export throughout the full annual cycle across the North Pacific basin (35°N-50°N, 142°E-125°W) by constructing mixed layer budgets that account for physical and biological influences on these tracers. During the productive season from spring to fall, GOP and NCP are highest in the Kuroshio region west of 170°E and decrease eastward across the basin. However, deep winter mixed layers (>200 m) west of 160°W ventilate ~40-90% of this seasonally exported carbon, while only ~10% of seasonally exported carbon east of 160°W is ventilated in winter where mixed layers are <120 m. As a result, despite higher annual GOP in the west than the east, the annual carbon export (sequestration) rate and efficiency decrease westward across the basin from export of 2.3 ± 0.3 mol C m-2 yr-1 east of 160°W to 0.5 ± 0.7 mol C m-2 yr-1 west of 170°E. Existing productivity rate estimates from time series stations are consistent with our regional productivity rate estimates in the eastern but not western North Pacific. These results highlight the need to estimate productivity rates over broad spatial areas and throughout the full annual cycle including during winter ventilation in order to accurately estimate the rate and efficiency of carbon sequestration via the ocean's biological pump.

  11. Carbon export in the naturally iron-fertilized Kerguelen area of the Southern Ocean based on the 234Th approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planchon, F.; Ballas, D.; Cavagna, A.-J.; Bowie, A. R.; Davies, D.; Trull, T.; Laurenceau, E.; Van Der Merwe, P.; Dehairs, F.

    2014-11-01

    The Kerguelen Plateau region in the Indian sector of the Southern Ocean supports annually a large-scale phytoplankton bloom which is naturally fertilized with iron. As part of the second KErguelen Ocean and Plateau compared Study expedition (KEOPS2) in austral spring (October-November 2011), we examined upper-ocean Particulate Organic Carbon (POC) export using the 234Th approach. We aimed at characterizing the spatial and the temporal variability of POC export production at high productivity sites over and downstream the Kerguelen plateau. Export production is compared to a High Nutrient Low Chlorophyll area upstream of the plateau in order to assess the impact of iron-induced productivity on the vertical export of carbon. Deficits in 234Th activities relative to its parent nuclide 238U were observed at all stations in surface waters, indicating that scavenging by particles occurred during the early stages of the phytoplankton bloom. 234Th export was lowest at reference station R-2 (412 ± 134 dpm m-2 d-1) and highest inside a~permanent meander of the Polar Front (PF) at stations E (1995 ± 176 dpm m-2 d-1, second visit E-3) where a detailed time series was obtained as part of a~pseudo-lagrangian study. 234Th export over the central plateau was relatively limited at station A3 early (776 ± 171 dpm m-2 d-1, first visit A3-1) and late in the survey (993 ± 223 dpm m-2 d-1, second visit A3-2), but it was higher at high biomass stations TNS-8 (1372 ± 255 dpm m-2 d-1) and E-4W (1068 ± 208 dpm m-2 d-1) in waters which could be considered as derived from plateau. Limited 234Th export of 973 ± 207 dpm m-2 d-1 was also found in the northern branch of the Kerguelen bloom located downstream of the island, north of the PF (station F-L). The 234Th results support that Fe fertilization increased particle export in all iron fertilized waters. The impact was greatest in the recirculation feature (3-4 fold at 200 m depth), but more moderate over the central Kerguelen plateau and in the northern plume of the Kerguelen bloom (∼2-fold at 200 m depth). The C : Th ratio of large (> 53 μm) potentially sinking particles collected via sequential filtration using in situ pumping (ISP) systems were used to convert the 234Th flux into a POC export flux. The C : Th ratios of sinking particles were highly variable (range: 3.1 ± 0.1-10.5 ± 0.2 μmol dpm-1) with no clear site related trend, despite the variety of ecosystem responses in the fertilized regions. C : Th ratios showed a decreasing trend between 100 and 200 m depth suggesting preferential loss of carbon relative to 234Th possibly due to heterotrophic degradation and/or grazing activity. Comparison of the C : Th ratios within sinking particles obtained with the drifting sediment traps showed in most cases very good agreement to those collected via ISP deployments (> 53 μm particles). Carbon export production varied between 3.5 ± 0.9 mmol m-2 d-1 and 11.8 ± 1.3 mmol m-2 d-1 from the upper 100 m and between 1.8 ± 0.9 mmol m-2 d-1 and 8.2 ± 0.9 mmol m-2 d-1 from the upper 200 m. Highest export production was found inside the PF meander with a range of 5.4 ± 0.7 mmol m-2 d-1 to 11.8 ± 1.1 mmol m-2 d-1 at 100 m depth decreasing to 5.3 ± 1.0 mmol m-2 d-1 to 8.2 ± 0.8 mmol m-2 d-1 at 200 m depth over the 19 day survey period. The impact of Fe fertilization is highest inside the PF meander with 2.9- up to 4.5-fold higher carbon flux at 200 m depth in comparison to the HNLC control station. The impact of Fe fertilization was significantly less over the central plateau (stations A3 and E-4W) and in the northern branch of the bloom (station F-L) with 1.6- up to 2.0-fold higher carbon flux compared to the reference station R. Export efficiencies (ratio of export to primary production) were particularly variable with relatively high values in the recirculation feature (6-27%) and low values (1-5%) over the central plateau (station A3) and north of the PF (station F-L) indicating spring biomass accumulation. Comparison with KEOPS1 results indicated that carbon export production is much lower during the onset of the bloom in austral spring in comparison to the peak and declining phase in late summer.

  12. Kara Sea freshwater transport through Vilkitsky Strait: Variability, forcing, and further pathways toward the western Arctic Ocean from a model and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janout, Markus A.; Aksenov, Yevgeny; Hölemann, Jens A.; Rabe, Benjamin; Schauer, Ursula; Polyakov, Igor V.; Bacon, Sheldon; Coward, Andrew C.; Karcher, Michael; Lenn, Yueng-Djern; Kassens, Heidemarie; Timokhov, Leonid

    2015-07-01

    Siberian river water is a first-order contribution to the Arctic freshwater budget, with the Ob, Yenisey, and Lena supplying nearly half of the total surface freshwater flux. However, few details are known regarding where, when, and how the freshwater transverses the vast Siberian shelf seas. This paper investigates the mechanism, variability, and pathways of the fresh Kara Sea outflow through Vilkitsky Strait toward the Laptev Sea. We utilize a high-resolution ocean model and recent shipboard observations to characterize the freshwater-laden Vilkitsky Strait Current (VSC), and shed new light on the little-studied region between the Kara and Laptev Seas, characterized by harsh ice conditions, contrasting water masses, straits, and a large submarine canyon. The VSC is 10-20 km wide, surface intensified, and varies seasonally (maximum from August to March) and interannually. Average freshwater (volume) transport is 500 ± 120 km3 a-1 (0.53 ± 0.08 Sv), with a baroclinic flow contribution of 50-90%. Interannual transport variability is explained by a storage-release mechanism, where blocking-favorable summer winds hamper the outflow and cause accumulation of freshwater in the Kara Sea. The year following a blocking event is characterized by enhanced transports driven by a baroclinic flow along the coast that is set up by increased freshwater volumes. Eventually, the VSC merges with a slope current and provides a major pathway for Eurasian river water toward the western Arctic along the Eurasian continental slope. Kara (and Laptev) Sea freshwater transport is not correlated with the Arctic Oscillation, but rather driven by regional summer pressure patterns.

  13. Composition of settling particles in the Southern Ocean and processes controlling seasonal variations of deep export production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardinal, Damien; Ameur, Khedidja; Closset, Ivia; Bray, Stephen; Trull, Thomas W.

    2014-05-01

    In order to understand the processes controlling the biological carbon pump and the efficiency of export production, we need time series in contrasted oceanic regions that fully describe seasonality. Due to strong logistic constraints, especially in the Southern Ocean, such data can only be obtained from above (satellite) or from below (sediment traps). In this study, settling particles of Subantarctic Zone (SAZ), Polar Front Zone (PFZ) and Antarctic Zone (AZ) along the CLIVAR-SR3 transect (140°E, south to Tasmania) have been collected in sediment traps deployed at 1000, 2000 and 3800m (SAZ), 800 and 1500 m (PFZ) and 200 and 3700 m (AZ). In addition to the measurements of Particulate Organic Carbon, Particulate Inorganic Carbon, Biogenic silica we have measured particulate composition of some trace and major elements (Al, Ca, Fe, Ti, Ba, Sr, Mn, U, light Rare Earth Elements) by ICP-MS. When looking at correlations between elemental fluxes we show that there are generally different modes of variations. Surprisingly, those are not necessarily site-specific, i.e. different periods of SAZ and AZ traps can behave in a similar way, while they can be strongly decoupled at other periods. This is the case not only for biogenic elements (e.g. Ba, Ca, Sr) but also for elements usually representative of lithogenic particles (e.g., Al, Fe, Ti). More particularly Al vs. Fe fluxes appear to be strongly bimodal: Al fluxes are generally higher in northern traps while Fe fluxes are higher in AZ and PFZ traps; moreover single data points of both traps are distributed over two clear correlation lines, each one displaying little scattering. This suggests that the types of Fe- and/or Al- bearing particles vary more seasonally than spatially. In contrast, Ba fluxes, which are used in paleo-oceanography as a proxy of export production, are very similar to Ca fluxes, whatever the location. This suggests that carbonate productivity is more prone to deep carbon export compared to opal-dominated productivity probably as a result of higher mesopelagic C remineralisation efficiency reducing deep C export for the later. We will further discuss the implications of these results for our understanding of the element biogeochemical cycles in the Southern Ocean and their likely impact on surface productivity, ballast effect and carbon cycle.

  14. Hydrography, oxygen saturation, suspended particulate matter, and chlorophyll- a fluorescence in an oceanic region under freshwater influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Signoret, Martha; Monreal-Gómez, María Adela; Aldeco, Javier; Salas-de-León, David Alberto

    2006-08-01

    During the northern hemisphere summer of 1999, we analyzed the hydrography, oxygen saturation, suspended particulate matter, and chlorophyll- a fluorescence of the Southern Gulf of Mexico, an oceanic region under the influence of freshwater from the Grijalva-Usumacinta Rivers system. This rivers system induces thermal and haline fronts within the Southern Gulf, with surface temperature and salinity increasing offshore. A westward shelf circulation is inferred from the tilting of isopycnes and cold water on the bottom of the shelf break. Oxygen saturation shows low values in the region under freshwater influence. The composition of suspended particulate matter shows high variability, with the inorganic fraction dominant over the organic fraction. At the edge of the continental slope, the organic fraction is very high within the euphotic layer. The vertical distribution of chlorophyll- a fluorescence indicates different trophic conditions within the water column at three studied regions: the eastern shallow region, the middle shelf, and the continental slope. We found mesotrophic or eutrophic waters at the chlorophyll- a maximum level and oligotrophic waters at the background level. The behavior of the analyzed variables enables us to identify three ecological regions: (1) the inner shelf, where chlorophyll- a fluorescence increases near the seafloor, related to the thermocline; in this region the euphotic layer comprises the entire water column; (2) the middle shelf, with a sharp maximum of chlorophyll- a at mid-depths, strongly associated with the thermocline; and (3) the outer region above the continental slope that shows a deep-level chlorophyll- a maximum associated with low-light conditions. We propose that the vertical structure of chlorophyll- a fluorescence in the study area is dependant on thermal and light structures, and in some cases on the thermal and haline fronts associated with the river plumes, as well as on the regional circulation pattern.

  15. Increased ocean carbon export in the Sargasso Sea linked to climate variability is countered by its enhanced mesopelagic attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomas, M. W.; Steinberg, D. K.; Dickey, T.; Carlson, C. A.; Nelson, N. B.; Condon, R. H.; Bates, N. R.

    2010-01-01

    Photosynthetic CO2 uptake by oceanic phytoplankton and subsequent export of particulate organic carbon (POC) to the ocean interior comprises a globally significant biological carbon pump, controlled in part by the composition of the planktonic community. The strength and efficiency of this pump depends upon the balance of particle production in the euphotic zone and remineralization of those particles in the mesopelagic (defined here as depths between 150 and 300 m), but how these processes respond to climate-driven changes in the physical environment is not completely understood. In the Sargasso Sea, from ~1996-2007, we have observed a decade-long >50% increase in euphotic zone integrated autotrophic biomass (estimated from chlorophyll TChl-α), prokaryotic phytoplankton, primary production and shallow (150 m) POC export coinciding with a shift in the mean phase of the winter North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) from consistently positive to neutral but variable. During this same period mesopelagic POC flux attenuation has doubled such that carbon sequestration below 300 m, the maximum winter/spring ventilation depth, has not changed. The increased mesopelagic POC attenuation appears mediated by changes in plankton community composition and metabolic activity in both the euphotic and mesopelagic zones. These changes are counter to extant hypotheses regarding inter-relationships between phytoplankton community composition, productivity and carbon export, and have significant impacts on how the Sargasso Sea ecosystem, at least, is modeled. Moreover, these time-series observations suggest that processes in the euphotic zone and mesopelagic are tightly coupled and should be considered together in future research.

  16. Controls on the Flux, Age, and Composition of Terrestrial Organic Carbon Exported by Rivers to the Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galy, Valier; Peucker-Ehrenbrink, Bernhard; Eglinton, Timothy; Holmes, Robert; Soule, Adam; Goetz, Scott; Laporte, Nadine; Wollheim, Wilfred

    2010-05-01

    Export of organic carbon, alkalinity and silicate-derived Ca and Mg ions to the ocean exerts critical controls on the sequestration of atmospheric carbon. As this export is mediated to a significant extent by river systems, understanding processes that control transport of land-derived matter to the coastal ocean is of fundamental importance to successful models of past and future climates. Scientists from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, the Woods Hole Research Center and the University of New Hampshire have formed a river research consortium that aims at investigating large river systems with a holistic approach. The National Science Foundation is funding this initiative through its Emerging Topics in Biogeochemical Cycles (ETBC) program. Our project focuses on the biogeochemistries of the Lena and Kolyma rivers in the Russian Arctic, the Yangtze river in China, the Ganges and Brahmaputra rivers in India and Bangladesh, the Congo river in central Africa as well as the Fraser river basin in western Canada. Campaign-style sampling using a uniform sampling strategy is complemented by time-series sampling that is accomplished through collaborations with scientists at local institutions such as the East China Normal University in Shanghai (Yangtze), the University of the Fraser Valley in Abbotsford (Fraser), schools and research institutions in eastern Russia (Lena and Kolyma) and the University of Nancy, France (Ganges, Brahmaputra). We combine a standardized sampling approach for organic and inorganic constituents with spatial analyzes of digital, mostly satellite-based data products with the aim of obtaining an integrated understanding of the response of river ecosystems to past, ongoing and future environmental changes. We will present first results with a special emphasis on the age of terrestrial organic carbon exported by the Ganges-Brahmaputra river system.

  17. Do the Amazon and Orinoco freshwater plumes really matter for hurricane-induced ocean surface cooling?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, O.; Jouanno, J.; Durand, F.

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies suggested that the plume of low-saline waters formed by the discharge of the Amazon and Orinoco rivers could favor Atlantic Tropical Cyclone (TC) intensification by weakening the cool wake and its impact on the hurricane growth potential. The main objective of this study is to quantify the effects of the Amazon-Orinoco river discharges in modulating the amplitude of TC-induced cooling in the western Tropical Atlantic. Our approach is based on the analysis of TC cool wake statistics obtained from an ocean regional numerical simulation with ¼º horizontal resolution over the 1998-2012 period, forced with realistic TC winds. In both model and observations, the amplitude of TC-induced cooling in plume waters (0.3-0.4ºC) is reduced significantly by around 50-60% compared to the cooling in open ocean waters out of the plume (0.6-0.7ºC). A twin simulation without river runoff shows that TC-induced cooling over the plume region (defined from the reference experiment) is almost unchanged (˜0.03ºC) despite strong differences in salinity stratification and the absence of barrier layers. This argues for a weaker than thought cooling inhibition effect of salinity stratification and barrier layers in this region. Indeed, results suggest that haline stratification and barrier layers caused by the river runoff may explain only ˜10% of the cooling difference between plume waters and open ocean waters. Instead, the analysis of the background oceanic conditions suggests that the regional distribution of the thermal stratification is the main factor controlling the amplitude of cooling in the plume region.

  18. Recent Changes in Arctic Sea-Ice as a Component of the Arctic Freshwater System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moritz, R. E.

    2005-12-01

    With a salinity typically one-tenth that of seawater, Arctic sea-ice can be an effective agent for the transport of freshwater within the Arctic, and for export from the Arctic to lower latitude. Large and persistent changes have occurred in the concentration, extent, thickness, motion and age of sea-ice during the era of good satellite observations, approximately 1970-2005. These changes are summarized and interpreted in terms of their relationships to the freshwater cycle of the Arctic, and the export of freshwater to the high latitude North Atlantic Ocean. Quantitative estimates of freshwater content and horizontal flux are updated using observations from the North Pole Environmental Observatory, 2001-2005.

  19. Freshwater and polynya components of the shelf-derived Arctic Ocean halocline in summer 2007 identified by stable oxygen isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauch, D.; Rutgers van der Loeff, M.; Andersen, N.; Torres-Valdes, S.; Bakker, K.; Abrahamsen, E.

    2011-12-01

    With the aim of determining the origin of freshwater in the halocline, fractions of river water and sea-ice meltwater (or brine influence from sea-ice formation) in the upper 150 m were quantified by a combination of salinity and δ18O and nutrients in the Eurasian basins and the Makarov Basin. Our study indicates which layers of the Arctic Ocean halocline are primarily influenced by sea-ice formation in coastal polynyas and which are primarily influenced by sea-ice formation over the open ocean. With the ongoing changes in sea-ice coverage in the Arctic Ocean it can be expected that these processes will change in the immediate future and that the relative contributions to the halocline will change accordingly. Within the Eurasian Basin a west to east oriented front between net melting and production of sea-ice is observed. Outside the Atlantic regime dominated by net sea-ice melting, a pronounced layer influenced by brines released during sea-ice formation is present at about 30 to 50 m water depth with a maximum over the Lomonosov Ridge. The geographically distinct definition of this maximum demonstrates the rapid release and transport of signals from the shelf regions in discrete pulses within the Transpolar Drift. We use the ratio of sea-ice derived brine influence and river water to link the maximum in brine influence within the Transpolar Drift with a pulse of shelf waters from the Laptev Sea likely released in summer 2005. For a distinction of Atlantic and Pacific-derived contributions the initial phosphate corrected for mineralization with oxygen (PO*) and alternatively the nitrate to phosphate ratio (N/P) in each sample were used. While PO*-based assessments systematically underestimate the contribution of Pacific-derived waters, N/P-based calculations overestimate Pacific-derived waters within the Transpolar Drift due to denitrification in bottom sediments of the Laptev Sea. The extent of Pacific-derived water in the Arctic Ocean was approximately limited by the position of the Lomonosov Ridge in 2007. The ratio of sea-ice derived brine influence and river water is roughly constant within each layer of the Arctic Ocean halocline. The correlation between brine influence and river water reveals two clusters that can be assigned to the two main mechanisms of sea-ice formation within the Arctic Ocean. Over the open ocean or in polynyas at the continental slope sea-ice formation results in a linear correlation between brine influence and river water at salinities of ~ 32 to 34. In coastal polynyas in the shallow regions of the Laptev Sea and southern Kara Sea, sea-ice formation transports river water into the shelf's bottom layer due to the close proximity to the river mouths. This process results in a second linear correlation between brine influence and river water at salinities of ~ 30 to 32.

  20. Late Pleistocene ice export events into the Arctic Ocean from the M'Clure Strait Ice Stream, Canadian Arctic Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokes, Chris R.; Clark, Chris D.; Darby, Dennis A.; Hodgson, Douglas A.

    2005-12-01

    Rapidly-flowing sectors of an ice sheet (ice streams) can play an important role in abrupt climate change through the delivery of icebergs and meltwater and the subsequent disruption of ocean thermohaline circulation (e.g., the North Atlantic's Heinrich events). Recently, several cores have been raised from the Arctic Ocean which document the existence of massive ice export events during the Late Pleistocene and whose provenance has been linked to source regions in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. In this paper, satellite imagery is used to map glacial geomorphology in the vicinity of Victoria Island, Banks Island and Prince of Wales Island (Canadian Arctic) in order to reconstruct ice flow patterns in the highly complex glacial landscape. A total of 88 discrete flow-sets are mapped and of these, 13 exhibit the characteristic geomorphology of palaeo-ice streams (i.e., parallel patterns of large, highly elongated mega-scale glacial lineations forming a convergent flow pattern with abrupt lateral margins). Previous studies by other workers and cross-cutting relationships indicate that the majority of these ice streams are relatively young and operated during or immediately prior to deglaciation. Our new mapping, however, documents a large (> 700 km long; 110 km wide) and relatively old ice stream imprint centred in M'Clintock Channel and converging into Viscount Melville Sound. A trough mouth fan located on the continental shelf suggests that it extended along M'Clure Strait and was grounded at the shelf edge. The location of the M'Clure Strait Ice Stream exactly matches the source area of 4 (possibly 5) major ice export events recorded in core PS1230 raised from Fram Strait, the major ice exit for the Arctic Ocean. These ice export events occur at 12.9, 15.6, 22 and 29.8 ka ( 14C yr BP) and we argue that they record vigorous episodes of activity of the M'Clure Strait Ice Stream. The timing of these events is remarkably similar to the North Atlantic's Heinrich events and we take this as evidence that the M'Clure Strait Ice Stream was also activated around the same time. This may hold important implications for the cause of the North Atlantic's Heinrich events and hints at the possibility of a pan-ice sheet response.

  1. Mineral-organic Dynamics During Export From Rivers to Oceans: Implications for Organic Matter Source and Diagenetic Alteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, A.; Hernes, P. J.; Montanez, I.

    2007-12-01

    The record of vegetation preserved along continental margins has traditionally been used to assess the contributions of organic matter derived from adjacent watersheds of rivers. Our ability to draw conclusions from these records relies on the fundamental assumption that the processing of these particles is limited, or at least congruent, across different vascular plant biomarkers, thereby allowing direct correlations between vascular plant distributions on land and marine compositions. Ratios of syringyl (S), vanillyl (V) and cinnamyl (C) lignin phenols should provide diagnostic source indicators for angiosperm and gymnosperm woody and nonwoody tissues. We conducted benchtop experiments to test whether lignin phenol-clay particulates prepared in freshwater and exported through a steep geochemical gradient to full marine salinities resulted in distinctly different particulate biomarker compositions. Variations in biomarker compositions highlight the importance of compound- and mineral-specific retention mechanisms as a function of salinity changes. Losses of lignin phenols from mineral surfaces is most pronounced at very low salinities and essentially absent at salinities greater than 2 parts per thousand to full marine salinities. Therefore, sediment processing at slightly elevated salinities, such as in an estuary, may be particularly adept at removing part, but not all lignin phenols sorbed to sediments. Mineral- specific trends indicate that an increase in surface area and reactivity (e.g., cation exchange capacity) slightly increases desorption of particulate-bound lignin phenols. When comparing sediments within and between watersheds, particle history and mineralogy becomes even more important, particularly during the export from riverine to marine settings. For example, preferential loss of syringyl phenols could lead to higher S/V ratios than the areal distribution of angiosperms within the watershed would have indicated. Similarly, the molecular compositions used to infer the extent of diagenetic alteration, and thus the relative age of particulate organic matter, are subject to these desorptive processes. Sediment compositions may appear younger, less diagenetically altered than would be determined for the sediments prior to export. These subtle differences in behavior have significant implications for determining carbon budgets, characterizing vascular plant inputs to marine sediments, and assessing anthropogenic fingerprints from land use change. This work demonstrates a new approach where sorptive-desorptive mechanisms controlling the distribution and composition of vascular biomarkers are accounted for, providing a new lens through which biomarker trends in continental margin sediments should be viewed.

  2. Flux and age of dissolved organic carbon exported to the Arctic Ocean: A carbon isotopic study of the five largest arctic rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raymond, P.A.; McClelland, J.W.; Holmes, R.M.; Zhulidov, A.V.; Mull, K.; Peterson, B.J.; Striegl, R.G.; Aiken, G.R.; Gurtovaya, T.Y.

    2007-01-01

    The export and A ??14C-age of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was determined for the Yehisey, Lena, Ob', Mackenzie, and Yukon rivers for 2004-2005. Concentrations of DOC elevate significantly with increasing discharge in these rivers, causing approximately 60% of the annual export to occur during a 2-month period following spring ice breakup. We present a total annual flux from the five rivers of ???16 teragrams (Tg), and conservatively estimate that the total input of DOC to the Arctic Ocean is 25-36 Tg, which is ???5-20% greater than previous fluxes. These fluxes are also ???2.5 ?? greater than temperate rivers with similar watershed sizes and water discharge. ??14C-DOC shows a clear relationship with hydrology. A small pool of DOC slightly depleted in ??14C is exported with base flow. The large pool exported with spring thaw is enriched in ??14C with respect to current-day atmospheric ??14C-CO2 values. A simple model predicts that ???50% of DOC exported during the arctic spring thaw is 1-5 years old, ???25% is 6-10 years in age, and 15% is 11-20 years old. The dominant spring melt period, a historically undersampled period export a large amount of young and presumably semilabile DOC to the Arctic Ocean. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. North Atlantic Deep Water export to the Southern Ocean over the past 14 Myr: Evidence from Nd and Pb isotopes in ferromanganese crusts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frank, M.; Whiteley, N.; Kasten, S.; Hein, J.R.; O'Nions, K.

    2002-01-01

    The intensity of North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) production has been one of the most important parameters controlling the global thermohaline ocean circulation system and climate. Here we present a new approach to reconstruct the overall strength of NADW export from the North Atlantic to the Southern Ocean over the past 14 Myr applying the deep water Nd and Pb isotope composition as recorded by ferromanganese crusts and nodules. We present the first long-term Nd and Pb isotope time series for deep Southern Ocean water masses, which are compared with previously published time series for NADW from the NW Atlantic Ocean. These data suggest a continuous and strong export of NADW, or a precursor of it, into the Southern Ocean between 14 and 3 Ma. An increasing difference in Nd and Pb isotope compositions between the NW Atlantic and the Southern Ocean over the past 3 Myr gives evidence for a progressive overall reduction of NADW export since the onset of Northern Hemisphere glaciation (NHG). The Nd isotope data allow us to assess at least semiquantitatively that the amount of this reduction has been in the range between 14 and 37% depending on location.

  4. Controls on the Flux, Age, and Composition of Terrestrial Organic Carbon Exported by Rivers to the Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peucker-Ehrenbrink, B.; Eglinton, T. I.; Holmes, R. M.; Galy, V.; Soule, S.; Goetz, S. J.; Laporte, N. T.; Wollheim, W. M.

    2009-12-01

    Export of organic carbon, alkalinity and silicate-derived Ca and Mg ions to the ocean exerts important controls on the sequestration of atmospheric carbon. As this export is mediated to a significant extent by river systems, understanding processes that control transport of land-derived matter to the coastal ocean is of fundamental importance to successful models of past and future climates. Scientists from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, the Woods Hole Research Center and the University of New Hampshire have formed a river research consortium that aims at investigating large river systems with a holistic approach. The National Science Foundation is funding this initiative through its Emerging Topics in Biogeochemical Cycles (ETBC) program. Our project focuses on the biogeochemistries of the Lena and Kolyma rivers in the Russian Arctic, the Yangtze river in China, the Ganges and Brahmaputra rivers in India and Bangladesh, the Congo river in central Africa as well as the Fraser river basin in western Canada. Campaign-style sampling using a uniform sampling strategy is complemented by time-series sampling that is accomplished through collaborations with scientists at local institutions such as the East China Normal University in Shanghai (Yangtze), the University of the Fraser Valley in Abbotsford (Fraser), schools and research institutions in eastern Russia (Lena and Kolyma) and the University of Nancy, France (Ganges, Brahmaputra). We combine a standardized sampling approach for organic and inorganic constituents with spatial analyzes of digital, mostly satellite-based data products with the aim of obtaining an integrated understanding of the response of river ecosystems to past, ongoing and future environmental changes. We will present first results from the Ganges-Brahmaputra, Kolyma as well as the Fraser River systems.

  5. Simulated 21st century's increase in oceanic suboxia by CO2-enhanced biotic carbon export

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oschlies, Andreas; Schulz, Kai G.; Riebesell, Ulf; Schmittner, Andreas

    2008-12-01

    The primary impacts of anthropogenic CO2 emissions on marine biogeochemical cycles predicted so far include ocean acidification, global warming induced shifts in biogeographical provinces, and a possible negative feedback on atmospheric CO2 levels by CO2-fertilized biological production. Here we report a new potentially significant impact on the oxygen-minimum zones of the tropical oceans. Using a model of global climate, ocean circulation, and biogeochemical cycling, we extrapolate mesocosm-derived experimental findings of a pCO2-sensitive increase in biotic carbon-to-nitrogen drawdown to the global ocean. For a simulation run from the onset of the industrial revolution until A.D. 2100 under a "business-as-usual" scenario for anthropogenic CO2 emissions, our model predicts a negative feedback on atmospheric CO2 levels, which amounts to 34 Gt C by the end of this century. While this represents a small alteration of the anthropogenic perturbation of the carbon cycle, the model results reveal a dramatic 50% increase in the suboxic water volume by the end of this century in response to the respiration of excess organic carbon formed at higher CO2 levels. This is a significant expansion of the marine "dead zones" with severe implications not only for all higher life forms but also for oxygen-sensitive nutrient recycling and, hence, for oceanic nutrient inventories.

  6. Greenland Ice Sheet exports labile organic carbon to the Arctic oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, E. C.; Wadham, J. L.; Tranter, M.; Stibal, M.; Lis, G. P.; Butler, C. E. H.; Laybourn-Parry, J.; Nienow, P.; Chandler, D.; Dewsbury, P.

    2013-12-01

    Runoff from small glacier systems contains dissolved organic carbon (DOC), rich in protein-like, low molecular weight (LMW) compounds, designating glaciers as an important source of bioavailable carbon for downstream heterotrophic activity. Fluxes of DOC and particulate organic carbon (POC) exported from large Greenland catchments, however, remain unquantified, despite the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) being the largest source of global glacial runoff (ca. 400 km3 yr-1). We report high and episodic fluxes of POC and DOC from a large (1200 km2) GrIS catchment during contrasting melt seasons. POC dominates organic carbon (OC) export (70-89% on average), is sourced from the ice sheet bed and contains a significant bioreactive component (9% carbohydrates). A major source for the "bioavailable" (free carbohydrates) LMW-DOC fraction is microbial activity on the ice sheet surface, with some further addition of LMW-DOC to meltwaters by biogeochemical processes at the ice sheet bed. The bioavailability of the exported DOC (30-58%) to downstream marine microorganisms is similar to that reported from other glacial watersheds. Annual fluxes of DOC and free carbohydrates during two melt seasons were similar, despite the ~ 2 fold difference in runoff fluxes, suggesting production-limited DOC sources. POC fluxes were also insensitive to an increase in seasonal runoff volumes, indicating supply-limitation of suspended sediment in runoff. Scaled to the GrIS, the combined DOC and POC fluxes (0.13-0.17 Tg C yr-1 DOC, 0.36-1.52 Tg C yr-1 mean POC) are of a similar order of magnitude to a large Arctic river system, and hence represent an important OC source to the North Atlantic, Greenland and Labrador Seas.

  7. Greenland Ice Sheet exports labile organic carbon to the Arctic oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, E. C.; Wadham, J. L.; Tranter, M.; Stibal, M.; Lis, G. P.; Butler, C. E. H.; Laybourn-Parry, J.; Nienow, P.; Chandler, D.; Dewsbury, P.

    2014-07-01

    Runoff from small glacier systems contains dissolved organic carbon (DOC) rich in protein-like, low molecular weight (LMW) compounds, designating glaciers as an important source of bioavailable carbon for downstream heterotrophic activity. Fluxes of DOC and particulate organic carbon (POC) exported from large Greenland catchments, however, remain unquantified, despite the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) being the largest source of global glacial runoff (ca. 400 km3 yr-1). We report high and episodic fluxes of POC and DOC from a large (>600 km2) GrIS catchment during contrasting melt seasons. POC dominates organic carbon (OC) export (70-89% on average), is sourced from the ice sheet bed, and contains a significant bioreactive component (9% carbohydrates). A major source of the "bioavailable" (free carbohydrate) LMW-DOC fraction is microbial activity on the ice sheet surface, with some further addition of LMW-DOC to meltwaters by biogeochemical processes at the ice sheet bed. The bioavailability of the exported DOC (26-53%) to downstream marine microorganisms is similar to that reported from other glacial watersheds. Annual fluxes of DOC and free carbohydrates during two melt seasons were similar, despite the approximately two-fold difference in runoff fluxes, suggesting production-limited DOC sources. POC fluxes were also insensitive to an increase in seasonal runoff volumes, indicating a supply limitation in suspended sediment in runoff. Scaled to the GrIS, the combined DOC (0.13-0.17 Tg C yr-1 (±13%)) and POC fluxes (mean = 0.36-1.52 Tg C yr-1 (±14%)) are of a similar order of magnitude to a large Arctic river system, and hence may represent an important OC source to the near-coastal North Atlantic, Greenland and Labrador seas.

  8. Export fluxes in a naturally fertilized area of the Southern Ocean, the Kerguelen Plateau: ecological vectors of carbon and biogenic silica to depth (Part 2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rembauville, M.; Blain, S.; Armand, L.; Quéguiner, B.; Salter, I.

    2014-12-01

    The chemical (particulate organic carbon and nitrogen, biogenic silica) and biological (diatoms and faecal pellets) composition of the material exported to a moored sediment trap located under the winter mixed layer of the naturally-fertilized Kerguelen Plateau in the Southern Ocean was studied over an annual cycle. Despite iron availability in spring, the annual particulate organic carbon (POC) export (98.2 mmol m-2) at 289 m was low but annual biogenic silica export was significant (114 mmol m-2). This feature was related to the abundance of empty diatom frustules and the ratio of full : empty cell exerted a first order control in BSi : POC export stoichiometry of biological pump. Chaetoceros Hyalochaete spp. and Thalassiosira antarctica resting spores were found to be responsible for more than 60% of the annual POC that occurred during two very short export events (<14 days in spring-summer) representing the majority of captured export. Low diatom fluxes were observed over the remainder of the year. Faecal pellet contribution to annual carbon flux was low (34%) and reached it's seasonal maximum in autumn and winter (>80%). The seasonal progression of faecal pellet types revealed a clear transition from small spherical shapes (small copepods) in spring, larger cylindrical and ellipsoid shapes in summer (euphausiids and large copepods) and finally large tabular shapes (salps) in autumn and winter. We propose that in this High Biomass, Low Export (HBLE) environment, small, highly silicified, fast-sinking resting spores are able to bypass the high grazing pressure and efficient carbon transfer to higher trophic levels that are responsible for the low fluxes observed the during the remainder of the year. Our study also provides a statistical framework linking the ecological succession of diatom and zooplankton communities to the seasonality of carbon and silicon export within an iron-fertilized bloom region in the Southern Ocean.

  9. Projected Impact of Climate Change on the Water and Salt Budgets of the Arctic Ocean by a Global Climate Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James R.; Russell, Gary L.

    1996-01-01

    The annual flux of freshwater into the Arctic Ocean by the atmosphere and rivers is balanced by the export of sea ice and oceanic freshwater. Two 150-year simulations of a global climate model are used to examine how this balance might change if atmospheric greenhouse gases (GHGs) increase. Relative to the control, the last 50-year period of the GHG experiment indicates that the total inflow of water from the atmosphere and rivers increases by 10% primarily due to an increase in river discharge, the annual sea-ice export decreases by about half, the oceanic liquid water export increases, salinity decreases, sea-ice cover decreases, and the total mass and sea-surface height of the Arctic Ocean increase. The closed, compact, and multi-phased nature of the hydrologic cycle in the Arctic Ocean makes it an ideal test of water budgets that could be included in model intercomparisons.

  10. Late summer particulate organic carbon export and twilight zone remineralisation in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planchon, F.; Cavagna, A.-J.; Cardinal, D.; André, L.; Dehairs, F.

    2013-02-01

    As part of the GEOTRACES Bonus-GoodHope (BGH) expedition (January-March 2008) in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean, particulate organic carbon (POC) export was examined from the surface to the mesopelagic twilight zone using water column distributions of total 234Th and biogenic particulate Ba (Baxs). Surface POC export production was estimated from steady state and non steady state modelling of 234Th fluxes, which were converted into POC fluxes, using the POC/234Th ratio of large, potentially sinking particles (> 53 μm) collected via in situ pumps. Deficits in 234Th activities were observed at all stations from the surface to the bottom of the mixed layer, yielding 234Th export fluxes from the upper 100 m of 496 ± 214 dpm m-2 d-1 to 1195 ± 158 dpm m-2 d-1 for the steady state model and of 149 ±517 dpm m-2 d-1 to 1217 ± 231 dpm m-2 d-1 for the non steady state model. Using the POC/234Thp ratio of sinking particles (ratios varied from 1.7 ± 0.2 μmol dpm-1 to 4.8 ± 1.9 μmol dpm-1) POC export production at 100 m was calculated to range between 0.9 ± 0.4 and 5.1 ± 2.1 mmol C m-2 d-1,assuming steady state and between 0.3 ± 0.9 m-2 d-1 and 4.9 ± 3.3 mmol C m-2 d-1, assuming non steady state. From the comparison of both approaches, it appears that during late summer export decreased by 56 to 16% for the area between the sub-Antarctic zone and the southern Antarctic Circumpolar Current Front (SACCF), whereas it remained rather constant over time in the HNLC area south of the SACCF. POC export represented only 6 to 54% of new production, indicating that export efficiency was, in general, low, except in the vicinity of the SACCF, where export represented 56% of new production. Attenuation of the POC sinking flux in the upper mesopelagic waters (100-600 m depth interval) was evidenced both, from excess 234Th activities and from particulate biogenic Ba (Baxs) accumulation. Excess 234Th activities, reflected by 234Th/238U ratios as large as 1.21 ± 0.05, are attributed to remineralisation/disaggregation of 234Th-bearing particles. The accumulation of excess 234Th in the 100-600 m depth interval ranged from 458 ± 633 dpm m-2 d-1 to 3068 ± 897 dpm m-2 d-1, assuming steady state. Using the POC/234Thp ratio of sinking particles (> 53 μm), this 234Th accumulation flux was converted into a POC remineralisation flux which ranged between 0.9 ± 1.2 mmol C m-2 d-1 and 9.2 ± 2.9 mmol C m-2 d-1. Mesopelagic particulate biogenic Ba has been reported to reflect bacterial degradation of organic matter and to be related to oxygen consumption and bacterial carbon respiration. We observed that the highest Baxs contents (reaching up to > 1000 pM), in general, occurred between 200 and 400 m. Depth-weighted average mesopelagic Baxs (meso-Baxs) values were converted into respired C fluxes, which ranged between 0.23 and 6.4 mmol C m-2 d-1, in good agreement with 234Th-based remineralisation fluxes. A major outcome from this study is the observed significant positive correlation between POC remineralisation as estimated from meso-Baxs contents and from 234Th excess (R2 = 0.73; excluding 2 outliers). Remineralisation of POC in the twilight zone was particularly efficient relative to POC export resulting in negligible bathypelagic (> 600 m) POC export fluxes in the sub-Antarctic zone, the Polar Front zone and the northern Weddell Gyre, while the subtropical zone as well as the vicinity of the SACCF had significant deep POC fluxes.

  11. Export of young terrigenous dissolved organic carbon from rivers to the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benner, Ronald; Benitez-Nelson, Bryan; Kaiser, Karl; Amon, Rainer M. W.

    2004-03-01

    Soils in the drainage basins of Arctic rivers are a major global reservoir of aged organic carbon. The fate of this old carbon is of growing concern as the effects of climate change become more evident in the Arctic. We report natural abundance 14C data indicating that dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from several Eurasian and North American rivers is predominantly young and largely derived from recently-fixed C in plant litter and upper soil horizons. Concentrations of dissolved lignin phenols, unique organic tracers of terrestrial plant material, and 14C content in DOC were strongly correlated throughout the Arctic Ocean, indicating terrigenous DOC is mostly young and widely distributed in polar surface waters. These young ages of terrigenous DOC in rivers and the ocean indicate little of the old carbon stored in Arctic soils is currently being mobilized in the dissolved component of continental runoff.

  12. Deep carbon export from a Southern Ocean iron-fertilized diatom bloom.

    PubMed

    Smetacek, Victor; Klaas, Christine; Strass, Volker H; Assmy, Philipp; Montresor, Marina; Cisewski, Boris; Savoye, Nicolas; Webb, Adrian; d'Ovidio, Francesco; Arrieta, Jesús M; Bathmann, Ulrich; Bellerby, Richard; Berg, Gry Mine; Croot, Peter; Gonzalez, Santiago; Henjes, Joachim; Herndl, Gerhard J; Hoffmann, Linn J; Leach, Harry; Losch, Martin; Mills, Matthew M; Neill, Craig; Peeken, Ilka; Röttgers, Rüdiger; Sachs, Oliver; Sauter, Eberhard; Schmidt, Maike M; Schwarz, Jill; Terbrüggen, Anja; Wolf-Gladrow, Dieter

    2012-07-19

    Fertilization of the ocean by adding iron compounds has induced diatom-dominated phytoplankton blooms accompanied by considerable carbon dioxide drawdown in the ocean surface layer. However, because the fate of bloom biomass could not be adequately resolved in these experiments, the timescales of carbon sequestration from the atmosphere are uncertain. Here we report the results of a five-week experiment carried out in the closed core of a vertically coherent, mesoscale eddy of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, during which we tracked sinking particles from the surface to the deep-sea floor. A large diatom bloom peaked in the fourth week after fertilization. This was followed by mass mortality of several diatom species that formed rapidly sinking, mucilaginous aggregates of entangled cells and chains. Taken together, multiple lines of evidence-although each with important uncertainties-lead us to conclude that at least half the bloom biomass sank far below a depth of 1,000 metres and that a substantial portion is likely to have reached the sea floor. Thus, iron-fertilized diatom blooms may sequester carbon for timescales of centuries in ocean bottom water and for longer in the sediments. PMID:22810695

  13. Atmospheric freshwater fluxes and their effect on the global thermohaline circulation

    SciTech Connect

    Zaucker, F.; Stocker, T.F.; Broecker, W.S.

    1994-06-15

    Atmospheric water vapor fluxes were derived from a 1-year data set of horizontal wind speed and specific humidity assimilated from meteorological observations by the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF). Vertically integrated horizontal freshwater fluxes were compared to those of two data sets based on a climatology and on simulations with an atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM). Zonal transports agree fairly well at all latitudes outside the tropics, where fluxes are about double for the AGCM data set. Meridional fluxes of the AGCM and ECMWF data sets show close agreement, while the climatological fluxes are generally smaller with a considerable northward shift in the southern hemisphere. Atmosphere-to-ocean freshwater fluxes were derived from the three data sets. Not only is there substantial disagreement between the data sets, but their zonal averages over the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Ocean basins show little resemblance to the respective restoring freshwater fluxes from a 2-dimensional ocean model. If the ocean model is forced with the observed and modeled atmospheric fluxes, we find that the mode of ocean circulation is determined mostly the net flux to the high-latitude oceans and the amount of freshwater exported from the Atlantic basin. The latitudinal structure of the freshwater fluxes in low-latitudes and midlatitudes has little influence on the modeled thermohaline circulation. The fluxes derived from the climatology and ECMWF permit North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) formation, but a strong freshwater input to the Southern Ocean inhibits Antarctic Bottom Water formation. The AGCM transports so much moisture to the Arctic Ocean that NADW formation is shut down, resulting in a ocean circulation mode of southern sinking in all three ocean basins.

  14. A model-based study of ice and freshwater transport variability along both sides of Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lique, Camille; Treguier, Anne Marie; Scheinert, Markus; Penduff, Thierry

    2009-10-01

    We investigate some aspects of the variability of the Arctic freshwater content during the 1965-2002 period using the DRAKKAR eddy admitting global ocean/sea-ice model (12 km resolution in the Arctic). A comparison with recent mooring sections shows that the model realistically represents the major advective exchanges with the Arctic basin, through Bering, Fram and Davis Straits, and the Barents Sea. This allows the separate contributions of the inflows and outflows across each section to be quantified. In the model, the Arctic freshwater content variability is explained by the sea-ice flux at Fram and the combined variations of ocean freshwater inflow (at Bering) and outflow (at Fram and Davis). At all routes, except trough Fram Strait, the freshwater transport variability is mainly accounted for by the liquid component, with small contributions from the sea-ice flux. The ocean freshwater transport variability through both Davis and Fram is controlled by the variability of the export branch (Baffin Island Current and East Greenland Current, respectively), the variability of the inflow branches playing a minor role. We examine the respective role of velocity and salinity fluctuations in the variability of the ocean freshwater transport. Fram and Davis Straits offer a striking contrast in this regard. Freshwater transport variations across Davis Strait are completely determined by the variations of the total volume flux (0.91 correlation). On the other hand, the freshwater transport through Fram Strait depends both on variations of volume transport and salinity. As a result, there is no significant correlation between the variability of freshwater flux at Fram and Davis, although the volume transports on each side of Greenland are strongly anti-correlated (-0.84). Contrary to Davis Strait, the salinity of water carried by the East Greenland Current through Fram Strait varies strongly due to the ice-ocean flux north of Greenland.

  15. Ocean eddies drive the export of salt out of the subtropical gyres: insights from the DRAKKAR 1/12 degree global model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treguier, Anne Marie; Deshayes, Julie; Le Sommer, Julien; Lique, Camille; Madec, Gurvan; Penduff, Thierry; Molines, Jean-Marc; Barnier, Bernard; Bourdalle-Badie, Romain; Talandier, Claude

    2014-05-01

    The spatial distribution of salinity in the ocean results from exchanges with the atmosphere and land (evaporation, precipitation and runoff) as well as transports by the ocean circulation. The eddy contribution to the oceanic meridional transport of salt is quantified for the first time at the global scale in an eddy resolving ocean model at 1/12 degree (DRAKKAR ORCA12 model, based on the NEMO modelling platform). We propose a decomposition of the meridional salt transport which clarifies the link between distribution of salt and freshwater forcing, without defining a "freshwater anomaly" based on an arbitrary reference salinity. The method consists in a decomposition of the meridional transport into i) transport by the time-longitude-depth mean velocity, ii) transport by time-mean velocity recirculations and iii) transport by transient eddy perturbations. The latter is especially large at the northern and southern boundary of the subtropical gyres, where the eddy contribution is comparable in size to the salt transport by the time-mean recirculations. The hierarchy of DRAKKAR simulations demonstrate the sensitivity of eddy transport to the spatial resolution of the model. This eddy transport has to be taken into account when building scenarios for the evolution of ocean salinity in a changing climate.

  16. An assessment of the Arctic Ocean in a suite of interannual CORE-II simulations. Part I: Sea ice and solid freshwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang; Ilicak, Mehmet; Gerdes, Rüdiger; Drange, Helge; Aksenov, Yevgeny; Bailey, David A.; Bentsen, Mats; Biastoch, Arne; Bozec, Alexandra; Böning, Claus; Cassou, Christophe; Chassignet, Eric; Coward, Andrew C.; Curry, Beth; Danabasoglu, Gokhan; Danilov, Sergey; Fernandez, Elodie; Fogli, Pier Giuseppe; Fujii, Yosuke; Griffies, Stephen M.; Iovino, Doroteaciro; Jahn, Alexandra; Jung, Thomas; Large, William G.; Lee, Craig; Lique, Camille; Lu, Jianhua; Masina, Simona; Nurser, A. J. George; Rabe, Benjamin; Roth, Christina; Salas y Mélia, David; Samuels, Bonita L.; Spence, Paul; Tsujino, Hiroyuki; Valcke, Sophie; Voldoire, Aurore; Wang, Xuezhu; Yeager, Steve G.

    2016-03-01

    The Arctic Ocean simulated in fourteen global ocean-sea ice models in the framework of the Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiments, phase II (CORE II) is analyzed. The focus is on the Arctic sea ice extent, the solid freshwater (FW) sources and solid freshwater content (FWC). Available observations are used for model evaluation. The variability of sea ice extent and solid FW budget is more consistently reproduced than their mean state in the models. The descending trend of September sea ice extent is well simulated in terms of the model ensemble mean. Models overestimating sea ice thickness tend to underestimate the descending trend of September sea ice extent. The models underestimate the observed sea ice thinning trend by a factor of two. When averaged on decadal time scales, the variation of Arctic solid FWC is contributed by those of both sea ice production and sea ice transport, which are out of phase in time. The solid FWC decreased in the recent decades, caused mainly by the reduction in sea ice thickness. The models did not simulate the acceleration of sea ice thickness decline, leading to an underestimation of solid FWC trend after 2000. The common model behavior, including the tendency to underestimate the trend of sea ice thickness and March sea ice extent, remains to be improved.

  17. Projected decreases in future marine export production: the role of the carbon flux through the upper ocean ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laufkötter, C.; Vogt, M.; Gruber, N.; Aumont, O.; Bopp, L.; Doney, S. C.; Dunne, J. P.; Hauck, J.; John, J. G.; Lima, I. D.; Seferian, R.; Völker, C.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate projections of marine particle export production (EP) are crucial for predicting the response of the marine carbon cycle to climate change, yet models show a wide range in both global EP and their responses to climate change. This is, in part, due to EP being the net result of a series of processes, starting with net primary production (NPP) in the sunlit upper ocean, followed by the formation of particulate organic matter and the subsequent sinking and remineralization of these particles, with each of these processes responding differently to changes in environmental conditions. Here, we compare future projections in EP over the 21st century, generated by four marine ecosystem models under IPCC's high emission scenario RCP8.5, and determine the processes driving these changes. The models simulate small to modest decreases in global EP between -1 and -12 %. Models differ greatly with regard to the drivers causing these changes. Among them, the formation of particles is the most uncertain process with models not agreeing on either magnitude or the direction of change. The removal of the sinking particles by remineralization is simulated to increase in the low and intermediate latitudes in three models, driven by either warming-induced increases in remineralization or slower particle sinking, and show insignificant changes in the remaining model. Changes in ecosystem structure, particularly the relative role of diatoms matters as well, as diatoms produce larger and denser particles that sink faster and are partly protected from remineralization. Also this controlling factor is afflicted with high uncertainties, particularly since the models differ already substantially with regard to both the initial (present-day) distribution of diatoms (between 11-94 % in the Southern Ocean) and the diatom contribution to particle formation (0.6-3.8 times lower/higher than their contribution to biomass). As a consequence, changes in diatom concentration are a strong driver for EP changes in some models but of low significance in others. Observational and experimental constraints on ecosystem structure and how the fixed carbon is routed through the ecosystem to produce export production are urgently needed in order to improve current generation ecosystem models and their ability to project future changes.

  18. Marinobacter confluentis sp. nov., a lipolytic bacterium isolated from a junction between the ocean and a freshwater lake.

    PubMed

    Park, Sooyeon; Kim, Sona; Kang, Chul-Hyung; Jung, Yong-Taek; Yoon, Jung-Hoon

    2015-12-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, motile, aerobic and rod-shaped bacterium, designated HJM-18T, was isolated from the place where the ocean and a freshwater lake meet at Hwajinpo, South Korea, and subjected to a taxonomic study using a polyphasic approach. Strain HJM-18T grew optimally at 30 °C, at pH 7.0-8.0 and in the presence of 1.0-3.0 % (w/v) NaCl. Phylogenetic trees based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain HJM-18T belonged to the genus Marinobacter. Strain HJM-18T exhibited 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity values of 97.05-98.22 % to the type strains of Marinobacter algicola, Marinobacter flavimaris, Marinobacter adhaerens, Marinobacter salarius, Marinobacter salsuginis, Marinobacter guineae and Marinobacter gudaonensis and of 93.21-96.98 % to the type strains of the other species of the genus Marinobacter. Strain HJM-18T contained Q-9 as the predominant ubiquinone and summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω7c and/or C16 : 1ω6c), C16 : 0 and C18 : 1ω9c as the major fatty acids. The major polar lipids detected in strain HJM-18T were phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol and one unidentified aminophospholipid. The DNA G+C content was 58 mol% and the mean DNA-DNA relatedness values with the type strains of the seven phylogenetically related species of the genus Marinobacter were 10-27 %. Differential phenotypic properties, together with phylogenetic and genetic distinctiveness, revealed that strain HJM-18T is separated from recognized species of the genus Marinobacter. On the basis of the data presented, strain HJM-18T represents a novel species of the genus Marinobacter, for which the name Marinobacter confluentis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is HJM-18T ( = KCTC 42705T = NBRC 111223T). PMID:26442839

  19. Downward particle flux and carbon export in the Beaufort Sea, Arctic Ocean; the role of zooplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miquel, J.-C.; Gasser, B.; Martín, J.; Marec, C.; Babin, M.; Fortier, L.; Forest, A.

    2015-08-01

    As part of the international, multidisciplinary project Malina, downward particle fluxes were investigated by means of a drifting multi-sediment trap mooring deployed at three sites in the Canadian Beaufort Sea in late summer 2009. Mooring deployments lasted between 28 and 50 h and targeted the shelf-break and the slope along the Beaufort-Mackenzie continental margin, as well as the edge between the Mackenzie Shelf and the Amundsen Gulf. Besides analyses of C and N, the collected material was investigated for pigments, phyto- and microzooplankton, faecal pellets and swimmers. The measured fluxes were relatively low, in the range of 11-54 mg m-2 d-1 for the total mass, 1-15 mg C m-2 d-1 for organic carbon and 0.2-2.5 mg N m-2 d-1 for nitrogen. Comparison with a long-term trap data set from the same sampling area showed that the short-term measurements were at the lower end of the high variability characterizing a rather high flux regime during the study period. The sinking material consisted of aggregates and particles that were characterized by the presence of hetero- and autotrophic microzooplankters and diatoms and by the corresponding pigment signatures. Faecal pellets contribution to sinking carbon flux was important, especially at depths below 100 m, where they represented up to 25 % of the total carbon flux. The vertical distribution of different morphotypes of pellets showed a marked pattern with cylindrical faeces (produced by calanoid copepods) present mainly within the euphotic zone, whereas elliptical pellets (produced mainly by smaller copepods) were more abundant at mesopelagic depths. These features, together with the density of matter within the pellets, highlighted the role of the zooplankton community in the transformation of carbon issued from the primary production and the transition of that carbon from the productive surface zone to the Arctic Ocean's interior. Our data indicate that sinking carbon flux in this late summer period is primarily the result of a heterotrophic-driven ecosystem.

  20. Downward particle flux and carbon export in the Beaufort Sea, Arctic Ocean; the Malina experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miquel, J.-C.; Gasser, B.; Martín, J.; Marec, C.; Babin, M.; Fortier, L.; Forest, A.

    2015-01-01

    As part of the international, multidisciplinary project Malina, downward particle fluxes were investigated by means of a drifting multi-sediment trap mooring deployed at three sites in the Canadian Beaufort Sea in late summer 2009. Mooring deployments lasted for 28-50 h and targeted the shelf-break and the slope along the Beaufort-Mackenzie continental margin, as well as the edge between the Mackenzie Shelf and the Amundsen Gulf. Besides analyses of C and N, the collected material was investigated for pigments, phyto- and microzooplankton, faecal pellets and swimmers. The measured fluxes were relatively low, in the range of 11-54 mg m-2 d-1 for the total mass, 1-15 mg C m-2 d-1 for organic carbon and 0.2-2.5 mg N m-2 d-1 for nitrogen. Comparison with a long-term trap dataset from the same sampling area showed that the short-term measurements were at the lower end of the high variability characterizing a rather high flux regime during the study period. The sinking material consisted of aggregates and particles that were characterized by the presence of hetero- and autotrophic microzooplankters and diatoms and by the corresponding pigment signatures. Faecal pellets contribution to sinking carbon flux was important, especially at depth where they represented up to 25% of the total carbon flux. The vertical distribution of different morphotypes of pellets showed a marked pattern with cylindrical faeces (produced by calanoid copepods) present mainly within the euphotic zone, whereas elliptical pellets (produced mainly by smaller copepods) were more abundant at mesopelagic depths. These features, together with the density of matter within the pellets, highlighted the role of the zooplankton community in the transformation of carbon issued from the primary production and the transition of that carbon from the productive surface zone to the Arctic Ocean's interior. Our data indicate that sinking carbon flux in this late summer period is primarily the result of a heterotrophic driven ecosystem as compared to the system driven by autotrophy earlier in the year.

  1. POC export from ocean surface waters by means of 234Th/ 238U and 210Po/ 210Pb disequilibria: A review of the use of two radiotracer pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdeny, Elisabet; Masqué, Pere; Garcia-Orellana, Jordi; Hanfland, Claudia; Kirk Cochran, J.; Stewart, Gillian M.

    2009-08-01

    234Th ( T1/2=24.1 d) and 210Po ( T1/2=138.4 d) are particle reactive radioisotopes that are used as tracers for particle cycling in the upper ocean. Particulate organic carbon (POC) export has frequently been estimated using 234Th/ 238U disequilibrium. Recent evidence suggests that 210Po/ 210Pb disequilibrium may be used as an additional tool to examine particle export, given the direct biological uptake of 210Po into cellular material. Differences in these two radioisotope pairs with regard to their half-lives, particle reactivity and scavenging affinity in seawater should provide complementary information to be obtained on the processes occurring in the water column. Here, we review eight different studies that have simultaneously used both approaches to estimate POC export fluxes from the surface ocean. Our aim is to provide a complete "dataset" of all the existing POC flux data derived from the coupled use of both 234Th and 210Po and to evaluate the advantages and limitations of each tracer pair. Our analysis suggests that the simultaneous use of both radiotracers provides more useful comparative data than can be derived from the use of a single tracer alone. The difference in half-lives of 234Th and 210Po enables the study of export production rates over different time scales. In addition, their different biogeochemical behaviour and preferred affinity for specific types of particles leads to the conclusion that 234Th is a better tracer of total mass flux, whereas 210Po tracks POC export more specifically. The synthesis presented here is also intended to provide a basis for planning future sampling strategies and promoting further work in this field to help reveal the more specific application of each tracer under specific water column biogeochemistries.

  2. Freshwater pulse experiments in a coupled climate model with bistable AMOC: testing the theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, T.; Jackson, L.; Menary, M.; Palmer, M.

    2012-04-01

    A collapse of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) could have severe consequences for the climate of Northern Europe and may impact the climate of the whole planet (e.g. Vellinga and Wood, 2002). Several paleoclimate studies have suggested that such events have occurred in the past and may have been responsible for large shifts in Earth's climate. Although such events have been simulated in simple box models and models of intermediate complexity most GCMs have been unable to produce these events. Several recent papers (e.g. Rammstorf, 1999; Pardaens et al., 2003; Drijfhout et al., 2010, Hawkins et al., 2011) have suggested that the direction of freshwater transport by the AMOC at the southern boundary of the Atlantic Ocean (Fov) may be crucial to the stability of the AMOC. Observational estimates suggest that the AMOC exports freshwater from the Atlantic Ocean (Fov < 0) whereas in almost all models without flux adjustments the AMOC imports freshwater (Fov > 0). The latest UK Met Office Hadley Centre climate model (HadGEM3) has a negative Fov as a result of reduced upper ocean salinity biases in the South Atlantic. This suggests that the AMOC may be less stable than in previous models. We will present the first results from a series of freshwater pulse experiments where freshwater is rapidly added to the North Atlantic Ocean to see whether the AMOC will collapse, and furthermore whether it will recover to its initial state.

  3. Quantifying the ocean, freshwater and human effects on year-to-year variability of one-sea-winter Atlantic salmon angled in multiple Norwegian rivers.

    PubMed

    Otero, Jaime; Jensen, Arne J; L'Abée-Lund, Jan Henning; Stenseth, Nils Chr; Storvik, Geir O; Vøllestad, Leif Asbjørn

    2011-01-01

    Many Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar, populations are decreasing throughout the species' distributional range probably due to several factors acting in concert. A number of studies have documented the influence of freshwater and ocean conditions, climate variability and human impacts resulting from impoundment and aquaculture. However, most previous research has focused on analyzing single or only a few populations, and quantified isolated effects rather than handling multiple factors in conjunction. By using a multi-river mixed-effects model we estimated the effects of oceanic and river conditions, as well as human impacts, on year-to-year and between-river variability across 60 time series of recreational catch of one-sea-winter salmon (grilse) from Norwegian rivers over 29 years (1979-2007). Warm coastal temperatures at the time of smolt entrance into the sea and increased water discharge during upstream migration of mature fish were associated with higher rod catches of grilse. When hydropower stations were present in the course of the river systems the strength of the relationship with runoff was reduced. Catches of grilse in the river increased significantly following the reduction of the harvesting of this life-stage at sea. However, an average decreasing temporal trend was still detected and appeared to be stronger in the presence of salmon farms on the migration route of smolts in coastal/fjord areas. These results suggest that both ocean and freshwater conditions in conjunction with various human impacts contribute to shape interannual fluctuations and between-river variability of wild Atlantic salmon in Norwegian rivers. Current global change altering coastal temperature and water flow patterns might have implications for future grilse catches, moreover, positioning of aquaculture facilities as well as the implementation of hydropower schemes or other encroachments should be made with care when implementing management actions and searching for solutions to conserve this species. PMID:21897867

  4. Quantifying the Ocean, Freshwater and Human Effects on Year-to-Year Variability of One-Sea-Winter Atlantic Salmon Angled in Multiple Norwegian Rivers

    PubMed Central

    Otero, Jaime; Jensen, Arne J.; L'Abée-Lund, Jan Henning; Stenseth, Nils Chr.; Storvik, Geir O.; Vøllestad, Leif Asbjørn

    2011-01-01

    Many Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar, populations are decreasing throughout the species' distributional range probably due to several factors acting in concert. A number of studies have documented the influence of freshwater and ocean conditions, climate variability and human impacts resulting from impoundment and aquaculture. However, most previous research has focused on analyzing single or only a few populations, and quantified isolated effects rather than handling multiple factors in conjunction. By using a multi-river mixed-effects model we estimated the effects of oceanic and river conditions, as well as human impacts, on year-to-year and between-river variability across 60 time series of recreational catch of one-sea-winter salmon (grilse) from Norwegian rivers over 29 years (1979–2007). Warm coastal temperatures at the time of smolt entrance into the sea and increased water discharge during upstream migration of mature fish were associated with higher rod catches of grilse. When hydropower stations were present in the course of the river systems the strength of the relationship with runoff was reduced. Catches of grilse in the river increased significantly following the reduction of the harvesting of this life-stage at sea. However, an average decreasing temporal trend was still detected and appeared to be stronger in the presence of salmon farms on the migration route of smolts in coastal/fjord areas. These results suggest that both ocean and freshwater conditions in conjunction with various human impacts contribute to shape interannual fluctuations and between-river variability of wild Atlantic salmon in Norwegian rivers. Current global change altering coastal temperature and water flow patterns might have implications for future grilse catches, moreover, positioning of aquaculture facilities as well as the implementation of hydropower schemes or other encroachments should be made with care when implementing management actions and searching for solutions to conserve this species. PMID:21897867

  5. Freshwater fluxes in the Weddell Gyre: results from δ18O.

    PubMed

    Brown, Peter J; Meredith, Michael P; Jullion, Loïc; Naveira Garabato, Alberto; Torres-Valdés, Sinhue; Holland, Paul; Leng, Melanie J; Venables, Hugh

    2014-07-13

    Full-depth measurements of δ(18)O from 2008 to 2010 enclosing the Weddell Gyre in the Southern Ocean are used to investigate the regional freshwater budget. Using complementary salinity, nutrients and oxygen data, a four-component mass balance was applied to quantify the relative contributions of meteoric water (precipitation/glacial input), sea-ice melt and saline (oceanic) sources. Combination of freshwater fractions with velocity fields derived from a box inverse analysis enabled the estimation of gyre-scale budgets of both freshwater types, with deep water exports found to dominate the budget. Surface net sea-ice melt and meteoric contributions reach 1.8% and 3.2%, respectively, influenced by the summer sampling period, and -1.7% and +1.7% at depth, indicative of a dominance of sea-ice production over melt and a sizable contribution of shelf waters to deep water mass formation. A net meteoric water export of approximately 37 mSv is determined, commensurate with local estimates of ice sheet outflow and precipitation, and the Weddell Gyre is estimated to be a region of net sea-ice production. These results constitute the first synoptic benchmarking of sea-ice and meteoric exports from the Weddell Gyre, against which future change associated with an accelerating hydrological cycle, ocean climate change and evolving Antarctic glacial mass balance can be determined. PMID:24891394

  6. Freshwater fluxes in the Weddell Gyre: results from δ18O

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Peter J.; Meredith, Michael P.; Jullion, Loïc; Naveira Garabato, Alberto; Torres-Valdés, Sinhue; Holland, Paul; Leng, Melanie J.; Venables, Hugh

    2014-01-01

    Full-depth measurements of δ18O from 2008 to 2010 enclosing the Weddell Gyre in the Southern Ocean are used to investigate the regional freshwater budget. Using complementary salinity, nutrients and oxygen data, a four-component mass balance was applied to quantify the relative contributions of meteoric water (precipitation/glacial input), sea-ice melt and saline (oceanic) sources. Combination of freshwater fractions with velocity fields derived from a box inverse analysis enabled the estimation of gyre-scale budgets of both freshwater types, with deep water exports found to dominate the budget. Surface net sea-ice melt and meteoric contributions reach 1.8% and 3.2%, respectively, influenced by the summer sampling period, and −1.7% and +1.7% at depth, indicative of a dominance of sea-ice production over melt and a sizable contribution of shelf waters to deep water mass formation. A net meteoric water export of approximately 37 mSv is determined, commensurate with local estimates of ice sheet outflow and precipitation, and the Weddell Gyre is estimated to be a region of net sea-ice production. These results constitute the first synoptic benchmarking of sea-ice and meteoric exports from the Weddell Gyre, against which future change associated with an accelerating hydrological cycle, ocean climate change and evolving Antarctic glacial mass balance can be determined. PMID:24891394

  7. Export of newly formed LSW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Katharina; Klein, Birgit; Karstensen, Johannes; Fischer, Jürgen; Baumann, Till; Kanzow, Torsten

    2015-04-01

    The Atlantic meridional overturning circulation represents the strongest mechanism for oceanic northward heat transport. This is accomplished by moving warm water northward in the upper ocean compensated by a deep return flow of cold and dense North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW). Labrador Sea Water (LSW) constitutes the shallowest component of NADW. Since LSW is also supposed to be the most sensitive NADW component to climate change it is of particular interest. LSW is formed by deep convection not only in the centre of the Labrador Sea but also near its western boundary. Recent studies have suggested that LSW formed in the boundary region enters its export route from the Labrador Sea, the Deep Western Boundary Current, faster than LSW originating from the central Labrador Sea. In this study the spatial and temporal evolution of the export of newly formed LSW is investigated. For this purpose hydrographic mooring data from an array located at the western bounndary at 53°N starting in the late 1990s until 2014 and data from the Argo float network is used. The averaged seasonal salinity cycle at the array, particularly at the moorings further onshore, shows a pronounced freshwater signal in May indicating the arrival of newly formed LSW in the boundary current. In order to learn more about its preceding pathway and the corresponding export timescale the mooring data is complemented by data from Argo floats. Besides the annual cycles of LSW formation and export, their interannual variations are important aspects affecting the large-scale circulation. For instance, in years of relatively strong convection, as in 2008 and 2012, LSW is observed to pass the boundary current array at 53°N earlier, i.e. in February and March, respectively, than in years with weak convection, as in 2007 or 2010. Besides seasonal variations in the boundary current, a possible explanation for the earlier freshwater signal in years of enhanced convection might be a shift in convection sites southwards and/ or towards the boundary.

  8. Freshwater movement patterns by juvenile Pacific salmon Oncorhynchus spp. before they migrate to the ocean: Oh the places you'll go!

    PubMed

    Shrimpton, J M; Warren, K D; Todd, N L; McRae, C J; Glova, G J; Telmer, K H; Clarke, A D

    2014-10-01

    Juvenile movement patterns for coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch and Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha from two large interior rivers of British Columbia, Canada, were examined. Otoliths from post-spawned fishes were collected on spawning grounds and elemental signatures were determined through transects from sectioned otoliths using laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Large variations in otolith elemental signatures were found during the freshwater life stage indicative of movement downstream to rivers and tributaries that differed in elemental signature. This study highlights that downstream movements occur before migration to the ocean during the parr-smolt transformation. Extensive downstream movements of parr appear to be a successful life-history strategy based on variations observed in the otolith elemental signatures of spawners. Movements downstream in parr and the remarkable homing ability of adults also suggest that imprinting to natal streams must occur prior to the parr-smolt transformation. PMID:25053226

  9. Climate Change Response of Ocean Net Primary Production (NPP) and Export Production (EP) Regulated by Stratification Increases in The CMIP5 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, W.; Randerson, J. T.; Moore, J. K.

    2014-12-01

    Ocean warming due to rising atmospheric CO2 has increasing impacts on ocean ecosystems by modifying the ecophysiology and distribution of marine organisms, and by altering ocean circulation and stratification. We explore ocean NPP and EP changes at the global scale with simulations performed in the framework of the fifth Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project (CMIP5). Global NPP and EP are reduced considerably by the end of the century for the representative concentration pathway (RCP) 8.5 scenario, although models differ in their significantly in their direct temperature impacts on production and remineralization. The Earth system models used here project similar NPP trends albeit the magnitudes vary substantially. In general, projected changes in the 2090s for NPP range between -2.3 to -16.2% while export production reach -7 to -18% relative to 1990s. This is accompanied by increased stratification by 17-30%. Results indicate that globally reduced NPP is closely related to increased ocean stratification (R2=0.78). This is especially the case for global export production, that seems to be mostly controlled by the increased stratification (R2=0.95). We also identify phytoplankton community impacts on these patterns, that vary across the models. The negative response of NPP to climate change may be through bottom-up control, leading to a reduced capacity of oceans to regulate climate through the biological carbon pump. There are large disagreements among the CMIP5 models in terms of simulated nutrient and oxygen concentrations for the 1990s, and their trends over time with climate change. In addition, potentially important marine biogeochemical feedbacks on the climate system were not well represented in the CMIP5 models, including important feedbacks with aerosol deposition and the marine iron cycle, and feedbacks involving the oxygen minimum zones and the marine nitrogen cycle. Thus, these substantial reductions in primary productivity and export production over the 21st century simulated under the RCP 8.5 scenario were likely conservative estimates, and may need to be revised as marine biogeochemistry in Earth System Models (ESMs) continues to be developed.

  10. Recognition of extensive freshwater and brackish marshes and of multiple transgressions and regressions: The Holocene wetlands of the Delaware Bay and Atlantic Ocean coasts

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, H.I. . Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    Extensive and closely spaced cores (204) were analyzed to find detailed facies (microfacies) and paleoenvironments in the subsurface sediments along the Delaware Bay and Atlantic Ocean. To determine detailed facies and paleoenvironments, several composite methods were employed: traditional lithological analysis, botanical identification, macro- and micro-paleontological analysis, grain size analysis, organic and inorganic content, water content, mineral composition, particulate plant, and C-14 dating. Twenty-two sedimentary microfacies were identified in the surface and subsurface sediments of the study area. Most of the lower section of the Holocene sediments contained freshwater and brackish marsh microfacies which alternated or intercalated with fluvial microfacies or brackish tidal flat/tidal stream microfacies. After tides encroached upon the freshwater marshes and swamps, several events of transgression and regression were recorded in the stratigraphic section. Finally, saline paleoenvironments predominated at the top section of subsurface sediments. Within saline facies, three subgroups of salt marsh microfacies were identified: high salt marsh sub-microfacies, middle salt marsh sub-microfacies were identified: high salt marsh sub-microfacies, middle salt marsh sub-microfacies, and low salt marsh sub-microfacies. The major controlling factors of these paleoenvironmental changes were local relative sea-level fluctuations, sediment supply, pre-Holocene configuration, fluvial activity, groundwater influence, climatic change, sediment compaction, tectonics, isostasy and biological competition. Ten events of transgression and regression in some areas were found in about 2,000 years, but other areas apparently contained no evidence of multiple events of transgression and regression. Some other areas showed one or two distinctive events of transgression and regression. Therefore, further investigation is necessary to understand the details of these records.

  11. Freshwater Macroinvertebrates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nalepa, T. F.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of freshwater biology particularly freshwater macroinvertebrates and their effect on water pollution, covering publications of 1976-77. A list of 158 references is also presented. (HM)

  12. Arctic Ocean circulation and variability - advection and external forcing encounter constraints and local processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudels, B.

    2011-12-01

    The first hydrographic data from the Arctic Ocean, the section from the Laptev Sea to the passage between Greenland and Svalbard obtained by Nansen on the drift by Fram 1893-1896, aptly illustrate the main features of Arctic Ocean oceanography and indicate possible processes active in transforming the water masses in the Arctic Ocean. Many, perhaps most, of these processes were identified already by Nansen, who put his mark on almost all subsequent research in the Arctic Ocean. Here we shall revisit some key questions and follow how our understanding has evolved from the early 20th century to present. What questions, if any, can now be regarded as solved and which remain still open? Five different but connected topics will be discussed: (1) The low salinity surface layer and the storage and export of freshwater. (2) The vertical heat transfer from the Atlantic water to sea ice and to the atmosphere. (3) The circulation and mixing of the two Atlantic inflow branches. (4) The formation and circulation of deep and bottom waters in the Arctic Ocean. (5) The exchanges through Fram Strait. Foci will be on the potential effects of increased freshwater input and reduced sea ice export on the freshwater storage and residence time in the Arctic Ocean, on the deep waters of the Makarov Basin and on the circulation and relative importance of the two inflows, over the Barents Sea and through Fram Strait, for the distribution of heat in the intermediate layers of the Arctic Ocean.

  13. Preferential remineralization of dissolved organic phosphorus and non-Redfield DOM dynamics in the global ocean: Impacts on marine productivity, nitrogen fixation, and carbon export

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letscher, Robert T.; Moore, J. Keith

    2015-03-01

    Selective removal of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) from the marine dissolved organic matter (DOM) pool has been reported in several regional studies. Because DOM is an important advective/mixing pathway of carbon (C) export from the ocean surface layer and its non-Redfieldian stoichiometry would affect estimates of marine export production per unit N and P, we investigated the stoichiometry of marine DOM and its remineralization globally using a compiled DOM data set. Marine DOM is enriched in C and N compared to Redfield stoichiometry, averaging 317:39:1 and 810:48:1 for C:N:P within the degradable and total bulk pools, respectively. Dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) is found to be preferentially remineralized about twice as rapidly with respect to the enriched C:N stoichiometry of marine DOM. Biogeochemical simulations with the Biogeochemical Elemental Cycling model using Redfield and variable DOM stoichiometry corroborate the need for non-Redfield dynamics to match the observed DOM stoichiometry. From our model simulations, preferential DOP remineralization is found to increase the strength of the biological pump by ~9% versus the case of Redfield DOM cycling. Global net primary productivity increases ~10% including an increase in marine nitrogen fixation of ~26% when preferential DOP remineralization and direct utilization of DOP by phytoplankton are included. The largest increases in marine nitrogen fixation, net primary productivity, and carbon export are observed within the western subtropical gyres, suggesting the lateral transfer of P in the form of DOP from the productive eastern and poleward gyre margins may be important for sustaining these processes downstream in the subtropical gyres.

  14. Millennial-Scale Variations of Nitrogen Isotopes and Export Proxies in the Subarctic Pacific During MIS 3: Evidence for an Oceanic Fertility Switch?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galbraith, E. D.; Schmittner, A.; Pedersen, T. F.

    2005-12-01

    Millennial-scale variability has previously been observed in both the nitrogen isotopic ratio (?15N) and paleoproductivity proxies in sediments of the Arabian Sea and the Californian margin. Here we show that hemipelagic sediments from a seamount in the Gulf of Alaska (ODP site 887) record similar millennial variability in ?15N and biogenic components during Marine Isotope Stage 3, with a tantalizing resemblance to North Atlantic temperature records. The subarctic Pacific record can be interpreted in several ways. One possibility is that periods of intense aridity promoted enhanced dust transport to the North Pacific, alleviating Fe limitation and allowing more complete utilization of the available nitrate. Although the age constraints are insufficient to distinguish stadials from interstadials, one would expect stadial periods to be more arid and, hence, to be correlated with high ?15N and productivity. However, in this case the Gulf of Alaska ?15N record would be antiphased with ?15N records of the Oregon and California margins, which seems unlikely. Alternatively, Fe could have been delivered by enhanced offshore transport of shelf material during periods of sea level rise, resulting in a positive phasing between the Gulf of Alaska and other ?15N records, but without providing a mechanistic link between them. A more parsimonious explanation is that nitrogen isotopes and export productivity varied in phase, on millennial timescales, at all of these locations. We propose that this resulted from millennial changes in the distribution of nutrients and oxygen in the ocean, caused by changes in the physical circulation. During interstadials, strong NADW formation maintained relatively low deep water nutrient concentrations, ensuring a rich supply of nutrients in the upper ocean. The cessation of NADW formation during stadials allowed the migration of nutrients to the deep sea, stripping the upper ocean of its potential fertility. The marine nitrogen cycle responded to these events through the modulation of thermocline suboxia by upper ocean fertility. During interstadials when the upper ocean was relatively nutrient-rich, expanded thermocline suboxia drove accelerated denitrification, producing an increase in ?15N near denitrification zones. When the upper ocean became nutrient-poor during stadials, thermocline suboxia contracted and ?15N fell to lower values. Enhanced ventilation in much of the upper ocean, particularly in the North Pacific, may have further increased the subsurface oxygen supply during stadials. If valid, this mechanism would have had some effect on atmospheric trace gases including carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide.

  15. Human freshwater demand for economic activity and ecosystems in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Ferng, Jiun-Jiun

    2007-12-01

    Freshwater is necessary to economic activity, and humans depend on goods and services generated by water-dependent ecosystems. However, national freshwater management usually focuses on direct use of domestic freshwater. With an increasing scarcity of freshwater, attention has turned to two indirect uses of freshwater by humans. The first indirect use is freshwater used by foreign countries when producing products for export. The second use is freshwater required by local ecosystems: human survival and development depend on goods and services generated in these ecosystems. This work adopted Taiwan as a case study. In addition to two widely recognized ecosystem freshwater demands, evapotranspiration and reversed river flow, this study suggests that freshwater is a constituent of some abiotic components, such as groundwater in aquifers, because excessive withdrawal has already caused significant land subsidence in Taiwan. Moreover, the estimated results show that Taiwan's net imports of freshwater through trade amounts to approximately 25% of its total freshwater use for economic production. Integrating industrial policy, trade policy, and national freshwater management is a useful approach for developing strategies to limit the growing use of freshwater in Taiwan. Policy implications are then developed by further analyzing withdrawal sources of freshwater (domestic and foreign) for supporting economic production in Taiwan and identifying the factors (domestic final demand and export) driving freshwater-intensive products. PMID:17899249

  16. Human Freshwater Demand for Economic Activity and Ecosystems in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferng, Jiun-Jiun

    2007-12-01

    Freshwater is necessary to economic activity, and humans depend on goods and services generated by water-dependent ecosystems. However, national freshwater management usually focuses on direct use of domestic freshwater. With an increasing scarcity of freshwater, attention has turned to two indirect uses of freshwater by humans. The first indirect use is freshwater used by foreign countries when producing products for export. The second use is freshwater required by local ecosystems: human survival and development depend on goods and services generated in these ecosystems. This work adopted Taiwan as a case study. In addition to two widely recognized ecosystem freshwater demands, evapotranspiration and reversed river flow, this study suggests that freshwater is a constituent of some abiotic components, such as groundwater in aquifers, because excessive withdrawal has already caused significant land subsidence in Taiwan. Moreover, the estimated results show that Taiwan’s net imports of freshwater through trade amounts to approximately 25% of its total freshwater use for economic production. Integrating industrial policy, trade policy, and national freshwater management is a useful approach for developing strategies to limit the growing use of freshwater in Taiwan. Policy implications are then developed by further analyzing withdrawal sources of freshwater (domestic and foreign) for supporting economic production in Taiwan and identifying the factors (domestic final demand and export) driving freshwater-intensive products.

  17. Arctic Ocean circulation and variability - advection and external forcing encounter constraints and local processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudels, B.

    2012-04-01

    The first hydrographic data from the Arctic Ocean, the section from the Laptev Sea to the passage between Greenland and Svalbard obtained by Nansen on his drift with Fram 1893-1896, aptly illustrate the main features of Arctic Ocean oceanography and indicate possible processes active in transforming the water masses in the Arctic Ocean. Many, perhaps most, processes were identified already by Nansen, who put his mark on almost all subsequent research in the Arctic. Here we shall revisit some key questions and follow how our understanding has evolved from the early 20th century to present. What questions, if any, can now be regarded as solved and which remain still open? Five different but connected topics will be discussed: (1) The low salinity surface layer and the storage and export of freshwater. (2) The vertical heat transfer from the Atlantic water to sea ice and to the atmosphere. (3) The circulation and mixing of the two Atlantic inflow branches. (4) The formation and circulation of deep and bottom waters in the Arctic Ocean. (5) The exchanges through Fram Strait. Foci will be on the potential effects of increased freshwater input and reduced sea ice export on the freshwater storage and residence time in the Arctic Ocean, on the deep waters of the Makarov Basin, and on the circulation and relative importance of the two inflows, over the Barents Sea and through Fram Strait, for the distribution of heat in the intermediate layers of the Arctic Ocean.

  18. Modeling responses of diatom productivity and biogenic silica export to iron enrichment in the equatorial Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, F.; Jiang, M.-S.; Chao, Y.; Dugdale, R. C.; Chavez, F.; Barber, R. T.

    2007-09-01

    Using a three-dimensional physical-biogeochemical model, we have investigated the modeled responses of diatom productivity and biogenic silica export to iron enrichment in the equatorial Pacific, and compared the model simulation with in situ (IronEx II) iron fertilization results. In the eastern equatorial Pacific, an area of 540,000 km2 was enhanced with iron by changing the photosynthetic efficiency and silicate and nitrogen uptake kinetics of phytoplankton in the model for a period of 20 days. The vertically integrated Chl a and primary production increased by about threefold 5 days after the start of the experiment, similar to that observed in the IronEx II experiment. Diatoms contribute to the initial increase of the total phytoplankton biomass, but decrease sharply after 10 days because of mesozooplankton grazing. The modeled surface nutrients (silicate and nitrate) and TCO2 anomaly fields, obtained from the difference between the "iron addition" and "ambient" (without iron) concentrations, also agreed well with the IronEx II observations. The enriched patch is tracked with an inert tracer similar to the SF6 used in the IronEx II. The modeled depth-time distribution of sinking biogenic silica (BSi) indicates that it would take more than 30 days after iron injection to detect any significant BSi export out of the euphotic zone. Sensitivity studies were performed to establish the importance of fertilized patch size, duration of fertilization, and the role of mesozooplankton grazing. A larger size of the iron patch tends to produce a broader extent and longer-lasting phytoplankton blooms. Longer duration prolongs phytoplankton growth, but higher zooplankton grazing pressure prevents significant phytoplankton biomass accumulation. With the same treatment of iron fertilization in the model, lowering mesozooplankton grazing rate generates much stronger diatom bloom, but it is terminated by Si(OH)4 limitation after the initial rapid increase. Increasing mesozooplankton grazing rate, the diatom increase due to iron addition stays at minimum level, but small phytoplankton tend to increase. The numerical model experiments demonstrate the value of ecosystem modeling for evaluating the detailed interaction between biogeochemical cycle and iron fertilization in the equatorial Pacific.

  19. Deep and bottom water export from the Southern Ocean to the Pacific over the past 38 million years

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van de Flierdt, T.; Frank, M.; Halliday, A.N.; Hein, J.R.; Hattendorf, B.; Gunther, D.; Kubik, P.W.

    2004-01-01

    The application of radiogenic isotopes to the study of Cenozoic circulation patterns in the South Pacific Ocean has been hampered by the fact that records from only equatorial Pacific deep water have been available. We present new Pb and Nd isotope time series for two ferromanganese crusts that grew from equatorial Pacific bottom water (D137-01, "Nova," 7219 m water depth) and southwest Pacific deep water (63KD, "Tasman," 1700 m water depth). The crusts were dated using 10Be/9Be ratios combined with constant Co-flux dating and yield time series for the past 38 and 23 Myr, respectively. The surface Nd and Pb isotope distributions are consistent with the present-day circulation pattern, and therefore the new records are considered suitable to reconstruct Eocene through Miocene paleoceanography for the South Pacific. The isotope time series of crusts Nova and Tasman suggest that equatorial Pacific deep water and waters from the Southern Ocean supplied the dissolved trace metals to both sites over the past 38 Myr. Changes in the isotopic composition of crust Nova are interpreted to reflect development of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and changes in Pacific deep water circulation caused by the build up of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet. The Nd isotopic composition of the shallower water site in the southwest Pacific appears to have been more sensitive to circulation changes resulting from closure of the Indonesian seaway. Copyright 2004 by the American Geophysical Union.

  20. An approach to estimate the freshwater contribution from glacial melt and precipitation in East Greenland shelf waters using colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stedmon, Colin A.; Granskog, Mats A.; Dodd, Paul A.

    2015-02-01

    Changes in the supply and storage of freshwater in the Arctic Ocean and its subsequent export to the North Atlantic can potentially influence ocean circulation and climate. In order to understand how the Arctic freshwater budget is changing and the potential impacts, it is important to develop and refine empirical approaches for tracing freshwater contributions. This in turn can help develop and validate model simulations. Arctic rivers are an important source of freshwater and stable oxygen isotope measurements are used to separate contributions from meteoric water (river, glacial, and precipitation) and sea ice melt. We develop this approach further and investigate the use of an additional tracer, colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM), which is largely specific to freshwater originating from Arctic rivers. A robust relationship between the freshwater contribution from meteoric water and CDOM is derived from 4 years of measurements in Fram Strait (2009-2012), combined with measurements from the East Greenland shelf and Dijmpha Sound (NE Greenland). Results confirm a high contribution of riverine CDOM in Arctic halocline waters with salinities >31.5 and indicate the importance of shelf processes (riverine input and sea ice formation), while previously, these waters where thought to be derived from open sea processes (cooling and sea ice formation) in the northern Barents and Kara Seas. In Greenlandic coastal waters the meteoric water contribution is influenced by Greenland ice sheet meltwater and deviations from the CDOM-meteoric water relationships found are applied to quantify meltwater contribution along the East Greenland shelf waters (0-13%).

  1. Export fluxes in a naturally fertilized area of the Southern Ocean, the Kerguelen Plateau: seasonal dynamic reveals long lags and strong attenuation of particulate organic carbon flux (Part 1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rembauville, M.; Salter, I.; Leblond, N.; Gueneugues, A.; Blain, S.

    2014-12-01

    A sediment trap moored in the naturally iron-fertilized Kerguelen plateau in the Southern Ocean provided an annual record of particulate organic carbon and nitrogen fluxes at 289 m. At the trap deployment depth current speeds were low (∼10 cm s-1) and primarily tidal-driven (M2 tidal component) providing favorable hydrodynamic conditions for the collection of flux. Particulate organic carbon (POC) flux was generally low (<0.5 mmol m-2 d-1) although two episodic export events (<14 days) of 1.5 mmol m-2 d-1 were recorded. These increases in flux occurred with a 1 month time lag from peaks in surface chlorophyll and together accounted for approximately 40% of the annual flux budget. The annual POC flux of 98.2 ± 4.4 mmol m-2 yr-1 was relatively low considering the shallow deployment depth, but similar to deep-ocean (>2 km) fluxes measured from similarly productive iron-fertilized blooms. Comparison of the sediment trap data with complementary estimates of biomass accumulation and export indicate that ∼90% of the flux was lost between 200 and 300 m. We hypothesize that grazing pressure, including mesozooplankton and mesopelagic fishes, may be responsible for rapid flux attenuation and the High Biomass Low Export regime characterizing the Kerguelen bloom. The importance of plankton community structure in controlling the temporal variability of export fluxes is addressed in a companion paper.

  2. Particulate organic carbon export fluxes on Chukchi Shelf, western Arctic Ocean, derived from 210Po/210Pb disequilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jianhua; Yu, Wen; Lin, Wuhui; Men, Wu; Chen, Liqi

    2015-05-01

    Fluxes of particulate organic carbon (POC) were derived from 210Po/210Pb disequilibrium during the 4th Chinese National Arctic Research Expedition (CHINARE-4) from July 1 to September 28, 2010. Average residence times of particulate 210Po in the euphotic zone were -16.00 a to 1.54 a, which are higher than those of dissolved 210Po (-6.89 a to -0.70 a). Great excesses of dissolved 210Po were observed at all stations, with an average 210Po/210Pb ratio of 1.91±0.20, resulting from 210Pb atmospheric deposition after sea ice melt. POC fluxes from the euphotic zone were estimated by two methods (E and B) in the irreversible scavenging model. Estimated POC fluxes were 945-126 mmol C/(m2·a) and 1 848-109 mmol C/(m2·a) by methods E and B, respectively, both decreasing from low to high latitude. The results are comparable to previous works for the same region, indicating efficient biological pumping in the Chukchi Sea. The results can improve understanding of the carbon cycle in the western Arctic Ocean.

  3. The stabilizing effect of sea-ice on a freshwater perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Mari F.; Nisancioglu, Kerim H.; Nilsson, Johan

    2015-04-01

    A retreating sea-ice cover is one of the hypothesized mechanisms for the abrupt warming observed during Dansgaard-Oeschger events of the last glacial. It has been proposed that a warming of the subsurface ocean during cold stadials could explain the rapid retreating sea-ice cover in the Nordic Seas at the start of each interstadial (Dokken et al., 2013). The warming of the subsurface ocean would gradually weaken the vertical stratification and lead to a sudden convective overturning as the vertical density difference disappeared. In this study, we show that the circulation can become unstable even before the vertical density difference vanishes. We study the stability of a salinity-dominated circulation to freshwater perturbations in the presence of sea-ice, by using a one-dimensional, analytical model. The model represents the sea-ice covered Nordic Seas, and consists of a sea-ice component and a two-layer ocean; a cold, fresh surface layer above a warm, salty deep ocean. The sea-ice thickness depends on the atmospheric energy fluxes as well as the ocean heat flux, and we impose a thickness-dependent sea-ice export. The stabilizing effect of sea-ice to a freshwater perturbation is shown to depend on the representation of vertical mixing. In a system where the mixing increases with density differences, the sea-ice acts as a positive feedback to a freshwater perturbation. If the mixing decreases with density differences, the sea-ice acts as a negative feedback. However, both representations lead to a circulation that breaks down when the freshwater input at the surface is small. As a consequence, we get rapid changes in sea-ice. In addition to low freshwater values, increasing deep-ocean temperatures promote instability and the disappearance of sea-ice. Dokken, T. M., Nisancioglu, K. H., Li, C., Battisti, D. S. and Kissel, C. (2013), `Dansgaard Oeschger cycles: interactions between ocean and sea ice intrinsic to the Nordic Seas', Paleoceanography 28

  4. Increased nitrogen export from eastern North America to the Atlantic Ocean due to climatic and anthropogenic changes during 1901-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qichun; Tian, Hanqin; Friedrichs, Marjorie A. M.; Hopkinson, Charles S.; Lu, Chaoqun; Najjar, Raymond G.

    2015-06-01

    We used a process-based land model, Dynamic Land Ecosystem Model 2.0, to examine how climatic and anthropogenic changes affected riverine fluxes of ammonium (NH4+), nitrate (NO3-), dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), and particulate organic nitrogen (PON) from eastern North America, especially the drainage areas of the Gulf of Maine (GOM), Mid-Atlantic Bight (MAB), and South Atlantic Bight (SAB) during 1901-2008. Model simulations indicated that annual fluxes of NH4+, NO3-, DON, and PON from the study area during 1980-2008 were 0.019 ± 0.003 (mean ± 1 standard deviation) Tg N yr-1, 0.18 ± 0.035 Tg N yr-1, 0.10 ± 0.016 Tg N yr-1, and 0.043 ± 0.008 Tg N yr-1, respectively. NH4+, NO3-, and DON exports increased while PON export decreased from 1901 to 2008. Nitrogen export demonstrated substantial spatial variability across the study area. Increased NH4+ export mainly occurred around major cities in the MAB. NO3- export increased in most parts of the MAB but decreased in parts of the GOM. Enhanced DON export was mainly distributed in the GOM and the SAB. PON export increased in coastal areas of the SAB and northern parts of the GOM but decreased in the Piedmont areas and the eastern parts of the MAB. Climate was the primary reason for interannual variability in nitrogen export; fertilizer use and nitrogen deposition tended to enhance the export of all nitrogen species; livestock farming and sewage discharge were also responsible for the increases in NH4+ and NO3- fluxes; and land cover change (especially reforestation of former agricultural land) reduced the export of the four nitrogen species.

  5. Freshwater Wetlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Provides descriptions about freshwater wetlands, such as marshes, swamps, and bogs. Contains three learning activities which deal with unusual wetland plants, the animals and plants in a typical marsh, and the effects of a draught on a swamp. Included are reproducible handouts and worksheets for two of the activities. (TW)

  6. The influence of large-scale environmental changes on carbon export in the North Pacific Ocean using satellite and shipboard data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goes, Joaquim I.; Gomes, Helga do R.; Limsakul, Atsamon; Saino, Toshiro

    2004-01-01

    The subarctic Pacific Ocean experiences strong climate-modulated seasonal, interannual to decadal variations in meteorological and physical oceanographic conditions, which can have a profound influence on biological processes and carbon cycling in the region. Inorganic nitrate, a major nutrient controlling phytoplankton growth, is key to understanding the export of organic matter out of the euphotic zone. Its supply to the region is driven largely by winter convective mixing. Using satellite data for a 5-year period beginning in 1997, we provide evidence of strong interannual variations in the supply of inorganic nitrate and new production in the subarctic Pacific in association with the El-Nio of 1997 and the transition to La-Nia conditions thereafter. These satellite based climatologies allowed us to view and describe large changes in nitrate distribution and new production along the entire breadth of the subarctic Pacific basin. In addition, our accessibility to a 25-year database of shipboard measurements focused primarily in the Oyashio waters, a region representative of the western subarctic Pacific, enabled us to demonstrate that El-Nio/La-Nia changes in this region differed from those observed in the eastern subarctic Pacific. Thus, in addition to the primary motive of verifying the changes that we observed in our satellite-derived maps, this exercise allowed us to obtain a clear picture of the mechanistic connections between the atmosphere and the oceans and the biological response to these changes. The results from this study make a compelling case that the primary driver for the observed interannual variations in biological production in the western subarctic Pacific is the strength of the wintertime monsoonal winds. This anomalous intensification of the southeastward wind stress appears to be particularly strong during El-Nio years when the Aleutian Low intensifies and moves southeastwards, causing disturbances in the pressure gradient between the Siberian high and the Aleutian Low. An abrupt shift in oceanographic conditions follows this change in pressure gradient, among them the most prominent being a reduction in sea surface temperature, a southward migration of the belt of zero wind-stress curl, and the anomalous southward penetration of the Oyashio Current. In tandem, these changes, contribute to an increase in nutrient inputs in winter and a southward displacement of the boundary of the subarctic gyre. The spring following an El-Nio event is characterized by reduced wind stress and a resulting increase in water column stability as well as the elevated solar radiation leads to blooms. Conversely, in the winter of 2000, the subarctic gyre experienced the weakest winds of all 5 years. These weak wind conditions were associated with increased wind speeds in spring of that year and the lowest annual rates of new production of all 5 years.

  7. Large-Scale Ocean Circulation: Deep Circulation and Meridional Overturning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rintoul, Stephen R.

    Roughly half the world ocean volume lies below 2,000m depth. This deep half of the ocean is cold (<3C), indicating that the abyssal ocean is filled with waters that sink in high latitudes, where cold surface waters are found [1]. The deep ocean circulation transports the cold waters that sink in the polar regions throughout the deep ocean basins. The transfer of surface water to the deep ocean must be balanced by an inflow of water in the upper ocean to the deep water formation regions, to conserve mass. The result is an "overturning circulation," in which the export of cold deep waters from the source regions is balanced by a return flow of warmer water in the upper ocean. The large temperature contrast between the upper and lower limbs of the overturning circulation makes this flow pattern an efficient means of transporting heat. The large-scale overturning circulation is the primary means by which the ocean stores and transports quantities of relevance to the Earth's climate system and biogeochemical cycles, including heat, freshwater, carbon, and nutrients. The evolution of climate is therefore influenced strongly by the overturning circulation.

  8. Variation in freshwater input to the Eastern US coastal ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, D.; Yoon, Y.; Beighley, E., II; Hughes, R.; Kimbro, D.

    2014-12-01

    Phragmites is one of the most invasive plants in North American wetlands. Although its spread in coastal marshes has been linked by independent studies to urbanization, eutrophication, and salinity change, there is good evidence that these factors may interactively determine invasion success and in turn, the ecosystem services provided by marshes. We hypothesize that the invasion of Phragmites is linked to changes in freshwater inputs due to climate and/or land use change. El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO), originating in the sea surface temperature anomalies (warm or cold) in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean, is a notable and prominent signal in inter-annual climatic variation. Recent studies shows that the probability of strong El Nino events may increase in the future. In this study, we will investigate the teleconnections between freshwater inputs to the coastal zone along the eastern U.S. and ENSO indices, and attempt to explore the predictability of temporal and spatial variation of freshwater inputs based on ENSO conditions. To quantify changes in freshwater input in this region, hydrologic modeling, remote sensing and field measurements are combined. The Hillslope River Routing (HRR) model is used to simulate hourly streamflow from all watersheds from southern Florida to northern Maine draining into the Atlantic Ocean. The modeling effort utilizes satellite precipitation (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Product 3B42v7: 2001-current with a 3-hr temporal resolution and 0.25 degree spatial resolution), land surface temperature and vegetation measures (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, MODIS, products: 2001-current with a monthly temporal resolution and 0.05 degree spatial resolution). To account for land cover change, annual MODIS land cover data and time varying population statics are merged to estimate annual land cover characteristics for each sub-catchment within the study region. Static datasets for soils and ground elevations are used. Daily U.S. Geological Survey streamflow data from major river outlets along the coastline are used for model validation. Annual streamflow is characterized in terms of volume of export to the ocean: as total flow, storm flow and baseflow and used to explore longitudinal discharge patterns along the coastline.

  9. Export Fluxes of Dissolved Organic Carbon From the Yukon River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, L.; Cai, Y.; Belzile, C.; MacDonald, R.

    2005-12-01

    Quantitative determination of export fluxes of carbon species through Arctic rivers is required to constrain the carbon budget in the Arctic Ocean and to understand the biogeochemical consequence of climate change in Northern drainage basins. In order to quantify the annual riverine export flux from the Yukon River, monthly or bimonthly water samples were collected at Pilot Station from July 2004 to July 2005 and analyzed for concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), particulate organic carbon (POC) and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). Concentration of DOC varied from 182 to 1683 uM (average 441 uM), with the highest concentration during river ice opening and the lowest in April under the ice. In contrast, DIC concentration increased from ice opening in May (1178 uM) to winter frozen season (2128 uM), with an average of 1588 uM. In addition to the DOC maximum during ice opening, an elevated DOC concentration was observed during the early stage of river ice formation, suggesting the rejection of DOC from ice during its formation. There was a positive correlation of DOC with freshwater flow rate whereas DIC correlated negatively with flow, indicating a hydrological control on both components but different source terms and transport mechanisms. Integrated annual export flux during 2004/2005 was 2.78x1012 g-C/y for DOC and 4.53x1012 g-C/y for DIC. Within the annual fluxes, only 5% of DOC and 17% of DIC were exported during the winter period when the river was frozen over. Long-term observations of DOC and DIC together with their molecular and isotopic signatures are needed to understand how the Yukon River Basin responds to a changing climate.

  10. Greenland Freshwater Input to the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaird, N.; Straneo, F.

    2014-12-01

    The Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) is losing mass at an unprecedented rate. The associated increased freshwater flux directly contributes to sea level rise, but also has dynamical implications for the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation and global climate. The freshwater buoyancy forcing from marine terminating outlet glaciers is distributed throughout the depth of coastal fjords. When coupled with strong fjord stratification, this buoyancy forcing can drive significant water mass transformation (WMT) of subsurface waters in the fjord. The WMT differs substantially from a simple freshwater input to the surface ocean. This often overlooked small-scale overturning has potentially important consequences for the influence of GrIS freshwater on large scale ocean circulation and needs to be accounted for in studies of GrIS impact on the ocean. From ship-based and moored hydrographic measurements in East Greenland (2008 to 2013) we describe the character and temporal variability of meltwater driven WMT. While melting always adds freshwater to the ocean, the corresponding WMT causes a seasonally variable vertical redistribution of heat and salt. Observations show that the seasonal cycle of the WMT lags surface air temperatures by several months. We discuss how the WMT and its timing might impact the boundary current system in East Greenland, and implications for its representation in numerical models and impact on North Atlantic deep convection.

  11. Arctic freshwater synthesis: Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prowse, T.; Bring, A.; Mârd, J.; Carmack, E.

    2015-11-01

    In response to a joint request from the World Climate Research Program's Climate and Cryosphere Project, the International Arctic Science Committee, and the Arctic Council's Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program, an updated scientific assessment has been conducted of the Arctic Freshwater System (AFS), entitled the Arctic Freshwater Synthesis (AFSΣ). The major reason for joint request was an increasing concern that changes to the AFS have produced, and could produce even greater, changes to biogeophysical and socioeconomic systems of special importance to northern residents and also produce extra-Arctic climatic effects that will have global consequences. Hence, the key objective of the AFSΣ was to produce an updated, comprehensive, and integrated review of the structure and function of the entire AFS. The AFSΣ was organized around six key thematic areas: atmosphere, oceans, terrestrial hydrology, terrestrial ecology, resources and modeling, and the review of each coauthored by an international group of scientists and published as separate manuscripts in this special issue of Journal of Geophysical Research-Biogeosciences. This AFSΣ—Introduction reviews the motivations for, and foci of, previous studies of the AFS, discusses criteria used to define the domain of the AFS, and details key characteristics of the definition adopted for the AFSΣ.

  12. Amounts, isotopic character and ages of organic and inorganic carbon exported from rivers to ocean margins: Assessment of natural and anthropogenic controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, J. E.; Hossler, K.

    2012-12-01

    Riverine exports of carbon (C) and organic matter (OM) are regulated by a variety of natural and anthropogenic factors. Understanding the relationships between these various factors and C and OM exports can help to constrain global C budgets, as well allow assessment of current and future anthropogenic impacts on both riverine and global C cycles. We quantified the effects of multiple natural and anthropogenic controls on riverine export fluxes and compositions of particulate organic C (POC), dissolved organic C (DOC), and dissolved inorganic C (DIC) for a regional group of eight rivers in the northeastern U.S. For allochthonous and aged C contributions to POC, DOC and DIC exports, we first estimated fractional contributions from six potential sources for POC and DOC (i.e., modern C3 plant material (C3-OC), modern C4 plant material (C4-OC), modern algal material (algal OC), slow-turnover soil OC (slow SOC; turnover time 25 yr), passive-turnover soil OC (passive SOC; turnover time 5,000 yr) and fossil OC and four potential sources for DIC (i.e., modern atmospheric CO2 exchange, carbonate dissolution, POC remineralization and DOC remineralization) using a novel time-varying isotope mixing model. Using these estimated source contributions, we then estimated the allochthonous proportions of (a) the POC and DOC pools to be the C3-OC, C4-OC, slow SOC, passive SOC, and fossil OC contributions; and (b) the DIC pools to be the dissolved carbonates, remineralized allochthonous POC, and remineralized allochthonous DOC contributions. We considered aged C to be anything older than ˜ 60 yr, which included passive SOC and fossil OC for POC and DOC and dissolved carbonates and aged fractions of remineralized POC and DOC for DIC. Potential controls related to hydrogeomorphology and regional climate, soil order, soil texture, bedrock lithology, land use, and additional anthropogenic factors were analyzed collectively, individually, and at scales of both local and regional influence. Factors related either to hydrogeomorphology and climate or to anthropogenic factors exhibited the strongest impacts on riverine C exports and compositions, particularly at broader regional scales. The effect of hydrogeomorphology and climate was primarily one of size, as larger watersheds with greater discharge exported more total C and terrestrial C. Principal anthropogenic factors included impacts of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) and river impoundments. The presence of WWTPs as well as anthropogenic use of carbonate-based materials (e.g., limestone) may have substantially increased riverine C exports, particularly fossil C exports, in the study region. The presence of nuclear power plants in the associated watersheds is also discussed because of the potential for anthropogenic 14C inputs and subsequent biasing of aquatic C studies utilizing natural abundance 14C.

  13. Contemporary ocean warming and freshwater conditions are related to later sea age at maturity in Atlantic salmon spawning in Norwegian rivers.

    PubMed

    Otero, Jaime; Jensen, Arne J; L'abée-Lund, Jan Henning; Stenseth, Nils Chr; Storvik, Geir O; Vøllestad, Leif Asbjørn

    2012-09-01

    Atlantic salmon populations are reported to be declining throughout its range, raising major management concerns. Variation in adult fish abundance may be due to variation in survival, growth, and timing of life history decisions. Given the complex life history, utilizing highly divergent habitats, the reasons for declines may be multiple and difficult to disentangle. Using recreational angling data of two sea age groups, one-sea-winter (1SW) and two-sea-winter (2SW) fish originated from the same smolt year class, we show that sea age at maturity of the returns has increased in 59 Norwegian rivers over the cohorts 1991-2005. By means of linear mixed-effects models we found that the proportion of 1SW fish spawning in Norway has decreased concomitant with the increasing sea surface temperature experienced by the fish in autumn during their first year at sea. Furthermore, the decrease in the proportion of 1SW fish was influenced by freshwater conditions as measured by water discharge during summer months 1 year ahead of seaward migration. These results suggest that part of the variability in age at maturity can be explained by the large-scale changes occurring in the north-eastern Atlantic pelagic food web affecting postsmolt growth, and by differences in river conditions influencing presmolt growth rate and later upstream migration. PMID:23139878

  14. Arctic Outflow West Of Greenland: Nine Years Of Volume And Freshwater Transports From Observations In Davis Strait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, B.; Lee, C.; Petrie, B.; Moritz, R. E.; Kwok, R.

    2014-12-01

    Recent Arctic changes suggest alterations in the export of freshwater from the Arctic to the North Atlantic, with conceivable impacts on the Atlantic Meridional Overturning circulation. Approximately 50% of the Arctic outflow exits west of Greenland, traveling through the Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA) and into Baffin Bay before crossing Davis Strait. The CAA outflow contributes over 50% of the net southward freshwater outflow through Davis Strait. The remainder is deeper outflow from Baffin Bay, flow from the West Greenland Current and runoff from West Greenland and CAA glaciers. Since September 2004, an observational program in Davis Strait has quantified volume and freshwater transport variability. The year-round program includes velocity, temperature and salinity measurements from 15 moorings spanning the full width (330 km) of the strait accompanied by autonomous Seagliders surveys (average profile separation = 4 km) and autumn ship-based hydrographic sections. Over the shallow Baffin Island and West Greenland shelves, moored instrumentation provides temperature and salinity measurements near the ice-ocean interface. From 2004-2013, the average net volume and liquid freshwater transports are -1.6 ± 0.2 Sv, -94 ± 7 mSv, respectively (salinity referenced to 34.8 and negative indicates southward transport); sea ice contributes an additional -10 ± 1 mSv. Over this period, volume and liquid freshwater transports show significant interannual variability and no clear trends, but a comparison with reanalyzed 1987-90 data indicate a roughly 40% decrease in net southward liquid volume transport and a corresponding an almost 30% decrease in freshwater transport. Connections between the Arctic are also captured, e.g., a unique yearlong Davis Strait freshening event starting September 2009 that was likely driven by an earlier freshening (January 2009 - April/May 2010) in the Canadian Arctic. The Davis Strait autumn 2009 salinity minimum was fresher (by about 0.2), lasted longer, and spanned a greater distance across the strait than in other years.

  15. Dom Export from Coastal Temperate Bog Forest Watersheds to Marine Ecosystems: Improving Understanding of Watershed Processes and Terrestrial-Marine Linkages on the Central Coast of British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, A. A.; Giesbrecht, I.; Tank, S. E.; Hunt, B. P.; Lertzman, K. P.

    2014-12-01

    The coastal temperate bog forests of British Columbia, Canada, export high amounts of dissolved organic matter (DOM) relative to the global average. Little is known about the factors influencing the quantity and quality of DOM exported from these forests or the role of this terrestrially-derived DOM in near-shore marine ecosystems. The objectives of this study are to better understand patterns and controls of DOM being exported from bog forest watersheds and its potential role in near-shore marine ecosystems. In 2013, the Kwakshua Watershed Ecosystems Study at Hakai Beach Institute (Calvert Island, BC) began year-round routine collection and analysis of DOM, nutrients, and environmental variables (e.g. conductivity, pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen) of freshwater grab samples from the outlets of seven watersheds draining directly to the ocean, as well as near-shore marine samples adjacent to freshwater outflows. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) varied across watersheds (mean= 11.45 mg L-1, sd± 4.22) and fluctuated synchronously with seasons and storm events. In general, higher DOC was associated with lower specific UV absorbance (SUVA254; mean= 4.59 L mg-1 m-1, sd± 0.55). The relationship between DOC and SUVA254 differed between watersheds, suggesting exports in DOM are regulated by individual watershed attributes (e.g. landscape classification, flow paths) as well as precipitation. We are using LiDAR and other remote sensing data to examine watershed controls on DOC export. At near-shore marine sites, coupled CTD (Conductivity Temperature Depth) and optical measures (e.g. spectral slopes, slope ratios (SR), EEMs), showed a clear freshwater DOM signature within the system following rainfall events. Ongoing work will explore the relationship between bog forest watershed attributes and DOM flux and composition, with implications for further studies on biogeochemical cycling, carbon budgets, marine food webs, and climate change.

  16. Impact of natural (waves and currents) and anthropogenic (trawl) resuspension on the export of particulate matter to the open ocean: Application to the Gulf of Lion (NW Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferr, B.; Durrieu de Madron, X.; Estournel, C.; Ulses, C.; Le Corre, G.

    2008-08-01

    Modern sediment deposits on continental margins form a vast reservoir of particulate matter that is regularly affected by resuspension processes. Resuspension by bottom trawling on shelves with strong fishing activity can modify the scale of natural disturbance by waves and currents. Recent field data show that the impact of bottom trawls on fine sediment resuspension per unit surface is comparable with that of the largest storms. We assessed the impact of both natural and anthropogenic processes on the dispersal of riverborne particles and shelf sediments on the Gulf of Lion shelf. We performed realistic numerical simulations of resuspension and transport forced by currents and waves or by a fleet of bottom trawlers. Simulations were conducted for a 16-month period (January 1998-April 1999) to characterise the seasonal variability. The sediment dynamics takes into account bed armoring, ripple geometry and the cohesive and non-cohesive characteristics of the sediments. Essential but uncertain parameters (clay content, erosion fluxes and critical shear stress for cohesive sediment) were set with existing data. Resuspension by waves and currents was controlled by shear stress, whereas resuspension by trawls was controlled by density and distribution of the bottom trawler fleet. Natural resuspension by waves and currents mostly occurred during short seasonal episodes, and was concentrated on the inner shelf. Trawling-induced resuspension, in contrast, occurred regularly throughout the year and was concentrated on the outer shelf. The total annual erosion by trawls (5.610 6 t y -1, t for metric tonnes) was four orders of magnitude lower than the erosion induced by waves and currents (35.310 9 t y -1). However the net resuspension (erosion/deposition budget) for trawling (0.410 6 t y -1) was only one order of magnitude lower than that for waves and currents (9.210 6 t y -1). Off-shelf export concerned the finest fraction of the sediment (clays and fine silts) and took place primarily at the southwestern end of the Gulf. Off-shelf transport was favoured during the winter 1999 by a very intense episode of dense shelf water cascading. Export of sediment resuspended by trawls (0.410 6 t y -1) was one order of magnitude lower than export associated with natural resuspension (8.510 6 t y -1). Trawling-induced resuspension is thought to represent one-third of the total export of suspended sediment from the shelf. A simulation combining both resuspension processes reveals no significant changes in resuspension and export rates compared with the sum of each individual process, suggesting the absence of interference between both processes.

  17. A subtropical fate awaited freshwater discharged from glacial Lake Agassiz

    SciTech Connect

    Condron, Alan; Winsor, Peter

    2011-02-10

    The 8.2 kyr event is the largest abrupt climatic change recorded in the last 10,000 years, and is widely hypothesized to have been triggered by the release of thousands of kilometers cubed of freshwater into the North Atlantic Ocean. Using a high-resolution (1/6°) global, ocean-ice circulation model we present an alternative view that freshwater discharged from glacial Lake Agassiz would have remained on the continental shelf as a narrow, buoyant, coastal current, and would have been transported south into the subtropical North Atlantic. The pathway we describe is in contrast to the conceptual idea that freshwater from this lake outburst spread over most of the sub-polar North Atlantic, and covered the deep, open-ocean, convection regions. This coastally confined freshwater pathway is consistent with the present-day routing of freshwater from Hudson Bay, as well as paleoceanographic evidence of this event. In this study, using a coarse-resolution (2.6°) version of the same model, we demonstrate that the previously reported spreading of freshwater across the sub-polar North Atlantic results from the inability of numerical models of this resolution to accurately resolve narrow coastal flows, producing instead a diffuse circulation that advects freshwater away from the boundaries. To understand the climatic impact of freshwater released in the past or future (e.g. Greenland and Antarctica), the ocean needs to be modeled at a resolution sufficient to resolve the dynamics of narrow, coastal buoyant flows.

  18. 75 FR 48933 - 2010 Russian Export Certification for Fishery Products

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-12

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XX94 2010 Russian Export Certification for Fishery... Russian Federation. Pursuant to the MOU, NOAA, through its Seafood Inspection Program, will issue export... Rosselkhoznadzor for export of seafood products to Russia. The Seafood Inspection Program of the National...

  19. Simulation of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation in an atmosphere ocean global coupled model. Part I: a mechanism governing the variability of ocean convection in a preindustrial experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guemas, Virginie; Salas-Mélia, David

    2008-07-01

    A preindustrial climate experiment was conducted with the third version of the CNRM global atmosphere ocean sea ice coupled model (CNRM-CM3) for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fourth Assessment Report (IPCC AR4). This experiment is used to investigate the main physical processes involved in the variability of the North Atlantic ocean convection and the induced variability of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (MOC). Three ocean convection sites are simulated, in the Labrador, Irminger and Greenland Iceland Norwegian (GIN) Seas in agreement with observations. A mechanism linking the variability of the Arctic sea ice cover and convection in the GIN Seas is highlighted. Contrary to previous suggested mechanisms, in CNRM-CM3 the latter is not modulated by the variability of freshwater export through Fram Strait. Instead, the variability of convection is mainly driven by the variability of the sea ice edge position in the Greenland Sea. In this area, the surface freshwater balance is dominated by the freshwater input due to the melting of sea ice. The ice edge position is modulated either by northwestward geostrophic current anomalies or by an intensification of northerly winds. In the model, stronger than average northerly winds force simultaneous intense convective events in the Irminger and GIN Seas. Convection interacts with the thermohaline circulation on timescales of 5 10 years, which translates into MOC anomalies propagating southward from the convection sites.

  20. Hydrology of small oceanic islands — Utility of an estimate of recharge inferred from the chloride concentration of the freshwater lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacher, H. L.; Ayers, J. F.

    1980-01-01

    In Bermuda, as in other coastal and oceanic-island environments, rainfall has a significant chloride concentration. As a result, there is a relatively straightforward way of estimating groundwater recharge by considering the Cl - ion as a tracer which is concentrated by evapotranspiration. The Cl - concentration of rainfall in Bermuda is about 15 ppm. That of the freshest part of the largest Ghyben-Herzberg lens is about 60 ppm. Taking the 60 ppm value as an indicator of the Cl - concentration of recharge, the average recharge rate is estimated at 0.25 of the 147-cm/yr. average rainfall, or about 37 cm/yr. This estimate is similar to two other estimates of recharge in Bermuda, each derived from hydrogeologic field data: (1) A 33-cm/yr. estimate inferred from a 2·10 6-m 2 area of diversion in which: (a) outflows (extractions) are 2870 m 3/day; and (b) the change in storage is estimated at 1100 m 3/day, from the rate of lowering of the water table. (2) An estimate of 35 to 45 cm/yr. resulting from combination of: (a) the ratio of recharge to hydraulic conductivity of the Paget Formation (12·10 -6), determined from the configuration of the Ghyben-Herzberg lenses; and (b) the hydraulic conductivity of the Paget Formation (85-100 m/day), estimated from the behavior of the water table. The agreement between the three estimates of recharge indicates that the rather simple and inexpensive technique of calculating recharge from Cl - content of rainfall and fresh groundwater can be a useful addition to the arsenal of techniques by which recharge of small oceanic islands can be evaluated.

  1. 7 CFR 1488.9 - Evidence of export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... truck, the exporter shall furnish to the Treasurer, CCC, one copy of the bill of lading covering the... exported, showing the quantity, the gross landed weight of the commodity, the place and date of entry, and... type of copy of either (1) an on-board ocean bill of lading or (2) an ocean bill of lading with...

  2. 7 CFR 1488.9 - Evidence of export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... truck, the exporter shall furnish to the Treasurer, CCC, one copy of the bill of lading covering the... exported, showing the quantity, the gross landed weight of the commodity, the place and date of entry, and... type of copy of either (1) an on-board ocean bill of lading or (2) an ocean bill of lading with...

  3. The interaction between sea ice and salinity-dominated ocean circulation: implications for halocline stability and rapid changes of sea ice cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Mari F.; Nilsson, Johan; Nisancioglu, Kerim H.

    2016-02-01

    Changes in the sea ice cover of the Nordic Seas have been proposed to play a key role for the dramatic temperature excursions associated with the Dansgaard-Oeschger events during the last glacial. In this study, we develop a simple conceptual model to examine how interactions between sea ice and oceanic heat and freshwater transports affect the stability of an upper-ocean halocline in a semi-enclosed basin. The model represents a sea ice covered and salinity stratified Nordic Seas, and consists of a sea ice component and a two-layer ocean. The sea ice thickness depends on the atmospheric energy fluxes as well as the ocean heat flux. We introduce a thickness-dependent sea ice export. Whether sea ice stabilizes or destabilizes against a freshwater perturbation is shown to depend on the representation of the diapycnal flow. In a system where the diapycnal flow increases with density differences, the sea ice acts as a positive feedback on a freshwater perturbation. If the diapycnal flow decreases with density differences, the sea ice acts as a negative feedback. However, both representations lead to a circulation that breaks down when the freshwater input at the surface is small. As a consequence, we get rapid changes in sea ice. In addition to low freshwater forcing, increasing deep-ocean temperatures promote instability and the disappearance of sea ice. Generally, the unstable state is reached before the vertical density difference disappears, and the temperature of the deep ocean do not need to increase as much as previously thought to provoke abrupt changes in sea ice.

  4. Temporal and spatial variability in export production in the SE Pacific Ocean: evidence from siliceous plankton fluxes and surface sediment assemblages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Oscar E.; Hebbeln, Dierk; Wefer, Gerold

    2001-12-01

    Flux of siliceous plankton and taxonomic composition of diatom and silicoflagellate assemblages were determined from sediment trap samples collected in coastal upwelling-influenced waters off northern Chile (30°S, CH site) under "normal" or non-El Niño (1993-94) and El Niño conditions (1997-98). In addition, concentration of biogenic opal and siliceous plankton, and diatom and silicoflagellate assemblages preserved in surface sediments are provided for a wide area between 27° and 43°S off Chile. Regardless of the year, winter upwelling determines the maximum production pattern of siliceous microorganisms, with diatoms numerically dominating the biogenic opal flux. During the El Niño year the export is markedly lower: on an annual basis, total mass flux diminished by 60%, and diatom and silicoflagellate export by 75%. Major components of the diatom flora maintain much of their regular seasonal cycle of flux maxima and minima during both sampling periods. Neritic resting spores (RS) of Chaetoceros dominate the diatom flux, mirroring the influence of coastal-upwelled waters at the CH trap site. Occurrence of pelagic diatoms species Fragilariopsis doliolus, members of the Rhizosoleniaceae, Azpeitia spp. and Nitzschia interruptestriata, secondary components of the assemblage, reflects the intermingling of warmer waters of the Subtropical Gyre. Dictyocha messanensis dominates the silicoflagellate association almost year-around, but Distephanus pulchra delivers ca. 60% of its annual production in less than three weeks during the winter peak. The siliceous thanatocoenosis is largely dominated by diatoms, whose assemblage shows significant qualitative and quantitative variations from north to south. Between 27° and 35°S, the dominance of RS Chaetoceros, Thalassionema nitzschioides var. nitzschioides and Skeletonema costatum reflects strong export production associated with occurrence of coastal upwelling. Both highest biogenic opal content and diatom concentration at 35° and 41°-43°S coincide with highest pigment concentrations along the Chilean coast. Predominance of the diatom species Thalassiosira pacifica and T. poro- irregulata, and higher relative contribution of the silicoflagellate Distephanus speculum at 41°-43°S suggest the influence of more nutrient-rich waters and low sea surface temperatures, probably associated with the Antarctic Circumpolar Water.

  5. Greenland Ice Sheet Meltwater Export and River Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rennermalm, A. K.; Tedesco, M.; Mote, T. L.; Overeem, I.; Mikkelsen, A. B.; Hasholt, B.

    2014-12-01

    The Greenland ice sheet supplies massive amounts of freshwater and sediments to surrounding oceans, contributing to global sea level rise and influencing marine ecosystems. A large portion of this meltwater runoff flows through rivers draining the entire perimeter of the ice sheet. These unique river systems are characterized by strong seasonality, high sediment loads due to glacial erosion, and variable basin size and hypsometry over a melt season, during which the melting front propagates upwards and engages an increasingly larger drainage basin area. Other sources of Greenland streamflow include runoff from tundra areas, peripheral glaciers and ice caps. Despite the uniqueness and importance of Greenland surface streams, a comprehensive, comparative study of these systems has not been made. Here, we present an investigation of these systems and analyze their role in the total Greenland meltwater export to the ocean. River catchment areas are identified by analyzing high-resolution digital elevation models of ice sheet surface topography. Discharge from individual rivers are derived from the regional surface mass balance model Modèle Atmosphérique Régional (MAR). Our inventory of Greenland Rivers' hydrological regime, characteristics, and emerging trends provides insights into the current and future state of Greenland streamflow.

  6. Might eddies dominate carbon export ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, J.; Rixen, M.; Fielding, S.; Mustard, A.; Brown, L.; Sanders, R.

    2003-04-01

    Yes - from a review of recent data sets we present a scale analysis of the potential for globally integrated carbon export, from the surface ocean, due to the vertical transports of mesoscale eddies. Mesoscale eddies are the oceanic equivalent of atmospheric storms, most are a fundamental result of horizontally unstable density gradients on the surface of a rotating sphere (baroclinic instability) and ~ 90% of the oceans energy exchanges take place at this scale. Recent studies from satellite remote sensing and high resolution models show that mesoscale eddies are a ubiquitous feature of the open ocean in both time and space; they are even present in sub-tropical oligotrophic gyres. Individual atmospheric weather systems generally have little ecological impact on terrestrial or marine biological systems. Grass grows and herbivores munch through many cyclone and anticyclone periods. In the open ocean we have a very different picture. The primary producers and herbivores have shorter time scales; time scales that coincide with those of mesoscale eddies. Plankton can have either good or bad weather lifetimes associated with just a single cyclone or anticyclone period. Furthermore, although the spring bloom may be the single largest source of material for the export of carbon from the upper ocean, it is short lived and may not be dominant everywhere in the annual export budget. The magnitude of vertical motion associated with mesoscale eddies is significant on biological timescales both for phytoplankton growth and the development of zooplankton grazing pressure. Critically this motion does not form a closed vertical circulation; baroclinic instability releases potential energy and thus water masses are exchanged both vertically and horizontally across water mass boundaries. Thus mesoscale eddies have been shown to provide a mechanism for export both in the direct transport of biomass downwards out of the surface mixed layer and the fertilisation of an exhausted surface mixed layer by nutrient upwelling. In this paper we explore the parameter space for mesoscale vertical velocities (10e-5 to 10e-3 m/s), phytoplankton carbon biomass (1 to 1000 mg/m3) and mesoscale eddy ubiquity (10 to 50%). By considering sensible ranges for an open ocean global mean in each case we show that the potential mesoscale eddy transports are much larger than accepted estimates for carbon export. Thus the determination of a sensible vertical eddy flux is essential if we are to quantify the ocean carbon cycle for prognostic studies. Furthermore, we consider the effect that climatically reduced deep winter mixing might have on the sensible range of values of our parameters.

  7. Aquimixticola soesokkakensis gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel lipolytic alphaproteobacterium isolated from the junction between the ocean and a freshwater spring, and reclassification of Roseovarius marinus as Pacificibacter marinus comb. nov. and emended description of the genus Pacificibacter.

    PubMed

    Park, Sooyeon; Kang, Chul-Hyung; Park, Ji-Min; Yoon, Jung-Hoon

    2014-10-01

    A Gram-negative, aerobic, non-flagellated and rod-shaped or ovoid bacterial strain, designated DSSK2-3(T), was isolated from the junction between the ocean and a freshwater spring at Jeju island, South Korea. Strain DSSK2-3(T) was found to grow optimally at 30 °C, at pH 7.0-8.0 and in the presence of 2.0-3.0% (w/v) NaCl. Neighbour-joining and maximum-likelihood phylogenetic trees based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain DSSK2-3(T) joins the cluster comprising the type strains of Pacificibacter maritimus and Roseovarius marinus, with which it exhibited the highest sequence similarity values of 96.04 and 95.75%, respectively. Sequence similarities to the type strains of other recognized species were <95.74%. Strain DSSK2-3(T) was found to contain Q-10 as the predominant ubiquinone and C(18:1) ω7c as the major fatty acid. The polar lipid profile of strain DSSK2-3(T) was found to contain phosphatidylglycerol, an unidentified lipid and an unidentified aminolipid as major components, which distinguished the strain from those of phylogenetically related taxa. The DNA G+C content of strain DSSK2-3(T) was determined to be 60.8 mol%. On the basis of the phylogenetic data and the chemotaxonomic and other phenotypic properties, strain DSSK2-3(T) is considered to represent a new genus and species within the class Alphaproteobacteria, for which the name Aquimixticola soesokkakensis gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of A. soesokkakensis is DSSK2-3(T) (=KCTC 42137(T) = CECT 8620(T)). In this study, it is also proposed that R. marinus should be reclassified as a member of the genus Pacificibacter and the description of the genus Pacificibacter is emended. PMID:25052535

  8. The Greenland Ice Sheet as a hot spot of phosphorus weathering and export in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkings, Jon; Wadham, Jemma; Tranter, Martyn; Telling, Jon; Bagshaw, Elizabeth; Beaton, Alexander; Simmons, Sarah-Louise; Chandler, David; Tedstone, Andrew; Nienow, Peter

    2016-02-01

    The contribution of ice sheets to the global biogeochemical cycle of phosphorus is largely unknown, due to the lack of field data. Here we present the first comprehensive study of phosphorus export from two Greenland Ice Sheet glaciers. Our results indicate that the ice sheet is a hot spot of phosphorus export in the Arctic. Soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) concentrations, up to 0.35 µM, are similar to those observed in Arctic rivers. Yields of SRP are among the highest in the literature, with denudation rates of 17-27 kg P km-2 yr-1. Particulate phases, as with nonglaciated catchments, dominate phosphorus export (>97% of total phosphorus flux). The labile particulate fraction differs between the two glaciers studied, with significantly higher yields found at the larger glacier (57.3 versus 8.3 kg P km-2 yr-1). Total phosphorus yields are an order of magnitude higher than riverine values reported in the literature. We estimate that the ice sheet contributes ~15% of total bioavailable phosphorus input to the Arctic oceans (~11 Gg yr-1) and dominates total phosphorus input (408 Gg yr-1), which is more than 3 times that estimated from Arctic rivers (126 Gg yr-1). We predict that these fluxes will rise with increasing ice sheet freshwater discharge in the future.

  9. Greenland Ice Sheet nutrient export: Towards a reaction-transport model of fjord dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosby, James; Arndt, Sandra; Wadham, Jemma; Bingham, Rory

    2015-04-01

    Glacial runoff has the potential to deliver large quantities of dissolved and particulate bioavailable nutrients to surrounding marine environments. The marine waters bordering the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) host some of the most productive ecosystems in the world, and possess high socio-economic value from fisheries. Furthermore, the productivity of phytoplankton in the North Atlantic sequesters CO2 from the atmosphere with a potentially important effect on the global coastal ocean CO2 budget. Providing a link between glacier and coastal ocean, fjords are critical components of the marine coastal system in this region, acting as both transfer routes and sinks for glacial nutrient export. As such they have the potential to act as significant biogeochemical processors, yet are currently underexplored. We propose to close this knowledge gap by developing a coupled 2D physical-biogeochemical model of the Godthåbsfjord system to quantitatively assess the impact of nutrients exported from the GrIS on fjord primary productivity and biogeochemical dynamics. Here, we present the first results of the hydrodynamic model. Hydrodynamic circulation patterns and freshwater transit times are explored to provide a first understanding of the glacier-fjord-ocean continuum. The hydrodynamic model will be dynamically coupled to a biogeochemical model with the view to providing a comprehensive understanding of the fate of nutrients exported from the GrIS. This will be extended to address the future sensitivity of these coastal systems to a warming climate, knowledge of which is critical when assessing the role of these dynamic and unique environments.

  10. A 50% increase in the amount of terrestrial particles delivered by the Mackenzie River into the Beaufort Sea (Canadian Arctic Ocean) over the last 10 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doxaran, D.; Devred, E.; Babin, M.

    2015-01-01

    Global warming has a significant impact at the regional scale on the Arctic Ocean and surrounding coastal zones (i.e., Alaska, Canada, Greenland, Norway and Russia). The recent increase in air temperature has resulted in increased precipitations along the drainage basins of Arctic Rivers. It has also directly impacted land and seawater temperatures with the consequence of melting the permafrost and sea-ice. An increase in freshwater discharge by main Arctic rivers has been clearly identified in time series of field observations. The freshwater discharge of the Mackenzie River has increased by 25% since 2003. This may have increased the mobilization and transport of various dissolved and particulate substances, including organic carbon, as well as their export to the ocean. The release from land to the ocean of such organic material, which was sequestered as frozen since the last glacial maximum, may significantly impact the Arctic Ocean carbon cycle as well as marine ecosystems. In this study we use 11 years of ocean-colour satellite data and field observations collected in 2009 to estimate the amount of terrestrial suspended solids and particulate organic carbon delivered by the Mackenzie River into the Beaufort Sea (Arctic Ocean). Our results show that during the summer period the concentration of suspended solids at the river mouth, in the delta zone and in the river plume has increased by 46, 71 and 33%, respectively, since 2003. Combined with the variations observed in the freshwater discharge, this corresponds to a more than 50% increase in the particulate (terrestrial suspended particles and organic carbon) export from the Mackenzie River into the Beaufort Sea.

  11. A 50 % increase in the mass of terrestrial particles delivered by the Mackenzie River into the Beaufort Sea (Canadian Arctic Ocean) over the last 10 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doxaran, D.; Devred, E.; Babin, M.

    2015-06-01

    Global warming has a significant impact on the regional scale on the Arctic Ocean and surrounding coastal zones (i.e., Alaska, Canada, Greenland, Norway and Russia). The recent increase in air temperature has resulted in increased precipitation along the drainage basins of Arctic rivers. It has also directly impacted land and seawater temperatures with the consequence of melting permafrost and sea ice. An increase in freshwater discharge by main Arctic rivers has been clearly identified in time series of field observations. The freshwater discharge of the Mackenzie River has increased by 25% since 2003. This may have increased the mobilization and transport of various dissolved and particulate substances, including organic carbon, as well as their export to the ocean. The release from land to the ocean of such organic material, which has been sequestered in a frozen state since the Last Glacial Maximum, may significantly impact the Arctic Ocean carbon cycle as well as marine ecosystems. In this study we use 11 years of ocean color satellite data and field observations collected in 2009 to estimate the mass of terrestrial suspended solids and particulate organic carbon delivered by the Mackenzie River into the Beaufort Sea (Arctic Ocean). Our results show that during the summer period, the concentration of suspended solids at the river mouth, in the delta zone and in the river plume has increased by 46, 71 and 33%, respectively, since 2003. Combined with the variations observed in the freshwater discharge, this corresponds to a more than 50% increase in the particulate (terrestrial suspended particles and organic carbon) export from the Mackenzie River into the Beaufort Sea.

  12. Forcing of the deep ocean circulation in simulations of the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmittner, A.; Meissner, K. J.; Eby, M.; Weaver, A. J.

    2002-05-01

    From the interpretation of different proxy data it is widely believed that the North Atlantic thermohaline circulation during the maximum of the last ice age ~21,000 years ago was considerably weaker than today. Recent equilibrium simulations with a coupled ocean-atmosphere-sea ice model successfully simulated a reduction in North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) formation consistent with reconstructions. Here we examine the influence of different air-sea fluxes on simulated changes in the deep ocean circulation between the Last Glacial Maximum and present day. We find that changes in the oceanic surface freshwater fluxes are the dominant forcing mechanism for the reduced Atlantic overturning. Diminished export of freshwater out of the Atlantic drainage basin through the atmosphere decreases surface salinities in the North Atlantic, leading to less NADW formation in the colder climate. Changes in heat fluxes, which lead to increased sea surface densities in the North Atlantic and therefore to an enhanced overturning, are of secondary importance. Wind stress variations seem to play a negligible role. The degree to which the Atlantic freshwater export and hence the NADW formation are reduced depends on the formulation of the atmospheric hydrological cycle and on the strength of the overturning in the present-day simulation. Simulated changes in sea surface properties for a large variety of overturning strengths are compared with different reconstruction data sets. The results depend strongly on the data set used. Sea surface temperature reconstructions from Climate: Long-Range Investigation, Mapping, and Prediction (CLIMAP) and earlier salinity reconstructions based on planktonic foraminifera are most consistent with a significant reduction of the circulation, while recent reconstructions using dinocyst assemblages allow no unequivocal conclusion.

  13. Confluentimicrobium lipolyticum gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel lipolytic alphaproteobacterium isolated from the junction between the ocean and a freshwater spring, and emended description of Actibacterium mucosum Lucena et al. 2012.

    PubMed

    Park, Sooyeon; Park, Ji-Min; Kang, Chul-Hyung; Yoon, Jung-Hoon

    2014-11-01

    A Gram-negative, aerobic, non-flagellated and coccoid, ovoid or rod-shaped bacterial strain, designated SSK1-4(T), was isolated from the junction between the ocean and a freshwater spring at Jeju island, South Korea. Strain SSK1-4(T) was found to grow optimally at 30 °C, at pH 7.0-8.0 and in the presence of 2.0 % (w/v) NaCl. In the neighbour-joining, maximum-likelihood and maximum-parsimony phylogenetic trees based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, strain SSK1-4(T) was found to form an evolutionary lineage independent of those of other genera within the family Rhodobacteraceae. Strain SSK1-4(T) exhibited the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity values to the type strains of Ruegeria lacuscaerulensis (94.99 %), Ruegeria atlantica (94.98 %) and Rhodovulum marinum (94.97 %). Sequence similarities to the type strains of other recognized species were less than 94.87 %. Strain SSK1-4(T) was found to contain Q-10 as the predominant ubiquinone and C18:1 ω7c and cyclo-C19:0 ω8c as the major fatty acids. The polar profile of strain SSK1-4(T) was found to contain phosphatidylglycerol, sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol, an unidentified lipid and an unidentified aminolipid as major components, which distinguish it from those of the phylogenetically related taxa. The DNA G+C content of strain SSK1-4(T) was determined to be 58.4 mol%. On the basis of the phylogenetic data and the chemotaxonomic and other phenotypic properties, strain SSK1-4(T) is considered to represent a new genus and species within the class Alphaproteobacteria, for which the name Confluentimicrobium lipolyticum gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of C. lipolyticum is SSK1-4(T) (=KCTC 42136(T) = CECT 8621(T)). In addition, an emended description of Actibacterium mucosum Lucena et al. 2012 is also proposed. PMID:25150887

  14. The Central American Seaway and the Late Neogene ocean conveyor belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Birgit; Krebs-Kanzow, Uta; Park, Wonsun

    2013-04-01

    'The great ocean conveyor belt' depicts the large scale exchange of water mass properties between today's oceans. Over the past million years the tectonic evolution of ocean passages altered this pan-oceanic communication. The last such tectonic transformation was the closure of the Central American Seaway (CAS) which represented a low latitude gateway between Pacific and Atlantic prior to 4 million years ago. We use a coupled general circulation model and configure the topography for the past. The Central American Seaway modifies the global ocean circulation and the ocean conveyor belt which implies drastic changes in water mass properties and inter basin heat and freshwater transports. Compared to an experiment with modern basin geometry, a 1000-meter deep passage at the location of today's Isthmus of Panama results in a fundamental change in the warm water route of the conveyor belt while the cold path remains qualitatively unchanged. A transport of 10 Sv from Pacific to Atlantic is associated with the meridional transport in the South Atlantic changing from 10Sv northward to 2 Sv southward. Both Indonesian throughflow and export of warm water from the Indian Ocean across 30S are reduced by about 7 Sv. Analysing transports in density classes we are able to propose a sketch of the late Neogene conveyor belt.

  15. MODIFICATION OF PHOSPHORUS EXPORT FROM A CATCHMENT BY FLUVIAL SEDIMENT PHOSPHORUS INPUTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phosphorus (P) export from agricultural watersheds can accelerate freshwater eutrophication. Landscape-based remedial measures can reduce edge-of-field P losses. However stream channel hydraulics and fluvial sediment properties can modify the forms and amounts of P exported by the time it reaches th...

  16. When can ocean acidification impacts be detected from decadal alkalinity measurements?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, B. R.; Frölicher, T. L.; Dunne, J. P.; Rodgers, K. B.; Slater, R. D.; Sarmiento, J. L.

    2016-04-01

    We use a large initial condition suite of simulations (30 runs) with an Earth system model to assess the detectability of biogeochemical impacts of ocean acidification (OA) on the marine alkalinity distribution from decadally repeated hydrographic measurements such as those produced by the Global Ship-Based Hydrographic Investigations Program (GO-SHIP). Detection of these impacts is complicated by alkalinity changes from variability and long-term trends in freshwater and organic matter cycling and ocean circulation. In our ensemble simulation, variability in freshwater cycling generates large changes in alkalinity that obscure the changes of interest and prevent the attribution of observed alkalinity redistribution to OA. These complications from freshwater cycling can be mostly avoided through salinity normalization of alkalinity. With the salinity-normalized alkalinity, modeled OA impacts are broadly detectable in the surface of the subtropical gyres by 2030. Discrepancies between this finding and the finding of an earlier analysis suggest that these estimates are strongly sensitive to the patterns of calcium carbonate export simulated by the model. OA impacts are detectable later in the subpolar and equatorial regions due to slower responses of alkalinity to OA in these regions and greater seasonal equatorial alkalinity variability. OA impacts are detectable later at depth despite lower variability due to smaller rates of change and consistent measurement uncertainty.

  17. Changes in the North Pacific Ocean biological pump from MIS 5e to MIS 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swann, G.

    2009-12-01

    Diatom isotope records from the North Pacific Ocean provide an important means by which to further investigate past climatic and oceanographic changes in a region marked by depleted concentrations of foraminifera and other carbonates within the sedimentary record. Combined measurements of diatom oxygen (?18Odiatom) and silicon (?30Sidiatom) from ODP Site 882 indicate significant changes in both freshwater input to the region and the biological pump between MIS 5e and MIS 3. Unchanging values of ?18Odiatom and low/moderate values of ?30Sidiatom suggest relatively stable oceanographic conditions during MIS 5e until a marked, freshwater induced, decrease in ?18Odiatom at the MIS 5e/d boundary. Increases in opal concentrations and ?30Sidiatom to values of 1.2-1.3 between MIS 5d and MIS 5b indicate a subsequent increase in nutrient utilisation and export production. With these changes coinciding with a progressive long-term decrease in atmospheric pCO2, the North West Pacific Ocean may have assisted in lowering pCO2 and driving the climatic system into the glacial conditions that prevailed during the last glacial. Subsequent changes in ?30Sidiatom/nutrient utilisation from MIS 5a to MIS 3 covary with ?18Odiatom inferred changes in freshwater input to the region, indicating a long-term regulation of the regional biological pump via a strengthening/weakening of the halocline stratification.

  18. A model-data comparison of δ13C in the glacial Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesse, T.; Butzin, M.; Bickert, T.; Lohmann, G.

    2011-09-01

    We compare a compilation of 220 sediment core δ13C data from the glacial Atlantic Ocean with three-dimensional ocean circulation simulations including a marine carbon cycle model. The carbon cycle model employs circulation fields which were derived from previous climate simulations. All sediment data have been thoroughly quality controlled, focusing on epibenthic foraminiferal species (such as Cibicidoides wuellerstorfi or Planulina ariminensis) to improve the comparability of model and sediment core carbon isotopes. The model captures the general δ13C pattern indicated by present-day water column data and Late Holocene sediment cores but underestimates intermediate and deep water values in the South Atlantic. The best agreement with glacial reconstructions is obtained for a model scenario with an altered freshwater balance in the Southern Ocean that mimics enhanced northward sea ice export and melting away from the zone of sea ice production. This results in a shoaled and weakened North Atlantic Deep Water flow and intensified Antarctic Bottom Water export, hence confirming previous reconstructions from paleoproxy records. Moreover, the modeled abyssal ocean is very cold and very saline, which is in line with other proxy data evidence.

  19. Speciation and dynamics of dissolved inorganic nitrogen export in the Danshui River, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, T.-Y.; Shih, Y.-T.; Huang, J.-C.; Kao, S.-J.; Shiah, F.-K.; Liu, K.-K.

    2014-10-01

    Human-induced excess nitrogen outflowing from land through rivers to oceans has resulted in serious impacts on terrestrial and coastal ecosystems. Oceania, which occupies < 2.5% of the global land surface, delivers 12% of the freshwater and dissolved materials to the ocean on a global scale. However, there are few empirical data sets on riverine dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) fluxes in the region, and their dynamics are poorly understood. In this study, a river monitoring network covering different types of land uses and population densities was implemented to investigate the mechanism of DIN export. The results show that DIN concentration/yield varied from ∼20 μM/∼300 kg-N km-2 yr-1 to ∼378 μM/∼10 000 kg-N km-2 yr-1 from the relatively pristine headwaters to the populous estuary. Agriculture and population density control DIN export in less densely populated regions and urban areas, respectively, and runoff controls DIN at the watershed scale. Compared to documented estimates from global models, the observed DIN export from the Danshui River is 2.3 times larger, which results from the region-specific response of DIN yield to dense population and abundant runoff. The dominating DIN species change gradually from NO3- in the headwaters (∼97%) to NH4+ in the estuary (∼60%) following the urbanization gradient. The prominent existence of NH4+ is probably the result of the anaerobic water body and short residence time, unlike in large river basins. Given the analogous watershed characteristics of the Danshui River to the rivers in Oceania, our study could serve as a first example to examine riverine DIN fluxes in Oceania.

  20. A subtropical fate awaited freshwater discharged from glacial Lake Agassiz

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Condron, Alan; Winsor, Peter

    2011-02-10

    The 8.2 kyr event is the largest abrupt climatic change recorded in the last 10,000 years, and is widely hypothesized to have been triggered by the release of thousands of kilometers cubed of freshwater into the North Atlantic Ocean. Using a high-resolution (1/6°) global, ocean-ice circulation model we present an alternative view that freshwater discharged from glacial Lake Agassiz would have remained on the continental shelf as a narrow, buoyant, coastal current, and would have been transported south into the subtropical North Atlantic. The pathway we describe is in contrast to the conceptual idea that freshwater from this lake outburstmore » spread over most of the sub-polar North Atlantic, and covered the deep, open-ocean, convection regions. This coastally confined freshwater pathway is consistent with the present-day routing of freshwater from Hudson Bay, as well as paleoceanographic evidence of this event. In this study, using a coarse-resolution (2.6°) version of the same model, we demonstrate that the previously reported spreading of freshwater across the sub-polar North Atlantic results from the inability of numerical models of this resolution to accurately resolve narrow coastal flows, producing instead a diffuse circulation that advects freshwater away from the boundaries. To understand the climatic impact of freshwater released in the past or future (e.g. Greenland and Antarctica), the ocean needs to be modeled at a resolution sufficient to resolve the dynamics of narrow, coastal buoyant flows.« less

  1. Aquatic carbon export from peatland catchments recently undergone wind farm development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Ben; Waldron, Susan; Henderson, Andrew; Flowers, Hugh; Gilvear, David

    2013-04-01

    Scotland's peat landscapes are desirable locations for wind-based renewables due to high wind resources and low land use pressures in these areas. The environmental impact of sitting wind-based renewables on peats however, is unknown. Globally, peatlands are important terrestrial carbon stores. Given the topical nature of carbon-related issues, e.g. global warming and carbon footprints, it is imperative we help mitigate their degradation and maintain carbon sequestration. To do so, we need to better understand how peatland systems function with regards to their carbon balance (export versus sequestration) so we can assess their resilience and adaptation to hosting land-based renewable energy projects. Predicting carbon lost as a result of construction of wind farms built on peatland has not been fully characterised and this research will provide data that can supplement current 'carbon payback calculator' models for wind farms that aim to reinforce their 'green' credentials. Transfer of carbon from the terrestrial peatland systems to the aquatic freshwater and oceanic systems is most predominant during periods of high rainfall. It has been estimated that 50% of carbon is exported during only 10% of highest river flows, (Hinton et al., 1998). Furthermore, carbon export from peatlands is known to have a seasonal aspect with highest concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) found mostly in late summer months of August and September and lowest in December and January, (Dawson et al., 2004). Event sampling, where high intensity sample collection is carried out during high river flow periods, offers a better insight, understanding and estimation of carbon aquatic fluxes from peatland landscapes. The Gordonbush estate, near Brora, has an extensive peatland area where a wind farm development has recently been completed (April 2012). Investigations of aquatic carbon fluxes from this peatland system were started in July 2010, in conjunction with the start of construction of the 35-turbine wind farm, with a strong focus on event sampling. Fieldwork and sample collection is due to continue until at least September 2013 but data collated so far shows seasonal differences of carbon export from similar sized hydrological events. In addition, event sampling has highlighted the different characteristics between DOC and POC export as well as their contribution to the overall aquatic carbon flux. Phosphorous and nitrate concentrations have also been analysed and their export regimes and interactions with carbon export will also be discussed.

  2. Methanotrophy controls groundwater methane export from a barrier island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schutte, Charles A.; Wilson, Alicia M.; Evans, Tyler; Moore, Willard S.; Joye, Samantha B.

    2016-04-01

    Methane concentrations can be high in coastal groundwater, resulting in methane export driven by submarine groundwater discharge. However, the magnitude of this methane flux depends significantly on the rate of methanotrophy, the often overlooked process of microbial methane consumption that occurs within coastal aquifer sediments. Here we describe a zone of methanogenesis within the freshwater lens of a barrier island aquifer and investigate the methane source/sink behavior of the barrier island system as a whole. The median concentration of methane dissolved in fresh groundwater beneath the center of the island was 0.6 mM, supported by high rates of potential methanogenesis (22 mmol m-2 day-1). However, rates of microbial methane consumption were also elevated in surrounding sediments (18 mmol m-2 day-1). Groundwater flowing from the zone of methanogenesis to the point of discharge into the ocean had a long residence time within methanotrophic sediments (∼195 days) such that the majority of the methane produced within the barrier island aquifer was likely consumed there.

  3. 48 CFR 52.247-51 - Evaluation of Export Offers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Offers. 52.247-51 Section 52.247-51 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION....247-51 Evaluation of Export Offers. As prescribed in 47.305-6(e), insert the following provision: Evaluation of Export Offers (JAN 2001) (a) Port handling and ocean charges—other than DOD water...

  4. Greater diversification of freshwater than marine parasites of fish.

    PubMed

    Poulin, Robert

    2016-04-01

    The species richness of freshwater environments is disproportionately high compared with that of the oceans, given their respective sizes. If diversification rates are higher in freshwaters because they are isolated and heterogeneous, this should apply to parasites as well. Using 14 large datasets comprising 677 species of freshwater and marine fish, the hypothesis that freshwater parasites experience higher rates of diversification than marine ones is tested by contrasting the relative numbers of species per parasite genus between the regional endohelminth faunas of fish in both environments. The relationship between the number of parasite genera and the number of parasite species per host was well described by a power function, in both environments; although the exponent of this function was slightly lower for freshwater parasite faunas than marine ones, the difference was not significant. However, the ratio between the number of parasite species and the number of parasite genera per host species was significantly higher in freshwater fish than in marine ones. These findings suggest fundamental differences between the way parasite faunas diversify in freshwater versus marine habitats, with the independent evolution of conspecific parasite populations in isolated host populations being a more common phenomenon in freshwater environments. PMID:26802461

  5. Why freshwater organisms survived the asteroid that killed the dinosaurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2013-08-01

    Roughly 65.5 million years ago, a massive asteroid smashed into present-day Chicxulub, Mexico. The impact set fire to Earth's surface. Dust and ash darkened the sky, sending the planet into an "impact winter" that lasted months to years and caused the extinction of nonavian dinosaurs and half of ocean-dwelling species. However, life in inland freshwater ecosystems largely escaped this fate. To try to understand why freshwater organisms held on while ocean life failed, Robertson et al. surveyed relevant research to understand how the mechanisms of extinction would have operated differently in the two environments.

  6. Ocean circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Andrew F.; Rahmstorf, Stefan

    The ocean moderates the Earth's climate due to its vast capacity to store and transport heat; the influence of the large-scale ocean circulation on changes in climate is considered in this chapter. The ocean experiences both buoyancy forcing (through heating/cooling and evaporation/precipitation) and wind forcing. Almost all ocean forcing occurs at the surface, but these changes are communicated throughout the entire depth of the ocean through the meridional overturning circulation (MOC). In a few localized regions, water become sufficiently dense to penetrate thousands of meters deep, where it spreads, providing a continuous source of deep dense water to the entire ocean. Dense water returns to the surface and thus closes the MOC, either through density modification due to diapycnal mixing or by upwelling along sloping isopycnals across the Southern Ocean. Determination of the relative contributions of these two processes in the MOC remains an active area of research. Observations obtained primarily from isotopic compositions in ocean sediments provide substantial evidence that the structure of the MOC has changed significantly in the past. Indeed, large and abrupt changes to the Earth's climate during the past 120,000 years can be linked to either a reorganization or a complete collapse of the MOC. Two of the more dramatic instances of abrupt change include Dansgaard-Oeschger events, abrupt warmings that could exceed 10°C over a period as short as a few decades, and Heinrich events, which are associated with massive freshwater fluxes due to rapid iceberg discharges into the North Atlantic. Numerical models of varying complexity that have captured these abrupt transitions all underscore that the MOC is a highly nonlinear system with feedback loops, multiple equilibria, and hysteresis effects. Prediction of future abrupt shifts in the MOC or "tipping points" remains uncertain. However, the inferred behavior of the MOC during glacial climates suggests that significant modifications to the present circulation are possible and that any change is likely to have a large effect on the Earth's climate.

  7. Evidence of local short-distance spawning migration of tropical freshwater eels, and implications for the evolution of freshwater eel migration

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Takaomi

    2014-01-01

    Freshwater eels have fascinated biologists for centuries due to the spectacular long-distance migrations between the eels’ freshwater habitats and their spawning areas far out in the ocean and the mysteries of their ecology. The spawning areas of Atlantic eels and Japanese eel were located far offshore in the Atlantic Ocean and the Pacific Ocean, respectively, and their reproduction took place thousands of kilometers away from their growth habitats. Phylogenetic studies have revealed that freshwater eels originated in the Indonesian region. However, remarkably little is known about the life histories of tropical freshwater eels despite the fact that tropical eels are key to understanding the nature of primitive forms of catadromous migration. This study found spawning-condition tropical freshwater eels in Lake Poso, central Sulawesi, Indonesia, with considerably high gonadosomatic index values and with histologically fully developed gonads. This study provides the first evidence that under certain conditions, freshwater eels have conditions that are immediately able to spawn even in river downstream. The results suggest that, in contrast to the migrations made by the Atlantic and Japanese eels, freshwater eels originally migrated only short distances of <100 kilometers to local spawning areas adjacent to their freshwater growth habitats. Ancestral eels most likely underwent a catadromous migration from local short-distance movements in tropical coastal waters to the long-distance migrations characteristic of present-day temperate eels, which has been well established as occurring in subtropical gyres in both hemispheres. PMID:25614795

  8. Fluxes of Colloidal Organic Carbon to the Arctic Ocean From North American Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Y.; Guo, L.

    2005-12-01

    Colloidal organic carbon (COC) is a major component in the carbon biogeochemical cycle. The Arctic Ocean receives a disproportionally large input of global terrestrial organic carbon, but the riverine input of COC to the Arctic Ocean is still poorly quantified. Water samples were collected during Summer 2005 from the Mackenzie River, Sagavanirktok River, Kuparuk River, and the Yukon River Basin, including Yukon River, Tanana River and Chena River. Using cross-flow ultrafiltration, the concentration of COC (1kD to 0.45um) and its percentage in bulk dissolved organic carbon (DOC) were quantified with the application of an ultrafiltration permeation model. Riverine export fluxes of COC by these rivers were also estimated based on freshwater discharge and corresponding COC concentrations. COC concentrations derived from the ultrafiltration permeation model ranged from 0.54 to 14.3 mg-C/L, while the percentages of COC in the bulk DOC remained somewhat constant, ranging from 62 to 77% with an average of 68+/-5%. These COC percentages are higher than those found in tropical/subtropical rivers, indicating the importance of COC in the Arctic rivers. The annual export flux of COC was 2.30E+12 g-C/y for the Yukon River, 1.23x1012 g-C/y for the Mackenzie River, 1.51x109 g-C/y for the Sagavanirktok River, and 3.89x109 g-C/y for the Kuparuk River. Within the COC export flux from the Yukon River Basin, ~65% was from the Yukon River, ~3% was from the Tanana River, and 32% was from the Koyukuk River and other tributaries. The total COC discharged by rivers into the Arctic Ocean was estimated as 12.2-17.7x1012 g-C/y, given a DOC flux of 18-26x1012 g-C/y to the Arctic Ocean and an average COC percentage of 68%.

  9. ABC transporters: bacterial exporters.

    PubMed Central

    Fath, M J; Kolter, R

    1993-01-01

    The ABC transporters (also called traffic ATPases) make up a large superfamily of proteins which share a common function and a common ATP-binding domain. ABC transporters are classified into three major groups: bacterial importers (the periplasmic permeases), eukaryotic transporters, and bacterial exporters. We present a comprehensive review of the bacterial ABC exporter group, which currently includes over 40 systems. The bacterial ABC exporter systems are functionally subdivided on the basis of the type of substrate that each translocates. We describe three main groups: protein exporters, peptide exporters, and systems that transport nonprotein substrates. Prototype exporters from each group are described in detail to illustrate our current understanding of this protein family. The prototype systems include the alpha-hemolysin, colicin V, and capsular polysaccharide exporters from Escherichia coli, the protease exporter from Erwinia chrysanthemi, and the glucan exporters from Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Rhizobium meliloti. Phylogenetic analysis of the ATP-binding domains from 29 bacterial ABC exporters indicates that the bacterial ABC exporters can be divided into two primary branches. One branch contains the transport systems where the ATP-binding domain and the membrane-spanning domain are present on the same polypeptide, and the other branch contains the systems where these domains are found on separate polypeptides. Differences in substrate specificity do not correlate with evolutionary relatedness. A complete survey of the known and putative bacterial ABC exporters is included at the end of the review. PMID:8302219

  10. 7 CFR 1488.9 - Evidence of export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... exporter shall furnish to the Treasurer, CCC, one copy of the bill of lading covering the commodity..., showing the quantity, the gross landed weight of the commodity, the place and date of entry, and the name... of copy of either (1) an on-board ocean bill of lading or (2) an ocean bill of lading with an...

  11. 7 CFR 1488.9 - Evidence of export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... exporter shall furnish to the Treasurer, CCC, one copy of the bill of lading covering the commodity..., showing the quantity, the gross landed weight of the commodity, the place and date of entry, and the name... of copy of either (1) an on-board ocean bill of lading or (2) an ocean bill of lading with an...

  12. Freshwater Education: The Need, The Tools, and The "Vital Link."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shroeder, Linda

    1984-01-01

    Freshwater education programs are beginning to instill in young people a sense of awareness and a sense of responsibility regarding the future of water resources. Several of these programs are discussed, including Project COAST (Coastal, Oceanic, and Aquatic Studies) and "Acid Precipitation Learning Materials, Grades 7-12." (JN)

  13. Multimodel simulations of Arctic Ocean sea surface height variability in the period 1970-2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koldunov, Nikolay V.; Serra, Nuno; Khl, Armin; Stammer, Detlef; Henry, Olivier; Cazenave, Anny; Prandi, Pierre; Knudsen, Per; Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Gao, Yongqi; Johannessen, Johnny

    2014-12-01

    The performance of several numerical ocean models is assessed with respect to their simulation of sea surface height (SSH) in the Arctic Ocean, and the main patterns of SSH variability and their causes over the past 40 years (1970-2009) are analyzed. In comparison to observations, all tested models broadly reproduce the mean SSH in the Arctic and reveal a good correlation with both tide gauge data and SSH anomalies derived from satellite observations. Although the models do not represent the positive Arctic SSH trend observed over the last two decades, their interannual-to-decadal SSH variability is in reasonable agreement with available measurements. Focusing on results from one of the models for a detailed analysis, it is shown that the decadal-scale SSH variability over shelf areas and deep parts of the Arctic Ocean have pronounced differences that are determined mostly by salinity variations. A further analysis of the three time periods 1987-1992, 1993-2002, and 2003-2009, corresponding to the transition times between cyclonic and anticyclonic regimes of the atmospheric circulation over the Arctic, revealed an unusual increase of SSH in the Amerasian basin during 2003-2009. Results from this model support the recent finding that the increase is caused mainly by changes in freshwater content brought about by the freshwater export through the Canadian Arctic Archiplago and increased Ekman pumping in the Amerasian basin and partly by lateral freshwater transport changes, leading to a redistribution of low-salinity shelf water. Overall, we show that present-day models can be used for investigating the reasons for low-frequency SSH variability in the region.

  14. Ocean acidification in the Western Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, W.; Chen, B.; Chen, L.

    2011-12-01

    We report carbonate chemistry and ocean acidification status in the western Arctic Ocean from 65-88οN based on data collected in summer 2008 and 2010. In the marginal seas, surface waters have high pH and high carbonate saturation state (Ω) due to intensive biological uptake of CO2. In the southern Canada Basin, surface waters have low pH and low Ω due to the uptake of atmospheric CO2 and sea-ice melt. In the northern Arctic Ocean basin, there is no serious ocean acidification in surface water due to heavy ice-coverage but pH and Ω in the subsurface waters at the oxygen minimum and nutrient maximum zone (at 100-150 m) are low due mostly to respiration-derived CO2 and an increased biological production and export in surface waters. Such multitude responses of ocean carbonate chemistry (northern vs. southern basin, basins vs. margins, and surface vs. subsurface) to climate changes are unique to the Arctic Ocean system. We will explore biogeochemical control mechanisms on carbonate chemistry and ocean acidification in the Arctic Ocean environments in the context of recent warming and sea-ice retreat.

  15. Freshwater Marsh. Habitat Pac.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fish and Wildlife Service (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    The materials in this educational packet are designed for use with students in grades 4 through 7. They consist of an overview, three lesson plans and student data sheets, and a poster. The overview describes how the freshwater marsh is an important natural resource for plant, animal, and human populations and how the destruction of marshes causes…

  16. Freshwater aspects of anadromous salmonid enhancement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gould, Rowan W.

    1982-01-01

    Freshwater enhancement of anadromous salmonid populations has been practiced in the United States and Canada since the late 1800's. Reduction of natural spawning habitat and increasing fishing pressure make artificial enhancement a possible alternative to declining populations. Enhancement of anadromous salmonids involved improvement of the natural environment and reducing natural mortality. Methods of enhancement include fishways, spawning and rearing channels, stream rehabilitation, lake fertilization, environmental management, and artificial propagation techniques. Five Pacific salmon species and steelhead trout are commonly enhanced, primarily in watershed entering the Pacific Ocean and Great Lakes. Enhancement efforts contribute heavily to a commercial and sport industry realizing over $1.5 billion.

  17. Freshwater runoff and salinity distribution in the Loxahatchee River estuary, southeastern Florida, 1980-82

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Russell, G.M.; McPherson, B.F.

    1984-01-01

    Freshwater mixed with seawater over a distance of 5 to 10 river miles in the Loxahatchee River estuary during a recent study. Large freshwater inflows vertically stratified the estuary and shifted the mixing zone seaward. In the northwest fork of the estuary, the saltwater-freshwater interface moved daily about 0.5 to 1.5 river miles as a result of tides, and annually about 3 to 5 miles as a result of seasonal changes in freshwater inflow. In the southwest fork, saltwater movement upstream was blocked by a gate and dam structure in Canal-18, 4.7 miles upstream from the Atlantic Ocean. Although Canal-18 discharged about one-third of the total freshwater tributary inflow to the estuary, the effects of canal discharge on salinity were limited to relatively brief periods. Much of the time, no freshwater was discharged. (USGS)

  18. Freshwater runoff and salinity distribution in the Loxahatchee River estuary, southeastern Florida, 1980-1982

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, G.M.; McPherson, B.F.

    1984-01-01

    During a recent study, freshwater mixed with seawater over a distance of 5 to 10 river miles in the Loxahatchee River estuary. Large freshwater inflows vertically stratified the estuary and shifted the mixing zone seaward. In the northwest fork of the estuary, the saltwater-freshwater interface moved daily about 0.5 to 1.5 river miles as a result of tides and annually about 3 to 5 miles as a result of seasonal changes in freshwater inflow. In the southwest fork, saltwater movement upstream was blocked by a gate and dam structure in Canal-18, 4.7 miles upstream from the Atlantic Ocean. Although Canal-18 discharged about one-third of the total freshwater tributary inflow to the estuary, the effects of canal discharge on salinity were limited to relatively brief periods. Much of the time, no freshwater was discharged. 15 refs., 21 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Model sensitivity of the Weddell and Ross seas, Antarctica, to vertical mixing and freshwater forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjellsson, Joakim; Holland, Paul R.; Marshall, Gareth J.; Mathiot, Pierre; Aksenov, Yevgeny; Coward, Andrew C.; Bacon, Sheldon; Megann, Alex P.; Ridley, Jeff

    2015-10-01

    We examine the sensitivity of the Weddell and Ross seas to vertical mixing and surface freshwater forcing using an ocean-sea ice model. The high latitude Southern Ocean is very weakly stratified, with a winter salinity difference across the pycnocline of only ∼0.2 PSU. We find that insufficient vertical mixing, freshwater supply from the Antarctic Ice Sheet, or initial sea ice causes a high salinity bias in the mixed layer which erodes the stratification and causes excessive deep convection. This leads to vertical homogenisation of the Weddell and Ross seas, opening of polynyas in the sea ice and unrealistic spin-up of the subpolar gyres and Antarctic Circumpolar Current. The model freshwater budget shows that a ∼30% error in any component can destratify the ocean in about a decade. We find that freshwater forcing in the model should be sufficient along the Antarctic coastline to balance a salinity bias caused by dense coastal water that is unable to sink to the deep ocean. We also show that a low initial sea ice area introduces a salinity bias in the marginal ice zone. We demonstrate that vertical mixing, freshwater forcing and initial sea ice conditions need to be constrained simultaneously to reproduce the Southern Ocean hydrography, circulation and sea ice in a model. As an example, insufficient vertical mixing will cause excessive convection in the Weddell and Ross seas even in the presence of large surface freshwater forcing and initial sea ice cover.

  20. Multiyear Survey of the Distribution and Fate of Biomarkers in the Atlantic Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fietz, S.; Rosell Mele, A.; Rueda, G.; Martinez Garcia, A.; Hambach, B.; Viladrich, N.; Barrera Sansón, A.; Rossi, S.; Ziveri, P.

    2010-12-01

    Biogeochemical signatures derived from organisms thriving in the ocean water column are driven by environmental conditions, with highly complex processes linking primary and export productivity. Organic matter input, in-situ production and fate depend on conditions such as sea surface temperature, ice-cover and freshwater input, mixing/stratification regime, fertilization and acidification etc. for which important changes are predicted in subpolar and polar environments. However, the spatial and interannual variability of organic matter distribution and their driving environmental factors in these vast oceanic regions are not fully determined or understood. To gain some new insights into these issues in the Arctic region we have participated in a multiyear survey, based on four summer cruises from 2005 to 2009 following latitudinal transects from the North Atlantic to the Fram Strait, and longitudinal transects from Greenland to Svalbard and collected particulate matter in the water column as well as twenty surface sediments. We focus on biogeochemical markers for terrestrial matter input (e.g., n-alkanes, branched GDGTs), for in-situ productivity and pelagic community composition (e.g., photosynthetic pigments, alkenones, isoprenoid GDGTs) and food-web structure (e.g., fatty acids, sterols). We also collected samples to determine the distribution of specific algal groups (coccolithophores) in this region. Results from the 2008 and 2009 surveys will be presented. Our aim is to compare the organic matter signatures in the upper water column to those in the exported matter that reaches deep water masses and surface sediments.

  1. Recent Advances in Quantifying Hydrological Processes Linking Water, Carbon, and Energy Exports into Coastal Margins Along the Arctic Land-Sea Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawlins, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    The high northern latitudes have experienced rapid warming in recent decades with projections of larger increases likely by the end of this century. Warming permafrost and an acceleration of the arctic freshwater cycle are among the myriad interconnected changes taking place that have the potential to impact ecosystems throughout the pan-Arctic. The Arctic Ocean receives a disproportionately large amount of global freshwater runoff and as such near-shore coastal margins along the arctic land-sea boundary are strongly influenced by riverine freshwater discharge. Alterations in hydrological flows driven by a changing climate and other perturbations, therefore, are likely to impact the biology and biogeochemistry of arctic coastal margins. Advances have been made in the quantification of water, carbon, and materials transports with recent studies documenting significant changes in exports of quantities such as dissolved organic carbon from large rivers, linked in turn to changes in landscape characteristics and hydrological flow rates. Here key measured data sets, derived empirical relationships, and the resulting pan-Arctic estimates for several constituents are described for the major arctic rivers and full pan-Arctic basin. Complementary estimates from a process-based model are presented, illustrating the potential for leveraging measured data to derive more accurate flows at basin and continental scales. A series of retrospective model simulations point to an increasing influence of river-borne heat transport on ice melt in coastal margins. Case studies of large freshwater anomalies provide a framework for understanding connections between river discharge and the biology and biogeochemistry of arctic coastal margins.

  2. JPL Export Compliance Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Momjian, E.; Lam, C.

    2000-01-01

    The transfer of commodities, software, or technlogies to foreign persons is subject to U.S. export control laws and regulations. These export controls are applicable, regardless of whether the transfer occurs in the U.S. or outside of the U.S.

  3. Acidification of freshwaters

    SciTech Connect

    Cresser, M.S.; Edwards, A.C.

    1987-01-01

    This volume gives an account that draws not only on the main branches of chemistry but also on soil physics, chemistry, hydrology, meteorology, geography, geology, plant physiology, soil microbiology and zoology. The author examine the numerous interacting physical, chemical, and biological, processes that regulate the acidity of freshwaters, a phenomenon that has various causes, including precipitation; acidifying pollutions; and the interaction of plants, soils and water. The relative importance of the different processes is examined.

  4. Anticipated Improvements to Net Surface Freshwater Fluxes from GPM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Eric A.

    2005-01-01

    Evaporation and precipitation over the oceans play very important roles in the global water cycle, upper-ocean heat budget, ocean dynamics, and coupled ocean-atmosphere dynamics. In the conventional representation of the terrestrial water cycle, the assumed role of the oceans is to act as near-infinite reservoirs of water with the main drivers of the water cycle being land- atmosphere interactions in which excess precipitation (P) over evaporation (E) is returned to the oceans as surface runoff and baseflow. Whereas this perspective is valid for short space and time scales -- fundamental principles, available observed estimates, and results from models indicate that the oceans play a far more important role in the large-scale water cycle at seasonal and longer timescales. Approximately 70-80% of the total global evaporation and precipitation occurs over oceans. Moreover, latent heat release into the atmosphere over the oceans is the major heat source driving global atmospheric circulations, with the moisture transported by circulations from oceans to continents being the major source of water precipitating over land. Notably, the major impediment in understanding and modeling the oceans role in the global water cycle is the lack of reliable net surface freshwater flux estimates (E - P fluxes) at the salient spatial and temporal resolutions, i.e., consistent coupled weekly to monthly E - P gridded datasets.

  5. Interannual variability of the Arctic freshwater cycle in the second half of the twentieth century in a regionally coupled climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niederdrenk, Anne Laura; Sein, Dmitry V.; Mikolajewicz, Uwe

    2016-03-01

    We use a regionally coupled ocean-sea ice-atmosphere-hydrological discharge model to investigate the influence of changes in the atmospheric large-scale circulation on the interannual variability of the Arctic freshwater (FW) components. This model includes all sinks and sources of FW and allows for the analysis of a closed FW cycle in the Arctic. We show that few atmospheric winter modes explain large parts of the interannual variability of the Arctic FW cycle. A strong Icelandic low causing anomalous strong westerlies over the North Atlantic leads to warmer and wetter conditions over Eurasia. The ocean circulation is then characterized by a strong transpolar drift leading to increased export of FW in liquid and solid form into the North Atlantic. In contrast to this, a weaker than usual Icelandic low and a strong Siberian high is associated with a strong Beaufort Gyre and thus an accumulation of FW within the Arctic Ocean. Not only specific winter conditions but also increased precipitation in late spring and summer, caused by enhanced cyclone activity over land, lead to increased Eurasian runoff, which is responsible for most of the variability in Arctic river runoff.

  6. Estimating freshwater flows from tidally affected hydrographic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagendam, D. E.; Percival, D. B.

    2015-03-01

    Detiding end-of-catchment flow data are an important step in determining the total volumes of freshwater (and associated pollutant loads) entering the ocean. We examine three approaches for separating freshwater and tidal flows from tidally affected data: (i) a simple low-pass Butterworth filter (BWF); (ii) a robust, harmonic analysis with Kalman smoothing (RoHAKS) which is a novel approach introduced in this paper; and (iii) dynamic harmonic regression (DHR). Using hydrographic data collected in the Logan River, Australia, over a period of 452 days, we judge the accuracy of the three methods based on three criteria: consistency of freshwater flows with upstream gauges; consistency of total discharge volumes with the raw data over the event; and minimal upstream flow. A simulation experiment shows that RoHAKS outperforms both BWF and DHR on a number of criteria. In addition, RoHAKS enjoys a computational advantage over DHR in speed and use of freely available software.

  7. Effects of pollution on freshwater organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Phipps, G.L.; Harden, M.J.; Leonard, E.N.; Roush, T.H; Spehar, D.L.; Stephan, C.E.; Pickering, Q.H.; Buikema, A.L. Jr.

    1984-06-01

    This review includes subjects in last year's reviews on effects of pollution on freshwater invertebrates and effects of pollution on freshwater fish and amphibians. This review also includes information on the effects of pollution on freshwater plants. 625 references.

  8. Evidence for reduced export productivity following the Cretaceous/Paleogene mass extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmeray-Senlet, Selen; Wright, James D.; Olsson, Richard K.; Miller, Kenneth G.; Browning, James V.; Quan, Tracy M.

    2015-06-01

    The Cretaceous/Paleogene (K/Pg) mass extinction was associated with a collapse in the carbon isotopic (δ13C) gradient between planktonic and benthic foraminifera and a decrease in bulk carbonate δ13C values. These perturbations have been explained by several hypotheses: global collapse of primary productivity (Strangelove Ocean), greatly reduced export but not primary productivity (Living Ocean), little or no reduction in export productivity (Resilient Ocean), and geographic heterogeneity in the change of export productivity (Heterogeneous Ocean). We tested primary versus export productivity changes in the paleoshelf of New Jersey, where δ13C values and organic carbon accumulation rates can distinguish among different ocean responses. On the shelf, the K/Pg boundary is associated with a ~2.5‰ δ13C decrease in bulk carbonate, a ~0.8‰ δ13C decrease in organic carbon, a collapse of the surface to bottom δ13C gradient, and a drop in organic carbon accumulation rates. We interpret an early Danian ~1.0‰ planktonic foraminiferal δ13C gradient, a ~0.75‰ cross-shelf benthic foraminiferal δ13C gradient, and a drop in carbon accumulation rates to reflect the presence of active primary but limited export productivity, consistent with the Living Ocean hypothesis. We evaluated interbasinal deep-sea benthic foraminiferal δ13C gradients between the Pacific (Site 1210) and Atlantic (Site 1262) oceans as a proxy for changes in export productivity. The interbasinal δ13C gradient was reduced after the mass extinction, suggesting a reduction in global export productivity. Although our data support the Living Ocean hypothesis, evidence from paleoupwelling zones shows significant export productivity, indicating spatial heterogeneity in the wake of the K/Pg mass extinction (Heterogeneous Ocean).

  9. Ocean Observations of Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, Don

    2016-01-01

    The ocean influences climate by storing and transporting large amounts of heat, freshwater, and carbon, and exchanging these properties with the atmosphere. About 93% of the excess heat energy stored by the earth over the last 50 years is found in the ocean. More than three quarters of the total exchange of water between the atmosphere and the earth's surface through evaporation and precipitation takes place over the oceans. The ocean contains 50 times more carbon than the atmosphere and is at present acting to slow the rate of climate change by absorbing one quarter of human emissions of carbon dioxide from fossil fuel burning, cement production, deforestation and other land use change.Here I summarize the observational evidence of change in the ocean, with an emphasis on basin- and global-scale changes relevant to climate. These include: changes in subsurface ocean temperature and heat content, evidence for regional changes in ocean salinity and their link to changes in evaporation and precipitation over the oceans, evidence of variability and change of ocean current patterns relevant to climate, observations of sea level change and predictions over the next century, and biogeochemical changes in the ocean, including ocean acidification.

  10. Ice sheet collapse affects ocean circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretkoff, Ernie

    2011-06-01

    As Earth's climate warms and ice melts, freshwater input to oceans could weaken the large-scale Atlantic meridional overturning circulation, which acts as an important conveyor of heat and has significant effects on climate. Green et al. used an intermediate complexity climate model to study how freshwater input to oceans can affect the meridional overturning circulation. They applied their model to the collapse of the Barents ice sheet about 140,000 years ago—the first study of this kind for the time period—which resulted in a huge influx of freshwater to the North Atlantic Ocean as large icebergs calved off of the ice sheet. (Paleoceanography, doi:10.1029/ 2010PA002088, 2011)

  11. Sperm in "parhenogenetic" freshwater gastrotrichs.

    PubMed

    Weiss, M J; Levy, D P

    1979-07-20

    Freshwater members of the phylum Gastrotricha have been considered obligate parthenogens. In Lepidodermelia squammata, the species for which there is most evidence for parthenogenesis, sperm have been discovered. This finding will necessitate reexamination of the nature of sexuality and life cycles and of the concept of "species" in freshwater gastrotrichs. PMID:17747043

  12. Marine and freshwater toxins.

    PubMed

    Hungerford, James M

    2006-01-01

    In a very busy and exciting year, 2005 included First Action approval of a much needed official method for paralytic shellfish toxins and multiple international toxin symposia highlighted by groundbreaking research. These are the first-year milestones and activities of the Marine and Freshwater Toxins Task Force and Analytical Community. Inaugurated in 2004 and described in detail in last year's General Referee Report (1) this international toxins group has grown to 150 members from many regions and countries. Perhaps most important they are now making important and global contributions to food safety and to providing alternatives to animal-based assays. Official Method 2005.06 was first approved in late 2004 by the Task Force and subsequently Official First Action in 2005 (2) by the Methods Committee on Natural Toxins and Food Allergens and the Official Methods Board. This nonproprietary method (3) is a precolumn oxidation, liquid chromatographic method that makes good use of fluorescence detection to provide high sensitivity detection of the saxitoxins. It has also proven to be rugged enough for regulatory use and the highest level of validation. As pointed out in the report of method principle investigator and Study Director James Lawrence, approval of 2005.06 now provides the first official alternative to the mouse bioassay after many decades of shellfish monitoring. This past year in April 2005 the group also held their first international conference, "Marine and Freshwater Toxins Analysis: Ist Joint Symposium and AOAC Task Force Meeting," in Baiona, Spain. The 4-day conference consisted of research and stakeholder presentations and symposium-integrated subgroup sessions on ciguatoxins, saxitoxin assays and liquid chromatography (LC) methods for saxitoxins and domoic acids, okadaiates and azaspiracids, and yessotoxins. Many of these subgroups were recently formed in 2005 and are working towards their goals of producing officially validated analytical methods. (Abstracts from the Baiona 2005 meeting cited in this report can be found in the online version of the conference abstract book in the Files and Folders section of the Marine and Freshwater Toxins online community at www.aoac.org.) An active topic for discussion in Baiona and subsequent Task Force activities was the expert consultation for Codex which met in Oslo, Norway in 2004 (previously described and cited in last year's GR report, ref 1). The consultation group's executive summary report (http://www.fao.org/es/ESN/food/risk_biotoxin en.stm) describes suggested changes in action levels as well as methods, method validation, and other issues. September 2005 saw the AOAC Task Force efforts further supported by another symposium, "Marine and Freshwater Toxins: Quality Methods for Food Safety and International Trade," at the AOAC INTERNATIONAL Annual Conference in Orlando, Florida. The multidisciplinary talks at this full day symposium ranged from ciguatoxins to cyanobacterial toxins, and spanned toxicology, biochemistry, molecular biology and analytical chemistry. Again, the symposium preceded Task Force meetings. Toxin subgroups, including a new group on cyanobacterial toxins, met for engaging and productive subgroup discussions. All of these activities were preceded by a Wiley Award symposium for Task Force member Mike Quilliam of NRC Canada. These talks, presented at a half-day symposium on the first day of the Annual Meeting, focused on Quilliam's work with LC tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) and certified reference standards and materials, and included related presentations by some of his many research collaborators. To maintain flow and continuity between symposia and between Task Force meetings, the group now uses new electronic discussion forums. Individual subgroup areas, under the Marine and Freshwater Toxins Task Force, comprise this online community. First introduced by AOAC INTERNATIONAL in early 2005, these new resources are being used to distribute information and to supplement the in-person subgroup meetings and electronic mail in the group's validation efforts. PMID:16512256

  13. Landscape scale controls on the vascular plant component of dissolved organic carbon across a freshwater delta

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eckard, Robert S.; Hernes, Peter J.; Bergamaschi, Brian A.; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Kendall, Carol

    2007-01-01

    Lignin phenol concentrations and compositions were determined on dissolved organic carbon (DOC) extracts (XAD resins) within the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta (the Delta), the tidal freshwater portion of the San Francisco Bay Estuary, located in central California, USA. Fourteen stations were sampled, including the following habitats and land-use types: wetland, riverine, channelized waterway, open water, and island drains. Stations were sampled approximately seasonally from December, 1999 through May, 2001. DOC concentrations ranged from 1.3 mg L-1 within the Sacramento River to 39.9 mg L-1 at the outfall from an island drain (median 3.0 mg L-1), while lignin concentrations ranged from 3.0 μL-1 within the Sacramento River to 111 μL-1 at the outfall from an island drain (median 11.6 μL-1). Both DOC and lignin concentrations varied significantly among habitat/land-use types and among sampling stations. Carbon-normalized lignin yields ranged from 0.07 mg (100 mg OC)-1 at an island drain to 0.84 mg (100 mg OC)-1 for a wetland (median 0.36 mg (100 mg OC)-1), and also varied significantly among habitat/land-use types. A simple mass balance model indicated that the Delta acted as a source of lignin during late autumn through spring (10-83% increase) and a sink for lignin during summer and autumn (13-39% decrease). Endmember mixing models using S:V and C:V signatures of landscape scale features indicated strong temporal variation in sources of DOC export from the Delta, with riverine source signatures responsible for 50% of DOC in summer and winter, wetland signatures responsible for 40% of DOC in summer, winter, and late autumn, and island drains responsible for 40% of exported DOC in late autumn. A significant negative correlation was observed between carbon-normalized lignin yields and DOC bioavailability in two of the 14 sampling stations. This study is, to our knowledge, the first to describe organic vascular plant DOC sources at the level of localized landscape features, and is also the first to indicate a significant negative correlation between lignin and DOC bioavailability within environmental samples. Based upon observed trends: (1) Delta features exhibit significant spatial variability in organic chemical composition, and (2) localized Delta features appear to exert strong controls on terrigenous DOC as it passes through the Delta and is exported into the Pacific Ocean.

  14. Hosed vs. unhosed: global response to interruptions of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning, with and without freshwater forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, N.; Galbraith, E. D.

    2015-10-01

    It is well known that glacial periods were punctuated by abrupt climate changes, with large impacts on air temperature, precipitation, and ocean circulation across the globe. However, the long-held idea that freshwater forcing, caused by massive iceberg discharges, was the driving force behind these changes has been questioned in recent years. This throws into doubt the abundant literature on modelling abrupt climate change through "hosing" experiments, whereby the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) is interrupted by an injection of freshwater to the North Atlantic: if some, or all, abrupt climate change was not driven by freshwater input, could its character have been very different than the typical hosed experiments? Here, we take advantage of a global coupled ocean-atmosphere model that exhibits spontaneous, unhosed oscillations in AMOC strength, in order to examine how the global imprint of AMOC variations depends on whether or not it is the result of external freshwater input. The results imply that, to first order, the ocean-ice-atmosphere dynamics associated with an AMOC weakening dominate the global response, regardless of whether or not freshwater input is the cause. The exception lies in the impact freshwater inputs can have on the strength of other polar haloclines, particularly the Southern Ocean, to which freshwater can be transported relatively quickly after injection in the North Atlantic.

  15. Analysis of the Arctic system for freshwater cycle intensification: Observations and expectations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rawlins, M.A.; Steele, M.; Holland, M.M.; Adam, J.C.; Cherry, J.E.; Francis, J.A.; Groisman, P.Y.; Hinzman, L.D.; Huntington, T.G.; Kane, D.L.; Kimball, J.S.; Kwok, R.; Lammers, R.B.; Lee, C.M.; Lettenmaier, D.P.; McDonald, K.C.; Podest, E.; Pundsack, J.W.; Rudels, B.; Serreze, M.C.; Shiklomanov, A.; Skagseth, O.; Troy, T.J.; Vorosmarty, C.J.; Wensnahan, M.; Wood, E.F.; Woodgate, R.; Yang, D.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, T.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrologic cycle intensification is an expected manifestation of a warming climate. Although positive trends in several global average quantities have been reported, no previous studies have documented broad intensification across elements of the Arctic freshwater cycle (FWC). In this study, the authors examine the character and quantitative significance of changes in annual precipitation, evapotranspiration, and river discharge across the terrestrial pan-Arctic over the past several decades from observations and a suite of coupled general circulation models (GCMs). Trends in freshwater flux and storage derived from observations across the Arctic Ocean and surrounding seas are also described. With few exceptions, precipitation, evapotranspiration, and river discharge fluxes from observations and the GCMs exhibit positive trends. Significant positive trends above the 90% confidence level, however, are not present for all of the observations. Greater confidence in the GCM trends arises through lower interannual variability relative to trend magnitude. Put another way, intrinsic variability in the observations tends to limit confidence in trend robustness. Ocean fluxes are less certain, primarily because of the lack of long-term observations. Where available, salinity and volume flux data suggest some decrease in saltwater inflow to the Barents Sea (i.e., a decrease in freshwater outflow) in recent decades. A decline in freshwater storage across the central Arctic Ocean and suggestions that large-scale circulation plays a dominant role in freshwater trends raise questions as to whether Arctic Ocean freshwater flows are intensifying. Although oceanic fluxes of freshwater are highly variable and consistent trends are difficult to verify, the other components of the Arctic FWC do show consistent positive trends over recent decades. The broad-scale increases provide evidence that the Arctic FWC is experiencing intensification. Efforts that aim to develop an adequate observation system are needed to reduce uncertainties and to detect and document ongoing changes in all system components for further evidence of Arctic FWC intensification.

  16. Modeling ocean circulation and biogeochemical variability in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Z.; He, R.; Fennel, K.; Cai, W.-J.; Lohrenz, S.; Hopkinson, C.

    2013-11-01

    A three-dimensional coupled physical-biogeochemical model is applied to simulate and examine temporal and spatial variability of circulation and biogeochemical cycling in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM). The model is driven by realistic atmospheric forcing, open boundary conditions from a data assimilative global ocean circulation model, and observed freshwater and terrestrial nitrogen input from major rivers. A 7 yr model hindcast (2004-2010) was performed, and validated against satellite observed sea surface height, surface chlorophyll, and in situ observations including coastal sea level, ocean temperature, salinity, and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) concentration. The model hindcast revealed clear seasonality in DIN, phytoplankton and zooplankton distributions in the GoM. An empirical orthogonal function analysis indicated a phase-locked pattern among DIN, phytoplankton and zooplankton concentrations. The GoM shelf nitrogen budget was also quantified, revealing that on an annual basis the DIN input is largely balanced by the removal through denitrification (an equivalent of ~ 80% of DIN input) and offshore exports to the deep ocean (an equivalent of ~ 17% of DIN input).

  17. Modeling ocean circulation and biogeochemical variability in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Z.; He, R.; Fennel, K.; Cai, W.-J.; Lohrenz, S.; Hopkinson, C.

    2013-05-01

    A three-dimensional coupled physical-biogeochemical model is applied to simulate and examine temporal and spatial variability of circulation and biogeochemical cycling in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM). The model is driven by realistic atmospheric forcing, open boundary conditions from a data assimilative global ocean circulation model, and observed freshwater and terrestrial nutrient input from major rivers. A 7 yr model hindcast (2004-2010) was performed, and validated against satellite observed sea surface height, surface chlorophyll, and in-situ observations including coastal sea-level, ocean temperature, salinity, and nutrient concentration. The model hindcast revealed clear seasonality in nutrient, phytoplankton and zooplankton distributions in the GoM. An Empirical Orthogonal Function analysis indicated a phase-locked pattern among nutrient, phytoplankton and zooplankton concentrations. The GoM shelf nutrient budget was also quantified, revealing that on an annual basis ~80% of nutrient input was denitrified on the shelf and ~17% was exported to the deep ocean.

  18. Potential Impacts of Food Production on Freshwater Availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Shinjiro; Hanasaki, Naota; Itsubo, Norihiro; Kim, Hyungjun; Oki, Taikan

    2014-05-01

    The sustainability of freshwater use is often evaluated based on the total volume of water consumption or withdrawal. However, the renewable freshwater resource and potential impacts of water depletion differ with location and water source. In addition, most estimates of the environmental impacts of water use have focused on depletion from a single-source perspective without separating geographically different water sources. Therefore, comprehensive potential impacts from multiple water sources remain unclear. In this study, we quantified the potential impacts of the global food production on freshwater availability (water availability footprint), applying the Water Availability Factor (fwa). Each water source including rainfall, surface water, and groundwater had individual fwa, which is calculated based on the geophysical hydrological cycle, to reflect the differences among renewable freshwater resources by place and source. The fwa for each water source was estimated based on land area or time period required to obtain the reference volume of freshwater. The reference volume was regarded as 1 m3 of rainfall over an area of 1.0 m2 (1,000 mm/year), based on the global mean annual precipitation. This concept is consistent with the Ecological Footprint (EF), which measures how much biologically productive land area is required to provide the resources consumed. The EF concept is measured in global hectares, a standardized unit equal to one hectare with global average bioproductivity. We found that the current agriculture consumes freshwater resources at 1.3 times the rapid rate than sustainable water use. This rate can also indicate environmental water scarcity. Among environmentally water-scarce countries, well-financed countries tend to import cereal products as virtual water to compensate for their domestic water resources. Among water-abundant countries, well-financed countries tend to export cereal products by exploiting their freshwater availability. The fwa concept provides a non-conventional approach to compare and integrate the potential impacts of freshwater use from various sources and climatic conditions. The results should focus attention on the need to address not only physical but also social and environmental water-scarcity issues.

  19. The Ocean-Atmosphere Hydrothermohaline Conveyor Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döös, Kristofer; Kjellsson, Joakim; Zika, Jan; Laliberté, Frédéric; Brodeau, Laurent

    2015-04-01

    The ocean thermohaline circulation is linked to the hydrothermal circulation of the atmosphere. The ocean thermohaline circulation is expressed in potential temperature-salinity space and comprises a tropical upper-ocean circulation, a global conveyor belt cell and an Antarctic Bottom Water cell. The atmospheric hydrothermal circulation in a potential temperature-specific humidity space unifies the tropical Hadley and Walker cells as well as the midlatitude eddies into a single, global circulation. Superimposed, these thermohaline and hydrothermal stream functions reveal the possibility of a close connection between some parts of the water and air mass conversions. The exchange of heat and fresh water through the sea surface (precipiation-evaporation) and incoming solar radiation act to make near-surface air warm and moist while making surface water warmer and saltier as both air and water travel towards the Equator. In the tropics, air masses can undergo moist convection releasing latent heat by forming precipitation, thus acting to make warm surface water fresher. We propose that the Clausius-Clapeyron relationship for moist near-surface air acts like a lower bound for the atmospheric hydrothermal cell and an upper bound for the ocean thermohaline Conveyor-Belt cell. The analysis is made by combining and merging the overturning circulation of the ocean and atmosphere by relating the salinity of the ocean to the humidity of the atmosphere, where we set the heat and freshwater transports equal in the two stream functions By using simulations integrated with our Climate-Earth system model EC-Earth, we intend to produce the "hydrothermohaline" stream function of the coupled ocean-atmosphere overturning circulation in one single picture. We explore how the oceanic thermohaline Conveyor Belt can be linked to the global atmospheric hydrothermal circulation and if the water and air mass conversions in humidity-temperature-salinity space can be related and linked to each other along a "line" corresponding to the Clausius-Clapeyron relationship. A geographical description of how and where this occurs together with this new hydrothermohaline stream function will be searched for. The net heat and freshwater transport of the ocean and atmosphere can aslo be calculated from the thermohaline and hydrothermal stream functions. The heat transport across isohumes in the atmosphere and isohalines in the ocean as well as the freshwater transport across isotherms in both the atmosphere and ocean are computed. The maximum heat transport is about 16 PW in the atmosphere, while that of the ocean is just about 1 PW. The freshwater transport across isotherms in the atmosphere and ocean are shown to be tightly connected with a net maximum freshwater transport of 4 SV in the atmosphere and 2 Sv in the ocean.

  20. 50 CFR 222.205 - Import and export requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Import and export requirements. 222.205 Section 222.205 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS GENERAL ENDANGERED AND THREATENED MARINE SPECIES Certificates of Exemption for...

  1. Larval salinity tolerance of the South American salt-marsh crab, Neohelice (Chasmagnathus) granulata: physiological constraints to estuarine retention, export and reimmigration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anger, Klaus; Spivak, Eduardo; Luppi, Tomás; Bas, Claudia; Ismael, Deborah

    2008-06-01

    The semiterrestrial crab Neohelice (= Chasmagnathus) granulata (Dana 1851) is a predominant species in brackish salt marshes, mangroves and estuaries. Its larvae are exported towards coastal marine waters. In order to estimate the limits of salinity tolerance constraining larval retention in estuarine habitats, we exposed in laboratory experiments freshly hatched zoeae to six different salinities (5 32‰). At 5‰, the larvae survived for a maximum of 2 weeks, reaching only exceptionally the second zoeal stage, while 38% survived to the megalopa stage at 10‰. Shortest development and negligible mortality occurred at all higher salt concentrations. These observations show that the larvae of N. granulata can tolerate a retention in the mesohaline reaches of estuaries, with a lower limit of ca. 10 15‰. Maximum survival at 25‰ suggests that polyhaline conditions rather than an export to oceanic waters are optimal for successful larval development of this species. In another experiment, we tested the capability of the last zoeal stage (IV) for reimmigration from coastal marine into brackish waters. Stepwise reductions of salinity during this stage allowed for moulting to the megalopa at 4 10‰. Although survival was at these conditions reduced and development delayed, these results suggest that already the zoea-IV stage is able to initiate the reimmigration into estuaries. After further salinity reduction, megalopae survived in this experiment for up to >3 weeks in freshwater, without moulting to juvenile crabs. In a similar experiment starting from the megalopa stage, successful metamorphosis occurred at 4 10‰, and juvenile growth continued in freshwater. Although these juvenile crabs showed significantly enhanced mortality and smaller carapace width compared to a seawater control, our results show that the late larval and early juvenile stages of N. granulata are well adapted for successful recruitment in brackish and even limnetic habitats.

  2. Carbon export algorithm advancements in models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çağlar Yumruktepe, Veli; Salihoğlu, Barış

    2015-04-01

    The rate at which anthropogenic CO2 is absorbed by the oceans remains a critical question under investigation by climate researchers. Construction of a complete carbon budget, requires better understanding of air-sea exchanges and the processes controlling the vertical and horizontal transport of carbon in the ocean, particularly the biological carbon pump. Improved parameterization of carbon sequestration within ecosystem models is vital to better understand and predict changes in the global carbon cycle. Due to the complexity of processes controlling particle aggregation, sinking and decomposition, existing ecosystem models necessarily parameterize carbon sequestration using simple algorithms. Development of improved algorithms describing carbon export and sequestration, suitable for inclusion in numerical models is an ongoing work. Existing unique algorithms used in the state-of-the art ecosystem models and new experimental results obtained from mesocosm experiments and open ocean observations have been inserted into a common 1D pelagic ecosystem model for testing purposes. The model was implemented to the timeseries stations in the North Atlantic (BATS, PAP and ESTOC) and were evaluated with datasets of carbon export. Targetted topics of algorithms were PFT functional types, grazing and vertical movement of zooplankton, and remineralization, aggregation and ballasting dynamics of organic matter. Ultimately it is intended to feed improved algorithms to the 3D modelling community, for inclusion in coupled numerical models.

  3. Mechanisms driving ocean carbon cycle response to rising atmospheric CO2: results from the Community Earth System Model, version 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, M.; Lindsay, K. T.; Moore, J. K.; Doney, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    We present results from simulations conducted with the Community Earth System Model, version 1 (CESM1 (BGC)), which includes marine ecosystem dynamics and ocean biogeochemistry. We consider fully-coupled 21st century integrations, forced with Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) projections of radiatively-active atmospheric constituents. We characterize climate-carbon feedbacks on ocean CO2 fluxes in these integrations, using control simulations that include the atmospheric CO2 transient as a boundary condition for sea-air fluxes, but its radiative effects (and those of other transients) are turned off. In RCP8.5 under a constant climate, the ocean carbon sink for anthropogenic CO2 began to stabilize around 2080, due to nonlinearities in carbonate chemistry. Climate change caused further reductions in the ocean carbon sink, such that by 2100, the ocean absorbed about 1 Pg C yr-1 less than under constant climate conditions. The carbon cycle response to climate change differed regionally. The North Atlantic was most strongly affected in a relative sense, experiencing a reduction in uptake due to climate change in excess of 40% by 2100. Strong freshwater forcing in the Subpolar gyre and Labrador Sea regions caused diminished deep convection, which curtailed the supply of nutrients, thereby forcing reductions in biological carbon export and diminished CO2 uptake. The Southern Ocean, by contrast, experienced a smaller, relative climate-induced reduction in CO2 uptake: less than 20%. In this region, climate change caused a poleward shift and intensification of the westerly winds, which enhanced the upper cell of the meridional overturning circulation; concomitant changes, however, resulted in a reduction in Antarctic Bottom Water formation. Shifting circulation patterns resulted in a net reduction in the resolved advective transport of carbon out of the surface ocean; increased eddy-induced mixing exacerbated this effect: eddy-induced mixing is parameterized (responsive to winds) and a net source of carbon to the surface of the Southern Ocean. Since the Southern Ocean is characterized by ample surface nutrient, reductions in vertical resupply due to enhanced stratification resulted in little change to biological export flux. Climate change caused a reduction in eastern equatorial Pacific outgassing, predominantly driven by enhanced biological production; the mechanisms for this are complex. Stratification resulted in greater macronutrient limitation in regions upstream of the eastern equatorial Pacific upwelling zone. Reduced production in these regions resulted in decreased iron utilization, thereby alleviating iron limitation in the eastern equatorial Pacific upwelling region.

  4. Southern Ocean nutrient trapping and the efficiency of the biological pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primeau, FrançOis W.; Holzer, Mark; Devries, Timothy

    2013-05-01

    We present a data-assimilated model of the ocean's phosphorus cycle that is constrained by climatological phosphate, temperature, salinity, sea-surface height, surface heat and freshwater fluxes, as well as chlorofluorocarbon-11(CFC-11) and natural Δ14C. Export production is estimated to be 5.8±2.0×1012 mol P/yr of which (26±6)% originates in the Southern Ocean (SO) south of 40°S. The biological pump efficiency, defined as the proportion of the ocean's phosphate inventory that is regenerated, is (39±7)%. Dividing the SO south of 40°S into a sub-Antarctic zone (SANTZ) and an Antarctic zone (ANTZ) separated by the latitude of maximum Ekman divergence, we estimate that the SANTZ and ANTZ account, respectively, for (23±5)% and (3±1)% of global export production, (17±4)% and (3±1)% of the regenerated nutrient inventory, and (31±1)% and (43±5)% of the preformed nutrient inventory. Idealized SO nutrient depletion experiments reveal a large-scale transfer of nutrients into circumpolar and deep waters and from the preformed to the regenerated pool. In accord with the concept of the biogeochemical divide, we find that nutrient drawdown in the ANTZ is more effective than in the SANTZ for increasing the efficiency of the biological pump, while having a smaller impact on production in regions north of 40°S. Complete SO nutrient drawdown would allow the biological pump to operate at 94% efficiency by short circuiting the transport of nutrients in northward Ekman currents, leading to a trapping of nutrients in circumpolar and deep waters that would decrease production outside the SO by approximately 44% while increasing it in the SO by more than 725%.

  5. The puzzle of oceanic oxygen utilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koeve, Wolfgang; Kähler, Paul

    2014-05-01

    The biological carbon pump is an important component of the oceanic carbon cycle and expected to respond to the anthropogenic perturbation of climate and ocean chemistry. Yet, large uncertainties exist in the quantification of the strength of the biological carbon pump of today's ocean. The export of organic matter from the ocean's euphotic zone is a critical benchmark number of this strength. Local measurements of the export flux are highly uncertain, due f.e. to severe methodological issues and undersampling of the ocean. Uncertainties in the contribution of dissolved organic matter to export further add when it comes to a global assessment. The vertical integral of oxygen utilization in the interior of the ocean is considered an independent and save estimate of export production, which accounts for particles as well as dissolved export pathways. For that purpose regional oxygen utilization rates (OUR) have been computed from apparent oxygen utilization (AOU) and an estimate of the time elapsed since the last contact with the atmosphere. Surprisingly the assumptions underlying this concept have not been tested rigorously. Using global ocean biogeochemical models we compare OUR computed from AOU and an ideal age tracer with an independent and perfect estimate of ocean respiration available in the model. Consistently in three different global models, we find that OUR underestimates true respiration by a factor of about three. Most of the differences between respiration and OUR are observed in the upper 1000m of the ocean. In addition to this underestimate in bulk global numbers, we find also important qualitative differences between the two independent approaches. For example, the contribution of dissolved organic matter driving oxygen utilization is largely underestimated when based on bulk tracer concentrations (AOU, DOC), which is the usual approach applied to observations. Also, diagnosing the global importance of denitrification relative to oxic metabolism is found to be uncertain by a factor of three when based on analysis of bulk tracers.

  6. Mercury Isotopic Evidence for Contrasting Mercury Transport Pathways to Coastal versus Open Ocean Fisheries (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, J. D.; Senn, D. B.; Chesney, E. J.; Bank, M. S.; Maage, A.; Shine, J. P.

    2009-12-01

    Mercury stable isotopes provide a new method for tracing the sources and chemical transformations of Hg in the environment. In this study we used Hg isotopes to investigate Hg sources to coastal versus migratory open-ocean species of fish residing in the northern Gulf of Mexico (nGOM). We report Hg isotope ratios as δ202Hg (mass dependent fractionation relative to NIST 3133) and Δ201Hg (mass independent fractionation of odd isotopes). In six coastal and two open ocean species (blackfin and yellowfin tuna), Hg isotopic compositions fell into two non-overlapping ranges. The tuna had significantly higher δ202Hg (0.1 to 0.7‰) and Δ201Hg (1.0 to 2.2‰) than the coastal fish (δ202Hg = 0 to -1.0‰; Δ201Hg = 0.4 to 0.5‰). The observations can be best explained by largely disconnected food webs with isotopically distinct MeHg sources. The ratio Δ199Hg/Δ201Hg in nGOM fish is 1.30±0.10 which is consistent with laboratory studies of photochemical MeHg degradation and with ratios measured in freshwater fish (Bergquist and Blum, 2007). The magnitude of mass independent fractionation of Hg in the open-ocean fish suggests that this source of MeHg was subjected to extensive photodegradation (~50%) before entering the base of the open-ocean food web. Given the Mississippi River’s large, productive footprint in the nGOM and the potential for exporting prey and MeHg to the adjacent oligotrophic GOM, the different MeHg sources are noteworthy and consistent with recent evidence in other systems of important open-ocean MeHg sources. Bergquist, B. A. and Blum, J. D., 2007. Mass-dependent and -independent fractionation of Hg isotopes by photoreduction in aquatic systems. Science 318, 417-420.

  7. [Lactobacilli of freshwater fishes].

    PubMed

    Kvasnikov, E I; Kovalenko, N K; Materinskaia, L G

    1977-01-01

    Normal microflora in the intestinal tract of fishes inhabiting fresh-water reservoirs includes lactic bacteria. The number of the bacteria depends on the animal species, the composition of food, the age, and the season. The highest number of these microorganisms (hundreds of millions per gram of the intestinal content) is found in carps. Enterococci are most often encountered in fishes inhabiting ponds: Streptococcus faecalis Andrewes a. Horder, Str. faecium Orla-Jensen, Str. bovis Orla-Jensen. Lactobacilli are more typical of fishes in water reserviors: Lactobacillus plantarum (Orla-Jensen) Bergey et al., L. casei (Orla-Jensen) Hansen a. Lessel, L. casei var. casei, L. casei var. rhamnosus, L. Casei var. alactosus, L. leichmannii (Henneberg) Bergey et al., L. acidophillus (Moro) Hansen a. Mocquot, L. Fermenti Beijerinck, L. cellobiosus Rogosa et al., L. Buchneri (Henneberg) Bergey et al. The content of lactic bacteria varies in water reservoirs; their highest content is found in ooze (tens of thousands per gram). PMID:909475

  8. Nutrient and Organic Matter Dynamics in Tidally-Influenced Freshwater Sections of the Mission and Aransas Rivers, South Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, N. J.; Bulloch, S. K.; Mooney, R. M.; Garlough, P.; McCllelland, J. W.

    2008-12-01

    The Mission and Aransas rivers empty into Copano Bay, Texas, a part of the Mission-Aransas National Estuarine Research Reserve (MANERR). Both rivers have extensive agricultural and other developed land use in their watersheds. Export from the rivers is dominated by infrequent storm events. During normal, low- flow conditions, the lower sections of both rivers are pushed upstream during incoming tides, but a salinity gradient forms only relatively near the bay. Tidally-influenced freshwater reaches are poorly accounted for in riverine export modeling, but may significantly alter export due to processing during long residence times. Samples collected between June and August, 2008, were analyzed for nutrient and organic matter concentrations as well as particulate C and N stable isotope ratios. Although nutrient concentrations are high in upstream sections of the rivers, dissolved inorganic nitrogen concentrations are near limit of detection throughout the tidally-influenced freshwater reaches, and both systems are strongly N-limited. Autochthonous production dominates (POδ13C < -30‰), with 15N-enriched PON values indicating chiefly terrestrial-derived N from wastewater outfalls. Production (as measured by [PON], [POC], [Chl a], and surface %DO) is high throughout the tidal freshwater reaches and peaks near the beginning of the salinity gradient. The [DON] and [DOC] maximum lies just downstream of maximum productivity and corresponds with a peak in [POC]:[Chl a] ratios, indicating decomposition likely due to breakdown of freshwater phytoplankton encountering the increasing salinity. DON and DOC concentrations decrease downstream and into the bay, but remain elevated. Overall, the data indicate high production stimulated by inorganic nutrient inputs within the tidally-influenced freshwater reaches, resulting in an export of freshly produced organic material to the bay. The transformative effects of tidal freshwater reaches can be significant and should be considered in models and when designing management plans for such systems.

  9. Interdecadal variability of Northeast Pacific coastal freshwater and its implications on biological productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royer, Thomas C.; Grosch, Chester E.; Mysak, Lawrence A.

    The coastal freshwater discharge along the northern Gulf of Alaska has been determined using a simple hydrology model for 1931-1999, and through the use of autocorrelative and spectral techniques oscillations were discovered with significant periods of 0.5, 1, 1.2 and 16-20 years. Changes in the freshwater discharge are well correlated with hydrographic properties, namely temperature and salinity, at a coastal site near Seward, Alaska. Changes in the salinity should change the vertical stability, which will affect the mixed layer depth and primary production. Changes in the mixed layer depth concurrent with changes in phytoplankton production may provide a link between zooplankton and freshwater discharge. This is supported by periodicities of 0.5, 1 and 1.2 years that have been found in the zooplankton at Ocean Station P. A positive atmosphere-ocean feedback loop is proposed that could maintain accelerated coastal freshwater discharge at periods similar to those seen in the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). This could provide a mechanism that links the PDO with coastal freshwater discharge and consequently relates coastal freshwater discharge to salmon production in Alaska, since the latter depends on zooplankton abundance.

  10. Contribution of glacier runoff to freshwater discharge into the Gulf of Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, Edward G.; Hood, Eran; Smikrud, Kathy

    2010-03-01

    Watersheds along the Gulf of Alaska (GOA) are undergoing climate warming, glacier volume loss, and shifts in the timing and volume of freshwater delivered to the eastern North Pacific Ocean. We estimate recent mean annual freshwater discharge to the GOA at 870 km3 yr-1. Small distributed coastal drainages contribute 78% of the freshwater discharge with the remainder delivered by larger rivers penetrating coastal ranges. Discharge from glaciers and icefields accounts for 47% of total freshwater discharge, with 10% coming from glacier volume loss associated with rapid thinning and retreat of glaciers along the GOA. Our results indicate the region of the GOA from Prince William Sound to the east, where glacier runoff contributes 371 km3 yr-1, is vulnerable to future changes in freshwater discharge as a result of glacier thinning and recession. Changes in timing and magnitude of freshwater delivery to the GOA could impact coastal circulation as well as biogeochemical fluxes to near-shore marine ecosystems and the eastern North Pacific Ocean.

  11. Contribution of glacier runoff to freshwater discharge into the Gulf of Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, E.G.; Hood, E.; Smikrud, K.

    2010-01-01

    Watersheds along the Gulf of Alaska (GOA) are undergoing climate warming, glacier volume loss, and shifts in the timing and volume of freshwater delivered to the eastern North Pacific Ocean. We estimate recent mean annual freshwater discharge to the GOA at 870 km3 yr-1. Small distributed coastal drainages contribute 78% of the freshwater discharge with the remainder delivered by larger rivers penetrating coastal ranges. Discharge from glaciers and icefields accounts for 47% of total freshwater discharge, with 10% coming from glacier volume loss associated with rapid thinning and retreat of glaciers along the GOA. Our results indicate the region of the GOA from Prince William Sound to the east, where glacier runoff contributes 371 km3 yr -1, is vulnerable to future changes in freshwater discharge as a result of glacier thinning and recession. Changes in timing and magnitude of freshwater delivery to the GOA could impact coastal circulation as well as biogeochemical fluxes to near-shore marine ecosystems and the eastern North Pacific Ocean. Copyright ?? 2010 by the American Geophysical Union.

  12. Forests fuel fish growth in freshwater deltas

    PubMed Central

    Tanentzap, Andrew J.; Szkokan-Emilson, Erik J.; Kielstra, Brian W.; Arts, Michael T.; Yan, Norman D.; Gunn, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Aquatic ecosystems are fuelled by biogeochemical inputs from surrounding lands and within-lake primary production. Disturbances that change these inputs may affect how aquatic ecosystems function and deliver services vital to humans. Here we test, using a forest cover gradient across eight separate catchments, whether disturbances that remove terrestrial biomass lower organic matter inputs into freshwater lakes, thereby reducing food web productivity. We focus on deltas formed at the stream-lake interface where terrestrial-derived particulate material is deposited. We find that organic matter export increases from more forested catchments, enhancing bacterial biomass. This transfers energy upwards through communities of heavier zooplankton, leading to a fourfold increase in weights of planktivorous young-of-the-year fish. At least 34% of fish biomass is supported by terrestrial primary production, increasing to 66% with greater forest cover. Habitat tracers confirm fish were closely associated with individual catchments, demonstrating that watershed protection and restoration increase biomass in critical life-stages of fish. PMID:24915965

  13. Methane cycling in a tidal freshwater swamp

    SciTech Connect

    Megonigal, J.P.; Schlesinger, W.H. )

    1993-06-01

    Previous studies of methanogenesis in a tidal freshwater swamp on the North Carolina coast have found that potential rates of methane production overestimate observed rates of methane flux, especially during summer months. This research investigates three possibilities for the unexplained losses: methane oxidation, lateral export of dissolved methane to the adjacent river, and ebullition. It is possible that each of these sinks increase during the summer. The potential for methane oxidation was demonstrated in intact soil cores incubated for 21 hours under a 0.5% CH[sub 3]F atmosphere. Methane flux increased from 10+/-27 (mean+/-sd) to 60+/-3 mg m[sup [minus]2] d[sup [minus]1] in treated cores; control core fluxes were 15+/-3 and 19+/-3 mg m[sup [minus]2] d[sup [minus]1] over the same periods. Incubations of slightly unsaturated soils with [sup 14]CH[sub 4] confirmed rapid potential rates of methane oxidation.

  14. Contrasting size evolution in marine and freshwater diatoms.

    PubMed

    Litchman, E; Klausmeier, C A; Yoshiyama, K

    2009-02-24

    Diatoms are key players in the global carbon cycle and most aquatic ecosystems. Their cell sizes impact carbon sequestration and energy transfer to higher trophic levels. We report fundamental differences in size distributions of marine and freshwater diatoms, with marine diatoms significantly larger than freshwater species. An evolutionary game theoretical model with empirical allometries of growth and nutrient uptake shows that these differences can be explained by nitrogen versus phosphorus limitation, nutrient fluctuations and mixed layer depth differences. Constant and pulsed phosphorus supply select for small sizes, as does constant nitrogen supply. In contrast, intermediate frequency nitrogen pulses common in the ocean select for large sizes or the evolutionarily stable coexistence of large and small sizes. Size-dependent sinking interacts with mixed layer depth (MLD) to further modulate optimal sizes, with smaller sizes selected for by strong sinking and shallow MLD. In freshwaters, widespread phosphorus limitation, together with strong sinking and shallow MLD produce size distributions with smaller range, means and upper values, compared with the ocean. Shifting patterns of nutrient limitation and mixing may alter diatom size distributions, affecting global carbon cycle and the structure and functioning of aquatic ecosystems. PMID:19202058

  15. South China Sea throughflow: A heat and freshwater conveyer belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, T.; Du, Y.

    2006-12-01

    Water of the Pacific origin enters the South China Sea through Luzon Strait. From there it flows southward into the Java Sea through Karimata Strait. Part of the water returns to the Pacific through Makassar Strait, while the rest leaks into the Indian Ocean through Indonesian archipelago. Analysis of surface flux data suggests that this circulation, termed the South China Sea throughflow, acts as a heat and freshwater conveyer belt transferring up to 0.2 PW of heat and 0.1 Sv of freshwater from the South China Sea to the Maritime Continent. As both surface heat and freshwater fluxes display substantially different temporal variabilities with the South China Sea throughflow, we hypothesize that the upper South China Sea is a buffer receiving an excess of heat in certain years and releasing it in others. Results from a high-resolution general circulation model confirm this hypothesis, implying that the South China Sea is likely to play a more active role than previously thought in regulating the sea surface temperature pattern in the Maritime Continent and its adjoining western Pacific and eastern Indian Oceans.

  16. Freshwater Variability between Ellesmere Island and the North Pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smethie, W. M.; Schlosser, P.; Newton, R.; Friedrich, R.; Steele, M.

    2013-12-01

    The Switchyard Project has established a time series of CTD and chemical measurements between Ellesmere Island and the North Pole and annual observations have been taken since 2005 to the present. The total freshwater inventory and inventories of the freshwater components (meteoric water [MEW], sea-ice melt water [SIMW] and inflow from the Pacific Ocean [PFW]) are determined from measurements of temperature, salinity, delta O-18, nitrate and phosphate, each year. The total inventory has varied by about 5 m between 2005 and 2013, which is about 50% of the lowest inventory. The total inventory was fairly stable between 2003 - 2007, then increased dramatically between 2007 and 2008 and again between 2008 and 2009. It then decreased between 2009 and 2011 and increased from 2011 to 2013. The increase between 2007 and 2008 resulted primarily from an increase in MEW tempered by decreases in SIMW and PFW. Back tracks of ice flow suggested that these waters came from the Russian continental shelves via the Transpolar Drift along the Lomonosov Ridge. The continued freshening in 2009 corresponded with a change is the large scale circulation of the Canada Basin with a weakening of the Beaufort Gyre and expulsion of freshwater, which included water from the large sea ice melting event of 2007. SIMW accounted for about two-thirds of the freshening. Ice back tracks suggest that water flowed out of the Beaufort Sea in an anticylonic pattern and crossed the Canada Basin along the Mendelev Ridge to reach the Lincoln Sea with a transport time of 2-3 years. The freshwater decrease between 2010 and 2011 was the result of a 70% decrease in SIMW and 30% decrease in MEW and the ice track flow pattern had shifted back to the pattern prior to 2009. The source of freshwater for the increase in freshwater inventory between 2011 and 2013 was MEW. PFW retreated to the continental shelf of Ellesmere Island, decreasing by about 30% and SIMW decreased to more negative values indicating water flowing into the region had been subjected to substantial sea ice formation, removing freshwater. There was a major decrease in sea ice in the summer of 2012, reaching values lower than the 2007 event. A pulse of freshwater from sea ice melt was observed two years later as discussed above. It will be interesting see if a pulse is observed in 2014, but the flow pathways may be different now than during the 2009-2010 period when sea ice and presumably surface water were exiting the Beaufort Gyre in an anticyclonic flow.

  17. Contemporary estimates of Pan-Arctic freshwater discharge from GRACE and reanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syed, T. H.; Famiglietti, J. S.; Zlotnicki, V.; Rodell, M.

    2007-10-01

    Streamflow from Arctic river basins has been increasing in recent decades in response to warming climate. In addition to being a sensitive indicator of global change, Arctic discharge is a critical component of the freshwater budget of the Arctic Ocean, where increasing freshwater flows may slow rates of North Atlantic Deep Water formation and heat transport by the thermohaline circulation. However, quantifying rates of freshwater discharge from the entire Pan-Arctic drainage has been troublesome using traditional stream gauging methods. Here we use satellite measurements of variations in continental water storage from the GRACE mission to present first estimates of monthly freshwater discharge from the entire Pan-Arctic for the period 2003-2005. Results show that rates of Pan-Arctic discharge for this time period (3588 +/- 257 km3 yr-1) are significantly larger than those suggested by gauge-based estimates (3238 km3 yr-1), and furthermore, may indicate that discharge rates are accelerating.

  18. Measuring Ocean Literacy: What teens understand about the ocean using the Survey of Ocean Literacy and Engagement (SOLE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greely, T. M.; Lodge, A.

    2009-12-01

    Ocean issues with conceptual ties to science and global society have captured the attention, imagination, and concern of an international audience. Climate change, over fishing, marine pollution, freshwater shortages and alternative energy sources are a few ocean issues highlighted in our media and casual conversations. The ocean plays a role in our life in some way everyday, however, disconnect exists between what scientists know and the public understands about the ocean as revealed by numerous ocean and coastal literacy surveys. While the public exhibits emotive responses through care, concern and connection with the ocean, there remains a critical need for a baseline of ocean knowledge. However, knowledge about the ocean must be balanced with understanding about how to apply ocean information to daily decisions and actions. The present study analyzed underlying factors and patterns contributing to ocean literacy and reasoning within the context of an ocean education program, the Oceanography Camp for Girls. The OCG is designed to advance ocean conceptual understanding and decision making by engagement in a series of experiential learning and stewardship activities from authentic research settings in the field and lab. The present study measured a) what understanding teens currently hold about the ocean (content), b) how teens feel toward the ocean environment (environmental attitudes and morality), and c) how understanding and feelings are organized when reasoning about ocean socioscientific issues (e.g. climate change, over fishing, energy). The Survey of Ocean Literacy and Engagement (SOLE), was used to measure teens understanding about the ocean. SOLE is a 57-item survey instrument aligned with the Essential Principles and Fundamental Concepts of Ocean Literacy (NGS, 2007). Rasch analysis was used to refine and validate SOLE as a reasonable measure of ocean content knowledge (reliability, 0.91). Results revealed that content knowledge and environmental attitudes significantly contributed to ocean literacy. Teens demonstrated a 2-32% increase in content knowledge following the OCG learning experience. The most significant content gains correlated with ocean literacy Essential Principles 1, 2 and 5. Analysis of environmental reasoning patterns revealed that biocentric reasoning (71%) was most important to teens in solving ocean dilemmas. Further, teens reasoning about challenging ocean dilemmas were capable of supporting a position, counter-argument, rebuttal, and accurately use scientific information. Findings provide empirical evidence that connects field studies with ocean literacy. Current guidelines for ocean literacy address cognitive understanding but lack multimodality. The need for ocean literacy that goes beyond content to include reasoning and actions is relevant towards preparing students, teachers and citizens to regularly contribute to decisions about ocean issues and undertake actions as consumer, citizen or steward. This research supports the use of socioscientific issues and stewardship to advance ‘functional’ ocean literacy.

  19. Empirical and mechanistic models for the particle export ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunne, John P.; Armstrong, Robert A.; Gnanadesikan, Anand; Sarmiento, Jorge L.

    2005-12-01

    We present new empirical and mechanistic models for predicting the export of organic carbon out of the surface ocean by sinking particles. To calibrate these models, we have compiled a synthesis of field observations related to ecosystem size structure, primary production and particle export from around the globe. The empirical model captures 61% of the observed variance in the ratio of particle export to primary production (the pe ratio) using sea-surface temperature and chlorophyll concentrations (or primary productivity) as predictor variables. To describe the mechanisms responsible for pe-ratio variability, we present size-based formulations of phytoplankton grazing and sinking particle export, combining them into an alternative, mechanistic model. The formulation of grazing dynamics, using simple power laws as closure terms for small and large phytoplankton, reproduces 74% of the observed variability in phytoplankton community composition wherein large phytoplankton augment small ones as production increases. The formulation for sinking particle export partitions a temperature-dependent fraction of small and large phytoplankton grazing into sinking detritus. The mechanistic model also captures 61% of the observed variance in pe ratio, with large phytoplankton in high biomass and relatively cold regions leading to more efficient export. In this model, variability in primary productivity results in a biomass-modulated switch between small and large phytoplankton pathways.

  20. Representing Greenland ice sheet freshwater fluxes in climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenaerts, Jan T. M.; Le Bars, Dewi; Kampenhout, Leo; Vizcaino, Miren; Enderlin, Ellyn M.; Broeke, Michiel R.

    2015-08-01

    Here we present a long-term (1850-2200) best estimate of Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) freshwater runoff that improves spatial detail of runoff locations and temporal resolution. Ice discharge is taken from observations since 2000 and assumed constant in time. Surface meltwater runoff is retrieved from regional climate model output for the recent past and parameterized for the future based on significant correlations between runoff and midtropospheric (500 hPa) summer temperature changes over the GrIS. The simplicity of this approach enables assimilation of meltwater runoff into coupled climate models, which is demonstrated here in a case study with the medium-resolution (1°) Community Earth System Model. The model results suggest that the decrease in Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) is dominated by warming of the surface ocean and enhanced GrIS freshwater forcing leads to a slightly enhanced (-1.2 sverdrup in the 21st century) weakening of the AMOC.

  1. Accelerated drawdown of meridional overturning in the late-glacial Atlantic triggered by transient pre-H event freshwater perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, I. R.; Moran, S. B.; Zahn, R.; Knutz, P. C.; Shen, C.-C.; Edwards, R. L.

    2006-08-01

    Abrupt decreases of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (MOC) during the Late Pleistocene have been directly linked to catastrophic discharges of glacimarine freshwater, triggering disruption of northward marine heat transport and causing global climate changes. Here we provide measurements of excess sedimentary 231Pa/230Th from a high-accumulation sediment drift deposit in the NE Atlantic that record a sequence of sudden variations in the rate of MOC, associated deep ocean ventilation and surface-ocean climatology. The data series reveal a sequential decrease in the MOC rate at ~18.0 ka BP ago that coincides with only transient and localized freshwater inputs. This change represents a substantial, though not total, cessation in MOC that predates the major Heinrich (H1) meltwater event by at least 1,200 years. These results highlight the potential of targeted freshwater perturbations in promoting substantial MOC changes without a direct linking with catastrophic freshwater surges.

  2. A twentieth-century reanalysis forced ocean model to reconstruct the North Atlantic climate variation during the 1920s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mller, W. A.; Matei, D.; Bersch, M.; Jungclaus, J. H.; Haak, H.; Lohmann, K.; Compo, G. P.; Sardeshmukh, P. D.; Marotzke, J.

    2015-04-01

    The observed North Atlantic multi-decadal variability for the period 1872-2009 is reconstructed with the Max Planck Institute ocean model, which is forced with an ensemble of the atmospheric twentieth century reanalysis. Special emphasis is put on the early part of the experiments, which includes a prominent climate variation during the 1920s. The experiments are in agreement with selected hydrographic records, indicating a transition from cold and fresh North Atlantic water properties, prior to the 1920 climate variation, towards warm and saline waters afterwards. Examining the variation reveals that sea level pressure (SLP) anomalies prior to the 1900s resemble a negative phase of North Atlantic Oscillation and associated weak winds result in a weak North Atlantic Current (NAC) and sub-polar gyre (SPG). This leads to a reduced transport of warm and saline waters into the higher latitudes. Simultaneously, Arctic freshwater release results in the accumulation of cold and fresh water properties, which cover the upper layers in the Labrador Sea and subsequently suppress convection. From the 1910s, the Arctic freshwater export is reduced, and, NAC and SPG are strengthened as a result of an increased SLP gradient over the North Atlantic. Concurrently, Labrador Sea convection and Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) increase. The intensified NAC, SPG, and AMOC redistribute sub-tropical water into the North Atlantic and Nordic Seas, thereby increasing observed and modelled temperature and salinity during the 1920s.

  3. High-resolution modelling of the shelf and open ocean adjacent to South Georgia, Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Emma F.; Meredith, Michael P.; Murphy, Eugene J.; Carvalho, Gary R.

    2011-07-01

    The marine ecosystem on the shelf and open ocean adjacent to South Georgia is extraordinarily rich, with a history of commercial exploitation. Although much progress has been made, attempts at modelling (and hence better understanding) this system have consistently been hampered by the poor representation of key physical processes in global or regional ocean general circulation models. Here we present the development of a high-resolution 3D hydrodynamic model of the South Georgia shelf and the adjacent open ocean, including a novel method for prescribing freshwater fluxes. The ability of the model to reproduce the observed oceanography of the region is quantified by comparisons with data from tide gauges at South Georgia, with satellite-derived sea surface temperatures, and with an extensive CTD dataset collected during January-April 1995. Predicted cotidal charts for the diurnal tides O 1 and K 1 show a periodic amplification in both the current and elevation fields at the shelf edge, suggesting the presence of a diurnally forced continental shelf wave. This could have important implications for processes such as larval transport and retention. The comparison with CTD data reveals mean and root mean square errors in temperature (salinity) of -0.27 °C (-0.07) and 0.64 °C (0.23), respectively. Vertical profiles of potential temperature and salinity on the shelf agree acceptably well with observations, but there is a tendency for the model to under-predict the density contrast between surface and bottom waters. The main limitation on model accuracy is found to be the large-scale forcing. Releasing a passive tracer into the model, transport and retention pathways are identified, including a prevalence for tracer export from the shelf to the west of South Georgia, and a transport pathway linking South Georgia and Shag Rocks. Significantly, the model suggests this to be a unidirectional link, from South Georgia to Shag Rocks, with possible significance for fisheries management. The implications of these results in the context of the South Georgia ecosystem are discussed briefly, demonstrating the usefulness of this new tool for interdisciplinary studies of the region.

  4. Freshwater, Climate Variability and Physical Forcing of Arctic Foodwebs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmack, E. C.

    2005-05-01

    The freshwater budget of the Arctic Ocean is widely believed to play a role in the global thermohaline circulation. This is not only due to the large delivery of fresh water to the system, but also due to its great storage capacity and variability in the various layers of its halocline complex. The resulting halocline complex is likewise known to be efficient in insulating the surface layers from the underlying warm inflows from the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, thus shielding the ice cover. But, at the same time, the halocline retards the vertical flux of nutrients. In fact, the late Max Dunbar once wrote a paper entitled "Hudson Bay has too much fresh water" noting that the surrounding river inflows to Hudson Bay blocked vertical exchange with the nutrient-rich Pacific waters below, and thus constrained production. Here I extend Dunbar's original concept and ask, `Does the Arctic Ocean have too much freshwater?', and then explore the question of light versus nutrient limitation for primary production. In addressing this question the roles of Atlantic and Pacific inflows are examined, and the panarctic shelf regions are distinguished among three basic types: inflow, interior and outflow shelves. Finally, remarks are made on projected climate changes that will likely have the greatest impact on arctic foodwebs.

  5. Response of Thermohaline Circulation to Freshwater Forcing under Present Day and LGM Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, A.; Otto-Bliesner, B. L.; Meehl, G. A.; Han, W.; Morrill, C.; Brady, E. C.; Briegleb, B.

    2007-12-01

    Responses of the thermohaline circulation (THC) to freshwater forcing (hosing) in the subpolar North Atlantic Ocean under present day and the last glacial maximum (LGM) conditions are investigated using the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate System Model versions 2 and 3. Three sets of simulations are analyzed, with each set including a control run and a freshwater hosing run. The first two sets are under present day conditions with an open and closed Bering Strait. The third one is under LGM conditions, which has a closed Bering Strait. Results show that the THC nearly collapses in all three hosing runs when the freshwater forcing is turned on. The full recovery of the THC, however, is at least a century earlier in the open Bering Strait run than the closed Bering Strait and LGM runs. This is because the excessive freshwater is diverged almost equally towards north and south from the subpolar North Atlantic when the Bering Strait is open. A significant portion of the freshwater flowing northward into the Arctic exits into the North Pacific via a reversed Bering Strait throughflow, which accelerates the THC recovery. When the Bering Strait is closed, this Arctic to Pacific transport is absent and freshwater can only be removed through the southern end of the North Atlantic. Together with the surface freshwater excess due to precipitation, evaporation, river runoff, and melting ice in the closed Bering Strait experiments after the hosing, the removal of the excessive freshwater takes longer, and this slows the recovery of the THC. Although the background conditions are quite different between the present day closed Bering Strait run and the LGM run, the THC responds to the freshwater forcing added in the North Atlantic in a very similar manner.

  6. Inhabitants of the Fresh-Water Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jorgensen, Joseph; Schroeder, Marlene

    This learner's guide is designed to assist middle school students in studying freshwater organisms. Following a brief introduction to freshwater ecology, simple line drawings facilitate the identification of plants and animals common to Florida's freshwater ecosystems. Emphasis of the short text which accompanies each illustration is upon the

  7. Inhabitants of the Fresh-Water Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jorgensen, Joseph; Schroeder, Marlene

    This learner's guide is designed to assist middle school students in studying freshwater organisms. Following a brief introduction to freshwater ecology, simple line drawings facilitate the identification of plants and animals common to Florida's freshwater ecosystems. Emphasis of the short text which accompanies each illustration is upon the…

  8. The sensitivity of the climate response to the magnitude and location of freshwater forcing: last glacial maximum experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto-Bliesner, Bette L.; Brady, Esther C.

    2010-01-01

    Proxy records indicate that the locations and magnitudes of freshwater forcing to the Atlantic Ocean basin as iceberg discharges into the high-latitude North Atlantic, Laurentide meltwater input to the Gulf of Mexico, or meltwater diversion to the North Atlantic via the St. Lawrence River and other eastern outlets may have influenced the North Atlantic thermohaline circulation and global climate. We have performed Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) simulations with the NCAR Community Climate System Model (CCSM3) in which the magnitude of the freshwater forcing has been varied from 0.1 to 1 Sv and inserted either into the subpolar North Atlantic Ocean or the Gulf of Mexico. In these glacial freshening experiments, the less dense freshwater provides a lid on the ocean water below, suppressing ocean convection and interaction with the atmosphere above and reducing the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). This is the case whether the freshwater is added directly to the area of convection south of Greenland or transported there by the subtropical and subpolar gyres when added to the Gulf of Mexico. The AMOC reduction is less for the smaller freshwater forcings, but is not linear with the size of the freshwater perturbation. The recovery of the AMOC from a "slow" state is ˜200 years for the 0.1 Sv experiment and ˜500 years for the 1 Sv experiment. For glacial climates, with large Northern Hemisphere ice sheets and reduced greenhouse gases, the cold subpolar North Atlantic is primed to respond rapidly and dramatically to freshwater that is either directly dumped into this region or after being advected from the Gulf of Mexico. Greenland temperatures cool by 6-8 °C in all the experiments, with little sensitivity to the magnitude, location or duration of the freshwater forcing, but exhibiting large seasonality. Sea ice is important for explaining the responses. The Northern Hemisphere high latitudes are slow to recover. Antarctica and the Southern Ocean show a bipolar response, with warming and reduced sea ice. This warming continues after the cessation of the freshwater forcing and shows a dependence on the duration of the freshwater forcing. Equatorward of the expanded sea ice, the simulated temperature and salinity anomalies are sensitive to the amount of colder and fresher waters that are advected out of the subpolar North Atlantic. In the tropical Atlantic, the recovery of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) from its more southerly position during the freshwater forcing is much more rapid than the recovery of the AMOC, and is more related to the recovery of low-latitude surface temperatures than Greenland temperature or sea ice. These results have implications for using proxy records as indirect measures of the AMOC.

  9. Protein export through the bacterial flagellar type III export pathway.

    PubMed

    Minamino, Tohru

    2014-08-01

    For construction of the bacterial flagellum, which is responsible for bacterial motility, the flagellar type III export apparatus utilizes both ATP and proton motive force across the cytoplasmic membrane and exports flagellar proteins from the cytoplasm to the distal end of the nascent structure. The export apparatus consists of a membrane-embedded export gate made of FlhA, FlhB, FliO, FliP, FliQ, and FliR and a water-soluble ATPase ring complex consisting of FliH, FliI, and FliJ. FlgN, FliS, and FliT act as substrate-specific chaperones that do not only protect their cognate substrates from degradation and aggregation in the cytoplasm but also efficiently transfer the substrates to the export apparatus. The ATPase ring complex facilitates the initial entry of the substrates into the narrow pore of the export gate. The export gate by itself is a proton-protein antiporter that uses the two components of proton motive force, the electric potential difference and the proton concentration difference, for different steps of the export process. A specific interaction of FlhA with FliJ located in the center of the ATPase ring complex allows the export gate to efficiently use proton motive force to drive protein export. The ATPase ring complex couples ATP binding and hydrolysis to its assembly-disassembly cycle for rapid and efficient protein export cycle. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Protein trafficking and secretion in bacteria. Guest Editors: Anastassios Economou and Ross Dalbey. PMID:24064315

  10. Cable Bacteria in Freshwater Sediments.

    PubMed

    Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Kristiansen, Michael; Frederiksen, Rasmus B; Dittmer, Anders Lindequist; Bjerg, Jesper Tataru; Trojan, Daniela; Schreiber, Lars; Damgaard, Lars Riis; Schramm, Andreas; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2015-09-01

    In marine sediments cathodic oxygen reduction at the sediment surface can be coupled to anodic sulfide oxidation in deeper anoxic layers through electrical currents mediated by filamentous, multicellular bacteria of the Desulfobulbaceae family, the so-called cable bacteria. Until now, cable bacteria have only been reported from marine environments. In this study, we demonstrate that cable bacteria also occur in freshwater sediments. In a first step, homogenized sediment collected from the freshwater stream Giber Å, Denmark, was incubated in the laboratory. After 2 weeks, pH signatures and electric fields indicated electron transfer between vertically separated anodic and cathodic half-reactions. Fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed the presence of Desulfobulbaceae filaments. In addition, in situ measurements of oxygen, pH, and electric potential distributions in the waterlogged banks of Giber Å demonstrated the presence of distant electric redox coupling in naturally occurring freshwater sediment. At the same site, filamentous Desulfobulbaceae with cable bacterium morphology were found to be present. Their 16S rRNA gene sequence placed them as a distinct sister group to the known marine cable bacteria, with the genus Desulfobulbus as the closest cultured lineage. The results of the present study indicate that electric currents mediated by cable bacteria could be important for the biogeochemistry in many more environments than anticipated thus far and suggest a common evolutionary origin of the cable phenotype within Desulfobulbaceae with subsequent diversification into a freshwater and a marine lineage. PMID:26116678

  11. Cable Bacteria in Freshwater Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Kristiansen, Michael; Frederiksen, Rasmus B.; Dittmer, Anders Lindequist; Bjerg, Jesper Tataru; Trojan, Daniela; Schreiber, Lars; Damgaard, Lars Riis; Schramm, Andreas; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2015-01-01

    In marine sediments cathodic oxygen reduction at the sediment surface can be coupled to anodic sulfide oxidation in deeper anoxic layers through electrical currents mediated by filamentous, multicellular bacteria of the Desulfobulbaceae family, the so-called cable bacteria. Until now, cable bacteria have only been reported from marine environments. In this study, we demonstrate that cable bacteria also occur in freshwater sediments. In a first step, homogenized sediment collected from the freshwater stream Giber Å, Denmark, was incubated in the laboratory. After 2 weeks, pH signatures and electric fields indicated electron transfer between vertically separated anodic and cathodic half-reactions. Fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed the presence of Desulfobulbaceae filaments. In addition, in situ measurements of oxygen, pH, and electric potential distributions in the waterlogged banks of Giber Å demonstrated the presence of distant electric redox coupling in naturally occurring freshwater sediment. At the same site, filamentous Desulfobulbaceae with cable bacterium morphology were found to be present. Their 16S rRNA gene sequence placed them as a distinct sister group to the known marine cable bacteria, with the genus Desulfobulbus as the closest cultured lineage. The results of the present study indicate that electric currents mediated by cable bacteria could be important for the biogeochemistry in many more environments than anticipated thus far and suggest a common evolutionary origin of the cable phenotype within Desulfobulbaceae with subsequent diversification into a freshwater and a marine lineage. PMID:26116678

  12. Meltwater Events in the Eastern Arctic Ocean: Relations to Eurasian Ice-dammed Lakes and Climate Forcings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spielhagen, R. F.

    2005-12-01

    Analysis of foraminiferal oxygen and carbon isotope records from long sediment cores from the eastern and central Arctic Ocean reveals a number of peaks which are interpreted as evidence for strong meltwater events. Most of these events were accompanied by strong deposition of coarse ice-rafted terrestrial debris indicative of large amounts of icebergs in the area. Hgh-resolution stratigraphic models for the cores, based on a variety of independant methods, allow to identify the the ages of meltwater events within the last 200 ky. They cluster in the intervals 160-155, 140-125, 90-75, 65-60, and 55-50 ka. According to recent results from the QUEEN program (Quaternary Science Reviews, v. 23 (11-13), 2004), these times fall into intervals of extended glaciations in northern Eurasia. The ice sheets dammed large rivers in European Russia and western Siberia and led to the formation of large lakes. The "marine" ages of meltwater events in the Arctic Ocean, as determined from sediment core data, correlate well with terrestrial age estimates for the deglacial events in northern Eurasia which must have included the discharge of the meltwater lakes into the Arctic Ocean. According to amplitudes in the foraminiferal isotopic records, the strongest events occurred at the glacial terminations of marine isotope stages 6 (130 ka) and 3/4 (52 ka). In my presentation, I will give an overview of existing stratigraphic and isotopic data sets of meltwater events in the eastern and central Arctic Ocean, including their limitations. Furthermore, I will analyze possible connections of meltwater events in the Arctic to similar events in the Norwegian-Greenland Sea and to external forcings. Finally, possible evidence for a strong freshwater export from the Arctic Ocean as a trigger of the cold Younger Dryas event will be reviewed.

  13. Effects of acidification on olfactory-mediated behaviour in freshwater and marine ecosystems: a synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Leduc, Antoine O. H. C.; Munday, Philip L.; Brown, Grant E.; Ferrari, Maud C. O.

    2013-01-01

    For many aquatic organisms, olfactory-mediated behaviour is essential to the maintenance of numerous fitness-enhancing activities, including foraging, reproduction and predator avoidance. Studies in both freshwater and marine ecosystems have demonstrated significant impacts of anthropogenic acidification on olfactory abilities of fish and macroinvertebrates, leading to impaired behavioural responses, with potentially far-reaching consequences to population dynamics and community structure. Whereas the ecological impacts of impaired olfactory-mediated behaviour may be similar between freshwater and marine ecosystems, the underlying mechanisms are quite distinct. In acidified freshwater, molecular change to chemical cues along with reduced olfaction sensitivity appear to be the primary causes of olfactory-mediated behavioural impairment. By contrast, experiments simulating future ocean acidification suggest that interference of high CO2 with brain neurotransmitter function is the primary cause for olfactory-mediated behavioural impairment in fish. Different physico-chemical characteristics between marine and freshwater systems are probably responsible for these distinct mechanisms of impairment, which, under globally rising CO2 levels, may lead to strikingly different consequences to olfaction. While fluctuations in pH may occur in both freshwater and marine ecosystems, marine habitat will remain alkaline despite future ocean acidification caused by globally rising CO2 levels. In this synthesis, we argue that ecosystem-specific mechanisms affecting olfaction need to be considered for effective management and conservation practices. PMID:23980246

  14. Freshwater outburst from Lake Superior as a trigger for the cold event 9300 years ago.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shi-Yong; Colman, Steven M; Lowell, Thomas V; Milne, Glenn A; Fisher, Timothy G; Breckenridge, Andy; Boyd, Matthew; Teller, James T

    2010-06-01

    Paleoclimate proxy records reveal a pervasive cooling event with a Northern Hemispheric extent approximately 9300 years ago. Coeval changes in the oceanic circulation of the North Atlantic imply freshwater forcing. However, the source, magnitude, and routing of meltwater have remained unknown. Located in central North America, Lake Superior is a key site for regulating the outflow of glacial meltwater to the oceans. Here, we show evidence for an approximately 45-meter rapid lake-level fall in this basin, centered on 9300 calibrated years before the present, due to the failure of a glacial drift dam on the southeast corner of the lake. We ascribe the widespread climate anomaly approximately 9300 years ago to this freshwater outburst delivered to the North Atlantic Ocean through the Lake Huron-North Bay-Ottawa River-St. Lawrence River valleys. PMID:20430972

  15. The importance of subsurface diatom production for export flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, A. E.

    2006-12-01

    Laminated marine sediments that preserve the seasonal flux cycle form an increasingly extensive and geographically and temporally diverse archive of ocean biogeochemistry. Such sediments or "paleo sediment traps" from a range of both oceanic and marginal settings complemented by modern observations show evidence of massive flux of a number of distinct large diatom species that appear to be adapted to production at depth within stratified oceans. The importance of such subsurface species underscores the need to be circumspect over satellite-derived estimates of export production. For example, in the Southern Ocean satellite-derived estmates significantly underestimate export. Although there is some water column data, many of these key species are poorly sampled both because of 1) their large size (within the mesoplankton), 2) they occur in aggregates or 3) their location in the water column. While some classic studies exist, too few oceanographic surveys have sampled separate depth levels. Until they do so and until there is more observational oceanography and process studies that target subsurface production, our ability to understand and model these important contributors to ocean flux will remain impaired.

  16. Tracking Freshwater from Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsdorf, D.

    2005-05-01

    River discharge as well as lake and wetland storage of water are critical elements of land surface hydrology, yet they are poorly observed globally and the prospects for improvement from in-situ networks are bleak. Considering this, a NASA Surface Water working group has been focused on answering the following science and applications questions: (1) What are the observational and data assimilation requirements for measuring natural and manmade surface storage and river discharge that will allow us to (a) understand the land surface branch of the global hydrologic cycle, (b) predict the consequences of global change, and (c) make assessments for water resources management? (2) What are the roles of wetlands, lakes, and rivers (a) as regulators of biogeochemical and constituent cycles (e.g., carbon, nutrients, and sediments) and (b) in creating or ameliorating water-related hazards of relevance to society? Global models of weather and climate could be constrained spatially and temporally by stream discharge and surface storage measurements. Yet this constraint is rarely applied, despite weather and climate modeling results showing that predicted precipitation is often inconsistent with observed discharge. Thus, as satellite missions are developed for global observations of critical hydrologic parameters such as soil moisture (i.e., HYDROS) and precipitation (i.e., GPM), the lack of concomitant measurements of runoff and surface water storage at compatible spatial and temporal scales may well result in inconsistent parameterizations of global hydrologic, weather, and climate models. Fortunately, several spaceborne methods have provided potential avenues toward answering these hydrologic questions. Among the most promising are active radar and lidar methods that measure inundation area, water heights, and changes. For example, radar altimetry is well known for its ability to measure ocean surface topography and such methods should be easily adaptable to inland waters. The global observations possible from such platforms will have important implications for global water cycle research. Future directions for the SWWG include expanding our scientific interests beyond water mass-balance and hydrodynamics. Issues regarding water quality and water management - even on global scales - are becoming more important. Sediment transport remains a fundamental science goal for many, especially considering the increased efforts toward river and wetland restoration. Hydrologic modeling and remote sensing efforts that connect each of these topics should be a greater focus within the SWWG. Everyone is most welcome to join us in these endeavors.

  17. An electromagnetic geophysical survey of the freshwater lens of Isla de Mona, Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richards, R.T.; Troester, J.W.; Martinez, M.I.

    1998-01-01

    An electromagnetic reconnaissance of the freshwater lens of Isla de Mona, Puerto Rico was conducted with both terrain conductivity (TC) and transient electromagnetic (TEM) surface geophysical techniques. These geophysical surveys were limited to the southern and western parts of the island because of problems with access and cultural metallic objects such as reinforced concrete roadways on the eastern part of the island. The geophysical data were supplemented with the location of a freshwater spring found by scuba divers at a depth of about 20 m below sea level along the northern coast of the island. The geophysical data suggest that the freshwater lens has a maximum thickness of 20 m in the southern half of the island. The freshwater lens is not thickest at the center of the island but nearer the southwestern edge in Quaternary deposits and the eastern edge of the island in the Tertiary carbonates. This finding indicates that the groundwater flow paths on Isla de Mona are not radially summetrical from the center of the island to the ocean. The asymmetry of the freshwater lens indicates that the differences in hydraulic conductivity are a major factor in determining the shape of the freshwater lens. The porosity of the aquifer, as determined by the geophysical data is about 33%.

  18. Productivity and salinity structuring of the microplankton revealed by comparative freshwater metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    Eiler, Alexander; Zaremba-Niedzwiedzka, Katarzyna; Martínez-García, Manuel; McMahon, Katherine D; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Andersson, Siv G E; Bertilsson, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the diversity and structuring of freshwater microbial communities beyond the patterns revealed by tracing their distribution in the landscape with common taxonomic markers such as the ribosomal RNA. To address this gap in knowledge, metagenomes from temperate lakes were compared to selected marine metagenomes. Taxonomic analyses of rRNA genes in these freshwater metagenomes confirm the previously reported dominance of a limited subset of uncultured lineages of freshwater bacteria, whereas Archaea were rare. Diversification into marine and freshwater microbial lineages was also reflected in phylogenies of functional genes, and there were also significant differences in functional beta-diversity. The pathways and functions that accounted for these differences are involved in osmoregulation, active transport, carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism. Moreover, predicted genes orthologous to active transporters and recalcitrant organic matter degradation were more common in microbial genomes from oligotrophic versus eutrophic lakes. This comparative metagenomic analysis allowed us to formulate a general hypothesis that oceanic- compared with freshwater-dwelling microorganisms, invest more in metabolism of amino acids and that strategies of carbohydrate metabolism differ significantly between marine and freshwater microbial communities. PMID:24118837

  19. Black Carbon in Estuarine and Coastal Ocean Dissolved Organic Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mannino, Antonio; Harvey, H. Rodger

    2003-01-01

    Analysis of high-molecular-weight dissolved organic matter (DOM) from two estuaries in the northwest Atlantic Ocean reveals that black carbon (BC) is a significant component of previously uncharacterized DOM, suggesting that river-estuary systems are important exporters of recalcitrant dissolved organic carbon to the ocean.

  20. 7 CFR 1218.6 - Exporter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BLUEBERRY PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Blueberry Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1218.6 Exporter. Exporter means a person involved in exporting blueberries from another country to the United States....

  1. 7 CFR 1218.6 - Exporter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BLUEBERRY PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Blueberry Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1218.6 Exporter. Exporter means a person involved in exporting blueberries from another country to the United States....

  2. 7 CFR 1218.6 - Exporter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BLUEBERRY PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Blueberry Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1218.6 Exporter. Exporter means a person involved in exporting blueberries from another country to the United States....

  3. 7 CFR 1218.6 - Exporter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BLUEBERRY PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Blueberry Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1218.6 Exporter. Exporter means a person involved in exporting blueberries from another country to the United States....

  4. 7 CFR 1218.6 - Exporter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BLUEBERRY PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Blueberry Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1218.6 Exporter. Exporter means a person involved in exporting blueberries from another country to the United States....

  5. Freshwater from the Bay of Biscay shelves in 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reverdin, G.; Marié, L.; Lazure, P.; d'Ovidio, F.; Boutin, J.; Testor, P.; Martin, N.; Lourenco, A.; Gaillard, F.; Lavin, A.; Rodriguez, C.; Somavilla, R.; Mader, J.; Rubio, A.; Blouch, P.; Rolland, J.; Bozec, Y.; Charria, G.; Batifoulier, F.; Dumas, F.; Louazel, S.; Chanut, J.

    2013-01-01

    In April-November 2009, surface salinity data provide a good coverage of most of the south-east Bay of Biscay and nearby Aquitaine/Armorican shelves. By late April most of the shelf, in particular south of 46°N, is covered by a fresh surface layer amounting to a fresh water volume of 49 · 109 m3. At that time, a moderate amount of fresh water has spread over the Landes Plateau. By mid-June, this shelf water penetrates over the Cape Ferret Canyon north of the Landes Plateau. By mid-July, it is found west of the Landes Plateau to at least 4°W, with an estimated fresh-water content of 11-14 · 109 m3. Drifters deployed on June 17 in the Cape Ferret Canyon, or later on the shelves, confirm the spreading of shelf fresh-water over the deep ocean. Lagrangian tracking using altimetric products, also confirms the transport by a quasi-stationary circulation. Operational numerical simulations (PREVIMER, IBI, HYCOM) display this spread of the freshwater, but in different areas. In particular, all have some fresh water escaping westward near the coast in the Basque region, which is not observed. Later in the summer season, the fresh water spreads westward to south-westward and along the shelf break to at least 5.5°W in late September.

  6. Arctic circulation regimes and Greenland freshwater in the sub-Arctic seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dukhovskoy, Dmitry; Proshutinsky, Andrey; Herbaut, Christophe; Aksenov, Yevgeny; Luneva, Maria; Myers, Paul; Platov, Gennady; Popova, Ekaterina

    2015-04-01

    Between 1948 and 1996, wind-driven components of ice drift and surface ocean currents experienced a well pronounced decadal variability alternating between anticyclonic and cyclonic circulation regimes. During cyclonic regimes, low sea level atmospheric pressure dominated over the Arctic Ocean driving sea ice and the upper ocean clockwise; the Arctic atmosphere was relatively warm and humid and freshwater flux from the Arctic Ocean toward the sub-Arctic seas was intensified. During anticylonic circulation regimes, high sea level pressure dominated over the Arctic driving sea ice and ocean counter-clockwise; the atmosphere was cold and dry and the freshwater flux from the Arctic to the sub-Arctic seas was reduced. Since 1997, however, the Arctic system has been dominated by a 17-year anticyclonic circulation regime with a set of environmental parameters that are atypical for these regimes. Of essential importance is to discern the causes and consequences of the apparent break-down in the natural decadal variability of the Arctic climate system, and specifically: Why has the well-pronounced decadal variability observed in the 20th century been replaced by relatively weak interannual changes under anticyclonic circulation regime conditions in the 21st century? We speculate that before the 2000s, the freshwater and heat exchanges between the Arctic Ocean and the North Atlantic were self-regulated and their interactions were realized via decadal climate oscillations. In the 21st century, this near-decadal variability has been interrupted as a result of an additional freshwater source associated with Greenland ice sheet melt. We hypothesize that the excess freshwater flux from Greenland has reduced deep convection in the sub-Arctic seas, resulting in the cessation of decadal oscillations in Arctic climate regimes. In order to test this hypothesis, numerical experiments with a set of FAMOS (Forum for Arctic Modeling & Observational Synthesis) ice-ocean coupled models have been conducted. In these experiments, Greenland freshwater is tracked by passive tracers being constantly released along the Greenland coast. The experiments demonstrate propagation pathways and time scales of freshening signal within the sub-Arctic seas.

  7. Biomass production by freshwater and marine macrophytes

    SciTech Connect

    North, W.J.; Gerard, V.A.; Kuwabara, J.S.

    1981-01-01

    Research on aquatic macrophytes as producers of biomass has been undertaken at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) on the east coast and on the west coast by a group of collaborators in a joint effort known as the Marine Biomass Project. Studies at WHOI have focused on estuarine and coastal situations with some attention recently to freshwater plants. The Marine Farm Project has primarily been concerned with oceanic biomass production. A group at WHOI has undertaken a wide variety of studies concerning aquatic macrophytes including nutrient uptake, growth, yields, and environmental factors affecting yields. Aquatic biomass production systems have been surveyed on a worldwide basis and currently the role of carbon as a potential limiting nutrient in biomass culturing is being examined. The Marine Farm Project is presently attempting to grow giant kelp in offshore waters off southern California. Other work related to aquatic biomass production includes an investigation at the University of California, Berkeley, of microalgae in ponds. This paper will emphasize discussion of the kelp production phases of the Marine Farm Project. Activities by the WHOI are briefly summarized.

  8. Exporting calcium from cells.

    PubMed

    Guerini, Danilo; Coletto, Luisa; Carafoli, Ernesto

    2005-01-01

    All eukaryotic cells import Ca2+ through a number of variously gated plasma membrane channels. Once inside cells, Ca2+ transmits information to a large number of (enzyme) targets. Eventually, it must be exported again, to prevent the overloading of the cytosol with Ca2+. Two systems export Ca2+ from cells: a high affinity, low capacity Ca2+-ATPase, and a lower affinity, but much larger capacity, Na+/Ca2+ exchanger. The ATPase (commonly called the Ca2+ pump) is the fine-tuner of cell Ca2+, as it functions well even if the concentration of the ion drops below the microM level. It is a large enzyme, with 10 transmembrane domains and a C-terminal cytosolic tail that contains regulatory sites, including a calmodulin-binding domain. Four distinct gene products plus a large number of splice variants have been described. Some are tissue specific, the isoform 2 being specifically expressed in the sensorial cells of the Corti organ in the inner-ear. Its genetic absence causes deafness in mice. Two different families of the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger exist, one of which, originally described in photoreceptors, transports K+ and Ca2+ in exchange for Na+. The exchanger is particularly active in excitable cells, e.g., heart, where the necessity cyclically arises to rapidly eject large amounts of Ca2+. In addition to heart, the exchanger is particularly important to neurons: the cleavage of the most important neuronal isoform (NCX3) by calpains activated by excitotoxic treatments generates Ca2+ overload and eventually cell death. PMID:16102821

  9. Uncertainties in freshwater and MOC predictions in the North Atlantic region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, T.; Latif, M.; Reintges, A.

    2012-04-01

    Future changes in the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (MOC) will result from processes both internal and external to the climate system. Global warming leads to an amplified hydrological cycle, which affects the vertical salinity and temperature profiles. The meridional changes in the ocean-atmosphere interaction diminish the meridional oceanic density contrast. In the North Atlantic sinking regions, these changes are strongly related to salinity anomalies at the surface. Most climate models predict a weakening of the North Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (MOC) during the twenty-first century when forced by increasing levels of greenhouse gas concentrations. However, large uncertainty exists in comparing different climate model predictions, even under identical forcing. Individual studies suggest that multidecadal changes in the MOC are strongly related to large-scale salinity anomalies and therefore probably to changes in the surface freshwater fluxes and freshwater transport. We derived the general relationship between the MOC and freshwater budget of the Northern Hemisphere analyzing the CMIP3 20th century simulations and the A1B scenario prediction. A quantification of the different sources of uncertainty (external, internal and model uncertainties) indicates the model error as the largest component. The internal variability is significant during the first decades, while scenario uncertainty is almost negligible. The different contributions to model uncertainty like surface wind and density, salinity versus temperature has been analyzed additionally. Overall, the strongest MOC changes have been predicted in the models around 40°N, whereas the strongest signal-to-noise ratio is located south of 40°N. Uncertainties in meridional ocean density profiles are dominated by model uncertainties in the salinity distribution. The local signal-to-noise ratio of the ocean freshwater flux is low in the arctic and subpolar region. First analyses of the CMIP5 historical simulations and the RCP45 scenario runs show still large model variability for the freshwater fluxes as well as for the meridional overturning.

  10. Freshwater Biodiversity and Insect Diversification

    PubMed Central

    Dijkstra, Klaas-Douwe B.; Monaghan, Michael T.; Pauls, Steffen U.

    2016-01-01

    Inland waters cover less than one percent of Earth’s surface, but harbor more than six percent of all insect species: nearly 100,000 species from 12 orders spend one or more life stages in freshwater. Little is known about how this remarkable diversity arose, although allopatric speciation and ecological adaptation are thought to be primary mechanisms. Freshwater habitats are exceptionally susceptible to environmental change, and exhibit marked ecological gradients. The amphibiotic lifestyles of aquatic insects result in complex contributions of extinction and allopatric and non-allopatric speciation in species diversification. In contrast to the lack of evolutionary studies, the ecology and habitat preferences of aquatic insects have been intensively studied, in part because of their widespread use as bio-indicators. The combination of phylogenetics with the extensive ecological data provides a promising avenue for future research, making aquatic insects highly suitable models for the study of ecological diversification. PMID:24160433

  11. Water quality for freshwater fish

    SciTech Connect

    Howells, G. )

    1994-01-01

    This timely and up-to-date volume brings together recent critical reviews on water quality requirements for freshwater fish commissioned by the European Inland Fisheries Advisory Commission, an agency of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization. It provides a unique and authoritative source of critically evaluated water quality data concerning the effects of chromium, nickel, aluminum and nitrite on freshwater fish and includes an assessment of the toxicity of mixtures. The reports presented in this volume cover all stages of the life cycle and relevant trophic levels, including aquatic invertebrates and plants and potential bioaccumulation through the food chain. An extensive bibliography is provided for each chapter as well as a glossary of terms and a list of fish species mentioned in the text. This compilation of papers is the definitive reference volume for chemists, biologists, ecologists and toxicologists as well as for water resource managers concerned with management and control of pollution in fresh waters.

  12. 7 CFR 923.15 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SWEET CHERRIES GROWN IN DESIGNATED COUNTIES IN WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 923.15 Export. Export means to ship...

  13. 7 CFR 923.15 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SWEET CHERRIES GROWN IN DESIGNATED COUNTIES IN WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 923.15 Export. Export means to ship...

  14. 7 CFR 923.15 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SWEET CHERRIES GROWN IN DESIGNATED COUNTIES IN WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 923.15 Export. Export means to ship...

  15. Influence of net freshwater supply on salinity in Florida Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nuttle, W.K.; Fourqurean, J.W.; Cosby, B.J.; Zieman, J.C.; Robblee, M.B.

    2000-01-01

    An annual water budget for Florida Bay, the large, seasonally hypersaline estuary in the Everglades National Park, was constructed using physically based models and long-term (31 years) data on salinity, hydrology, and climate. Effects of seasonal and interannual variations of the net freshwater supply (runoff plus rainfall minus evaporation) on salinity variation within the bay were also examined. Particular attention was paid to the effects of runoff, which are the focus of ambitious plans to restore and conserve the Florida Bay ecosystem. From 1965 to 1995 the annual runoff from the Everglades into the bay was less than one tenth of the annual direct rainfall onto the bay, while estimated annual evaporation slightly exceeded annual rainfall. The average net freshwater supply to the bay over a year was thus approximately zero, and interannual variations in salinity appeared to be affected primarily by interannual fluctuations in rainfall. At the annual scale, runoff apparently had little effect on the bay as a whole during this period. On a seasonal basis, variations in rainfall, evaporation, and runoff were not in phase, and the net freshwater supply to the bay varied between positive and negative values, contributing to a strong seasonal pattern in salinity, especially in regions of the bay relatively isolated from exchanges with the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic Ocean. Changes in runoff could have a greater effect on salinity in the bay if the seasonal patterns of rainfall and evaporation and the timing of the runoff are considered. One model was also used to simulate spatial and temporal patterns of salinity responses expected to result from changes in net freshwater supply. Simulations in which runoff was increased by a factor of 2 (but with no change in spatial pattern) indicated that increased runoff will lower salinity values in eastern Florida Bay, increase the variability of salinity in the South Region, but have little effect on salinity in the Central and West Regions.

  16. The role of moisture transport in the arctic freshwater cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, W.; Liu, W.

    2004-12-01

    This study focuses on understanding the impact of recent Arctic warming to the regional freshwater cycle from the perspective of the atmospheric integrated moisture transport (IMT), estimated based on measurements by multi- spaceborne- sensors. As one of the important components in the polar water/ice balance, IMT is traditionally derived from inadequate rawinsonde measurements. A method is developed to retrieve IMT over oceans using spaceborne scatterometer and microwave radiometer observations. More than five years (from August 1999 to present) daily IMT fields, at 0.5∞x0.5∞ resolution over global ocean, were produced by combining measurements from NASA scatterometer SeaWinds on QuikSCAT (QSCAT) and the Special Sensor Microwave/ Imagers (SSM/I) from Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP). Retrieved IMT fields have demonstrated credible annual and interannual variations in polar regions. Taking advantage of unprecedented coverage and resolution of satellite data, we were able to depict the temporal and spatial variation of IMT across the boundary of Greenland ice-sheet along a simulated coastline surrounding the Greenland, and revealed its correlation with observed abnormal Greenland ice-sheet melting during 2002 and 2003. The IMT data was also analyzed in the context of global water cycle to explore the linkage between changes in arctic freshwater cycle and global climate.

  17. Arctic freshwater forcing of the Younger Dryas cold reversal.

    PubMed

    Tarasov, Lev; Peltier, W R

    2005-06-01

    The last deglaciation was abruptly interrupted by a millennial-scale reversal to glacial conditions, the Younger Dryas cold event. This cold interval has been connected to a decrease in the rate of North Atlantic Deep Water formation and to a resulting weakening of the meridional overturning circulation owing to surface water freshening. In contrast, an earlier input of fresh water (meltwater pulse 1a), whose origin is disputed, apparently did not lead to a reduction of the meridional overturning circulation. Here we analyse an ensemble of simulations of the drainage chronology of the North American ice sheet in order to identify the geographical release points of freshwater forcing during deglaciation. According to the simulations with our calibrated glacial systems model, the North American ice sheet contributed about half the fresh water of meltwater pulse 1a. During the onset of the Younger Dryas, we find that the largest combined meltwater/iceberg discharge was directed into the Arctic Ocean. Given that the only drainage outlet from the Arctic Ocean was via the Fram Strait into the Greenland-Iceland-Norwegian seas, where North Atlantic Deep Water is formed today, we hypothesize that it was this Arctic freshwater flux that triggered the Younger Dryas cold reversal. PMID:15931219

  18. Will ocean acidification affect marine microbes?

    PubMed

    Joint, Ian; Doney, Scott C; Karl, David M

    2011-01-01

    The pH of the surface ocean is changing as a result of increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO(2)), and there are concerns about potential impacts of lower pH and associated alterations in seawater carbonate chemistry on the biogeochemical processes in the ocean. However, it is important to place these changes within the context of pH in the present-day ocean, which is not constant; it varies systematically with season, depth and along productivity gradients. Yet this natural variability in pH has rarely been considered in assessments of the effect of ocean acidification on marine microbes. Surface pH can change as a consequence of microbial utilization and production of carbon dioxide, and to a lesser extent other microbially mediated processes such as nitrification. Useful comparisons can be made with microbes in other aquatic environments that readily accommodate very large and rapid pH change. For example, in many freshwater lakes, pH changes that are orders of magnitude greater than those projected for the twenty second century oceans can occur over periods of hours. Marine and freshwater assemblages have always experienced variable pH conditions. Therefore, an appropriate null hypothesis may be, until evidence is obtained to the contrary, that major biogeochemical processes in the oceans other than calcification will not be fundamentally different under future higher CO(2)/lower pH conditions. PMID:20535222

  19. 9 CFR 91.19 - Inspection of ocean vessels prior to loading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Inspection of ocean vessels prior to... Inspection of ocean vessels prior to loading. It shall be the responsibility of the owners or the masters of an ocean vessel intended for use in exporting livestock to present the vessel to an inspector at...

  20. 9 CFR 91.19 - Inspection of ocean vessels prior to loading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Inspection of ocean vessels prior to... Inspection of ocean vessels prior to loading. It shall be the responsibility of the owners or the masters of an ocean vessel intended for use in exporting livestock to present the vessel to an inspector at...

  1. 9 CFR 91.19 - Inspection of ocean vessels prior to loading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Inspection of ocean vessels prior to... Inspection of ocean vessels prior to loading. It shall be the responsibility of the owners or the masters of an ocean vessel intended for use in exporting livestock to present the vessel to an inspector at...

  2. 9 CFR 91.19 - Inspection of ocean vessels prior to loading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Inspection of ocean vessels prior to... Inspection of ocean vessels prior to loading. It shall be the responsibility of the owners or the masters of an ocean vessel intended for use in exporting livestock to present the vessel to an inspector at...

  3. 9 CFR 91.19 - Inspection of ocean vessels prior to loading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Inspection of ocean vessels prior to... Inspection of ocean vessels prior to loading. It shall be the responsibility of the owners or the masters of an ocean vessel intended for use in exporting livestock to present the vessel to an inspector at...

  4. Simulating the impact of freshwater inputs and deep-draft icebergs formed during a MIS 6 Barents Ice Sheet collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Clare L.; Green, J. A. Mattias; Bigg, Grant R.

    2011-06-01

    An intermediate complexity climate model is used to simulate the collapse of the Barents Ice Sheet during Marine Isotope Stage 6 (MIS 6; 140 ka B.P) with the purpose of investigating whether a mass input of freshwater from the collapse could have affected the convection and deep water formation in the North Atlantic Ocean. Further experiments used a coupled dynamic and thermodynamic iceberg model to determine the effects of deep-draft icebergs, rather than freshwater alone, on the ocean circulation. The results predict that the collapse of the Barents Ice Sheet had a significant impact on the meridional overturning circulation in both the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. Freshwater fluxes have more of an impact on the Atlantic overturning circulation during the actual release period compared to icebergs, but the bergs induce effects over longer time scales even after the pulse is removed. Freshwater fluxes of 0.15 sverdrup (Sv) and iceberg surges of 0.1 Sv trigger significant changes in the global patterns, particularly in the North Pacific where there is strengthening of the overturning circulation at the expense of that in the North Atlantic, and associated increases in Pacific sea surface temperatures. These results highlight the importance of simulating not only the correct flux but also the form of the freshwater input from ice sheet collapses appropriately.

  5. Rapid seawater circulation through animal burrows in mangrove forests - A significant source of saline groundwater to the tropical coastal ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, J. F.; Stieglitz, T. C.; Hancock, G. J.

    2010-12-01

    A common approach for quantifying rates of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) to the coastal ocean is to use geochemical tracers that are part of the U- and Th-decay chains such as Rn-222 and short lived radium isotopes. These radionuclides are naturally enriched in groundwater relative to seawater and have well understood chemistries within the marine environment. They occur in both fresh (continental) and saline (marine) groundwaters and thus the water source is often ambiguous. Stieglitz (2005, Marine Pollution Bulletin 51, 51-59) has shown that some coastal areas within the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) lagoon (Australia) are enriched in the SGD tracer, Rn-222; he attributed this to four possible processes including the tidal flushing of mangrove forest floors. Here, we present a detailed investigation into the tidal circulation of seawater through animal burrows using Rn-222 and isotopes of radium in the Coral Creek mangrove forest, Hinchinbrook Island, Queensland, Australia. The study was conducted at the end of the dry season in a creek with no freshwater inputs. Significant export of radionuclides and salt from the forest into the creek indicates continuous tidally driven circulation through the burrows. Results demonstrate that the forest sediment is efficiently flushed, with a water flux of about 30 L/m2/ day of forest floor, which is equivalent to flushing about 10% of the total burrow volume per tidal cycle. Annual average circulation flux through mangrove forest floors are of the same order as annual river discharge in the central GBR. However, unlike the river discharge, the tidal circulation should be relatively stable throughout the year. This work documents the importance of animal burrows in maintaining productive sediments in these systems, and illustrates the physical process that supports large exports of organic and inorganic matter from mangrove forests to the coastal zone. It also illustrates the importance of considering saline groundwater sources when interpreting SGD radionuclide tracers in the coastal ocean.

  6. Dynamics of ocean surface mixed layer variability in the Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiller, Andreas; Oke, Peter R.

    2015-06-01

    We present a new methodology that allows quantifying the impact of individual terms of the temperature and salinity conservation within the mixed layer on mixed layer depth (MLD). The method is applied to output from an ocean general circulation model in the Indian Ocean to investigate variability and changes in MLD. On seasonal timescales and for most areas of the Indian Ocean variability of MLD is tightly linked to all thermohaline budget terms. In the Indian Ocean at approximately 20°S the MLD covaries with surface heat and freshwater fluxes on intraseasonal and interannual timescales. The geography of the region includes the Leeuwin Current, plus the tropical eastern Indian Ocean for interannual surface freshwater fluxes. The range of seasonal amplitudes of MLD variability varies with individual budget terms but is typically within 1 m/month to 100 m/month. The ocean footprints of an intraseasonal tropical cyclone, tropical and midlatitude seasonal temperature and salinity budgets and interannual variability associated with the Indian Ocean Dipole Mode are analyzed. The results reveal close relationships of the thermohaline budgets within the mixed layer with the variability of the MLD. The associated tendencies of changes in MLD are consistent with Argo and satellite-based observations of tendencies within the mixed layer and sea-surface temperature and salinity.

  7. Recent increases in Arctic freshwater flux affects Labrador Sea convection and Atlantic overturning circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qian; Dixon, Timothy H.; Myers, Paul G.; Bonin, Jennifer; Chambers, Don; van den Broeke, M. R.

    2016-01-01

    The Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) is an important component of ocean thermohaline circulation. Melting of Greenland's ice sheet is freshening the North Atlantic; however, whether the augmented freshwater flux is disrupting the AMOC is unclear. Dense Labrador Sea Water (LSW), formed by winter cooling of saline North Atlantic water and subsequent convection, is a key component of the deep southward return flow of the AMOC. Although LSW formation recently decreased, it also reached historically high values in the mid-1990s, making the connection to the freshwater flux unclear. Here we derive a new estimate of the recent freshwater flux from Greenland using updated GRACE satellite data, present new flux estimates for heat and salt from the North Atlantic into the Labrador Sea and explain recent variations in LSW formation. We suggest that changes in LSW can be directly linked to recent freshening, and suggest a possible link to AMOC weakening.

  8. Recent increases in Arctic freshwater flux affects Labrador Sea convection and Atlantic overturning circulation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qian; Dixon, Timothy H; Myers, Paul G; Bonin, Jennifer; Chambers, Don; van den Broeke, M R

    2016-01-01

    The Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) is an important component of ocean thermohaline circulation. Melting of Greenland's ice sheet is freshening the North Atlantic; however, whether the augmented freshwater flux is disrupting the AMOC is unclear. Dense Labrador Sea Water (LSW), formed by winter cooling of saline North Atlantic water and subsequent convection, is a key component of the deep southward return flow of the AMOC. Although LSW formation recently decreased, it also reached historically high values in the mid-1990s, making the connection to the freshwater flux unclear. Here we derive a new estimate of the recent freshwater flux from Greenland using updated GRACE satellite data, present new flux estimates for heat and salt from the North Atlantic into the Labrador Sea and explain recent variations in LSW formation. We suggest that changes in LSW can be directly linked to recent freshening, and suggest a possible link to AMOC weakening. PMID:26796579

  9. Linking the 8.2 ka Event and its Freshwater Forcing in the Labrador Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Jeremy S.; Carlson, Anders E.; Winsor, Kelsey; Klinkhammer, Gary P.; LeGrande, Allegra N.; Andrews, John T.; Strasser, C.

    2012-01-01

    The 8.2 ka event was the last deglacial abrupt climate event. A reduction in the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) attributed to the drainage of glacial Lake Agassiz may have caused the event, but the freshwater signature of Lake Agassiz discharge has yet to be identified in (delta)18O of foraminiferal calcite records from the Labrador Sea, calling into question the connection between freshwater discharge to the North Atlantic and AMOC strength. Using Mg/Ca-paleothermometry, we demonstrate that approx. 3 C of near-surface ocean cooling masked an 1.0 % decrease in western Labrador Sea (delta)18O of seawater concurrent with Lake Agassiz drainage. Comparison with North Atlantic (delta)18O of seawater records shows that the freshwater discharge was transported to regions of deep-water formation where it could perturb AMOC and force the 8.2 ka event.

  10. Recent increases in Arctic freshwater flux affects Labrador Sea convection and Atlantic overturning circulation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qian; Dixon, Timothy H.; Myers, Paul G.; Bonin, Jennifer; Chambers, Don; van den Broeke, M. R.

    2016-01-01

    The Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) is an important component of ocean thermohaline circulation. Melting of Greenland's ice sheet is freshening the North Atlantic; however, whether the augmented freshwater flux is disrupting the AMOC is unclear. Dense Labrador Sea Water (LSW), formed by winter cooling of saline North Atlantic water and subsequent convection, is a key component of the deep southward return flow of the AMOC. Although LSW formation recently decreased, it also reached historically high values in the mid-1990s, making the connection to the freshwater flux unclear. Here we derive a new estimate of the recent freshwater flux from Greenland using updated GRACE satellite data, present new flux estimates for heat and salt from the North Atlantic into the Labrador Sea and explain recent variations in LSW formation. We suggest that changes in LSW can be directly linked to recent freshening, and suggest a possible link to AMOC weakening. PMID:26796579

  11. Consequences of future increased Arctic runoff on Arctic Ocean stratification, circulation, and sea ice cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nummelin, Aleksi; Ilicak, Mehmet; Li, Camille; Smedsrud, Lars H.

    2016-01-01

    The Arctic Ocean has important freshwater sources including river runoff, low evaporation, and exchange with the Pacific Ocean. In the future, we expect even larger freshwater input as the global hydrological cycle accelerates, increasing high-latitude precipitation, and river runoff. Previous modeling studies show some robust responses to high-latitude freshwater perturbations, including a strengthening of Arctic stratification and a weakening of the large-scale ocean circulation; some idealized modeling studies also document a stronger cyclonic circulation within the Arctic Ocean itself. With the broad range of scales and processes involved, the overall effect of increasing runoff requires an understanding of both the local processes and the broader linkages between the Arctic and surrounding oceans. Here we adopt a more comprehensive modeling approach by increasing river runoff to the Arctic Ocean in a coupled ice-ocean general circulation model, and show contrasting responses in the polar and subpolar regions. Within the Arctic, the stratification strengthens, the halocline and Atlantic Water layer warm, and the cyclonic circulation spins up, in agreement with previous work. In the subpolar North Atlantic, the model simulates a colder and fresher water column with weaker barotropic circulation. In contrast to the estuarine circulation theory, the volume exchange between the Arctic Ocean and the surrounding oceans does not increase with increasing runoff. While these results are robust in our model, we require experiments with other model systems and more complete observational syntheses to better constrain the sensitivity of the climate system to high-latitude freshwater perturbations.

  12. Seasonal Sources of Carbon Exports in a Headwater Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argerich, A.; Johnson, S. L.

    2013-12-01

    Climate change is intimately tied to changes in carbon (C) budgets. Understanding the compartments and processes involved in the global C cycle across a landscape is essential to predict future climate change scenarios. While most C budgets focus on terrestrial contributions, river systems contribute to the C cycle by the export of total organic carbon (TOC) and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) to the ocean and by exporting CO2 to the atmosphere. Although headwater streams constitute between 60 and 80 percent of fluvial systems their role in the C cycle has often been neglected due to the methodological constrains derived from their heterogeneous morphology. Here we present an analysis of the temporal variation of C export both downstream and evaded to the atmosphere for a headwater stream draining a forested watershed. We relate it to in-stream metabolic processes (respiration and primary production) and to different carbon pools. Specifically, we estimate downstream exports of C in the form of dissolved organic (DOC), dissolved inorganic (DIC), and particulate organic (POC); we estimate the C content in the fine benthic organic matter (FBOM), dead wood, algae, and macroinvertebrate pools; and finally, the amount of CO2 originated and fixed by stream respiration and primary production. Organic exports, both particulate and dissolved, represented 39.7% of the annual downstream export of C while dissolved inorganic C represented 60.3%. Higher exports were observed during periods of high flow (late fall and winter). Highest seasonality in downstream exports was observed for POC (89.5% coefficient of variation in mean monthly fluxes), followed by DOC and DIC (24.3% and 15.9% respectively). Dissolved CO2 had mostly an autochthonous origin during summer (i.e. from stream ecosystem respiration) and originated from allochthonous sources during the rain-dominated months in Oregon (late fall and winter). The stream was net heterotrophic and the amount of C cycled through respiration and primary production had a similar magnitude to the carbon transported downstream in the form of DOC. Future climate scenarios in the Pacific Northwest predict highest flows during winter and longer periods of low flow during late summer. Our results suggest that if these predictions become true there might be a change in the origin of the CO2 evaded to the atmosphere to a more autochthonous origin and a decrease in the rate between downstream C transport and in-stream C processing. All together, these results increase our understanding of the factors controlling carbon exports downstream and to the atmosphere and to better predict future impacts to climate change.

  13. Multidrug-exporting secondary transporters.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Akihito

    2003-08-01

    The major cause of intrinsic drug resistance in Gram-negative bacteria is a resistance nodulation division type multidrug exporter, which couples with an outer membrane channel and a membrane fusion protein and exports drugs out of the cell, bypassing the periplasm; this process is driven by proton motive force. A recent crystal structure determination of a major resistance nodulation division type multidrug exporter, AcrB in Escherichia coli, greatly advances our understanding of the multidrug export mechanism. The most striking feature of the AcrB trimer is the presence of three vestibules open to the periplasm at the boundary between the periplasmic headpiece and the transmembrane region. Substrates can gain access to the central cavity from the periplasmic surface of the cytoplasmic membrane and are then actively transported through the extramembrane pore into the outer membrane channel TolC, via the funnel at the top of the AcrB headpiece. PMID:12948774

  14. Dynamic Proxies of Ocean Circulation in the North Atlantic During the Younger Dryas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praetorius, S.; McManus, J.

    2007-05-01

    The North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) is a major component of the Atlantic's meridional overturning circulation, which is strongly linked to climate through the sea-to-air heat transfer by water transported from low to high latitudes. Changes in this circulation system have been implicated in the abrupt climate reversal of the Younger Dryas. Previous studies using nutrient proxies such as ?13C and Cd/Ca show a nutrient enrichment in the North Atlantic during the Younger Dryas, reflecting a reduction in the volume of nutrient-depleted NADW. Although valuable, water mass tracers cannot constrain the rate of overturning; a crucial factor in the overall heat flux of deep water formation. Dynamic proxies such as 231Pa/230Th disequilibria and the grain size of deep sea sediments provide tools to measure changes in the vigor of ocean circulation. 231Pa/230Th ratios act as a proxy for the export rate of subsurface waters from the North Atlantic. Changes in the non-cohesive sortable silt (SS) size fraction (10-63?m) of terrigenous sediments reflect variations in the current strength as a result of the relative entrainment capacity of flow velocity. Here we compare the grain size record from site 984, along the Rekjanes Ridge, with 231Pa/230Th data from core GGC5 on the Bermuda Rise. Site 984 is well situated to monitor both the modern deep water overflows and the intermediate depth waters of the glacial period, whereas core GGC5 offers a more basin-wide measure of circulation export. These records indicate similarly robust overturning circulation during the last glacial maximum and Holocene. In contrast, the deglacial period reveals significant reductions in the circulation. The Younger Dryas exhibits the most dramatic decrease in grain size throughout the 20,000 year record, and the 231Pa/230Th data indicate a reduction in export rate that is rivaled only by the first Heinrich iceberg discharge event. The reduction in current strength during the Younger Dryas is concurrent with an increase in ?18O and polar fauna at both sites, indicating colder surface temperatures. The dynamic circulation proxies demonstrate that decreases in the rate of circulation occurred in association with deglacial melting, supporting the hypothesis that freshwater influx can have a dampening effect on the rate of overturning. This confirms the close connection between ocean circulation and such rapid climate oscillations as the Younger Dryas.

  15. Sea ice and the ocean mixed layer over the Antarctic shelf seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petty, A. A.; Holland, P. R.; Feltham, D. L.

    2013-08-01

    An ocean mixed layer model has been incorporated into the Los Alamos sea ice model CICE to investigate regional variations in the surface-driven formation of Antarctic shelf waters. This model captures well the expected sea ice thickness distribution, and produces deep (> 500 m) mixed layers in the Weddell and Ross shelf seas each winter. This results in the complete destratification of the water column in deep southern coastal regions (leading to HSSW formation) and also in some shallower regions (no HSSW formation) of these seas. Shallower mixed layers are produced in the Amundsen and Bellingshausen seas. By deconstructing the surface power input to the mixed layer, we show that the freshwater flux from sea ice growth/melt dominates the evolution of the mixed layer in all seas, with a smaller contribution from the surface heat flux. The Weddell and Ross shelf seas receive an annual surplus of energy at the surface, the Amundsen shelf sea energy input in autumn/winter is balanced by energy extraction in spring/summer, and the Bellingshausen shelf sea experiences an annual surface energy deficit, through both a low energy input in autumn/winter and the highest energy loss in spring/summer. An analysis of the sea ice mass balance demonstrates the contrasting mean ice growth, melt and export in each region. The Weddell and Ross shelf seas have the highest annual ice growth, with a large fraction exported northwards each year, whereas the Bellingshausen shelf sea experiences the highest annual ice melt, driven by the advection of ice from the northeast. A linear regression analysis is performed to determine the temporal and spatial correlations between the autumn/winter mixed layer power input and several atmospheric variables. The temporal mean Weddell and Ross autumn/winter power input shows stronger spatial correlation to several atmospheric variables compared to the Amundsen and Bellingshausen. In contrast the spatial mean autumn/winter power input shows stronger temporal correlation to several atmospheric variables, in the Amundsen and Bellingshausen. All regions show strong temporal correlation between the autumn/winter surface power input and the meridional wind speed except the Ross, which instead shows moderate correlation to the zonal wind speed. Further regressions demonstrate that this is probably due to the Ross shelf-sea geometry and impact of the ocean turning angle on ice motion, with a more zonal (eastward) wind preventing ice build up along the Cape Adare coast in the eastern Ross shelf sea, increasing ice export.

  16. 78 FR 4833 - Order Denying Export Privileges

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-23

    ... Bureau of Industry and Security Order Denying Export Privileges In the Matter of: James Allen Larrison... was convicted of knowingly and willfully attempting to export and causing the attempted export from... 24 months of probation. Section 766.25 of the Export Administration Regulations (``EAR''...

  17. 40 CFR 92.909 - Export exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Export exemptions. 92.909 Section 92....909 Export exemptions. (a) A new locomotive or locomotive engine intended solely for export, and so... from EPA standards. (c) It is a condition of any exemption for the purpose of export under paragraph...

  18. 15 CFR 2012.3 - Export certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Export certificates. 2012.3 Section... STATES TRADE REPRESENTATIVE IMPLEMENTATION OF TARIFF-RATE QUOTAS FOR BEEF § 2012.3 Export certificates... export certificate is in effect with respect to the beef. (b) To be valid, an export certificate...

  19. 40 CFR 94.909 - Export exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Export exemptions. 94.909 Section 94... Export exemptions. (a) A new engine intended solely for export, and so labeled or tagged on the outside... of export under paragraph (a) of this section, that such exemption is void ab initio with respect...

  20. 40 CFR 91.1009 - Export exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Export exemptions. 91.1009 Section 91....1009 Export exemptions. (a) A new marine SI engine intended solely for export, and so labeled or tagged...., Washington, DC 20460. New marine SI engines exported to such countries must comply with EPA...

  1. Metagenomic insights into the evolution, function, and complexity of the planktonic microbial community of Lake Lanier, a temperate freshwater ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Oh, Seungdae; Caro-Quintero, Alejandro; Tsementzi, Despina; DeLeon-Rodriguez, Natasha; Luo, Chengwei; Poretsky, Rachel; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T

    2011-09-01

    Lake Lanier is an important freshwater lake for the southeast United States, as it represents the main source of drinking water for the Atlanta metropolitan area and is popular for recreational activities. Temperate freshwater lakes such as Lake Lanier are underrepresented among the growing number of environmental metagenomic data sets, and little is known about how functional gene content in freshwater communities relates to that of other ecosystems. To better characterize the gene content and variability of this freshwater planktonic microbial community, we sequenced several samples obtained around a strong summer storm event and during the fall water mixing using a random whole-genome shotgun (WGS) approach. Comparative metagenomics revealed that the gene content was relatively stable over time and more related to that of another freshwater lake and the surface ocean than to soil. However, the phylogenetic diversity of Lake Lanier communities was distinct from that of soil and marine communities. We identified several important genomic adaptations that account for these findings, such as the use of potassium (as opposed to sodium) osmoregulators by freshwater organisms and differences in the community average genome size. We show that the lake community is predominantly composed of sequence-discrete populations and describe a simple method to assess community complexity based on population richness and evenness and to determine the sequencing effort required to cover diversity in a sample. This study provides the first comprehensive analysis of the genetic diversity and metabolic potential of a temperate planktonic freshwater community and advances approaches for comparative metagenomics. PMID:21764968

  2. Metagenomic Insights into the Evolution, Function, and Complexity of the Planktonic Microbial Community of Lake Lanier, a Temperate Freshwater Ecosystem ?

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Seungdae; Caro-Quintero, Alejandro; Tsementzi, Despina; DeLeon-Rodriguez, Natasha; Luo, Chengwei; Poretsky, Rachel; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T.

    2011-01-01

    Lake Lanier is an important freshwater lake for the southeast United States, as it represents the main source of drinking water for the Atlanta metropolitan area and is popular for recreational activities. Temperate freshwater lakes such as Lake Lanier are underrepresented among the growing number of environmental metagenomic data sets, and little is known about how functional gene content in freshwater communities relates to that of other ecosystems. To better characterize the gene content and variability of this freshwater planktonic microbial community, we sequenced several samples obtained around a strong summer storm event and during the fall water mixing using a random whole-genome shotgun (WGS) approach. Comparative metagenomics revealed that the gene content was relatively stable over time and more related to that of another freshwater lake and the surface ocean than to soil. However, the phylogenetic diversity of Lake Lanier communities was distinct from that of soil and marine communities. We identified several important genomic adaptations that account for these findings, such as the use of potassium (as opposed to sodium) osmoregulators by freshwater organisms and differences in the community average genome size. We show that the lake community is predominantly composed of sequence-discrete populations and describe a simple method to assess community complexity based on population richness and evenness and to determine the sequencing effort required to cover diversity in a sample. This study provides the first comprehensive analysis of the genetic diversity and metabolic potential of a temperate planktonic freshwater community and advances approaches for comparative metagenomics. PMID:21764968

  3. Catchment controls on solute export

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musolff, Andreas; Schmidt, Christian; Selle, Benny; Fleckenstein, Jan H.

    2015-12-01

    Dynamics of solute export from catchments can be classified in terms of chemostatic and chemodynamic export regimes by an analysis of concentration-discharge relationships. Previous studies hypothesized that distinct export regimes emerge from the presence of solute mass stores within the catchment and their connectivity to the stream. However, so far a direct link of solute export to identifiable catchment characteristics is missing. Here we investigate long-term time series of stream water quality and quantity of nine neighboring catchments in Central Germany ranging from relatively pristine mountain catchments to agriculturally dominated lowland catchments, spanning large gradients in land use, geology, and climatic conditions. Given the strong collinearity of catchment characteristics we used partial least square regression analysis to quantify the predictive power of these characteristics for median concentrations and the metrics of export regime. We can show that median concentrations and metrics of the export regimes of major ions and nutrients can indeed be inferred from catchment characteristics. Strongest predictors for median concentrations were the share of arable land, discharge per area, runoff coefficient and available water capacity in the root zone of the catchments. The available water capacity in the root zone, the share of arable land being artificially drained and the topographic gradient were found to be the most relevant predictors for the metrics of export regime. These catchment characteristics can represent the size of solute mass store such as the fraction of arable land being a measure for the store of nitrate. On the other hand, catchment characteristics can be a measure for the connectivity of these solute stores to the stream such as the fraction of tile drained land in the catchments. This study demonstrates the potential of data-driven, top down analyses using simple metrics to classify and better understand dominant controls of solute export from catchments.

  4. Greenland freshwater pathways in the sub-Arctic Seas from model experiments with passive tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dukhovskoy, Dmitry S.; Myers, Paul G.; Platov, Gennady; Timmermans, Mary-Louise; Curry, Beth; Proshutinsky, Andrey; Bamber, Jonathan L.; Chassignet, Eric; Hu, Xianmin; Lee, Craig M.; Somavilla, Raquel

    2016-01-01

    Accelerating since the early 1990s, the Greenland Ice Sheet mass loss exerts a significant impact on thermohaline processes in the sub-Arctic seas. Surplus freshwater discharge from Greenland since the 1990s, comparable in volume to the amount of freshwater present during the Great Salinity Anomaly events, could spread and accumulate in the sub-Arctic seas, influencing convective processes there. However, hydrographic observations in the Labrador Sea and the Nordic Seas, where the Greenland freshening signal might be expected to propagate, do not show a persistent freshening in the upper ocean during last two decades. This raises the question of where the surplus Greenland freshwater has propagated. In order to investigate the fate, pathways, and propagation rate of Greenland meltwater in the sub-Arctic seas, several numerical experiments using a passive tracer to track the spreading of Greenland freshwater have been conducted as a part of the Forum for Arctic Ocean Modeling and Observational Synthesis effort. The models show that Greenland freshwater propagates and accumulates in the sub-Arctic seas, although the models disagree on the amount of tracer propagation into the convective regions. Results highlight the differences in simulated physical mechanisms at play in different models and underscore the continued importance of intercomparison studies. It is estimated that surplus Greenland freshwater flux should have caused a salinity decrease by 0.06-0.08 in the sub-Arctic seas in contradiction with the recently observed salinification (by 0.15-0.2) in the region. It is surmised that the increasing salinity of Atlantic Water has obscured the freshening signal.

  5. Arctic Outflow West of Greenland: Mass and Freshwater Fluxes at Davis Strait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Craig; Curry, Beth; Petrie, Brian; Azetsu-Scott, Kumiko; Gobat, Jason

    2014-05-01

    Eberhard Fahrbach worked to understand the communication between the Arctic and subpolar oceans and its role in modulating Arctic change. This included long-standing leadership in the Arctic-Subarctic Ocean Flux program and the long-term quantification of fluxes east of Greenland, through Fram Strait, the primary pathway for Atlantic water passing into the Arctic and one of two gateways for freshwater flowing out. Freshwater also exits the Arctic west of Greenland, though the Canadian Arctic Archipelago and, to the south, Davis Strait. The strait provides a convenient choke point for monitoring temporal and spatial variability of Arctic outflow while also characterizing a critical upstream boundary condition for Labrador Sea convection. Fluxes through the Strait represent the net integrated Canadian Archipelago throughflow, over 50% of the Arctic's liquid freshwater discharge, modified by terrestrial inputs and oceanic processes during its southward transit through Baffin Bay. By the time they reach Davis Strait, Arctic waters already embody most of the transformations they undergo prior to exerting their influence on the deepwater formation sites in the Labrador Sea. An ongoing program has characterized Davis Strait volume, freshwater and heat flux since September 2004. Measurements include continuous velocity, temperature and salinity time series collected by a moored array, autumn ship-based hydrographic sections and high-resolution sections occupied by autonomous gliders. Moored instrumentation includes novel new instruments that provide temperature and salinity measurements in the critical region neat the ice-ocean interface and measurements over the shallow Baffin and West Greenland shelves, while gliders have captured the first high-resolution wintertime sections across the Strait. These data show large interannual variability in volume and freshwater transport, with no clear trends observed between 2004-2010. Average volume, liquid freshwater and sea ice transports are -1.6 +- 0.2 Sv, -93 +- 6 mSv and -10 +- 1 mSv, respectively (negative indicates southward transport). However, changes in circulation have occurred, as freshwater outflow from Baffin Bay has decreased and warm, salty North Atlantic inflow has increased since 1987-90. Local atmospheric variability within Baffin Bay and the Labrador Sea influence the observed variability in Davis Strait volume transport either directly or indirectly. Large-scale atmospheric teleconnections, such as the AO and NAO, correlate poorly with Davis Strait volume transport and are likely only an indicator of transport variability when the indices are strong.

  6. Abbreviation of larval development and extension of brood care as key features of the evolution of freshwater Decapoda.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Günter

    2013-02-01

    The transition from marine to freshwater habitats is one of the major steps in the evolution of life. In the decapod crustaceans, four groups have colonized fresh water at different geological times since the Triassic, the freshwater shrimps, freshwater crayfish, freshwater crabs and freshwater anomurans. Some families have even colonized terrestrial habitats via the freshwater route or directly via the sea shore. Since none of these taxa has ever reinvaded its environment of origin the Decapoda appear particularly suitable to investigate life-history adaptations to fresh water. Evolutionary comparison of marine, freshwater and terrestrial decapods suggests that the reduction of egg number, abbreviation of larval development, extension of brood care and lecithotrophy of the first posthatching life stages are key adaptations to fresh water. Marine decapods usually have high numbers of small eggs and develop through a prolonged planktonic larval cycle, whereas the production of small numbers of large eggs, direct development and extended brood care until the juvenile stage is the rule in freshwater crayfish, primary freshwater crabs and aeglid anomurans. The amphidromous freshwater shrimp and freshwater crab species and all terrestrial decapods that invaded land via the sea shore have retained ocean-type planktonic development. Abbreviation of larval development and extension of brood care are interpreted as adaptations to the particularly strong variations of hydrodynamic parameters, physico-chemical factors and phytoplankton availability in freshwater habitats. These life-history changes increase fitness of the offspring and are obviously favoured by natural selection, explaining their multiple origins in fresh water. There is no evidence for their early evolution in the marine ancestors of the extant freshwater groups and a preadaptive role for the conquest of fresh water. The costs of the shift from relative r- to K-strategy in freshwater decapods are traded-off against fecundity, future reproduction and growth of females and perhaps against size of species but not against longevity of species. Direct development and extension of brood care is associated with the reduction of dispersal and gene flow among populations, which may explain the high degree of speciation and endemism in directly developing freshwater decapods. Direct development and extended brood care also favour the evolution of social systems, which in freshwater decapods range from simple subsocial organization to eusociality. Hermaphroditism and parthenogenesis, which have evolved in some terrestrial crayfish burrowers and invasive open water crayfish, respectively, may enable populations to adapt to restrictive or new environments by spatio-temporal alteration of their socio-ecological characteristics. Under conditions of rapid habitat loss, environmental pollution and global warming, the reduced dispersal ability of direct developers may turn into a severe disadvantage, posing a higher threat of extinction to freshwater crayfish, primary freshwater crabs, aeglids and landlocked freshwater shrimps as compared to amphidromous freshwater shrimps and secondary freshwater crabs. PMID:22891642

  7. Testing massive Arctic sea ice export as a trigger for abrupt climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coletti, Anthony; Condron, Alan; Bradley, Raymond

    2014-05-01

    The discharge of freshwater from glacial lakes to the North Atlantic is repeatedly cited as the main trigger for abrupt centennial to millennial length climate change during the last deglaciation. Broecker et al., (1989) was a proponent of this idea suggesting that abrupt re-routing of pro-glacial lake freshwater to the North Atlantic through the St. Lawrence Valley weakened the strength of the AMOC. Yet, evidence for this is lacking, freshwater estimates in these lakes are relatively small and flood durations are rather short (<5 years), suggesting that floods may not have been the only mechanism driving these climate shifts. Using sophisticated ocean modeling, it has been shown that the release of freshwater originating from the Arctic is more effective at weakening the AMOC compared to freshwater released further south. Here we investigate whether the break-up and mobilization of thick Arctic sea-ice would have supplied enough freshwater to the Nordic Seas to sufficiently cause dampening of the AMOC and hinder NADW formation in the sub-polar North Atlantic. We use numerical climate models to assess 1) the maximum thickness of sea ice that can be formed during glacial periods and the volume of freshwater in the ice, 2) the mechanism which caused the collapse and mobilization of arctic sea-ice into the North Atlantic and 3) the impact of melting sea-ice on global ocean circulation. This hypothesis focuses on the potential impacts of sea-ice as a forcing mechanism for abrupt climate change events on geologic time scales.

  8. 15 CFR 758.1 - The Shipper's Export Declaration (SED) or Automated Export System (AES) record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) or Automated Export System (AES) record. 758.1 Section 758.1 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations... (SED) or Automated Export System (AES) record. (a) The Shipper's Export Declaration (SED) or Automated Export System (AES) record. The SED (Form 7525-V, Form 7525-V-Alt, or Automated Export System record)...

  9. 15 CFR 758.1 - The Shipper's Export Declaration (SED) or Automated Export System (AES) record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...) or Automated Export System (AES) record. 758.1 Section 758.1 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations... (SED) or Automated Export System (AES) record. (a) The Shipper's Export Declaration (SED) or Automated Export System (AES) record. The SED (Form 7525-V, Form 7525-V-Alt, or Automated Export System record)...

  10. 15 CFR 732.5 - Steps regarding Shipper's Export Declaration or Automated Export System record, Destination...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Declaration or Automated Export System record, Destination Control Statements, and recordkeeping. 732.5... THE EAR § 732.5 Steps regarding Shipper's Export Declaration or Automated Export System record... Automated Export System (AES) record. Exporters or agents authorized to complete the Shipper's...

  11. 15 CFR 732.5 - Steps regarding Shipper's Export Declaration or Automated Export System record, Destination...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Declaration or Automated Export System record, Destination Control Statements, and recordkeeping. 732.5... THE EAR § 732.5 Steps regarding Shipper's Export Declaration or Automated Export System record... Automated Export System (AES) record. Exporters or agents authorized to complete the Shipper's...

  12. 15 CFR 732.5 - Steps regarding Shipper's Export Declaration or Automated Export System record, Destination...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Declaration or Automated Export System record, Destination Control Statements, and recordkeeping. 732.5... THE EAR § 732.5 Steps regarding Shipper's Export Declaration or Automated Export System record... Automated Export System (AES) record. Exporters or agents authorized to complete the Shipper's...

  13. 15 CFR 758.1 - The Shipper's Export Declaration (SED) or Automated Export System (AES) record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) or Automated Export System (AES) record. 758.1 Section 758.1 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations... (SED) or Automated Export System (AES) record. (a) The Shipper's Export Declaration (SED) or Automated Export System (AES) record. The SED (Form 7525-V, Form 7525-V-Alt, or Automated Export System record)...

  14. 15 CFR 732.5 - Steps regarding Shipper's Export Declaration or Automated Export System record, Destination...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Declaration or Automated Export System record, Destination Control Statements, and recordkeeping. 732.5... THE EAR § 732.5 Steps regarding Shipper's Export Declaration or Automated Export System record... Automated Export System (AES) record. Exporters or agents authorized to complete the Shipper's...

  15. 15 CFR 758.1 - The Shipper's Export Declaration (SED) or Automated Export System (AES) record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) or Automated Export System (AES) record. 758.1 Section 758.1 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations... (SED) or Automated Export System (AES) record. (a) The Shipper's Export Declaration (SED) or Automated Export System (AES) record. The SED (Form 7525-V, Form 7525-V-Alt, or Automated Export System record)...

  16. 15 CFR 732.5 - Steps regarding Shipper's Export Declaration or Automated Export System record, Destination...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Declaration or Automated Export System record, Destination Control Statements, and recordkeeping. 732.5... THE EAR § 732.5 Steps regarding Shipper's Export Declaration or Automated Export System record... Automated Export System (AES) record. Exporters or agents authorized to complete the Shipper's...

  17. 75 FR 70905 - President's Export Council: Meeting of the President's Export Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-19

    ... International Trade Administration President's Export Council: Meeting of the President's Export Council AGENCY... President's Export Council will hold a meeting to discuss topics related to the National Export Initiative... at 9 a.m. (EST). ADDRESSES: The President's Export Council will convene its next meeting via...

  18. 75 FR 47548 - President's Export Council Subcommittee on Export Administration; Notice of Recruitment of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-06

    ...The President's Export Council Subcommittee on Export Administration (PECSEA) advises the U.S. Government on matters and issues pertinent to implementation of the provisions of the Export Administration Act and the Export Administration Regulations, as amended, and related statutes and regulations. These issues relate to U.S. export controls as mandated by law for national security, foreign......

  19. 75 FR 54857 - President's Export Council, Subcommittee on Export Administration; Notice of Recruitment of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-09

    ...The President's Export Council Subcommittee on Export Administration (PECSEA) advises the U.S. Government on matters and issues pertinent to implementation of the provisions of the Export Administration Act and the Export Administration Regulations, as amended, and related statutes and regulations. These issues relate to U.S. export controls as mandated by law for national security, foreign......

  20. Davis Pond Freshwater Prediversion Biomonitoring Study: Freshwater Fisheries and Eagles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jenkins, Jill A.; Bourgeois, E. Beth; Jeske, Clint W.

    2008-01-01

    In January 2001, the construction of the Davis Pond freshwater diversion structure was completed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The diversion of freshwater from the Mississippi River is intended to mitigate saltwater intrusion from the Gulf of Mexico and to lessen the concomitant loss of wetland areas. In addition to the freshwater inflow, Barataria Bay basin would receive nutrients, increased flows of sediments, and water-borne and sediment-bound compounds. The purpose of this biomonitoring study was, therefore, to serve as a baseline for prediversion concentrations of selected contaminants in bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) nestlings (hereafter referred to as eaglets), representative freshwater fish, and bivalves. Samples were collected from January through June 2001. Two similarly designed postdiversion studies, as described in the biological monitoring program, are planned. Active bald eagle nests targeted for sampling eaglet blood (n = 6) were generally located southwest and south of the diversion structure. The designated sites for aquatic animal sampling were at Lake Salvador, at Lake Cataouatche, at Bayou Couba, and along the Mississippi River. Aquatic animals representative of eagle prey were collected. Fish were from three different trophic levels and have varying feeding strategies and life histories. These included herbivorous striped mullet (Mugil cephalus), omnivorous blue catfish (Ictalurus furcatus), and carnivorous largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Three individuals per species were collected at each of the four sampling sites. Freshwater Atlantic rangia clams (Rangia cuneata) were collected at the downstream marsh sites, and zebra mussels (Dreissena spp.) were collected on the Mississippi River. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Biomonitoring of Environmental Status and Trends (BEST) protocols served as guides for fish sampling and health assessments. Fish are useful for monitoring aquatic ecosystems because they accumulate pesticides and other contaminants. Biomarker data on individual fish, generated at the USGS National Wetlands Research Center (Lafayette, La.), included percent white blood cells in whole blood, spleen weight to body weight ratio, liver weight to body weight ratio, condition factor, splenic macrophage aggregates, and liver microsomal 7-ethoxyresorufin-o-deethylase (EROD) activity. Fish age was estimated by comparing total lengths with values from the same species in the Southeast United States as determined from the literature. Contaminant analyses were coordinated by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Analytical Control Facility (Laurel, Md.), where residues of organochlorine (OC) pesticides, total polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), aliphatic hydrocarbons (AHs), and trace elements were determined. The organic contaminant data were generated at the Mississippi State University Chemical Lab (Mississippi State, Miss.), and the inorganic contaminant data were generated by the Texas A&M University Geochemical and Environmental Research Group (College Station, Tex.). Statistical tests were performed to assess relationships among contaminants, fish age, fish species, and collection sites.

  1. Ice-sheet feedbacks to freshwater perturbations on the climate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philippon, G.; Ramstein, G.; Charbit, S.

    2009-04-01

    Fresh water inputs in North Atlantic due to huge surge of icebergs coming from ice sheets might be responsible for drastic regional and global abrupt climatic transitions. To quantify the sensitivity of climate system to these fresh water inputs, we use a model of intermediate complexity coupled to ice-sheet models for both Northern and Southern Hemispheres. We mimic the Dansgaard-Oeschger and Heinrich events by forcing the model with appropriate fresh water perturbations. Moreover, we perform perturbations at high latitudes for both Northern (North Atlantic) and Southern (Circum Polar Ocean) hemispheres. The originality of this study is to investigate with such a global model, the response of the coupled system to freshwater discharges in three different climate contexts, the Last Maximum Glacial (LGM), the Last Glacial Inception (LGI) and the present-day (PD) climates. We show that: 1/ In all climate contexts, the stability of the North Atlantic circulation diagnosed through "hysteresis diagram is more sensitive to freshwater flux when ice sheets are considered as an interactive component of the climate system. 2/ The seesaw mechanism (swings between the Northern and Southern hemispheres) occurs mostly for the North Atlantic freshwater perturbation whereas it remains very weak for the Southern Ocean freshwater release. Moreover, in most cases, the seesaw is enhanced when ice sheets are interactive. 3/ An interesting result is that the fresh water perturbation amplifies the inception of an ice sheet at LGI. The sea-level drop is significantly increased and is in a better agreement with data.

  2. Swimming in the USA: Beachgoer Characteristics and Health Outcomes at U.S. Marine and Freshwater Beaches

    EPA Science Inventory

    Swimming in lakes and oceans is popular, but tittle is known about the demographic characteristics, behaviors, and health risks of beachgoers on a national level. Data from a prospective cohort study of beachgoers at multiple marine and freshwater beaches in the USA were used to ...

  3. Influence of water allocation and freshwater inflow on oyster production: a hydrodynamic-oyster population model for Galveston Bay, Texas, USA.

    PubMed

    Powell, Eric N; Klinck, John M; Hofmann, Eileen E; McManus, Margaret A

    2003-01-01

    A hydrodynamic-oyster population model was developed to assess the effect of changes in freshwater inflow on oyster populations in Galveston Bay, Texas, USA. The population model includes the effects of environmental conditions, predators, and the oyster parasite, Perkinsus marinus, on oyster populations. The hydrodynamic model includes the effects of wind stress, river runoff, tides, and oceanic exchange on the circulation of the bay. Simulations were run for low, mean, and high freshwater inflow conditions under the present (1993) hydrology and predicted hydrologies for 2024 and 2049 that include both changes in total freshwater inflow and diversions of freshwater from one primary drainage basin to another. Freshwater diversion to supply the Houston metropolitan area is predicted to negatively impact oyster production in Galveston Bay. Fecundity and larval survivorship both decline. Mortality from Perkinsus marinus increases, but to a lesser extent. A larger negative impact in 2049 relative to 2024 originates from the larger drop in fecundity under that hydrology. Changes in recruitment and mortality, resulting in lowered oyster abundance, occur because the bay volume available for mixing freshwater input from the San Jacinto and Buffalo Bayou drainage basins that drain metropolitan Houston is small in comparison to the volume of Trinity Bay that presently receives the bulk of the bay's freshwater inflow. A smaller volume for mixing results in salinities that decline more rapidly and to a greater extent under conditions of high freshwater discharge.Thus, the decline in oyster abundance results from a disequilibrium between geography and salinity brought about by freshwater diversion. Although the bay hydrology shifts, available hard substrate does not. The simulations stress the fact that it is not just the well-appreciated reduction in freshwater inflow that can result in decreased oyster production. Changing the location of freshwater inflow can also significantly impact the bay environment, even if the total amount of freshwater inflow does not change. PMID:12447579

  4. Single-cell genomics reveal low recombination frequencies in freshwater bacteria of the SAR11 clade

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The SAR11 group of Alphaproteobacteria is highly abundant in the oceans. It contains a recently diverged freshwater clade, which offers the opportunity to compare adaptations to salt- and freshwaters in a monophyletic bacterial group. However, there are no cultivated members of the freshwater SAR11 group and no genomes have been sequenced yet. Results We isolated ten single SAR11 cells from three freshwater lakes and sequenced and assembled their genomes. A phylogeny based on 57 proteins indicates that the cells are organized into distinct microclusters. We show that the freshwater genomes have evolved primarily by the accumulation of nucleotide substitutions and that they have among the lowest ratio of recombination to mutation estimated for bacteria. In contrast, members of the marine SAR11 clade have one of the highest ratios. Additional metagenome reads from six lakes confirm low recombination frequencies for the genome overall and reveal lake-specific variations in microcluster abundances. We identify hypervariable regions with gene contents broadly similar to those in the hypervariable regions of the marine isolates, containing genes putatively coding for cell surface molecules. Conclusions We conclude that recombination rates differ dramatically in phylogenetic sister groups of the SAR11 clade adapted to freshwater and marine ecosystems. The results suggest that the transition from marine to freshwater systems has purged diversity and resulted in reduced opportunities for recombination with divergent members of the clade. The low recombination frequencies of the LD12 clade resemble the low genetic divergence of host-restricted pathogens that have recently shifted to a new host. PMID:24286338

  5. Freshwater sources in the North Atlantic subpolar gyre from isotopes of sea water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benetti, Marion; Reverdin, Gilles; Pierre, Catherine; Khatiwala, Samar

    2014-05-01

    The surface freshwater budget of the North Atlantic subpolar gyre may contribute to control the meridional overturning variability. The isotopic composition of sea water is sensitive to the origin of the freshwater. It can be used together with salinity measurements and other tracers to investigate the relative contributions of water from Greenland icesheet and sea ice melt or Arctic freshwater to the surface layer budget. The transect Iceland-Newfoundland was sampled for isotopic measurements during two periods (1994-1996 and the 2010s) in order to assess the recent changes. These two periods are very contrasted in terms of ocean circulation and Labrador Sea water formation. The recent one corresponds to a period of accelerated melting of Greenland icesheet and of reduced subpolar and Arctic ice cover. In both periods, the Labrador Current carries a large part of the freshwater from the higher latitudes. These sections illustrate the seasonal variability of the freshwater input to the Labrador Current. On the Newfoundland shelf and slope, the salinity variability is dominated by the successive formation and melting of sea ice. We also observe decadal changes in the relation between salinity and isotopic composition in the interior subpolar gyre.

  6. Impact of wind and tides on the Lena River freshwater plume dynamics in the summer season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fofonova, Vera; Danilov, Sergey; Androsov, Alexey; Janout, Markus; Bauer, Martin; Overduin, Paul; Itkin, Polona; Wiltshire, Karen Helen

    2015-07-01

    The Lena plume dynamics in the Lena Delta region of the Laptev Sea are explored in simulations performed with the Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM) on a mesh with the horizontal resolution 0.4-5 km. The impact of wind and tides on the Lena plume propagation is analysed based on simulations for the summer season of 2008 and also on idealised experiments. All main Lena River freshwater channels (Trofimovskaya, Bykovskaya, Tumatskaya and Olenekskaya) produce buoyant outflows in the summer season. The surface plume buoyancy signature proves to be highly variable in time, especially in case of upwelling favourable wind events. Winds stronger than 6 m s-1 can already turn the dynamics of flows from all main freshwater channels to the wind-driven state. During the summer season, the bulk of freshwater from the Lena River stays in the eastern Laptev Sea because of location of the main Lena River freshwater channels, their large Kelvin numbers and light summer winds. Westward and northward plume excursions are wind-driven, and the model skill in simulating them depends on the available wind forcing. The main mechanism of tidal influence in the freshwater plume zone is through tidally induced mixing, except for the northern vicinity of the delta, where residual circulation may contribute to the plume eastward transport significantly.

  7. Freshwater Biological Traits Database (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cover of the <span class=Freshwater Biological Traits Database Final Report"> This final report discusses the development of a database of freshwater biolo...

  8. Freshwater Ecology. LC Science Tracer Bullet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niskern, Diana, Comp.

    Freshwater ecosystems include lakes, ponds, streams, rivers, and certain types of wetlands. This literature and resources guide is not intended to be a comprehensive bibliography on freshwater ecology; the guide is designed--as the name of the series implies--to put the reader or student "on target." Other literature guides related to freshwater…

  9. Freshwater Biological Traits Database (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cover of the <span class=Freshwater Biological Traits Database Final Report"> This final report discusses the development of a database of freshwater biolo...

  10. Effects of Pollution on Freshwater Fish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brungs, W. A.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of the effects of pollution on freshwater fish, covering publications of 1976-77. This review includes: (1) water quality; (2) pesticide pollutants; (3) chemical pollutants; (4) miscellaneous pollutants; and (5) physical factors of pollution on freshwater fish. A list of 338 references is also presented. (HM)

  11. Scientific development of a massively parallel ocean climate model. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Semtner, A.J.; Chervin, R.M.

    1996-09-01

    Over the last three years, very significant advances have been made in refining the grid resolution of ocean models and in improving the physical and numerical treatments of ocean hydrodynamics. Some of these advances have occurred as a result of the successful transition of ocean models onto massively parallel computers, which has been led by Los Alamos investigators. Major progress has been made in simulating global ocean circulation and in understanding various ocean climatic aspects such as the effect of wind driving on heat and freshwater transports. These steps have demonstrated the capability to conduct realistic decadal to century ocean integrations at high resolution on massively parallel computers.

  12. Rapid and early export of Phaeocystis antarctica blooms in the Ross Sea, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    DiTullio, G R; Grebmeier, J M; Arrigo, K R; Lizotte, M P; Robinson, D H; Leventer, A; Barry, J P; VanWoert, M L; Dunbar, R B

    2000-04-01

    The Southern Ocean is very important for the potential sequestration of carbon dioxide in the oceans and is expected to be vulnerable to changes in carbon export forced by anthropogenic climate warming. Annual phytoplankton blooms in seasonal ice zones are highly productive and are thought to contribute significantly to pCO2 drawdown in the Southern Ocean. Diatoms are assumed to be the most important phytoplankton class with respect to export production in the Southern Ocean; however, the colonial prymnesiophyte Phaeocystis antarctica regularly forms huge blooms in seasonal ice zones and coastal Antarctic waters. There is little evidence regarding the fate of carbon produced by P. antarctica in the Southern Ocean, although remineralization in the upper water column has been proposed to be the main pathway in polar waters. Here we present evidence for early and rapid carbon export from P. antarctica blooms to deep water and sediments in the Ross Sea. Carbon sequestration from P. antarctica blooms may influence the carbon cycle in the Southern Ocean, especially if projected climatic changes lead to an alteration in the structure of the phytoplankton community. PMID:10766240

  13. Freshwater Circulation in the Bay of Bengal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, E. A.; Riser, S.

    2012-12-01

    Based on new estimates, the Bay of Bengal receives a net input of approximately 5000 km3 of freshwater each year. This is primarily supplied by the precipitation and river discharge associated with the southwest monsoon. To balance this input, freshwater must be removed from the bay's surface layer at a mean rate of roughly 0.16 Sverdrup. This relatively large transport of freshwater, which could be of major climatological importance, remains poorly understood. In this study, we attempt to construct a seasonal freshwater budget for the Bay of Bengal using available climatological datasets. In particular, we investigate the relative importance of boundary currents, vertical mixing, and interior eddy fluxes in maintaining a closed freshwater budget. These observational findings are compared to simulated outputs from state-of-the-art models such as HYCOM and SODA.

  14. Arctic mass, freshwater and heat fluxes: methods and modelled seasonal variability.

    PubMed

    Bacon, Sheldon; Aksenov, Yevgeny; Fawcett, Stephen; Madec, Gurvan

    2015-10-13

    Considering the Arctic Ocean (including sea ice) as a defined volume, we develop equations describing the time-varying fluxes of mass, heat and freshwater (FW) into, and storage of those quantities within, that volume. The seasonal cycles of fluxes and storage of mass, heat and FW are quantified and illustrated using output from a numerical model. The meanings of 'reference values' and FW fluxes are discussed, and the potential for error through the use of arbitrary reference values is examined. PMID:26347537

  15. Sustainable Management of Coastal Environments Through Coupled Terrestrial-Coastal Ocean Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohrenz, S. E.; Cai, W.; Tian, H.; He, R.; Xue, Z.; Fennel, K.; Hopkinson, C.; Howden, S. D.

    2012-12-01

    Changing climate and land use practices have the potential to dramatically alter coupled hydrologic-biogeochemical processes and associated movement of water, carbon and nutrients through various terrestrial reservoirs into rivers, estuaries, and coastal ocean waters. Consequences of climate- and land use-related changes will be particularly evident in large river basins and their associated coastal outflow regions. The large spatial extent of such systems necessitates a combination of satellite observations and model-based approaches coupled with targeted ground-based site studies to adequately characterize relationships among climate forcing (e.g., wind, precipitation, temperature, solar radiation, humidity, extreme weather), land use practice/land cover change, and transport of materials through watersheds and, ultimately, to coastal regions. Here, we describe a NASA Interdisciplinary Science project that employs an integrated suite of models in conjunction with remotely sensed as well as targeted in situ observations with the objectives of describing processes controlling fluxes on land and their coupling to riverine, estuarine and ocean ecosystems. The objectives of this effort are to 1) assemble and evaluate long term datasets for the assessment of impacts of climate variability, extreme weather events, and land use practices on transport of water, carbon and nitrogen within terrestrial systems and the delivery of materials to waterways and rivers; 2) using the Mississippi River as a testbed, develop and evaluate an integrated suite of models to describe linkages between terrestrial and riverine systems, transport of carbon and nutrients in the Mississippi river and its tributaries, and associated cycling of carbon and nutrients in coastal ocean waters; and 3) evaluate uncertainty in model products and parameters and identify areas where improved model performance is needed through model refinement and data assimilation. The effort employs the Dynamic Land Ecosystem Model (DLEM) to characterize changes in terrestrial hydrogeologic processes and link this to a coupled physical-biological model characterizing ecosystem dynamics in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Comparisons between observed and modeled exports of freshwater, dissolved inorganic nitrogen and dissolved inorganic carbon show good agreement. These export fluxes are then coupled to a 3-dimensional coupled physical-biogeochemical model adapted for the Gulf of Mexico. Extensive model validations have been performed against satellite observed surface chlorophyll, and in-situ measurements including temperature, salinity, nutrient, alkalinity and dissolved inorganic carbon. Significant seasonal and interannual variations in coastal circulation, nutrient and carbon contents, and plankton concentrations are reasonably well simulated by this model. This research will provide information that will contribute to determining an overall carbon balance in North America. Results would also benefit efforts to describe and predict how land use and land cover changes impact coastal water quality including possible effects of coastal eutrophication and hypoxia.

  16. Modulation of Saharan dust export by the North African dipole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, S.; Cuevas, E.; Prospero, J. M.; Alastuey, A.; Querol, X.; López-Solano, J.; García, M. I.; Alonso-Pérez, S.

    2014-10-01

    Desert dust aerosols influence air quality and climate on a global scale, including radiative forcing, cloud properties and carbon dioxide modulation through ocean fertilisation. North Africa is the largest and most active dust source worldwide; however, the mechanisms modulating year-to-year variability in Saharan dust export in summer remains unclear. In this season, enhanced dust mobilization in the hyper-arid Sahara results in maximum dust impacts throughout the North Atlantic. The objective of this study is to identify the relationship between the long term interannual variability in Saharan dust export in summer and large scale meteorology in western North Africa. We address this issue by analysing ~25 yr (1987-2012) dust concentrations at the high altitude Izaña observatory (2373 m a.s.l.) in Tenerife Island, satellite and meteorological reanalysis data. Because in summer Saharan dust export occurs at altitudes 1-5 km, we paid special attention to the summer meteorological scenario in the 700 hPa standard level, characterised by a high over the subtropical Sahara and lower geopotential heights over the tropics; we measured the intensity of this low-high dipole like pattern in terms of the North AFrican Dipole Index (NAFDI): the difference of the 700 hPa geopotential heights anomalies averaged over central Morocco (subtropic) and over Bamako region (tropic). The correlations we found between the 1987-2012 NAFDI with dust at Izaña, satellite dust observations and meteorological re-analysis data, indicates that increase in the NAFDI (i) results in higher wind speeds at the north of the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone which enhances dust export over the subtropical North Atlantic, (ii) influences on the size distribution of exported dust particles, increasing the load of coarse dust and (iii) are associated with higher rainfall over tropical North Africa and the Sahel. Because of the North African dipole modulation, inter-annual variability in Saharan dust export is correlated with monsoon rainfall in the Sahel. High values of the NAFDI enhance dust export at subtropical latitudes. Our results suggest that long term variability in Saharan dust export may be influenced by global oscillations in the climate of the tropics and subtropics and that this may have influenced dust transport pathways in the last decades.

  17. Southern Ocean Iron Experiment (SOFex)

    SciTech Connect

    Coale, Kenneth H.

    2005-07-28

    The Southern Ocean Iron Experiment (SOFeX) was an experiment decades in the planning. It's implementation was among the most complex ship operations that SIO has been involved in. The SOFeX field expedition was successful in creating and tracking two experimentally enriched areas of the Southern Ocean, one characterized by low silicic acid, one characterized by high silicic acid. Both experimental sites were replete with abundant nitrate. About 100 scientists were involved overall. The major findings of this study were significant in several ways: (1) The productivity of the southern ocean is limited by iron availability. (2) Carbon uptake and flux is therefore controlled by iron availability (3) In spite of low silicic acid, iron promotes non-silicious phytoplankton growth and the uptake of carbon dioxide. (4) The transport of fixed carbon from the surface layers proceeds with a C:N ratio that would indicate differential remineralization of nitrogen at shallow depths. (5) These finding have major implications for modeling of carbon export based on nitrate utilization. (6) The general results of the experiment indicate that, beyond other southern ocean enrichment experiments, iron inputs have a much wider impact of productivity and carbon cycling than previously demonstrated. Scientific presentations: Coale, K., Johnson, K, Buesseler, K., 2002. The SOFeX Group. Eos. Trans. AGU 83(47) OS11A-0199. Coale, K., Johnson, K. Buesseler, K., 2002. SOFeX: Southern Ocean Iron Experiments. Overview and Experimental Design. Eos. Trans. AGU 83 (47) OS22D-01. Buesseler, K.,et al. 2002. Does Iron Fertilization Enhance Carbon Sequestration? Particle flux results from the Southern Ocean Iron Experiment. Eos. Trans. AGU 83 (47), OS22D-09. Johnson, K. et al. 2002. Open Ocean Iron Fertilization Experiments From IronEx-I through SOFeX: What We Know and What We Still Need to Understand. Eos. Trans. AGU 83 (47), OS22D-12. Coale, K. H., 2003. Carbon and Nutrient Cycling During the Southern Ocean Iron Enrichment Experiments. Seattle, WA. Geological Society of America. Coale, K., 2003. Open Ocean Iron Enrichment Experiments: What they have told us, what they have not. American Society for Limnology and Oceanography and The Oceanography Society, Honolulu, February 2004. Coale, K., 2004. Recent Research from the Southern Ocean Iron Experiment (SOFeX), in Taking the Heat: What is the impact of ocean fertilization on climate and ocean ecology? Science of earth and sky. AAAS, February 12-16, Seattle, WA

  18. Hydrography and biogeochemistry of the coastal ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naqvi, S. W. A.; Unnikrishnan, A. S.

    The coastal ocean accounts for only 7% of the total oceanic area, but it plays a very important role in biogeochemical cycles. It not only exchanges energy and matter with the open ocean, but terrestrial inputs of materials such as freshwater, sediments, dissolved/particulate nutrients and organic matter by surface runoff and groundwater flow have to pass through it. The processing of these materials in shallow waters is markedly different from that in the open ocean, and the contribution of the former to biogeochemical fluxes is disproportionately large (15% of oceanic primary production, 80% of organic burial, 50% of calcium carbonate deposition, 90% of sedimentary mineralization, and 75-90% of oceanic sink of suspended material carried by rivers). About 90% of the marine fish catch comes from the shallow seas whose overall economic value is estimated to be >40% of the world's ecosystem services and natural capital. Finally, as much as 40% of the world's population lives within 100 km of the coastlines, making the coastal ocean extremely vulnerable to anthropogenic impingement. This chapter first provides an overview of physical processes that differentiate coastal and openocean regions. It then focuses on selected biogeochemical processes that are of relevance to Surface Ocean-Lower Atmosphere Study, and how they are being affected by human activities.

  19. New insights into the organic carbon export in the Mediterranean Sea from 3-D modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyennon, A.; Baklouti, M.; Diaz, F.; Palmieri, J.; Beuvier, J.; Lebaupin-Brossier, C.; Arsouze, T.; Béranger, K.; Dutay, J.-C.; Moutin, T.

    2015-12-01

    The Mediterranean Sea is one of the most oligotrophic regions of the oceans, and nutrients have been shown to limit both phytoplankton and bacterial activities, resulting in a potential major role of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) export in the biological pump. Strong DOC accumulation in surface waters is already well documented, though measurements of DOC stocks and export flux are still sparse and associated with major uncertainties. This study provides the first basin-scale overview and analysis of organic carbon stocks and export fluxes in the Mediterranean Sea through a modeling approach based on a coupled model combining a mechanistic biogeochemical model (Eco3M-MED) and a high-resolution (eddy-resolving) hydrodynamic simulation (NEMO-MED12). The model is shown to reproduce the main spatial and seasonal biogeochemical characteristics of the Mediterranean Sea. Model estimations of carbon export are also of the same order of magnitude as estimations from in situ observations, and their respective spatial patterns are mutually consistent. Strong differences between the western and eastern basins are evidenced by the model for organic carbon export. Though less oligotrophic than the eastern basin, the western basin only supports 39 % of organic carbon (particulate and dissolved) export. Another major result is that except for the Alboran Sea, the DOC contribution to organic carbon export is higher than that of particulate organic carbon (POC) throughout the Mediterranean Sea, especially in the eastern basin. This paper also investigates the seasonality of DOC and POC exports as well as the differences in the processes involved in DOC and POC exports in light of intracellular quotas. Finally, according to the model, strong phosphate limitation of both bacteria and phytoplankton growth is one of the main drivers of DOC accumulation and therefore of export.

  20. Fluid flow enhances the effectiveness of toxin export by aquatic microorganisms: a first-passage perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licata, Nicholas; Clark, Aaron

    2014-03-01

    Aquatic microorganisms face a variety of challenges in the course of development. One central challenge is efficiently regulating the export of toxic molecules inside the developing embryo. The strategies employed should be robust with respect to the variable ocean environment and limit the chances that exported toxins are reabsorbed. In this talk we consider the first-passage problem for the uptake of exported toxins by a spherical embryo. A perturbative solution of the advection-diffusion equation reveals that a concentration boundary layer forms in the vicinity of the embryo, and that fluid flow enhances the effectiveness of toxin export. We highlight connections between the model results and recent experiments on the development of sea urchin embryos. We acknowledge financial support from the University of Michigan-Dearobrn CASL Faculty Summer Research Grant.

  1. A decrease in discharge-normalized DOC export by the Yukon River during summer through autumn

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Striegl, R.G.; Aiken, G.R.; Dornblaser, M.M.; Raymond, P.A.; Wickland, K.P.

    2005-01-01

    Climate warming is having a dramatic effect on the vegetation distribution and carbon cycling of terrestrial subarctic and arctic ecosystems. Here, we present hydrologic evidence that warming is also affecting the export of dissolved organic carbon and bicarbonate (DOC and HCO3-) at the large basin scale. In the 831,400 km2 Yukon River basin, water discharge (Q) corrected DOC export significantly decreased during the growing season from 1978-80 to 2001-03, indicating a major shift in terrestrial to aquatic C transfer. We conclude that decreased DOC export, relative to total summer through autumn Q, results from increased flow path, residence time, and microbial mineralization of DOC in the soil active layer and groundwater. Counter to current predictions, we argue that continued warming could result in decreased DOC export to the Bering Sea and Arctic Ocean by major subarctic and arctic rivers, due to increased respiration of organic C on land. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  2. Ocean dumping

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The regulation of the dumping of materials into the ocean is reviewed. Criteria to be applied in reviewing and evaluating permit applications for the transportation and dumping of materials into the ocean are established. A definition of monitoring of dumping sites, the assessment of fees to cover permit processing costs, and a moratorium is placed on the issuance of permits for the disposal of radioactive waste are included.

  3. 78 FR 31517 - Export Trade Certificate of Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-24

    ... Export Trade Certificate of Review to California Almond Export Association, LLC (``CAEA'') (Application... Review to California Almond Export Association, LLC on May 20, 2013. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION...

  4. Natural Gas Exports from Iran

    EIA Publications

    2012-01-01

    This assessment of the natural gas sector in Iran, with a focus on Iran’s natural gas exports, was prepared pursuant to section 505 (a) of the Iran Threat Reduction and Syria Human Rights Act of 2012 (Public Law No: 112-158). As requested, it includes: (1) an assessment of exports of natural gas from Iran; (2) an identification of the countries that purchase the most natural gas from Iran; (3) an assessment of alternative supplies of natural gas available to those countries; (4) an assessment of the impact a reduction in exports of natural gas from Iran would have on global natural gas supplies and the price of natural gas, especially in countries identified under number (2); and (5) such other information as the Administrator considers appropriate.

  5. Pathogenic agents in freshwater resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geldreich, Edwin E.

    1996-02-01

    Numerous pathogenic agents have been found in freshwaters used as sources for water supplies, recreational bathing and irrigation. These agents include bacterial pathogens, enteric viruses, several protozoans and parasitic worms more common to tropical waters. Although infected humans are a major source of pathogens, farm animals (cattle, sheep, pigs), animal pets (dogs, cats) and wildlife serve as significant reservoirs and should not be ignored. The range of infected individuals within a given warm-blooded animal group (humans included) may range from 1 to 25%. Survival times for pathogens in the water environment may range from a few days to as much as a year (Ascaris, Taenia eggs), with infective dose levels varying from one viable cell for several primary pathogenic agents to many thousands of cells for a given opportunistic pathogen.As pathogen detection in water is complex and not readily incorporated into routine monitoring, a surrogate is necessary. In general, indicators of faecal contamination provide a positive correlation with intestinal pathogen occurrences only when appropriate sample volumes are examined by sensitive methodology.Pathways by which pathogens reach susceptible water users include ingestion of contaminated water, body contact with polluted recreational waters and consumption of salad crops irrigated by polluted freshwaters. Major contributors to the spread of various water-borne pathogens are sewage, polluted surface waters and stormwater runoff. All of these contributions are intensified during periods of major floods. Several water-borne case histories are cited as examples of breakdowns in public health protection related to water supply, recreational waters and the consumption of contaminated salad crops. In the long term, water resource management must focus on pollution prevention from point sources of waste discharges and the spread of pathogens in watershed stormwater runoff.

  6. The imbalance of new and export production in the western Antarctic Peninsula, a potentially "leaky" ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stukel, Michael R.; Asher, Elizabeth; Couto, Nicole; Schofield, Oscar; Strebel, Stefanie; Tortell, Philippe; Ducklow, Hugh W.

    2015-09-01

    To quantify the balance between new production and vertical nitrogen export of sinking particles, we measured nitrate uptake, net nitrate drawdown, ΔO2/Ar-based net community production, sediment trap flux, and 234Th export at a coastal site near Palmer Station, Antarctica, during the phytoplankton growing season from October 2012 to March 2013. We also measured nitrate uptake and 234Th export throughout the northern western Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) region on a cruise in January 2013. We used a nonsteady state 234Th equation with temporally varying upwelling rates and an irradiance-based phytoplankton production model to correct our export and new production estimates in the complex coastal site near Palmer Station. Results unequivocally showed that nitrate uptake and net community production were significantly greater than the sinking particle export on region-wide spatial scales and season-long temporal scales. At our coastal site, new production (105 ± 17.4 mg N m-2 d-1, mean ± standard error) was 5.3 times greater than vertical nitrogen export (20.4 ± 2.4 mg N m-2 d-1). On the January cruise in the northern WAP, new production (47.9 ± 14.4 mg N m-2 d-1) was 2.4 times greater than export (19.9 ± 1.4 mg N m-2 d-1). Much of this imbalance can be attributed to diffusive losses of particulate nitrogen from the surface ocean due to diapycnal mixing, indicative of a "leaky" WAP ecosystem. If these diffusive losses are common in other systems where new production exceeds export, it may be necessary to revise current estimates of the ocean's biological pump.

  7. Climate Change-Related Hydrologic Variation Affects Dissolved Organic Carbon Export to the Gulf of Maine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huntington, T. G.; Balch, W. M.; Aiken, G.; Butler, K. D.; Billmire, M.; Roesler, C. S.; Camill, P.; Bourakovsky, A.

    2014-12-01

    Ongoing climate change is affecting the timing and amount of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) exported to the Gulf of Maine (GoM) through effects on hydrologic conditions. Climate warming in the northeast United States has resulted in decreases in snowfall amount and increases in the proportion of annual precipitation that falls as rain compared with snow. Warming has resulted in an increase in runoff during winter and earlier snowmelt and associated high spring flow. Increases in annual precipitation have resulted in increases in annual runoff. Increases in flashiness in some rivers have resulted in higher variability in daily runoff. DOC fluxes were estimated for water years 1950 through 2012 in eight rivers draining to the GoM that had long-term discharge data and data for DOC during all months of the year. These estimates used LOADEST to fit a seasonally-adjusted concentration - discharge relation. The adjusted maximum likelihood estimation (AMLE) method was used to estimate loads. One of several predefined regression models evaluated in LOADEST was selected based on the Akaike information criterion (AIC) for each river. This analysis assumed stationarity in the concentration - discharge relations. The proportion of total annual DOC exported during winter has increased. The proportion of DOC exported during March and April has also increased and the proportion exported during May has decreased in association with earlier snowmelt runoff and earlier recession to summer low flow. The total annual DOC exported by these rivers increased significantly from 1950 to 2012. The increase in flashiness has increased daily variability in DOC export in some rivers. Changes in the timing and amount of DOC exported to the near coastal ocean may influence marine biogeochemistry including the development of nuisance and harmful algal blooms, carbon sequestration, and the interpretation of satellite-derived ocean color. Terrestrially derived DOC exported to the marine environment could decrease phytoplankton productivity through light attenuation.

  8. RNA Export through the NPC in Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Okamura, Masumi; Inose, Haruko; Masuda, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, RNAs are transcribed in the nucleus and exported to the cytoplasm through the nuclear pore complex. The RNA molecules that are exported from the nucleus into the cytoplasm include messenger RNAs (mRNAs), ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs), transfer RNAs (tRNAs), small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs), micro RNAs (miRNAs), and viral mRNAs. Each RNA is transported by a specific nuclear export receptor. It is believed that most of the mRNAs are exported by Nxf1 (Mex67 in yeast), whereas rRNAs, snRNAs, and a certain subset of mRNAs are exported in a Crm1/Xpo1-dependent manner. tRNAs and miRNAs are exported by Xpot and Xpo5. However, multiple export receptors are involved in the export of some RNAs, such as 60S ribosomal subunit. In addition to these export receptors, some adapter proteins are required to export RNAs. The RNA export system of eukaryotic cells is also used by several types of RNA virus that depend on the machineries of the host cell in the nucleus for replication of their genome, therefore this review describes the RNA export system of two representative viruses. We also discuss the NPC anchoring-dependent mRNA export factors that directly recruit specific genes to the NPC. PMID:25802992

  9. Global carbon export from the terrestrial biosphere controlled by erosion.

    PubMed

    Galy, Valier; Peucker-Ehrenbrink, Bernhard; Eglinton, Timothy

    2015-05-14

    Riverine export of particulate organic carbon (POC) to the ocean affects the atmospheric carbon inventory over a broad range of timescales. On geological timescales, the balance between sequestration of POC from the terrestrial biosphere and oxidation of rock-derived (petrogenic) organic carbon sets the magnitude of the atmospheric carbon and oxygen reservoirs. Over shorter timescales, variations in the rate of exchange between carbon reservoirs, such as soils and marine sediments, also modulate atmospheric carbon dioxide levels. The respective fluxes of biospheric and petrogenic organic carbon are poorly constrained, however, and mechanisms controlling POC export have remained elusive, limiting our ability to predict POC fluxes quantitatively as a result of climatic or tectonic changes. Here we estimate biospheric and petrogenic POC fluxes for a suite of river systems representative of the natural variability in catchment properties. We show that export yields of both biospheric and petrogenic POC are positively related to the yield of suspended sediment, revealing that POC export is mostly controlled by physical erosion. Using a global compilation of gauged suspended sediment flux, we derive separate estimates of global biospheric and petrogenic POC fluxes of 157(+74)(-50) and 43(+61)(-25) megatonnes of carbon per year, respectively. We find that biospheric POC export is primarily controlled by the capacity of rivers to mobilize and transport POC, and is largely insensitive to the magnitude of terrestrial primary production. Globally, physical erosion rates affect the rate of biospheric POC burial in marine sediments more strongly than carbon sequestration through silicate weathering. We conclude that burial of biospheric POC in marine sediments becomes the dominant long-term atmospheric carbon dioxide sink under enhanced physical erosion. PMID:25971513

  10. Global carbon export from the terrestrial biosphere controlled by erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galy, Valier; Peucker-Ehrenbrink, Bernhard; Eglinton, Timothy

    2015-05-01

    Riverine export of particulate organic carbon (POC) to the ocean affects the atmospheric carbon inventory over a broad range of timescales. On geological timescales, the balance between sequestration of POC from the terrestrial biosphere and oxidation of rock-derived (petrogenic) organic carbon sets the magnitude of the atmospheric carbon and oxygen reservoirs. Over shorter timescales, variations in the rate of exchange between carbon reservoirs, such as soils and marine sediments, also modulate atmospheric carbon dioxide levels. The respective fluxes of biospheric and petrogenic organic carbon are poorly constrained, however, and mechanisms controlling POC export have remained elusive, limiting our ability to predict POC fluxes quantitatively as a result of climatic or tectonic changes. Here we estimate biospheric and petrogenic POC fluxes for a suite of river systems representative of the natural variability in catchment properties. We show that export yields of both biospheric and petrogenic POC are positively related to the yield of suspended sediment, revealing that POC export is mostly controlled by physical erosion. Using a global compilation of gauged suspended sediment flux, we derive separate estimates of global biospheric and petrogenic POC fluxes of and megatonnes of carbon per year, respectively. We find that biospheric POC export is primarily controlled by the capacity of rivers to mobilize and transport POC, and is largely insensitive to the magnitude of terrestrial primary production. Globally, physical erosion rates affect the rate of biospheric POC burial in marine sediments more strongly than carbon sequestration through silicate weathering. We conclude that burial of biospheric POC in marine sediments becomes the dominant long-term atmospheric carbon dioxide sink under enhanced physical erosion.

  11. Biodiversity and distribution of polar freshwater DNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre de Cárcer, Daniel; López-Bueno, Alberto; Pearce, David A.; Alcamí, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Viruses constitute the most abundant biological entities and a large reservoir of genetic diversity on Earth. Despite the recent surge in their study, our knowledge on their actual biodiversity and distribution remains sparse. We report the first metagenomic analysis of Arctic freshwater viral DNA communities and a comparative analysis with other freshwater environments. Arctic viromes are dominated by unknown and single-stranded DNA viruses with no close relatives in the database. These unique viral DNA communities mostly relate to each other and present some minor genetic overlap with other environments studied, including an Arctic Ocean virome. Despite common environmental conditions in polar ecosystems, the Arctic and Antarctic DNA viromes differ at the fine-grain genetic level while sharing a similar taxonomic composition. The study uncovers some viral lineages with a bipolar distribution, suggesting a global dispersal capacity for viruses, and seemingly indicates that viruses do not follow the latitudinal diversity gradient known for macroorganisms. Our study sheds light into the global biogeography and connectivity of viral communities. PMID:26601189

  12. Biodiversity and distribution of polar freshwater DNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Aguirre de Cárcer, Daniel; López-Bueno, Alberto; Pearce, David A; Alcamí, Antonio

    2015-06-01

    Viruses constitute the most abundant biological entities and a large reservoir of genetic diversity on Earth. Despite the recent surge in their study, our knowledge on their actual biodiversity and distribution remains sparse. We report the first metagenomic analysis of Arctic freshwater viral DNA communities and a comparative analysis with other freshwater environments. Arctic viromes are dominated by unknown and single-stranded DNA viruses with no close relatives in the database. These unique viral DNA communities mostly relate to each other and present some minor genetic overlap with other environments studied, including an Arctic Ocean virome. Despite common environmental conditions in polar ecosystems, the Arctic and Antarctic DNA viromes differ at the fine-grain genetic level while sharing a similar taxonomic composition. The study uncovers some viral lineages with a bipolar distribution, suggesting a global dispersal capacity for viruses, and seemingly indicates that viruses do not follow the latitudinal diversity gradient known for macroorganisms. Our study sheds light into the global biogeography and connectivity of viral communities. PMID:26601189

  13. Arctic Freshwater Synthesis: Summary of key emerging issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prowse, T.; Bring, A.; Mârd, J.; Carmack, E.; Holland, M.; Instanes, A.; Vihma, T.; Wrona, F. J.

    2015-10-01

    In response to a joint request from the World Climate Research Program's Climate and Cryosphere Project, the International Arctic Science Committee, and the Arctic Council's Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program an updated scientific assessment has been conducted of the Arctic Freshwater System (AFS), entitled the Arctic Freshwater Synthesis (AFSΣ). The major reason behind the joint request was an increasing concern that changes to the AFS have produced, and could produce even greater, changes to biogeophysical and socioeconomic systems of special importance to northern residents and also produce extra-Arctic climatic effects that will have global consequences. The AFSΣ was structured around six key thematic areas: atmosphere, oceans, terrestrial hydrology, terrestrial ecology, resources, and modeling, the review of each coauthored by an international group of scientists and published as separate manuscripts in this special issue of Journal of Geophysical Research-Biogeosciences. This AFSΣ summary manuscript reviews key issues that emerged during the conduct of the synthesis, especially those that are cross-thematic in nature, and identifies future research required to address such issues.

  14. The Oceanic Biogeochemical Cycle of Zinc and Its Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vance, D.; Little, S. H.; de Souza, G. F.; Cullen, J. T.; Lohan, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    Zinc (Zn) is the most abundant trace metal in the phytoplankton that dominate vertical carbon export in the ocean, the diatoms. But the strong relationship between the vertical distributions of Zn and the silicon (Si) that makes up the opal hard parts of diatoms represents a long-standing puzzle. Zn is overwhelmingly co-located with phosphate in the organic matter of diatom cells, not with Si in opal, and is regenerated with phosphate in the upper ocean, not with Si in the deep. The resolution of this apparent paradox is key both to an understanding of the global oceanic cycling of Zn, and to the rates and mechanisms by which biologically-assimilated trace metals are returned to the photic zone. Here, we show that oceanic dissolved Zn exhibits significant isotopic variation in the upper ocean that is consistent with vertical cycling. However, we suggest that the isotopically homogeneous global deep ocean Zn pool is largely sourced from the Southern Ocean. This leads to a new view of the global oceanic cycling of this important trace metal, one that is consistent with the unique physiology of Southern Ocean diatoms, the coupling of Zn and Si in the global deep ocean, and the emerging paradigm for global ocean nutrient dynamics. Our data and interpretation imply a small Zn pool that is biologically cycled in the upper ocean, but is to a great extent decoupled from the much larger Southern-Ocean-dominated deep ocean pool.

  15. Export Production Fluctuations in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific during the Pliocene-Pleistocene: Reconstruction Using Barite Accumulation Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paytan, A.; Ma, Z.; Ravelo, A. C.; Liu, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Over the last 5 million years, Earth has experienced a transition from warmer climates to cooler climates. It is not clear how these changes affected export productivity in the Equatorial Pacific (EEP) and what are the potential feedbacks between ocean productivity and climate? To address these questions we use barite accumulation rates to reconstruct export productivity in the eastern equatorial Pacific (ODP Site 849) and compare the record to sea surface temperature (SST) fluctuations and other productivity proxies over the past 5.3 Ma. We find that export productivity fluctuated considerably on multiple time scales. During the Pliocene between 4.5 and 3 Ma, export productivity was on average higher (~50 g C m-2 yr-1) than during the Pleistocene (~ 35 g C m-2 yr-1). In the Pleistocene a trend of decreasing export production occurred between 3 Ma and 1 Ma (from ~60 to ~20 g C m-2 yr-1) followed by an increase over the last million years. Our record reveal decoupling between export productivity and SST on long (million year) time scales as previously suggested. Throughout this time interval shorter orbital-scale large amplitude fluctuations (between 10 and 100 g C m-2 yr-1) in export productivity are observed and export production was generally higher during cold periods or during transitions. Results from this study suggest that in the EEP mechanisms that affect carbon export on orbital time scales differed from those operating on longer time scales.

  16. Observations of Ocean Primary Productivity Using MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esaias, Wayne E.; Abbott, Mark R.; Koblinsky, Chester J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Measuring the magnitude and variability of oceanic net primary productivity (NPP) represents a key advancement toward our understanding of the dynamics of marine ecosystems and the role of the ocean in the global carbon cycle. MODIS observations make two new contributions in addition to continuing the bio-optical time series begun with Orbview-2's SeaWiFS sensor. First, MODIS provides weekly estimates of global ocean net primary productivity on weekly and annual time periods, and annual empirical estimates of carbon export production. Second, MODIS provides additional insight into the spatial and temporal variations in photosynthetic efficiency through the direct measurements of solar-stimulated chlorophyll fluorescence. The two different weekly productivity indexes (first developed by Behrenfeld & Falkowski and by Yoder, Ryan and Howard) are used to derive daily productivity as a function of chlorophyll biomass, incident daily surface irradiance, temperature, euphotic depth, and mixed layer depth. Comparisons between these two estimates using both SeaWiFS and MODIS data show significant model differences in spatial distribution after allowance for the different integration depths. Both estimates are strongly dependence on the accuracy of the chlorophyll determination. In addition, an empirical approach is taken on annual scales to estimate global NPP and export production. Estimates of solar stimulated fluorescence efficiency from chlorophyll have been shown to be inversely related to photosynthetic efficiency by Abbott and co-workers. MODIS provides the first global estimates of oceanic chlorophyll fluorescence, providing an important proof of concept. MODIS observations are revealing spatial patterns of fluorescence efficiency which show expected variations with phytoplankton photo-physiological parameters as measured during in-situ surveys. This has opened the way for research into utilizing this information to improve our understanding of oceanic NPP variability. Deriving the ocean bio-optical properties places severe demands on instrument performance (especially band to band precision) and atmospheric correction. Improvements in MODIS instrument characterization and calibration over the first 16 mission months have greatly improved the accuracy of the chlorophyll input fields and FLH, and therefore the estimates of NPP and fluorescence efficiency. Annual estimates now show the oceanic NPP accounts for 40-50% of the global total NPP, with significant interannual variations related to large scale ocean processes. Spatial variations in ocean NPP, and exported production, have significant effects on exchange of CO2 between the ocean and atmosphere. Further work is underway to improve both the primary productivity model functions, and to refine our understanding of the relationships between fluorescence efficiency and NPP estimates. We expect that the MODIS instruments will prove extremely useful in assessing the time dependencies of oceanic carbon uptake and effects of iron enrichment, within the global carbon cycle.

  17. Contamination of the freshwater ecosystem by pesticides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cope, Oliver B.

    1966-01-01

    A large part of our disquieting present-day pesticide problem is intimately tied to the freshwater ecosystem. Economic poisons are used in so many types of terrain to control so many kinds of organisms that almost all lakes and streams are likely to be contaminated. In addition to accidental contamination many pesticides are deliberately applied directly to fresh waters for suppression of aquatic animals or plants. The problem is intensified because of the extreme susceptibility of freshwater organisms. The complexity of freshwater environments and their variety makes it difficult to comprehend the total effect of pesticides.

  18. 40 CFR 35.1605-3 - Publicly owned freshwater lake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Publicly owned freshwater lake. 35.1605... Owned Freshwater Lakes § 35.1605-3 Publicly owned freshwater lake. A freshwater lake that offers public access to the lake through publicly owned contiguous land so that any person has the same opportunity...

  19. 40 CFR 35.1605-3 - Publicly owned freshwater lake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Publicly owned freshwater lake. 35.1605... Owned Freshwater Lakes § 35.1605-3 Publicly owned freshwater lake. A freshwater lake that offers public... maintaining the public access and recreational facilities of this lake or other publicly owned...

  20. Export production fluctuations in the eastern equatorial Pacific during the Pliocene-Pleistocene: Reconstruction using barite accumulation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zhongwu; Ravelo, Ana Christina; Liu, Zhonghui; Zhou, Liping; Paytan, Adina

    2015-11-01

    Export production is an important component of the carbon cycle, modulating the climate system by transferring CO2 from the atmosphere to the deep ocean via the biological pump. Here we use barite accumulation rates to reconstruct export production in the eastern equatorial Pacific over the past 4.3 Ma. We find that export production fluctuated considerably on multiple time scales. Export production was on average higher (51 g C m-2 yr-1) during the Pliocene than the Pleistocene (40 g C m-2 yr-1), decreasing between 3 and 1 Ma (from more than 60 to 20 g C m-2 yr-1) followed by an increase over the last million years. These trends likely reflect basin-scale changes in nutrient inventory and ocean circulation. Our record reveals decoupling between export production and temperatures on these long (million years) time scale. On orbital time scales, export production was generally higher during cold periods (glacial maxima) between 4.3 and 1.1 Ma. This could be due to stronger wind stress and higher upwelling rates during glacial periods. A shift in the timing of maximum export production to deglaciations is seen in the last ~1.1 million years. Results from this study suggest that, in the eastern equatorial Pacific, mechanisms that affect nutrient supply and/or ecosystem structure and in turn carbon export on orbital time scales differ from those operating on longer time scales and that processes linking export production and climate-modulated oceanic conditions changed about 1.1 million years ago. These observations should be accounted for in climate models to ensure better predictions of future climate change.

  1. Lessons in divergence and convergence in marine and freshwater iron-oxidizing bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emerson, D.; McBeth, J. M.; Fleming, E. J.; Moyer, C. L.

    2011-12-01

    Lithoautotrophic oxygen-dependent Fe-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) that grow at circumneutral pH are found in marine and freshwater habitats and play an important role in Fe-transformations. These obligately microaerophilic bacteria form unique biogenic Fe minerals that can become fossilized. Their obligate metabolism suggests they may been present during the late Archaean or early Proterozoic when oxygen was in low abundance and high Fe(II) concentrations existed in the ocean. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that members of the marine FeOB community belong to the Zetaproteobacteria, a novel class of Proteobacteria, whereas dominant freshwater FeOB belong to the class Betaproteobacteria. Despite different evolutionary histories, freshwater and marine strains share remarkable morphological and physiological similarities. As an illustration, this work describes the discovery of a sheathed FeOB that grows as a surface film on thick microbial mats composed of FeOB at hydrothermal vents associated with Loihi Seamount, an active undersea volcano. This uncultivated organism bears striking resemblance to the freshwater sheath forming Fe-oxidizer, Leptothrix ochracea; however by using different culture-independent techniques, including specific fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) probes to the SSU rRNA gene, we show that it is not L. ochracea, but a member of the Zetaproteobacteria. The strong morphological similarities between these organisms likely represent a case of convergent evolution. To further constrain relationships between members of the marine and freshwater groups of FeOB we surveyed four iron mat communities along a salinity gradient, from freshwater to near full strength seawater, in a tidal region of the Sheepscot river in Maine. The mat communities were examined microscopically, and all had abundant evidence for biogenically formed iron oxides. Community DNA was extracted from each site and community composition, as assessed by tagged pyrosequencing of V4 region of the SSU rRNA gene, revealed that FeOB related to Betaproteobacteria were most abundant at the freshwater site, but even at low salinity (1-3 ppt), Zetaproteobacteria were present and were dominant at intermediate salinity (10 ppt), where members of the FeOB Betaproteobacteria were not observed. These results were corroborated using appropriate FISH probes. This analysis demonstrated that marine FeOB are capable of growth under a range of salt conditions, while freshwater FeOB are restricted only to freshwater habitats. This has implications for interpretation of biogenic microfossils found in ancient environments.

  2. Global deep ocean oxygenation by enhanced ventilation in the Southern Ocean under long-term global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, A.; Abe-Ouchi, A.; Shigemitsu, M.; Oka, A.; Takahashi, K.; Ohgaito, R.; Yamanaka, Y.

    2015-10-01

    Global warming is expected to decrease ocean oxygen concentrations by less solubility of surface ocean and change in ocean circulation. The associated expansion of the oxygen minimum zone would have adverse impacts on marine organisms and ocean biogeochemical cycles. Oxygen reduction is expected to persist for a thousand years or more, even after atmospheric carbon dioxide stops rising. However, long-term changes in ocean oxygen and circulation are still unclear. Here we simulate multimillennium changes in ocean circulation and oxygen under doubling and quadrupling of atmospheric carbon dioxide, using a fully coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model and an offline biogeochemical model. In the first 500 years, global oxygen concentration decreases, consistent with previous studies. Thereafter, however, the oxygen concentration in the deep ocean globally recovers and overshoots at the end of the simulations, despite surface oxygen decrease and weaker Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. This is because, after the initial cessation, the recovery and overshooting of deep ocean convection in the Weddell Sea enhance ventilation and supply oxygen-rich surface waters to deep ocean. Another contributor to deep ocean oxygenation is seawater warming, which reduces the export production and shifts the organic matter remineralization to the upper water column. Our results indicate that the change in ocean circulation in the Southern Ocean potentially drives millennial-scale oxygenation in deep ocean, which is opposite to the centennial-scale global oxygen reduction and general expectation.

  3. Modeling the Arctic freshwater system and its integration in the global system: Lessons learned and future challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lique, Camille; Holland, Marika M.; Dibike, Yonas B.; Lawrence, David M.; Screen, James A.

    2016-03-01

    Numerous components of the Arctic freshwater system (atmosphere, ocean, cryosphere, and terrestrial hydrology) have experienced large changes over the past few decades, and these changes are projected to amplify further in the future. Observations are particularly sparse, in both time and space, in the polar regions. Hence, modeling systems have been widely used and are a powerful tool to gain understanding on the functioning of the Arctic freshwater system and its integration within the global Earth system and climate. Here we present a review of modeling studies addressing some aspect of the Arctic freshwater system. Through illustrative examples, we point out the value of using a hierarchy of models with increasing complexity and component interactions, in order to dismantle the important processes at play for the variability and changes of the different components of the Arctic freshwater system and the interplay between them. We discuss past and projected changes for the Arctic freshwater system and explore the sources of uncertainty associated with these model results. We further elaborate on some missing processes that should be included in future generations of Earth system models and highlight the importance of better quantification and understanding of natural variability, among other factors, for improved predictions of Arctic freshwater system change.

  4. Impact of Freshwater Fluxes on Labrador Sea Dynamics in the Regional Arctic System Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossainzadeh, S.; Maslowski, W.; Osinski, R.; Tulaczyk, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    Continental runoff provides a critical freshwater flux into the ocean because it adds time-space varying buoyancy to the coastal ocean. This forcing is linked to the large-scale ocean dynamics and climate via the shelf-basin exchange and its resulting impact on the stratification and ventilation of the interior basin. Here we evaluate the role that a realistic runoff forcing has on the hydrography and dynamics of the Labrador Sea by comparing results from two simulations using a subset of the Regional Arctic System Model (RASM). RASM is a regional earth system model, however in this study the atmospheric (Weather and Research Forecasting - WRF) and land (Variable Infiltration Capacity - VIC) model components are replaced with prescribed realistic atmospheric reanalysis data. Its ocean and sea ice models (Parallel Ocean Program - POP and Los Alamos Sea Ice - CICE models, respectively) are the only model components that are actively coupled via the flux coupler (CPL7). This model has a high spatial resolution of 1/12oin the horizontal and 45 levels in the vertical direction. The results of two simulations are analyzed which vary only in the way that sea surface salinity is determined: i) restored to monthly sea surface salinity climatology, or ii) calculated based on the prescribed surface freshwater fluxes. In the first run, the sea surface salinity is restored to mean monthly climatology from the Polar Science Center Hydrographic Climatology (PHC). In the second run, the surface salinity restoring is turned off and instead more realistic surface liquid freshwater fluxes from land runoff and precipitation minus evaporation (P-E) fluxes are prescribed from the Coordinated Ice-ocean Reference Experiments version 2 (CORE2). We find that the change in surface freshwater forcing creates a substantial difference in: (i) the modeled magnitude and spatial distribution of total kinetic energy, not only at the surface but also at depth, (ii) the sea ice extent and (iii) the spatial distribution and annual cycle of the mixed layer depth in the Labrador Sea. In addition, the hydrographic structure is more realistic in the second run when compared to observations. We further analyze the results in terms of the role that mesoscale eddies play in preconditioning or inhibiting open ocean convection and deep-water formation in the Labrador Sea.

  5. 7 CFR 966.18 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TOMATOES GROWN IN FLORIDA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 966.18 Export. Export means shipment of tomatoes beyond the boundaries of the...

  6. 7 CFR 922.15 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE APRICOTS GROWN IN DESIGNATED COUNTIES IN WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 922.15 Export. Export means to ship apricots beyond...

  7. 7 CFR 922.15 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE APRICOTS GROWN IN DESIGNATED COUNTIES IN WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 922.15 Export. Export means to ship apricots beyond...

  8. 7 CFR 922.15 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE APRICOTS GROWN IN DESIGNATED COUNTIES IN WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 922.15 Export. Export means to ship apricots beyond...

  9. 7 CFR 915.12 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AVOCADOS GROWN IN SOUTH FLORIDA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 915.12 Export. Export means to ship avocados to any destination which...

  10. 7 CFR 915.12 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AVOCADOS GROWN IN SOUTH FLORIDA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 915.12 Export. Export means to ship avocados to any destination which...

  11. 7 CFR 966.18 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TOMATOES GROWN IN FLORIDA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 966.18 Export. Export means shipment of tomatoes beyond the boundaries of the...

  12. 7 CFR 966.18 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TOMATOES GROWN IN FLORIDA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 966.18 Export. Export means shipment of tomatoes beyond the boundaries of the...

  13. 7 CFR 966.18 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TOMATOES GROWN IN FLORIDA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 966.18 Export. Export means shipment of tomatoes beyond the boundaries of the...

  14. Global patterns of dissolved silica export to the coastal zone: Results from a spatially explicit global model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beusen, A. H. W.; Bouwman, A. F.; Dürr, H. H.; Dekkers, A. L. M.; Hartmann, J.

    2009-12-01

    We present a multiple linear regression model developed for describing global river export of dissolved SiO2 (DSi) to coastal zones. The model, with river basin spatial scale and an annual temporal scale, is based on four variables with a significant influence on DSi yields (soil bulk density, precipitation, slope, and area with volcanic lithology) for the predam situation. Cross validation showed that the model is robust with respect to the selected model variables and coefficients. The calculated global river export of DSi is 380 Tg a-1 (340-427 Tg a-1). Most of the DSi is exported by global rivers to the coastal zone of the Atlantic Ocean (41%), Pacific Ocean (36%), and Indian Ocean (14%). South America and Asia are the largest contributors (25% and 23%, respectively). DSi retention in reservoirs in global river basins may amount to 18-19%.

  15. Estimating Freshwater Discharge from the Greenland Ice Sheet with MODIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, B. D.; Overeem, I.; Mikkelsen, A. B.; McGrath, D.; Syvitski, J. P.

    2013-12-01

    Freshwater discharge from the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) has significant ecological importance, impacts ocean circulation and represents a major contribution to global sea level rise. Despite these factors, only one river in Greenland (accounting for less than one percent of land terminating river outlets) has a published discharge record. Due to logistical constrains future efforts to directly gauge river discharge will likely remain ad hoc. To overcome this deficiency, we developed a remote sensing technique that utilizes observations of sediment plume geometry as a proxy for freshwater discharge from the ice sheet. We use MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) imagery, validated with a suite of oceanographic measurements from four fjords in southwest Greenland during the 2008, 2010, 2011 and 2012 summer seasons. From surface water samples collected during these campaigns we develop a robust retrieval algorithm for suspended sediment concentrations based on MODIS band one and two reflectance values (r2 =.84). This relationship allows us to accurately map sediment plume geometry of numerous river-fjord systems on all cloud-free days during the summer season. We then use in situ river discharge records from the Watson River at Kangerlussuaq (a six year record), ';Pakitsuup South' River near Illulisat (a two year record) and Naujat Kuat River near Nuuk (a three year record) to derive an empirical relationship between plume geometry and discharge volume. These fjords provide a robust test for this method, as fjord salinity for these locations span a continuum of river-dominated low salinity to ocean-dominated high salinity cases. We find high interannual stability in these relationships for individual sites, suggesting that this method may be suitable for estimating historical river discharges back to 2000 when Terra, the first satellite carrying MODIS was launched. Despite promise, variability in the empirical relationships found precludes reconstructions for additional river-fjord systems without in situ observations.

  16. Exceptional ocean surface conditions on the SE Greenland shelf during the Medieval Climate Anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miettinen, Arto; Divine, Dmitry V.; Husum, Katrine; Koç, Nalan; Jennings, Anne

    2015-12-01

    Diatom inferred 2900 year long records of August sea surface temperature (aSST) and April sea ice concentration (aSIC) are generated from a marine sediment core from the SE Greenland shelf with a special focus on the interval ca. 870-1910 Common Era (C.E.) reconstructed in subdecadal temporal resolution. The Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA) between 1000 and 1200 C.E. represents the warmest ocean surface conditions of the SE Greenland shelf over the late Holocene (880 B.C.E.(before the Common Era) to 1910 C.E.). It was characterized by abrupt, decadal to multidecadal changes, such as an abrupt warming of ~2.4°C in 55 years around 1000 C.E. Temperature changes of these magnitudes are rare on the North Atlantic proxy data. Compared to regional air temperature reconstructions, our results indicate a lag of about 50 years in ocean surface warming either due to increased freshwater discharge from the Greenland ice sheet or intensified sea ice export from the Arctic as a response to atmospheric warming at the beginning of the MCA. A cool phase, from 1200-1890 C.E., associated with the Little Ice Age, ends with the rapid warming of aSST and diminished aSIC in the early twentieth century. The results show that the periods of warm aSST and aSIC minima are coupled with solar minima suggesting that solar forcing possibly amplified by atmospheric forcing have been behind the variability of surface conditions on the SE Greenland over the last millennium. The results indicate that the SE Greenland shelf is a climatologically sensitive area where extremely rapid changes are possible and highlights the importance of the area under the present warming conditions.

  17. Decadal fingerprints of freshwater discharge around Greenland in a multi-model ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swingedouw, Didier; Rodehacke, Christian B.; Behrens, Erik; Menary, Matthew; Olsen, Steffen M.; Gao, Yongqi; Mikolajewicz, Uwe; Mignot, Juliette; Biastoch, Arne

    2013-08-01

    The recent increase in the rate of the Greenland ice sheet melting has raised with urgency the question of the impact of such a melting on the climate. As former model projections, based on a coarse representation of the melting, show very different sensitivity to this melting, it seems necessary to consider a multi-model ensemble to tackle this question. Here we use five coupled climate models and one ocean-only model to evaluate the impact of 0.1 Sv (1 Sv = 106 m3/s) of freshwater equally distributed around the coast of Greenland during the historical era 1965-2004. The ocean-only model helps to discriminate between oceanic and coupled responses. In this idealized framework, we find similar fingerprints in the fourth decade of hosing among the models, with a general weakening of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). Initially, the additional freshwater spreads along the main currents of the subpolar gyre. Part of the anomaly crosses the Atlantic eastward and enters into the Canary Current constituting a freshwater leakage tapping the subpolar gyre system. As a consequence, we show that the AMOC weakening is smaller if the leakage is larger. We argue that the magnitude of the freshwater leakage is related to the asymmetry between the subpolar-subtropical gyres in the control simulations, which may ultimately be a primary cause for the diversity of AMOC responses to the hosing in the multi-model ensemble. Another important fingerprint concerns a warming in the Nordic Seas in response to the re-emergence of Atlantic subsurface waters capped by the freshwater in the subpolar gyre. This subsurface heat anomaly reaches the Arctic where it emerges and induces a positive upper ocean salinity anomaly by introducing more Atlantic waters. We found similar climatic impacts in all the coupled ocean-atmosphere models with an atmospheric cooling of the North Atlantic except in the region around the Nordic Seas and a slight warming south of the equator in the Atlantic. This meridional gradient of temperature is associated with a southward shift of the tropical rains. The free surface models also show similar sea-level fingerprints notably with a comma-shape of high sea-level rise following the Canary Current.

  18. Export bill and scientific exchanges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    President Ronald Reagan has signed into law the reauthorization of the Export Administration Act (EAA), first passed in 1979. The amended version of the law, signed July 12, includes a policy statement in support of “vigorous scientific enterprise. . .in accordance with applicable provisions of law. . .by means of publication, teaching, conferences, and other forms of scholarly exchange.”

  19. Physicist sentenced for export violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwynne, Peter

    2009-08-01

    J Reece Roth, a retired University of Tennessee plasma physicist convicted of violating the American Arms Export Control Act, is planning to appeal against a four-year prison sentence handed down last month. "It's an appeal against everything, including the verdict and the sentence," says his lawyer Thomas Dundon.

  20. Nuclear export of messenger RNA.

    PubMed

    Katahira, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Transport of messenger RNA (mRNA) from the nucleus to the cytoplasm is an essential step of eukaryotic gene expression. In the cell nucleus, a precursor mRNA undergoes a series of processing steps, including capping at the 5' ends, splicing and cleavage/polyadenylation at the 3' ends. During this process, the mRNA associates with a wide variety of proteins, forming a messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) particle. Association with factors involved in nuclear export also occurs during transcription and processing, and thus nuclear export is fully integrated into mRNA maturation. The coupling between mRNA maturation and nuclear export is an important mechanism for providing only fully functional and competent mRNA to the cytoplasmic translational machinery, thereby ensuring accuracy and swiftness of gene expression. This review describes the molecular mechanism of nuclear mRNA export mediated by the principal transport factors, including Tap-p15 and the TREX complex. PMID:25836925

  1. 76 FR 52935 - President's Export Council, Subcommittee on Export Administration; Notice of Open Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Bureau of Industry and Security President's Export Council, Subcommittee on Export Administration; Notice of Open Meeting The President's Export Council Subcommittee on Export Administration (PECSEA) will meet on September 19 and 20, 2011, 10 a.m.,...

  2. 78 FR 54450 - President's Export Council Subcommittee on Export Administration; Notice of Open Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Bureau of Industry and Security President's Export Council Subcommittee on Export Administration; Notice of Open Meeting The President's Export Council Subcommittee on Export Administration (PECSEA) will meet on September 18, 2013, 10 a.m., at the...

  3. 77 FR 30500 - President's Export Council; Subcommittee on Export Administration; Notice of Open Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Bureau of Industry and Security President's Export Council; Subcommittee on Export Administration; Notice of Open Meeting The President's Export Council Subcommittee on Export Administration (PECSEA) will meet on June 4, 2012, 10:00 a.m., at the...

  4. 19 CFR 351.414 - Comparison of normal value with export price (constructed export price).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Comparison of normal value with export price... Price, Fair Value, and Normal Value § 351.414 Comparison of normal value with export price (constructed... value and, in an investigation, prices used as the basis for export price or constructed export price...

  5. Arctic Fresh Water Export and its Impact on Climate in the 20th and 21st Century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenigk, T.; Mikolajewicz, U.; Haak, H.; Jungclaus, J.

    2005-12-01

    Coupled IPCC experiments with the Max-Planck-Institute climate model ECHAM5/MPI-OM are used to analyse the changes in the fresh water export out of the Arctic. Furthermore, the impacts of these changes on climate are investigated. In the 20th century, 57 % of the simulated Arctic fresh water export (reference salinity is 34.8) into the North Atlantic Ocean takes place through Fram Strait, 32 % through the Canadian Archipelago and 11 % over the Barents Shelf. The variability is mainly governed by the ice export through Fram Strait and is highly affected by the atmospheric circulation. Large ice exports provoke a dramatic reduction in Labrador Sea surface salinity in the following years. Oceanic convection is decreased and ice cover is increased. As a consequence, the heat flux from ocean to atmosphere is below normal, which leads to significant negative temperature anomalies in the Labrador Sea. In the 21st century, our model results show a reduction of sea ice volume and an increase of precipitation and Arctic rivers runoff. Most of this additional fresh water is stored in the Arctic Ocean. The total Arctic fresh water export is only slightly changing until year 2100. However, a redistribution of the export occurs: The solid part becomes much smaller with time and plays no significant role anymore at the end of the 21st century. At the same time the fluid part increases. The export through the Canadian Archipelago rises by 0.025 Sverdrup, while the export over the Barents Shelf is reduced by 0.02 Sverdrup. The amount of fresh water exported through Fram Strait stays constant but the interannual variability is decreased by 25 %. The impact of the export through Fram Strait on Labrador Sea climate is thus strongly reduced. In contrast, the export through the Canadian Archipelago gains importance. The convection is reduced by about 40 % in the Greenland Sea and 60 % in the Labrador Sea. The reduction in the Labrador Sea can be explained by increased fresh water export through the Canadian Archipelago. In the Greenland Sea higher air and sea temperatures are the main reason for the decrease. In both regions the difference of precipitation and evaporation becomes larger and contributes to the decrease in convection. The meridional overturning circulation (MOC) at 30 degrees N declines from about 22 Sverdrup in the 20th century to 16 Sverdrup at the end of the 21st century. The reduction in the MOC leads to a much weaker warming in the northern North Atlantic in comparison to the surrounding areas.

  6. Role of the Freshwater Forcing on the Atlantic Thermohaline Circulation in Climate Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, S.; Kitoh, A.

    2005-12-01

    Effects of the freshwater forcing changes on the thermohaline circulation (THC) differ depending on as to which regimes the circulation is in. This fact is obvious from the considerations based on the simple conceptual box models like Stommel 1961 or Rahmstorf 1996. However, the THC regime of the real Atlantic is not obvious including the problem as to whether such a simple view is applicable or not. In this study, the authors try to determine the Atlantic THC regime of the MRI-CGCM2 from an analysis of a partially coupled experiment, where the greenhouse gas concentrations are fixed to the present-day values but the ocean surface freshwater flux is taken from a transient global warming experiment. Such an experiment is thought to show the role of freshwater forcing more clearly then a fully coupled transient global warming simulation. Analyses show that the salt content of the northern North Atlantic increases in the case of global warming as a long-term response although the water flux over there makes the surface water fresher. It stabilize (or enhance) the Atlantic THC as a long-term response. This response of the THC to an increased freshwater forcing suggests that the THC of the MRI-CGCM2 is in the thermohaline driven regime in the context of the boxmodels. The freshwater flux adjustment used in the MRI-CGCM2 make the problem somewhat complicated. However, a consideration based on the box model and the Atlantic freshwater budget suggests that this result can be generalized to other AOGCMs and/or the real world.

  7. Arctic Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, Claire L.; Zukor, Dorothy J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Arctic Ocean is the smallest of the Earth's four major oceans, covering 14x10(exp 6) sq km located entirely within the Arctic Circle (66 deg 33 min N). It is a major player in the climate of the north polar region and has a variable sea ice cover that tends to increase its sensitivity to climate change. Its temperature, salinity, and ice cover have all undergone changes in the past several decades, although it is uncertain whether these predominantly reflect long-term trends, oscillations within the system, or natural variability. Major changes include a warming and expansion of the Atlantic layer, at depths of 200-900 m, a warming of the upper ocean in the Beaufort Sea, a considerable thinning (perhaps as high as 40%) of the sea ice cover, a lesser and uneven retreat of the ice cover (averaging approximately 3% per decade), and a mixed pattern of salinity increases and decreases.

  8. Ocean Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veron, Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    Ocean spray consists of small water droplets ejected from the ocean surface following surface breaking wave events. These drops get transported in the marine atmospheric boundary layer, in which they exchange momentum and heat with the atmosphere. Small spray droplets are transported over large distances and can remain in the atmosphere for several days, where they will scatter radiation; evaporate entirely, leaving behind sea salt; participate in the aerosol chemical cycle; and act as cloud condensation nuclei. Large droplets remain close to the ocean surface and affect the air-sea fluxes of momentum and enthalpy, thereby enhancing the intensity of tropical cyclones. This review summarizes recent progress and the emerging consensus about the number flux and implications of small sea spray droplets. I also summarize shortcomings in our understanding of the impact of large spray droplets on the meteorology of storm systems.

  9. EFFECTS OF POLLUTION ON FRESHWATER FISH

    EPA Science Inventory

    An extensive literature review is presented which is concerned with the effects of pollutants (metals, pesticides, detergents, industrial wastes) on freshwater fish; chemical and biological methods for identifying and determining the effects of such pollutants; and the effects of...

  10. Temporal Trends in Deep Ocean Redfield Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahlow, Markus; Riebesell, Ulf

    2000-02-01

    The Redfield ratio [carbon:nitrogen:phosphorus (C:N:P)] of particle flux to the deep ocean is a key factor in marine biogeochemical cycling. Changes in oceanic carbon sequestration have been linked to variations in the Redfield ratio on geological time scales, but this ratio generally is assumed to be constant with time in the modern ocean. However, deep-water Redfield ratios in the northern hemisphere show evidence for temporal trends over the past five decades. The North Atlantic Ocean exhibits a rising N:P ratio, which may be related to increased deposition of atmospheric nitrous oxides from anthropogenic N emissions. In the North Pacific Ocean, increasing C:N and C:P ratios are accompanied by rising remineralization rates, which suggests intensified export production. Stronger export of carbon in this region may be due to enhanced bioavailability of aeolian iron. These findings imply that the biological part of the marine carbon cycle currently is not in steady state.

  11. 40 CFR 92.909 - Export exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Export exemptions. 92.909 Section 92....909 Export exemptions. (a) A new locomotive or locomotive engine intended solely for export, and so labeled or tagged on the outside of any container, the locomotive and on the engine itself, is subject...

  12. 40 CFR 90.909 - Export exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of Nonroad Engines from Regulations § 90.909 Export exemptions. (a) A new nonroad engine intended solely for export, and so labeled or tagged on the outside of the container and on the engine itself, is... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Export exemptions. 90.909 Section...

  13. 40 CFR 91.1009 - Export exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Export exemptions. 91.1009 Section 91....1009 Export exemptions. (a) A new marine SI engine intended solely for export, and so labeled or tagged on the outside of the container and on the engine itself, is subject to the provisions of §...

  14. 40 CFR 85.1709 - Export exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Engines § 85.1709 Export exemptions. (a) A new motor vehicle or new motor vehicle engine intended solely for export, and so labeled or tagged on the outside of the container and on the vehicle or engine... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Export exemptions. 85.1709 Section...

  15. 40 CFR 94.909 - Export exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Export exemptions. (a) A new engine intended solely for export, and so labeled or tagged on the outside of any container and on the engine, is subject to the provisions of § 94.1103, unless the importing... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Export exemptions. 94.909 Section...

  16. 78 FR 60248 - Order Denying Export Privileges

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-01

    ... extended by successive Presidential Notices, the most recent being that of August 8, 2013 (78 FR 49107... Bureau of Industry and Security Order Denying Export Privileges In the Matter of: Volha Dubouskaya... States, that is, to willfully export from the United States to Belarus export-controlled items,...

  17. 78 FR 60250 - Order Denying Export Privileges

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-01

    ... Bureau of Industry and Security Order Denying Export Privileges In the Matter of: Vikramaditya Singh, a.k... attempting to cause the export of digital microwave radios to Iran without the required authorization from... probation, six months of home confinement and a $100,000 fine. Section 766.25 of the Export...

  18. 27 CFR 28.154 - Export marks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Section 28.154 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS EXPORTATION OF ALCOHOL Withdrawal of Specially Denatured Spirits, Free of Tax, for Exportation or Transfer to a Foreign-Trade Zone § 28.154 Export marks. In addition to the...

  19. 27 CFR 28.154 - Export marks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Section 28.154 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS EXPORTATION OF ALCOHOL Withdrawal of Specially Denatured Spirits, Free of Tax, for Exportation or Transfer to a Foreign-Trade Zone § 28.154 Export marks. In addition to the...

  20. 27 CFR 28.154 - Export marks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Section 28.154 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL EXPORTATION OF ALCOHOL Withdrawal of Specially Denatured Spirits, Free of Tax, for Exportation or Transfer to a Foreign-Trade Zone § 28.154 Export marks. In addition to the...

  1. 27 CFR 28.154 - Export marks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Section 28.154 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL EXPORTATION OF ALCOHOL Withdrawal of Specially Denatured Spirits, Free of Tax, for Exportation or Transfer to a Foreign-Trade Zone § 28.154 Export marks. In addition to the...

  2. 27 CFR 28.154 - Export marks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Section 28.154 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS EXPORTATION OF ALCOHOL Withdrawal of Specially Denatured Spirits, Free of Tax, for Exportation or Transfer to a Foreign-Trade Zone § 28.154 Export marks. In addition to the...

  3. 22 CFR 120.17 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Export. 120.17 Section 120.17 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS PURPOSE AND DEFINITIONS § 120.17 Export. (a) Export means: (1) Sending or taking a defense article out of the United States in any manner, except...

  4. 22 CFR 120.17 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Export. 120.17 Section 120.17 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS PURPOSE AND DEFINITIONS § 120.17 Export. (a) Export means: (1) Sending or taking a defense article out of the United States in any manner, except by mere travel outside of the...

  5. 22 CFR 120.17 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Export. 120.17 Section 120.17 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS PURPOSE AND DEFINITIONS § 120.17 Export. (a) Export means: (1) Sending or taking a defense article out of the United States in any manner, except...

  6. 40 CFR 90.909 - Export exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Export exemptions. 90.909 Section 90... of Nonroad Engines from Regulations § 90.909 Export exemptions. (a) A new nonroad engine intended solely for export, and so labeled or tagged on the outside of the container and on the engine itself,...

  7. 27 CFR 7.60 - Exports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exports. 7.60 Section 7.60... TREASURY LIQUORS LABELING AND ADVERTISING OF MALT BEVERAGES General Provisions § 7.60 Exports. This part shall not apply to malt beverages exported in bond....

  8. 40 CFR 211.208 - Export provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Export provisions. 211.208 Section 211... PRODUCT NOISE LABELING Hearing Protective Devices § 211.208 Export provisions. (a) The outside of each package or container containing a hearing protective device intended solely for export must be so...

  9. 40 CFR 85.1709 - Export exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Export exemptions. 85.1709 Section 85... Engines § 85.1709 Export exemptions. (a) A new motor vehicle or new motor vehicle engine intended solely for export, and so labeled or tagged on the outside of the container and on the vehicle or...

  10. 19 CFR 351.514 - Export subsidies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Export subsidies. 351.514 Section 351.514 Customs... Identification and Measurement of Countervailable Subsidies § 351.514 Export subsidies. (a) In general. The Secretary will consider a subsidy to be an export subsidy if the Secretary determines that eligibility...

  11. 27 CFR 28.193 - Export marks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Export marks. 28.193... Drawback Filing of Notice and Removal § 28.193 Export marks. In addition to the marks and brands required... chapter, the exporter shall mark the word “Export” on the Government side of each case or Government...

  12. 27 CFR 4.80 - Exports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exports. 4.80 Section 4.80... TREASURY LIQUORS LABELING AND ADVERTISING OF WINE General Provisions § 4.80 Exports. The regulations in this part shall not apply to wine exported in bond....

  13. 27 CFR 28.223 - Export marks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Export marks. 28.223... Export marks. In addition to the marks and brands required to be placed on kegs, barrels, cases, crates... “Export” on each container or case before removal for export, for use on vessels or aircraft, or...

  14. 15 CFR 2014.3 - Export certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Export certificates. 2014.3 Section... STATES TRADE REPRESENTATIVE IMPLEMENTATION OF TARIFF-RATE QUOTA FOR IMPORTS OF LAMB MEAT § 2014.3 Export... determined by the United States Customs Service, that a valid export certificate is in effect with respect...

  15. 27 CFR 555.129 - Exportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exportation. 555.129 Section 555.129 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE EXPLOSIVES COMMERCE IN EXPLOSIVES Records and Reports § 555.129 Exportation. Exportation of explosive materials is to be...

  16. 78 FR 54238 - President's Export Council; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-03

    ... International Trade Administration President's Export Council; Meeting AGENCY: International Trade Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice of an open meeting. SUMMARY: The President's Export... least one week in advance of the meeting on the President's Export Council Web site at...

  17. 7 CFR 927.12 - Export market.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Export market. 927.12 Section 927.12 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 927.12 Export market. Export market means any destination...

  18. 7 CFR 927.12 - Export market.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Export market. 927.12 Section 927.12 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 927.12 Export market. Export market means any destination...

  19. 15 CFR 2014.3 - Export certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Export certificates. 2014.3 Section... STATES TRADE REPRESENTATIVE IMPLEMENTATION OF TARIFF-RATE QUOTA FOR IMPORTS OF LAMB MEAT § 2014.3 Export... determined by the United States Customs Service, that a valid export certificate is in effect with respect...

  20. 77 FR 37823 - Export Sales Reporting Requirements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-25

    ...), the Export Sales Reporting Requirements mandate that exporters of wheat and wheat flour, feed grains..., and record keeping is estimated to be 30 minutes. Respondents: All exporters of wheat and wheat flour...) Commodity. Wheat and wheat flour, feed grains, oilseeds, cotton, rice, cattle hides and skins, beef,...

  1. 22 CFR 120.17 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Export. 120.17 Section 120.17 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS PURPOSE AND DEFINITIONS § 120.17 Export. (a) Export means: (1) Sending or taking a defense article out of the United States in any manner, except...

  2. 22 CFR 120.17 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Export. 120.17 Section 120.17 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS PURPOSE AND DEFINITIONS § 120.17 Export. (a) Export means: (1) Sending or taking a defense article out of the United States in any manner, except...

  3. 7 CFR 922.15 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Export. 922.15 Section 922.15 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and... WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 922.15 Export. Export means to ship apricots beyond...

  4. 7 CFR 923.15 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Export. 923.15 Section 923.15 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and... IN WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 923.15 Export. Export means to ship...

  5. 7 CFR 923.15 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Export. 923.15 Section 923.15 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and... IN WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 923.15 Export. Export means to ship...

  6. 7 CFR 948.17 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Export. 948.17 Section 948.17 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and... Regulating Handling Definitions § 948.17 Export. Export means the shipment of potatoes to any...

  7. 7 CFR 959.18 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Export. 959.18 Section 959.18 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and... Handling Definitions § 959.18 Export. Export means to ship onions to any destination which is not...

  8. 7 CFR 915.12 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Export. 915.12 Section 915.12 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and... Regulating Handling Definitions § 915.12 Export. Export means to ship avocados to any destination which...

  9. 7 CFR 947.17 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Export. 947.17 Section 947.17 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and... Definitions § 947.17 Export. Export means shipment of potatoes beyond the boundaries of continental...

  10. 7 CFR 966.18 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Export. 966.18 Section 966.18 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and... Handling Definitions § 966.18 Export. Export means shipment of tomatoes beyond the boundaries of the...

  11. 7 CFR 924.15 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Export. 924.15 Section 924.15 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and... WASHINGTON AND IN UMATILLA COUNTY, OREGON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 924.15 Export. Export...

  12. 7 CFR 915.12 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Export. 915.12 Section 915.12 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and... Regulating Handling Definitions § 915.12 Export. Export means to ship avocados to any destination which...

  13. 7 CFR 959.18 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Export. 959.18 Section 959.18 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and... Handling Definitions § 959.18 Export. Export means to ship onions to any destination which is not...

  14. 7 CFR 946.15 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Export. 946.15 Section 946.15 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and... Regulating Handling Definitions § 946.15 Export. Export means shipment of potatoes beyond the boundaries...

  15. 7 CFR 922.15 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Export. 922.15 Section 922.15 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and... WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 922.15 Export. Export means to ship apricots beyond...

  16. 7 CFR 948.17 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Export. 948.17 Section 948.17 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and... Regulating Handling Definitions § 948.17 Export. Export means the shipment of potatoes to any...

  17. 7 CFR 924.15 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Export. 924.15 Section 924.15 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and... WASHINGTON AND IN UMATILLA COUNTY, OREGON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 924.15 Export. Export...

  18. 7 CFR 947.17 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Export. 947.17 Section 947.17 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and... Definitions § 947.17 Export. Export means shipment of potatoes beyond the boundaries of continental...

  19. 7 CFR 946.15 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Export. 946.15 Section 946.15 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and... Regulating Handling Definitions § 946.15 Export. Export means shipment of potatoes beyond the boundaries...

  20. 19 CFR 351.520 - Export insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Export insurance. 351.520 Section 351.520 Customs... Identification and Measurement of Countervailable Subsidies § 351.520 Export insurance. (a) Benefit—(1) In general. In the case of export insurance, a benefit exists if the premium rates charged are inadequate...

  1. A Freshwater Starvation Mechanism for Dansgaard-Oeschger Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, E. W.; Hewitt, I.; Fowler, A.; Clark, C.; Evatt, G. W.; Munday, D. R.; Stokes, C.

    2014-12-01

    Many northern hemisphere climate records, particularly those from around the North Atlantic, show a series of rapid climate changes that recurred on centennial to millennial timescales throughout most of the last glacial period. These Dansgaard-Oeschger (D-O) sequences are observed most prominently in Greenland ice cores, although they have a global signature, including an out of phase Antarctic signal. They consist of warming jumps of order 10°C, occurring in typically 40 years, followed generally by a slow cooling (Greenland Interstadial, GI) lasting between a few centuries and a few millennia, and then a final rapid temperature drop into a cold Greenland Stadial (GS) that lasts for a similar period. The most distinctive feature of D-O cycles is the rapid warming event, often attributed to a sudden change in the strength of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC). Recent work has suggested that AMOC is most easily disrupted by freshwater delivered through the Arctic. We suggest that the proposed AMOC changes may have occurred as part of a natural oscillation, in which runoff from the Laurentide ice sheet into the Arctic is controlled by temperature around the North Atlantic. The Arctic buffers the salinity changes, but under warm conditions, high runoff eventually leads to water entering the North Atlantic with low enough salinity to switch AMOC into its weaker state. Under the colder conditions now prevailing, the Arctic is starved of runoff, and the salinity rises until a further switch occurs. Contrary to many previous studies, this mechanism does not require large freshwater pulses to the North Atlantic. Instead, steady changes in ice-sheet runoff, driven by the AMOC, lead to a naturally arising oscillator, in which the rapid warmings come about because the Arctic Ocean is starved of freshwater. The changing size of the ice sheets would have affected the magnitude and extent of runoff, and we suggest that this may provide a simple explanation for the absence of the events during interglacials and around the time of glacial maxima. Heinrich events, delivering additional freshwater into the Atlantic during a Greenland stadial, play no direct role in this mechanism, but would serve to delay the switch to faster AMOC.

  2. Glacial/interglacial changes in export production in a series of sediment cores spanning the Indian sector Antarctic Polar Front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaccard, S.; Thöle, L.; Martinez-Garcia, A.; Studer, A.; Michel, E.; Mazaud, A.

    2014-12-01

    Export of organic carbon from surface waters of the Antarctic Zone of the Southern Ocean decreased during the last ice age, coinciding with declining atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations, signaling reduced exchange of CO2 between the ocean interior and the atmosphere. In contrast, in the Subantarctic Zone, export production increased into ice ages coinciding with rising dust fluxes, thus suggesting iron fertilization of Subantarctic phytoplankton. Recently developed XRF core-scanning methods permit paleoceanographic reconstructions on time-scales similar to ice core temperature and atmospheric carbon dioxide measurements. We have investigated the sedimentary distribution of various proxies allowing reconstructing export production in a series of sedimentary archives retrieved from the Indian Sector of the Southern Ocean spanning the Antarctic Polar Front in the vicinity of Kerguelen Island (Marion Dufresne Expeditions IndienSud-1 & 2). These high-resolution measurements are complemented with reconstruction of 230Th-normalized biogenic particle flux to the seafloor covering the last glacial termination.This contribution will explore the effects of Fe-fertilization on export production in an area remote from major dust sources. Furthermore, quantitative vertical flux determinations will allow comparing carbon export efficiency in the Indian Ocean with previously published records from the South Atlantic.

  3. Future freshwater demands in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, D.; Strang, E. T.; Hinzman, L.; Alessa, L.; Kliskey, A.

    2004-12-01

    The overall objective of our research is to understand how humans rely on freshwater at local and regional scales in the Arctic, how these dependencies have changed in the recent past, and how they are likely to change in the future. This study will take place on the Seward Peninsula where climate induced changes in the hydrologic cycle are already being observed. This presentation will describe the human dependencies on freshwater in the Arctic. In particular, we will discuss the effects of inadequate quantity or quality of freshwater on Arctic inhabitants. The freshwater used by humans in the Arctic for drinking, cooking, and washing is derived in many cases from surface water, such as lakes and streams. Since the surface water frozen 6-9 months of the year in the Arctic, communities that rely on rivers and lakes must treat and store large volumes of water for use during winter. The stored water must be heated throughout the winter and distributed on an as-needed basis. Unfortunately, when not enough water can be gathered in the summer or stored in the winter, the entire community may be without freshwater. During these months, water must be collected by individuals from ice, snow, and rain. Collecting water during breakup can be dangerous. River ice is rotten, there is too little snow for snow mobiles, and the tundra is too soft all terrain vehicles. While the state of Alaska and Federal programs are making progress towards developing sustainable water sources for Alaska's Arctic communities, freshwater remains a precious commodity. Communities throughout the Arctic, including Canada and Russia, have similar problems with obtaining and purifying freshwater. As climate induced changes are being observed in the Arctic, the threat to the freshwater resource is now a greater concern than ever. This study is being funded under the NSF Arctic System Science Program, Human Dimensions of the Arctic (OPP-0328686).

  4. Enhanced deep ocean ventilation and oxygenation with global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froelicher, T. L.; Jaccard, S.; Dunne, J. P.; Paynter, D.; Gruber, N.

    2014-12-01

    Twenty-first century coupled climate model simulations, observations from the recent past, and theoretical arguments suggest a consistent trend towards warmer ocean temperatures and fresher polar surface oceans in response to increased radiative forcing resulting in increased upper ocean stratification and reduced ventilation and oxygenation of the deep ocean. Paleo-proxy records of the warming at the end of the last ice age, however, suggests a different outcome, namely a better ventilated and oxygenated deep ocean with global warming. Here we use a four thousand year global warming simulation from a comprehensive Earth System Model (GFDL ESM2M) to show that this conundrum is a consequence of different rates of warming and that the deep ocean is actually better ventilated and oxygenated in a future warmer equilibrated climate consistent with paleo-proxy records. The enhanced deep ocean ventilation in the Southern Ocean occurs in spite of increased positive surface buoyancy fluxes and a constancy of the Southern Hemisphere westerly winds - circumstances that would otherwise be expected to lead to a reduction in deep ocean ventilation. This ventilation recovery occurs through a global scale interaction of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation undergoing a multi-centennial recovery after an initial century of transient decrease and transports salinity-rich waters inform the subtropical surface ocean to the Southern Ocean interior on multi-century timescales. The subsequent upwelling of salinity-rich waters in the Southern Ocean strips away the freshwater cap that maintains vertical stability and increases open ocean convection and the formation of Antarctic Bottom Waters. As a result, the global ocean oxygen content and the nutrient supply from the deep ocean to the surface are higher in a warmer ocean. The implications for past and future changes in ocean heat and carbon storage will be discussed.

  5. Freshwater Commercial Bycatch: an Understated Conservation Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Raby, Graham D.; Colotelo, Alison HA; Blouin-Demers, Gabriel; Cooke, Steven J.

    2011-04-01

    Commercial fisheries bycatch in marine systems has been regarded as a global conservation concern by environmental groups, scientists, government, and the public for decades. Fortunately, some headway has been made to mitigate the negative impacts of bycatch in marine environments. In a survey of the literature, we found that despite freshwater commercial fisheries yields comprising 11% of the global commercial catch, bycatch research focusing on freshwater commercial fisheries represented only {approx}3% of the total bycatch literature. This paucity of research is particularly alarming given that freshwater animals and habitats are some of the world's most imperiled. The limited inland bycatch literature that does exist includes examples of population declines attributed to commercial bycatch (e.g., freshwater dolphins in the Yangtze River in China) and illustrates that in some systems bycatch can be substantial (e.g., lake trout bycatch in the Laurentian Great Lakes). Encouraging results from the marine realm can serve as models for bycatch research in freshwater, and lead to measurable gains in conservation of freshwater ecosystems. We summarize existing work on inland bycatch in an effort to draw attention to this understated and understudied conservation problem.

  6. Estimates of micro-, nano-, and picoplankton contributions to particle export in the northeast Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackinson, B. L.; Moran, S. B.; Lomas, M. W.; Stewart, G. M.; Kelly, R. P.

    2015-06-01

    The contributions of micro-, nano-, and picoplankton to particle export were estimated from measurements of size-fractionated particulate 234Th, organic carbon, and phytoplankton indicator pigments obtained during five cruises between 2010 and 2012 along Line P in the subarctic northeast Pacific Ocean. Sinking fluxes of particulate organic carbon (POC) and indicator pigments were calculated from 234Th-238U disequilibria and, during two cruises, measured by a sediment trap at Ocean Station Papa. POC fluxes at 100 m ranged from 0.65 to 7.95 mmol m-2 d-1, similar in magnitude to previous results at Line P. Microplankton pigments dominate indicator pigment fluxes (averaging 69 ± 19% of total pigment flux), while nanoplankton pigments comprised the majority of pigment standing stocks (averaging 64 ± 23% of total pigment standing stocks). Indicator pigment loss rates (the ratio of pigment export flux to pigment standing stocks) point to preferential export of larger microplankton relative to smaller nano- and picoplankton. However, indicator pigments do not quantitatively trace particle export resulting from zooplankton grazing, which may be an important pathway for the export of small phytoplankton. These results have important implications for understanding the magnitude and mechanisms controlling the biological pump at Line P in particular, and more generally in oligotrophic gyres and high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll (HNLC) regions where small phytoplankton represent a major component of the autotrophic community.

  7. Estimates of micro-, nano-, and picoplankton contributions to particle export in the northeast Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackinson, B. L.; Moran, S. B.; Lomas, M. W.; Stewart, G. M.; Kelly, R. P.

    2014-08-01

    The contributions of micro-, nano-, and picoplankton to particle export were estimated from measurements of size-fractionated particulate 234Th, organic carbon, and phytoplankton indicator pigments obtained during five cruises between 2010 and 2012 along Line P in the subarctic northeast Pacific Ocean. Sinking fluxes of particulate organic carbon (POC) and indicator pigments were calculated from 234Th-238U disequilibria and, during two cruises, measured by sediment trap at Ocean Station Papa. POC fluxes at 100 m ranged from 0.65-7.95 mmol m-2 d-1, similar in magnitude to previous results at Line P. Microplankton pigments dominate indicator pigment fluxes (averaging 69 ± 19% of total pigment flux), while nanoplankton pigments comprised the majority of pigment standing stocks (averaging 64 ± 23% of total pigment standing stock). Indicator pigment loss rates (the ratio of pigment export flux to pigment standing stock) point to preferential export of larger microplankton relative to smaller nano- and picoplankton. However, indicator pigments do not quantitatively trace particle export resulting from zooplankton grazing, which may be an important pathway for the export of small phytoplankton. These results have important implications for understanding the magnitude and mechanisms controlling the biological pump at Line P in particular, and more generally in oligotrophic gyres and high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll regions where small phytoplankton represent a major component of the autotrophic community.

  8. Commissioned Review. Carbon: freshwater plants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keeley, J.E.; Sandquist, D.R.

    1992-01-01

    δ13C values for freshwater aquatic plant matter varies from −11 to −50‰ and is not a clear indicator of photosynthetic pathway as in terrestrial plants. Several factors affect δ13C of aquatic plant matter. These include: (1) The δ13C signature of the source carbon has been observed to range from +1‰ for HCO3− derived from limestone to −30‰ for CO2 derived from respiration. (2) Some plants assimilate HCO3−, which is –7 to –11‰ less negative than CO2. (3) C3, C4, and CAM photosynthetic pathways are present in aquatic plants. (4) Diffusional resistances are orders of magnitude greater in the aquatic environment than in the aerial environment. The greater viscosity of water acts to reduce mixing of the carbon pool in the boundary layer with that of the bulk solution. In effect, many aquatic plants draw from a finite carbon pool, and as in terrestrial plants growing in a closed system, biochemical discrimination is reduced. In standing water, this factor results in most aquatic plants having a δ13C value similar to the source carbon. Using Farquhar's equation and other physiological data, it is possible to use δ13C values to evaluate various parameters affecting photosynthesis, such as limitations imposed by CO2 diffusion and carbon source.

  9. Testing Massive Arctic Sea Ice Export as a Trigger for Abrupt Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coletti, A. J.; Condron, A.; Bradley, R. S.

    2014-12-01

    The discharge of large volumes of freshwater from glacial lakes to the subpolar North Atlantic is repeatedly cited as one of the main triggers for abrupt centennial-to-millennial length climate cooling during the last deglaciation. Here we investigate an alternative mechanism focusing on whether the break-up and mobilization of thick, multiyear, Arctic sea ice - so called 'paleocrystic' sea ice - might have supplied enough freshwater to the Nordic Seas to reduce North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) formation and weaken the AMOC. Indeed, low biological productivity and extremely low, or absent, sediment deposition in the Arctic during glacial periods suggest that parts of the central and western Arctic Ocean were covered by very thick, perennial ice. Here we use a numerical climate model to assess: (1) whether paleocrystic ice covered much of the Arctic Ocean during glacial periods, (2) the mechanisms leading to the collapse and mobilization of Arctic sea-ice into the North Atlantic, and (3) the impact of melting sea ice on global ocean circulation. Preliminary results suggest that Arctic sea ice grows up to ~24 - 54 meters in LGM-type conditions and that the Arctic Ocean north of Fram Strait can store ~1.4 - 2.9x1014 m3 of freshwater as ice. If this ice was released from the Arctic in 1yr (10yrs) it would have been equivalent to a high-latitude freshwater forcing of 3-6 Sv (0.3-0.6 Sv), which is comparable (or larger) in magnitude than most estimates of meltwater emanating from glacial Lake Agassiz believed to have triggered episodes of dramatic global cooling during the last deglaciation.

  10. The Ocean.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broecker, Wallace S.

    1983-01-01

    The chemistry of the ocean, whose constituents interact with those of air and land to support life and influence climate, is known to have undergone changes since the last glacial epoch. Changes in dissolved oxygen, calcium ions, phosphate, carbon dioxide, carbonate ions, and bicarbonate ions are discussed. (JN)

  11. Sixth Australian conference on coastal and ocean engineering (Preprints)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on marine engineering. Topics considered at the conference included wave measurements and the utilization of wave data, field studies of currents and simulation of oil dispersion in the Central Great Barrier Reef, a practical method for determining the dispersion at an ocean outfall, water level variations in aquifers caused by ocean tides, and design procedures and parameters for marine facilities at coal export terminals.

  12. Advancing understanding of the fluvial export of organic matter through high-resolution profiling of dissolved organic carbon.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldron, S.; Drew, S.; Gilvear, D.; Murray, H.; Heal, K.

    2012-04-01

    Quantifying the natural variation (complexity) of a system remains an enduring scientific challenge in better understanding controls on surface water quality. This characterisation is needed in order to reveal controlling processes, such as dilution, and also to identify unusual load profiles. In trying to capture that natural variation we still rely largely on concentration time series (and associated export budgets) generated from manual spot sampling, or from samples collected by autosamplers - approaches which are unlikely to provide the high temporal resolution of parameter concentration required. Now however, advances in sensor technology are helping us address this challenge. Here we present detailed dissolved organic carbon (DOC) export profiles from a small upland river (9.4 km sq.), generated since June 2011 by semi-continuous logging of UV-vis absorption (200-750 nm, every 2.5 nm) every 30 minutes. Observed increases in the concentration of the DOC, [DOC], in freshwaters have prompted significant research to understand the cause and consequences of increased export: higher levels of DOC require additional water purification of potable sources; increased aquatic export may represent a reduction in terrestrial C-soil sequestration; changes in light penetration can affect the heterotrophic / autotrophic balance in surface waters and this has consequences for the food web structure; increased aquatic export may also result in increased carbon dioxide evasion. Additionally, C export is often linked to nutrient export: we have observed statistically significant stoichiometric relationships between DOC and soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) concentrations, thus understanding better this parameters offers insight into export of other nutrient and the source of material from which these dissolved compounds are produced; this may be particulate. Our Scottish study site is interesting because there are multiple processes that can contribute to DOC and other nutrient exports. Whilst the river drains pastureland the headwaters are predominantly a peatland undergoing restoration as part of a habitat management plan implemented in response to the nearby construction of a wind farm. The DOC time series we present reveals new details of DOC export responses to both hydrological controls such as rainfall-induced event flow, and terrestrial controls such as seasonal changes in terrestrial DOC production. Additionally, we compare this profile of absorption-estimated DOC export to one generated from statistically significant relationships between [DOC] from manual water sampling with water chemistry time series (e.g. conductivity) generated from sondes deployed at the same site. Finally, both approaches support the calculation of a C export budget, and we compare the export budget generated by these two semi-continuous profiles with that derived from manual spot sampling.

  13. Fennoscandian freshwater control on Greenland hydroclimate shifts at the onset of the Younger Dryas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muschitiello, Francesco; Pausata, Francesco S. R.; Watson, Jenny E.; Smittenberg, Rienk H.; Salih, Abubakr A. M.; Brooks, Stephen J.; Whitehouse, Nicola J.; Karlatou-Charalampopoulou, Artemis; Wohlfarth, Barbara

    2015-11-01

    Sources and timing of freshwater forcing relative to hydroclimate shifts recorded in Greenland ice cores at the onset of Younger Dryas, ~12,800 years ago, remain speculative. Here we show that progressive Fennoscandian Ice Sheet (FIS) melting 13,100-12,880 years ago generates a hydroclimate dipole with drier-colder conditions in Northern Europe and wetter-warmer conditions in Greenland. FIS melting culminates 12,880 years ago synchronously with the start of Greenland Stadial 1 and a large-scale hydroclimate transition lasting ~180 years. Transient climate model simulations forced with FIS freshwater reproduce the initial hydroclimate dipole through sea-ice feedbacks in the Nordic Seas. The transition is attributed to the export of excess sea ice to the subpolar North Atlantic and a subsequent southward shift of the westerly winds. We suggest that North Atlantic hydroclimate sensitivity to FIS freshwater can explain the pace and sign of shifts recorded in Greenland at the climate transition into the Younger Dryas.

  14. Fennoscandian freshwater control on Greenland hydroclimate shifts at the onset of the Younger Dryas

    PubMed Central

    Muschitiello, Francesco; Pausata, Francesco S. R.; Watson, Jenny E.; Smittenberg, Rienk H.; Salih, Abubakr A. M.; Brooks, Stephen J.; Whitehouse, Nicola J.; Karlatou-Charalampopoulou, Artemis; Wohlfarth, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Sources and timing of freshwater forcing relative to hydroclimate shifts recorded in Greenland ice cores at the onset of Younger Dryas, ∼12,800 years ago, remain speculative. Here we