Science.gov

Sample records for ocean transportation intermediary

  1. 75 FR 4560 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-28

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants Notice is hereby given that the following...-Operating Common Carrier and Ocean Freight Forwarder--Ocean Transportation Intermediary pursuant to section...-Operating Common Carrier--Ocean Transportation Intermediary Applicants: Doma Consolidating Inc. dba...

  2. 75 FR 14160 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-24

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants Notice is hereby given that the following...-Operating Common Carrier and Ocean Freight Forwarder--Ocean Transportation Intermediary pursuant to section...-Operating Common Carrier--Ocean Transportation Intermediary: Radiant Global Logistics, Inc., dba...

  3. 76 FR 44331 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Revocation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-25

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Revocation The Federal Maritime Commission hereby gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been revoked pursuant to... pertaining to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR part 515, effective on...

  4. 76 FR 67731 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Revocation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-02

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Revocation The Federal Maritime Commission hereby gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary license has been revoked pursuant to section... pertaining to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR part 515, effective on...

  5. 75 FR 70674 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Revocation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-18

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Revocation The Federal Maritime Commission hereby gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been revoked pursuant to... pertaining to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR part 515, effective on...

  6. 76 FR 41259 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Revocation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-13

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Revocation The Federal Maritime Commission hereby gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary license has been revoked pursuant to section... pertaining to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR Part 515, effective on...

  7. 76 FR 71035 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-16

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocation The Federal Maritime Commission hereby gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been revoked pursuant to section 19... to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR part 515, effective on...

  8. 75 FR 67974 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-04

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations The Federal Maritime Commission hereby gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been revoked pursuant to... pertaining to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR part 515, effective on...

  9. 75 FR 61758 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-06

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations The Federal Maritime Commission hereby gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been revoked pursuant to... pertaining to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR Part 515, effective on...

  10. 77 FR 12584 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-01

    ... COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuance Notice is hereby given that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been reissued by the Federal Maritime Commission... Commission pertaining to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR part 515. License...

  11. 77 FR 18817 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Revocation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-28

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Revocation The Federal Maritime Commission hereby gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been revoked pursuant to... pertaining to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR Part 515, effective on...

  12. 77 FR 26009 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-02

    ... COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocation The Federal Maritime Commission hereby gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary license has been revoked pursuant to section... pertaining to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR part 515, effective on...

  13. 76 FR 65194 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Revocation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-20

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Revocation The Federal Maritime Commission hereby gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been revoked pursuant to... pertaining to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR Part 515, effective on...

  14. 75 FR 28252 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-20

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocation The Federal Maritime Commission hereby gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been revoked pursuant to section 19... to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR Part 515, effective on...

  15. 76 FR 10594 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-25

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocation The Federal Maritime Commission hereby gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been revoked pursuant to section 19... to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR part 515, effective on...

  16. 76 FR 27644 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Revocation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-12

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Revocation The Federal Maritime Commission hereby gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been revoked pursuant to... pertaining to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR part 515, effective on...

  17. 77 FR 12584 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Revocation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-01

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Revocation The Federal Maritime Commission hereby gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary license has been revoked pursuant to section... pertaining to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR part 515, effective on...

  18. 77 FR 32116 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-31

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocation The Federal Maritime Commission hereby gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been revoked pursuant to section 19... to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR part 515, effective on...

  19. 76 FR 60837 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-30

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocation The Federal Maritime Commission hereby gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been revoked pursuant to section 19... to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR part 515, effective on...

  20. 77 FR 50688 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-22

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants The Commission gives notice that the following applicants have filed an application for an Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) license as a Non-Vessel... Office of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, Federal Maritime Commission, Washington, DC 20573,...

  1. 78 FR 48435 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants The Commission gives notice that the following applicants have filed an application for an Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) license as a Non-Vessel... Office of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, Federal Maritime Commission, Washington, DC 20573,...

  2. 77 FR 5014 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Revocation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-01

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Revocation The Federal Maritime Commission hereby gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary license has been revoked pursuant to section... pertaining to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR part 515, effective on...

  3. 78 FR 23252 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-18

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants The Commission gives notice that the following applicants have filed an application for an Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) license as a Non-Vessel... Office of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, Federal Maritime Commission, Washington, DC 20573,...

  4. 76 FR 72409 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-23

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocation The Federal Maritime Commission hereby gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been revoked pursuant to section 19... to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR part 515, effective on...

  5. 77 FR 70162 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-23

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants The Commission gives notice that the following applicants have filed an application for an Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) license as a Non-Vessel... Office of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, Federal Maritime Commission, Washington, DC 20573,...

  6. 77 FR 27457 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-10

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocation The Federal Maritime Commission hereby gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been revoked pursuant to section 19... to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR Part 515, effective on...

  7. 77 FR 54911 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-06

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants The Commission gives notice that the following applicants have filed an application for an Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) license as a Non-Vessel... Office of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, Federal Maritime Commission, Washington, DC 20573,...

  8. 78 FR 37540 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-21

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants The Commission gives notice that the following applicants have filed an application for an Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) license as a Non-Vessel... Office of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, Federal Maritime Commission, Washington, DC 20573,...

  9. 76 FR 7210 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Revocation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-09

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Revocation The Federal Maritime Commission hereby gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been revoked pursuant to... pertaining to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR part 515, effective on...

  10. 76 FR 70145 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Revocation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-10

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Revocation The Federal Maritime Commission hereby gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been revoked pursuant to... pertaining to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR part 515, effective on...

  11. 76 FR 67189 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Revocation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-31

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Revocation The Federal Maritime Commission hereby gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been revoked pursuant to... pertaining to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR part 515, effective on...

  12. 75 FR 19402 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-14

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants Notice is hereby given that the following...-Operating Common Carrier and Ocean Freight Forwarder--Ocean Transportation Intermediary pursuant to section... Office of Transportation Intermediaries, Federal Maritime Commission, Washington, DC 20573....

  13. 75 FR 72825 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Revocation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-26

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Revocation The Federal Maritime Commission hereby gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been revoked pursuant to... pertaining to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR part 515, effective on...

  14. 77 FR 66841 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-07

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants The Commission gives notice that the following applicants have filed an application for an Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) license as a Non-Vessel... Office of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, Federal Maritime Commission, Washington, DC 20573,...

  15. 78 FR 10173 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-13

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants The Commission gives notice that the following applicants have filed an application for an Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) license as a Non-Vessel... Office of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, Federal Maritime Commission, Washington, DC 20573,...

  16. 77 FR 13606 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-07

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocation The Federal Maritime Commission hereby gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary license has been revoked pursuant to section 19 of... the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR part 515, effective on the...

  17. 77 FR 39707 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-05

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants Notice is hereby given that the following...-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF)--Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI.... Interested persons may contact the Office of Transportation Intermediaries, Federal Maritime...

  18. 76 FR 50216 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Revocation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-12

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Revocation The Federal Maritime Commission hereby gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been revoked pursuant to... pertaining to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR part 515, effective on...

  19. 78 FR 68444 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-14

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants The Commission gives notice that the following applicants have filed an application for an Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) license as a Non-Vessel... Office of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, Federal Maritime Commission, Washington, DC 20573,...

  20. 78 FR 32650 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-31

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants The Commission gives notice that the following applicants have filed an application for an Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) license as a Non-Vessel... Office of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, Federal Maritime Commission, Washington, DC 20573,...

  1. 77 FR 60434 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants The Commission gives notice that the following applicants have filed an application for an Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) license as a Non-Vessel... Office of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, Federal Maritime Commission, Washington, DC 20573,...

  2. 76 FR 3635 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-20

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocation The Federal Maritime Commission hereby gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been revoked pursuant to section 19... to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR Part 515, effective on...

  3. 77 FR 45610 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-01

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants The Commission gives notice that the following applicants have filed an application for an Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) license as a Non-Vessel... Office of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, Federal Maritime Commission, Washington, DC 20573,...

  4. 78 FR 33841 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-05

    ... COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants The Commission gives notice that the following applicants have filed an application for an Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) license as a... contact the Office of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, Federal Maritime Commission, Washington,...

  5. 75 FR 76466 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-08

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocation The Federal Maritime Commission hereby gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been revoked pursuant to section 19... to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR ] part 515, effective on...

  6. 75 FR 12748 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-17

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants Notice is hereby given that the following...-Operating Common Carrier and Ocean Freight Forwarder--Ocean Transportation Intermediary pursuant to section... Office of Transportation Intermediaries, Federal Maritime Commission, Washington, DC 20573....

  7. 78 FR 8534 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-06

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants The Commission gives notice that the following applicants have filed an application for an Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) license as a Non-Vessel... Office of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, Federal Maritime Commission, Washington, DC 20573,...

  8. 75 FR 12749 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-17

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations The Federal Maritime Commission hereby gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been revoked pursuant to... pertaining to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR Part 515, effective on...

  9. 75 FR 16483 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ... COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants Notice is hereby given that the following...-Operating Common Carrier and Ocean Freight Forwarder--Ocean Transportation Intermediary pursuant to section... Office of Transportation Intermediaries, Federal Maritime Commission,Washington, DC 20573....

  10. 75 FR 51074 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-18

    ... COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations The Federal Maritime Commission hereby gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been revoked pursuant to... pertaining to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR Part 515, effective on...

  11. 75 FR 66100 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-27

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations The Federal Maritime Commission hereby gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been revoked pursuant to... pertaining to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR part 515, effective on...

  12. 77 FR 72863 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-06

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants The Commission gives notice that the following applicants have filed an application for an Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) license as a Non-Vessel... Office of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, Federal Maritime Commission, Washington, DC 20573,...

  13. 78 FR 59359 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-26

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants The Commission gives notice that the following applicants have filed an application for an Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) license as a Non-Vessel... Office of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, Federal Maritime Commission, Washington, DC 20573,...

  14. 77 FR 40882 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-11

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants Notice is hereby given that the following...-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF)--Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI.... Interested persons may contact the Office of Transportation Intermediaries, Federal Maritime...

  15. 77 FR 59193 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-26

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants The Commission gives notice that the following applicants have filed an application for an Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) license as a Non-Vessel... Office of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, Federal Maritime Commission, Washington, DC 20573,...

  16. 76 FR 41259 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Reissuance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Reissuance Notice is hereby given that the following Ocean... to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR part 515. License No....

  17. 75 FR 67974 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuance Notice is hereby given that the following Ocean... to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR part 515. License No....

  18. 75 FR 70674 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuance Notice is hereby given that the following Ocean... to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR Part 515. License No....

  19. 77 FR 26008 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Reissuance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Reissuance Notice is hereby given that the following Ocean... to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR part 515. License No....

  20. 76 FR 55911 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Reissuance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Reissuance Notice is hereby given that the following Ocean... to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR, part 515. License No....

  1. 75 FR 14161 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuance Notice is hereby given that the following Ocean... to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR Part 515. License No....

  2. 77 FR 18817 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Reissuance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Reissuance Notice is hereby given that the following Ocean... to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR part 515. License No....

  3. 75 FR 28252 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Reissuance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Reissuance Notice is hereby given that the following Ocean... to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR part 515. License No....

  4. 76 FR 71034 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuance Notice is hereby given that the following Ocean... to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR part 515. License No....

  5. 76 FR 27643 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Reissuance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Reissuance Notice is hereby given that the following Ocean... to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR part 515. ] License No....

  6. 77 FR 30531 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Reissuance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Reissuance Notice is hereby given that the following Ocean... to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR part 515. License No....

  7. 75 FR 47306 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuance Notice is hereby given that the following Ocean... to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR part 515. License No....

  8. 76 FR 19098 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Reissuance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Reissuance Notice is hereby given that the following Ocean... to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR part 515. License No....

  9. 77 FR 40882 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Revocations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-11

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Revocations The Federal Maritime Commission hereby gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been revoked pursuant to...: 3918N. Name: Benison International Transportation, Inc. Address: 9740 Jordan Circle, Suite A, Santa...

  10. 77 FR 60434 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations The Commission gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been revoked pursuant to section 40901 of the Shipping.... ] License No.: 018124NF. Name: Limitless Transportation Services Inc. Address: 14631 Heathermere...

  11. 75 FR 9602 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-03

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants Notice is hereby given that the following...-Operating Common Carrier and Ocean Freight Forwarder--Ocean Transportation Intermediary pursuant to section...-Vessel-Operating Common Carrier--Ocean Transportation Intermediary Intlmove LLC, 16980 NE. 19th...

  12. 78 FR 30922 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations The Commission gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been revoked pursuant to section 19 of the Shipping...

  13. 78 FR 75346 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuances The Commission gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary license has been reissued pursuant to section 19 of the Shipping...

  14. 77 FR 68779 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations The Commission gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been revoked pursuant to section 19 of the Shipping...

  15. 78 FR 24200 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuances The Commission gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been reissued pursuant to section 19 of the Shipping...

  16. 77 FR 37045 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Reissuances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Reissuances Notice is hereby given that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been reissued by the Federal Maritime Commission pursuant to...

  17. 77 FR 74187 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuances The Commission gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been reissued pursuant to section 19 of the Shipping...

  18. 77 FR 42312 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Revocations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Revocations The Federal Maritime Commission hereby gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been revoked pursuant...

  19. 77 FR 71002 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations The Commission gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been ] revoked pursuant to section 19 of the...

  20. 77 FR 37044 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Revocations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Revocations The Federal Maritime Commission hereby gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been revoked pursuant...

  1. 78 FR 25741 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations The Commission gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been revoked pursuant to section 19 of the Shipping...

  2. 78 FR 25741 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuances The Commission gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary license has been reissued pursuant to section 19 of the Shipping...

  3. 77 FR 58379 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuances The Commission gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been reissued pursuant to section 40901 of the...

  4. 77 FR 42311 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuances Notice is hereby given that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been reissued by the Federal Maritime Commission pursuant to...

  5. 78 FR 3425 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations The Commission gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been revoked pursuant to section 19 of...

  6. 77 FR 50689 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuances The Commission gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been reissued pursuant to section 40901 of the...

  7. 77 FR 70163 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations The Commission gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary license has been revoked pursuant to section 19 of the Shipping Act...

  8. 77 FR 72863 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuances The Commission gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been reissued pursuant to section 19 of the Shipping...

  9. 77 FR 72863 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations The Commission gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been revoked pursuant to section 19 of the Shipping...

  10. 78 FR 23252 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations The Commission gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been revoked pursuant to section 19 of the Shipping...

  11. 78 FR 8533 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations The Commission gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been revoked pursuant to section 19 of the Shipping...

  12. 78 FR 64941 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuances The Commission gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary license has been reissued pursuant to section 19 of the Shipping...

  13. 76 FR 50216 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Reissuance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-12

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Reissuance Notice is hereby given that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been reissued by the Federal Maritime Commission pursuant to section 19... to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR part 515. License No....

  14. 76 FR 4696 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-26

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuance Notice is hereby given that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been reissued by the Federal Maritime Commission pursuant to section 19... to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR part 515. License No....

  15. 76 FR 60837 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-30

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuance Notice is hereby given that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary license has been reissued by the Federal Maritime Commission pursuant to section 19... to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR part 515. License No....

  16. 76 FR 3636 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-20

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuance Notice is hereby given that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been reissued by the Federal Maritime Commission pursuant to section 19... to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR part 515. License No....

  17. 76 FR 70145 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Reissuance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-10

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Reissuance Notice is hereby given that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been reissued by the Federal Maritime Commission pursuant to section 19... to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR part 515. License No....

  18. 77 FR 13605 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Reissuance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-07

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Reissuance Notice is hereby given that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been reissued by the Federal Maritime Commission pursuant to section 19... to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR Part 515. License no....

  19. 76 FR 76411 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Reissuance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-07

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Reissuance Notice is hereby given that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been reissued by the Federal Maritime Commission pursuant to section 19... to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR part 515. ] License No....

  20. 75 FR 34140 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-16

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuance Notice is hereby given that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary license has been reissued by the Federal Maritime Commission pursuant to section 19... to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR part 515. License No....

  1. 75 FR 66100 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-27

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuance Notice is hereby given that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary license has been reissued by the Federal Maritime Commission pursuant to section 19... to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR part 515. License No....

  2. 75 FR 55329 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-10

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuance Notice is hereby given that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary license has been reissued by the Federal Maritime Commission pursuant to section 19... to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR Part 515. License No....

  3. 75 FR 51075 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-18

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuance Notice is hereby given that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been reissued by the Federal Maritime Commission pursuant to section 19... to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR Part 515. License No....

  4. 75 FR 16483 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuance Notice is hereby given that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been reissued by the Federal Maritime Commission pursuant to section 19... to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR part 515. License No....

  5. 76 FR 72408 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-23

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuance Notice is hereby given that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary license has been reissued by the Federal Maritime Commission pursuant to section 19... to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR part 515. License No....

  6. 75 FR 72825 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-26

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuance Notice is hereby given that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been reissued by the Federal Maritime Commission pursuant to section 19... to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR part 515. License No....

  7. 76 FR 67189 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Reissuance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-31

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Reissuance Notice is hereby given that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary license have been reissued by the Federal Maritime Commission pursuant to section 19... to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR part 515. License No....

  8. 77 FR 5014 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Reissuance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-01

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Reissuance Notice is hereby given that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been reissued by the Federal Maritime Commission pursuant to section 19... to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR part 515. License No....

  9. 76 FR 7210 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Reissuance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-09

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Reissuance Notice is hereby given that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary license has been reissued by the Federal Maritime Commission pursuant to section 19... to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR part 515. License No....

  10. 75 FR 12749 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-17

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuances Notice is hereby given that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been reissued by the Federal Maritime Commission pursuant to section 19... to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR part 515. License No....

  11. 75 FR 76466 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-08

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuance Notice is hereby given that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been reissued by the Federal Maritime Commission pursuant to section 19... to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR part 515. License No....

  12. 77 FR 3773 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-25

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants Notice is hereby given that the following...-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF)--Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI...). Application Type: New OFF License. Kamino International Transport, Inc. dba Kamino Ocean Line (NVO &...

  13. 77 FR 35384 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-13

    ... Individual), Application Type: New NVO & OFF License Deep Ocean International Logistics LLC (NVO), 9814... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants Notice is hereby given that the following...-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF)--Ocean Transportation Intermediary...

  14. 77 FR 18815 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-28

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants Notice is hereby given that the following...-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF)--Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI... Structure Change. Chronos International Cargo Corp. dba AOC Log--Air Ocean Chronos Logistics (NVO &...

  15. 76 FR 23598 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-27

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants Notice is hereby given that the following...-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF)--Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI..., Officers: AiChu Sun-Franck, Sec./Dir. Of Ocean Export Operations (Qualifying Individual), Bryan D....

  16. 76 FR 10593 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-25

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants Notice is hereby given that the following...-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF)--Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI..., President, Application Type: New OFF License. AIT Ocean Systems, Inc. (OFF), 701 N. Rohlwing Road,...

  17. 75 FR 40837 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-14

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants Notice is hereby given that the following...-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF)--Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI..., (Qualifying Individual), Roseline A. Izedonmwen, CEO/Member, Application Type: New OFF License. Ocean Air...

  18. 76 FR 71034 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-16

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants Notice is hereby given that the following...-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF)--Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI..., Executive Vice President of Air & Ocean (Qualifying Individual), Jeff Bullard, CEO. Application Type:...

  19. 76 FR 55909 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-09

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants Notice is hereby given that the following...-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF)--Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI... Change. BestOcean Worldwide Logistics, Inc. (NVO & OFF), 1300 Valley Vista Drive, Suite 203, Diamond...

  20. 77 FR 30530 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-23

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants Notice is hereby given that the following...-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF)--Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI... dba DHL Global Forwarding, dba Danmar Lines Ltd, dba DHL Danzas Air & Ocean, dba Danmar Lines...

  1. 77 FR 37044 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-20

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants Notice is hereby given that the following...-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF)--Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI... NVO & OFF License. ] Ocean Trade Lines, Inc. (NVO), 500 E. Broward Blvd., 1710, Ft. Lauderdale,...

  2. 75 FR 28250 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-20

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants Notice is hereby given that the following...-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF)--Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI...). Randy R. Bennett, Vice President. Application Type: New NVO License. Ocean Line Logistics Inc....

  3. 75 FR 32780 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-09

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants Notice is hereby given that the following...-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF)--Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI..., Vice President, Application Type: License Transfer. Albermarle Ocean Logistics LLC (OFF), 257...

  4. 75 FR 61757 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-06

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants Notice is hereby given that the following...-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF)--Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI... & Ocean Cargo (NVO & OFF), 1316 NW 78th Avenue, Miami, FL 33126. Officers: Omar A....

  5. 75 FR 42446 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-21

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants Notice is hereby given that the following...-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF)--Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI.... dba E-Lines Shipping and Logistics, and Ocean Champ Shipping Limited (NVO), 1000 Corporate...

  6. 77 FR 12583 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-01

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants Notice is hereby given that the following...-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF)--Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI..., Dulles, VA 20166, Officers: Philippe Pierson, Vice President of Ocean Exports (Qualifying...

  7. 76 FR 74060 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-30

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants Notice is hereby given that the following...-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF)--Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI... OTI@fmc.gov . Ameri Ocean Worldwide Lines, Limited Liability Company (NVO), 1040 North...

  8. 76 FR 10593 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-25

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuance Notice is hereby given that the following Ocean... to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR Part 515. License No. Name/Address... B, Miami, FL 33167. 020577N Bosmak, Inc. dba Ocean Breeze January 14, 2011. Shipping, 2501...

  9. 78 FR 53456 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-29

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants The Commission gives notice that the following applicants have filed an application for an Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) license as a Non-Vessel-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF) pursuant to section 19 of the...

  10. 77 FR 71002 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-28

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants The Commission gives notice that the following applicants have filed an application for an Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) license as a Non-Vessel-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF) pursuant to section 19 of the...

  11. 78 FR 50054 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-16

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants The Commission gives notice that the following applicants have filed an application for an Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) license as a Non-Vessel-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF) pursuant to section 19 of the...

  12. 78 FR 53456 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-29

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuances The Commission gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been reissued pursuant to section 19 of the Shipping Act..., TX 77449. Date Reissued: June 09, 2013. License No.: 023062F. Name: A & M Ocean Machinery,...

  13. 78 FR 3424 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-16

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants The Commission gives notice that the following applicants have filed an application for an Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) license as a Non-Vessel-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF) pursuant to section 19 of the...

  14. 76 FR 27643 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants Notice is hereby given that the following...-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF)--Ocean Transportation Intermediary...

  15. 75 FR 70673 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants Notice is hereby given that the following...-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF)--Ocean Transportation Intermediary...

  16. 77 FR 42311 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants Notice is hereby given that the following...-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF)--Ocean Transportation Intermediary...

  17. 78 FR 56229 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-12

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants The Commission gives notice that the following applicants have filed an application for an Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) license as a Non-Vessel-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF) pursuant to section 19 of the...

  18. 77 FR 58378 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-20

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants The Commission gives notice that the following applicants have filed an application for an Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) license as a Non-Vessel-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF) pursuant to section 40901 of...

  19. 76 FR 67730 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants Notice is hereby given that the following...-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF)--Ocean Transportation Intermediary...

  20. 78 FR 25740 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-02

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants The Commission gives notice that the following applicants have filed an application for an Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) license as a Non-Vessel-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF) pursuant to section 19 of the...

  1. 77 FR 74186 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-13

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants The Commission gives notice that the following applicants have filed an application for an Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) license as a Non-Vessel-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF) pursuant to section 19 of the...

  2. 78 FR 60282 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-01

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants The Commission gives notice that the following applicants have filed an application for an Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) license as a Non-Vessel-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF) pursuant to section 19 of the...

  3. 77 FR 32115 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants Notice is hereby given that the following...-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF)--Ocean Transportation Intermediary...

  4. 78 FR 30921 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-23

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants The Commission gives notice that the following applicants have filed an application for an Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) license as a Non-Vessel-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF) pursuant to section 19 of the...

  5. 78 FR 48435 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants The Commission gives notice that the following applicants have filed an application for an Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) license as a Non-Vessel-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF) pursuant to section 19 of the...

  6. 76 FR 41258 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants Notice is hereby given that the following...-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF)--Ocean Transportation Intermediary...

  7. 77 FR 58379 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-20

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations The Commission gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been revoked pursuant to section 40901 of the Shipping.... License No.: 022225NF. Name: Trans Ocean Logistics Forwarding L.L.C. Address: 1320 West Blancke...

  8. 78 FR 24200 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-24

    ... COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants The Commission gives notice that the following applicants have filed an application for an Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) license as a Non-Vessel-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF) pursuant to section...

  9. 78 FR 75345 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-11

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants The Commission gives notice that the following applicants have filed an application for an Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) license as a Non-Vessel-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF) pursuant to section 19 of the...

  10. 77 FR 26008 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants Notice is hereby given that the following...-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF)--Ocean Transportation Intermediary...

  11. 77 FR 27457 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-10

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants Notice is hereby given that the following...-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF)--Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI... Qualifying Individual (QI) for a license. Interested persons may contact the Office of...

  12. 76 FR 4696 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-26

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants Notice is hereby given that the following...-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF)--Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI... Qualifying Individual (QI) for a license. Interested persons may contact the Office of...

  13. 76 FR 70145 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-10

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants Notice is hereby given that the following...-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF)--Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI... Qualifying Individual (QI) for a license. Interested persons may contact the Office of...

  14. 76 FR 3636 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-20

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants Notice is hereby given that the following...-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF)--Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI... Qualifying Individual (QI) for a license. Interested persons may contact the Office of...

  15. 77 FR 6563 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-08

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants Notice is hereby given that the following...-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF)--Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI... Qualifying Individual (QI) for a license. Interested persons may contact the Office of...

  16. 77 FR 5013 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-01

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants Notice is hereby given that the following...-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF)--Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI... Qualifying Individual (QI) for a license. Interested persons may contact the Office of...

  17. 76 FR 72409 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-23

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants Notice is hereby given that the following...-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF)--Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI... Qualifying Individual (QI) for a license. Interested persons may contact the Office of...

  18. 75 FR 76466 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-08

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants Notice is hereby given that the following...-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF)--Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI... Qualifying Individual (QI) for a license. Interested persons may contact the Office of...

  19. 77 FR 13604 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-07

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants Notice is hereby given that the following...-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF)--Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI... Qualifying Individual (QI) for a license. Interested persons may contact the Office of...

  20. 75 FR 51074 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-18

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants Notice is hereby given that the following...-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF)--Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI... Qualifying Individual (QI) for a license. Interested persons may contact the Office of...

  1. 75 FR 66099 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-27

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants Notice is hereby given that the following...-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF)--Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI... Qualifying Individual (QI) for a license. Interested persons may contact the Office of...

  2. 76 FR 67188 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-31

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants Notice is hereby given that the following...-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF)--Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI... Qualifying Individual (QI) for a license. Interested persons may contact the Office of...

  3. 76 FR 76411 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-07

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants Notice is hereby given that the following...-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF)--Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI... Qualifying Individual (QI) for a license. Interested persons may contact the Office of...

  4. 75 FR 69080 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-10

    ... COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants Notice is hereby given that the following...-Operating Common Carrier (NVO), and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF)--Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI... Qualifying Individual (QI) for a license. Interested persons may contact the Office of...

  5. 75 FR 34139 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-16

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants Notice is hereby given that the following...-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF)--Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI... Qualifying Individual (QI) for a license. Interested persons may contact the Office of...

  6. 76 FR 7209 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-09

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants Notice is hereby given that the following...-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF)--Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI... Qualifying Individual (QI) for a license. Interested persons may contact the Office of...

  7. 75 FR 72824 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-26

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants Notice is hereby given that the following...-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF)--Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI... Qualifying Individual (QI) for a license. Interested persons may contact the Office of...

  8. 78 FR 33841 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-05

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations The Commission gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been revoked pursuant to section 19 of the Shipping Act... License. License No.: 021796NF. Name: Keith Phillips Transportation, LLC. Address: 124 Garden Gate...

  9. 75 FR 3467 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations The Federal Maritime Commission hereby gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been revoked pursuant to section 19 of the Shipping Act of 1984 (46...

  10. 78 FR 56229 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations and Terminations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations and Terminations The Commission gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been revoked or terminated for the reason shown pursuant to section 19 of...

  11. 78 FR 38336 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants The Commission gives notice that the following applicants have filed an application for an Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) license as a Non-Vessel-Operating Common Carrier (NVO)...

  12. 78 FR 35635 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-13

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations The Commission gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been revoked pursuant to section 19 of the Shipping Act.... Name: KN Special Logistics, Inc. Address: 22780 Indian Creek Drive, Suite 160, Sterling, VA 20166....

  13. 76 FR 38653 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Revocation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Revocation The Federal Maritime Commission hereby gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been revoked pursuant to section 19 of the Shipping Act of 1984 (46...

  14. 75 FR 65017 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations The Federal Maritime Commission hereby gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary licenses have been revoked pursuant to section 19 of the Shipping Act of 1984 (46...

  15. 75 FR 3467 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Reissuance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Reissuance Notice is hereby given that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary license has been reissued by the Federal Maritime Commission pursuant to section 19 of the Shipping Act of 1984...

  16. 76 FR 34993 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Revocation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-15

    ... Number: 022019NF. Name: International Logistic Services, Inc. Address: 155-11 146th Avenue, Jamaica, NY... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Revocation The Federal Maritime Commission hereby...

  17. 78 FR 55698 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION... Office of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, Federal Maritime Commission, Washington, DC 20573, by...), Yanzhong Ding, President, Application Type: QI Change. Harvest Logistics, LLC (NVO & OFF), 2441...

  18. 76 FR 555 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocation The Federal Maritime Commission hereby gives notice...: General Logistic Solutions Corp. Address: 6701 NW. 7th Street, Suite 135, Miami, FL 33126. Date...

  19. 77 FR 21559 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants Notice is hereby given that the following applicants have filed with the Federal Maritime Commission an application for a license as a Non-Vessel-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or...

  20. 46 CFR Appendix C to Subpart C of... - Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) Guaranty Form [Form 68

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) Guaranty Form C Appendix C to Subpart C of Part 515 Shipping FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION REGULATIONS AFFECTING OCEAN SHIPPING IN FOREIGN COMMERCE LICENSING, FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY REQUIREMENTS, AND GENERAL DUTIES FOR OCEAN TRANSPORTATION INTERMEDIARIES...

  1. 46 CFR Appendix B to Subpart C of... - Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) Insurance Form [Form 67

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) Insurance Form B Appendix B to Subpart C of Part 515 Shipping FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION REGULATIONS AFFECTING OCEAN SHIPPING IN FOREIGN COMMERCE LICENSING, FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY REQUIREMENTS, AND GENERAL DUTIES FOR OCEAN TRANSPORTATION INTERMEDIARIES...

  2. 46 CFR Appendix C to Subpart C of... - Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) Guaranty Form [Form 68

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SHIPPING IN FOREIGN COMMERCE LICENSING, FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY REQUIREMENTS, AND GENERAL DUTIES FOR OCEAN TRANSPORTATION INTERMEDIARIES Financial Responsibility Requirements; Claims Against Ocean Transportation... may become a group or association of OTIs, and desires to establish its financial responsibility...

  3. 78 FR 8533 - The Commission gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary license has been...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuances The Commission gives notice that the following Ocean Transportation Intermediary license has been reissued pursuant to section 19 of the Shipping Act of 1984 (46 U.S.C. 40101) effective on...

  4. 46 CFR 515.23 - Claims against an ocean transportation intermediary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Claims against an ocean transportation intermediary. 515.23 Section 515.23 Shipping FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION REGULATIONS AFFECTING OCEAN SHIPPING IN FOREIGN COMMERCE LICENSING, FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY REQUIREMENTS, AND GENERAL DUTIES FOR...

  5. 46 CFR 515.23 - Claims against an ocean transportation intermediary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Claims against an ocean transportation intermediary. 515.23 Section 515.23 Shipping FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION REGULATIONS AFFECTING OCEAN SHIPPING IN FOREIGN COMMERCE LICENSING, FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY REQUIREMENTS, AND GENERAL DUTIES FOR...

  6. 46 CFR 515.23 - Claims against an ocean transportation intermediary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Claims against an ocean transportation intermediary. 515.23 Section 515.23 Shipping FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION REGULATIONS AFFECTING OCEAN SHIPPING IN FOREIGN COMMERCE LICENSING, FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY REQUIREMENTS, AND GENERAL DUTIES FOR...

  7. 46 CFR 515.23 - Claims against an ocean transportation intermediary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Claims against an ocean transportation intermediary. 515.23 Section 515.23 Shipping FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION REGULATIONS AFFECTING OCEAN SHIPPING IN FOREIGN COMMERCE LICENSING, FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY REQUIREMENTS, AND GENERAL DUTIES FOR...

  8. 46 CFR 515.23 - Claims against an ocean transportation intermediary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Claims against an ocean transportation intermediary. 515.23 Section 515.23 Shipping FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION REGULATIONS AFFECTING OCEAN SHIPPING IN FOREIGN COMMERCE LICENSING, FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY REQUIREMENTS, AND GENERAL DUTIES FOR...

  9. 76 FR 50217 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Rescission of Order of Revocation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Rescission of Order of Revocation Notice is hereby given that the Order revoking the following licenses are being rescinded by the Federal Maritime Commission pursuant to section 19 of the Shipping Act...

  10. 78 FR 32945 - Amendments to Regulations Governing Ocean Transportation Intermediary Licensing and Financial...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-31

    ...The Federal Maritime Commission proposes to amend its rules governing the licensing, financial responsibility requirements and duties of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries. The proposed rule is intended to adapt to changing industry conditions, improve regulatory effectiveness, improve transparency, streamline processes and reduce regulatory...

  11. 77 FR 22576 - Possible Revocation of Ocean Transportation Intermediary License No. 021899-Trans World Logistics...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-16

    ... Possible Revocation of Ocean Transportation Intermediary License No. 021899--Trans World Logistics Corporation; Order To Show Cause Trans World Logistics Corporation (Trans World Logistics) is an Indiana... Licensing (BCL) indicate that Trans World Logistics maintains its principal offices at 702 Penny...

  12. 77 FR 1936 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION... applicants have filed with the Federal Maritime Commission an application for a license as a Non-Vessel... Intermediaries, Federal Maritime Commission, Washington, DC 20573, by telephone at (202) 523-5843 or by email...

  13. 76 FR 38651 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION... applicants have filed with the Federal Maritime Commission an application for a license as a Non-Vessel... Intermediaries, Federal Maritime Commission, Washington, DC 20573, by telephone at (202) 523-5843, or by...

  14. 77 FR 61752 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-11

    ... Embarque Corporation (NVO & OFF), 376 Totowa Avenue, Paterson, NJ 07502, Officers: Robert Guerra, President (QI), Henry Guerra, Vice President, Application Type: New NVO & OFF License. Ocean Line Logistics...

  15. 75 FR 8720 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-25

    ...: 17678N. Name: Four Link International, Inc. Address: 146-27 167th Street, Suite 100, Jamaica, NY 11434...: 020658N. Name: Goal Ocean & Air Logistics Inc. Address: 147-35 Farmers Blvd., Suite 203-204, Jamaica,...

  16. 77 FR 20398 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-04

    .../Treasurer, (Qualifying Individual), Application Type: New NVO License. Tigers (USA) Global Logistics, Inc. dba Tigers Ocean Line (NVO & OFF), 145th Avenue & Hook Creek Blvd., Valley Stream, NY 11581,...

  17. 78 FR 13343 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION... of 1984 (46 U.S.C. 40101) effective on the date shown. License No.: 017697N. Name: IREH Logistic Services Inc. Address: 488 E. Ocean Blvd., Suite 702, Long Beach, CA 90802. Date Reissued: December...

  18. 76 FR 9015 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-16

    .../Treasurer/Secretary. Application Type: New OFF License. American Freight Transport, Inc. (OFF), 4805 Meyer Road, Pendleton, NY 14120. Officers: Mark E. Oehm, Vice President (Qualifying Individual), Mary...

  19. 76 FR 31962 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-02

    ... 77040, Officers: John A. Onorato, President, (Qualifying Individual), Thomas J. Springer, Vice President... Transport, LLC. (NVO), 211 W. 135th Street, Los Angeles, CA 90061, Officers: John Ma, Manager/President... & OFF License. Worldwide Cargo Express, Inc. (OFF), 76 W. 13775 S., Suite 8, Draper, UT 84020,...

  20. 76 FR 28780 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Revocation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-18

    ... to maintain a valid bond. License Number: 004093F. Name: Marathon International Transport Services.... Reason: Failed to maintain a valid bond. License Number: 4473N. Name: Maromar International Freight...: April 8, 2011. Reason: Failed to maintain a valid bond. License Number: 4677F. Name: B.M. &...

  1. 76 FR 12962 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-09

    ... applicants have filed with the Federal Maritime Commission an application for a license as a Non-Vessel... Qualifying Individual (QI) for a license. Interested persons may contact the Office of Transportation... OTI@fmc.gov . A & A Shipping & Logistics Inc. (NVO), 2 Reiter Avenue, Hicksville, NY 11801....

  2. 75 FR 29545 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-26

    ... & NVO), 800 S. Pacific Coast Highway, Suite 8406, Redondo Beach, CA 90277. Officers: Li Mei, Manager... Top Drive, Weston, FL 33332. Officers: Graeme W. Rodriquez, President, (Qualifying Individual). Wendy... Reefco Transport dba Foodcareplus (OFF & NVO), 314-021 W. Millbrook Road, Raleigh, NC 27609....

  3. 77 FR 13606 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Rescission of Order of Revocation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-07

    ... Number: 021014N. Name: Magic Transport, Inc. Address: Pepsi Industrial Park, PR-2, KM 19.5, Interior BO Candelaria, Toa Baja, PR 00949. Order Published: FR: 3/1/12 (Volume 77, No. 41, Pg. 12584). Vern W....

  4. 46 CFR Appendix B to Subpart C of... - Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) Insurance Form [Form 67

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 CFR § 515.23(b) for damages against the Insured arising from the Insured's transportation-related... amount per OTI set forth in 46 CFR § 515.21 or the amount per group or association of OTIs set forth in 46 CFR § 515.21 in aggregate. Whereas, the Insurer certifies that it has sufficient and...

  5. 46 CFR Appendix B to Subpart C of... - Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) Insurance Form [Form 67

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 CFR § 515.23(b) for damages against the Insured arising from the Insured's transportation-related... amount per OTI set forth in 46 CFR § 515.21 or the amount per group or association of OTIs set forth in 46 CFR § 515.21 in aggregate. Whereas, the Insurer certifies that it has sufficient and...

  6. 46 CFR Appendix B to Subpart C of... - Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) Insurance Form [Form 67

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 CFR § 515.23(b) for damages against the Insured arising from the Insured's transportation-related... amount per OTI set forth in 46 CFR § 515.21 or the amount per group or association of OTIs set forth in 46 CFR § 515.21 in aggregate. Whereas, the Insurer certifies that it has sufficient and...

  7. 46 CFR Appendix B to Subpart C of... - Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) Insurance Form [Form 67

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 CFR § 515.23(b) for damages against the Insured arising from the Insured's transportation-related... amount per OTI set forth in 46 CFR § 515.21 or the amount per group or association of OTIs set forth in 46 CFR § 515.21 in aggregate. Whereas, the Insurer certifies that it has sufficient and...

  8. 77 FR 49445 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-16

    .... Garcia, Vice President (Qualifying Individual), John R. Nash, CFO, Application Type: Add Trade Name... 33122, Officers: Juan A. Garcia, Vice President (Qualifying Individual), John R. Nash, CFO, Application Type: QI Change. Seagull Maritime Agencies Private Limited (NVO), F-35/3, Okhla Industrial Area,...

  9. 76 FR 47182 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-04

    .... Transit Air Cargo, Inc. (OFF & NVO), 2204 E 4th Street, Santa Ana, CA 92705, Officers: Gary Syner, CEO... Services, Incorporation (OFF & NVO), 20603 Wayne River Court, Cypress, TX 77433, Officers: Tiffni...

  10. 76 FR 17862 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-31

    ...), David R. Price, Manager, Application Type: New NVO License. Madrigal Express, Inc. (NVO & OFF), 1789 NW... Algonquin Parkway, Whippany, NJ 07981, Officers:Marcel Z. Antaki, ] President, (Qualifying...

  11. 78 FR 20106 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-03

    ... Act of 1984 (46 U.S.C. 40101). Notice is also given of the filing of applications to amend an existing... 60106. Officer: Keh J. Wu, President (QI). Application Type: Add Trade Name, KCW-Logistics. Majestic... Logistics (NVO), 18747 S. Laurel Park Road, Rancho Dominguez, CA 90220. Officer: Tino M. Tsai, President...

  12. 78 FR 66713 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-06

    ... Act of 1984 (46 U.S.C. 40101). Notice is also given of the filing of applications to amend an existing... (QI), Application Type: Add Trade Name Rolasa USA. C J International, Inc. (OFF), 519 S. Ellwood.... vmlog international logistics U.S.A. ``L.L.C.'' (NVO & OFF), 7025 Hodgson Memorial Drive, Suite...

  13. 76 FR 28778 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-18

    ..., Inc. (NVO & OFF), 618 Glasgow Avenue, Suite 355, Inglewood, CA 90301, Officers: Andy C. Wu, Vice...) pursuant to section 19 of the Shipping Act of 1984 as amended (46 U.S.C. Chapter 409 and 46 ] CFR 515... Avenue, 105-106, Auburn, AL 36832, Officers: Joseph K. Ji, COO, (Qualifying Individual), Jong S....

  14. 75 FR 63476 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-15

    ...) pursuant to section 19 of the Shipping Act of 1984 as amended (46 U.S.C. chapter 409 and 46 CFR part 515...: Winnie W. Wu, Vice President/Director (Qualifying Individual), Larry Y.R. Wu, President/CEO/Director... Express, Inc. (NVO & OFF), 1415 Neal Street, Cookeville, TN 38502-3166. Officers: Charles S. McGee,...

  15. 77 FR 75162 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-19

    ... Act of 1984 (46 U.S.C. 40101). Notice is also given of the filing of ] applications to amend an...-CHB, LLC (OFF), 765 North Route 83, Suite 114, Bensenville, IL 60106. Officer: Keh J. Wu, President.... Durand, President (QI). Application Type: New NVO License. Rapid Cargo & Logistics, Inc. (NVO), 15606...

  16. 78 FR 5441 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-25

    ... Act of 1984 (46 U.S.C. 40101). Notice is also given of the filing of applications to amend an existing..., Humble, TX 77338, Officers: Gary C. Cockrell, Assistant Vice President for Regulatory Affairs (QI), Greg..., CA 91754, Officers: Janet Li, Secretary (QI), Jesse Wu, CEO/CFO, Application Type: New NVO &...

  17. 75 FR 53696 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-01

    ... section 19 of the Shipping Act of 1984 (46 U.S.C. chapter 409) and the regulations of the Commission...., CC Wu Bldg., 302-308 Hennessy Road, Wanchai, Hong Kong, Republic of China. Date Revoked: August 7, 2010. Reason: Failed to maintain a valid bond. License Number: 016037N. Name: J.C. Express of...

  18. 75 FR 39529 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-09

    ...) pursuant to section 19 of the Shipping Act of 1984 as amended (46 U.S.C. Chapter 409 and 46 CFR part 515... Convoy Court, San Diego, CA 92111. Officers: Terrance C. Simokat, President (Qualifying Individual... JWJ Express Inc. (OFF & NVO), 149-23 182nd Street, Suite 100, Jamaica, NY 11413. Officers: Charles...

  19. 78 FR 20107 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-03

    .... License No.: 016816F. Name: Green Integrated Logistics, Inc. Address: 16210 South Maple Avenue, Gardena... Forwarding Inc. Address: 1290 Maple View Drive, Pomona, CA 91766. Date Revoked: March 13, 2013....

  20. 77 FR 52736 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-30

    ... Solutions (NVO & OFF), 14144 Central Avenue, H, Chino, CA 91710, Officers: Xiaosong Liu, Secretary..., Director, (Qualifying Individual), Daniel D. Ferraz, Director, Application Type: Add Trade Names...

  1. 78 FR 49752 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations and Terminations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-15

    ....: 018392F. Name: Broom U.S.A., Inc. dba Transcontinental Logistics Neutral 3PL. Address: 2293 NW 82th Avenue....: 018461F. Name: Select Aircargo Services, Inc. dba PAC International Logistics Company. Address: 12801... No.: 019608N. Name: United Logistics (LAX) Inc. Address: 13079 Artesia Blvd., Suite B-110,...

  2. 77 FR 65887 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-31

    ... South, 185, The Woodlands, TX 77385, Officer: John C. Heimsath, President (QI), Application Type: New...), 2203 Timberloch Place, Suite 218D, The Woodlands, TX 77380, Officers: Jeffrey K. Bonner,...

  3. 75 FR 52343 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-25

    ...: Xiao Chun Li, Vice President (Qualifying Individual), Yan Yang, CEO, Application Type: New NVO & OFF..., Chairman/Director, Application Type: New NVO License, United Marine Lines, L.L.C. (NVO), 201 Sevilla...

  4. 75 FR 44261 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-28

    .... Sierra Vista Avenue, C, Alhambra, CA 91801. Officer: Shunkun He, CEO, (Qualifying Individual..., Secretary (Qualifying Individual). Eric Sun, President/CEO/Director. Application Type: New NVO & OFF License. Mega Shipping, Inc. (NVO), 9550 Flair Drive, 508, El Monte, CA 91731. Officers: Yuwei Chen,...

  5. 78 FR 14792 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-07

    ... 91733. Officers: Alex C. Huang, CEO (QI); Wei Zheng, Shareholder. Application Type: New NVO & OFF.... Officers: Richard L. Giovannone, President (QI); Miranda L. Lou, Chairman. Application Type: QI Change.... Zavaleta, Secretary (QI); Patricia A. Whaley, CEO. Application Type: New NVO & OFF License Triple...

  6. 77 FR 28880 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-16

    .../Manager/CEO, Application Type: QI Change/Trade Name Change. Lone Star Integrated Distribution, LLC dba H.B.... Choi, CEO/President/Secretary, Application Type: QI Change. Rockin Boxes Global, Inc. (NVO & OFF...: Jeffrey R. Landa, President (Qualifying Individual), Warren P. Powers, Chairman, Application Type:...

  7. 76 FR 16420 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-23

    ... Logistics Officer (Qualifying Individual), Jack R. Lentz, CEO/Chairman/ Secretary, Application Type: New NVO... (Qualifying Individual), Kazuo Ishizuka, President/CEO, Application Type: Business Structure Change and...

  8. 75 FR 60124 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-29

    ..., Officers: Edward H. Lee, Secretary (Qualifying Individual), Darren Kim, Chairman/ President/CFO...), George W. Pasha, IV, Member/President/CEO, Application Type: New NVO & OFF License RDD Freight... (Qualifying Individual), Victor L. Sheng, Director/ ] President/CEO, Application Type: New NVO License...

  9. 76 FR 62407 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-07

    ... 30326, Officers: Chad Rosenberg, President/CEO (Qualifying Individual), Michael Shea, Secretary..., Officers: Alexandre Ayanou, Manager/President/CEO (Qualifying Individual), Faty Ayanou, Member, Application... Brodecki, Chairman, Application Type: QI Change. Crowley Logistics, Inc. (NVO & OFF), 9487 Regency...

  10. 78 FR 21365 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-10

    ... Officer (QI), Rosemary Myers, CEO, Application Type: New NVO & OFF License. Full Hull Logistics, LLC (NVO... 30096, Officers: Christopher J. Reilly, Vice President (QI), Neal Baines, Chairman of the...

  11. 75 FR 20998 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-22

    .... Causeway Blvd., Suite 250, Metairie, LA 70001. Date Revoked: March 3, 2010. Reason: Failed to maintain a...: March 3, 2010. Reason: Failed to maintain a valid bond. License Number: 4379N. Name: U.S.G.A. Logistic...: 020764N. Name: Get One Later, Inc. dba Omega Shipping West. Address: 4379 Sheila Street, Los Angeles,...

  12. 76 FR 65193 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-20

    .... Officer: Andrea Bigi, President (Qualifying Individual), Application Type: Business Structure Change... Individual); Ronald S. Penn, President, Application Type: New OFF License. Earth Relocation Inc (NVO &...

  13. 77 FR 76483 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-28

    ... 1984 (46 U.S.C. 40101) effective on the date shown. License No.: 18751N. Name: World Commerce Services, L.L.C. dba WLG USA, LLC. Address: 920 E. Algonquin Road, Suite 120, Schaumburg, IL 60173....

  14. 78 FR 13342 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-27

    ... & OFF), 975 Cobb Place Blvd., Suite 101, Kennesaw, GA 30144. Officers: Keith Phillips, Vice President...: Frank M. Ramirez, Assistant Secretary (QI), William Askew, Member. Application Type: QI Change. Emarat..., Suite D, Wood Dale, IL 60191. Officers: Matway Gurfinkel, Manager (QI), Andrew Shepin,...

  15. 76 FR 25690 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-05

    ... International, Inc. (NVO & OFF), 9750 3rd Avenue NE, Suite 200, Seattle, WA 98115, Officers: John Griffin... Carriers, Inc. (NVO & OFF), 9750 3rd Avenue NE, Seattle, WA 98115, Officers: John Griffin, President... Corp. (OFF), 9750 3rd Avenue NE, 200, Seattle, WA 98115, Officers: John Griffin, President,...

  16. 75 FR 20998 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Reissuance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-22

    ... Date reissued 004379F U.S.G.A. Logistic, Inc., 16206 March 15, 2010. Aldine Westfield Road Houston, TX 77032. 004553F Marianas Steamship Agencies, March 4, 2010. Inc. dba MSA Logistics, Commercial Port...

  17. 75 FR 46939 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-04

    ... Number: 8904F. Name: Port Jersey Shipping International Inc. Address: 268 Seaview Avenue, Jersey City, NJ.... dba Airwave Express. Address: 155 Diplomat Drive, Suite D, Columbia City, IN 46525. Date Revoked:...

  18. 76 FR 78007 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-15

    ... (OFF), 7823 New London Drive, Springfield, VA 22153, Officers: Feras Hindi, Member, (Qualifying Individual), Ruba Hindi, Member, Application Type: New OFF License. Kemka USA Limited Liability Company...

  19. 78 FR 6325 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-30

    ..., Unit 3B, Oak Lawn, IL 60453. Officer: Ahmed Sadek, President (QI). Application Type: New NVO & OFF...., Karachi, Pakistan. Officers: Asif Ali, Vice President (QI), Ayaz Ali, President. Application Type: New NVO.... Officers: Syed H. Hussaini, Vice President (QI), Mohamed Abouelmaati, President. Application Type: New...

  20. 77 FR 64992 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-24

    .... Reason: Failed to maintain a valid bond. License No.: 022878F. Name: A-1 Fargo Van and Storage, Inc... of 1984 (46 U.S.C. 40101) effective on the date shown. License No.: 3184F. Name: Alliance...: September 6, 2012. Reason: Failed to maintain a valid bond. License No.: 003977F. Name: A Active...

  1. 75 FR 57798 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-22

    ...). Application Type: New NVO & OFF License. Cambria Global Logistics, LLC (OFF), 12140 Quilting Lane, Boca Raton... Pondwood Road, Boca Raton, FL 33428. Officer: Suramya (A.K.A. Ron) T. Atapattu,...

  2. 78 FR 43202 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-19

    ...), 8000 NW 29th Street, Miami, FL 33122, Officers: Adrian Martinez, Operations Manager (QI), Jose G. Suarez, Sales Manager, Application Type: QI Change. UBA Express Cargo, Corp. (NVO), 10350 West Flagler..., Suite 6, Miami, FL 33178, Officers: Paul Selvage, Member (QI), Steven Periman,...

  3. 75 FR 46938 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-04

    ... International Movers Corp. (NVO & OFF), 23-83 31st Street, Astoria, NY 11105, Officers: Ioannis Ladis, Jr., Vice President, (Qualifying Individual), Ioannis Ladis, Sr., President, Application Type: QI Change....

  4. 75 FR 80500 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-22

    ...: 8952N. Name: Ace Consolidators Corp. Address: 147-19 Springfield Lane, Suite D, Jamaica, NY 11413. Date...: November 30, 2010. Reason: Surrendered license voluntarily. License Number: 022244F. Name: Golden...

  5. 75 FR 44262 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-28

    ... Surface Distribution, Inc. ADDRESS: 2018 Mount Forest Drive, Kingwood, TX 78521. DATE REVOKED: May 30...: 020821NF. NAME: Gold Coast Shipping, LLC. ADDRESS: 2964 Main Street, Hartford, CA 06120. DATE REVOKED:...

  6. 78 FR 57634 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations and Terminations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-19

    .... Address: 145-18 156th Street, Room 1, Jamaica, NY 11434. Date Revoked: July 22, 2013. Reason: Failed to... Floor, Jamaica, NY 11434. Date Revoked: August 29, 2013. Reason: Voluntary Surrender of License. License....A. Group Corp. Address: 145-30 156th Street, Suite 202, Jamaica, NY 11434. Date Revoked: July...

  7. 76 FR 79682 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-22

    ... OTI@fmc.gov . A.C.T. Logistics, LLC (NVO), 154-09 146th Avenue, 3rd Floor, Jamaica, NY 11434. Officers... Airport, Cargo Plaza, Bldg. 87, Jamaica, NY 11430. Officers: Anna Shneyder, General Manager,...

  8. 78 FR 13343 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-27

    ... International Inc. Address: 149-23 182nd Street, Suite 101, Jamaica, NY 11413. Date Revoked: January 25, 2013...: 167-43 148th Avenue, 2nd Floor, Jamaica, NY 11434. Date Revoked: January 25, 2013. Reason: Failed to...-51 Rockaway Blvd., Suite 200, Jamaica, NY 11434. Date Revoked: January 28, 2013. Reason:...

  9. 78 FR 75346 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations and Terminations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-11

    ...., Jamaica, NY 11434. Date Revoked: October 21, 2013. Reason: Voluntary Surrender of License. License No.: 015677N. Name: OHL Solutions, Inc. dba Activsea USA. Address: 147-80 184th Street, Jamaica, NY 11413. Date... Youngtrans, Inc. dba Youngtrans. Address: 167-55 148th Ave. Jamaica, NY 11434. Date Revoked: November...

  10. 77 FR 47393 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-08

    .... ] Name: Ape Freight International Inc. Address: 167-10 South Conduit Avenue, Suite 202, Jamaica, NY 11434.... License No.: 022773F. Name: WLI (USA) Inc. Address: 175-01 Rockaway Blvd., Suite 228, Jamaica, NY...

  11. 75 FR 9602 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Reissuances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-03

    ... Date reissued 017678N Four Link January 2, 2010. International, Inc., 146-27 167th Street, 100, Jamaica..., Jamaica, NY 11434. 021418F Asbun January 4, 2010. International Freight, Inc., 8140 NW. 74th Avenue,...

  12. 78 FR 28845 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-16

    ..., Application Type: New OFF License AZ Freight International Inc. (NVO & OFF), 18311 Railroad Street, City of... Change Contract Logistics, LLC (NVO), 4911 North Portland Avenue, Suite 200, Oklahoma City, OK 73112... Trade Name Smart Lines Worldwide Feiliks Global Logistics Corporation (NVO), 176-20 S. Conduit...

  13. 75 FR 54884 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-09

    ... Individual), Wen X. Xie, President/CEO/Treasurer/CFO. Application Type: New NVO & OFF License. Advanced..., Managing Director, (Qualifying Individual), Marc Hapanionek, President/ CEO. Application Type: New NVO... Logistics Services (NVO & OFF), 1881 Alpha Road, Apt. 15, Glendale, CA 91208. Officer: Chia W. Lo,...

  14. 77 FR 38288 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-27

    ... Commerce Park Drive, Suite E, Marietta, GA 30060. Officers: Cornelius U. Odinjor, President/CEO (Qualifying.... Romine, President (Qualifying Individual). Ron ] Cain, CEO. Application Type: Trade Name Change and QI... Lee, CEO/President. Application Type: New NVO License. Dated: June 22, 2012. Karen V....

  15. 76 FR 14395 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-16

    ... Individual), Iain C. Aitchison, CEO/President/Director. Application Type: Trade Name Change & Add NVO Service..., Exeter, NH 03833. Officers: William Walsh, President/CEO (Qualifying Individual), James McKenna, Vice... Individual), Kazuo Ishizuka, President/CEO, Application Type: Name Change & QI Change. Dated: March 11,...

  16. 75 FR 37805 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-30

    .... Lorrie Vidal, CEO (Qualifying Individual). Application Type: New OFF & NVO. Alisped U.S.A. Inc. (NVO... LLC (NVO), 25 E. Spring Valley Avenue--Suite 100, Maywood, NJ 07607. Joseph Monaghan, President/CEO...., Carteret, NJ 07008. Myles O'Brien, President & CEO, (Qualifying Individual) Robert Agresti, CFO &...

  17. 75 FR 11180 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-10

    ... San Francisco, CA 94080., Officer: Arben Hodza, CEO, CFO, Secretary (Qualifying Individual). Non..., CEO (Qualifying Individual). Dated: March 5, 2010. Rachel E. Dickon, Assistant Secretary. BILLING...

  18. 76 FR 554 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-05

    ..., Brooklyn, NY 11214. Officers: Begator Hila, President (Qualifying Individual), Skender Gashi, CEO.... Officer: Ray Kao, CEO/CFO/Secretary/Director (Qualifying Individual), Application Type: New NVO License.... Lindsey, COO (Qualifying Individual), Lorraine E. Lasater, CEO/ President/Secretary/Treasurer....

  19. 75 FR 6398 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-09

    ..., Rhett N. Willis, President/CEO, (Qualifying Individual), Richard E. Carter, Chairman. H T International..., COO, (Qualifying Individual), Jean Jacques Lalou, CEO. Geevee Enterprises Inc. dba Aerosend, 245...

  20. 77 FR 23719 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-20

    .... Officers: David F. Gross, CEO (Qualifying Individual), Lance A. Lucibello, Vice President. Application Type... (Qualifying Individual), Michael Patterson, CEO/CFO/ Secretary. Application Type: New NVO & OFF License. NIT.../Secretary (Qualifying Individual), Patrica A. Whaley, President/CEO. Application Type: New NVO & OFF...

  1. 75 FR 20997 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-22

    ..., Secretary/Treasurer, (Qualifying Individual). Andres R. Guerra-Mondragon, CEO, Application Type: QI Change... Individual). Won S. Jang, President/CEO/Secretary, Application Type: QI Change. Intertrade Systems Inc. (OFF... San Francisco, CA 94080. Officers: Victoria Andreychikova, CEO/ President/Director,...

  2. 76 FR 34992 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-15

    ...), Hakmyung Rho, CEO, Application Type: New NVO & OFF License S.O. Express Moving International, Inc. (NVO.../CEO/Director (Qualifying Individual), Application Type: New NVO & OFF License Specialized...

  3. 76 FR 59128 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-23

    .... Officer: Francis Lucas, CEO. (Qualifying Individual) Application Type: New NVO & OFF License. DVN Carriers...: Yalonda R. Henderson, Vice President (Operations). (Qualifying Individual) Walter Bandos, CEO....

  4. 76 FR 44330 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-25

    .... Lee, Secretary/CFO, (Qualifying Individual), Kathlyn Park, CEO, Application Type: New NVO License..., CEO, Application Type: New OFF License. Annam Cargo, Inc. (NVO & OFF), 1340 Tully Road, 308, San Jose..., (Qualifying Individual), Yaoyao (Jessie) Guo, CEO/President, Application Type: QI Change. Kamino...

  5. 75 FR 53696 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-01

    ... Park, GA 30297. Officer: Kil Ra, CEO (Qualifying Individual). Application Type: Add NVO Service. Primex... (Qualifyng Individual), Dookee Kim, CEO/CFO. Application Type: QI Change. Unique Logistics International (LAX), Inc. (NVO), 16330 Marquardt Avenue, Cerritos, CA 90703. Officers: Sunandan Ray, CEO...

  6. 75 FR 48686 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-11

    ... (Qualifying Individual), Kenryo Senda, President/CEO, Application Type: QI Change. Praxis SCM, LLC (NVO & OFF), 5725 Paradise Drive, 1000, Corte Madera, CA 94925, Officers: George W. Pasha, IV, President/CEO... Brooks, CEO (Qualifying Individual), Maria Caceres, Secretary, Application Type: Add Trade...

  7. 77 FR 64991 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-24

    ...), Joosup Jung, CEO. Application Type: New NVO & OFF License. E.T.H. Cargo Services Inc. (OFF), Av. Galicia... & OFF), 1400 Glenn Curtiss Street, Carson, CA 90746. Officers: Thomas Donahue, III, Vice President...

  8. 77 FR 30532 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Revocation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-23

    ...: April 28, 2012. Reason: Failed to maintain a valid bond. License Number: 019878NF. Name: Unity Logistics...: April 23, 2012. Reason: Failed to maintain valid bonds. License Number: 020376NF. Name: Unity...

  9. 75 FR 8720 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-25

    .... Officers: James P. Middleton, CEO/President (Qualifying Individual), Michael Middleton, Vice President... (Cont'd): V. Alexander & Co., Inc., 22 Century Blvd., 510, Nashville, TN 37214. Officer: Gary Brown, Senior Vice President/ Director (Qualifying Individual), D.F. Brown, Jr., President/COB Dated:...

  10. 76 FR 16421 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Reissuance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-23

    ..., Houston, TX 77095. 021268F Scan Global January 15, 2011. Logistics, Inc., 650 Atlanta South Parkway, Suite 109, Atlanta, GA 30349. 021504N Onward Shipping & January 10, 2011. Clearing Service Inc., 2305...

  11. 78 FR 35634 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-13

    ... & OFF License. Koch Maritime, Inc. (NVO & OFF), 2230 Energy Park Drive, St. Paul, MN 55108. Officers: Stan Sing Lau, Vice President (QI), David Koch, CEO. Application Type: QI Change. Logistics...

  12. 75 FR 17743 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-07

    ... Northbrook Parkway, Suwanee, GA 30024. Officers: George Liu, Member/Principal Manager (Qualifying Individual..., Inc. dba Allied Shipping, 9102 Westpark Drive, Houston, TX 77063. Officers: Han aka Tony Liu,...

  13. 76 FR 2382 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-13

    .... Officers: Gilbert Khoury, President/Secretary/ Director, (Qualifying Individual), George Romanos, Vice... Westfair West Drive, Houston, TX 77041. Officers: Gilbert Khoury, President/Director, (Qualifying.... (OFF), 535 Regal Row, Dallas, TX 75247. Officer: Gilbert R. Khoury, President, (Qualifying...

  14. 78 FR 48870 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-12

    ..., Application Type: QI Change. D. Martin LLC (OFF), 2915 Quail Run Drive, Humble, TX 77396, Officer: Dorsille Martin, Managing Member (QI), Application Type: New OFF License. Global Customs Services, LLC (NVO & OFF...., Grand Rapids, MI 49512, Officers: Peter G. Gonzales, Vice President (QI), James Ward, COO,...

  15. 76 FR 30360 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-25

    ... Street, Laurelton, NY 11413. Officers: Donald Bristol, President (Qualifying Individual), Ingrid Bristol... Individual), Wei Shu, President. Application Type: New NVO License. Taymegs Impex Inc. (OFF), 2429 S....

  16. 75 FR 25257 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-07

    ... Palma, CA 90623, Officers: Tony Lee, Vice President (Qualifying Individual), Haidong Zhang, President... Zhang, Secretary (Qualifying Individual), Yiwen Hu, President, Application Type: New OFF License....

  17. 78 FR 78956 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ..., Application Type: QI Change Agility Logistics Corp. (OFF), 240 Commerce, Irvine, CA 96202, Officers: John... Seahorse Container Lines, Inc. (NVO), 10731 Walker Street, Suite B, Cypress, CA 90630, Officers: Carlo De..., Charlotte, NC 28226, Officers: John W. Dellinger, Jr., President (QI), Dan Zalomek, Secretary,...

  18. 75 FR 67973 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-04

    .... Officers: Wei Hu, Vice President, (Qualifying Individual), Gianluca Pirrotta, President, Application Type..., President, (Qualifying Individual), Yiwen Hu, Treasurer, Application Type: New NVO & OFF License....

  19. 78 FR 71611 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations and Terminations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-29

    ...: October 10, 2013. Reason: Failed to maintain a valid bond. License No.: 7952N. Name: Freight Line of the....: 022001NF. Name: Encompass Global Logistics, LLC. Address: 18881 Von Karman Avenue, Suite 1450, Irvine,...

  20. 75 FR 56111 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-15

    ... Herring & Associates (OFF), 6601 Etherington Court, Manassas, VA 20112. Officers: Shawn D. Scott, Manager, Freight Forwarding, (Qualifying Individual), Tomette L. Herring, President, Application Type: New...

  1. 77 FR 43599 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-25

    ... Shipping Act of 1984 (46 U.S.C. 40101). Notice is also given of the filing of applications to amend an..., Application Type: New OFF License. Brox Logistics USA, LLC (NVO,) 244 5th Avenue, V-280, New York, NY 10001, Officers: Vladimir Eremin, Managing Member, (Qualifying Individual), Application Type: New NVO License....

  2. 75 FR 22408 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-28

    .../COO, (Qualifying Individual). Jeremy Haycock, President/Director. Application Type: QI Change. Dice Worldwide Logistics, LLC dba Dice Worldwide Logistics (OFF & NVO), 8140 N.W. 29th Street, Miami, FL...

  3. 75 FR 57797 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-22

    .... License Number: 020414F. Name: Planet Freight Services, Inc. Address: 1744 NW. 82nd Avenue, Doral, FL... corresponding date shown below: License Number: 4383F. Name: Relogistics Worldwide, Inc. Address: 8767 South.... License Number: 11078N. Name: ACS Associates, Inc. Address: 1 Bridge Street, Suite 10, Irvington, NY...

  4. 76 FR 22104 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-20

    ..., (Qualifying Individual), Harrison Cutler, Chairman, Application Type: Trade Name Change Den Helder Inc. (NVO... John Crosland Jr. Way, Charlotte, NC 28208, Officers: William A. Pottow, Vice President...

  5. 76 FR 19097 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-06

    ...), Ali Ismailzada, Partner/CFO, Application Type: New NVO License. Alpha-Raleigh USA, Limited Liability... Logistics LLC (OFF), 8394 Elder Creek Road, Sacramento, CA 95828, Officers: Lisa L. Germen, Vice...

  6. 76 FR 16421 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Revocation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-23

    .... License Number: 015847N. Name: Straightline Logistics, Inc. Address: One Cross Island Plaza, Suite 210...: 228-236 Star of India Lane, Main Street, Carson, CA 90746. Date Revoked: February 7, 2011. Reason.... License Number: 019288F. Name: Kairos Logistics LLC. Address: 1447 West 178th Street, Suite 305,...

  7. 75 FR 80499 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-22

    ... Transfer. CTC Logistics (L.A.) Inc. (NVO), 5250 W. Century Blvd., Suite 660, Los Angeles, CA 90045. Officers: Ruonan Mowia, Secretary, (Qualifying Individual), Yon L. Li, President. Application Type: QI... dba Famous Container Lines (NVO), 879 W. 190th Street, 905, Gardena, CA 90248. Officer: Quincy H....

  8. 76 FR 56759 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-14

    ..., President/Treasurer, Application Type: QI Change. Global Cargo Connection, Inc. (OFF), 2775 W. Okeechobee..., Corona, CA 92880. Officers: Xiaosong M. Liu, Operation Manager (Qualifying Individual), Xin S....

  9. 76 FR 6135 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-03

    ... (Qualifying Individual), Application Type: License Transfer. CBM Global Freight Corporation (NVO), 223 South...., Dongmen Nan Road, ShenZhen, GuangDong Province, China 518002, Officers: DeFang Kong, Secretary (Qualifying... Individual), Application Type: License Transfer. Missouri Sea and Air Services, Inc. (NVO & OFF), 500...

  10. 7 CFR 17.8 - Ocean transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Ocean transportation. 17.8 Section 17.8 Agriculture... THE AGRICULTURAL TRADE DEVELOPMENT AND ASSISTANCE ACT OF 1954, AS AMENDED § 17.8 Ocean transportation... in this section. (2) The supplier of ocean transportation must be engaged in the business...

  11. 7 CFR 17.8 - Ocean transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ocean transportation. 17.8 Section 17.8 Agriculture... THE AGRICULTURAL TRADE DEVELOPMENT AND ASSISTANCE ACT OF 1954, AS AMENDED § 17.8 Ocean transportation... in this section. (2) The supplier of ocean transportation must be engaged in the business...

  12. 7 CFR 17.8 - Ocean transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Ocean transportation. 17.8 Section 17.8 Agriculture... THE AGRICULTURAL TRADE DEVELOPMENT AND ASSISTANCE ACT OF 1954, AS AMENDED § 17.8 Ocean transportation... in this section. (2) The supplier of ocean transportation must be engaged in the business...

  13. 7 CFR 17.8 - Ocean transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ocean transportation. 17.8 Section 17.8 Agriculture... THE AGRICULTURAL TRADE DEVELOPMENT AND ASSISTANCE ACT OF 1954, AS AMENDED § 17.8 Ocean transportation... in this section. (2) The supplier of ocean transportation must be engaged in the business...

  14. 7 CFR 17.8 - Ocean transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Ocean transportation. 17.8 Section 17.8 Agriculture... THE AGRICULTURAL TRADE DEVELOPMENT AND ASSISTANCE ACT OF 1954, AS AMENDED § 17.8 Ocean transportation... in this section. (2) The supplier of ocean transportation must be engaged in the business...

  15. Glucose transport and glucose transporter GLUT4 are regulated by product(s) of intermediary metabolism in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Y; Böttcher, U; Eblenkamp, M; Thomas, J; Jüngling, E; Rösen, P; Kammermeier, H

    1997-01-01

    )propyl-2-amine]. In conclusion, cardiomyocyte glucose transport is subject to counter-regulation by alternative substrates. The glucose transport system appears to be controlled by (a) compound(s) of intermediary metabolism (other than glucose 6-phosphate), but in a different way than pyruvate dehydrogenase. Transport inhibition eventually occurs via a decrease in the amount of glucose transporters in the plasma membrane. PMID:9032447

  16. 22 CFR 228.21 - Ocean transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ocean transportation. 228.21 Section 228.21... for USAID Financing § 228.21 Ocean transportation. (a) The Cargo Preference Act of 1954, Section 901(b... transportation services is determined by the flag registry of the vessel. (1) When the authorized source...

  17. 22 CFR 228.21 - Ocean transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ocean transportation. 228.21 Section 228.21... for USAID Financing § 228.21 Ocean transportation. (a) The Cargo Preference Act of 1954, Section 901(b... transportation services is determined by the flag registry of the vessel. (1) When the authorized source...

  18. 22 CFR 228.21 - Ocean transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... implementing regulations in 46 CFR part 381 (and any waivers applicable thereto). Subpart D of 22 CFR part 228... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ocean transportation. 228.21 Section 228.21... § 228.21 Ocean transportation. When transporting commodities subject to the provisions of the...

  19. 22 CFR 228.21 - Ocean transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... implementing regulations in 46 CFR part 381 (and any waivers applicable thereto). Subpart D of 22 CFR part 228... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ocean transportation. 228.21 Section 228.21... § 228.21 Ocean transportation. When transporting commodities subject to the provisions of the...

  20. 22 CFR 228.21 - Ocean transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... implementing regulations in 46 CFR part 381 (and any waivers applicable thereto). Subpart D of 22 CFR part 228... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ocean transportation. 228.21 Section 228.21... § 228.21 Ocean transportation. When transporting commodities subject to the provisions of the...

  1. Chaotic transport in a double gyre ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Huijun; Liu, Zhengyu

    1994-04-01

    Lagrangian trajectories in a deterministic simple flow can exhibit complex behavior. This is called the chaotic advection, which can induce the chaotic transport and mixing (which oceanographers conventionally call stirring) in the fluid particles and fine structure in the tracer fields. We propose the chaotic transport as a gyre-scale transport mechansim in oceans. Our model ocean has double gyres, subtropical and subpolar gyres, driven by the surface wind. When the wind is allowed to seasonally migrate, the inter-gyre transport and across streamline transport within each gyre will be excited. The fastest inter-gyre transport occurs when the wind migrates about 1000km in north-south direction with a period of interannual to decadal time. The estimate of the effective diffusion coefficient by this gyre-scale mixing is about 3 × 107cm 2s-1, comparable to those derived for synoptical eddies. The results shed some light on gyre-scale exchange of water and heat flux in general oceans and implications for the studies of ocean climate. The concepts and methods used here will find applications in coastal oceanography, ocean biology and chemistry.

  2. Oceanic mass transport by mesoscale eddies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengguang; Wang, Wei; Qiu, Bo

    2014-07-18

    Oceanic transports of heat, salt, fresh water, dissolved CO2, and other tracers regulate global climate change and the distribution of natural marine resources. The time-mean ocean circulation transports fluid as a conveyor belt, but fluid parcels can also be trapped and transported discretely by migrating mesoscale eddies. By combining available satellite altimetry and Argo profiling float data, we showed that the eddy-induced zonal mass transport can reach a total meridionally integrated value of up to 30 to 40 sverdrups (Sv) (1 Sv = 10(6) cubic meters per second), and it occurs mainly in subtropical regions, where the background flows are weak. This transport is comparable in magnitude to that of the large-scale wind- and thermohaline-driven circulation. PMID:25035491

  3. Investigating transport pathways in the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffa, Annalisa; Haza, Angelique; Özgökmen, Tamay M.; Molcard, Anne; Taillandier, Vincent; Schroeder, Katrin; Chang, Yeon; Poulain, P.-M.

    2013-01-01

    The ocean is a very complex medium with scales of motion that range from thousands of kilometers to the dissipation scales. Transport by ocean currents plays an important role in many practical applications ranging from climatic problems to coastal management and accident mitigation at sea. Understanding transport is challenging because of the chaotic nature of particle motion. In the last decade, new methods have been put forth to improve our understanding of transport. Powerful tools are provided by dynamical system theory, that allow the identification of the barriers to transport and their time variability for a given flow. A shortcoming of this approach, though, is that it is based on the assumption that the velocity field is known with good accuracy, which is not always the case in practical applications. Improving model performance in terms of transport can be addressed using another important methodology that has been recently developed, namely the assimilation of Lagrangian data provided by floating buoys. The two methodologies are technically different but in many ways complementary. In this paper, we review examples of applications of both methodologies performed by the authors in the last few years, considering flows at different scales and in various ocean basins. The results are among the very first examples of applications of the methodologies to the real ocean including testing with Lagrangian in-situ data. The results are discussed in the general framework of the extended fields related to these methodologies, pointing out to open questions and potential for improvements, with an outlook toward future strategies.

  4. Increased ocean heat transports and warmer climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rind, D.; Chandler, M.

    1991-04-01

    We investigated the effect of increased ocean heat transports on climate in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) general circulation model (GCM). The increases used were sufficient to melt all sea ice at high latitudes, and amounted to 15% on the global average. The resulting global climate is 2°C warmer, with temperature increases of some 20°C at high latitudes, and 1°C near the equator. The warming is driven by the decreased sea ice/planetary albedo, a feedback which would appear to be instrumental for producing extreme high-latitude amplification of temperature changes. Resulting hydrologic and wind stress changes suggest that qualitatively, for both the wind-driven and thermohaline circulation, the increased transports might be self-sustaining. As such, they would represent a possible mechanism to help account for the high-latitude warmth of climates in the Mesozoic and Tertiary, and decadal-scale climate fluctuations during the Holocene, as well as a powerful feedback to amplify other climate forcings. It is estimated that ocean transport increases of 50-70% would have been necessary to reproduce the warmth of various Mesozoic (65-230 m.y. ago) climates without changes in atmospheric composition, while the 15% increase used in these experiments would have been sufficient to reproduce the general climatic conditions of the Eocene (40-55 Ma). A companion experiment indicates that increased topography during the Cenozoic (0-65 Ma) might have altered the surface wind stress in a manner that led to reduced heat transports; this effect would then need to be considered in understanding the beginning of ice ages. Colder climates, or rapid climate perturbations, might have been generated with the aid of such altered ocean transports. The large high-latitude amplification associated with ocean heat transport and sea ice changes differs significantly from that forecast for increased trace gases, for which water vapor increase is the primary feedback

  5. Increased ocean heat transports and warmer climate

    SciTech Connect

    Rind, D. ); Chandler, M. )

    1991-04-20

    The authors investigated the effect of increased ocean heat transports on climate in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) general circulation model (GCM). The warming is driven by the decreased sea ice/planetary albedo, a feedback which would appear to be instrumental for producing extreme high-latitude amplification of temperature changes. Resulting hydrologic and wind stress changes suggest that qualitatively the increased transports might be self-sustaining. As such, they would represent a possible mechanism to help account for the high-latitude warmth of climates in the Mesozoic and Tertiary, and decadal-scale climate fluctuations during the Holocene, as well as a powerful feedback to amplify other climate forcings. It is estimated that ocean transport increases of 50-70% would have been necessary to reproduce the warmth of various Mesozoic (65-230 m.y. ago) climates without changes in atmospheric composition, while the 15% increase used in these experiments would have been sufficient to reproduce the general climatic conditions of the Eocene (40-55 Ma). A companion experiment indicates that increased topography during the Cenozoic (0-65 Ma) might have altered the surface wind stress in a manner that led to reduced heat transports; this effect would then need to be considered in understanding the beginning of ice ages. The large high-latitude amplification associated with ocean heat transport and sea ice changes differs significantly from that forecast for increased trace gases, for which water vapor increase is the primary feedback mechanism. The different signatures might allow for discrimination of these different forcings; e.g., the warming of the 1930s looks more like the altered ocean heat transport signal, while the warming of the 1980s is more like the trace gas effect.

  6. 77 FR 76483 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants The Commission gives notice that the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-28

    ... Act of 1984 (46 U.S.C. 40101). Notice is also given of the filing of applications to amend an existing... 935, Rowland Heights, CA 91748. Officer: Willie Wu, President (QI). Application Type: New NVO & OFF..., GA 30341. Officer: John S. Chihade, Manager (QI). Application Type: New OFF License. NDA...

  7. 46 CFR Appendix A to Subpart C of... - Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) Bond Form [Form 48

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... available to pay any judgment or any settlement made pursuant to a claim under 46 CFR § 515.23(b) for... settlement made pursuant to a claim under 46 CFR § 515.23(b) for damages against the Principal arising from... such a judgment pursuant to 46 CFR § 515.23(b), the Federal Maritime Commission, or where all...

  8. 46 CFR Appendix A to Subpart C of... - Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) Bond Form [Form 48

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... available to pay any judgment or any settlement made pursuant to a claim under 46 CFR § 515.23(b) for... settlement made pursuant to a claim under 46 CFR § 515.23(b) for damages against the Principal arising from... such a judgment pursuant to 46 CFR § 515.23(b), the Federal Maritime Commission, or where all...

  9. 76 FR 22106 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Rescission of Order of Revocation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-20

    .... Order Published: FR: 3/23/11 (Volume 76, No. 56, Pg. 16422). License Number: 020923NF. Name: Fast Logistics, Inc. Address: 3350 SW 3rd Avenue, Suite 207, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33315. Order Published: FR:...

  10. 76 FR 16421 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Rescission of Order of Revocation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-23

    .... Address: 1082 Rogers Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11226. Order Published: FR: 2/25/11 (Volume 76, No. 38, Pg... Published: FR: 2/25/11 (Volume 76, No. 38, Pg. 10594). License Number: 019544NF. Name: Japan Star America... Published: FR: 2/25/11 (Volume 76, No. 38, Pg. 10594). License Number: 020577F. Name: Bosmak, Inc. dba...

  11. 46 CFR Appendix C to Subpart C of... - Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) Guaranty Form [Form 68

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... settlement made pursuant to a claim under 46 CFR § 515.23(b) for damages against the Applicant arising from... judgment pursuant to 46 CFR § 515.23(b), the FMC, or where all parties and claimants otherwise mutually... virtue of a compromise settlement agreement made with the Applicant and/or Guarantor pursuant to 46...

  12. 46 CFR Appendix C to Subpart C of... - Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) Guaranty Form [Form 68

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... settlement made pursuant to a claim under 46 CFR § 515.23(b) for damages against the Applicant arising from... judgment pursuant to 46 CFR § 515.23(b), the FMC, or where all parties and claimants otherwise mutually... virtue of a compromise settlement agreement made with the Applicant and/or Guarantor pursuant to 46...

  13. 46 CFR Appendix C to Subpart C of... - Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) Guaranty Form [Form 68

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... settlement made pursuant to a claim under 46 CFR § 515.23(b) for damages against the Applicant arising from... judgment pursuant to 46 CFR § 515.23(b), the FMC, or where all parties and claimants otherwise mutually... virtue of a compromise settlement agreement made with the Applicant and/or Guarantor pursuant to 46...

  14. 76 FR 38652 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Rescission of Order of Revocation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-01

    ..., Reno, NV 89511 Order Published: FR: 5/12/11 (Volume 76, No. 92, Pg. 27644) Sandra L. Kusumoto, Director..., Stoughton, MA 02072 Order Published: FR: 6/15/11 (Volume 76, No. 115, Pg. 34994) License Number: 021442F Name: Ferm Holdings, Inc. Address: 3640 NW 115th Avenue, Miami, FL 33178 Order Published: FR:...

  15. 75 FR 44262 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Rescission of Order of Revocation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-28

    ... Number: 003486F. Name: Mozart Forwarding, Inc. Address: 535 Seaview Avenue, Bridgeport, CT 06607. Order Published: FR: 3/10/2010 (Volume 75, No. 46 Pg. 11181). Sandra L. Kusumoto, Director, Bureau...

  16. 78 FR 42921 - Amendments to Regulations Governing Ocean Transportation Intermediary Licensing and Financial...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-18

    ... Licensing and Financial Responsibility Requirements, and General Duties AGENCY: Federal Maritime Commission... Commission proposes to amend its rules governing the licensing, financial responsibility requirements and... Rulemaking, published on May 31, 2013 (78 FR 32946), are due on or before August 30, 2013. ADDRESSES:...

  17. 46 CFR Appendix A to Subpart C of... - Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) Bond Form [Form 48

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 CFR part 515 and 520, and pursuant to section 19 of the 1984 Act, files this bond with the... available to pay any judgment or any settlement made pursuant to a claim under 46 CFR § 515.23(b) for... settlement made pursuant to a claim under 46 CFR § 515.23(b) for damages against the Principal arising...

  18. 46 CFR Appendix A to Subpart C of... - Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) Bond Form [Form 48

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 CFR part 515 and 520, and pursuant to section 19 of the 1984 Act, files this bond with the... available to pay any judgment or any settlement made pursuant to a claim under 46 CFR § 515.23(b) for... settlement made pursuant to a claim under 46 CFR § 515.23(b) for damages against the Principal arising...

  19. 46 CFR Appendix A to Subpart C of... - Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) Bond Form [Form 48

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 CFR part 515 and 520, and pursuant to section 19 of the 1984 Act, files this bond with the... available to pay any judgment or any settlement made pursuant to a claim under 46 CFR § 515.23(b) for... settlement made pursuant to a claim under 46 CFR § 515.23(b) for damages against the Principal arising...

  20. 76 FR 25691 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Rescission of Order of Revocation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-05

    ... Number: 018977N. Name: Alas Cargo LLC. Address: 228-236 Star of India Lane, Main Street, Carson, CA 90746. Order Published: FR: 3/23/11 (Volume 76, No. 56, Pg. 16422). License Number: 021901F. Name: Magusa Logistics, Corp. Address: 11222 NW. 53rd Lane, Doral, FL 33178. Order Published: FR: 3/23/11 (Volume 76,...

  1. Changes in ocean vertical heat transport with global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zika, Jan D.; Laliberté, Frédéric; Mudryk, Lawrence R.; Sijp, Willem P.; Nurser, A. J. G.

    2015-06-01

    Heat transport between the surface and deep ocean strongly influences transient climate change. Mechanisms setting this transport are investigated using coupled climate models and by projecting ocean circulation into the temperature-depth diagram. In this diagram, a "cold cell" cools the deep ocean through the downwelling of Antarctic waters and upwelling of warmer waters and is balanced by warming due to a "warm cell," coincident with the interhemispheric overturning and previously linked to wind and haline forcing. With anthropogenic warming, the cold cell collapses while the warm cell continues to warm the deep ocean. Simulations with increasingly strong warm cells, set by their mean Southern Hemisphere winds, exhibit increasing deep-ocean warming in response to the same anthropogenic forcing. It is argued that the partition between components of the circulation which cool and warm the deep ocean in the preindustrial climate is a key determinant of ocean vertical heat transport with global warming.

  2. Possible role of oceanic heat transport in early Eocene climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sloan, L. C.; Walker, J. C.; Moore, T. C. Jr

    1995-01-01

    Increased oceanic heat transport has often been cited as a means of maintaining warm high-latitude surface temperatures in many intervals of the geologic past, including the early Eocene. Although the excess amount of oceanic heat transport required by warm high latitude sea surface temperatures can be calculated empirically, determining how additional oceanic heat transport would take place has yet to be accomplished. That the mechanisms of enhanced poleward oceanic heat transport remain undefined in paleoclimate reconstructions is an important point that is often overlooked. Using early Eocene climate as an example, we consider various ways to produce enhanced poleward heat transport and latitudinal energy redistribution of the sign and magnitude required by interpreted early Eocene conditions. Our interpolation of early Eocene paleotemperature data indicate that an approximately 30% increase in poleward heat transport would be required to maintain Eocene high-latitude temperatures. This increased heat transport appears difficult to accomplish by any means of ocean circulation if we use present ocean circulation characteristics to evaluate early Eocene rates. Either oceanic processes were very different from those of the present to produce the early Eocene climate conditions or oceanic heat transport was not the primary cause of that climate. We believe that atmospheric processes, with contributions from other factors, such as clouds, were the most likely primary cause of early Eocene climate.

  3. The Importance of Planetary Rotation Period for Ocean Heat Transport

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, D.; Joshi, M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The climate and, hence, potential habitability of a planet crucially depends on how its atmospheric and ocean circulation transports heat from warmer to cooler regions. However, previous studies of planetary climate have concentrated on modeling the dynamics of atmospheres, while dramatically simplifying the treatment of oceans, which neglects or misrepresents the effect of the ocean in the total heat transport. Even the majority of studies with a dynamic ocean have used a simple so-called aquaplanet that has no continental barriers, which is a configuration that dramatically changes the ocean dynamics. Here, the significance of the response of poleward ocean heat transport to planetary rotation period is shown with a simple meridional barrier—the simplest representation of any continental configuration. The poleward ocean heat transport increases significantly as the planetary rotation period is increased. The peak heat transport more than doubles when the rotation period is increased by a factor of ten. There are also significant changes to ocean temperature at depth, with implications for the carbon cycle. There is strong agreement between the model results and a scale analysis of the governing equations. This result highlights the importance of both planetary rotation period and the ocean circulation when considering planetary habitability. Key Words: Exoplanet—Oceans—Rotation—Climate—Habitability. Astrobiology 14, 645–650. PMID:25041658

  4. The importance of planetary rotation period for ocean heat transport.

    PubMed

    Cullum, J; Stevens, D; Joshi, M

    2014-08-01

    The climate and, hence, potential habitability of a planet crucially depends on how its atmospheric and ocean circulation transports heat from warmer to cooler regions. However, previous studies of planetary climate have concentrated on modeling the dynamics of atmospheres, while dramatically simplifying the treatment of oceans, which neglects or misrepresents the effect of the ocean in the total heat transport. Even the majority of studies with a dynamic ocean have used a simple so-called aquaplanet that has no continental barriers, which is a configuration that dramatically changes the ocean dynamics. Here, the significance of the response of poleward ocean heat transport to planetary rotation period is shown with a simple meridional barrier--the simplest representation of any continental configuration. The poleward ocean heat transport increases significantly as the planetary rotation period is increased. The peak heat transport more than doubles when the rotation period is increased by a factor of ten. There are also significant changes to ocean temperature at depth, with implications for the carbon cycle. There is strong agreement between the model results and a scale analysis of the governing equations. This result highlights the importance of both planetary rotation period and the ocean circulation when considering planetary habitability. PMID:25041658

  5. Pacific Array (Transportable Broadband Ocean Floor Array)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakatsu, Hitoshi; Ekstrom, Goran; Evans, Rob; Forsyth, Don; Gaherty, Jim; Kennett, Brian; Montagner, Jean-Paul; Utada, Hisashi

    2016-04-01

    Based on recent developments on broadband ocean bottom seismometry, we propose a next generation large-scale array experiment in the ocean. Recent advances in ocean bottom broadband seismometry1, together with advances in the seismic analysis methodology, have enabled us to resolve the regional 1-D structure of the entire lithosphere/asthenosphere system, including seismic anisotropy (azimuthal, and hopefully radial), with deployments of ~15 broadband ocean bottom seismometers (BBOBSs). Having ~15 BBOBSs as an array unit for a 2-year deployment, and repeating such deployments in a leap-frog way or concurrently (an array of arrays) for a decade or so would enable us to cover a large portion of the Pacific basin. Such efforts, not only by giving regional constraints on the 1-D structure beneath Pacific ocean, but also by sharing waveform data for global scale waveform tomography, would drastically increase our knowledge of how plate tectonics works on this planet, as well as how it worked for the past 150 million years. International collaborations is essential: if three countries/institutions participate this endeavor together, Pacific Array may be accomplished within five-or-so years.

  6. Diagnosing ocean energy transports from earth radiation budget measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohn, Byung-Ju; Smith, Eric A.

    1992-01-01

    The maximum energy production (MEP) principle suggested by Paltridge (1975) is applied to separate the satellite-inferred required total transports into the atmospheric and the oceanic components within a two-dimensional (2D) framework. For this purpose, the required 2D energy transports (Sohn and Smith, 1991) are imposed on Paltridge's energy balance model which is then solved as a variational problem. The results provide separated atmospheric and oceanic transports on a 2D basis such that the total divergence is equal to the net radiation measured from a satellite.

  7. Energy transports by ocean and atmosphere based on an entropy extremum principle. I - Zonal averaged transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohn, Byung-Ju; Smith, Eric A.

    1993-01-01

    The maximum entropy production principle suggested by Paltridge (1975) is applied to separating the satellite-determined required total transports into atmospheric and oceanic components. Instead of using the excessively restrictive equal energy dissipation hypothesis as a deterministic tool for separating transports between the atmosphere and ocean fluids, the satellite-inferred required 2D energy transports are imposed on Paltridge's energy balance model, which is then solved as a variational problem using the equal energy dissipation hypothesis only to provide an initial guess field. It is suggested that Southern Ocean transports are weaker than previously reported. It is argued that a maximum entropy production principle can serve as a governing rule on macroscale global climate, and, in conjunction with conventional satellite measurements of the net radiation balance, provides a means to decompose atmosphere and ocean transports from the total transport field.

  8. LARGE-SCALE CO2 TRANSPORTATION AND DEEP OCEAN SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Hamid Sarv

    1999-03-01

    Technical and economical feasibility of large-scale CO{sub 2} transportation and ocean sequestration at depths of 3000 meters or grater was investigated. Two options were examined for transporting and disposing the captured CO{sub 2}. In one case, CO{sub 2} was pumped from a land-based collection center through long pipelines laid on the ocean floor. Another case considered oceanic tanker transport of liquid carbon dioxide to an offshore floating structure for vertical injection to the ocean floor. In the latter case, a novel concept based on subsurface towing of a 3000-meter pipe, and attaching it to the offshore structure was considered. Budgetary cost estimates indicate that for distances greater than 400 km, tanker transportation and offshore injection through a 3000-meter vertical pipe provides the best method for delivering liquid CO{sub 2} to deep ocean floor depressions. For shorter distances, CO{sub 2} delivery by parallel-laid, subsea pipelines is more cost-effective. Estimated costs for 500-km transport and storage at a depth of 3000 meters by subsea pipelines and tankers were 1.5 and 1.4 dollars per ton of stored CO{sub 2}, respectively. At these prices, economics of ocean disposal are highly favorable. Future work should focus on addressing technical issues that are critical to the deployment of a large-scale CO{sub 2} transportation and disposal system. Pipe corrosion, structural design of the transport pipe, and dispersion characteristics of sinking CO{sub 2} effluent plumes have been identified as areas that require further attention. Our planned activities in the next Phase include laboratory-scale corrosion testing, structural analysis of the pipeline, analytical and experimental simulations of CO{sub 2} discharge and dispersion, and the conceptual economic and engineering evaluation of large-scale implementation.

  9. The impact of oceanic heat transport on the atmospheric circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knietzsch, M.-A.; Schröder, A.; Lucarini, V.; Lunkeit, F.

    2015-09-01

    A general circulation model of intermediate complexity with an idealized Earth-like aquaplanet setup is used to study the impact of changes in the oceanic heat transport on the global atmospheric circulation. Focus is on the atmospheric mean meridional circulation and global thermodynamic properties. The atmosphere counterbalances to a large extent the imposed changes in the oceanic heat transport, but, nonetheless, significant modifications to the atmospheric general circulation are found. Increasing the strength of the oceanic heat transport up to 2.5 PW leads to an increase in the global mean near-surface temperature and to a decrease in its equator-to-pole gradient. For stronger transports, the gradient is reduced further, but the global mean remains approximately constant. This is linked to a cooling and a reversal of the temperature gradient in the tropics. Additionally, a stronger oceanic heat transport leads to a decline in the intensity and a poleward shift of the maxima of both the Hadley and Ferrel cells. Changes in zonal mean diabatic heating and friction impact the properties of the Hadley cell, while the behavior of the Ferrel cell is mostly controlled by friction. The efficiency of the climate machine, the intensity of the Lorenz energy cycle and the material entropy production of the system decline with increased oceanic heat transport. This suggests that the climate system becomes less efficient and turns into a state of reduced entropy production as the enhanced oceanic transport performs a stronger large-scale mixing between geophysical fluids with different temperatures, thus reducing the available energy in the climate system and bringing it closer to a state of thermal equilibrium.

  10. Climate in the Absence of Ocean Heat Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, B. E. J.

    2015-12-01

    The energy transported by the oceans to mid- and high latitudes is small compared to the atmosphere, yet exerts an outsized influence on the climate. A key reason is the strong interaction between ocean heat transport (OHT) and sea ice extent. I quantify this by comparing a realistic control climate simulation with a slab ocean simulation in which OHT is disabled. Using the state-of-the-art CESM with a realistic present-day continental configuration, I show that the absence of OHT leads to a 23 K global cooling and massive expansion of sea ice to near 30º latitude in both hemisphere. The ice expansion is asymmetric, with greatest extent in the South Pacific and South Indian ocean basins. I discuss implications of this enormous and asymmetric climate change for atmospheric circulation, heat transport, and tropical precipitation. Parameter sensitivity studies show that the simulated climate is far more sensitive to small changes in ice surface albedo in the absence of OHT, with some perturbations sufficient to cause a runaway Snowball Earth glaciation. I conclude that the oceans are responsible for an enormous global warming by mitigating an otherwise very potent sea ice albedo feedback, but that the magnitude of this effect is still rather uncertain. I will also present some ideas on adapting the simple energy balance model to account for the enhanced sensitivity of sea ice to heating from the ocean.

  11. Freshwater and heat transports from global ocean synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivieso, M.; Haines, K.; Zuo, H.; Lea, D.

    2014-01-01

    An eddy-permitting ¼° global ocean reanalysis based on the Operational Met Office FOAM data assimilation system has been run for 1989-2010 forced by ERA-Interim meteorology. Freshwater and heat transports are compared with published estimates globally and in each basin, with special focus on the Atlantic. The meridional transports agree with observations within errors at most locations, but where eddies are active the transports by the mean flow are nearly always in better agreement than the total transports. Eddy transports are down gradient and are enhanced relative to a free run. They may oppose or reinforce mean transports and provide 40-50% of the total transport near midlatitude fronts, where eddies with time scales <1 month provide up to 15%. Basin-scale freshwater convergences are calculated with the Arctic/Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific oceans north of 32°S, all implying net evaporation of 0.33 ± 0.04 Sv, 0.65 ± 0.07 Sv, and 0.09 ± 0.04 Sv, respectively, within the uncertainty of observations in the Atlantic and Pacific. The Indian is more evaporative and the Southern Ocean has more precipitation (1.07 Sv). Air-sea fluxes are modified by assimilation influencing turbulent heat fluxes and evaporation. Generally, surface and assimilation fluxes together match the meridional transports, indicating that the reanalysis is close to a steady state. Atlantic overturning and gyre transports are assessed with overturning freshwater transports southward at all latitudes. At 26°N eddy transports are negligible, overturning transport is 0.67 ± 0.19 Sv southward and gyre transport is 0.44 ± 0.17 Sv northward, with divergence between 26°N and the Bering Strait of 0.13 ± 0.23 Sv over 2004-2010.

  12. Southern Ocean warming delayed by circumpolar upwelling and equatorward transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armour, Kyle C.; Marshall, John; Scott, Jeffery R.; Donohoe, Aaron; Newsom, Emily R.

    2016-07-01

    The Southern Ocean has shown little warming over recent decades, in stark contrast to the rapid warming observed in the Arctic. Along the northern flank of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, however, the upper ocean has warmed substantially. Here we present analyses of oceanographic observations and general circulation model simulations showing that these patterns--of delayed warming south of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and enhanced warming to the north--are fundamentally shaped by the Southern Ocean's meridional overturning circulation: wind-driven upwelling of unmodified water from depth damps warming around Antarctica; greenhouse gas-induced surface heat uptake is largely balanced by anomalous northward heat transport associated with the equatorward flow of surface waters; and heat is preferentially stored where surface waters are subducted to the north. Further, these processes are primarily due to passive advection of the anomalous warming signal by climatological ocean currents; changes in ocean circulation are secondary. These findings suggest the Southern Ocean responds to greenhouse gas forcing on the centennial, or longer, timescale over which the deep ocean waters that are upwelled to the surface are warmed themselves. It is against this background of gradual warming that multidecadal Southern Ocean temperature trends must be understood.

  13. Interpreting the implied meridional oceanic energy transport in AMIP

    SciTech Connect

    Randall, D.A.; Gleckler, P.J.

    1993-09-01

    The Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP) was outlined in Paper No. CLIM VAR 2.3 (entitled {open_quote}The validation of ocean surface heat fluxes in AMIP`) of these proceedings. Preliminary results of AMIP subproject No. 5 were also summarized. In particular, zonally averaged ocean surface heat fluxes resulting from various AMIP simulations were intercompared, and to the extent possible they were validated with uncertainties in observationally-based estimates of surface heat fluxes. The intercomparison is continued in this paper by examining the Oceanic Meridional Energy Transport (OMET) implied by the net surface heat fluxes of the AMIP simulations. As with the surface heat fluxes of the AMIP simulations. As with the surface heat fluxes, the perspective here will be very cursory. The annual mean implied ocean heat transport can be estimated by integrating the zonally averaged net ocean surface heat flux, N{sub sfc}, from one pole to the other. In AGCM simulations (and perhaps reality), the global mean N{sub sfc} is typically not in exact balance when averaged over one or more years. Because of this, an important assumption must be made about changes in the distribution of energy in the oceans. Otherwise, the integration will yield a non-zero transport at the endpoint of integration (pole) which is not physically realistic. Here the authors will only look at 10-year means of the AMIP runs, and for simplicity they assume that any long term imbalance in the global averaged N{sub sfc} will be sequestered (or released) over the global ocean. Tests have demonstrated that the treatment of how the global average energy imbalance is assumed to be distributed is important, especially when the long term imbalances are in excess of 10 W m{sup {minus}2}. However, this has not had a substantial impact on the qualitative features of the implied heat transport of the AMIP simulations examined thus far.

  14. 48 CFR 247.573-2 - Direct purchase of ocean transportation services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Direct purchase of ocean... REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TRANSPORTATION Ocean Transportation by U.S.-Flag Vessels 247.573-2 Direct purchase of ocean transportation services. (a) This subsection applies when...

  15. 48 CFR 247.573-2 - Direct purchase of ocean transportation services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Direct purchase of ocean... REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TRANSPORTATION Ocean Transportation by U.S.-Flag Vessels 247.573-2 Direct purchase of ocean transportation services. (a) This subsection applies when...

  16. 48 CFR 247.573-2 - Direct purchase of ocean transportation services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Direct purchase of ocean... REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TRANSPORTATION Ocean Transportation by U.S.-Flag Vessels 247.573-2 Direct purchase of ocean transportation services. (a) This subsection applies when...

  17. 48 CFR 247.573-2 - Direct purchase of ocean transportation services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Direct purchase of ocean... REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TRANSPORTATION Ocean Transportation by U.S.-Flag Vessels 247.573-2 Direct purchase of ocean transportation services. (a) This subsection applies when...

  18. 48 CFR 247.573-2 - Direct purchase of ocean transportation services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Direct purchase of ocean... REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TRANSPORTATION Ocean Transportation by U.S.-Flag Vessels 247.573-2 Direct purchase of ocean transportation services. (a) This subsection applies when...

  19. An oceanic heat transport pathway to the Amundsen Sea Embayment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Angelica R.; Mazloff, Matthew R.; Gille, Sarah T.

    2016-05-01

    The Amundsen Sea Embayment (ASE) on the West Antarctic coastline has been identified as a region of accelerated glacial melting. A Southern Ocean State Estimate (SOSE) is analyzed over the 2005-2010 time period in the Amundsen Sea region. The SOSE oceanic heat budget reveals that the contribution of parameterized small-scale mixing to the heat content of the ASE waters is small compared to advection and local air-sea heat flux, both of which contribute significantly to the heat content of the ASE waters. Above the permanent pycnocline, the local air-sea flux dominates the heat budget and is controlled by seasonal changes in sea ice coverage. Overall, between 2005 and 2010, the model shows a net heating in the surface above the pycnocline within the ASE. Sea water below the permanent pycnocline is isolated from the influence of air-sea heat fluxes, and thus, the divergence of heat advection is the major contributor to increased oceanic heat content of these waters. Oceanic transport of mass and heat into the ASE is dominated by the cross-shelf input and is primarily geostrophic below the permanent pycnocline. Diagnosis of the time-mean SOSE vorticity budget along the continental shelf slope indicates that the cross-shelf transport is sustained by vorticity input from the localized wind-stress curl over the shelf break.

  20. On Lagrangian stochastic modelling of material transport in oceanic gyres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, A. M.

    2002-11-01

    The introduction of ‘spin’ into second-order Lagrangian stochastic models (LSM) for stationary turbulence with broken reflectional symmetry is shown to result in the prediction of super-diffusive transport at intermediate times and the occurrence of anomalously large normal diffusion at later times. These characteristic features of material transport in oceanic gyres cannot be reproduced by two-dimensional first-order LSM. A correspondence is established between high-dimensional, low-order LSM and lower-dimensional, higher-order LSM. It is found that time-dependent spin statistics allow for the coexistence of rotating particle trajectories and non-oscillatory Lagrangian velocity autocorrelation functions.

  1. Anisotropic Mesoscale Eddy Transport in Ocean General Circulation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reckinger, S. J.; Fox-Kemper, B.; Bachman, S.; Bryan, F.; Dennis, J.; Danabasoglu, G.

    2014-12-01

    Modern climate models are limited to coarse-resolution representations of large-scale ocean circulation that rely on parameterizations for mesoscale eddies. The effects of eddies are typically introduced by relating subgrid eddy fluxes to the resolved gradients of buoyancy or other tracers, where the proportionality is, in general, governed by an eddy transport tensor. The symmetric part of the tensor, which represents the diffusive effects of mesoscale eddies, is universally treated isotropically in general circulation models. Thus, only a single parameter, namely the eddy diffusivity, is used at each spatial and temporal location to impart the influence of mesoscale eddies on the resolved flow. However, the diffusive processes that the parameterization approximates, such as shear dispersion, potential vorticity barriers, oceanic turbulence, and instabilities, typically have strongly anisotropic characteristics. Generalizing the eddy diffusivity tensor for anisotropy extends the number of parameters to three: a major diffusivity, a minor diffusivity, and the principal axis of alignment. The Community Earth System Model (CESM) with the anisotropic eddy parameterization is used to test various choices for the newly introduced parameters, which are motivated by observations and the eddy transport tensor diagnosed from high resolution simulations. Simply setting the ratio of major to minor diffusivities to a value of five globally, while aligning the major axis along the flow direction, improves biogeochemical tracer ventilation and reduces global temperature and salinity biases. These effects can be improved even further by parameterizing the anisotropic transport mechanisms in the ocean.

  2. 46 CFR Appendix D to Subpart C of... - Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) Group Bond Form [FMC-69

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... settlement made pursuant to a claim under 46 CFR § 515.23(b) against the OTIs enumerated in Appendix A of... persons who have obtained a judgment or made a settlement pursuant to a claim under 46 CFR § 515.23(b) for... complied with the procedures for collecting on such a judgment pursuant to 46 CFR § 515.23(b), the...

  3. 46 CFR Appendix D to Subpart C of... - Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) Group Bond Form [FMC-69

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... settlement made pursuant to a claim under 46 CFR § 515.23(b) against the OTIs enumerated in Appendix A of... persons who have obtained a judgment or made a settlement pursuant to a claim under 46 CFR § 515.23(b) for... complied with the procedures for collecting on such a judgment pursuant to 46 CFR § 515.23(b), the...

  4. 46 CFR Appendix D to Subpart C of... - Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) Group Bond Form [FMC-69

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... settlement made pursuant to a claim under 46 CFR § 515.23(b) against the OTIs enumerated in Appendix A of... persons who have obtained a judgment or made a settlement pursuant to a claim under 46 CFR § 515.23(b) for... complied with the procedures for collecting on such a judgment pursuant to 46 CFR § 515.23(b), the...

  5. 46 CFR Appendix D to Subpart C of... - Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) Group Bond Form [FMC-69

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... settlement made pursuant to a claim under 46 CFR § 515.23(b) against the OTIs enumerated in Appendix A of... persons who have obtained a judgment or made a settlement pursuant to a claim under 46 CFR § 515.23(b) for... complied with the procedures for collecting on such a judgment pursuant to 46 CFR § 515.23(b), the...

  6. 46 CFR Appendix D to Subpart C of... - Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) Group Bond Form [FMC-69

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... settlement made pursuant to a claim under 46 CFR § 515.23(b) against the OTIs enumerated in Appendix A of... persons who have obtained a judgment or made a settlement pursuant to a claim under 46 CFR § 515.23(b) for... complied with the procedures for collecting on such a judgment pursuant to 46 CFR § 515.23(b), the...

  7. Radiation Transport in the Atmosphere - Sea Ice - Ocean System.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Zhonghai

    1995-01-01

    A comprehensive radiative transfer model for the coupled atmosphere-sea ice-ocean system has been developed. The theoretical work required for constructing such a coupled model is described first. This work extends the discrete ordinate method, which has been proven to be effective in studies of radiative transfer in the atmosphere, to solve the radiative transfer problem pertaining to a system consisting of two strata with different indices of refraction, such as the atmosphere-ocean system and the atmosphere -sea ice-ocean system. The relevant changes (as compared to the standard problem with constant index of refraction throughout the medium) in formulation and solution of the radiative transfer equation, including the proper application of interface and boundary conditions, are presented. This solution is then applied to the atmosphere -sea ice-ocean system to study the solar energy balance in this coupled system. The input parameters required by the model are observable physical properties (e.g., the profiles of temperature and gas concentrations in the atmosphere, and the profiles of temperature, density, and salinity in the ice). The atmosphere, sea ice and ocean are each divided into a sufficient number of layers in the vertical to adequately resolve changes in their optical properties. This model rigorously accounts for the multiple scattering and absorption by atmospheric molecules, clouds, snow and sea water, as well as inclusions in the sea ice, such as brine pockets and air bubbles. The effects of various factors on the solar energy distribution in the entire system have been studied quantitatively. These factors include the ice salinity and density variations, cloud microphysics as well as variations in melt ponds and snow cover on the ice surface. Finally, the coupled radiative transfer model is used to study the impacts of clouds, snow and ice algae on the light transport in sea ice and in the ocean, as well as to simulate spectral irradiance and

  8. Economics of information intermediaries

    SciTech Connect

    Sass, T.R.

    1984-01-01

    For the last 20 years, economists have studied the economics of information, with emphasis on the effect costly information has on the organization of markets. In contrast, little attention has been paid to the market for information itself. Typically, buyers are assumed to produce information for themselves through search. In many markets however, buyers and sellers don't act independently, but rather exchange information through an intermediary such as a real estate broker or employment agency. Such information middlemen are the subject of this dissertation. In particular, two important aspects are explored: the demand for information intermediaries, and the choice of contractural arrangements under which they are employed. The demand begins with individuals transacting in an environment of costly information, without the aid of a middleman. Sellers advertise their goods for sale and buyers pursue search and measurement to obtain information on goods for sale. The various functions of middlemen are examined and incorporated into the model. Finally, the gains from using a middleman and the resulting demand for their services are analyzed. Testable implications regarding the use of intermediaries are then derived.

  9. Heat and salt transport throughout the North Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lina; Yuan, Dongliang

    2016-03-01

    Absolute geostrophic currents in the North Pacific Ocean are calculated using the P-vector method and gridded Argo profiling data from January 2004 to December 2012. Three-dimensional structures and seasonal variability of meridional heat transport (MHT) and meridional salt transport (MST) are analyzed. The results show that geostrophic and Ekman components are generally opposite in sign, with the southward geostrophic component dominating in the subtropics and the northward Ekman component dominating in the tropics. In combination with the net surface heat flux and the MST through the Bering Strait, the MHT and MST of the western boundary currents (WBCs) are estimated for the first time. The results suggest that the WBCs are of great importance in maintaining the heat and salt balance of the North Pacific. The total interior MHT and MST in the tropics show nearly the same seasonal variability as that of the Ekman components, consistent with the variability of zonal wind stress. The geostrophic MHT in the tropics is mainly concentrated in the upper layers, while MST with large amplitude and annual variation can extend much deeper. This suggests that shallow processes dominate MHT in the North Pacific, while MST can be affected by deep ocean circulation. In the extratropical ocean, both MHT and MST are weak. However, there is relatively large and irregular seasonal variability of geostrophic MST, suggesting the importance of the geostrophic circulation in the MST of that area.

  10. Estimating moisture transport over oceans using space-based observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. Timothy; Wenqing, Tang

    2005-01-01

    The moisture transport integrated over the depth of the atmosphere (0) is estimated over oceans using satellite data. The transport is the product of the precipitable water and an equivalent velocity (ue), which, by definition, is the depth-averaged wind velocity weighted by humidity. An artificial neural network is employed to construct a relation between the surface wind velocity measured by the spaceborne scatterometer and coincident ue derived using humidity and wind profiles measured by rawinsondes and produced by reanalysis of operational numerical weather prediction (NWP). On the basis of this relation, 0 fields are produced over global tropical and subtropical oceans (40_N- 40_S) at 0.25_ latitude-longitude and twice daily resolutions from August 1999 to December 2003 using surface wind vector from QuikSCAT and precipitable water from the Tropical Rain Measuring Mission. The derived ue were found to capture the major temporal variability when compared with radiosonde measurements. The average error over global oceans, when compared with NWP data, was comparable with the instrument accuracy specification of space-based scatterometers. The global distribution exhibits the known characteristics of, and reveals more detailed variability than in, previous data.

  11. Transport of continental air to the subantarctic Indian Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balkanski, Yves J.; Jacob, Daniel J.

    1990-01-01

    The occurrence of high Rn-222 episodes (radonic storms) observed at three islands (Crozet, Kerguelen, and Amsterdam) in the subantarctic Indian Ocean is simulated using a three-dimensional chemical tracer model. The chemical tracer model is described and the simulated time series of Rn-222 concentrations at the three islands are compared to observations. The origin, seasonal frequencies, and periodicities of the storms are examined. It is found that the storms are due to fast boundary layer advection of air from South Africa, made possible by the conjunction of a subtropical high SE of Madagascar and a midlatitudes low off the southern tip of Africa. The implications of the results for the transport of continental air to the subantarctic Indian Ocean are discussed.

  12. Anisotropic mesoscale eddy transport in ocean general circulation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reckinger, Scott; Fox-Kemper, Baylor; Bachman, Scott; Bryan, Frank; Dennis, John; Danabasoglu, Gokhan

    2014-11-01

    In modern climate models, the effects of oceanic mesoscale eddies are introduced by relating subgrid eddy fluxes to the resolved gradients of buoyancy or other tracers, where the proportionality is, in general, governed by an eddy transport tensor. The symmetric part of the tensor, which represents the diffusive effects of mesoscale eddies, is universally treated isotropically. However, the diffusive processes that the parameterization approximates, such as shear dispersion and potential vorticity barriers, typically have strongly anisotropic characteristics. Generalizing the eddy diffusivity tensor for anisotropy extends the number of parameters from one to three: major diffusivity, minor diffusivity, and alignment. The Community Earth System Model (CESM) with the anisotropic eddy parameterization is used to test various choices for the parameters, which are motivated by observations and the eddy transport tensor diagnosed from high resolution simulations. Simply setting the ratio of major to minor diffusivities to a value of five globally, while aligning the major axis along the flow direction, improves biogeochemical tracer ventilation and reduces temperature and salinity biases. These effects can be improved by parameterizing the oceanic anisotropic transport mechanisms.

  13. A new geometrical approach to Eulerian transport: an application to the ocean circulation; final report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McWilliams, J. C.; Chao, Y.

    2003-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to investigate the transport processes in the large-scale ocean circulations using the new transport theory. We focus on the mid-latitude ocean circulation, especially the Gulf Stream, because it is recognized as a most energetic ocean current and plays a crucial role in maintaining the earth's climate system.

  14. 46 CFR 545.3 - Interpretation of § 515.23(b) of this chapter-Payment pursuant to a claim against an ocean...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Interpretation of § 515.23(b) of this chapter-Payment pursuant to a claim against an ocean transportation intermediary. 545.3 Section 545.3 Shipping FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION REGULATIONS AFFECTING OCEAN SHIPPING IN FOREIGN COMMERCE INTERPRETATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF POLICY § 545.3 Interpretation of...

  15. Transporting Ocean Viromes: Invasion of the Aquatic Biosphere.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yiseul; Aw, Tiong Gim; Rose, Joan B

    2016-01-01

    Studies of marine viromes (viral metagenomes) have revealed that DNA viruses are highly diverse and exhibit biogeographic patterns. However, little is known about the diversity of RNA viruses, which are mostly composed of eukaryotic viruses, and their biogeographic patterns in the oceans. A growth in global commerce and maritime traffic may accelerate spread of diverse and non-cosmopolitan DNA viruses and potentially RNA viruses from one part of the world to another. Here, we demonstrated through metagenomic analyses that failure to comply with mid-ocean ballast water exchange regulation could result in movement of viromes including both DNA viruses and RNA viruses (including potential viral pathogens) unique to geographic and environmental niches. Furthermore, our results showed that virus richness (known and unknown viruses) in ballast water is associated with distance between ballast water exchange location and its nearest shoreline as well as length of water storage time in ballast tanks (voyage duration). However, richness of only known viruses is governed by local environmental conditions and different viral groups have different responses to environmental variation. Overall, these results identified ballast water as a factor contributing to ocean virome transport and potentially increased exposure of the aquatic bioshpere to viral invasion. PMID:27055282

  16. Transporting Ocean Viromes: Invasion of the Aquatic Biosphere

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yiseul; Aw, Tiong Gim; Rose, Joan B.

    2016-01-01

    Studies of marine viromes (viral metagenomes) have revealed that DNA viruses are highly diverse and exhibit biogeographic patterns. However, little is known about the diversity of RNA viruses, which are mostly composed of eukaryotic viruses, and their biogeographic patterns in the oceans. A growth in global commerce and maritime traffic may accelerate spread of diverse and non-cosmopolitan DNA viruses and potentially RNA viruses from one part of the world to another. Here, we demonstrated through metagenomic analyses that failure to comply with mid-ocean ballast water exchange regulation could result in movement of viromes including both DNA viruses and RNA viruses (including potential viral pathogens) unique to geographic and environmental niches. Furthermore, our results showed that virus richness (known and unknown viruses) in ballast water is associated with distance between ballast water exchange location and its nearest shoreline as well as length of water storage time in ballast tanks (voyage duration). However, richness of only known viruses is governed by local environmental conditions and different viral groups have different responses to environmental variation. Overall, these results identified ballast water as a factor contributing to ocean virome transport and potentially increased exposure of the aquatic bioshpere to viral invasion. PMID:27055282

  17. Correlated signals and causal transport in ocean circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffress, Stephen

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents a framework for interpreting the time-lagged correlation of oceanographic data in terms of physical transport mechanisms. Previous studies have inferred aspects of ocean circulation by correlating fluctuations in temperature and salinity measurements at distant stations. Typically, the time-lag of greatest correlation is interpreted as an advective transit time and hence the advective speed of the current. In this paper we relate correlation functions directly to the underlying equations of fluid transport. This is accomplished by expressing the correlation functions in terms of the Green's function of the transport equation. Two types of correlation functions are distinguished: field-forcing correlation and field-field correlation. Their unique relationships to the Green's function are illustrated in two idealized models of geophysical transport: a leaky pipe model and an advective-diffusive model. Both models show that the field-forcing correlation function converges to the Green's function as the characteristic (time or length) scale of forcing autocorrelation decreases. The leaky pipe model provides an explanation for why advective speeds inferred from time-lagged correlations are often less than the speed of the main current. The advective-diffusive model reveals a structural bias in the field-field correlation function when used to estimate transit times.

  18. Coastal ocean transport patterns in the central Southern California Bight

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Noble, M.A.; Rosenberger, K.J.; Hamilton, P.; Xu, J. P.

    2009-01-01

    In the past decade, several large programs that monitor currents and transport patterns for periods from a few months to a few years were conducted by a consortium of university, federal, state, and municipal agencies in the central Southern California Bight, a heavily urbanized section of the coastal ocean off the west coast of the United States encompassing Santa Monica Bay, San Pedro Bay, and the Palos Verdes shelf. These programs were designed in part to determine how alongshelf and cross-shelf currents move sediments, pollutants, and suspended material through the region. Analysis of the data sets showed that the current patterns in this portion of the Bight have distinct changes in frequency and amplitude with location, in part because the topography of the shelf and upper slope varies rapidly over small spatial scales. However, because the mean, subtidal, and tidal-current patterns in any particular location were reasonably stable with time, one could determine a regional pattern for these current fields in the central Southern California Bight even though measurements at the various locations were obtained at different times. In particular, because the mean near-surface flows over the San Pedro and Palos Verdes shelves are divergent, near-surface waters from the upper slope tend to carry suspended material onto the shelf in the northwestern portion of San Pedro Bay. Water and suspended material are also carried off the shelf by the mean and subtidal flow fields in places where the orientation of the shelf break changes abruptly. The barotropic tidal currents in the central Southern California Bight flow primarily alongshore, but they have pronounced amplitude variations over relatively small changes in alongshelf location that are not totally predicted by numerical tidal models. Nonlinear internal tides and internal bores at tidal frequencies are oriented more across the shelf. They do not have a uniform transport direction, since they move fine sediment

  19. TRANSPORT OF LOW-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE SOIL AT DEEP-OCEAN DISPOSAL SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Transport studies were conducted to assess ocean disposal of soil contaminated with low-level natural radioisotopes. he experimental approach involved characterization of the soil for parameters affecting transport and fate of radionuclides- Radioactivity was associated with disc...

  20. Global estimation of freshwater fluxes and freshwater oceanic transport from satellite data

    SciTech Connect

    Gautier, C.; Peterson, P.; Jones, C.

    1996-12-01

    The exchange of moisture and heat fluxes across the ocean-atmosphere interface exerts a strong influence on the oceanic and atmospheric circulations, and therefore on the maintenance of the climate system equilibrium. Observational measurements of these fluxes over large areas of the ocean`s surface are limited by the lack of in-situ data. This paper reports research efforts to estimate the freshwater budget and freshwater oceanic transport using remotely sensed data. Six years (1988--1993) of surface evaporation estimated with satellite and in-situ data re combined with satellite-derived precipitation to compute the freshwater budget and freshwater oceanic transport. The interannual variability of the freshwater budget and oceanic transport eliminates are examined for two contrasting events: the La Nina of 1988--89 and the El Nino condition during 1991--92, one of the longest El Nino episodes on record. Possible implications for future climate change are discussed.

  1. 48 CFR 247.573-1 - Ocean transportation incidental to a contract for supplies, services, or construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ocean transportation... MANAGEMENT TRANSPORTATION Ocean Transportation by U.S.-Flag Vessels 247.573-1 Ocean transportation incidental to a contract for supplies, services, or construction. (a) This subsection applies when...

  2. 48 CFR 247.573-1 - Ocean transportation incidental to a contract for supplies, services, or construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ocean transportation... MANAGEMENT TRANSPORTATION Ocean Transportation by U.S.-Flag Vessels 247.573-1 Ocean transportation incidental to a contract for supplies, services, or construction. (a) This subsection applies when...

  3. 48 CFR 247.573-1 - Ocean transportation incidental to a contract for supplies, services, or construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ocean transportation... MANAGEMENT TRANSPORTATION Ocean Transportation by U.S.-Flag Vessels 247.573-1 Ocean transportation incidental to a contract for supplies, services, or construction. (a) This subsection applies when...

  4. 48 CFR 247.573-1 - Ocean transportation incidental to a contract for supplies, services, or construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ocean transportation... MANAGEMENT TRANSPORTATION Ocean Transportation by U.S.-Flag Vessels 247.573-1 Ocean transportation incidental to a contract for supplies, services, or construction. (a) This subsection applies when...

  5. 48 CFR 247.573-1 - Ocean transportation incidental to a contract for supplies, services, or construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ocean transportation... MANAGEMENT TRANSPORTATION Ocean Transportation by U.S.-Flag Vessels 247.573-1 Ocean transportation incidental to a contract for supplies, services, or construction. (a) This subsection applies when...

  6. Parameterizing Ocean Eddy Transports From Surface to Bottom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiki, H.; Jacobson, T.; Yamagata, T.

    2004-12-01

    To improve subgrid-scale physics of climate ocean models, in particular near the top and bottom boundaries, we consider new parameterization schemes for the extra transport velocity by waves and eddies in baroclinic instability. These come in the form of elliptic equations, previously unmentioned, which we derive for the eddy-induced overturning stream function. They guarantee decrease of the mean field potential energy. Our principal example gives a relationship between the vertical shear of the overturning velocity and the buoyancy torque of the main geostrophic current. Interestingly the parameterized velocity is nonsingular at the bottom and the sea surface, contrasting with the constant-coefficient Gent and McWilliams (1990)scheme. Idealized two-dimensional numerical experiments uccessfully reproduce meridional overturning circulation even when the background density gradient is uniform everywhere (the Eady problem) or when the bottom is steeply sloped. We further demonstrate that adding an eddy form drag (wave tress) term in the TRM momentum equations yields overturning of the velocity field.

  7. Noble gas transport during devolatilization of oceanic crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, C.; Smye, A.; Shuster, D. L.; Parman, S. W.; Kelley, S. P.; Hesse, M. A.; Cooper, R. F.

    2014-12-01

    Here we examine the role of slab dehydration in determining the elemental pattern of recycled noble gases. As a first step, we apply newly reported measurements of He-Ne-Ar (light noble gases) solubility and diffusivity in amphibole to parameterize a 1D diffusive-reaction transport model that simulates noble gas behavior during fluid loss from down-going oceanic crust. Recent experiments demonstrate that noble gases are highly soluble in ring-structured minerals, such as amphibole and other common hydrothermal products in slabs [1]. These results suggest that ring-structured minerals have the potential to strongly influence the budget of noble gases input into subduction zones and the elemental fractionations associated with volatile loss from slabs New measurements of He-Ne-Ar solubility in a suite of amphiboles have been completed utilizing the methodology described in [1]. These new measurements confirm that all light noble gases are highly soluble in amphibole, and that noble gas solubility correlates with the availability of unoccupied ring sites. New experimental measurements of He and Ne diffusivity have also been completed using a step-degassing approach at the Berkeley Geochronology Center. These measurements suggest that vacant ring sites in amphibole act to slow noble gas diffusion. We combine the newly acquired He and Ne diffusivity measurements with literature values for Ar diffusivity [2] to parameterize the diffusive-reaction transport model. Application of these data to the diffusive-reaction transport model yields several new insights. The relative mobility of Ne compared to Ar allows for efficient extraction of Ne from "hot" slabs by shallow depths (<50 km), while Ar is effectively retained to deeper depths, potentially past sub-arc conditions. Noble gas partition coefficients sharply increase with depth, following their increasing non-ideality in supercritical fluids, causing noble gases to partition back into minerals from any fluids retained in

  8. Cloud-radiative effects on implied oceanic energy transports as simulated by atmospheric general circulation models

    SciTech Connect

    Gleckler, P.J.; Randall, D.A.; Boer, G.

    1994-03-01

    This paper reports on energy fluxes across the surface of the ocean as simulated by fifteen atmospheric general circulation models in which ocean surface temperatures and sea-ice boundaries are prescribed. The oceanic meridional energy transport that would be required to balance these surface fluxes is computed, and is shown to be critically sensitive to the radiative effects of clouds, to the extent that even the sign of the Southern Hemisphere ocean energy transport can be affected by the errors in simulated cloud-radiation interactions.

  9. Estimation of Interbasin Transport Using Ocean Bottom Pressure: Theory and Model for Asian Marginal Seas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Y. Tony

    2006-01-01

    The Asian Marginal Seas are interconnected by a number of narrow straits, such as the Makassar Strait connecting the Pacific Ocean with the Indian Ocean, the Luzon Strait connecting the South China Sea with the Pacific Ocean, and the Korea/Tsushima Strait connecting the East China Sea with the Japan/East Sea. Here we propose a method, the combination of the "geostrophic control" formula of Garrett and Toulany (1982) and the "hydraulic control" theory of Whitehead et al. (1974), allowing the use of satellite-observed sea-surface-height (SSH) and ocean-bottom-pressure (OBP) data for estimating interbasin transport. The new method also allows separating the interbasin transport into surface and bottom fluxes that play an important role in maintaining the mass balance of the regional oceans. Comparison with model results demonstrates that the combined method can estimate the seasonal variability of the strait transports and is significantly better than the method of using SSH or OBP alone.

  10. Basin-scale transport of hydrothermal dissolved metals across the South Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Resing, Joseph A; Sedwick, Peter N; German, Christopher R; Jenkins, William J; Moffett, James W; Sohst, Bettina M; Tagliabue, Alessandro

    2015-07-01

    Hydrothermal venting along mid-ocean ridges exerts an important control on the chemical composition of sea water by serving as a major source or sink for a number of trace elements in the ocean. Of these, iron has received considerable attention because of its role as an essential and often limiting nutrient for primary production in regions of the ocean that are of critical importance for the global carbon cycle. It has been thought that most of the dissolved iron discharged by hydrothermal vents is lost from solution close to ridge-axis sources and is thus of limited importance for ocean biogeochemistry. This long-standing view is challenged by recent studies which suggest that stabilization of hydrothermal dissolved iron may facilitate its long-range oceanic transport. Such transport has been subsequently inferred from spatially limited oceanographic observations. Here we report data from the US GEOTRACES Eastern Pacific Zonal Transect (EPZT) that demonstrate lateral transport of hydrothermal dissolved iron, manganese, and aluminium from the southern East Pacific Rise (SEPR) several thousand kilometres westward across the South Pacific Ocean. Dissolved iron exhibits nearly conservative (that is, no loss from solution during transport and mixing) behaviour in this hydrothermal plume, implying a greater longevity in the deep ocean than previously assumed. Based on our observations, we estimate a global hydrothermal dissolved iron input of three to four gigamoles per year to the ocean interior, which is more than fourfold higher than previous estimates. Complementary simulations with a global-scale ocean biogeochemical model suggest that the observed transport of hydrothermal dissolved iron requires some means of physicochemical stabilization and indicate that hydrothermally derived iron sustains a large fraction of Southern Ocean export production. PMID:26156374

  11. Basin-scale transport of hydrothermal dissolved metals across the South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resing, Joseph A.; Sedwick, Peter N.; German, Christopher R.; Jenkins, William J.; Moffett, James W.; Sohst, Bettina M.; Tagliabue, Alessandro

    2015-07-01

    Hydrothermal venting along mid-ocean ridges exerts an important control on the chemical composition of sea water by serving as a major source or sink for a number of trace elements in the ocean. Of these, iron has received considerable attention because of its role as an essential and often limiting nutrient for primary production in regions of the ocean that are of critical importance for the global carbon cycle. It has been thought that most of the dissolved iron discharged by hydrothermal vents is lost from solution close to ridge-axis sources and is thus of limited importance for ocean biogeochemistry. This long-standing view is challenged by recent studies which suggest that stabilization of hydrothermal dissolved iron may facilitate its long-range oceanic transport. Such transport has been subsequently inferred from spatially limited oceanographic observations. Here we report data from the US GEOTRACES Eastern Pacific Zonal Transect (EPZT) that demonstrate lateral transport of hydrothermal dissolved iron, manganese, and aluminium from the southern East Pacific Rise (SEPR) several thousand kilometres westward across the South Pacific Ocean. Dissolved iron exhibits nearly conservative (that is, no loss from solution during transport and mixing) behaviour in this hydrothermal plume, implying a greater longevity in the deep ocean than previously assumed. Based on our observations, we estimate a global hydrothermal dissolved iron input of three to four gigamoles per year to the ocean interior, which is more than fourfold higher than previous estimates. Complementary simulations with a global-scale ocean biogeochemical model suggest that the observed transport of hydrothermal dissolved iron requires some means of physicochemical stabilization and indicate that hydrothermally derived iron sustains a large fraction of Southern Ocean export production.

  12. DREDGED MATERIAL TRANSPORT AT DEEP-OCEAN DISPOSAL SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessment of environmental impact of dredged material disposal in deep ocean water calls for predictions of water column concentration, exposure time as well as the impacted area of the bottom (footprint). redictions based on vertical willing and horizontal advection of single p...

  13. Transport of 137Cs to the Southern Hemisphere in an ocean general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsumune, Daisuke; Aoyama, Michio; Hirose, Katsumi; Bryan, Frank O.; Lindsay, Keith; Danabasoglu, Gokhan

    2011-04-01

    137Cs originating from global fallout is transported into the ocean interior by advection and diffusion, and the 137Cs concentration is reduced by radioactive decay. 137Cs concentrations in the global ocean can be simulated by global integration of the coarse-resolution Parallel Ocean Program to understand the mechanism of material transport in the ocean. We investigated the transport mechanism of 137Cs to the Southern Hemisphere using an ocean general circulation model (OGCM) and compared the simulated results with observations of 137Cs concentrations in the Southern Hemisphere. 137Cs was deposited on the ocean surface mainly as global fallout originating from atmospheric nuclear weapons testing since 1945, and the global distribution of cumulative 137Cs deposition has been reconstructed from global measurements of 137Cs in rain, seawater, and soil. We estimated the global distribution of 137Cs deposition from 1945 to 2003 using these distribution data, 137Cs deposition data observed at the Meteorological Research Institute, Tsukuba, Japan, from 1958 to 2003, and 137Cs deposition data for 1945-1957 estimated from ice-core data. We compared the simulated results with 137Cs sections from the South Pacific, Indian, and South Atlantic Oceans obtained during the BEAGLE2003 cruise in 2003. The simulated 137Cs sections were in good agreement with the observations, except for the effects of mesoscale eddies, which not be simulated by the model because of its coarse resolution. OGCMs can simulate the general pattern of 137Cs distribution in the world’s oceans and improve our understanding of the transport mechanism leading to those 137Cs distributions on a time scale of several decades. The model simulation results suggest that the 137Cs deposited in the North Pacific advected to the South Pacific and Indian Ocean, and then to the South Atlantic over about four decades. The North Pacific is thus an important source area of 137Cs to the Southern Hemisphere.

  14. Heat Transport and Long-Term Change in the Southern Ocean: Assessing the Role of Eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwiazda, R.; Paull, C. K.; Dallimore, S.; Melling, H.; Jin, Y. K.

    2014-12-01

    Long-term change in the Southern Ocean can be difficult to evaluate because of both the paucity of historic observations and the magnitude of eddy variability. The low stratification of the Southern Ocean means that eddies detected by altimetry at the ocean surface extend through the top 2 km of the ocean. Sea surface height anomalies are more strongly correlated with sub-surface variability at depths between about 600 and 1400 dbars than they are with variability in the upper 200 dbars. Altimetric variability can thus be used to remove eddy-related anomalies from individual Argo profiles, resulting in a smoother estimate of mean temperature and salinity. This "eddy-free" mean field serves as a benchmark against which to assess decadal-scale changes in the Southern Ocean, and we use historic hydrographic data to evaluate temperature and salinity changes through the second half of the 20th century. We also evaluate the behavior of Southern Ocean eddies themselves: Although in most parts of the ocean closed oceanic eddies appear to result in thermally indirect heat transport, eddies that are carried eastward by the ACC tend to propagate in the opposite direction, resulting in thermally direct, poleward heat transport across the ACC. Evidence suggests that this cell is maintained by the effective eastward propagation of eddies relative to the mean flow at deep levels.

  15. Modelling subglacial discharge and its influence on ocean heat transport in Arctic fjords

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendtsen, Jørgen; Mortensen, John; Rysgaard, Søren

    2015-11-01

    Tidewater outlet glaciers are directly connected to the ocean via ice walls or floating shelves. Melting and freezing of ice, runoff, englacial, and subglacial discharge of freshwater and ocean heat transport are therefore potential feedback processes between glacial ice flow and ocean circulation. Subglacial discharge occurs at the base of tidewater glacier outlets where out-flowing freshwater forms a convective buoyant plume ascending close to the glacier face and, due to entrainment, transports relatively warm and saline ambient bottom water up towards the surface. Plume dynamics, typically occurring at sub-grid scales in regional ocean models, therefore has to be parameterized in areas where ice-ocean interactions occur, as for example in Arctic fjords. Here, we develop and analyze a new simple boundary condition of subglacial discharge where entrainment-induced transport between the subsurface and surface layer is described. A sensitivity study showed that subglacial discharge increased ocean heat transport near the glacier whereas the impact from plume-entrainment became relatively small further from the glacier. Subglacial discharge was shown to have a significant influence on surface concentrations. The impact from subglacial discharge was demonstrated in a regional model of Godthåbsfjord (64°N), located at the west coast of Greenland, where surface concentrations near the glacier were shown to be sensitive to subglacial discharge in accordance with observations.

  16. Journeys on the Rivers and Oceans: Ship Transportation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritz, John M.; Carper, Susan

    2008-01-01

    Ship transportation includes various forms of technology. Ships have special designs to meet technological needs. They are used to transport people and cargoes and have been a major part of history throughout civilization. Products are available from around the world because they can be economically moved from producers to consumers. Not only are…

  17. Role of ocean heat transport in climates of tidally locked exoplanets around M dwarf stars

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yongyun; Yang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The distinctive feature of tidally locked exoplanets is the very uneven heating by stellar radiation between the dayside and nightside. Previous work has focused on the role of atmospheric heat transport in preventing atmospheric collapse on the nightside for terrestrial exoplanets in the habitable zone around M dwarfs. In the present paper, we carry out simulations with a fully coupled atmosphere–ocean general circulation model to investigate the role of ocean heat transport in climate states of tidally locked habitable exoplanets around M dwarfs. Our simulation results demonstrate that ocean heat transport substantially extends the area of open water along the equator, showing a lobster-like spatial pattern of open water, instead of an “eyeball.” For sufficiently high-level greenhouse gases or strong stellar radiation, ocean heat transport can even lead to complete deglaciation of the nightside. Our simulations also suggest that ocean heat transport likely narrows the width of M dwarfs’ habitable zone. This study provides a demonstration of the importance of exooceanography in determining climate states and habitability of exoplanets. PMID:24379386

  18. Role of ocean heat transport in climates of tidally locked exoplanets around M dwarf stars.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yongyun; Yang, Jun

    2014-01-14

    The distinctive feature of tidally locked exoplanets is the very uneven heating by stellar radiation between the dayside and nightside. Previous work has focused on the role of atmospheric heat transport in preventing atmospheric collapse on the nightside for terrestrial exoplanets in the habitable zone around M dwarfs. In the present paper, we carry out simulations with a fully coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model to investigate the role of ocean heat transport in climate states of tidally locked habitable exoplanets around M dwarfs. Our simulation results demonstrate that ocean heat transport substantially extends the area of open water along the equator, showing a lobster-like spatial pattern of open water, instead of an "eyeball." For sufficiently high-level greenhouse gases or strong stellar radiation, ocean heat transport can even lead to complete deglaciation of the nightside. Our simulations also suggest that ocean heat transport likely narrows the width of M dwarfs' habitable zone. This study provides a demonstration of the importance of exooceanography in determining climate states and habitability of exoplanets. PMID:24379386

  19. Cloud-radiative effects on implied oceanic energy transport as simulated by atmospheric general circulation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gleckler, P. J.; Randall, D. A.; Boer, G.; Colman, R.; Dix, M.; Galin, V.; Helfand, M.; Kiehl, J.; Kitoh, A.; Lau, W.

    1995-01-01

    This paper summarizes the ocean surface net energy flux simulated by fifteen atmospheric general circulation models constrained by realistically-varying sea surface temperatures and sea ice as part of the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project. In general, the simulated energy fluxes are within the very large observational uncertainties. However, the annual mean oceanic meridional heat transport that would be required to balance the simulated surface fluxes is shown to be critically sensitive to the radiative effects of clouds, to the extent that even the sign of the Southern Hemisphere ocean heat transport can be affected by the errors in simulated cloud-radiation interactions. It is suggested that improved treatment of cloud radiative effects should help in the development of coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models.

  20. Comparison of Indonesian Throughflow transport observations, Makassar Strait to eastern Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vranes, Kevin; Gordon, Arnold L.

    2005-05-01

    The Pacific to Indian Ocean transport within the passageways of the Indonesian seas (ITF) varies on interannual and longer time scales associated with ENSO, the Asian monsoons and interannual climate variability of the Indian Ocean. Although direct current measurements of the ITF are of limited duration, none long enough to properly describe greater than annual variability of the ITF, observations indicate that the bulk of the ITF passes through Makassar Strait. The repeat expendable bathythermograph (XBT) IX1 section begun in 1983 provides the longest time series of the full ITF introduced into the Indian Ocean between northwest Australia and Java. We find that the surface to 600 dbar Makassar Strait transport, as measured by current meter moorings from December 1996 to July 1998, correlates at r = 0.77 +/- 0.14 with the geostrophic transport constructed from IX1 XBT data for that time interval, with a 98 day lag.

  1. Global ocean circulation and equator-pole heat transport as a function of ocean GCM resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Covey, C.

    1994-06-01

    To determine whether resolution of smaller scales is necessary to simulate large-scale ocean climate correctly, I examine results from a global ocean GCM run with horizontal grid spacings spanning a range from coarse resolutions traditionally used in climate modeling to nearly the highest resolution attained with today`s computers. The experiments include four cases employing 4{degrees}, 2{degrees}, 1{degrees} and 1/2{degrees} spacing in latitude and longitude, which were run with minimal differences among them, i.e., in a controlled experiment. Two additional cases-1/2{degrees} spacing with a more scale-selective sub-gridscale mixing of heat and momentum, and approximate 1/4{degrees} spacing-are also included. The 1/4{degrees} run resolves most of the observed mesoscale eddy energy in the ocean. Several artificial constraints on the model tend to minimize differences among the different resolution cases. Nevertheless, for quantities of interest to global climate studies,the simulations show significant changes as resolution increases.

  2. Aerosol transport along the Andes from Amazonia to the remote Pacific Ocean: A multiyear CALIOP assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgeois, Quentin; Ekman, Annica; Krejci, Radovan

    2015-04-01

    The free troposphere over South America and the Pacific Ocean is a particularly interesting region to study due to the prevailing easterly wind direction, forcing air over Amazonia towards the Pacific Ocean but encountering a natural barrier - the Andes - in between which might play a significant role. In addition, the strong contrast between the wet, relatively clean season and the dry, relatively polluted season as well as the difference between day and night meteorological conditions may influence the vertical distribution of aerosols in the free troposphere. Six years (2007-2012) of CALIOP observations at both day and night were used to investigate the vertical distribution, transport and removal processes of aerosols over South America and the Pacific Ocean. The multiyear assessment shows that aerosols, mainly biomass burning particles emitted during the dry season in Amazonia, may be lifted along the Andes. During their lifting, aerosols remain in the boundary layer which makes them subject to scavenging and deposition processes. The removal aerosol extinction rate was quantified. After reaching the top of the Andes, free tropospheric aerosols are likely pushed by the large-scale subsidence towards the marine boundary layer (MBL) during their transport over the Pacific Ocean. CALIOP observations may indicate that aerosols are transported over thousands of kilometers in the free troposphere over the Pacific Ocean. During their long range transport, aerosols could be entrained into the MBL and may further act as cloud condensation nuclei, and influence climate and the radiative budget of the Earth.

  3. Weak oceanic heat transport as a cause of the instability of glacial climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colin de Verdière, Alain; Te Raa, L.

    2010-12-01

    The stability of the thermohaline circulation of modern and glacial climates is compared with the help of a two dimensional ocean—atmosphere—sea ice coupled model. It turns out to be more unstable as less freshwater forcing is required to induce a polar halocline catastrophy in glacial climates. The large insulation of the ocean by the extensive sea ice cover changes the temperature boundary condition and the deepwater formation regions moves much further South. The nature of the instability is of oceanic origin, identical to that found in ocean models under mixed boundary conditions. With similar strengths of the oceanic circulation and rates of deep water formation for warm and cold climates, the loss of stability of the cold climate is due to the weak thermal stratification caused by the cooling of surface waters, the deep water temperatures being regulated by the temperature of freezing. Weaker stratification with similar overturning leads to a weakening of the meridional oceanic heat transport which is the major negative feedback stabilizing the oceanic circulation. Within the unstable regime periodic millennial oscillations occur spontaneously. The climate oscillates between a strong convective thermally driven oceanic state and a weak one driven by large salinity gradients. Both states are unstable. The atmosphere of low thermal inertia is carried along by the oceanic overturning while the variation of sea ice is out of phase with the oceanic heat content. During the abrupt warming events that punctuate the course of a millennial oscillation, sea ice variations are shown respectively to damp (amplify) the amplitude of the oceanic (atmospheric) response. This sensitivity of the oceanic circulation to a reduced concentration of greenhouse gases and to freshwater forcing adds support to the hypothesis that the millennial oscillations of the last glacial period, the so called Dansgaard—Oeschger events, may be internal instabilities of the climate system.

  4. Atmospheric Compensation of Variations in Tropical Ocean Heat Transport: Understanding Mechanisms and Implications on Tectonic Timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rencurrel, M. C.; Rose, B. E. J.

    2015-12-01

    The poleward transport of energy is a key aspect of the climate system, with surface ocean currents presently dominating the transport out of deep tropics. A classic study by Stone (1978) proposed that the total heat transport is determined by astronomical parameters and is highly insensitive to the detailed atmosphere-ocean dynamics. On the other hand, previous modeling work has shown that past continental configurations could have produced substantially different tropical ocean heat transport (OHT). How thoroughly does the atmosphere compensate for changes in ocean transport in terms of the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiative budget, what are the relevant mechanisms, and what are the consequences for surface temperature and climate on tectonic timescales? We examine these issues in a suite of aquaplanet GCM simulations subject to large prescribed variations in OHT. We find substantial but incomplete compensation, in which adjustment of the atmospheric Hadley circulation plays a key role. We then separate out the dynamical and thermodynamical components of the adjustment mechanism. Increased OHT tends to warm the mid- to high latitudes without cooling the tropics due asymmetries in radiative feedback processes. The warming is accompanied by hydrological cycle changes that are completely different from those driven by greenhouse gases, suggesting that drivers of past global change might be detectable from combinations of hydroclimate and temperature proxies.

  5. Intermediary metabolism of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Urbina, J A

    1994-03-01

    In this article, Julio Urbino discusses the characteristics o f the intermediary metabolism of Trypanosoma cruzi (the causative agent of Chagas disease), which are responsible for the unusual capacity of this parasite to use carbohydrates or amino acids as carbon and energy sources without drastic changes in its catabolic enzyme levels(1-3). Many, but not all, o f the metabolic capabilities of this organism are shared with Leishmania and the procyclic form o f the African trypanosomes, and the reviewer presents a metabolic model which is also consistent with the information available on these other parasites(2,4). PMID:15275492

  6. Transports and budgets of volume, heat, and salt from a global eddy-resolving ocean model

    SciTech Connect

    McCann, M.P.; Semtner, A.J. Jr.; Chervin, R.M.

    1994-07-01

    The results from an integration of a global ocean circulation model have been condensed into an analysis of the volume, heat, and salt transports among the major ocean basins. Transports are also broken down between the model`s Ekman, thermocline, and deep layers. Overall, the model does well. Horizontal exchanges of mass, heat, and salt between ocean basins have reasonable values: and the volume of North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) transport is in general agreement with what limited observations exist. On a global basis the zonally integrated meridional heat transport is poleward at all latitudes except for the latitude band 30{degrees}S to 45{degrees}S. This anomalous transport is most likely a signature of the model`s inability to form Antarctic Intermediate (AAIW) and Antarctic bottom water (AABW) properly. Eddy heat transport is strong at the equator where its convergence heats the equatorial Pacific about twice as much as it heats the equatorial Atlantic. The greater heating in the Pacific suggests that mesoscale eddies may be a vital mechanism for warming and maintaining an upwelling portion of the global conveyor-belt circulation. The model`s fresh water transport compares well with observations. However, in the Atlantic there is an excessive southward transport of fresh water due to the absence of the Mediterranean outflow and weak northward flow of AAIW. Perhaps the model`s greatest weakness is the lack of strong AAIW and AABW circulation cells. Accurate thermohaline forcing in the North Atlantic (based on numerous hydrographic observations) helps the model adequately produce NADW. In contrast, the southern ocean is an area of sparse observation. Better thermohaline observations in this area may be needed if models such as this are to produce the deep convection that will achieve more accurate simulations of the global 3-dimensional circulation. 41 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Hydrodynamic provinces and oceanic connectivity from a transport network help designing marine reserves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Vincent; Ser-Giacomi, Enrico; López, Cristóbal; Hernández-García, Emilio

    2014-04-01

    Oceanic dispersal and connectivity have been identified as crucial factors for structuring marine populations and designing marine protected areas (MPAs). Focusing on larval dispersal by ocean currents, we propose an approach coupling Lagrangian transport and new tools from Network Theory to characterize marine connectivity in the Mediterranean basin. Larvae of different pelagic durations and seasons are modeled as passive tracers advected in a simulated oceanic surface flow from which a network of connected areas is constructed. Hydrodynamical provinces extracted from this network are delimited by frontiers which match multiscale oceanographic features. By examining the repeated occurrence of such boundaries, we identify the spatial scales and geographic structures that would control larval dispersal across the entire seascape. Based on these hydrodynamical units, we study novel connectivity metrics for existing reserves. Our results are discussed in the context of ocean biogeography and MPAs design, having ecological and managerial implications.

  8. Ocean plankton. Environmental characteristics of Agulhas rings affect interocean plankton transport.

    PubMed

    Villar, Emilie; Farrant, Gregory K; Follows, Michael; Garczarek, Laurence; Speich, Sabrina; Audic, Stéphane; Bittner, Lucie; Blanke, Bruno; Brum, Jennifer R; Brunet, Christophe; Casotti, Raffaella; Chase, Alison; Dolan, John R; d'Ortenzio, Fabrizio; Gattuso, Jean-Pierre; Grima, Nicolas; Guidi, Lionel; Hill, Christopher N; Jahn, Oliver; Jamet, Jean-Louis; Le Goff, Hervé; Lepoivre, Cyrille; Malviya, Shruti; Pelletier, Eric; Romagnan, Jean-Baptiste; Roux, Simon; Santini, Sébastien; Scalco, Eleonora; Schwenck, Sarah M; Tanaka, Atsuko; Testor, Pierre; Vannier, Thomas; Vincent, Flora; Zingone, Adriana; Dimier, Céline; Picheral, Marc; Searson, Sarah; Kandels-Lewis, Stefanie; Acinas, Silvia G; Bork, Peer; Boss, Emmanuel; de Vargas, Colomban; Gorsky, Gabriel; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Pesant, Stéphane; Sullivan, Matthew B; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Wincker, Patrick; Karsenti, Eric; Bowler, Chris; Not, Fabrice; Hingamp, Pascal; Iudicone, Daniele

    2015-05-22

    Agulhas rings provide the principal route for ocean waters to circulate from the Indo-Pacific to the Atlantic basin. Their influence on global ocean circulation is well known, but their role in plankton transport is largely unexplored. We show that, although the coarse taxonomic structure of plankton communities is continuous across the Agulhas choke point, South Atlantic plankton diversity is altered compared with Indian Ocean source populations. Modeling and in situ sampling of a young Agulhas ring indicate that strong vertical mixing drives complex nitrogen cycling, shaping community metabolism and biogeochemical signatures as the ring and associated plankton transit westward. The peculiar local environment inside Agulhas rings may provide a selective mechanism contributing to the limited dispersal of Indian Ocean plankton populations into the Atlantic. PMID:25999514

  9. Atmospheric transport of pollutants from North America to the North Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harriss, R. C.; Browell, E. V.; Sebacher, D. I.; Gregory, G. L.; Hinton, R. R.; Beck, S. M.; Mcdougal, D. S.; Shipley, S. T.

    1984-01-01

    Ground-based measurements strongly support the hypothesis that pollutant materials of anthropogenic origin are being transported over long distances in the midtroposphere and are a significant source of acid rain, acid snow, trace metal deposition, ozone and visibility-reducing aerosols in remote oceanic and polar regions of the Norhern Hemisphere. Atmospheric sulphur budget calculations and studies of acid rain on Bermuda indicate that a large fraction of pollutant materials emitted into the atmosphere in eastern North America are advected eastwards over the North Atlantic Ocean. The first direct airborne measurements of the vertical distribution of tropospheric aerosols over the western North Atlantic is reported here. A newly developed airborne differential adsorption lidar system was used to obtain continuous, remotely sensed aerosol distributions along its flight path. The data document two episodes of long-distance transport of pollutant materials from North America over the North Atlantic Ocean.

  10. The Specific Features of Pollution Transport in the Northwest Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diansky, Nikolay; Fomin, Vladimir; Gusev, Anatoly

    2013-04-01

    Two calculations of pollutant dispersal in the Northwest Pacific Ocean are presented: (1) during possible shipwrecks in the process of spent nuclear fuel transportation from Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky and (2) pollutant spread from the Japanese coast after the Fukushima 1 nuclear disaster on March 11, 2011. The circulation was simulated using a σ - coordinate ocean model INMOM (Institute of Numerical Mathematics Ocean Model) developed at the INM RAS. The INMOM is based on the primitive equations using the spherical σ - coordinate system with a free ocean surface. The INMOM was realized for the Pacific Ocean basin from the equator to the Bering Strait with a high 1/8° spatial resolution for reproducing the mesoscale ocean variability. The pollutant dispersal in the case of possible shipwrecks was estimated for currents for a statistically average year with atmospheric forcing from Common Ocean-ice Reference Experiments (CORE) for normal year data. The pollution spread from the Fukushima 1 nuclear power plant (NPP) was estimated for currents calculated with the real atmospheric forcing in accordance with the NCEP GFS (0.5 degree grid). The simulation period of pollutant dispersal from Fukushima 1 was 17 days: from March 11 to 28, 2011. The results of numerical simulation show that pollutant dispersal from the Fukushima 1 spread eastward according to the Kuroshio. Moreover, exceeding of natural background radiation level was simulated in the narrow region of the Japanese coast with width of less than 50 km.

  11. Micropaleontological evidence for increased meridional heat transport in the North Atlantic Ocean during the pliocene

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dowsett, H.J.; Cronin, T. M.; Poore, R.Z.; Thompson, R.S.; Whatley, R.C.; Wood, A.M.

    1992-01-01

    The Middle Pliocene (???3 million years ago) has been identified as the last time the Earth was significantly warmer than it was during the Last Interglacial and Holocene. A quantitative micropaleontological paleotemperature transect from equator to high latitudes in the North Atlantic indicates that Middle Pliocene warmth involved increased meridional oceanic heat transport.

  12. 75 FR 37435 - Fact Finding Investigation No. 27; Potentially Unlawful, Unfair or Deceptive Ocean Transportation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-29

    ... Fact Finding Investigation No. 27; Potentially Unlawful, Unfair or Deceptive Ocean Transportation... will use the information obtained in this investigation and recommendations of the Fact-Finding Officer... property in the oceanborne foreign commerce of the United States, in order to gather facts and establish...

  13. Importance of 3D Processes Near the Ocean's Surface for Material Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozgokmen, T. M.

    2014-12-01

    There are a number of practical problems that demand an accurate knowledge of ocean currents near the surface of the ocean. It is known that oceanic coherent features transport heat and carry out vertical exchange of biogeochemical tracers. Ocean currents can affect biological primary production, air-sea gas exchanges and global tracer budgets. Ocean currents are also important for the dispersion of substances that pose a danger to society, economy and human health. Examples of such events include algal blooms, the Fukushima nuclear plant incident in the Pacific Ocean in 2011, and repeated large oil spills in the Gulf of Mexico, namely the IXTOC in 1978 and the Deepwater Horizon event in 2010. Such incidents demand accurate answers to questions such as ``where will the pollutant go?", ``how fast will it get there?" and ``how much pollutant will arrive there?", and in some instances ``where did the pollutant come from?". The answers to these questions are critical to the allocation of limited response resources, and in determining the overall impact of the events. We will summarize the efforts by the Consortium for Advanced Research on Transport of Hydrocarbon in the Environment (CARTHE). One of the primary objectives of CARTHE is to improve predictive modeling capability for flows near the air-sea interface. In particular, two large experiments, Grand Lagrangian Deployment (GLAD) and Surf-zone and Coastal Oil Pathways Experiment (SCOPE), coordinated with real-time modeling were instructive on processes influencing near-surface material transport. Findings on submesoscale flows as well as model deficiencies to capture processes relevant to transport will be discussed. Insight into future modeling and observational plans will be provided.

  14. The Arctic Mediterranean Sea - Deep convection, oceanic heat transport and freshwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudels, Bert

    2014-05-01

    The speculations about the driving forces behind the oceanic meridional circulation and the importance of the northward transports of oceanic heat for the ice conditions in the Arctic Ocean have a long history, but only after the Fram expedition 1893-1896 and from the studies by Nansen, Helland-Hansen and Sandström in the early 1900s did these speculations attain observational substance. In the late 1970s and onward these questions have again risen to prominence. A study of deep convection in the Greenland Sea, then assumed to drive the global thermohaline circulation, started with the Greenland Sea Project (GSP), while the investigation of the exchanges of volume and heat through Fram Strait had a more hesitant start in the Fram Strait Project (FSP). Not until 1997 with the EC project VEINS (Variation of Exchanges in the Northern Seas) was a mooring array deployed across Fram Strait. This array has been maintained and has measured the exchanges ever since. Eberhard Fahrbach was closely involved in these studies, as a secretary for the GSP and as the major driving force behind the Fram Strait array. Here we shall examine the legacy of these projects; How our understanding of these themes has evolved in recent years. After the 1980s no convective bottom water renewal has been observed in the Greenland Sea, and the Greenland Sea deep waters have gradually been replaced by warmer, more saline deep water from the Arctic Ocean passing through Fram Strait. Small-scale convective events penetrating deeper than 2500m but there less dense than their surroundings were, however, observed in the early 2000s. The Fram Strait exchanges have proven difficult to estimate due to strong variability, high barotropic and baroclinic eddy activity and short lateral coherence scales. The fact that the mass transports through Fram Strait do not balance complicates the assessment of the heat transport through Fram Strait into the Arctic Ocean and mass (volume) and salt (freshwater

  15. Morphology Alters Fluid Transport and the Ability of Organisms to Mix Oceanic Waters.

    PubMed

    Katija, Kakani

    2015-10-01

    Mixing in the ocean is opposed by the stratification of fluid, such that density of seawater increases with greater depth. The mechanisms by which mixing occurs have been attributed largely to physical processes that include atmospheric forcing, tides, and internal waves. Biogenic mixing, another potential source of mixing in the ocean, may generate significant transport of fluid during diel vertical migrations of organisms. Biogenic mixing is not limited to the near-surface or to regions of rough bottom topography, as are other physical mixing processes, and may contribute significantly to the energy budget of mixing in mid-ocean. "Fluid drift", a mechanism first described by Charles Galton Darwin, has been identified as a mechanism that allows for long-distance, vertical transport of fluid by the smallest of swimming organisms. However, little is known about how fluid drift varies with morphology and behavior of swimming organisms. We conducted numerical simulations of theoretical and experimentally measured flows of swimming medusae (Phyllorhiza sp.), and compared the volume of the drift induced by these flows. Our numerical simulations of fluid drift showed that morphology coupled with swimming behavior alters the transport of fluid both spatially and temporally. Given empirical velocity field data, the methods presented here allow us to systematically compare fluid transport across taxa, and enable us to deduce the potential of swimming organisms to influence fluid transport. PMID:26117832

  16. Ocean Transport Pathways to a World Heritage Fringing Coral Reef: Ningaloo Reef, Western Australia

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiangtao; Lowe, Ryan J.; Ivey, Gregory N.; Jones, Nicole L.; Zhang, Zhenlin

    2016-01-01

    A Lagrangian particle tracking model driven by a regional ocean circulation model was used to investigate the seasonally varying connectivity patterns within the shelf circulation surrounding the 300 km long Ningaloo Reef in Western Australia (WA) during 2009–2010. Forward-in-time simulations revealed that surface water was transported equatorward and offshore in summer due to the upwelling-favorable winds. In winter, however, water was transported polewards down the WA coast due to the seasonally strong Leeuwin Current. Using backward-in-time simulations, the subsurface transport pathways revealed two main source regions of shelf water reaching Ningaloo Reef: (1) a year-round source to the northeast in the upper 100 m of water column; and (2) during the summer, an additional source offshore and to the west of Ningaloo in depths between ~30 and ~150 m. Transient wind-driven coastal upwelling, onshore geostrophic transport and stirring by offshore eddies were identified as the important mechanisms influencing the source water origins. The identification of these highly time-dependent transport pathways and source water locations is an essential step towards quantifying how key material (e.g., nutrients, larvae, contaminants, etc.) is exchanged between Ningaloo Reef and the surrounding shelf ocean, and how this is mechanistically coupled to the complex ocean dynamics in this region. PMID:26790154

  17. Ocean Transport Pathways to a World Heritage Fringing Coral Reef: Ningaloo Reef, Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiangtao; Lowe, Ryan J; Ivey, Gregory N; Jones, Nicole L; Zhang, Zhenlin

    2016-01-01

    A Lagrangian particle tracking model driven by a regional ocean circulation model was used to investigate the seasonally varying connectivity patterns within the shelf circulation surrounding the 300 km long Ningaloo Reef in Western Australia (WA) during 2009-2010. Forward-in-time simulations revealed that surface water was transported equatorward and offshore in summer due to the upwelling-favorable winds. In winter, however, water was transported polewards down the WA coast due to the seasonally strong Leeuwin Current. Using backward-in-time simulations, the subsurface transport pathways revealed two main source regions of shelf water reaching Ningaloo Reef: (1) a year-round source to the northeast in the upper 100 m of water column; and (2) during the summer, an additional source offshore and to the west of Ningaloo in depths between ~30 and ~150 m. Transient wind-driven coastal upwelling, onshore geostrophic transport and stirring by offshore eddies were identified as the important mechanisms influencing the source water origins. The identification of these highly time-dependent transport pathways and source water locations is an essential step towards quantifying how key material (e.g., nutrients, larvae, contaminants, etc.) is exchanged between Ningaloo Reef and the surrounding shelf ocean, and how this is mechanistically coupled to the complex ocean dynamics in this region. PMID:26790154

  18. Constraints on oceanic meridional heat transport from combined measurements of oxygen and carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resplandy, L.; Keeling, R. F.; Stephens, B. B.; Bent, J. D.; Jacobson, A.; Rödenbeck, C.; Khatiwala, S.

    2016-02-01

    Despite its importance to the climate system, the ocean meridional heat transport is still poorly quantified. We identify a strong link between the northern hemisphere deficit in atmospheric potential oxygen (APO = O_2 + 1.1 × CO_2 ) and the asymmetry in meridional heat transport between northern and southern hemispheres. The recent aircraft observations from the HIPPO campaign reveal a northern APO deficit in the tropospheric column of - 10.4 ± 1.0 per meg, double the value at the surface and more representative of large-scale air-sea fluxes. The global northward ocean heat transport asymmetry necessary to explain the observed APO deficit is about 0.7-1.1 PW, which corresponds to the upper range of estimates from hydrographic sections and atmospheric reanalyses.

  19. Seasonal Cycles of Meridional Overturning and Heat Transport of the Indian Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Tong; Marotzke, Jochem

    1998-01-01

    A general circulation model of the Indian Ocean is fitted to monthly averaged climatological temperatures, salinities, and surface fluxes using the adjoint method. Interannual variability is minimized by penalizing the temporal drift from one seasonal cycle to another during a two-year integration. The resultant meridional overturning and heat transport display large seasonal variations, with maximum amplitudes of 18 and 22 (x 10(exp 6) cubic m/s) for the overturning and 1.8 and 1.4 (x 10(exp 15) W) for heat transport near 10 S and 10 N, respectively. A dynamical decomposition of the overturning and heat transport shows that the time-varying Ekman How plus its barotropic compensation can explain a large part of the seasonal variations in overturning and heat transport. The maximum variations at 10 deg N and 10 deg S are associated with monsoon reversal over the northern Indian Ocean and changes of the easterlies over the southern Indian Ocean. An external mode with variable topography has a moderate contribution where the Somali Current and the corresponding gyre reverse direction seasonally. Contribution front vertical shear (thermal wind and ageostrophic shear) is dominant near the southern boundary and large near the Somali Current latitudes. The dominant balance in the zonally integrated heat budget is between heat storage change and heat transport convergence except south of 15 S. Optimization with seasonal forcings improves estimates of sea surface temperatures, but the annual average overturning and heat transport are very similar to previous results with annual mean forcings. The annual average heat transport consists of roughly equal contributions from time-mean and time-varying fields of meridional velocities and temperatures in the northern Indian Ocean. indicating a significant rectification to the heat transport due to the time-varying fields. The time-mean and time-varying contributions are primarily due to the overturning and horizontal gyre

  20. Sea-ice transport driving Southern Ocean salinity and its recent trends.

    PubMed

    Haumann, F Alexander; Gruber, Nicolas; Münnich, Matthias; Frenger, Ivy; Kern, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Recent salinity changes in the Southern Ocean are among the most prominent signals of climate change in the global ocean, yet their underlying causes have not been firmly established. Here we propose that trends in the northward transport of Antarctic sea ice are a major contributor to these changes. Using satellite observations supplemented by sea-ice reconstructions, we estimate that wind-driven northward freshwater transport by sea ice increased by 20 ± 10 per cent between 1982 and 2008. The strongest and most robust increase occurred in the Pacific sector, coinciding with the largest observed salinity changes. We estimate that the additional freshwater for the entire northern sea-ice edge entails a freshening rate of -0.02 ± 0.01 grams per kilogram per decade in the surface and intermediate waters of the open ocean, similar to the observed freshening. The enhanced rejection of salt near the coast of Antarctica associated with stronger sea-ice export counteracts the freshening of both continental shelf and newly formed bottom waters due to increases in glacial meltwater. Although the data sources underlying our results have substantial uncertainties, regional analyses and independent data from an atmospheric reanalysis support our conclusions. Our finding that northward sea-ice freshwater transport is also a key determinant of the mean salinity distribution in the Southern Ocean further underpins the importance of the sea-ice-induced freshwater flux. Through its influence on the density structure of the ocean, this process has critical consequences for the global climate by affecting the exchange of heat, carbon and nutrients between the deep ocean and surface waters. PMID:27582222

  1. Estimating uncertainty caused by ocean heat transport to the North Sea: experiments downscaling EC-Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, T.; Su, J.; Boberg, F.; Yang, S.; Schmith, T.

    2016-01-01

    The heat content of the North Sea is determined by the surface heat flux and the ocean heat transport into the region. The uncertainty in the projected warming in the North Sea caused by ocean heat transport has rarely been quantified. The difference in the estimates using regional ocean models is known to arise from the poorly prescribed temperature boundary forcing, either provided by global models at coarse grid resolutions, or from anomaly correction (using difference of the simulation from observed climatology) without interannual variation. In this study, two marine downscaling experiments were performed using boundary temperature forcings prepared with the two above mentioned strategies: one interpolated from a global model simulation (MI: model incl. interannual variation), and the other from observed climatology with warming trends in the future ocean derived from the global model simulation (OT: observed climatol. plus trend). The comparative experiments allowed us to estimate the uncertainty caused by ocean heat transport to the North Sea. The global climate model EC-Earth CMIP5 simulations of historical and future scenarios were used to provide lateral boundary forcing for regional models. The OT boundary was found to affect deep water temperatures (below 50 m) in the North Sea because of reduced interannual variability. The difference of mean temperature changes by 2100 (MI - OT) was up to 0.5 °C near the bottom across 58°N. While the deep water temperature in the North Sea did not directly link to the large-scale atmospheric circulation, the Norwegian outflow was highly correlated with the NAO index and heat transport of the Atlantic inflow provided by EC-Earth. It was found that model uncertainty due to the choice of lateral boundary forcing could be significant in the interannual variation of thermal stratification in the northern North Sea in a long-term simulation.

  2. Investigating bomb radiocarbon transport in the southern Pacific Ocean with otolith radiocarbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grammer, G. L.; Fallon, S. J.; Izzo, C.; Wood, R.; Gillanders, B. M.

    2015-08-01

    To explore the transport of carbon into water masses from the surface ocean to depths of ∼ 1000 m in the southwest Pacific Ocean, we generated time series of radiocarbon (Δ14C) from fish otoliths. Otoliths (carbonate earstones) from long-lived fish provide an indirect method to examine the "bomb pulse" of radiocarbon that originated in the 1950s and 1960s, allowing identification of changes to distributions of 14C that has entered and mixed within the ocean. We micro-sampled ocean perch (Helicolenus barathri) otoliths, collected at ∼ 400- 500 m in the Tasman Sea, to obtain measurements of Δ14C for those depths. We compared our ocean perch Δ14C series to published otolith-based marine surface water Δ14C values (Australasian snapper (Chrysophrys auratus) and nannygai (Centroberyx affinis)) and to published deep-water values (800-1000 m; orange roughy (Hoplostethus atlanticus)) from the southwest Pacific to establish a mid-water Δ14C series. The otolith bomb 14C results from these different depths were consistent with previous water mass results in the upper 1500 m of the southwest Pacific Ocean (e.g. World Ocean Circulation Experiment and Geochemical Ocean Sections Study). A comparison between the initial Δ14C bomb pulse rise at 400-500 m suggested a ventilation lag of 5 to 10 yr, whereas a comparison of the surface and depths of 800-1000 m detailed a 10 to 20 yr lag in the time history of radiocarbon invasion at this depth. Pre-bomb reservoir ages derived from otolith 14C located in Tasman Sea thermocline waters were ∼ 530 yr, while reservoir ages estimated for Tasman Antarctic intermediate water were ∼ 730 yr.

  3. Effects of tropical cyclones on large-scale circulation and ocean heat transport in the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xidong; Wang, Chunzai; Han, Guijun; Li, Wei; Wu, Xinrong

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we investigate the influence of tropical cyclones (TCs) on large-scale circulation and ocean heat transport in the South China Sea (SCS) by using an ocean general circulation model at a 1/8° resolution during 2000-2008. The model uses a data assimilation system to assimilate observations in order to improve the representation of SCS circulation. The results reveal an unexpected deep SCS circulation anomaly induced by TCs, which suggests that effects of TC can penetrate deeper into the ocean. This deep effect may result from the near inertial oscillations excited by TCs. The inertial oscillations can propagate downward to the oceanic interior. The analyses confirm that TCs have two effects on ocean heat transport of the SCS. Firstly, the wind stress curl induced by TCs affects the structure of SCS circulation, and then changes heat transport. Secondly, TCs pump surface heat downward to the thermocline, increasing the heat injection from the atmosphere to the ocean. Two effects together amplify the outflow of the surface heat southward away the SCS through the Mindoro and Karimata Straits. The TC-induced heat transports through the Mindoro, Balabac and Karimata Straits account for 20 % of the total heat transport through three straits. An implication of this study is that ocean models need to simulate the TC effect on heat transport in order to correctly evaluate the role of the SCS through flow in regulating upper ocean circulation and climate in the Indonesian maritime continent and its adjacent regions.

  4. Estimate of Nutrient Input to the Pacific Ocean from Long-Range Transport of Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cliff, S. S.; Vancuren, T.

    2003-12-01

    Dust and pollution generation and transport have increasingly become the subject of scrutiny for their impacts on global climate, the ecosystem, and human health. Several recent regional and hemispheric scale campaigns were conducted to better characterize aerosol composition and transport. These campaigns include the 2001 Aerosol Characterization Experiment in Asia (ACE-Asia) and the Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation Experiment of 2002 (ITCT-2K2). In addition, long-term sampling has been conducted at National Parks and Monuments across the United States as part of the Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) program. These data provide a basis for estimating the transport and deposition of atmospheric particulate matter to the northern hemisphere oceans. Here we focus on the aerosol that is generated in Asia (i.e. compositionally distinct from North America and Europe) and transported across the Pacific Basin. The flux of aerosol from the source region from ACE-Asia data combined with data from receptor sites in North America from ACE-Asia, ITCT, and IMPROVE sampling are used to estimate oceanic deposition. A previously identified signature for Asian aerosol (VanCuren and Cahill, JGR December 2003) is used as a marker for transport. Comparison with direct deposition measurements is made.

  5. Transport of North Pacific 137Cs labeled waters to the south-eastern Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Cabeza, J. A.; Levy, I.; Gastaud, J.; Eriksson, M.; Osvath, I.; Aoyama, M.; Povinec, P. P.; Komura, K.

    2011-04-01

    During the reoccupation of the WOCE transect A10 at 30°S by the BEAGLE2003 cruise, the SHOTS project partners collected a large number of samples for the analysis of isotopic tracers. 137Cs was mostly deposited on the oceans surface during the late 1950s and early 1960s, after the atmospheric detonation of large nuclear devices, which mostly occurred in the Northern Hemisphere. The development of advanced radioanalytical and counting techniques allowed to obtain, for the first time in this region, a zonal section of 137Cs water concentrations, where little information existed before, thus constituting an important benchmark for further studies. 137Cs concentrations in the upper waters (0-1000 m) of the south-eastern Atlantic Ocean are similar to those observed in the south-western Indian Ocean, suggesting transport of 137Cs labeled waters by the Agulhas current to the Benguela Current region. In contrast, bomb radiocarbon data do not show this feature, indicating the usefulness of 137Cs as a radiotracer of water mass transport from the Indian to the South Atlantic Ocean.

  6. Oceanic Transport of Surface Meltwater from the Southern Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luo, Hao; Castelao, Renato M.; Rennermalm, Asa K.; Tedesco, Marco; Bracco, Annalisa; Yager, Patricia L.; Mote, Thomas L.

    2016-01-01

    The Greenland ice sheet has undergone accelerating mass losses during recent decades. Freshwater runoff from ice melt can influence fjord circulation and dynamic1 and the delivery of bioavailable micronutrients to the ocean. It can also have climate implications, because stratification in the adjacent Labrador Sea may influence deep convection and the strength of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. Yet, the fate of the meltwater in the ocean remains unclear. Here, we use a high-resolution ocean model to show that only 1-15% of the surface meltwater runoff originating from southwest Greenland is transported westwards. In contrast, up to 50-60% of the meltwater runoff originating from southeast Greenland is transported westwards into the northern Labrador Sea, leading to significant salinity and stratification anomalies far from the coast. Doubling meltwater runoff, as predicted in future climate scenarios, results in a more-than-double increase in anomalies offshore that persists further into the winter. Interannual variability in offshore export of meltwater is tightly related to variability in wind forcing. The new insight that meltwaters originating from the west and east coasts have different fates indicates that future changes in mass loss rates and surface runoff will probably impact the ocean differently, depending on their Greenland origins.

  7. Oceanic transport of surface meltwater from the southern Greenland ice sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Hao; Castelao, Renato M.; Rennermalm, Asa K.; Tedesco, Marco; Bracco, Annalisa; Yager, Patricia L.; Mote, Thomas L.

    2016-07-01

    The Greenland ice sheet has undergone accelerating mass losses during recent decades. Freshwater runoff from ice melt can influence fjord circulation and dynamics and the delivery of bioavailable micronutrients to the ocean. It can also have climate implications, because stratification in the adjacent Labrador Sea may influence deep convection and the strength of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. Yet, the fate of the meltwater in the ocean remains unclear. Here, we use a high-resolution ocean model to show that only 1-15% of the surface meltwater runoff originating from southwest Greenland is transported westwards. In contrast, up to 50-60% of the meltwater runoff originating from southeast Greenland is transported westwards into the northern Labrador Sea, leading to significant salinity and stratification anomalies far from the coast. Doubling meltwater runoff, as predicted in future climate scenarios, results in a more-than-double increase in anomalies offshore that persists further into the winter. Interannual variability in offshore export of meltwater is tightly related to variability in wind forcing. The new insight that meltwaters originating from the west and east coasts have different fates indicates that future changes in mass loss rates and surface runoff will probably impact the ocean differently, depending on their Greenland origins.

  8. Volume, heat, and freshwater transports of the global ocean circulation 1993-2000, estimated from a general circulation model constrained by World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stammer, D.; Wunsch, C.; Giering, R.; Eckert, C.; Heimbach, P.; Marotzke, J.; Adcroft, A.; Hill, C. N.; Marshall, J.

    2003-01-01

    An analysis of ocean volume, heat, and freshwater transports from a fully constrained general circulation model (GCM) is described. Output from a data synthesis, or state estimation, method is used by which the model was forced to large-scale, time-varying global ocean data sets over 1993 through 2000. Time-mean horizontal transports, estimated from this fully time-dependent circulation, have converged with independent time-independent estimates from box inversions over most parts of the world ocean but especially in the southern hemisphere. However, heat transport estimates differ substantially in the North Atlantic where our estimates result in only 1/2 previous results. The models drift over the estimation period is consistent with observations from TOPEX/Poseidon in their spatial pattern, but smaller in their amplitudes by about a factor of 2. Associated temperature and salinity changes are complex, and both point toward air-sea interaction over water mass formation regions as the primary source for changes in the deep ocean. The estimated mean circulation around Australia involves a net volume transport of 11 Sv through the Indonesian Throughflow and the Mozambique Channel. In addition, we show that this flow regime exists on all timescales above 1 month, rendering the variability in the South Pacific strongly coupled to the Indian Ocean. Moreover, the dynamically consistent variations in the model show temporal variability of oceanic heat transports, heat storage, and atmospheric exchanges that are complex and with a strong dependence upon location, depth, and timescale. Our results demonstrate the great potential of an ocean state estimation system to provide a dynamical description of the time-dependent observed heat transport and heat content changes and their relation to air-sea interactions.

  9. 49 CFR 1103.34 - Intermediaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Responsibilities Regarding Witnesses, Other Litigants and the Public § 1103.34 Intermediaries. (a) The services of a practitioner should not be controlled or exploited by any lay agency, personal or corporate,...

  10. Climatic Analysis of Oceanic Water Vapor Transports Based on Satellite E-P Datasets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Eric A.; Sohn, Byung-Ju; Mehta, Vikram

    2004-01-01

    Understanding the climatically varying properties of water vapor transports from a robust observational perspective is an essential step in calibrating climate models. This is tantamount to measuring year-to-year changes of monthly- or seasonally-averaged, divergent water vapor transport distributions. This cannot be done effectively with conventional radiosonde data over ocean regions where sounding data are generally sparse. This talk describes how a methodology designed to derive atmospheric water vapor transports over the world oceans from satellite-retrieved precipitation (P) and evaporation (E) datasets circumvents the problem of inadequate sampling. Ultimately, the method is intended to take advantage of the relatively complete and consistent coverage, as well as continuity in sampling, associated with E and P datasets obtained from satellite measurements. Independent P and E retrievals from Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) measurements, along with P retrievals from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) measurements, are used to obtain transports by solving a potential function for the divergence of water vapor transport as balanced by large scale E - P conditions.

  11. Is the oceanic heat transport with Atlantic water towards the Arctic changing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Østerhus, Svein

    2013-04-01

    The flow of Atlantic water (Atlantic inflow) across the Greenland-Scotland Ridge (GSR) is critical for conditions in the Nordic Seas and Arctic Ocean by importing heat and salt. All three branches crossing the GSR have been monitored since the mid-1990ies and the transports of water and heat have been estimated. The Atlantic inflow, that forms the surface part of the thermohaline circulation in the North Atlantic, is affected by wind forcing and freshwater input but the most important driving appears to be the cooling of the ocean by the atmosphere in the subarctic seas and increasing of salinity in the Arctic Ocean through freezing of seawater. This results in the sinking of the surface waters that subsequently flow out of the area close to the bottom over the GSR. This removal of water from the Arctic region by the overflow generates sea level slopes that drive a northward transport of water and heat. With global climate change, the Arctic atmosphere is expected to warm and freshwater input to the Arctic to increase, both of which may act to slow the mechanism that drives these flows, and climate models predict a weakening of the North Atlantic thermohaline circulation. This presentation addresses the question, whether the weakening has already been initiated and what regions may have been affected. Based on observations and model results, we conclude that the volume transport of the Atlantic inflow has not weakened consistently whereas the temperature has increased.

  12. Meridional transport of salt in the global ocean from an eddy-resolving model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treguier, A. M.; Deshayes, J.; Le Sommer, J.; Lique, C.; Madec, G.; Penduff, T.; Molines, J.-M.; Barnier, B.; Bourdalle-Badie, R.; Talandier, C.

    2014-04-01

    The meridional transport of salt is computed in a global eddy-resolving numerical model (1/12° resolution) in order to improve our understanding of the ocean salinity budget. A methodology is proposed that allows a global analysis of the salinity balance in relation to surface water fluxes, without defining a "freshwater anomaly" based on an arbitrary reference salinity. The method consists of a decomposition of the meridional transport into (i) the transport by the time-longitude-depth mean velocity, (ii) time-mean velocity recirculations and (iii) transient eddy perturbations. Water is added (rainfall and rivers) or removed (evaporation) at the ocean surface at different latitudes, which creates convergences and divergences of mass transport with maximum and minimum values close to ±1 Sv. The resulting meridional velocity effects a net transport of salt at each latitude (±30 Sv PSU), which is balanced by the time-mean recirculations and by the net effect of eddy salinity-velocity correlations. This balance ensures that the total meridional transport of salt is close to zero, a necessary condition for maintaining a quasi-stationary salinity distribution. Our model confirms that the eddy salt transport cannot be neglected: it is comparable to the transport by the time-mean recirculation (up to 15 Sv PSU) at the poleward and equatorial boundaries of the subtropical gyres. Two different mechanisms are found: eddy contributions are localized in intense currents such as the Kuroshio at the poleward boundary of the subtropical gyres, while they are distributed across the basins at the equatorward boundaries. Closer to the Equator, salinity-velocity correlations are mainly due to the seasonal cycle and large-scale perturbations such as tropical instability waves.

  13. Evaluation of Oceanic Transport Statistics By Use of Transient Tracers and Bayesian Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trossman, D. S.; Thompson, L.; Mecking, S.; Bryan, F.; Peacock, S.

    2013-12-01

    Key variables that quantify the time scales over which atmospheric signals penetrate into the oceanic interior and their uncertainties are computed using Bayesian methods and transient tracers from both models and observations. First, the mean residence times, subduction rates, and formation rates of Subtropical Mode Water (STMW) and Subpolar Mode Water (SPMW) in the North Atlantic and Subantarctic Mode Water (SAMW) in the Southern Ocean are estimated by combining a model and observations of chlorofluorocarbon-11 (CFC-11) via Bayesian Model Averaging (BMA), statistical technique that weights model estimates according to how close they agree with observations. Second, a Bayesian method is presented to find two oceanic transport parameters associated with the age distribution of ocean waters, the transit-time distribution (TTD), by combining an eddying global ocean model's estimate of the TTD with hydrographic observations of CFC-11, temperature, and salinity. Uncertainties associated with objectively mapping irregularly spaced bottle data are quantified by making use of a thin-plate spline and then propagated via the two Bayesian techniques. It is found that the subduction of STMW, SPMW, and SAMW is mostly an advective process, but up to about one-third of STMW subduction likely owes to non-advective processes. Also, while the formation of STMW is mostly due to subduction, the formation of SPMW is mostly due to other processes. About half of the formation of SAMW is due to subduction and half is due to other processes. A combination of air-sea flux, acting on relatively short time scales, and turbulent mixing, acting on a wide range of time scales, is likely the dominant SPMW erosion mechanism. Air-sea flux is likely responsible for most STMW erosion, and turbulent mixing is likely responsible for most SAMW erosion. Two oceanic transport parameters, the mean age of a water parcel and the half-variance associated with the TTD, estimated using the model's tracers as

  14. Deep intrusions, lateral magma transport and related uplift at ocean island volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klügel, Andreas; Longpré, Marc-Antoine; García-Cañada, Laura; Stix, John

    2015-12-01

    Oceanic intraplate volcanoes grow by accumulation of erupted material as well as by coeval or discrete magmatic intrusions. Dykes and other intrusive bodies within volcanic edifices are comparatively well studied, but intrusive processes deep beneath the volcanoes remain elusive. Although there is geological evidence for deep magmatic intrusions contributing to volcano growth through uplift, this has rarely been demonstrated by real-time monitoring. Here we use geophysical and petrological data from El Hierro, Canary Islands, to show that intrusions from the mantle and subhorizontal transport of magma within the oceanic crust result in rapid endogenous island growth. Seismicity and ground deformation associated with a submarine eruption in 2011-2012 reveal deep subhorizontal intrusive sheets (sills), which have caused island-scale uplift of tens of centimetres. The pre-eruptive intrusions migrated 15-20 km laterally within the lower oceanic crust, opening pathways that were subsequently used by the erupted magmas to ascend from the mantle to the surface. During six post-eruptive episodes between 2012 and 2014, further sill intrusions into the lower crust and upper mantle have caused magma to migrate up to 20 km laterally, resulting in magma accumulation exceeding that of the pre-eruptive phase. A comparison of geobarometric data for the 2011-2012 El Hierro eruption with data for other Atlantic intraplate volcanoes shows similar bimodal pressure distributions, suggesting that eruptive phases are commonly accompanied by deep intrusions of sills and lateral magma transport. These processes add significant material to the oceanic crust, cause uplift, and are thus fundamentally important for the growth and evolution of volcanic islands. We suggest that the development of such a magma accumulation zone in the lower oceanic crust begins early during volcano evolution, and is a consequence of increasing size and complexity of the mantle reservoir system, and potentially

  15. Meridional transport of salt in the global ocean from an eddy-resolving model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treguier, A. M.; Deshayes, J.; Le Sommer, J.; Lique, C.; Madec, G.; Penduff, T.; Molines, J.-M.; Barnier, B.; Bourdalle-Badie, R.; Talandier, C.

    2013-12-01

    The meridional transport of salt is computed in a global eddy-resolving numerical model (1/12° resolution) in order to improve our understanding of the ocean salinity budget. A methodology is proposed that allows a global analysis of the salinity balance in relation with surface water fluxes, without defining a "freshwater anomaly" based on an arbitrary reference salinity. The method consists in a decomposition of the meridional transport into (i) the transport by the time-longitude-depth mean velocity, (ii) time-mean velocity recirculations and (iii) transient eddy perturbations. Water is added (rainfall) or removed (evaporation) at the ocean surface at different latitudes, which creates convergences and divergences of mass tranport with maximum and minimum values close to ±1 Sv. The resulting meridional velocity effects a net transport of salt at each latitude (±30 Sv PSU), which is balanced by the time-mean recirculations and by the net effect of eddy salinity-velocity correlations. This balance ensures that the total meridional transport of salt is close to zero, a necessary condition to maintain a quasi-stationary salinity distribution. Our model confirms that the eddy salt transport cannot be neglected: it is comparable to the transport by the time-mean recirculation (up to 15 Sv PSU) at the poleward and equatorial boundaries of the subtropical gyres. Two different mechanisms are found: eddy contributions are localized in intense currents such as the Kuroshio at the poleward boundary of the subtropical gyres, while they are distributed across the basins at the equatorward boundaries. Closer to the equator, salinity-velocity correlations are mainly due to the seasonal cycle and large scale perturbations such as tropical instability waves.

  16. Hazardous Off-Gassing of Carbon Monoxide and Oxygen Depletion during Ocean Transportation of Wood Pellets

    PubMed Central

    Svedberg, Urban; Samuelsson, Jerker; Melin, Staffan

    2008-01-01

    Five ocean vessels were investigated for the characterization and quantification of gaseous compounds emitted during ocean transportation of wood pellets in closed cargo hatches from Canada to Sweden. The study was initiated after a fatal accident with several injured during discharge in Sweden. The objective with the investigation was to better understand the off-gassing and issues related to workers' exposure. Air sampling was done during transport and immediately before discharge in the undisturbed headspace air above the wood pellets and in the staircase adjacent to each hatch. The samples were analyzed with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and direct reading instruments. The following compounds and ranges were detected in samples from the five ships: carbon monoxide (CO) 1460–14650 ppm, carbon dioxide (CO2) 2960–21570 ppm, methane 79.9–956 ppm, butane equivalents 63–842 ppm, ethylene 2–21.2 ppm, propylene 5.3–36 ppm, ethane 0–25 ppm and aldehydes 2.3–35 ppm. The oxygen levels were between 0.8 and 16.9%. The concentrations in the staircases were almost as high as in the cargo hatches, indicating a fairly free passage of air between the two spaces. A potentially dangerous atmosphere was reached within a week from loading. The conclusions are that ocean transportation of wood pellets in confined spaces may produce an oxygen deficient atmosphere and lethal levels of CO which may leak into adjacent access spaces. The dangerous combination of extremely high levels of CO and reduced oxygen produces a fast-acting toxic combination. Measurement of CO in combination with oxygen is essential prior to entry in spaces having air communication with cargo hatches of wood pellets. Forced ventilation of staircases prior to entry is necessary. Redesign, locking and labeling of access doors and the establishment of rigorous entry procedures and training of onboard crew as well as personnel boarding ocean vessels are also important. PMID:18397907

  17. The origin of intermediary metabolism.

    PubMed

    Morowitz, H J; Kostelnik, J D; Yang, J; Cody, G D

    2000-07-01

    The core of intermediary metabolism in autotrophs is the citric acid cycle. In a certain group of chemoautotrophs, the reductive citric acid cycle is an engine of synthesis, taking in CO(2) and synthesizing the molecules of the cycle. We have examined the chemistry of a model system of C, H, and O that starts with carbon dioxide and reductants and uses redox couples as the energy source. To inquire into the reaction networks that might emerge, we start with the largest available database of organic molecules, Beilstein on-line, and prune by a set of physical and chemical constraints applicable to the model system. From the 3.5 million entries in Beilstein we emerge with 153 molecules that contain all 11 members of the reductive citric acid cycle. A small number of selection rules generates a very constrained subset, suggesting that this is the type of reaction model that will prove useful in the study of biogenesis. The model indicates that the metabolism shown in the universal chart of pathways may be central to the origin of life, is emergent from organic chemistry, and may be unique. PMID:10859347

  18. The origin of intermediary metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morowitz, H. J.; Kostelnik, J. D.; Yang, J.; Cody, G. D.

    2000-01-01

    The core of intermediary metabolism in autotrophs is the citric acid cycle. In a certain group of chemoautotrophs, the reductive citric acid cycle is an engine of synthesis, taking in CO(2) and synthesizing the molecules of the cycle. We have examined the chemistry of a model system of C, H, and O that starts with carbon dioxide and reductants and uses redox couples as the energy source. To inquire into the reaction networks that might emerge, we start with the largest available database of organic molecules, Beilstein on-line, and prune by a set of physical and chemical constraints applicable to the model system. From the 3.5 million entries in Beilstein we emerge with 153 molecules that contain all 11 members of the reductive citric acid cycle. A small number of selection rules generates a very constrained subset, suggesting that this is the type of reaction model that will prove useful in the study of biogenesis. The model indicates that the metabolism shown in the universal chart of pathways may be central to the origin of life, is emergent from organic chemistry, and may be unique.

  19. The origin of intermediary metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Morowitz, Harold J.; Kostelnik, Jennifer D.; Yang, Jeremy; Cody, George D.

    2000-01-01

    The core of intermediary metabolism in autotrophs is the citric acid cycle. In a certain group of chemoautotrophs, the reductive citric acid cycle is an engine of synthesis, taking in CO2 and synthesizing the molecules of the cycle. We have examined the chemistry of a model system of C, H, and O that starts with carbon dioxide and reductants and uses redox couples as the energy source. To inquire into the reaction networks that might emerge, we start with the largest available database of organic molecules, Beilstein on-line, and prune by a set of physical and chemical constraints applicable to the model system. From the 3.5 million entries in Beilstein we emerge with 153 molecules that contain all 11 members of the reductive citric acid cycle. A small number of selection rules generates a very constrained subset, suggesting that this is the type of reaction model that will prove useful in the study of biogenesis. The model indicates that the metabolism shown in the universal chart of pathways may be central to the origin of life, is emergent from organic chemistry, and may be unique. PMID:10859347

  20. Investigation of hurricane Ivan using the coupled ocean-atmosphere-wave-sediment transport (COAWST) model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zambon, Joseph B.; He, Ruoying; Warner, John C.

    2014-01-01

    The coupled ocean–atmosphere–wave–sediment transport (COAWST) model is used to hindcast Hurricane Ivan (2004), an extremely intense tropical cyclone (TC) translating through the Gulf of Mexico. Sensitivity experiments with increasing complexity in ocean–atmosphere–wave coupled exchange processes are performed to assess the impacts of coupling on the predictions of the atmosphere, ocean, and wave environments during the occurrence of a TC. Modest improvement in track but significant improvement in intensity are found when using the fully atmosphere–ocean-wave coupled configuration versus uncoupled (e.g., standalone atmosphere, ocean, or wave) model simulations. Surface wave fields generated in the fully coupled configuration also demonstrates good agreement with in situ buoy measurements. Coupled and uncoupled model-simulated sea surface temperature (SST) fields are compared with both in situ and remote observations. Detailed heat budget analysis reveals that the mixed layer temperature cooling in the deep ocean (on the shelf) is caused primarily by advection (equally by advection and diffusion).

  1. Particle release transport in Danshuei River estuarine system and adjacent coastal ocean: a modeling assessment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Bo; Liu, Wen-Cheng; Kimura, Nobuaki; Hsu, Ming-Hsi

    2010-09-01

    A three-dimensional hydrodynamic model was created to study the Danshuei River estuarine system and adjacent coastal ocean in Taiwan. The model was verified using measurements of the time-series water surface elevation, tidal current, and salinity from 1999. We conclude that our model is consistent with these observations. Our particle-tracking model was also used to explore the transport of particles released from the Hsin-Hai Bridge, an area that is heavily polluted. The results suggest that it takes a much longer time for the estuary to be flushed out under low freshwater discharge conditions than with high freshwater discharge. We conclude that the northeast and southwest winds minimally impact particle dispersion in the estuary. The particles fail to settle to the bottom in the absence of density-induced circulation. Our model was also used to simulate the ocean outfall at the Bali. Our experimental results suggest that the tidal current dominates the particle trajectories and influences the transport properties in the absence of a wind stress condition. The particles tend to move northeast or southwest along the coast when northeast or southwest winds prevail. Our data suggest that wind-driven currents and tidal currents play important roles in water movement as linked with ocean outfall in the context of the Danshuei River. PMID:19680754

  2. Heat Transport Compensation in Atmosphere and Ocean over the Past 22,000 Years

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Haijun; Zhao, Yingying; Liu, Zhengyu; Li, Qing; He, Feng; Zhang, Qiong

    2015-01-01

    The Earth’s climate has experienced dramatic changes over the past 22,000 years; however, the total meridional heat transport (MHT) of the climate system remains stable. A 22,000-year-long simulation using an ocean-atmosphere coupled model shows that the changes in atmosphere and ocean MHT are significant but tend to be out of phase in most regions, mitigating the total MHT change, which helps to maintain the stability of the Earth’s overall climate. A simple conceptual model is used to understand the compensation mechanism. The simple model can reproduce qualitatively the evolution and compensation features of the MHT over the past 22,000 years. We find that the global energy conservation requires the compensation changes in the atmosphere and ocean heat transports. The degree of compensation is mainly determined by the local climate feedback between surface temperature and net radiation flux at the top of the atmosphere. This study suggests that an internal mechanism may exist in the climate system, which might have played a role in constraining the global climate change over the past 22,000 years. PMID:26567710

  3. Heat Transport Compensation in Atmosphere and Ocean over the Past 22,000 Years.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haijun; Zhao, Yingying; Liu, Zhengyu; Li, Qing; He, Feng; Zhang, Qiong

    2015-01-01

    The Earth's climate has experienced dramatic changes over the past 22,000 years; however, the total meridional heat transport (MHT) of the climate system remains stable. A 22,000-year-long simulation using an ocean-atmosphere coupled model shows that the changes in atmosphere and ocean MHT are significant but tend to be out of phase in most regions, mitigating the total MHT change, which helps to maintain the stability of the Earth's overall climate. A simple conceptual model is used to understand the compensation mechanism. The simple model can reproduce qualitatively the evolution and compensation features of the MHT over the past 22,000 years. We find that the global energy conservation requires the compensation changes in the atmosphere and ocean heat transports. The degree of compensation is mainly determined by the local climate feedback between surface temperature and net radiation flux at the top of the atmosphere. This study suggests that an internal mechanism may exist in the climate system, which might have played a role in constraining the global climate change over the past 22,000 years. PMID:26567710

  4. Numerical simulation of vertical transport and oxidation of methane in Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanenko, Victor; Iakovlev, Nikolai

    2013-04-01

    The high abundance of methane in shelf of East Siberian Arctic Seas (ESAS) has been a subject of a number of field studies (e.g. Shakhova et al., 2010). This experimental evidence provoked discussions on probable origins of that methane and possible feedbacks to modern climate change. For instance, the hypothesis of methane hydrates degradation under current ocean warming was tested recently in several modeling studies none of which supported this degradation to be significant feedback for climate change. Regardless the origin of methane the knowledge of its budget in the water column is important to link its bottom flux with emission to the atmosphere (and vice versa). It is frequently assumed that all methane released from a seabed of ESAS shelf reaches the atmosphere. When using ocean circulation models (Biastoch et al., 2011) this simplification is cancelled out but the vertical resolution of 3D models at the shelf (that is several tens meters deep) is not enough to accurately resolve turbulent transport of methane and other gases. Moreover, up the knowledge of authors none of the ocean models includes explicitly bubble transport of gases. These constrains motivate this study. In this study a high-resolution 1D single column ocean model is constructed to explicitly simulate the methane transport, oxidation and emission to the atmosphere. The model accounts for both vertical turbulent transport (using k-ɛ closure) and bubble transport of gases. The ground under the seabed is represented by multilayer heat and moisture transfer model, including methane hydrate evolution. It is forced by time series of atmospheric variables from NCEP reanalysis and horizontal advection terms taken from FEMAO-1 3D ocean model. The baseline simulation is performed for the period 1948-2011. The model is validated using temperature profiles measured at research vessels in ESAS. The annual cycle and multiyear variability of methane profiles in water are studied and compared to

  5. Climate change and larval transport in the ocean: fractional effects from physical and physiological factors.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Matthew S; Poti, Matt; Karnauskas, Kristopher B

    2016-04-01

    Changes in larval import, export, and self-seeding will affect the resilience of coral reef ecosystems. Climate change will alter the ocean currents that transport larvae and also increase sea surface temperatures (SST), hastening development, and shortening larval durations. Here, we use transport simulations to estimate future larval connectivity due to: (1) physical transport of larvae from altered circulation alone, and (2) the combined effects of altered currents plus physiological response to warming. Virtual larvae from islands throughout Micronesia were moved according to present-day and future ocean circulation models. The Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) spanning 2004-2012 represented present-day currents. For future currents, we altered HYCOM using analysis from the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Earth System Model, version 1-Biogeochemistry, Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5 experiment. Based on the NCAR model, regional SST is estimated to rise 2.74 °C which corresponds to a ~17% decline in larval duration for some taxa. This reduction was the basis for a separate set of simulations. Results predict an increase in self-seeding in 100 years such that 62-76% of islands experienced increased self-seeding, there was an average domainwide increase of ~1-3% points in self-seeding, and increases of up to 25% points for several individual islands. When changed currents alone were considered, approximately half (i.e., random) of all island pairs experienced decreased connectivity but when reduced PLD was added as an effect, ~65% of connections were weakened. Orientation of archipelagos relative to currents determined the directional bias in connectivity changes. There was no universal relationship between climate change and connectivity applicable to all taxa and settings. Islands that presently export large numbers of larvae but that also maintain or enhance this role into the future should be the focus of conservation

  6. Atmospheric moisture transport: the bridge between ocean evaporation and Arctic ice melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimeno, L.; Vázquez, M.; Nieto, R.; Trigo, R. M.

    2015-09-01

    Changes in the atmospheric moisture transport have been proposed as a vehicle for interpreting some of the most significant changes in the Arctic region. The increasing moisture over the Arctic during the last decades is not strongly associated with the evaporation that takes place within the Arctic area itself, despite the fact that the sea ice cover is decreasing. Such an increment is consistent and is more dependent on the transport of moisture from the extratropical regions to the Arctic that has increased in recent decades and is expected to increase within a warming climate. This increase could be due either to changes in circulation patterns which have altered the moisture sources, or to changes in the intensity of the moisture sources because of enhanced evaporation, or a combination of these two mechanisms. In this short communication we focus on the more objective assessment of the strong link between ocean evaporation trends and Arctic Sea ice melting. We will critically analyse several recent results suggesting links between moisture transport and the extent of sea ice in the Arctic, this being one of the most distinct indicators of continuous climate change both in the Arctic and on a global scale. To do this we will use a sophisticated Lagrangian approach to develop a more robust framework on some of these previous disconnecting results, using new information and insights. Results reached in this study stress the connection between two climate change indicators, namely an increase in evaporation over source regions (mainly the Mediterranean Sea, the North Atlantic Ocean and the North Pacific Ocean in the paths of the global western boundary currents and their extensions) and Arctic ice melting precursors.

  7. Ocean heat transport into the Arctic in the twentieth and twenty-first century in EC-Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenigk, Torben; Brodeau, Laurent

    2014-06-01

    The ocean heat transport into the Arctic and the heat budget of the Barents Sea are analyzed in an ensemble of historical and future climate simulations performed with the global coupled climate model EC-Earth. The zonally integrated northward heat flux in the ocean at 70°N is strongly enhanced and compensates for a reduction of its atmospheric counterpart in the twenty first century. Although an increase in the northward heat transport occurs through all of Fram Strait, Canadian Archipelago, Bering Strait and Barents Sea Opening, it is the latter which dominates the increase in ocean heat transport into the Arctic. Increased temperature of the northward transported Atlantic water masses are the main reason for the enhancement of the ocean heat transport. The natural variability in the heat transport into the Barents Sea is caused to the same extent by variations in temperature and volume transport. Large ocean heat transports lead to reduced ice and higher atmospheric temperature in the Barents Sea area and are related to the positive phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation. The net ocean heat transport into the Barents Sea grows until about year 2050. Thereafter, both heat and volume fluxes out of the Barents Sea through the section between Franz Josef Land and Novaya Zemlya are strongly enhanced and compensate for all further increase in the inflow through the Barents Sea Opening. Most of the heat transported by the ocean into the Barents Sea is passed to the atmosphere and contributes to warming of the atmosphere and Arctic temperature amplification. Latent and sensible heat fluxes are enhanced. Net surface long-wave and solar radiation are enhanced upward and downward, respectively and are almost compensating each other. We find that the changes in the surface heat fluxes are mainly caused by the vanishing sea ice in the twenty first century. The increasing ocean heat transport leads to enhanced bottom ice melt and to an extension of the area with bottom ice

  8. Regional eddy vorticity transport and the equilibrium vorticity budgets of a numerical model ocean circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, D. E.; Holland, W. R.

    1981-01-01

    A mean vorticity budget analysis is presented of Holland's (1978) numerical ocean general circulation experiment. The stable budgets are compared with classical circulation theory to emphasize the ways in which the mesoscale motions of the model alter (or leave unaltered) classical vorticity balances. The basinwide meridional transports of vorticity by the mean flow and by the mesoscale flow in the mean are evaluated to establish the role(s) of the mesoscale in the larger scale equilibrium vorticity transports. The vorticity equation for this model fluid system is presented and the budget analysis method is described. Vorticity budgets over the selected regions and on a larger scale are given, and a summary of budget results is provided along with remarks about the utility of this type of analysis.

  9. Upward nitrate transport by phytoplankton in oceanic waters: balancing nutrient budgets in oligotrophic seas.

    PubMed

    Villareal, Tracy A; Pilskaln, Cynthia H; Montoya, Joseph P; Dennett, Mark

    2014-01-01

    In oceanic subtropical gyres, primary producers are numerically dominated by small (1-5 µm diameter) pro- and eukaryotic cells that primarily utilize recycled nutrients produced by rapid grazing turnover in a highly efficient microbial loop. Continuous losses of nitrogen (N) to depth by sinking, either as single cells, aggregates or fecal pellets, are balanced by both nitrate inputs at the base of the euphotic zone and N2-fixation. This input of new N to balance export losses (the biological pump) is a fundamental aspect of N cycling and central to understanding carbon fluxes in the ocean. In the Pacific Ocean, detailed N budgets at the time-series station HOT require upward transport of nitrate from the nutricline (80-100 m) into the surface layer (∼0-40 m) to balance productivity and export needs. However, concentration gradients are negligible and cannot support the fluxes. Physical processes can inject nitrate into the base of the euphotic zone, but the mechanisms for transporting this nitrate into the surface layer across many 10s of m in highly stratified systems are unknown. In these seas, vertical migration by the very largest (10(2)-10(3) µm diameter) phytoplankton is common as a survival strategy to obtain N from sub-euphotic zone depths. This vertical migration is driven by buoyancy changes rather than by flagellated movement and can provide upward N transport as nitrate (mM concentrations) in the cells. However, the contribution of vertical migration to nitrate transport has been difficult to quantify over the required basin scales. In this study, we use towed optical systems and isotopic tracers to show that migrating diatom (Rhizosolenia) mats are widespread in the N. Pacific Ocean from 140°W to 175°E and together with other migrating phytoplankton (Ethmodiscus, Halosphaera, Pyrocystis, and solitary Rhizosolenia) can mediate time-averaged transport of N (235 µmol N m(-2) d(-1)) equivalent to eddy nitrate injections (242 µmol NO3 (-) m(-2) d(-1

  10. Upward nitrate transport by phytoplankton in oceanic waters: balancing nutrient budgets in oligotrophic seas

    PubMed Central

    Pilskaln, Cynthia H.; Montoya, Joseph P.; Dennett, Mark

    2014-01-01

    In oceanic subtropical gyres, primary producers are numerically dominated by small (1–5 µm diameter) pro- and eukaryotic cells that primarily utilize recycled nutrients produced by rapid grazing turnover in a highly efficient microbial loop. Continuous losses of nitrogen (N) to depth by sinking, either as single cells, aggregates or fecal pellets, are balanced by both nitrate inputs at the base of the euphotic zone and N2-fixation. This input of new N to balance export losses (the biological pump) is a fundamental aspect of N cycling and central to understanding carbon fluxes in the ocean. In the Pacific Ocean, detailed N budgets at the time-series station HOT require upward transport of nitrate from the nutricline (80–100 m) into the surface layer (∼0–40 m) to balance productivity and export needs. However, concentration gradients are negligible and cannot support the fluxes. Physical processes can inject nitrate into the base of the euphotic zone, but the mechanisms for transporting this nitrate into the surface layer across many 10s of m in highly stratified systems are unknown. In these seas, vertical migration by the very largest (102–103 µm diameter) phytoplankton is common as a survival strategy to obtain N from sub-euphotic zone depths. This vertical migration is driven by buoyancy changes rather than by flagellated movement and can provide upward N transport as nitrate (mM concentrations) in the cells. However, the contribution of vertical migration to nitrate transport has been difficult to quantify over the required basin scales. In this study, we use towed optical systems and isotopic tracers to show that migrating diatom (Rhizosolenia) mats are widespread in the N. Pacific Ocean from 140°W to 175°E and together with other migrating phytoplankton (Ethmodiscus, Halosphaera, Pyrocystis, and solitary Rhizosolenia) can mediate time-averaged transport of N (235 µmol N m-2 d-1) equivalent to eddy nitrate injections (242 µmol NO3− m-2 d-1

  11. A bimodel climate response controlled by water vapor transport in a coupled ocean-atmosphere box model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birchfield, G. Edward; Wang, Huaxiao; Wyant, Matthew

    1990-06-01

    The importance of the hydrological cycle as a controlling factor on the magnitude of the thermohaline circulation is illustrated in a simple one-hemisphere coupled ocean-atmosphere box model. The ocean model includes differential surface heating and evaporation, horizontal and vertical exchange of heat and salt between boxes, and a simply parameterized thermohaline circulation. Surface heat fluxes and evaporation are determined through the coupled ocean and energy balance atmosphere models which treat fluxes of long- and short-wave radiation and sensible and latent heat. Two parameters represent the most important physics: µ controls the magnitude of the thermohaline circulation; ɛ controls the strength of the hydrological cycle. For fixed µ, two regimes are distinguished. One, associated with small values of ɛ, has weak latitudinal water vapor transport in the atmosphere, a strong thermohaline circulation with sinking in high latitudes, upwelling in low latitudes, and strong latitudinal transport of heat by the ocean. The second regime for larger ɛ is characterized by strong latitudinal water vapor transport which, by reducing the surface salinity in high latitudes, shuts down the thermohaline circulation and has reduced ocean and net latitudinal heat transport. The bimodal response in the model is shown to be the consequence of a shift in the mechanism of supply of salt to the high-latitude surface ocean from predominantly thermohaline transport, a nonlinear process, to or from predominantly eddy mixing transport, a linear process. In climatological terms, the bimodality represents two distinct climate regimes, one with an active ocean meridional circulation and relatively warm ocean and atmosphere temperatures in high latitudes, and the other with a less active ocean circulation and an increased latitudinal temperature gradient in atmosphere and ocean. The regime with an active thermohaline circulation tends to be less stable than the other, exhibiting over

  12. Saharan Dust Export towards the Caribbean: Transport, Mixing and Deposition Processes over the Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinold, Bernd; Schepanski, Kerstin; Haarig, Moritz; Ansmann, Albert; Groß, Silke; Schäfler, Andreas; Weinzierl, Bernadett; Tegen, Ina

    2015-04-01

    Large amounts of Saharan dust are carried towards the Caribbean within the Saharan Air Layer (SAL), with maximum transport in late boreal spring and early summer. During long-range transport, the dust particles are transformed by aging and mixing, which may have significant but as yet unquantified effects on the dust impact on radiation, cloud properties, and the biogeochemical processes of ecosystems. Here, we investigate the long-range transport of Saharan dust across the Atlantic Ocean by means of transport modelling that has been performed within the framework of the SALTRACE (Saharan Aerosol Long-Range Transport and Aerosol-Cloud Interaction Experiment) project. The emission, transport, dry and wet deposition of Saharan dust as well as the effect of dust radiative forcing are simulated with the regional model COSMO-MUSCAT. The model results are evaluated against the various ground and airborne observations from the SALTRACE field measurements at Barbados Island in June and July 2013. The dust simulations, in turn, help to interpret the observations, in particular from a Lagrangian flight experiment, by providing a spatiotemporal context. Specifically, this study addresses the questions of (a) how the Saharan dust export towards the Caribbean is influenced by the atmospheric circulation over West Africa, (b) which role the different removal and mixing processes play during long-range transport, and (c) what is the impact of dust forcing on the vertical structure of the SAL? In addition, the Saharan dust simulations with COSMO-MUSCAT are combined with trajectory analysis to study particle aging and dust-cloud interactions.

  13. Transport of very short-lived halocarbons from the Indian Ocean to the stratosphere through the Asian monsoon circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiehn, Alina; Hepach, Helmke; Atlas, Elliot; Quack, Birgit; Tegtmeier, Susann; Krüger, Kirstin

    2016-04-01

    Halogenated organic compounds are naturally produced in the ocean and emitted to the atmosphere. The halogenated very short-lived substances (VSLS), such as bromoform, have atmospheric lifetimes of less than half a year. When VSLS reach the stratosphere, they enhance ozone depletion and thus impact the climate. During boreal summer, the Asian monsoon circulation transfers air masses from the Asian troposphere to the global stratosphere. Still, the extent to which VSLS from the Indian Ocean contribute to the stratospheric halogen burden and their exact origin is unclear. Here we show that the monsoon circulation transports VSLS from the Indian Ocean to the stratosphere. During the research cruises SO234-2 and SO235 in July-August 2014 onboard RV SONNE, we measured oceanic and atmospheric concentrations of bromoform (tropical lifetime at 10 km = 17 days), dibromomethane (150 days) and methyl iodide (3.5 days) in the subtropical and tropical West Indian Ocean and calculated their emission strengths. We use the Langrangian transport model FLEXPART driven by ERA-Interim meteorological fields to investigate the transport of oceanic emissions in the atmosphere. We analyze the direct contribution of observed bromoform emissions to the stratospheric halogen budget with forward trajectories. Furthermore, we investigate the connection between the Asian monsoon anticyclone and the oceanic source regions using backward trajectories. The West Indian Ocean is a strong source region of VSLS to the atmosphere and the monsoon transport is fast enough for bromoform to reach the stratosphere. However, the main source regions for the entrainment of oceanic air masses through the Asian monsoon anticyclone are the West Pacific and Bay of Bengal as well as the Arabian Sea. Our findings indicate that changes in emission or circulation in this area due to climate change can directly affect the stratospheric halogen burden and thus the ozone layer.

  14. 13 CFR 120.711 - What rules govern Intermediaries?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What rules govern Intermediaries? 120.711 Section 120.711 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Microloan Program § 120.711 What rules govern Intermediaries? Intermediaries must operate in accordance...

  15. 13 CFR 120.705 - What is a Specialized Intermediary?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What is a Specialized Intermediary? 120.705 Section 120.705 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Microloan Program § 120.705 What is a Specialized Intermediary? At the end of an Intermediary's first...

  16. Self Service: What Is the Function of the New Intermediary?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middleton, Michael

    This paper discusses the role of the intermediary in the information profession. Changes due to the advent of digital media are addressed, and ways that a positive role for the intermediary can be promoted are suggested. Several activities are listed to illustrate the expanding role of the intermediary, and actions in order to secure a future for…

  17. The Intermediary Guidebook: Making and Managing Community Connections for Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Marc; Kazis, Richard; Trippe, Steve; Eagleson, Glenn; Porter, Lois Ann

    This guidebook summarizes learning on the role of intermediaries and how to build organizations that perform intermediary functions effectively and efficiently. An introduction defines intermediaries, in the context of youth-serving systems, as staffed organizations that connect schools and other youth-preparation organizations with workplaces and…

  18. The role of ocean heat transport in the habitaility of tidal-locking exoplanets around M dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Y.; Yang, J.

    2013-12-01

    The distinctive feature of tidally locked exoplanets is the very uneven heating by stellar radiation between the dayside and nightside. Previous work has focused on the role of atmospheric heat transport in preventing atmospheric collapse on the nightside for terrestrial exoplanets in the habitable zone (HZ) around M dwarfs. In the present paper, we carry out the first simulation with a fully coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (AOGCM) to investigate the role of ocean heat transport in climate states of tidally locked habitable exoplanets around M dwarfs. Our simulation results demonstrate that ocean heat transport substantially extends the area of open water along the equator, showing a lobster-like spatial pattern of open water, instead of an 'eyeball'. For sufficiently high-level greenhouse gases or strong stellar radiation, ocean heat transport can even lead to complete deglaciation of the nightside. Our simulations also suggest that ocean heat transport likely narrows the width of M dwarfs' HZ. This study provides the first demonstration of the importance of exo-oceanography in determining climate states and habitability of exoplanets.

  19. 42 CFR 421.100 - Intermediary functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...-based hospices, where the HHA or the hospice and its parent provider will be served by different... payments to the HHAs and the hospices. The intermediary or Medicare integrity program contractor serving... cost reports and the HHA and hospice supplement worksheets....

  20. Terminological Knowledge Structure for Intermediary Expert Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fidel, Raya; Efthimiadis, Efthimis N.

    1995-01-01

    Examines the knowledge base of an intermediary expert system that provides advice about search term selection. Topics include a proposal for an integrated approach, including an option focusing on terminological attributes based on knowledge acquired from professional searchers; and the content of the knowledge base and the research needed to…

  1. Temperature Modulates the Effects of Ocean Acidification on Intestinal Ion Transport in Atlantic Cod, Gadus morhua.

    PubMed

    Hu, Marian Y; Michael, Katharina; Kreiss, Cornelia M; Stumpp, Meike; Dupont, Sam; Tseng, Yung-Che; Lucassen, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    CO2-driven seawater acidification has been demonstrated to enhance intestinal bicarbonate secretion rates in teleosts, leading to an increased release of CaCO3 under simulated ocean acidification scenarios. In this study, we investigated if increasing CO2 levels stimulate the intestinal acid-base regulatory machinery of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) and whether temperatures at the upper limit of thermal tolerance stimulate or counteract ion regulatory capacities. Juvenile G. morhua were acclimated for 4 weeks to three CO2 levels (550, 1200, and 2200 μatm) covering present and near-future natural variability, at optimum (10°C) and summer maximum temperature (18°C), respectively. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed the subcellular localization of ion transporters, including Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (NKA), Na(+)/H(+)-exchanger 3 (NHE3), Na(+)/[Formula: see text] cotransporter (NBC1), pendrin-like Cl(-)/[Formula: see text] exchanger (SLC26a6), V-type H(+)-ATPase subunit a (VHA), and Cl(-) channel 3 (CLC3) in epithelial cells of the anterior intestine. At 10°C, proteins and mRNA were generally up-regulated for most transporters in the intestinal epithelium after acclimation to higher CO2 levels. This supports recent findings demonstrating increased intestinal [Formula: see text] secretion rates in response to CO2 induced seawater acidification. At 18°C, mRNA expression and protein concentrations of most ion transporters remained unchanged or were even decreased, suggesting thermal compensation. This response may be energetically favorable to retain blood [Formula: see text] levels to stabilize pHe, but may negatively affect intestinal salt and water resorption of marine teleosts in future oceans. PMID:27313538

  2. Temperature Modulates the Effects of Ocean Acidification on Intestinal Ion Transport in Atlantic Cod, Gadus morhua

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Marian Y.; Michael, Katharina; Kreiss, Cornelia M.; Stumpp, Meike; Dupont, Sam; Tseng, Yung-Che; Lucassen, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    CO2-driven seawater acidification has been demonstrated to enhance intestinal bicarbonate secretion rates in teleosts, leading to an increased release of CaCO3 under simulated ocean acidification scenarios. In this study, we investigated if increasing CO2 levels stimulate the intestinal acid–base regulatory machinery of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) and whether temperatures at the upper limit of thermal tolerance stimulate or counteract ion regulatory capacities. Juvenile G. morhua were acclimated for 4 weeks to three CO2 levels (550, 1200, and 2200 μatm) covering present and near-future natural variability, at optimum (10°C) and summer maximum temperature (18°C), respectively. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed the subcellular localization of ion transporters, including Na+/K+-ATPase (NKA), Na+/H+-exchanger 3 (NHE3), Na+/HCO3− cotransporter (NBC1), pendrin-like Cl−/HCO3− exchanger (SLC26a6), V-type H+-ATPase subunit a (VHA), and Cl− channel 3 (CLC3) in epithelial cells of the anterior intestine. At 10°C, proteins and mRNA were generally up-regulated for most transporters in the intestinal epithelium after acclimation to higher CO2 levels. This supports recent findings demonstrating increased intestinal HCO3− secretion rates in response to CO2 induced seawater acidification. At 18°C, mRNA expression and protein concentrations of most ion transporters remained unchanged or were even decreased, suggesting thermal compensation. This response may be energetically favorable to retain blood HCO3− levels to stabilize pHe, but may negatively affect intestinal salt and water resorption of marine teleosts in future oceans. PMID:27313538

  3. Numerical simulation of Typhoon Muifa (2011) using a Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) modeling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Na; Ling, Tiejun; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Yunfei; Gao, Zhiyi; Wang, Yi

    2015-04-01

    The newly developed Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) Modeling System is applied to investigate typhoon-ocean interactions in this study. The COAWST modeling system represents the state-of-the-art numerical simulation technique comprising several coupled models to study coastal and environmental processes. The modeling system is applied to simulate Typhoon Muifa (2011), which strengthened from a tropical storm to a super typhoon in the Northwestern Pacific, to explore the heat fluxes exchanged among the processes simulated using the atmosphere model WRF, ocean model ROMS and wave model SWAN. These three models adopted the same horizontal grid. Three numerical experiments with different coupling configurations are performed in order to investigate the impact of typhoon-ocean interaction on the intensity and ocean response to typhoon. The simulated typhoon tracks and intensities agree with observations. Comparisons of the simulated variables with available atmospheric and oceanic observations show the good performance of using the coupled modeling system for simulating the ocean and atmosphere processes during a typhoon event. The fully coupled simulation that includes a ocean model identifies a decreased SST as a result of the typhoon-forced entrainment. Typhoon intensity and wind speed are reduced due to the decrease of the sea surface temperature when using a coupled ocean model. The experiments with ocean coupled to atmosphere also results in decreased sea surface heat flux and air temperature. The heat flux decreases by about 29% compared to the WRF only case. The reduction of the energy induced by SST decreases, resulting in weakening of the typhoon. Coupling of the waves to the atmosphere and ocean model induces a slight increase of SST in the typhoon center area with the ocean-atmosphere interaction increased as a result of wave feedback to atmosphere.

  4. Understanding the Transport of Patagonian Dust and Its Influence on Marine Biological Activity in the South Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Matthew; Meskhidze, Nicholas; Kiliyanpilakkil, Praju; Gasso, Santiago

    2010-01-01

    Modeling and remote sensing techniques were applied to examine the horizontal and vertical transport pathways of Patagonian dust and quantify the effect of soluble-iron- laden mineral dust deposition on marine primary productivity in the South Atlantic Ocean (SAO) surface waters. The global chemistry transport model GEOS-Chem, implemented with an iron dissolution scheme, was applied to evaluate the atmospheric transport and deposition of mineral dust and bioavailable iron during two dust outbreaks originating in the source regions of Patagonia. In addition to this "rapidly released" iron, offline calculations were also carried out to estimate the amount of bioavailable iron leached during the residence time of dust in the ocean mixed layer. Model simulations showed that the horizontal and vertical transport pathways of Patagonian dust plumes were largely influenced by the synoptic meteorological patterns of high and low pressure systems. Model-predicted horizontal and vertical transport pathways of Patagonian dust over the SAO were in reasonable agreement with remotely-sensed data. Comparison between remotely-sensed and offline calculated ocean surface chlorophyll-a concentrations indicated that, for the two dust outbreaks examined in this study, the deposition of bioavailable iron in the SAO through atmospheric pathways was insignificant. As the two dust transport episodes examined here represent typical outflows of mineral dust from South American sources, our study suggests that the atmospheric deposition of mineral dust is unlikely to induce large scale marine primary productivity and carbon sequestration in the South Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean.

  5. Construction of the adjoint MIT ocean general circulation model and application to Atlantic heat transport sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marotzke, Jochem; Giering, Ralf; Zhang, Kate Q.; Stammer, Detlef; Hill, Chris; Lee, Tong

    1999-12-01

    We first describe the principles and practical considerations behind the computer generation of the adjoint to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology ocean general circulation model (GCM) using R. Giering's software tool Tangent-Linear and Adjoint Model Compiler (TAMC). The TAMC's recipe for (FORTRAN-) line-by-line generation of adjoint code is explained by interpreting an adjoint model strictly as the operator that gives the sensitivity of the output of a model to its input. Then, the sensitivity of 1993 annual mean heat transport across 29°N in the Atlantic, to the hydrography on January 1, 1993, is calculated from a global solution of the GCM. The "kinematic sensitivity" to initial temperature variations is isolated, showing how the latter would influence heat transport if they did not affect the density and hence the flow. Over 1 year the heat transport at 29°N is influenced kinematically from regions up to 20° upstream in the western boundary current and up to 5° upstream in the interior. In contrast, the dynamical influences of initial temperature (and salinity) perturbations spread from as far as the rim of the Labrador Sea to the 29°N section along the western boundary. The sensitivities calculated with the adjoint compare excellently to those from a perturbation calculation with the dynamical model. Perturbations in initial interior salinity influence meridional overturning and heat transport when they have propagated to the western boundary and can thus influence the integrated east-west density difference. Our results support the notion that boundary monitoring of meridional mass and heat transports is feasible.

  6. A mass-conserving advection scheme for offline simulation of scalar transport in coastal ocean models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillibrand, P. A.; Herzfeld, M.

    2016-05-01

    We present a flux-form semi-Lagrangian (FFSL) advection scheme designed for offline scalar transport simulation with coastal ocean models using curvilinear horizontal coordinates. The scheme conserves mass, overcoming problems of mass conservation typically experienced with offline transport models, and permits long time steps (relative to the Courant number) to be used by the offline model. These attributes make the method attractive for offline simulation of tracers in biogeochemical or sediment transport models using archived flow fields from hydrodynamic models. We describe the FFSL scheme, and test it on two idealised domains and one real domain, the Great Barrier Reef in Australia. For comparison, we also include simulations using a traditional semi-Lagrangian advection scheme for the offline simulations. We compare tracer distributions predicted by the offline FFSL transport scheme with those predicted by the original hydrodynamic model, assess the conservation of mass in all cases and contrast the computational efficiency of the schemes. We find that the FFSL scheme produced very good agreement with the distributions of tracer predicted by the hydrodynamic model, and conserved mass with an error of a fraction of one percent. In terms of computational speed, the FFSL scheme was comparable with the semi-Lagrangian method and an order of magnitude faster than the full hydrodynamic model, even when the latter ran in parallel on multiple cores. The FFSL scheme presented here therefore offers a viable mass-conserving and computationally-efficient alternative to traditional semi-Lagrangian schemes for offline scalar transport simulation in coastal models.

  7. Oceanic transports through the Solomon Sea: The bend of the New Guinea Coastal Undercurrent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasparin, Florent; Ganachaud, Alexandre; Maes, Christophe; Marin, Frédéric; Eldin, Gérard

    2012-08-01

    Thermocline waters of the tropical southwest Pacific can be traced back to the center of the South Pacific basin and have a potential influence on equatorial surface conditions and on the characteristics of the El Niño Southern Oscillation on decadal timescales. The Solomon Sea is traversed by this influential flow, and therefore is an optimal place for exploring this oceanic connection to the equator. From a high-resolution hydrographic survey at which we applied an inverse box model, we describe the main pathways at the entrance of the Solomon Sea, and more particularly the extremely sharp bend of the western boundary current around the south-east tip of Papua New Guinea. Of the 30 Sv subtropical waters transported into the Coral Sea from the east, above 1300 m, 29 ± 5 Sv makes its way through the Solomon Sea with a large part transported in a boundary current, at the entrance of the Solomon Sea. Around the south-east tip of Papua New Guinea, the Gulf of Papua Current turns abruptly to the north, in a very sharp bend as it merges into the New Guinea Coastal Undercurrent, on its way, toward the equator. The warm currents transport large amounts of internal energy, with a total of 1.0 ± 0.3 1015W entering the Solomon Sea from the south.

  8. Airborne dust transport to the eastern Pacific Ocean off southern California: Evidence from San Clemente Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhs, Daniel R.; Budahn, James; Reheis, Marith; Beann, Jossh; Skipp, Gary; Fisher, Eric

    2007-07-01

    Islands are natural dust traps, and San Clemente Island, California, is a good example. Soils on marine terraces cut into Miocene andesite on this island are clay-rich Vertisols or Alfisols with vertic properties. These soils are overlain by silt-rich mantles, 5-20 cm thick, that contrast sharply with the underlying clay-rich subsoils. The silt mantles have a mineralogy that is distinct from the island bedrock. Silt mantles are rich in quartz, which is rare in the island andesite. The clay fraction of the silt mantles is dominated by mica, also absent from local andesite, and contrasts with the subsoils, dominated by smectite. Ternary plots of immobile trace elements (Sc-Th-La and Ta-Nd-Cr) show that the island andesite has a composition intermediate between average upper continental crust and average oceanic crust. In contrast, the silt and, to a lesser extent, clay fractions of the silt mantles have compositions closer to average upper continental crust. The silt mantles have particle size distributions similar to loess and Mojave Desert dust, but are coarser than long-range-transported Asian dust. We infer from these observations that the silt mantles are derived from airborne dust from the North American mainland, probably river valleys in the coastal mountains of southern California and/or the Mojave Desert. Although average winds are from the northwest in coastal California, easterly winds occur numerous times of the year when "Santa Ana" conditions prevail, caused by a high-pressure cell centered over the Great Basin. Examination of satellite imagery shows that easterly Santa Ana winds carry abundant dust to the eastern Pacific Ocean and the California Channel Islands. Airborne dust from mainland North America may be an important component of the offshore sediment budget in the easternmost Pacific Ocean, a finding of potential biogeochemical and climatic significance.

  9. Airborne dust transport to the eastern Pacific Ocean off southern California: Evidence from San Clemente Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhs, D.R.; Budahn, J.; Reheis, M.; Beann, J.; Skipp, G.; Fisher, E.

    2007-01-01

    Islands are natural dust traps, and San Clemente Island, California, is a good example. Soils on marine terraces cut into Miocene andesite on this island are clay-rich Vertisols or Alfisols with vertic properties. These soils are overlain by silt-rich mantles, 5-20 cm thick, that contrast sharply with the underlying clay-rich subsoils. The silt mantles have a mineralogy that is distinct from the island bedrock. Silt mantles are rich in quartz, which is rare in the island andesite. The clay fraction of the silt mantles is dominated by mica, also absent from local andesite, and contrasts with the subsoils, dominated by smectite. Ternary plots of immobile trace elements (Sc-Th-La and Ta-Nd-Cr) show that the island andesite has a composition intermediate between average upper continental crust and average oceanic crust. In contrast, the silt and, to a lesser extent, clay fractions of the silt mantles have compositions closer to average upper continental crust. The silt mantles have particle size distributions similar to loess and Mojave Desert dust, but are coarser than long-range-transported Asian dust. We infer from these observations that the silt mantles are derived from airborne dust from the North American mainland, probably river valleys in the coastal mountains of southern California and/or the Mojave Desert. Although average winds are from the northwest in coastal California, easterly winds occur numerous times of the year when "Santa Ana" conditions prevail, caused by a high-pressure cell centered over the Great Basin. Examination of satellite imagery shows that easterly Santa Ana winds carry abundant dust to the eastern Pacific Ocean and the California Channel Islands. Airborne dust from mainland North America may be an important component of the offshore sediment budget in the easternmost Pacific Ocean, a finding of potential biogeochemical and climatic significance.

  10. Development of a Coupled Ocean-Hydrologic Model to Simulate Pollutant Transport in Singapore Coastal Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chua, V. P.

    2015-12-01

    Intensive agricultural, economic and industrial activities in Singapore and Malaysia have made our coastal areas under high risk of water pollution. A coupled ocean-hydrologic model is employed to perform three-dimensional simulations of flow and pollutant transport in Singapore coastal waters. The hydrologic SWAT model is coupled with the coastal ocean SUNTANS model by outputting streamflow and pollutant concentrations from the SWAT model and using them as inputs for the SUNTANS model at common boundary points. The coupled model is calibrated with observed sea surface elevations and velocities, and high correlation coefficients that exceed 0.97 and 0.91 are found for sea surface elevations and velocities, respectively. The pollutants are modeled as Gaussian passive tracers, and are released at five upstream locations in Singapore coastal waters. During the Northeast monsoon, pollutants released in Source 1 (Johor River), Source 2 (Tiram River), Source 3 (Layang River) and Source 4 (Layau River) enter the Singapore Strait after 4 days of release and reach Sentosa Island within 9 days. Meanwhile, pollutants released in Source 5 (Kallang River) reach Sentosa Island after 4 days. During the Southwest monsoon, the dispersion time is roughly doubled, with pollutants from Sources 1 - 4 entering the Singapore Strait only after 12 days of release due to weak currents.

  11. Atmospheric Chemistry Transport Modeling of Organic Nitrogen Input to the Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, A.; Lin, G.; Penner, J. E.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric deposition of reactive nitrogen (N) species from air pollutants is a significant source of exogenous nitrogen in marine ecosystems. Here we use an atmospheric chemical transport model to investigate the supply of soluble organic nitrogen (ON) from anthropogenic sources to the ocean. Comparisons of modeled deposition with observations at coastal and marine locations show good overall agreement for inorganic nitrogen and total soluble nitrogen, but significant underestimates for soluble ON when we include the primary soluble ON from combustion sources and the secondary carbon-containing oxidized N in gases and aerosols. The model results suggest that including the secondary carbon-containing reduced N in aerosols contributes to a better predictive capability of the deposition rates. The model results show a clear distinction in the vertical distribution of soluble ON in aerosols between different processes from the primary sources and the secondary formation. The model results (excluding the biomass burning and natural emission changes) suggest an increase in soluble ON outflow from atmospheric pollution, in particular from East Asia, to the oceans in the twentieth century. These results highlight the necessity of improving the process-based quantitative understanding of the chemical reactions of inorganic nitrogen species with organics in aerosol and cloud water.

  12. Modeled natural and excess radiocarbon: Sensitivities to the gas exchange formulation and ocean transport strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, S. A.; Joos, F.; Plattner, G.-K.; Edwards, N. R.; Stocker, T. F.

    2008-09-01

    Observation-based surface ocean Δ14C distributions and regional inventories for excess, bomb-produced radiocarbon are compared with results of two ocean models of intermediate complexity. By applying current descriptions of the air-sea gas exchange the models produce similar column inventories for excess 14C among all basins. This result is robust across a wide range of transport parameter settings, but inconsistent with data-based inventories. In the absence of evidence of fundamentally different gas exchange mechanisms in the North Atlantic than in the other basins, we infer regional North Atlantic 14C inventories which are considerably smaller than previous estimates. The results further suggest that the gas exchange velocity field should be reduced by (19 ± 16)%, which corresponds to a global mean air-sea gas transfer rate for CO2 in seawater of 17.1 ± 3.3 cm h-1, to find good agreement of simulated quantities with a range of data-based metrics.

  13. Impact of ocean heat transport variations on the zonal mean circulation in an idealized moist GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischoff, T.; Schneider, T.

    2012-12-01

    We study how equatorial surface heat sources affect the strength and width of the Hadley circulation to elucidate the dynamics of tropical-extratropical interactions. The well-known atmospheric response to El Niño-like forcings includes an equatorward shift in the Hadley circulation terminus and the subtropical jets. One proposed mechanisms for this response involves changes in subtropical baroclinicity and associated equatorward shifts in critical latitudes. Here we use an idealized aquaplanet general circulation model with a hydrological cycle and a time-independent, zonally symmetric background ocean heat transport to investigate systematically how the zonal mean climate responds to imposed equatorial ocean heating anomalies. This approach allows for dynamically adjusted surface temperatures and closed surface energy budgets. We study the sensitivity to the equatorial heating anomalies for different imposed longwave optical thickness profiles representing cold, Earth-like and warm climates. Consistent with previous studies, we find a shift of the Hadley circulation terminus towards the equator and a concomitant increase in subtropical baroclinicity for equatorial warming, and vice versa for an equatorial cooling. Together with the Hadley circulation terminus, the subtropical jets, regions of poleward eddy momentum and heat fluxes as well as storm tracks, shift towards (away from) the equator for simulations with imposed equatorial warming (cooling). We account for the circulation response with theoretical arguments for the structure of baroclinic eddies.

  14. Data assimilation technique of 2-dimensional vertical temperature transport model (Case study: Tropical Pacific Ocean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurfitri, Suliskania; Putri, Mutiara Rachmat

    2015-09-01

    Data assimilation technique was applied into 2-dimensional vertical temperature transport model to improve temperature results especially at thermocline layer that have large change toward depth. The simple case experiment only applies on baroclinic condition in Tropical Pacific Ocean (2°N and 137°E - 140°W). Model simulation was running for 2 years from January 1st 2011 to December 31st 2012 from surface to 500 m depth and verified to observation data from TAO (Tropical Atmosphere Ocean) at 3 locations, 147°E, 165°E, and 170°W. Data assimilation procedure which applied at 3 locations (156°E, 180°W, and 155°W) using Cressman analysis technique can reduce model's RMSE (Root Mean Square Error) toward depth until 55,7% and toward time until 64,5%. The largest error of model was found at 200 m depth, while the smallest found at the surface and 500 m depth.

  15. Southern Ocean albedo, inter-hemispheric energy transports and the double ITCZ: global impacts of biases in a coupled model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawcroft, Matt; Haywood, Jim M.; Collins, Mat; Jones, Andy; Jones, Anthony C.; Stephens, Graeme

    2016-06-01

    A causal link has been invoked between inter-hemispheric albedo, cross-equatorial energy transport and the double-Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) bias in climate models. Southern Ocean cloud biases are a major determinant of inter-hemispheric albedo biases in many models, including HadGEM2-ES, a fully coupled model with a dynamical ocean. In this study, targeted albedo corrections are applied in the Southern Ocean to explore the dynamical response to artificially reducing these biases. The Southern Hemisphere jet increases in strength in response to the increased tropical-extratropical temperature gradient, with increased energy transport into the mid-latitudes in the atmosphere, but no improvement is observed in the double-ITCZ bias or atmospheric cross-equatorial energy transport, a finding which supports other recent work. The majority of the adjustment in energy transport in the tropics is achieved in the ocean, with the response further limited to the Pacific Ocean. As a result, the frequently argued teleconnection between the Southern Ocean and tropical precipitation biases is muted. Further experiments in which tropical longwave biases are also reduced do not yield improvement in the representation of the tropical atmosphere. These results suggest that the dramatic improvements in tropical precipitation that have been shown in previous studies may be a function of the lack of dynamical ocean and/or the simplified hemispheric albedo bias corrections applied in that work. It further suggests that efforts to correct the double ITCZ problem in coupled models that focus on large-scale energetic controls will prove fruitless without improvements in the representation of atmospheric processes.

  16. A modeling study to explore on-shelf transport of oceanic zooplankton in the Eastern Bering Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, G. A.; Coyle, K. O.; Hedstrom, K.; Curchitser, E. N.

    2013-07-01

    The Eastern Bering Sea shelf is divided into distinct hydrographic domains by structural fronts. Despite frontal obstructions to cross-shelf transport, each year large oceanic copepods—primarily Neocalanus spp.—are known to dominate the biomass of the outer-shelf zooplankton communities, and in some years are advected into the middle-shelf domain. Using ROMS (the Regional Ocean Modeling System), coupled with a float tracking model designed to represent ontogenetic vertical migration behavior of Neocalanus, we explored the mechanisms, timing, and location of the transport of oceanic zooplankton onto the eastern Bering Sea shelf from overwintering sources along the Gulf of Alaska and Bering Sea shelf breaks, under a variety of environmental conditions. Our float tracking experiments suggest that the timing of on-shelf transport and the distribution of oceanic zooplankton on the shelf can vary substantially between one year and another. The Bering, Pribilof, and Zhemchug Canyons and Cape Navarin were all regions of elevated on-shelf float transport. Wind direction was the primary factor controlling inter-annual variability in the timing, amount, and location of the on-shelf transport of our Neocalanus floats. Float transport across the northern and southern shelves responded in opposite directions to inter-annual differences in wind forcing: southeasterly wind enhanced on-shelf transport of the Neocalanus floats along the southern shelf but suppressed on-shelf transport over the northern shelf. Conversely, northwesterly wind suppressed on-shelf zooplankton transport onto the southern shelf but promoted enhanced transport around Cape Navarin on the northern shelf. Transport of the Neocalanus floats onto the shelf can be very episodic, reflecting the short duration of winds that promote on-shelf transport. Relatively short (days to weeks) periods of southeasterly wind between March and April significantly impacted the number of floats transported onto the shelf. The

  17. The Impact of Multidecadal NAO Variations on Atlantic Ocean Heat Transport and Rapid Changes in Arctic Sea Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, F. J.; Delworth, T. L.

    2015-12-01

    The Arctic and North Atlantic have experienced pronounced changes over the 20th and early 21st centuries, including a rapid loss of Arctic sea ice over the last several decades and prominent multidecadal variability in both ocean temperatures and sea ice. Here we use suites of climate model simulations to probe some of the factors responsible for the multidecadal variability in the Atlantic/Arctic system. We show that multidecadal fluctuations of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) induce multidecadal fluctuations of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). A positive phase of the NAO is associated with strengthened westerly winds over the North Atlantic. These winds extract more heat than normal from the subpolar ocean, thereby increasing upper ocean density, deepwater formation, and the strength of the AMOC and associated poleward ocean heat transport. In model simulations the observed negative phase of the NAO in the 1960s and 1970s led to a weaker than normal AMOC, reduced poleward ocean heat transport, a cold North Atlantic, and an increase in Arctic sea ice extent in both winter and summer. The NAO strengthened from the 1970s to the mid 1990s, leading to an increase of the AMOC and a warming of the North Atlantic. The increased heat transport extended throughout the North Atlantic, into the Barents Sea, and finally into the Arctic, contributing to a rapid reduction of sea ice in the 1990s through the 2000s. Feedbacks involving shortwave radiation are an important component of the overall changes. In these model simulations as much as 1/3 of the recent reduction of Arctic sea ice is associated with the NAO-induced AMOC and heat transport increase. Since the mid 1990s the NAO has changed from a strong positive phase to a more neutral phase. In our model simulations this weakens the AMOC and poleward ocean heat transport, and diminishes the contribution of ocean heat transport to the reduction of Arctic sea ice extent. Considered in isolation

  18. Seasonal cycle of volume transport through Kerama Gap revealed by a 20-year global HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model reanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhitao; Metzger, E. Joseph; Thoppil, Prasad; Hurlburt, Harley E.; Zamudio, Luis; Smedstad, Ole Martin; Na, Hanna; Nakamura, Hirohiko; Park, Jae-Hun

    2015-12-01

    The temporal variability of volume transport from the North Pacific Ocean to the East China Sea (ECS) through Kerama Gap (between Okinawa Island and Miyakojima Island - a part of Ryukyu Islands Arc) is investigated using a 20-year global HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) reanalysis with the Navy Coupled Ocean Data Assimilation from 1993 to 2012. The HYCOM mean transport is 2.1 Sv (positive into the ECS, 1 Sv = 106 m3/s) from June 2009 to June 2011, in good agreement with the observed 2.0 Sv transport during the same period. This is similar to the 20-year mean Kerama Gap transport of 1.95 ± 4.0 Sv. The 20-year monthly mean volume transport (transport seasonal cycle) is maximum in October (3.0 Sv) and minimum in November (0.5 Sv). The annual variation component (345-400 days), mesoscale eddy component (70-345 days), and Kuroshio meander component (< 70 days) are separated to determine their contributions to the transport seasonal cycle. The annual variation component has a close relation with the local wind field and increases (decreases) transport into the ECS through Kerama Gap in summer (winter). Most of the variations in the transport seasonal cycle come from the mesoscale eddy component. The impinging mesoscale eddies increase the transport into the ECS during January, February, May, and October, and decrease it in March, April, November, and December, but have little effect in summer (June-September). The Kuroshio meander components cause smaller transport variations in summer than in winter.

  19. Backward-in-time methods to simulate large-scale transport and mixing in the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prants, S. V.

    2015-06-01

    In oceanography and meteorology, it is important to know not only where water or air masses are headed for, but also where they came from as well. For example, it is important to find unknown sources of oil spills in the ocean and of dangerous substance plumes in the atmosphere. It is impossible with the help of conventional ocean and atmospheric numerical circulation models to extrapolate backward from the observed plumes to find the source because those models cannot be reversed in time. We review here recently elaborated backward-in-time numerical methods to identify and study mesoscale eddies in the ocean and to compute where those waters came from to a given area. The area under study is populated with a large number of artificial tracers that are advected backward in time in a given velocity field that is supposed to be known analytically or numerically, or from satellite and radar measurements. After integrating advection equations, one gets positions of each tracer on a fixed day in the past and can identify from known destinations a particle positions at earlier times. The results provided show that the method is efficient, for example, in estimating probabilities to find increased concentrations of radionuclides and other pollutants in oceanic mesoscale eddies. The backward-in-time methods are illustrated in this paper with a few examples. Backward-in-time Lagrangian maps are applied to identify eddies in satellite-derived and numerically generated velocity fields and to document the pathways by which they exchange water with their surroundings. Backward-in-time trapping maps are used to identify mesoscale eddies in the altimetric velocity field with a risk to be contaminated by Fukushima-derived radionuclides. The results of simulations are compared with in situ mesurement of caesium concentration in sea water samples collected in a recent research vessel cruise in the area to the east of Japan. Backward-in-time latitudinal maps and the corresponding

  20. Ocean-atmosphere dynamics during Hurricane Ida and Nor'Ida: An application of the coupled ocean-atmosphere-wave-sediment transport (COAWST) modeling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olabarrieta, Maitane; Warner, John C.; Armstrong, Brandy; Zambon, Joseph B.; He, Ruoying

    The coupled ocean-atmosphere-wave-sediment transport (COAWST) modeling system was used to investigate atmosphere-ocean-wave interactions in November 2009 during Hurricane Ida and its subsequent evolution to Nor'Ida, which was one of the most costly storm systems of the past two decades. One interesting aspect of this event is that it included two unique atmospheric extreme conditions, a hurricane and a nor'easter storm, which developed in regions with different oceanographic characteristics. Our modeled results were compared with several data sources, including GOES satellite infrared data, JASON-1 and JASON-2 altimeter data, CODAR measurements, and wave and tidal information from the National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) and the National Tidal Database. By performing a series of numerical runs, we were able to isolate the effect of the interaction terms between the atmosphere (modeled with Weather Research and Forecasting, the WRF model), the ocean (modeled with Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS)), and the wave propagation and generation model (modeled with Simulating Waves Nearshore (SWAN)). Special attention was given to the role of the ocean surface roughness. Three different ocean roughness closure models were analyzed: DGHQ (which is based on wave age), TY2001 (which is based on wave steepness), and OOST (which considers both the effects of wave age and steepness). Including the ocean roughness in the atmospheric module improved the wind intensity estimation and therefore also the wind waves, surface currents, and storm surge amplitude. For example, during the passage of Hurricane Ida through the Gulf of Mexico, the wind speeds were reduced due to wave-induced ocean roughness, resulting in better agreement with the measured winds. During Nor'Ida, including the wave-induced surface roughness changed the form and dimension of the main low pressure cell, affecting the intensity and direction of the winds. The combined wave age- and wave steepness

  1. Low Order Uncertainty Dynamics in Ocean State Estimation: Reduced Hessian Method for Constraining Barotropic Drake Passage Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalmikov, A.; Heimbach, P.; Wunsch, C. I.

    2015-12-01

    Uncertainty Quantification (UQ) is of central practical and theoretical importance in Ocean State Estimation, enabling estimation of error bounds of model outputs as well as new dynamical insight by analyzing information propagation in ocean models. Key effort in developing UQ techniques applicable to realistic large scale ocean models is numerical scalability for high dimensionality imposed by high resolution discretization of infinite dimensional PDEs governing ocean dynamics. This scalability requirement conflicts with the "curse of dimensionality" restricting current non-Gaussian UQ approaches to low dimensional idealized problems. On the other hand, practical progress in large scale UQ was enabled by Hessian-based methodologies, relying on a Gaussian approximation of the nonlinear state-space statistics. Validity of this approximation is rooted in the experience that for many large scale ocean problems the dynamics are smooth and not chaotic, supported by the expectation that small scale turbulence cancels out in aggregate converging to asymptotic normality on the large scale. Here, the dynamics of large scale uncertainty is addressed directly by explicit analysis of propagation of assimilated information in a global ocean model. It is demonstrated that for the case of barotropic Drake Passage transport separate uncertainty propagation mechanisms can be identified on small and large scales, with aggregate balances governed by simple low order dynamics. Reduced order Hessian is derived to approximate the dominant uncertainty evolution patterns, explaining the physical mechanisms of uncertainty propagation and reduction in a global ocean model.

  2. Aerosol transport over the Andes from the Amazon Basin to the remote Pacific Ocean: A multiyear CALIOP assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgeois, Quentin; Ekman, Annica M. L.; Krejci, Radovan

    2015-08-01

    Six years (2007-2012) of data from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) satellite instrument were used to investigate the vertical distribution and transport of aerosols over the tropical South American continent and the southeast Pacific Ocean. The multiyear aerosol extinction assessment indicates that aerosols, mainly biomass burning particles emitted during the dry season in the Amazon Basin, are lifted in significant amounts over the Andes. The aerosols are mainly transported in the planetary boundary layer between the surface and 2 km altitude with an aerosol extinction maximum near the surface. During the transport toward the Andes, the aerosol extinction decreases at a rate of 0.02 km-1 per kilometer of altitude likely due to dilution and deposition processes. Aerosols reaching the top of the Andes, at altitudes typically between 4 and 5 km, are entrained into the free troposphere (FT) over the southeast Pacific Ocean. A comparison between CALIOP observations and ERA-Interim reanalysis data indicates that during their long-range transport over the tropical Pacific Ocean, these aerosols are slowly transported toward the marine boundary layer by the large-scale subsidence at a rate of 0.4 cm s-1. The observed vertical/horizontal transport ratio is 0.7-0.8 m km-1. Continental aerosols linked to transport over the Andes can be traced on average over 4000 km away from the continent indicating an aerosol residence time of 8-9 days in the FT over the Pacific Ocean. The FT aerosol optical depth (AOD) above the Pacific Ocean near South American coast accounts on average for 6% and 25% of the total AOD during the season of low and high biomass burning, respectively. This result shows that, during the biomass burning season, continental aerosols largely influence the AOD over the remote southeast Pacific Ocean. Overall, FT AOD decrease exponentially with the distance to continental sources at a rate of about 10% per degree of longitude over the

  3. Meridional overturning transports at 30°S in the Indian and Pacific Oceans in 2002-2003 and 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Guerra, Alonso; Talley, Lynne D.

    2016-08-01

    The meridional circulation and transports at 30°S in the Pacific and Indian Oceans for the years 2002-2003 and 2009 are compared, using GO-SHIP hydrographic section data with an inverse box model and several choices of constraints. Southward heat transport across the combined Indian-Pacific sections, reflecting net heating north of these sections, doubled from -0.7 ± 0.2 PW in 2002-2003 to -1.4 ± 0.1 PW in 2009 (negative sign is southward), with the increase concentrated in the Indian Ocean (∼0.6 PW compared with ∼0.2 PW in the Pacific), and was insensitive to model choices for the Indonesian Throughflow. Diagnosed net evaporation also more than doubled in the Indian Ocean, from 0.21-0.27 Sv in 2002-2003 to 0.51-0.58 in 2009, with a smaller but significant increase in net evaporation in the Pacific, from 0.06-0.08 Sv to 0.16-0.32 Sv. These increased heat and freshwater exports coincided with Indian Ocean warming, a shift in the Indian's shallow gyre overturning transport to lower densities, and an increase in southward Agulhas Current transport from 75 Sv in 2002 to 92 Sv in 2009. The Indian's deep overturn weakened from about 11 Sv in 2002 to 7 Sv in 2009. In contrast, the Pacific Ocean overturning circulation was nearly unchanged from 2003 to 2009, independent of model within the uncertainties. The East Australian Current transport decreased only slightly, from -52 Sv to -46 Sv. The southward Pacific Deep Water transport was at a higher density than the southward Indian Deep Water transport in both years and all models, similar to prior results. Estimated diapycnal diffusivity and velocity are strongly enhanced near the ocean bottom and are higher farther up in the water column in the Indian than in the Pacific, likely extending the reach of Indian Ocean overturning up to shallower depths than in the Pacific. The horizontal distribution of transports in the Pacific at all depths changed notably from 2003 to 2009, despite the stability of its meridional

  4. Short Communication: Atmospheric moisture transport, the bridge between ocean evaporation and Arctic ice melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimeno, L.; Vázquez, M.; Nieto, R.; Trigo, R. M.

    2015-06-01

    If we could choose a region where the effects of global warming are likely to be pronounced and considerable, and at the same time one where the changes could affect the global climate in similarly asymmetric way with respect to other regions, this would unequivocally be the Arctic. The atmospheric branch of the hydrological cycle lies behind the linkages between the Arctic system and the global climate. Changes in the atmospheric moisture transport have been proposed as a vehicle for interpreting the most significant changes in the Arctic region. This is because the transport of moisture from the extratropical regions to the Arctic has increased in recent decades, and is expected to increase within a warming climate. This increase could be due either to changes in circulation patterns which have altered the moisture sources, or to changes in the intensity of the moisture sources because of enhanced evaporation, or a combination of these two mechanisms. In this short communication we focus on the assessing more objectively the strong link between ocean evaporation trends and Arctic Sea ice melting. We will critically analyze several recent results suggesting links between moisture transport and the extent of sea-ice in the Arctic, this being one of the most distinct indicators of continuous climate change both in the Arctic and on a global scale. To do this we will use a sophisticated Lagrangian approach to develop a more robust framework on some of these previous disconnect ng results, using new information and insights. Among the many mechanisms that could be involved are hydrological (increased Arctic river discharges), radiative (increase of cloud cover and water vapour) and meteorological (increase in summer storms crossing the Arctic, or increments in precipitation).

  5. Dust transport and deposition observed from the Terra-Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) spacecraft over the Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Y. J.; Koren, I.; Remer, L. A.; Tanré, D.; Ginoux, P.; Fan, S.

    2005-05-01

    Meteorological observations, in situ data, and satellite images of dust episodes were used already in the 1970s to estimate that 100 Tg of dust are transported from Africa over the Atlantic Ocean every year between June and August and are deposited in the Atlantic Ocean and the Americas. Desert dust is a main source of nutrients to oceanic biota and the Amazon forest, but it deteriorates air quality, as shown for Florida. Dust affects the Earth radiation budget, thus participating in climate change and feedback mechanisms. There is an urgent need for new tools for quantitative evaluation of the dust distribution, transport, and deposition. The Terra spacecraft, launched at the dawn of the last millennium, provides the first systematic well-calibrated multispectral measurements from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument for daily global analysis of aerosol. MODIS data are used here to distinguish dust from smoke and maritime aerosols and to evaluate the African dust column concentration, transport, and deposition. We found that 240 ± 80 Tg of dust are transported annually from Africa to the Atlantic Ocean, 140 ± 40 Tg are deposited in the Atlantic Ocean, 50 Tg fertilize the Amazon Basin (four times as previous estimates, thus explaining a paradox regarding the source of nutrition to the Amazon forest), 50 Tg reach the Caribbean, and 20 Tg return to Africa and Europe. The results are compared favorably with dust transport models for maximum particle diameter between 6 and 12 μm. This study is a first example of quantitative use of MODIS aerosol for a geophysical research.

  6. Distal transport of dissolved hydrothermal iron in the deep South Pacific Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Fitzsimmons, Jessica N.; Boyle, Edward A.; Jenkins, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, hydrothermal vents were not considered to be an important source to the marine dissolved Fe (dFe) inventory because hydrothermal Fe was believed to precipitate quantitatively near the vent site. Based on recent abyssal dFe enrichments near hydrothermal vents, however, the leaky vent hypothesis [Toner BM, et al. (2012) Oceanography 25(1):209–212] argues that some hydrothermal Fe persists in the dissolved phase and contributes a significant flux of dFe to the global ocean. We show here the first, to our knowledge, dFe (<0.4 µm) measurements from the abyssal southeast and southwest Pacific Ocean, where dFe of 1.0–1.5 nmol/kg near 2,000 m depth (0.4–0.9 nmol/kg above typical deep-sea dFe concentrations) was determined to be hydrothermally derived based on its correlation with primordial 3He and dissolved Mn (dFe:3He of 0.9–2.7 × 106). Given the known sites of hydrothermal venting in these regions, this dFe must have been transported thousands of kilometers away from its vent site to reach our sampling stations. Additionally, changes in the size partitioning of the hydrothermal dFe between soluble (<0.02 µm) and colloidal (0.02–0.4 µm) phases with increasing distance from the vents indicate that dFe transformations continue to occur far from the vent source. This study confirms that although the southern East Pacific Rise only leaks 0.02–1% of total Fe vented into the abyssal Pacific, this dFe persists thousands of kilometers away from the vent source with sufficient magnitude that hydrothermal vents can have far-field effects on global dFe distributions and inventories (≥3% of global aerosol dFe input). PMID:25349389

  7. Distal transport of dissolved hydrothermal iron in the deep South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzsimmons, Jessica N.; Boyle, Edward A.; Jenkins, William J.

    2014-11-01

    Until recently, hydrothermal vents were not considered to be an important source to the marine dissolved Fe (dFe) inventory because hydrothermal Fe was believed to precipitate quantitatively near the vent site. Based on recent abyssal dFe enrichments near hydrothermal vents, however, the leaky vent hypothesis [Toner BM, et al. (2012) Oceanography 25(1):209-212] argues that some hydrothermal Fe persists in the dissolved phase and contributes a significant flux of dFe to the global ocean. We show here the first, to our knowledge, dFe (<0.4 µm) measurements from the abyssal southeast and southwest Pacific Ocean, where dFe of 1.0-1.5 nmol/kg near 2,000 m depth (0.4-0.9 nmol/kg above typical deep-sea dFe concentrations) was determined to be hydrothermally derived based on its correlation with primordial 3He and dissolved Mn (dFe:3He of 0.9-2.7 × 106). Given the known sites of hydrothermal venting in these regions, this dFe must have been transported thousands of kilometers away from its vent site to reach our sampling stations. Additionally, changes in the size partitioning of the hydrothermal dFe between soluble (<0.02 µm) and colloidal (0.02-0.4 µm) phases with increasing distance from the vents indicate that dFe transformations continue to occur far from the vent source. This study confirms that although the southern East Pacific Rise only leaks 0.02-1% of total Fe vented into the abyssal Pacific, this dFe persists thousands of kilometers away from the vent source with sufficient magnitude that hydrothermal vents can have far-field effects on global dFe distributions and inventories (≥3% of global aerosol dFe input).

  8. Suspended particulate loads and transports in the nepheloid layer of the abyssal Atlantic Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Biscaye, P.E.; Eittreim, S.L.

    1977-01-01

    Vertical profiles of light scattering from over 1000 L-DGO nephelometer stations in the Atlantic Ocean have been used to calculate mass concentrations of suspended particles based on a calibration from the western North American Basin. From these data are plotted the distributions of particulate concentrations at clear water and in the more turbid near-bottom water. Clear water is the broad minimum in concentration and light scattering that occurs at varying mid-depths in the water column. Concentrations at clear water are as much as one-to-two orders of magnitude lower than those in surface water but still reflect a similar geographic distribution: relatively higher concentrations at ocean margins, especially underneath upwelling areas, and the lowest concentrations underneath central gyre areas. These distributions within the clear water reflect surface-water biogenic productivity, lateral injection of particles from shelf areas and surface circulation patterns and require that the combination of downward vertical and horizontal transport processes of particles retain this pattern throughout the upper water column. Below clear water, the distribution of standing crops of suspended particulate concentrations in the lower water column are presented. The integration of mass of all particles per unit area (gross particulate standing crop) reflects a relative distribution similar to that at the surface and at clear water levels, superimposed on which is the strong imprint of boundary currents along the western margins of the Atlantic. Reducing the gross particulate standing crop by the integral of the concentration of clear water yields a net particulate standing crop. The distribution of this reflects primarily the interaction of circulating abyssal waters with the ocean bottom, i.e. a strong nepheloid layer which is coincident with western boundary currents and which diminishes in intensity equatorward. The resuspended particulate loads in the nepheloid layer of the

  9. Splitting of Atlantic water transport towards the Arctic Ocean into the Fram Strait and Barents Sea Branches - mechanisms and consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beszczynska-Möller, Agnieszka; Skagseth, Øystein; von Appen, Wilken-Jon; Walczowski, Waldemar; Lien, Vidar

    2016-04-01

    The heat content in the Arctic Ocean is to a large extent determined by oceanic advection from the south. During the last two decades the extraordinary warm Atlantic water (AW) inflow has been reported to progress through the Nordic Seas into the Arctic Ocean. Warm anomalies can result from higher air temperatures (smaller heat loss) in the Nordic Seas, and/or from an increased oceanic advection. But the ultimate fate of warm anomalies of Atlantic origin depends strongly on their two possible pathways towards the Arctic Ocean. The AW temperature changes from 7-10°C at the entrance to the Nordic Seas, to 6-6.5°C in the Barents Sea opening and 3-3.5°C as the AW leaving Fram Strait enters the Arctic Ocean. When AW passes through the shallow Barents Sea, nearly all its heat is lost due to atmospheric cooling and AW looses its signature. In the deep Fram Strait the upper part of Atlantic water becomes transformed into a less saline and colder surface layer and thus AW preserves its warm core. A significant warming and high variability of AW volume transport was observed in two recent decades in the West Spitsbergen Current, representing the Fram Strait Branch of Atlantic inflow. The AW inflow through Fram Strait carries between 26 and 50 TW of heat into the Arctic Ocean. While the oceanic heat influx to the Barents Sea is of a similar order, the heat leaving it through the northern exit into the Arctic Ocean is negligible. The relative strength of two Atlantic water branches through Fram Strait and the Barents Sea governs the oceanic heat transport into the Arctic Ocean. According to recently proposed mechanism, the Atlantic water flow in the Barents Sea Branch is controlled by the strength of atmospheric low over the northern Barents Sea, acting through a wind-induced Ekman divergence, which intensifies eastward AW flow. The Atlantic water transport in the Fram Strait Branch is mainly forced by the large-scale low-pressure system over the eastern Norwegian and

  10. 77 FR 22625 - Intermediary Lending Pilot (ILP) Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-16

    ...The U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) requests that eligible organizations submit applications to become Intermediary Lending Pilot (ILP) Intermediaries. SBA will select up to 20 applicants to participate in the ILP program and receive direct loans of up to $1,000,000 each. ILP Intermediaries must use the ILP Loan funds to make loans of up to $200,000 to startup, newly established, or......

  11. On the Sensitivity of Atmospheric Model Implied Ocean Heat Transport to the Dominant Terms of the Surface Energy Balance

    SciTech Connect

    Gleckler, P J

    2004-11-03

    The oceanic meridional heat transport (T{sub o}) implied by an atmospheric General Circulation Model (GCM) can help evaluate a model's readiness for coupling with an ocean GCM. In this study we examine the T{sub o} from benchmark experiments of the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project, and evaluate the sensitivity of T{sub o} to the dominant terms of the surface energy balance. The implied global ocean TO in the Southern Hemisphere of many models is equatorward, contrary to most observationally-based estimates. By constructing a hybrid (model corrected by observations) T{sub o}, an earlier study demonstrated that the implied heat transport is critically sensitive to the simulated shortwave cloud radiative effects, which have been argued to be principally responsible for the Southern Hemisphere problem. Systematic evaluation of one model in a later study suggested that the implied T{sub o} could be equally as sensitive to a model's ocean surface latent heat flux. In this study we revisit the problem with more recent simulations, making use of estimates of ocean surface fluxes to construct two additional hybrid calculations. The results of the present study demonstrate that indeed the implied T{sub o} of an atmospheric model is very sensitive to problems in not only the surface net shortwave, but the latent heat flux as well. Many models underestimate the shortwave radiation reaching the surface in the low latitudes, and overestimate the latent heat flux in the same region. The additional hybrid transport calculations introduced here could become useful model diagnostic tests as estimates of implied ocean surface fluxes are improved.

  12. Understanding the transport of Patagonian dust and its influence on marine biological activity in the South Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, M. S.; Meskhidze, N.; Kiliyanpilakkil, V. P.; Gassó, S.

    2011-03-01

    The supply of bioavailable iron to the high-nitrate low-chlorophyll (HNLC) waters of the Southern Ocean through atmospheric pathways could stimulate phytoplankton blooms and have major implications for the global carbon cycle. In this study, model results and remotely-sensed data are analyzed to examine the horizontal and vertical transport pathways of Patagonian dust and quantify the effect of iron-laden mineral dust deposition on marine biological productivity in the surface waters of the South Atlantic Ocean (SAO). Model simulations for the atmospheric transport and deposition of mineral dust and bioavailable iron are carried out for two large dust outbreaks originated at the source regions of northern Patagonia during the austral summer of 2009. Model-simulated horizontal and vertical transport pathways of Patagonian dust plumes are in reasonable agreement with remotely-sensed data. Simulations indicate that the synoptic meteorological patterns of high and low pressure systems are largely accountable for dust transport trajectories over the SAO. According to model results and retrievals from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO), synoptic flows caused by opposing pressure systems (a high pressure system located to the east or north-east of a low pressure system) elevate the South American dust plumes well above the marine boundary layer. Under such conditions, the bulk concentration of mineral dust can quickly be transported around the low pressure system in a clockwise manner, follow the southeasterly advection pathway, and reach the HNLC waters of the SAO and Antarctica in ~3-4 days after emission from the source regions of northern Patagonia. Two different mechanisms for dust-iron mobilization into a bioavailable form are considered in this study. A global 3-D chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem), implemented with an iron dissolution scheme, is employed to estimate the atmospheric fluxes of soluble iron, while a

  13. Understanding the transport of Patagonian dust and its influence on marine biological activity in the South Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, M. S.; Meskhidze, N.; Kiliyanpilakkil, V. P.; Gassó, S.

    2010-11-01

    The supply of bioavailable iron to the high-nitrate low-chlorophyll (HNLC) waters of the Southern Ocean through atmospheric pathways could stimulate phytoplankton blooms and have major implications for the global carbon cycle. In this study, model results and remotely-sensed data are analyzed to examine the horizontal and vertical transport pathways of Patagonian dust and quantify the effect of iron-laden mineral dust deposition on marine biological productivity in the surface waters of the South Atlantic Ocean (SAO). Model simulations for the atmospheric transport and deposition of mineral dust and bioavailable iron are carried out for two large dust outbreaks originated at the source regions of Northern Patagonia during the austral summer of 2009. Model-simulated horizontal and vertical transport pathways of Patagonian dust plumes are in reasonable agreement with remotely-sensed data. Simulations indicate that the synoptic meteorological patterns of high and low pressure systems are largely accountable for dust transport trajectories over the SAO. According to model results and retrievals from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO), synoptic flows caused by opposing pressure systems (a high pressure system located to the east or north-east of a low pressure system) elevate the South American dust plumes well above the marine boundary layer. Under such conditions, the bulk concentration of mineral dust can quickly be transported around the low pressure system in a clockwise manner, follow the southeasterly advection pathway, and reach the HNLC waters of the SAO and Antarctica in ~3-4 days after emission from the source regions of Northern Patagonia. Two different mechanisms for dust-iron mobilization into a bioavailable form are considered in this study. A global 3-D chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem), implemented with an iron dissolution scheme, is employed to estimate the atmospheric fluxes of soluble iron, while a

  14. Effect of improved subgrid scale transport of tracers on uptake of bomb radiocarbon in ghe GFDL ocean general circulation model

    SciTech Connect

    Duffy, P.B.; Elgroth, P.; Caldeira, K.

    1995-05-01

    The authors show that the Gent-McWilliams tracer transport parameterization greatly improves the ability of the GFDL ocean general circulation model to simulate vertical profiles of both temperature and bomb radiocarbon with a single set of model parameter values. This parameterization, which includes new advection terms as well as isopycnal mixing, has previously been shown to greatly improve simulated temperature fields. Here, the authors show that it does not markedly affect the already good simulation of oceanic absorption of bomb radiocarbon, and discuss the reasons for this result. 19 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Increased oceanic heat transport in the main Atlantic inflow branch to the Nordic Seas 1993-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Bogi; Margretha Larsen, Karin; Østerhus, Svein

    2015-04-01

    The flow of warm and saline water from the Atlantic Ocean, across the Greenland-Scotland Ridge, into the Nordic Seas - the Atlantic inflow - is split into three separate branches. The most intensive of these branches is the flow between Iceland and Faroes - the IF-inflow - which according to the latest estimates accounts for about half the total volume transport of the Atlantic inflow. The Atlantic inflow transports heat and salt into the Arctic region and is an integral part of the North Atlantic thermohaline circulation, projected to weaken during the 21st century, which might conceivably reduce the oceanic heat transport towards the Arctic. Since the late 1980s, the hydrographic properties of the IF-inflow have been monitored on regular CTD cruises along a section north from the Faroes and ADCPs have been moored on the section since the mid-1990s. From these in situ observations, time series of volume and heat transport have previously been reported, but the high variability of the heat transport has made identification of trends difficult. Here, we present the results from a new analysis of the IF-inflow where the in situ observations have been combined with data from satellite altimetry. The new time series show no indication of reduced volume transport and show a clear trend in heat transport. From 1993 to 2013, the heat transport relative to 0°C of the IF-inflow increased by more than 10%. This increase was mainly caused by increased temperatures of the inflow, which has been attributed to the weakening of the subpolar gyre, but small variations in the volume transport delayed the increase in heat transport so that it mainly occurred between 2003 and 2005.

  16. Can organic matter flux profiles be diagnosed using remineralisation rates derived from observed tracers and modelled ocean transport rates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J. D.; Ridgwell, A.; Barker, S.

    2015-09-01

    The average depth in the ocean at which the majority of sinking organic matter particles remineralise is a fundamental parameter in the ocean's role in regulating atmospheric CO2. Observed spatial patterns in sinking fluxes and relationships between the fluxes of different particles in the modern ocean have widely been used to invoke controlling mechanisms with important implications for CO2 regulation. However, such analyses are limited by the sparse spatial sampling of the available sediment trap data. Here we explore whether model ocean circulation rates, in the form of a transport matrix, can be used to derive remineralisation rates and infer sinking particle flux curves from the much more highly resolved observations of dissolved nutrient concentrations. Initially we show an example of the method using a transport matrix from the MITgcm model and demonstrate that there are a number of potential uncertainties associated with the method. We then use the Earth system model GENIE to generate a synthetic tracer data set to explore the method and its sensitivity to key sources of uncertainty arising from errors in the tracer observations and in the model circulation. We use a 54-member ensemble of different, but plausible, estimates of the modern circulation to explore errors associated with model transport rates. We find that reconstructed re-mineralisation rates are very sensitive to both errors in observations and model circulation rates, such that a simple inversion cannot provide a robust estimate of particulate flux profiles. Estimated remineralisation rates are particularly sensitive to differences between the "observed" and modelled circulation because remineralisation rates are 3-4 magnitudes smaller than transport rates. We highlight a potential method of constraining the uncertainty associated with using modelled circulation rates, although its success is limited by the observations currently available. Finally, we show that there are additional

  17. Ocean2ice: Processes and variability of ocean heat transport toward ice shelves in the Amundsen Sea Embayment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heywood, Karen J.; Webber, Benjamin; Stevens, David; Biddle, Louise C.; Kaiser, Jan; Jenkins, Adrian; Naveira Garabato, Alberto; Assmann, Karen

    2014-05-01

    Eberhard Fahrbach was an inspiration to me, as well as a colleague and friend. He had great insight into the physics on the continental shelf and slope of Antarctica. He taught me the importance of the Antarctic Slope Current and of shelf-edge exchange processes for providing heat to melt the ice shelves. This presentation is dedicated to him. Here we present the first results of the Ocean2ice field campaign in the Amundsen Sea in January-March 2014. The Amundsen Sea hosts some of the most rapidly retreating ice shelves in Antarctica such as Pine Island Glacier. This field campaign is designed to understand the processes by which ocean heat is delivered from the open ocean to the continental shelf, and by which that heat is then modified across the continental shelf en route for the Amundsen Sea ice shelves. The processes to be studied include the Antarctic Slope Undercurrent, coastally trapped waves, wind-driven upwelling, bottom Ekman layers, diapycnal mixing and topographic steering. The influence of mixing of inflowing warm Circumpolar Deep Water with glacial meltwater, and of atmosphere-ocean-ice interaction, are of particular interest. We will present the hydrographic sections (temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, current velocity and microstructure) at the Amundsen Sea shelf break and along and across troughs towards the ice shelves from a variety of ship-based and autonomous platforms. Initial calculations of quasi-heat fluxes will be discussed, as well as the modifications of water masses across the slope and shelf using their temperature, salinity, and dissolved oxygen characteristics. We will compare the observations with historical hydrographic sections from the region since 1994, and with our understanding of the circulation from numerical modelling. A high resolution limited area model of the Amundsen sea faithfully reproduces key features of the historically-observed circulation. The warm Circumpolar Deep Water arriving at the ice front

  18. The impact of multidecadal NAO variations on Atlantic ocean heat transport and rapid changes in Arctic sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delworth, Thomas; Zeng, Fanrong

    2016-04-01

    The Arctic and North Atlantic have experienced pronounced changes over the 20th and early 21st centuries, including a rapid loss of Arctic sea ice over the last several decades, prominent multidecadal variability in both ocean temperatures and sea ice, and decadal-scale change in tropical storm activity. We use suites of coupled climate model simulations to probe some of the factors responsible for the observed multidecadal variability in the Atlantic/Arctic system. In our models we show that multidecadal fluctuations of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) induce multidecadal fluctuations of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). A positive phase of the NAO is associated with strengthened westerly winds over the North Atlantic. These winds extract more heat than normal from the subpolar ocean, thereby increasing upper ocean density, deepwater formation, and the strength of the AMOC and associated poleward ocean heat transport. In model simulations the observed negative phase of the NAO in the 1960s and 1970s led to a weaker than normal AMOC, reduced poleward ocean heat transport, a cold North Atlantic, and an increase in Arctic sea ice extent in both winter and summer. The NAO strengthened from the 1970s to the mid 1990s, leading to an increase of the AMOC and a warming of the North Atlantic. The increased heat transport extended throughout the North Atlantic, into the Barents Sea, and finally into the Arctic, contributing to a rapid reduction of sea ice in the 1990s through the 2000s. Feedbacks involving shortwave radiation are an important component of the overall changes. The NAO-induced AMOC increase also led to hemispheric-scale atmospheric circulation changes and increased Atlantic hurricane activity, as well as atmospheric teleconnections to the Southern Ocean. Since the mid 1990s the strong positive phase of the NAO has weakened to a more neutral phase. Climate projections for the next decade that take into account recent behavior of the

  19. An Extension Case Study in Institutional Innovation: Microfinance Intermediary Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edelman, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    An institutional innovation process led by Extension created a statewide microfinance intermediary. The intermediary provides business technical assistance and microloans to entrepreneurs having difficulty securing conventional credit but having workable business plans. The process included (1) gathering indicators of a problem; (2) formation of a…

  20. 42 CFR 405.1825 - Witnesses at intermediary hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Witnesses at intermediary hearing. 405.1825 Section 405.1825 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Determinations and Appeals § 405.1825 Witnesses at intermediary hearing. The hearing officer(s) may examine...

  1. 42 CFR 405.1825 - Witnesses at intermediary hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Witnesses at intermediary hearing. 405.1825 Section 405.1825 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Determinations and Appeals § 405.1825 Witnesses at intermediary hearing. The hearing officer(s) may examine...

  2. 42 CFR 405.1825 - Witnesses at intermediary hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Witnesses at intermediary hearing. 405.1825 Section 405.1825 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Determinations and Appeals § 405.1825 Witnesses at intermediary hearing. The hearing officer(s) may examine...

  3. 42 CFR 405.1825 - Witnesses at intermediary hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Witnesses at intermediary hearing. 405.1825 Section 405.1825 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Determinations and Appeals § 405.1825 Witnesses at intermediary hearing. The hearing officer(s) may examine...

  4. Prochlorococcus can use the Pro1404 transporter to take up glucose at nanomolar concentrations in the Atlantic Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Marín, María del Carmen; Luque, Ignacio; Zubkov, Mikhail V.; Hill, Polly G.; Diez, Jesús; García-Fernández, José Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Prochlorococcus is responsible for a significant part of CO2 fixation in the ocean. Although it was long considered an autotrophic cyanobacterium, the uptake of organic compounds has been reported, assuming they were sources of limited biogenic elements. We have shown in laboratory experiments that Prochlorococcus can take up glucose. However, the mechanisms of glucose uptake and its occurrence in the ocean have not been shown. Here, we report that the gene Pro1404 confers capability for glucose uptake in Prochlorococcus marinus SS120. We used a cyanobacterium unable to take up glucose to engineer strains that express the Pro1404 gene. These recombinant strains were capable of specific glucose uptake over a wide range of glucose concentrations, showing multiphasic transport kinetics. The Ks constant of the high affinity phase was in the nanomolar range, consistent with the average concentration of glucose in the ocean. Furthermore, we were able to observe glucose uptake by Prochlorococcus in the central Atlantic Ocean, where glucose concentrations were 0.5–2.7 nM. Our results suggest that Prochlorococcus are primary producers capable of tuning their metabolism to energetically benefit from environmental conditions, taking up not only organic compounds with key limiting elements in the ocean, but also molecules devoid of such elements, like glucose. PMID:23569224

  5. Prochlorococcus can use the Pro1404 transporter to take up glucose at nanomolar concentrations in the Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Marín, María del Carmen; Luque, Ignacio; Zubkov, Mikhail V; Hill, Polly G; Diez, Jesús; García-Fernández, José Manuel

    2013-05-21

    Prochlorococcus is responsible for a significant part of CO2 fixation in the ocean. Although it was long considered an autotrophic cyanobacterium, the uptake of organic compounds has been reported, assuming they were sources of limited biogenic elements. We have shown in laboratory experiments that Prochlorococcus can take up glucose. However, the mechanisms of glucose uptake and its occurrence in the ocean have not been shown. Here, we report that the gene Pro1404 confers capability for glucose uptake in Prochlorococcus marinus SS120. We used a cyanobacterium unable to take up glucose to engineer strains that express the Pro1404 gene. These recombinant strains were capable of specific glucose uptake over a wide range of glucose concentrations, showing multiphasic transport kinetics. The Ks constant of the high affinity phase was in the nanomolar range, consistent with the average concentration of glucose in the ocean. Furthermore, we were able to observe glucose uptake by Prochlorococcus in the central Atlantic Ocean, where glucose concentrations were 0.5-2.7 nM. Our results suggest that Prochlorococcus are primary producers capable of tuning their metabolism to energetically benefit from environmental conditions, taking up not only organic compounds with key limiting elements in the ocean, but also molecules devoid of such elements, like glucose. PMID:23569224

  6. Detecting Intermediary Hosts by TCP Latency Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Gurvinder; Eian, Martin; Willassen, Svein Y.; Mjølsnes, Stig Fr.

    Use of intermediary hosts as stepping stones to conceal tracks is common in Internet misuse. It is therefore desirable to find a method to detect whether the originating party is using an intermediary host. Such a detection technique would allow the activation of a number of countermeasures that would neutralize the effects of misuse, and make it easier to trace a perpetrator. This work explores a new approach in determining if a host communicating via TCP is the data originator or if it is acting as a mere TCP proxy. The approach is based on measuring the inter packet arrival time at the receiving end of the connection only, and correlating the observed results with the network latency between the receiver and the proxy. The results presented here indicate that determining the use of a proxy host is possible, if the network latency between the originator and proxy is larger than the network latency between the proxy and the receiver. We show that this technique has potential to be used to detect connections were data is sent through a TCP proxy, such as remote login through TCP proxies, or rejecting spam sent through a bot network.

  7. Physical processes that enhance nutrient transport and primary productivity in the coastal and open ocean of the subarctic NE Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitney, F. A.; Crawford, W. R.; Harrison, P. J.

    2005-03-01

    In comparison to the open ocean, several additional processes including coastal upwelling, river discharge, tidal mixing, estuarine circulation and benthic remineralization enhance nutrient supply to the surface waters of the continental shelf. In general, coastal waters become nitrate-limited during the phytoplankton growing season, whereas iron and dissolved silicate limit phytoplankton growth in the less productive oceanic waters of the Gulf of Alaska. If coastal processes supply ample amounts of macro and micro nutrients during the growing season, diatom communities dominated by species such as Skeletomema costatum, Chaetoceros spp. and Thalassiosira spp. will bloom. Growth rates of these bloom populations typically range from 0.5 to >1.5 doublings per day, which place a high demand on nutrients. Any transport of coastal waters away from the shelf will enhance productivity in oceanic waters. The general circulation of the eastern subarctic Pacific does not allow for offshore transport except in special circumstances. These include anticyclonic mesoscale eddy formation, which can export as much as 5000 km 3 of nutrient-rich waters from the shelf in a single eddy, and recirculation of waters away from southwestern Alaska due to the cyclonic circulation around the western edge of the Alaskan Gyre. Recirculation can carry nutrient-rich water from the coast to the vicinity of Ocean Station Papa (50°N, 145°W) within a few months. For both eddies and gyre recirculation, much of the water being carried into the open ocean lies below the euphotic zone. Iron enrichment occurs to a depth of at least 1000 m in the Gulf of Alaska as a result. Periods of enhanced eddy formation or recirculation may supply iron that enriches the open ocean for several years. Damming of the Columbia River and human uses of its waters have resulted in more winter and less summer discharge of fresh water and dissolved Si. Coastal currents in this area flow north in winter and south in summer

  8. Water Vapor Transport Over the Tropical Oceans During ENSO as Diagnosed from TRMM and SSM/I Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Franklin R.; Smith, Eric A.; Sohn, Byung-Ju

    2000-01-01

    Traditionally, large-scale water vapor transport [div Q] has been derived directly from circulation statistics in which transport processes are often depicted by mean and eddy motions. Thus detailed and accurate calculations of moisture transport terms over the globe are required. Notably, the lack of systematically spaced conventional measurements of meteorological variables over oceans has hindered understanding of the distribution and transport of water vapor. This motivates the use of indirect calculation methods in which horizontal divergence of water vapor is balanced by the evaporation minus precipitation, assuming the rate of changes of precipitable water and condensates is small over a sufficiently long time period. In order to obtain the water vapor transport, we need evaporation rate minus precipitation (E-P). Focussing on the differences in water vapor transport between El Nino and La Nina periods and their influences on atmospheric circulations, we study January, February, and March of 1998 and 1999 periods which represent El Nino and La Nina respectively. SSM/I-derived precipitation and evaporation rate from SSM/I wind and total precipitable water, in conjunction with NCEP SST and surface air temperature, are used for the calculation of the transport potential function. For the retrieval of evaporation we use a stability-dependent aerodynamic bulk scheme developed by Chou (1993). It was tested against aircraft covariance fluxes measured during cold air outbreaks over the North Atlantic Ocean. Chou et al. (1997) reported that the SSM/I retrieved latent heat flux over the western Pacific warm pool area were found to be comparable with daily mean fluxes of a ship measurements during TOGA/COARE.

  9. Can organic matter flux profiles be diagnosed using remineralisation rates derived from observed tracers and modelled ocean transport rates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J. D.; Ridgwell, A.; Barker, S.

    2015-03-01

    The average depth in the ocean at which the majority of sinking organic matter particles remineralise is a fundamental parameter in the oceans role in regulating atmospheric CO2. Observed spatial patterns in sinking fluxes and relationships between the fluxes of different particles in the modern ocean have widely been used to invoke controlling mechanisms with important implications for CO2 regulation. However, such analyses are limited by the sparse spatial sampling of the available sediment trap data. Here we explore whether model ocean circulation rates, in the form of a transport matrix, can be used to derive remineralisation rates and sinking particle flux curves from the much more highly resolved observations of dissolved nutrient concentrations. Initially we use the Earth system model GENIE to generate a synthetic tracer dataset to explore the methods and its sensitivity to key sources of uncertainty arising from errors in the tracer observations and in the model circulation. We use a perturbed physics ensemble to generate 54 different estimates of circulation to explore errors associated with model transport rates. We find that reconstructed remineralisation rates are highly sensitive to both errors in observations and our ensemble uncertainty in model circulation rates such that a simple inversion does not provide a robust estimate of particulate flux profiles. Inferred remineralisation rates are particularly sensitive to differences between the "observed" and modelled transport fluxes because remineralisation rates are 3-4 magnitudes smaller than circulation rates. We also find that when inferring particle flux curves from remineralisation rates the cycling of dissolved organic matter also creates biases that have a similar magnitude and spatial variability to flux curves diagnosed using sediment trap data. We end with a discussion on the potential future directions and pitfalls of estimating remineralisation rates using model circulation schemes.

  10. Influences of land-ocean-atmosphere dynamics and emissions sectors on atmospheric chemical transport during VOCALS REx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spak, S.; Mena, M.; Carmichael, G. R.

    2009-12-01

    Measurements and modeling from the VOCALS REx campaign have identified a range of transport regimes based on synoptic meteorology, and suggested roles for the marine boundary layer inversion, downslope katabatic winds from the Andean cordillera, and Hadley cell subsidence as primary causes for observed aerosol and trace gas concentration gradients over the Southeast Pacific. This study employs atmospheric chemical transport modeling and airmass trajectory analyses to more directly address the influence of orographic winds, boundary layer dynamics, coastal circulations, and large-scale circulation by the subtropical high on the diurnal and episodic variability of pollution transport in the region. Using hourly simulations with the Weather Research and Forecasting model and the STEM chemical transport model at 12 km x 12 km resolution, we introduce tracer emissions within and above the boundary layer at representative locations--including the western slopes of the Andes, on-shore and off-shore coastal areas, metropolitan Santiago, the Chilean altiplano, and the free troposphere over the open ocean--and follow their transport and fate throughout the REx experiment of October-November 2008. Comparison between trajectories and tracer concentrations illustrate long range airmass history and allow for an understanding of the representativeness of instantaneous trajectories on transport phenomena. We further assess the contributions of emissions from power generation, copper smelters, natural sources, and anthropogenic area sources to aerosol concentrations over the Southeast Pacific, identifying their role in each transport regime.

  11. Characteristics, vertical structures, and heat/salt transports of mesoscale eddies in the southeastern tropical Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guang; Yu, Weidong; Yuan, Yeli; Zhao, Xia; Wang, Fan; Chen, Gengxin; Liu, Lin; Duan, Yongliang

    2015-10-01

    Satellite altimetry sea surface height measurements reveal high mesoscale eddy activity in the southeastern tropical Indian Ocean (SETIO). In this study, the characteristics of mesoscale eddies in the SETIO are investigated by analyzing 564 cyclonic eddy (CE) tracks and 695 anticyclonic eddy (AE) tracks identified from a new version of satellite altimetry data with a daily temporal resolution. The mean radius, lifespan, propagation speed, and distance of CEs (AEs) are 149 (153) km, 50 (46) days, 15.3 (16.6) cm s-1, and 651 (648) km, respectively. Some significant differences exist in the eddy statistical characteristics between the new-version daily altimeter data and the former weekly data. Mean vertical structures of anomalous potential temperature, salinity, geostrophic current, as well as heat and salt transports of the composite eddies, are estimated by analyzing Argo profile data matched to altimeter-detected eddies. The composite analysis shows that eddy-induced ocean anomalies are mainly confined in the upper 300 dbar. In the eddy core, CE (AE) could induce a cooling (warming) of 2°C between 60 and 180 dbar and maximum positive (negative) salinity anomalies of 0.1 (-0.3) psu in the upper 50 (110) dbar. The meridional heat transport induced by the composite CE (AE) is southward (northward), whereas the salt transport of CE (AE) is northward (southward). Most of the meridional heat and salt transports are carried in the upper 300 dbar.

  12. Interannual variations of North Equatorial Current transport in the Pacific Ocean during two types of El Niño

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guoli; Zhai, Fangguo; Hu, Dunxin

    2016-05-01

    Interannual variations of Pacific North Equatorial Current (NEC) transport during eastern-Pacific El Niños (EP-El Niños) and central-Pacific El Niños (CP-El Niños) are investigated by composite analysis with European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast Ocean Analysis/Reanalysis System 3. During EP-El Niño, NEC transport shows significant positive anomalies from the developing to decay phases, with the largest anomalies around the mature phase. During CP-El Niño, however, the NEC transport only shows positive anomalies before the mature phase, with much weaker anomalies than those during EP-El Niño. The NEC transport variations are strongly associated with variations of the tropical gyre and wind forcing in the tropical North Pacific. During EP-El Niño, strong westerly wind anomalies and positive wind stress curl anomalies in the tropical North Pacific induce local upward Ekman pumping and westward-propagating upwelling Rossby waves in the ocean, lowering the sea surface height and generating a cyclonic gyre anomaly in the western tropical Pacific. During CP-El Niño, however, strength of the wind and associated Ekman pumping velocity are very weak. Negative sea surface height and cyclonic flow anomalies are slightly north of those during EP El Niño.

  13. Pathways of PFOA to the Arctic: variabilities and contributions of oceanic currents and atmospheric transport and chemistry sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stemmler, I.; Lammel, G.

    2010-10-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and other perfluorinated compounds are industrial chemicals in use for decades which resist degradation in the environment and seem to accumulate in polar regions. Transport of PFOA was modeled using a spatially resolved global multicompartment model including fully coupled three-dimensional ocean and atmosphere general circulation models, and two-dimensional top soil, vegetation surfaces, and sea ice compartments. In addition to primary emissions, the formation of PFOA in the atmosphere from degradation of 8:2 fluorotelomer alcohol was included as a PFOA source. Oceanic transport, delivered 14.8±5.0 (8-23) t a-1 to the Arctic, strongly influenced by changes in water transport, which determined its interannual variability. This pathway constituted the dominant source of PFOA to the Arctic. Formation of PFOA in the atmosphere led to episodic transport events (timescale of days) into the Arctic with small spatial extent. Deposition in the polar region was found to be dominated by wet deposition over land, and shows maxima in boreal winter. The total atmospheric deposition of PFOA in the Arctic in the 1990s was ≈1 t a-1, much higher than previously estimated, and is dominated by primary emissions rather than secondary formation.

  14. Pathways of PFOA to the Arctic: variabilities and contributions of oceanic currents and atmospheric transport and chemistry sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stemmler, I.; Lammel, G.

    2010-05-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and other perfluorinated compounds are industrial chemicals in use since decades which resist degradation in the environment and seem to accumulate in polar regions. Transport of PFOA was modeled using a spatially resolved global multicompartment model including fully coupled three-dimensional ocean and atmosphere general circulation models, and two-dimensional top soil, vegetation surfaces, and sea ice compartments. In addition to primary emissions, the formation of PFOA in the atmosphere from degradation of 8:2 fluorotelomer alcohol was included as a PFOA source. Oceanic transport, delivered 14.8±5.0 (8-23) t a-1 to the Arctic, strongly influenced by changes in water transport, which determined its interannual variability. This pathway constituted the dominant source of PFOA to the Arctic. Formation of PFOA in the atmosphere lead to episodic transport events (timescale of days) into the Arctic with small spatial extent. Deposition in the polar region was found to be dominated by wet deposition over land, and shows maxima in boreal winter. The total atmospheric deposition of PFOA in the Arctic in the 1990s was ≍1 t a-1, much higher than previously estimated, and is dominated by primary emissions rather than secondarily formed.

  15. The role of the Medicare fiscal intermediary and the regional home health intermediary, Part 2.

    PubMed

    Randall, D A

    1992-01-01

    The Medicare fiscal intermediaries (FIs) are private insurance companies that serve as the federal government's agents in the administration of the Medicare program, including the payment of claims. There are two primary functions of the FI--reimbursement review and medical coverage review. Hospital-based home health agencies relate to the hospital's FI for reimbursement purposes. All home health agencies are assigned to a special FI, the Regional Home Health Intermediary (RHHI), for medical review issues. This may be the same FI or a different one than that audits the hospital's cost report. Freestanding home health agencies deal with separate reimbursement and medical review divisions within a single RHHI's office. The author reviews the role of the Medicare FI and the RHHI and their relationship to home health agencies. Part 1 was featured in the June issue. PMID:1506908

  16. A Giant Arctic Freshwater Pond at the end of the Early Eocene; Implications for Ocean Heat Transport and Carbon Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinkhuis, H.; Schouten, S.; Collinson, M. E.; Sluijs, A.; Sinninghe-Damste, J. S.; Dickens, G. R.; Huber, M.; Cronin, T. M.; Bujak, J. P.; Stein, R.; Eldrett, J. S.; Harding, I. C.; Sangiorgi, F.

    2005-12-01

    In the last decades remains of the free-floating, fresh water fern Azolla have been found in unusually high abundances in basal middle Eocene (~48.5 Ma) marine sediments deposited in all Nordic seas. While generally taken to signal some `freshwater input', their source and significance were not determined. Through palynological and organic geochemical analyses of unique cores obtained from unprecedented Arctic Ocean drilling (IODP 302 - ACEX) we show that the brackish surface conditions that prevailed in the Arctic Ocean through the late Paleocene and early Eocene culminated in the deposition of laminated organic rich deposits yielding huge amounts of remains of Azolla. This, plus e.g., low diversity dinoflagellate assemblages, and concomitant low BIT values, indicates in-situ Azolla growth, and that the surface of the Arctic Ocean episodically resembled a giant fresh water pond over an interval altogether lasting ~800,000 years. The Arctic Basin thus constituted the main source of the freshwater pulses found elsewhere, reaching as far south as the southern North Sea.TEX86-derived surface temperatures were 13-14°C before and after the Azolla interval and only 10°C during the event, which may be related to obstruction of pole ward ocean heat transport and/or increased carbon burial.

  17. The transport of beta-hexachlorocyclohexane to the western Arctic Ocean: a contrast to alpha-HCH.

    PubMed

    Li, Y F; Macdonald, R W; Jantunen, L M M; Harner, T; Bidleman, T F; Strachan, W M J

    2002-05-27

    A large database for alpha-hexachlorocyclohexane (alpha-HCH), together with multimedia models, shows this chemical to have exhibited classical 'cold condensation' behavior. The surface water of the Arctic Ocean became loaded between 1950 and 1990 because atmospheric transport of alpha-HCH from source regions to the Arctic was rapid and because alpha-HCH partitioned strongly into cold water there. Following emission reductions during the 1980s, alpha-HCH remained trapped under the permanent ice pack, with the result that the highest oceanic concentrations in the early 1990s were to be found in surface waters of the Canada Basin. Despite a much stronger partitioning into water than for alpha-HCH, beta-HCH did not accumulate under the pack ice of the Arctic Ocean, as might be expected from the similar emission histories for the two chemicals. Beta-HCH appears to have loaded only weakly into the high Arctic through the atmosphere because it was rained out or partitioned into North Pacific surface water. However, beta-HCH has subsequently entered the western Arctic in ocean currents passing through Bering Strait. Beta-HCH provides an important lesson that environmental pathways must be comprehensively understood before attempting to predict the behavior of one chemical by extrapolation from a seemingly similar chemical. PMID:12150440

  18. Changes in Global Ocean Bottom Properties and Volume Transports in CMIP5 Models under Climate Change Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heuzé, C.; Heywood, K. J.; Stevens, D. P.; Ridley, J. K.

    2014-12-01

    Changes in bottom temperature, salinity and density in the global ocean by 2100 for 24 CMIP5 climate models are investigated for the climate change scenarios RCP4.5 and RCP8.5. The multimodel mean shows a decrease in density in all deep basins except for the North Atlantic which becomes denser. The individual model responses to climate change forcing are more complex: regarding temperature, only one model predicts a cooling of the bottom waters while the 23 others predict a warming; in salinity, there is less agreement regarding the sign of the change, especially in the Southern Ocean. The magnitude and equatorward extent of these changes also vary strongly among models. The changes in properties can be linked with the changes in transport of key water masses. The Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation weakens in most models and is directly linked to changes in bottom density in the North Atlantic. These changes are due to the intrusion of modified Antarctic Bottom Water, made possible by the decrease in North Atlantic Deep Water formation. In the Indian, Pacific and South Atlantic basins, changes in bottom density are congruent with the weakening in Antarctic Bottom Water transport through these basins. We argue that the greater the meridional transport, the more the change is propagated towards the equator. Then strong decreases in density over 100 years of climate change cause a weakening of the transports. The speed at which these property changes reach the deep basins is critical for a correct assessment of the heat storage capacity of the oceans as well as for predictions of future sea level rise.

  19. Atmospheric moisture transport and fresh water flux over oceans derived from spacebased sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. T.; Tang, W.

    2001-01-01

    preliminary results will be shown to demonstrate the application of spacebased IMT and fresh water flux in ocean-atmosphere-land interaction studies, such as the hydrologica balance on Amazon rainfall and Indian monsoon.

  20. How Accurate is Land/Ocean Moisture Transport Variability in Reanalyses?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, F. R.; Bosilovich, M. G.

    2014-01-01

    Quantifying the global hydrological cycle and its variability across various time scales remains a challenge to the climate community. Direct measurements of evaporation (E), evapotranspiration (ET), and precipitation (P) are not feasible on a global scale, nor is the transport of water vapor over the global oceans and sparsely populated land areas. Expanding satellite data streams have enabled development of various water (and energy) flux products, complementing reanalyses and facilitating observationally constrained modeling. But the evolution of the global observing system has produced additional complications--improvements in satellite sensor resolution and accuracy have resulted in "epochs" of observational quasi-uniformity that can adversely affect reanalysis trends. In this work we focus on vertically integrated moisture flux convergence (VMFC) variations within the period 1979 - present integrated over global land. We show that VMFC in recent reanalyses (e.g. ERA-I, NASA MERRA, NOAA CFSR and JRA55) suffers from observing system changes, though differently in each product. Land Surface Models (LSMs) forced with observations-based precipitation, radiation and near-surface meteorology share closely the interannual P-ET variations of the reanalyses associated with ENSO events. (VMFC over land and P-ET estimates are equivalent quantities since atmospheric storage changes are small on these scales.) But the long-term LSM trend over the period since 1979 is approximately one-fourth that of the reanalyses. Additional reduced observation reanalyses assimilating only surface pressure and /or specifying seasurface temperature also have a much smaller trend in P-ET like the LSMs. We explore the regional manifestation of the reanalysis P-ET / VMFC problems, particularly over land. Both principal component analysis and a simple time series changepoint analysis highlight problems associated with data poor regions such as Equatorial Africa and, for one reanalysis, the