Science.gov

Sample records for octanuclear cubane-structured complex

  1. A novel octanuclear vanadium(V) oxide cluster complex having an unprecedented neutral V8O20 core functionalized with 4,4'-di-tert-butyl-2,2'-bipyridine.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Shintaro; Taya, Nobuto; Ishii, Youichi

    2014-03-17

    A novel octanuclear vanadium(V) oxide cluster complex, [V8O20(4,4'-(t)Bubpy)4] (1), was synthesized and characterized by single-crystal X-ray structure analysis to reveal that 1 has an unprecedented neutral V8O20 core. An unexpected interconversion between 1 and the methoxo(oxo)vanadium(V) cluster complex, [V4O8(OMe)4(4,4'-(t)Bubpy)2] (2), was observed upon changes in the solvent systems. PMID:24559114

  2. An octanuclear molybdenum(VI) complex containing coordinatively bound 4,4'-di-tert-butyl-2,2'-bipyridine, [Mo8O22(OH)4(di-tBu-bipy)4]: synthesis, structure, and catalytic epoxidation of bio-derived olefins.

    PubMed

    Amarante, Tatiana R; Neves, Patrícia; Tomé, Cátia; Abrantes, Marta; Valente, Anabela A; Paz, Filipe A Almeida; Pillinger, Martyn; Gonçalves, Isabel S

    2012-03-19

    The reaction of [MoO(2)Cl(2)(di-tBu-bipy)] (1) (di-tBu-bipy = 4,4'-di-tert-butyl-2,2'-bipyridine) with water at 100-120 °C in a Teflon-lined stainless steel autoclave, in an open reflux system, or in a microwave synthesis system gave the octanuclear complex [Mo(8)O(22)(OH)(4)(di-tBu-bipy)(4)] (2) as a microcrystalline powder in good yields. Single crystals of 2 suitable for X-ray diffraction were obtained by the reaction of MoO(3) and di-tBu-bipy in water at 160 °C for 3 days. The molecular structure of 2 comprises a purely inorganic core, Mo(4)O(8)(μ(3)-OH)(2)(μ(2)-O)(2), attached to two peripheral oxo-bridged binuclear units, Mo(2)O(4)(μ(2)-O)(2)(OH)(di-tBu-bipy)(2). The inorganic core is composed of a unique assembly of four {MoO(5)} distorted square pyramids connected to each other via edge-sharing. Overall, the octanuclear complex adopts a highly distorted form strongly resembling an "S"-shaped molecular unit. Complex 2 was applied in the catalytic epoxidation of the biorenewable olefins DL-limonene (Lim) and methyl oleate (Ole), using tert-butylhydroperoxide (TBHP) as an oxygen donor, under mild reaction conditions (55 °C, air). The reactions of Lim and Ole gave the respective epoxide monomers in fairly high selectivities at high conversions (89% 1,2-epoxy-p-menth-8-ene selectivity at 96% Lim conversion; 99% methyl 9,10-epoxystearate selectivity at 94% Ole conversion, reached within 24 h reaction). Iodometric titrations revealed no measurable "non-productive" decomposition of TBHP. PMID:22372402

  3. Enlarging the ring by incorporating a phosphonate coligand: from the cyclic hexanuclear to octanuclear dysprosium clusters.

    PubMed

    Tian, Haiquan; Bao, Song-Song; Zheng, Li-Min

    2015-08-28

    Solvothermal reaction of a double pyrazinyl hydrazone ligand EDDC(2-) with Dy(OAc)3 results in a cyclic hexanuclear cluster [Dy6(EDDC)2(OAc)14(H2O)2]·MeOH·2H2O (). The addition of 1-naphthylphosphonate to the reaction mixture expands the ring size with the formation of a cyclic octanuclear cluster [Dy8(EDDC)4(O3PC10H7)4(OAc)8(H2O)4]·12H2O (). The latter shows slow magnetization relaxation below 12 K, characteristic of single molecule magnet behavior. PMID:26207786

  4. Octanuclear Heterobimetallic {Ni4Ln4} Assemblies Possessing Ln4 Square Grid [2 × 2] Motifs: Synthesis, Structure, and Magnetism.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Sourav; Goura, Joydeb; Das, Sourav; Topping, Craig V; Brambleby, Jamie; Goddard, Paul A; Chandrasekhar, Vadapalli

    2016-09-01

    Octanuclear heterobimetallic complexes, [Ln4Ni4(H3L)4(μ3-OH)4(μ2-OH)4]4Cl·xH2O·yCHCl3 (Dy(3+), x = 30.6, y = 2 (1); Tb(3+), x = 28, y = 0 (2) ; Gd(3+), x = 25.3, y = 0 (3); Ho(3+), x = 30.6, y = 3 (4)) (H5L = N1,N3-bis(6-formyl-2-(hydroxymethyl)-4-methylphenol)diethylenetriamine) are reported. These are assembled by the cumulative coordination action of four doubly deprotonated compartmental ligands, [H3L](2-), along with eight exogenous -OH ligands. Within the core of these complexes, four Ln(3+)'s are distributed to the four corners of a perfect square grid while four Ni(2+)'s are projected away from the plane of the Ln4 unit. Each of the four Ni(2+)'s possesses distorted octahedral geometry while all of the Ln(3+)'s are crystallographically equivalent and are present in an elongated square antiprism geometry. The magnetic properties of compound 3 are dominated by an easy-plane single-ion anisotropy of the Ni(2+) ions [DNi = 6.7(7) K] and dipolar interactions between Gd(3+) centers. Detailed ac magnetometry reveals the presence of distinct temperature-dependent out-of-phase signals for compounds 1 and 2, indicative of slow magnetic relaxation. Magnetochemical analysis of complex 1 implies the 3d and the 4f metal ions are engaged in ferromagnetic interactions with SMM behavior, while dc magnetometry of compound 2 is suggestive of an antiferromagnetic Ni-Tb spin-exchange with slow magnetic relaxation due to a field-induced level crossing. Compound 4 exhibits an easy-plane single-ion anisotropy for the Ho(3+) ions and weak interactions between spin centers. PMID:27500314

  5. On the synthesis, measurement and applications of octanuclear heterometallic rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faust, T. B.

    Inorganic macrocycles have stimulated interest in recent years for their magnetic properties, their associated host-guest chemistry and their aesthetically appealing structures. These characteristics have led to suggestions that they could be exploited for the purposes of ion recognition, catalysis, as single molecule magnets, MRI agents, antibacterial agents and as part of larger architectures in a molecular machine. This thesis explores the properties of a group of chromium(III) macrocycles, with functionality tailored towards different pursuits. Firstly the magnetic properties of a newly synthesised family of ring dimers are investigated. The nature of magnetic exchange within each ring leads to a net electronic spin which, it has been proposed, could represent a quantum binary digit within a quantum information processing system. By linking together pairs of rings, the degree of inter-ring communication can be determined. Such interactions are important for the correlation of spin as initiation of quantum entanglement, a pre-requisite for quantum computing. The rings can also act as fluoro-metallocrown, hosting the molecule which templated their formation. A range of rings with different guests are synthesised and their solid and solution state structures are explored. On templating about bulky dialykyl amines hybrid organic-inorganic rotaxanes are formed where the guest is fixed. In contrast when using small amines and alkali metals, exchange of guests is possible. The dynamics of all of these systems are investigated with proton NMR, quite remarkable for such highly paramagnetic complexes.

  6. Single-molecule magnet behavior in an octanuclear dysprosium(iii) aggregate inherited from helical triangular Dy3 SMM-building blocks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Zhang, Peng; Zhao, Lang; Wu, Jianfeng; Guo, Mei; Tang, Jinkui

    2016-06-28

    An unprecedented octanuclear dysprosium(iii) cluster with the formula [Dy8L6(μ3-OH)4(μ2-CH3O)2(CH3OH)6(H2O)2]·6H2O·10CH3OH·2CH3CN () based on a nonlinearly tritopic aroylhydrazone ligand H3L has been isolated, realizing the successful linking of pairwise interesting triangular Dy3 SMMs. It is noteworthy that two enantiomers (Λ and Δ configurations) individually behaving as a coordination-induced chirality presented in the Dy3 helicate are connected in the meso Dy8 cluster. Remarkably, alternating-current magnetic susceptibility measurements revealed that the Dy8 cluster shows typical SMM behavior inherited from its Dy3 helical precursor. It is one of the rare polynuclear Lnn SMMs (n > 7) under zero dc field. PMID:27231152

  7. Squaring the cube: a family of octametallic lanthanide complexes including a Dy8 single-molecule magnet.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ming; Zhao, Hanhua; Prosvirin, Andrey V; Pinkowicz, Dawid; Zhao, Bin; Cheng, Peng; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Brechin, Euan K; Dunbar, Kim R

    2013-10-01

    A series of isostructural octanuclear lanthanide complexes of general formula [Ln8(sao)4(μ3-OH)4(NO3)12(DMF)12] (Ln = Nd (), Sm (), Eu (), Gd (), Tb (), Dy (), Ho (), Er (); DMF = dimethylformamide) have been prepared via reactions of salicylaldoxime (saoH2), tetramethylammonium hydroxide (Me4NOH) with the appropriate lanthanide nitrate salt (Ln(NO3)3·6H2O). The metallic skeletons of the complexes describe [Ln4] tetrahedra encapsulated inside a [Ln4] square with the inner core stabilised through μ3-OH(-) ions and the periphery by μ4-sao(2-) ligands. The magnetic properties of compounds were investigated by dc and ac magnetometry. Temperature dependent ac magnetic susceptibility data reveal that the dysprosium analogue () displays an out-of-phase signal in the absence of an applied magnetic field indicative of slow relaxation of the magnetization typical of a Single-Molecule Magnet (SMM). Micro-SQUID measurements reveal temperature and sweep rate dependent hysteresis below 1.0 K. PMID:23943045

  8. Construction of Polynuclear Lanthanide (Ln = Dy(III), Tb(III), and Nd(III)) Cage Complexes Using Pyridine-Pyrazole-Based Ligands: Versatile Molecular Topologies and SMM Behavior.

    PubMed

    Bala, Sukhen; Sen Bishwas, Mousumi; Pramanik, Bhaskar; Khanra, Sumit; Fromm, Katharina M; Poddar, Pankaj; Mondal, Raju

    2015-09-01

    Employment of two different pyridyl-pyrazolyl-based ligands afforded three octanuclear lanthanide(III) (Ln = Dy, Tb) cage compounds and one hexanuclear neodymium(III) coordination cage, exhibiting versatile molecular architectures including a butterfly core. Relatively less common semirigid pyridyl-pyrazolyl-based asymmetric ligand systems show an interesting trend of forming polynuclear lanthanide cage complexes with different coordination environments around the metal centers. It is noteworthy here that construction of lanthanide complex itself is a challenging task in a ligand system as soft N-donor rich as pyridyl-pyrazol. We report herein some lanthanide complexes using ligand containing only one or two O-donors compare to five N-coordinating sites. The resultant multinuclear lanthanide complexes show interesting magnetic and spectroscopic features originating from different spatial arrangements of the metal ions. Alternating current (ac) susceptibility measurements of the two dysprosium complexes display frequency- and temperature-dependent out-of-phase signals in zero and 0.5 T direct current field, a typical characteristic feature of single-molecule magnet (SMM) behavior, indicating different energy reversal barriers due to different molecular topologies. Another aspect of this work is the occurrence of the not-so-common SMM behavior of the terbium complex, further confirmed by ac susceptibility measurement. PMID:26347289

  9. Gold(I) and silver(I) complexes containing a tripodal tetraphosphine ligand: influence of the halogen and stoichiometry on the properties. The X-ray crystal structure of two gold(I) dimeric aggregates.

    PubMed

    Fernández, D; García-Seijo, M I; Bardají, M; Laguna, A; García-Fernández, M E

    2008-05-21

    Complexes of the type [Au2(micro-PP3)2]X2 [X=Cl (), Br (), I ()], [Ag2(micro-PP3)2](NO3)2 (), Ag(PP3)Cl (), M3(micro-PP3)X3 [M=Au, X=Cl (), Br (), I (); M=Ag, X=NO3 ()] and Au4(micro-PP3)X4 [X=Cl (), Br (), I ()] have been prepared by interaction between gold(I) or silver(I) salts and the ligand tris[2-(diphenylphosphino)ethyl]phosphine (PP3) in the appropriate molar ratio. Microanalysis, mass spectrometry, IR and NMR spectroscopies and conductivity measurements were used for characterization. and are ionic dinuclear species containing four-coordinate gold(i) and four/three coordinate silver(i), respectively. Solutions of behave as mixtures of complexes in a 2:1 [Au2(micro-PP3)X2; X=Cl(), Br(), I()] and 4:1 () metal to ligand ratio. and react with free PP(3) in solution to generate the ionic compounds and , respectively. Complexes and , with four linear PAuX fragments per molecule, were shown by X-ray diffraction to consist of dimeric aggregates via close intermolecular gold(I)gold(I) contacts of 3.270 A () and 3.184 A (). The resultant octanuclear systems have an inversion center with two symmetry-related gold(I) atoms being totally out of the aurophilic area and represent a new form of aggregation compared to that found in other halo complexes of gold(I) containing polyphosphines. The luminescence properties of the ligand and complexes, in the solid state, have been studied. Most of the gold systems display intense luminescent emission at room and low temperature. The influence of the halogen on the aurophilic contacts of compounds with a 4:1 metal to ligand ratio results in different photophysical properties, while and are luminescent complex is nonemissive. The luminescence increases with increasing the phosphine/metal ratio affording for complexes , without aurophilic contacts, the stronger emissions. Silver complexes and are nonemissive at room temperature and show weaker emissions than gold(I) species at 77 K. PMID:18443708

  10. S-shaped decanuclear heterometallic [Ni8Ln2] complexes [Ln(III) = Gd, Tb, Dy and Ho]: theoretical modeling of the magnetic properties of the gadolinium analogue.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Sakiat; Das, Sourav; Chakraborty, Amit; Lloret, Francesc; Cano, Joan; Pardo, Emilio; Chandrasekhar, Vadapalli

    2014-07-14

    The reaction of 8-quinolinol-2-carboaldoxime (LH2) with Ni(II) and Ln(III) salts afforded the heterometallic decanuclear compounds [Ni8Dy2(μ3-OH)2(L)8(LH)2(H2O)6](ClO4)2·16H2O (1), [Ni8Gd2(μ3-OH)2(L)8(LH)2(H2O)4(MeOH)2](NO3)2·12H2O (2), [Ni8Ho2(μ3-OH)2(L)8(LH)2(H2O)4(MeOH)2](ClO4)2·2MeOH·12H2O (3) and [Ni8Tb2 (μ3-OH)2(L)8(LH)2(MeOH)4(OMe)2]·2CH2Cl2·8H2O (4). While compounds 1-3 are dicationic, compound 4 is neutral. These compounds possess an S-shaped architecture and comprise a long chain of metal ions bound to each other. In all the complexes, the eight Ni(II) and two Ln(III) ions of the multimetallic ensemble are hold together by two μ3-OH, eight dianionic (L(2-)) and two monoanionic oxime ligands (LH(-)) whereas compound 4 has two μ3-OH, eight dianionic (L(2-)), two monoanionic oxime ligands (LH(-)) and two terminal methoxy (MeO(-)) ligands. The central portion of the S-shaped molecular wire is made up of an octanuclear Ni(II) ensemble which has at its two ends the Ln(III) caps. Magnetic studies on 1-4 reveal that the magnetic interactions between neighboring metal ions are negligible at room temperature. On the other hand, at lower temperatures in all the compounds anti-ferromagnetic interactions seem to be dominated. Analysis of the magnetic data for the Gd(III) derivative indicates Ni(II)-Ni(II) anti-ferromagnetic interactions and Gd(III)-Ni(II) ferromagnetic interactions at low temperatures. A theoretical density functional study on the magnetic behavior of the Gd(III) derivative suggests that while the weak ferromagnetic interaction between Gd(III) and Ni(II) is in line with the expectation of the magnetic interactions between orthogonal d and f orbitals, antiferromagnetic Ni(II)-Ni(II) interactions are related to the wide Ni-O-Ni angles (∼102°) and quasi-planar conformation of the Ni2O2 core. PMID:24876072

  11. Complexity Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Sandra L.; Anderson, Beth C.

    To determine whether consensus existed among teachers about the complexity of common classroom materials, a survey was administered to 66 pre-service and in-service kindergarten and prekindergarten teachers. Participants were asked to rate 14 common classroom materials as simple, complex, or super-complex. Simple materials have one obvious part,…

  12. Communication complexity and information complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankratov, Denis

    Information complexity enables the use of information-theoretic tools in communication complexity theory. Prior to the results presented in this thesis, information complexity was mainly used for proving lower bounds and direct-sum theorems in the setting of communication complexity. We present three results that demonstrate new connections between information complexity and communication complexity. In the first contribution we thoroughly study the information complexity of the smallest nontrivial two-party function: the AND function. While computing the communication complexity of AND is trivial, computing its exact information complexity presents a major technical challenge. In overcoming this challenge, we reveal that information complexity gives rise to rich geometrical structures. Our analysis of information complexity relies on new analytic techniques and new characterizations of communication protocols. We also uncover a connection of information complexity to the theory of elliptic partial differential equations. Once we compute the exact information complexity of AND, we can compute exact communication complexity of several related functions on n-bit inputs with some additional technical work. Previous combinatorial and algebraic techniques could only prove bounds of the form theta( n). Interestingly, this level of precision is typical in the area of information theory, so our result demonstrates that this meta-property of precise bounds carries over to information complexity and in certain cases even to communication complexity. Our result does not only strengthen the lower bound on communication complexity of disjointness by making it more exact, but it also shows that information complexity provides the exact upper bound on communication complexity. In fact, this result is more general and applies to a whole class of communication problems. In the second contribution, we use self-reduction methods to prove strong lower bounds on the information

  13. Complex derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battiston, Stefano; Caldarelli, Guido; Georg, Co-Pierre; May, Robert; Stiglitz, Joseph

    2013-03-01

    The intrinsic complexity of the financial derivatives market has emerged as both an incentive to engage in it, and a key source of its inherent instability. Regulators now faced with the challenge of taming this beast may find inspiration in the budding science of complex systems.

  14. Designing Complexity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glanville, Ranulph

    2007-01-01

    This article considers the nature of complexity and design, as well as relationships between the two, and suggests that design may have much potential as an approach to improving human performance in situations seen as complex. It is developed against two backgrounds. The first is a world view that derives from second order cybernetics and radical…

  15. Carney Complex

    MedlinePlus

    ... Screening guidelines may change over time as new technologies are developed and more is learned about Carney complex. It is important to talk with your doctor about appropriate screening tests. Learn more about what to expect when having ...

  16. The use of phosphonates for constructing 3d-4f clusters at high oxidation states: synthesis and characterization of two unusual heterometallic CeMn complexes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mei; Yuan, Da-Qiang; Ma, Cheng-Bing; Yuan, Ming-Jian; Hu, Ming-Qiang; Li, Na; Chen, Hui; Chen, Chang-Neng; Liu, Qiu-Tian

    2010-08-21

    The use of phosphonic acids in the synthesis of mixed-metal CeMn complexes has led to the formation of two phosphonate complexes with unusual topologies: [Ce(2)Mn(6)O(6)(OH)(5)(t-BuPO(3))(6)(O(2)CMe)(3)] x 53 H(2)O (1 x 53 H(2)O) and [Ce(22)Mn(12)O(34)(MePO(3))(12)(O(2)CMe)(33)(OMe)(6)(NO(3))(H(2)O)(12)](n) (2). The two mixed-metal CeMn complexes were both prepared from a reaction system containing Mn(O(2)CMe)(2) and (NH(4))(2)[Ce(NO(3))(6)] with similar procedures except for using different phosphonic acids (tert-butylphosphonic acid and methylphosphonic acid, respectively) as coligands. Both complexes possess rare topology of triangular type, with compound 1 being a 0D discrete cluster, whereas, compound 2 is a 1D polymer. The octanuclear core of complex 1 is composed of three symmetry equivalent distorted cubanes {Ce(IV)(2)Mn(IV)(2)O(2)(OH)(2)} sharing a trigonal-bipyramidal unit {Ce(IV)(2)(OH)(3)} in the centre. Compound 2 is a one-dimensional chain polymer of identical Ce(22)Mn(12)O(34) units linked together by NO(3)(-) and MeCO(2)(-) groups, while the Ce(22)Mn(12)O(34) unit is constituted by two centrosymmetric Ce(9)(IV)Ce(2)(III)Mn(IV)(6)O(17) subunits, which features three identical distorted cubanes {Ce(IV)(2)Mn(IV)(2)O(4)} connecting to a central trigonal-bipyramidal unit {Ce(IV)(3)O(2)}, and two additional Ce(III) ions capping the top and bottom of the central trigonal bipyramid by six MePO(3)(2-) ligands. Complexes 1 and 2 are the first high-nuclearity Mn/Ln aggregates reported to date using phosphonates as ligands. Magnetic susceptibility measurements reveal that compound 1 displays dominant ferromagnetic interactions between the adjacent metal ions with the best fit parameters for the exchanges are J(1) = 6.186 cm(-1), J(2) = 4.172 cm(-1), and with a result of S = 9 ground state confirmed by the M versus HT(-1) data, which indicates the spins of all the six Mn(IV) ions in the cluster are parallel to each other. In contrast, the data for 2 reveals

  17. Complex networks: Patterns of complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2010-07-01

    The Turing mechanism provides a paradigm for the spontaneous generation of patterns in reaction-diffusion systems. A framework that describes Turing-pattern formation in the context of complex networks should provide a new basis for studying the phenomenon.

  18. Researching Complexity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumara, Dennis J.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses what Complexity Theory (presented as a rubric that collects theoretical understandings from a number of domains such as ecology, biology, neurology, and education) suggests about mind, selfhood, intelligence, and practices of reading, and the import of these reconceptualizations to reader-response researchers. Concludes that developing…

  19. Complex Clouds

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ...     View Larger Image The complex structure and beauty of polar clouds are highlighted by these images acquired ... Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer observes the daylit Earth continuously from pole to pole, and every 9 days views the entire globe ...

  20. Amorphic complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrmann, G.; Gröger, M.; Jäger, T.

    2016-02-01

    We introduce amorphic complexity as a new topological invariant that measures the complexity of dynamical systems in the regime of zero entropy. Its main purpose is to detect the very onset of disorder in the asymptotic behaviour. For instance, it gives positive value to Denjoy examples on the circle and Sturmian subshifts, while being zero for all isometries and Morse-Smale systems. After discussing basic properties and examples, we show that amorphic complexity and the underlying asymptotic separation numbers can be used to distinguish almost automorphic minimal systems from equicontinuous ones. For symbolic systems, amorphic complexity equals the box dimension of the associated Besicovitch space. In this context, we concentrate on regular Toeplitz flows and give a detailed description of the relation to the scaling behaviour of the densities of the p-skeletons. Finally, we take a look at strange non-chaotic attractors appearing in so-called pinched skew product systems. Continuous-time systems, more general group actions and the application to cut and project quasicrystals will be treated in subsequent work.

  1. Complex interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Régules, Sergio

    2016-04-01

    Complexity science – which describes phenomena such as collective and emergent behaviour – is the focus of a new centre where researchers are examining everything from the spread of influenza to what a healthy heartbeat looks like. Sergio de Régules reports.

  2. Managing Complexity

    SciTech Connect

    Chassin, David P.; Posse, Christian; Malard, Joel M.

    2004-08-01

    Physical analogs have shown considerable promise for understanding the behavior of complex adaptive systems, including macroeconomics, biological systems, social networks, and electric power markets. Many of today’s most challenging technical and policy questions can be reduced to a distributed economic control problem. Indeed, economically-based control of large-scale systems is founded on the conjecture that the price-based regulation (e.g., auctions, markets) results in an optimal allocation of resources and emergent optimal system control. This paper explores the state of the art in the use physical analogs for understanding the behavior of some econophysical systems and to deriving stable and robust control strategies for them. In particular we review and discussion applications of some analytic methods based on the thermodynamic metaphor according to which the interplay between system entropy and conservation laws gives rise to intuitive and governing global properties of complex systems that cannot be otherwise understood.

  3. Employment of 2,6-diacetylpyridine dioxime as a new route to high nuclearity metal clusters: Mn6 and Mn8 complexes.

    PubMed

    Stamatatos, Theocharis C; Luisi, Brian S; Moulton, Brian; Christou, George

    2008-02-01

    The employment of the anion of 2,6-diacetylpyridine dioxime (dapdoH2) as a pentadentate chelate in transition metal cluster chemistry is reported. The syntheses, crystal structures, and magnetochemical characterization are described for [Mn6O2(OMe)2(dapdo)2(dapdoH)4](ClO4)2 (1), [Mn6O2(OMe)2(dapdo)2(dapdoH)4][Ca(NO3)4] (2), and [Mn8O4(OH)4(OMe)2(N3)2(dapdo)2(dapdoH)2(H2O)2] (3). The reaction of [Mn3O(O2CMe)6(py)3](ClO4) with 3 equiv of dapdoH2 (with or without 2 equiv of NEt3) in MeOH gave 1. The same cation, but with a [Ca(NO3)4]2- anion, was found in complex 2, which was obtained from the reaction in MeOH between Mn(NO3)2, Ca(NO3)2, and dapdoH2 in the presence of NEt3. In contrast, addition of NaN3 to several reactions comprising MnCl2, dapdoH2, and NEt3 in MeOH gave the octanuclear complex 3. Complexes 1-3 all possess rare topologies and are mixed-valence: 2MnII, 4MnIII for 1 and 2, and 2MnII, 6MnIII for 3. The core of the cation of 1 and 2 consists of two edge-sharing Mn4 tetrahedra at the center of each of which is a micro4-O2- ion. Peripheral ligation is provided by two micro-OMe-, four micro-dapdoH-, and two micro3-dapdo2- groups. The core of 3 consists of two [MnIIMnIII3(micro3-O)2]7+ "butterfly" units linked together by one of the micro3-O2- ions, which thus becomes micro4. Peripheral ligation is provided by four micro-OMe-, two micro-OH-, two micro-dapdoH-, and two micro4-dapdo2- groups. Variable-temperature, solid-state dc and ac magnetization studies were carried out on complexes 1-3 in the 5.0-300 K range; the data for 1 and 2 are identical. Fitting of the obtained magnetization versus field (H) and temperature (T) data by matrix diagonalization and including only axial anisotropy (zero-field splitting, D) established that 1 possesses an S=5 ground state with D=-0.24 cm(-1). For 3, low-lying excited states precluded obtaining a good fit from the magnetization data, and the ground state was instead determined from the ac data, which indicated an S=1

  4. Complex Systems

    PubMed Central

    Goldberger, Ary L.

    2006-01-01

    Physiologic systems in health and disease display an extraordinary range of temporal behaviors and structural patterns that defy understanding based on linear constructs, reductionist strategies, and classical homeostasis. Application of concepts and computational tools derived from the contemporary study of complex systems, including nonlinear dynamics, fractals and “chaos theory,” is having an increasing impact on biology and medicine. This presentation provides a brief overview of an emerging area of biomedical research, including recent applications to cardiopulmonary medicine and chronic obstructive lung disease. PMID:16921107

  5. [Carney complex].

    PubMed

    Kacerovská, D; Michal, M; Síma, R; Grossmann, P; Kazakov, D V

    2011-10-01

    Carney complex is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disease, with at least two genetic loci including the PRKAR1A gene located on chromosome 17 and the CNC2 locus mapped to chromosome 2. Clinically this syndrome is characterized by multiple myxomas occurring in different anatomic sites, mucocutaneous pigmentary lesions, and a variety of non-endocrine and endocrine tumors, often causing endocrine abnormalities, involving various organs. Knowledge of morphological findings in CNC patients with their typical locations is necessary to raise suspicion of this syndrome by pathologists. Confirmation of the diagnosis allows regular clinical check-ups and early treatment of these patients. PMID:22145222

  6. Carney complex.

    PubMed

    Espiard, Stéphanie; Bertherat, Jérôme

    2013-01-01

    Carney complex is a rare, dominantly inherited multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome, affecting endocrine glands as the adrenal cortex (causing Cushing's syndrome), the pituitary and the thyroid. It is associated with many other nonendocrine tumors, including cardiac myxomas, testicular tumors, melanotic schwannoma, breast myxomatosis, and abnormal pigmentation (lentiginosis) or myxomas of the skin. The gene located on the CNC1 locus was identified 12 years ago as the regulatory subunit 1A (R1A) of the protein kinase A (PRKAR1A) located at 17q22-24. Inactivating heterozygous germline mutations of PRKAR1A are observed in about two thirds of Carney complex patients with some genotype-phenotype correlation useful for follow-up and prognosis. More rarely, mutations of phosphodiesterase genes have been reported in patients presenting mainly with Cushing's syndrome. In vitro and in vivo studies help to understand how R1A inactivation leads to tumorigenesis. PRKAR1A appears to be a relatively weak tumorigenic signal which can cooperate with other signaling pathways and tumor suppressors. PMID:23652670

  7. Cosmic Complexity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John C.

    2012-01-01

    What explains the extraordinary complexity of the observed universe, on all scales from quarks to the accelerating universe? My favorite explanation (which I certainty did not invent) ls that the fundamental laws of physics produce natural instability, energy flows, and chaos. Some call the result the Life Force, some note that the Earth is a living system itself (Gaia, a "tough bitch" according to Margulis), and some conclude that the observed complexity requires a supernatural explanation (of which we have many). But my dad was a statistician (of dairy cows) and he told me about cells and genes and evolution and chance when I was very small. So a scientist must look for me explanation of how nature's laws and statistics brought us into conscious existence. And how is that seemll"!gly Improbable events are actually happening a!1 the time? Well, the physicists have countless examples of natural instability, in which energy is released to power change from simplicity to complexity. One of the most common to see is that cooling water vapor below the freezing point produces snowflakes, no two alike, and all complex and beautiful. We see it often so we are not amazed. But physlc!sts have observed so many kinds of these changes from one structure to another (we call them phase transitions) that the Nobel Prize in 1992 could be awarded for understanding the mathematics of their common features. Now for a few examples of how the laws of nature produce the instabilities that lead to our own existence. First, the Big Bang (what an insufficient name!) apparently came from an instability, in which the "false vacuum" eventually decayed into the ordinary vacuum we have today, plus the most fundamental particles we know, the quarks and leptons. So the universe as a whole started with an instability. Then, a great expansion and cooling happened, and the loose quarks, finding themselves unstable too, bound themselves together into today's less elementary particles like protons and

  8. Cosmic Complexity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John C.

    2012-01-01

    What explains the extraordinary complexity of the observed universe, on all scales from quarks to the accelerating universe? My favorite explanation (which I certainty did not invent) ls that the fundamental laws of physics produce natural instability, energy flows, and chaos. Some call the result the Life Force, some note that the Earth is a living system itself (Gaia, a "tough bitch" according to Margulis), and some conclude that the observed complexity requires a supernatural explanation (of which we have many). But my dad was a statistician (of dairy cows) and he told me about cells and genes and evolution and chance when I was very small. So a scientist must look for me explanation of how nature's laws and statistics brought us into conscious existence. And how is that seemll"!gly Improbable events are actually happening a!1 the time? Well, the physicists have countless examples of natural instability, in which energy is released to power change from simplicity to complexity. One of the most common to see is that cooling water vapor below the freezing point produces snowflakes, no two alike, and all complex and beautiful. We see it often so we are not amazed. But physlc!sts have observed so many kinds of these changes from one structure to another (we call them phase transitions) that the Nobel Prize in 1992 could be awarded for understanding the mathematics of their common features. Now for a few examples of how the laws of nature produce the instabilities that lead to our own existence. First, the Big Bang (what an insufficient name!) apparently came from an instability, in which the "false vacuum" eventually decayed into the ordinary vacuum we have today, plus the most fundamental particles we know, the quarks and leptons. So the universe as a whole started with an instability. Then, a great expansion and cooling happened, and the loose quarks, finding themselves unstable too, bound themselves together into today's less elementary particles like protons and

  9. [Carney complex].

    PubMed

    Losada Grande, Eladio José; Al Kassam Martínez, Daniel; González Boillos, Margarita

    2011-01-01

    Carney complex (CNC) is an autosomal dominantly inherited syndrome characterized by spotty skin pigmentation, cardiac and cutaneous myxoma, and endocrine overactivity. Skin pigmentation includes lentigines and blue nevi. Myxomas may occur in breast, skin and heart. Cardiac myxomas may be multiple and occur in any cardiac chamber, and are more prone to recurrence. The most common endocrine gland manifestation is an ACTH-independent Cushing's syndrome due to primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD). PPNAD may occur isolated, with no other signs of CNC. Pituitary and thyroid glands and gonads are also involved. The PRKAR1A gene, located in 17 q22-24, encodes type 1A regulatory subunit of protein kinase A. Inactivating germline mutations of this gene are found in 70% of patients with CNC. PRKAR1A is a key component of the c-AMP signaling pathway that has been implicated in endocrine tumorigenesis. Many different mutations have been reported in the PRKAR1A gene. In almost all cases the sequence change was predicted to lead to a premature stop codon and the resultant mutant mRNA was subject to nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. There is no clear genotype-phenotype correlation in patients with CNC. Genetic analysis should be performed in all CNC index cases. All affected patients should be monitored for clinical signs of CNC at least once a year. Genetic diagnosis allows for more effective preparation of more appropriate and effective therapeutic strategies and genetic counseling for patients and gene carriers, and to avoid unnecessary tests to relatives not carrying the gene. PMID:21536508

  10. On State Complexes and Special Cube Complexes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Valerie J.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis presents the first steps toward a classification of non-positively curved cube complexes called state complexes. A "state complex" is a configuration space for a "reconfigurable system," i.e., an abstract system in which local movements occur in some discrete manner. Reconfigurable systems can be used to describe, for example,…

  11. Double exchange in a mixed-valent octanuclear iron cluster, [Fe8(μ4-O)4(μ-4-Cl-pz)12Cl4](-).

    PubMed

    Zueva, Ekaterina M; Herchel, Radovan; Borshch, Serguei A; Govor, Evgen V; Sameera, W M C; McDonald, Ross; Singleton, John; Krzystek, Jurek; Trávníček, Zdeněk; Sanakis, Yiannis; McGrady, John E; Raptis, Raphael G

    2014-08-01

    A combination of SQUID and pulsed high-field magnetometry is used to probe the nature of mixed valency in an Fe(II)Fe7(III) cluster. DFT-computed spin Hamiltonian parameters suggest that antiferromagnetic coupling dominates, and that electron transfer both between the four irons of the cubane core (t1) and between a cubane and three neighboring irons (t2) is significant. Simulations using the computed parameters are able to reproduce the key features of the measured effective magnetic moment, μeff(T), over the 2 < T < 300 K temperature range. In contrast, the field dependence of the molar magnetization, Mmol, measured at 0.4 K is inconsistent with substantial electron transfer: only values of t2∼ 0 place the separation between ground and first excited states in the region indicated by experiment. The apparent quenching of the cubane-outer electron transfer at very low temperatures indicates that vibronic coupling generates one or more shallow minima on the adiabatic potential energy surfaces that serve to trap the itinerant electron in the cubane core. PMID:24668287

  12. Cyanobacterial NADPH dehydrogenase complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Teruo; Mi, Hualing

    2007-07-01

    Cyanobacteria possess functionally distinct multiple NADPH dehydrogenase (NDH-1) complexes that are essential to CO2 uptake, photosystem-1 cyclic electron transport and respiration. The unique nature of cyanobacterial NDH-1 complexes is the presence of subunits involved in CO2 uptake. Other than CO2 uptake, chloroplastic NDH-1 complex has similar role as cyanobacterial NDH-1 complexes in photosystem-1 cyclic electron transport and respiration (chlororespiration). In this mini-review we focus on the structure and function of cyanobacterial NDH-1 complexes and their phylogeny. The function of chloroplastic NDH-1 complex and characteristics of plants defective in NDH-1 are also described forcomparison.

  13. Doxorubicin Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Doxorubicin lipid complex is used to treat ovarian cancer that has not improved or that has worsened after treatment with other medications. Doxorubicin lipid complex is also used to treat Kaposi's sarcoma ( ...

  14. Daunorubicin Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Daunorubicin lipid complex is used to treat advanced Kaposi's sarcoma (a type of cancer that causes abnormal tissue to ... body) related to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Daunorubicin lipid complex is in a class of medications called ...

  15. Vincristine Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Vincristine lipid complex is used to treat a certain type of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL; a type of cancer ... least two different treatments with other medications. Vincristine lipid complex is in a class of medications called ...

  16. Daunorubicin Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Daunorubicin lipid complex is used to treat advanced Kaposi's sarcoma (a type of cancer that causes abnormal tissue to grow on ... related to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Daunorubicin lipid complex is in a class of medications called anthracyclines. ...

  17. Cytarabine Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Cytarabine lipid complex is used to treat lymphomatous meningitis (a type of cancer in the covering of the spinal cord and brain). Cytarabine lipid complex is in a class of medications called antimetabolites. ...

  18. Irinotecan Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Irinotecan lipid complex is used in combination with other medications to treat pancreatic cancer that has spread to other parts of ... after treatment with other chemotherapy medications. Irinotecan lipid complex is in a class of antineoplastic medications called ...

  19. Complex regional pain syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic pain condition that can affect any area of the ... Bailey A, Audette JF. Complex regional pain syndrome. In: Frontera ... of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. 2nd ed. Philadelphia, ...

  20. Doxorubicin Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Doxorubicin lipid complex is used to treat ovarian cancer that has not improved or that has worsened after treatment with other medications. Doxorubicin lipid complex is also used to treat Kaposi's sarcoma (a ...

  1. Vincristine Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Vincristine lipid complex is used to treat a certain type of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL; a type of cancer of the ... two different treatments with other medications. Vincristine lipid complex is in a class of medications called vinca ...

  2. Irinotecan Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Irinotecan lipid complex is used in combination with other medications to treat pancreatic cancer that has spread ... has worsened after treatment with other chemotherapy medications. Irinotecan lipid complex is in a class of antineoplastic ...

  3. Oligocyclopentadienyl transition metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    de Azevedo, Cristina G.; Vollhardt, K. Peter C.

    2002-01-18

    Synthesis, characterization, and reactivity studies of oligocyclopentadienyl transition metal complexes, namely those of fulvalene, tercyclopentadienyl, quatercyclopentadienyl, and pentacyclopentadienyl(cyclopentadienyl) are the subject of this account. Thermal-, photo-, and redox chemistries of homo- and heteropolynuclear complexes are described.

  4. Complex-I-ty in aging

    PubMed Central

    Stork, Devon A.

    2016-01-01

    The role of mitochondrial complex I in aging has been studied in both C. elegans and Drosophila, where RNAi knock down of specific complex I subunits has been shown to extend lifespan. More recently, studies in Drosophila have shown that an increase in mitochondrial activity, including complex I-like activity, can also slow aging. In this review, we discuss this apparent paradox. Improved maintenance of mitochondrial activity, mitochondrial homeostasis, may be responsible for lifespan extension in both cases. Decreased electron transport chain activity caused by reducing complex I subunit expression prompts an increase in stress response signaling that leads to enhanced mitochondrial homeostasis during aging. Increased complex I activity, as well as mitochondrial biogenesis, is expected to both directly counteract the decline in mitochondrial health that occurs during aging and may also increase cellular NAD+ levels, which have been linked to mitochondrial homeostatic mechanisms through activation of sirtuins. We suggest that manipulations that increase or decrease complex I activity both converge on improved mitochondrial homeostasis during aging, resulting in prolonged lifespan. PMID:24961226

  5. Palladium (II) Hydrazopyrazolone Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Maraghy, Salah B.; Salib, K. A.; Stefan, Shaker L.

    1989-12-01

    Palladium (II) complexes with 1-pheny1-3-methy1-4-(arylhydrazo)-5- pyrazolone dyes were studied spectrophotometrically. Pd (II) forms 1:1 and 1:2 complexes with the ligands by the replacement of their phenolic and hydrazo protons. The ligands behave as tridentate in the 1:1 complex and as bidentate in the 1:2 complex. The sability constants of these complexes are dependent on the type of substituents in the benzene ring of the arylazo moiety.

  6. Heuristic dynamic complexity coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Škorupa, Jozef; Slowack, Jürgen; Mys, Stefaan; Lambert, Peter; Van de Walle, Rik

    2008-04-01

    Distributed video coding is a new video coding paradigm that shifts the computational intensive motion estimation from encoder to decoder. This results in a lightweight encoder and a complex decoder, as opposed to the predictive video coding scheme (e.g., MPEG-X and H.26X) with a complex encoder and a lightweight decoder. Both schemas, however, do not have the ability to adapt to varying complexity constraints imposed by encoder and decoder, which is an essential ability for applications targeting a wide range of devices with different complexity constraints or applications with temporary variable complexity constraints. Moreover, the effect of complexity adaptation on the overall compression performance is of great importance and has not yet been investigated. To address this need, we have developed a video coding system with the possibility to adapt itself to complexity constraints by dynamically sharing the motion estimation computations between both components. On this system we have studied the effect of the complexity distribution on the compression performance. This paper describes how motion estimation can be shared using heuristic dynamic complexity and how distribution of complexity affects the overall compression performance of the system. The results show that the complexity can indeed be shared between encoder and decoder in an efficient way at acceptable rate-distortion performance.

  7. A trimetallic strategy towards ZnDyCr and ZnDyCo single-ion magnets.

    PubMed

    Hu, Kong-Qiu; Jiang, Xiang; Wu, Shu-Qi; Liu, Cai-Ming; Cui, Ai-Li; Kou, Hui-Zhong

    2015-09-21

    Two cyano- and phenoxo-bridged octanuclear complexes ZnDyCo (complex ) and ZnDyCr (complex ) with diamagnetic Zn(ii) and Co(iii) are reported. Dy(iii) is surrounded by nine oxygen atoms of two [Zn(Me2valpn)] (Me2valpn(2-) = dianion of N,N'-2,2-dimethylpropylenebis(3-methoxysalicylideneimine)) and one water molecule. Magnetic studies reveal that both exhibit single-ion magnet (SIM) behavior with the energy barrier of 85.9 K for complex and 100.9 K for complex . PMID:26256244

  8. Assessing physiological complexity.

    PubMed

    Burggren, W W; Monticino, M G

    2005-09-01

    Physiologists both admire and fear complexity, but we have made relatively few attempts to understand it. Inherently complex systems are more difficult to study and less predictable. However, a deeper understanding of physiological systems can be achieved by modifying experimental design and analysis to account for complexity. We begin this essay with a tour of some mathematical views of complexity. After briefly exploring chaotic systems, information theory and emergent behavior, we reluctantly conclude that, while a mathematical view of complexity provides useful perspectives and some narrowly focused tools, there are too few generally practical take-home messages for physiologists studying complex systems. Consequently, we attempt to provide guidelines as to how complex systems might be best approached by physiologists. After describing complexity based on the sum of a physiological system's structures and processes, we highlight increasingly refined approaches based on the pattern of interactions between structures and processes. We then provide a series of examples illustrating how appreciating physiological complexity can improve physiological research, including choosing experimental models, guiding data collection, improving data interpretations and constructing more rigorous system models. Finally, we conclude with an invitation for physiologists, applied mathematicians and physicists to collaborate on describing, studying and learning from studies of physiological complexity. PMID:16109885

  9. Two giant stellar complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremov, Yu. N.; Efremov, E. Yu.

    Common star complexes are huge (0.3-1 kpc in diameter) groups of relatively young stars, associations and clusters. The complexes usually form regular chains along spiral arms of grand design galaxies, being evidently formed and supported by magneto- gravitational instability developing along an arm. Special attention is given to a few large complexes which have signatures of gravitational boundness, such as round shape and high central density. Concentrations of stars and clusters in such a complex in M51 galaxy were found in this paper; we concluded it is possible to suggest that the complex is gravitationally bound. It is also stressed that some properties of the giant complex in NGC 6946 (such as its semicircular and sharp Western edge) are still enigmatic.

  10. Hypergraph coloring complexes.

    PubMed

    Breuer, Felix; Dall, Aaron; Kubitzke, Martina

    2012-08-28

    The aim of this paper is to generalize the notion of the coloring complex of a graph to hypergraphs. We present three different interpretations of those complexes-a purely combinatorial one and two geometric ones. It is shown, that most of the properties, which are known to be true for coloring complexes of graphs, break down in this more general setting, e.g., Cohen-Macaulayness and partitionability. Nevertheless, we are able to provide bounds for the [Formula: see text]- and [Formula: see text]-vectors of those complexes which yield new bounds on chromatic polynomials of hypergraphs. Moreover, though it is proven that the coloring complex of a hypergraph has a wedge decomposition, we provide an example showing that in general this decomposition is not homotopy equivalent to a wedge of spheres. In addition, we can completely characterize those hypergraphs whose coloring complex is connected. PMID:23483700

  11. Artistic forms and complexity.

    PubMed

    Boon, J-P; Casti, J; Taylor, R P

    2011-04-01

    We discuss the inter-relationship between various concepts of complexity by introducing a complexity 'triangle' featuring objective complexity, subjective complexity and social complexity. Their connections are explored using visual and musical compositions of art. As examples, we quantify the complexity embedded within the paintings of the Jackson Pollock and the musical works of Johann Sebastian Bach. We discuss the challenges inherent in comparisons of the spatial patterns created by Pollock and the sonic patterns created by Bach, including the differing roles that time plays in these investigations. Our results draw attention to some common intriguing characteristics suggesting 'universality' and conjecturing that the fractal nature of art might have an intrinsic value of more general significance. PMID:21382264

  12. Complexation of Optoelectronic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boreisho, A. S.; Il‧in, M. Yu.; Konyaev, M. A.; Mikhailenko, A. S.; Morozov, A. V.; Strakhov, S. Yu.

    2016-06-01

    Problems of increasing the efficiency and the functionality of complex optoelectronic systems for monitoring real atmospheric conditions and of their use are discussed. It is shown by the example of a meteorological complex comprising an infrared wind-sensing lidar and an X-range Doppler radar that the complexation of probing systems working in different electromagnetic-radiation ranges opens up new opportunities for determining the meteorological parameters of a turbulent atmosphere and investigating the interaction of radiation with it.

  13. Complexity and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Alberto; Gómez, Carlos; Hornero, Roberto; López-Ibor, Juan José

    2013-08-01

    Complexity estimators have been broadly utilized in schizophrenia investigation. Early studies reported increased complexity in schizophrenia patients, associated with a higher variability or "irregularity" of their brain signals. However, further investigations showed reduced complexities, thus introducing a clear divergence. Nowadays, both increased and reduced complexity values are reported. The explanation of such divergence is a critical issue to understand the role of complexity measures in schizophrenia research. Considering previous arguments a complementary hypothesis is advanced: if the increased irregularity of schizophrenia patients' neurophysiological activity is assumed, a "natural" tendency to increased complexity in EEG and MEG scans should be expected, probably reflecting an abnormal neuronal firing pattern in some critical regions such as the frontal lobes. This "natural" tendency to increased complexity might be modulated by the interaction of three main factors: medication effects, symptomatology, and age effects. Therefore, young, medication-naïve, and highly symptomatic (positive symptoms) patients are expected to exhibit increased complexities. More importantly, the investigation of these interacting factors by means of complexity estimators might help to elucidate some of the neuropathological processes involved in schizophrenia. PMID:22507763

  14. Performance Improvement Assuming Complexity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowland, Gordon

    2007-01-01

    Individual performers, work teams, and organizations may be considered complex adaptive systems, while most current human performance technologies appear to assume simple determinism. This article explores the apparent mismatch and speculates on future efforts to enhance performance if complexity rather than simplicity is assumed. Included are…

  15. U1A Complex

    SciTech Connect

    2014-10-28

    Some of the most sophisticated experiments in the stockpile stewardship program are conducted in an environmentally safe manner, nearly 1000 feet below the ground at the site. The U1a complex a sprawling underground laboratory and tunnel complex is home to a number of unique capabilities.

  16. Complexity and Relations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancaster, Jeanette Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    A central feature of complexity is that it is based on non-linear, recursive relations. However, in most current accounts of complexity such relations, while non-linear, are based on the reductive relations of a Newtonian onto-epistemological framework. This means that the systems that are emergent from the workings of such relations are a…

  17. The Tom Core Complex

    PubMed Central

    Ahting, Uwe; Thun, Clemens; Hegerl, Reiner; Typke, Dieter; Nargang, Frank E.; Neupert, Walter; Nussberger, Stephan

    1999-01-01

    Translocation of nuclear-encoded preproteins across the outer membrane of mitochondria is mediated by the multicomponent transmembrane TOM complex. We have isolated the TOM core complex of Neurospora crassa by removing the receptors Tom70 and Tom20 from the isolated TOM holo complex by treatment with the detergent dodecyl maltoside. It consists of Tom40, Tom22, and the small Tom components, Tom6 and Tom7. This core complex was also purified directly from mitochondria after solubilization with dodecyl maltoside. The TOM core complex has the characteristics of the general insertion pore; it contains high-conductance channels and binds preprotein in a targeting sequence-dependent manner. It forms a double ring structure that, in contrast to the holo complex, lacks the third density seen in the latter particles. Three-dimensional reconstruction by electron tomography exhibits two open pores traversing the complex with a diameter of ∼2.1 nm and a height of ∼7 nm. Tom40 is the key structural element of the TOM core complex. PMID:10579717

  18. Gold trifluoromethyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Gil-Rubio, Juan; Vicente, José

    2015-12-01

    This article reviews the synthesis, reactivity and applications of gold trifluoromethyl complexes, which are the only isolated perfluoroalkyl complexes of gold. The most reported examples are neutral Au(i) complexes of the type [Au(CF3)L], whereas only two Au(ii) trifluoromethyl complexes have been reported, both being diamagnetic and containing a strong Au-Au bond. A number of Au(iii) trifluoromethyl complexes have been prepared by oxidative addition of halogens or iodotrifluoromethane to Au(i) complexes or, in a few cases, by transmetallation reactions. Owing to the limitations of the available synthetic methods, a lower number of examples is known, particularly for the oxidation states (ii) and (iii). Gold trifluoromethyl complexes present singular characteristics, such as thermal stability, strong Au-C bonds and, in some cases, reactive α-C-F bonds. Some of the Au(iii) complexes reported, show unusually easy reductive elimination reactions of trifluoromethylated products which could be applied in the development of gold-catalyzed processes for the trifluoromethylation of organic compounds. PMID:26169553

  19. Freestanding Complex Optical Scanners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frisbie, David A.

    A complex freestanding optical mark recognition (OMR) scanner is one which is not on-line to an external processor; it has intelligence stemming from an internal processor located within the unit or system. The advantages and disadvantages of a complex OMR can best be assessed after identifying the scanning needs and constraints of the potential…

  20. COMPLEXITY IN ECOLOGICAL SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The enormous complexity of ecosystems is generally obvious under even the most cursory examination. In the modern world, this complexity is further augmented by the linkage of ecosystems to economic and social systems through the human use of the environment for technological pu...

  1. Bacterial formate hydrogenlyase complex

    PubMed Central

    McDowall, Jennifer S.; Murphy, Bonnie J.; Haumann, Michael; Palmer, Tracy; Armstrong, Fraser A.; Sargent, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Under anaerobic conditions, Escherichia coli can carry out a mixed-acid fermentation that ultimately produces molecular hydrogen. The enzyme directly responsible for hydrogen production is the membrane-bound formate hydrogenlyase (FHL) complex, which links formate oxidation to proton reduction and has evolutionary links to Complex I, the NADH:quinone oxidoreductase. Although the genetics, maturation, and some biochemistry of FHL are understood, the protein complex has never been isolated in an intact form to allow biochemical analysis. In this work, genetic tools are reported that allow the facile isolation of FHL in a single chromatographic step. The core complex is shown to comprise HycE (a [NiFe] hydrogenase component termed Hyd-3), FdhF (the molybdenum-dependent formate dehydrogenase-H), and three iron-sulfur proteins: HycB, HycF, and HycG. A proportion of this core complex remains associated with HycC and HycD, which are polytopic integral membrane proteins believed to anchor the core complex to the cytoplasmic side of the membrane. As isolated, the FHL complex retains formate hydrogenlyase activity in vitro. Protein film electrochemistry experiments on Hyd-3 demonstrate that it has a unique ability among [NiFe] hydrogenases to catalyze production of H2 even at high partial pressures of H2. Understanding and harnessing the activity of the FHL complex is critical to advancing future biohydrogen research efforts. PMID:25157147

  2. U1A Complex

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2015-01-09

    Some of the most sophisticated experiments in the stockpile stewardship program are conducted in an environmentally safe manner, nearly 1000 feet below the ground at the site. The U1a complex a sprawling underground laboratory and tunnel complex is home to a number of unique capabilities.

  3. Visual Complexity: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donderi, Don C.

    2006-01-01

    The idea of visual complexity, the history of its measurement, and its implications for behavior are reviewed, starting with structuralism and Gestalt psychology at the beginning of the 20th century and ending with visual complexity theory, perceptual learning theory, and neural circuit theory at the beginning of the 21st. Evidence is drawn from…

  4. Complexity in Picture Books

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sierschynski, Jarek; Louie, Belinda; Pughe, Bronwyn

    2015-01-01

    One of the key requirements of Common Core State Standards (CCSS) in English Language Arts is that students are able to read and access complex texts across all grade levels. The CCSS authors emphasize both the limitations and lack of accuracy in the current CCSS model of text complexity, calling for the development of new frameworks. In response…

  5. Leading healthcare in complexity.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Jeffrey

    2014-12-01

    Healthcare institutions and providers are in complexity. Networks of interconnections from relationships and technology create conditions in which interdependencies and non-linear dynamics lead to surprising, unpredictable outcomes. Previous effective approaches to leadership, focusing on top-down bureaucratic methods, are no longer effective. Leading in complexity requires leaders to accept the complexity, create an adaptive space in which innovation and creativity can flourish and then integrate the successful practices that emerge into the formal organizational structure. Several methods for doing adaptive space work will be discussed. Readers will be able to contrast traditional leadership approaches with leading in complexity. They will learn new behaviours that are required of complexity leaders, along with challenges they will face, often from other leaders within the organization. PMID:25815410

  6. Nickel Hydride Complexes.

    PubMed

    Eberhardt, Nathan A; Guan, Hairong

    2016-08-10

    Nickel hydride complexes, defined herein as any molecules bearing a nickel hydrogen bond, are crucial intermediates in numerous nickel-catalyzed reactions. Some of them are also synthetic models of nickel-containing enzymes such as [NiFe]-hydrogenase. The overall objective of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of this specific type of hydride complexes, which has been studied extensively in recent years. This review begins with the significance and a very brief history of nickel hydride complexes, followed by various methods and spectroscopic or crystallographic tools used to synthesize and characterize these complexes. Also discussed are stoichiometric reactions involving nickel hydride complexes and how some of these reactions are developed into catalytic processes. PMID:27437790

  7. [Complexity: an introduction].

    PubMed

    Gómez, Carlos Alberto Palacio; Jaramillo, Francisco Luis Ochoa

    2011-01-01

    Complexity appears in the twentieth century as a way to understand many phenomena that are perceived as chaotic and complex from classical thought, which still persist in our way of explaining the world. Its purpose is to study the complex and adaptive systems that are sensitive to initial conditions. Some of the characteristics of complex thought are systemic perspective, autopoiesis, self-organization, emergent properties, unpredictability of the systems, analogic thought, and the complementarity of the phenomena, among others. Living systems respond to a complex logic, and in that sense, our vision of human populations and patients, and how we try to solve problems and human diseases, should be open to the possibilities that arise from this form of understand the world. PMID:21503430

  8. Profil'-1 measuring complex

    SciTech Connect

    Andrianov, V.R.; Petrov, A.P.

    1985-04-01

    This paper describes the Profil'-1 hydroacoustic measuring complex. The complex provides documentary information on the bottom profile of reservoirs, the configuration and geometric dimensions of underwater trenches, the spatial position of pipes in uncovered or washedout trenches, the thickness of a layer covering underwater pipes, etc. The complex can also be used to solve other industrial problems such as hydraulic exploration and searching for sunken objects. The Profil'-1 complex is designed for use on board small craft under field conditions with periodic transportation from storage bases to the operating location and back. The complex uses an echo-pulse method for determining the distance and coordinates of objects with the aid of an ultrasonic transceiver in an aqueous medium. Structurally, the complex consists of four main units: a BA-1 vertical sounding antenna unit; a BAS-1 antenna scanning unit; a BFOS-1 signal shaping and processing unit, and a BR-1 recording unit. Use of the complex in pipeline construction and the oil and gas industry will provide a considerable economic gain by reducing the number of diver inspections of underwater pipelines.

  9. Selenophene transition metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    White, C.J.

    1994-07-27

    This research shows that selenophene transition metal complexes have a chemistry that is similar to their thiophene analogs. Selenophene coordination has been demonstrated and confirmed by molecular structure in both the {eta}{sup 5}- and the {eta}{sup 1}(Se)-coordination modes. The reaction chemistry of selenophene complexes closely resembles that of the analogous thiophene complexes. One major difference, however, is that selenophene is a better donor ligand than thiophene making the selenophene complexes more stable than the corresponding thiophene complexes. The {sup 77}Se NMR chemical shift values for selenophene complexes fall within distinct regions primarily depending on the coordination mode of the selenophene ligand. In the final paper, the C-H bond activation of {eta}{sup 1}(S)-bound thiophenes, {eta}{sup 1}(S)-benzothiophene and {eta}{sup 1}(Se)-bound selenophenes has been demonstrated. The deprotonation and rearrangement of the {eta}{sup 1}(E)-bound ligand to the carbon bound L-yl complex readily occurs in the presence of base. Reprotonation with a strong acid gives a carbene complex that is unreactive towards nucleophilic attack at the carbene carbon and is stable towards exposure to air. The molecular structure of [Cp(NO)(PPh{sub 3})Re(2-benzothioenylcarbene)]O{sub 3}SCF{sub 3} was determined and contains a Re-C bond with substantial double bond character. Methyl substitution for the thienylcarbene or selenylcarbene gives a carbene that rearranges thermally to give back the {eta}{sup 1}(E)-bound complex. Based on these model reactions, a new mechanism for the H/D exchange of thiophene over the hydrodesulfurization catalyst has been proposed.

  10. Afterglow Complex Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Samarian, A. A.; Boufendi, L.; Mikikian, M.

    2008-09-07

    The review of the first detailed experimental and theoretical studies of complex plasma in RF discharge afterglow is presented. The studies have been done in a frame of FAST collaborative research project between Complex Plasma Laboratory of the University of Sydney and the GREMI laboratory of Universite d'Orleans. We examined the existing models of plasma decay, presents experimental observations of dust dynamics under different afterglow complex plasma conditions, presents the experimental data obtained (in particular the presence of positively charged particles in discharge afterglow), discusses the use of dust particles as a probe to study the diffusion losses in afterglow plasmas.

  11. Complexity and robustness

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, J. M.; Doyle, John

    2002-01-01

    Highly optimized tolerance (HOT) was recently introduced as a conceptual framework to study fundamental aspects of complexity. HOT is motivated primarily by systems from biology and engineering and emphasizes, (i) highly structured, nongeneric, self-dissimilar internal configurations, and (ii) robust yet fragile external behavior. HOT claims these are the most important features of complexity and not accidents of evolution or artifices of engineering design but are inevitably intertwined and mutually reinforcing. In the spirit of this collection, our paper contrasts HOT with alternative perspectives on complexity, drawing on real-world examples and also model systems, particularly those from self-organized criticality. PMID:11875207

  12. Controllability of Complex Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slotine, Jean-Jacques

    2013-03-01

    We review recent work on controllability of complex systems. We also discuss the interplay of our results with questions of synchronization, and point out key directions of future research. Work done in collaboration with Yang-Yu Liu, Center for Complex Network Research and Departments of Physics, Computer Science and Biology, Northeastern University and Center for Cancer Systems Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute; and Albert-László Barabási, Center for Complex Network Research and Departments of Physics, Computer Science and Biology, Northeastern University; Center for Cancer Systems Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute; and Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School.

  13. Complexity and forensic pathology.

    PubMed

    Jones, Richard Martin

    2015-12-01

    It has become increasingly apparent that nonlinearity and complexity are the norm in human physiological systems, the relevance of which is informing an enhanced understanding of basic pathological processes such as inflammation, the host response to severe trauma, and critical illness. This article will explore how an understanding of nonlinear systems and complexity might inform the study of the pathophysiology of deaths of medicolegal interest, and how 'complexity thinking' might usefully be incorporated into modern forensic medicine and forensic pathology research, education and practice. PMID:26372537

  14. Complex intuitionistic fuzzy sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkouri, Abdulazeez (Moh'd. Jumah) S.; Salleh, Abdul Razak

    2012-09-01

    This paper presents a new concept of complex intuitionistic fuzzy set (CIFS) which is generalized from the innovative concept of a complex fuzzy set (CFS) by adding the non-membership term to the definition of CFS. The novelty of CIFS lies in its ability for membership and non-membership functions to achieve more range of values. The ranges of values are extended to the unit circle in complex plane for both membership and non-membership functions instead of [0, 1] as in the conventional intuitionistic fuzzy functions. We define basic operations namely complement, union, and intersection on CIFSs. Properties of these operations are derived.

  15. Complex equiangular tight frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tropp, Joel A.

    2005-08-01

    A complex equiangular tight frame (ETF) is a tight frame consisting of N unit vectors in Cd whose absolute inner products are identical. One may view complex ETFs as a natural geometric generalization of an orthonormal basis. Numerical evidence suggests that these objects do not arise for most pairs (d, N). The goal of this paper is to develop conditions on (d, N) under which complex ETFs can exist. In particular, this work concentrates on the class of harmonic ETFs, in which the components of the frame vectors are roots of unity. In this case, it is possible to leverage field theory to obtain stringent restrictions on the possible values for (d, N).

  16. A complex legacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Cristopher

    2011-11-01

    In his tragically short life, Alan Turing helped define what computing machines are capable of, and where they reach inherent limits. His legacy is still felt every day, in areas ranging from computational complexity theory to cryptography and quantum computing.

  17. Specialist complex care.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Susan

    2016-08-01

    I agree with your editorial on how NHS England and the Department of Health (DH) have failed to realise that specialist care for complex diseases requires experienced and knowledgeable support. PMID:27484551

  18. Complexity at mesoscopic lengthscale.

    PubMed

    Egami, T

    2015-09-01

    Modern materials are often complex in the structure at mesoscale. The method of pair-density function (PDF) is a powerful tool to characterize mesoscopic structure, bridging short- and long-range structures. PMID:26306189

  19. Pigment-protein complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Siegelman, H W

    1980-01-01

    The photosynthetically-active pigment protein complexes of procaryotes and eucaryotes include chlorophyll proteins, carotenochlorophyll proteins, and biliproteins. They are either integral components or attached to photosynthetic membranes. Detergents are frequently required to solubilize the pigment-protein complexes. The membrane localization and detergent solubilization strongly suggest that the pigment-protein complexes are bound to the membranes by hydrophobic interactions. Hydrophobic interactions of proteins are characterized by an increase in entropy. Their bonding energy is directly related to temperature and ionic strength. Hydrophobic-interaction chromatography, a relatively new separation procedure, can furnish an important method for the purification of pigment-protein complexes. Phycobilisome purification and properties provide an example of the need to maintain hydrophobic interactions to preserve structure and function.

  20. Complex Flow Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2012-05-01

    This report documents findings from a workshop on the impacts of complex wind flows in and out of wind turbine environments, the research needs, and the challenges of meteorological and engineering modeling at regional, wind plant, and wind turbine scales.

  1. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic pain condition. It causes intense pain, usually in the arms, hands, legs, or feet. ... in skin temperature, color, or texture Intense burning pain Extreme skin sensitivity Swelling and stiffness in affected ...

  2. Complex coacervate core micelles.

    PubMed

    Voets, Ilja K; de Keizer, Arie; Cohen Stuart, Martien A

    2009-01-01

    In this review we present an overview of the literature on the co-assembly of neutral-ionic block, graft, and random copolymers with oppositely charged species in aqueous solution. Oppositely charged species include synthetic (co)polymers of various architectures, biopolymers - such as proteins, enzymes and DNA - multivalent ions, metallic nanoparticles, low molecular weight surfactants, polyelectrolyte block copolymer micelles, metallo-supramolecular polymers, equilibrium polymers, etcetera. The resultant structures are termed complex coacervate core/polyion complex/block ionomer complex/interpolyelectrolyte complex micelles (or vesicles); i.e., in short C3Ms (or C3Vs) and PIC, BIC or IPEC micelles (and vesicles). Formation, structure, dynamics, properties, and function will be discussed. We focus on experimental work; theory and modelling will not be discussed. Recent developments in applications and micelles with heterogeneous coronas are emphasized. PMID:19038373

  3. Reconstruction Using Witness Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Oudot, Steve Y.

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel reconstruction algorithm that, given an input point set sampled from an object S, builds a one-parameter family of complexes that approximate S at different scales. At a high level, our method is very similar in spirit to Chew’s surface meshing algorithm, with one notable difference though: the restricted Delaunay triangulation is replaced by the witness complex, which makes our algorithm applicable in any metric space. To prove its correctness on curves and surfaces, we highlight the relationship between the witness complex and the restricted Delaunay triangulation in 2d and in 3d. Specifically, we prove that both complexes are equal in 2d and closely related in 3d, under some mild sampling assumptions. PMID:21643440

  4. Reconstruction Using Witness Complexes.

    PubMed

    Guibas, Leonidas J; Oudot, Steve Y

    2008-10-01

    We present a novel reconstruction algorithm that, given an input point set sampled from an object S, builds a one-parameter family of complexes that approximate S at different scales. At a high level, our method is very similar in spirit to Chew's surface meshing algorithm, with one notable difference though: the restricted Delaunay triangulation is replaced by the witness complex, which makes our algorithm applicable in any metric space. To prove its correctness on curves and surfaces, we highlight the relationship between the witness complex and the restricted Delaunay triangulation in 2d and in 3d. Specifically, we prove that both complexes are equal in 2d and closely related in 3d, under some mild sampling assumptions. PMID:21643440

  5. Cytarabine Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Cytarabine lipid complex is used to treat lymphomatous meningitis (a type of cancer in the covering of ... to take.tell your doctor if you have meningitis. Your doctor will probably not want you to ...

  6. Inside the complexity labyrinth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Gordon

    2010-02-01

    Although the world we live in is complex, complexity as a science does not have a long history. For generations, most physicists tried to understand everything in terms of interactions between pairs of idealized "test particles". Then, about a 100 years ago, Henri Poincaré pointed out that a fully interacting three-body system was not just the sum of its three component pairs. The famous "three-body problem" was born.

  7. Complex/Symplectic Mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, Wu-yen; Kachru, Shamit; Tomasiello, Alessandro; /Stanford U., ITP

    2005-10-28

    We construct a class of symplectic non-Kaehler and complex non-Kaehler string theory vacua, extending and providing evidence for an earlier suggestion by Polchinski and Strominger. The class admits a mirror pairing by construction. Comparing hints from a variety of sources, including ten-dimensional supergravity and KK reduction on SU(3)-structure manifolds, suggests a picture in which string theory extends Reid's fantasy to connect classes of both complex non-Kaehler and symplectic non-Kaehler manifolds.

  8. Interglacial complex and solcomplex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirmer, Wolfgang

    2010-03-01

    All younger Pleistocene interglacials form interglacial complexes. The term interglacial complex is a short term for a tight complex of interglacials, interstadials and breviglacials, separating a complex of warm periods from the long glacial periods (euglacials). In the terrestric environment the interglacial complexes are represented by soil clusters (solcomplexes). Therein which occur interglacial and interstadial soils of different types in the loess environment separated by thin beds of loess or loess derivates (breviglacials). This article considers the mutilation and simulation of solcomplexes. Frequently, fossil solcomplexes present themselves as diminished to a few soils or to one single soil. This mutilation of solcomplexes can be due to soil convergence (soils of different warm periods — interglacials, interstadials — merge to form optically one soil), syn-solcomplex erosion or post-solcomplex erosion and sometimes to soil disguise. Conversely solcomplexes may be simulated by narrowing of soils which belong to different interglacial complexes and moreover by soil divergence (splitting of a soil of one single warm period by an interlayer of rock) or by reworked soil sediment.

  9. Synchronization in complex dynamical networks coupled with complex chaotic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Qiang; Xie, Cheng-Jun; Wang, Bo

    2015-11-01

    This paper investigates synchronization in complex dynamical networks with time delay and perturbation. The node of complex dynamical networks is composed of complex chaotic system. A complex feedback controller is designed to realize different component of complex state variable synchronize up to different scaling complex function when complex dynamical networks realize synchronization. The synchronization scaling function is changed from real field to complex field. Synchronization in complex dynamical networks with constant delay and time-varying coupling delay are investigated, respectively. Numerical simulations show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  10. Cell complexes through time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klette, Reinhard

    2000-10-01

    The history of cell complexes is closely related to the birth and development of topology in general. Johann Benedict Listing (1802 - 1882) introduced the term 'topology' into mathematics in a paper published in 1847, and he also defined cell complexes for the first time in a paper published in 1862. Carl Friedrich Gauss (1777 - 1855) is often cited as the one who initiated these ideas, but he did not publish either on topology or on cell complexes. The pioneering work of Leonhard Euler (1707 - 1783) on graphs is also often cited as the birth of topology, and Euler's work was cited by Listing in 1862 as a stimulus for his research on cell complexes. There are different branches in topology which have little in common: point set topology, algebraic topology, differential topology etc. Confusion may arise if just 'topology' is specified, without clarifying the used concept. Topological subjects in mathematics are often related to continuous models, and therefore quite irrelevant to computer based solutions in image analysis. Compared to this, only a minority of topology publications in mathematics addresses discrete spaces which are appropriate for computer-based image analysis. In these cases, often the notion of a cell complex plays a crucial role. This paper briefly reports on a few of these publications. This paper is not intended to cover the very lively progress in cell complex studies within the context of image analysis during the last two decades. Basically it stops its historic review at the time when this subject in image analysis research gained speed in 1980 - 1990. As a general point of view, the paper indicates that image analysis contributes to a fusion of topological concepts, the geometric and the abstract cell structure approach and point set topology, which may lead towards new problems for the study of topologies defined on geometric or abstract cell complexes.

  11. Complexes and imagination.

    PubMed

    Kast, Verena

    2014-11-01

    Fantasies as imaginative activities are seen by Jung as expressions of psychic energy. In the various descriptions of active imagination the observation of the inner image and the dialogue with inner figures, if possible, are important. The model of symbol formation, as Jung describes it, can be experienced in doing active imagination. There is a correspondence between Jung's understanding of complexes and our imaginations: complexes develop a fantasy life. Complex episodes are narratives of difficult dysfunctional relationship episodes that have occurred repeatedly and are internalized with episodic memory. This means that the whole complex episode (the image for the child and the image for the aggressor, connected with emotions) is internalized and can get constellated in everyday relationship. Therefore inner dialogues do not necessarily qualify as active imaginations, often they are the expression of complex-episodes, very similar to fruitless soliloquies. If imaginations of this kind are repeated, new symbols and new possibilities of behaviour are not found. On the contrary, old patterns of behaviour and fantasies are perpetuated and become cemented. Imaginations of this kind need an intervention by the analyst. In clinical examples different kinds of imaginations are discussed. PMID:25331506

  12. Hydridomethyl iridium complex

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, Robert G.; Buchanan, J. Michael; Stryker, Jeffrey M.; Wax, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    A process for functionalizing methane comprising: (a) reacting methane with a hydridoalkyl metal complex of the formula: CpIr[P(R.sub.1).sub.3 ]H(R.sub.2) wherein Cp represents a cyclopentadienyl or alkylcyclopentadienyl radical having from 1 to 5 carbon atoms; Ir represents an iridium atom; P represents a phosphorus atom; R.sub.1 represents an alkyl group; R.sub.2 represents an alkyl group having at least two carbon atoms; and H represents a hydrogen atom, in the presence of a liquid alkane R.sub.3 H having at least three carbon atoms to form a hydridomethyl complex of the formula: CpIr[P(R.sub.1).sub.3 ]HMe where Me represents a methyl radical. (b) reacting said hydridomethyl complex with an organic halogenating agent such as a tetrahalomethane or a haloform of the formulas: CX'X"X'"X"" or CHX'X"X'"; wherein X', X", X"', and X"" represent halogens selected from bromine, iodine and chlorine, to halomethyl complex of step (a) having the formula: CpIr[P(R.sub.1).sub.3 ]MeX: (c) reacting said halomethyl complex with a mercuric halide of the formula HgX.sub.2 to form a methyl mercuric halide of the formula HgMeX; and (d) reacting said methyl mercuric halide with a molecular halogen of the formula X.sub.2 to form methyl halide.

  13. Controllability of Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Slotine, Jean-Jacques; Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo

    2011-03-01

    The ultimate proof of our understanding of natural or technological systems is reflected in our ability to control them. While control theory offers mathematical tools to steer engineered systems towards a desired state, we lack a general framework to control complex self-organized systems, like the regulatory network of a cell or the Internet. Here we develop analytical tools to study the controllability of an arbitrary complex directed network, identifying the set of driver nodes whose time-dependent control can guide the system's dynamics. We apply these tools to real and model networks, finding that sparse inhomogeneous networks, which emerge in many real complex systems, are the most difficult to control. In contrast, dense and homogeneous networks can be controlled via a few driver nodes. Counterintuitively, we find that in both model and real systems the driver nodes tend to avoid the hubs. We show that the robustness of control to link failure is determined by a core percolation problem, helping us understand why many complex systems are relatively insensitive to link deletion. The developed approach offers a framework to address the controllability of an arbitrary network, representing a key step towards the eventual control of complex systems.

  14. Quantum Complexity in Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskaran, G.

    Carbon has a unique position among elements in the periodic table. It produces an allotrope, graphene, a mechanically robust two dimensional semimetal. The multifarious properties that graphene exhibits has few parallels among elemental metals. From simplicity, namely carbon atoms connected by pure sp2 bonds, a wealth of novel quantum properties emerge. In classical complex systems such as a spin glass or a finance market, several competing agents or elements are responsible for unanticipated and difficult to predict emergent properties. The complex (sic) structure of quantum mechanics is responsbile for an unanticipated set of emergent properties in graphene. We call this quantum complexity. In fact, most quantum systems, phenomena and modern quantum field theory could be viewed as examples of quantum complexity. After giving a brief introduction to the quantum complexity we focus on our own work, which indicates the breadth in the type of quantum phenomena that graphene could support. We review our theoretical suggestions of, (i) spin-1 collective mode in netural graphene, (ii) relativistic type of phenomena in crossed electric and magnetic fields, (iii) room temperature superconductivity in doped graphene and (iv) composite Fermi sea in neutral graphene in uniform magnetic field and (v) two-channel Kondo effect. Except for the relativistic type of phenomena, the rest depend in a fundamental way on a weak electron correlation that exists in the broad two-dimensional band of graphene.

  15. Nonergodic complexity management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccinini, Nicola; Lambert, David; West, Bruce J.; Bologna, Mauro; Grigolini, Paolo

    2016-06-01

    Linear response theory, the backbone of nonequilibrium statistical physics, has recently been extended to explain how and why nonergodic renewal processes are insensitive to simple perturbations, such as in habituation. It was established that a permanent correlation results between an external stimulus and the response of a complex system generating nonergodic renewal processes, when the stimulus is a similar nonergodic process. This is the principle of complexity management, whose proof relies on ensemble distribution functions. Herein we extend the proof to the nonergodic case using time averages and a single time series, hence making it usable in real life situations where ensemble averages cannot be performed because of the very nature of the complex systems being studied.

  16. Synchronization in complex networks

    SciTech Connect

    Arenas, A.; Diaz-Guilera, A.; Moreno, Y.; Zhou, C.; Kurths, J.

    2007-12-12

    Synchronization processes in populations of locally interacting elements are in the focus of intense research in physical, biological, chemical, technological and social systems. The many efforts devoted to understand synchronization phenomena in natural systems take now advantage of the recent theory of complex networks. In this review, we report the advances in the comprehension of synchronization phenomena when oscillating elements are constrained to interact in a complex network topology. We also overview the new emergent features coming out from the interplay between the structure and the function of the underlying pattern of connections. Extensive numerical work as well as analytical approaches to the problem are presented. Finally, we review several applications of synchronization in complex networks to different disciplines: biological systems and neuroscience, engineering and computer science, and economy and social sciences.

  17. Viral quasispecies complexity measures.

    PubMed

    Gregori, Josep; Perales, Celia; Rodriguez-Frias, Francisco; Esteban, Juan I; Quer, Josep; Domingo, Esteban

    2016-06-01

    Mutant spectrum dynamics (changes in the related mutants that compose viral populations) has a decisive impact on virus behavior. The several platforms of next generation sequencing (NGS) to study viral quasispecies offer a magnifying glass to study viral quasispecies complexity. Several parameters are available to quantify the complexity of mutant spectra, but they have limitations. Here we critically evaluate the information provided by several population diversity indices, and we propose the introduction of some new ones used in ecology. In particular we make a distinction between incidence, abundance and function measures of viral quasispecies composition. We suggest a multidimensional approach (complementary information contributed by adequately chosen indices), propose some guidelines, and illustrate the use of indices with a simple example. We apply the indices to three clinical samples of hepatitis C virus that display different population heterogeneity. Areas of virus biology in which population complexity plays a role are discussed. PMID:27060566

  18. Synchronization in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arenas, Alex; Díaz-Guilera, Albert; Kurths, Jurgen; Moreno, Yamir; Zhou, Changsong

    2008-12-01

    Synchronization processes in populations of locally interacting elements are the focus of intense research in physical, biological, chemical, technological and social systems. The many efforts devoted to understanding synchronization phenomena in natural systems now take advantage of the recent theory of complex networks. In this review, we report the advances in the comprehension of synchronization phenomena when oscillating elements are constrained to interact in a complex network topology. We also take an overview of the new emergent features coming out from the interplay between the structure and the function of the underlying patterns of connections. Extensive numerical work as well as analytical approaches to the problem are presented. Finally, we review several applications of synchronization in complex networks to different disciplines: biological systems and neuroscience, engineering and computer science, and economy and social sciences.

  19. Synthesis and X-ray Structural Study on the Complexes of Silver(I) Halide with Tricyclohexylephosphine, Diphenyl-(2,4,6-trimethoxy)phenylphosphine, Phenyl-2,4,6-trimethoxyphenyl phosphine, and Tris(2,4,6-trimethoxy)phenylphosphine

    SciTech Connect

    Effendy; White, A. H.

    2008-03-17

    A diverse array of structures for the complexes of silver(I) halide with triphenylphosphine (PPh{sub 3}) has been studied. The complexes may be described as being of the type [AgX(PPh{sub 3}){sub n}] (X = Cl, Br or I). The value of n varies in the range of 1-3. This also indicates that the stoichiometry of the complexes is in the range of 1-3. The complex with stoichiometry 1:1 is a tetramer. There are two structural types of tetramer reported, termed cubane and step or chair. The cubane structure has been reported for [AgX(PPh{sub 3})]{sub 4} (X = Cl, Br or I), while the step structure has only been reported for [AgI(PPh{sub 3})]{sub 4}. The complex with stoichiometry 1:2 may be a monomer or a dimer. The monomer has a quasi trigonal planar structural type and has only been reported for [AgBr(PPh{sub 3}){sub 2}]. The dimer has been reported for [(PPh{sub 3}){sub 2}Ag({mu}-X){sub 2}Ag(PPh{sub 3}){sub 2}] (X = Cl or Br) with silver atom in the distorted tetrahedral environment. The complex with stoichiometry 1:3 has a distorted tetrahedral structural type and has been reported for [AgX(PPh{sub 3}){sub 3}] (X = Cl, Br or I). Changing PPh{sub 3} with more hindered ligand such as tricyclohexylephosphine (Pcy{sub 3}) or derivative of PPh{sub 3} such as diphenyl-2,4,6-trimethoxy(phenyl)phosphine (dpmp), phenyl-bis{l_brace}2,4,6-trimethoxy(phenyl){r_brace} phosphine (pdmp), or tris{l_brace}2,4,6-trimethoxy(phenyl){r_brace}phosphine (tmpp) may give complexes with various structural types but with lower range of stoichiometry. Synthesis and X-ray structural study of these complexes has been done with the results summarized below. Silver(I) halide and Pcy{sub 3} give complexes with stoichiometry 1:1 and 1:2. The complex with stoichiometry 1:1 is a dimer or cubane. The dimer is observed for [(Pcy{sub 3})Ag({mu}-X){sub 2}Ag(Pcy{sub 3})] (X = Cl or Br). The unusual dimer is observed for [(Pcy{sub 3})Ag({mu}-I){sub 2}({mu}-py)Ag(Pcy{sub 3})] where the pyridine ligand is bonded to

  20. Planning Complex Projects Automatically

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henke, Andrea L.; Stottler, Richard H.; Maher, Timothy P.

    1995-01-01

    Automated Manifest Planner (AMP) computer program applies combination of artificial-intelligence techniques to assist both expert and novice planners, reducing planning time by orders of magnitude. Gives planners flexibility to modify plans and constraints easily, without need for programming expertise. Developed specifically for planning space shuttle missions 5 to 10 years ahead, with modifications, applicable in general to planning other complex projects requiring scheduling of activities depending on other activities and/or timely allocation of resources. Adaptable to variety of complex scheduling problems in manufacturing, transportation, business, architecture, and construction.

  1. Complexity and Fly Swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cates, Grant; Murray, Joelle

    Complexity is the study of phenomena that emerge from a collection of interacting objects and arises in many systems throughout physics, biology, finance, economics and more. Certain kinds of complex systems can be described by self-organized criticality (SOC). An SOC system is one that is internally driven towards some critical state. Recent experimental work suggests scaling behavior of fly swarms-one of the hallmarks of an SOC system. Our goal is to look for SOC behavior in computational models of fly swarms.

  2. Luminescent macrocyclic lanthanide complexes

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, Kenneth N; Corneillie, Todd M; Xu, Jide

    2014-05-20

    The present invention provides a novel class of macrocyclic compounds as well as complexes formed between a metal (e.g., lanthanide) ion and the compounds of the invention. Preferred complexes exhibit high stability as well as high quantum yields of lanthanide ion luminescence in aqueous media without the need for secondary activating agents. Preferred compounds incorporate hydroxy-isophthalamide moieties within their macrocyclic structure and are characterized by surprisingly low, non-specific binding to a variety of polypeptides such as antibodies and proteins as well as high kinetic stability. These characteristics distinguish them from known, open-structured ligands.

  3. Luminescent macrocyclic lanthanide complexes

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, Kenneth N.; Corneillie, Todd M.; Xu, Jide

    2012-05-08

    The present invention provides a novel class of macrocyclic compounds as well as complexes formed between a metal (e.g., lanthanide) ion and the compounds of the invention. Preferred complexes exhibit high stability as well as high quantum yields of lanthanide ion luminescence in aqueous media without the need for secondary activating agents. Preferred compounds incorporate hydroxy-isophthalamide moieties within their macrocyclic structure and are characterized by surprisingly low, non-specific binding to a variety of polypeptides such as antibodies and proteins as well as high kinetic stability. These characteristics distinguish them from known, open-structured ligands.

  4. Complex matrix model duality

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, T. W.

    2011-04-15

    The same complex matrix model calculates both tachyon scattering for the c=1 noncritical string at the self-dual radius and certain correlation functions of operators which preserve half the supersymmetry in N=4 super-Yang-Mills theory. It is dual to another complex matrix model where the couplings of the first model are encoded in the Kontsevich-like variables of the second. The duality between the theories is mirrored by the duality of their Feynman diagrams. Analogously to the Hermitian Kontsevich-Penner model, the correlation functions of the second model can be written as sums over discrete points in subspaces of the moduli space of punctured Riemann surfaces.

  5. Salen complexes with dianionic counterions

    DOEpatents

    Job, Gabriel E.; Farmer, Jay J.; Cherian, Anna E.

    2016-08-02

    The present invention describes metal salen complexes having dianionic counterions. Such complexes can be readily precipitated and provide an economical method for the purification and isolation of the complexes, and are useful to prepare novel polymer compositions.

  6. Six Questions on Complex Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symons, John F.; Sanayei, Ali

    2011-09-01

    This paper includes an interview with John F. Symons regarding some important questions in "complex systems" and "complexity". In addition, he has stated some important open problems concerning complex systems in his research area from a philosophical point of view.

  7. Coordination Complexes of Cobalt.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Gregory M.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Described is an experiment involving the synthesis and spectral studies of cobalt complexes that not only give general chemistry students an introduction to inorganic synthesis but allows them to conduct a systematic study on the effect of different ligands on absorption spectra. Background information, procedures, and experimental results are…

  8. Complex carbohydrates (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... foods such as peas, beans, whole grains, and vegetables. Both simple and complex carbohydrates are turned to glucose (blood sugar) in the body and are used as energy. Glucose is used in the cells of the body and in the brain. Any ...

  9. Nature, computation and complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binder, P.-M.; Ellis, G. F. R.

    2016-06-01

    The issue of whether the unfolding of events in the world can be considered a computation is explored in this paper. We come to different conclusions for inert and for living systems (‘no’ and ‘qualified yes’, respectively). We suggest that physical computation as we know it exists only as a tool of complex biological systems: us.

  10. Launching Complex Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Kara J.; Shahan, Emily C.; Gibbons, Lynsey K.; Cobb, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    Mathematics lessons can take a variety of formats. In this article, the authors discuss lessons organized around complex mathematical tasks. These lessons usually unfold in three phases. First, the task is introduced to students. Second, students work on solving the task. Third, the teacher "orchestrates" a concluding whole-class discussion in…

  11. Complex Characters Made Simple

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kettle, Sidney F. A.

    2009-01-01

    The physical significance of complex characters is explored with particular reference to the C[subscript 4] point group. While a diagrammatic representation of these characters in this group is possible, the extension to higher groups C[subscript n], n greater than 4 is left as a problem for discussion. (Contains 3 tables, 8 figures, and 1 note.)

  12. Dynamic and topological complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turalska, Malgorzata; Geneston, Elvis; Grigolini, Paolo

    2010-03-01

    Cooperative phenomena in complex networks are expected to display unusual characteristics, associated with the peculiar topology of these systems. In this context we study networks of interacting stochastic two-state units as a model of cooperative decision making. Each unit in isolation generates a Poisson process with rate g. We show that when the cooperation is introduced, the decision-making process becomes intermittent. The decision-time distribution density characterized by inverse power-law behavior is defined as a dynamic complexity. Further, the onset of intermittency, expressed in terms of the coupling parameter K, is used as a measure of dynamic efficiency of investigated topologies. We find that the dynamic complexity emerges from regular and small-world topologies. In contrast, both random and scale-free networks correspond to fast transition into exponential decision-time distribution. This property is accompanied by high dynamic efficiency of the decision-making process. Our results indicate that complex dynamical processes occurring on networks could be related to relatively simple topologies.

  13. Unifying Complexity and Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Da-Guan

    2013-04-01

    Complex systems, arising in many contexts in the computer, life, social, and physical sciences, have not shared a generally-accepted complexity measure playing a fundamental role as the Shannon entropy H in statistical mechanics. Superficially-conflicting criteria of complexity measurement, i.e. complexity-randomness (C-R) relations, have given rise to a special measure intrinsically adaptable to more than one criterion. However, deep causes of the conflict and the adaptability are not much clear. Here I trace the root of each representative or adaptable measure to its particular universal data-generating or -regenerating model (UDGM or UDRM). A representative measure for deterministic dynamical systems is found as a counterpart of the H for random process, clearly redefining the boundary of different criteria. And a specific UDRM achieving the intrinsic adaptability enables a general information measure that ultimately solves all major disputes. This work encourages a single framework coving deterministic systems, statistical mechanics and real-world living organisms.

  14. Surface complexation modeling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adsorption-desorption reactions are important processes that affect the transport of contaminants in the environment. Surface complexation models are chemical models that can account for the effects of variable chemical conditions, such as pH, on adsorption reactions. These models define specific ...

  15. Complex Event Recognition Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, William A.; Firby, R. James

    2009-01-01

    Complex Event Recognition Architecture (CERA) is the name of a computational architecture, and software that implements the architecture, for recognizing complex event patterns that may be spread across multiple streams of input data. One of the main components of CERA is an intuitive event pattern language that simplifies what would otherwise be the complex, difficult tasks of creating logical descriptions of combinations of temporal events and defining rules for combining information from different sources over time. In this language, recognition patterns are defined in simple, declarative statements that combine point events from given input streams with those from other streams, using conjunction, disjunction, and negation. Patterns can be built on one another recursively to describe very rich, temporally extended combinations of events. Thereafter, a run-time matching algorithm in CERA efficiently matches these patterns against input data and signals when patterns are recognized. CERA can be used to monitor complex systems and to signal operators or initiate corrective actions when anomalous conditions are recognized. CERA can be run as a stand-alone monitoring system, or it can be integrated into a larger system to automatically trigger responses to changing environments or problematic situations.

  16. E Complex groundbreaking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Representatives from NASA, Orbital Sciences Corp. and Aerojet participate in a ribbon-cutting ceremony for construction of a flame deflector trench at Stennis Space Center's E Test Complex. Participants included Orbital CEO J.R. Thompson (center, left) and Stennis Space Center Director Gene Goldman (center, right).

  17. The Complexity of Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Steve; Ting, Hermia

    2014-01-01

    The profession of teaching is unique because of the extent to which a teacher becomes involved in the lives of their "clients". The level of care required to support students well can be intense, confusing, and overwhelming. Relationships co-evolve within an ever-changing process and care is considered an essential aspect of complex relationships…

  18. Complex Digital Visual Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeny, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    This article identifies possibilities for data visualization as art educational research practice. The author presents an analysis of the relationship between works of art and digital visual culture, employing aspects of network analysis drawn from the work of Barabási, Newman, and Watts (2006) and Castells (1994). Describing complex network…

  19. Managing Complex Dynamical Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, John C.; Webster, Robert L.; Curry, Jeanie A.; Hammond, Kevin L.

    2011-01-01

    Management commonly engages in a variety of research designed to provide insight into the motivation and relationships of individuals, departments, organizations, etc. This paper demonstrates how the application of concepts associated with the analysis of complex systems applied to such data sets can yield enhanced insights for managerial action.

  20. Complexity in Cultural Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holliday, Adrian

    2010-01-01

    Despite their diverse national backgrounds, 28 interviewees speak similarly about the complexity of the cultural realities with which they live, and refuse to be pinned down to specific cultural types. While nation is of great importance, unless personally inspiring, it tends to be an external force which is in conflict with a wide variety of…

  1. Putting Grammatical Complexity in Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rimmer, Wayne

    2008-01-01

    Effective writing is to some degree characterised by the ability to use complex grammatical structures. However, grammatical complexity is poorly defined in linguistics and related disciplines such as literacy. This empirical study examined the notion of grammatical complexity and its relevance to literacy. Complexity is multifaceted, so for…

  2. Statistical Factors in Complexation Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, Chung-Sun

    1985-01-01

    Four cases which illustrate statistical factors in complexation reactions (where two of the reactants are monodentate ligands) are presented. Included are tables showing statistical factors for the reactions of: (1) square-planar complexes; (2) tetrahedral complexes; and (3) octahedral complexes. (JN)

  3. Oscillations of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingang; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Lai, Choy Heng

    2006-12-01

    A complex network processing information or physical flows is usually characterized by a number of macroscopic quantities such as the diameter and the betweenness centrality. An issue of significant theoretical and practical interest is how such quantities respond to sudden changes caused by attacks or disturbances in recoverable networks, i.e., functions of the affected nodes are only temporarily disabled or partially limited. By introducing a model to address this issue, we find that, for a finite-capacity network, perturbations can cause the network to oscillate persistently in the sense that the characterizing quantities vary periodically or randomly with time. We provide a theoretical estimate of the critical capacity-parameter value for the onset of the network oscillation. The finding is expected to have broad implications as it suggests that complex networks may be structurally highly dynamic.

  4. Debating complexity in modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunt, Randall J.; Zheng, Chunmiao

    1999-01-01

    As scientists trying to understand the natural world, how should our effort be apportioned? We know that the natural world is characterized by complex and interrelated processes. Yet do we need to explicitly incorporate these intricacies to perform the tasks we are charged with? In this era of expanding computer power and development of sophisticated preprocessors and postprocessors, are bigger machines making better models? Put another way, do we understand the natural world better now with all these advancements in our simulation ability? Today the public's patience for long-term projects producing indeterminate results is wearing thin. This increases pressure on the investigator to use the appropriate technology efficiently. On the other hand, bringing scientific results into the legal arena opens up a new dimension to the issue: to the layperson, a tool that includes more of the complexity known to exist in the real world is expected to provide the more scientifically valid answer.

  5. Compressively sensed complex networks.

    SciTech Connect

    Dunlavy, Daniel M.; Ray, Jaideep; Pinar, Ali

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this project is to develop low dimension parametric (deterministic) models of complex networks, to use compressive sensing (CS) and multiscale analysis to do so and to exploit the structure of complex networks (some are self-similar under coarsening). CS provides a new way of sampling and reconstructing networks. The approach is based on multiresolution decomposition of the adjacency matrix and its efficient sampling. It requires preprocessing of the adjacency matrix to make it 'blocky' which is the biggest (combinatorial) algorithm challenge. Current CS reconstruction algorithm makes no use of the structure of a graph, its very general (and so not very efficient/customized). Other model-based CS techniques exist, but not yet adapted to networks. Obvious starting point for future work is to increase the efficiency of reconstruction.

  6. Immunization of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2002-03-01

    Complex networks such as the sexual partnership web or the Internet often show a high degree of redundancy and heterogeneity in their connectivity properties. This peculiar connectivity provides an ideal environment for the spreading of infective agents. Here we show that the random uniform immunization of individuals does not lead to the eradication of infections in all complex networks. Namely, networks with scale-free properties do not acquire global immunity from major epidemic outbreaks even in the presence of unrealistically high densities of randomly immunized individuals. The absence of any critical immunization threshold is due to the unbounded connectivity fluctuations of scale-free networks. Successful immunization strategies can be developed only by taking into account the inhomogeneous connectivity properties of scale-free networks. In particular, targeted immunization schemes, based on the nodes' connectivity hierarchy, sharply lower the network's vulnerability to epidemic attacks.

  7. The vault complex.

    PubMed

    van Zon, A; Mossink, M H; Scheper, R J; Sonneveld, P; Wiemer, E A C

    2003-09-01

    Vaults are large ribonucleoprotein particles found in eukaryotic cells. They are composed of multiple copies of a Mr 100,000 major vault protein and two minor vault proteins of Mr 193,000 and 240,000, as well as small untranslated RNAs of 86-141 bases. The vault components are arranged into a highly characteristic hollow barrel-like structure of 35 x 65 nm in size. Vaults are predominantly localized in the cytoplasm where they may associate with cytoskeletal elements. A small fraction of vaults are found to be associated with the nucleus. As of yet, the precise cellular function of the vault complex is unknown. However, their distinct morphology and intracellular distribution suggest a role in intracellular transport processes. Here we review the current knowledge on the vault complex, its structure, components and possible functions. PMID:14523546

  8. Carney Complex: an update

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Ricardo; Salpea, Paraskevi; Stratakis, Constantine

    2015-01-01

    Carney Complex (CNC) is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome, characterized by pigmented lesions of the skin and mucosa, cardiac, cutaneous and other myxomas, and multiple endocrine tumors. The disease is caused by inactivating mutations or large deletions of the PRKAR1A gene located at 17q22–24 coding for the regulatory subunit type I alpha of protein kinase A (PKA) gene. Most recently, components of the complex have been associated with defects of other PKA subunits, such as the catalytic subunits PRKACA (adrenal hyperplasia) and PRKACB (pigmented spots, myxomas, pituitary adenomas). In this report, we review CNC, its clinical features, diagnosis, treatment, and molecular etiology including PRKAR1A mutations and the newest on PRKACA and PRKACB defects especially as they pertain to adrenal tumors and Cushing’s syndrome. PMID:26130139

  9. Carney complex: an update.

    PubMed

    Correa, Ricardo; Salpea, Paraskevi; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2015-10-01

    Carney complex (CNC) is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome, characterized by pigmented lesions of the skin and mucosa, cardiac, cutaneous and other myxomas and multiple endocrine tumors. The disease is caused by inactivating mutations or large deletions of the PRKAR1A gene located at 17q22-24 coding for the regulatory subunit type I alpha of protein kinase A (PKA) gene. Most recently, components of the complex have been associated with defects of other PKA subunits, such as the catalytic subunits PRKACA (adrenal hyperplasia) and PRKACB (pigmented spots, myxomas, pituitary adenomas). In this report, we review CNC, its clinical features, diagnosis, treatment and molecular etiology, including PRKAR1A mutations and the newest on PRKACA and PRKACB defects especially as they pertain to adrenal tumors and Cushing's syndrome. PMID:26130139

  10. NDT for Complex Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnevale, Mario

    2013-04-01

    Non-destructive testing of structures composed of various types of materials is performed using a variety of methods. Most commonly, electromagnetic and acoustic methods are used to perform this task. Advances in computer software and electro-mechanical hardware have resulted in semi-automated systems for performing simple low-cost in-situ concrete testing. These systems are designed to be operated by anyone who can read a manual and push the right buttons. Although useful in many circumstances, we ask: "What happens when concrete structures are not simple and are too complex to be analyzed by these semi-automated systems and, most importantly, by minimally trained operators?" Many infrastructure projects are boldly pushing the limit of traditional engineering design. As structures become more complex, the methods and techniques used to evaluate these structures must also evolve. A first step towards adapting geophysical methods to evaluate complex structures is to develop pre-investigation conceptual models of possible responses that structures will have to available geophysical methods. This approach is important for designing the geometry and data acquisition parameters necessary for achieving the desired results. Examples of case by case assessments of the application of GPR to concrete investigations are examined. These include complex concrete wall structures, soil tunnel structures, and airport runways. HGI's adaption of ground penetrating radar (GPR) and seismic methods for assessing the substrate of a heavily reinforced concrete structure up to seven feet thick is reviewed. A range of GPR antenna frequencies were used to image the concrete and the underlying material. Time and frequency domain GPR analyses where used in the assessment. A multi-channel seismic survey using a roll-along data collection technique was used to assess the resonant frequency of the concrete structure, the nature of the underlying medium, and behavior of the structural system.

  11. Complex Flows by Nanohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Alley, E; Covello, P; Alder, B

    2004-03-01

    The study of complex flows by particle simulations is speeded up over molecular dynamics (MD) by more than two orders of magnitude by employing a stochastic collision dynamics method (DSMC) extended to high density (CBA). As a consequence, a picture generated on a single processor shows the typical features of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and is in quantitative agreement with the experimentally found long time behavior.

  12. Complex posterior urethral injury

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Sanjay B.; Joshi, Pankaj M.; Hunter, Craig; Surana, Sandesh; Shahrour, Walid; Alhajeri, Faisal

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess treatment strategies for seven different scenarios for treating complex pelvic fracture urethral injury (PFUI), categorised as repeat surgery for PFUI, ischaemic bulbar urethral necrosis (BUN), repair in boys and girls aged ⩽12 years, in patients with a recto-urethral fistula, or bladder neck incontinence, or with a double block at the bulbomembranous urethra and bladder neck/prostate region. Patients and methods We retrospectively reviewed the success rates and surgical procedures of these seven complex scenarios in the repair of PFUI at our institution from 2000 to 2013. Results In all, >550 PFUI procedures were performed at our centre, and 308 of these patients were classified as having a complex PFUI, with 225 patients available for follow-up. The overall success rates were 81% and 77% for primary and repeat procedures respectively. The overall success rate of those with BUN was 76%, using various methods of novel surgical techniques. Boys aged ⩽12 years with PFUI required a transpubic/abdominal approach 31% of the time, compared to 9% in adults. Young girls with PFUI also required a transpubic/abdominal urethroplasty, with a success rate of 66%. In patients with a recto-urethral fistula the success rate was 90% with attention to proper surgical principles, including a three-stage procedure and appropriate interposition. The treatment of bladder neck incontinence associated with the tear-drop deformity gave a continence rate of 66%. Children with a double block at the bulbomembranous urethra and at the bladder neck-prostate junction were all continent after a one-stage transpubic/abdominal procedure. Conclusion An understanding of complex pelvic fractures and their appropriate management can provide successful outcomes. PMID:26019978

  13. Modeling Complex Calorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a software suite that models complex calorimeters in the time and frequency domain. These models can reproduce all measurements that we currently do in a lab setting, like IV curves, impedance measurements, noise measurements, and pulse generation. Since all these measurements are modeled from one set of parameters, we can fully describe a detector and characterize its behavior. This leads to a model than can be used effectively for engineering and design of detectors for particular applications.

  14. Engineering Complex Tissues

    PubMed Central

    MIKOS, ANTONIOS G.; HERRING, SUSAN W.; OCHAREON, PANNEE; ELISSEEFF, JENNIFER; LU, HELEN H.; KANDEL, RITA; SCHOEN, FREDERICK J.; TONER, MEHMET; MOONEY, DAVID; ATALA, ANTHONY; VAN DYKE, MARK E.; KAPLAN, DAVID; VUNJAK-NOVAKOVIC, GORDANA

    2010-01-01

    This article summarizes the views expressed at the third session of the workshop “Tissue Engineering—The Next Generation,” which was devoted to the engineering of complex tissue structures. Antonios Mikos described the engineering of complex oral and craniofacial tissues as a “guided interplay” between biomaterial scaffolds, growth factors, and local cell populations toward the restoration of the original architecture and function of complex tissues. Susan Herring, reviewing osteogenesis and vasculogenesis, explained that the vascular arrangement precedes and dictates the architecture of the new bone, and proposed that engineering of osseous tissues might benefit from preconstruction of an appropriate vasculature. Jennifer Elisseeff explored the formation of complex tissue structures based on the example of stratified cartilage engineered using stem cells and hydrogels. Helen Lu discussed engineering of tissue interfaces, a problem critical for biological fixation of tendons and ligaments, and the development of a new generation of fixation devices. Rita Kandel discussed the challenges related to the re-creation of the cartilage-bone interface, in the context of tissue engineered joint repair. Frederick Schoen emphasized, in the context of heart valve engineering, the need for including the requirements derived from “adult biology” of tissue remodeling and establishing reliable early predictors of success or failure of tissue engineered implants. Mehmet Toner presented a review of biopreservation techniques and stressed that a new breakthrough in this field may be necessary to meet all the needs of tissue engineering. David Mooney described systems providing temporal and spatial regulation of growth factor availability, which may find utility in virtually all tissue engineering and regeneration applications, including directed in vitro and in vivo vascularization of tissues. Anthony Atala offered a clinician’s perspective for functional tissue

  15. [Complex posttraumatic stress disorder].

    PubMed

    Green, Tamar; Kotler, Moshe

    2007-11-01

    The characteristic symptoms resulting from exposure to an extreme trauma include three clusters of symptoms: persistent experience of the traumatic event, persistent avoidance of stimuli associated with the trauma and persistent symptoms of increased arousal. Beyond the accepted clusters of symptoms for posttraumatic stress disorder exists a formation of symptoms related to exposure to extreme or prolonged stress e.g. childhood abuse, physical violence, rape, and confinement within a concentration camp. With accumulated evidence of the existence of these symptoms began a trail to classify a more complex syndrome, which included, but was not confined to the symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder. This review addresses several subjects for study in complex posttraumatic stress disorder, which is a complicated and controversial topic. Firstly, the concept of complex posttraumatic stress disorder is presented. Secondly, the professional literature relevant to this disturbance is reviewed and finally, the authors present the polemic being conducted between the researchers of posttraumatic disturbances regarding validity, reliability and the need for separate diagnosis for these symptoms. PMID:18087837

  16. Manufacturing complexity analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delionback, L. M.

    1977-01-01

    The analysis of the complexity of a typical system is presented. Starting with the subsystems of an example system, the step-by-step procedure for analysis of the complexity of an overall system is given. The learning curves for the various subsystems are determined as well as the concurrent numbers of relevant design parameters. Then trend curves are plotted for the learning curve slopes versus the various design-oriented parameters, e.g. number of parts versus slope of learning curve, or number of fasteners versus slope of learning curve, etc. Representative cuts are taken from each trend curve, and a figure-of-merit analysis is made for each of the subsystems. Based on these values, a characteristic curve is plotted which is indicative of the complexity of the particular subsystem. Each such characteristic curve is based on a universe of trend curve data taken from data points observed for the subsystem in question. Thus, a characteristic curve is developed for each of the subsystems in the overall system.

  17. Emergent Complex Network Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhihao; Menichetti, Giulia; Rahmede, Christoph; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2015-05-01

    Networks are mathematical structures that are universally used to describe a large variety of complex systems such as the brain or the Internet. Characterizing the geometrical properties of these networks has become increasingly relevant for routing problems, inference and data mining. In real growing networks, topological, structural and geometrical properties emerge spontaneously from their dynamical rules. Nevertheless we still miss a model in which networks develop an emergent complex geometry. Here we show that a single two parameter network model, the growing geometrical network, can generate complex network geometries with non-trivial distribution of curvatures, combining exponential growth and small-world properties with finite spectral dimensionality. In one limit, the non-equilibrium dynamical rules of these networks can generate scale-free networks with clustering and communities, in another limit planar random geometries with non-trivial modularity. Finally we find that these properties of the geometrical growing networks are present in a large set of real networks describing biological, social and technological systems.

  18. Complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bruehl, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome is a chronic pain condition characterized by autonomic and inflammatory features. It occurs acutely in about 7% of patients who have limb fractures, limb surgery, or other injuries. Many cases resolve within the first year, with a smaller subset progressing to the chronic form. This transition is often paralleled by a change from "warm complex regional pain syndrome," with inflammatory characteristics dominant, to "cold complex regional pain syndrome" in which autonomic features dominate. Multiple peripheral and central mechanisms seem to be involved, the relative contributions of which may differ between individuals and over time. Possible contributors include peripheral and central sensitization, autonomic changes and sympatho-afferent coupling, inflammatory and immune alterations, brain changes, and genetic and psychological factors. The syndrome is diagnosed purely on the basis of clinical signs and symptoms. Effective management of the chronic form of the syndrome is often challenging. Few high quality randomized controlled trials are available to support the efficacy of the most commonly used interventions. Reviews of available randomized trials suggest that physical and occupational therapy (including graded motor imagery and mirror therapy), bisphosphonates, calcitonin, subanesthetic intravenous ketamine, free radical scavengers, oral corticosteroids, and spinal cord stimulation may be effective treatments. Multidisciplinary clinical care, which centers around functionally focused therapies is recommended. Other interventions are used to facilitate engagement in functional therapies and to improve quality of life. PMID:26224572

  19. First pentahaptofullerene metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Masaya, Sawamura; Iikura, Hitoshi; Nakamura, Eiichi

    1996-12-18

    Cyclopentadienyl metal complexes have played important roles in chemistry owing to their unique structures and functional activities. Here we report the synthesis and characterization of an entirely new class of cyclopentadienyl (Cp) metal complexes ({eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 60}Ph{sub 5})MLn (MLn = Li, K, Tl, and Cu.PEt{sub 3}). In these molecules, the five Cp carbons represent one pentagon of C{sub 60}, isolated from the remaining 50 sp{sup 2} carbon atoms by five surrounding sp{sup 3} carbon atoms each bearing a phenyl group. The X-ray crystal structure analysis of the thallium complex Tl({eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 60}Ph{sub 5}).2.5THF revealed its unique and esthetically pleasing C{sub 5} symmetrical molecular structure with the phenyl groups forming a chiral propeller array. The thallium atom is deeply buried in the cavity created by the phenyl groups, bonding to the five Cp carbons ({eta}{sup 5}-coordination) with an averaged Tl-C distance of 2.87 A. The key finding that we made in this research was a remarkable 5-fold addition of an organocopper reagent to C{sub 60}, which stands in contrast to the monoaddition reaction of Grignard or organolithium reagents. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Emergent Complex Network Geometry

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhihao; Menichetti, Giulia; Rahmede, Christoph; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2015-01-01

    Networks are mathematical structures that are universally used to describe a large variety of complex systems such as the brain or the Internet. Characterizing the geometrical properties of these networks has become increasingly relevant for routing problems, inference and data mining. In real growing networks, topological, structural and geometrical properties emerge spontaneously from their dynamical rules. Nevertheless we still miss a model in which networks develop an emergent complex geometry. Here we show that a single two parameter network model, the growing geometrical network, can generate complex network geometries with non-trivial distribution of curvatures, combining exponential growth and small-world properties with finite spectral dimensionality. In one limit, the non-equilibrium dynamical rules of these networks can generate scale-free networks with clustering and communities, in another limit planar random geometries with non-trivial modularity. Finally we find that these properties of the geometrical growing networks are present in a large set of real networks describing biological, social and technological systems. PMID:25985280

  1. Keynes, Hayek and Complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ormerod, Paul

    In the spirit of the overall topic of the conference, in this paper I consider the extent to which economic theory includes elements of the complex systems approach. I am setting to one side here the developments over the past decade in applying complex systems analysis to economic problems. This is not because this recent work is not important. It most certainly is. But I want to argue that there is a very distinct tradition of what we would now describe as a complex systems approach in the works of two of the greatest economists of the 20th century. There is of course a dominant intellectual paradigm within economics, that known as `neo-classical'economics. This paradigm is by no means an empty box, and is undoubtedly useful in helping to understand how some aspects of the social and economic worlds work. But even in its heyday, neo-classical economics never succeeded by its empirical success in driving out completely other theoretical approaches, for its success was simply not sufficient to do so. Much more importantly, economics over the past twenty or thirty years has become in an increasing state of flux.

  2. The Stigma Complex

    PubMed Central

    Pescosolido, Bernice A.; Martin, Jack K.

    2016-01-01

    Since the beginning of the twenty-first century, research on stigma has continued. Building on conceptual and empirical work, the recent period clarifies new types of stigmas, expansion of measures, identification of new directions, and increasingly complex levels. Standard beliefs have been challenged, the relationship between stigma research and public debates reconsidered, and new scientific foundations for policy and programs suggested. We begin with a summary of the most recent Annual Review articles on stigma, which reminded sociologists of conceptual tools, informed them of developments from academic neighbors, and claimed findings from the early period of “resurgence.” Continued (even accelerated) progress has also revealed a central problem. Terms and measures are often used interchangeably, leading to confusion and decreasing accumulated knowledge. Drawing from this work but focusing on the past 14 years of stigma research (including mental illness, sexual orientation, HIV/AIDS, and race/ethnicity), we provide a theoretical architecture of concepts (e.g., prejudice, experienced/received discrimination), drawn together through a stigma process (i.e., stigmatization), based on four theoretical premises. Many characteristics of the mark (e.g., discredited, concealable) and variants (i.e., stigma types and targets) become the focus of increasingly specific and multidimensional definitions. Drawing from complex and systems science, we propose a stigma complex, a system of interrelated, heterogeneous parts bringing together insights across disciplines to provide a more realistic and complicated sense of the challenge facing research and change efforts. The Framework Integrating Normative Influences on Stigma (FINIS) offers a multilevel approach that can be tailored to stigmatized statuses. Finally, we outline challenges for the next phase of stigma research, with the goal of continuing scientific activity that enhances our understanding of stigma and builds

  3. Complex-Valued Autoencoders

    PubMed Central

    Baldi, Pierre; Lu, Zhiqin

    2012-01-01

    Autoencoders are unsupervised machine learning circuits, with typically one hidden layer, whose learning goal is to minimize an average distortion measure between inputs and outputs. Linear autoencoders correspond to the special case where only linear transformations between visible and hidden variables are used. While linear autoencoders can be defined over any field, only real-valued linear autoencoders have been studied so far. Here we study complex-valued linear autoencoders where the components of the training vectors and adjustable matrices are defined over the complex field with the L2 norm. We provide simpler and more general proofs that unify the real-valued and complex-valued cases, showing that in both cases the landscape of the error function is invariant under certain groups of transformations. The landscape has no local minima, a family of global minima associated with Principal Component Analysis, and many families of saddle points associated with orthogonal projections onto sub-space spanned by sub-optimal subsets of eigenvectors of the covariance matrix. The theory yields several iterative, convergent, learning algorithms, a clear understanding of the generalization properties of the trained autoencoders, and can equally be applied to the hetero-associative case when external targets are provided. Partial results on deep architecture as well as the differential geometry of autoencoders are also presented. The general framework described here is useful to classify autoencoders and identify general properties that ought to be investigated for each class, illuminating some of the connections between autoencoders, unsupervised learning, clustering, Hebbian learning, and information theory. PMID:22622264

  4. Quasicrystals: diversity and complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Jean-Marie; Lifshitz, Ron

    2011-07-01

    Scientific presentations at ICQ11 - the 11th International Conference on Quasicrystals, which took place in Sapporo, Japan, in June 2010 - offered a variety of stimulating new experimental data and novel theoretical results. New aperiodic crystals were presented; new theoretical ideas were described; exciting experimental results were revealed; and potential applications of quasicrystals were reviewed, showing an unprecedented level of development. ICQ11 was a great success thanks to the high standard of its scientific content and to the efficiency of its organization. ICQ11 proved that quasicrystal research is sure to continue offering diverse challenges and profound insights into the complexity of matter.

  5. Emergent complex neural dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chialvo, Dante R.

    2010-10-01

    A large repertoire of spatiotemporal activity patterns in the brain is the basis for adaptive behaviour. Understanding the mechanism by which the brain's hundred billion neurons and hundred trillion synapses manage to produce such a range of cortical configurations in a flexible manner remains a fundamental problem in neuroscience. One plausible solution is the involvement of universal mechanisms of emergent complex phenomena evident in dynamical systems poised near a critical point of a second-order phase transition. We review recent theoretical and empirical results supporting the notion that the brain is naturally poised near criticality, as well as its implications for better understanding of the brain.

  6. Macroevolution of complex retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Katzourakis, Aris; Gifford, Robert J; Tristem, Michael; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Pybus, Oliver G

    2009-09-18

    Retroviruses can leave a "fossil record" in their hosts' genomes in the form of endogenous retroviruses. Foamy viruses, complex retroviruses that infect mammals, have been notably absent from this record. We have found an endogenous foamy virus within the genomes of sloths and show that foamy viruses were infecting mammals more than 100 million years ago and codiverged with their hosts across an entire geological era. Our analysis highlights the role of evolutionary constraint in maintaining viral genome structure and indicates that accessory genes and mammalian mechanisms of innate immunity are the products of macroevolutionary conflict played out over a geological time scale. PMID:19762636

  7. Complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sebastin, Sandeep J

    2011-05-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) previously known as reflex sympathetic dystrophy is a chronic neurological disorder involving the limbs characterized by disabling pain, swelling, vasomotor instability, sudomotor abnormality, and impairment of motor function. CRPS is not uncommon after hand surgery and may complicate post-operative care. There is no specific diagnostic test for CRPS and the diagnosis is based on history, clinical examination, and supportive laboratory findings. Recent modifications to diagnostic criteria have enabled clinicians to diagnose this disease more consistently. This review gives a synopsis of CRPS and discusses the diagnosis, pathophysiology, and treatment options based on the limited evidence in the literature. PMID:22022040

  8. Complex regional pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sebastin, Sandeep J

    2011-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) previously known as reflex sympathetic dystrophy is a chronic neurological disorder involving the limbs characterized by disabling pain, swelling, vasomotor instability, sudomotor abnormality, and impairment of motor function. CRPS is not uncommon after hand surgery and may complicate post-operative care. There is no specific diagnostic test for CRPS and the diagnosis is based on history, clinical examination, and supportive laboratory findings. Recent modifications to diagnostic criteria have enabled clinicians to diagnose this disease more consistently. This review gives a synopsis of CRPS and discusses the diagnosis, pathophysiology, and treatment options based on the limited evidence in the literature. PMID:22022040

  9. Physics and complexity

    PubMed Central

    Sherrington, David

    2010-01-01

    This paper is concerned with complex macroscopic behaviour arising in many-body systems through the combinations of competitive interactions and disorder, even with simple ingredients at the microscopic level. It attempts to indicate and illustrate the richness that has arisen, in conceptual understanding, in methodology and in application, across a large range of scientific disciplines, together with a hint of some of the further opportunities that remain to be tapped. In doing so, it takes the perspective of physics and tries to show, albeit rather briefly, how physics has contributed and been stimulated. PMID:20123753

  10. Organization of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitsak, Maksim

    Many large complex systems can be successfully analyzed using the language of graphs and networks. Interactions between the objects in a network are treated as links connecting nodes. This approach to understanding the structure of networks is an important step toward understanding the way corresponding complex systems function. Using the tools of statistical physics, we analyze the structure of networks as they are found in complex systems such as the Internet, the World Wide Web, and numerous industrial and social networks. In the first chapter we apply the concept of self-similarity to the study of transport properties in complex networks. Self-similar or fractal networks, unlike non-fractal networks, exhibit similarity on a range of scales. We find that these fractal networks have transport properties that differ from those of non-fractal networks. In non-fractal networks, transport flows primarily through the hubs. In fractal networks, the self-similar structure requires any transport to also flow through nodes that have only a few connections. We also study, in models and in real networks, the crossover from fractal to non-fractal networks that occurs when a small number of random interactions are added by means of scaling techniques. In the second chapter we use k-core techniques to study dynamic processes in networks. The k-core of a network is the network's largest component that, within itself, exhibits all nodes with at least k connections. We use this k-core analysis to estimate the relative leadership positions of firms in the Life Science (LS) and Information and Communication Technology (ICT) sectors of industry. We study the differences in the k-core structure between the LS and the ICT sectors. We find that the lead segment (highest k-core) of the LS sector, unlike that of the ICT sector, is remarkably stable over time: once a particular firm enters the lead segment, it is likely to remain there for many years. In the third chapter we study how

  11. Linking social complexity and vocal complexity: a parid perspective

    PubMed Central

    Krams, Indrikis; Krama, Tatjana; Freeberg, Todd M.; Kullberg, Cecilia; Lucas, Jeffrey R.

    2012-01-01

    The Paridae family (chickadees, tits and titmice) is an interesting avian group in that species vary in important aspects of their social structure and many species have large and complex vocal repertoires. For this reason, parids represent an important set of species for testing the social complexity hypothesis for vocal communication—the notion that as groups increase in social complexity, there is a need for increased vocal complexity. Here, we describe the hypothesis and some of the early evidence that supported the hypothesis. Next, we review literature on social complexity and on vocal complexity in parids, and describe some of the studies that have made explicit tests of the social complexity hypothesis in one parid—Carolina chickadees, Poecile carolinensis. We conclude with a discussion, primarily from a parid perspective, of the benefits and costs of grouping and of physiological factors that might mediate the relationship between social complexity and changes in signalling behaviour. PMID:22641826

  12. Method for preparing radiopharmaceutical complexes

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Alun G.; Davison, Alan; Abrams, Michael J.

    1989-05-02

    A method for preparing radiopharmaceutical complexes that are substantially free of the reaction materials used to produce the radiopharmaceutical complex is disclosed. The method involves admixing in a suitable first solvent in a container a target seeking ligand or salt or metal adduct thereof, a radionuclide label, and a reducing agent for said radionuclide, thereby forming said radiopharmaceutical complex; coating the interior walls of the container with said pharmaceutical complex; discarding the solvent containing by-products and unreacted starting reaction materials; and removing the radiopharmaceutical complex from said walls by dissolving it in a second solvent, thereby obtaining said radiopharmaceutical complex substantially free of by-products and unreacted starting materials.

  13. Polyhydride complexes for hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, C.M.

    1995-09-01

    Polyhydride metal complexes are being developed for application in hydrogen storage. Efforts have focused on developing complexes with improved available hydrogen weight percentages. We have explored the possibility that complexes containing aromatic hydrocarbon ligands could store hydrogen at both the metal center and in the ligands. We have synthesized novel indenyl hydride complexes and explored their reactivity with hydrogen. The reversible hydrogenation of [IrH{sub 3}(PPh{sub 3})({eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 10}H{sub 7})]{sup +} has been achieved. While attempting to prepare {eta}{sup 6}-tetrahydronaphthalene complexes, we discovered that certain polyhydride complexes catalyze both the hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of tetrahydronaphthalene.

  14. Shapes of Interacting RNA Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Benjamin M.M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Shapes of interacting RNA complexes are studied using a filtration via their topological genus. A shape of an RNA complex is obtained by (iteratively) collapsing stacks and eliminating hairpin loops. This shape projection preserves the topological core of the RNA complex, and for fixed topological genus there are only finitely many such shapes. Our main result is a new bijection that relates the shapes of RNA complexes with shapes of RNA structures. This allows for computing the shape polynomial of RNA complexes via the shape polynomial of RNA structures. We furthermore present a linear time uniform sampling algorithm for shapes of RNA complexes of fixed topological genus. PMID:25075750

  15. The authority of complexity.

    PubMed

    Stehr, N; Grundmann, R

    2001-06-01

    The assertion about the unique 'complexity' or the peculiarly intricate character of social phenomena has, at least within sociology, a long, venerable and virtually uncontested tradition. At the turn of the last century, classical social theorists, for example, Georg Simmel and Emile Durkheim, made prominent and repeated reference to this attribute of the subject matter of sociology and the degree to which it complicates, even inhibits the develop and application of social scientific knowledge. Our paper explores the origins, the basis and the consequences of this assertion and asks in particular whether the classic complexity assertion still deserves to be invoked in analyses that ask about the production and the utilization of social scientific knowledge in modern society. We present John Maynard Keynes' economic theory and its practical applications as an illustration. We conclude that the practical value of social scientific knowledge is not dependent on a faithful, in the sense of complete, representation of social reality. Instead, social scientific knowledge that wants to optimize its practicality has to attend and attach itself to elements of social situations that can be altered or are actionable. PMID:11440059

  16. Judging orthodontic treatment complexity

    PubMed Central

    Clijmans, Maïté; Medhat, Aly; Geest, An De; van Gastel, Johannes; Kellens, Annelies; Fieuws, Steffen; Willems, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to investigate possible relations between anticipated overall treatment complexity (AOTC) of an orthodontic case and malocclusion characteristics. Methods: Two groups of orthodontists (groups A and B) were asked to define perceived treatment complexity (PTC) of orthodontic cases based on 16 characteristics of malocclusion by means of a questionnaire. Each question was answered on a six-point ordinal scale, with one "not applicable" option (score 0). Group A was also asked to give the AOTC of the specific case on a five-point ordinal scale. The index of orthodontic treatment need (IOTN) score of the specific cases as well as the malocclusion characteristics were assessed by one author. Results: There is a significant relationship between IOTN and AOTC (p< 0.0001), 22% of variability is explained by differences in IOTN. Adding objective characteristics of malocclusion to explain AOTC does not significantly increase the explained variability (p = 0.086). In judging interobserver agreement, a weighted Kappa of 0.60 for group A and 0.56 for group B was found. The weighted Kappa for agreement in AOTC equals 0.06. Conclusion: The relation between IOTN and AOTC was found to be significant. Moderate agreement on PTC among observers and a low level agreement regarding AOTC were found in the present study. PMID:27007763

  17. [Complex decongestive therapy].

    PubMed

    Heinig, B; Wollina, U

    2015-11-01

    The amount of physical pressure plays an important role in complex decongestive therapy (CDT). As a function of pressure, microcirculation takes place between blood vessels and tissue. As part of the total lymphatic system, lymphatic vessels transport the lymphatic load from the interstitial space to the blood stream. The lymphatic vessel system, characterized by specific anatomical conditions like initial lymphatic vessels, precollectors, collectors, and lymphatic strains, is the therapeutic target of complex decongestive therapy. Components of CDT include manual lymphatic drainage, compression therapy, decongestive kinesitherapy, and good skin care, which increase the transport capacity of the lymphatic vessel system. Currently, CDT is acknowledged as the main conservative treatment of lymphedema of primary and secondary genesis, lipolymphedema, and phlebolymphedema. In clinical practice, we are increasingly confronted with edema of multifactorial genesis requiring a critical discussion and stocktaking of comprehensive clinical findings in terms of the indication for CDT. Therapeutic success depends on a joint application of all CDT components and patient compliance. To an increasing extent, medical research tries to combine successfully CDT with adjunct treatment options. PMID:26315101

  18. Complex master slave interferometry.

    PubMed

    Rivet, Sylvain; Maria, Michael; Bradu, Adrian; Feuchter, Thomas; Leick, Lasse; Podoleanu, Adrian

    2016-02-01

    A general theoretical model is developed to improve the novel Spectral Domain Interferometry method denoted as Master/Slave (MS) Interferometry. In this model, two functions, g and h are introduced to describe the modulation chirp of the channeled spectrum signal due to nonlinearities in the decoding process from wavenumber to time and due to dispersion in the interferometer. The utilization of these two functions brings two major improvements to previous implementations of the MS method. A first improvement consists in reducing the number of channeled spectra necessary to be collected at Master stage. In previous MSI implementation, the number of channeled spectra at the Master stage equated the number of depths where information was selected from at the Slave stage. The paper demonstrates that two experimental channeled spectra only acquired at Master stage suffice to produce A-scans from any number of resolved depths at the Slave stage. A second improvement is the utilization of complex signal processing. Previous MSI implementations discarded the phase. Complex processing of the electrical signal determined by the channeled spectrum allows phase processing that opens several novel avenues. A first consequence of such signal processing is reduction in the random component of the phase without affecting the axial resolution. In previous MSI implementations, phase instabilities were reduced by an average over the wavenumber that led to reduction in the axial resolution. PMID:26906857

  19. Tuberous sclerosis complex.

    PubMed

    Henske, Elizabeth P; Jóźwiak, Sergiusz; Kingswood, J Christopher; Sampson, Julian R; Thiele, Elizabeth A

    2016-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is an autosomal dominant disorder that affects multiple organ systems and is caused by loss-of-function mutations in one of two genes: TSC1 or TSC2. The disorder can affect both adults and children. First described in depth by Bourneville in 1880, it is now estimated that nearly 2 million people are affected by the disease worldwide. The clinical features of TSC are distinctive and can vary widely between individuals, even within one family. Major features of the disease include tumours of the brain, skin, heart, lungs and kidneys, seizures and TSC-associated neuropsychiatric disorders, which can include autism spectrum disorder and cognitive disability. TSC1 (also known as hamartin) and TSC2 (also known as tuberin) form the TSC protein complex that acts as an inhibitor of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling pathway, which in turn plays a pivotal part in regulating cell growth, proliferation, autophagy and protein and lipid synthesis. Remarkable progress in basic and translational research, in addition to several randomized controlled trials worldwide, has led to regulatory approval of the use of mTOR inhibitors for the treatment of renal angiomyolipomas, brain subependymal giant cell astrocytomas and pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis, but further research is needed to establish full indications of therapeutic treatment. In this Primer, we review the state-of-the-art knowledge in the TSC field, including the molecular and cellular basis of the disease, medical management, major knowledge gaps and ongoing research towards a cure. PMID:27226234

  20. BTA copper complexes.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Manfred; Gálvez-Ruiz, Juan Carlos; Klapötke, Thomas M; Mayer, Peter; Weber, Birgit; Weigand, Jan J

    2005-10-31

    Cupric oxide is one of the most important additives used (a) to catalyze decomposition reactions in gas generators to obtain cooler reaction gases, (b) as burning enhancer for ammonium perchlorate-based composite propellants, and (c) as coloring agent in pyrotechnics. In this context, the reaction of Cu(2+) ions in aqueous ammonia solution with bis(tetrazolyl)amine (H(2)bta) was investigated. Depending on the reaction conditions three complexes were obtained: Cu(bta)(NH(3))(2) (1), Cu(bta)(NH(3))(2).H(2)O (2), and (NH(4))(2)Cu(bta)(2).2.5H(2)O (3). The crystal structures of 1 and 2 are discussed with respect to the coordination mode of the dianion of N,N-bis(1(2)H-tetrazol-5-yl)-amine (bta), which mediates in the case of 1 and 2 weak superexchange interactions between the adjacent magnetic transition-metal Cu(II) cations. These antiferromagnetic interactions result from 1D copper chains over an hidden azide end-to-end bridge. Interestingly, the structural arrangement of 1 completely changes in the presence of crystal-bound water. Moreover, some physicochemical properties (e.g., heat of formation, friction, and impact sensitivity, DSC) of these complexes with respect to high-energetic materials are discussed. PMID:16241154

  1. Not so Complex: Iteration in the Complex Plane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Dell, Robin S.

    2014-01-01

    The simple process of iteration can produce complex and beautiful figures. In this article, Robin O'Dell presents a set of tasks requiring students to use the geometric interpretation of complex number multiplication to construct linear iteration rules. When the outputs are plotted in the complex plane, the graphs trace pleasing designs…

  2. Syntactic Complexity as an Aspect of Text Complexity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frantz, Roger S.; Starr, Laura E.; Bailey, Alison L.

    2015-01-01

    Students' ability to read complex texts is emphasized in the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) for English Language Arts and Literacy. The standards propose a three-part model for measuring text complexity. Although the model presents a robust means for determining text complexity based on a variety of features inherent to a text as well as…

  3. Nuclear Weapons Complex reconfiguration study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Shortly after assuming duties as Secretary of Energy, I reviewed the Nuclear Weapons Complex Modernization Report'' submitted to the Congress in January 1989 as required by the National Defense Authorization Act of 1988 and 1989. My review showed that several of the report's assumptions needed to be re-evaluated. During this eighteen-month review, dramatic world changes forced further reassessments of the future Nuclear Weapons Complex. These changes are reflected in the new report. The new report presents a plan to achieve a reconfigured complex, called Complex-21. Complex-21 would be smaller, less diverse, and less expensive to operated than the Complex of today. Complex-21 would be able to safely and reliability support nuclear deterrent stockpile objectives set forth by the President and funded by the Congress. It would be consistent with realities of the emerging international security environment and flexible enough to accommodate the likely range of deterrent contingencies. In addition, Complex-21 would be constructed and operated to comply with all applicable federal, state, and local laws, regulations, and orders. Achieving Complex-21 will require significant resources. This report provides and organized approach toward selecting the most appropriate configuration for Complex-21, satisfying environmental requirements, and minimizing costs. The alternative -- to continue to use piecemeal fixes to run an antiquated complex -- will be more expensive and provide a less reliable Nuclear Weapons Complex. As a consequence, implementation of the Complex-21 plan is considered necessary to ensure continued viability of our nuclear deterrent.

  4. {NiLn} (Ln = Gd, Dy) rod-like nano-sized heteronuclear coordination clusters with a double carbonate bridge skeleton and remarkable MCE behaviour.

    PubMed

    Guarda, Eliana; Bader, Katharina; van Slageren, Joris; Alborés, Pablo

    2016-05-17

    The newly obtained complexes [NiLn(Piv)16(teaH)6(OCH3)2(CO3)2(H2O)2] Ln = Gd, Dy, show a remarkable μ5-carbonate bridged octanuclear planar {Ni4Ln4} core further capped with embedded {Ni3Ln} cubane motifs to afford a rod shaped nano-sized molecule of about 1.2 × 2.8 nm. Unusual MCE behaviour has been found due to multiple low lying excited states arising from competing ferromagnetic and anti-ferromagnetic Ni-Ni and Ni-Ln exchange interactions. PMID:27126965

  5. LC-MS study of ruthenium catalysts of water oxidation in artificial photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhabieva, Z. M.; Martynenko, V. M.; Temnova, M. L.; Yakutkina, O. V.; Dzhabiev, T. S.; Shilov, A. E.

    2014-05-01

    Catalysts of water oxidation for artificial photosynthesis, formed from the binuclear oxysulfate ruthenium(IV) complex K4[Ru2(SO4)2(μ-SO4)2(μ-O)2] · 2H2O, are studied via chromatography-mass spectrometry. It is shown that these new catalysts do not contain organic ligands and are more stable and active than the familiar blue dimer [(bpy)2Ru(OH)2]2O4+ and its analogues. It is found that adamantane-like tetra-nuclear and octanuclear ruthenium clusters are active catalysts that oxidize water to oxygen and oxozone O4, respectively.

  6. Amphotericin B Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Amphotericin B lipid complex injection is used to treat serious, possibly life-threatening fungal infections in people who did not respond ... to tolerate conventional amphotericin B therapy. Amphotericin B lipid complex injection is in a class of medications ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: Carney complex

    MedlinePlus

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Carney complex Carney complex Enable ...

  8. Complexity in scalable computing.

    SciTech Connect

    Rouson, Damian W. I.

    2008-12-01

    The rich history of scalable computing research owes much to a rapid rise in computing platform scale in terms of size and speed. As platforms evolve, so must algorithms and the software expressions of those algorithms. Unbridled growth in scale inevitably leads to complexity. This special issue grapples with two facets of this complexity: scalable execution and scalable development. The former results from efficient programming of novel hardware with increasing numbers of processing units (e.g., cores, processors, threads or processes). The latter results from efficient development of robust, flexible software with increasing numbers of programming units (e.g., procedures, classes, components or developers). The progression in the above two parenthetical lists goes from the lowest levels of abstraction (hardware) to the highest (people). This issue's theme encompasses this entire spectrum. The lead author of each article resides in the Scalable Computing Research and Development Department at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, CA. Their co-authors hail from other parts of Sandia, other national laboratories and academia. Their research sponsors include several programs within the Department of Energy's Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research and its National Nuclear Security Administration, along with Sandia's Laboratory Directed Research and Development program and the Office of Naval Research. The breadth of interests of these authors and their customers reflects in the breadth of applications this issue covers. This article demonstrates how to obtain scalable execution on the increasingly dominant high-performance computing platform: a Linux cluster with multicore chips. The authors describe how deep memory hierarchies necessitate reducing communication overhead by using threads to exploit shared register and cache memory. On a matrix-matrix multiplication problem, they achieve up to 96% parallel efficiency with a three-part strategy: intra

  9. [COMPLEX REGIONAL PAIN SYNDROME].

    PubMed

    Blažeković, Ivan; Bilić, Ervina; Žagar, Marija; Anić, Branimir

    2015-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) represents a state of constant and often disabling pain, affecting one region (usually hand) and often occurs after a trauma whose severity does not correlate with the level of pain. The older term for this condition of chronic pain associated with motor and autonomic symptoms is reflex sympathetic dystrophy or causalgia. The aim of this review, based on contemporary literature, is to show the epidemiology and etiology, proposed pathophysiological mechanisms, method of diagnosis and treatment options, prevention and mitigation of this under-recognized disease. CRPS I occurs without known neurological damage, unlike CRPS II, where the history of trauma is present and in some cases damage to the peripheral nervous system can be objectively assessed using electromyoneurography. New diagnostic methods, such as quantitative sensory testing (CST), challenge this division because the CST findings in patients with CRPS I can suggest damage to Adelta peripheral nerve fibers. Except for distinguishing type I and type II disease, it is important to bear in mind the diversity of clinical presentation of CRPS in acute and chronic phase of the disease. This regional pain syndrome typically includes the autonomic and motor signs and thus differs from other peripheral neuropathic pain syndromes. The complexity of the clinical presentation indicates the likely presence of different pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this disease. Previous studies have demonstrated the autonomic dysfunction, neurogenic inflammation and neuroplastic changes. The diagnosis of CRPS is based on anamnesis and clinical examination on the basis of which the disease can be graded according to the Budapest Criteria. A valuable aid in differentiating subtypes of the disease is electromyoneurography. The treatment of CRPS is as complex as the clinical picture and the pathophysiology of the disease and requires interdisciplinary cooperation and individual approach

  10. Supramolecular Macrocyclic Pd(II) and Pt(II) Squares and Rectangles with Aryldithiolate Ligands and their Excellent Catalytic Activity in Suzuki C-C Coupling Reaction.

    PubMed

    Vivekananda, K V; Dey, S; Maity, D K; Bhuvanesh, N; Jain, V K

    2015-11-01

    Addition of 1,4-benezenedithiol and 4,4'-biphenyldithiol to M(OTf)2 (M = cis-[Pt(PEt3)2](2+) or cis-[Pd(dppe)](2+)) (dppe = 1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane) gave self-assembled tetranuclear complexes [M2{S(C6H4)nS}]2(OTf)4 (n = 1, 2). The same reaction with 1,4-benezenedimethanethiol yielded octanuclear supramolecular coordination complexes (SCC) [M2{SCH2C6H4CH2S}]4(OTf)8. These complexes were characterized by NMR, mass, and UV-vis spectroscopies, cyclic voltammetry, as well as density functional theory studies and represent the first examples of SCCs constructed by thiolate groups and square-planar metal ions. The rectangular shape of tetranuclear complexes and square shape of octanuclear complex are confirmed by single-crystal structures and computational studies. The palladium complexes showed excellent catalytic activity in Suzuki C-C cross-coupling reactions with high turnover numbers (2 × 10(7)), even with low catalyst loading. PMID:26444245

  11. Transient complex peroxisomal interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bonekamp, Nina A.; Schrader, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria and peroxisomes are ubiquitous subcellular organelles that fulfill essential metabolic functions, rendering them indispensable for human development and health. Both are highly dynamic organelles that can undergo remarkable changes in morphology and number to accomplish cellular needs. While mitochondrial dynamics are also regulated by frequent fusion events, the fusion of mature peroxisomes in mammalian cells remained a matter of debate. In our recent study, we clarified systematically that there is no complete fusion of mature peroxisomes analogous to mitochondria. Moreover, in contrast to key division components such as DLP1, Fis1 or Mff, mitochondrial fusion proteins were not localized to peroxisomes. However, we discovered and characterized novel transient, complex interactions between individual peroxisomes which may contribute to the homogenization of the often heterogeneous peroxisomal compartment, e.g., by distribution of metabolites, signals or other “molecular information” via interperoxisomal contact sites. PMID:23336019

  12. Evolution of Biological Complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Raymond E.

    It is a general rule of nature that larger organisms are more complex, at least as measured by the number of distinct types of cells present. This reflects the fitness advantage conferred by a division of labor among specialized cells over homogeneous totipotency. Yet, increasing size has both costs and benefits, and the search for understanding the driving forces behind the evolution of multicellularity is becoming a very active area of research. This article presents an overview of recent experimental and theoretical work aimed at understanding this biological problem from the perspective of physics. For a class of model organisms, the Volvocine green algae, an emerging hypothesis connects the transition from organisms with totipotent cells to those with terminal germ-soma differentiation to the competition between diffusion and fluid advection created by beating flagella. A number of challenging problems in fluid dynamics, nonlinear dynamics, and control theory emerge when one probes the workings of the simplest multicellular organisms.

  13. Complexity, Metastability and Nonextensivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, C.; Benedek, G.; Rapisarda, A.; Tsallis, C.

    Work and heat fluctuations in systems with deterministic and stochastic forces / E. G. D. Cohen and R. Van Zon -- Is the entropy S[symbol] extensive or nonextensive? / C. Tsallis -- Superstatistics: recent developments and applications / C. Beck -- Two stories outside Boltzmann-Gibbs statistics: Mori's Q-phase transitions and glassy dynamics at the onset of chaos / A. Robledo, F. Baldovin and E. Mayoral -- Time-averages and the heat theorem / A. Carati -- Fundamental formulae and numerical evidences for the central limit theorem in Tsallis statistics / H. Suyari -- Generalizing the Planck distribution / A. M. C. Soma and C. Tsallis -- The physical roots of complexity: renewal or modulation? / P. Grigolini -- Nonequivalent ensembles and metastability / H. Touchette and R. S. Ellis -- Statistical physics for cosmic structures / L. Pietronero and F. Sylos Labini -- Metastability and anomalous behavior in the HMF model: connections to nonextensive thermodynamics and glassy dynamics / A. Pluchino, A. Rapisarda and V. Latora -- Vlasov analysis of relaxation and meta-equilibrium / C. Anteneodo and R. O. Vallejos -- Weak chaos in large conservative systems - infinite-range coupled standard maps / L. G. Moyano, A. P. Majtey and C. Tsallis -- Deterministc aging / E. Barkai -- Edge of chaos of the classical kicked top map: sensitivity to initial conditions / S. M. Duarte Queirós and C. Tsallis -- What entropy at the edge of chaos? / M. Lissia, M. Coraddu and R. Tonelli -- Fractal growth of carbon schwarzites / G. Benedek ... [et al.] -- Clustering and interface propagation in interacting particle dynamics / A. Provata and V. K. Noussiou -- Resonant activation and noise enhanced stability in Josephson junctions / A. L. Pankratov and B. Spagnolo -- Symmetry breaking induced directed motions / C.-H. Chang and T. Y. Tsong -- General theory of Galilean-invariant entropic lattic Boltzmann models / B. M. Boghosian -- Unifying approach to the jamming transition in granular media and

  14. Complex regional pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Emily S.; De La Cerda, Ashley

    2016-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a neurologic disorder that often results in debilitating chronic pain, but the diagnosis may elude providers as it is one of exclusion. A history of trauma may be elucidated. We report a case of CRPS and review the clinical findings, appropriate workup, and treatment options for the patient. The patient we describe went through an extensive workup before receiving the correct diagnosis. Delay in diagnosis leads to prolonged suffering for the patient and, at times, unnecessary invasive debridement procedures. Raising awareness of this entity may help physicians make the correct diagnosis early, as well as initiate a collaborative effort between neurology, anesthesiology, and dermatology to provide the patient the most favorable outcome. PMID:27365892

  15. Complex pendulum biomass sensor

    DOEpatents

    Hoskinson, Reed L.; Kenney, Kevin L.; Perrenoud, Ben C.

    2007-12-25

    A complex pendulum system biomass sensor having a plurality of pendulums. The plurality of pendulums allow the system to detect a biomass height and density. Each pendulum has an angular deflection sensor and a deflector at a unique height. The pendulums are passed through the biomass and readings from the angular deflection sensors are fed into a control system. The control system determines whether adjustment of machine settings is appropriate and either displays an output to the operator, or adjusts automatically adjusts the machine settings, such as the speed, at which the pendulums are passed through the biomass. In an alternate embodiment, an entanglement sensor is also passed through the biomass to determine the amount of biomass entanglement. This measure of entanglement is also fed into the control system.

  16. Complex Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2015-04-16

    After a century of study, scientists have come to the realization that the ordinary matter made of atoms is a minority in the universe. In order to explain observations, it appears that there exists a new and undiscovered kind of matter, called dark matter, that is five times more prevalent than ordinary matter. The evidence for this new matter’s existence is very strong, but scientists know only a little about its nature. In today’s video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln talks about an exciting and unconventional idea, specifically that dark matter might have a very complex set of structures and interactions. While this idea is entirely speculative, it is an interesting hypothesis and one that scientists are investigating.

  17. Complex Tectonism on Ganymede

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Complex tectonism is evident in these images of Ganymede's surface. The solid state imaging camera on NASA's Galileo spacecraft imaged this region as it passed Ganymede during its second orbit through the Jovian system. The 80 kilometer (50 mile) wide lens-shaped feature in the center of the image is located at 32 degrees latitude and 188 degrees longitude along the border of a region of ancient dark terrain known as Marius Regio, and is near an area of younger bright terrain named Nippur Sulcus. The tectonism that created the structures in the bright terrain nearby has strongly affected the local dark terrain to form unusual structures such as the one shown here. The lens-like appearance of this feature is probably due to shearing of the surface, where areas have slid past each other and also rotated slightly. Note that in several places in these images, especially around the border of the lens-shaped feature, bright ridges appear to turn into dark grooves. Analysis of the geologic structures in areas like this are helping scientists to understand the complex tectonic history of Ganymede.

    North is to the top-left of the image, and the sun illuminates the surface from the southeast. The image covers an area about 63 kilometers (39 miles) by 120 kilometers (75 miles) across at a resolution of 188 meters (627 feet) per picture element. The images were taken on September 6, 1996 at a range of 18,522 kilometers (11,576 miles) by the solid state imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov.

  18. Canberra Deep Dish Communications Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    View of Canberra 70m (230 ft.) antenna with flags from the three Deep Space Network sites. The Canberra Deep Space Communications Complex, located outside Canberra, Australia, is one of the three complexes which comprise NASA's Deep Space Network. The other complexes are located in Goldstone, California, and Madrid, Spain.

  19. Managing complexity of aerospace systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamaskar, Shashank

    Growing complexity of modern aerospace systems has exposed the limits of conventional systems engineering tools and challenged our ability to design them in a timely and cost effective manner. According to the US Government Accountability Office (GAO), in 2009 nearly half of the defense acquisition programs are expecting 25% or more increase in unit acquisition cost. Increase in technical complexity has been identified as one of the primary drivers behind cost-schedule overruns. Thus to assure the affordability of future aerospace systems, it is increasingly important to develop tools and capabilities for managing their complexity. We propose an approach for managing the complexity of aerospace systems to address this pertinent problem. To this end, we develop a measure that improves upon the state-of-the-art metrics and incorporates key aspects of system complexity. We address the problem of system decomposition by presenting an algorithm for module identification that generates modules to minimize integration complexity. We demonstrate the framework on diverse spacecraft and show the impact of design decisions on integration cost. The measure and the algorithm together help the designer track and manage complexity in different phases of system design. We next investigate how complexity can be used as a decision metric in the model-based design (MBD) paradigm. We propose a framework for complexity enabled design space exploration that introduces the idea of using complexity as a non-traditional design objective. We also incorporate complexity with the component based design paradigm (a sub-field of MBD) and demonstrate it on several case studies. The approach for managing complexity is a small but significant contribution to the vast field of complexity management. We envision our approach being used in concert with a suite of complexity metrics to provide an ability to measure and track complexity through different stages of design and development. This will not

  20. A geometric approach to complexity.

    PubMed

    Ay, Nihat; Olbrich, Eckehard; Bertschinger, Nils; Jost, Jürgen

    2011-09-01

    We develop a geometric approach to complexity based on the principle that complexity requires interactions at different scales of description. Complex systems are more than the sum of their parts of any size and not just more than the sum of their elements. Using information geometry, we therefore analyze the decomposition of a system in terms of an interaction hierarchy. In mathematical terms, we present a theory of complexity measures for finite random fields using the geometric framework of hierarchies of exponential families. Within our framework, previously proposed complexity measures find their natural place and gain a new interpretation. PMID:21974666

  1. The Mycobacterium avium complex.

    PubMed Central

    Inderlied, C B; Kemper, C A; Bermudez, L E

    1993-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) disease emerged early in the epidemic of AIDS as one of the common opportunistic infections afflicting human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. However, only over the past few years has a consensus developed about its significance to the morbidity and mortality of AIDS. M. avium was well known to mycobacteriologists decades before AIDS, and the MAC was known to cause disease, albeit uncommon, in humans and animals. The early interest in the MAC provided a basis for an explosion of studies over the past 10 years largely in response to the role of the MAC in AIDS opportunistic infection. Molecular techniques have been applied to the epidemiology of MAC disease as well as to a better understanding of the genetics of antimicrobial resistance. The interaction of the MAC with the immune system is complex, and putative MAC virulence factors appear to have a direct effect on the components of cellular immunity, including the regulation of cytokine expression and function. There now is compelling evidence that disseminated MAC disease in humans contributes to both a decrease in the quality of life and survival. Disseminated disease most commonly develops late in the course of AIDS as the CD4 cells are depleted below a critical threshold, but new therapies for prophylaxis and treatment offer considerable promise. These new therapeutic modalities are likely to be useful in the treatment of other forms of MAC disease in patients without AIDS. The laboratory diagnosis of MAC disease has focused on the detection of mycobacteria in the blood and tissues, and although the existing methods are largely adequate, there is need for improvement. Indeed, the successful treatment of MAC disease clearly will require an early and rapid detection of the MAC in clinical specimens long before the establishment of the characteristic overwhelming infection of bone marrow, liver, spleen, and other tissue. Also, a standard method of susceptibility testing

  2. Sociality influences cultural complexity

    PubMed Central

    Muthukrishna, Michael; Shulman, Ben W.; Vasilescu, Vlad; Henrich, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Archaeological and ethnohistorical evidence suggests a link between a population's size and structure, and the diversity or sophistication of its toolkits or technologies. Addressing these patterns, several evolutionary models predict that both the size and social interconnectedness of populations can contribute to the complexity of its cultural repertoire. Some models also predict that a sudden loss of sociality or of population will result in subsequent losses of useful skills/technologies. Here, we test these predictions with two experiments that permit learners to access either one or five models (teachers). Experiment 1 demonstrates that naive participants who could observe five models, integrate this information and generate increasingly effective skills (using an image editing tool) over 10 laboratory generations, whereas those with access to only one model show no improvement. Experiment 2, which began with a generation of trained experts, shows how learners with access to only one model lose skills (in knot-tying) more rapidly than those with access to five models. In the final generation of both experiments, all participants with access to five models demonstrate superior skills to those with access to only one model. These results support theoretical predictions linking sociality to cumulative cultural evolution. PMID:24225461

  3. Shanghai Delta Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, R.E.; Hoffman, P.F.; Parker, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    The upper Eocene Yegua Formation expands dramatically across a regional system of growth faults into an area generally 12-15 km wide, extending at least from the western edge of the Houston sale dome basin to the San Marcos arch. Within this area, the expanded Yegua trend has yielded, since 1982, at least seven noteworthy discoveries: Toro Grande and Lost Bridge fields in Jackson County, and Black Owl, Shanghai, Shanghai East, El Campo, and Phase Four fields in Wharton County. During each of several postulated Yegua sea level drops, this flexure became a focal point for deltaic deposition of excellent reservoir-quality sands. Shanghai, Shanghai East, and El Campo fields are located within what the writers have labeled the ''Shanghai delta complex.'' Integration of seismic and well data in this vicinity shows a marked increase in the expansion indices of growth faults, and moderately thick progradational sand sequences have accumulated immediately downthrow. This structural-stratigraphic pattern, as well as internal bedding characteristics and other lithologic data observed, is believed typical of deltas deposited along the Yegua shelf margin.

  4. Fact Sheet: Range Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornelson, C.; Fretter, E.

    2004-01-01

    NASA Ames has a long tradition in leadership with the use of ballistic ranges and shock tubes for the purpose of studying the physics and phenomena associated with hypervelocity flight. Cutting-edge areas of research run the gamut from aerodynamics, to impact physics, to flow-field structure and chemistry. This legacy of testing began in the NACA era of the 1940's with the Supersonic Free Flight Tunnel, and evolved dramatically up through the late 1950s with the pioneering work in the Ames Hypersonic Ballistic Range. The tradition continued in the mid-60s with the commissioning of the three newest facilities: the Ames Vertical Gun Range (AVGR) in 1964, the Hypervelocity Free Flight Facility (HFFF) in 1965 and the Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) in 1966. Today the Range Complex continues to provide unique and critical testing in support of the Nation's programs for planetary geology and geophysics; exobiology; solar system origins; earth atmospheric entry, planetary entry, and aerobraking vehicles; and various configurations for supersonic and hypersonic aircraft.

  5. Hypernetworks of Complex Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Jeffrey

    Hypernetworks generalise the concept of a relation between two things to relations between many things. The notion of relational simplex generalises the concept of network edge to relations between many elements. Relational simplices have multi-dimensional connectivity related to hyper-graphs and the Galois lattice of maximally connected sets of elements. This structure acts as a kind of backcloth for the dynamic system traffic represented by numerical mappings, where the topology of the backcloth constrains the dynamics of the traffic. Simplices provide a way of defining multilevel structure. This relates to system time measured by the formation of simplices as system events. Multilevel hypernetworks are classes of sets of relational simplices that represent the system backcloth and the traffic of systems activity it supports. Hypernetworks provide a significant generalisation of network theory, enabling the integration of relational structure, logic, and topological and analytic dynamics. They provide structures that are likely to be necessary if not sufficient for a science of complex multilevel socio-technical systems.

  6. Complex emergencies in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Bradt, D A; Drummond, C M; Richman, M

    2001-01-01

    Recently, Indonesia has experienced six major provincial, civil, armed conflicts. Underlying causes include the transmigration policy, sectarian disputes, the Asian economic crisis, fall of authoritarian rule, and a backlash against civil and military abuses. The public health impact involves the displacement nationwide of > 1.2 million persons. Violence in the Malukus, Timor, and Kalimantan has sparked the greatest population movements such that five provinces in Indonesia each now harbor > 100,000 internally displaced persons. With a background of government instability, hyperinflation, macroeconomic collapse, and elusive political solutions, these civil armed conflicts are ripe for persistence as complex emergencies. Indonesia has made substantial progress in domestic disaster management with the establishment of central administrative authority, strategic planning, and training programs. Nevertheless, the Indonesian experience reveals recurrent issues in international humanitarian health assistance. Clinical care remains complicated by absences of treatment protocols, inappropriate drug use, high procedural complication rates, and variable referral practices. Epidemiological surveillance remains complicated by unsettled clinical case definitions, non-standardized case management of diseases with epidemic potential, variable outbreak management protocols, and inadequate epidemiological analytic capacity. International donor support has been semi-selective, insufficient, and late. The militia murders of three UN staff in West Timor prompted the withdrawal of UN international staff from West Timor for nearly a year to date. Re-establishing rules of engagement for humanitarian health workers must address security, public health, and clinical threats. PMID:12090212

  7. Information Complexity and Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnoli, Franco; Bignone, Franco A.; Cecconi, Fabio; Politi, Antonio

    Kolmogorov contributed directly to Biology in essentially three problems: the analysis of population dynamics (Lotka-Volterra equations), the reaction-diffusion formulation of gene spreading (FKPP equation), and some discussions about Mendel's laws. However, the widely recognized importance of his contribution arises from his work on algorithmic complexity. In fact, the limited direct intervention in Biology reflects the generally slow growth of interest of mathematicians towards biological issues. From the early work of Vito Volterra on species competition, to the slow growth of dynamical systems theory, contributions to the study of matter and the physiology of the nervous system, the first 50-60 years have witnessed important contributions, but as scattered pieces apparently uncorrelated, and in branches often far away from Biology. Up to the 40' it is hard to see the initial loose build up of a convergence, for those theories that will become mainstream research by the end of the century, and connected by the study of biological systems per-se.

  8. Nonisostructural complex oxide heteroepitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Franklin J. Ramanathan, Shriram

    2014-07-01

    The authors present an overview of the fundamentals and representative examples of the growth of epitaxial complex oxide thin films on structurally dissimilar substrates. The authors will delineate how the details of particular crystal structures and symmetry of different oxide surfaces can be employed for a rational approach to the synthesis of nonisostructural epitaxial heterostructures. The concept of oxygen eutaxy can be widely applied. Materials combinations will be split into three categories, and in all cases the films and substrates occur in different crystal structures: (1) common translational and rotational symmetry between the film and substrate planes; (2) translational symmetry mismatch between the substrates and films that is distinct from a simple mismatch in lattice parameters; and (3) rotational symmetry mismatch. In case (1), in principle single-crystalline thin films can be attained despite the films and substrates possessing different crystal structures. In case (2), antiphase boundaries will be prevalent in the thin films. In case (3), thin-film rotational variants that are joined by tilt boundaries will be present. Diffraction techniques to determine crystallographic alignment and epitaxial variants are discussed, and transmission electron microscopy studies to investigate extended defects in the thin films will also be reviewed. The authors end with open problems in this field regarding the structure of oxide interfaces that can be topics for future research.

  9. What is a complex graph?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jongkwang; Wilhelm, Thomas

    2008-04-01

    Many papers published in recent years show that real-world graphs G(n,m) ( n nodes, m edges) are more or less “complex” in the sense that different topological features deviate from random graphs. Here we narrow the definition of graph complexity and argue that a complex graph contains many different subgraphs. We present different measures that quantify this complexity, for instance C1e, the relative number of non-isomorphic one-edge-deleted subgraphs (i.e. DECK size). However, because these different subgraph measures are computationally demanding, we also study simpler complexity measures focussing on slightly different aspects of graph complexity. We consider heuristically defined “product measures”, the products of two quantities which are zero in the extreme cases of a path and clique, and “entropy measures” quantifying the diversity of different topological features. The previously defined network/graph complexity measures Medium Articulation and Offdiagonal complexity ( OdC) belong to these two classes. We study OdC measures in some detail and compare it with our new measures. For all measures, the most complex graph G has a medium number of edges, between the edge numbers of the minimum and the maximum connected graph n-1complexity measures are characterized with the help of different example graphs. For all measures the corresponding time complexity is given. Finally, we discuss the complexity of 33 real-world graphs of different biological, social and economic systems with the six computationally most simple measures (including OdC). The complexities of the real graphs are compared with average complexities of two different random graph versions: complete random graphs (just fixed n,m) and rewired graphs with fixed node degrees.

  10. Spatiotemporal imaging of complexity

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Stephen E.; Mandell, Arnold J.; Coppola, Richard

    2013-01-01

    What are the functional neuroimaging measurements required for more fully characterizing the events and locations of neocortical activity? A prime assumption has been that modulation of cortical activity will inevitably be reflected in changes in energy utilization (for the most part) changes of glucose and oxygen consumption. Are such a measures complete and sufficient? More direct measures of cortical electrophysiological activity show event or task-related modulation of amplitude or band-limited oscillatory power. Using magnetoencephalography (MEG), these measures have been shown to correlate well with energy utilization sensitive BOLD fMRI. In this paper, we explore the existence of state changes in electrophysiological cortical activity that can occur independently of changes in averaged amplitude, source power or indices of metabolic rates. In addition, we demonstrate that such state changes can be described by applying a new measure of complexity, rank vector entropy (RVE), to source waveform estimates from beamformer-processed MEG. RVE is a non-parametric symbolic dynamic informational entropy measure that accommodates the wide dynamic range of measured brain signals while resolving its temporal variations. By representing the measurements by their rank values, RVE overcomes the problem of defining embedding space partitions without resorting to signal compression. This renders RVE-independent of absolute signal amplitude. In addition, this approach is robust, being relatively free of tunable parameters. We present examples of task-free and task-dependent MEG demonstrating that RVE provides new information by uncovering hidden dynamical structure in the apparent turbulent (or chaotic) dynamics of spontaneous cortical activity. PMID:23355820

  11. Complex oxides: Intricate disorder

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Uberuaga, Blas Pedro

    2016-05-01

    In this study, complex oxides such as pyrochlores have a myriad of potential technological applications, including as fast ion conductors and radiation-tolerant nuclear waste forms. They are also of interest for their catalytic and spin ice properties. Many of these functional properties are enabled by the atomic structure of the cation sublattices. Pyrochlores (A2B2O7) contain two different cations (A and B), typically a 3+ rare earth and a 4+ transition metal such as Hf, Zr, or Ti. The large variety of chemistries that can form pyrochlores leads to a rich space in which to search for exotic new materials. Furthermore,more » how cations order or disorder on their respective sublattices for a given chemical composition influences the functional properties of the oxide. For example, oxygen ionic conductivity is directly correlated with the level of cation disorder — the swapping of A and B cations1. Further, the resistance of these materials against amorphization has also been connected with the ability of the cations to disorder2, 3. These correlations between cation structure and functionality have spurred great interest in the structure of the cation sublattice under irradiation, with significant focus on the disordering mechanisms and disordered structure. Previous studies have found that, upon irradiation, pyrochlores often undergo an order-to-disorder transformation, in which the resulting structure is, from a diffraction point of view, indistinguishable from fluorite (AO2) (ref. 3). Shamblin et al. now reveal that the structure of disordered pyrochlore is more complicated than previously thought4.« less

  12. Species complexes in the Simuliidae*

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    The recent discovery that Simulium damnosum in Africa is not a single species but a complex of sibling species has important implications for the epidemiology and control of onchocerciasis. This paper sets out the current situation with regard to classification within the S. damnosum complex and the smaller S. neavei group. The nomenclature of the S. damnosum complex and current morphological and enzyme electrophoretic methods of differentiating among sibling species are discussed. Finally, recommendations are made on priorities for future research. PMID:307447

  13. COMPLEXITY and the QGCW Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zichichi, Antonino

    2014-06-01

    The following sections are included: * Seven definitions of Complexity * Complexity exists at all scales * AFB phenomena from Beethoven to the Superworld * UEEC events, from Galilei up to SM&B * The two asymptotic limits: History and Science * The basic points on the correlation between Complexity and Predictions * The lesson needed for the future * From Planck to Complexity * Consequences for LHC: the QGCW project * Conclusions * The Platonic Grand Unification * The Platonic Supersymmetry * Examples of UEEC events in the construction of the SM&B * Open Problems in Subnuclear Physics * The ten challenges of Subnuclear Physics * References

  14. Complex Constructivism: A Theoretical Model of Complexity and Cognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doolittle, Peter E.

    2014-01-01

    Education has long been driven by its metaphors for teaching and learning. These metaphors have influenced both educational research and educational practice. Complexity and constructivism are two theories that provide functional and robust metaphors. Complexity provides a metaphor for the structure of myriad phenomena, while constructivism…

  15. Sustainability, Complexity and Learning: Insights from Complex Systems Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espinosa, A.; Porter, T.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to explore core contributions from two different approaches to complexity management in organisations aiming to improve their sustainability,: the Viable Systems Model (VSM), and the Complex Adaptive Systems (CAS). It is proposed to perform this by summarising the main insights each approach offers to…

  16. Forecasting in Complex Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rundle, J. B.; Holliday, J. R.; Graves, W. R.; Turcotte, D. L.; Donnellan, A.

    2014-12-01

    Complex nonlinear systems are typically characterized by many degrees of freedom, as well as interactions between the elements. Interesting examples can be found in the areas of earthquakes and finance. In these two systems, fat tails play an important role in the statistical dynamics. For earthquake systems, the Gutenberg-Richter magnitude-frequency is applicable, whereas for daily returns for the securities in the financial markets are known to be characterized by leptokurtotic statistics in which the tails are power law. Very large fluctuations are present in both systems. In earthquake systems, one has the example of great earthquakes such as the M9.1, March 11, 2011 Tohoku event. In financial systems, one has the example of the market crash of October 19, 1987. Both were largely unexpected events that severely impacted the earth and financial systems systemically. Other examples include the M9.3 Andaman earthquake of December 26, 2004, and the Great Recession which began with the fall of Lehman Brothers investment bank on September 12, 2013. Forecasting the occurrence of these damaging events has great societal importance. In recent years, national funding agencies in a variety of countries have emphasized the importance of societal relevance in research, and in particular, the goal of improved forecasting technology. Previous work has shown that both earthquakes and financial crashes can be described by a common Landau-Ginzburg-type free energy model. These metastable systems are characterized by fat tail statistics near the classical spinodal. Correlations in these systems can grow and recede, but do not imply causation, a common source of misunderstanding. In both systems, a common set of techniques can be used to compute the probabilities of future earthquakes or crashes. In this talk, we describe the basic phenomenology of these systems and emphasize their similarities and differences. We also consider the problem of forecast validation and verification

  17. The Algebra of Complex Numbers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LePage, Wilbur R.

    This programed text is an introduction to the algebra of complex numbers for engineering students, particularly because of its relevance to important problems of applications in electrical engineering. It is designed for a person who is well experienced with the algebra of real numbers and calculus, but who has no experience with complex number…

  18. Complexity and Education: Vital Simultaneities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Brent

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the place of complexity science within education and educational research. The discussion begins with the suggestion that educational research has a history of adopting interpretive frames from other domains with little adaptation. Complexity science is argued to compel a different sort of positioning, one that requires…

  19. Too Dumb for Complex Texts?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauerlein, Mark

    2011-01-01

    High school students' lack of experience and practice with reading complex texts is a primary cause of their difficulties with college-level reading. Filling the syllabus with digital texts does little to address this deficiency. Complex texts demand three dispositions from readers: a willingness to probe works characterized by dense meanings, the…

  20. Understanding and Teaching Complex Texts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Douglas; Frey, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Teachers in today's classrooms struggle every day to design instructional interventions that would build students' reading skills and strategies in order to ensure their comprehension of complex texts. Text complexity can be determined in both qualitative and quantitative ways. In this article, the authors describe various innovative…

  1. Amphotericin B Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Amphotericin B lipid complex injection is used to treat serious, possibly life-threatening fungal infections in people who did not respond or are ... tolerate conventional amphotericin B therapy. Amphotericin B lipid complex injection is in a class of medications called ...

  2. Teacher Knowledge: A Complex Tapestry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adoniou, Misty

    2015-01-01

    Teachers need to know a great deal, in many areas and in multiple ways. Teacher knowledge is a complex tapestry, and teachers must successfully weave the multiple threads. In this article, I present a conceptualisation of teacher knowledge that provides a framework for describing the complexity of teacher knowledge. The framework describes three…

  3. Improve Reading with Complex Texts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Douglas; Frey, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards have cast a renewed light on reading instruction, presenting teachers with the new requirements to teach close reading of complex texts. Teachers and administrators should consider a number of essential features of close reading: They are short, complex texts; rich discussions based on worthy questions; revisiting…

  4. The Complexity of Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Charles

    2011-01-01

    This paper takes a complexity theory approach to looking at language learning, an approach that investigates how language learners adapt to and interact with people and their environment. Based on interviews with four graduate students, it shows how complexity theory can help us understand both the situatedness of language learning and also…

  5. Sun-climate complexity linking.

    PubMed

    West, B J; Grigolini, P

    2008-02-29

    It is known that Earth's short-term temperature anomalies share the same complexity index mu as solar flares. We show that this property is not accidental and is a consequence of the phenomenon of information transfer based on the crucial role of non-Poisson renewal events in complex networks. PMID:18352672

  6. Monotone measures of statistical complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudnicki, Łukasz; Toranzo, Irene V.; Sánchez-Moreno, Pablo; Dehesa, Jesús S.

    2016-01-01

    We introduce and discuss the notion of monotonicity for the complexity measures of general probability distributions, patterned after the resource theory of quantum entanglement. Then, we explore whether this property is satisfied by the three main intrinsic measures of complexity (Crámer-Rao, Fisher-Shannon, LMC) and some of their generalizations.

  7. A Simple Explanation of Complexation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, J. Richard

    2010-01-01

    The topics of solution thermodynamics, activity coefficients, and complex formation are introduced through computational exercises and sample applications. The presentation is designed to be accessible to freshmen in a chemical engineering computations course. The MOSCED model is simplified to explain complex formation in terms of hydrogen…

  8. Earthquake cycles in complex geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanet, Pierre; Bhat, Harsha; Madariaga, Raul

    2016-04-01

    Our understanding of earthquake cycles, from a modelling perspective, comes mainly from theoretical, and numerical, work on a single straight fault. However, natural fault systems are geometrically complex. Modelling complex fault geometry (bends, kinks and multiple faults) is in itself a challenge as it is computationally intensive. To overcome this difficulty, we appeal to the Fast Multipole Method which was developed in the context of modelling N-body problems. This method is then used to model the quasi-dynamic response of multiple faults, with complex geometries, that are governed by rate and state friction laws. Our preliminary findings tell us that when stress interaction between faults, due to complex geometry, is accounted then even strongly rate-weakening faults (a-b)<0 show a complex spectrum of slow slip and dynamic ruptures.

  9. The Evolution of Complex Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billingham, John

    1989-01-01

    In considering the probabilities that intelligent life might exist elsewhere in the Universe, it is important to ask questions about the factors governing the emergence of complex living organisms in the context of evolutionary biology, planetary environments and events in space. Two important problems arise. First, what can be learned about the general laws governing the evolution of complex life anywhere in space by studying its history on the Earth? Second, how is the evolution of complex life affected by events in space? To address these problems, a series of Science Workshops on the Evolution of Complex Life was held at the Ames Research Center. Included in this paper are highlights of those workshops, with particular emphasis on the first question, namely the evolution of complex extraterrestrial life.

  10. Complex-extended Bohmian mechanics.

    PubMed

    Chou, Chia-Chun; Wyatt, Robert E

    2010-04-01

    Complex-extended Bohmian mechanics is investigated by analytically continuing the wave function in polar form into the complex plane. We derive the complex-extended version of the quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation and the continuity equation in Bohmian mechanics. Complex-extended Bohmian mechanics recovers the standard real-valued Bohmian mechanics on the real axis. The trajectories on the real axis are in accord with the standard real-valued Bohmian trajectories. The trajectories launched away from the real axis never intersect the real axis, and they display symmetry with respect to the real axis. Trajectories display hyperbolic deflection around nodes of the wave function in the complex plane. PMID:20387916

  11. Ternary complexes in analytical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Babko, A K

    1968-08-01

    Reactions between a complex AB and a third component C do not always proceed by a displacement mechanism governed by the energy difference of the chemical bonds A-B and A-C. The third component often becomes part of the complex, forming a mixed co-ordination sphere or ternary complex. The properties of this ternary complex ABC are not additive functions of the properties of AB and AC. Such reactions are important in many methods in analytical chemistry, particularly in photometric analysis, extractive separation, masking, etc. The general properties of the four basic types of ternary complex are reviewed and examples given. The four types comprise the systems (a) metal ion, electronegative ligand, organic base, (b) one metal ion, two different electronegative ligands, (c) ternary heteropoly acids, and (d) two different metal ions, one ligand. PMID:18960358

  12. Modelling of Complex Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akdim, Mohamed Reda

    2003-09-01

    Nowadays plasmas are used for various applications such as the fabrication of silicon solar cells, integrated circuits, coatings and dental cleaning. In the case of a processing plasma, e.g. for the fabrication of amorphous silicon solar cells, a mixture of silane and hydrogen gas is injected in a reactor. These gases are decomposed by making a plasma. A plasma with a low degree of ionization (typically 10_5) is usually made in a reactor containing two electrodes driven by a radio-frequency (RF) power source in the megahertz range. Under the right circumstances the radicals, neutrals and ions can react further to produce nanometer sized dust particles. The particles can stick to the surface and thereby contribute to a higher deposition rate. Another possibility is that the nanometer sized particles coagulate and form larger micron sized particles. These particles obtain a high negative charge, due to their large radius and are usually trapped in a radiofrequency plasma. The electric field present in the discharge sheaths causes the entrapment. Such plasmas are called dusty or complex plasmas. In this thesis numerical models are presented which describe dusty plasmas in reactive and nonreactive plasmas. We started first with the development of a simple one-dimensional silane fluid model where a dusty radio-frequency silane/hydrogen discharge is simulated. In the model, discharge quantities like the fluxes, densities and electric field are calculated self-consistently. A radius and an initial density profile for the spherical dust particles are given and the charge and the density of the dust are calculated with an iterative method. During the transport of the dust, its charge is kept constant in time. The dust influences the electric field distribution through its charge and the density of the plasma through recombination of positive ions and electrons at its surface. In the model this process gives an extra production of silane radicals, since the growth of dust is

  13. Cancer complexity and radiation protection.

    PubMed

    Mossman, Kenneth L

    2014-07-01

    Management of radiological risks typically encountered in environmental and occupational settings is challenging because of uncertainties in the magnitude of the risks and the benefits of risk reduction. In practice, radiation dose instead of risk is measured. However, the relationship between dose and risk is not straightforward because cancer (the major health effect of concern at low doses) is a disease of complexity. Risks at small doses (defined as less than 100 mSv) can never be known exactly because of the inherent uncertainties in cancer as a complex disease. Tumors are complex because of the nonlinear interactions that occur among tumor cells and between the tumor and its local tissue environment. This commentary reviews evidence for cancer complexity and what complexity means for radiation protection. A complexity view of cancer does not mean we must abandon our current system of protection. What it does mean is that complexity requires new ways of thinking about control of cancer-the ideas that cancers can occur without cause, cancers behave unpredictably, and calculated cancer risks following small doses of radiation are highly uncertain. PMID:24849905

  14. Kinetics of actinide complexation reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, K.L.; Sullivan, J.C.

    1997-09-01

    Though the literature records extensive compilations of the thermodynamics of actinide complexation reactions, the kinetics of complex formation and dissociation reactions of actinide ions in aqueous solutions have not been extensively investigated. In light of the central role played by such reactions in actinide process and environmental chemistry, this situation is somewhat surprising. The authors report herein a summary of what is known about actinide complexation kinetics. The systems include actinide ions in the four principal oxidation states (III, IV, V, and VI) and complex formation and dissociation rates with both simple and complex ligands. Most of the work reported was conducted in acidic media, but a few address reactions in neutral and alkaline solutions. Complex formation reactions tend in general to be rapid, accessible only to rapid-scan and equilibrium perturbation techniques. Complex dissociation reactions exhibit a wider range of rates and are generally more accessible using standard analytical methods. Literature results are described and correlated with the known properties of the individual ions.

  15. The complexity of anatomical systems

    PubMed Central

    Grizzi, Fabio; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio

    2005-01-01

    Background The conception of anatomical entities as a hierarchy of infinitely graduated forms and the increase in the number of observed anatomical sub-entities and structural variables has generated a growing complexity, thus highlighting new properties of organised biological matter. Results (1) Complexity is so pervasive in the anatomical world that it has come to be considered as a primary characteristic of anatomical systems. (2) Anatomical entities, when viewed at microscopic as well as macroscopic level of observation, show a different degree of complexity. (3) Complexity can reside in the structure of the anatomical system (having many diverse parts with varying interactions or an intricate architecture) or in its behaviour. Often complexity in structure and behaviour go together. (4) Complex systems admit many descriptions (ways of looking at the system) each of which is only partially true. Each way of looking at a complex system requires its own description, its own mode of analysis and its own breaking down of the system in different parts; (5) Almost all the anatomical entities display hierarchical forms: their component structures at different spatial scales or their process at different time scales are related to each other. Conclusion The need to find a new way of observing and measuring anatomical entities, and objectively quantifying their different structural changes, prompted us to investigate the non-Euclidean geometries and the theories of complexity, and to apply their concepts to human anatomy. This attempt has led us to reflect upon the complex significance of the shape of an observed anatomical entity. Its changes have been defined in relation to variations in its status: from a normal (i.e. natural) to a pathological or altered state introducing the concepts of kinematics and dynamics of anatomical forms, speed of their changes, and that of scale of their observation. PMID:16029490

  16. Actinide cation-cation complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Stoyer, N.J.; Seaborg, G.T.

    1994-12-01

    The +5 oxidation state of U, Np, Pu, and Am is a linear dioxo cation (AnO{sub 2}{sup +}) with a formal charge of +1. These cations form complexes with a variety of other cations, including actinide cations. Other oxidation states of actinides do not form these cation-cation complexes with any cation other than AnO{sub 2}{sup +}; therefore, cation-cation complexes indicate something unique about AnO{sub 2}{sup +} cations compared to actinide cations in general. The first cation-cation complex, NpO{sub 2}{sup +}{center_dot}UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, was reported by Sullivan, Hindman, and Zielen in 1961. Of the four actinides that form AnO{sub 2}{sup +} species, the cation-cation complexes of NpO{sub 2}{sup +} have been studied most extensively while the other actinides have not. The only PuO{sub 2}{sup +} cation-cation complexes that have been studied are with Fe{sup 3+} and Cr{sup 3+} and neither one has had its equilibrium constant measured. Actinides have small molar absorptivities and cation-cation complexes have small equilibrium constants; therefore, to overcome these obstacles a sensitive technique is required. Spectroscopic techniques are used most often to study cation-cation complexes. Laser-Induced Photacoustic Spectroscopy equilibrium constants for the complexes NpO{sub 2}{sup +}{center_dot}UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, NpO{sub 2}{sup +}{center_dot}Th{sup 4+}, PuO{sub 2}{sup +}{center_dot}UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, and PuO{sub 2}{sup +}{center_dot}Th{sup 4+} at an ionic strength of 6 M using LIPAS are 2.4 {plus_minus} 0.2, 1.8 {plus_minus} 0.9, 2.2 {plus_minus} 1.5, and {approx}0.8 M{sup {minus}1}.

  17. SDO: Complex Mass of Plasma

    NASA Video Gallery

    A small, but complex mass of solar material gyrated and spun about over the course of 40 hours above the surface of the sun on Sept. 1-3, 2015. It was stretched and pulled back and forth by powerfu...

  18. Complex Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Slattery, Darlene; Hampton, Michael

    2003-03-10

    This report describes research into the use of complex hydrides for hydrogen storage. The synthesis of a number of alanates, (AIH4) compounds, was investigated. Both wet chemical and mechano-chemical methods were studied.

  19. The future of complexity engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frei, Regina; Di Marzo Serugendo, Giovanna

    2012-06-01

    Complexity Engineering encompasses a set of approaches to engineering systems which are typically composed of various interacting entities often exhibiting self-* behaviours and emergence. The engineer or designer uses methods that benefit from the findings of complexity science and often considerably differ from the classical engineering approach of "divide and conquer". This article provides an overview on some very interdisciplinary and innovative research areas and projects in the field of Complexity Engineering, including synthetic biology, chemistry, artificial life, self-healing materials and others. It then classifies the presented work according to five types of nature-inspired technology, namely: (1) using technology to understand nature, (2) nature-inspiration for technology, (3) using technology on natural systems, (4) using biotechnology methods in software engineering, and (5) using technology to model nature. Finally, future trends in Complexity Engineering are indicated and related risks are discussed.

  20. Making the Tent Function Complex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sprows, David J.

    2010-01-01

    This note can be used to illustrate to the student such concepts as periodicity in the complex plane. The basic construction makes use of the Tent function which requires only that the student have some working knowledge of binary arithmetic.

  1. Volatile hexafluoroacetylacetonate complexes of einsteinium

    SciTech Connect

    Fedoseev, E.V.; Aizenberg, M.I.; Travnikov, S.S.; Davydov, A.V.; Myasoedov, B.F.

    1988-07-01

    Volatile hexafluoroacetylacetonate complexes of einsteinium have been synthesized. Their sublimation and thermochromatographic behavior in the presence of free ..beta..-diketone were studied. The reaction of einsteinium di- and tri-chlorides with hexafluoroacetylacetone vapor is discussed.

  2. Differential Complexes in Continuum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angoshtari, Arzhang; Yavari, Arash

    2015-04-01

    We study some differential complexes in continuum mechanics that involve both symmetric and non-symmetric second-order tensors. In particular, we show that the tensorial analogue of the standard grad-curl-div complex can simultaneously describe the kinematics and the kinetics of motion of a continuum. The relation between this complex and the de Rham complex allows one to readily derive the necessary and sufficient conditions for the compatibility of displacement gradient and the existence of stress functions on non-contractible bodies.We also derive the local compatibility equations in terms of the Green deformation tensor for motions of 2D and 3D bodies, and shells in curved ambient spaces with constant curvatures.

  3. Algorithmic complexity of a protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewey, T. Gregory

    1996-07-01

    The information contained in a protein's amino acid sequence dictates its three-dimensional structure. To quantitate the transfer of information that occurs in the protein folding process, the Kolmogorov information entropy or algorithmic complexity of the protein structure is investigated. The algorithmic complexity of an object provides a means of quantitating its information content. Recent results have indicated that the algorithmic complexity of microstates of certain statistical mechanical systems can be estimated from the thermodynamic entropy. In the present work, it is shown that the algorithmic complexity of a protein is given by its configurational entropy. Using this result, a quantitative estimate of the information content of a protein's structure is made and is compared to the information content of the sequence. Additionally, the mutual information between sequence and structure is determined. It is seen that virtually all the information contained in the protein structure is shared with the sequence.

  4. Mathematicians, Attributional Complexity, and Gender

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stalder, Daniel R.

    Given indirect indications in sex role and soda! psychology research that mathematical-deductive reasoning may negatively relate to social acuity, Study 1 investigated whether mathematicians were less attributionally complex than nonmathematicians. Study 1 administered the Attributional Complexity Scale, a measure of social acuity, to female and male faculty members and graduate students in four Midwestern schools. Atlrihutional complexity (AC) is the ability and motivation to give complex explanations for behavior. Study 1 found a significant interaction between field and gender. Only among women did mathematicians score lower on AC. In addition, an established gender difference in AC (that women score higher than men) was present only among nonmathematicians. Studies 2 and 3 offered some preliminary support for the possibility that it is generally female students who score tow on AC who aspire to he mathematicians and for the underlying view that female students' perceived similarity to mathematicians can influence their vocational choices.

  5. Complex Topographic Feature Ontology Patterns

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Varanka, Dalia E.; Jerris, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Semantic ontologies are examined as effective data models for the representation of complex topographic feature types. Complex feature types are viewed as integrated relations between basic features for a basic purpose. In the context of topographic science, such component assemblages are supported by resource systems and found on the local landscape. Ontologies are organized within six thematic modules of a domain ontology called Topography that includes within its sphere basic feature types, resource systems, and landscape types. Context is constructed not only as a spatial and temporal setting, but a setting also based on environmental processes. Types of spatial relations that exist between components include location, generative processes, and description. An example is offered in a complex feature type ‘mine.’ The identification and extraction of complex feature types are an area for future research.

  6. Recent developments in complex scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Rescigno, T.N.

    1980-12-15

    Some recent developments in the use of complex basis function techniques to study resonance as well as certain types of non-resonant, scattering phenomena are discussed. Complex scaling techniques and other closely related methods have continued to attract the attention of computational physicists and chemists and have now reached a point of development where meaningful calculations on many-electron atoms and molecules are beginning to appear feasible.

  7. Supramolecular complexations of natural products.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Hans-Jörg; Agrawal, Pawan; Yatsimirsky, Anatoly K

    2013-08-21

    Complexations of natural products with synthetic receptors as well as the use of natural products as host compounds are reviewed, with an emphasis on possible practical uses or on biomedical significance. Applications such as separation, sensing, enzyme monitoring, and protection of natural drugs are first outlined. We then discuss examples of complexes with all important classes of natural compounds, such as amino acids, peptides, nucleosides/nucleotides, carbohydrates, catecholamines, flavonoids, terpenoids/steroids, alkaloids, antibiotics and toxins. PMID:23703643

  8. Complexity, action, and black holes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brown, Adam R.; Roberts, Daniel A.; Susskind, Leonard; Swingle, Brian; Zhao, Ying

    2016-04-18

    In an earlier paper "Complexity Equals Action" we conjectured that the quantum computational complexity of a holographic state is given by the classical action of a region in the bulk (the `Wheeler-DeWitt' patch). We provide calculations for the results quoted in that paper, explain how it fits into a broader (tensor) network of ideas, and elaborate on the hypothesis that black holes are the fastest computers in nature.

  9. Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Bradley P.; Hulbert, John C.; Bissler, John J.

    2010-01-01

    Although not as common as other genetic renal diseases such as autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, patients with tuberous sclerosis complex frequently have significant renal involvement. Recent revelations in the cell biology of these renal disease manifestations as well as effective therapies for tuberous sclerosis complex-related renal issues have heralded hope of improved renal survival and improved quality of life for the TSC patient. This review specifically addresses some of the major renal manifestations of this disease. PMID:21071977

  10. Evolving Complexity, Cognition, and Consciousness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liljenström, H.

    2012-12-01

    All through the history of the universe there is an apparent tendency for increasing complexity, with the organization of matter in evermore elaborate and interactive systems. The living world in general, and the human brain in particular, provides the highest complexity known. It seems obvious that all of this complexity must be the result of physical, chemical and biological evolution, but it was only with Darwin that we began to get a scientific understanding of biological evolution. Darwinian principles are guiding in our understanding of such complex systems as the nervous system, but also for the evolution of human society and technology. Living organisms have to survive in a complex and changing environment. This implies response and adaption to environmental events and changes at several time scales. The interaction with the environment depends on the present state of the organism, as well as on previous experiences stored in its molecular and cellular structures. At a longer time scale, organisms can adapt to slow environmental changes, by storing information in the genetic material carried over from generation to generation. This phylogenetic learning is complemented by ontogenetic learning, which is adaptation at a shorter time scale, occuring in non-genetic structures. The evolution of a nervous system is a major transition in biological evolution and allows for an increasing capacity for information storage and processing, increasing chances of survival. Such neural knowledge processing, cognition, shows the same principal features as nonneural adaptive processes. Similarly, consciousness might appear, to different degrees, at different stages in evolution. Both cognition and consciousness depends critically on the organization and complexity of the organism. In this presentation, I will briefly discuss general principles for evolution of complexity, focussing on the evolution of the nervous system, which provides organisms with ever increasing

  11. Complexity, action, and black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Adam R.; Roberts, Daniel A.; Susskind, Leonard; Swingle, Brian; Zhao, Ying

    2016-04-01

    Our earlier paper "Complexity Equals Action" conjectured that the quantum computational complexity of a holographic state is given by the classical action of a region in the bulk (the "Wheeler-DeWitt" patch). We provide calculations for the results quoted in that paper, explain how it fits into a broader (tensor) network of ideas, and elaborate on the hypothesis that black holes are the fastest computers in nature.

  12. Goldstone Deep Space Communication Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Three 34m (110 ft.) diameter Beam Waveguide antennas located at the Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex, situated in the Mojave Desert in California. This is one of three complexes which comprise NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN). The DSN provides radio communications for all of NASA's interplanetary spacecraft and is also utilized for radio astronomy and radar observations of the solar system and the universe.

  13. Complex Hybrid Inflation and Baryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Delepine, David; Martinez, Carlos; Urena-Lopez, L. Arturo

    2007-04-20

    We propose a hybrid inflation model with a complex waterfall field which contains an interaction term that breaks the U(1) global symmetry associated with the waterfall field charge. We show that the asymmetric evolution of the real and imaginary parts of the complex field during the phase transition at the end of inflation translates into a charge asymmetry. The latter strongly depends on the vacuum expectation value of the waterfall field, which is well constrained by diverse cosmological observations.

  14. Computerized measures of visual complexity.

    PubMed

    Machado, Penousal; Romero, Juan; Nadal, Marcos; Santos, Antonino; Correia, João; Carballal, Adrián

    2015-09-01

    Visual complexity influences people's perception of, preference for, and behaviour toward many classes of objects, from artworks to web pages. The ability to predict people's impression of the complexity of different kinds of visual stimuli holds, therefore, great potential for many domains, basic and applied. Here we use edge detection operations and several image metrics based on image compression error and Zipf's law to estimate the visual complexity of images. The experiments involved 800 images, each previously rated by thirty participants on perceived complexity. In a first set of experiments we analysed the correlation of individual features with the average human response, obtaining correlations up to rs = .771. In a second set of experiments we employed Machine Learning techniques to predict the average visual complexity score attributed by humans to each stimuli. The best configurations obtained a correlation of rs = .832. The average prediction error of the Machine Learning system over the set of all stimuli was .096 in a normalized 0 to 1 interval, showing that it is possible to predict, with high accuracy human responses. Overall, edge density and compression error were the strongest predictors of human complexity ratings. PMID:26164647

  15. Conforming Morse-Smale Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Gyulassy, Attila; Gunther, David; Levine, Joshua A.; Tierny, Julien; Pascucci, Valerio

    2014-08-11

    Morse-Smale (MS) complexes have been gaining popularity as a tool for feature-driven data analysis and visualization. However, the quality of their geometric embedding and the sole dependence on the input scalar field data can limit their applicability when expressing application-dependent features. In this paper we introduce a new combinatorial technique to compute an MS complex that conforms to both an input scalar field and an additional, prior segmentation of the domain. The segmentation constrains the MS complex computation guaranteeing that boundaries in the segmentation are captured as separatrices of the MS complex. We demonstrate the utility and versatility of our approach with two applications. First, we use streamline integration to determine numerically computed basins/mountains and use the resulting segmentation as an input to our algorithm. This strategy enables the incorporation of prior flow path knowledge, effectively resulting in an MS complex that is as geometrically accurate as the employed numerical integration. Our second use case is motivated by the observation that often the data itself does not explicitly contain features known to be present by a domain expert. We introduce edit operations for MS complexes so that a user can directly modify their features while maintaining all the advantages of a robust topology-based representation.

  16. "Computational Modeling of Actinide Complexes"

    SciTech Connect

    Balasubramanian, K

    2007-03-07

    We will present our recent studies on computational actinide chemistry of complexes which are not only interesting from the standpoint of actinide coordination chemistry but also of relevance to environmental management of high-level nuclear wastes. We will be discussing our recent collaborative efforts with Professor Heino Nitsche of LBNL whose research group has been actively carrying out experimental studies on these species. Computations of actinide complexes are also quintessential to our understanding of the complexes found in geochemical, biochemical environments and actinide chemistry relevant to advanced nuclear systems. In particular we have been studying uranyl, plutonyl, and Cm(III) complexes are in aqueous solution. These studies are made with a variety of relativistic methods such as coupled cluster methods, DFT, and complete active space multi-configuration self-consistent-field (CASSCF) followed by large-scale CI computations and relativistic CI (RCI) computations up to 60 million configurations. Our computational studies on actinide complexes were motivated by ongoing EXAFS studies of speciated complexes in geo and biochemical environments carried out by Prof Heino Nitsche's group at Berkeley, Dr. David Clark at Los Alamos and Dr. Gibson's work on small actinide molecules at ORNL. The hydrolysis reactions of urnayl, neputyl and plutonyl complexes have received considerable attention due to their geochemical and biochemical importance but the results of free energies in solution and the mechanism of deprotonation have been topic of considerable uncertainty. We have computed deprotonating and migration of one water molecule from the first solvation shell to the second shell in UO{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 5}{sup 2+}, UO{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 5}{sup 2+}NpO{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}{sup +}, and PuO{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 5}{sup 2+} complexes. Our computed Gibbs free energy(7.27 kcal/m) in solution for the first time agrees with the experiment (7.1 kcal

  17. Restricted Complexity Framework for Nonlinear Adaptive Control in Complex Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Rube B.

    2004-02-04

    Control law adaptation that includes implicit or explicit adaptive state estimation, can be a fundamental underpinning for the success of intelligent control in complex systems, particularly during subsystem failures, where vital system states and parameters can be impractical or impossible to measure directly. A practical algorithm is proposed for adaptive state filtering and control in nonlinear dynamic systems when the state equations are unknown or are too complex to model analytically. The state equations and inverse plant model are approximated by using neural networks. A framework for a neural network based nonlinear dynamic inversion control law is proposed, as an extrapolation of prior developed restricted complexity methodology used to formulate the adaptive state filter. Examples of adaptive filter performance are presented for an SSME simulation with high pressure turbine failure to support extrapolations to adaptive control problems.

  18. Restricted Complexity Framework for Nonlinear Adaptive Control in Complex Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Rube B.

    2004-02-01

    Control law adaptation that includes implicit or explicit adaptive state estimation, can be a fundamental underpinning for the success of intelligent control in complex systems, particularly during subsystem failures, where vital system states and parameters can be impractical or impossible to measure directly. A practical algorithm is proposed for adaptive state filtering and control in nonlinear dynamic systems when the state equations are unknown or are too complex to model analytically. The state equations and inverse plant model are approximated by using neural networks. A framework for a neural network based nonlinear dynamic inversion control law is proposed, as an extrapolation of prior developed restricted complexity methodology used to formulate the adaptive state filter. Examples of adaptive filter performance are presented for an SSME simulation with high pressure turbine failure to support extrapolations to adaptive control problems.

  19. Diversity of parasite complex II.

    PubMed

    Harada, Shigeharu; Inaoka, Daniel Ken; Ohmori, Junko; Kita, Kiyoshi

    2013-05-01

    Parasites have developed a variety of physiological functions necessary for completing at least part of their life cycles in the specialized environments of surrounding the parasites in the host. Regarding energy metabolism, which is essential for survival, parasites adapt to the low oxygen environment in mammalian hosts by using metabolic systems that are very different from those of the hosts. In many cases, the parasite employs aerobic metabolism during the free-living stage outside the host but undergoes major changes in developmental control and environmental adaptation to switch to anaerobic energy metabolism. Parasite mitochondria play diverse roles in their energy metabolism, and in recent studies of the parasitic nematode, Ascaris suum, the mitochondrial complex II plays an important role in anaerobic energy metabolism of parasites inhabiting hosts by acting as a quinol-fumarate reductase. In Trypanosomes, parasite complex II has been found to have a novel function and structure. Complex II of Trypanosoma cruzi is an unusual supramolecular complex with a heterodimeric iron-sulfur subunit and seven additional non-catalytic subunits. The enzyme shows reduced binding affinities for both substrates and inhibitors. Interestingly, this structural organization is conserved in all trypanosomatids. Since the properties of complex II differ across a wide range of parasites, this complex is a potential target for the development of new chemotherapeutic agents. In this regard, structural information on the target enzyme is essential for the molecular design of drugs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Respiratory complex II: Role in cellular physiology and disease. PMID:23333273

  20. Complexity matching in neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usefie Mafahim, Javad; Lambert, David; Zare, Marzieh; Grigolini, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    In the wide literature on the brain and neural network dynamics the notion of criticality is being adopted by an increasing number of researchers, with no general agreement on its theoretical definition, but with consensus that criticality makes the brain very sensitive to external stimuli. We adopt the complexity matching principle that the maximal efficiency of communication between two complex networks is realized when both of them are at criticality. We use this principle to establish the value of the neuronal interaction strength at which criticality occurs, yielding a perfect agreement with the adoption of temporal complexity as criticality indicator. The emergence of a scale-free distribution of avalanche size is proved to occur in a supercritical regime. We use an integrate-and-fire model where the randomness of each neuron is only due to the random choice of a new initial condition after firing. The new model shares with that proposed by Izikevich the property of generating excessive periodicity, and with it the annihilation of temporal complexity at supercritical values of the interaction strength. We find that the concentration of inhibitory links can be used as a control parameter and that for a sufficiently large concentration of inhibitory links criticality is recovered again. Finally, we show that the response of a neural network at criticality to a harmonic stimulus is very weak, in accordance with the complexity matching principle.

  1. Chemical complexity in galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Pintado, Jesus

    2007-12-01

    In recent years our knowledge of the chemical complexity in the nuclei of galaxies has dramatically changed. Recent observations of the nucleus of the Milky Way, of the starburst galaxy NGC253 and of the ultraluminous infrared galaxy (ULIRG) Arp220 have shown large abundance of complex organic molecules believed to be formed on grains. The Galactic center appears to be the largest repository of complex organic molecule like aldehydes and alcohols in the galaxy. We also measure large abundance of methanol in starburst galaxies and in ULIRGs suggesting that complex organic molecules are also efficiently produced in the central region of galaxies with strong star formation activity. From the systematic observational studies of molecular abundance in regions dominated by different heating processes like shocks, UV radiation, X-rays and cosmic rays in the center of the Milky Way, we are opening the possibility of using chemistry as a diagnostic tool to study the highly obscured regions of galactic centers. The templates found in the nucleus of the Milky Way will be used to establish the main mechanisms driving the heating and the chemistry of the molecular clouds in galaxies with different type of activity. The role of grain chemistry in the chemical complexity observed in the center of galaxies will be also briefly discussed.

  2. Metal complex interactions with DNA.

    PubMed

    Pages, Benjamin J; Ang, Dale L; Wright, Elisé P; Aldrich-Wright, Janice R

    2015-02-28

    Increasing numbers of DNA structures are being revealed using biophysical, spectroscopic and genomic methods. The diversity of transition metal complexes is also growing, as the unique contributions that transition metals bring to the overall structure of metal complexes depend on the various coordination numbers, geometries, physiologically relevant redox potentials, as well as kinetic and thermodynamic characteristics. The vast range of ligands that can be utilised must also be considered. Given this diversity, a variety of biological interactions is not unexpected. Specifically, interactions with negatively-charged DNA can arise due to covalent/coordinate or subtle non-coordinate interactions such as electrostatic attraction, groove binding and intercalation as well as combinations of all of these modes. The potential of metal complexes as therapeutic agents is but one aspect of their utility. Complexes, both new and old, are currently being utilised in conjunction with spectroscopic and biological techniques to probe the interactions of DNA and its many structural forms. Here we present a review of metal complex-DNA interactions in which several binding modes and DNA structural forms are explored. PMID:25427534

  3. Multi-stage complex contagions.

    PubMed

    Melnik, Sergey; Ward, Jonathan A; Gleeson, James P; Porter, Mason A

    2013-03-01

    The spread of ideas across a social network can be studied using complex contagion models, in which agents are activated by contact with multiple activated neighbors. The investigation of complex contagions can provide crucial insights into social influence and behavior-adoption cascades on networks. In this paper, we introduce a model of a multi-stage complex contagion on networks. Agents at different stages-which could, for example, represent differing levels of support for a social movement or differing levels of commitment to a certain product or idea-exert different amounts of influence on their neighbors. We demonstrate that the presence of even one additional stage introduces novel dynamical behavior, including interplay between multiple cascades, which cannot occur in single-stage contagion models. We find that cascades-and hence collective action-can be driven not only by high-stage influencers but also by low-stage influencers. PMID:23556961

  4. Manipulating Complex Light with Metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jinwei; Wang, Xi; Sun, Jingbo; Pandey, Apra; Cartwright, Alexander N.; Litchinitser, Natalia M.

    2013-01-01

    Recent developments in the field of metamaterials have revealed unparalleled opportunities for “engineering” space for light propagation; opening a new paradigm in spin- and quantum-related phenomena in optical physics. Here we show that unique optical properties of metamaterials (MMs) open unlimited prospects to “engineer” light itself. We propose and demonstrate for the first time a novel way of complex light manipulation in few-mode optical fibers using optical MMs. Most importantly, these studies highlight how unique properties of MMs, namely the ability to manipulate both electric and magnetic field components of electromagnetic (EM) waves, open new degrees of freedom in engineering complex polarization states of light at will, while preserving its orbital angular momentum (OAM) state. These results lay the first steps in manipulating complex light in optical fibers, likely providing new opportunities for high capacity communication systems, quantum information, and on-chip signal processing. PMID:24084836

  5. Attack vulnerability of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holme, Petter; Kim, Beom Jun; Yoon, Chang No; Han, Seung Kee

    2002-05-01

    We study the response of complex networks subject to attacks on vertices and edges. Several existing complex network models as well as real-world networks of scientific collaborations and Internet traffic are numerically investigated, and the network performance is quantitatively measured by the average inverse geodesic length and the size of the largest connected subgraph. For each case of attacks on vertices and edges, four different attacking strategies are used: removals by the descending order of the degree and the betweenness centrality, calculated for either the initial network or the current network during the removal procedure. It is found that the removals by the recalculated degrees and betweenness centralities are often more harmful than the attack strategies based on the initial network, suggesting that the network structure changes as important vertices or edges are removed. Furthermore, the correlation between the betweenness centrality and the degree in complex networks is studied.

  6. Ofloxacin/beta-cyclodextrin complexation.

    PubMed

    Koester, L S; Guterres, S S; Le Roch, M; Eifler-Lima, V L; Zuanazzi, J A; Bassani, V L

    2001-07-01

    Ofloxacin (OFX) is a fluorquinolone characterized by photochemical instability. With the goal to improve its photostability in aqueous solutions, the complexation of ofloxacin with beta-cyclodextrin was investigated. The complexes showed a water solubility enhancement of approximately 2.6 times; nevertheless, the photodegradation of ofloxacin was not reduced. The complexes obtained were characterized by thermal and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis, which revealed an interaction between ofloxacin and beta-cyclodextrin. The last analysis indicated that only partial inclusion of the N-methylpiperazinyl moiety occurred, which can explain the fact that photostabilization was not improved. This partial inclusion phenomenon could be explained also by computer-aided molecular modeling. PMID:11548860

  7. Multi-stage complex contagions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnik, Sergey; Ward, Jonathan A.; Gleeson, James P.; Porter, Mason A.

    2013-03-01

    The spread of ideas across a social network can be studied using complex contagion models, in which agents are activated by contact with multiple activated neighbors. The investigation of complex contagions can provide crucial insights into social influence and behavior-adoption cascades on networks. In this paper, we introduce a model of a multi-stage complex contagion on networks. Agents at different stages—which could, for example, represent differing levels of support for a social movement or differing levels of commitment to a certain product or idea—exert different amounts of influence on their neighbors. We demonstrate that the presence of even one additional stage introduces novel dynamical behavior, including interplay between multiple cascades, which cannot occur in single-stage contagion models. We find that cascades—and hence collective action—can be driven not only by high-stage influencers but also by low-stage influencers.

  8. Characterising Complex Enzyme Reaction Data.

    PubMed

    Dönertaş, Handan Melike; Martínez Cuesta, Sergio; Rahman, Syed Asad; Thornton, Janet M

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between enzyme-catalysed reactions and the Enzyme Commission (EC) number, the widely accepted classification scheme used to characterise enzyme activity, is complex and with the rapid increase in our knowledge of the reactions catalysed by enzymes needs revisiting. We present a manual and computational analysis to investigate this complexity and found that almost one-third of all known EC numbers are linked to more than one reaction in the secondary reaction databases (e.g., KEGG). Although this complexity is often resolved by defining generic, alternative and partial reactions, we have also found individual EC numbers with more than one reaction catalysing different types of bond changes. This analysis adds a new dimension to our understanding of enzyme function and might be useful for the accurate annotation of the function of enzymes and to study the changes in enzyme function during evolution. PMID:26840640

  9. Interdisciplinary research with complex plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Morfill, G. E.; Ivlev, A. V.; Brandt, P.; Loewen, H.

    2010-06-16

    In this topical review we combine results of research from the field of complex plasmas and colloidal dispersions. This research has opened the way to study strong coupling phenomena in real space and time at the most fundamental kinetic level. The physics of complex plasmas is dominated by the dynamics of slow moving and individually visible microparticles. In contrast to colloidal suspensions, where the fluid background medium results in huge overdamping, the neutral gas background medium in complex plasmas introduces only very little damping so that processes at all relevant time scales can be studied. This is of particular importance for some of the most outstanding questions in the self-organization of matter and critical phenomena.

  10. Complex Fluids and Hydraulic Fracturing.

    PubMed

    Barbati, Alexander C; Desroches, Jean; Robisson, Agathe; McKinley, Gareth H

    2016-06-01

    Nearly 70 years old, hydraulic fracturing is a core technique for stimulating hydrocarbon production in a majority of oil and gas reservoirs. Complex fluids are implemented in nearly every step of the fracturing process, most significantly to generate and sustain fractures and transport and distribute proppant particles during and following fluid injection. An extremely wide range of complex fluids are used: naturally occurring polysaccharide and synthetic polymer solutions, aqueous physical and chemical gels, organic gels, micellar surfactant solutions, emulsions, and foams. These fluids are loaded over a wide range of concentrations with particles of varying sizes and aspect ratios and are subjected to extreme mechanical and environmental conditions. We describe the settings of hydraulic fracturing (framed by geology), fracturing mechanics and physics, and the critical role that non-Newtonian fluid dynamics and complex fluids play in the hydraulic fracturing process. PMID:27070765

  11. Characterising Complex Enzyme Reaction Data

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Syed Asad; Thornton, Janet M.

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between enzyme-catalysed reactions and the Enzyme Commission (EC) number, the widely accepted classification scheme used to characterise enzyme activity, is complex and with the rapid increase in our knowledge of the reactions catalysed by enzymes needs revisiting. We present a manual and computational analysis to investigate this complexity and found that almost one-third of all known EC numbers are linked to more than one reaction in the secondary reaction databases (e.g., KEGG). Although this complexity is often resolved by defining generic, alternative and partial reactions, we have also found individual EC numbers with more than one reaction catalysing different types of bond changes. This analysis adds a new dimension to our understanding of enzyme function and might be useful for the accurate annotation of the function of enzymes and to study the changes in enzyme function during evolution. PMID:26840640

  12. Complex Educational Design: A Course Design Model Based on Complexity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freire, Maximina Maria

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This article aims at presenting a conceptual framework which, theoretically grounded on complexity, provides the basis to conceive of online language courses that intend to respond to the needs of students and society. Design/methodology/approach: This paper is introduced by reflections on distance education and on the paradigmatic view…

  13. The Ontologies of Complexity and Learning about Complex Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Michael J.; Kapur, Manu; So, Hyo-Jeong; Lee, June

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses a study of students learning core conceptual perspectives from recent scientific research on complexity using a hypermedia learning environment in which different types of scaffolding were provided. Three comparison groups used a hypermedia system with agent-based models and scaffolds for problem-based learning activities that…

  14. Silver Complexes of Dihalogen Molecules.

    PubMed

    Malinowski, Przemysław J; Himmel, Daniel; Krossing, Ingo

    2016-08-01

    The perfluorohexane-soluble and donor-free silver compound Ag(A) (A=Al(OR(F) )4 ; R(F) =C(CF3 )3 ) prepared using a facile novel route has unprecedented capabilities to form unusual and weakly bound complexes. Here, we report on the three dihalogen-silver complexes Ag(Cl2 )A, Ag(Br2 )A, and Ag(I2 )A derived from the soluble silver compound Ag(A) (characterized by single-crystal/powder XRD, Raman spectra, and quantum-mechanical calculations). PMID:27404568

  15. Holographic Complexity Equals Bulk Action?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Adam R.; Roberts, Daniel A.; Susskind, Leonard; Swingle, Brian; Zhao, Ying

    2016-05-01

    We conjecture that the quantum complexity of a holographic state is dual to the action of a certain spacetime region that we call a Wheeler-DeWitt patch. We illustrate and test the conjecture in the context of neutral, charged, and rotating black holes in anti-de Sitter spacetime, as well as black holes perturbed with static shells and with shock waves. This conjecture evolved from a previous conjecture that complexity is dual to spatial volume, but appears to be a major improvement over the original. In light of our results, we discuss the hypothesis that black holes are the fastest computers in nature.

  16. Accessing complexity from genome information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenreiro Machado, J. A.

    2012-06-01

    This paper studies the information content of the chromosomes of 24 species. In a first phase, a scheme inspired in dynamical system state space representation is developed. For each chromosome the state space dynamical evolution is shed into a two dimensional chart. The plots are then analyzed and characterized in the perspective of fractal dimension. This information is integrated in two measures of the species' complexity addressing its average and variability. The results are in close accordance with phylogenetics pointing quantitative aspects of the species' genomic complexity.

  17. 1998 Complex Systems Summer School

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-15

    For the past eleven years a group of institutes, centers, and universities throughout the country have sponsored a summer school in Santa Fe, New Mexico as part of an interdisciplinary effort to promote the understanding of complex systems. The goal of these summer schools is to provide graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and active research scientists with an introduction to the study of complex behavior in mathematical, physical, and living systems. The Center for Nonlinear Studies supported the eleventh in this series of highly successful schools in Santa Fe in June, 1998.

  18. Correlation dimension of complex networks.

    PubMed

    Lacasa, Lucas; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesús

    2013-04-19

    We propose a new measure to characterize the dimension of complex networks based on the ergodic theory of dynamical systems. This measure is derived from the correlation sum of a trajectory generated by a random walker navigating the network, and extends the classical Grassberger-Procaccia algorithm to the context of complex networks. The method is validated with reliable results for both synthetic networks and real-world networks such as the world air-transportation network or urban networks, and provides a computationally fast way for estimating the dimensionality of networks which only relies on the local information provided by the walkers. PMID:23679650

  19. Thermolysis of lanthanide dithiocarbamate complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Boncher, William L.; Regulacio, Michelle D.; Stoll, Sarah L.

    2010-01-15

    Polycrystalline lanthanide sulfide materials were formed at low temperatures using a single-source precursor based on the lanthanide dithiocarbamate complex. The synthesis temperatures are generally lower than standard solid state preparations, avoid toxic sulfurizing gases and provide a convenient route to prepare lanthanide chalcogenide nanoparticles. Depending on the reaction conditions and oxophilicity of the lanthanide, the sulfide material was formed with oxidized products including oxysulfides, oxysulfates and the oxide. - Graphical abstract: Polycrystalline lanthanide sulfide materials were formed at low temperatures using a single-source precursor based on the lanthanide dithiocarbamate complex.

  20. Holographic Complexity Equals Bulk Action?

    PubMed

    Brown, Adam R; Roberts, Daniel A; Susskind, Leonard; Swingle, Brian; Zhao, Ying

    2016-05-13

    We conjecture that the quantum complexity of a holographic state is dual to the action of a certain spacetime region that we call a Wheeler-DeWitt patch. We illustrate and test the conjecture in the context of neutral, charged, and rotating black holes in anti-de Sitter spacetime, as well as black holes perturbed with static shells and with shock waves. This conjecture evolved from a previous conjecture that complexity is dual to spatial volume, but appears to be a major improvement over the original. In light of our results, we discuss the hypothesis that black holes are the fastest computers in nature. PMID:27232013

  1. Cascade dynamics of complex propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centola, Damon; Eguíluz, Víctor M.; Macy, Michael W.

    2007-01-01

    Random links between otherwise distant nodes can greatly facilitate the propagation of disease or information, provided contagion can be transmitted by a single active node. However, we show that when the propagation requires simultaneous exposure to multiple sources of activation, called complex propagation, the effect of random links can be just the opposite; it can make the propagation more difficult to achieve. We numerically calculate critical points for a threshold model using several classes of complex networks, including an empirical social network. We also provide an estimation of the critical values in terms of vulnerable nodes.

  2. Assessing the complexity of topographic mass in complex terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurmankozhayev, Azimkhan; Nemec, Vaclav; Sarybaev, Edil

    2014-05-01

    To assess the structure of terrain more objectively it is necessary to supplement and clarify the available characteristics with a number of numerical statistical indicators and formulas that reflect the actual links between separate features of terrain. Results from analysis of traditional variability assessment methods for characteristics of georesources allow concluding that a characteristic's variability usually has oscillatory and wavelike geometric image in the form of broken, polygonal, zigzagging, polyhedral and, less frequently, regular geometric shapes, defined by deviation amplitude and period of irregularities. It is established that variability cannot be evaluated with one universal indicator since variability consists of a random and a regular component, thus it is considered reasonable to assess the characteristic's variability depending on current mining and geometrical tasks and by stages of georesources development. The recommended topographic terrain mass complexity assessment method is based on the leading concept of using properties of specific anti-entropy that, unlike regular entropy, allows accounting for changes in total number of component elements in stable populations for the topographic terrain mass. Concept of utilizing value of specific anti-entropy, widely used in information theory, is taken as an assessment criterion for integral complexity of topographic terrain mass. Modification of specific anti-entropy formula, as applied to substance of formation of the georesource development target's topographic mass integral complexity, is based on qualimetric model of its assessment. Essence of the model comes down to determining the topographic mass complexity using the topographic mass structure uncertainty measure, assessed using the quantity of heterogeneous morphometric elements contained in the topographic surface of terrain. The main basic reference value in qualimetric model of the topographic terrain mass complexity is the

  3. Language Networks as Complex Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Max Kueiming; Ou, Sheue-Jen

    2008-01-01

    Starting in the late eighties, with a growing discontent with analytical methods in science and the growing power of computers, researchers began to study complex systems such as living organisms, evolution of genes, biological systems, brain neural networks, epidemics, ecology, economy, social networks, etc. In the early nineties, the research…

  4. Capturing Complexity through Maturity Modelling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underwood, Jean; Dillon, Gayle

    2004-01-01

    The impact of information and communication technologies (ICT) on the process and products of education is difficult to assess for a number of reasons. In brief, education is a complex system of interrelationships, of checks and balances. This context is not a neutral backdrop on which teaching and learning are played out. Rather, it may help, or…

  5. Aromatic triamide-lanthanide complexes

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, Kenneth N; Petoud, Stephane; Xu, Jide

    2013-10-08

    The present invention provides luminescent lanthanide metal chelates comprising a metal ion of the lanthanide series and a complexing agent comprising at least one phthalamidyl moiety. Also provided are probes incorporating the phthalamidyl ligands of the invention and methods utilizing the ligands of the invention and probes comprising the ligands of the invention.

  6. Complex Landscape Terms in Seri

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Meara, Carolyn; Bohnemeyer, Jurgen

    2008-01-01

    The nominal lexicon of Seri is characterized by a prevalence of analytical descriptive terms. We explore the consequences of this typological trait in the landscape domain. The complex landscape terms of Seri classify geographic entities in terms of their material make-up and spatial properties such as shape, orientation, and merological…

  7. Tracking simple and complex sequences.

    PubMed

    Large, Edward W; Fink, Philip; Kelso, J A Scott

    2002-02-01

    We address issues of synchronization to rhythms of musical complexity. In two experiments, synchronization to simple and more complex rhythmic sequences was investigated. Experiment 1 examined responses to phase and tempo perturbations within simple, structurally isochronous sequences, presented at different base rates. Experiment 2 investigated responses to similar perturbations embedded within more complex, metrically structured sequences; participants were explicitly instructed to synchronize at different metrical levels (i.e., tap at different rates to the same rhythmic patterns) on different trials. We found evidence that (1) the intrinsic tapping frequency adapts in response to temporal perturbations in both simple (isochronous) and complex (metrically structured) rhythms, (2) people can synchronize with unpredictable, metrically structured rhythms at different metrical levels, with qualitatively different patterns of synchronization seen at higher versus lower levels of metrical structure, and (3) synchronization at each tapping level reflects information from other metrical levels. The latter finding provides evidence for a dynamic and flexible internal representation of the sequence's metrical structure. PMID:11963276

  8. Design Patterns for Complex Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohse, Shanta; Anderson, Terry

    2006-01-01

    A complex view of learning recognises that learning cannot be pre-determined by teaching, but is as much defined by circumstances and context as pre-defined learning objectives. Learning designs that accept uncertainty help us to envision classrooms and curricula that are open, dynamic and innovative. Architect Christopher Alexander's patterns and…

  9. Hydrogen storage via polyhydride complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, C.M.

    1996-10-01

    Polyhydride metal complexes are being developed for application to hydrogen storage. Complexes have been found which catalyze the reversible hydrogenation of unsaturated hydrocarbons. This catalytic reaction could be the basis for a low temperature, hydrogen storage system with a available hydrogen density greater than 7 weight percent. The P-C-P pincer complexes, RhH{sub 2}(C{sub 6}H{sub 3}-2,6-(CH{sub 2}PBu{sup t}{sub 2}){sub 2}) and IrH{sub 2}(C{sub 6}H{sub 3}-2,6-(CH{sub 2}PBu{sup t}{sub 2}){sub 2}) have unprecedented, long term stability at elevated temperatures. The novel iridium complex catalyzes the transfer dehydrogenation of cycloctane to cyclooctene at the rate of 716 turnovers/h which is 2 orders of magnitude greater than that found for previously reported catalytic systems which do not require the sacrificial hydrogenation of a large excess of hydrogen acceptor.

  10. The Complexities of Domestic Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dutton, Donald G.

    2007-01-01

    Comments on the article by Robert Bornstein, "The complex relationship between dependency and domestic violence: Converging psychological factors and social forces." Although a more focused examination of the psychological factors involved in domestic violence is welcome, there are some factual errors in Bornstein's article that need attention and…

  11. Complex disease, gender and epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Kaminsky, Zachary; Wang, Sun-Chong; Petronis, Arturas

    2006-01-01

    Gender differences in susceptibility to complex disease such as asthma, diabetes, lupus, autism and major depression, among numerous other disorders, represent one of the hallmarks of non-Mendelian biology. It has been generally accepted that endocrinological differences are involved in the sexual dimorphism of complex disease; however, specific molecular mechanisms of such hormonal effects have not been elucidated yet. This paper will review evidence that sex hormone action may be mediated via gene-specific epigenetic modifications of DNA and histones. The epigenetic modifications can explain sex effects at DNA sequence polymorphisms and haplotypes identified in gender-stratified genetic linkage and association studies. Hormone-induced DNA methylation and histone modification changes at specific gene regulatory regions may increase or reduce the risk of a disease. The epigenetic interpretation of sexual dimorphism fits well into the epigenetic theory of complex disease, which argues for the primary pathogenic role of inherited and/or acquired epigenetic misregulation rather than DNA sequence variation. The new experimental strategies, especially the high throughput microarray-based epigenetic profiling, can be used for testing the epigenetic hypothesis of gender effects in complex diseases. PMID:17438668

  12. Teaching the Prison Industrial Complex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakshmi, Aparna

    2012-01-01

    The author teaches in an alternative school in Boston Public Schools and works with students who had dropped out, transferred, or been expelled from their previous schools. Many of her students struggled with reading complex texts and had never learned how to make and defend an argument through their writing. She was determined that they would…

  13. Complex Knowledge Mastery: Some Propositions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Joyce A.; Schallert, Diane L.

    The proposition that the mastery of complex tasks embodies several components was studied for 236 students in an undergraduate introductory financial accounting course. A new curriculum was developed for the course that included in-depth exposure to the actual financial statements of a company and the understanding of the structural relationships…

  14. Porous Soil as Complex Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benito, R. M.; Santiago, A.; Cárdenas, J. P.; Tarquis, A. M.; Borondo, F.; Losada, J. C.

    2009-04-01

    We present a complex network model based on a heterogeneous preferential attachment scheme [1,2] to quantify the structure of porous soils [3]. Under this perspective pores are represented by nodes and the space for the flow of fluids between them are represented by links. Pore properties such as position and size are described by fixed states in a metric space, while an affinity function is introduced to bias the attachment probabilities of links according to these properties. We perform an analytical and numerical study of the degree distributions in the soil model and show that under reasonable conditions all the model variants yield a multiscaling behavior in the connectivity degrees, leaving a empirically testable signature of heterogeneity in the topology of pore networks. References [1] A. Santiago and R. M. Benito, "Emergence of multiscaling in heterogeneous complex networks". Int. J. Mod. Phys. C 18, 1591 (2007). [2] A. Santiago and R. M. Benito, "An extended formalism for preferential attachment in heterogeneous complex networks". Europhys. Lett. 82, 58004 (2008). [3] A. Santiago, R. M. Benito, J. P. Cárdenas, J. C. Losada, A. M. Tarquis and F. Borondo, "Multiscaling of porous soils as heterogeneous complex networks". Nonl. Proc. Geophys. 15, 1-10 (2008).

  15. Women's Health and Complexity Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Eileen

    2000-01-01

    Explores how changes in conceptual frameworks in science, from reductionism to complexity; an outgrowth of the chaos theory that views parts in relation to one another, the entity they form, and the environment, must inform the development of an academic discipline in women's health. (SLD)

  16. Leadership Learning for Complex Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, F. S. David

    2015-01-01

    Many school leadership programs are set and delivered in specific modules or workshops in order to achieve a pre-determined set of competencies, knowledge, and skills. In addition, these programs are driven by the faculty member and the prescribed content. As Singapore schools become more complex in the roles and responsibilities to educate the…

  17. Biologically Inspired Phosphino Platinum Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Avijita; Helm, Monte L.; Linehan, John C.; DuBois, Daniel L.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2012-08-01

    Platinum complexes containing phosphino amino acid and amino acid ester ligands, built upon the PPhNR’2 platform, have been synthesized and characterized (PPhNR’2= [1,3-diaza]-5-phenyl phosphacyclohexane, R’=glycine or glycine ester). These complexes were characterized by 31P, 13C, 1H, 195Pt NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The X-ray crystal structure of one of the complexes, [PtCl2(PPhNGlyester 2)2], is also reported. These biologically inspired ligands have potential use in homogeneous catalysis, with special applications in chiral chemistry and water soluble chemistry. These complexes also provide a foundation upon which larger peptides can be attached, to allow the introduction of enzyme-like features onto small molecule catalysts. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  18. Mass spectrometry of large complexes.

    PubMed

    Bich, Claudia; Zenobi, Renato

    2009-10-01

    Mass spectrometry is becoming a more and more powerful tool for investigating protein complexes. Recent developments, based on different ionization techniques, electrospray, desorption/ionization and others are contributing to the usefulness of MS to describe the organization and structure of large non-covalent assemblies. PMID:19782560

  19. Challenges in complex systems science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    San Miguel, M.; Johnson, J. H.; Kertesz, J.; Kaski, K.; Díaz-Guilera, A.; MacKay, R. S.; Loreto, V.; Érdi, P.; Helbing, D.

    2012-11-01

    FuturICT foundations are social science, complex systems science, and ICT. The main concerns and challenges in the science of complex systems in the context of FuturICT are laid out in this paper with special emphasis on the Complex Systems route to Social Sciences. This include complex systems having: many heterogeneous interacting parts; multiple scales; complicated transition laws; unexpected or unpredicted emergence; sensitive dependence on initial conditions; path-dependent dynamics; networked hierarchical connectivities; interaction of autonomous agents; self-organisation; non-equilibrium dynamics; combinatorial explosion; adaptivity to changing environments; co-evolving subsystems; ill-defined boundaries; and multilevel dynamics. In this context, science is seen as the process of abstracting the dynamics of systems from data. This presents many challenges including: data gathering by large-scale experiment, participatory sensing and social computation, managing huge distributed dynamic and heterogeneous databases; moving from data to dynamical models, going beyond correlations to cause-effect relationships, understanding the relationship between simple and comprehensive models with appropriate choices of variables, ensemble modeling and data assimilation, modeling systems of systems of systems with many levels between micro and macro; and formulating new approaches to prediction, forecasting, and risk, especially in systems that can reflect on and change their behaviour in response to predictions, and systems whose apparently predictable behaviour is disrupted by apparently unpredictable rare or extreme events. These challenges are part of the FuturICT agenda.

  20. DNA/chitosan electrostatic complex.

    PubMed

    Bravo-Anaya, Lourdes Mónica; Soltero, J F Armando; Rinaudo, Marguerite

    2016-07-01

    Up to now, chitosan and DNA have been investigated for gene delivery due to chitosan advantages. It is recognized that chitosan is a biocompatible and biodegradable non-viral vector that does not produce immunological reactions, contrary to viral vectors. Chitosan has also been used and studied for its ability to protect DNA against nuclease degradation and to transfect DNA into several kinds of cells. In this work, high molecular weight DNA is compacted with chitosan. DNA-chitosan complex stoichiometry, net charge, dimensions, conformation and thermal stability are determined and discussed. The influence of external salt and chitosan molecular weight on the stoichiometry is also discussed. The isoelectric point of the complexes was found to be directly related to the protonation degree of chitosan. It is clearly demonstrated that the net charge of DNA-chitosan complex can be expressed in terms of the ratio [NH3(+)]/[P(-)], showing that the electrostatic interactions between DNA and chitosan are the main phenomena taking place in the solution. Compaction of DNA long chain complexed with low molar mass chitosan gives nanoparticles with an average radius around 150nm. Stable nanoparticles are obtained for a partial neutralization of phosphate ionic sites (i.e.: [NH3(+)]/[P(-)] fraction between 0.35 and 0.80). PMID:27050113

  1. Libraries Serving the CSIR Complex.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rajagopalan, T. S.; Ramaswami, K.

    A survey of the resources and services of the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) libraries was made so that the libraries in the complex could share the benefit of the experiences of each other. The report is based on questionnaire replies received from 31 CSIR Institutions and eight Co-operative Research Associations and relates…

  2. Reading, Complexity and the Brain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goswami, Usha

    2008-01-01

    Brain imaging offers a new technology for understanding the acquisition of reading by children. It can contribute novel evidence concerning the key mechanisms supporting reading, and the brain systems that are involved. The extensive neural architecture that develops to support efficient reading testifies to the complex developmental processes…

  3. Learning To Live with Complexity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dosa, Marta

    Neither the design of information systems and networks nor the delivery of library services can claim true user centricity without an understanding of the multifaceted psychological environment of users and potential users. The complexity of the political process, social problems, challenges to scientific inquiry, entrepreneurship, and…

  4. Copper complexes as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Marzano, Cristina; Pellei, Maura; Tisato, Francesco; Santini, Carlo

    2009-02-01

    Metal-based antitumor drugs play a relevant role in antiblastic chemotherapy. Cisplatin is regarded as one of the most effective drugs, even if severe toxicities and drug resistance phenomena limit its clinical use. Therefore, in recent years there has been a rapid expansion in research and development of novel metal-based anticancer drugs to improve clinical effectiveness, to reduce general toxicity and to broaden the spectrum of activity. The variety of metal ion functions in biology has stimulated the development of new metallodrugs other than Pt drugs with the aim to obtain compounds acting via alternative mechanisms of action. Among non-Pt compounds, copper complexes are potentially attractive as anticancer agents. Actually, since many years a lot of researches have actively investigated copper compounds based on the assumption proposal that endogenous metals may be less toxic. It has been established that the properties of copper-coordinated compounds are largely determined by the nature of ligands and donor atoms bound to the metal ion. In this review, the most remarkable achievements in the design and development of copper(I, II) complexes as antitumor agents are discussed. Special emphasis has been focused on the identification of structure-activity relationships for the different classes of copper(I,II) complexes. This work was motivated by the observation that no comprehensive surveys of copper complexes as anticancer agents were available in the literature. Moreover, up to now, despite the enormous efforts in synthesizing different classes of copper complexes, very few data concerning the molecular basis of the mechanisms underlying their antitumor activity are available. This overview, collecting the most significant strategies adopted in the last ten years to design promising anticancer copper(I,II) compounds, would be a help to the researchers working in this field. PMID:19199864

  5. Statistical mechanics of macromolecular complexation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Issei

    The self-assembly of macromolecules through molecular association has attracted long-standing attention in soft-condensed matter physics. The hierarchical formation from small-scale building blocks into larger-scale complex structures often leads to very rich phase behavior controlled by various ambient conditions. The understanding and control of the phase behavior of self-assembling systems require detailed knowledge about the entropy and enthalpy contributions to the free energy of the system. However, this knowledge is limited at the present time because a comprehensive theoretical description of molecular association is still lacking. In this thesis, four tales of achievements in developing theories of macromolecular complexation are presented. (1) We begin with an analytically solvable model of the self-assembly of rigid macromolecules with surface adsorption. A generic understanding of the driving force and the role of entropy is obtained from the exact solutions. (2) We move on to further development of the theory in order to study the complexation between polymers and ionic molecules. The extension of the first model to chain-like molecules is performed using a well-established method in polymer physics, the self-consistent field theory (SCFT) of polymers. We also discuss gelation in this system within the scope of mean-filed approximations. (3) Then, a ladder-like polymer-polymer complexation is studied. Unconventional phase diagrams are predicted from the modified SCFT, indicating a large effect of variations in entropy due to the complexation on bulk properties. (4) Finally, the kinetic aspect of macromolecular binding reactions is discussed.

  6. Hierarchy Measure for Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Mones, Enys; Vicsek, Lilla; Vicsek, Tamás

    2012-01-01

    Nature, technology and society are full of complexity arising from the intricate web of the interactions among the units of the related systems (e.g., proteins, computers, people). Consequently, one of the most successful recent approaches to capturing the fundamental features of the structure and dynamics of complex systems has been the investigation of the networks associated with the above units (nodes) together with their relations (edges). Most complex systems have an inherently hierarchical organization and, correspondingly, the networks behind them also exhibit hierarchical features. Indeed, several papers have been devoted to describing this essential aspect of networks, however, without resulting in a widely accepted, converging concept concerning the quantitative characterization of the level of their hierarchy. Here we develop an approach and propose a quantity (measure) which is simple enough to be widely applicable, reveals a number of universal features of the organization of real-world networks and, as we demonstrate, is capable of capturing the essential features of the structure and the degree of hierarchy in a complex network. The measure we introduce is based on a generalization of the m-reach centrality, which we first extend to directed/partially directed graphs. Then, we define the global reaching centrality (GRC), which is the difference between the maximum and the average value of the generalized reach centralities over the network. We investigate the behavior of the GRC considering both a synthetic model with an adjustable level of hierarchy and real networks. Results for real networks show that our hierarchy measure is related to the controllability of the given system. We also propose a visualization procedure for large complex networks that can be used to obtain an overall qualitative picture about the nature of their hierarchical structure. PMID:22470477

  7. Neural Mechanisms Underlying Breathing Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Agathe; Yu, Lianchun; Klein, Isabelle; De Mazancourt, Marine; Jebrak, Gilles; Mal, Hervé; Brugière, Olivier; Fournier, Michel; Courbage, Maurice; Dauriat, Gaelle; Schouman-Clayes, Elisabeth; Clerici, Christine; Mangin, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    Breathing is maintained and controlled by a network of automatic neurons in the brainstem that generate respiratory rhythm and receive regulatory inputs. Breathing complexity therefore arises from respiratory central pattern generators modulated by peripheral and supra-spinal inputs. Very little is known on the brainstem neural substrates underlying breathing complexity in humans. We used both experimental and theoretical approaches to decipher these mechanisms in healthy humans and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). COPD is the most frequent chronic lung disease in the general population mainly due to tobacco smoke. In patients, airflow obstruction associated with hyperinflation and respiratory muscles weakness are key factors contributing to load-capacity imbalance and hence increased respiratory drive. Unexpectedly, we found that the patients breathed with a higher level of complexity during inspiration and expiration than controls. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we scanned the brain of the participants to analyze the activity of two small regions involved in respiratory rhythmogenesis, the rostral ventro-lateral (VL) medulla (pre-Bötzinger complex) and the caudal VL pons (parafacial group). fMRI revealed in controls higher activity of the VL medulla suggesting active inspiration, while in patients higher activity of the VL pons suggesting active expiration. COPD patients reactivate the parafacial to sustain ventilation. These findings may be involved in the onset of respiratory failure when the neural network becomes overwhelmed by respiratory overload We show that central neural activity correlates with airflow complexity in healthy subjects and COPD patients, at rest and during inspiratory loading. We finally used a theoretical approach of respiratory rhythmogenesis that reproduces the kernel activity of neurons involved in the automatic breathing. The model reveals how a chaotic activity in neurons can

  8. Complex DNA structures and structures of DNA complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Chazin, W.J.; Carlstroem, G.; Shiow-Meei Chen; Miick, S.; Gomez-Paloma, L.; Smith, J.; Rydzewski, J.

    1994-12-01

    Complex DNA structures (for example, triplexes, quadruplexes, junctions) and DNA-ligand complexes are more difficult to study by NMR than standard DNA duplexes are because they have high molecular weights, show nonstandard or distorted local conformations, and exhibit large resonance linewidths and severe {sup 1}H spectral overlap. These systems also tend to have limited solubility and may require specialized solution conditions to maintain favorable spectral characteristics, which adds to the spectroscopic difficulties. Furthermore, with more atoms in the system, both assignment and structure calculation become more challenging. In this article, we focus on demonstrating the current status of NMR studies of such systems and the limitations to further progress; we also indicate in what ways isotopic enrichment can be useful.

  9. 1: Redox chemistry of bimetallic fulvalene complexes; 2: Oligocyclopentadienyl complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D. S.

    1993-11-01

    The electrochemistry of the heterobimetallic complexes (fulvalene)WFe(CO){sub 5} (30) and (fulvalene)WRu(CO){sub 5} (31) has been investigated. Compound 30 is reduced in two one-electron processes, and this behavior was exploited synthetically to prepare a tetranuclear dimer by selective metal reduction. Complex 31 displayed a distinction between the metals upon reoxidation of the dianion, allowing the formation of a dimer by selective metal anion oxidation. The redox behavior of 30 led to an investigation of the use of electrocatalysis to effect metal-specific ligand substitution. It was found that reduction of 30 with a catalytic amount of CpFe(C{sub 6}Me{sub 6}) (97) in the presence of excess P(OMe){sub 3} or PMe{sub 3} led to the formation of the zwitterions (fulvalene)[W(CO){sub 3}{sup {minus}}][Fe(CO)PR{sub 3}{sup +}] (107, R = P(OMe){sub 3}; 108, R = PMe{sub 3}). Compound 31 also displayed unique behavior with different reducing agents, as the monosubstituted zwitterion (fulvalene)[W(CO){sub 3}{sup {minus}}][Ru(CO){sub 2}(PMe{sub 3}){sup +}] was obtained when 97 was used while the disubstituted complex (fulvalene) [W(CO){sub 3}{sup {minus}}] [Ru(CO)(PMe{sub 3}){sub 2}{sup +}] was produced when Cp*Fe(C{sub 6}Me{sub 6}) was the catalyst. Potential synthetic routes to quatercyclopentadienyl complexes were also explored. Various attempts to couple heterobimetallic fulvalene compounds proved to be unsuccessful. 138 refs.

  10. Is a "Complex" Task Really Complex? Validating the Assumption of Cognitive Task Complexity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sasayama, Shoko

    2016-01-01

    In research on task-based learning and teaching, it has traditionally been assumed that differing degrees of cognitive task complexity can be inferred through task design and/or observations of differing qualities in linguistic production elicited by second language (L2) communication tasks. Without validating this assumption, however, it is…

  11. Physical approach to complex systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwapień, Jarosław; Drożdż, Stanisław

    2012-06-01

    Typically, complex systems are natural or social systems which consist of a large number of nonlinearly interacting elements. These systems are open, they interchange information or mass with environment and constantly modify their internal structure and patterns of activity in the process of self-organization. As a result, they are flexible and easily adapt to variable external conditions. However, the most striking property of such systems is the existence of emergent phenomena which cannot be simply derived or predicted solely from the knowledge of the systems’ structure and the interactions among their individual elements. This property points to the holistic approaches which require giving parallel descriptions of the same system on different levels of its organization. There is strong evidence-consolidated also in the present review-that different, even apparently disparate complex systems can have astonishingly similar characteristics both in their structure and in their behaviour. One can thus expect the existence of some common, universal laws that govern their properties. Physics methodology proves helpful in addressing many of the related issues. In this review, we advocate some of the computational methods which in our opinion are especially fruitful in extracting information on selected-but at the same time most representative-complex systems like human brain, financial markets and natural language, from the time series representing the observables associated with these systems. The properties we focus on comprise the collective effects and their coexistence with noise, long-range interactions, the interplay between determinism and flexibility in evolution, scale invariance, criticality, multifractality and hierarchical structure. The methods described either originate from “hard” physics-like the random matrix theory-and then were transmitted to other fields of science via the field of complex systems research, or they originated elsewhere but

  12. Agriculture and the energy-complexity spiral.

    PubMed

    Tainter, Joseph A

    2016-01-01

    The study of cultural complexity is entwined with ancestors myths from contemporary cosmology. Gowdy & Krall expose this mythology by arguing that complexity emerged from economic changes following cultivation. There is more, however, to the development of cultural complexity. Complexity can emerge from abundant energy or from addressing societal problems, which compels still further energy production. PMID:27562534

  13. Polycomb complexes and epigenetic states.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Yuri B; Pirrotta, Vincenzo

    2008-06-01

    Important advances in the study of Polycomb Group (PcG) complexes in the past two years have focused on the role of this repressive system in programing the genome. Genome-wide analyses have shown that PcG mechanisms control a large number of genes regulating many cellular functions and all developmental pathways. Current evidence shows that, contrary to the classical picture of their role, PcG complexes do not set a repressed chromatin state that is maintained throughout development but have a much more dynamic role. PcG target genes can become repressed or be reactivated or exist in intermediate states. What controls the balance between repression and derepression is a crucial question in understanding development and differentiation in higher organisms. PMID:18439810

  14. Electricity Market Complex Adaptive System

    SciTech Connect

    2004-10-14

    EMCAS is a model developed for the simulation and analysis of electricity markets. As power markets are relatively new and still continue to evolve, there is a growing need for advanced modeling approaches that simulate the behavior of electricity markets over time and how market participants may act and react to the changing economic, financial, and regulatory environments in which they operate. A new and rather promising approach applied in the EMCAS software is to model the electricity market as a complex adaptive system using an agent-based modeling and simulation scheme. With its unique combination of various novel approaches, the Agent Based Modeling System (ABMS) provides the ability to capture and investigate the complex interactions between the physical infrastructures (generation, transmission, and distribution) and the economic behavior of market participants that are a trademark of the newly emerging markets.

  15. Wave propagation in complex coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsley, S. A. R.; King, C. G.; Philbin, T. G.

    2016-04-01

    We give an interpretation for the use of complex spatial coordinates in electromagnetism, in terms of a family of closely related inhomogeneous media. Using this understanding we find that the phenomenon of reflection can be related to branch cuts in the wave that originate from poles of ε (z) at complex positions. Demanding that these branch cuts disappear, we derive a new large family of inhomogeneous media that are reflectionless for a single angle of incidence. Extending this property to all angles of incidence leads us to a generalized form of the Pöschl Teller potentials that in general include regions of loss and gain. We conclude by analyzing our findings within the phase integral (WKB) method, and find another very large family of isotropic planar media that from one side have a transmission of unity and reflection of zero, for all angles of incidence.

  16. Imaging an Adapted Dentoalveolar Complex

    PubMed Central

    Herber, Ralf-Peter; Fong, Justine; Lucas, Seth A.; Ho, Sunita P.

    2012-01-01

    Adaptation of a rat dentoalveolar complex was illustrated using various imaging modalities. Micro-X-ray computed tomography for 3D modeling, combined with complementary techniques, including image processing, scanning electron microscopy, fluorochrome labeling, conventional histology (H&E, TRAP), and immunohistochemistry (RANKL, OPN) elucidated the dynamic nature of bone, the periodontal ligament-space, and cementum in the rat periodontium. Tomography and electron microscopy illustrated structural adaptation of calcified tissues at a higher resolution. Ongoing biomineralization was analyzed using fluorochrome labeling, and by evaluating attenuation profiles using virtual sections from 3D tomographies. Osteoclastic distribution as a function of anatomical location was illustrated by combining histology, immunohistochemistry, and tomography. While tomography and SEM provided past resorption-related events, future adaptive changes were deduced by identifying matrix biomolecules using immunohistochemistry. Thus, a dynamic picture of the dentoalveolar complex in rats was illustrated. PMID:22567314

  17. Griffiths Phases on Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, Miguel A.; Juhász, Róbert; Castellano, Claudio; Ódor, Géza

    2010-09-01

    Quenched disorder is known to play a relevant role in dynamical processes and phase transitions. Its effects on the dynamics of complex networks have hardly been studied. Aimed at filling this gap, we analyze the contact process, i.e., the simplest propagation model, with quenched disorder on complex networks. We find Griffiths phases and other rare-region effects, leading rather generically to anomalously slow (algebraic, logarithmic, …) relaxation, on Erdős-Rényi networks. Similar effects are predicted to exist for other topologies with a finite percolation threshold. More surprisingly, we find that Griffiths phases can also emerge in the absence of quenched disorder, as a consequence of topological heterogeneity in networks with finite topological dimension. These results have a broad spectrum of implications for propagation phenomena and other dynamical processes on networks.

  18. Disorder in Complex Human System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akdeniz, K. Gediz

    2011-11-01

    Since the world of human and whose life becomes more and more complex every day because of the digital technology and under the storm of knowledge (media, internet, governmental and non-governmental organizations, etc...) the simulation is rapidly growing in the social systems and in human behaviors. The formation of the body and mutual interactions are left to digital technological, communication mechanisms and coding the techno genetics of the body. Deconstruction begins everywhere. The linear simulation mechanism with modern realities are replaced by the disorder simulation of human behaviors with awareness realities. In this paper I would like to introduce simulation theory of "Disorder Sensitive Human Behaviors". I recently proposed this theory to critique the role of disorder human behaviors in social systems. In this theory the principle of realty is the chaotic awareness of the complexity of human systems inside of principle of modern thinking in Baudrillard's simulation theory. Proper examples will be also considered to investigate the theory.

  19. Computational complexity of Boolean functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korshunov, Aleksei D.

    2012-02-01

    Boolean functions are among the fundamental objects of discrete mathematics, especially in those of its subdisciplines which fall under mathematical logic and mathematical cybernetics. The language of Boolean functions is convenient for describing the operation of many discrete systems such as contact networks, Boolean circuits, branching programs, and some others. An important parameter of discrete systems of this kind is their complexity. This characteristic has been actively investigated starting from Shannon's works. There is a large body of scientific literature presenting many fundamental results. The purpose of this survey is to give an account of the main results over the last sixty years related to the complexity of computation (realization) of Boolean functions by contact networks, Boolean circuits, and Boolean circuits without branching. Bibliography: 165 titles.

  20. Complex Regional Pain Type 1.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Michael Joseph; Barnett, Peter Leslie John

    2016-03-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome is increasingly recognized in the pediatric population. Owing to the nature of presentation with pain, many of these children present to the emergency setting at different stages of the syndrome with or without numerous prior interactions with health professionals. Complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS1) is a clinical syndrome characterized by amplified musculoskeletal limb pain that is out of proportion to the history and physical findings, or pain due to non-noxious stimuli (allodynia/hyperalgesia), and accompanied by one or more signs of autonomic dysfunction. Differential diagnosis may include significant trauma (eg, fractures), inflammatory conditions, malignancies, and systemic illness. The diagnosis is clinical. The treatment goals for CRPS1 are restoration of function and relief of pain. Education, physical, and occupational therapy with psychotherapy and defined goals of achievement with reward are the mainstay of treatment for this population. Most children with CRPS1 will have a favorable outcome. PMID:26928099

  1. Measuring importance in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Greg; Dudte, Levi; Mahadevan, L.

    2013-03-01

    A variety of centrality measures can be defined on a network to determine the global `importance' of a node i. However, the inhomogeneity of complex networks implies that not all nodes j will consider i equally important. In this talk, we use a linearized form of the Generalized Erdos numbers [Morrison and Mahadevan EPL 93 40002 (2011)] to define a pairwise measure of the importance of a node i from the perspective of node j which incorporates the global network topology. This localized importance can be used to define a global measure of centrality that is consistent with other well-known centrality measures. We illustrate the use of the localized importance in both artificial and real-world networks with a complex global topology.

  2. Evolution of genetic switch complexity

    PubMed Central

    Broussard, Gregory W.; Hatfull, Graham F.

    2013-01-01

    The circuitry of the phage λ genetic switch determining the outcome of lytic or lysogenic growth is well-integrated and complex, raising the question as to how it evolved. It is plausible that it arose from a simpler ancestral switch with fewer components that underwent various additions and refinements, as it adapted to vast numbers of different hosts and conditions. We have recently identified a new class of genetic switches found in mycobacteriophages and other prophages, in which immunity is dependent on integration. These switches contain only three genes (integrase, repressor and cro) and represent a major departure from the λ-like circuitry, lacking many features such as xis, cII and cIII. These small self-contained switches represent an unrealized, elegant circuitry for controlling infection outcome. In this addendum, we propose a model of possible events in the evolution of a complex λ-like switch from a simpler integration-dependent switch. PMID:23819104

  3. Leptogenesis in Complex Hybrid Inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Prieto, Carlos

    2008-12-04

    We study the transference of an initial leptonic charge contained in a complex scalar field (waterfall field) at the end of the inflation to the leptons of the standard model and then convert this leptonic charge in baryonic charge by sphaleron process. The proposal is that this is done trough the decay of the complex scalar field particles into the the right-handed neutrino which in turn decays into the left-handed lepton doublet and the Higgs field of the standard model. It must be analyzed in what environment the transference is done. We propose that the inflaton (the dominant energy density of the universe) decay into ultrarelativistic fermions before the waterfall field particles decay in the right handed-neutrino, leaving a thermalized bath where the transference of the leptonic asymmetry can be achieved.

  4. Decameric uracil complexes around Li+.

    PubMed

    Zins, Emilie-Laure; Pepe, Claude; Schröder, Detlef

    2010-07-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) in combination with mass spectrometry (MS) experiments were carried out to study decameric uracil complexes cationized with Li(+) ion. A previous study has shown that, under specific experimental conditions, a particularly intense peak of the decamer U(10)Li(+) is formed, which was referred to as an indication for so-called 'magic number' cluster. In order to gain more insight on the structure of this decameric complex, here, we report experimental studies concerning the kinetics of the fragmentation. In accordance with the new experimental data, structural models were constructed and fully optimized using ab initio and density functional theory quantum chemistry calculations. The theoretical study allowed us to propose a stable gas-phase structure which is compatible with all experimental findings. PMID:20564575

  5. Quantum physics and complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biamonte, Jacob

    2014-03-01

    There is a widely used and successful theory of ``chemical reaction networks,'' which provides a framework describing systems governed by mass action kinetics. Computer science and population biology use the same ideas under a different name: ``stochastic Petri nets.'' But if we look at these theories from the perspective of quantum theory, they turn out to involve creation and annihilation operators, coherent states and other well-known ideas--yet in a context where probabilities replace amplitudes. I will explain this connection as part of a detailed analogy between quantum mechanics and stochastic mechanics which we've produced several results on recently, including the recent analytical results uniting quantum physics and complex networks. Our general idea is about merging concepts from quantum physics and complex network theory to provide a bidirectional bridge between both disciplines. Support is acknowledged from the Foundational Questions Institute (FQXi) and the Compagnia di San Paolo Foundation.

  6. Complex Chemistry on Interstellar Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widicus Weaver, Susanna L.; Kelley, Matthew J.; Blake, Geoffrey A.

    Early interstellar chemical models considered complex molecule formation on grains [Allen & Robinson (1977)], but current models assume that simple molecules form on grains and subsequent gas phase ion-molecule reactions produce the more complex species [Ruffle & Herbst (2001), Charnley (2001)]. It has been shown, however, that gas phase ion-molecule reactions are insufficient for the production of such complex organic species as ethanol (CH3CH2OH) and methyl formate (CH3OCHO) [Horn et al. (2004)]. Organics such as acetaldehyde (CH3CHO), ethanol, methyl formate, acetic acid (CH3COOH), and glycolaldehyde (CH2OHCHO) have also been detected in high abundance in regions of grain mantle disruption or evaporation, indicating that these species are formed on grain surfaces [see Chengalur & Kanekar (2003), Bottinelli et al. (2004), Hollis et al. (2001)]. The mechanisms for complex molecule production on grains are clearly much more important, and much more complex, than has been recognized. Recent observational studies of these types of species have offered insight into the mechanisms for their possible grain surface synthesis. The relative hot core abundances of the 2C structural isomers methyl formate, acetic acid, and glycolaldehyde (52:2:1, respectively [Hollis et al. (2001)]) indicate that if they form on grains it is not from kinetically-controlled single-atom addition reactions. Likewise, the 3C aldose sugar, glyceraldehyde (CH2OHCHOHCHO), was not detected in Sgr B2(N-LMH) [Hollis et al. (2004)] while the 3C ketose sugar, dihydroxyacetone (CO(CH2OH)2) was detected in this source [Widicus Weaver & Blake (2005)]. Chemical pathways favoring the more stable carbonates over acids and aldehydes are required to explain these results. Interestingly, all of these species can be formed from reactions involving the abundant grain mantle constituents CO, HCOOH, and CH3OH and their radical precursors. A model has been developed to investigate this type of chemical network, and

  7. Electricity Market Complex Adaptive System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2004-10-14

    EMCAS is a model developed for the simulation and analysis of electricity markets. As power markets are relatively new and still continue to evolve, there is a growing need for advanced modeling approaches that simulate the behavior of electricity markets over time and how market participants may act and react to the changing economic, financial, and regulatory environments in which they operate. A new and rather promising approach applied in the EMCAS software is tomore » model the electricity market as a complex adaptive system using an agent-based modeling and simulation scheme. With its unique combination of various novel approaches, the Agent Based Modeling System (ABMS) provides the ability to capture and investigate the complex interactions between the physical infrastructures (generation, transmission, and distribution) and the economic behavior of market participants that are a trademark of the newly emerging markets.« less

  8. Swimming bacteria at complex interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Diego; Lauga, Eric

    2013-11-01

    Swimming microorganisms such as bacteria often move in confined geometries. Such confinement can be caused by the presence of solid boundaries, free surfaces, or liquid interfaces. It is well established that confinement affects significantly locomotion, generating additional forces and torques on the bacteria. In the presence of a solid boundary (imposing a no-slip condition), microorganisms using helical propulsion undergo circular motion (clockwise in the case of E. coli). Conversely, close to a free (no-shear) surface the circular motion is reversed. However, realistic interfaces are complex, and experimental results do not always agree with theoretical predictions. In this work, we show, using analytical modeling, how different complex interfaces affect a nearby bacterium and modify its swimming kinematics. IUSTI UMR 7343, Polytech Marseille, France.

  9. Region extraction from complex shapes.

    PubMed

    Nevins, A J

    1982-05-01

    An algorithm is described which extracts primitive regions (i.e., convex, spiral shaped, and biconcave lens) from complex shapes. The interior region bounded by the shape is decomposed by first slicing it into a set of convex subregions and then rotating and dissolving the various boundaries between subregions until a satisfactory decomposition is obtained. The same algorithm also is used to decompose the exterior region between the shape and its convex hull. The algorithm has been implemented as an Algol-W computer program for the UNIVAC 90/80 and results of running the program are presented for a wide variety of complex shapes. These results compare favorably with the experience reported by previous programs. PMID:21869069

  10. Statistical mechanics of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Réka; Barabási, Albert-László

    2002-01-01

    Complex networks describe a wide range of systems in nature and society. Frequently cited examples include the cell, a network of chemicals linked by chemical reactions, and the Internet, a network of routers and computers connected by physical links. While traditionally these systems have been modeled as random graphs, it is increasingly recognized that the topology and evolution of real networks are governed by robust organizing principles. This article reviews the recent advances in the field of complex networks, focusing on the statistical mechanics of network topology and dynamics. After reviewing the empirical data that motivated the recent interest in networks, the authors discuss the main models and analytical tools, covering random graphs, small-world and scale-free networks, the emerging theory of evolving networks, and the interplay between topology and the network's robustness against failures and attacks.

  11. Human Error In Complex Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Nancy M.; Rouse, William B.

    1991-01-01

    Report presents results of research aimed at understanding causes of human error in such complex systems as aircraft, nuclear powerplants, and chemical processing plants. Research considered both slips (errors of action) and mistakes (errors of intention), and influence of workload on them. Results indicated that: humans respond to conditions in which errors expected by attempting to reduce incidence of errors; and adaptation to conditions potent influence on human behavior in discretionary situations.

  12. SAR Image Complex Pixel Representations

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin W.

    2015-03-01

    Complex pixel values for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images of uniform distributed clutter can be represented as either real/imaginary (also known as I/Q) values, or as Magnitude/Phase values. Generally, these component values are integers with limited number of bits. For clutter energy well below full-scale, Magnitude/Phase offers lower quantization noise than I/Q representation. Further improvement can be had with companding of the Magnitude value.

  13. Maxillofacial esthesioneuroblastoma: A diagnostic complexity.

    PubMed

    Raj, G Shyam; Rao, Guttikonda Venkateswara; Kumar, Manchikatla Praveen; Sudheerkanth, Kondamari

    2016-01-01

    Esthesioneuroblastoma is a rare malignant tumor of the sinonasal tract. Oral and maxillofacial pathologists rarely encounter this tumor in their daily practice. Because of their complex anatomic location, non-specific symptoms, varied histomorphology and unfamiliarity, most of the times, the tumor is diagnosed as benign tumor and thereby conservative treatment results in multiple recurrences. A recurrent case of esthesioneuroblastoma in a 24-year-old female patient describing the clinical, histopathological and immunohistochemical features along with differential diagnosis is discussed. PMID:27601839

  14. Modeling Wildfire Incident Complexity Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Matthew P.

    2013-01-01

    Wildfire management in the United States and elsewhere is challenged by substantial uncertainty regarding the location and timing of fire events, the socioeconomic and ecological consequences of these events, and the costs of suppression. Escalating U.S. Forest Service suppression expenditures is of particular concern at a time of fiscal austerity as swelling fire management budgets lead to decreases for non-fire programs, and as the likelihood of disruptive within-season borrowing potentially increases. Thus there is a strong interest in better understanding factors influencing suppression decisions and in turn their influence on suppression costs. As a step in that direction, this paper presents a probabilistic analysis of geographic and temporal variation in incident management team response to wildfires. The specific focus is incident complexity dynamics through time for fires managed by the U.S. Forest Service. The modeling framework is based on the recognition that large wildfire management entails recurrent decisions across time in response to changing conditions, which can be represented as a stochastic dynamic system. Daily incident complexity dynamics are modeled according to a first-order Markov chain, with containment represented as an absorbing state. A statistically significant difference in complexity dynamics between Forest Service Regions is demonstrated. Incident complexity probability transition matrices and expected times until containment are presented at national and regional levels. Results of this analysis can help improve understanding of geographic variation in incident management and associated cost structures, and can be incorporated into future analyses examining the economic efficiency of wildfire management. PMID:23691014

  15. Electrogenerated chemiluminescence. 59. Rhenium complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, M.M.; Debad, J.D.; Bard, A.J.; Striplin, D.R.; Crosby, G.A.

    1996-12-15

    Re(L)(CO){sub 3}Cl complexes (where L is 1,10-phenanthroline, 2,2`-bipyridine, or a phenanthroline or bipyridine derivative containing methyl groups) are photoluminescent in fluid solution at room temperature. In acetonitrile solutions, these complexes display one chemically reversible one-electron reduction process and one chemically irreversible oxidation process. {lambda}{sub max} for the luminescence is dependent on the nature of L, and a linear relationship between {lambda}{sub max} and the difference in electrode potentials for oxidation and reduction is evident. Electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) was observed in acetonitrile solutions of these complexes (Bu{sub 4}NPF{sub 6} as electrolyte) by stepping the potential of a Pt disk working electrode between potentials sufficient to form the radical anionic and cationic species. The relative amount of light produced during the anodic and cathodic pulses was dependent on the potential limits and pulse duration. ECL was also generated in the presence of coreactants, i.e., with tri-n-propylamine upon stepping the potential sufficiently positive to form the deprotonated tri-n-propylamine radical and the cationic rhenium(II) species Re{sup II}(L)(CO){sub 3}Cl{sup +}. When S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2-} was present in solution, ECL was also observed for all of the complexes upon stepping to potentials sufficient to form (Re{sup I}(L)(CO){sub 3}Cl){sup -} and the strong oxidant SO{sub 4}{sup .-}. 44 refs., 8 figs.

  16. Structural Complexity of DNA Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Liou, Cheng-Yuan; Cheng, Wei-Chen; Tsai, Huai-Ying

    2013-01-01

    In modern bioinformatics, finding an efficient way to allocate sequence fragments with biological functions is an important issue. This paper presents a structural approach based on context-free grammars extracted from original DNA or protein sequences. This approach is radically different from all those statistical methods. Furthermore, this approach is compared with a topological entropy-based method for consistency and difference of the complexity results. PMID:23662161

  17. Materials and Fuels Complex Tour

    ScienceCinema

    Miley, Don

    2013-05-28

    The Materials and Fuels Complex at Idaho National Laboratory is home to several facilities used for the research and development of nuclear fuels. Stops include the Fuel Conditioning Facility, the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (post-irradiation examination), and the Space and Security Power System Facility, where radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) are assembled for deep space missions. You can learn more about INL research programs at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  18. Thermodynamic characterization of polyhydride complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Zidan, R.A.; Rocheleau, R.E.; Jensen, C.M.

    1996-10-01

    The authors have investigated the interaction of hydrogen with solid IrXH{sub 2} (PPr{sup i}{sub 3}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}) (X=Cl, I). Gaseous hydrogen was found to react directly and reversibly with solid iridium chloro-complex, IrClH{sub 2}(PPr{sup i}{sub 3}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}) under mild conditions of pressure and temperature. Equilibrium absorption and desorption isotherms were obtained at fixed temperatures ranging from 273{degrees} K to 323{degrees} K over the pressure range from 0.1 to 11 atmospheres. The rates of hydrogen uptake and release were found to be very rapid. A Gaussian shaped thermal desorption spectrum showed that hydrogen desorption occurred over a wide range of temperatures from 200{degrees} K to 350{degrees} K. The TDS results and the absence of well defined plateaus in p-c isotherms indicated a disorder of the hydrogen arrangement in the iridium complex matrix. These observation were consistent with earlier findings from NMR and neutron diffraction measurements. The enthalpy ({Delta}H) and the entropy ({Delta}S) of hydrogen desorption, from a van`t Hoffs plot based on the hydrogen pressure at 50% of full loading of hydrogen at fixed temperatures, were {minus}4.9 {+-}0.3 kcaL/mole of H{sub 2} and 28.6{+-} cal/deg. mole of H{sub 2} respectively. Hydrogen desorption from IrIH{sub 2}(PPr{sup i}{sub 3}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}) was not observed at the above temperature and pressure ranges, indicating stronger hydrogen bond in iodo-complex compared to the chloro-complex.

  19. Maxillofacial esthesioneuroblastoma: A diagnostic complexity

    PubMed Central

    Raj, G Shyam; Rao, Guttikonda Venkateswara; Kumar, Manchikatla Praveen; Sudheerkanth, Kondamari

    2016-01-01

    Esthesioneuroblastoma is a rare malignant tumor of the sinonasal tract. Oral and maxillofacial pathologists rarely encounter this tumor in their daily practice. Because of their complex anatomic location, non-specific symptoms, varied histomorphology and unfamiliarity, most of the times, the tumor is diagnosed as benign tumor and thereby conservative treatment results in multiple recurrences. A recurrent case of esthesioneuroblastoma in a 24-year-old female patient describing the clinical, histopathological and immunohistochemical features along with differential diagnosis is discussed. PMID:27601839

  20. Materials and Fuels Complex Tour

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, Don

    2011-01-01

    The Materials and Fuels Complex at Idaho National Laboratory is home to several facilities used for the research and development of nuclear fuels. Stops include the Fuel Conditioning Facility, the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (post-irradiation examination), and the Space and Security Power System Facility, where radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) are assembled for deep space missions. You can learn more about INL research programs at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  1. On real quadric line complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnov, Vyacheslav A.

    2010-12-01

    We describe the topological types of the real parts of the Kummer surfaces associated with real three-dimensional quadric line complexes. The topological type of the real part of such a surface is shown to depend on the number of real singular points: it is determined by the number of such points if any exist, and otherwise the real part of the Kummer surface is either empty or consists of one or two tori.

  2. Complex cobordism and formal groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchstaber, Viktor M.

    2012-10-01

    This paper surveys the current state of the theory of cobordism, focusing on geometric and universal properties of complex cobordism, the Landweber-Novikov algebra, and the formal group law of geometric cobordisms. The relationships with K-theory, algebraic cycles, formal group laws, compact Lie group actions on manifolds, toric topology, infinite-dimensional Lie algebras, and nilmanifolds are described. The survey contains key results and open problems. Bibliography: 124 titles.

  3. Complex hydrides for hydrogen storage

    DOEpatents

    Zidan, Ragaiy

    2006-08-22

    A hydrogen storage material and process of forming the material is provided in which complex hydrides are combined under conditions of elevated temperatures and/or elevated temperature and pressure with a titanium metal such as titanium butoxide. The resulting fused product exhibits hydrogen desorption kinetics having a first hydrogen release point which occurs at normal atmospheres and at a temperature between 50.degree. C. and 90.degree. C.

  4. Reduced and Superreduced Diplatinum Complexes.

    PubMed

    Darnton, Tania V; Hunter, Bryan M; Hill, Michael G; Záliš, Stanislav; Vlček, Antonín; Gray, Harry B

    2016-05-01

    A d(8)-d(8) complex [Pt2(μ-P2O5(BF2)4](4-) (abbreviated Pt(pop-BF2)(4-)) undergoes two 1e(-) reductions at E1/2 = -1.68 and Ep = -2.46 V (vs Fc(+)/Fc) producing reduced Pt(pop-BF2)(5-) and superreduced Pt(pop-BF2)(6-) species, respectively. The EPR spectrum of Pt(pop-BF2)(5-) and UV-vis spectra of both the reduced and the superreduced complexes, together with TD-DFT calculations, reveal successive filling of the 6pσ orbital accompanied by gradual strengthening of Pt-Pt bonding interactions and, because of 6pσ delocalization, of Pt-P bonds in the course of the two reductions. Mayer-Millikan Pt-Pt bond orders of 0.173, 0.268, and 0.340 were calculated for the parent, reduced, and superreduced complexes, respectively. The second (5-/6-) reduction is accompanied by a structural distortion that is experimentally manifested by electrochemical irreversibility. Both reduction steps proceed without changing either d(8) Pt electronic configuration, making the superreduced Pt(pop-BF2)(6-) a very rare 6p(2) σ-bonded binuclear complex. However, the Pt-Pt σ bonding interaction is limited by the relatively long bridging-ligand-imposed Pt-Pt distance accompanied by repulsive electronic congestion. Pt(pop-BF2)(4-) is predicted to be a very strong photooxidant (potentials of +1.57 and +0.86 V are estimated for the singlet and triplet dσ*pσ excited states, respectively). PMID:27068652

  5. Experiments on Cryogenic Complex Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ishihara, O.; Sekine, W.; Kubota, J.; Uotani, N.; Chikasue, M.; Shindo, M.

    2009-11-10

    Experiments on a cryogenic complex plasma have been performed. Preliminary experiments include production of a plasma in a liquid helium or in a cryogenic helium gas by a pulsed discharge. The extended production of a plasma has been realized in a vapor of liquid helium or in a cryogenic helium gas by rf discharge. The charge of dust particles injected in such a plasma has been studied in detail.

  6. A chiroptical photoswitchable DNA complex.

    PubMed

    Mammana, Angela; Carroll, Gregory T; Areephong, Jetsuda; Feringa, Ben L

    2011-10-13

    The interesting structural, electronic, and optical properties of DNA provide fascinating opportunities for developing nanoscale smart materials by integrating DNA with opto-electronic components. In this article we demonstrate the electrostatic binding of an amine-terminated dithienylethene (DET) molecular switch to double-stranded synthetic polynucleotides. The DET switch can undergo photochemical ring-closure and opening reactions. Circular dichroism (CD) and UV-vis spectroscopy show that both the open, 1o, and the closed, 1c, forms of the switch bind to DNA. Upon addition of DNA to a solution of 1o or 1c, the UV-vis spectrum displays a hypochromic effect, indicative of an interaction between the switch and the DNA. The chirality of the DNA double-helix is transmitted to the switching unit which displays a well-defined CD signal upon supramolecular complexation to the DNA. Additionally, the CD signal of the DNA attenuates, demonstrating that both components of the complex mutually influence each other's structure; the DNA induces chirality in the switch, and the switch modifies the structure of the DNA. Modulation of the chiroptical properties of the complex is achieved by photochemically switching the DET between its ring open and closed isomers. A pH dependence study of the binding shows that when the pH is increased the switches lose their binding ability, indicating that electrostatic interactions between protonated amines and the negatively charged phosphate backbone are the dominant driving force for binding to the DNA. A comparison of poly(deoxyguanylic-deoxycytidylic) acid [poly(dGdC)(2)] polynucleotides with poly(deoxyadenylic-deoxythymidylic) acid [poly(dAdT)(2)] shows distinct differences in the CD spectra of the complexes. PMID:21879715

  7. Representing SAR complex image pixels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerry, A. W.

    2016-05-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images are often complex-valued to facilitate specific exploitation modes. Furthermore, these pixel values are typically represented with either real/imaginary (also known as I/Q) values, or as Magnitude/Phase values, with constituent components comprised of integers with limited number of bits. For clutter energy well below full-scale, Magnitude/Phase offers lower quantization noise than I/Q representation. Further improvement can be had with companding of the Magnitude value.

  8. Synchronization in node of complex networks consist of complex chaotic system

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Qiang; Xie, Cheng-jun; Liu, Hong-jun; Li, Yan-hui

    2014-07-15

    A new synchronization method is investigated for node of complex networks consists of complex chaotic system. When complex networks realize synchronization, different component of complex state variable synchronize up to different scaling complex function by a designed complex feedback controller. This paper change synchronization scaling function from real field to complex field for synchronization in node of complex networks with complex chaotic system. Synchronization in constant delay and time-varying coupling delay complex networks are investigated, respectively. Numerical simulations are provided to show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  9. Epidemic processes in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo; Castellano, Claudio; Van Mieghem, Piet; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2015-07-01

    In recent years the research community has accumulated overwhelming evidence for the emergence of complex and heterogeneous connectivity patterns in a wide range of biological and sociotechnical systems. The complex properties of real-world networks have a profound impact on the behavior of equilibrium and nonequilibrium phenomena occurring in various systems, and the study of epidemic spreading is central to our understanding of the unfolding of dynamical processes in complex networks. The theoretical analysis of epidemic spreading in heterogeneous networks requires the development of novel analytical frameworks, and it has produced results of conceptual and practical relevance. A coherent and comprehensive review of the vast research activity concerning epidemic processes is presented, detailing the successful theoretical approaches as well as making their limits and assumptions clear. Physicists, mathematicians, epidemiologists, computer, and social scientists share a common interest in studying epidemic spreading and rely on similar models for the description of the diffusion of pathogens, knowledge, and innovation. For this reason, while focusing on the main results and the paradigmatic models in infectious disease modeling, the major results concerning generalized social contagion processes are also presented. Finally, the research activity at the forefront in the study of epidemic spreading in coevolving, coupled, and time-varying networks is reported.

  10. Emergence: Complexity Pedagogy in Action

    PubMed Central

    Jonas-Simpson, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Many educators are looking for new ways to engage students and each other in order to enrich curriculum and the teaching-learning process. We describe an example of how we enacted teaching-learning approaches through the insights of complexity thinking, an approach that supports the emergence of new possibilities for teaching-learning in the classroom and online. Our story begins with an occasion to meet with 10 nursing colleagues in a three-hour workshop using four activities that engaged learning about complexity thinking and pedagogy. Guiding concepts for the collaborative workshop were nonlinearity, distributed decision-making, divergent thinking, self-organization, emergence, and creative exploration. The workshop approach considered critical questions to spark our collective inquiry. We asked, “What is emergent learning?” and “How do we, as educators and learners, engage a community so that new learning surfaces?” We integrated the arts, creative play, and perturbations within a complexity approach. PMID:25838945

  11. Child health in complex emergencies.

    PubMed Central

    Moss, William J.; Ramakrishnan, Meenakshi; Storms, Dory; Henderson Siegle, Anne; Weiss, William M.; Lejnev, Ivan; Muhe, Lulu

    2006-01-01

    Coordinated and effective interventions are critical for relief efforts to be successful in addressing the health needs of children in situations of armed conflict, population displacement, and/or food insecurity. We reviewed published literature and surveyed international relief organizations engaged in child health activities in complex emergencies. Our aim was to identify research needs and improve guidelines for the care of children. Much of the literature details the burden of disease and the causes of morbidity and mortality; few interventional studies have been published. Surveys of international relief organizations showed that most use World Health Organization (WHO), United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF), and ministry of health guidelines designed for use in stable situations. Organizations were least likely to have formal guidelines on the management of asphyxia, prematurity, and infection in neonates; diagnosis and management of children with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection; active case-finding and treatment of tuberculosis; paediatric trauma; and the diagnosis and management of mental-health problems in children. Guidelines often are not adapted to the different types of health-care workers who provide care in complex emergencies. Evidence-based, locally adapted guidelines for the care of children in complex emergencies should be adopted by ministries of health, supported by WHO and UNICEF, and disseminated to international relief organizations to ensure appropriate, effective, and uniform care. PMID:16501716

  12. Contour complexity and contour detection

    PubMed Central

    Wilder, John; Feldman, Jacob; Singh, Manish

    2015-01-01

    It is well-known that “smooth” chains of oriented elements—contours—are more easily detected amid background noise than more undulating (i.e., “less smooth”) chains. Here, we develop a Bayesian framework for contour detection and show that it predicts that contour detection performance should decrease with the contour's complexity, quantified as the description length (DL; i.e., the negative logarithm of probability integrated along the contour). We tested this prediction in two experiments in which subjects were asked to detect simple open contours amid pixel noise. In Experiment 1, we demonstrate a consistent decline in performance with increasingly complex contours, as predicted by the Bayesian model. In Experiment 2, we confirmed that this effect is due to integrated complexity along the contour, and does not seem to depend on local stretches of linear structure. The results corroborate the probabilistic model of contours, and show how contour detection can be understood as a special case of a more general process—the identification of organized patterns in the environment. PMID:26024453

  13. The complex chemical Langevin equation

    SciTech Connect

    Schnoerr, David; Sanguinetti, Guido; Grima, Ramon

    2014-07-14

    The chemical Langevin equation (CLE) is a popular simulation method to probe the stochastic dynamics of chemical systems. The CLE’s main disadvantage is its break down in finite time due to the problem of evaluating square roots of negative quantities whenever the molecule numbers become sufficiently small. We show that this issue is not a numerical integration problem, rather in many systems it is intrinsic to all representations of the CLE. Various methods of correcting the CLE have been proposed which avoid its break down. We show that these methods introduce undesirable artefacts in the CLE’s predictions. In particular, for unimolecular systems, these correction methods lead to CLE predictions for the mean concentrations and variance of fluctuations which disagree with those of the chemical master equation. We show that, by extending the domain of the CLE to complex space, break down is eliminated, and the CLE’s accuracy for unimolecular systems is restored. Although the molecule numbers are generally complex, we show that the “complex CLE” predicts real-valued quantities for the mean concentrations, the moments of intrinsic noise, power spectra, and first passage times, hence admitting a physical interpretation. It is also shown to provide a more accurate approximation of the chemical master equation of simple biochemical circuits involving bimolecular reactions than the various corrected forms of the real-valued CLE, the linear-noise approximation and a commonly used two moment-closure approximation.

  14. Supramolecular Organization of Respiratory Complexes.

    PubMed

    Enríquez, José Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery of the existence of superassemblies between mitochondrial respiratory complexes, such superassemblies have been the object of a passionate debate. It is accepted that respiratory supercomplexes are structures that occur in vivo, although which superstructures are naturally occurring and what could be their functional role remain open questions. The main difficulty is to make compatible the existence of superassemblies with the corpus of data that drove the field to abandon the early understanding of the physical arrangement of the mitochondrial respiratory chain as a compact physical entity (the solid model). This review provides a nonexhaustive overview of the evolution of our understanding of the structural organization of the electron transport chain from the original idea of a compact organization to a view of freely moving complexes connected by electron carriers. Today supercomplexes are viewed not as a revival of the old solid model but rather as a refined revision of the fluid model, which incorporates a new layer of structural and functional complexity. PMID:26734886

  15. Decision paths in complex tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galanter, Eugene

    1991-01-01

    Complex real world action and its prediction and control has escaped analysis by the classical methods of psychological research. The reason is that psychologists have no procedures to parse complex tasks into their constituents. Where such a division can be made, based say on expert judgment, there is no natural scale to measure the positive or negative values of the components. Even if we could assign numbers to task parts, we lack rules i.e., a theory, to combine them into a total task representation. We compare here two plausible theories for the amalgamation of the value of task components. Both of these theories require a numerical representation of motivation, for motivation is the primary variable that guides choice and action in well-learned tasks. We address this problem of motivational quantification and performance prediction by developing psychophysical scales of the desireability or aversiveness of task components based on utility scaling methods (Galanter 1990). We modify methods used originally to scale sensory magnitudes (Stevens and Galanter 1957), and that have been applied recently to the measure of task 'workload' by Gopher and Braune (1984). Our modification uses utility comparison scaling techniques which avoid the unnecessary assumptions made by Gopher and Braune. Formula for the utility of complex tasks based on the theoretical models are used to predict decision and choice of alternate paths to the same goal.

  16. Analysis of Genetically Complex Epilepsies

    PubMed Central

    Ottman, Ruth

    2006-01-01

    During the last decade, great progress has been made in the discovery of genes that influence risk for epilepsy. However, these gene discoveries have been in epilepsies with Mendelian modes of inheritance, which comprise only a tiny fraction of all epilepsy. Most people with epilepsy have no affected relatives, suggesting that the great majority of all epilepsies are genetically complex: multiple genes contribute to their etiology, none of which has a major effect on disease risk. Gene discovery in the genetically complex epilepsies is a formidable task. It is unclear which epilepsy phenotypes are most advantageous to study, and chromosomal localization and mutation detection are much more difficult than in Mendelian epilepsies. Association studies are very promising for the identification of complex epilepsy genes, but we are still in the earliest stages of their application in the epilepsies. Future studies should employ very large sample sizes to ensure adequate statistical power, clinical phenotyping methods of the highest quality, designs and analytic techniques that control for population stratification, and state-of-the-art molecular methods. Collaborative studies are essential to achieve these goals. PMID:16359464

  17. Towards Structural Complexity with Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Colloids rather easily assemble into simple crystal structures like the face-centered cubic lattice or the body-centered cubic lattice. More complex phases are harder to achieve, but have recently been reported using a number of approaches. Yet, assembling complex structures often results from trial-and-error and is not well understood. In this presentation, we show how novel crystals, quasicrystals, and liquid crystals can be achieved with colloidal building blocks by varying the interactions and the shapes of the building blocks. Using computer simulations, we demonstrate the formation of unusually ordered phases both with isotropic pair potentials, as well as with facetted shapes like polyhedra. We describe new tools we have developed to perform complex structural analysis on simulated systems and show how they may be used to analyze real space images from colloid experiments. We also compare the assembled structures with densest packings of the building blocks and show that good packings can often be distinct from what is observed to assemble from the disordered state. This suggests that dense packings may not be illustrative of what is achievable in colloid experiments.

  18. Entropy, complexity, and spatial information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batty, Michael; Morphet, Robin; Masucci, Paolo; Stanilov, Kiril

    2014-10-01

    We pose the central problem of defining a measure of complexity, specifically for spatial systems in general, city systems in particular. The measures we adopt are based on Shannon's (in Bell Syst Tech J 27:379-423, 623-656, 1948) definition of information. We introduce this measure and argue that increasing information is equivalent to increasing complexity, and we show that for spatial distributions, this involves a trade-off between the density of the distribution and the number of events that characterize it; as cities get bigger and are characterized by more events—more places or locations, information increases, all other things being equal. But sometimes the distribution changes at a faster rate than the number of events and thus information can decrease even if a city grows. We develop these ideas using various information measures. We first demonstrate their applicability to various distributions of population in London over the last 100 years, then to a wider region of London which is divided into bands of zones at increasing distances from the core, and finally to the evolution of the street system that characterizes the built-up area of London from 1786 to the present day. We conclude by arguing that we need to relate these measures to other measures of complexity, to choose a wider array of examples, and to extend the analysis to two-dimensional spatial systems.

  19. Entropy, complexity, and spatial information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batty, Michael; Morphet, Robin; Masucci, Paolo; Stanilov, Kiril

    2014-09-01

    We pose the central problem of defining a measure of complexity, specifically for spatial systems in general, city systems in particular. The measures we adopt are based on Shannon's (in Bell Syst Tech J 27:379-423, 623-656, 1948) definition of information. We introduce this measure and argue that increasing information is equivalent to increasing complexity, and we show that for spatial distributions, this involves a trade-off between the density of the distribution and the number of events that characterize it; as cities get bigger and are characterized by more events—more places or locations, information increases, all other things being equal. But sometimes the distribution changes at a faster rate than the number of events and thus information can decrease even if a city grows. We develop these ideas using various information measures. We first demonstrate their applicability to various distributions of population in London over the last 100 years, then to a wider region of London which is divided into bands of zones at increasing distances from the core, and finally to the evolution of the street system that characterizes the built-up area of London from 1786 to the present day. We conclude by arguing that we need to relate these measures to other measures of complexity, to choose a wider array of examples, and to extend the analysis to two-dimensional spatial systems.

  20. Algorithms, complexity, and the sciences.

    PubMed

    Papadimitriou, Christos

    2014-11-11

    Algorithms, perhaps together with Moore's law, compose the engine of the information technology revolution, whereas complexity--the antithesis of algorithms--is one of the deepest realms of mathematical investigation. After introducing the basic concepts of algorithms and complexity, and the fundamental complexity classes P (polynomial time) and NP (nondeterministic polynomial time, or search problems), we discuss briefly the P vs. NP problem. We then focus on certain classes between P and NP which capture important phenomena in the social and life sciences, namely the Nash equlibrium and other equilibria in economics and game theory, and certain processes in population genetics and evolution. Finally, an algorithm known as multiplicative weights update (MWU) provides an algorithmic interpretation of the evolution of allele frequencies in a population under sex and weak selection. All three of these equivalences are rife with domain-specific implications: The concept of Nash equilibrium may be less universal--and therefore less compelling--than has been presumed; selection on gene interactions may entail the maintenance of genetic variation for longer periods than selection on single alleles predicts; whereas MWU can be shown to maximize, for each gene, a convex combination of the gene's cumulative fitness in the population and the entropy of the allele distribution, an insight that may be pertinent to the maintenance of variation in evolution. PMID:25349382

  1. Complexity science and leadership in healthcare.

    PubMed

    Burns, J P

    2001-10-01

    The emerging field of complexity science offers an alternative leadership strategy for the chaotic, complex healthcare environment. A survey revealed that healthcare leaders intuitively support principles of complexity science. Leadership that uses complexity principles offers opportunities in the chaotic healthcare environment to focus less on prediction and control and more on fostering relationships and creating conditions in which complex adaptive systems can evolve to produce creative outcomes. PMID:11676217

  2. Cluster algorithms and computational complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuenan

    Cluster algorithms for the 2D Ising model with a staggered field have been studied and a new cluster algorithm for path sampling has been worked out. The complexity properties of Bak-Seppen model and the Growing network model have been studied by using the Computational Complexity Theory. The dynamic critical behavior of the two-replica cluster algorithm is studied. Several versions of the algorithm are applied to the two-dimensional, square lattice Ising model with a staggered field. The dynamic exponent for the full algorithm is found to be less than 0.5. It is found that odd translations of one replica with respect to the other together with global flips are essential for obtaining a small value of the dynamic exponent. The path sampling problem for the 1D Ising model is studied using both a local algorithm and a novel cluster algorithm. The local algorithm is extremely inefficient at low temperature, where the integrated autocorrelation time is found to be proportional to the fourth power of correlation length. The dynamic exponent of the cluster algorithm is found to be zero and therefore proved to be much more efficient than the local algorithm. The parallel computational complexity of the Bak-Sneppen evolution model is studied. It is shown that Bak-Sneppen histories can be generated by a massively parallel computer in a time that is polylog in the length of the history, which means that the logical depth of producing a Bak-Sneppen history is exponentially less than the length of the history. The parallel dynamics for generating Bak-Sneppen histories is contrasted to standard Bak-Sneppen dynamics. The parallel computational complexity of the Growing Network model is studied. The growth of the network with linear kernels is shown to be not complex and an algorithm with polylog parallel running time is found. The growth of the network with gamma ≥ 2 super-linear kernels can be realized by a randomized parallel algorithm with polylog expected running time.

  3. Processible Polyaniline Copolymers and Complexes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Yun-Hsin

    1995-01-01

    Polyaniline (PANI) is an intractable polymer due to the difficulty of melt processing or dissolving it in common solvents. The purpose of the present investigation was to prepare a new class of conducting polyanilines with better solubility both in base and dope forms by (1) adding external salt to break aggregated chains, (2) introducing ring substituted units onto the backbone without disturbing the coplanar structure, and (3) complexing with polymeric dopants to form a soluble polymer complex. Aggregation of PANI chains in dilute solution was investigated in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP) by light scattering, gel permeation chromatography, and viscosity measurements. The aggregation of chains resulted in a negative second virial coefficient in light scattering measurement, a bimodal molecular weight distribution in gel permeation chromatography, and concave reduced viscosity curves. The aggregates can be broken by adding external salt, which resulting in a higher reduced viscosity. The driving force for aggregation is assumed to be a combination of hydrogen bonding between the imine and amine groups, and the rigidity of backbone. The aggregation was modeled to occur via side-on packing of PANI chains. The ring substituted PANI copolymers, poly(aniline -co-phenetidine) were synthesized by chemical oxidation copolymerization using ammonium persulfate as an oxidant. The degree of copolymerization declined with an increasing feed of o-phenetidine in the reaction mixture. The o-phenetidine had a higher reactivity than aniline in copolymerization resulting in a higher content of o-phenetidine in copolymers. The resulting copolymers can be readily dissolved in NMP up to 20% (w/w), and other common solvents, and solutions possess a longer gelation time. The highly soluble copolymer with 20 mole % o-phenetidine in the backbone has same order of conductivity as the unsubstituted PANI after it is doped by HCl. Complexation of PANI and polymeric dopant, poly

  4. HIV surveillance in complex emergencies.

    PubMed

    Salama, P; Dondero, T J

    2001-04-01

    Many studies have shown a positive association between both migration and temporary expatriation and HIV risk. This association is likely to be similar or even more pronounced for forced migrants. In general, HIV transmission in host-migrant or host-forced-migrant interactions depends on the maturity of the HIV epidemic in both the host and the migrant population, the relative seroprevalence of HIV in the host and the migrant population, the prevalence of other sexually transmitted infections (STIs) that may facilitate transmission, and the level of sexual interaction between the two communities. Complex emergencies are the major cause of mass population movement today. In complex emergencies, additional factors such as sexual interaction between forced-migrant populations and the military; sexual violence; increasing commercial sex work; psychological trauma; and disruption of preventive and curative health services may increase the risk for HIV transmission. Despite recent success in preventing HIV infection in stable populations in selected developing countries, internally displaced persons and refugees (or forced migrants) have not been systematically included in HIV surveillance systems, nor consequently in prevention activities. Standard surveillance systems that rely on functioning health services may not provide useful data in many complex emergency settings. Secondary sources can provide some information in these settings. Little attempt has been made, however, to develop innovative HIV surveillance systems in countries affected by complex emergencies. Consequently, data on the HIV epidemic in these countries are scarce and HIV prevention programs are either not implemented or interventions are not effectively targeted. Second generation surveillance methods such as cross-sectional, population-based surveys can provide rapid information on HIV, STIs, and sexual behavior. The risks for stigmatization and breaches of confidentiality must be recognized

  5. Xiphinema krugi, Species Complex or Complex of Cryptic Species?

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Claudio M. G.; Ferraz, Luiz C. C. B.; Neilson, Roy

    2006-01-01

    Fourteen morphologically putative populations of X. krugi were clearly separated into four different profiles by RFLP analysis (Alu I and Hinf I), sequencing of the ITS-1 region, and subsequent Maximum Likelihood phylogenetic analyses. These four profiles were further supported by a principal component analysis of morphometric characters that yielded four taxonomic clusters matching those produced by the molecular data. Sequence homology was greater amongst populations that represented the same RFLP profile than between profiles and similar both between representative populations of the RFLP profiles and putative closely related Xiphinema species. This study suggests that X. krugi is a potential species complex comprised of at least four distinct genotypes. PMID:19259458

  6. Dissecting complex diseases in complex populations: asthma in latino americans.

    PubMed

    Choudhry, Shweta; Seibold, Max A; Borrell, Luisa N; Tang, Hua; Serebrisky, Denise; Chapela, Rocio; Rodriguez-Santana, José R; Avila, Pedro C; Ziv, Elad; Rodriguez-Cintron, William; Risch, Neil J; Burchard, Esteban González

    2007-07-01

    Asthma is a common but complex respiratory ailment; current data indicate that interaction of genetic and environmental factors lead to its clinical expression. In the United States, asthma prevalence, morbidity, and mortality vary widely among different Latino ethnic groups. The prevalence of asthma is highest in Puerto Ricans, intermediate in Dominicans and Cubans, and lowest in Mexicans and Central Americans. Independently, known socioeconomic, environmental, and genetic differences do not fully account for this observation. One potential explanation is that there may be unique and ethnic-specific gene-environment interactions that can differentially modify risk for asthma in Latino ethnic groups. These gene-environment interactions can be tested using genetic ancestry as a surrogate for genetic risk factors. Latinos are admixed and share varying proportions of African, Native American, and European ancestry. Most Latinos are unaware of their precise ancestry and report their ancestry based on the national origin of their family and their physical appearance. The unavailability of precise ancestry and the genetic complexity among Latinos may complicate asthma research studies in this population. On the other hand, precisely because of this rich mixture of ancestry, Latinos present a unique opportunity to disentangle the clinical, social, environmental, and genetic underpinnings of population differences in asthma prevalence, severity, and bronchodilator drug responsiveness. PMID:17607004

  7. Diverse Tp*-Capped W-Cu-S Clusters from One-Pot Assembly Involving in Situ Thiolation of Phosphines.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Zhou, Feng; Liu, Quan; Chen, Qiu-Fang; Yang, Jun-Yi; Zhang, Wen-Hua; Song, Ying-Lin; Lang, Jian-Ping

    2016-02-15

    In the absence/presence of S8, the one-pot assembly of [Et4N][Tp*WS3] [1; Tp* = hydridotris(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)borate] with [Cu(MeCN)4]PF6 and bis- or tetraphosphine ligands 1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane (dppe), 1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane (dppp), 1,4-bis(diphenylphosphino)butane (dppb), and N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(diphenylphosphinomethyl)ethylenediamine (dppeda) produces six W-Cu-S clusters, namely, [(Tp*WS3Cu2Cl)2(dppe)] (2), [Tp*WS3Cu4(dppp)2(μ4-Cl)(μ-Cl)]PF6·MeCN (3·MeCN), [(Tp*WS3Cu3)2(μ4-Cl)(μ-Cl)2(dpppS2)] (4), [(Tp*WS3Cu2Cl)2(dppbS2)]·2MeCN·2H2O (5·2MeCN·2H2O), [(Tp*WS3Cu3Cl2)2(dppbS2)] (6), and [(Tp*WS3Cu3)2(Ph2PS2)3(μ6-Cl)0.5](PF6)0.5·0.75CH2Cl2 (7·0.75CH2Cl2). Compounds 2-7 are characterized by elemental analysis, IR, UV-vis, (1)H and (31)P{(1)H} NMR, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, and X-ray crystallography. For 2, the dppe ligand bridges a pair of butterfly-shaped [Tp*WS3Cu2] cores to form a double-butterfly-shaped structure. For 4, the dppp ligand is susceptible toward S association and forms an in situ generated dpppS2 ligand, supporting an octanuclear double-half-open-cubane structure and contrasting an analogous system wherein a pentanuclear motorcycle-shaped cationic cluster 3 is formed with the absence of S8. A longer dppb ligand readily converts to S-based ligands in 5 and 6, subsequently serving as bridges between a pair of a butterfly-shaped (5) and nest-shaped (6) clusters. Further use of a tetraphosphine ligand, dppeda, in the cluster formation, with the presence of S8, leads to an unexpected ligand degradation to give the [Ph2PS2](-) anions. Three [Ph2PS2](-) anions juxtapose a pair of nest-shaped cluster cores to yield an octanuclear cluster, 7, featuring a cage to encapsulate μ6-Cl(-). The third-order nonlinear-optical (NLO) properties of 2-7 in N,N-dimethylformamide, investigated using a Z-scan technique at 532 nm, show that 2-6 have a reverse saturable absorption, while 7 has a notable saturable

  8. Complex I function in mitochondrial supercomplexes.

    PubMed

    Lenaz, Giorgio; Tioli, Gaia; Falasca, Anna Ida; Genova, Maria Luisa

    2016-07-01

    This review discusses the functional properties of mitochondrial Complex I originating from its presence in an assembled form as a supercomplex comprising Complex III and Complex IV in stoichiometric ratios. In particular several lines of evidence are presented favouring the concept that electron transfer from Complex I to Complex III is operated by channelling of electrons through Coenzyme Q molecules bound to the supercomplex, in contrast with the hypothesis that the transfer of reducing equivalents from Complex I to Complex III occurs via random diffusion of the Coenzyme Q molecules in the lipid bilayer. Furthermore, another property provided by the supercomplex assembly is the control of generation of reactive oxygen species by Complex I. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory Complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt. PMID:26820434

  9. Intertextuality for Handling Complex Environmental Issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byhring, Anne Kristine; Knain, Erik

    2016-02-01

    Nowhere is the need for handling complexity more pertinent than in addressing environmental issues. Our study explores students' situated constructs of complexity in unfolding discourses on socio-scientific issues. Students' dialogues in two group-work episodes are analysed in detail, with tools from Systemic Functional Linguistics. We identify the significance of intertextuality in students' realizations of low- and high-complexity discourses. In the high-complexity event, we show how students take on different roles and use modality and projection as grammatical resources for opening up, for different positions, multiple voices, and various contextual resources. Successful handling of complexity is construed by the interplay between students' roles in the discourse and resources in language for making multiple voices present. In the high-complexity event, the handling of complexity is guided by the students' sense of purpose. Handling complexity is demanding, and explicit scaffolding is necessary to prevent a potentially complex challenge from being treated as a simple one.

  10. Nipple areola complex sparing mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Mingozzi, Matteo; Curcio, Annalisa; Buggi, Federico; Folli, Secondo

    2015-01-01

    Breast conservative therapy (BCT) is established as a safe option for most women with early breast cancer (BC). The best conservative mastectomy that can be performed, when mastectomy is unavoidable, is nipple-areola-complex sparing mastectomy (NSM), which allows the complete glandular dissection preserving the skin envelope and the nipple areola complex. In the treatment of BC, the cosmetic outcomes have become fundamental goals, as well as oncologic control. NSM is nowadays considered an alternative technique to improve the overall quality of life for women allowing excellent cosmetic results because it provides a natural appearing breast. The breast surgeon must pay attention to details and skin incision must be planned to minimize vascular impairment to the skin and the nipple. Preservation of the blood supply to the nipple is one of the most important concern during NSM because nipple or areolar necrosis is a well-described complication of this surgery. Another issue associated with the nipple preservation and the surgical technique is oncological safety related to nipple-areola-complex (NAC) involvement in patients with invasive BC. The authors present their experience on 252 NSM performed in the Breast Surgery Unit in Forlì. Careful selection of patients for this surgical procedure is imperative and many patients are not ideal candidates for this procedure because of concerns about nipple-areolar viability as women with significant large/ptotic breast, pre-existing breast scars and history of active cigarette smoking. To extend the benefits of nipple preservation to patients who are perceived to be at higher risk for nipple necrosis the authors describe technical modifications of NSM to allow nipple preservation and obtain good cosmetic outcomes. PMID:26645007

  11. Information communication on complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igarashi, Akito; Kawamoto, Hiroki; Maruyama, Takahiro; Morioka, Atsushi; Naganuma, Yuki

    2013-02-01

    Since communication networks such as the Internet, which is regarded as a complex network, have recently become a huge scale and a lot of data pass through them, the improvement of packet routing strategies for transport is one of the most significant themes in the study of computer networks. It is especially important to find routing strategies which can bear as many traffic as possible without congestion in complex networks. First, using neural networks, we introduce a strategy for packet routing on complex networks, where path lengths and queue lengths in nodes are taken into account within a framework of statistical physics. Secondly, instead of using shortest paths, we propose efficient paths which avoid hubs, nodes with a great many degrees, on scale-free networks with a weight of each node. We improve the heuristic algorithm proposed by Danila et. al. which optimizes step by step routing properties on congestion by using the information of betweenness, the probability of paths passing through a node in all optimal paths which are defined according to a rule, and mitigates the congestion. We confirm the new heuristic algorithm which balances traffic on networks by achieving minimization of the maximum betweenness in much smaller number of iteration steps. Finally, We model virus spreading and data transfer on peer-to-peer (P2P) networks. Using mean-field approximation, we obtain an analytical formulation and emulate virus spreading on the network and compare the results with those of simulation. Moreover, we investigate the mitigation of information traffic congestion in the P2P networks.

  12. Complex Organics in Interstellar Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foing, B.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Ruiterkamp, R.; Cox, N.

    There are signatures of large organic molecules in the interstellar medium, from the ultraviolet to the infrared. Some infrared emission bands, which have been ascribed to families of large aromatic compounds are not specific for individual identification (and for discriminating free floating PAH molecules from loosely bound aromatics in amorphous carbon compounds). Red fluorescence and FUV absorption have also been ascribed to these aromatic compounds. Electronic transitions in the visible are a key to identify free gas phase molecules. The origin of Diffuse Interstellar Bands (Herbig 1995), more than 300 in recent surveys (O' Tuairisg et al 2000) is still a mystery. However the measurements of sub-structures rotational contours in DIBs (Ehrenfreund Foing 1996) indicate large molecules such as chains (12-18C), rings, 50 C PAHs or fullerenes. The distribution of DIB widths permit to estimate a distribution of size of molecular carriers. The environment properties of DIB carriers also indicate ionisation potentials similar to those of cations of large carbonaceous molecules, such as large PAHs or fullerenes (Sonnentrucker et al 1997). The correlation studies of DIBS also indicate different carriers for the strong DIBs observed in the visible (Cami et al 1997). DIBS are weakened in the in the low-metallicity Magellanic clouds (Ehrenfreund et al 2002, Cox et al 2004). The detection of near IR bands at 9577 and 9632 A coinciding with laboratory transitions of C60+ (Foing, Ehrenfreund 1994, 1997, Galatzudinov et al 2000 ) suggest that significant interstellar carbon could reside in complex fullerene type compounds. These results indicate that many different large and complex organic molecules can form and survive in the very harsh interstellar environments. A follow up interdisciplinary work is required between astronomical observations, laboratory matrix and gas phase spectroscopy, theoretical work and modelling, and active experiments in space to study the formation

  13. Nipple areola complex sparing mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Camilla; Mingozzi, Matteo; Curcio, Annalisa; Buggi, Federico; Folli, Secondo

    2015-12-01

    Breast conservative therapy (BCT) is established as a safe option for most women with early breast cancer (BC). The best conservative mastectomy that can be performed, when mastectomy is unavoidable, is nipple-areola-complex sparing mastectomy (NSM), which allows the complete glandular dissection preserving the skin envelope and the nipple areola complex. In the treatment of BC, the cosmetic outcomes have become fundamental goals, as well as oncologic control. NSM is nowadays considered an alternative technique to improve the overall quality of life for women allowing excellent cosmetic results because it provides a natural appearing breast. The breast surgeon must pay attention to details and skin incision must be planned to minimize vascular impairment to the skin and the nipple. Preservation of the blood supply to the nipple is one of the most important concern during NSM because nipple or areolar necrosis is a well-described complication of this surgery. Another issue associated with the nipple preservation and the surgical technique is oncological safety related to nipple-areola-complex (NAC) involvement in patients with invasive BC. The authors present their experience on 252 NSM performed in the Breast Surgery Unit in Forlì. Careful selection of patients for this surgical procedure is imperative and many patients are not ideal candidates for this procedure because of concerns about nipple-areolar viability as women with significant large/ptotic breast, pre-existing breast scars and history of active cigarette smoking. To extend the benefits of nipple preservation to patients who are perceived to be at higher risk for nipple necrosis the authors describe technical modifications of NSM to allow nipple preservation and obtain good cosmetic outcomes. PMID:26645007

  14. Managing Complexity in Multidisciplinary Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miceli, Kristina D.; Lasinski, T. A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    As high performance computing technology progresses, computational simulations are becoming more advanced in their capabilities. In the computational aerosciences domain, single discipline steady-state simulations computed on a single grid are far from the state-of-the-art. In their place are complex, time-dependent multidisciplinary simulations that attempt to model a given geometry more realistically. The product of these multidisciplinary simulations is a massive amount of data stored in different formats, grid topologies, units of measure, etc., as a result of the differences in the simulated physical domains. In addition to the challenges posed by setting up and performing the simulation, additional challenges exist in analyzing computational results. Visualization plays an important role in the advancement of multidisciplinary simulations. To date, visualization has been used to aid in the interpretation of large amounts of simulation data. Because the human visual system is effective in digesting a large amount of information presented graphically, visualization has helped simulation scientists to understand complex simulation results. As these simulations become even more complex, integrating several different physical domains, visualization will be critical to digest the massive amount of information. Another important role for visualization is to provide a common communication medium from which the domain scientists can use to develop, debug, and analyze their work. Multidisciplinary analyses are the next step in simulation technology, not only in computational aerosciences, but in many other areas such as global climate modeling. Visualization researchers must understand and work towards the challenges posed by multidisciplinary simulation scenarios. This paper addresses some of these challenges, describing technologies that must be investigated to create a useful visualization analysis tool for domain scientists.

  15. Complexity and the Arrow of Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lineweaver, Charles H.; Davies, Paul C. W.; Ruse, Michael

    2013-08-01

    1. What is complexity? Is it increasing? Charles H. Lineweaver, Paul C. W. Davies and Michael Ruse; 2. Directionality principles from cancer to cosmology Paul C. W. Davies; 3. A simple treatment of complexity: cosmological entropic boundary conditions on increasing complexity Charles H. Lineweaver; 4. Using complexity science to search for unity in the natural sciences Eric J. Chaisson; 5. On the spontaneous generation of complexity in the universe Seth Lloyd; 6. Emergent spatiotemporal complexity in field theory Marcelo Gleiser; 7. Life: the final frontier for complexity? Simon Conway Morris; 8. Evolution beyond Newton, Darwin, and entailing law: the origin of complexity in the evolving biosphere Stuart A. Kauffman; 9. Emergent order in processes: the interplay of complexity, robustness, correlation, and hierarchy in the biosphere D. Eric Smith; 10. The inferential evolution of biological complexity: forgetting nature by learning to nurture David C. Krakauer; 11. Information width: a way for the second law to increase complexity David Wolpert; 12. Wrestling with biological complexity: from Darwin to Dawkins Michael Ruse; 13. The role of generative entrenchment and robustness in the evolution of complexity William C. Wimsatt; 14. On the plurality of complexity-producing mechanisms Philip Clayton; Index.

  16. Quantum walks on simplicial complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsue, Kaname; Ogurisu, Osamu; Segawa, Etsuo

    2016-05-01

    We construct a new type of quantum walks on simplicial complexes as a natural extension of the well-known Szegedy walk on graphs. One can numerically observe that our proposing quantum walks possess linear spreading and localization as in the case of the Grover walk on lattices. Moreover, our numerical simulation suggests that localization of our quantum walks reflects not only topological but also geometric structures. On the other hand, our proposing quantum walk contains an intrinsic problem concerning exhibition of non-trivial behavior, which is not seen in typical quantum walks such as Grover walks on graphs.

  17. Shear Banding of Complex Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divoux, Thibaut; Fardin, Marc A.; Manneville, Sebastien; Lerouge, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Even in simple geometries, many complex fluids display nontrivial flow fields, with regions where shear is concentrated. The possibility for such shear banding has been known for several decades, but in recent years, we have seen an upsurge in studies offering an ever-more precise understanding of the phenomenon. The development of new techniques to probe the flow on multiple scales with increasing spatial and temporal resolution has opened the possibility for a synthesis of the many phenomena that could only have been thought of separately before. In this review, we bring together recent research on shear banding in polymeric and soft glassy materials and highlight their similarities and disparities.

  18. Complex dynamics of text analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Xiaohua; Zeng, Yongqiang; Ma, Qinghua; Zhu, Lin

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a novel method for the analysis of nonlinear text quality in Chinese language. Texts produced by university students in China were represented as scale-free networks (word adjacency model), from which typical network features such as the in/outdegree, clustering coefficient and network dynamics were obtained. The method integrates the classical concepts of network feature representation and text quality series variation. The analytical and numerical scheme leads to a parameter space representation that constitutes a valid alternative to represent the network features. The results reveal that complex network features of different text qualities can be clearly revealed and applied to potential applications in other instances of text analysis.

  19. Quantization Effects on Complex Networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Wang, Lin; Yang, Wen; Wang, Xiaofan

    2016-01-01

    Weights of edges in many complex networks we constructed are quantized values of the real weights. To what extent does the quantization affect the properties of a network? In this work, quantization effects on network properties are investigated based on the spectrum of the corresponding Laplacian. In contrast to the intuition that larger quantization level always implies a better approximation of the quantized network to the original one, we find a ubiquitous periodic jumping phenomenon with peak-value decreasing in a power-law relationship in all the real-world weighted networks that we investigated. We supply theoretical analysis on the critical quantization level and the power laws. PMID:27226049

  20. General complex polynomial root solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skowron, J.; Gould, A.

    2012-12-01

    This general complex polynomial root solver, implemented in Fortran and further optimized for binary microlenses, uses a new algorithm to solve polynomial equations and is 1.6-3 times faster than the ZROOTS subroutine that is commercially available from Numerical Recipes, depending on application. The largest improvement, when compared to naive solvers, comes from a fail-safe procedure that permits skipping the majority of the calculations in the great majority of cases, without risking catastrophic failure in the few cases that these are actually required.

  1. Quantization Effects on Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Wang, Lin; Yang, Wen; Wang, Xiaofan

    2016-05-01

    Weights of edges in many complex networks we constructed are quantized values of the real weights. To what extent does the quantization affect the properties of a network? In this work, quantization effects on network properties are investigated based on the spectrum of the corresponding Laplacian. In contrast to the intuition that larger quantization level always implies a better approximation of the quantized network to the original one, we find a ubiquitous periodic jumping phenomenon with peak-value decreasing in a power-law relationship in all the real-world weighted networks that we investigated. We supply theoretical analysis on the critical quantization level and the power laws.

  2. Quantization Effects on Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Wang, Lin; Yang, Wen; Wang, Xiaofan

    2016-01-01

    Weights of edges in many complex networks we constructed are quantized values of the real weights. To what extent does the quantization affect the properties of a network? In this work, quantization effects on network properties are investigated based on the spectrum of the corresponding Laplacian. In contrast to the intuition that larger quantization level always implies a better approximation of the quantized network to the original one, we find a ubiquitous periodic jumping phenomenon with peak-value decreasing in a power-law relationship in all the real-world weighted networks that we investigated. We supply theoretical analysis on the critical quantization level and the power laws. PMID:27226049

  3. The Colletotrichum acutatum species complex

    PubMed Central

    Damm, U.; Cannon, P.F.; Woudenberg, J.H.C.; Crous, P.W.

    2012-01-01

    Colletotrichum acutatum is known as an important anthracnose pathogen of a wide range of host plants worldwide. Numerous studies have reported subgroups within the C. acutatum species complex. Multilocus molecular phylogenetic analysis (ITS, ACT, TUB2, CHS-1, GAPDH, HIS3) of 331 strains previously identified as C. acutatum and other related taxa, including strains from numerous hosts with wide geographic distributions, confirmed the molecular groups previously recognised and identified a series of novel taxa. Thirty-one species are accepted, of which 21 have not previously been recognised. Colletotrichum orchidophilum clusters basal to the C. acutatum species complex. There is a high phenotypic diversity within this complex, and some of the species appear to have preferences to specific hosts or geographical regions. Others appear to be plurivorous and are present in multiple regions. In this study, only C. salicis and C. rhombiforme formed sexual morphs in culture, although sexual morphs have been described from other taxa (especially as laboratory crosses), and there is evidence of hybridisation between different species. One species with similar morphology to C. acutatum but not belonging to this species complex was also described here as new, namely C. pseudoacutatum. Taxonomic novelties: New combinations - Colletotrichum limetticola (R.E. Clausen) Damm, P.F. Cannon & Crous, C. lupini (Bondar) Damm, P.F. Cannon & Crous, C. salicis (Fuckel) Damm, P.F. Cannon & Crous. New species - C. acerbum Damm, P.F. Cannon & Crous, C. australe Damm, P.F. Cannon & Crous, C. brisbanense Damm, P.F. Cannon & Crous, C. cosmi Damm, P.F. Cannon & Crous, C. costaricense Damm, P.F. Cannon & Crous, C. cuscutae Damm, P.F. Cannon & Crous, C. guajavae Damm, P.F. Cannon & Crous, C. indonesiense Damm, P.F. Cannon & Crous, C. johnstonii Damm, P.F. Cannon & Crous, C. kinghornii Damm, P.F. Cannon & Crous, C. laticiphilum Damm, P.F. Cannon & Crous, C. melonis Damm, P.F. Cannon & Crous, C

  4. [Complex injuries associated with somnambulism].

    PubMed

    Sillesen, Nanna Hylleholt; Nielsen, Lisa Toft; Bonde, Christian

    2010-12-13

    Up to 3% of adults walk in their sleep and some perform complex behaviours. Treatment recommendations for sleepwalking are inconsistent. This case report describes a 64-year-old man who climbed out of a 2nd floor toilet window during somnambulism. He fell 6-8 meters and fractured the tibia, fibula, cervical columna, lumbal columna, calcaneus, costae and suffered a pneumothorax. Evidence to support sleepwalking treatment is lacking and besides benzodiazepines, prevention is the preferred treatment choice according to the literature. PMID:21156113

  5. Material behavior under complex loading

    SciTech Connect

    Breuer, H.J.; Raule, G.; Rodig, M.

    1984-09-01

    Studies of material behavior under complex loading form a bridge between standard material testing methods and the stress analysis calculations for reactor components at high temperatures. The aim of these studies is to determine the influence of typical load change sequences on material properties, to derive the equations required for stress analyses, to carry out tests under multiaxial conditions, and to investigate the structural deformation mechanisms of creep buckling and ratcheting. The present state of the investigations within the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor materials program is described, with emphasis on the experimental apparatus, the scope of the program, and the initial results obtained.

  6. The Complexity of Explicit Constructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santhanam, Rahul

    The existence of extremal combinatorial objects, such as Ramsey graphs and expanders, is often shown using the probabilistic method. It is folklore that pseudo-random generators can be used to obtain explicit constructions of these objects, if the test that the object is extremal can be implemented in polynomial time. In this talk, we pose several questions geared towards initiating a structural approach to the relationship between extremal combinatorics and computational complexity. One motivation for such an approach is to understand better why circuit lower bounds are hard. Another is to formalize connections between the two areas, so that progress in one leads automatically to progress in the other.

  7. Complexed iron removal from groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Munter, R.; Ojaste, H.; Sutt, J.

    2005-07-01

    The paper demonstrates an intensive work carried out and results obtained on the pilot plant of the City of Kogalym Water Treatment Station (Tjumen, Siberia, Russian Federation) to elaborate on a contemporary nonreagent treatment technology for the local iron-rich groundwater. Several filter materials (Birm, Pyrolox, hydroanthracite, Everzit, granulated activated carbon) and chemical oxidants (ozone, chlorine, hydrogen peroxide, oxygen, and potassium permanganate) were tested to solve the problem with complexed iron removal from groundwater. The final elaborated technology consists of raw water intensive aeration in the gas-degas treatment unit followed by sequential filtration through hydroanthracite and the special anthracite Everzit.

  8. Core percolation on complex networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang-Yu; Csóka, Endre; Zhou, Haijun; Pósfai, Márton

    2012-11-16

    We analytically solve the core percolation problem for complex networks with arbitrary degree distributions. We find that purely scale-free networks have no core for any degree exponents. We show that for undirected networks if core percolation occurs then it is continuous while for directed networks it is discontinuous (and hybrid) if the in- and out-degree distributions differ. We also find that core percolations on undirected and directed networks have completely different critical exponents associated with their critical singularities. PMID:23215509

  9. Computational complexity in entanglement transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitambar, Eric A.

    In physics, systems having three parts are typically much more difficult to analyze than those having just two. Even in classical mechanics, predicting the motion of three interacting celestial bodies remains an insurmountable challenge while the analogous two-body problem has an elementary solution. It is as if just by adding a third party, a fundamental change occurs in the structure of the problem that renders it unsolvable. In this thesis, we demonstrate how such an effect is likewise present in the theory of quantum entanglement. In fact, the complexity differences between two-party and three-party entanglement become quite conspicuous when comparing the difficulty in deciding what state changes are possible for these systems when no additional entanglement is consumed in the transformation process. We examine this entanglement transformation question and its variants in the language of computational complexity theory, a powerful subject that formalizes the concept of problem difficulty. Since deciding feasibility of a specified bipartite transformation is relatively easy, this task belongs to the complexity class P. On the other hand, for tripartite systems, we find the problem to be NP-Hard, meaning that its solution is at least as hard as the solution to some of the most difficult problems humans have encountered. One can then rigorously defend the assertion that a fundamental complexity difference exists between bipartite and tripartite entanglement since unlike the former, the full range of forms realizable by the latter is incalculable (assuming P≠NP). However, similar to the three-body celestial problem, when one examines a special subclass of the problem---invertible transformations on systems having at least one qubit subsystem---we prove that the problem can be solved efficiently. As a hybrid of the two questions, we find that the question of tripartite to bipartite transformations can be solved by an efficient randomized algorithm. Our results are

  10. Addiction Science: Uncovering Neurobiological Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Volkow, N. D.; Baler, R. D.

    2013-01-01

    Until very recently addiction-research was limited by existing tools and strategies that were inadequate for studying the inherent complexity at each of the different phenomenological levels. However, powerful new tools (e.g., optogenetics and designer drug receptors) and high throughput protocols are starting to give researchers the potential to systematically interrogate “all” genes, epigenetic marks, and neuronal circuits. These advances, combined with imaging technologies (both for preclinical and clinical studies) and a paradigm shift towards open access have spurred an unlimited growth of datasets transforming the way we investigate the neurobiology of substance use disorders (SUD) and the factors that modulate risk and resilience. PMID:23688927

  11. Metastable vacua and complex deformations

    SciTech Connect

    Tatar, Radu; Wetenhall, Ben

    2007-12-15

    We use the non-normalizable complex deformations to describe the stringy realizations of the metastable vacua in N=1, SU(N{sub c}) SUSY theories with N{sub f}>N{sub c} massive fundamental flavors. The consideration of the non-normalizable deformations requires a modified toric duality. The new approach considers the tachyon condensation between pairs of wrapped D5 branes and anti-D5 branes and the resulting mixing between some cycles in the geometry. We enlarge the class of metastable vacua to the case of branes-antibranes wrapped on cycles of deformed A{sub n} singularities.

  12. The complex structured singular value

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packard, A.; Doyle, J.

    1993-01-01

    A tutorial introduction to the complex structured singular value (mu) is presented, with an emphasis on the mathematical aspects of mu. The mu-based methods discussed here have been useful for analyzing the performance and robustness properties of linear feedback systems. Several tests for robust stability and performance with computable bounds for transfer functions and their state space realizations are compared, and a simple synthesis problem is studied. Uncertain systems are represented using linear fractional transformations which naturally unify the frequency-domain and state space methods.

  13. Wealth distribution on complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichinomiya, Takashi

    2012-12-01

    We study the wealth distribution of the Bouchaud-Mézard model on complex networks. It is known from numerical simulations that this distribution depends on the topology of the network; however, no one has succeeded in explaining it. Using “adiabatic” and “independent” assumptions along with the central-limit theorem, we derive equations that determine the probability distribution function. The results are compared to those of simulations for various networks. We find good agreement between our theory and the simulations, except for the case of Watts-Strogatz networks with a low rewiring rate due to the breakdown of independent assumption.

  14. The relationship between complexity (taxonomy) and difficulty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yih Tyng; Othman, Abdul Rahman

    2013-04-01

    Difficulty and complexity are important factors that occur in every test questions. These two factors will also affect the reliability of the test. Hence, difficulty and complexity must be considered by educators during preparation of the test questions. The relationship between difficulty and complexity is studied. Complexity is defined as the level in Bloom's Taxonomy. Difficulty is represented by the proportion of students scoring between specific score intervals. A chi-square test of independence between difficulty and complexity was conducted on the results of a continuous assessment of a third year undergraduate course, Probability Theory. The independence test showed that the difficulty and complexity are related. However, this relationship is small.

  15. Antitumor effect of arabinogalactan and platinum complex.

    PubMed

    Starkov, A K; Zamay, T N; Savchenko, A A; Ingevatkin, E V; Titova, N M; Kolovskaya, O S; Luzan, N A; Silkin, P P; Kuznetsova, S A

    2016-03-01

    The article presents the results of investigation of antitumor properties of platinum-arabinogalactan complex. We showed the ability of the complex to inhibit the growth of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells. It is found that the distribution of the platinum-arabinogalactan complex is not specific only for tumor cells in mice. The complex was found in all tissues and organs examined (ascites cells, embryonic cells, kidney, and liver). The mechanism of action of the arabinogalactan-platinum complex may be similar to cisplatin as the complex is able to accumulate in tumor cells. PMID:27193706

  16. Low-Oscillation Complex Wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ADDISON, P. S.; WATSON, J. N.; FENG, T.

    2002-07-01

    In this paper we explore the use of two low-oscillation complex wavelets—Mexican hat and Morlet—as powerful feature detection tools for data analysis. These wavelets, which have been largely ignored to date in the scientific literature, allow for a decomposition which is more “temporal than spectral” in wavelet space. This is shown to be useful for the detection of small amplitude, short duration signal features which are masked by much larger fluctuations. Wavelet transform-based methods employing these wavelets (based on both wavelet ridges and modulus maxima) are developed and applied to sonic echo NDT signals used for the analysis of structural elements. A new mobility scalogram and associated reflectogram is defined for analysis of impulse response characteristics of structural elements and a novel signal compression technique is described in which the pertinent signal information is contained within a few modulus maxima coefficients. As an example of its usefulness, the signal compression method is employed as a pre-processor for a neural network classifier. The authors believe that low oscillation complex wavelets have wide applicability to other practical signal analysis problems. Their possible application to two such problems is discussed briefly—the interrogation of arrhythmic ECG signals and the detection and characterization of coherent structures in turbulent flow fields.

  17. Organometallic neptunium(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Dutkiewicz, Michał S; Farnaby, Joy H; Apostolidis, Christos; Colineau, Eric; Walter, Olaf; Magnani, Nicola; Gardiner, Michael G; Love, Jason B; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Caciuffo, Roberto; Arnold, Polly L

    2016-08-01

    Studies of transuranic organometallic complexes provide a particularly valuable insight into covalent contributions to the metal-ligand bonding, in which the subtle differences between the transuranium actinide ions and their lighter lanthanide counterparts are of fundamental importance for the effective remediation of nuclear waste. Unlike the organometallic chemistry of uranium, which has focused strongly on U(III) and has seen some spectacular advances, that of the transuranics is significantly technically more challenging and has remained dormant. In the case of neptunium, it is limited mainly to Np(IV). Here we report the synthesis of three new Np(III) organometallic compounds and the characterization of their molecular and electronic structures. These studies suggest that Np(III) complexes could act as single-molecule magnets, and that the lower oxidation state of Np(II) is chemically accessible. In comparison with lanthanide analogues, significant d- and f-electron contributions to key Np(III) orbitals are observed, which shows that fundamental neptunium organometallic chemistry can provide new insights into the behaviour of f-elements. PMID:27442286

  18. Organometallic neptunium(III) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutkiewicz, Michał S.; Farnaby, Joy H.; Apostolidis, Christos; Colineau, Eric; Walter, Olaf; Magnani, Nicola; Gardiner, Michael G.; Love, Jason B.; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Caciuffo, Roberto; Arnold, Polly L.

    2016-08-01

    Studies of transuranic organometallic complexes provide a particularly valuable insight into covalent contributions to the metal–ligand bonding, in which the subtle differences between the transuranium actinide ions and their lighter lanthanide counterparts are of fundamental importance for the effective remediation of nuclear waste. Unlike the organometallic chemistry of uranium, which has focused strongly on UIII and has seen some spectacular advances, that of the transuranics is significantly technically more challenging and has remained dormant. In the case of neptunium, it is limited mainly to NpIV. Here we report the synthesis of three new NpIII organometallic compounds and the characterization of their molecular and electronic structures. These studies suggest that NpIII complexes could act as single-molecule magnets, and that the lower oxidation state of NpII is chemically accessible. In comparison with lanthanide analogues, significant d- and f-electron contributions to key NpIII orbitals are observed, which shows that fundamental neptunium organometallic chemistry can provide new insights into the behaviour of f-elements.

  19. Efficient Analysis of Complex Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapania, Rakesh K.

    2000-01-01

    Last various accomplishments achieved during this project are : (1) A Survey of Neural Network (NN) applications using MATLAB NN Toolbox on structural engineering especially on equivalent continuum models (Appendix A). (2) Application of NN and GAs to simulate and synthesize substructures: 1-D and 2-D beam problems (Appendix B). (3) Development of an equivalent plate-model analysis method (EPA) for static and vibration analysis of general trapezoidal built-up wing structures composed of skins, spars and ribs. Calculation of all sorts of test cases and comparison with measurements or FEA results. (Appendix C). (4) Basic work on using second order sensitivities on simulating wing modal response, discussion of sensitivity evaluation approaches, and some results (Appendix D). (5) Establishing a general methodology of simulating the modal responses by direct application of NN and by sensitivity techniques, in a design space composed of a number of design points. Comparison is made through examples using these two methods (Appendix E). (6) Establishing a general methodology of efficient analysis of complex wing structures by indirect application of NN: the NN-aided Equivalent Plate Analysis. Training of the Neural Networks for this purpose in several cases of design spaces, which can be applicable for actual design of complex wings (Appendix F).

  20. Alpine Corsica Metamorphic Core Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, Marc; Jolivet, Laurent; Goffé, Bruno; Dubois, Roland

    1991-12-01

    Alpine Corsica is an example where superficial nonmetamorphic allochtonous units rest upon a highly strained metamorphic complex. Early ductile deformation under high pressure-low temperature (HP-LT) conditions is due to the westward thrusting of oceanic material onto a continental basement as shown by previous studies. New thermobarometric estimates yield minimal peak HP-LT metamorphism conditions of 11 kbar at 400°C. The early deformation is overprinted by a ductile deformation with an eastward sense of shear postdating or contemporaneous with mineral recrystallizations in the greenschist facies conditions. Early compressive thrust contacts are reworked as east dipping ductile normal faults and the less competent units display only eastward shear criteria. The upper units are affected by an extensional brittle deformation, and east dipping brittle normal faults bound to the west the early to middle Miocene Saint-Florent half-graben. The greenschist metamorphic event lasted until 33 Ma, which is contemporaneous with the beginning of the extension in the Liguro-Provençal basin. We interpret the second deformation stage as the result of a ductile extension following the overthickening of the crust due to the westward thrusting. Extension reduces the thickness of the crust so that upper units free from early P-T conditions are brought into close contact with a HP-LT metamorphic core complex. The geometry of the late extension is controlled by that of the early compressive thrust.

  1. Robustness Elasticity in Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Matisziw, Timothy C.; Grubesic, Tony H.; Guo, Junyu

    2012-01-01

    Network robustness refers to a network’s resilience to stress or damage. Given that most networks are inherently dynamic, with changing topology, loads, and operational states, their robustness is also likely subject to change. However, in most analyses of network structure, it is assumed that interaction among nodes has no effect on robustness. To investigate the hypothesis that network robustness is not sensitive or elastic to the level of interaction (or flow) among network nodes, this paper explores the impacts of network disruption, namely arc deletion, over a temporal sequence of observed nodal interactions for a large Internet backbone system. In particular, a mathematical programming approach is used to identify exact bounds on robustness to arc deletion for each epoch of nodal interaction. Elasticity of the identified bounds relative to the magnitude of arc deletion is assessed. Results indicate that system robustness can be highly elastic to spatial and temporal variations in nodal interactions within complex systems. Further, the presence of this elasticity provides evidence that a failure to account for nodal interaction can confound characterizations of complex networked systems. PMID:22808060

  2. Algorithms, complexity, and the sciences

    PubMed Central

    Papadimitriou, Christos

    2014-01-01

    Algorithms, perhaps together with Moore’s law, compose the engine of the information technology revolution, whereas complexity—the antithesis of algorithms—is one of the deepest realms of mathematical investigation. After introducing the basic concepts of algorithms and complexity, and the fundamental complexity classes P (polynomial time) and NP (nondeterministic polynomial time, or search problems), we discuss briefly the P vs. NP problem. We then focus on certain classes between P and NP which capture important phenomena in the social and life sciences, namely the Nash equlibrium and other equilibria in economics and game theory, and certain processes in population genetics and evolution. Finally, an algorithm known as multiplicative weights update (MWU) provides an algorithmic interpretation of the evolution of allele frequencies in a population under sex and weak selection. All three of these equivalences are rife with domain-specific implications: The concept of Nash equilibrium may be less universal—and therefore less compelling—than has been presumed; selection on gene interactions may entail the maintenance of genetic variation for longer periods than selection on single alleles predicts; whereas MWU can be shown to maximize, for each gene, a convex combination of the gene’s cumulative fitness in the population and the entropy of the allele distribution, an insight that may be pertinent to the maintenance of variation in evolution. PMID:25349382

  3. Control efficacy of complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xin-Dong; Wang, Wen-Xu; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Controlling complex networks has become a forefront research area in network science and engineering. Recent efforts have led to theoretical frameworks of controllability to fully control a network through steering a minimum set of driver nodes. However, in realistic situations not every node is accessible or can be externally driven, raising the fundamental issue of control efficacy: if driving signals are applied to an arbitrary subset of nodes, how many other nodes can be controlled? We develop a framework to determine the control efficacy for undirected networks of arbitrary topology. Mathematically, based on non-singular transformation, we prove a theorem to determine rigorously the control efficacy of the network and to identify the nodes that can be controlled for any given driver nodes. Physically, we develop the picture of diffusion that views the control process as a signal diffused from input signals to the set of controllable nodes. The combination of mathematical theory and physical reasoning allows us not only to determine the control efficacy for model complex networks and a large number of empirical networks, but also to uncover phenomena in network control, e.g., hub nodes in general possess lower control centrality than an average node in undirected networks. PMID:27324438

  4. Programs Automate Complex Operations Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center, just off the east coast of Florida on Merritt Island, has been the starting place of every human space flight in NASA s history. It is where the first Americans left Earth during Project Mercury, the terrestrial departure point of the lunar-bound Apollo astronauts, as well as the last solid ground many astronauts step foot on before beginning their long stays aboard the International Space Station. It will also be the starting point for future NASA missions to the Moon and Mars and temporary host of the new Ares series rockets designed to take us there. Since the first days of the early NASA missions, in order to keep up with the demands of the intricate and critical Space Program, the launch complex - host to the large Vehicle Assembly Building, two launch pads, and myriad support facilities - has grown increasingly complex to accommodate the sophisticated technologies needed to manage today s space missions. To handle the complicated launch coordination safely, NASA found ways to automate mission-critical applications, resulting in streamlined decision-making. One of these methods, management software called the Control Monitor Unit (CMU), created in conjunction with McDonnell Douglas Space & Defense Systems, has since left NASA, and is finding its way into additional applications.

  5. Control efficacy of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xin-Dong; Wang, Wen-Xu; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2016-06-01

    Controlling complex networks has become a forefront research area in network science and engineering. Recent efforts have led to theoretical frameworks of controllability to fully control a network through steering a minimum set of driver nodes. However, in realistic situations not every node is accessible or can be externally driven, raising the fundamental issue of control efficacy: if driving signals are applied to an arbitrary subset of nodes, how many other nodes can be controlled? We develop a framework to determine the control efficacy for undirected networks of arbitrary topology. Mathematically, based on non-singular transformation, we prove a theorem to determine rigorously the control efficacy of the network and to identify the nodes that can be controlled for any given driver nodes. Physically, we develop the picture of diffusion that views the control process as a signal diffused from input signals to the set of controllable nodes. The combination of mathematical theory and physical reasoning allows us not only to determine the control efficacy for model complex networks and a large number of empirical networks, but also to uncover phenomena in network control, e.g., hub nodes in general possess lower control centrality than an average node in undirected networks.

  6. Control efficacy of complex networks.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xin-Dong; Wang, Wen-Xu; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Controlling complex networks has become a forefront research area in network science and engineering. Recent efforts have led to theoretical frameworks of controllability to fully control a network through steering a minimum set of driver nodes. However, in realistic situations not every node is accessible or can be externally driven, raising the fundamental issue of control efficacy: if driving signals are applied to an arbitrary subset of nodes, how many other nodes can be controlled? We develop a framework to determine the control efficacy for undirected networks of arbitrary topology. Mathematically, based on non-singular transformation, we prove a theorem to determine rigorously the control efficacy of the network and to identify the nodes that can be controlled for any given driver nodes. Physically, we develop the picture of diffusion that views the control process as a signal diffused from input signals to the set of controllable nodes. The combination of mathematical theory and physical reasoning allows us not only to determine the control efficacy for model complex networks and a large number of empirical networks, but also to uncover phenomena in network control, e.g., hub nodes in general possess lower control centrality than an average node in undirected networks. PMID:27324438

  7. Glycosyltransferase complexes improve glycolipid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Spessott, Waldo; Crespo, Pilar M; Daniotti, José Luis; Maccioni, Hugo J F

    2012-07-30

    The synthesis of gangliosides GM3 and GD3 is carried out by the successive addition of sialic acid residues on lactosylceramide (LacCer) by the Golgi located sialyltransferases Sial-T1 and Sial-T2, respectively. CHO-K1 cells lack Sial-T2 and only express GM3. Here we show that the activity of Sial-T1 was near 2.5-fold higher in homogenates of CHO-K1 cells transfected to express Sial-T2 (CHO-K1(Sial-T2)) than in untransfected cells. The appearance of Sial-T1 enzyme or gene transcription activators or the stabilization of the Sial-T1 protein were discarded as possible causes of the activation. Sial-T2 lacking the catalytic domain failed to promote Sial-T1 activation. Since Gal-T1, Sial-T1 and Sial-T2 form a multienzyme complex, we propose that transformation of formed GM3 into GD3 and GT3 by Sial-T2 in the complex leaves Sial-T1 unoccupied, enabled for new rounds of LacCer utilization, which results in its apparent activation. PMID:22687240

  8. Atmospheric processes over complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banta, Robert M.; Berri, G.; Blumen, William; Carruthers, David J.; Dalu, G. A.; Durran, Dale R.; Egger, Joseph; Garratt, J. R.; Hanna, Steven R.; Hunt, J. C. R.

    1990-06-01

    A workshop on atmospheric processes over complex terrain, sponsored by the American Meteorological Society, was convened in Park City, Utah from 24 vto 28 October 1988. The overall objective of the workshop was one of interaction and synthesis--interaction among atmospheric scientists carrying out research on a variety of orographic flow problems, and a synthesis of their results and points of view into an assessment of the current status of topical research problems. The final day of the workshop was devoted to an open discussion on the research directions that could be anticipated in the next decade because of new and planned instrumentation and observational networks, the recent emphasis on development of mesoscale numerical models, and continual theoretical investigations of thermally forced flows, orographic waves, and stratified turbulence. This monograph represents an outgrowth of the Park City Workshop. The authors have contributed chapters based on their lecture material. Workshop discussions indicated interest in both the remote sensing and predictability of orographic flows. These chapters were solicited following the workshop in order to provide a more balanced view of current progress and future directions in research on atmospheric processes over complex terrain.

  9. Hydrogen storage via polyhydride complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, C.M.; Zidan, R.A.

    1998-08-01

    The reversible dehydrogenation of NaAlH{sub 4} is catalyzed in toluene slurries of the NaAlH{sub 4} containing the pincer complex, IrH{sub 4} {l_brace}C{sub 6}H{sub 3}-2,6-(CH{sub 2}PBu{sup t}{sub 2}){sub 2}{r_brace}. The rates of the pincer complex catalyzed dehydrogenation are about five times greater those previously found for NaAlH{sub 4} that was doped with titanium through a wet chemistry method. Homogenization of NaAlH{sub 4} with 2 mole % Ti(OBu{sup n}){sub 4} under an atmosphere of argon produces a novel titanium containing material. TPD measurements show that the dehydrogenation of this material occurs about 30 C lower than that previously found for wet titanium doped NaAlH{sub 4}. In further contrast to wet doped NaAlH{sub 4}, the dehydrogenation kinetics and hydrogen capacity of the novel material are undiminished over several dehydriding/hydriding cycles. Rehydrogenation of the titanium doped material occurs readily at 170 C under 150 atm of hydrogen. TPD measurements show that about 80% of the original hydrogen content (4.2 wt%) can be restored under these conditions.

  10. Statistical mechanics of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waclaw, B.

    2007-04-01

    The science of complex networks is a new interdisciplinary branch of science which has arisen recently on the interface of physics, biology, social and computer sciences, and others. Its main goal is to discover general laws governing the creation and growth as well as processes taking place on networks, like e.g. the Internet, transportation or neural networks. It turned out that most real-world networks cannot be simply reduced to a compound of some individual components. Fortunately, the statistical mechanics, being one of pillars of modern physics, provides us with a very powerful set of tools and methods for describing and understanding these systems. In this thesis, we would like to present a consistent approach to complex networks based on statistical mechanics, with the central role played by the concept of statistical ensemble of networks. We show how to construct such a theory and present some practical problems where it can be applied. Among them, we pay attention to the problem of finite-size corrections and the dynamics of a simple model of mass transport on networks.

  11. Minimum complexity echo state network.

    PubMed

    Rodan, Ali; Tino, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Reservoir computing (RC) refers to a new class of state-space models with a fixed state transition structure (the reservoir) and an adaptable readout form the state space. The reservoir is supposed to be sufficiently complex so as to capture a large number of features of the input stream that can be exploited by the reservoir-to-output readout mapping. The field of RC has been growing rapidly with many successful applications. However, RC has been criticized for not being principled enough. Reservoir construction is largely driven by a series of randomized model-building stages, with both researchers and practitioners having to rely on a series of trials and errors. To initialize a systematic study of the field, we concentrate on one of the most popular classes of RC methods, namely echo state network, and ask: What is the minimal complexity of reservoir construction for obtaining competitive models and what is the memory capacity (MC) of such simplified reservoirs? On a number of widely used time series benchmarks of different origin and characteristics, as well as by conducting a theoretical analysis we show that a simple deterministically constructed cycle reservoir is comparable to the standard echo state network methodology. The (short-term) MC of linear cyclic reservoirs can be made arbitrarily close to the proved optimal value. PMID:21075721

  12. Les Granites des Complexes Annulaires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowden, Peter

    This book, Manual and Methods 4, published by France's BRGM, together with a mouthwatering preface by R. Black promises much for the student of ring complexes. It consists of four distinct chapters, each divided into a number of subsections, with 52 text figures and 9 tables. Although in reality it is based on a doctoral dissertation concerned with the newly discovered ring structures in Corsica, it is spiced with references to past and present research in Nigeria, and observations from French expeditions to the Kerguelen Islands. There are also brief commentaries on the author's observations in New Hampshire and Massachusetts. The text effectively represents a distillation of knowledge concerned with oversaturated alkaline magmatism in continental and oceanic settings. The book has a good bibliography with English-language scientific literature references up to 1980. While aware that ring-complex compositions can be variable, ranging from calc-alkaline to alkaline, the author restricts his writings to granitic and related rocks of the alkaline and peralkaline spectrum.

  13. Getting a Grip on Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Yan; Viola, Cristina; Bieniossek, Christoph; Trowitzsch, Simon; Vijay-achandran, Lakshmi Sumitra; Chaillet, Maxime; Garzoni, Frederic; Berger, Imre

    2009-01-01

    We are witnessing tremendous advances in our understanding of the organization of life. Complete genomes are being deciphered with ever increasing speed and accuracy, thereby setting the stage for addressing the entire gene product repertoire of cells, towards understanding whole biological systems. Advances in bioinformatics and mass spectrometric techniques have revealed the multitude of interactions present in the proteome. Multiprotein complexes are emerging as a paramount cornerstone of biological activity, as many proteins appear to participate, stably or transiently, in large multisubunit assemblies. Analysis of the architecture of these assemblies and their manifold interactions is imperative for understanding their function at the molecular level. Structural genomics efforts have fostered the development of many technologies towards achieving the throughput required for studying system-wide single proteins and small interaction motifs at high resolution. The present shift in focus towards large multiprotein complexes, in particular in eukaryotes, now calls for a likewise concerted effort to develop and provide new technologies that are urgently required to produce in quality and quantity the plethora of multiprotein assemblies that form the complexome, and to routinely study their structure and function at the molecular level. Current efforts towards this objective are summarized and reviewed in this contribution. PMID:20514218

  14. Complex Networks and Socioeconomic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almendral, Juan A.; López, Luis; Mendes, Jose F.; Sanjuán, Miguel A. F.

    2003-04-01

    The study and characterization of complex systems is a fruitful research area nowadays. Special attention has been paid recently to complex networks, where graph and network analysis plays an important role since they reduce a given system to a simpler problem. Using a simple model for the information flow on social networks, we show that the traditional hierarchical topologies frequently used by companies and organizations, are poorly designed in terms of efficiency. Moreover, we prove that this type of structures are the result of the individual aim of monopolizing as much information as possible within the network. As the information is an appropriate measurement of centrality, we conclude that this kind of topology is so attractive for leaders because the global influence each actor has within the network is completely determined by the hierarchical level occupied. The effect on the efficiency caused by a change in a traditional hierarchical topology is also analyzed. In particular, by introducing the possibility of communication on the same level of the hierarchy.

  15. Complex Networks and Critical Infrastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setola, Roberto; de Porcellinis, Stefano

    The term “Critical Infrastructures” indicates all those technological infrastructures such as: electric grids, telecommunication networks, railways, healthcare systems, financial circuits, etc. that are more and more relevant for the welfare of our countries. Each one of these infrastructures is a complex, highly non-linear, geographically dispersed cluster of systems, that interact with their human owners, operators, users and with the other infrastructures. Their augmented relevance and the actual political and technological scenarios, which have increased their exposition to accidental failure and deliberate attacks, demand for different and innovative protection strategies (generally indicate as CIP - Critical Infrastructure Protection). To this end it is mandatory to understand the mechanisms that regulate the dynamic of these infrastructures. In this framework, an interesting approach is those provided by the complex networks. In this paper we illustrate some results achieved considering structural and functional properties of the corresponding topological networks both when each infrastructure is assumed as an autonomous system and when we take into account also the dependencies existing among the different infrastructures.

  16. Learning to live with complexity.

    PubMed

    Sargut, Gökçe; McGrath, Rita Gunther

    2011-09-01

    Business life has always featured the unpredictable, the surprising, and the unexpected. But in today's hyperconnected world, complexity is the norm. Systems that used to be separate are now intertwined and interdependent, and knowing the starting conditions is no guide to predicting outcomes; too many continuously changing interactive elements are in play. Managers looking to navigate these difficulties need to adopt new approaches. They should drop outmoded forecasting tools-for example, ones that rely on averages, which are often less important than outliers. Instead, they should use models that simulate the behavior of the system. They should also make sure that their data include a good amount of future-oriented information. Risk mitigation is crucial as well. Managers should minimize the need to rely on predictions-for instance, they can give users a say in product design. They can decouple elements in a system and build in redundancy to minimize the consequences of a partial system failure, and turn to outside partners to extend their own company's capabilities. They can complement hard analysis with "soft" methods such as storytelling to make potentially important future possibilities more real. And they can make trade-offs that keep early failures small and provide the diversity of thought needed in a nimble organization faced with complexity on virtually every front. PMID:21939129

  17. Semiotics of constructed complex systems

    SciTech Connect

    Landauer, C.; Bellman, K.L.

    1996-12-31

    The scope of this paper is limited to software and other constructed complex systems mediated or integrated by software. Our research program studies foundational issues that we believe will help us develop a theoretically sound approach to constructing complex systems. There have really been only two theoretical approaches that have helped us understand and develop computational systems: mathematics and linguistics. We show how semiotics can also play a role, whether we think of it as part of these other theories or as subsuming one or both of them. We describe our notion of {open_quotes}computational semiotics{close_quotes}, which we define to be the study of computational methods of dealing with symbols, show how such a theory might be formed, and describe what we might get from it in terms of more interesting use of symbols by computing systems. This research was supported in part by the Federal Highway Administration`s Office of Advanced Research and by the Advanced Research Projects Agency`s Software and Intelligent Systems Technology Office.

  18. COG complexes form spatial landmarks for distinct SNARE complexes

    PubMed Central

    Willett, Rose; Kudlyk, Tetyana; Pokrovskaya, Irina; Schönherr, Robert; Ungar, Daniel; Duden, Rainer; Lupashin, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Vesicular tethers and SNAREs are two key protein components of the intracellular membrane trafficking machinery. The COG (conserved oligomeric Golgi) complex has been implicated in the tethering of retrograde intra-Golgi vesicles. Here, using yeast two hybrid and co-immunoprecipitation approaches, we show that three COG subunits, namely COG4, 6, and 8, are capable of interacting with defined Golgi SNAREs, namely STX5, STX6, STX16, GS27, and SNAP29. Comparative analysis of COG8-STX16 and COG4-STX5 interactions by a COG-based mitochondrial re-localization assay reveals that the COG8 and COG4 proteins initiate the formation of two different tethering platforms that can facilitate the redirection of two populations of Golgi transport intermediates to the mitochondrial vicinity. Our results uncover a role for COG subcomplexes in defining the specificity of vesicular sorting within the Golgi. PMID:23462996

  19. Complex Dynamic Development of Poliovirus Membranous Replication Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Vinod; Hansen, Bryan T.; Hoyt, Forrest H.; Fischer, Elizabeth R.; Ehrenfeld, Ellie

    2012-01-01

    Replication of all positive-strand RNA viruses is intimately associated with membranes. Here we utilize electron tomography and other methods to investigate the remodeling of membranes in poliovirus-infected cells. We found that the viral replication structures previously described as “vesicles” are in fact convoluted, branching chambers with complex and dynamic morphology. They are likely to originate from cis-Golgi membranes and are represented during the early stages of infection by single-walled connecting and branching tubular compartments. These early viral organelles gradually transform into double-membrane structures by extension of membranous walls and/or collapsing of the luminal cavity of the single-membrane structures. As the double-membrane regions develop, they enclose cytoplasmic material. At this stage, a continuous membranous structure may have double- and single-walled membrane morphology at adjacent cross-sections. In the late stages of the replication cycle, the structures are represented mostly by double-membrane vesicles. Viral replication proteins, double-stranded RNA species, and actively replicating RNA are associated with both double- and single-membrane structures. However, the exponential phase of viral RNA synthesis occurs when single-membrane formations are predominant in the cell. It has been shown previously that replication complexes of some other positive-strand RNA viruses form on membrane invaginations, which result from negative membrane curvature. Our data show that the remodeling of cellular membranes in poliovirus-infected cells produces structures with positive curvature of membranes. Thus, it is likely that there is a fundamental divergence in the requirements for the supporting cellular membrane-shaping machinery among different groups of positive-strand RNA viruses. PMID:22072780

  20. Recent results on complex Cartan spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldea, Nicoleta; Munteanu, Gheorghe

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we first provide an updated survey of the geometry of complex Cartan spaces. New characterizations for some particular classes of complex Cartan spaces are pointed out, e.g. Landsberg-Cartan, strongly Berwald-Cartan and others. We introduce the Cartan-Randers spaces which offer examples of Berwald-Cartan and strongly Berwald-Cartan spaces. Then, we investigate the complex geodesic curves of a complex Cartan space, using the image by Legendre transformation (L-duality) of complex geodesic curves of a complex Finsler space. Assuming the weakly Kähler condition for a complex Cartan space, we establish that its complex geodesic curves derive from Hamilton-Jacobi equations. Also, by L-duality, we introduce the corespondent notion of the projectively related complex Finsler metrics, on the complex Cartan spaces. Various descriptions of the projectively related complex Cartan metrics are given. As applications, the projectiveness of a complex Cartan-Randers metric and the locally projectively flat complex Cartan metrics are analyzed.

  1. Complex and liquid hydrides for energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callini, Elsa; Atakli, Zuleyha Özlem Kocabas; Hauback, Bjørn C.; Orimo, Shin-ichi; Jensen, Craig; Dornheim, Martin; Grant, David; Cho, Young Whan; Chen, Ping; Hjörvarsson, Bjørgvin; de Jongh, Petra; Weidenthaler, Claudia; Baricco, Marcello; Paskevicius, Mark; Jensen, Torben R.; Bowden, Mark E.; Autrey, Thomas S.; Züttel, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The research on complex hydrides for hydrogen storage was initiated by the discovery of Ti as a hydrogen sorption catalyst in NaAlH4 by Boris Bogdanovic in 1996. A large number of new complex hydride materials in various forms and combinations have been synthesized and characterized, and the knowledge regarding the properties of complex hydrides and the synthesis methods has grown enormously since then. A significant portion of the research groups active in the field of complex hydrides is collaborators in the International Energy Agreement Task 32. This paper reports about the important issues in the field of complex hydride research, i.e. the synthesis of borohydrides, the thermodynamics of complex hydrides, the effects of size and confinement, the hydrogen sorption mechanism and the complex hydride composites as well as the properties of liquid complex hydrides. This paper is the result of the collaboration of several groups and is an excellent summary of the recent achievements.

  2. Functionalized active-nucleus complex sensor

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Wemmer, David E.; Spence, Megan; Rubin, Seth

    2003-11-25

    A functionalized active-nucleus complex sensor that selectively associates with one or more target species, and a method for assaying and screening for one or a plurality of target species utilizing one or a plurality of functionalized active-nucleus complexes with at least two of the functionalized active-nucleus complexes having an attraction affinity to different corresponding target species. The functionalized active-nucleus complex has an active-nucleus and a targeting carrier. The method involves functionalizing an active-nucleus, for each functionalized active-nucleus complex, by incorporating the active-nucleus into a macromolucular or molecular complex that is capable of binding one of the target species and then bringing the macromolecular or molecular complexes into contact with the target species and detecting the occurrence of or change in a nuclear magnetic resonance signal from each of the active-nuclei in each of the functionalized active-nucleus complexes.

  3. A physical interpretation of hydrologic model complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moayeri, MohamadMehdi; Pande, Saket

    2015-04-01

    It is intuitive that instability of hydrological system representation, in the sense of how perturbations in input forcings translate into perturbation in a hydrologic response, may depend on its hydrological characteristics. Responses of unstable systems are thus complex to model. We interpret complexity in this context and define complexity as a measure of instability in hydrological system representation. We provide algorithms to quantify model complexity in this context. We use Sacramento soil moisture accounting model (SAC-SMA) parameterized for MOPEX basins and quantify complexities of corresponding models. Relationships between hydrologic characteristics of MOPEX basins such as location, precipitation seasonality index, slope, hydrologic ratios, saturated hydraulic conductivity and NDVI and respective model complexities are then investigated. We hypothesize that complexities of basin specific SAC-SMA models correspond to aforementioned hydrologic characteristics, thereby suggesting that model complexity, in the context presented here, may have a physical interpretation.

  4. Complex oxides useful for thermoelectric energy conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, Arunava; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy; Yu, Choongho; Scullin, Matthew L.; Huijben, Mark

    2012-07-17

    The invention provides for a thermoelectric system comprising a substrate comprising a first complex oxide, wherein the substrate is optionally embedded with a second complex oxide. The thermoelectric system can be used for thermoelectric power generation or thermoelectric cooling.

  5. Clinical leadership effectiveness, change and complexity.

    PubMed

    McKimm, Judy; Till, Alex

    2015-04-01

    This article explores how an understanding of approaches to leading and managing change and complexity science can help clinical leaders engage with and manage change in complex environments and systems more effectively. PMID:25853356

  6. The Colletotrichum boninense species complex

    PubMed Central

    Damm, U.; Cannon, P.F.; Woudenberg, J.H.C.; Johnston, P.R.; Weir, B.S.; Tan, Y.P.; Shivas, R.G.; Crous, P.W.

    2012-01-01

    Although only recently described, Colletotrichum boninense is well established in literature as an anthracnose pathogen or endophyte of a diverse range of host plants worldwide. It is especially prominent on members of Amaryllidaceae, Orchidaceae, Proteaceae and Solanaceae. Reports from literature and preliminary studies using ITS sequence data indicated that C. boninense represents a species complex. A multilocus molecular phylogenetic analysis (ITS, ACT, TUB2, CHS-1, GAPDH, HIS3, CAL) of 86 strains previously identified as C. boninense and other related strains revealed 18 clades. These clades are recognised here as separate species, including C. boninense s. str., C. hippeastri, C. karstii and 12 previously undescribed species, C. annellatum, C. beeveri, C. brassicicola, C. brasiliense, C. colombiense, C. constrictum, C. cymbidiicola, C. dacrycarpi, C. novae-zelandiae, C. oncidii, C. parsonsiae and C. torulosum. Seven of the new species are only known from New Zealand, perhaps reflecting a sampling bias. The new combination C. phyllanthi was made, and C. dracaenae Petch was epitypified and the name replaced with C. petchii. Typical for species of the C. boninense species complex are the conidiogenous cells with rather prominent periclinal thickening that also sometimes extend to form a new conidiogenous locus or annellations as well as conidia that have a prominent basal scar. Many species in the C. boninense complex form teleomorphs in culture. Taxonomic novelties: New combination - Colletotrichum phyllanthi (H. Surendranath Pai) Damm, P.F. Cannon & Crous. Name replacement - C. petchii Damm, P.F. Cannon & Crous. New species - C. annellatum Damm, P.F. Cannon & Crous, C. beeveri Damm, P.F. Cannon, Crous, P.R. Johnst. & B. Weir, C. brassicicola Damm, P.F. Cannon & Crous, C. brasiliense Damm, P.F. Cannon, Crous & Massola, C. colombiense Damm, P.F. Cannon, Crous, C. constrictum Damm, P.F. Cannon, Crous, P.R. Johnst. & B. Weir, C. cymbidiicola Damm, P.F. Cannon

  7. Combinatorial Laplacian and entropy of simplicial complexes associated with complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maletić, S.; Rajković, M.

    2012-09-01

    Simplicial complexes represent useful and accurate models of complex networks and complex systems in general. We explore the properties of spectra of combinatorial Laplacian operator of simplicial complexes and show its relationship with connectivity properties of the Q-vector and with connectivities of cliques in the simplicial clique complex. We demonstrate the need for higher order analysis in complex networks and compare the results with ordinary graph spectra. Methods and results are obtained using social network of the Zachary karate club.

  8. Modification in band gap of zirconium complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Mayank; Singh, J.; Chouhan, S.; Mishra, A.; Shrivastava, B. D.

    2016-05-01

    The optical properties of zirconium complexes with amino acid based Schiff bases are reported here. The zirconium complexes show interesting stereo chemical features, which are applicable in organometallic and organic synthesis as well as in catalysis. The band gaps of both Schiff bases and zirconium complexes were obtained by UV-Visible spectroscopy. It was found that the band gap of zirconium complexes has been modified after adding zirconium compound to the Schiff bases.

  9. Complexity and synchronization in stochastic chaotic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son Dang, Thai; Palit, Sanjay Kumar; Mukherjee, Sayan; Hoang, Thang Manh; Banerjee, Santo

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the complexity of a hyperchaotic dynamical system perturbed by noise and various nonlinear speech and music signals. The complexity is measured by the weighted recurrence entropy of the hyperchaotic and stochastic systems. The synchronization phenomenon between two stochastic systems with complex coupling is also investigated. These criteria are tested on chaotic and perturbed systems by mean conditional recurrence and normalized synchronization error. Numerical results including surface plots, normalized synchronization errors, complexity variations etc show the effectiveness of the proposed analysis.

  10. Approximation by fully complex multilayer perceptrons.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taehwan; Adali, Tülay

    2003-07-01

    We investigate the approximation ability of a multilayer perceptron (MLP) network when it is extended to the complex domain. The main challenge for processing complex data with neural networks has been the lack of bounded and analytic complex nonlinear activation functions in the complex domain, as stated by Liouville's theorem. To avoid the conflict between the boundedness and the analyticity of a nonlinear complex function in the complex domain, a number of ad hoc MLPs that include using two real-valued MLPs, one processing the real part and the other processing the imaginary part, have been traditionally employed. However, since nonanalytic functions do not meet the Cauchy-Riemann conditions, they render themselves into degenerative backpropagation algorithms that compromise the efficiency of nonlinear approximation and learning in the complex vector field. A number of elementary transcendental functions (ETFs) derivable from the entire exponential function e(z) that are analytic are defined as fully complex activation functions and are shown to provide a parsimonious structure for processing data in the complex domain and address most of the shortcomings of the traditional approach. The introduction of ETFs, however, raises a new question in the approximation capability of this fully complex MLP. In this letter, three proofs of the approximation capability of the fully complex MLP are provided based on the characteristics of singularity among ETFs. First, the fully complex MLPs with continuous ETFs over a compact set in the complex vector field are shown to be the universal approximator of any continuous complex mappings. The complex universal approximation theorem extends to bounded measurable ETFs possessing a removable singularity. Finally, it is shown that the output of complex MLPs using ETFs with isolated and essential singularities uniformly converges to any nonlinear mapping in the deleted annulus of singularity nearest to the origin. PMID:12816570

  11. Genre Complexes in Popular Music

    PubMed Central

    Childress, C. Clayton

    2016-01-01

    Recent work in the sociology of music suggests a declining importance of genre categories. Yet other work in this research stream and in the sociology of classification argues for the continued prevalence of genres as a meaningful tool through which creators, critics and consumers focus their attention in the topology of available works. Building from work in the study of categories and categorization we examine how boundary strength and internal differentiation structure the genre pairings of some 3 million musicians and groups. Using a range of network-based and statistical techniques, we uncover three musical “complexes,” which are collectively constituted by 16 smaller genre communities. Our analysis shows that the musical universe is not monolithically organized but rather composed of multiple worlds that are differently structured—i.e., uncentered, single-centered, and multi-centered. PMID:27203852

  12. Pushing limits by embracing complexity.

    PubMed

    Wolkenhauer, Olaf

    2014-12-01

    In this essay, celebrating the tenth anniversary of this journal, the author describes his journey, from being an engineering student to being a researcher in the biomolecular and biomedical sciences. Along the way, he is going to explain how he learned that handling the complexity of biological systems and cellular processes can provide guidance in situation we all face in our everyday life. In particular, he has in mind the decisions one faces in choosing the topic for a University degree and how to deal with the uncertainty when it comes to career decisions. Looking back at a decade of mathematical modelling in the biological and biomedical sciences, he is going to consider the role mathematical abstraction has played in systems biology and the role theory should play in systems medicine. By describing his own journey, he hopes to encourage young engineers and scientists to follow an interdisciplinary path. PMID:25478699

  13. Complex Networks in Psychological Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wedemann, R. S.; Carvalho, L. S. A. V. D.; Donangelo, R.

    We develop schematic, self-organizing, neural-network models to describe mechanisms associated with mental processes, by a neurocomputational substrate. These models are examples of real world complex networks with interesting general topological structures. Considering dopaminergic signal-to-noise neuronal modulation in the central nervous system, we propose neural network models to explain development of cortical map structure and dynamics of memory access, and unify different mental processes into a single neurocomputational substrate. Based on our neural network models, neurotic behavior may be understood as an associative memory process in the brain, and the linguistic, symbolic associative process involved in psychoanalytic working-through can be mapped onto a corresponding process of reconfiguration of the neural network. The models are illustrated through computer simulations, where we varied dopaminergic modulation and observed the self-organizing emergent patterns at the resulting semantic map, interpreting them as different manifestations of mental functioning, from psychotic through to normal and neurotic behavior, and creativity.

  14. Calculate and Plot Complex Potential

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1998-05-05

    SOLUPLOT is a program designed to calculate and plot complex potential, pH diagrams and log oxygen activity, pH diagrams for aqueous chemical syatems, considering speciation of ligands, from free energy and thermodynamic activity data. These diagrams, commonly referred to as Eh-pH and ao2-pH diagrams, respectively, define areas of predominance in Eh-pH diagrams or ao2-pH space for chemical species of a chemical system at equilibrium. Over an area of predominance, one predominant species is at greatermore » activity than the other species of the system considered. The diagram axes, pH (a measure of hydrogen ion activity) and either Eh or log ao2 (measures of a tendency toward either oxidation or reduction) , are paremeters commonly applied in describing the chemistry of aqueous systems.« less

  15. Quantum Computing: Solving Complex Problems

    ScienceCinema

    DiVincenzo, David [IBM Watson Research Center

    2009-09-01

    One of the motivating ideas of quantum computation was that there could be a new kind of machine that would solve hard problems in quantum mechanics. There has been significant progress towards the experimental realization of these machines (which I will review), but there are still many questions about how such a machine could solve computational problems of interest in quantum physics. New categorizations of the complexity of computational problems have now been invented to describe quantum simulation. The bad news is that some of these problems are believed to be intractable even on a quantum computer, falling into a quantum analog of the NP class. The good news is that there are many other new classifications of tractability that may apply to several situations of physical interest.

  16. Saloplastics: processing compact polyelectrolyte complexes.

    PubMed

    Schaaf, Pierre; Schlenoff, Joseph B

    2015-04-17

    Polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs) are prepared by mixing solutions of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes. These diffuse, amorphous precipitates may be compacted into dense materials, CoPECs, by ultracentrifugation (ucPECs) or extrusion (exPECs). The presence of salt water is essential in plasticizing PECs to allow them to be reformed and fused. When hydrated, CoPECs are versatile, rugged, biocompatible, elastic materials with applications including bioinspired materials, supports for enzymes and (nano)composites. In this review, various methods for making CoPECs are described, as well as fundamental responses of CoPEC mechanical properties to salt concentration. Possible applications as synthetic cartilage, enzymatically active biocomposites, self-healing materials, and magnetic nanocomposites are presented. PMID:25771881

  17. Multisoliton complexes in fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobko, D. A.; Gumenyuk, R.; Zolotovskii, I. O.; Okhotnikov, O. G.

    2014-12-01

    The formation of stationary and non-stationary pulse groups is regularly observed in multiple pulse soliton fiber lasers. The environment developed in this study for the flexible investigation of this phenomenon is based on the cavity comprising a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM) with complex dynamics of absorption recovery and all-fiber dispersion management. The detailed experimental and theoretical considerations show that multiple pulsing in fiber systems offers numerous embodiments ranging from stationary bound states to chaotic bunches. The pulse interaction through the dispersive waves was found to produce a principal impact on the bound state formation. The stability and transformation of stationary bound states and bunch propagation have been also addressed.

  18. Genre Complexes in Popular Music.

    PubMed

    Silver, Daniel; Lee, Monica; Childress, C Clayton

    2016-01-01

    Recent work in the sociology of music suggests a declining importance of genre categories. Yet other work in this research stream and in the sociology of classification argues for the continued prevalence of genres as a meaningful tool through which creators, critics and consumers focus their attention in the topology of available works. Building from work in the study of categories and categorization we examine how boundary strength and internal differentiation structure the genre pairings of some 3 million musicians and groups. Using a range of network-based and statistical techniques, we uncover three musical "complexes," which are collectively constituted by 16 smaller genre communities. Our analysis shows that the musical universe is not monolithically organized but rather composed of multiple worlds that are differently structured-i.e., uncentered, single-centered, and multi-centered. PMID:27203852

  19. The Hirudo medicinalis species complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutschera, U.

    2012-05-01

    Recently, Hildebrandt and Lemke (Naturwissenschaften 98:995-1008, 2011) argued that the taxonomic status of the three European medicinal leeches, Hirudo medicinalis Linnaeus 1758, Hirudo verbana Carena 1820, and Hirudo orientalis Utevsky and Trontelj (Parasitol Res 98:61-66, 2005) is "questionable" since "all three species interbreed in the laboratory". This statement is in conflict with data published by Elliott and Kutschera (Freshwater Reviews 4:21-41, 2011), indicating that these leeches, which are reciprocally copulating hermaphrodites, represent reproductively isolated biospecies. Here, I summarize evidence indicating that these three European taxa, plus the North African "dragon leech" ( Hirudo troctina Johnson 1816), must be interpreted as a complex of closely related species, and that the economically most important taxon H. verbana is polymorphic.

  20. Terminal Gold-Oxo Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, R.; Anderson, T.M.; Piccoli, P.M.B.; Schultz, A.J.; Koetzle, T.F.; Geletii, Y.V.; Slonkina, E.; Hedman, B.; Hodgson, K.O.; Hardcastle, K.I.; Fang, X.; Kirk, M.L.; Knottenbelt, S.; Kogerler, P.; Musaev, D.G.; Morokuma, K.; Takahashi, M.; Hill, C.L.; /Emory U. /Argonne /SLAC, SSRL /New Mexico U. /Iowa State U. /Toho U.

    2007-10-19

    In contradiction to current bonding paradigms, two terminal Au-oxo molecular complexes have been synthesized by reaction of AuCl{sub 3} with metal oxide-cluster ligands that model redox-active metal oxide surfaces. Use of K{sub 10}[{alpha}{sub 2}-P{sub 2}W{sub 17}O{sub 61}] x 20H{sub 2}O and K{sub 2}WO{sub 4} (forming the [A-PW{sub 9}O{sub 34}]{sup 9-} ligand in situ) produces K{sub 15}H{sub 2}[Au(O)(OH{sub 2})P{sub 2}W{sub 18}O{sub 68}] x 25H{sub 2}O (1); use of K{sub 10}[P{sub 2}W{sub 20}O{sub 70}(OH{sub 2}){sub 2}] x 22H{sub 2}O (3) produces K{sub 7}H{sub 2}[Au(O)(OH{sub 2})P{sub 2}W{sub 20}O{sub 70}(OH{sub 2}){sub 2}] x 27H{sub 2}O (2). Complex 1 crystallizes in orthorhombic Fddd, with a = 28.594(4) Angstroms, b = 31.866(4) Angstroms, c = 38.241(5) Angstroms, V = 34844(7) Angstroms{sup 3}, Z = 16 (final R = 0.0540), and complex 2 crystallizes in hexagonal P6(3)/mmc, with a = 16.1730(9) Angstroms, b = 16.1730(9) Angstroms, c = 19.7659(15) Angstroms, V = 4477.4(5) Angstroms{sup 3}, Z = 2 (final R = 0.0634). The polyanion unit in 1 is disorder-free. Very short ({approx}1.76 Angstroms) Au-oxo distances are established by both X-ray and 30 K neutron diffraction studies, and the latter confirms oxo and trans aqua (H2O) ligands on Au. Seven findings clarify that Au and not W is present in the Au-oxo position in 1 and 2. Five lines of evidence are consistent with the presence of d8 Au(III) centers that are stabilized by the flanking polytungstate ligands in both 1 and 2: redox titrations, electrochemical measurements, 17 K optical spectra, Au L2 edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and Au-oxo bond distances. Variable-temperature magnetic susceptibility data for crystalline 1 and 2 establish that both solids are diamagnetic, and {sup 31}P and {sup 17}O NMR spectroscopy confirm that both remain diamagnetic in solution. Both complexes have been further characterized by FT-IR, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and other techniques.

  1. ICDF Complex Remedial Action Report

    SciTech Connect

    W. M. Heileson

    2007-09-26

    This Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) Remedial Action Report has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of Section 6.2 of the INEEL CERCLA Disposal Facility Remedial Action Work Plan. The agency prefinal inspection of the ICDF Staging, Storage, Sizing, and Treatment Facility (SSSTF) was completed in June of 2005. Accordingly, this report has been developed to describe the construction activities completed at the ICDF along with a description of any modifications to the design originally approved for the facility. In addition, this report provides a summary of the major documents prepared for the design and construction of the ICDF, a discussion of relevant requirements and remedial action objectives, the total costs associated with the development and operation of the facility to date, and identification of necessary changes to the Agency-approved INEEL CERCLA Disposal Facility Remedial Action Work Plan and the ICDF Complex Operations and Maintenance Plan.

  2. Cultural complexities and scientific development.

    PubMed

    Branco, Angela Uchoa

    2007-03-01

    Methodological issues in psychology consist of a key aspect for the scientific development of the discipline. In this paper I elaborate on the reasons why I partially agree with Toomela's ideas, and why I also disagree with some of his arguments. The convergence refers to the need for a radical change concerning the widespread use of methodologies that has been typical of mainstream psychology, which still flavors too positivist and pseudo-quantitative, overlooking the central relevance of theory for scientific development. The divergence resides in Toomela's insistence to oppose what he designates as "the North American" to "the German-Austrian" scientific thinking: from my perspective, the misuse of cultural categories can only lead to misguided and unconstructive dichotomies that entails a naive concept of culture, and do not contribute to scientific development. From a contemporary systemic approach, complex issues deserve more sophisticated analysis. PMID:17992868

  3. The evolution of complex life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billingham, J.

    1985-01-01

    The emergence of complex living organisms in the context of evolutionary biology, planetary environments, and space events is investigated. The application of data on biological evolution, climatology, and the chemical and physical environments of the earth's surface, to explain the development of extraterrestrial life is described and an example is provided. The possibility of extraplanetary disturbances such as, meteorite and comet bombardments, and supernova explosions, causing the elimination of preexisting life and allowing advanced life development is analyzed. The possible existence of different life cycles (genetic and reproductive strategies) on other planets is studied. The GAIA hypothesis (Lovelock, 1979) which states living things modify the global environment to their own advantage is examined. The improved identification of habitable planetary environments and the possible existence of a form of extraterrestrial intelligent life is discussed.

  4. Quantum Computing: Solving Complex Problems

    SciTech Connect

    DiVincenzo, David

    2007-04-12

    One of the motivating ideas of quantum computation was that there could be a new kind of machine that would solve hard problems in quantum mechanics. There has been significant progress towards the experimental realization of these machines (which I will review), but there are still many questions about how such a machine could solve computational problems of interest in quantum physics. New categorizations of the complexity of computational problems have now been invented to describe quantum simulation. The bad news is that some of these problems are believed to be intractable even on a quantum computer, falling into a quantum analog of the NP class. The good news is that there are many other new classifications of tractability that may apply to several situations of physical interest.

  5. Quantum Computing: Solving Complex Problems

    SciTech Connect

    DiVincenzo, David

    2007-04-11

    One of the motivating ideas of quantum computation was that there could be a new kind of machine that would solve hard problems in quantum mechanics. There has been significant progress towards the experimental realization of these machines (which I will review), but there are still many questions about how such a machine could solve computational problems of interest in quantum physics. New categorizations of the complexity of computational problems have now been invented to describe quantum simulation. The bad news is that some of these problems are believed to be intractable even on a quantum computer, falling into a quantum analog of the NP class. The good news is that there are many other new classifications of tractability that may apply to several situations of physical interest.

  6. Scheduling Software for Complex Scenarios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Preparing a vehicle and its payload for a single launch is a complex process that involves thousands of operations. Because the equipment and facilities required to carry out these operations are extremely expensive and limited in number, optimal assignment and efficient use are critically important. Overlapping missions that compete for the same resources, ground rules, safety requirements, and the unique needs of processing vehicles and payloads destined for space impose numerous constraints that, when combined, require advanced scheduling. Traditional scheduling systems use simple algorithms and criteria when selecting activities and assigning resources and times to each activity. Schedules generated by these simple decision rules are, however, frequently far from optimal. To resolve mission-critical scheduling issues and predict possible problem areas, NASA historically relied upon expert human schedulers who used their judgment and experience to determine where things should happen, whether they will happen on time, and whether the requested resources are truly necessary.

  7. The complexity of chloroplast chaperonins.

    PubMed

    Vitlin Gruber, Anna; Nisemblat, Shahar; Azem, Abdussalam; Weiss, Celeste

    2013-12-01

    Type I chaperonins are large oligomeric protein ensembles that are involved in the folding and assembly of other proteins. Chloroplast chaperonins and co-chaperonins exist in multiple copies of two distinct isoforms that can combine to form a range of labile oligomeric structures. This complex system increases the potential number of chaperonin substrates and possibilities for regulation. The incorporation of unique subunits into the oligomer can modify substrate specificity. Some subunits are upregulated in response to heat shock and some show organ-specific expression, whereas others possess additional functions that are unrelated to their role in protein folding. Accumulating evidence suggests that specific subunits have distinct roles in biogenesis of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (Rubisco). PMID:24035661

  8. Forman curvature for complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreejith, R. P.; Mohanraj, Karthikeyan; Jost, Jürgen; Saucan, Emil; Samal, Areejit

    2016-06-01

    We adapt Forman’s discretization of Ricci curvature to the case of undirected networks, both weighted and unweighted, and investigate the measure in a variety of model and real-world networks. We find that most nodes and edges in model and real networks have a negative curvature. Furthermore, the distribution of Forman curvature of nodes and edges is narrow in random and small-world networks, while the distribution is broad in scale-free and real-world networks. In most networks, Forman curvature is found to display significant negative correlation with degree and centrality measures. However, Forman curvature is uncorrelated with clustering coefficient in most networks. Importantly, we find that both model and real networks are vulnerable to targeted deletion of nodes with highly negative Forman curvature. Our results suggest that Forman curvature can be employed to gain novel insights on the organization of complex networks.

  9. Complexity Characteristics of Currency Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorski, A. Z.; Drozdz, S.; Kwapien, J.; Oswiecimka, P.

    2006-11-01

    A large set of daily FOREX time series is analyzed. The corresponding correlation matrices (CM) are constructed for USD, EUR and PLN used as the base currencies. The triangle rule is interpreted as constraints reducing the number of independent returns. The CM spectrum is computed and compared with the cases of shuffled currencies and a fictitious random currency taken as a base currency. The Minimal Spanning Tree (MST) graphs are calculated and the clustering effects for strong currencies are found. It is shown that for MSTs the node rank has power like, scale free behavior. Finally, the scaling exponents are evaluated and found in the range analogous to those identified recently for various complex networks.

  10. Information Horizons in Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sneppen, Kim

    2005-03-01

    We investigate how the structure constrain specific communication in social-, man-made and biological networks. We find that human networks of governance and collaboration are predictable on teat-a-teat level, reflecting well defined pathways, but globally inefficient (1). In contrast, the Internet tends to have better overall communication abilities, more alternative pathways, and is therefore more robust. Between these extremes are the molecular network of living organisms. Further, for most real world networks we find that communication ability is favored by topology on small distances, but disfavored at larger distances (2,3,4). We discuss the topological implications in terms of modularity and the positioning of hubs in the networks (5,6). Finally we introduce some simple models which demonstarte how communication may shape the structure of in particular man made networks (7,8). 1) K. Sneppen, A. Trusina, M. Rosvall (2004). Hide and seek on complex networks [cond-mat/0407055] 2) M. Rosvall, A. Trusina, P. Minnhagen and K. Sneppen (2004). Networks and Cities: An Information Perspective [cond-mat/0407054]. In PRL. 3) A. Trusina, M. Rosvall, K. Sneppen (2004). Information Horizons in Networks. [cond-mat/0412064] 4) M. Rosvall, P. Minnhagen, K. Sneppen (2004). Navigating Networks with Limited Information. [cond-mat/0412051] 5) S. Maslov and K. Sneppen (2002). Specificity and stability in topology of protein networks Science 296, 910-913 [cond-mat/0205380]. 6) A. Trusina, S. Maslov, P. Minnhagen, K. Sneppen Hierarchy Measures in Complex Networks. Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 178702 [cond-mat/0308339]. 7) M. Rosvall and K. Sneppen (2003). Modeling Dynamics of Information Networks. Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 178701 [cond-mat/0308399]. 8) B-J. Kim, A. Trusina, P. Minnhagen, K. Sneppen (2003). Self Organized Scale-Free Networks from Merging and Regeneration. nlin.AO/0403006. In European Journal of Physics.

  11. Cognitive dynamics: complexity and creativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tito Arecchi, F.

    2007-05-01

    A scientific problem described within a given code is mapped by a corresponding computational problem. We call (algorithmic) complexity the bit length of the shortest instruction which solves the problem. Deterministic chaos in general affects a dynamical system making the corresponding problem experimentally and computationally heavy, since one must reset the initial conditions at a rate higher than that of information loss (Kolmogorov entropy). One can control chaos by adding to the system new degrees of freedom (information swapping: information lost by chaos is replaced by that arising from the new degrees of freedom). This implies a change of code, or a new augmented model. Within a single code, changing hypotheses is equivalent to fixing different sets of control parameters, each with a different a-priori probability, to be then confirmed and transformed to an a-posteriori probability via Bayes theorem. Sequential application of Bayes rule is nothing else than the Darwinian strategy in evolutionary biology. The sequence is a steepest ascent algorithm, which stops once maximum probability has been reached. At this point the hypothesis exploration stops. By changing code (and hence the set of relevant variables) one can start again to formulate new classes of hypotheses. We call creativity the action of code changing, which is guided by hints not formalized within the previous code, whence not accessible to a computer. We call semantic complexity the number of different scientific codes, or models, that describe a situation. It is however a fuzzy concept, in so far as this number changes due to interaction of the operator with the context. These considerations are illustrated with reference to a cognitive task, starting from synchronization of neuron arrays in a perceptual area and tracing the putative path towards a model building. Since this is a report on work in progress, we skip technicalities in order to stress the gist of the question, and provide

  12. Supramolecular Allosteric Cofacial Porphyrin Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveri, Christopher G.; Gianneschi, Nathan C.; Nguyen, Son Binh T.; Mirkin, Chad A.; Stern, Charlotte L.; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Pink, Maren

    2008-04-12

    Nature routinely uses cooperative interactions to regulate cellular activity. For years, chemists have designed synthetic systems that aim toward harnessing the reactivity common to natural biological systems. By learning how to control these interactions in situ, one begins to allow for the preparation of man-made biomimetic systems that can efficiently mimic the interactions found in Nature. To this end, we have designed a synthetic protocol for the preparation of flexible metal-directed supramolecular cofacial porphyrin complexes which are readily obtained in greater than 90% yield through the use of new hemilabile porphyrin ligands with bifunctional ether-phosphine or thioether-phosphine substituents at the 5 and 15 positions on the porphyrin ring. The resulting architectures contain two hemilabile ligand-metal domains (Rh{sup I} or Cu{sup I} sites) and two cofacially aligned porphyrins (Zn{sup II} sites), offering orthogonal functionalities and allowing these multimetallic complexes to exist in two states, 'condensed' or 'open'. Combining the ether-phosphine ligand with the appropriate Rh{sup I} or Cu{sup I} transition-metal precursors results in 'open' macrocyclic products. In contrast, reacting the thioether-phosphine ligand with RhI or CuI precursors yields condensed structures that can be converted into their 'open' macrocyclic forms via introduction of additional ancillary ligands. The change in cavity size that occurs allows these structures to function as allosteric catalysts for the acyl transfer reaction between X-pyridylcarbinol (where X = 2, 3, or 4) and 1-acetylimidazole. For 3- and 4-pyridylcarbinol, the 'open' macrocycle accelerates the acyl transfer reaction more than the condensed analogue and significantly more than the porphyrin monomer. In contrast, an allosteric effect was not observed for 2-pyridylcarbinol, which is expected to be a weaker binder and is unfavorably constrained inside the macrocyclic cavity.

  13. A Computer Story: Complexity from Simplicity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLeo, Gary; Weidenhammer, Amanda; Wecht, Kristen

    2012-01-01

    In this technological age, digital devices are conspicuous examples of extraordinary complexity. When a user clicks on computer icons or presses calculator buttons, these devices channel electricity through a complex system of decision-making circuits. Yet, in spite of this remarkable complexity, the hearts of these devices are components that…

  14. Planning and evaluation parameters for offshore complexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sincoff, M. Z. (Editor); Dajani, J. S. (Editor)

    1976-01-01

    Issues are presented for consideration in the planning and design of offshore artificial complexes. The construction of such complexes, their social, economic, and ecological impacts, and the legal-political-institutional environments within which their development could occur, are discussed. Planning, design, and construction of near-shore complexes located off the Mid-Atlantic coast of the United States is emphasized.

  15. Understanding Complex Adaptive Systems by Playing Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Bilsen, Arthur; Bekebrede, Geertje; Mayer, Igor

    2010-01-01

    While educators teach their students about decision making in complex environments, managers have to deal with the complexity of large projects on a daily basis. To make better decisions it is assumed, that the latter would benefit from better understanding of complex phenomena, as do students as the professionals of the future. The goal of this…

  16. Teacher Modeling Using Complex Informational Texts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Douglas; Frey, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Modeling in complex texts requires that teachers analyze the text for factors of qualitative complexity and then design lessons that introduce students to that complexity. In addition, teachers can model the disciplinary nature of content area texts as well as word solving and comprehension strategies. Included is a planning guide for think aloud.

  17. A Simple Approach to Complexity Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanger, Michael; Giddings, Martha M.

    2012-01-01

    This teaching note presents 7 basic ideas that are drawn from complexity theory. These ideas are designed to help students appreciate and work with the complex systems that they often face in practice. Although complexity theory may be presented using mathematical language not easily accessible to non-mathematicians, it also may be presented by…

  18. Defining and Operationalising L2 Complexity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulte, Bram; Housen, Alex

    2012-01-01

    This chapter takes a critical look at complexity in L2 research. We demonstrate several problems in the L2 literature in terms of how complexity has been defined and operationalised as a construct. In the first part of the chapter we try to unravel its highly complex, multidimensional nature by presenting a taxonomic model that identifies major…

  19. Cobalt Complexes as Antiviral and Antibacterial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Eddie L.; Simmers, Christa; Knight, D. Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Metal ion complexes are playing an increasing role in the development of antimicrobials. We review here the antimicrobial properties of cobalt coordination complexes in oxidation state 3+. In addition to reviewing the cobalt complexes containing polydentate donor ligands, we also focus on the antimicrobial activity of the homoleptic [Co(NH3)6]3+ ion.

  20. Controlled complexation of plasmid DNA with cationic polymers: effect of surfactant on the complexation and stability of the complexes.

    PubMed

    Ikonen, Marjukka; Murtomäki, Lasse; Kontturi, Kyösti

    2008-10-01

    The aggregation of the cationic polymer-plasmid DNA complexes of two commonly used polymers, polyethyleneimine (PEI) and poly-l-lysine (PLL) were systematically compared. The complexation was studied in 5% glucose solution at 25 degrees C using dynamic light scattering and isothermal titration calorimetry. The aggregation of the complexes was controlled by addition of the surfactant polyoxyethylene stearate (POES). The stability of the complexes was evaluated using dextran sulphate (DS) as relaxing agent. The relaxation of the complexes in the presence of DS was studied using agarose gel electrophoresis. This study elucidates the role of surfactant in controlling the size of the PEI/pDNA complex and reveals the differences of the two polymers as complexing agents. PMID:18583110

  1. Aging and the complexity of cardiovascular dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, D. T.; Furman, M. I.; Pincus, S. M.; Ryan, S. M.; Lipsitz, L. A.; Goldberger, A. L.

    1991-01-01

    Biomedical signals often vary in a complex and irregular manner. Analysis of variability in such signals generally does not address directly their complexity, and so may miss potentially useful information. We analyze the complexity of heart rate and beat-to-beat blood pressure using two methods motivated by nonlinear dynamics (chaos theory). A comparison of a group of healthy elderly subjects with healthy young adults indicates that the complexity of cardiovascular dynamics is reduced with aging. This suggests that complexity of variability may be a useful physiological marker.

  2. Protein Complex Purification by Affinity Capture.

    PubMed

    LaCava, John; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Hakhverdyan, Zhanna; Rout, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Affinity capture has become a powerful technique for consistently purifying endogenous protein complexes, facilitating biochemical and biophysical assays on otherwise inaccessible biological assemblies, and enabling broader interactomic exploration. For this procedure, cells are broken and their contents separated and extracted into a solvent, permitting access to target macromolecular complexes thus released in solution. The complexes are specifically enriched from the extract onto a solid medium coupled with an affinity reagent-usually an antibody-that recognizes the target either directly or through an appended affinity tag, allowing subsequent characterization of the complex. Here, we discuss approaches and considerations for purifying endogenous yeast protein complexes by affinity capture. PMID:27371601

  3. Fock spaces for modeling macromolecular complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinney, Justin

    Large macromolecular complexes play a fundamental role in how cells function. Here I describe a Fock space formalism for mathematically modeling these complexes. Specifically, this formalism allows ensembles of complexes to be defined in terms of elementary molecular ``building blocks'' and ``assembly rules.'' Such definitions avoid the massive redundancy inherent in standard representations, in which all possible complexes are manually enumerated. Methods for systematically computing ensembles of complexes from a list of components and interaction rules are described. I also show how this formalism readily accommodates coarse-graining. Finally, I introduce diagrammatic techniques that greatly facilitate the application of this formalism to both equilibrium and non-equilibrium biochemical systems.

  4. Sterols as Complex-forming Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioffe, D. V.

    1986-02-01

    The formation of complexes of sterols with different compounds determines the biological properties of both sterols and various natural substances such as saponins and polyene antibiotics. Complex formation by sterols with phospholipids, steroid saponins, and polyene antibiotics is determined by the same characteristic features of the structure of the sterol molecule. The principal role in complex formation is played by the hydrophobic reaction of the cyclopentanoperhydrophenanthrene ring. The formation of a hydrogen bond between the hydroxyl group of the sterol and a proton acceptor, which is assumed in most complexes, has been proved only in the complexes of sterols with water and acids. The bibliography contains 122 references.

  5. Aging and the complexity of cardiovascular dynamics.

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, D T; Furman, M I; Pincus, S M; Ryan, S M; Lipsitz, L A; Goldberger, A L

    1991-01-01

    Biomedical signals often vary in a complex and irregular manner. Analysis of variability in such signals generally does not address directly their complexity, and so may miss potentially useful information. We analyze the complexity of heart rate and beat-to-beat blood pressure using two methods motivated by nonlinear dynamics (chaos theory). A comparison of a group of healthy elderly subjects with healthy young adults indicates that the complexity of cardiovascular dynamics is reduced with aging. This suggests that complexity of variability may be a useful physiological marker. PMID:2065195

  6. Heat Transfer in Complex Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Mehrdad Massoudi

    2012-01-01

    Amongst the most important constitutive relations in Mechanics, when characterizing the behavior of complex materials, one can identify the stress tensor T, the heat flux vector q (related to heat conduction) and the radiant heating (related to the radiation term in the energy equation). Of course, the expression 'complex materials' is not new. In fact, at least since the publication of the paper by Rivlin & Ericksen (1955), who discussed fluids of complexity (Truesdell & Noll, 1992), to the recently published books (Deshpande et al., 2010), the term complex fluids refers in general to fluid-like materials whose response, namely the stress tensor, is 'non-linear' in some fashion. This non-linearity can manifest itself in variety of forms such as memory effects, yield stress, creep or relaxation, normal-stress differences, etc. The emphasis in this chapter, while focusing on the constitutive modeling of complex fluids, is on granular materials (such as coal) and non-linear fluids (such as coal-slurries). One of the main areas of interest in energy related processes, such as power plants, atomization, alternative fuels, etc., is the use of slurries, specifically coal-water or coal-oil slurries, as the primary fuel. Some studies indicate that the viscosity of coal-water mixtures depends not only on the volume fraction of solids, and the mean size and the size distribution of the coal, but also on the shear rate, since the slurry behaves as shear-rate dependent fluid. There are also studies which indicate that preheating the fuel results in better performance, and as a result of such heating, the viscosity changes. Constitutive modeling of these non-linear fluids, commonly referred to as non-Newtonian fluids, has received much attention. Most of the naturally occurring and synthetic fluids are non-linear fluids, for example, polymer melts, suspensions, blood, coal-water slurries, drilling fluids, mud, etc. It should be noted that sometimes these fluids show Newtonian

  7. GECluster: a novel protein complex prediction method

    PubMed Central

    Su, Lingtao; Liu, Guixia; Wang, Han; Tian, Yuan; Zhou, Zhihui; Han, Liang; Yan, Lun

    2014-01-01

    Identification of protein complexes is of great importance in the understanding of cellular organization and functions. Traditional computational protein complex prediction methods mainly rely on the topology of protein–protein interaction (PPI) networks but seldom take biological information of proteins (such as Gene Ontology (GO)) into consideration. Meanwhile, the environment relevant analysis of protein complex evolution has been poorly studied, partly due to the lack of high-precision protein complex datasets. In this paper, a combined PPI network is introduced to predict protein complexes which integrate both GO and expression value of relevant protein-coding genes. A novel protein complex prediction method GECluster (Gene Expression Cluster) was proposed based on a seed node expansion strategy, in which a combined PPI network was utilized. GECluster was applied to a training combined PPI network and it predicted more credible complexes than peer methods. The results indicate that using a combined PPI network can efficiently improve protein complex prediction accuracy. In order to study protein complex evolution within cells due to changes in the living environment surrounding cells, GECluster was applied to seven combined PPI networks constructed using the data of a test set including yeast response to stress throughout a wine fermentation process. Our results showed that with the rise of alcohol concentration, protein complexes within yeast cells gradually evolve from one state to another. Besides this, the number of core and attachment proteins within a protein complex both changed significantly. PMID:26019559

  8. Predicting Physical Interactions between Protein Complexes*

    PubMed Central

    Clancy, Trevor; Rødland, Einar Andreas; Nygard, Ståle; Hovig, Eivind

    2013-01-01

    Protein complexes enact most biochemical functions in the cell. Dynamic interactions between protein complexes are frequent in many cellular processes. As they are often of a transient nature, they may be difficult to detect using current genome-wide screens. Here, we describe a method to computationally predict physical interactions between protein complexes, applied to both humans and yeast. We integrated manually curated protein complexes and physical protein interaction networks, and we designed a statistical method to identify pairs of protein complexes where the number of protein interactions between a complex pair is due to an actual physical interaction between the complexes. An evaluation against manually curated physical complex-complex interactions in yeast revealed that 50% of these interactions could be predicted in this manner. A community network analysis of the highest scoring pairs revealed a biologically sensible organization of physical complex-complex interactions in the cell. Such analyses of proteomes may serve as a guide to the discovery of novel functional cellular relationships. PMID:23438732

  9. Spectroscopy of plutonium-organic complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Richmann, M.K.; Reed, D.T.

    1995-12-31

    Information on the spectroscopy of plutonium-organic complexes is needed to help establish the speciation of these complexes under environmentally relevant conditions. Laser photoacoustic spectroscopy (LPAS) and absorption spectrometry were used to characterize the Pu(IV)-citrate and Pu(IV)-nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) complexes at concentrations of 10{sup {minus}3}--10{sup {minus}7} M in aqueous solution. Good agreement was observed between the band shape of the LPAS and absorption spectra for the Pu(IV)-NTA complex. Agreement for the Pu(IV)-citrate complex was not quite as good. In both cases, a linear dependence of the LPAS signal on laser power and total concentration of the complexes was noted. This work is part of an ongoing research effort to study key subsurface interactions of plutonium-organic complexes.

  10. The Colletotrichum gloeosporioides species complex

    PubMed Central

    Weir, B.S.; Johnston, P.R.; Damm, U.

    2012-01-01

    The limit of the Colletotrichum gloeosporioides species complex is defined genetically, based on a strongly supported clade within the Colletotrichum ITS gene tree. All taxa accepted within this clade are morphologically more or less typical of the broadly defined C. gloeosporioides, as it has been applied in the literature for the past 50 years. We accept 22 species plus one subspecies within the C. gloeosporioides complex. These include C. asianum, C. cordylinicola, C. fructicola, C. gloeosporioides, C. horii, C. kahawae subsp. kahawae, C. musae, C. nupharicola, C. psidii, C. siamense, C. theobromicola, C. tropicale, and C. xanthorrhoeae, along with the taxa described here as new, C. aenigma, C. aeschynomenes, C. alatae, C. alienum, C. aotearoa, C. clidemiae, C. kahawae subsp. ciggaro, C. salsolae, and C. ti, plus the nom. nov. C. queenslandicum (for C. gloeosporioides var. minus). All of the taxa are defined genetically on the basis of multi-gene phylogenies. Brief morphological descriptions are provided for species where no modern description is available. Many of the species are unable to be reliably distinguished using ITS, the official barcoding gene for fungi. Particularly problematic are a set of species genetically close to C. musae and another set of species genetically close to C. kahawae, referred to here as the Musae clade and the Kahawae clade, respectively. Each clade contains several species that are phylogenetically well supported in multi-gene analyses, but within the clades branch lengths are short because of the small number of phylogenetically informative characters, and in a few cases individual gene trees are incongruent. Some single genes or combinations of genes, such as glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutamine synthetase, can be used to reliably distinguish most taxa and will need to be developed as secondary barcodes for species level identification, which is important because many of these fungi are of biosecurity

  11. Physical mapping of complex genomes

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Glen A.

    1993-01-01

    Method for simultaneous identification of overlapping cosmid clones among multiple cosmid clones and the use of the method for mapping complex genomes are provided. A library of cosmid clones that contains the DNA to be mapped is constructed and arranged in a manner such that individual clones can be identified and replicas of the arranged clones prepared. In preferred embodiments, the clones are arranged in a two dimensional matrix. In such embodiments, the cosmid clones in a row are pooled, mixed probes complementary to the ends of the DNA inserts int he pooled clones are synthesized, hybridized to a first replica of the library. Hybridizing clones, which include the pooled row, are identified. A second portion of clones is prepared by pooling cosmid clones that correspond to a column in the matrix. The second pool thereby includes one clone from the first portion pooled clones. This common clone is located on the replica at the intersection of the column and row. Mixed probes complementary to the ends of the DNA inserts in the second pooled portion of clones are prepared and hybridized to a second replica of the library. The hybridization pattern on the first and second replicas of the library are compared and cross-hybridizing clones, other than the clones in the pooled column and row, that hybridize to identical clones in the first and second replicas are identified. These clones necessarily include DNA inserts that overlap with the DNA insert int he common clone located at the intersection of the pooled row and pooled column. The DNA in the entire library may be mapped by pooling the clones in each of the rows and columns of the matrix, preparing mixed end-specific probes and hybridizing the probes from each row or column to a replica of the library. Since all clones in the library are located at the intersection of a column and a row, the overlapping clones for all clones in the library may be identified and a physical map constructed. In other preferred

  12. Complex computation in the retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshmukh, Nikhil Rajiv

    Elucidating the general principles of computation in neural circuits is a difficult problem requiring both a tractable model circuit as well as sophisticated measurement tools. This thesis advances our understanding of complex computation in the salamander retina and its underlying circuitry and furthers the development of advanced tools to enable detailed study of neural circuits. The retina provides an ideal model system for neural circuits in general because it is capable of producing complex representations of the visual scene, and both its inputs and outputs are accessible to the experimenter. Chapter 2 describes the biophysical mechanisms that give rise to the omitted stimulus response in retinal ganglion cells described in Schwartz et al., (2007) and Schwartz and Berry, (2008). The extra response to omitted flashes is generated at the input to bipolar cells, and is separable from the characteristic latency shift of the OSR apparent in ganglion cells, which must occur downstream in the circuit. Chapter 3 characterizes the nonlinearities at the first synapse of the ON pathway in response to high contrast flashes and develops a phenomenological model that captures the effect of synaptic activation and intracellular signaling dynamics on flash responses. This work is the first attempt to model the dynamics of the poorly characterized mGluR6 transduction cascade unique to ON bipolar cells, and explains the second lobe of the biphasic flash response. Complementary to the study of neural circuits, recent advances in wafer-scale photolithography have made possible new devices to measure the electrical and mechanical properties of neurons. Chapter 4 reports a novel piezoelectric sensor that facilitates the simultaneous measurement of electrical and mechanical signals in neural tissue. This technology could reveal the relationship between the electrical activity of neurons and their local mechanical environment, which is critical to the study of mechanoreceptors

  13. Application of the surface complexation concept to complex mineral assemblages

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, J.A.; Coston, J.A.; Kent, D.B.; Fuller, C.C.

    1998-01-01

    Two types of modeling approaches are illustrated for describing inorganic contaminant adsorption in aqueous environments: (a) the component additivity approach and (b) the generalized composite approach. Each approach is applied to simulate Zn2+ adsorption by a well-characterized sediment collected from an aquifer at Cape Cod, MA. Zn2+ adsorption by the sediment was studied in laboratory batch experiments with a range of pH and Zn(II) concentrations selected to encompass conditions observed in the aquifer. In the generalized composite approach, one, and two-site surface complexation model parameters were calibrated with the experimental data using FITEQL. The pH dependence of Zn2+ adsorption was simulated without explicit representation of electrostatic energy terms. Surface acidity constants and ion pair formation by major electrolyte ions were also not required in the model thereby minimizing the number of fitted parameters. Predictions of Zn2+ adsorption with the component additivity modeling approach did not simulate the experimental data adequately without manipulation of surface area or site density parameter values. To apply the component additivity approach to environmental sorbents, further research is needed to better characterize the composition of sediment surface coatings. The generalized composite modeling approach requires less information and can be viewed as more practical for application within solute transport models. With only three adjustable parameters, this approach could simulate Zn2+ adsorption over a range of chemical conditions that would cause several orders of magnitude variation in the distribution coefficient (K(d)) for Zn2+ within the aquifer.Two types of modeling approaches are illustrated for describing inorganic contaminant adsorption in aqueous environments: (a) the component additivity approach and (b) the generalized composite approach. Each approach is applied to simulate Zn2+ adsorption by a well-characterized sediment

  14. Complex Contagion of Campaign Donations.

    PubMed

    Traag, Vincent A

    2016-01-01

    Money is central in US politics, and most campaign contributions stem from a tiny, wealthy elite. Like other political acts, campaign donations are known to be socially contagious. We study how campaign donations diffuse through a network of more than 50000 elites and examine how connectivity among previous donors reinforces contagion. We find that the diffusion of donations is driven by independent reinforcement contagion: people are more likely to donate when exposed to donors from different social groups than when they are exposed to equally many donors from the same group. Counter-intuitively, being exposed to one side may increase donations to the other side. Although the effect is weak, simultaneous cross-cutting exposure makes donation somewhat less likely. Finally, the independence of donors in the beginning of a campaign predicts the amount of money that is raised throughout a campaign. We theorize that people infer population-wide estimates from their local observations, with elites assessing the viability of candidates, possibly opposing candidates in response to local support. Our findings suggest that theories of complex contagions need refinement and that political campaigns should target multiple communities. PMID:27077742

  15. Simple molecules as complex systems.

    PubMed

    Furtenbacher, Tibor; Arendás, Péter; Mellau, Georg; Császár, Attila G

    2014-01-01

    For individual molecules quantum mechanics (QM) offers a simple, natural and elegant way to build large-scale complex networks: quantized energy levels are the nodes, allowed transitions among the levels are the links, and transition intensities supply the weights. QM networks are intrinsic properties of molecules and they are characterized experimentally via spectroscopy; thus, realizations of QM networks are called spectroscopic networks (SN). As demonstrated for the rovibrational states of H2(16)O, the molecule governing the greenhouse effect on earth through hundreds of millions of its spectroscopic transitions (links), both the measured and first-principles computed one-photon absorption SNs containing experimentally accessible transitions appear to have heavy-tailed degree distributions. The proposed novel view of high-resolution spectroscopy and the observed degree distributions have important implications: appearance of a core of highly interconnected hubs among the nodes, a generally disassortative connection preference, considerable robustness and error tolerance, and an "ultra-small-world" property. The network-theoretical view of spectroscopy offers a data reduction facility via a minimum-weight spanning tree approach, which can assist high-resolution spectroscopists to improve the efficiency of the assignment of their measured spectra. PMID:24722221

  16. Complex Contagion of Campaign Donations

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Money is central in US politics, and most campaign contributions stem from a tiny, wealthy elite. Like other political acts, campaign donations are known to be socially contagious. We study how campaign donations diffuse through a network of more than 50000 elites and examine how connectivity among previous donors reinforces contagion. We find that the diffusion of donations is driven by independent reinforcement contagion: people are more likely to donate when exposed to donors from different social groups than when they are exposed to equally many donors from the same group. Counter-intuitively, being exposed to one side may increase donations to the other side. Although the effect is weak, simultaneous cross-cutting exposure makes donation somewhat less likely. Finally, the independence of donors in the beginning of a campaign predicts the amount of money that is raised throughout a campaign. We theorize that people infer population-wide estimates from their local observations, with elites assessing the viability of candidates, possibly opposing candidates in response to local support. Our findings suggest that theories of complex contagions need refinement and that political campaigns should target multiple communities. PMID:27077742

  17. Tuberous Sclerosis Complex: Perioperative Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Rabito, Matthew J.; Kaye, Alan David

    2014-01-01

    Background Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), also known as Bourneville disease, is an inherited, progressive neurocutaneous disorder characterized by the potential for hamartoma formation throughout the body. TSC is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder, but more than two-thirds of cases are sporadic. Methods Clinical manifestations and treatment options are discussed. Both surgical and anesthetic perioperative considerations are described in this review. Results Routine monitoring is appropriate for minor surgical procedures for patients with TSC who have mild disease manifestations. More extensive monitoring is indicated for major procedures that have the potential for significant blood loss and for patients with more severe pathology. Postoperatively, TSC patients should be admitted for monitoring and treatment after more extensive procedures or if significant organ dysfunction occurs. Postoperative complications, which may be related to either the surgery or the TSC pathology itself, may have origins in many different organs and may include seizures, severe hypertension, and bradyarrhythmias. Conclusion TSC is a rare disease with a highly variable clinical presentation and provides a multitude of challenges for the patient, the family, and the healthcare team. PMID:24940133

  18. Simple Substrates for Complex Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Dayan, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Complex cognitive tasks present a range of computational and algorithmic challenges for neural accounts of both learning and inference. In particular, it is extremely hard to solve them using the sort of simple policies that have been extensively studied as solutions to elementary Markov decision problems. There has thus been recent interest in architectures for the instantiation and even learning of policies that are formally more complicated than these, involving operations such as gated working memory. However, the focus of these ideas and methods has largely been on what might best be considered as automatized, routine or, in the sense of animal conditioning, habitual, performance. Thus, they have yet to provide a route towards understanding the workings of rule-based control, which is critical for cognitively sophisticated competence. Here, we review a recent suggestion for a uniform architecture for habitual and rule-based execution, discuss some of the habitual mechanisms that underpin the use of rules, and consider a statistical relationship between rules and habits. PMID:19225599

  19. Simple molecules as complex systems

    PubMed Central

    Furtenbacher, Tibor; Árendás, Péter; Mellau, Georg; Császár, Attila G.

    2014-01-01

    For individual molecules quantum mechanics (QM) offers a simple, natural and elegant way to build large-scale complex networks: quantized energy levels are the nodes, allowed transitions among the levels are the links, and transition intensities supply the weights. QM networks are intrinsic properties of molecules and they are characterized experimentally via spectroscopy; thus, realizations of QM networks are called spectroscopic networks (SN). As demonstrated for the rovibrational states of H216O, the molecule governing the greenhouse effect on earth through hundreds of millions of its spectroscopic transitions (links), both the measured and first-principles computed one-photon absorption SNs containing experimentally accessible transitions appear to have heavy-tailed degree distributions. The proposed novel view of high-resolution spectroscopy and the observed degree distributions have important implications: appearance of a core of highly interconnected hubs among the nodes, a generally disassortative connection preference, considerable robustness and error tolerance, and an “ultra-small-world” property. The network-theoretical view of spectroscopy offers a data reduction facility via a minimum-weight spanning tree approach, which can assist high-resolution spectroscopists to improve the efficiency of the assignment of their measured spectra. PMID:24722221

  20. Breathing Mode in Complex Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujioka, K.; Henning, C.; Ludwig, P.; Bonitz, M.; Melzer, A.; Vitkalov, S.

    2007-11-01

    The breathing mode is a fundamental normal mode present in Coulomb systems, and may have utility in identifying particle charge and the Debye length of certain systems. The question remains whether this mode can be extended to strongly coupled Yukawa balls [1]. These systems are characterized by particles confined within a parabolic potential well and interacting through a shielded Coulomb potential [2,3]. The breathing modes for a variety of systems in 1, 2, and 3 dimensions are computed by solving the eigenvalue problem given by the dynamical (Hesse) matrix. These results are compared to theoretical investigations that assume a strict definition for a breathing mode within the system, and an analysis is made of the most fitting model to utilize in the study of particular systems of complex plasmas [1,4]. References [1] T.E. Sheridan, Phys. of Plasmas. 13, 022106 (2006)[2] C. Henning et al., Phys. Rev. E 74, 056403 (2006)[3] M. Bonitz et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 075001 (2006)[4] C. Henning et al., submitted for publication

  1. Nanobacteria Are Mineralo Fetuin Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel; Azza, Saïd; Nappez, Claude; Guieu, Régis; Rolain, Jean-Marc; Fourquet, Patrick; Campagna, Bernard; La Scola, Bernard; Mege, Jean-Louis; Mansuelle, Pascal; Lechevalier, Eric; Berland, Yvon; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Renesto, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    “Nanobacteria” are nanometer-scale spherical and ovoid particles which have spurred one of the biggest controversies in modern microbiology. Their biological nature has been severely challenged by both geologists and microbiologists, with opinions ranging from considering them crystal structures to new life forms. Although the nature of these autonomously replicating particles is still under debate, their role in several calcification-related diseases has been reported. In order to gain better insights on this calciferous agent, we performed a large-scale project, including the analysis of “nanobacteria” susceptibility to physical and chemical compounds as well as the comprehensive nucleotide, biochemical, proteomic, and antigenic analysis of these particles. Our results definitively ruled out the existence of “nanobacteria” as living organisms and pointed out the paradoxical role of fetuin (an anti-mineralization protein) in the formation of these self-propagating mineral complexes which we propose to call “nanons.” The presence of fetuin within renal calculi was also evidenced, suggesting its role as a hydroxyapatite nucleating factor. PMID:18282102

  2. Cooperative behaviour in complex systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karsai, Márton

    2009-07-01

    In my PhD thesis I studied cooperative phenomena arise in complex systems using the methods of statistical and computational physics. The aim of my work was also to study the critical behaviour of interacting many-body systems during their phase transitions and describe their universal features analytically and by means of numerical calculations. In order to do so I completed studies in four different subjects. My first investigated subject was a study of non-equilibrium phase transitions in weighted scale-free networks. The second problem I examined was the ferromagnetic random bond Potts model with large values of q on evolving scale-free networks which problem is equivalent to an optimal cooperation problem. The third examined problem was related to the large-q sate random bond Potts model also and I examined the critical density of clusters which touched a certain border of a perpendicular strip like geometry and expected to hold analytical forms deduced from conformal invariance. The last investigated problem was a study of the non-equilibrium dynamical behaviour of the antiferromagnetic Ising model on two-dimensional triangular lattice at zero temperature in the absence of external field and at the Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition point.

  3. Traffic gridlock on complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes, G. A.; da Silva, L. R.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2012-01-01

    Here we study how a traffic jam spreads on complex networks when driven by an increasing flux between certain initial and final points. For that purpose, we developed two new traffic models based on vehicular traffic and applied them on the Apollonian network and the Swiss road network. The first model is an electrical analog, using ohmic and non-ohmic resistors which is a classical approach in Physics while the second one which we call the herding model, is based on human driving behavior. For both models, we study the sequence of clogged roads up to the traffic gridlock and display the fragilities of the network. In the electrical model, by increasing the external potential, resistors burn out, as the voltage drop between the ends increases above a certain threshold. Analyzing both models, we observed some power-law functions that occur only near a traffic gridlock as well as the dependence on topological features of the network and influence on flux and the robustness in Apollonian networks of different generations.

  4. Multilevel Complex Networks and Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldarelli, Guido

    2014-03-01

    Network theory has been a powerful tool to model isolated complex systems. However, the classical approach does not take into account the interactions often present among different systems. Hence, the scientific community is nowadays concentrating the efforts on the foundations of new mathematical tools for understanding what happens when multiple networks interact. The case of economic and financial networks represents a paramount example of multilevel networks. In the case of trade, trade among countries the different levels can be described by the different granularity of the trading relations. Indeed, we have now data from the scale of consumers to that of the country level. In the case of financial institutions, we have a variety of levels at the same scale. For example one bank can appear in the interbank networks, ownership network and cds networks in which the same institution can take place. In both cases the systemically important vertices need to be determined by different procedures of centrality definition and community detection. In this talk I will present some specific cases of study related to these topics and present the regularities found. Acknowledged support from EU FET Project ``Multiplex'' 317532.

  5. Spreading dynamics in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Sen; Makse, Hernán A.

    2013-12-01

    Searching for influential spreaders in complex networks is an issue of great significance for applications across various domains, ranging from epidemic control, innovation diffusion, viral marketing, and social movement to idea propagation. In this paper, we first display some of the most important theoretical models that describe spreading processes, and then discuss the problem of locating both the individual and multiple influential spreaders respectively. Recent approaches in these two topics are presented. For the identification of privileged single spreaders, we summarize several widely used centralities, such as degree, betweenness centrality, PageRank, k-shell, etc. We investigate the empirical diffusion data in a large scale online social community—LiveJournal. With this extensive dataset, we find that various measures can convey very distinct information of nodes. Of all the users in the LiveJournal social network, only a small fraction of them are involved in spreading. For the spreading processes in LiveJournal, while degree can locate nodes participating in information diffusion with higher probability, k-shell is more effective in finding nodes with a large influence. Our results should provide useful information for designing efficient spreading strategies in reality.

  6. National Wind Tunnel Complex (NWTC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The National Wind Tunnel Complex (NWTC) Final Report summarizes the work carried out by a unique Government/Industry partnership during the period of June 1994 through May 1996. The objective of this partnership was to plan, design, build and activate 'world class' wind tunnel facilities for the development of future-generation commercial and military aircraft. The basis of this effort was a set of performance goals defined by the National Facilities Study (NFS) Task Group on Aeronautical Research and Development Facilities which established two critical measures of improved wind tunnel performance; namely, higher Reynolds number capability and greater productivity. Initial activities focused upon two high-performance tunnels (low-speed and transonic). This effort was later descoped to a single multipurpose tunnel. Beginning in June 1994, the NWTC Project Office defined specific performance requirements, planned site evaluation activities, performed a series of technical/cost trade studies, and completed preliminary engineering to support a proposed conceptual design. Due to budget uncertainties within the Federal government, the NWTC project office was directed to conduct an orderly closure following the Systems Design Review in March 1996. This report provides a top-level status of the project at that time. Additional details of all work performed have been archived and are available for future reference.

  7. The complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Oaklander, Anne Louise; Horowitz, Steven H

    2015-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is the current consensus-derived name for a syndrome usually triggered by limb trauma. Required elements include prolonged, disproportionate distal-limb pain and microvascular dysregulation (e.g., edema or color changes) or altered sweating. CRPS-II (formerly "causalgia") describes patients with identified nerve injuries. CRPS-I (formerly "reflex sympathetic dystrophy") describes most patients who lack evidence of specific nerve injuries. Diagnosis is clinical and the pathophysiology involves combinations of small-fiber axonopathy, microvasculopathy, inflammation, and brain plasticity/sensitization. Females have much higher risk and workplace accidents are a well-recognized cause. Inflammation and dysimmunity, perhaps facilitated by injury to the blood-nerve barrier, may contribute. Most patients, particularly the young, recover gradually, but treatment can speed healing. Evidence of efficacy is strongest for rehabilitation therapies (e.g., graded-motor imagery), neuropathic pain medications, and electric stimulation of the spinal cord, injured nerve, or motor cortex. Investigational treatments include ketamine, botulinum toxin, immunoglobulins, and transcranial neuromodulation. Nonrecovering patients should be re-evaluated for neurosurgically treatable causal lesions (nerve entrapment, impingement, infections, or tumors) and treatable potentiating medical conditions, including polyneuropathy and circulatory insufficiency. Earlier impressions that CRPS represents malingering or psychosomatic illness have been replaced by evidence that CRPS is a rare complication of limb injury in biologically susceptible individuals. PMID:26563805

  8. Nanofabrication of Doped, Complex Oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, A.; Waller, G.H.; Abiade, J.T.

    2012-01-01

    Complex oxides have many promising attributes, including wide band gaps for high temperature semiconductors, ion conducting electrolytes in fuel cells, ferroelectricity and ferromagnetism. Bulk and thin film oxides can be readily manufactured and tested however these physically hard and chemically inert materials cannot be nanofabricated by direct application of conventional methods. In order to study these materials at the nanoscale there must first be a simple and effective means to achieve the desired structures. Here we discuss the use of pulsed laser deposition at room temperature onto electron beam lithography defined templates of poly methyl methacrylate photoresist. Following a resist liftoff in organic solvents, a heat treatment was used to crystallize the nanostructures. The morphology of these structures was studied using scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Crystallinity and composition as determined by x ray diffraction and photo-electron spectroscopy respectively is reported for thin film analogues of the nanostructured oxide. The oxide studied in this report is Nb doped SrTiO{sub 3}, which has been investigated for use as a high temperature thermoelectric material; however the approach used is not materials-dependent.

  9. [Joseph Babinski: a complex personality].

    PubMed

    Poirier, Jacques

    2007-10-01

    Joseph Babinski (1857-1932), a Paris hospital neurologist known for the discovery of his eponymous sign, was a highly complex personality. He was known as a handsome but silent "blue-eyed giant". His parents left Poland for Paris after the insurrection of 1848. Joseph and his elder brother Henri (1855-1931) were born in Paris and were therefore French, but they remained devoted to Poland. Joseph suffered from excruciating self-doubt and was meticulous. He was a reasoner and a righter of wrongs. Henri, who trained as a civil engineer at the French National School of Mines, prospected mineral, gold and diamond deposits in various countries. On his return to France at the end of the century, he wrote, under the pseudonym Ali-Bab, a monumental cookbook called "Gastronomie pratique", which was widely acclaimed Joseph and Henri, both unmarried, lived together and formed an inseparable couple. Joseph Babinski had no religious, political or ideological commitments. Some areas of his private life still remain rather shadowy. PMID:18447056

  10. Nanobacteria are mineralo fetuin complexes.

    PubMed

    Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel; Azza, Saïd; Nappez, Claude; Guieu, Régis; Rolain, Jean-Marc; Fourquet, Patrick; Campagna, Bernard; La Scola, Bernard; Mege, Jean-Louis; Mansuelle, Pascal; Lechevalier, Eric; Berland, Yvon; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Renesto, Patricia

    2008-02-01

    "Nanobacteria" are nanometer-scale spherical and ovoid particles which have spurred one of the biggest controversies in modern microbiology. Their biological nature has been severely challenged by both geologists and microbiologists, with opinions ranging from considering them crystal structures to new life forms. Although the nature of these autonomously replicating particles is still under debate, their role in several calcification-related diseases has been reported. In order to gain better insights on this calciferous agent, we performed a large-scale project, including the analysis of "nanobacteria" susceptibility to physical and chemical compounds as well as the comprehensive nucleotide, biochemical, proteomic, and antigenic analysis of these particles. Our results definitively ruled out the existence of "nanobacteria" as living organisms and pointed out the paradoxical role of fetuin (an anti-mineralization protein) in the formation of these self-propagating mineral complexes which we propose to call "nanons." The presence of fetuin within renal calculi was also evidenced, suggesting its role as a hydroxyapatite nucleating factor. PMID:18282102

  11. Role models for complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichardt, J.; White, D. R.

    2007-11-01

    We present a framework for automatically decomposing (“block-modeling”) the functional classes of agents within a complex network. These classes are represented by the nodes of an image graph (“block model”) depicting the main patterns of connectivity and thus functional roles in the network. Using a first principles approach, we derive a measure for the fit of a network to any given image graph allowing objective hypothesis testing. From the properties of an optimal fit, we derive how to find the best fitting image graph directly from the network and present a criterion to avoid overfitting. The method can handle both two-mode and one-mode data, directed and undirected as well as weighted networks and allows for different types of links to be dealt with simultaneously. It is non-parametric and computationally efficient. The concepts of structural equivalence and modularity are found as special cases of our approach. We apply our method to the world trade network and analyze the roles individual countries play in the global economy.

  12. Simple theories of complex lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peyrard, Michel

    1998-11-01

    While the theory of solitons has been very successful for continuous systems, very few nonlinear discrete lattices are amenable to an exact analytical treatment. In these “complex lattices” discreteness can be hostile to the solitons, preventing them to move due to the lack of translational invariance or even to exist as localized excitations. On the other hand, lattice discreteness can sometimes be very helpful. It can stabilize solutions that otherwise would split apart as in the discrete sine-Gordon lattice, or even allow the existence of localized oscillatory modes as exact solutions in systems where they would decay in the continuum limit. It is interesting that many of these phenomena can be understood qualitatively, and sometimes quantitatively, with very simple theories that rely on the usual concepts of linear wave propagation, resonances, linear stability of waves, for instance. There are, however, phenomena specific to discrete nonlinear lattices which allow the build up of large amplitude localized excitations, sometimes out of thermal fluctuations, which are more resistant to simple approaches and could deserve further interest because they may be relevant for various physical systems.

  13. Collaboration in Complex Medical Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiao, Yan; Mankenzie, Colin F.

    1998-01-01

    Improving our understanding of collaborative work in complex environments has the potential for developing effective supporting technologies, personnel training paradigms, and design principles for multi-crew workplaces. USing a sophisticated audio-video-data acquisition system and a corresponding analysis system, the researchers at University of Maryland have been able to study in detail team performance during real trauma patient resuscitation. The first study reported here was on coordination mechanisms and on characteristics of coordination breakdowns. One of the key findings was that implicit communications were an important coordination mechanism (e.g. through the use of shared workspace and event space). The second study was on the sources of uncertainty during resuscitation. Although incoming trauma patients' status is inherently uncertain, the findings suggest that much of the uncertainty felt by care providers was related to communication and coordination. These two studies demonstrate the value of and need for creating a real-life laboratory for studying team performance with the use of comprehensive and integrated data acquisition and analysis tools.

  14. Perceived contrast in complex images

    PubMed Central

    Haun, Andrew M.; Peli, Eli

    2013-01-01

    To understand how different spatial frequencies contribute to the overall perceived contrast of complex, broadband photographic images, we adapted the classification image paradigm. Using natural images as stimuli, we randomly varied relative contrast amplitude at different spatial frequencies and had human subjects determine which images had higher contrast. Then, we determined how the random variations corresponded with the human judgments. We found that the overall contrast of an image is disproportionately determined by how much contrast is between 1 and 6 c/°, around the peak of the contrast sensitivity function (CSF). We then employed the basic components of contrast psychophysics modeling to show that the CSF alone is not enough to account for our results and that an increase in gain control strength toward low spatial frequencies is necessary. One important consequence of this is that contrast constancy, the apparent independence of suprathreshold perceived contrast and spatial frequency, will not hold during viewing of natural images. We also found that images with darker low-luminance regions tended to be judged as having higher overall contrast, which we interpret as the consequence of darker local backgrounds resulting in higher band-limited contrast response in the visual system. PMID:24190908

  15. Electrical potentials in stomatal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Saftner, R.A.; Raschke, K.

    1981-06-01

    Guard cells of several species, but predominantly Commelina communis, were impaled by micropipette electrodes and potential differences measured that occurred between cell compartments and the flowing bathing medium. The wall developed a Donnan potential that was between -60 and -70 millivolt in 30 millimolar KC1 at pH 7. The density of the fixed charges ranged from 0.3 to 0.5 molar; its dependence on pH was almost identical with the titration curve of authentic polygalacturonic acid. The vacuolar potential of guard cells of Commelina communis L., Zea mays L., Nicotiana glauca Graham, Allium cepa L., and Vicia faba L. was between -40 and -50 millivolt in 30 millimolar KCl when stomata were open and about -30 millivolt when stomata were closed. The vacuolar potential of guard cells of C. communis was almost linearly related to stomatal aperture and responded to changes in the ionic strength in the bathing medium in a Nernstian manner. No specificity for any alkali ion (except Li/sup +/), ammonium, or choline appeared. Lithium caused hyperpolarization. Calcium in concentrations between 1 and 100 millimolar in the medium led to stomatal closure, also caused hyperpolarization, and triggered transient oscillations in the intracellular potential. Gradients in the electrical potential existed across stomatal complexes with open pores. When stomata closed, these gradients almost disappeared or slightly reverted; all epidermal cells were then at potentials near -30 millivolt in 30 millimolar KCl.

  16. Measuring distances between complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, Roberto F. S.; Miranda, José G. V.; Pinho, Suani T. R.; Lobão, Thierry Petit

    2008-08-01

    A previously introduced concept of higher order neighborhoods in complex networks, [R.F.S. Andrade, J.G.V. Miranda, T.P. Lobão, Phys. Rev. E 73 (2006) 046101] is used to define a distance between networks with the same number of nodes. With such measure, expressed in terms of the matrix elements of the neighborhood matrices of each network, it is possible to compare, in a quantitative way, how far apart in the space of neighborhood matrices two networks are. The distance between these matrices depends on both the network topologies and the adopted node numberings. While the numbering of one network is fixed, a Monte Carlo algorithm is used to find the best numbering of the other network, in the sense that it minimizes the distance between the matrices. The minimal value found for the distance reflects differences in the neighborhood structures of the two networks that arise only from distinct topologies. This procedure ends up by providing a projection of the first network on the pattern of the second one. Examples are worked out allowing for a quantitative comparison for distances among distinct networks, as well as among distinct realizations of random networks.

  17. Software Complexity Threatens Performance Portability

    SciTech Connect

    Gamblin, T.

    2015-09-11

    Modern HPC software packages are rarely self-contained. They depend on a large number of external libraries, and many spend large fractions of their runtime in external subroutines. Performance portability depends not only on the effort of application teams, but also on the availability of well-tuned libraries. At most sites, the burden of maintaining libraries is shared by code teams and facilities. Facilities typically provide well-tuned default versions, but code teams frequently build with bleeding-edge compilers to achieve high performance. For this reason, HPC has no “standard” software stack, unlike other domains where performance is not critical. Incompatibilities among compilers and software versions force application teams and facility staff to re-build custom versions of libraries for each new toolchain. Because the number of potential configurations is combinatorial, and because HPC software is notoriously difficult to port to new machines [3, 7, 8], the tuning effort required to support and maintain performance-portable libraries outstrips the available manpower at most sites. Software complexity is a growing obstacle to performance portability for HPC.

  18. Advanced nuclear plant control complex

    DOEpatents

    Scarola, Kenneth; Jamison, David S.; Manazir, Richard M.; Rescorl, Robert L.; Harmon, Daryl L.

    1993-01-01

    An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

  19. Unraveling chaotic attractors by complex networks and measurements of stock market complexity

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Hongduo; Li, Ying

    2014-03-15

    We present a novel method for measuring the complexity of a time series by unraveling a chaotic attractor modeled on complex networks. The complexity index R, which can potentially be exploited for prediction, has a similar meaning to the Kolmogorov complexity (calculated from the Lempel–Ziv complexity), and is an appropriate measure of a series' complexity. The proposed method is used to research the complexity of the world's major capital markets. None of these markets are completely random, and they have different degrees of complexity, both over the entire length of their time series and at a level of detail. However, developing markets differ significantly from mature markets. Specifically, the complexity of mature stock markets is stronger and more stable over time, whereas developing markets exhibit relatively low and unstable complexity over certain time periods, implying a stronger long-term price memory process.

  20. Complex Generalized Synchronization and Parameter Identification of Nonidentical Nonlinear Complex Systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shibing; Wang, Xingyuan; Han, Bo

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, generalized synchronization (GS) is extended from real space to complex space, resulting in a new synchronization scheme, complex generalized synchronization (CGS). Based on Lyapunov stability theory, an adaptive controller and parameter update laws are designed to realize CGS and parameter identification of two nonidentical chaotic (hyperchaotic) complex systems with respect to a given complex map vector. This scheme is applied to synchronize a memristor-based hyperchaotic complex Lü system and a memristor-based chaotic complex Lorenz system, a chaotic complex Chen system and a memristor-based chaotic complex Lorenz system, as well as a memristor-based hyperchaotic complex Lü system and a chaotic complex Lü system with fully unknown parameters. The corresponding numerical simulations illustrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed scheme. PMID:27014879

  1. Complex Generalized Synchronization and Parameter Identification of Nonidentical Nonlinear Complex Systems

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shibing; Wang, Xingyuan; Han, Bo

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, generalized synchronization (GS) is extended from real space to complex space, resulting in a new synchronization scheme, complex generalized synchronization (CGS). Based on Lyapunov stability theory, an adaptive controller and parameter update laws are designed to realize CGS and parameter identification of two nonidentical chaotic (hyperchaotic) complex systems with respect to a given complex map vector. This scheme is applied to synchronize a memristor-based hyperchaotic complex Lü system and a memristor-based chaotic complex Lorenz system, a chaotic complex Chen system and a memristor-based chaotic complex Lorenz system, as well as a memristor-based hyperchaotic complex Lü system and a chaotic complex Lü system with fully unknown parameters. The corresponding numerical simulations illustrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed scheme. PMID:27014879

  2. Reduction of Subjective and Objective System Complexity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Occam's razor is often used in science to define the minimum criteria to establish a physical or philosophical idea or relationship. Albert Einstein is attributed the saying "everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler". These heuristic ideas are based on a belief that there is a minimum state or set of states for a given system or phenomena. In looking at system complexity, these heuristics point us to an idea that complexity can be reduced to a minimum. How then, do we approach a reduction in complexity? Complexity has been described as a subjective concept and an objective measure of a system. Subjective complexity is based on human cognitive comprehension of the functions and inter relationships of a system. Subjective complexity is defined by the ability to fully comprehend the system. Simplifying complexity, in a subjective sense, is thus gaining a deeper understanding of the system. As Apple's Jonathon Ive has stated," It's not just minimalism or the absence of clutter. It involves digging through the depth of complexity. To be truly simple, you have to go really deep". Simplicity is not the absence of complexity but a deeper understanding of complexity. Subjective complexity, based on this human comprehension, cannot then be discerned from the sociological concept of ignorance. The inability to comprehend a system can be either a lack of knowledge, an inability to understand the intricacies of a system, or both. Reduction in this sense is based purely on a cognitive ability to understand the system and no system then may be truly complex. From this view, education and experience seem to be the keys to reduction or eliminating complexity. Objective complexity, is the measure of the systems functions and interrelationships which exist independent of human comprehension. Jonathon Ive's statement does not say that complexity is removed, only that the complexity is understood. From this standpoint, reduction of complexity can be approached

  3. Forces in the complex octonion curved space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Zi-Hua

    2016-04-01

    The paper aims to extend major equations in the electromagnetic and gravitational theories from the flat space into the complex octonion curved space. Maxwell applied simultaneously the quaternion analysis and vector terminology to describe the electromagnetic theory. It inspires subsequent scholars to study the electromagnetic and gravitational theories with the complex quaternions/octonions. Furthermore Einstein was the first to depict the gravitational theory by means of tensor analysis and curved four-space-time. Nowadays some scholars investigate the electromagnetic and gravitational properties making use of the complex quaternion/octonion curved space. From the orthogonality of two complex quaternions, it is possible to define the covariant derivative of the complex quaternion curved space, describing the gravitational properties in the complex quaternion curved space. Further it is possible to define the covariant derivative of the complex octonion curved space by means of the orthogonality of two complex octonions, depicting simultaneously the electromagnetic and gravitational properties in the complex octonion curved space. The result reveals that the connection coefficient and curvature of the complex octonion curved space will exert an influence on the field strength and field source of the electromagnetic and gravitational fields, impacting the linear momentum, angular momentum, torque, energy, and force and so forth.

  4. Visuospatial complexity modulates reading in the brain.

    PubMed

    Rao, Chaitra; Singh, Nandini C

    2015-02-01

    Neurocognitive processing of orthographic visuospatial complexity was examined through fMRI-based overt naming (n=16) of phonologically transparent, high and low frequency Hindi/Devanagari words that were visually simple (पालक, चातक) or complex (, चकली). Participants' overt behavior was modestly influenced by visuospatial complexity (accuracy: main effect p=.01, complexity×frequency interaction p<.07), while neuroimaging data revealed a robust effect of complexity (main effect FWE p<10(-4), complexity×frequency interaction FWE p<7×10(-8)). Interaction-based RoIs showed higher BOLD response in the VWFA to complex and left posterior temporal cortex to simple words, with greater right lingual de-activation to complex than simple words. Subtractions confirmed additional recruitment of VWFA, right frontal, inferior orbitofrontal, mid-temporal pole and left cerebellum by visuospatially complex over simple words. Finally, low frequency words activated bilateral occipital and putamen areas, left IPL, SPL, IFG and VWFA, suggesting that effortful phonological processing in alphasyllabic Hindi/Devanagari requires neural resources specialized for both visuospatially simple and complex orthographies. PMID:25528288

  5. The sarcoglycan complex in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Tarakci, Hakan; Berger, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    In skeletal muscle, the dystrophin-associated glycoprotein complex forms a link between the actin cytoskeleton and the extracellular matrix that is critical for muscle integrity. Within this complex resides the sarcoglycan subcomplex, which consists of four transmembrane glycoproteins (alpha-, beta-, gamma-, and delta-sarcoglycan). During assembly, beta-sarcoglycan tightly associates with delta-sarcoglycan to form a functional core that then recruits gamma- and alpha-sarcoglycan to form the sarcoglycan complex. Together with sarcospan, the sarcoglycan complex binds other components of the dystrophin-associated glycoprotein complex and integrates into the myofibre's membrane. Once integrated, the sarcoglycan complex plays a pivotal role in mechanically stabilising the sarcolemma as well as the dystrophin-associated glycoprotein complex. Additionally, the sarcoglycan complex undergoes chemical modifications in response to muscle contractions, thereby transducing mechanical information into a cellular signal. Mutations in the sarcoglycans induce limb girdle muscular dystrophy, and several animal models have been established to study the molecular biology and function of the sarcoglycan complex. This review discusses the role of the sarcoglycan complex in skeletal muscle and describes the functional deficiencies that lead to muscular dystrophies. PMID:26709803

  6. Superspace de Rham complex and relative cohomology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linch, William D.; Randall, Stephen

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the super-de Rham complex of five-dimensional superforms with N = 1 supersymmetry. By introducing a free supercommutative algebra of auxiliary variables, we show that this complex is equivalent to the Chevalley-Eilenberg complex of the translation supergroup with values in superfields. Each cocycle of this complex is defined by a Lorentz- and iso-spin-irreducible superfield subject to a set of constraints. Restricting to constant coefficients results in a subcomplex in which components of the cocycles are coboundaries while the constraints on the defining superfields span the cohomology. This reduces the computation of all of the superspace Bianchi identities to a single linear algebra problem the solution of which implies new features not present in the standard four-dimensional, N = 1 complex. These include splitting/joining in the complex and the existence of cocycles that do not correspond to irreducible supermultiplets of closed differential forms. Interpreting the five-dimensional de Rham complex as arising from dimensional reduction from the six-dimensional complex, we find a second five-dimensional complex associated to the relative de Rham complex of the embedding of the latter in the former. This gives rise to a second source of closed differential forms previously attributed to the phenomenon called "Weyl triviality".

  7. Complexity of the Fennoscandian lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinnik, Lev; Kozlovskaya, Elena; Oreshin, Sergey; Kosarev, Grigoriy; Silvennoinen, Hanna; Vaganova, Natalia; Kiselev, Sergey

    2014-05-01

    -explosion profile crossing this part of Fennoscandia. At the stations of the POLENET/LAPNET array the P-wave velocities are generally close to the IASPEI91 velocities down to a depth of about 200 km. The S-wave velocities are close to the IASPEI91 velocities in the depth interval from the Moho to 100 km and higher than the IASPEI91 velocities in a depth range from 100 to 200 km. The most complex lithosphere structure is obtained for stations where the anomalously thick (more than 60-km) crust is known from earlier controlled-source seismology experiments. For some stations the S-wave and P-wave crust-mantle boundaries are located at different depths (around 45 km and 75-80 km, respectively). In summary, the structure of the Fennoscandian lithosphere appears to be very complex and deserving further multi-disciplinary studies.

  8. Dynamic and interacting complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickison, Mark E.

    This thesis employs methods of statistical mechanics and numerical simulations to study some aspects of dynamic and interacting complex networks. The mapping of various social and physical phenomena to complex networks has been a rich field in the past few decades. Subjects as broad as petroleum engineering, scientific collaborations, and the structure of the internet have all been analyzed in a network physics context, with useful and universal results. In the first chapter we introduce basic concepts in networks, including the two types of network configurations that are studied and the statistical physics and epidemiological models that form the framework of the network research, as well as covering various previously-derived results in network theory that are used in the work in the following chapters. In the second chapter we introduce a model for dynamic networks, where the links or the strengths of the links change over time. We solve the model by mapping dynamic networks to the problem of directed percolation, where the direction corresponds to the time evolution of the network. We show that the dynamic network undergoes a percolation phase transition at a critical concentration pc, that decreases with the rate r at which the network links are changed. The behavior near criticality is universal and independent of r. We find that for dynamic random networks fundamental laws are changed: i) The size of the giant component at criticality scales with the network size N for all values of r, rather than as N2/3 in static network, ii) In the presence of a broad distribution of disorder, the optimal path length between two nodes in a dynamic network scales as N1/2, compared to N1/3 in a static network. The third chapter consists of a study of the effect of quarantine on the propagation of epidemics on an adaptive network of social contacts. For this purpose, we analyze the susceptible-infected-recovered model in the presence of quarantine, where susceptible

  9. Compaction in the Bushveld Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boorman, S.; Boudreau, A.

    2003-12-01

    Compaction in the mush zone of a crystallizing chamber is a model for fractionation, whereby evolved interstitial liquid expelled from the compacting crystal pile is returned to the magma chamber. If compaction was important during crystallization of the Lower and Critical Zones of the Bushveld Complex, certain textural features are expected; and, these features should correlate to position in the section, as well as to the number of mineral phases present. We report on a spectrum of textural data for 30 samples form the Lower and Critical Zones of the Bushveld Complex. Crystal Size Distributions (CSDs) are a semi-log plot of population density against crystal size, and provide information about magmatic processes such as crystal accumulation, removal and aging. Changes to the magmatic system are reflected in the shape of the CSD plot. CSDs of Bushveld rocks show a log-linear trend overturned at smaller grain sizes, a result consistent with both crystal aging, wherein larger grains grow at the expense of small ones in the crystallizing pile, and melt migration, where nucleation is suppressed by the loss of late melt fractions. CSD slope and intercept data vary with stratigraphy. Slopes in the Critical Zone are steeper, indicating less recrystallization and less of a compaction effect. In contrast, slopes in the Lower Zone are shallower, a result consistent with slower cooling and a greater compaction/recrystallization effect. Likewise, lower CSD intercepts are associated with the shallower slopes of the lower zone and vice versa. The extent of foliation is measured as alignment factor (AF), determined by orientation statistics of the major axes of the grains of interest. AF decreases with stratigraphic height and foliation is best developed in the nearly monomineralic harzburgite of the Lower Zone (AF avg=64). At the Lower Zone-Critical Zone transition, plagioclase content increases, decreasing bulk density and thus, the systems ability to accommodate compaction

  10. Biofilm monitoring using complex permittivity.

    SciTech Connect

    Altman, Susan Jeanne; McGrath, Lucas K.; Dolan, Patricia L.; Yelton, William Graham

    2008-10-01

    There is strong interest in the detection and monitoring of bio-fouling. Bio-fouling problems are common in numerous water treatments systems, medical and dental apparatus and food processing equipment. Current bio-fouling control protocols are time consuming and costly. New early detection techniques to monitor bio-forming contaminates are means to enhanced efficiency. Understanding the unique dielectric properties of biofilm development, colony forming bacteria and nutrient background will provide a basis to the effectiveness of controlling or preventing biofilm growth. Dielectric spectroscopy measurements provide values of complex permittivity, {var_epsilon}*, of biofilm formation by applying a weak alternating electric field at various frequencies. The dielectric characteristic of the biofilm, {var_epsilon}{prime}, is the real component of {var_epsilon}* and measures the biofilm's unique ability to store energy. Graphically observed dependencies of {var_epsilon}{prime} to frequency indicate dielectric relaxation or dielectric dispersion behaviors that mark the particular stage of progression during the development of biofilms. In contrast, any frequency dependency of the imaginary component, {var_epsilon}{double_prime} the loss factor, is expressed as dielectric losses from the biofilm due to dipole relaxation. The tangent angle of these two component vectors is the ratio of the imaginary component to the real component, {var_epsilon}{double_prime}/{var_epsilon}{prime} and is referred to as the loss angle tangent (tan {delta}) or dielectric loss. Changes in tan {delta} are characteristic of changes in dielectric losses during various developmental stages of the films. Permittivity scans in the above figure are of biofilm growth from P. Fluorescens (10e7 CFU's at the start). Three trends are apparent from these scans, the first being a small drop in the imaginary permittivity over a 7 hours period, best seen in the Cole-Cole plot (a). The second trend is

  11. Acoustic Change Complex: Clinical Implications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Ryong

    2015-12-01

    The acoustic change complex (ACC) is a cortical auditory evoked potential elicited in response to a change in an ongoing sound. The characteristics and potential clinical implications of the ACC are reviewed in this article. The P1-N1-P2 recorded from the auditory cortex following presentation of an acoustic stimulus is believed to reflect the neural encoding of a sound signal, but this provides no information regarding sound discrimination. However, the neural processing underlying behavioral discrimination capacity can be measured by modifying the traditional methodology for recording the P1-N1-P2. When obtained in response to an acoustic change within an ongoing sound, the resulting waveform is referred to as the ACC. When elicited, the ACC indicates that the brain has detected changes within a sound and the patient has the neural capacity to discriminate the sounds. In fact, results of several studies have shown that the ACC amplitude increases with increasing magnitude of acoustic changes in intensity, spectrum, and gap duration. In addition, the ACC can be reliably recorded with good test-retest reliability not only from listeners with normal hearing but also from individuals with hearing loss, hearing aids, and cochlear implants. The ACC can be obtained even in the absence of attention, and requires relatively few stimulus presentations to record a response with a good signal-to-noise ratio. Most importantly, the ACC shows reasonable agreement with behavioral measures. Therefore, these findings suggest that the ACC might represent a promising tool for the objective clinical evaluation of auditory discrimination and/or speech perception capacity. PMID:26771009

  12. Minimal complexity control law synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, Dennis S.; Haddad, Wassim M.; Nett, Carl N.

    1989-01-01

    A paradigm for control law design for modern engineering systems is proposed: Minimize control law complexity subject to the achievement of a specified accuracy in the face of a specified level of uncertainty. Correspondingly, the overall goal is to make progress towards the development of a control law design methodology which supports this paradigm. Researchers achieve this goal by developing a general theory of optimal constrained-structure dynamic output feedback compensation, where here constrained-structure means that the dynamic-structure (e.g., dynamic order, pole locations, zero locations, etc.) of the output feedback compensation is constrained in some way. By applying this theory in an innovative fashion, where here the indicated iteration occurs over the choice of the compensator dynamic-structure, the paradigm stated above can, in principle, be realized. The optimal constrained-structure dynamic output feedback problem is formulated in general terms. An elegant method for reducing optimal constrained-structure dynamic output feedback problems to optimal static output feedback problems is then developed. This reduction procedure makes use of star products, linear fractional transformations, and linear fractional decompositions, and yields as a byproduct a complete characterization of the class of optimal constrained-structure dynamic output feedback problems which can be reduced to optimal static output feedback problems. Issues such as operational/physical constraints, operating-point variations, and processor throughput/memory limitations are considered, and it is shown how anti-windup/bumpless transfer, gain-scheduling, and digital processor implementation can be facilitated by constraining the controller dynamic-structure in an appropriate fashion.

  13. Yolla Bolly Complex Wildland Fire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Yolla Bolly Complex Wildland Fire was started on June 21 by a lightning strike. As of July 11, it had burned 8,000 acres and was 65% contained. This is one of the numerous lightning-triggered blazes burning in northern California this summer. This false-color image was made from visible and infrared data collected by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite on July 6. The image centers on the largest of the fires. The burned area is charcoal-colored, while surrounding forest and other vegetation is red. Smoke is light blue-gray.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

    Size: 22.5 by 33.2 kilometers (14 by 20.6 miles) Location: 40.1 degrees North latitude, 122.9 degrees West longitude Orientation: North at top Image Data: ASTER bands 3, 2, and 1 Original Data Resolution: 15 meters (49 feet) Dates Acquired: July 6, 2008

  14. Software Performs Complex Design Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Designers use computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to gain greater understanding of the fluid flow phenomena involved in components being designed. They also use finite element analysis (FEA) as a tool to help gain greater understanding of the structural response of components to loads, stresses and strains, and the prediction of failure modes. Automated CFD and FEA engineering design has centered on shape optimization, which has been hindered by two major problems: 1) inadequate shape parameterization algorithms, and 2) inadequate algorithms for CFD and FEA grid modification. Working with software engineers at Stennis Space Center, a NASA commercial partner, Optimal Solutions Software LLC, was able to utilize its revolutionary, one-of-a-kind arbitrary shape deformation (ASD) capability-a major advancement in solving these two aforementioned problems-to optimize the shapes of complex pipe components that transport highly sensitive fluids. The ASD technology solves the problem of inadequate shape parameterization algorithms by allowing the CFD designers to freely create their own shape parameters, therefore eliminating the restriction of only being able to use the computer-aided design (CAD) parameters. The problem of inadequate algorithms for CFD grid modification is solved by the fact that the new software performs a smooth volumetric deformation. This eliminates the extremely costly process of having to remesh the grid for every shape change desired. The program can perform a design change in a markedly reduced amount of time, a process that would traditionally involve the designer returning to the CAD model to reshape and then remesh the shapes, something that has been known to take hours, days-even weeks or months-depending upon the size of the model.

  15. Multiscale Resilience of Complex Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchiguirinskaia, I.; Schertzer, D. J. M.; Giangola-Murzyn, A.; Hoang Cong, T.

    2014-12-01

    We first argue the need for well defined resilience metrics to better evaluate the resilience of complex systems such as (peri-)urban flood management systems. We review both the successes and limitations of resilience metrics in the framework of dynamical systems and their generalization in the framework of the viability theory. We then point out that the most important step to achieve is to define resilience across scales instead of doing it at a given scale. Our preliminary, critical analysis of the series of attempts to define an operational resilience metrics led us to consider a scale invariant metrics based on the scale independent codimension of extreme singularities. Multifractal downscaling of climate scenarios can be considered as a first illustration. We focussed on a flood scenario evaluation method with the help of two singularities γ_s and γ_Max, corresponding respectively to an effective and a probable maximum singularity, that yield an innovative framework to address the issues of flood resilience systems in a scale independent manner. Indeed, the stationarity of the universal multifractal parameters would result into a rather stable value of probable maximum singularity γ_s. By fixing the limit of acceptability for a maximum flood water depth at a given scale, with a corresponding singularity, we effectively fix the threshold of the probable maximum singularity γ_s as a criterion of the flood resilience we accept. Then various scenarios of flood resilient measures could be simulated with the help of Multi-Hydro under upcoming climat scenarios. The scenarios that result in estimates of either γ_Max or γ_s below the pre-selected γ_s value will assure the effective flood resilience of the whole modeled system across scales. The research for this work was supported, in part, by the EU FP7 SMARTesT and INTERREG IVB RainGain projects.

  16. Mesoscale convective complexes in Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Laing, A.G.; Fritsch, J.M. )

    1993-08-01

    Digitized full-disk infrared satellite imagery from the European geostationary satellite (Meteosat) for 1986 and 1987 was used to construct a climatology of mesoscale convective complexes (MCCs) in Africa. One hundred ninety-five systems formed over Africa and its near vicinity during the two-year study period. From this database, characteristics of Africa MCCs were calculated. The results indicate that these MCCs display many of the same characteristics as those found in the Americas, the Indian subcontinent, and the western Pacific region. The systems are predominantly nocturnal and tend to form over or in the immediate vicinity of land. The average lifetime of African MCCs is about 11.5 h. The size distributions of the African systems are also extremely similar to those of the Americas, the Indian subcontinent, and the western Pacific region with most systems exhibiting areas between 2 [times] 10[sup 5] and 3 [times] 10[sup 5] km[sup 2]. The monthly frequency distribution of African systems indicates that peak activity tends to occur during the period of most intense insolation. Like the MCCs in the western Pacific region and the Americas, the African MCCs tend to propagate toward the low-level high-[theta][sub e] air that feeds the convective systems. Systems over northern Africa moved toward the west-southwest, with a few developing into tropical cyclones over the Atlantic. Systems over southeastern Africa generally moved toward the northeast and east. It is concluded that the satellite-observed systems over Africa are essentially the same phenomena as the MCC populations observed over the Americas, the Indian monsoon region, and the western Pacific region. In addition, the large number of MCCs found worldwide (approximately 300-400 per year) indicate that they may be significant contributors to the global tropospheric energy budget and hydrological cycle. 46 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Complexity of vitamin E metabolism.

    PubMed

    Schmölz, Lisa; Birringer, Marc; Lorkowski, Stefan; Wallert, Maria

    2016-02-26

    Bioavailability of vitamin E is influenced by several factors, most are highlighted in this review. While gender, age and genetic constitution influence vitamin E bioavailability but cannot be modified, life-style and intake of vitamin E can be. Numerous factors must be taken into account however, i.e., when vitamin E is orally administrated, the food matrix may contain competing nutrients. The complex metabolic processes comprise intestinal absorption, vascular transport, hepatic sorting by intracellular binding proteins, such as the significant α-tocopherol-transfer protein, and hepatic metabolism. The coordinated changes involved in the hepatic metabolism of vitamin E provide an effective physiological pathway to protect tissues against the excessive accumulation of, in particular, non-α-tocopherol forms. Metabolism of vitamin E begins with one cycle of CYP4F2/CYP3A4-dependent ω-hydroxylation followed by five cycles of subsequent β-oxidation, and forms the water-soluble end-product carboxyethylhydroxychroman. All known hepatic metabolites can be conjugated and are excreted, depending on the length of their side-chain, either via urine or feces. The physiological handling of vitamin E underlies kinetics which vary between the different vitamin E forms. Here, saturation of the side-chain and also substitution of the chromanol ring system are important. Most of the metabolic reactions and processes that are involved with vitamin E are also shared by other fat soluble vitamins. Influencing interactions with other nutrients such as vitamin K or pharmaceuticals are also covered by this review. All these processes modulate the formation of vitamin E metabolites and their concentrations in tissues and body fluids. Differences in metabolism might be responsible for the discrepancies that have been observed in studies performed in vivo and in vitro using vitamin E as a supplement or nutrient. To evaluate individual vitamin E status, the analytical procedures used for

  18. Acoustic Change Complex: Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The acoustic change complex (ACC) is a cortical auditory evoked potential elicited in response to a change in an ongoing sound. The characteristics and potential clinical implications of the ACC are reviewed in this article. The P1-N1-P2 recorded from the auditory cortex following presentation of an acoustic stimulus is believed to reflect the neural encoding of a sound signal, but this provides no information regarding sound discrimination. However, the neural processing underlying behavioral discrimination capacity can be measured by modifying the traditional methodology for recording the P1-N1-P2. When obtained in response to an acoustic change within an ongoing sound, the resulting waveform is referred to as the ACC. When elicited, the ACC indicates that the brain has detected changes within a sound and the patient has the neural capacity to discriminate the sounds. In fact, results of several studies have shown that the ACC amplitude increases with increasing magnitude of acoustic changes in intensity, spectrum, and gap duration. In addition, the ACC can be reliably recorded with good test-retest reliability not only from listeners with normal hearing but also from individuals with hearing loss, hearing aids, and cochlear implants. The ACC can be obtained even in the absence of attention, and requires relatively few stimulus presentations to record a response with a good signal-to-noise ratio. Most importantly, the ACC shows reasonable agreement with behavioral measures. Therefore, these findings suggest that the ACC might represent a promising tool for the objective clinical evaluation of auditory discrimination and/or speech perception capacity. PMID:26771009

  19. Complexity of vitamin E metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Schmölz, Lisa; Birringer, Marc; Lorkowski, Stefan; Wallert, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Bioavailability of vitamin E is influenced by several factors, most are highlighted in this review. While gender, age and genetic constitution influence vitamin E bioavailability but cannot be modified, life-style and intake of vitamin E can be. Numerous factors must be taken into account however, i.e., when vitamin E is orally administrated, the food matrix may contain competing nutrients. The complex metabolic processes comprise intestinal absorption, vascular transport, hepatic sorting by intracellular binding proteins, such as the significant α-tocopherol-transfer protein, and hepatic metabolism. The coordinated changes involved in the hepatic metabolism of vitamin E provide an effective physiological pathway to protect tissues against the excessive accumulation of, in particular, non-α-tocopherol forms. Metabolism of vitamin E begins with one cycle of CYP4F2/CYP3A4-dependent ω-hydroxylation followed by five cycles of subsequent β-oxidation, and forms the water-soluble end-product carboxyethylhydroxychroman. All known hepatic metabolites can be conjugated and are excreted, depending on the length of their side-chain, either via urine or feces. The physiological handling of vitamin E underlies kinetics which vary between the different vitamin E forms. Here, saturation of the side-chain and also substitution of the chromanol ring system are important. Most of the metabolic reactions and processes that are involved with vitamin E are also shared by other fat soluble vitamins. Influencing interactions with other nutrients such as vitamin K or pharmaceuticals are also covered by this review. All these processes modulate the formation of vitamin E metabolites and their concentrations in tissues and body fluids. Differences in metabolism might be responsible for the discrepancies that have been observed in studies performed in vivo and in vitro using vitamin E as a supplement or nutrient. To evaluate individual vitamin E status, the analytical procedures used for

  20. Proteins as paradigms of complex systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Fenimore, P. W.; Frauenfelder, Hans,; Young, R. D.

    2003-03-26

    The science of complexity has moved to center stage within the past few decades. Complex systems range from glasses to the immune system and the brain. Glasses are too simple to possess all aspects of complexity; brains are too complex to expose common concepts and laws of complexity. Proteins, however, are systems where many concepts and laws of complexity can be explored experimentally, theoretically, and computationally. Such studies have elucidated crucial aspects. The energy landscape has emerged as one central concept; it describes the free energy of a system as a function of temperature and the coordinates of all relevant atoms. A second concept is that of fluctuations. Without fluctuations, proteins would be dead and life impossible. A third concept is slaving. Proteins are not isolated systems; they are embedded in cells and membranes. Slaving arises when the fluctuations in the surroundings of a protein dominate many of the motions of the protein proper.