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Sample records for octopus wunderpus photogenicus

  1. Individually unique body color patterns in octopus (Wunderpus photogenicus) allow for photoidentification.

    PubMed

    Huffard, Christine L; Caldwell, Roy L; DeLoach, Ned; Gentry, David Wayne; Humann, Paul; MacDonald, Bill; Moore, Bruce; Ross, Richard; Uno, Takako; Wong, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    Studies on the longevity and migration patterns of wild animals rely heavily on the ability to track individual adults. Non-extractive sampling methods are particularly important when monitoring animals that are commercially important to ecotourism, and/or are rare. The use of unique body patterns to recognize and track individual vertebrates is well-established, but not common in ecological studies of invertebrates. Here we provide a method for identifying individual Wunderpus photogenicus using unique body color patterns. This charismatic tropical octopus is commercially important to the underwater photography, dive tourism, and home aquarium trades, but is yet to be monitored in the wild. Among the adults examined closely, the configurations of fixed white markings on the dorsal mantle were found to be unique. In two animals kept in aquaria, these fixed markings were found not to change over time. We believe another individual was photographed twice in the wild, two months apart. When presented with multiple images of W. photogenicus, volunteer observers reliably matched photographs of the same individuals. Given the popularity of W. photogenicus among underwater photographers, and the ease with which volunteers can correctly identify individuals, photo-identification appears to be a practical means to monitor individuals in the wild. PMID:19009019

  2. Individually Unique Body Color Patterns in Octopus (Wunderpus photogenicus) Allow for Photoidentification

    PubMed Central

    Huffard, Christine L.; Caldwell, Roy L.; DeLoach, Ned; Gentry, David Wayne; Humann, Paul; MacDonald, Bill; Moore, Bruce; Ross, Richard; Uno, Takako; Wong, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    Studies on the longevity and migration patterns of wild animals rely heavily on the ability to track individual adults. Non-extractive sampling methods are particularly important when monitoring animals that are commercially important to ecotourism, and/or are rare. The use of unique body patterns to recognize and track individual vertebrates is well-established, but not common in ecological studies of invertebrates. Here we provide a method for identifying individual Wunderpus photogenicus using unique body color patterns. This charismatic tropical octopus is commercially important to the underwater photography, dive tourism, and home aquarium trades, but is yet to be monitored in the wild. Among the adults examined closely, the configurations of fixed white markings on the dorsal mantle were found to be unique. In two animals kept in aquaria, these fixed markings were found not to change over time. We believe another individual was photographed twice in the wild, two months apart. When presented with multiple images of W. photogenicus, volunteer observers reliably matched photographs of the same individuals. Given the popularity of W. photogenicus among underwater photographers, and the ease with which volunteers can correctly identify individuals, photo-identification appears to be a practical means to monitor individuals in the wild. PMID:19009019

  3. Octopus

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2015-05-26

    Octopus is a scientific program aimed at the ab initio virtual experimentation on a hopefully ever-increasing range of system types. Electrons are described quantum-mechanically within density-functional theory (DFT), in its time-dependent form (TDDFT) when doing simulations in time. Nuclei are described classically as point particles. Electron-nucleus interaction is described within the pseudopotential approximation.

  4. Octopus automutilation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Reimschuessel, R; Stoskopf, M K

    1990-05-01

    This paper describes an automutilation syndrome (OAS) in three species of captive octopuses, Octopus dolfleini, O. bimaculoides, and O. maya, characterized by external arm and mantle lesions. Three clinical patterns in nine animals had similar and characteristic gross and histopathologic features. Axial nerve or brachial artery lesions were observed in six of the nine cases and vascular lesions were seen in two of eight cases with mantle ulcerations. A relationship between automutilation in the octopus and dysesthesias due to neural or vascular pathology is proposed. PMID:2351844

  5. The toxicology of Octopus maculosa: the blue-ringed octopus.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, M S

    1999-10-01

    The biotoxicology of the Australian blue-ringed octopus is detailed with the view of introducing it as a remedy into the homoeopathic Materia Medica and stimulating the second step of proving this venom. PMID:10582647

  6. Signal Use by Octopuses in Agonistic Interactions.

    PubMed

    Scheel, David; Godfrey-Smith, Peter; Lawrence, Matthew

    2016-02-01

    Cephalopods show behavioral parallels to birds and mammals despite considerable evolutionary distance [1, 2]. Many cephalopods produce complex body patterns and visual signals, documented especially in cuttlefish and squid, where they are used both in camouflage and a range of interspecific interactions [1, 3-5]. Octopuses, in contrast, are usually seen as solitary and asocial [6, 7]; their body patterns and color changes have primarily been interpreted as camouflage and anti-predator tactics [8-12], though the familiar view of the solitary octopus faces a growing list of exceptions. Here, we show by field observation that in a shallow-water octopus, Octopus tetricus, a range of visible displays are produced during agonistic interactions, and these displays correlate with the outcome of those interactions. Interactions in which dark body color by an approaching octopus was matched by similar color in the reacting octopus were more likely to escalate to grappling. Darkness in an approaching octopus met by paler color in the reacting octopus accompanied retreat of the paler octopus. Octopuses also displayed on high ground and stood with spread web and elevated mantle, often producing these behaviors in combinations. This study is the first to document the systematic use of signals during agonistic interactions among octopuses. We show prima facie conformity of our results to an influential model of agonistic signaling [13]. These results suggest that interactions have a greater influence on octopus evolution than has been recognized and show the importance of convergent evolution in behavioral traits. PMID:26832440

  7. Octopus movement: push right, go left.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Scott L

    2015-05-01

    Octopus arms have essentially infinite degrees of freedom. New research shows that, despite this potentially great complexity, to locomote octopuses simply elongate one or more arms, thus pushing the body in the opposite direction, and do so without activating the arms in an ordered pattern. PMID:25942549

  8. Cannibalistic behavior of octopus (Octopus vulgaris) in the wild.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Urcera, Jorge; Garci, Manuel E; Roura, Alvaro; González, Angel F; Cabanellas-Reboredo, Miguel; Morales-Nin, Beatriz; Guerra, Angel

    2014-11-01

    The first description of cannibalism in wild adult Octopus vulgaris is presented from 3 observations made in the Ría de Vigo (NW Spain), which were filmed by scuba divers. These records document common traits in cannibalistic behavior: (a) it was intercohort cannibalism; (b) attacks were made by both males and females; (c) in 2 of the records, the prey were transported to the den, which was covered with stones of different sizes; (d) the predator started to eat the tip of the arms of its prey; (e) predation on conspecifics occurred even if there were other abundant prey available (i.e., mussels); and (f) the prey/predator weight ratio in the 3 cases ranged from 20% to 25% body weight. The relationships between this behavior and sex, defense of territory, energy balance, food shortage, competition and predation, as well as how the attacker kills its victim are discussed. PMID:25198542

  9. Connecting your Apple to Octopus 7600's

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, G.W. Jr.

    1983-01-17

    In UCID-19588, Communicating between the Apple and the Wang, we described how to take Apple DOS text files and send them to the Wang, and how to return Wang files to the Apple. It is also possible to use your Apple as an Octopus terminal, and to exchange files with Octopus 7600's. Presumably, you can also talk to the Crays, or any other part of the system. This connection has another virtue. It eliminates one of the terminals in your office.

  10. An embodied view of octopus neurobiology.

    PubMed

    Hochner, Binyamin

    2012-10-23

    Octopuses have a unique flexible body and unusual morphology, but nevertheless they are undoubtedly a great evolutionary success. They compete successfully with vertebrates in their ecological niche using a rich behavioral repertoire more typical of an intelligent predator which includes extremely effective defensive behavior--fast escape swimming and an astonishing ability to adapt their shape and color to their environment. The most obvious characteristic feature of an octopus is its eight long and flexible arms, but these pose a great challenge for achieving the level of motor and sensory information processing necessary for their behaviors. First, coordinating motion is a formidable task because of the infinite degrees of freedom that have to be controlled; and second, it is hard to use body coordinates in this flexible animal to represent sensory information in a central control system. Here I will review experimental results suggesting that these difficulties, arising from the animal's morphology, have imposed the evolution of unique brain/body/behavior relationships best explained as intelligent behavior which emerges from the octopus's embodied organization. The term 'intelligent embodiment' comes from robotics and refers to an approach to designing autonomous robots in which the behavior emerges from the dynamic physical and sensory interactions of the agent's materials, morphology and environment. Consideration of the unusual neurobiology of the octopus in the light of its unique morphology suggests that similar embodied principles are instrumental for understanding the emergence of intelligent behavior in all biological systems. PMID:23098601

  11. Octopus-shaped Instabilities of Evaporating Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murisic, Nebojsa; Kondic, Lou; Gotkis, Yehiel; Ivanov, Igor

    2006-11-01

    We report on curious phenomena recorded recently during spreading of evaporating isopropyl alcohol droplets on silicon wafer surfaces. Novel ``octopus''-shaped instabilities were noticed appearing close to the contact line. In addition to our desire to understand the instability, a motivation for this study is the fact that the region close to the contact line carries significant amounts of solid residue which can deteriorate electrical and other properties of the semiconductor devices. After presenting the experimental results, we discuss a lubrication-based mathematical model describing spreading of volatile drops. Through linear stability analysis and numerical simulations, we show that essential factors influencing occurrence of ``octopus''-shaped instabilities include volatility of liquid, and thermal conductivity of both liquid and solid. see http://m.njit.edu/~kondic/thinfilms/octopi.html.

  12. Infiltrated plaques resulting from an injury caused by the common octopus (Octopus vulgaris): a case report.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Vidal; de Magalhães, Claudia Alves

    2014-01-01

    Several species of octopus are considered venomous due to toxins present in the glands connected to their "beak", which may be associated with hunt and kill of prey. Herein, we report an accident involving a common octopus (Octopus vulgaris) that injured an instructor during a practical biology lesson and provoked an inflamed infiltrated plaque on the hand of the victim. The lesion was present for about three weeks and was treated with cold compresses and anti-inflammatory drugs. It was healed ten days after leaving a hyperchromic macule at the bite site. The probable cause of the severe inflammation was the digestive enzymes of the glands and not the neurotoxins of the venom. PMID:25873938

  13. Neuroethology: self-recognition helps octopuses avoid entanglement.

    PubMed

    Crook, Robyn J; Walters, Edgar T

    2014-06-01

    How an octopus performs complex movements of its eight sucker-studded arms without entanglement has been a mystery. A new study has found that self-recognition of the octopus's skin by its suckers inhibits reflexive grasping of its own arms, simplifying the mechanisms needed to generate intricate arm behavior. PMID:24892911

  14. Metal accumulation and oxidative stress biomarkers in octopus (Octopus vulgaris) from Northwest Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Semedo, Miguel; Reis-Henriques, Maria Armanda; Rey-Salgueiro, Ledicia; Oliveira, Marta; Delerue-Matos, Cristina; Morais, Simone; Ferreira, Marta

    2012-09-01

    Metals are ubiquitous in the environment and accumulate in aquatic organisms and are known for their ability to enhance the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In aquatic species, oxidative stress mechanisms have been studied by measuring antioxidant enzyme activities and oxidative damages in tissues. The aim of this study was to apply and validate a set of oxidative stress biomarkers and correlate responses with metal contents in tissues of common octopus (Octopus vulgaris). Antioxidant enzyme activity (catalase--CAT, superoxide dismutase--SOD and glutathione S-transferases--GST), oxidative damages (lipid peroxidation--LPO and protein carbonyl content--PCO) and metal content (Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd and As) in the digestive gland and arm of octopus, collected in the NW Portuguese coast in different periods, were assessed after capture and after 14 days in captivity. CAT and SOD activities were highly responsive to fluctuations in metal concentrations and able to reduce oxidative damage, LPO and PCO in the digestive gland. CAT activity was also positively correlated with SOD and GST activities, which emphasizes that the three enzymes respond in a coordinated way to metal induced oxidative stress. Our results validate the use of oxidative stress biomarkers to assess metal pollution effects in this ecological and commercial relevant species. Moreover, octopus seems to have the ability to control oxidative damage by triggering an antioxidant enzyme coordinated response in the digestive gland. PMID:22796413

  15. Uptake, transfer and elimination kinetics of paralytic shellfish toxins in common octopus (Octopus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Lopes, Vanessa M; Baptista, Miguel; Repolho, Tiago; Rosa, Rui; Costa, Pedro Reis

    2014-01-01

    Marine phycotoxins derived from harmful algal blooms are known to be associated with mass mortalities in the higher trophic levels of marine food webs. Bivalve mollusks and planktivorous fish are the most studied vectors of marine phycotoxins. However, field surveys recently showed that cephalopod mollusks also constitute potential vectors of toxins. Thus, here we determine, for the first time, the time course of accumulation and depuration of paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs) in the common octopus (Octopus vulgaris). Concomitantly, the underlying kinetics of toxin transfer between tissue compartments was also calculated. Naturally contaminated clams were used to orally expose the octopus to PSTs during 6 days. Afterwards, octopus specimens were fed with non-contaminated shellfish during 10 days of depuration period. Toxins reached the highest concentrations in the digestive gland surpassing the levels in the kidney by three orders of magnitude. PSTs were not detected in any other tissue analyzed. Net accumulation efficiencies of 42% for GTX5, 36% for dcSTX and 23% for C1+2 were calculated for the digestive gland. These compounds were the most abundant toxins in both digestive gland and the contaminated shellfish diet. The small differences in relative abundance of each toxin observed between the prey and the cephalopod predator indicates low conversion rates of these toxins. The depuration period was better described using an exponential decay model comprising a single compartment - the entire viscera. It is worth noting that since octopuses' excretion and depuration rates are low, the digestive gland is able to accumulate very high toxin concentrations for long periods of time. Therefore, the present study clearly shows that O. vulgaris is a high-potential vector of PSTs during and even after the occurrence of these toxic algal blooms. PMID:24316438

  16. Allopatric Speciation within a Cryptic Species Complex of Australasian Octopuses

    PubMed Central

    Amor, Michael D.; Norman, Mark D.; Cameron, Hayley E.; Strugnell, Jan M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite extensive revisions over recent decades, the taxonomy of benthic octopuses (Family Octopodidae) remains in a considerable flux. Among groups of unresolved status is a species complex of morphologically similar shallow-water octopods from subtropical Australasia, including: Allopatric populations of Octopus tetricus on the eastern and western coasts of Australia, of which the Western Australian form is speculated to be a distinct or sub-species; and Octopus gibbsi from New Zealand, a proposed synonym of Australian forms. This study employed a combination of molecular and morphological techniques to resolve the taxonomic status of the ‘tetricus complex’. Phylogenetic analyses (based on five mitochondrial genes: 12S rRNA, 16S rRNA, COI, COIII and Cytb) and Generalised Mixed Yule Coalescent (GMYC) analysis (based on COI, COIII and Cytb) distinguished eastern and Western Australian O. tetricus as distinct species, while O. gibbsi was found to be synonymous with the east Australian form (BS = >97, PP = 1; GMYC p = 0.01). Discrete morphological differences in mature male octopuses (based on sixteen morphological traits) provided further evidence of cryptic speciation between east (including New Zealand) and west coast populations; although females proved less useful in morphological distinction among members of the tetricus complex. In addition, phylogenetic analyses suggested populations of octopuses currently treated under the name Octopus vulgaris are paraphyletic; providing evidence of cryptic speciation among global populations of O. vulgaris, the most commercially valuable octopus species worldwide. PMID:24964133

  17. RETROSPECTIVE REVIEW OF MORTALITY IN GIANT PACIFIC OCTOPUS (ENTEROCTOPUS DOFLEINI).

    PubMed

    Seeley, Kathryn E; Clayton, Leigh A; Hadfield, Catherine A; Muth, Dillon; Mankowski, Joseph L; Kelly, Kathleen M

    2016-03-01

    The giant Pacific octopus (Enteroctopus dofleini) is a popular exhibit species in public display aquaria, but information on health and disease is limited. This retrospective review evaluates time in collection and describes antemortem clinical signs and pathology of giant Pacific octopuses in an aquarium setting. Between March 2004 and December 2013, there were 19 mortalities: eight males, 10 females, and one individual whose sex was not recorded. Average time spent in collection for all octopuses was 375 ± 173 days (males 351 ± 148 days, females 410 ± 196 days). Ten (52.6%) of the octopuses were sexually mature at the time of death, six (31.6%) were not sexually mature, and reproductive status could not be determined in three octopuses (15.8%). Minimal changes were noted on gross necropsy but branchitis was histologically evident in 14 octopuses, often in conjunction with amoeboid or flagellate parasites. Senescence, parasitism, and husbandry were all important contributors to mortality and should be considered when caring for captive octopuses. PMID:27010286

  18. Allopatric speciation within a cryptic species complex of Australasian octopuses.

    PubMed

    Amor, Michael D; Norman, Mark D; Cameron, Hayley E; Strugnell, Jan M

    2014-01-01

    Despite extensive revisions over recent decades, the taxonomy of benthic octopuses (Family Octopodidae) remains in a considerable flux. Among groups of unresolved status is a species complex of morphologically similar shallow-water octopods from subtropical Australasia, including: Allopatric populations of Octopus tetricus on the eastern and western coasts of Australia, of which the Western Australian form is speculated to be a distinct or sub-species; and Octopus gibbsi from New Zealand, a proposed synonym of Australian forms. This study employed a combination of molecular and morphological techniques to resolve the taxonomic status of the 'tetricus complex'. Phylogenetic analyses (based on five mitochondrial genes: 12S rRNA, 16S rRNA, COI, COIII and Cytb) and Generalised Mixed Yule Coalescent (GMYC) analysis (based on COI, COIII and Cytb) distinguished eastern and Western Australian O. tetricus as distinct species, while O. gibbsi was found to be synonymous with the east Australian form (BS = >97, PP = 1; GMYC p = 0.01). Discrete morphological differences in mature male octopuses (based on sixteen morphological traits) provided further evidence of cryptic speciation between east (including New Zealand) and west coast populations; although females proved less useful in morphological distinction among members of the tetricus complex. In addition, phylogenetic analyses suggested populations of octopuses currently treated under the name Octopus vulgaris are paraphyletic; providing evidence of cryptic speciation among global populations of O. vulgaris, the most commercially valuable octopus species worldwide. PMID:24964133

  19. Arm coordination in octopus crawling involves unique motor control strategies.

    PubMed

    Levy, Guy; Flash, Tamar; Hochner, Binyamin

    2015-05-01

    To cope with the exceptional computational complexity that is involved in the control of its hyper-redundant arms [1], the octopus has adopted unique motor control strategies in which the central brain activates rather autonomous motor programs in the elaborated peripheral nervous system of the arms [2, 3]. How octopuses coordinate their eight long and flexible arms in locomotion is still unknown. Here, we present the first detailed kinematic analysis of octopus arm coordination in crawling. The results are surprising in several respects: (1) despite its bilaterally symmetrical body, the octopus can crawl in any direction relative to its body orientation; (2) body and crawling orientation are monotonically and independently controlled; and (3) contrasting known animal locomotion, octopus crawling lacks any apparent rhythmical patterns in limb coordination, suggesting a unique non-rhythmical output of the octopus central controller. We show that this uncommon maneuverability is derived from the radial symmetry of the arms around the body and the simple pushing-by-elongation mechanism by which the arms create the crawling thrust. These two together enable a mechanism whereby the central controller chooses in a moment-to-moment fashion which arms to recruit for pushing the body in an instantaneous direction. Our findings suggest that the soft molluscan body has affected in an embodied way [4, 5] the emergence of the adaptive motor behavior of the octopus. PMID:25891406

  20. Aggregata (Protozoa: Apicomplexa) infection in the common octopus Octopus vulgaris from the West Mediterranean Sea: The infection rates and possible effect of faunistic, environmental and ecological factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo-Hernández, E.; Barcala, E.; Berriatua, E.; García-Ayala, A.; Muñoz, P.

    2013-10-01

    Prevalence and distribution of the coccidian parasite Aggregata octopiana (Protozoa: Apicomplexa) in common octopus (Octopus vulgaris) in the Mediterranean Spanish coasts were studied. A total of 114 octopuses were sampled from 30 geographic sectors by trawl fleet, and whitish macroscopic oocysts typical of A. octopiana infection were recorded in 96% of octopuses in the digestive tract and mainly in intestine and spiral caecum. The univariate analysis showed that lesion extension varied according to specific octopus, environmental and faunistic variables. A subsequent multivariable analysis indicated that the risk of macroscopic lesions in the caecum was greater in males compared to females, in octopuses living in deeper compared to shallower waters and in hauls where the crustacean Pagurus excavatus was present. The study provides further evidence of the abundance of A. octopiana in octopus ecosystems urging for further studies to evaluate its health impact. The combined abundance of infected octopuses and P. excavatus merits attention.

  1. [Effect of freezing and cooking on the texture and electrophoretic pattern of the proteins of octopus arms (Octopus vulgaris)].

    PubMed

    Reyes, Genara; Nirchio, Mauro; Bello, Rafael; Borderías, Javier

    2014-09-01

    Texture is the most valuable feature in cephalopods. Factors that mainly affect the texture of octopus are: freezing, scalding and cooking. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of freezing, scalding and length of cooking time on the texture and electrophoretic pattern of proteins of octopus arms. Octopuses were trapped near Margarita Island and carried with ice to the laboratory where they were packed and subjected to: a) freezing at -27 degrees C or at -20 degrees C b) scalding c) cooking for 25 min, 35 min or 45 min. Shear force was determined by Kramer cell on strips of octopus arms. SDS-PAGE was done according to the Laemmli method with 12% polyacrilamide gels. A sensory evaluation of the preference of texture was carried out using a hedonic scale of 7-points and a non-trained panel. Octopus texture was not affected by freezing temperature or scalding. Frozen octopus was softer after cooking than fresh. The longer the cooking time was, the softer the octopus was. Myosin heavy chain (MHC) was not significantly affected by scalding or cooking; however large aggregates heavier than MHC, new bands and loss of resolution of the bands appeared. Myosin and paramyosin bands were more affected by freezing prior to cooking. PMID:26137796

  2. Amino and fatty acid dynamics of octopus (Octopus vulgaris) early life stages under ocean warming.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Vanessa M; Faleiro, Filipa; Baptista, Miguel; Pimentel, Marta S; Paula, José R; Couto, Ana; Bandarra, Narcisa; Anacleto, Patrícia; Marques, António; Rosa, Rui

    2016-01-01

    The oceans are becoming warmer, and the higher temperatures are expected to have a major impact on marine life at different levels of biological organization, especially at the most vulnerable early life stages. Thus, we hypothesize that the future warmer scenarios (here +3 °C) will affect the biochemical composition (amino acid - AA, and fatty acid-FA) of octopod (Octopus vulgaris) embryos and recently-hatched pelagic paralarvae. The main essential amino acids found in octopus embryos were arginine, leucine and lysine; while aspartic and glutamic acids, and taurine were the main non-essential amino acids. Palmitic, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids were the main FAs found in octopus tissues. Relevant ontogenetic changes were observed, namely a steep decrease in the content of many AAs, and a selective retention of FAs, thus evidencing the protein-based metabolism of these cephalopods. Temperature per si did not elicit significant changes in the overall FA composition, but was responsible for a significant decrease in the content of several AAs, indicating increased embryonic consumption. PMID:26724195

  3. [Reproduction, diet and fishery of Octopus (Octopus) hubbsorum (Mollusca: Cephalopoda) in the coast of Oaxaca, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Alejo-Plata, Maria del Carmen; Gómez-Márquez, José Luis; Carrillo, Samuel Ramos; Herrera-Galindo, Jorge Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    The octopus Octopus hubbsorum (Berry 1953) ranges widely and is important for the artisanal fishery in Puerto Angel, Oaxaca, Mexico. Samples were taken approximately at every two weeks from January 2002 to November 2003. All organisms were measured for dorsal mantle length (DLM) and total weight; sex and maturity gonadic stage were registered. For the stomach content analysis, frequency of occurrence and emptying indexes were used. The 352 organisms caught ranged from 4 to 18 cm in DLM; the sex ratio was different from 1 (chi2 = 24.2, p<0.05) throughout the year. The maximum values of the GSI appeared in May (4.1917 for females; 1.2675 in males). LDM for first sexual maturity (LDM50%) was 16 cm (females) and 14 cm (males). Octopus hubbsorum moves from deep waters to the coast, probably in search of better conditions, and lays masses of eggs on rocky substrata. They are fished from March to October, with higher intensity in April and May. Fishing effort was related to the oceanographic characteristics and the atmospheric conditions of the area. From April to September the CPUE monthly mean was 20-10 kg/divers/day. Using the CPUE and environmental condition relationship, the estimated adequate superficial temperature for fishing is 29.5 degrees C. PMID:19637689

  4. The Morphology and Adhesion Mechanism of Octopus vulgaris Suckers

    PubMed Central

    Tramacere, Francesca; Beccai, Lucia; Kuba, Michael; Gozzi, Alessandro; Bifone, Angelo; Mazzolai, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    The octopus sucker represents a fascinating natural system performing adhesion on different terrains and substrates. Octopuses use suckers to anchor the body to the substrate or to grasp, investigate and manipulate objects, just to mention a few of their functions. Our study focuses on the morphology and adhesion mechanism of suckers in Octopus vulgaris. We use three different techniques (MRI, ultrasonography, and histology) and a 3D reconstruction approach to contribute knowledge on both morphology and functionality of the sucker structure in O. vulgaris. The results of our investigation are two-fold. First, we observe some morphological differences with respect to the octopus species previously studied (i.e., Octopus joubini, Octopus maya, Octopus bimaculoides/bimaculatus and Eledone cirrosa). In particular, in O. vulgaris the acetabular chamber, that is a hollow spherical cavity in other octopuses, shows an ellipsoidal cavity which roof has an important protuberance with surface roughness. Second, based on our findings, we propose a hypothesis on the sucker adhesion mechanism in O. vulgaris. We hypothesize that the process of continuous adhesion is achieved by sealing the orifice between acetabulum and infundibulum portions via the acetabular protuberance. We suggest this to take place while the infundibular part achieves a completely flat shape; and, by sustaining adhesion through preservation of sucker configuration. In vivo ultrasonographic recordings support our proposed adhesion model by showing the sucker in action. Such an underlying physical mechanism offers innovative potential cues for developing bioinspired artificial adhesion systems. Furthermore, we think that it could possibly represent a useful approach in order to investigate any potential difference in the ecology and in the performance of adhesion by different species. PMID:23750233

  5. Multiple object redshift determinations in clusters of galaxies using OCTOPUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazure, A.; Proust, D.; Sodre, L.; Capelato, H. V.; Lund, G.

    1988-04-01

    The ESO multiobject facility, Octopus, was used to observe a sample of galaxy clusters such as SC2008-565 in an attempt to collect a large set of individual radial velocities. A dispersion of 114 A/mm was used, providing spectral coverage from 3800 to 5180 A. Octopus was found to be a well-adapted instrument for the rapid and simultaneous determination of redshifts in cataloged galaxy clusters.

  6. Multiple object redshift determinations in clusters of galaxies using OCTOPUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazure, A.; Proust, D.; Sodre, L.; Lund, G.; Capelato, H.

    1987-03-01

    The ESO multiobject facility, Octopus, was used to observe a sample of galaxy clusters such as SC2008-565 in an attempt to collect a large set of individual radial velocities. A dispersion of 114 A/mm was used, providing spectral coverage from 3800 to 5180 A. Octopus was found to be a well-adapted instrument for the rapid and simultaneous determination of redshifts in cataloged galaxy clusters.

  7. The morphology and adhesion mechanism of Octopus vulgaris suckers.

    PubMed

    Tramacere, Francesca; Beccai, Lucia; Kuba, Michael; Gozzi, Alessandro; Bifone, Angelo; Mazzolai, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    The octopus sucker represents a fascinating natural system performing adhesion on different terrains and substrates. Octopuses use suckers to anchor the body to the substrate or to grasp, investigate and manipulate objects, just to mention a few of their functions. Our study focuses on the morphology and adhesion mechanism of suckers in Octopus vulgaris. We use three different techniques (MRI, ultrasonography, and histology) and a 3D reconstruction approach to contribute knowledge on both morphology and functionality of the sucker structure in O. vulgaris. The results of our investigation are two-fold. First, we observe some morphological differences with respect to the octopus species previously studied (i.e., Octopus joubini, Octopus maya, Octopus bimaculoides/bimaculatus and Eledone cirrosa). In particular, in O. vulgaris the acetabular chamber, that is a hollow spherical cavity in other octopuses, shows an ellipsoidal cavity which roof has an important protuberance with surface roughness. Second, based on our findings, we propose a hypothesis on the sucker adhesion mechanism in O. vulgaris. We hypothesize that the process of continuous adhesion is achieved by sealing the orifice between acetabulum and infundibulum portions via the acetabular protuberance. We suggest this to take place while the infundibular part achieves a completely flat shape; and, by sustaining adhesion through preservation of sucker configuration. In vivo ultrasonographic recordings support our proposed adhesion model by showing the sucker in action. Such an underlying physical mechanism offers innovative potential cues for developing bioinspired artificial adhesion systems. Furthermore, we think that it could possibly represent a useful approach in order to investigate any potential difference in the ecology and in the performance of adhesion by different species. PMID:23750233

  8. Pull or Push? Octopuses Solve a Puzzle Problem.

    PubMed

    Richter, Jonas N; Hochner, Binyamin; Kuba, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Octopuses have large brains and exhibit complex behaviors, but relatively little is known about their cognitive abilities. Here we present data from a five-level learning and problem-solving experiment. Seven octopuses (Octopus vulgaris) were first trained to open an L shaped container to retrieve food (level 0). After learning the initial task all animals followed the same experimental protocol, first they had to retrieve this L shaped container, presented at the same orientation, through a tight fitting hole in a clear Perspex partition (level 1). This required the octopuses to perform both pull and release or push actions. After reaching criterion the animals advanced to the next stage of the test, which would be a different consistent orientation of the object (level 2) at the start of the trial, an opaque barrier (level 3) or a random orientation of the object (level 4). All octopuses were successful in reaching criterion in all levels of the task. At the onset of each new level the performance of the animals dropped, shown as an increase in working times. However, they adapted quickly so that overall working times were not significantly different between levels. Our findings indicate that octopuses show behavioral flexibility by quickly adapting to a change in a task. This can be compared to tests in other species where subjects had to conduct actions comprised of a set of motor actions that cannot be understood by a simple learning rule alone. PMID:27003439

  9. Pull or Push? Octopuses Solve a Puzzle Problem

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Jonas N.; Hochner, Binyamin; Kuba, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Octopuses have large brains and exhibit complex behaviors, but relatively little is known about their cognitive abilities. Here we present data from a five-level learning and problem-solving experiment. Seven octopuses (Octopus vulgaris) were first trained to open an L shaped container to retrieve food (level 0). After learning the initial task all animals followed the same experimental protocol, first they had to retrieve this L shaped container, presented at the same orientation, through a tight fitting hole in a clear Perspex partition (level 1). This required the octopuses to perform both pull and release or push actions. After reaching criterion the animals advanced to the next stage of the test, which would be a different consistent orientation of the object (level 2) at the start of the trial, an opaque barrier (level 3) or a random orientation of the object (level 4). All octopuses were successful in reaching criterion in all levels of the task. At the onset of each new level the performance of the animals dropped, shown as an increase in working times. However, they adapted quickly so that overall working times were not significantly different between levels. Our findings indicate that octopuses show behavioral flexibility by quickly adapting to a change in a task. This can be compared to tests in other species where subjects had to conduct actions comprised of a set of motor actions that cannot be understood by a simple learning rule alone. PMID:27003439

  10. Developmental and physiological challenges of octopus (Octopus vulgaris) early life stages under ocean warming.

    PubMed

    Repolho, Tiago; Baptista, Miguel; Pimentel, Marta S; Dionísio, Gisela; Trübenbach, Katja; Lopes, Vanessa M; Lopes, Ana Rita; Calado, Ricardo; Diniz, Mário; Rosa, Rui

    2014-01-01

    The ability to understand and predict the effects of ocean warming (under realistic scenarios) on marine biota is of paramount importance, especially at the most vulnerable early life stages. Here we investigated the impact of predicted environmental warming (+3 °C) on the development, metabolism, heat shock response and antioxidant defense mechanisms of the early stages of the common octopus, Octopus vulgaris. As expected, warming shortened embryonic developmental time by 13 days, from 38 days at 18 °C to 25 days at 21 °C. Concomitantly, survival decreased significantly (~29.9 %). Size at hatching varied inversely with temperature, and the percentage of smaller premature paralarvae increased drastically, from 0 % at 18 °C to 17.8 % at 21 °C. The metabolic costs of the transition from an encapsulated embryo to a free planktonic form increased significantly with warming, and HSP70 concentrations and glutathione S-transferase activity levels were significantly magnified from late embryonic to paralarval stages. Yet, despite the presence of effective antioxidant defense mechanisms, ocean warming led to an augmentation of malondialdehyde levels (an indicative of enhanced ROS action), a process considered to be one of the most frequent cellular injury mechanisms. Thus, the present study provides clues about how the magnitude and rate of ocean warming will challenge the buffering capacities of octopus embryos and hatchlings' physiology. The prediction and understanding of the biochemical and physiological responses to warmer temperatures (under realistic scenarios) is crucial for the management of highly commercial and ecologically important species, such as O. vulgaris. PMID:24100467

  11. Patterns of arm muscle activation involved in octopus reaching movements.

    PubMed

    Gutfreund, Y; Flash, T; Fiorito, G; Hochner, B

    1998-08-01

    The extreme flexibility of the octopus arm allows it to perform many different movements, yet octopuses reach toward a target in a stereotyped manner using a basic invariant motor structure: a bend traveling from the base of the arm toward the tip (Gutfreund et al., 1996a). To study the neuronal control of these movements, arm muscle activation [electromyogram (EMG)] was measured together with the kinematics of reaching movements. The traveling bend is associated with a propagating wave of muscle activation, with maximal muscle activation slightly preceding the traveling bend. Tonic activation was occasionally maintained afterward. Correlation of the EMG signals with the kinematic variables (velocities and accelerations) reveals that a significant part of the kinematic variability can be explained by the level of muscle activation. Furthermore, the EMG level measured during the initial stages of movement predicts the peak velocity attained toward the end of the reaching movement. These results suggest that feed-forward motor commands play an important role in the control of movement velocity and that simple adjustment of the excitation levels at the initial stages of the movement can set the velocity profile of the whole movement. A simple model of octopus arm extension is proposed in which the driving force is set initially and is then decreased in proportion to arm diameter at the bend. The model qualitatively reproduces the typical velocity profiles of octopus reaching movements, suggesting a simple control mechanism for bend propagation in the octopus arm. PMID:9671683

  12. Advances in the laboratory culture of octopuses for biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Hanlon, R T; Forsythe, J W

    1985-02-01

    Five species of Octopus were cultured in pilot, large-scale 2,600 liter circulating seawater systems. Improvements in system design, water management and culture methodology were described. These five species all produced large eggs and correspondingly large hatchlings that had no planktonic or larval stage and thus were easier to culture. Octopuses grew well only when fed live marine crustaceans, fishes and other molluscs. Growth occurred as a 4-7% increase in body weight per day during the early exponential growth phase and 2-4% during the latter 1/2 to 3/4 of the life cycle, which ranged from 6-15 months depending upon species. All species reproduced in captivity. Survival was 70-80% when octopuses were reared in individual containers, but in group culture survival dropped to as low as 40% by the adult stage. Causes of mortality were species-specific and included hatchling abnormalities, escapes, aggression, cannibalism, disease, senescence and laboratory accidents. Octopus bimaculoides showed superior qualities for laboratory culture. The future potential of providing American scientists with laboratory-cultured octopuses was discussed along with their uses in biomedical research. PMID:3981958

  13. Kinematic decomposition and classification of octopus arm movements

    PubMed Central

    Zelman, Ido; Titon, Myriam; Yekutieli, Yoram; Hanassy, Shlomi; Hochner, Binyamin; Flash, Tamar

    2013-01-01

    The octopus arm is a muscular hydrostat and due to its deformable and highly flexible structure it is capable of a rich repertoire of motor behaviors. Its motor control system uses planning principles and control strategies unique to muscular hydrostats. We previously reconstructed a data set of octopus arm movements from records of natural movements using a sequence of 3D curves describing the virtual backbone of arm configurations. Here we describe a novel representation of octopus arm movements in which a movement is characterized by a pair of surfaces that represent the curvature and torsion values of points along the arm as a function of time. This representation allowed us to explore whether the movements are built up of elementary kinematic units by decomposing each surface into a weighted combination of 2D Gaussian functions. The resulting Gaussian functions can be considered as motion primitives at the kinematic level of octopus arm movements. These can be used to examine underlying principles of movement generation. Here we used combination of such kinematic primitives to decompose different octopus arm movements and characterize several movement prototypes according to their composition. The representation and methodology can be applied to the movement of any organ which can be modeled by means of a continuous 3D curve. PMID:23745113

  14. Laboratory maintenance, breeding, rearing, and biomedical research potential of the Yucatan octopus (Octopus maya).

    PubMed

    Van Heukelem, W F

    1977-10-01

    Eggs of the Yucatan octopus, Octopus maya, were collected at Campeche, Mexico, transported to Hawaii, and incubated in glass funnels. Benthic juveniles hatched from the large (17-mm) eggs and were reared on a variety of live and frozen foods. As many as 200 animals were reared for the first month in a 20-liter aquarium. No disease or parasite problems were encountered and nearly all well-fed juveniles survived to sexual maturity. The species was reared through four generations in the laboratory. Animals weighed 0.1 g at hatching and within 8.5 months attained an average weight of 3231 g. Mating was promiscuous and sperm were stored in the oviducts until spawning. Spawning occurred at 8-9 months of age. Up to 5,000 eggs were laid by large females and nearly 100% of fertilized eggs developed to hatching. Females brooded eggs during the 45-day period of development but artificial was as successful as natural incubation by the mother. Pos-reproductive senescent decline of both males and females was rapid and average life span was 300 days from hatching. Areas of biomedical research in which O maya could be a useful model were suggested and included neurobiology, comparative psychology, ontogeny of behavior, immunology, endocrinology, and studies of aging. PMID:592733

  15. LINCS: Livermore's network architecture. [Octopus computing network

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, J.G.

    1982-01-01

    Octopus, a local computing network that has been evolving at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for over fifteen years, is currently undergoing a major revision. The primary purpose of the revision is to consolidate and redefine the variety of conventions and formats, which have grown up over the years, into a single standard family of protocols, the Livermore Interactive Network Communication Standard (LINCS). This standard treats the entire network as a single distributed operating system such that access to a computing resource is obtained in a single way, whether that resource is local (on the same computer as the accessing process) or remote (on another computer). LINCS encompasses not only communication but also such issues as the relationship of customer to server processes and the structure, naming, and protection of resources. The discussion includes: an overview of the Livermore user community and computing hardware, the functions and structure of each of the seven layers of LINCS protocol, the reasons why we have designed our own protocols and why we are dissatisfied by the directions that current protocol standards are taking.

  16. I Know My Neighbour: Individual Recognition in Octopus vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Tricarico, Elena; Borrelli, Luciana; Gherardi, Francesca; Fiorito, Graziano

    2011-01-01

    Background Little is known about individual recognition (IR) in octopuses, although they have been abundantly studied for their sophisticated behaviour and learning capacities. Indeed, the ability of octopuses to recognise conspecifics is suggested by a number of clues emerging from both laboratory studies (where they appear to form and maintain dominance hierarchies) and field observations (octopuses of neighbouring dens display little agonism between each other). To fill this gap in knowledge, we investigated the behaviour of 24 size-matched pairs of Octopus vulgaris in laboratory conditions. Methodology/Principal Findings The experimental design was composed of 3 phases: Phase 1 (acclimatization): 12 “sight-allowed” (and 12 “isolated”) pairs were maintained for 3 days in contiguous tanks separated by a transparent (and opaque) partition to allow (and block) the vision of the conspecific; Phase 2 (cohabitation): members of each pair (both sight-allowed and isolated) were transferred into an experimental tank and were allowed to interact for 15 min every day for 3 consecutive days; Phase 3 (test): each pair (both sight-allowed and isolated) was subject to a switch of an octopus to form pairs composed of either familiar (“sham switches”) or unfamiliar conspecifics (“real switches”). Longer latencies (i.e. the time elapsed from the first interaction) and fewer physical contacts in the familiar pairs as opposed to the unfamiliar pairs were used as proxies for recognition. Conclusions Octopuses appear able to recognise conspecifics and to remember the individual previously met for at least one day. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first experimental study showing the occurrence of a form of IR in cephalopods. Future studies should clarify whether this is a “true” IR. PMID:21533257

  17. Behavior and Body Patterns of the Larger Pacific Striped Octopus

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, Roy L.; Ross, Richard; Rodaniche, Arcadio; Huffard, Christine L.

    2015-01-01

    Over thirty years ago anecdotal accounts of the undescribed Larger Pacific Striped Octopus suggested behaviors previously unknown for octopuses. Beak-to-beak mating, dens shared by mating pairs, inking during mating and extended spawning were mentioned in publications, and enticed generations of cephalopod biologists. In 2012–2014 we were able to obtain several live specimens of this species, which remains without a formal description. All of the unique behaviors listed above were observed for animals in aquaria and are discussed here. We describe the behavior, body color patterns, and postures of 24 adults maintained in captivity. Chromatophore patterns of hatchlings are also shown. PMID:26266543

  18. Behavior and Body Patterns of the Larger Pacific Striped Octopus.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Roy L; Ross, Richard; Rodaniche, Arcadio; Huffard, Christine L

    2015-01-01

    Over thirty years ago anecdotal accounts of the undescribed Larger Pacific Striped Octopus suggested behaviors previously unknown for octopuses. Beak-to-beak mating, dens shared by mating pairs, inking during mating and extended spawning were mentioned in publications, and enticed generations of cephalopod biologists. In 2012-2014 we were able to obtain several live specimens of this species, which remains without a formal description. All of the unique behaviors listed above were observed for animals in aquaria and are discussed here. We describe the behavior, body color patterns, and postures of 24 adults maintained in captivity. Chromatophore patterns of hatchlings are also shown. PMID:26266543

  19. Isolation and characterization of novel tachykinins from the posterior salivary gland of the common octopus Octopus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Atsuhiro; Iwakoshi-Ukena, Eiko; Takuwa-Kuroda, Kyoko; Minakata, Hiroyuki

    2003-01-01

    Two novel tachykinins (OctTK-I: Lys-Pro-Pro-Ser-Ser-Ser-Glu-Phe-Ile-Gly-Leu-Met-NH(2) and OctTK-II: Lys-Pro-Pro-Ser-Ser-Ser-Glu-Phe-Val-Gly-Leu-Met-NH(2)) were isolated from the posterior salivary gland of the octopus (Octopus vulgaris) using a contraction assay of the carp rectum. These peptides had in common the pentapeptide sequence -Phe-X-Gly-Leu-Met-NH(2) at the C-terminal and induced immediate contractions on the carp rectum and the guinea-pig ileum. cDNAs encoding their precursor proteins were cloned. The OctTK gene was expressed in the posterior salivary gland and the expression was localized in mucus-secreting cells of the gland. The results suggested that OctTKs might be secreted as a venomous substance acting on vertebrates such as fishes, which are the prey or natural enemies of the octopus. PMID:12576083

  20. Role of olfaction in Octopus vulgaris reproduction.

    PubMed

    Polese, Gianluca; Bertapelle, Carla; Di Cosmo, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The olfactory system in any animal is the primary sensory system that responds to chemical stimuli emanating from a distant source. In aquatic animals "Odours" are molecules in solution that guide them to locate food, partners, nesting sites, and dangers to avoid. Fish, crustaceans and aquatic molluscs possess sensory systems that have anatomical similarities to the olfactory systems of land-based animals. Molluscs are a large group of aquatic and terrestrial animals that rely heavily on chemical communication with a generally dispersed sense of touch and chemical sensitivity. Cephalopods, the smallest class among extant marine molluscs, are predators with high visual capability and well developed vestibular, auditory, and tactile systems. Nevertheless they possess a well developed olfactory organ, but to date almost nothing is known about the mechanisms, functions and modulation of this chemosensory structure in octopods. Cephalopod brains are the largest of all invertebrate brains and across molluscs show the highest degree of centralization. The reproductive behaviour of Octopus vulgaris is under the control of a complex set of signal molecules such as neuropeptides, neurotransmitters and sex steroids that guide the behaviour from the level of individuals in evaluating mates, to stimulating or deterring copulation, to sperm-egg chemical signalling that promotes fertilization. These signals are intercepted by the olfactory organs and integrated in the olfactory lobes in the central nervous system. In this context we propose a model in which the olfactory organ and the olfactory lobe of O. vulgaris could represent the on-off switch between food intake and reproduction. PMID:25449183

  1. Morphologic, cytometric and functional characterization of the common octopus (Octopus vulgaris) hemocytes.

    PubMed

    Castellanos-Martínez, S; Prado-Alvarez, M; Lobo-da-Cunha, A; Azevedo, C; Gestal, C

    2014-05-01

    The hemocytes of Octopus vulgaris were morphologically and functionally characterized. Light and electron microscopy (TEM and SEM), and flow cytometry analyses revealed the existence of two hemocyte populations. Large granulocytes showed U-shaped nucleus, a mean of 11.6 μm±1.2 in diameter with basophilic granules, polysaccharide and lysosomic deposits in the cytoplasm. Small granulocytes measured a mean of 8.1 μm±0.7 in diameter, and have a round nucleus occupying almost the entire cell and few or not granules in the cytoplasm. Flow cytometry analysis showed that large granulocytes are the principal cells that develop phagocytosis of latex beads (rising up to 56%) and ROS after zymosan stimulation. Zymosan induced the highest production of both ROS and NO. This study is the first tread towards understanding the O. vulgaris immune system by applying new tools to provide a most comprehensive morpho-functional study of their hemocytes. PMID:24296436

  2. Malabsorption syndrome observed in the common octopus Octopus vulgaris infected with Aggregata octopiana (Protista: Apicomplexa).

    PubMed

    Gestal, C; Páez de la Cadena, M; Pascual, S

    2002-08-15

    Octopus vulgaris infected with Aggregata octopiana were collected from an open-water culture system in the Ría of Aldán (NW Spain). Digestive tract infection values were determined with the use of a Neubauer chamber by counting the number of A. octopiana sporocysts. After determining enzyme activity values by the colorimetric Api-Zym system Biomerieux, one representative enzyme of glycosidases, peptid hydrolases and phosphoric hydrolases showing high activity was spectrophotometrically analysed. The enzymes were maltase and leucine-aminopeptidase (LAP) involved in the absorption process, and acid phosphatase, a lysosomic enzyme, respectively. Enzymatic activity of maltase and LAP decreased significantly, with increased sporocyst counts. However, acid phosphatase activity increased with severity of infection, indicating the presence of degradative enzymes from phagocytic cells in the infected area. A detrimental effect on gastrointestinal function may result from a decrease or malfunction of absorption enzymes. The results suggest a malabsorption syndrome resulting from parasitic infection. PMID:12240971

  3. Nervous control of reproduction in Octopus vulgaris: a new model.

    PubMed

    Di Cristo, Carlo

    2013-06-01

    The classic study of Wells and Wells on the control of reproduction in Octopus demonstrated that the activity of the subpedunculate lobe of the brain and environmental illumination both inhibit the release of an unknown gonadotropin from the optic gland. This inhibitory control may be exerted by the neuropeptide Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-NH₂ (FMRFamide). It was later demonstrated that the olfactory lobe is also likely to be involved in the control of optic gland activity. The presence of gonadotropin-releasing hormone in the olfactory lobe suggested that it might exert an excitatory action on optic gland activity. Other neuropeptides have now been localised in the olfactory lobe: neuropeptide Y, galanin, corticotropin-releasing factor, Ala-Pro-Gly-Trp-NH₂ (APGWamide), as well as steroidogenic enzymes and an oestrogen receptor orthologue. This supports the hypothesis that this lobe may also play a part in the control of reproduction in Octopus. The olfactory lobe receives distant chemical stimuli and also appears to be an integrative centre containing a variety of neuropeptides involved in controlling the onset of sexual maturation of Octopus, via the optic gland hormone. This review attempts to summarise current knowledge about the role of the olfactory lobe and optic gland in the control of sexual maturation in Octopus, in the light of new findings and in the context of molluscan comparative physiology. PMID:23558706

  4. The inkless octopuses (Cephalopoda: Octopodidae) of the southwest Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Gleadall, Ian G; Guerrero-Kommritz, Juergen; Hochberg, Frederick G; Laptikhovsky, Vladimir V

    2010-06-01

    Three inkless octopodids are described from the continental shelf off southeastern South America. These octopuses are a non-commercial by-catch in the Falkland Islands fishery. Muusoctopus eureka (Robson, 1929) is one of two common inkless octopuses and is of medium size, with orange-pink skin and a distinctive pattern of irregular dark markings, interspersed with white spots visible only in living or freshly dead specimens. The second common inkless octopus is M. longibrachus akambei, a new subspecies of the Chilean species Muusoctopus longibrachus ( Ibáñez, Sepúlveda and Chong, 2006 ). It has slender arms and is much larger at full maturity than M. eureka. It is a plain orange color when alive, pinkish cream when preserved. Muusoctopus bizikovi, sp. nov., is a smaller, rarer species, colored wine-red whether alive or preserved, and has a vestigial ink duct between the digestive gland and the anus. Relations with other species are discussed. This group of octopuses has often been associated with the genus Benthoctopus Grimpe, 1921 , which is a junior synonym of Bathypolypus Grimpe (a genus of small species characterized by much shorter arms and males with a robust copulatory organ bearing transverse lamellae). It is argued that the misleading characterization of the so-called Benthoctopus group of species as "smooth skinned" is based upon the artefactual appearance of specimens fixed and preserved suboptimally following a detrimental freeze-thaw cycle of fisheries material previously frozen while at sea. PMID:20528161

  5. Dancing With an Octopus: The Graceful Art of Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Elizabeth Morgan

    2008-01-01

    Collaboration--working with like-minded others to achieve a common purpose--is an action-oriented strategy that can be considered as a way of reaching your goals. Because collaboration, as in dancing with an octopus, requires keeping track of many different points (or tentacles), planners who know when collaborations are more likely to work and…

  6. Toxin and species identification of toxic octopus implicated into food poisoning in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ya-Jung; Lin, Chun-Lan; Chen, Chien-Hung; Hsieh, Cheng-Hong; Jen, Hsiao-Chin; Jian, Shi-Jie; Hwang, Deng-Fwu

    2014-12-01

    A food poisoning incident due to ingestion of unknown octopus occurred in Taipei in December, 2010. The serum and urine from victims (male 38 and 43 years old) were collected, determined the toxicity, and identified tetrodotoxin (TTX) by high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). It was found that only urine contained the trace of TTX. Then, two retained specimen (one without blue ring in the skin and another with small blue ring in the skin) were collected from victims and examined for the toxicity and toxin. Meanwhile, 6 specimens of octopus without blue ring in the skin and 4 specimens of octopus with blue ring in the skin were re-collected from the market. Both retained octopus samples were found to contain TTX. However, re-collected market's octopus without blue ring in the skin did not show to contain TTX the and was identified as Octopus aegina by using the analysis of cytochrome b gene (Cyt b) and cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene (COI). Only octopus with blue ring in the skin contained TTX and was identified as Hapalochlaena fasciata by using the analysis of Cyt b and COI. Therefore, this octopus food poisoning was caused by toxic octopus H. fasciata and the causative agent was TTX. PMID:25286395

  7. Structure and mechanical properties of Octopus vulgaris suckers.

    PubMed

    Tramacere, Francesca; Kovalev, Alexander; Kleinteich, Thomas; Gorb, Stanislav N; Mazzolai, Barbara

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we investigate the morphology and mechanical features of Octopus vulgaris suckers, which may serve as a model for the creation of a new generation of attachment devices. Octopus suckers attach to a wide range of substrates in wet conditions, including rough surfaces. This amazing feature is made possible by the sucker's tissues, which are pliable to the substrate profile. Previous studies have described a peculiar internal structure that plays a fundamental role in the attachment and detachment processes of the sucker. In this work, we present a mechanical characterization of the tissues involved in the attachment process, which was performed using microindentation tests. We evaluated the elasticity modulus and viscoelastic parameters of the natural tissues (E ∼ 10 kPa) and measured the mechanical properties of some artificial materials that have previously been used in soft robotics. Such a comparison of biological prototypes and artificial material that mimics octopus-sucker tissue is crucial for the design of innovative artificial suction cups for use in wet environments. We conclude that the properties of the common elastomers that are generally used in soft robotics are quite dissimilar to the properties of biological suckers. PMID:24284894

  8. Octopus-like suction cups: from natural to artificial solutions.

    PubMed

    Tramacere, F; Follador, M; Pugno, N M; Mazzolai, B

    2015-06-01

    Octopus suckers are able to attach to all nonporous surfaces and generate a very strong attachment force. The well-known attachment features of this animal result from the softness of the sucker tissues and the surface morphology of the portion of the sucker that is in contact with objects or substrates. Unlike artificial suction cups, octopus suckers are characterized by a series of radial grooves that increase the area subjected to pressure reduction during attachment. In this study, we constructed artificial suction cups with different surface geometries and tested their attachment performances using a pull-off setup. First, smooth suction cups were obtained for casting; then, sucker surfaces were engraved with a laser cutter. As expected, for all the tested cases, the engraving treatment enhanced the attachment performance of the elastomeric suction cups compared with that of the smooth versions. Moreover, the results indicated that the surface geometry with the best attachment performance was the geometry most similar to octopus sucker morphology. The results obtained in this work can be utilized to design artificial suction cups with higher wet attachment performance. PMID:25970079

  9. Structure and mechanical properties of Octopus vulgaris suckers

    PubMed Central

    Tramacere, Francesca; Kovalev, Alexander; Kleinteich, Thomas; Gorb, Stanislav N.; Mazzolai, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the morphology and mechanical features of Octopus vulgaris suckers, which may serve as a model for the creation of a new generation of attachment devices. Octopus suckers attach to a wide range of substrates in wet conditions, including rough surfaces. This amazing feature is made possible by the sucker's tissues, which are pliable to the substrate profile. Previous studies have described a peculiar internal structure that plays a fundamental role in the attachment and detachment processes of the sucker. In this work, we present a mechanical characterization of the tissues involved in the attachment process, which was performed using microindentation tests. We evaluated the elasticity modulus and viscoelastic parameters of the natural tissues (E ∼ 10 kPa) and measured the mechanical properties of some artificial materials that have previously been used in soft robotics. Such a comparison of biological prototypes and artificial material that mimics octopus-sucker tissue is crucial for the design of innovative artificial suction cups for use in wet environments. We conclude that the properties of the common elastomers that are generally used in soft robotics are quite dissimilar to the properties of biological suckers. PMID:24284894

  10. When do octopuses play? Effects of repeated testing, object type, age, and food deprivation on object play in Octopus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Kuba, Michael J; Byrne, Ruth A; Meisel, Daniela V; Mather, Jennifer A

    2006-08-01

    Studying play behavior in octopuses is an important step toward understanding the phylogenetic origins and function of play as well as the cognitive abilities of invertebrates. Fourteen Octopus vulgaris (7 subadults and 7 adults) were presented 2 Lego objects and 2 different food items on 7 consecutive days under 2 different levels of food deprivation. Nine subjects showed play-like behavior with the Lego objects. There was no significant difference in play-like behavior corresponding to food deprivation, age, and sex of the octopuses. The sequence of behaviors, from exploration to play-like behavior, had a significant influence on the establishment of play-like behavior, as it occurred mostly on Days 3-6 of the 7-day experiment. The pattern of development of play-like activities after a period of exploration and habituation in this study agrees with the hypothesis that object play follows object exploration. A homologous origin of this behavioral trait in vertebrates and invertebrates is highly unlikely, as the last common ancestor might not have had the cognitive capacity to possess this trait. PMID:16893255

  11. Effect of additives in the shelflife extension of chilled and frozen stored Indian octopus (Cistopus indicus).

    PubMed

    Manimaran, Uthaman; Shakila, Robinson Jeya; Shalini, Rajendran; Sivaraman, Balasubramanian; Sumathi, Ganesan; Selvaganapathi, Rajendran; Jeyasekaran, Geevarathnam

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the effect of commercial additives viz. cafodos and altesa employed to treat Indian octopus (Cistopus indicus) was examined during chilled and frozen storage. Shelf lives of treated and untreated octopus in ice were 6 and 8 days, respectively in ice. Treated and untreated frozen octopus had a shelf life of 40 days. Autolytic and microbiological changes were not controlled by the additives, as evidenced through rapid reduction in non-protein nitrogen (NPN) and α-amino nitrogen (α-AN) compounds; as well as accumulation of water soluble ammoniacal nitrogen and total volatile base- nitrogen (TVB-N) compounds. Loss of texture and colour were the major quality defects noticed in treated octopus as a result of enhanced protein solubility. Therefore, the additives approved for use in octopus neither enhanced the shelf life nor improved the sensory quality. PMID:27162416

  12. Bioinspired locomotion and grasping in water: the soft eight-arm OCTOPUS robot.

    PubMed

    Cianchetti, M; Calisti, M; Margheri, L; Kuba, M; Laschi, C

    2015-06-01

    The octopus is an interesting model for the development of soft robotics, due to its high deformability, dexterity and rich behavioural repertoire. To investigate the principles of octopus dexterity, we designed an eight-arm soft robot and evaluated its performance with focused experiments. The OCTOPUS robot presented here is a completely soft robot, which integrates eight arms extending in radial direction and a central body which contains the main processing units. The front arms are mainly used for elongation and grasping, while the others are mainly used for locomotion. The robotic octopus works in water and its buoyancy is close to neutral. The experimental results show that the octopus-inspired robot can walk in water using the same strategy as the animal model, with good performance over different surfaces, including walking through physical constraints. It can grasp objects of different sizes and shapes, thanks to its soft arm materials and conical shape. PMID:25970014

  13. Use of octopus as a bioindicator species: Baseline studies

    SciTech Connect

    Holdway, D.A.; Butty, J.S.; Brennan, S.E.; Ahokas, J.T.

    1995-12-31

    The Australian octopus Octopus pallidus, is abundant, territorial, has a large digestive gland. This study was undertaken to assess octopii as a potential bioindicator species by establishing the efficacy of capturing octopi using traplines, and determining the impact of various modifying factors on the activities of digestive gland mixed-function oxidase (MFO) enzymes including ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD), ethoxycoumarin O-deethylase (ECOD) and total P-450. Trap success rates in Port Phillip Bay were 15--28% for the ``potentially contaminated`` site and 85% for the reference site. Cytochrome P-450 showed significant seasonal differences, with no site or sex differences. Mean ({+-} SE) Autumn P-450 values of 74.8 ({+-}5.5) pmol/mg protein were higher than Winter values of 51.2 ({+-}7.6), which were higher than Spring values of 21.8 ({+-}4.0) pmol/mg protein. Summer P-450 values of 61.4 ({+-} 9.8) pmol/mg protein were only different from Spring values. Mean ({+-} SE) Spring ECOD activity of 3.3 ({+-} 0.7) pmol/min/mg protein was lower than Summer, Autumn and Winter ECOD values of 8.9 ({+-} 1.6) 6.5 ({+-} 1.2) and 8.6 ({+-} 2.3) pmol/min/mg protein respectively. Females had roughly half the ECOD activities of males (3.8 {+-} 0.8 compared to 7.4 {+-} 0.9 pmol/min/mg protein). All octopi digestive gland EROD activities were low (roughly 0.2 pmol/min/mg protein) with no sex, site nor seasonal differences. Potential for using octopus as a bioindicator appears promising but sensitivity to chemical exposure has yet to be determined.

  14. Seasonal patterns of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in digestive gland and arm of octopus (Octopus vulgaris) from the Northwest Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Semedo, Miguel; Oliveira, Marta; Gomes, Filipa; Reis-Henriques, Maria Armanda; Delerue-Matos, Cristina; Morais, Simone; Ferreira, Marta

    2014-05-15

    Among organic pollutants existing in coastal areas, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are of great concern due to their ubiquity and carcinogenic potential. The aim of this study was to evaluate the seasonal patterns of PAHs in the digestive gland and arm of the common octopus (Octopus vulgaris) from the Northwest Atlantic Portuguese coast. In the different seasons, 18 PAHs were determined and the detoxification capacity of the species was evaluated. Ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) and ethoxycoumarin O-deethylase (ECOD) activities were measured to assess phase I biotransformation capacity. Individual PAH ratios were used for major source (pyrolytic/petrogenic) analysis. Risks for human consumption were determined by the total toxicity equivalence approach. Generally, low levels of PAHs were detected in the digestive gland and in the arm of octopus, with a predominance of low molecular over high molecular weight compounds. PAHs exhibited seasonality in the concentrations detected and in their main emission sources. In the digestive gland, the highest total PAH levels were observed in autumn possibly related to fat availability in the ecosystem and food intake. The lack of PAH elimination observed in the digestive gland after captivity could be possibly associated to a low biotransformation capacity, consistent with the negligible/undetected levels of EROD and ECOD activity in the different seasons. The emission sources of PAHs found in the digestive gland varied from a petrogenic profile observed in winter to a pyrolytic pattern in spring. In the arm, the highest PAH contents were observed in June; nevertheless, levels were always below the regulatory limits established for food consumption. The carcinogenic potential calculated for all the sampling periods in the arm were markedly lower than the ones found in various aquatic species from different marine environments. The results presented in this study give relevant baseline data for environmental

  15. Octopus, a fast and user-friendly tomographic reconstruction package developed in LabView®

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dierick, M.; Masschaele, B.; Van Hoorebeke, L.

    2004-07-01

    A new software package called Octopus was developed for tomographic reconstruction of parallel beam projection data and fan beam data. It was written entirely in LabView®. It has a full graphical user interface and a high level of automation while allowing every processing step to be manually controlled. Octopus displays some unique features such as dual-energy tomography for element-sensitive investigations. Most importantly it features distributed reconstruction over a network using a server-client architecture with negligible network delays reducing reconstruction times almost proportionally to the number of clients. Octopus runs independently in a Windows® environment.

  16. Energy balance and cold adaptation in the octopus Pareledone charcoti.

    PubMed

    Daly; Peck

    2000-03-15

    A complete energy balance equation is calculated for the Antarctic octopus Pareledone charcoti at 0 degrees C. Energy used in respiration, growth, and excretion of nitrogenous and faecal waste, was recorded along with the total consumption of energy through food, for three specimens of P. charcoti (live weights: 73, 51 and 29 g). Growth rates were very slow for cephalopods, with a mean daily increase in body weight of only 0.11%. Assimilation efficiencies were high, between 95.4 and 97.0%, which is consistent with previous work on octopods. The respiration rate in P. charcoti was low, with a mean of 2.45 mg O(2) h(-1) for a standard animal of 150 g wet mass at 0 degrees C. In the North Sea octopus Eledone cirrhosa, respiration rates of 9.79 mg O(2) h(-1) at 11.5 degrees C and 4.47 mg O(2) h(-1) at 4.5 degrees C for a standard animal of 150 g wet mass were recorded. Respiration rates between P. charcoti and E. cirrhosa were compared using a combined Q(10) value between P. charcoti at 0 degrees C and E. cirrhosa at 4.5 degrees C. This suggests that P. charcoti are respiring at a level predicted by E. cirrhosa rates at 4.5 and 11.5 degrees C extrapolated to 0 degrees C along the curve Q(10)=3, with no evidence of metabolic compensation for low temperature. PMID:10699210

  17. Ultra-fast Escape of a Octopus-inspired Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weymouth, Gabriel; Triantafyllou, Michael

    2013-11-01

    The octopus, squid, and other cephalopods inflate with water and then release a jet to accelerate in the opposite direction. This escape mechanism is particularly interesting in the octopus because they become initially quite bluff, yet this does not hinder them in achieving impressive bursts of speed. We examine this somewhat paradoxical maneuver using a simple deflating spheroid model in both potential and viscous flow. We demonstrate that the dynamic reduction of the width of the body completely changes the flow and forces acting on the escaping rocket in three ways. First, a body which reduces in size can generate an added mass thrust which counteracts the added mass inertia. Second, the motion of the shrinking wall acts similar to suction on a static wall, reducing separation and drag forces in a viscous fluid, but that this effects depends on the rate of size change. Third, using a combination of these two features it is possible to initially load the fluid with kinetic energy when heavy and bluff and then recover that energy when streamlined and light, enabling ultra-fast accelerations. As a notable example, these mechanisms allow a shrinking spheroid rocket in a heavy inviscid fluid to achieve speeds greater than an identical rocket in the vacuum of space. Southampton Marine and Maritime Institute.

  18. Dielectric elastomer actuators for octopus inspired suction cups.

    PubMed

    Follador, M; Tramacere, F; Mazzolai, B

    2014-01-01

    Suction cups are often found in nature as attachment strategy in water. Nevertheless, the application of the artificial counterpart is limited by the dimension of the actuators and their usability in wet conditions. A novel design for the development of a suction cup inspired by octopus suckers is presented. The main focus of this research was on the modelling and characterization of the actuation unit, and a first prototype of the suction cup was realized as a proof of concept. The actuation of the suction cup is based on dielectric elastomer actuators. The presented device works in a wet environment, has an integrated actuation system, and is soft. The dimensions of the artificial suction cups are comparable to proximal octopus suckers, and the attachment mechanism is similar to the biological counterpart. The design approach proposed for the actuator allows the definition of the parameters for its development and for obtaining a desired pressure in water. The fabricated actuator is able to produce up to 6 kPa of pressure in water, reaching the maximum pressure in less than 300 ms. PMID:25253019

  19. Sperm-attractant peptide influences the spermatozoa swimming behavior in internal fertilization in Octopus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    De Lisa, Emilia; Salzano, Anna Maria; Moccia, Francesco; Scaloni, Andrea; Di Cosmo, Anna

    2013-06-15

    Marine invertebrates exhibit both chemokinesis and chemotaxis phenomena, induced in most cases by the release of water-borne peptides or pheromones. In mollusks, several peptides released during egg-laying improve both male attraction and mating. Unlike other cephalopods, Octopus vulgaris adopts an indirect internal fertilization strategy. We here report on the identification and characterization of a chemoattractant peptide isolated from mature eggs of octopus females. Using two-chamber and time-lapse microscopy assays, we demonstrate that this bioactive peptide is able to increase sperm motility and induce chemotaxis by changing the octopus spermatozoa swimming behavior in a dose-dependent manner. We also provide evidence that chemotaxis in the octopus requires the presence of extracellular calcium and membrane protein phophorylation at tyrosine. This study is the first report on a sperm-activating factor in a non-free-spawning marine animal. PMID:23720799

  20. A "Mimic Octopus" in the Atlantic: Flatfish mimicry and camouflage by Macrotritopus defilippi.

    PubMed

    Hanlon, Roger T; Watson, Anya C; Barbosa, Alexandra

    2010-02-01

    The sand-dwelling octopus Macrotritopus defilippi was filmed or photographed in five Caribbean locations mimicking the swimming behavior (posture, style, speed, duration) and coloration of the common, sand-dwelling flounder Bothus lunatus. Each species was exceptionally well camouflaged when stationary, and details of camouflaging techniques are described for M. defilippi. Octopuses implemented flounder mimicry only during swimming, when their movement would give away camouflage in this open sandy habitat. Thus, both camouflage and fish mimicry were used by the octopuses as a primary defense against visual predators. This is the first documentation of flounder mimicry by an Atlantic octopus, and only the fourth convincing case of mimicry for cephalopods, a taxon renowned for its polyphenism that is implemented mainly by neurally controlled skin patterning, but also-as shown here-by their soft flexible bodies. PMID:20203250

  1. Arm injury produces long-term behavioral and neural hypersensitivity in octopus.

    PubMed

    Alupay, Jean S; Hadjisolomou, Stavros P; Crook, Robyn J

    2014-01-13

    Cephalopod molluscs are the most neurally and behaviorally complex invertebrates, with brains rivaling those of some vertebrates in size and complexity. This has fostered the opinion that cephalopods, particularly octopuses, may experience vertebrate-like pain when injured. However, it is not known whether octopuses possess nociceptors or if their somatic sensory neurons exhibit sensitization after injury. Here we show that the octopus Abdopus aculeatus expresses nocifensive behaviors including arm autotomy, and displays marked neural hyperexcitability both in injured and uninjured arms for at least 24h after injury. These findings do not demonstrate that octopuses experience pain-like states; instead they add to the minimal existing literature on how cephalopods receive, process, and integrate noxious sensory information, potentially informing and refining regulations governing use of cephalopods in scientific research. PMID:24239646

  2. Self-recognition mechanism between skin and suckers prevents octopus arms from interfering with each other.

    PubMed

    Nesher, Nir; Levy, Guy; Grasso, Frank W; Hochner, Binyamin

    2014-06-01

    Controlling movements of flexible arms is a challenging task for the octopus because of the virtually infinite number of degrees of freedom (DOFs) [1, 2]. Octopuses simplify this control by using stereotypical motion patterns that reduce the DOFs, in the control space, to a workable few [2]. These movements are triggered by the brain and are generated by motor programs embedded in the peripheral neuromuscular system of the arm [3-5]. The hundreds of suckers along each arm have a tendency to stick to almost any object they contact [6-9]. The existence of this reflex could pose significant problems with unplanned interactions between the arms if not appropriately managed. This problem is likely to be accentuated because it is accepted that octopuses are "not aware of their arms" [10-14]. Here we report of a self-recognition mechanism that has a novel role in motor control, restraining the arms from interfering with each other. We show that the suckers of amputated arms never attach to octopus skin because a chemical in the skin inhibits the attachment reflex of the suckers. The peripheral mechanism appears to be overridden by central control because, in contrast to amputated arms, behaving octopuses sometime grab amputated arms. Surprisingly, octopuses seem to identify their own amputated arms, as they treat arms of other octopuses like food more often than their own. This self-recognition mechanism is a novel peripheral component in the embodied organization of the adaptive interactions between the octopus's brain, body, and environment [15, 16]. PMID:24835454

  3. Lack of effect of tetrodotoxin and of an extract from the posterior salivary gland of the blue-ringed octopus following injection into the octopus and following application to its brachial nerve.

    PubMed

    Flachsenberger, W; Kerr, D I

    1985-01-01

    Lack of effect of tetrodotoxin and of an extract from the posterior salivary gland of the blue-ringed octopus following injection into the octopus and following application to its brachial nerve. Toxicon 23, 997-999, 1985. Injections of the blue-ringed octopus salivary gland extract and tetrodotoxin into the blue-ringed octopus have no ill-effect on the animals. Similarly, in vitro nerve preparations from the animal were not affected by these materials although they are both extremely potent on bioelectrically excitable preparations from other species. PMID:3006286

  4. The use of artificial crabs for testing predatory behavior and health in the octopus.

    PubMed

    Amodio, Piero; Andrews, Paul; Salemme, Marinella; Ponte, Giovanna; Fiorito, Graziano

    2014-01-01

    The willingness of the cephalopod mollusc Octopus vulgaris to attack a live crab is traditionally used as a method to assess the overall health and welfare of octopuses in the laboratory. This method requires placing a crab in the home tank of an animal, measuring the time (latency) taken for the octopus to initiate an attack and withdrawing the crab immediately prior to capture. The same crab is commonly used to assess multiple octopuses as part of daily welfare assessment. Growing concern for the welfare of crustaceans and a review of all laboratory practices for the care and welfare of cephalopods following the inclusion of this taxon in 2010/63/EU prompted a study of the utility of an artificial crab to replace a live crab in the assessment of octopus health. On consecutive days O. vulgaris (N=21) were presented with a live, a dead or an artificial crab, and the latency to attack measured. Despite differences in the predatory performance towards the three different crab alternatives, octopuses readily attacked the artificial (and the dead) crab, showing that they can generalize and respond appropriately towards artificial prey. Researchers should consider using an artificial crab to replace the use of a live crab as part of the routine health assessment of O. vulgaris. PMID:24919978

  5. A new dicyemid from Octopus hubbsorum (Mollusca:Cephalopoda:Octopoda).

    PubMed

    Castellanos-Martinez, Sheila; Gómez, M Carmen; Hochberg, F G; Gestal, Camino; Furuya, Hidetaka

    2011-04-01

    A new species of dicyemid mesozoan is described from Octopus hubbsorum Berry, 1953, collected in the south of Bahia de La Paz, Baja California Sur, México. Dicyema guaycurense n. sp. is a medium-size species that reaches about 1,600 µm in length. It occurs in folds of the renal appendages. The vermiform stages are characterized as having 22 peripheral cells, a conical calotte, and an axial cell that extends to the base of the propolar cells. Infusoriform embryos consist of 39 cells; 1 nucleus is present in each urn cell and the refringent bodies are solid. This is the first of a dicyemid species from a host collected in the Gulf of California. PMID:21506788

  6. Selective effects of an octopus toxin on action potentials

    PubMed Central

    Dulhunty, Angela; Gage, Peter W.

    1971-01-01

    1. A lethal, water soluble toxin (Maculotoxin, MTX) with a molecular weight less than 540, can be extracted from the salivary glands of an octopus (Hapalochlaena maculosa). 2. MTX blocks action potentials in sartorius muscle fibres of toads without affecting the membrane potential. Delayed rectification is not inhibited by the toxin. 3. At low concentrations (10-6-10-5 g/ml.) MTX blocks action potentials only after a certain number have been elicited. The number of action potentials, which can be defined accurately, depends on the concentration of MTX and the concentration of sodium ions in the extracellular solution. 4. The toxin has no post-synaptic effect at the neuromuscular junction and it is concluded that it blocks neuromuscular transmission by inhibiting action potentials in motor nerve terminals. PMID:4330930

  7. Comparative morphology of changeable skin papillae in octopus and cuttlefish.

    PubMed

    Allen, Justine J; Bell, George R R; Kuzirian, Alan M; Velankar, Sachin S; Hanlon, Roger T

    2014-04-01

    A major component of cephalopod adaptive camouflage behavior has rarely been studied: their ability to change the three-dimensionality of their skin by morphing their malleable dermal papillae. Recent work has established that simple, conical papillae in cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) function as muscular hydrostats; that is, the muscles that extend a papilla also provide its structural support. We used brightfield and scanning electron microscopy to investigate and compare the functional morphology of nine types of papillae of different shapes, sizes and complexity in six species: S. officinalis small dorsal papillae, Octopus vulgaris small dorsal and ventral eye papillae, Macrotritopus defilippi dorsal eye papillae, Abdopus aculeatus major mantle papillae, O. bimaculoides arm, minor mantle, and dorsal eye papillae, and S. apama face ridge papillae. Most papillae have two sets of muscles responsible for extension: circular dermal erector muscles arranged in a concentric pattern to lift the papilla away from the body surface and horizontal dermal erector muscles to pull the papilla's perimeter toward its core and determine shape. A third set of muscles, retractors, appears to be responsible for pulling a papilla's apex down toward the body surface while stretching out its base. Connective tissue infiltrated with mucopolysaccharides assists with structural support. S. apama face ridge papillae are different: the contraction of erector muscles perpendicular to the ridge causes overlying tissues to buckle. In this case, mucopolysaccharide-rich connective tissue provides structural support. These six species possess changeable papillae that are diverse in size and shape, yet with one exception they share somewhat similar functional morphologies. Future research on papilla morphology, biomechanics and neural control in the many unexamined species of octopus and cuttlefish may uncover new principles of actuation in soft, flexible tissue. PMID:24741712

  8. Beak measurements of octopus ( Octopus variabilis) in Jiaozhou Bay and their use in size and biomass estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Ying; Ren, Yiping; Meng, Wenrong; Li, Long; Mao, Xia; Han, Dongyan; Ma, Qiuyun

    2013-09-01

    Cephalopods play key roles in global marine ecosystems as both predators and preys. Regressive estimation of original size and weight of cephalopod from beak measurements is a powerful tool of interrogating the feeding ecology of predators at higher trophic levels. In this study, regressive relationships among beak measurements and body length and weight were determined for an octopus species ( Octopus variabilis), an important endemic cephalopod species in the northwest Pacific Ocean. A total of 193 individuals (63 males and 130 females) were collected at a monthly interval from Jiaozhou Bay, China. Regressive relationships among 6 beak measurements (upper hood length, UHL; upper crest length, UCL; lower hood length, LHL; lower crest length, LCL; and upper and lower beak weights) and mantle length (ML), total length (TL) and body weight (W) were determined. Results showed that the relationships between beak size and TL and beak size and ML were linearly regressive, while those between beak size and W fitted a power function model. LHL and UCL were the most useful measurements for estimating the size and biomass of O. variabilis. The relationships among beak measurements and body length (either ML or TL) were not significantly different between two sexes; while those among several beak measurements (UHL, LHL and LBW) and body weight (W) were sexually different. Since male individuals of this species have a slightly greater body weight distribution than female individuals, the body weight was not an appropriate measurement for estimating size and biomass, especially when the sex of individuals in the stomachs of predators was unknown. These relationships provided essential information for future use in size and biomass estimation of O. variabilis, as well as the estimation of predator/prey size ratios in the diet of top predators.

  9. Cryo-scanning electron microscopy investigation of the Octopus Vulgaris arm structures for the design of an octopus-like arm artefact.

    PubMed

    Minnocci, Antonio; Cianchetti, Matteo; Mazzolai, Barbara; Sebastiani, Luca; Laschi, Cecilia

    2015-12-01

    Octopus vulgaris is a cephalopod of the Octopodidae family. It has four pairs of arms and two rows of suckers which perform many functions, including bending and elongation. For this reason the octopus was chosen as model to develop a new generation of soft-body robots. In order to explain some of the fine structures of the octopus arm in relation to its specific ability, we examined the external and internal structures of O. vulgaris arms in a frozen-hydrated state using cryo-scanning electron microscopy. The arms showed skin with a very complex design that is useful to elongation, and a pore pattern distribution on their surface which is functional to cutaneous oxygen uptake. The analysis of freeze-fractured frozen-hydrated arm samples allowed us to describe the developmental differences in the relative proportion of the areas of axial nerve cord, intrinsic and extrinsic musculature, in relation to the growth of the arms and of the increase in functional capability. In the suckers, we analyzed the shedding mechanisms in the outer part of the infundibulum and described the outer and inner characteristics of the denticles, showing in detail their pore system, which is fundamental for their ability to explore the environment. These results are discussed by considering their possible application in the design of new octopus-like artefacts, which will be able to take advantage of some of these ultrastructure characteristics and achieve advanced bioinspired functionalities. PMID:26515907

  10. 76 FR 66655 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod and Octopus in the Bering Sea...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-27

    ... established by the final 2011 and 2012 harvest specifications for groundfish in the BSAI (76 FR 11139, March 1, 2011). NMFS closed directed fishing for octopus on January 13, 2011 (76 FR 3044, January 19, 2011) and prohibited retention of octopus on September 1, 2011 (76 FR 55276, September 7, 2011). As of October 15,...

  11. ELECTRON MICROSCOPY OF SYNAPTIC STRUCTURE OF OCTOPUS BRAIN.

    PubMed

    GRAY, E G; YOUNG, J Z

    1964-04-01

    The well known type of synapse between a presynaptic process containing vesicles and a "clear" postsynaptic process can be commonly observed in the various lobes of the brain of Octopus. The presynaptic vesicles are aggregated near regions of the synaptic membranes which show specialisation and asymmetric "thickening" indicating functional polarisation, and here chemical transmission is presumed to take place. In addition, in the vertical lobe a very interesting serial arrangement of synaptic contacts occurs. Presynaptic bags, formed from varicosities of fibres from the superior frontal lobe, contact the trunks of amacrine cells in the manner just described. The trunks, however, although apparently postsynaptic are themselves packed with synaptic vesicles. The trunks, in turn, make "presynaptic" contacts with clear spinous processes of other neurons of yet undetermined origin. Typical polarised membrane specialisations occur at the contact regions. The trunk vesicles aggregated closest to the contact regions have a shell of particles round their walls. At present, there is no way of telling whether the membrane conductance to the various ions is differently affected at either of the transmission sites, and, if an inhibitory mechanism is involved, whether it is of the presynaptic or postsynaptic variety. PMID:14154498

  12. Bioactive Lipidic Extracts from Octopus (Paraoctopus limaculatus): Antimutagenicity and Antiproliferative Studies.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Félix, Carolina; Wilson-Sánchez, Griselda; Cruz-Ramírez, Susana-Gabriela; Velázquez-Contreras, Carlos; Plascencia-Jatomea, Maribel; Acosta, Ana; Machi-Lara, Lorena; Aldana-Madrid, María-Lourdes; Ezquerra-Brauer, Josafat-Marina; Rocha-Alonzo, Fernando; Burgos-Hernández, Armando

    2013-01-01

    Fractions from an organic extract from fresh octopus (Paraoctopus limaculatus) were studied for biological activities such as antimutagenic and antiproliferative properties using Salmonella tester strains TA98 and TA100 with metabolic activation (S9) and a cancer cell line (B-cell lymphoma), respectively. A chloroform extract obtained from octopus tentacles was sequentially fractionated using thin layer chromatography (TLC), and each fraction was tested for antimutagenic and antiproliferative activities. Organic extract reduced the number of revertants caused by aflatoxin B(1) showing a dose-response type of relationship. Sequential TLC fractionation of the active extracts produced several antimutagenic and/or antiproliferative fractions. Based on the results obtained, the isolated fractions obtained from octopus contain compounds with chemoprotective properties that reduce the mutagenicity of AFB(1) and proliferation of cancer cell lines. PMID:23401709

  13. Unveiling the morphology of the acetabulum in octopus suckers and its role in attachment

    PubMed Central

    Tramacere, Francesca; Pugno, Nicola M.; Kuba, Michael J.; Mazzolai, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the attachment mechanism of the octopus sucker has attracted the interest of scientists from different research areas, including biology, engineering, medicine and robotics. From a technological perspective, the main goal is to identify the underlying mechanisms involved in sucker attachment for use in the development of new generations of artificial devices and materials. Recently, the understanding of the morphology of the sucker has been significantly improved; however, the mechanisms that allow attachment remain largely unknown. In this work, we present new anatomical findings: specifically, a protuberance in the acetabular roof in five different octopus species; previously, this protuberance was identified by the authors in Octopus vulgaris. Moreover, we discuss the role of the protuberance and other anatomical structures in attachment with minimal energy consumption. PMID:25657834

  14. Toxic exposure to ethylene dibromide and mercuric chloride: effects on laboratory-reared octopuses.

    PubMed

    Adams, P M; Hanlon, R T; Forsythe, J W

    1988-01-01

    The effects of acute and chronic exposure to either ethylene dibromide (EDB) or mercuric chloride (MC) were studied in laboratory-reared Octopus joubini, O. maya and O. bimaculoides. The advantages of using octopuses were that the responses were immediate, highly visible and sensitive. All species demonstrated signs of toxicity to acute and chronic exposure to EDB and to MC. A dosage-sensitive relationship for the loss and subsequent recovery of locomotor response and of chromatophore expansion was found for each species after acute exposure. For each species the LC50 for chronic exposure occurred within 12 hr at 100 mg/l for EDB and within 3 hr at 1,000 mg/l for MC. This study demonstrated the potential usefulness of laboratory-reared octopuses in evaluating the toxicity of marine environmental pollutants. PMID:3072470

  15. Innovative use of the octopus stabilizer in the excision of a cardiac hydatid cyst

    PubMed Central

    Musleh, Mohammud; Abuhussein, Nadia; Musleh, Ghassan; Waterworth, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Hydatid disease is caused through Echinococcus granulosus infection. Hydatid disease remains endemic in developing countries. The majority of cases involve the lungs or liver. We report the case of a patient diagnosed with concurrent mediastinal and cardiac cysts. In this patient, the Octopus IV cardiac stabilizer was used to rotate the heart after the excision of the mediastinal cyst, enabling the excision of a cyst adherent to left ventricle through a single median sternotomy incision. To date, there have been no reports of the application of the Octopus IV cardiac stabilizer in such a way. PMID:26921611

  16. Eye-independent, light-activated chromatophore expansion (LACE) and expression of phototransduction genes in the skin of Octopus bimaculoides

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, M. Desmond; Oakley, Todd H.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cephalopods are renowned for changing the color and pattern of their skin for both camouflage and communication. Yet, we do not fully understand how cephalopods control the pigmented chromatophore organs in their skin and change their body pattern. Although these changes primarily rely on eyesight, we found that light causes chromatophores to expand in excised pieces of Octopus bimaculoides skin. We call this behavior light-activated chromatophore expansion (or LACE). To uncover how octopus skin senses light, we used antibodies against r-opsin phototransduction proteins to identify sensory neurons that express r-opsin in the skin. We hypothesized that octopus LACE relies on the same r-opsin phototransduction cascade found in octopus eyes. By creating an action spectrum for the latency to LACE, we found that LACE occurred most quickly in response to blue light. We fit our action spectrum data to a standard opsin curve template and estimated the λmax of LACE to be 480 nm. Consistent with our hypothesis, the maximum sensitivity of the light sensors underlying LACE closely matches the known spectral sensitivity of opsin from octopus eyes. LACE in isolated preparations suggests that octopus skin is intrinsically light sensitive and that this dispersed light sense might contribute to their unique and novel patterning abilities. Finally, our data suggest that a common molecular mechanism for light detection in eyes may have been co-opted for light sensing in octopus skin and then used for LACE. PMID:25994633

  17. Eye-independent, light-activated chromatophore expansion (LACE) and expression of phototransduction genes in the skin of Octopus bimaculoides.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, M Desmond; Oakley, Todd H

    2015-05-15

    Cephalopods are renowned for changing the color and pattern of their skin for both camouflage and communication. Yet, we do not fully understand how cephalopods control the pigmented chromatophore organs in their skin and change their body pattern. Although these changes primarily rely on eyesight, we found that light causes chromatophores to expand in excised pieces of Octopus bimaculoides skin. We call this behavior light-activated chromatophore expansion (or LACE). To uncover how octopus skin senses light, we used antibodies against r-opsin phototransduction proteins to identify sensory neurons that express r-opsin in the skin. We hypothesized that octopus LACE relies on the same r-opsin phototransduction cascade found in octopus eyes. By creating an action spectrum for the latency to LACE, we found that LACE occurred most quickly in response to blue light. We fit our action spectrum data to a standard opsin curve template and estimated the λmax of LACE to be 480 nm. Consistent with our hypothesis, the maximum sensitivity of the light sensors underlying LACE closely matches the known spectral sensitivity of opsin from octopus eyes. LACE in isolated preparations suggests that octopus skin is intrinsically light sensitive and that this dispersed light sense might contribute to their unique and novel patterning abilities. Finally, our data suggest that a common molecular mechanism for light detection in eyes may have been co-opted for light sensing in octopus skin and then used for LACE. PMID:25994633

  18. The fine structure of the vertical lobe of octopus brain.

    PubMed

    Gray, E G

    1970-07-30

    Although much is known about the structural organization and connexions of the various lobes of the octopus brain from light microscopy, this is the first attempt at a detailed analysis of one of the lobes- the vertical lobe, with the electron microscope. The vertical lobe consists of five lobules. The median superior frontal (MSF) axons enter each lobule from the MSF lobe. The MSF axons contain both microtubules and neurofilaments. The varicosities of the MSF axons contain both agranular and dense-cored vesicles and synapse with trunks of the amacrine cells. These trunks run together in bundles termed amacrine tracts into the centres of the lobules. The amacrine trunks contain microtubules but no neurofilaments. The trunks contain large and small agranular synaptic vesicles and synapse with what are in all probability branches of the trunks of the large cells. These trunks contain microtubules but no neurofilaments. They run out through the bases of the lobules probably without forming synaptic contacts within the lobule. Fibres signalling 'pain' (nocifensor) enter the lobules from below. They can be recognized by their content of neurofilaments. Their terminals contain numerous very small synaptic vesicles and a few larger and dense-cored ones. These 'pain' fibres appear to synapse mostly with processes of the large cells. J. Z. Young has shown that the vertical lobe is especially concerned with the integrative action of the visual system, linked with the chemo-tactile system. Electron microscopy supports Young's suggestion that the superior frontal and interconnected vertical lobe systems constitute a loop which could sustain a positive feed-back mechanism (MSF -- amacrine -- large cell -- lateral superior frontal -- MSF) while the 'pain' (nocifensor) input could exert a suppressor (inhibitory) effect on the loop by its action on the large cells. PMID:22408833

  19. Octopus-inspired multi-arm robotic swimming.

    PubMed

    Sfakiotakis, M; Kazakidi, A; Tsakiris, D P

    2015-06-01

    The outstanding locomotor and manipulation characteristics of the octopus have recently inspired the development, by our group, of multi-functional robotic swimmers, featuring both manipulation and locomotion capabilities, which could be of significant engineering interest in underwater applications. During its little-studied arm-swimming behavior, as opposed to the better known jetting via the siphon, the animal appears to generate considerable propulsive thrust and rapid acceleration, predominantly employing movements of its arms. In this work, we capture the fundamental characteristics of the corresponding complex pattern of arm motion by a sculling profile, involving a fast power stroke and a slow recovery stroke. We investigate the propulsive capabilities of a multi-arm robotic system under various swimming gaits, namely patterns of arm coordination, which achieve the generation of forward, as well as backward, propulsion and turning. A lumped-element model of the robotic swimmer, which considers arm compliance and the interaction with the aquatic environment, was used to study the characteristics of these gaits, the effect of various kinematic parameters on propulsion, and the generation of complex trajectories. This investigation focuses on relatively high-stiffness arms. Experiments employing a compliant-body robotic prototype swimmer with eight compliant arms, all made of polyurethane, inside a water tank, successfully demonstrated this novel mode of underwater propulsion. Speeds of up to 0.26 body lengths per second (approximately 100 mm s(-1)), and propulsive forces of up to 3.5 N were achieved, with a non-dimensional cost of transport of 1.42 with all eight arms and of 0.9 with only two active arms. The experiments confirmed the computational results and verified the multi-arm maneuverability and simultaneous object grasping capability of such systems. PMID:25970151

  20. Hormonal inhibition of feeding and death in octopus: control by optic gland secretion.

    PubMed

    Wodinsky, J

    1977-12-01

    Female Octopus hummelincki lays eggs, broods them, reduces its food intake, and dies after the young hatch. Removal of both optic glands after spawning results in cessation of broodiness, resumption of feeding, increased growth, and greatly extended life-span. Optic gland secretions may cause death of most cephalopods and may function to control population size. PMID:17787564

  1. Olfactory organ of Octopus vulgaris: morphology, plasticity, turnover and sensory characterization

    PubMed Central

    Polese, Gianluca; Bertapelle, Carla

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The cephalopod olfactory organ was described for the first time in 1844 by von Kölliker, who was attracted to the pair of small pits of ciliated cells on each side of the head, below the eyes close to the mantle edge, in both octopuses and squids. Several functional studies have been conducted on decapods but very little is known about octopods. The morphology of the octopus olfactory system has been studied, but only to a limited extent on post-hatching specimens, and the only paper on adult octopus gives a minimal description of the olfactory organ. Here, we describe the detailed morphology of young male and female Octopus vulgaris olfactory epithelium, and using a combination of classical morphology and 3D reconstruction techniques, we propose a new classification for O. vulgaris olfactory sensory neurons. Furthermore, using specific markers such as olfactory marker protein (OMP) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) we have been able to identify and differentially localize both mature olfactory sensory neurons and olfactory sensory neurons involved in epithelium turnover. Taken together, our data suggest that the O. vulgaris olfactory organ is extremely plastic, capable of changing its shape and also proliferating its cells in older specimens. PMID:27069253

  2. Using ultrasound to estimate brain size in the cephalopod Octopus vulgaris cuvier in vivo.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, Anna Maria; Agnisola, Claudio; Fiorito, Graziano

    2007-12-01

    Ultrasound imaging was applied, for the first time, in the examination of the central nervous system of the cephalopod mollusc Octopus vulgaris, an invertebrate. Goals of this study were: i. to reveal and measure the cerebral masses in vivo, in their anatomical position; ii. to evaluate and compare the dimensions of the different parts of the octopus brain in vivo and postmortem, and iii. to test the reproducibility of the ultrasound method both in reaching a given sonographic plane in the same individual at two different times and in evaluating potential changes in brain size due to animal growth. Our results show that ultrasonography is a reliable method to measure the various parts of the octopus brain. Sonographic measurements of the brain masses in vivo were correlated with those determined postmortem. In addition, brain size estimation is reproducible via ultrasound: no significant difference resulted when measurements of the same brain were taken over consecutive days. Furthermore, when the time lapse between the two sonographic examinations was long enough (30 days), we were able to detect changes in brain dimensions in the same octopus. PMID:17964558

  3. Olfactory organ of Octopus vulgaris: morphology, plasticity, turnover and sensory characterization.

    PubMed

    Polese, Gianluca; Bertapelle, Carla; Di Cosmo, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The cephalopod olfactory organ was described for the first time in 1844 by von Kölliker, who was attracted to the pair of small pits of ciliated cells on each side of the head, below the eyes close to the mantle edge, in both octopuses and squids. Several functional studies have been conducted on decapods but very little is known about octopods. The morphology of the octopus olfactory system has been studied, but only to a limited extent on post-hatching specimens, and the only paper on adult octopus gives a minimal description of the olfactory organ. Here, we describe the detailed morphology of young male and female Octopus vulgaris olfactory epithelium, and using a combination of classical morphology and 3D reconstruction techniques, we propose a new classification for O. vulgaris olfactory sensory neurons. Furthermore, using specific markers such as olfactory marker protein (OMP) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) we have been able to identify and differentially localize both mature olfactory sensory neurons and olfactory sensory neurons involved in epithelium turnover. Taken together, our data suggest that the O. vulgaris olfactory organ is extremely plastic, capable of changing its shape and also proliferating its cells in older specimens. PMID:27069253

  4. [Growth of Octopus maya (Mollusca: Cephalopoda) of the Yucatan coast, Mexico: a long-term analysis].

    PubMed

    Nepita Villanueva, M R; Defeo, O

    2001-03-01

    Growth of the octopus (Octopus maya) off Yucatan (Mexico) was estimated from a long-term study (seven years) by the length-based methods ELEFAN, PROJMAT and SLCA. Some 19,251 octopuses with a range of mantle length between 50 and 240 mm were sampled from commercial landings in 1983-1987, 1989 and 1992. The jackknife technique was applied to deal with uncertainty in growth estimates resulting from chance variations in sampling design. The growth index phi' was used for comparative purposes. Results differed markedly among methods: ELEFAN produced parameter estimates within the range reported in the literature, whereas PROJMAT and SLCA showed problems to converge in an optimum combination of parameters, and tended to underestimate them. Jackknife analysis revealed very low intraannual variability in phi' but high variability among years, especially when applying PROJMAT. No significant differences were found in precision parameters--percent error and coefficient of variation--among methods. Estimates of phi' derived by ELEFAN varied between 4.19 and 5.23 and agreed with those reported in the literature (between 4.25 and 4.91), whereas PROJMAT and SLCA estimates were significantly lower. We suggest the use of ELEFAN, together with jackknife, to estimate growth parameters of Octopus maya. PMID:11795175

  5. Learning and memory in Octopus vulgaris: a case of biological plasticity.

    PubMed

    Zarrella, Ilaria; Ponte, Giovanna; Baldascino, Elena; Fiorito, Graziano

    2015-12-01

    Here we concisely summarize major aspects of the learning capabilities of the cephalopod mollusc Octopus vulgaris, a solitary living marine invertebrate. We aim to provide a backdrop against which neurobiology of these animals can be further interpreted and thus soliciting further interest for one of the most advanced members of invertebrate animals. PMID:26186237

  6. Resonance Raman studies of the HOOP modes in octopus bathorhodopsin with deuterium-labeled retinal chromophores

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, H.; Manor, D.; Weng, G.; Rath, P.; Callender, R.H. ); Koutalos, Y.; Ebrey, T. ); Gebhard, R.; Lugtenburg, J. ); Tsuda, M. )

    1991-05-07

    Resonance Raman spectra of the hydrogen out-of-plane (HOOP) vibrational modes in the retinal chromophore of octopus bathorhodopsin with deuterium label(s) along the polyene chain have been obtained. In clear contrast with bovine bathorhodopsin's HOOP modes, there are only two major HOOP bands at 887 and 940 cm{sup {minus}1} for octopus bathorhodopsin. On the basis of their isotopic shifts upon deuterium labeling, the authors have assigned the band at 887 cm{sup {minus}1} to C{sub 10}H and C{sub 14}H HOOP modes, and the band at 940 cm{sup {minus}1} to C{sub 11}H{double bond}C{sub 12}H A{sub u}-like HOOP mode. They found also that the C{sub 10}H and C{sub 14}H HOOP wags are also similar to those in the model-compound studies. However, they have found that the interaction between the C{sub 7}H and C{sub 8}H HOOP internal coordinates of the chromophore in octopus bathorhodopsin is different from that of the chromophore in solution. The twisted nature of the chromophore, semiquantitatively discussed here, likely affects the {lambda}{sub max} of the chromophore and its enthalpy. The nature of the HOOP modes of octopus bathorhodopsin differs substantially from those found in bovine bathorhodopsin.

  7. Nearly automatic motion capture system for tracking octopus arm movements in 3D space.

    PubMed

    Zelman, Ido; Galun, Meirav; Akselrod-Ballin, Ayelet; Yekutieli, Yoram; Hochner, Binyamin; Flash, Tamar

    2009-08-30

    Tracking animal movements in 3D space is an essential part of many biomechanical studies. The most popular technique for human motion capture uses markers placed on the skin which are tracked by a dedicated system. However, this technique may be inadequate for tracking animal movements, especially when it is impossible to attach markers to the animal's body either because of its size or shape or because of the environment in which the animal performs its movements. Attaching markers to an animal's body may also alter its behavior. Here we present a nearly automatic markerless motion capture system that overcomes these problems and successfully tracks octopus arm movements in 3D space. The system is based on three successive tracking and processing stages. The first stage uses a recently presented segmentation algorithm to detect the movement in a pair of video sequences recorded by two calibrated cameras. In the second stage, the results of the first stage are processed to produce 2D skeletal representations of the moving arm. Finally, the 2D skeletons are used to reconstruct the octopus arm movement as a sequence of 3D curves varying in time. Motion tracking, segmentation and reconstruction are especially difficult problems in the case of octopus arm movements because of the deformable, non-rigid structure of the octopus arm and the underwater environment in which it moves. Our successful results suggest that the motion-tracking system presented here may be used for tracking other elongated objects. PMID:19505502

  8. Survival after severe envenomation by the blue-ringed octopus (Hapalochlaena maculosa).

    PubMed

    Walker, D G

    I report two cases of life-endangering respiratory failure after envenomation by a blue-ringed octopus (Hapalochlaena maculosa). Early and efficient support of respiratory function is vital in such cases. Cardiac asystole occurred in one patient. Both patients recovered completely after the vigorous application of routine resuscitation techniques. PMID:6669130

  9. Maculotoxin: a neurotoxin from the venom glands of the octopus Hapalochlaena maculosa identified as tetrodotoxin.

    PubMed

    Sheumack, D D; Howden, M E; Spence, I; Quinn, R J

    1978-01-13

    Maculotoxin, a potent neurotoxin isolated from the posterior salivary glands of the blue-ringed octopus. Hapalochlaena maculosa, has now been identified as tetrodotoxin. This is the first reported case in which tetrodotoxin has been found to occur in a venom. PMID:619451

  10. The role of DNA methylation on Octopus vulgaris development and their perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Freije, Eva; Gestal, Camino; Castellanos-Martínez, Sheila; Morán, Paloma

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is a common regulator of gene expression and development in mammalian and other vertebrate genomes. DNA methylation has been studied so far in a few bivalve mollusk species, finding a wide spectrum of levels. We focused our study in the common octopus, Octopus vulgaris, an important organism for neuroscience, physiology and ethology research as well as for human consumption. We aim to confirm the existence of DNA methylation in O. vulgaris and ultimately, if methylation plays a role in gene regulation during octopus development. We used a genome-wide approach, methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP), firstly in four different tissues from the same specimens from adult benthonic individuals to test whether gene expression is regulated by methylation. Secondly, we tested the hypothesis that methylation underlies development by assessing MSAP patters from paralarvae to adult developmental stages. Our data indicate that octopus genome is widely methylated since clear differences can be observed, and the methylation pattern changes with the development. The statistical analyses showed significant differences in methylation pattern between paralarvae, where higher internal cytosine methylation is observed, and the three other post-hatching stages. This suggests an important role of cytosine methylation during the first step of development, when major morphological changes take place. However, methylation seems to have little effect on gene expression during the benthonic phase, since no significant effect was revealed in the analyses of molecular variance (AMOVA) performed. Our observations highlight the importance of epigenetic mechanisms in the first developmental steps of the common octopus and opens new perspectives to overcome high mortality rate during paralarvae growth. Thus, better understanding the molecular regulation patterns could lead to new approaches that increase the efficiency of husbandry of this emergent species for

  11. The octopus genome and the evolution of cephalopod neural and morphological novelties.

    PubMed

    Albertin, Caroline B; Simakov, Oleg; Mitros, Therese; Wang, Z Yan; Pungor, Judit R; Edsinger-Gonzales, Eric; Brenner, Sydney; Ragsdale, Clifton W; Rokhsar, Daniel S

    2015-08-13

    Coleoid cephalopods (octopus, squid and cuttlefish) are active, resourceful predators with a rich behavioural repertoire. They have the largest nervous systems among the invertebrates and present other striking morphological innovations including camera-like eyes, prehensile arms, a highly derived early embryogenesis and a remarkably sophisticated adaptive colouration system. To investigate the molecular bases of cephalopod brain and body innovations, we sequenced the genome and multiple transcriptomes of the California two-spot octopus, Octopus bimaculoides. We found no evidence for hypothesized whole-genome duplications in the octopus lineage. The core developmental and neuronal gene repertoire of the octopus is broadly similar to that found across invertebrate bilaterians, except for massive expansions in two gene families previously thought to be uniquely enlarged in vertebrates: the protocadherins, which regulate neuronal development, and the C2H2 superfamily of zinc-finger transcription factors. Extensive messenger RNA editing generates transcript and protein diversity in genes involved in neural excitability, as previously described, as well as in genes participating in a broad range of other cellular functions. We identified hundreds of cephalopod-specific genes, many of which showed elevated expression levels in such specialized structures as the skin, the suckers and the nervous system. Finally, we found evidence for large-scale genomic rearrangements that are closely associated with transposable element expansions. Our analysis suggests that substantial expansion of a handful of gene families, along with extensive remodelling of genome linkage and repetitive content, played a critical role in the evolution of cephalopod morphological innovations, including their large and complex nervous systems. PMID:26268193

  12. The octopus genome and the evolution of cephalopod neural and morphological novelties

    PubMed Central

    Albertin, Caroline B.; Simakov, Oleg; Mitros, Therese; Wang, Z. Yan; Pungor, Judit R.; Edsinger-Gonzalez, Eric; Brenner, Sydney; Ragsdale, Clifton W.; Rokhsar, Daniel S.

    2016-01-01

    Coleoid cephalopods (octopus, squid, and cuttlefish) are active, resourceful predators with a rich behavioral repertoire1. They have the largest nervous systems among the invertebrates2 and present other striking morphological innovations including camera-like eyes, prehensile arms, a highly derived early embryogenesis, and the most sophisticated adaptive coloration system among all animals1,3. To investigate the molecular bases of cephalopod brain and body innovations we sequenced the genome and multiple transcriptomes of the California two-spot octopus, Octopus bimaculoides. We found no evidence for hypothesized whole genome duplications in the octopus lineage4–6. The core developmental and neuronal gene repertoire of the octopus is broadly similar to that found across invertebrate bilaterians, except for massive expansions in two gene families formerly thought to be uniquely enlarged in vertebrates: the protocadherins, which regulate neuronal development, and the C2H2 superfamily of zinc finger transcription factors. Extensive mRNA editing generates transcript and protein diversity in genes involved in neural excitability, as previously described7, as well as in genes participating in a broad range of other cellular functions. We identified hundreds of cephalopod-specific genes, many of which showed elevated expression levels in such specialized structures as the skin, the suckers, and the nervous system. Finally, we found evidence for large-scale genomic rearrangements that are closely associated with transposable element expansions. Our analysis suggests that substantial expansion of a handful of gene families, along with extensive remodeling of genome linkage and repetitive content, played a critical role in the evolution of cephalopod morphological innovations, including their large and complex nervous systems. PMID:26268193

  13. Nuclear and mitochondrial markers reveal evidence for genetically segregated cryptic speciation in giant Pacific octopuses from Prince William Sound, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Toussaint, Rebecca K.; Scheel, David; Sage, G.K.; Talbot, S.L.

    2012-01-01

    Multiple species of large octopus are known from the north Pacific waters around Japan, however only one large species is known in the Gulf of Alaska (the giant Pacific octopus, Enteroctopus dofleini). Current taxonomy of E. dofleini is based on geographic and morphological characteristics, although with advances in genetic technology that is changing. Here, we used two mitochondrial genes (cytochrome b and cytochrome oxidase I), three nuclear genes (rhodopsin, octopine dehydrogenase, and paired-box 6), and 18 microsatellite loci for phylogeographic and phylogenetic analyses of octopuses collected from across southcentral and the eastern Aleutian Islands (Dutch Harbor), Alaska. Our results suggest the presence of a cryptic Enteroctopus species that is allied to, but distinguished from E. dofleini in Prince William Sound, Alaska. Existence of an undescribed and previously unrecognized taxon raises important questions about the taxonomy of octopus in southcentral Alaska waters.

  14. Occurrence of a tetrodotoxin-like compound in the eggs of the venomous blue-ringed octopus (Hapalochlaena maculosa).

    PubMed

    Sheumack, D D; Howden, M E; Spence, I

    1984-01-01

    A lethal toxin was isolated and partly purified from the eggs of the blue-ringed octopus, Hapalochlaena maculosa. Examination of the toxin by thin layer chromatography, isoelectric focusing and its effects upon the compound nerve action potentials of the toad sciatic nerve gave results that were indistinguishable from those displayed by authentic tetrodotoxin, the toxin present in the venom glands of the octopus. PMID:6441311

  15. Skin lesion-associated pathogens from Octopus vulgaris: first detection of Photobacterium swingsii, Lactococcus garvieae and betanodavirus.

    PubMed

    Fichi, G; Cardeti, G; Perrucci, S; Vanni, A; Cersini, A; Lenzi, C; De Wolf, T; Fronte, B; Guarducci, M; Susini, F

    2015-07-23

    The common octopus Octopus vulgaris Cuvier, 1798 is extremely important in fisheries and is a useful protein source in most Mediterranean countries. Here we investigated pathogens associated with skin lesions in 9 naturally deceased specimens that included both cultured and wild common octopus. Within 30 min after death, each octopus was stored at 4°C and microbiologically examined within 24 h. Bacterial colonies, cultured from swabs taken from the lesions, were examined using taxonomical and biochemical analyses. Vibrio alginolyticus and V. parahaemolyticus were only isolated from cultured animals. A conventional PCR targeting the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene and sequencing were performed on 2 bacterial isolates that remained unidentified after taxonomical and biochemical analysis. The sequence results indicated that the bacteria had a 99% identity with Lactococcus garvieae and Photobacterium swingsii. L. garvieae was confirmed using a specific PCR based on the 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer region, while P. swingsii was confirmed by phylogenetic analyses. Although all animals examined were found to be infected by the protozoan species Aggregata octopiana localised in the intestines, it was also present in skin lesions of 2 of the animals. Betanodavirus was detected in both cultured and wild individuals by cell culture, PCR and electron microscopy. These findings are the first report of L. garvieae and betanodavirus from skin lesions of common octopus and the first identification of P. swingsii both in octopus skin lesions and in marine invertebrates in Italy. PMID:26203886

  16. Life history of the bathyal octopus Pteroctopus tetracirrhus (Mollusca, Cephalopoda) in the Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quetglas, Antoni; Ordines, Francesc; González, María; Franco, Ignacio

    2009-08-01

    The life cycle of the deep-sea octopus Pteroctopus tetracirrhus was studied from monthly samples obtained throughout the year in different areas of the western Mediterranean (mainly around the Balearic Islands and along the coast of the Iberian Peninsula). A total of 373 individuals (205 females, 168 males) were analyzed; females ranged from 4.5 to 14.0 cm mantle length (ML) and males from 4.5 to 11.5 cm ML. There were few small-sized octopuses (<7 cm ML) in the samples, which might indicate that these individuals inhabit rocky grounds that are not accessible to trawlers or waters deeper than the maximum depth sampled (800 m). The species occurred more frequently around the Balearic Islands than along the Iberian Peninsula as they appeared in 20% and 7%, respectively, of the hauls in these areas. The octopus inhabits the lower continental shelf and upper slope in both areas, primarily between 200 and 500 m depth. Modal lengths were followed from autumn, when recruits were caught by trawlers, to summer, when reproduction took place. Females grew from 8 to 10 cm ML from winter to spring, but this modal size did not increase further in summer; males grew from 7 to 9 cm ML from winter to spring. The total disappearance of large individuals after summer suggests a life cycle lasting a single year. The evolution of the monthly mean sizes showed that the growth was best described by log-linear functions in both sexes. The length at first maturity was clearly higher in females (12 cm ML) than in males (8 cm ML). A total of 30 different prey items, belonging to four major taxonomic groups (crustaceans, osteichthyes, cephalopods and gastropods), were identified in the stomach contents. The diet of the octopus was based on crustaceans and teleosts, which accounted for 75% and 23% of the prey items, respectively. Cephalopods and gastropods were accessory prey as they only represented 1.6% and 0.7%, respectively, of the total. The octopus showed a marked preference for the

  17. Combined Transcriptomic and Proteomic Analysis of the Posterior Salivary Gland from the Southern Blue-Ringed Octopus and the Southern Sand Octopus.

    PubMed

    Whitelaw, Brooke L; Strugnell, Jan M; Faou, Pierre; da Fonseca, Rute R; Hall, Nathan E; Norman, Mark; Finn, Julian; Cooke, Ira R

    2016-09-01

    This study provides comprehensive proteomic profiles from the venom producing posterior salivary glands of octopus (superorder Octopodiformes) species. A combined transcriptomic and proteomic approach was used to identify 1703 proteins from the posterior salivary gland of the southern blue-ringed octopus, Hapalochlaena maculosa and 1300 proteins from the posterior salivary gland of the southern sand octopus, Octopus kaurna. The two proteomes were broadly similar; clustering of proteins into orthogroups revealed 937 that were shared between species. Serine proteases were particularly diverse and abundant in both species. Other abundant proteins included a large number of secreted proteins, many of which had no known conserved domains, or homology to proteins with known function. On the basis of homology to known venom proteins, 23 putative toxins were identified in H. maculosa and 24 in O. kaurna. These toxins span nine protein families: CAP (cysteine rich secretory proteins, antigen 5, parthenogenesis related), chitinase, carboxylesterase, DNase, hyaluronidase, metalloprotease, phospholipase, serine protease and tachykinin. Serine proteases were responsible for 70.9% and 86.3% of putative toxin expression in H. maculosa and O. kaurna, respectively, as determined using intensity based absolute quantification (iBAQ) measurements. Phylogenetic analysis of the putative toxin serine proteases revealed a similar suite of diverse proteins present in both species. Posterior salivary gland composition of H. maculosa and O. kaurna differ in several key aspects. While O. kaurna expressed the proteinaceous neurotoxin, tachykinin, this was absent from H. maculosa, perhaps reflecting the acquisition of a potent nonproteinaceous neurotoxin, tetrodotoxin (TTX) produced by bacteria in the salivary glands of that species. The dispersal factor, hyaluronidase was particularly abundant in H. maculosa. Chitinase was abundant in both species and is believed to facilitate

  18. Coccidian infection may explain the differences in the life history of octopus host populations.

    PubMed

    Storero, Lorena P; Narvarte, Maite A

    2013-11-01

    The prevalence of coccidian parasites in three Octopus tehuelchus populations from San Matías Gulf (Patagonia, Argentina) is compared. The prevalence was similar between sexes, but varied between seasons (being highest during cold months) and sites. Islote Lobos had the highest prevalence (42.7-100%) followed by San Antonio Bay (0-66%) and El Fuerte (0-24.5%). Octopuses under 27 mm of dorsal mantle length showed a low prevalence (less than 50%), which increased with size. We hypothesize that the high prevalence of parasites, which affect the three populations differentially, could account for the observed variability in life-span and growth, size-frequency distributions, reproduction and densities of O. tehuelchus populations. PMID:23999242

  19. Functional characterization on invertebrate and vertebrate tissues of tachykinin peptides from octopus venoms.

    PubMed

    Ruder, Tim; Ali, Syed Abid; Ormerod, Kiel; Brust, Andreas; Roymanchadi, Mary-Louise; Ventura, Sabatino; Undheim, Eivind A B; Jackson, Timothy N W; Mercier, A Joffre; King, Glenn F; Alewood, Paul F; Fry, Bryan G

    2013-09-01

    It has been previously shown that octopus venoms contain novel tachykinin peptides that despite being isolated from an invertebrate, contain the motifs characteristic of vertebrate tachykinin peptides rather than being more like conventional invertebrate tachykinin peptides. Therefore, in this study we examined the effect of three variants of octopus venom tachykinin peptides on invertebrate and vertebrate tissues. While there were differential potencies between the three peptides, their relative effects were uniquely consistent between invertebrate and vertebrae tissue assays. The most potent form (OCT-TK-III) was not only the most anionically charged but also was the most structurally stable. These results not only reveal that the interaction of tachykinin peptides is more complex than previous structure-function theories envisioned, but also reinforce the fundamental premise that animal venoms are rich resources of novel bioactive molecules, which are useful investigational ligands and some of which may be useful as lead compounds for drug design and development. PMID:23850991

  20. Development of microsatellite markers to genetically differentiate populations of Octopus minor from Korea and China.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jung-Ha; Kim, Yi-Kyung; Park, Jung-Youn; An, Chel-Min; Jun, Je-Chun

    2012-08-01

    Of the more than 300 octopus species, Octopus minor is one of the most popular and economically important species in Eastern Asia, including Korea, along with O. vulgaris, O. ocellatus, and O. aegina. We developed 19 microsatellite markers from Octopus minor and eight polymorphic markers were developed to analyze the genetic diversity and relationships among four octopus populations from Korea and three from China. The number of alleles per locus varied from 10 to 49, and allelic richness per locus ranged from 2 to 16.4 across all populations. The average allele number among the populations was 11.1, with a minimum of 8.3 and a maximum of 13.6. The mean allelic richness was 8.7 in all populations. The Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) test revealed significant deviation in 19 of the 56 single-locus sites, and null alleles were presumed in five of eight loci. The pairwise F ( ST ) values between populations from Korea and China differed significantly in all pairwise comparisons. The genetic distances between the China and Korea samples ranged from 0.161 to 0.454. The genetic distances among the populations from Korea ranged from 0.033 to 0.090, with an average of 0.062; those among populations from China ranged from 0.191 to 0.316, with an average of 0.254. The populations from Korea and China formed clearly separated into clusters via an unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean dendrogram. Furthermore, a population from muddy flats on the western coast of the Korean Peninsula and one from a rocky area on Jeju Island formed clearly separated subclusters. An assignment test based on the allele distribution discriminated between the Korean and Chinese origins with 96.9 % accuracy. PMID:22707143

  1. Phylogenetic analysis of the hyperthermophilic pink filament community in Octopus Spring, Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect

    Reysenbach, A.L.; Wickham, G.S.; Pace, N.R.

    1994-06-01

    This study uses a molecular phylogenetic approach to characterize the pink filament community at the outflow of Octopus Spring in Yellowstone National Park. The temperature range of the spring is from 84 to 88 C. The authors show that the pink filaments are most closely related to the hydrogen-oxidizing bacterium Aquifex pyrophilus and a close relative Hydrogenobacter thermophilus. 38 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Octopus-Inspired Smart Adhesive Pads for Transfer Printing of Semiconducting Nanomembranes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hochan; Um, Doo-Seung; Lee, Youngsu; Lim, Seongdong; Kim, Hyung-Jun; Ko, Hyunhyub

    2016-09-01

    By mimicking muscle actuation to control cavity-pressure-induced adhesion of octopus suckers, smart adhesive pads are developed in which the thermoresponsive actuation of a hydrogel layer on elastomeric microcavity pads enables excellent switchable adhesion in response to a thermal stimulus (maximum adhesive strength: 94 kPa, adhesion switching ratio: ≈293 for temperature change between 22 and 61 °C). PMID:27322886

  3. Octopus arm movements under constrained conditions: adaptation, modification and plasticity of motor primitives.

    PubMed

    Richter, Jonas N; Hochner, Binyamin; Kuba, Michael J

    2015-04-01

    The motor control of the eight highly flexible arms of the common octopus (Octopus vulgaris) has been the focus of several recent studies. Our study is the first to manage to introduce a physical constraint to an octopus arm and investigate the adaptability of stereotypical bend propagation in reaching movements and the pseudo-limb articulation during fetching. Subjects (N=6) were placed inside a transparent Perspex box with a hole at the center that allowed the insertion of a single arm. Animals had to reach out through the hole toward a target, to retrieve a food reward and fetch it. All subjects successfully adjusted their movements to the constraint without an adaptation phase. During reaching tasks, the animals showed two movement strategies: stereotypical bend propagation reachings, which were established at the hole of the Perspex box and variant waving-like movements that showed no bend propagations. During fetching movements, no complete pseudo-joint fetching was observed outside the box and subjects pulled their arms through the hole in a pull-in like movement. Our findings show that there is some flexibility in the octopus motor system to adapt to a novel situation. However, at present, it seems that these changes are more an effect of random choices between different alternative motor programs, without showing clear learning effects in the choice between the alternatives. Interestingly, animals were able to adapt the fetching movements to the physical constraint, or as an alternative explanation, they could switch the motor primitive fetching to a different motor primitive 'arm pulling'. PMID:25687436

  4. The gyri of the octopus vertical lobe have distinct neurochemical identities.

    PubMed

    Shigeno, Shuichi; Ragsdale, Clifton W

    2015-06-15

    The cephalopod vertical lobe is the largest learning and memory structure known in invertebrate nervous systems. It is part of the visual learning circuit of the central brain, which also includes the superior frontal and subvertical lobes. Despite the well-established functional importance of this system, little is known about neuropil organization of these structures and there is to date no evidence that the five longitudinal gyri of the vertical lobe, perhaps the most distinctive morphological feature of the octopus brain, differ in their connections or molecular identities. We studied the histochemical organization of these structures in hatchling and adult Octopus bimaculoides brains with immunostaining for serotonin, octopus gonadotropin-releasing hormone (oGNRH), and octopressin-neurophysin (OP-NP). Our major finding is that the five lobules forming the vertical lobe gyri have distinct neurochemical signatures. This is most prominent in the hatchling brain, where the median and mediolateral lobules are enriched in OP-NP fibers, the lateral lobule is marked by oGNRH innervation, and serotonin immunostaining heavily labels the median and lateral lobules. A major source of input to the vertical lobe is the superior frontal lobe, which is dominated by a neuropil of interweaving fiber bundles. We have found that this neuropil also has an intrinsic neurochemical organization: it is partitioned into territories alternately enriched or impoverished in oGNRH-containing fascicles. Our findings establish that the constituent lobes of the octopus superior frontal-vertical system have an intricate internal anatomy, one likely to reflect the presence of functional subsystems within cephalopod learning circuitry. PMID:25644267

  5. Distribution of tetrodotoxin in the body of the blue-ringed octopus (Hapalochlaena maculosa).

    PubMed

    Yotsu-Yamashita, Mari; Mebs, Dietrich; Flachsenberger, Wolfgang

    2007-03-01

    Tetrodotoxin (TTX) was quantitatively assayed in six specimens of semi-adult blue-ringed octopus, Hapalochlaena maculosa, by a post-column fluorescent-HPLC system. TTX was found to be present in all body parts, e.g. in high concentrations in the arms followed by the abdomen and cephalothorax. The toxin is not associated exclusively with the posterior salivary gland. PMID:17188731

  6. Learning the inverse kinetics of an octopus-like manipulator in three-dimensional space.

    PubMed

    Giorelli, M; Renda, F; Calisti, M; Arienti, A; Ferri, G; Laschi, C

    2015-06-01

    This work addresses the inverse kinematics problem of a bioinspired octopus-like manipulator moving in three-dimensional space. The bioinspired manipulator has a conical soft structure that confers the ability of twirling around objects as a real octopus arm does. Despite the simple design, the soft conical shape manipulator driven by cables is described by nonlinear differential equations, which are difficult to solve analytically. Since exact solutions of the equations are not available, the Jacobian matrix cannot be calculated analytically and the classical iterative methods cannot be used. To overcome the intrinsic problems of methods based on the Jacobian matrix, this paper proposes a neural network learning the inverse kinematics of a soft octopus-like manipulator driven by cables. After the learning phase, a feed-forward neural network is able to represent the relation between manipulator tip positions and forces applied to the cables. Experimental results show that a desired tip position can be achieved in a short time, since heavy computations are avoided, with a degree of accuracy of 8% relative average error with respect to the total arm length. PMID:25970238

  7. Purification and partial characterization of an agglutinin from Octopus maya serum.

    PubMed

    Alpuche, Juan; Pereyra, Ali; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; Agundis, Concepción; Rosas, Carlos; Zenteno, Edgar

    2010-05-01

    A 66-kDa lectin (OmA) was purified from the serum of the Yucatan peninsula endemic octopus (Octopus maya) by a single step affinity chromatography on glutaraldehyde-fixed stroma from rat erythrocytes. OmA corresponds to 0.8% of the total circulating protein in the hemolymph; it is composed of three equal subunits of 22kDa each, and 7.4% of linked carbohydrates. The amino acids' composition indicated that agglutinin contained mainly aspartic and glutamic acids, and cysteine and methionine were identified in minor proportion. OmA agglutinates mainly rat, guinea pig, and rabbit erythrocytes, and this activity is partially inhibited by galactosamine, melobiose, galacturonic acid, mannose, and methyl alpha and beta galactosides. Hemagglutinating activity is not dependent on divalent cations, such as Ca(2+), Mg(2+), or Mn(2+). The OmA subunits showed no identity for any lectin in databases but partial identity with the type A hemocyanin from Octopus dolfleini hemolymph; the main similarities are related to tyrosinase domains and copper A and B sites that conform to the oxygen-binding site of hemocyanin. PMID:20105460

  8. Gonad development during the early life of Octopus maya (Mollusca: Cephalopoda).

    PubMed

    Avila-Poveda, Omar Hernando; Colin-Flores, Rafael Francisco; Rosas, Carlos

    2009-02-01

    Gonad development during the early life of Octopus maya is described in terms of histological, morphometric, oocytes growth, and somatic-oocyte relationship data obtained from octopus cultured at the UMDI-UNAM, in Sisal, Yucatan, Mexico. This study is the first publication on gonad development during the early life of Octopus maya. A total of 83 O. maya specimens were used; their sizes ranged from 6.5 to 76 mm of total length (TL), 4 to 28 mm of dorsal mantle length (DML), 2.5 to 20 mm of ventral mantle length (VML), and 0.0180 to 7.2940 g of fixed body weight (fBW). Animals were weighed and measured only after preservation. A loss of 10% of living weight was estimated for juvenile octopuses after formalin preservation. The relation of length to weight (VML, DML, TL/fBW) pooled for both sexes had a strong positive correlation (r), as shown by a potential power function that was quite close to 1. Compound images were produced from numerous microscopic fields. The histological examination revealed that, 4 months after hatching, male octopus (24.5 mm DML and 7.2940 g fBW) were in gonad stages 2 (maturing) to 3 (mature), with spermatogonia and spermatocytes in the tubule wall and abundant spermatids and spermatozoa in the central lumen of the seminiferous tubules, suggesting the occurrence of different phases of gonad development at different maturity stages. In contrast, females (22.5 mm DML and 4.8210 g fBW) at the same time since hatching were immature (stage 1), with many oogonia, few oocytes, and germinal epithelium. This suggests that males reach maturity earlier than females, indicating a probable onset of maturity for males at around 4 months of culture or 8 g of wet body weight. Our results indicate the possibility that the size-at-weight can be recognized early with a degree of certainty that allows the sexes to be separated for culture purposes; but more detailed studies on reproduction in relation to endocrinology and nutrition are needed. PMID:19218496

  9. Persistent Contamination of Octopuses and Mussels with Lipophilic Shellfish Toxins during Spring Dinophysis Blooms in a Subtropical Estuary

    PubMed Central

    Mafra, Luiz L.; Lopes, Daiana; Bonilauri, Vanessa C.; Uchida, Hajime; Suzuki, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the occurrence of diarrhetic shellfish toxins (DSTs) and their producing phytoplankton species in southern Brazil, as well as the potential for toxin accumulation in co-occurring mussels (Perna perna) and octopuses (Octopus vulgaris). During the spring in 2012 and 2013, cells of Dinophysis acuminata complex were always present, sometimes at relatively high abundances (max. 1143 cells L−1), likely the main source of okadaic acid (OA) in the plankton (max. 34 ng L−1). Dinophysis caudata occurred at lower cell densities in 2013 when the lipophilic toxins pectenotoxin-2 (PTX-2) and PTX-2 seco acid were detected in plankton and mussel samples. Here, we report for the first time the accumulation of DSTs in octopuses, probably linked to the consumption of contaminated bivalves. Perna perna mussels were consistently contaminated with different DSTs (max. 42 µg kg−1), and all octopuses analyzed (n = 5) accumulated OA in different organs/tissues: digestive glands (DGs) > arms > gills > kidneys > stomach + intestine. Additionally, similar concentrations of 7-O-palmytoyl OA and 7-O-palmytoly dinophysistoxin-1 (DTX-1) were frequently detected in the hepatopancreas of P. perna and DGs of O. vulgaris. Therefore, octopuses can be considered a potential vector of DSTs to both humans and top predators such as marine mammals. PMID:26096277

  10. Persistent Contamination of Octopuses and Mussels with Lipophilic Shellfish Toxins during Spring Dinophysis Blooms in a Subtropical Estuary.

    PubMed

    Mafra, Luiz L; Lopes, Daiana; Bonilauri, Vanessa C; Uchida, Hajime; Suzuki, Toshiyuki

    2015-06-01

    This study investigates the occurrence of diarrhetic shellfish toxins (DSTs) and their producing phytoplankton species in southern Brazil, as well as the potential for toxin accumulation in co-occurring mussels (Perna perna) and octopuses (Octopus vulgaris). During the spring in 2012 and 2013, cells of Dinophysis acuminata complex were always present, sometimes at relatively high abundances (max. 1143 cells L-1), likely the main source of okadaic acid (OA) in the plankton (max. 34 ng L-1). Dinophysis caudata occurred at lower cell densities in 2013 when the lipophilic toxins pectenotoxin-2 (PTX-2) and PTX-2 seco acid were detected in plankton and mussel samples. Here, we report for the first time the accumulation of DSTs in octopuses, probably linked to the consumption of contaminated bivalves. Perna perna mussels were consistently contaminated with different DSTs (max. 42 µg kg-1), and all octopuses analyzed (n = 5) accumulated OA in different organs/tissues: digestive glands (DGs) > arms > gills > kidneys > stomach + intestine. Additionally, similar concentrations of 7-O-palmytoyl OA and 7-O-palmytoly dinophysistoxin-1 (DTX-1) were frequently detected in the hepatopancreas of P. perna and DGs of O. vulgaris. Therefore, octopuses can be considered a potential vector of DSTs to both humans and top predators such as marine mammals. PMID:26096277

  11. Microdistribution of tetrodotoxin in two species of blue-ringed octopuses (Hapalochlaena lunulata and Hapalochlaena fasciata) detected by fluorescent immunolabeling.

    PubMed

    Williams, Becky L; Stark, Michael R; Caldwell, Roy L

    2012-12-01

    Blue-ringed octopuses (genus Hapalochlaena) possess the potent neurotoxin tetrodotoxin (TTX). We examined the microdistribution of TTX in ten tissues of Hapalochlaena lunulata and Hapalochlaena fasciata by immunolabeling for fluorescent light microscopy (FLM). We visualized TTX throughout the posterior salivary gland, but the toxin was concentrated in cells lining the secretory tubules within the gland. Tetrodotoxin was present just beneath the epidermis of the integument (mantle and arms) and also concentrated in channels running through the dermis. This was suggestive of a TTX transport mechanism in the blood of the octopus, which would also explain the presence of the toxin in the blood-rich brachial hearts, gills, nephridia, and highly vascularized Needham's sac (testes contents). We also present the first report of TTX in any cephalopod outside of the genus Hapalochlaena. A specimen of Octopus bocki from French Polynesia contained a small amount of TTX in the digestive gland. PMID:22983011

  12. How nervous systems evolve in relation to their embodiment: what we can learn from octopuses and other molluscs.

    PubMed

    Hochner, Binyamin

    2013-01-01

    Cephalopods such as the octopus show the most advanced behavior among invertebrates, which they accomplish with an exceptionally flexible body plan. In this review I propose that the embodied organization approach, developed by roboticists to design efficient autonomous robots, is useful for understanding the evolution and development of the efficient adaptive interaction of animals with their environment, using the octopus as the leading example. The embodied organization approach explains adaptive behavior as emerging from the continuous dynamical and reciprocal physical and informational interactions between four elements: the controller, the mechanical and the sensory systems and the environment. In contrast to hierarchical organization, in embodied organization, self-organization processes can take part in the emergence of the adaptive properties. I first discuss how the embodiment concept explains covariation of body form, nervous system organization, and level of behavioral complexity using the Mollusca as an example. This is an ideal phylum to test such a qualitative correlation between body/brain/behavior, because they show the greatest variations of body plan within a single phylum. In some cases the covariation of nervous system and body structure seems to arise independently of close phylogenetic relationships. Next, I dwell on the octopus as an ideal model to test the embodiment concept within a single biological system. Here, the unusual body morphology of the octopus exposes the uniqueness of the four components comprising the octopus' embodiment. Considering together the results from behavioral, physiological, anatomical, and motor control research suggests that these four elements mutually influence each other. It is this mutual interactions and self-organization which have led to their unique evolution and development to create the unique and highly efficient octopus embodiment. PMID:23979453

  13. Composition and metabolism of phospholipids in Octopus vulgaris and Sepia officinalis hatchlings.

    PubMed

    Reis, Diana B; Acosta, Nieves G; Almansa, Eduardo; Tocher, Douglas R; Andrade, José P; Sykes, António V; Rodríguez, Covadonga

    2016-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to characterise the fatty acid (FA) profiles of the major phospholipids, of Octopus vulgaris and Sepia officinalis hatchlings, namely phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylserine (PS), phosphatidylinositol (PI) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE); and to evaluate the capability of both cephalopod species on dietary phospholipid remodelling. Thus, O. vulgaris and S. officinalis hatchlings were in vivo incubated with 0.3μM of L-∝-1-palmitoyl-2-[1-(14)C]arachidonyl-PC or L-∝-1-palmitoyl-2-[1-(14)C]arachidonyl-PE. Octopus and cuttlefish hatchlings phospholipids showed a characteristic FA profiles with PC presenting high contents of 16:0 and 22:6n-3 (DHA); PS having high 18:0, DHA and 20:5n-3 (EPA); PI a high content of saturated FA; and PE showing high contents of DHA and EPA. Interestingly, the highest content of 20:4n-6 (ARA) was found in PE rather than PI. Irrespective of the phospholipid in which [1-(14)C]ARA was initially bound (either PC or PE), the esterification pattern of [1-(14)C]ARA in octopus lipids was similar to that found in their tissues with high esterification of this FA into PE. In contrast, in cuttlefish hatchlings [1-(14)C]ARA was mainly recovered in the same phospholipid that was provided. These results showed a characteristic FA profiles in the major phospholipids of the two species, as well as a contrasting capability to remodel dietary phospholipids, which may suggest a difference in phospholipase activities. PMID:27267253

  14. Chemical Tools of Octopus maya during Crab Predation Are Also Active on Conspecifics.

    PubMed

    Pech-Puch, Dawrin; Cruz-López, Honorio; Canche-Ek, Cindy; Campos-Espinosa, Gabriela; García, Elpidio; Mascaro, Maite; Rosas, Carlos; Chávez-Velasco, Daniel; Rodríguez-Morales, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Octopus maya is a major socio-economic resource from the Yucatán Peninsula in Mexico. In this study we report for the first time the chemical composition of the saliva of O. maya and its effect on natural prey, i.e. the blue crab (Callinectes sapidus), the crown conch snail (Melongena corona bispinosa), as well as conspecifics. Salivary posterior glands were collected from octopus caught by local fishers and extracted with water; this extract paralyzed and predigested crabs when it was injected into the third pereiopod. The water extract was fractionated by membrane ultrafiltration with a molecular weight cut-off of 3 kDa leading to a metabolic phase (>3 kDa) and a neurotoxic fraction (<3 kDa). The neurotoxic fraction injected in the crabs caused paralysis and postural changes. Crabs recovered to their initial condition within two hours, which suggests that the effects of the neurotoxic fraction were reversible. The neurotoxic fraction was also active on O. maya conspecifics, partly paralyzing and sedating them; this suggests that octopus saliva might be used among conspecifics for defense and for reduction of competition. Bioguided separation of the neurotoxic fraction by chromatography led to a paralysis fraction and a relaxing fraction. The paralyzing activity of the saliva was exerted by amino acids, while the relaxing activity was due to the presence of serotonin. Prey-handling studies revealed that O. maya punctures the eye or arthrodial membrane when predating blue crabs and uses the radula to bore through crown conch shells; these differing strategies may help O. maya to reduce the time needed to handle its prey. PMID:26895025

  15. Chemical Tools of Octopus maya during Crab Predation Are Also Active on Conspecifics

    PubMed Central

    Pech-Puch, Dawrin; Cruz-López, Honorio; Canche-Ek, Cindy; Campos-Espinosa, Gabriela; García, Elpidio; Mascaro, Maite; Rosas, Carlos; Chávez-Velasco, Daniel; Rodríguez-Morales, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Octopus maya is a major socio-economic resource from the Yucatán Peninsula in Mexico. In this study we report for the first time the chemical composition of the saliva of O. maya and its effect on natural prey, i.e. the blue crab (Callinectes sapidus), the crown conch snail (Melongena corona bispinosa), as well as conspecifics. Salivary posterior glands were collected from octopus caught by local fishers and extracted with water; this extract paralyzed and predigested crabs when it was injected into the third pereiopod. The water extract was fractionated by membrane ultrafiltration with a molecular weight cut-off of 3kDa leading to a metabolic phase (>3kDa) and a neurotoxic fraction (<3kDa). The neurotoxic fraction injected in the crabs caused paralysis and postural changes. Crabs recovered to their initial condition within two hours, which suggests that the effects of the neurotoxic fraction were reversible. The neurotoxic fraction was also active on O. maya conspecifics, partly paralyzing and sedating them; this suggests that octopus saliva might be used among conspecifics for defense and for reduction of competition. Bioguided separation of the neurotoxic fraction by chromatography led to a paralysis fraction and a relaxing fraction. The paralyzing activity of the saliva was exerted by amino acids, while the relaxing activity was due to the presence of serotonin. Prey-handling studies revealed that O. maya punctures the eye or arthrodial membrane when predating blue crabs and uses the radula to bore through crown conch shells; these differing strategies may help O. maya to reduce the time needed to handle its prey. PMID:26895025

  16. Development of Visual Field Screening Procedures: A Case Study of the Octopus Perimeter

    PubMed Central

    Turpin, Andrew,; Myers, Jonathan S.; McKendrick, Allison M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We develop a methodology for designing perimetric screening procedures, using Octopus perimeters as a case study. Methods The process has three stages: analytically determining specificity and number of presentations required for different multisampling suprathreshold schemes at a single location of the visual field, ranking visual field locations by their positive predictive value (PPV) for glaucoma, and determining a pass/fail criteria for the test. For the case study the Octopus G-program visual field test pattern is used, and a dataset of 385 glaucoma and 86 normal patients. Results Using a 1-of-3 sampling strategy at a level equal to the 95 percentile of normal observers gave the most robust specificity under the influences of false-negative responses using an average of 1.5 presentations per location. The PPV analysis gave 19 locations that completely classified our glaucomatous data. A further 9 points were added to screen for nonglaucomatous loss. The final stage found that insisting that 3 locations are missed for the screening to fail gave a simulated specificity and sensitivity of approximately 95% for unreliable responders. Conclusions Our method gives a principled approach to choosing between the many parameters of a visual field screening procedure. We have developed a procedure for the Octopus that should terminate in less than 1 minute for normal observers with high specificity and sensitivity to glaucoma. Translational Relevance Visual field screening is used in community settings and eye care practice. This study provides a principled approach to the development of such screening procedures and details a new procedure. PMID:27190698

  17. Liquid-crystalline octopus dendrimers: block molecules with unusual mesophase morphologies.

    PubMed

    Gehringer, Lionel; Bourgogne, Cyril; Guillon, Daniel; Donnio, Bertrand

    2004-03-31

    The synthesis and the mesomorphic properties of several new main-chain liquid-crystalline dendrimers, thereafter designated as octopus dendrimers in accordance with their eight sidearms, are reported. In these dendritic systems, the arborescence is ensured by anisotropic segments, acting as branching cells with a double multiplicity, which are incorporated at every node of the dendritic architecture. In such a way, these compounds radically differ from the classical end-functionalized liquid-crystalline dendrimers, the most commonly reported systems. Following our previous report on purely homolithic systems, that is, the building blocks constituting the dendritic matrix are all identical, several heterolithic systems made of different anisotropic blocks have been prepared. The dendritic branches and corresponding dendrimers were synthesized using a modular construction. Polarized optical microscopy and X-ray diffraction studies showed that all of these new octopus dendrimers exhibit either smectic-like or columnar phases with novel morphologies, the nature of the mesophases depending on the number of terminal chains attached to the peripheral groups. The mesomorphism of these heterolithic dendrimers is discussed in terms of their intrinsic architecture and compared to the analogous homolithic octopus systems. Models for the molecular organizations within both the smectic and the columnar phases are proposed on the basis of small Bragg angle X-ray diffraction studies and are supported by molecular modelizations. Moreover, this study showed that the mesophase stability is very sensitive to the nature and to the mutual arrangement (the spatial location) of the mesogenic segments within the dendritic matrix, illustrating the intimate relationships existing between the mesomorphic properties and the molecular architecture of these dendrimers. PMID:15038740

  18. The pKa of the protonated Schiff bases of gecko cone and octopus visual pigments.

    PubMed Central

    Liang, J; Steinberg, G; Livnah, N; Sheves, M; Ebrey, T G; Tsuda, M

    1994-01-01

    A visual pigment is composed of retinal bound to its apoprotein by a protonated Schiff base linkage. Light isomerizes the chromophore and eventually causes the deprotonation of this Schiff base linkage at the meta II stage of the bleaching cycle. The meta II intermediate of the visual pigment is the active form of the pigment that binds to and activates the G protein transducin, starting the visual cascade. The deprotonation of the Schiff base is mandatory for the formation of meta II intermediate. We studied the proton binding affinity, pKa, of the Schiff base of both octopus rhodopsin and the gecko cone pigment P521 by spectral titration. Several fluorinated retinal analogs have strong electron withdrawing character around the Schiff base region and lower the Schiff base pKa in model compounds. We regenerated octopus and gecko visual pigments with these fluorinated and other retinal analogs. Experiments on these artificial pigments showed that the spectral changes seen upon raising the pH indeed reflected the pKa of the Schiff base and not the denaturation of the pigment or the deprotonation of some other group in the pigment. The Schiff base pKa is 10.4 for octopus rhodopsin and 9.9 for the gecko cone pigment. We also showed that although the removal of Cl- ions causes considerable blue-shift in the gecko cone pigment P521, it affects the Schiff base pKa very little, indicating that the lambda max of visual pigment and its Schiff base pKa are not tightly coupled. PMID:7948697

  19. What drives seasonal fluctuations of body condition in a semelparous income breeder octopus?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quetglas, Antoni; Ordines, Francesc; Valls, Maria

    2011-09-01

    The vast majority of modern cephalopods is single-season breeders, or semelparous in the strict sense, that die soon after the reproduction takes place. Individual body condition in these marine invertebrates is expected to be highly affected by reproduction because: 1) the gonad weight of females, which represents <1% of body weight when immature, increases up to 20-50% during maturation; and 2) octopus females reduce or even cease their food intake during breeding. Based on this expectation, we analysed the interrelationship between condition and reproduction in the temperate octopus Eledone cirrhosa. Results from a previous work using biochemical analyses showed that reproduction in this species is not fuelled by stored reserves (capital breeder), but by food intakes (income breeder). Since income breeders depend strongly on food resources, the effect of several environmental variables related to food availability such as primary production, sea temperature (ST) and river discharges were also analysed. Condition showed a marked intrannual cycle independently of the sex and, noteworthy, the maturity stage. Given that immature individuals are not expected to display seasonal fluctuations in body condition related to maturation, these results preclude reproduction as a driving factor for the observed circannual cycle. Condition was significantly correlated with all the environmental variables analysed, except with ST at the depths where the species lives. Although this last result also precludes concurrent ST as a driving factor of body condition, those correlations suggest that condition might display an intrinsic seasonal cycle, as many other life-history traits in most species such as reproduction, migration or moulting. Finally, there also remains the possibility that condition in this octopus species is determined genetically, as has been reported in recent studies across different taxonomical groups.

  20. The complete mitochondrial genome of Octopus conispadiceus (Sasaki, 1917) (Cephalopoda: Octopodidae).

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuanyuan; Zheng, Xiaodong; Cheng, Rubin; Li, Qi

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we determined the complete mitochondrial genome of Octopus conispadiceus (Cephalopoda: Octopodidae). The whole mitogenome of O. conispadiceus is 16,027 basepairs (bp) in length with a base composition of 41.4% A, 34.8% T, 16.1% C, 7.7% G and contains 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, and a major non-coding region (MNR). The gene arrangements of O. conispadiceus showed remarkable similarity to that of O. vulgaris, Amphioctopus fangsiao, Cistopus chinensis and C. taiwanicus. PMID:24971549

  1. Indole Alkaloids from the Sea Anemone Heteractis aurora and Homarine from Octopus cyanea.

    PubMed

    Shaker, Kamel H; Göhl, Matthias; Müller, Tobias; Seifert, Karlheinz

    2015-11-01

    The two new indole alkaloids 2-amino-1,5-dihydro-5-(1H-indol-3-ylmethyl)-4H-imidazol-4-one (1), 2-amino-5-[(6-bromo-1H-indol-3-yl)methyl]-3,5-dihydro-3-methyl-4H-imidazol-4-one (2), and auramine (3) have been isolated from the sea anemone Heteractis aurora. Both indole alkaloids were synthesized for the confirmation of the structures. Homarine (4), along with uracil (5), hypoxanthine (6), and inosine (7) have been obtained from Octopus cyanea. PMID:26567952

  2. Microsatellite marker isolation and development for the giant Pacific Octopus (Enteroctopus dofleini)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Toussaint, Rebecca K.; Sage, G. Kevin; Talbot, Sandra L.; Scheel, David

    2012-01-01

    We isolated and developed 18 novel microsatellite markers for the giant Pacific octopus (Enteroctopus dofleini) and examined them for 31 individuals from Prince William Sound (PWS), Alaska. These loci displayed moderate levels of allelic diversity (averaging 11 alleles per locus) and heterozygosity (averaging 65%). Seven loci deviated from Hardy–Weinberg Equilibrium (HWE) due to heterozygote deficiency for the PWS population, although deviations were not observed for all these loci in other populations, suggesting the PWS population is not in mutation-drift equilibrium. These novel microsatellite loci yielded sufficient genetic diversity for potential use in population genetics, individual identification, and parentage studies.

  3. Stereotypical reaching movements of the octopus involve both bend propagation and arm elongation.

    PubMed

    Hanassy, S; Botvinnik, A; Flash, T; Hochner, B

    2015-06-01

    The bend propagation involved in the stereotypical reaching movement of the octopus arm has been extensively studied. While these studies have analyzed the kinematics of bend propagation along the arm during its extension, possible length changes have been ignored. Here, the elongation profiles of the reaching movements of Octopus vulgaris were assessed using three-dimensional reconstructions. The analysis revealed that, in addition to bend propagation, arm extension movements involve elongation of the proximal part of the arm, i.e., the section from the base of the arm to the propagating bend. The elongations are quite substantial and highly variable, ranging from an average strain along the arm of -0.12 (i.e. shortening) up to 1.8 at the end of the movement (0.57 ± 0.41, n = 64 movements, four animals). Less variability was discovered in an additional set of experiments on reaching movements (0.64 ± 0.28, n = 30 movements, two animals), where target and octopus positions were kept more stationary. Visual observation and subsequent kinematic analysis suggest that the reaching movements can be broadly segregated into two groups. The first group involves bend propagation beginning at the base of the arm and propagating towards the arm tip. In the second, the bend is formed or present more distally and reaching is achieved mainly by elongation and straightening of the segment proximal to the bend. Only in the second type of movements is elongation significantly positively correlated with the distance of the bend from the target. We suggest that reaching towards a target is generated by a combination of both propagation of a bend along the arm and arm elongation. These two motor primitives may be combined to create a broad spectrum of reaching movements. The dynamical model, which recapitulates the biomechanics of the octopus muscular hydrostatic arm, suggests that achieving the observed elongation requires an extremely low ratio of longitudinal to transverse muscle

  4. Observations on associated histopathology with Aggregata octopiana infection (Protista: Apicomplexa) in Octopus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Gestal, C; Abollo, E; Pascual, S

    2002-06-21

    Gamogony and sporogony of Aggregata octopiana were commonly observed during histological examination of the digestive tract of wild Octopus vulgaris from Ria de Vigo (NW Spain). A. octopiana infected noncuticularized caecum and intestine, and cuticularized oesophagus and crop. Infection was also observed in the gills and in covering mesenterium, mainly of the digestive gland and gonad. Histological and ultrastructural lesions associated with A. octopiana included host cell hypertrophy with nuclear displacement, inflammation, phagocytosis, ulceration and destruction of organ architecture. The possible existence of a malabsorption syndrome in the host is deduced. PMID:12152904

  5. Octopus vulgaris (Cuvier, 1797) in the Mediterranean Sea: Genetic Diversity and Population Structure.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Daniele; Catanese, Gaetano; Procaccini, Gabriele; Fiorito, Graziano

    2016-01-01

    The common octopus, Octopus vulgaris Cuvier 1797, is a largely exploited cephalopod species in the Mediterranean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean, as well as along the coasts of Africa, Brazil and Japan, where its taxonomic identity is still debated. The assessment of its genetic structure is a pressing need to correctly manage the resource and to avoid overfishing and collapsing of local stocks. Here we analysed genetic variation and population structure of O. vulgaris using thirteen microsatellite loci in seven sampling localities from the Mediterranean Sea and one from the Atlantic Ocean. We also used a DNA barcoding approach by COI gene fragment to understand the phylogenetic relationships among the specimens here investigated and the ones whose sequences are available in literature. Our results reveal high levels of allelic richness and moderate heterozygosity in all samples investigated, and a pronounced differentiation of the Atlantic and Sicilian specimens. This latter aspect seems to support the isolation of the biota within the Strait of Messina. A certain degree of differentiation was detected among the other geographic samples within the Mediterranean Sea, which is more compatible with an island model than isolation by distance. The occurrence of null alleles affected more genetic diversity indices than population structure estimations. This study provides new insights about the genetic diversity and structure of O. vulgaris in the area of interest, which can be used as guidelines for a fisheries management perspective. PMID:26881847

  6. Inter-cohort growth for three tropical resources: tilapia, octopus and lobster.

    PubMed

    Velázquez-Abunader, Iván; Gómez-Muñoz, Victor Manuel; Salas, Silvia; Ruiz-Velazco, Javier M J

    2015-09-01

    Growth parameters are an important component for the stock assessment of exploited aquatic species. However, it is often difficult to apply direct methods to estimate growth and to analyse the differences between males and females, particularly in tropical areas. The objective of this study was to analyse the inter-cohort growth of three tropical resources and discuss the possible fisheries management implications. A simple method was used to compare individual growth curves obtained from length frequency distribution analysis, illustrated by case studies of three tropical species from different aquatic environments: tilapia (Oreochromis aureus), red octopus (Octopus maya) and the Caribbean spiny lobster (Panulirus argus). The analysis undertaken compared the size distribution of males and females of a given cohort through modal progression analysis. The technique used proved to be useful for highlighting the differences in growth between females and males of a specific cohort. The potential effect of extrinsic and intrinsic factors on the organism's development as reflected in the size distribution of the cohorts is discussed. PMID:26666119

  7. Formation of a fluorous/organic biphasic supramolecular octopus assembly for enhanced porphyrin phosphorescence in air.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chi; Arvapally, Ravi K; Tekarli, Sammer M; Salazar, Gustavo A; Elbjeirami, Oussama; Wang, Xiaoping; Omary, Mohammad A

    2015-04-13

    The trinuclear triangle-shaped system [tris{3,5-bis(heptafluoropropyl)-1,2,4-triazolatosilver(I)}] (1) and the multi-armed square-shaped metalloporphyrin PtOEP or the free porphyrin base H2OEP serve as excellent octopus hosts (OEP=2,3,7,8,12,13,17,18-octaethyl-21H,23H-porphine). Coupling of the fluorous/organic molecular octopi 1 and H2OEP or PtOEP by strong quadrupole-quadrupole and metal-π interactions affords the supramolecular assemblies [1⋅PtOEP] or [1⋅H2OEP] (2 a), which feature nanoscopic cavities surrounding the upper triangular and lower square cores. The fluorous/organic biphasic configuration of [1⋅PtOEP] leads to an increase in the phosphorescence of PtOEP under ambient conditions. Guest molecules can be included in the biphasic double-octopus assembly in three different site-selective modes. PMID:25735258

  8. Patterns of motor activity in the isolated nerve cord of the octopus arm.

    PubMed

    Gutfreund, Yoram; Matzner, Henry; Flash, Tamar; Hochner, Binyamin

    2006-12-01

    The extremely flexible octopus arm provides a unique opportunity for studying movement control in a highly redundant motor system. We describe a novel preparation that allows analysis of the peripheral nervous system of the octopus arm and its interaction with the muscular and mechanosensory elements of the arm's intrinsic muscular system. First we examined the synaptic responses in muscle fibers to identify the motor pathways from the axial nerve cord of the arm to the surrounding musculature. We show that the motor axons project to the muscles via nerve roots originating laterally from the arm nerve cord. The motor field of each nerve is limited to the region where the nerve enters the arm musculature. The same roots also carry afferent mechanosensory information from the intrinsic muscle to the axial nerve cord. Next, we characterized the pattern of activity generated in the dorsal roots by electrically stimulating the axial nerve cord. The evoked activity, although far reaching and long lasting, cannot alone account for the arm extension movements generated by similar electrical stimulation. The mismatch between patterns of activity in the isolated cord and in an intact arm may stem from the involvement of mechanosensory feedback in natural arm extension. PMID:17179381

  9. Octopus lipid and vitamin E composition: interspecies, interorigin, and nutritional variability.

    PubMed

    Torrinha, Alvaro; Cruz, Rebeca; Gomes, Filipa; Mendes, Eulália; Casal, Susana; Morais, Simone

    2014-08-20

    Octopus vulgaris, Octopus maya, and Eledone cirrhosa from distinct marine environments [Northeast Atlantic (NEA), Northwest Atlantic (NWA), Eastern Central Atlantic, Western Central Atlantic (WCA), Pacific Ocean, and Mediterranean Sea] were characterized regarding their lipid and vitamin E composition. These species are those commercially more relevant worldwide. Significant interspecies and interorigin differences were observed. Unsaturated fatty acids account for more than 65% of total fatty acids, mostly ω-3 PUFA due to docosahexaenoic (18.4-29.3%) and eicosapentanoic acid (11.4-23.9%) contributions. The highest ω-3 PUFA amounts and ω-3/ω-6 ratios were quantified in the heaviest specimens, O. vulgaris from NWA, with high market price, and simultaneously in the lowest graded samples, E. cirrhosa from NEA, of reduced dimensions. Although having the highest cholesterol contents, E. cirrhosa from NEA and O. maya from WCA have also higher protective fatty acid indexes. Chemometric discrimination allowed clustering the selected species and several origins based on lipid and vitamin E profiles. PMID:25087929

  10. Transcriptional and biochemical effects of cadmium and manganese on the defense system of Octopus vulgaris paralarvae.

    PubMed

    Nicosia, Aldo; Salamone, Monica; Mazzola, Salvatore; Cuttitta, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Due to anthropogenic activities the relative concentrations of cadmium and manganese have increased in the marine environment. Cephalopods are able to accumulate such metals and, as inhabitant of coastal waters, Octopus vulgaris is continuously exposed to anthropogenic activities. Since no study is available on the effects of heavy metals at molecular level in developing octopuses, herein we exposed 1-day-old paralarvae for 24 h to 10, 100, and 1000 μg/L of CdCl2 or MnCl2. Cd exerted a concentration-dependent inhibition of survival and a reduction in growth rate was shown while Mn exposure did not affect the survival rate even at the highest concentrations. Gene expression profiles of hsp70, sod, cat, and gst genes were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR and defined patterns of transcription were observed. Moreover posttranscriptional analyses were also performed suggesting the impairment of metabolic functions, under strong oxidative conditions (as occurred in paralarvae exposed to Cd) or the complete detoxification events (as occurred in paralarvae exposed to Mn). PMID:25705660

  11. Transcriptional and Biochemical Effects of Cadmium and Manganese on the Defense System of Octopus vulgaris Paralarvae

    PubMed Central

    Salamone, Monica; Mazzola, Salvatore; Cuttitta, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Due to anthropogenic activities the relative concentrations of cadmium and manganese have increased in the marine environment. Cephalopods are able to accumulate such metals and, as inhabitant of coastal waters, Octopus vulgaris is continuously exposed to anthropogenic activities. Since no study is available on the effects of heavy metals at molecular level in developing octopuses, herein we exposed 1-day-old paralarvae for 24 h to 10, 100, and 1000 μg/L of CdCl2 or MnCl2. Cd exerted a concentration-dependent inhibition of survival and a reduction in growth rate was shown while Mn exposure did not affect the survival rate even at the highest concentrations. Gene expression profiles of hsp70, sod, cat, and gst genes were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR and defined patterns of transcription were observed. Moreover posttranscriptional analyses were also performed suggesting the impairment of metabolic functions, under strong oxidative conditions (as occurred in paralarvae exposed to Cd) or the complete detoxification events (as occurred in paralarvae exposed to Mn). PMID:25705660

  12. Quantitative elemental imaging of octopus stylets using PIXE and the nuclear microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doubleday, Zoë; Belton, David; Pecl, Gretta; Semmens, Jayson

    2008-01-01

    By utilising targeted microprobe technology, the analysis of elements incorporated within the hard bio-mineralised structures of marine organisms has provided unique insights into the population biology of many species. As hard structures grow, elements from surrounding waters are incorporated effectively providing a natural 'tag' that is often unique to the animal's particular location or habitat. The spatial distribution of elements within octopus stylets was investigated, using the nuclear microprobe, to assess their potential for determining dispersal and population structure in octopus populations. Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) was conducted using the Dynamic Analysis method and GeoPIXE software package, which produced high resolution, quantitative elemental maps of whole stylet cross-sections. Ten elements were detected within the stylets which were heterogeneously distributed throughout the microstructure. Although Ca decreased towards the section edge, this trend was consistent between individuals and remained homogeneous in the inner region of the stylet, and thus appears a suitable internal standard for future microprobe analyses. Additional analyses used to investigate the general composition of the stylet structure suggested that they are amorphous and largely organic, however, there was some evidence of phosphatic mineralisation. In conclusion, this study indicates that stylets are suitable for targeted elemental analysis, although this is currently limited to the inner hatch region of the microstructure.

  13. Octopus vulgaris (Cuvier, 1797) in the Mediterranean Sea: Genetic Diversity and Population Structure

    PubMed Central

    De Luca, Daniele; Catanese, Gaetano; Procaccini, Gabriele; Fiorito, Graziano

    2016-01-01

    The common octopus, Octopus vulgaris Cuvier 1797, is a largely exploited cephalopod species in the Mediterranean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean, as well as along the coasts of Africa, Brazil and Japan, where its taxonomic identity is still debated. The assessment of its genetic structure is a pressing need to correctly manage the resource and to avoid overfishing and collapsing of local stocks. Here we analysed genetic variation and population structure of O. vulgaris using thirteen microsatellite loci in seven sampling localities from the Mediterranean Sea and one from the Atlantic Ocean. We also used a DNA barcoding approach by COI gene fragment to understand the phylogenetic relationships among the specimens here investigated and the ones whose sequences are available in literature. Our results reveal high levels of allelic richness and moderate heterozygosity in all samples investigated, and a pronounced differentiation of the Atlantic and Sicilian specimens. This latter aspect seems to support the isolation of the biota within the Strait of Messina. A certain degree of differentiation was detected among the other geographic samples within the Mediterranean Sea, which is more compatible with an island model than isolation by distance. The occurrence of null alleles affected more genetic diversity indices than population structure estimations. This study provides new insights about the genetic diversity and structure of O. vulgaris in the area of interest, which can be used as guidelines for a fisheries management perspective. PMID:26881847

  14. Sex identification and mating in the blue-ringed octopus, Hapalochlaena lunulata.

    PubMed

    Cheng; Caldwell

    2000-07-01

    We studied the reproductive behaviour of the blue-ringed octopus, Hapalochlaena lunulata, in the laboratory by examining 15 male-male and nine male-female interactions. The initiation of physical contact was independent of sex, size or residency status, and there were no noticeable changes in behaviour such as sexual displays associated with courtship or aggression prior to contact. Males did not distinguish between females or other males and copulated (defined as the insertion of the hectocotylus into the mantle cavity of another octopus) readily with both. Spermatophores were released in all copulations with females but not with males. The duration of copulation was significantly longer in male-female interactions (median 160.5 min) than in male-male interactions (median 30 s). Although male-male copulations ended passively with the withdrawal of the hectocotylus by the initiating animal, male-female copulations were always terminated by the females following an intense struggle. These studies suggest the inability of male H. lunulata to determine the sexual identity of potential mates prior to the insertion of the hectocotylus and demonstrate the active role of the female during copulation. Copyright 2000 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. PMID:10924200

  15. How does the blue-ringed octopus (Hapalochlaena lunulata) flash its blue rings?

    PubMed

    Mäthger, Lydia M; Bell, George R R; Kuzirian, Alan M; Allen, Justine J; Hanlon, Roger T

    2012-11-01

    The blue-ringed octopus (Hapalochlaena lunulata), one of the world's most venomous animals, has long captivated and endangered a large audience: children playing at the beach, divers turning over rocks, and biologists researching neurotoxins. These small animals spend much of their time in hiding, showing effective camouflage patterns. When disturbed, the octopus will flash around 60 iridescent blue rings and, when strongly harassed, bite and deliver a neurotoxin that can kill a human. Here, we describe the flashing mechanism and optical properties of these rings. The rings contain physiologically inert multilayer reflectors, arranged to reflect blue-green light in a broad viewing direction. Dark pigmented chromatophores are found beneath and around each ring to enhance contrast. No chromatophores are above the ring; this is unusual for cephalopods, which typically use chromatophores to cover or spectrally modify iridescence. The fast flashes are achieved using muscles under direct neural control. The ring is hidden by contraction of muscles above the iridophores; relaxation of these muscles and contraction of muscles outside the ring expose the iridescence. This mechanism of producing iridescent signals has not previously been reported in cephalopods and we suggest that it is an exceptionally effective way to create a fast and conspicuous warning display. PMID:23053367

  16. 76 FR 17360 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Octopus in the Bering Sea and Aleutian...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-29

    ... electronic public comments via the Federal eRulemaking Portal Web site at http://www.regulations.gov . Mail... (76 FR 11139, March 1, 2011). In accordance with Sec. 679.20(a)(3) the Regional Administrator, Alaska... groundfish in the BSAI (76 FR 11139, March 1, 2011). The harvest specification for octopus included in...

  17. Tools and methods for experimental in-vivo measurement and biomechanical characterization of an Octopus vulgaris arm.

    PubMed

    Margheri, Laura; Mazzolai, Barbara; Cianchetti, Matteo; Dario, Paolo; Laschi, Cecilia

    2009-01-01

    This work illustrates new tools and methods for an in vivo and direct, but non-invasive, measurement of an octopus arm mechanical properties. The active elongation (longitudinal stretch) and the pulling force capability are measured on a specimen of Octopus vulgaris in order to quantitatively characterize the parameters describing the arm mechanics, for biomimetic design purposes. The novel approach consists of observing and measuring a living octopus with minimally invasive methods, which allow the animal to move with its complete ability. All tools are conceived in order to create a collaborative interaction with the animal for the acquisition of active measures. The data analysis is executed taking into account the presence of an intrinsic error due to the mobility of the subject and the aquatic environment. Using a system of two synchronized high-speed high-resolution cameras and purpose-made instruments, the maximum elongation of an arm and its rest length (when all muscles fibres are relaxed during propulsion movement) are measured and compared to define the longitudinal stretch, with the impressive average result of 194%. With a similar setup integrated with a force sensor, the pulling force capability is measured as a function of grasp point position along the arm. The measured parameters are used as real specifications for the design of an octopus-like arm with a biomimetic approach. PMID:19965276

  18. 76 FR 55276 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Octopus in the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-07

    ... of the BSAI (76 FR 11139, March 1, 2011) and an apportionment from the non-specified reserve of groundfish (76 FR 17360, March 29, 2011). In accordance with Sec. 679.20(d)(2), the Administrator, Alaska... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Octopus in the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands AGENCY: National Marine...

  19. 76 FR 3044 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Sculpins, Sharks, Squid, and Octopus in the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-19

    ... harvest specifications for groundfish of the GOA (75 FR 11749, March 12, 2010). In accordance with Sec... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Sculpins, Sharks, Squid, and Octopus in the Gulf of Alaska AGENCY: National...: Temporary rule; closure. SUMMARY: NMFS is prohibiting directed fishing for sculpins, sharks, squid,...

  20. Wind-driven upwelling effects on cephalopod paralarvae: Octopus vulgaris and Loliginidae off the Galician coast (NE Atlantic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otero, Jaime; Álvarez-Salgado, X. Antón; González, Ángel F.; Souto, Carlos; Gilcoto, Miguel; Guerra, Ángel

    2016-02-01

    Circulation patterns of coastal upwelling areas may have central consequences for the abundance and cross-shelf transport of the larval stages of many species. Previous studies have provided evidences that larvae distribution results from a combination of subtidal circulation, species-specific behaviour and larval sources. However, most of these works were conducted on organisms characterised by small-sized and abundant early life phases. Here, we studied the influence of the hydrography and circulation of the Ría de Vigo and adjacent shelf (NW Iberian upwelling system) on the paralarval abundance of two contrasting cephalopods, the benthic common octopus (Octopus vulgaris) and the pelagic squids (Loliginidae). We sampled repeatedly a cross-shore transect during the years 2003-2005 and used zero inflated models to accommodate the scarcity and patchy distribution of cephalopod paralarvae. The probability of catching early stages of both cephalopods was higher at night. Octopus paralarvae were more abundant in the surface layer at night whereas loliginids preferred the bottom layer regardless of the sampling time. Abundance of both cephalopods increased when shelf currents flowed polewards, water temperature was high and water column stability was low. The probability of observing an excess of zero catches decreased during the year for octopus and at high current speed for loliginids. In addition, the circulation pattern conditioned the body size distribution of both paralarvae; while the average size of the captured octopuses increased (decreased) with poleward currents at daylight (nighttime), squids were smaller with poleward currents regardless of the sampling time. These results contribute to the understanding of the effects that the hydrography and subtidal circulation of a coastal upwelling have on the fate of cephalopod early life stages.

  1. Immunohistochemical localization of two types of choline acetyltransferase in neurons and sensory cells of the octopus arm.

    PubMed

    Sakaue, Yuko; Bellier, Jean-Pierre; Kimura, Shin; D'Este, Loredana; Takeuchi, Yoshihiro; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Cholinergic structures in the arm of the cephalopod Octopus vulgaris were studied by immunohistochemistry using specific antisera for two types (common and peripheral) of acetylcholine synthetic enzyme choline acetyltransferase (ChAT): antiserum raised against the rat common type ChAT (cChAT), which is cross-reactive with molluscan cChAT, and antiserum raised against the rat peripheral type ChAT (pChAT), which has been used to delineate peripheral cholinergic structures in vertebrates, but not previously in invertebrates. Western blot analysis of octopus extracts revealed a single pChAT-positive band, suggesting that pChAT antiserum is cross-reactive with an octopus counterpart of rat pChAT. In immunohistochemistry, only neuronal structures of the octopus arm were stained by cChAT and pChAT antisera, although the pattern of distribution clearly differed between the two antisera. cChAT-positive varicose nerve fibers were observed in both the cerebrobrachial tract and neuropil of the axial nerve cord, while pChAT-positive varicose fibers were detected only in the neuropil of the axial nerve cord. After epitope retrieval, pChAT-positive neuronal cells and their processes became visible in all ganglia of the arm, including the axial and intramuscular nerve cords, and in ganglia of suckers. Moreover, pChAT-positive structures also became detectable in nerve fibers connecting the different ganglia, in smooth nerve fibers among muscle layers and dermal connective tissues, and in sensory cells of the suckers. These results suggest that the octopus arm has two types of cholinergic nerves: cChAT-positive nerves from brain ganglia and pChAT-positive nerves that are intrinsic to the arm. PMID:23354679

  2. Population dynamics and stock assessment for Octopus maya (Cephalopoda: Octopodidae) fishery in the Campeche Bank, Gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Arreguín-Sánchez, F; Solís-Ramírez, M J; González de la Rosa, M E

    2000-01-01

    The octopus (Octopus maya) is one of the most important fish resources in the Mexican Gulf of Mexico with a mean annual yield of 9000 ton, and a reasonable number of jobs created; O. maya represents 80% of the total octopus catch, followed by Octopus vulgaris. There are two artisanal fleets based on Octopus maya and a middle-size fleet that covers both species. Catch-at-length structured data from the artisanal fleets, for the 1994 season (August 1st to December 15th) were used to analyze the O. maya population dynamics and stock and to estimate the current level of exploitation. Von Bertalanffy growth parameters were: L infinity = 252 mm, mantle length; K = 1.4 year-1; oscillation parameters C = 1.0, WP = 0.6; and tz = 0.842 years. A rough estimate of natural mortality was M = 2.2, total mortality from catch curve Z = 8.77, and exploitation rate F/Z = 0.75. This last value suggests an intensive exploitation, even when yield per recruit analysis indicates both fleets may increase the minimum legal size on about 10% to increase yields. The length-based VPA also shows that the stock is being exploited under its maximum acceptable biological limit. These apparently contradictory results are explained by biological and behavioral characteristics of this species. Because most females die after reproduction, a new gross estimation of natural mortality was computed as M = 3.3. The new estimate of exploitation rate was F/Z = 0.57. This new value coincides with results from the length-VPA and the Thompson and Bell methods, the former suggesting that a reduction of 20% in fishing mortality may provide larger yields. This fishery resource is fully exploited and current management measures must be revised to sustain and probably optimize yields. PMID:11354940

  3. De Novo Transcriptome Sequencing of the Octopus vulgaris Hemocytes Using Illumina RNA-Seq Technology: Response to the Infection by the Gastrointestinal Parasite Aggregata octopiana

    PubMed Central

    Castellanos-Martínez, Sheila; Arteta, David; Catarino, Susana; Gestal, Camino

    2014-01-01

    Background Octopus vulgaris is a highly valuable species of great commercial interest and excellent candidate for aquaculture diversification; however, the octopus’ well-being is impaired by pathogens, of which the gastrointestinal coccidian parasite Aggregata octopiana is one of the most important. The knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of the immune response in cephalopods, especially in octopus is scarce. The transcriptome of the hemocytes of O. vulgaris was de novo sequenced using the high-throughput paired-end Illumina technology to identify genes involved in immune defense and to understand the molecular basis of octopus tolerance/resistance to coccidiosis. Results A bi-directional mRNA library was constructed from hemocytes of two groups of octopus according to the infection by A. octopiana, sick octopus, suffering coccidiosis, and healthy octopus, and reads were de novo assembled together. The differential expression of transcripts was analysed using the general assembly as a reference for mapping the reads from each condition. After sequencing, a total of 75,571,280 high quality reads were obtained from the sick octopus group and 74,731,646 from the healthy group. The general transcriptome of the O. vulgaris hemocytes was assembled in 254,506 contigs. A total of 48,225 contigs were successfully identified, and 538 transcripts exhibited differential expression between groups of infection. The general transcriptome revealed genes involved in pathways like NF-kB, TLR and Complement. Differential expression of TLR-2, PGRP, C1q and PRDX genes due to infection was validated using RT-qPCR. In sick octopuses, only TLR-2 was up-regulated in hemocytes, but all of them were up-regulated in caecum and gills. Conclusion The transcriptome reported here de novo establishes the first molecular clues to understand how the octopus immune system works and interacts with a highly pathogenic coccidian. The data provided here will contribute to identification of biomarkers

  4. Hairy suckers: the surface microstructure and its possible functional significance in the Octopus vulgaris sucker.

    PubMed

    Tramacere, Francesca; Appel, Esther; Mazzolai, Barbara; Gorb, Stanislav N

    2014-01-01

    Octopus suckers are able to attach to any smooth surface and many rough surfaces. Here, we have discovered that the sucker surface, which has been hypothesised to be responsible for sealing the orifice during adhesion, is not smooth as previously assumed, but is completely covered by a dense network of hair-like micro-outgrowths. This finding is particularly important because it provides another demonstration of the role of hair-structures in a sealing mechanism in water, similar to that previously described for clingfish and abalones. Moreover, the discovered hairs may provide an additional adhesive mechanism that works in concert with suction. The discovered surface structures might be potentially interesting for biomimetics of novel technical suction cups with improved adhesion capabilities on non-smooth surfaces. PMID:24991492

  5. Hairy suckers: the surface microstructure and its possible functional significance in the Octopus vulgaris sucker

    PubMed Central

    Appel, Esther

    2014-01-01

    Summary Octopus suckers are able to attach to any smooth surface and many rough surfaces. Here, we have discovered that the sucker surface, which has been hypothesised to be responsible for sealing the orifice during adhesion, is not smooth as previously assumed, but is completely covered by a dense network of hair-like micro-outgrowths. This finding is particularly important because it provides another demonstration of the role of hair-structures in a sealing mechanism in water, similar to that previously described for clingfish and abalones. Moreover, the discovered hairs may provide an additional adhesive mechanism that works in concert with suction. The discovered surface structures might be potentially interesting for biomimetics of novel technical suction cups with improved adhesion capabilities on non-smooth surfaces. PMID:24991492

  6. Lactogenic Activity of an Enzymatic Hydrolysate from Octopus vulgaris and Carica papaya in SD Rats.

    PubMed

    Cai, Bingna; Chen, Hua; Sun, Han; Sun, Huili; Wan, Peng; Chen, Deke; Pan, Jianyu

    2015-11-01

    The traditional Chinese medicine theory believes that octopus papaya soup can stimulate milk production in lactating women. The objective of this study was to determine whether dietary supplementation with an enzymatic hydrolysate of Octopus vulgaris and Carica papaya (EHOC) could increase milk production and nutritional indexes in Sprague Dawley (SD) rats. Female SD rats (n = 24) were fed a control diet (n = 8), EHOC-supplemented diet, or a positive control diet (Shengruzhi) from day 10 of pregnancy to day 10 of lactation. Maternal serum, mammary gland (day 10 of lactation), milk, and pup weight (daily) were collected for analysis. Results showed that the EHOC diet obviously elevated daily milk yield and pup weight compared to the control group (P < .05). The EHOC diet was found to increase the concentration of prolactin (PRL), progesterone (P), estradiol (E2), and growth hormone (GH) significantly in the circulation and mammary gland. Mammary glands of EHOC-treated dams showed clear lobuloalveolar development and proliferation of myoepithelial cells, but no striking variations were observed among the groups. Furthermore, the nutrition content and immune globulin concentration in the milk of EHOC-supplemented dams were higher than those of the control group, especially the cholesterol, glucose, and IgG were higher by 44.98% (P < .001), 42.76% (P < .01), and 42.23% (P < .01), respectively. In conclusion, this article demonstrates that EHOC administration has beneficial effects on milk production in the dams and on performance of the dam and pup. These results indicate that EHOC could be explored as a potentially lactogenic nutriment for lactating women. PMID:26270883

  7. Comparison of Reconstruction and Control algorithms on the ESO end-to-end simulator OCTOPUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montilla, I.; Béchet, C.; Lelouarn, M.; Correia, C.; Tallon, M.; Reyes, M.; Thiébaut, É.

    Extremely Large Telescopes are very challenging concerning their Adaptive Optics requirements. Their diameters, the specifications demanded by the science for which they are being designed for, and the planned use of Extreme Adaptive Optics systems, imply a huge increment in the number of degrees of freedom in the deformable mirrors. It is necessary to study new reconstruction algorithms to implement the real time control in Adaptive Optics at the required speed. We have studied the performance, applied to the case of the European ELT, of three different algorithms: the matrix-vector multiplication (MVM) algorithm, considered as a reference; the Fractal Iterative Method (FrIM); and the Fourier Transform Reconstructor (FTR). The algorithms have been tested on ESO's OCTOPUS software, which simulates the atmosphere, the deformable mirror, the sensor and the closed-loop control. The MVM is the default reconstruction and control method implemented in OCTOPUS, but it scales in O(N2) operations per loop so it is not considered as a fast algorithm for wave-front reconstruction and control on an Extremely Large Telescope. The two other methods are the fast algorithms studied in the E-ELT Design Study. The performance, as well as their response in the presence of noise and with various atmospheric conditions, has been compared using a Single Conjugate Adaptive Optics configuration for a 42 m diameter ELT, with a total amount of 5402 actuators. Those comparisons made on a common simulator allow to enhance the pros and cons of the various methods, and give us a better understanding of the type of reconstruction algorithm that an ELT demands.

  8. Behavioural and immunological responses to an immune challenge in Octopus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Locatello, Lisa; Fiorito, Graziano; Finos, Livio; Rasotto, Maria B

    2013-10-01

    Behavioural and immunological changes consequent to stress and infection are largely unexplored in cephalopods, despite the wide employment of species such as Octopus vulgaris in studies that require their manipulation and prolonged maintenance in captivity. Here we explore O. vulgaris behavioural and immunological (i.e. haemocyte number and serum lysozyme activity) responses to an in vivo immune challenge with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Behavioural changes of immune-treated and sham-injected animals were observed in both sight-allowed and isolated conditions, i.e. visually interacting or not with a conspecific. Immune stimulation primarily caused a significant increase in the number of circulating haemocytes 4h after the treatment, while serum lysozyme activity showed a less clear response. However, the effect of LPS on the circulating haemocytes begins to vanish 24h after injection. Our observations indicate a significant change in behaviour consequent to LPS administration, with treated octopuses exhibiting a decrease of general activity pattern when kept in the isolated condition. A similar decrease was not observed in the sight-allowed condition, where we noticed a specific significant reduction only in the time spent to visually interact with the conspecific. Overall, significant, but lower, behavioural and immunological effects of injection were detected also in sham-injected animals, suggesting a non-trivial susceptibility to manipulation and haemolymph sampling. Our results gain importance in light of changes of the regulations for the use of cephalopods in scientific procedures that call for the prompt development of guidelines, covering many aspects of cephalopod provision, maintenance and welfare. PMID:24021926

  9. Thermopreference, tolerance and metabolic rate of early stages juvenile Octopus maya acclimated to different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Noyola, Javier; Caamal-Monsreal, Claudia; Díaz, Fernando; Re, Denisse; Sánchez, Adolfo; Rosas, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Thermopreference, tolerance and oxygen consumption rates of early juveniles Octopus maya (O. maya; weight range 0.38-0.78g) were determined after acclimating the octopuses to temperatures (18, 22, 26, and 30°C) for 20 days. The results indicated a direct relationship between preferred temperature (PT) and acclimated temperature, the PT was 23.4°C. Critical Thermal Maxima, (CTMax; 31.8±1.2, 32.7±0.9, 34.8±1.4 and 36.5±1.0) and Critical Thermal Minima, (CTMin; 11.6±0.2, 12.8±0.6, 13.7±1.0, 19.00±0.9) increased significantly (P<0.05) with increasing acclimation temperatures. The endpoint for CTMax was ink release and for CTMin was tentacles curled, respectively. A thermal tolerance polygon over the range of 18-30°C resulted in a calculated area of 210.0°C(2). The oxygen consumption rate increased significantly α=0.05 with increasing acclimation temperatures between 18 and 30°C. Maximum and minimum temperature quotients (Q10) were observed between 26-30°C and 22-26°C as 3.03 and 1.71, respectively. These results suggest that O. maya has an increased capability for adapting to moderate temperatures, and suggest increased culture potential in subtropical regions southeast of México. PMID:24229799

  10. Model based optimization of feeding regimens in aquaculture: application to the improvement of Octopus vulgaris viability in captivity.

    PubMed

    Hormiga, José A; Almansa, Eduardo; Sykes, António V; Torres, Néstor V

    2010-09-01

    The culture of common octopus (Octopus vulgaris), one important candidate to the aquaculture diversification, faces significant difficulties, mainly related with an inadequate first development stages diet. A mathematical model integrating disperse information on the nutrient composition throughout the species ontogenic development as well as on the effects of broodstock feeding and diet composition data of O. vulgaris, allowed us to predict the time evolution of paralarvae nutritional composition in terms of protein and lipid fractions and to design an optimal diet composition with the objective to ensure the maximal survival. The optimization routine showed that a diet based on the spider crab (Maja squinado) zoea composition is the most suitable for reaching the best survival rates. Results are verified by comparison with available experimental data. The obtained results and the prospective developments are a good example of how the systemic, quantitative model based approach can be used to analyse and contribute to the understanding of complex biological systems. PMID:20005909

  11. A numerical investigation of flow around octopus-like arms: near-wake vortex patterns and force development.

    PubMed

    Kazakidi, A; Vavourakis, V; Tsakiris, D P; Ekaterinaris, J A

    2015-01-01

    The fluid dynamics of cephalopods has so far received little attention in the literature, due to their complexity in structure and locomotion. The flow around octopuses, in particular, can be complicated due to their agile and dexterous arms, which frequently display some of the most diverse mechanisms of motion. The study of this flow amounts to a specific instance of the hydrodynamics problem for rough tapered cylinder geometries. The outstanding manipulative and locomotor skills of octopuses could inspire the development of advanced robotic arms, able to operate in fluid environments. Our primary aim was to study the hydrodynamic characteristics of such bio-inspired robotic models and to derive the hydrodynamic force coefficients as a concise description of the vortical flow effects. Utilizing computational fluid dynamic methods, the coefficients were computed on realistic morphologies of octopus-like arm models undergoing prescribed solid-body movements; such motions occur in nature for short durations in time, e.g. during reaching movements and exploratory behaviors. Numerical simulations were performed on translating, impulsively rotating, and maneuvering arms, around which the flow field structures were investigated. The results reveal in detail the generation of complex vortical flow structures around the moving arms. Hydrodynamic forces acting on a translating arm depend on the angle of incidence; forces generated during impulsive rotations of the arms are independent of their exact morphology and the angle of rotation; periodic motions based on a slow recovery and a fast power stroke are able to produce considerable propulsive thrust while harmonic motions are not. Parts of these results have been employed in bio-inspired models of underwater robotic mechanisms. This investigation may further assist elucidating the hydrodynamics underlying aspects of octopus locomotion and exploratory behaviors. PMID:24730546

  12. Respiratory failure and lethal hypotension due to blue-ringed octopus and tetrodotoxin envenomation observed and counteracted in animal models.

    PubMed

    Flachsenberger, W A

    The effects of crude blue-ringed octopus venom gland extract and tetrodotoxin (TTX) on anaesthetised rats and rabbits were studied. Paralysis of the respiratory musculature causing anoxia and cyanosis was overcome with positive, artificial respiration. The second lethal mechanism of the toxins: rapid and severe hypotension, had to be counteracted peripherally, since neural transmission had been drastically reduced by the toxins. Noradrenaline, d-amphetamine, phenylephrine and methoxamine, agonists acting on vascular adrenergic a-receptors, were tested. PMID:3573123

  13. Deep-Sea Octopus (Graneledone boreopacifica) Conducts the Longest-Known Egg-Brooding Period of Any Animal

    PubMed Central

    Robison, Bruce; Seibel, Brad; Drazen, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Octopuses typically have a single reproductive period and then they die (semelparity). Once a clutch of fertilized eggs has been produced, the female protects and tends them until they hatch. In most shallow-water species this period of parental care can last from 1 to 3 months, but very little is known about the brooding of deep-living species. In the cold, dark waters of the deep ocean, metabolic processes are often slower than their counterparts at shallower depths. Extrapolations from data on shallow-water octopus species suggest that lower temperatures would prolong embryonic development periods. Likewise, laboratory studies have linked lower temperatures to longer brooding periods in cephalopods, but direct evidence has not been available. We found an opportunity to directly measure the brooding period of the deep-sea octopus Graneledone boreopacifica, in its natural habitat. At 53 months, it is by far the longest egg-brooding period ever reported for any animal species. These surprising results emphasize the selective value of prolonged embryonic development in order to produce competitive hatchlings. They also extend the known boundaries of physiological adaptations for life in the deep sea. PMID:25075745

  14. Deep-sea octopus (Graneledone boreopacifica) conducts the longest-known egg-brooding period of any animal.

    PubMed

    Robison, Bruce; Seibel, Brad; Drazen, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Octopuses typically have a single reproductive period and then they die (semelparity). Once a clutch of fertilized eggs has been produced, the female protects and tends them until they hatch. In most shallow-water species this period of parental care can last from 1 to 3 months, but very little is known about the brooding of deep-living species. In the cold, dark waters of the deep ocean, metabolic processes are often slower than their counterparts at shallower depths. Extrapolations from data on shallow-water octopus species suggest that lower temperatures would prolong embryonic development periods. Likewise, laboratory studies have linked lower temperatures to longer brooding periods in cephalopods, but direct evidence has not been available. We found an opportunity to directly measure the brooding period of the deep-sea octopus Graneledone boreopacifica, in its natural habitat. At 53 months, it is by far the longest egg-brooding period ever reported for any animal species. These surprising results emphasize the selective value of prolonged embryonic development in order to produce competitive hatchlings. They also extend the known boundaries of physiological adaptations for life in the deep sea. PMID:25075745

  15. Selection of reliable reference genes for RT-qPCR studies in Octopus vulgaris paralarvae during development and immune-stimulation.

    PubMed

    García-Fernández, P; Castellanos-Martínez, S; Iglesias, J; Otero, J J; Gestal, C

    2016-07-01

    The common octopus, Octopus vulgaris is a new candidate species for aquaculture. However, rearing of octopus paralarvae is hampered by high mortality and poor growth rates that impede its entire culture. The study of genes involved in the octopus development and immune response capability could help to understand the key of paralarvae survival and thus, to complete the octopus life cycle. Quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) is the most frequently tool used to quantify the gene expression because of specificity and sensitivity. However, reliability of RT-qPCR requires the selection of appropriate normalization genes whose expression must be stable across the different experimental conditions of the study. Hence, the aim of the present work is to evaluate the stability of six candidate genes: β-actin (ACT), elongation factor 1-α (EF), ubiquitin (UBI), β-tubulin (TUB), glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GADPH) and ribosomal RNA 18 (18S) in order to select the best reference gene. The stability of gene expression was analyzed using geNorm, NormFinder and Bestkeeper, in octopus paralarvae of seven developmental stages (embryo, paralarvae of 0, 10, 15, 20, 30 and 34days) and paralarvae of 20days after challenge with Vibrio lentus and Vibrio splendidus. The results were validated by measuring the expression of PGRP, a stimuli-specific gene. Our results showed UBI, EF and 18S as the most suitable reference genes during development of octopus paralarvae, and UBI, ACT and 18S for bacterial infection. These results provide a basis for further studies exploring molecular mechanism of their development and innate immune defense. PMID:27267177

  16. Steady-state kinetics and chemical mechanism of octopus hepatopancreatic glutathione transferase.

    PubMed Central

    Tang, S S; Chang, G G

    1995-01-01

    The kinetic mechanism of glutathione S-transferase (GST) from Octopus vulgaris hepatopancreas was investigated by steady-state analysis. Initial-velocity studies showed an intersecting pattern, which suggests a sequential kinetic mechanism for the enzyme. Product-inhibition patterns by chloride and the conjugate product were all non-competitive with respect to glutathione or 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB), which indicates that the octopus digestive gland GST conforms to a steady-state sequential random Bi Bi kinetic mechanism. Dead-end inhibition patterns indicate that ethacrynic acid ([2,3-dichloro-4-(2-methyl-enebutyryl) phenoxy]acetic acid) binds at the hydrophobic H-site, norophthalmic acid (gamma-glutamylalanylglycine) binds at the glutathione G-site, and glutathione-ethacrynate conjugate occupied both H- and G-sites of the enzyme. The chemical mechanism of the enzyme was examined by pH and kinetic solvent-isotope effects. At pH (and p2H) = 8.011, in which kcat. was independent of pH or p2H, the solvent isotope effects on V and V/KmGSH were near unity, in the range 1.069-1.175. An inverse isotope effect was observed for V/KmCDNB (0.597), presumably resulting from the hydrogen-bonding of enzyme-bound glutathione, which has pKa of 6.83 +/- 0.04, a value lower by 2.34 pH units than the pKa of glutathione in aqueous solution. This lowering of the pKa value for the sulphydryl group of the bound glutathione was presumably due to interaction with the active site Tyr7, which had a pKa value of 8.46 +/- 0.09 that was raised to 9.63 +/- 0.08 in the presence of glutathione thiolate. Subsequent chemical reaction involves attacking of thiolate anion at the electrophilic substrate with the formation of a negatively charged Meisenheimer complex, which is the rate-limiting step of the reaction. Images Scheme 2 PMID:7619078

  17. Comparative Analysis of Visual Field Plotting by Octopus Interzeag 1-2-3, Humphrey Field Analyser II and Frequency Doubling Perimetry in Glaucoma Patients in South Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    Suma, Elangovan; Prabhu, D Ranjit

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Standard achromatic perimetry tests the differential light sensitivity whereas the frequency doubling technology tests the contrast sensitivity. The aim of this study was to compare and correlate the visual field indices with three different types of perimeters namely frequency doubling perimetry (FDP), Humphrey field analyser (HFA) and Octopus Interzeag 1-2-3 (OI) for detecting glaucomatous field defects. Design Prospective cross-sectional observational study. Materials and Methods Hundred eyes of 50 glaucoma patients were studied. All the patients underwent visual field examinations by Octopus Interzeag 1-2-3, Humphrey field Analyser II and Frequency Doubling perimetry (FDP). The correlations of the global indices were compared. The time taken to perform the test with the three perimeters was analysed. Results The visual field plotting by the perimeters were comparable and significant positive correlation was observed. The time taken to perform visual field test by Octopus Interzeag 1-2-3 was shorter than the other two methods. Conclusion The visual field plotting by Octopus Interzeag 1-2-3, Humphrey field analyser and frequency doubling technology perimetry were comparable and Octopus field plotting takes lesser time than the rest two methods. PMID:26393152

  18. An investigation of the nature of Bohr, Root, and Haldane effects in Octopus dofleini hemocyanin.

    PubMed

    Miller, K I; Mangum, C P

    1988-01-01

    1. The pH dependence of Octopus dofleini hemocyanin oxygenation is so great that below pH 7.0 the molecule does not become fully oxygenated, even in pure O2 at 1 atm pressure. However, the curves describing percent oxygenation as a function of PO2 appear to be gradually increasing in oxygen saturation, rather than leveling out at less than full saturation. Hill plots indicate that at pH 6.6 and below the molecule is stabilized in its low affinity conformation. Thus, the low saturation of this hemocyanin in air is due to the very large Bohr shift, and not to the disabling of one or more functionally distinct O2 binding sites on the native molecule. 2. Experiments in which pH was monitored continuously while oxygenation was manipulated in the presence of CO2 provide no evidence of O2 linked binding of CO2. While CO2 does influence O2 affinity independently of pH, its effect may be due to high levels of HCO3- and CO3-, rather than molecular CO2, and it may entail a lowering of the activities of the allosteric effectors Mg2+ and Ca2+. PMID:3150406

  19. Chromatin organization during spermiogenesis in Octopus vulgaris. II: DNA-interacting proteins.

    PubMed

    Giménez-Bonafé, Pepita; Soler, Fina Martínez; Buesa, Carlos; Sautière, Pierre-Eric; Ausió, Juan; Kouach, Mostafa; Kasinsky, Harold E; Chiva, Manel

    2004-06-01

    In this article we study the proteins responsible for chromatin condensation during spermiogenesis in the cephalopod Octopus vulgaris. The DNA of ripe sperm nuclei in this species is condensed by a set of five different proteins. Four of these proteins are protamines. The main protamine (Po2), a protein of 44 amino acid residues, is extraordinarily simple (composed of only three different amino acid types: arginine (R), serine (S), and glycine (G). It is a basic molecule consisting of 79.5 mol% arginine residues. The rest of the protamines (Po3, Po4, Po5) are smaller molecules (33, 28, and 30 amino acid residues, respectively) that are homologous among themselves and probably with the main Po2 protamine. The ripe sperm nucleus of O. vulgaris also contains a small quantity of a molecule (Po1) that is similar to Po2 protamine. This protein could represent a Po2 protamine-precursor in a very advanced step of its processing. We discuss the characteristics of these proteins, as well as the relation between the complexity of chromatin condensation and the transitions of nuclear proteins during spermiogenesis in O. vulgaris. PMID:15095345

  20. Ultra-fast escape maneuver of an octopus-inspired robot.

    PubMed

    Weymouth, G D; Subramaniam, V; Triantafyllou, M S

    2015-01-01

    We design and test an octopus-inspired flexible hull robot that demonstrates outstanding fast-starting performance. The robot is hyper-inflated with water, and then rapidly deflates to expel the fluid so as to power the escape maneuver. Using this robot we verify for the first time in laboratory testing that rapid size-change can substantially reduce separation in bluff bodies traveling several body lengths, and recover fluid energy which can be employed to improve the propulsive performance. The robot is found to experience speeds over ten body lengths per second, exceeding that of a similarly propelled optimally streamlined rigid rocket. The peak net thrust force on the robot is more than 2.6 times that on an optimal rigid body performing the same maneuver, experimentally demonstrating large energy recovery and enabling acceleration greater than 14 body lengths per second squared. Finally, over 53% of the available energy is converted into payload kinetic energy, a performance that exceeds the estimated energy conversion efficiency of fast-starting fish. The Reynolds number based on final speed and robot length is [Formula: see text]. We use the experimental data to establish a fundamental deflation scaling parameter [Formula: see text] which characterizes the mechanisms of flow control via shape change. Based on this scaling parameter, we find that the fast-starting performance improves with increasing size. PMID:25643048

  1. Dynamics of underwater legged locomotion: modeling and experiments on an octopus-inspired robot.

    PubMed

    Calisti, M; Corucci, F; Arienti, A; Laschi, C

    2015-08-01

    This paper studies underwater legged locomotion (ULL) by means of a robotic octopus-inspired prototype and its associated model. Two different types of propulsive actions are embedded into the robot model: reaction forces due to leg contact with the ground and hydrodynamic forces such as the drag arising from the sculling motion of the legs. Dynamic parameters of the model are estimated by means of evolutionary techniques and subsequently the model is exploited to highlight some distinctive features of ULL. Specifically, the separation between the center of buoyancy (CoB)/center of mass and density affect the stability and speed of the robot, whereas the sculling movements contribute to propelling the robot even when its legs are detached from the ground. The relevance of these effects is demonstrated through robotic experiments and model simulations; moreover, by slightly changing the position of the CoB in the presence of the same feed-forward activation, a number of different behaviors (i.e. forward and backward locomotion at different speeds) are achieved. PMID:26226238

  2. On gonadic maturation and reproductive strategy in deep-sea benthic octopus Graneledone macrotyla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, Ángel; Sieiro, María Pilar; Roura, Álvaro; Portela, Julio M.; del Río, José Luís

    2013-09-01

    The new information reported in this paper is based on five maturing and mature females of the large-tuberculate octopus Graneledone macrotyla. These specimens were caught in bottom trawl surveys ATLANTIS 2009 (February 24 to April 1, 2009) and ATLANTIS 2010 (March 9 to April 5, 2010) carried out off the Argentinean Economic Exclusive Zone. Capture depth ranged from 475 to 921 m and sea bottom temperature between 2.8 and 3.1 °C. Development of the complex ovary, oviducts, and oviducal glands during gonadic maturation is described. The absence of spermathecae in the oviducal glands and the presence of fertilized eggs inside the ovary suggested that fertilization took place within the ovary. Histological techniques showed the presence of four types of oocytes. Maturing oocyte size-frequency distribution was polymodal. Fluorescence reaction showed that atresia occurred in both early and later oocyte maturation stages. Atresia affected 48-55 % of the initial number of oocytes. The maximum observed potential fecundity was estimated at 250-300 eggs. G. macrotyla showed a group-synchronous ovulation pattern, regulative atresia, and a batching spawning pattern with a few egg batches spawned intermittently over an extended period of spawning.

  3. Electron-microscopic observations of the gravity receptor epithelia of normal and spinner juvenile Octopus maya.

    PubMed

    Fermin, C D; Colmers, W F; Igarashi, M

    1985-01-01

    Light and electron microscopy of the gravity receptor epithelia (maculae) of statocysts of normal and "spinner" juvenile Octopus maya showed differences between the structures of the hair cells, supporting cells, and afferent neurons of these cephalopods. The maculae of spinner animals were approximately 30% smaller in their surface area and had 40% fewer hair cells. Moreover, the average distance between randomly-chosen hair bundles in scanning electron micrographs of maculae of normal animals was significantly greater (4.33 +/- 6.47 microns) than those of maculae of spinner animals (3.38 +/- 4.90 microns; P less than 0.0001). The sectional area of the supporting cell's microvilli in spinner maculae was larger (0.16 +/- 0.18 microns) than those of normal (0.10 +/- 0.10 micron; P less than 0.0001) O. maya. The morphological differences observed between certain structural components of the maculae of normal and spinner O. maya may be related to the absence and/or malformation of the neuroepithelial suprastructures in spinners. This may have direct or indirect effects to their inability to orient to gravity with these organs. PMID:2861903

  4. The ultrastructure of the spermatozoon of Octopus ocellatus Gray, 1849 (Cephalopoda: Octopoda)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jianmin; Wang, Weijun; Zheng, Xiaodong; Zhou, Quanli; Zhang, Yu; Sun, Guohua; Liu, Xiangquan

    2011-01-01

    Morphology of the spermatozoon of Octopus ocellatus was studied by light, scanning electron, and transmission electron microscopes. Sperm are 600-700 μm long, with a large number of granules in diameter about 130 nm. Each spermatozoon is composed of a head, neck, and tail. The head is made up of an acrosomal complex anterior to the nucleus. The spiral acrosomal complex consists of an electron-lucent vesicle, lacuna, and an electron-dense acrosomal vesicle. Additionally, the spiral acrosomal vesicle has numerous equidistant striations, and is surrounded by many small granules (20 nm diameter). A long straight nucleus, which is electron-densed, has a deep posterior concavity, the nuclear vacuole. At the terminal end of the nucleus is a sleeve-like structure with a concave posterior nuclear fossa (PNF). The neck is short connecting the PNF. The basal body is located in the PNF and gives rise to the axoneme. This structure connects the head, neck, and tail. The tail is divided into a middle piece and a principal piece. The middle piece, having a 9+9+2 arrangement, is surrounded by a mitochondrial sheath and terminates by an electron-dense fibrous sheath. The principal piece is the longest part of the sperm with coarse fibers tapering posteriorly. The results of this study shall provide some useful information for artificial breeding of this species.

  5. An octopus toxin, maculotoxin, selectively blocks sodium current in squid axons.

    PubMed Central

    Gage, P W; Moore, J W; Westerfield, M

    1976-01-01

    1. A low molecular weight, stable, cationic neurotoxin (maculotoxin, MTX) extracted from the posterior salivary glands of the octopus Hapalochlaena maculosa, blocked sodium current in voltage-clamped squid axons without affecting potassium current. 2. The effectiveness of MTX was increased by repetitive, brief, depolarizing pulses but not by a single prolonged depolarization. 3. The potency of MTX decreased at pHs from 8 to 9. Effectiveness could be restored be restored by lowering the pH to 7-1 again. It was concluded that MTX is active in its cationic form. 4. MTX affected sodium conductance kinetics, slowing the turn-on of sodium current. This effect was most noticeable with small deploarizations but became progressively less with larger depolarizations. Neither the turn-off of sodium current nor sodium inactivation kinetics were affected by the toxin. 5. MTX inhibited sodium current without inhibiting sodium gating current. 6. The effectiveness of MTX was not detectably changed when calcium concentration was varied from 50 to 10 mM, or sodium concentration was varied from 225 to 750 mM. PMID:957253

  6. Vault-poly-ADP-ribose polymerase in the Octopus vulgaris brain: a regulatory factor of actin polymerization dynamic.

    PubMed

    De Maio, Anna; Natale, Emiliana; Rotondo, Sergio; Di Cosmo, Anna; Faraone-Mennella, Maria Rosaria

    2013-09-01

    Our previous behavioural, biochemical and immunohistochemical analyses conducted in selected regions (supra/sub oesophageal masses) of the Octopus vulgaris brain detected a cytoplasmic poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (more than 90% of total enzyme activity). The protein was identified as the vault-free form of vault-poly-ADP-ribose polymerase. The present research extends and integrates the biochemical characterization of poly-ADP-ribosylation system, namely, reaction product, i.e., poly-ADP-ribose, and acceptor proteins, in the O. vulgaris brain. Immunochemical analyses evidenced that the sole poly-ADP-ribose acceptor was the octopus cytoskeleton 50-kDa actin. It was present in both free, endogenously poly-ADP-ribosylated form (70kDa) and in complex with V-poly-ADP-ribose polymerase and poly-ADP-ribose (260kDa). The components of this complex, alkali and high salt sensitive, were purified and characterized. The kind and the length of poly-ADP-ribose corresponded to linear chains of 30-35 ADP-ribose units, in accordance with the features of the polymer synthesized by the known vault-poly-ADP-ribose polymerase. In vitro experiments showed that V-poly-ADP-ribose polymerase activity of brain cytoplasmic fraction containing endogenous actin increased upon the addition of commercial actin and was highly reduced by ATP. Anti-actin immunoblot of the mixture in the presence and absence of ATP showed that the poly-ADP-ribosylation of octopus actin is a dynamic process balanced by the ATP-dependent polymerization of the cytoskeleton protein, a fundamental mechanism for synaptic plasticity. PMID:23831359

  7. Expression analysis of HSP70 in the testis of Octopus tankahkeei under thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Long, Ling-Li; Han, Ying-Li; Sheng, Zhang; Du, Chen; Wang, You-Fa; Zhu, Jun-Quan

    2015-09-01

    The gene encoding heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) was identified in Octopus tankahkeei by homologous cloning and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The full-length cDNA (2471 bp) consists of a 5'-untranslated region (UTR) (89 bp), a 3'-UTR (426 bp), and an open reading frame (1956 bp) that encodes 651 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular mass of 71.8 kDa and an isoelectric point of 5.34. Based on the amino acid sequence analysis and multiple sequence alignment, this cDNA is a member of cytoplasmic hsp70 subfamily of the hsp70 family and was designated as ot-hsp70. Tissue expression analysis showed that HSP70 expression is highest in the testes when all examined organs were compared. Immunohistochemistry analysis, together with hematoxylin-eosin staining, revealed that the HSP70 protein was expressed in all spermatogenic cells, but not in fibroblasts. In addition, O. tankahkeei were heat challenged by exposure to 32 °C seawater for 2 h, then returned to 13 °C for various recovery time (0-24 h). Relative expression of ot-hsp70 mRNA in the testes was measured at different time points post-challenge by quantitative real-time PCR. A clear time-dependent mRNA expression of ot-hsp70 after thermal stress indicates that the HSP70 gene is inducible. Ultrastructural changes of the heat-stressed testis were observed by transmission electron microscopy. We suggest that HSP70 plays an important role in spermatogenesis and testis protection against thermal stress in O. tankahkeei. PMID:26033497

  8. Rapid method for controlling the correct labeling of products containing common octopus (Octopus vulgaris) and main substitute species (Eledone cirrhosa and Dosidicus gigas) by fast real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Espiñeira, Montserrat; Vieites, Juan M

    2012-12-15

    The TaqMan real-time PCR has the highest potential for automation, therefore representing the currently most suitable method for screening, allowing the detection of fraudulent or unintentional mislabeling of species. This work describes the development of a real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) system for the detection and identification of common octopus (Octopus vulgaris) and main substitute species (Eledone cirrhosa and Dosidicus gigas). This technique is notable for the combination of simplicity, speed, sensitivity and specificity in an homogeneous assay. The method can be applied to all kinds of products; fresh, frozen and processed, including those undergoing intensive processes of transformation. This methodology was validated to check how the degree of food processing affects the method and the detection of each species. Moreover, it was applied to 34 commercial samples to evaluate the labeling of products made from them. The methodology herein developed is useful to check the fulfillment of labeling regulations for seafood products and to verify traceability in commercial trade and for fisheries control. PMID:22980826

  9. Genetic differentiation of Octopus minor (Mollusca, Cephalopoda) off the northern coast of China as revealed by amplified fragment length polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Yang, J M; Sun, G H; Zheng, X D; Ren, L H; Wang, W J; Li, G R; Sun, B C

    2015-01-01

    Octopus minor (Sasaki, 1920) is an economically important cephalopod that is found in the northern coastal waters of China. In this study, we investigated genetic differentiation in fishery populations using amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs). A total of 150 individuals were collected from five locations: Dalian (DL), Yan-tai (YT), Qingdao (QD), Lianyungang (LY), and Zhoushan (ZS), and 243 reproducible bands were amplified using five AFLP primer combinations. The percentage of polymorphic bands ranged from 53.33 to 76.08%. Nei's genetic identity ranged from 0.9139 to 0.9713, and the genetic distance ranged from 0.0291 to 0.0900. A phylogenetic tree was constructed using the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean, based on the genetic distance. The DL and YT populations originated from one clade, while the QD, LY, and ZS populations originated from another. The results indicate that the O. minor stock consisted of two genetic populations with an overall significantly analogous FST value (0.1088, P < 0.05). Most of the variance was within populations. These findings will be important for more sustainable octopus fisheries, so that this marine resource can be conserved for its long-term utilization. PMID:26634529

  10. Using Age-Based Life History Data to Investigate the Life Cycle and Vulnerability of Octopus cyanea

    PubMed Central

    Herwig, Jade N.; Depczynski, Martial; Roberts, John D.; Semmens, Jayson M.; Gagliano, Monica; Heyward, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    Octopus cyanea is taken as an unregulated, recreationally fished species from the intertidal reefs of Ningaloo, Western Australia. Yet despite its exploitation and importance in many artisanal fisheries throughout the world, little is known about its life history, ecology and vulnerability. We used stylet increment analysis to age a wild O. cyanea population for the first time and gonad histology to examine their reproductive characteristics. O. cyanea conforms to many cephalopod life history generalisations having rapid, non-asymptotic growth, a short life-span and high levels of mortality. Males were found to mature at much younger ages and sizes than females with reproductive activity concentrated in the spring and summer months. The female dominated sex-ratios in association with female brooding behaviours also suggest that larger conspicuous females may be more prone to capture and suggests that this intertidal octopus population has the potential to be negatively impacted in an unregulated fishery. Size at age and maturity comparisons between our temperate bordering population and lower latitude Tanzanian and Hawaiian populations indicated stark differences in growth rates that correlate with water temperatures. The variability in life history traits between global populations suggests that management of O. cyanea populations should be tailored to each unique set of life history characteristics and that stylet increment analysis may provide the integrity needed to accurately assess this. PMID:22912898

  11. Characterization of proteases from Planomicrobium sp. L-2 isolated from the gastrointestinal tract of Octopus variabilis (Sasaki)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yulan; Wang, Yurong; Xiao, Lin; Lin, Xiukun

    2016-05-01

    A crude protease produced from Planomicrobium sp. L-2 is described, and its effectiveness as an additive in liquid detergent evaluated. We isolate the protease-producing Planomicrobium sp. L-2 from the gastrointestinal tract of Octopus variabilis. At least three caseinolytic protease clear bands were observed in zymogram analysis. The crude alkaline protease was highly tolerant of a pH range from 7.0 to 9.0, and temperatures to 50°C after incubation for 1 h. Proteolytic enzymes were stable towards three surfactants (5% Tween 80, 1% Triton X-100 and 0.05% SDS) and an oxidizing agent (1% hydrogen peroxide), in addition to being highly stable and compatible with popular commercial laundry powered detergent brands available in China. Our study demonstrates the potential these proteases have for development into novel classes of detergent additive. This study also suggests that the gastrointestinal tract of Octopus variabilis may be a rich source of commercially valuable strains of enzyme.

  12. Two new species of dicyemid mesozoans (Dicyemida: Dicyemidae) from Octopus maya Voss & Solis-Ramirez (Octopodidae) off Yucatan, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Castellanos-Martinez, Sheila; Aguirre-Macedo, M Leopoldina; Furuya, Hidetaka

    2016-07-01

    Two new dicyemid species are described from the endemic cephalopod Octopus maya Voss & Solis-Ramirez collected off Yucatan, Mexico. The renal sacs of 40 juvenile and adult octopuses from four localities were examined. Dicyema hochbergi n. sp. is a medium-sized species that reaches 2,245 µm in length. The vermiform stages consist of 18-24 peripheral cells, a conical calotte and the extension of the axial cell between the base and middle of the metapolar cells. Infusoriform embryos consist of 39 cells with urn cell containing one germinal cell, two nuclei and solid refringent bodies. Dicyema mexcayae n. sp. is a relatively small species that reaches 1,114 µm in length. The vermiform stages are constituted by 14-16 peripheral cells, an elongate calotte and the axial cell extending forward to the middle of the metapolar cells. The infusoriform embryos consist of 37 cells, two solid refringent bodies and urn cells with two nuclei each. The present study represents the first description of a dicyemid species from O. maya and increases the number of described species from Mexican waters to 11. PMID:27307168

  13. Intra-organismal distribution of tetrodotoxin in two species of blue-ringed octopuses (Hapalochlaena fasciata and H. lunulata).

    PubMed

    Williams, Becky L; Caldwell, Roy L

    2009-09-01

    In-depth studies on the intra-organismal distribution of toxin may yield valuable clues about potential ecological functions. The distribution of tetrodotoxin (TTX) in previously unexamined tissues of two species of blue-ringed octopuses, wild-caught Hapalochlaena fasciata and Hapalochlaena lunulata from the aquarium industry, was surveyed. Tissues from each individual were examined separately. Tetrodotoxin was detected in posterior salivary gland (PSG), arm, mantle, anterior salivary glands, digestive gland, testes contents, brachial heart, nephridia, gill, and oviducal gland of H. fasciata. By contrast TTX was found only in the PSG, mantle tissue, and ink of H. lunulata. The highest concentrations of TTX resided in the PSG of both species; however, the arms and mantle contained the greatest absolute amounts of TTX. Minimum total amounts of TTX per octopus ranged from 60 to 405 microg in H. fasciata and from 0 to 174 microg in H. lunulata and correlated well with the amounts in the PSG. Transport of TTX in the blood is loosely suggested by the presence of the toxin in blood-rich organs such as the gill and brachial hearts. The distributional data also suggest both offensive and defensive functions of TTX. PMID:19481562

  14. Positive Catch & Economic Benefits of Periodic Octopus Fishery Closures: Do Effective, Narrowly Targeted Actions ‘Catalyze’ Broader Management?

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Thomas A.; Oleson, Kirsten L. L.; Ratsimbazafy, Hajanaina; Raberinary, Daniel; Benbow, Sophie; Harris, Alasdair

    2015-01-01

    Overview Eight years of octopus fishery records from southwest Madagascar reveal significant positive impacts from 36 periodic closures on: (a) fishery catches and (b) village fishery income, such that (c) economic benefits from increased landings outweigh costs of foregone catch. Closures covered ~20% of a village’s fished area and lasted 2-7 months. Fishery Catches from Each Closed Site Octopus landings and catch per unit effort (CPUE) significantly increased in the 30 days following a closure’s reopening, relative to the 30 days before a closure (landings: +718%, p<0.0001; CPUE: +87%, p<0.0001; n = 36). Open-access control sites showed no before/after change when they occurred independently of other management (“no ban”, n = 17/36). On the other hand, open-access control sites showed modest catch increases when they extended a 6-week seasonal fishery shutdown (“ban”, n = 19/36). The seasonal fishery shutdown affects the entire region, so confound all potential control sites. Fishery Income in Implementing Villages In villages implementing a closure, octopus fishery income doubled in the 30 days after a closure, relative to 30 days before (+132%, p<0.001, n = 28). Control villages not implementing a closure showed no increase in income after “no ban” closures and modest increases after “ban” closures. Villages did not show a significant decline in income during closure events. Net Economic Benefits from Each Closed Site Landings in closure sites generated more revenue than simulated landings assuming continued open-access fishing at that site (27/36 show positive net earnings; mean +$305/closure; mean +57.7% monthly). Benefits accrued faster than local fishers’ time preferences during 17-27 of the 36 closures. High reported rates of illegal fishing during closures correlated with poor economic performance. Broader Co-Management We discuss the implications of our findings for broader co-management arrangements, particularly for catalyzing

  15. Real-space grids and the Octopus code as tools for the development of new simulation approaches for electronic systems.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Xavier; Strubbe, David; De Giovannini, Umberto; Larsen, Ask Hjorth; Oliveira, Micael J T; Alberdi-Rodriguez, Joseba; Varas, Alejandro; Theophilou, Iris; Helbig, Nicole; Verstraete, Matthieu J; Stella, Lorenzo; Nogueira, Fernando; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Castro, Alberto; Marques, Miguel A L; Rubio, Angel

    2015-12-21

    Real-space grids are a powerful alternative for the simulation of electronic systems. One of the main advantages of the approach is the flexibility and simplicity of working directly in real space where the different fields are discretized on a grid, combined with competitive numerical performance and great potential for parallelization. These properties constitute a great advantage at the time of implementing and testing new physical models. Based on our experience with the Octopus code, in this article we discuss how the real-space approach has allowed for the recent development of new ideas for the simulation of electronic systems. Among these applications are approaches to calculate response properties, modeling of photoemission, optimal control of quantum systems, simulation of plasmonic systems, and the exact solution of the Schrödinger equation for low-dimensionality systems. PMID:25721500

  16. Purification and Characterization of a Protease Produced by a Planomicrobium sp. L-2 from Gut of Octopus vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qing; Sun, Shujing; Piao, Meizi; Yang, Ji Young

    2013-01-01

    Protease widely exists in the digestive tract of animals and humans, playing a very important role in protein digestion and absorption. In this study, a high protease-producing strain Planomicrobium sp. L-2 was isolated and identified from the digestive tract of Octopus variabilis. The strain was identified by physiological and biochemical experiments and 16S rDNA sequences analysis. A protease was obtained from the strain Planomicrobium sp. L-2 through ammonium sulfate precipitation, dialysis and enrichment, DEAE-Sephadex A50 anion-exchange chromatography, and Sephadex G-100 gel chromatography. The molecular weight and properties of the protease were characterized, including optimum temperature and pH, thermal stability, protease inhibitions and metal ions. According to our results, the protease from Planomicrobium sp. L-2 strain designated as F1-1 was obtained by three-step separation and purification from crude enzyme. The molecular weight of the protease was 61.4 kDa and its optimum temperature was 40°C. The protease F1-1 showed a broad pH profile for casein hydrolysis between 5.0~11.0. No residual activity was observed after incubation for 40 min at 60°C and 60 min at 50°C. F1-1 protease was inhibited by Mn2+, Hg2+, Pb2+, Zn2+, and Cu2+ ions, as well as PMSF, indicating that the protease F1-1 was a serine protease. Additionally, research basis provided by this study could be considered for industrial application of octopus intestinal proteases. PMID:24551830

  17. Body Size, Growth and Life Span: Implications for the Polewards Range Shift of Octopus tetricus in South-Eastern Australia

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Jorge E.; Pecl, Gretta T.; Moltschaniwskyj, Natalie A.; Strugnell, Jan M.; León, Rafael I.; Semmens, Jayson M.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the response of any species to climate change can be challenging. However, in short-lived species the faster turnover of generations may facilitate the examination of responses associated with longer-term environmental change. Octopus tetricus, a commercially important species, has undergone a recent polewards range shift in the coastal waters of south-eastern Australia, thought to be associated with the southerly extension of the warm East Australian Current. At the cooler temperatures of a polewards distribution limit, growth of a species could be slower, potentially leading to a bigger body size and resulting in a slower population turnover, affecting population viability at the extreme of the distribution. Growth rates, body size, and life span of O. tetricus were examined at the leading edge of a polewards range shift in Tasmanian waters (40°S and 147°E) throughout 2011. Octopus tetricus had a relatively small body size and short lifespan of approximately 11 months that, despite cooler temperatures, would allow a high rate of population turnover and may facilitate the population increase necessary for successful establishment in the new extended area of the range. Temperature, food availability and gender appear to influence growth rate. Individuals that hatched during cooler and more productive conditions, but grew during warming conditions, exhibited faster growth rates and reached smaller body sizes than individuals that hatched into warmer waters but grew during cooling conditions. This study suggests that fast growth, small body size and associated rapid population turnover may facilitate the range shift of O. tetricus into Tasmanian waters. PMID:25090250

  18. Dose-dependent effects of the clinical anesthetic isoflurane on Octopus vulgaris: a contribution to cephalopod welfare.

    PubMed

    Polese, Gianluca; Winlow, William; Di Cosmo, Anna

    2014-12-01

    Recent progress in animal welfare legislation relating to invertebrates has provoked interest in methods for the anesthesia of cephalopods, for which different approaches to anesthesia have been tried but in most cases without truly anesthetizing the animals. For example, several workers have used muscle relaxants or hypothermia as forms of "anesthesia." Several inhalational anesthetics are known to act in a dose-dependent manner on the great pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis, a pulmonate mollusk. Here we report, for the first time, on the effects of clinical doses of the well-known inhalational clinical anesthetic isoflurane on the behavioral responses of the common octopus Octopus vulgaris. In each experiment, isoflurane was equilibrated into a well-aerated seawater bath containing a single adult O. vulgaris. Using a web camera, we recorded each animal's response to touch stimuli eliciting withdrawal of the arms and siphon and observed changes in the respiratory rate and the chromatophore pattern over time (before, during, and after application of the anesthetic). We found that different animals of the same size responded with similar behavioral changes as the isoflurane concentration was gradually increased. After gradual application of 2% isoflurane for a maximum of 5 min (at which time all the responses indicated deep anesthesia), the animals recovered within 45-60 min in fresh aerated seawater. Based on previous findings in gastropods, we believe that the process of anesthesia induced by isoflurane is similar to that previously observed in Lymnaea. In this study we showed that isoflurane is a good, reversible anesthetic for O. vulgaris, and we developed a method for its use. PMID:25369208

  19. Body size, growth and life span: implications for the polewards range shift of Octopus tetricus in south-eastern Australia.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Jorge E; Pecl, Gretta T; Moltschaniwskyj, Natalie A; Strugnell, Jan M; León, Rafael I; Semmens, Jayson M

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the response of any species to climate change can be challenging. However, in short-lived species the faster turnover of generations may facilitate the examination of responses associated with longer-term environmental change. Octopus tetricus, a commercially important species, has undergone a recent polewards range shift in the coastal waters of south-eastern Australia, thought to be associated with the southerly extension of the warm East Australian Current. At the cooler temperatures of a polewards distribution limit, growth of a species could be slower, potentially leading to a bigger body size and resulting in a slower population turnover, affecting population viability at the extreme of the distribution. Growth rates, body size, and life span of O. tetricus were examined at the leading edge of a polewards range shift in Tasmanian waters (40°S and 147°E) throughout 2011. Octopus tetricus had a relatively small body size and short lifespan of approximately 11 months that, despite cooler temperatures, would allow a high rate of population turnover and may facilitate the population increase necessary for successful establishment in the new extended area of the range. Temperature, food availability and gender appear to influence growth rate. Individuals that hatched during cooler and more productive conditions, but grew during warming conditions, exhibited faster growth rates and reached smaller body sizes than individuals that hatched into warmer waters but grew during cooling conditions. This study suggests that fast growth, small body size and associated rapid population turnover may facilitate the range shift of O. tetricus into Tasmanian waters. PMID:25090250

  20. Signature lipids and stable carbon isotope analyses of Octopus Spring hyperthermophilic communities compared with those of Aquificales representatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, L. L.; Eder, W.; Huber, R.; Hope, J. M.; Hinrichs, K. U.; Hayes, J. M.; Des Marais, D. J.; Cady, S. L.; Summons, R. E.

    2001-01-01

    The molecular and isotopic compositions of lipid biomarkers of cultured Aquificales genera have been used to study the community and trophic structure of the hyperthermophilic pink streamers and vent biofilm from Octopus Spring. Thermocrinis ruber, Thermocrinis sp. strain HI 11/12, Hydrogenobacter thermophilus TK-6, Aquifex pyrophilus, and Aquifex aeolicus all contained glycerol-ether phospholipids as well as acyl glycerides. The n-C(20:1) and cy-C(21) fatty acids dominated all of the Aquificales, while the alkyl glycerol ethers were mainly C(18:0). These Aquificales biomarkers were major constituents of the lipid extracts of two Octopus Spring samples, a biofilm associated with the siliceous vent walls, and the well-known pink streamer community (PSC). Both the biofilm and the PSC contained mono- and dialkyl glycerol ethers in which C(18) and C(20) alkyl groups were prevalent. Phospholipid fatty acids included both the Aquificales n-C(20:1) and cy-C(21), plus a series of iso-branched fatty acids (i-C(15:0) to i-C(21:0)), indicating an additional bacterial component. Biomass and lipids from the PSC were depleted in (13)C relative to source water CO(2) by 10.9 and 17.2 per thousand, respectively. The C(20-21) fatty acids of the PSC were less depleted than the iso-branched fatty acids, 18.4 and 22.6 per thousand, respectively. The biomass of T. ruber grown on CO(2) was depleted in (13)C by only 3.3 per thousand relative to C source. In contrast, biomass was depleted by 19.7 per thousand when formate was the C source. Independent of carbon source, T. ruber lipids were heavier than biomass (+1.3 per thousand). The depletion in the C(20-21) fatty acids from the PSC indicates that Thermocrinis biomass must be similarly depleted and too light to be explained by growth on CO(2). Accordingly, Thermocrinis in the PSC is likely to have utilized formate, presumably generated in the spring source region.

  1. Tailored Synthesis of Octopus-type Janus Nanoparticles for Synergistic Actively-Targeted and Chemo-Photothermal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lingyu; Chen, Yinyin; Li, Zilu; Li, Lu; Saint-Cricq, Philippe; Li, Chunxia; Lin, Jun; Wang, Chungang; Su, Zhongmin; Zink, Jeffrey I

    2016-02-01

    A facile, reproducible, and scalable method was explored to construct uniform Au@poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) Janus nanoparticles (JNPs). The as-prepared JNPs were used as templates to preferentially grow a mesoporous silica (mSiO2 ) shell and Au branches separately modified with methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol)-thiol (PEG) to improve their stability, and lactobionic acid (LA) for tumor-specific targeting. The obtained octopus-type PEG-Au-PAA/mSiO2 -LA Janus NPs (PEG-OJNP-LA) possess pH and NIR dual-responsive release properties. Moreover, DOX-loaded PEG-OJNP-LA, upon 808 nm NIR light irradiation, exhibit obviously higher toxicity at the cellular and animal levels compared with chemotherapy or photothermal therapy alone, indicating the PEG-OJNP-LA could be utilized as a multifunctional nanoplatform for in vitro and in vivo actively-targeted and chemo-photothermal cancer therapy. PMID:26732130

  2. Identification and Expression of Acetylcholinesterase in Octopus vulgaris Arm Development and Regeneration: a Conserved Role for ACHE?

    PubMed

    Fossati, Sara Maria; Candiani, Simona; Nödl, Marie-Therese; Maragliano, Luca; Pennuto, Maria; Domingues, Pedro; Benfenati, Fabio; Pestarino, Mario; Zullo, Letizia

    2015-08-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (ACHE) is a glycoprotein with a key role in terminating synaptic transmission in cholinergic neurons of both vertebrates and invertebrates. ACHE is also involved in the regulation of cell growth and morphogenesis during embryogenesis and regeneration acting through its non-cholinergic sites. The mollusk Octopus vulgaris provides a powerful model for investigating the mechanisms underlying tissue morphogenesis due to its high regenerative power. Here, we performed a comparative investigation of arm morphogenesis during adult arm regeneration and embryonic arm development which may provide insights on the conserved ACHE pathways. In this study, we cloned and characterized O. vulgaris ACHE, finding a single highly conserved ACHE hydrophobic variant, characterized by prototypical catalytic sites and a putative consensus region for a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchor attachment at the COOH-terminus. We then show that its expression level is correlated to the stage of morphogenesis in both adult and embryonic arm. In particular, ACHE is localized in typical neuronal sites when adult-like arm morphology is established and in differentiating cell locations during the early stages of arm morphogenesis. This possibility is also supported by the presence in the ACHE sequence and model structure of both cholinergic and non-cholinergic sites. This study provides insights into ACHE conserved roles during processes of arm morphogenesis. In addition, our modeling study offers a solid basis for predicting the interaction of the ACHE domains with pharmacological blockers for in vivo investigations. We therefore suggest ACHE as a target for the regulation of tissue morphogenesis. PMID:25112677

  3. A new species of pouched octopus, Cistopus Gray, 1849 (Cephalopoda: Octopodidae) from the southwest coast of India.

    PubMed

    Sreeja, Vijayamma; Norman, Mark D; Kumar, Appukuttannair Biju

    2015-01-01

    Octopuses of the genus Cistopus Gray, 1849 are commercially valuable catches in the cephalopod fisheries of India. The primary and unique diagnostic character of this genus is the possession of eight small mucous pouches embedded in the oral faces of the webs between the bases of each arm. Historically only a single species of Cistopus, C. indicus, had been reported from Indian waters. In reviewing the octopod fauna off the Kerala coast, we have detected three species of Cistopus, of which one is described here as a new species. Cistopus platinoidus sp. nov. is distinct from Cistopus species described to date (C. indicus, C. taiwanicus and C. chinensis) on the basis of sucker counts, the number and position of enlarged suckers in males, and presence/absence of a calamus. Our studies of catch composition of Kerala octopod fisheries indicate a higher diversity of target species than previously suspected, including a number of undescribed species. Taxonomic resolution and collation of biological and distributional data are required for effective monitoring and management of these valuable fisheries. PMID:26701522

  4. Cryptic speciation and the circumpolarity debate: A case study on endemic Southern Ocean octopuses using the COI barcode of life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allcock, A. Louise; Barratt, Iain; Eléaume, Marc; Linse, Katrin; Norman, Mark D.; Smith, Peter J.; Steinke, Dirk; Stevens, Darren W.; Strugnell, Jan M.

    2011-03-01

    Three hundred and fifty specimens of the endemic Southern Ocean octopus genus Pareledone, were sequenced for the barcoding gene COI. Geographic coverage comprised the South Shetland Islands, the Ross Sea, Adélie Land, George V Land, the Weddell Sea, under the site of the former Larsen B ice shelf, Prydz Bay, the South Orkney Islands and the Amundsen Sea. The greatest number of specimens was captured at the three first-mentioned localities. At least 11 species were represented in the samples and the analyses revealed cryptic species. Six species were found to have extended distributions. Circumpolarity is supported for at least one species. Evidence is presented for a barrier to gene flow to the west of the Antarctic Peninsula, with haplotypes of P. aequipapillae becoming progressively more diverse in a clockwise direction from the South Shetland Islands to the Amundsen Sea. This pattern is akin to that seen in ring species, although we suggest that comparatively warm bottom water acts as a physical barrier preventing completion of the ring.

  5. Reproductive traits of sandbird octopus, Amphioctopus aegina (Gray, 1849) from Mandapam coastal waters (Palk Bay), Southeast Coast of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatius, Boby; Srinivasan, Muthukumarasamy; Balakrishnan, Srinivasan

    2011-09-01

    The sandbird octopus Amphioctopus aegina (Gray, 1849) is one of the important octopod species in trawl catches in Mandapam waters (Palk Bay). The reproductive biology of this species from these waters was studied from October 2001 to September 2002. In the majority of months(Jan-June), the sex ratio was biased towards males. The ratios of males to females increased consistently with respect to weight Total weight at first maturity were 78.78g for females and 40.8 g for males. Four maturity stags were recognized for females and two for males. Maturation and spawning occur all year round, with a peak during October and another peak during January-February. In males, no definite seasonal changes were observed in gonadosomatic index (GSI) values. In females there were two peaks in GSI values during October and January-February. For individuals of a DML range of 67-85 mm fecundity varied between 2,962-8,820 oocytes. The average relative fecundity was estimated at 68 to 83 and the average number oocytes per gram of ovary were 488 to 539.

  6. Ontogeny of tetrodotoxin levels in blue-ringed octopuses: maternal investment and apparent independent production in offspring of Hapalochlaena lunulata.

    PubMed

    Williams, Becky L; Hanifin, Charles T; Brodie, Edmund D; Caldwell, Roy L

    2011-01-01

    Many organisms provision offspring with antipredator chemicals. Adult blue-ringed octopuses (Hapalochlaena spp.) harbor tetrodotoxin (TTX), which may be produced by symbiotic bacteria. Regardless of the ultimate source, we find that females invest TTX into offspring and offspring TTX levels are significantly correlated with female TTX levels. Because diversion of TTX to offspring begins during the earliest stages of egg formation, when females are still actively foraging and looking for mates, females may face an evolutionary tradeoff between provisioning larger stores of TTX in eggs and retaining that TTX for their own defense and offense (venom). Given that total TTX levels appear to increase during development and that female TTX levels correlate with those of offspring, investment may be an active adaptive process. Even after eggs have been laid, TTX levels continue to increase, suggesting that offspring or their symbionts begin producing TTX independently. The maternal investment of TTX in offspring of Hapalochlaena spp. represents a rare examination of chemical defenses, excepting ink, in cephalopods. PMID:21165679

  7. First descriptions of dicyemid mesozoans (Dicyemida: Dicyemidae) from Australian octopus (Octopodidae) and cuttlefish (Sepiidae), including a new record of Dicyemennea in Australian waters.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Sarah R

    2013-09-01

    Three new species of dicyemid mesozoans are described for the first time from Australian octopus and cuttlefish species. Dicyemennea floscephalum sp. n. is described from Octopus berrima Stranks et Norman (southern keeled octopus) collected from Spencer Gulf and Gulf St. Vincent, South Australia, Australia and represents the first description of a species of Dicyemennea Whitman, 1883 from Australian waters. Dicyema papuceum sp. n. and D. furuyi sp. n. are described from Sepia papuensis Hoyle (Papuan cuttlefish) collected from Shark Bay, Western Australia, Australia. Dicyemennea floscephalum sp. n. is a medium to large species that reaches approximately 4.9 mm in length. The vermiform stages are characterised by having 23-28 peripheral cells, and a disc-shaped, flower-like calotte in larger individuals. An anterior abortive axial cell is absent in vermiform embryos and verruciform cells were not observed in nematogens and rhombogens. Infusoriform embryos comprise 37 cells; one nucleus is present in each urn cell. Dicyema papuceum sp. n. is a small species that reaches approximately 1.1 mm in length. The vermiform stages are characterised by having 30-33 peripheral cells and a relatively small, cap-shaped calotte. An anterior abortive axial cell is absent in vermiform embryos and verruciform cells were occasionally observed in nematogens. Infusoriform embryos comprise 37 cells; two nuclei are present in each urn cell. Dicyema furuyi sp. n. is a large species that reaches approximately 5.3 mm in length. The vermiform stages are characterised by having 22-24 peripheral cells and an elongate calotte. An anterior abortive axial cell is absent in vermiform embryos and verruciform cells were not observed in nematogens and rhombogens. Infusoriform embryos comprise 37 cells; one nucleus is present in each urn cell. Three secondary nematogens were also observed in the right renal appendages of two host individuals, confirming the occurrence of this form. PMID:24261132

  8. Sphero-echinocytosis of human red blood cells caused by snake, red-back spider, bee and blue-ringed octopus venoms and its inhibition by snake sera.

    PubMed

    Flachsenberger, W; Leigh, C M; Mirtschin, P J

    1995-06-01

    It was found that bee (Apis mellifera) venom, red-back spider (Latrodectus mactans) venom, blue-ringed octopus (Hapalochlaena maculosa) venom, ten different snake venoms, phospholipase A2 and four snake toxins caused sphero-echinocytosis of human red blood cells at 200 ng/ml. Most venoms and toxins lost the ability to deform human red blood cells when their components of less than mol. wt 10,000 were applied. In a number of cases the sphero-echinocytotic effect was also inhibited by blood sera of Notechis scutatus and Pseudonaja textilis. PMID:7676470

  9. Involvement of a Serpin serine protease inhibitor (OoSerpin) from mollusc Octopus ocellatus in antibacterial response.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiumei; Xu, Jie; Yang, Jianmin; Liu, Xiangquan; Zhang, Ranran; Wang, Weijun; Yang, Jialong

    2015-01-01

    Serpin is an important member of serine protease inhibitors (SPIs), which is capable of regulating proteolytic events and involving in a variety of physiological processes. In present study, a Serpin homolog was identified from Octopus ocellatus (designated as OoSerpin). Full-length cDNA of OoSerpin was of 1735 bp, containing a 5' untranslated region of 214 bp, a 3' UTR of 282 bp, and an open reading frame of 1239 bp. The open reading frame encoded a polypeptide of 412 amino acids which has a predicted molecular weight of 46.5 kDa and an isoelectric point of 8.52. The OoSerpin protein shares 37% sequence identity with other Serpins from Mus musculus (NP_941373) and Ixodes scapularis (XP_002407493). The existence of a conserved SERPIN domain strongly suggested that OoSerpin was a member of the Serpin subfamily. Expression patterns of OoSerpin, both in tissues and towards bacterial stimulation, were then characterized. The mRNA of OoSerpin was constitutively expressed at different levels in all tested tissues of untreated O. ocellatus, including mantle (lowest), muscle, renal sac, gill, hemocyte, gonad, systemic heart, and hepatopancreas (highest). The transcriptional level of OoSerpin was significantly up-regulated (P<0.01) in O. ocellatus upon bacterial challenges with Vibrio anguillarum and Micrococcus luteus, indicating its involvement in the antibacterial immune response. Furthermore, rOoSerpin, the recombinant protein of OoSerpin, exhibited strong abilities to inhibit proteinase activities of trypsin and chymotrypsin as well as the growth of Escherichia coli. Our results demonstrate that OoSerpin is a potential antibacterial factor involved in the immune response of O. ocellatus against bacterial infection. PMID:25449372

  10. The Octopus Study: rationale and design of two randomized trials on medical effectiveness, safety, and cost-effectiveness of bypass surgery on the beating heart.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, D; Nierich, A P; Eefting, F D; Buskens, E; Nathoe, H M; Jansen, E W; Borst, C; Knape, J T; Bredée, J J; Robles de Medina, E O; Grobbee, D E; Diephuis, J C; de Jaegere, P P

    2000-12-01

    The Octopus Study consists of two multicenter randomized clinical trials in which coronary artery bypass grafting on the beating heart (off-pump CABG) using the Utrecht Octopus Method is compared to intracoronary stent implantation and conventional CABG. The primary endpoint in the comparison of off-pump CABG versus stent implantation (OctoStent Trial) is medical effectiveness (i.e., absence of reintervention and major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events at 1 year after treatment). The primary endpoint in the comparison of off-pump CABG versus conventional CABG (OctoPump Trial) is cerebral safety (i.e., absence of cognitive deficits and cerebrovascular events at 3 months after treatment). Secondary endpoints in both trials include presence and severity of angina, quality of life, exercise capacity, and cost-effectiveness. A total of 560 patients will be enrolled. A random sample of 210 patients will undergo repeat angiography at 1 year to assess angiographic restenosis rate and graft patency. Including 1-year follow-up, the study will last for 3 years. Control Clin Trials 2000;21:595-609 PMID:11146152

  11. Normal Values for the Full Visual Field, Corrected for Age- and Reaction Time, Using Semiautomated Kinetic Testing on the Octopus 900 Perimeter

    PubMed Central

    Grobbel, Julia; Dietzsch, Janko; Johnson, Chris A.; Vonthein, Reinhard; Stingl, Katarina; Weleber, Richard G.; Schiefer, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine normal values of the visual field (VF), corrected for age and reaction time (RT) for semiautomated kinetic perimetry (SKP) on the Octopus 900 perimeter, create a model describing the age-dependency of these values, and assess test–retest reliability for each isopter. Methods Eighty-six eyes of 86 ophthalmologically healthy subjects (age 11–79 years, 34 males, 52 females) underwent full-field kinetic perimetry with the Octopus 900 instrument. Stimulus size, luminance, velocity, meridional angle, subject age, and their interactions, were used to create a smooth multiple regression mathematical model (V/4e, III/4e, I/4e, I/3e, I/2e, I/1e, and I/1a isopters). Fourteen subjects (2 from each of 7 age groups) were evaluated on three separate sessions to assess test–retest reliability of the isopters. Reaction time (RT) was tested by presenting 12 designated RT-vectors between 10° and 20° within the seeing areas for the III/4e isopter (stimulus velocity, 3°/second). Four RT- vectors were presented at the nasal (0° or 180°), superotemporal (45°), and inferior (270°) meridians. Results The model fit was excellent (r2 = 0.94). The test–retest variability was less than 5°, and the median decrease in this deviation attributed to aging, per decade, for all age groups and for all stimulus sizes was 0.8°. No significant learning effect was observed for any age group or isopter. Conclusion Age-corrected and RT-corrected normative threshold values for full-field kinetic perimetry can be adequately described by a smooth multiple linear regression mathematical model. Translational Relevance A description of the entire kinetic VF is useful for assessing a full characterization of VF sensitivity, determining function losses associated with ocular and neurologic diseases, and for providing a more comprehensive analysis of structure–function relationships. PMID:26966641

  12. Thermal biology of prey (Melongena corona bispinosa, Strombus pugilis, Callinectes similis, Libinia dubia) and predators (Ocyurus chrysurus, Centropomus undecimalis) of Octopus maya from the Yucatan Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Noyola Regil, Javier; Mascaro, Maite; Díaz, Fernando; Denisse Re, Ana; Sánchez-Zamora, Adolfo; Caamal-Monsreal, Claudia; Rosas, Carlos

    2015-10-01

    On the Yucatan Peninsula there is an upwelling which allows access to a body of cold water that controls temperature in this area. This modulates the ecology and distribution of organisms that inhabit the continental shelf. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of different acclimation temperatures on the thermal biology of prey as mollusc, crustacean (Melongena corona bispinosa, Strombus pugilis, Callinectes similis, Libinia dubia) and predators as fish (Ocyurus chrysurus, Centropomus undecimalis) of Octopus maya. Octopus prey preferred temperatures between 23.5°C and 26.0°C, while predators preferred temperatures 26.4-28.5°C. The species with largest thermal windows were M. corona bispinosa (328.8°C(2)), C. similis (322.8°C(2)), L. dubia (319.2°C(2)), C. undecimalis (288.6°C(2)), O. chrysurus (237.5°C(2)), while the smallest thermal window was for S. pugilis (202.0°C(2)). The acclimation response ratios (ARR) estimated for prey ranged from 0.24-0.55 in animals exposed to CTMax and 0.21-0.65 in those exposed to CTMin. Amongst predators, ARR ranged from 0.30 to 0.60 and 0.41 to 0.53 for animals exposed to CTMax and CTMin, respectively. Correlating the optimal temperature limits of prey and predators with surface temperatures on the continental shelf and those 4m deep showed that the main prey, Callinectes similis and L. dubia, shared a thermal niche and that an increase in temperature could force these species to migrate to other sites to find optimal temperatures for their physiological functions. As a consequence the continental shelf community would undergo a structural change. Predators were found to be near their optimal temperatures in surface temperatures on the continental shelf. We conclude that they would remain in the area in a warming scenario. The size of the thermal window was related to the type of ecosystem inhabited by these species. These ARR intervals allowed us to categorize the species as temperate or tropical

  13. Genetic differentiation of octopuses from different habitats near the Korean Peninsula and eastern China based on analysis of the mDNA cytochrome C oxidase 1 gene.

    PubMed

    Kang, J-H; Park, J-Y; Choi, T-J

    2012-01-01

    Distributed along the coastal waters of Korea and China, Octopus minor is found in various habitats, including the mud flats in the southern and western coasts of the Korean Peninsula and the rocky areas around Jeju Island; however, the genetic relationships among the different populations are unknown and have not been studied. We compared 630-nucleotide sequences of the CO1 gene from O. minor specimens collected from five regions around the Korean Peninsula and three regions from eastern China in order to determine population structure and genetic relationships. Based on the sequences at 12 polymorphic sites in this region, 11 haplotypes were identified from 85 specimens. Individuals from Jeju Island had unique haplotypes, including two haplotypes not found in the other populations. Nucleotide and haplotype diversity for all populations ranged from 0.03-0.37 and 0.20-0.64, respectively. Pairwise F(ST) values indicated significant genetic differences in populations from Korea and China. An UPGMA dendrogram showed separation of the eight populations into three clusters; one included only the Jeju population, another included the rest of the Korean populations and some from Dalian, China; a third cluster consisted of two other populations from China. We conclude that there are discrete genetic differences in O. minor from the different habitats, suggesting that the populations should be considered as management units in the ongoing recovery program. PMID:23212336

  14. Surface Orientation Affects the Direction of Cone Growth by Leptolyngbya sp. Strain C1, a Likely Architect of Coniform Structures Octopus Spring (Yellowstone National Park)

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Kristina; Gonzalez, Nicolas I.; Stewart, Joshua; Ospino, Frank; Nguyen, Dickie; Cho, David T.; Ghahremani, Nahal; Spear, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Laminated, microbially produced stromatolites within the rock record provide some of the earliest evidence for life on Earth. The chemical, physical, and biological factors that lead to the initiation of these organosedimentary structures and shape their morphology are unclear. Modern coniform structures with morphological features similar to stromatolites are found on the surface of cyanobacterial/microbial mats. They display a vertical element of growth, can have lamination, can be lithified, and observably grow with time. To begin to understand the microbial processes and interactions required for cone formation, we determined the phylogenetic composition of the microbial community of a coniform structure from a cyanobacterial mat at Octopus Spring, Yellowstone National Park, and reconstituted coniform structures in vitro. The 16S rRNA clone library from the coniform structure was dominated by Leptolyngbya sp. Other cyanobacteria and heterotrophic bacteria were present in much lower abundance. The same Leptolyngbya sp. identified in the clone library was also enriched in the laboratory and could produce cones in vitro. When coniform structures were cultivated in the laboratory, the initial incubation conditions were found to influence coniform morphology. In addition, both the angle of illumination and the orientation of the surface affected the angle of cone formation demonstrating how external factors can influence coniform, and likely, stromatolite morphology. PMID:23241986

  15. The Octopus, the Squid and the Tortoise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caruth, Gail D.; Caruth, Donald L.

    2013-01-01

    What is the role of the Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) today? This is not a new question. In 1903, William James questioned the value of the degree as an indicator of teaching ability. Unfortunately, the issue James raised has never been resolved. Move forward in time to 1990. Theodore Ziolkowski essentially agreed with James, but raised additional…

  16. Flexible Octopus-Shaped Hydrogel Particles for Specific Cell Capture.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lynna; An, Harry Z; Haghgooie, Ramin; Shank, Aaron T; Martel, Joseph M; Toner, Mehmet; Doyle, Patrick S

    2016-04-01

    Multiarm hydrogel microparticles with varying geometry are fabricated to specifically capture cells expressing epithelial cell adhesion molecule. Results show that particle shape influences cell-capture efficiency due to differences in surface area, hydrodynamic effects, and steric constraints. These findings can lead to improved particle design for cell separation and diagnostic applications. PMID:26929053

  17. "Do octopuses have a brain?" Knowledge, perceptions and attitudes towards neuroscience at school.

    PubMed

    Sperduti, Alessandra; Crivellaro, Federica; Rossi, Paola Francesca; Bondioli, Luca

    2012-01-01

    The present study contributes to the question of school literacy about the brain, with an original survey conducted on Italian students from the 3(rd) to 10(th) grades (n=508). The main goal was to test student's knowledge, attitudes, and interests about neuroscience, to assess needs, prospects, and difficulties in teaching about the brain from elementary to high school. A written questionnaire, maintaining anonymity, asked 12 close-ended multiple choice questions on topics related to human and animal brains, plus one facultative open-ended question about interests and curiosities on brain topics. The results show that respondents have a fragmentary level of basic knowledge about the brain, with aspects related to brain functions and consciousness the most challenging. As expected, degrees of performance improve with school level; elementary school students answered correctly an average number of 5.3 questions, middle school 6.5, and high school 7.4. Overall, students show great interest in the brain, as shown by the large number of questions gathered through the open-ended question (n=384). Other topics are addressed, mostly related to brain structure/functions and the role of the brain in the everyday life. The survey indicates the need of more thorough school programs on this subject, reinforced by interdisciplinary teaching where comparative anatomy and evolutionary aspects of brain development are covered. PMID:23082231

  18. Structure formation of lipid membranes: Membrane self-assembly and vesicle opening-up to octopus-like micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2013-02-01

    We briefly review our recent studies on self-assembly and vesicle rupture of lipid membranes using coarse-grained molecular simulations. For single component membranes, lipid molecules self-assemble from random gas states to vesicles via disk-shaped clusters. Clusters aggregate into larger clusters, and subsequently the large disks close into vesicles. The size of vesicles are determined by kinetics than by thermodynamics. When a vesicle composed of lipid and detergent types of molecules is ruptured, a disk-shaped micelle called bicelle can be formed. When both surfactants have negligibly low critical micelle concentration, it is found that bicelles connected with worm-like micelles are also formed depending on the surfactant ratio and spontaneous curvature of the membrane monolayer.

  19. Sensing the sea bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-07-01

    William Wilcock and a team of scientists and engineers drilled holes in the sea floor, and inadvertently provided a breeding ground for octopuses, in their attempt to understand deep-ocean hydrothermal venting.

  20. 77 FR 33103 - Fisheries of the Economic Exclusive Zone Off Alaska; Shallow-Water Species Fishery by Vessels...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-05

    ... of the GOA (77 FR 15194, March 14, 2012), for the period 1200 hrs, A.l.t., April 1, 2012, through..., octopuses, and sculpins. This prohibition does not apply to fishing for pollock by vessels using...

  1. 78 FR 44538 - Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-24

    ... Angel Bolges Artificial Reef Project and Two Prototypes of Traps: Octopus and Spiny Lobster--Yabucoa... Olsen Update on the CFMC/STFA Lobster Study--David Olsen Public Comment Period (5-minutes...

  2. Inspiration, simulation and design for smart robot manipulators from the sucker actuation mechanism of cephalopods.

    PubMed

    Grasso, Frank W; Setlur, Pradeep

    2007-12-01

    Octopus arms house 200-300 independently controlled suckers that can alternately afford an octopus fine manipulation of small objects and produce high adhesion forces on virtually any non-porous surface. Octopuses use their suckers to grasp, rotate and reposition soft objects (e.g., octopus eggs) without damaging them and to provide strong, reversible adhesion forces to anchor the octopus to hard substrates (e.g., rock) during wave surge. The biological 'design' of the sucker system is understood to be divided anatomically into three functional groups: the infundibulum that produces a surface seal that conforms to arbitrary surface geometry; the acetabulum that generates negative pressures for adhesion; and the extrinsic muscles that allow adhered surfaces to be rotated relative to the arm. The effector underlying these abilities is the muscular hydrostat. Guided by sensory input, the thousands of muscle fibers within the muscular hydrostats of the sucker act in coordination to provide stiffness or force when and where needed. The mechanical malleability of octopus suckers, the interdigitated arrangement of their muscle fibers and the flexible interconnections of its parts make direct studies of their control challenging. We developed a dynamic simulator (ABSAMS) that models the general functioning of muscular hydrostat systems built from assemblies of biologically constrained muscular hydrostat models. We report here on simulation studies of octopus-inspired and artificial suckers implemented in this system. These simulations reproduce aspects of octopus sucker performance and squid tentacle extension. Simulations run with these models using parameters from man-made actuators and materials can serve as tools for designing soft robotic implementations of man-made artificial suckers and soft manipulators. PMID:18037726

  3. Ethnoecological knowledge of the artisan fishermen of octopi in the community of Coroa Vermelha.

    PubMed

    Martins, Viviane S; Schiavetti, Alexandre; Souto, Francisco J B

    2011-06-01

    Coral reefs are quite diverse ecosystems that carry out several ecological functions and plays a relevant socioeconomic role. The artisan fishing of octopi (Octopus spp.) is practiced for the survival of part of the inhabitants of Coroa Vermelha community, in the south of the state of Bahia. We intended to study the knowledge of the octopi fishermen of Coroa Vermelha using the comprehensive ethnoecological proposal of Marques. The data were collected between July, 2006 and April, 2008 through direct observation and from interviews with fishermen met by chance and through the "native specialists" criterion. Twenty semi-structured interviews were carried out following an itinerary of pre-established questions about the activity of octopi capture, and the biological and ecological aspects of the resource. The data showed that the fishermen have knowledge about biological and ecological aspects of the octopi. Two capture techniques are used: octopus fishing (polvejamento) in the reefs and through diving. Two specific folk are recognized: the "normal octopus" (Octopus insularis) and the "east octopus" (Octopus macropus (?)). The intervieews demonstrated ecological knowledge sometimes compatible with the scientific literature, mainly in which concerns the trophic ecology and behavior of the octopi. PMID:21670875

  4. Functional chondroitin sulfate from Enteroctopus dofleini containing a 3-O-sulfo glucuronic acid residue.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Kyohei; Okamoto, Yusuke; Mukuno, Ann; Wakai, Jun; Hosoyama, Saori; Linhardt, Robert J; Toida, Toshihiko

    2015-12-10

    There are several reports that chondroitin sulfate containing K-type units [GlcA (3S)-GalNAc (4S)] exhibiting similar levels of neurite outgrowth promoting activities as CS having high amounts of B-, D- and E-type disulfated disaccharides. Although CS containing K-type units possess important biological activities, there are only few sources, such as king crab cartilage, squid cartilage or sea cucumber. In this study, CS containing 13.9% of K-type units was found in octopus (Enteroctopus dofleini) cartilage using different substrate specificities of chondroitinases. The 2D NMR spectra showed cross-peaks assigned to protons on sugar ring of GlcA (3S), demonstrating the presence of K-type units in octopus CS. Furthermore, proportion of fucosylated disaccharide units in octopus CS was very low. Octopus CS showed high affinity for growth factors and stimulated neurite outgrowth of hippocampal neurons, similar to the activity of squid CS-E. These results strongly suggest that octopus cartilage is a rich source of CS-K and has important biological activities. PMID:26428158

  5. Content of mercury and cadmium in fish (Thunnus alalunga) and cephalopods (Eledone moschata) from the south-eastern Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Storelli, M M; Marcotrigiano, G O

    2004-11-01

    Mercury and cadmium concentrations were measured in the flesh and liver (or hepatopancreas) of albacore (Thunnus alalunga) and horned octopus (Eledone moschata) to establish whether the concentrations exceeded the maximum levels fixed by the European Commission. In both species, mercury and cadmium mean concentrations were higher in liver (albacore: mercury = 2.41 microg g(-1) wet wt, cadmium = 9.22 microg g(-1) wet wt; horned octopus: mercury = 0.76 microg g(-1) wet wt, cadmium = 6.72 microg g(-1) wet wt) than in flesh (albacore: mercury = 1.56 microg g(-1) wet wt, cadmium = 0.05 microg g(-1) wet wt; horned octopus: mercury = 0.36 microg g(-1) wet wt, cadmium = 0.33 microg g(-1)). Mercury concentrations exceeding the prescribed legal limit of 1 microg g(-1) wet wt were found in almost all albacore samples (flesh: 71.4%; liver: 85.7%). For horned octopus, concentrations above 0.5 microg g(-1) wet wt were observed solely in hepatopancreas, while in flesh, the concentrations were below this limit in all the samples examined. Of the flesh samples of albacore, 42.8% exceeded the proposed tolerance for cadmium for human consumption, whilst for horned octopus, the established limit was not exceeded in any sample. PMID:15764333

  6. Sodium pump molecular activity and membrane lipid composition in two disparate ectotherms, and comparison with endotherms.

    PubMed

    Turner, Nigel; Hulbert, A J; Else, Paul L

    2005-02-01

    Previous research has shown that the lower sodium pump molecular activity observed in tissues of ectotherms compared to endotherms, is largely related to the lower levels of polyunsaturates and higher levels of monounsaturates found in the cell membranes of ectotherms. Marine-based ectotherms, however, have very polyunsaturated membranes, and in the current study, we measured molecular activity and membrane lipid composition in tissues of two disparate ectothermic species, the octopus (Octopus vulgaris) and the bearded dragon lizard (Pogona vitticeps), to determine whether the high level of membrane polyunsaturation generally observed in marine-based ectotherms is associated with an increased sodium pump molecular activity relative to other ectotherms. Phospholipids from all tissues of the octopus were highly polyunsaturated and contained high concentrations of the omega-3 polyunsaturate, docosahexaenoic acid (22:6 (n-3)). In contrast, phospholipids from bearded dragon tissues contained higher proportions of monounsaturates and lower proportions of polyunsaturates. Sodium pump molecular activity was only moderately elevated in tissues of the octopus compared to the bearded dragon, despite the much greater level of polyunsaturation in octopus membranes. When the current data were combined with data for the ectothermic cane toad, a significant (P = 0.003) correlation was observed between sodium pump molecular activity and the content of 22:6 (n-3) in the surrounding membrane. These results are discussed in relation to recent work which shows a similar relationship in endotherms. PMID:15726386

  7. Predation Risk within Fishing Gear and Implications for South Australian Rock Lobster Fisheries.

    PubMed

    Briceño, Felipe; Linnane, Adrian Joseph; Quiroz, Juan Carlos; Gardner, Caleb; Pecl, Gretta Tatyana

    2015-01-01

    Depredation of southern rock lobster (Jasus edwardsii) within fishing gear by the Maori octopus (Pinnoctopus cordiformis) has economic and ecological impacts on valuable fisheries in South Australia. In addition, depredation rates can be highly variable resulting in uncertainties for the fishery. We examined how in-pot lobster predation was influenced by factors such as lobster size and sex, season, fishing zone, and catch rate. Using mixed modelling techniques, we found that in-pot predation risk increased with lobster size and was higher for male lobsters. In addition, the effect of catch rate of lobsters on predation risk by octopus differed among fishing zones. There was both a seasonal and a spatial component to octopus predation, with an increased risk within discrete fishing grounds in South Australia at certain times of the year. Information about predation within lobster gear can assist fishery management decision-making, potentially leading to significant reduction in economic losses to the fishery. PMID:26489035

  8. Predation Risk within Fishing Gear and Implications for South Australian Rock Lobster Fisheries

    PubMed Central

    Briceño, Felipe; Linnane, Adrian Joseph; Quiroz, Juan Carlos; Gardner, Caleb; Pecl, Gretta Tatyana

    2015-01-01

    Depredation of southern rock lobster (Jasus edwardsii) within fishing gear by the Maori octopus (Pinnoctopus cordiformis) has economic and ecological impacts on valuable fisheries in South Australia. In addition, depredation rates can be highly variable resulting in uncertainties for the fishery. We examined how in-pot lobster predation was influenced by factors such as lobster size and sex, season, fishing zone, and catch rate. Using mixed modelling techniques, we found that in-pot predation risk increased with lobster size and was higher for male lobsters. In addition, the effect of catch rate of lobsters on predation risk by octopus differed among fishing zones. There was both a seasonal and a spatial component to octopus predation, with an increased risk within discrete fishing grounds in South Australia at certain times of the year. Information about predation within lobster gear can assist fishery management decision-making, potentially leading to significant reduction in economic losses to the fishery. PMID:26489035

  9. Alternative diets for maintaining and rearing cephalopods in captivity.

    PubMed

    DeRusha, R H; Forsythe, J W; DiMarco, F P; Hanlon, R T

    1989-07-01

    The requirement of live marine prey for cephalopod mariculture has restricted its practicality for inland research laboratories, commercial enterprises and home aquarists. We evaluated acceptability and resultant growth on: (a) frozen marine shrimps, (b) live and frozen marine polychaete worms, (c) live and frozen marine crabs, (d) frozen marine fishes, (e) live adult brine shrimp, (f) live freshwater fish and (g) live freshwater crayfish. The diets were presented for periods of 2 to 11 weeks to octopuses, cuttlefishes or squids and in most trials the results were compared to animals fed control diets of live marine shrimps, crabs or fish. Overall, frozen marine shrimp proved to be the best alternative diet tested. Adult Octopus maya on frozen marine shrimp diets grew as well as those on control diets at 2.8% body weight per day (%/d) compared to 2.0%/d on live freshwater crayfish, 1.4%/d on live marine polychaete worms and 0.8%/d on live freshwater fish (Tilapia sp.). Juvenile Octopus maya and Octopus bimaculoides also grew comparably to controls when fed frozen marine shrimps; growth rates ranged from near 3.0%/d at 3 months of age to nearly 2.5%/d at 6 months of age. Thus, these alternatives are acceptable as the octopuses end their exponential growth phase at an age of 3 - 5 months. Attempts to rear O. maya hatchlings and juveniles (up to 1 month of age) on dead foods resulted in high mortality and slow or negative growth. No live or dead alternative diet has been found yet that will promote good growth and survival in hatchling octopuses. Hatchling F3 generation Sepia officinalis (the European cuttlefish) were reared for 6 weeks exclusively on adult brine shrimp (Artemia salina).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2761235

  10. Sensational Sea Life: A Teacher-Friendly Thematic Unit [with CD-ROM]. R.E.A.D. A.N.D. F.E.E.D. Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klingborg, Beverly; Cardinalli, Antonina

    This book is the second in a series of thematic units designed especially for children who are deaf and hard of hearing in kindergarten through the elementary grades. The unit focuses on sea creatures and is divided into seven sections. Five sections contain lessons on particular sea animals including whales, turtles, starfish, octopuses, and…

  11. Application of FRAMIS to K/sub D/ data

    SciTech Connect

    Storch, N.

    1980-03-20

    This report documents an application of the FRAMIS relational data base management system. A geochemical data base of ion exchange distribution coefficients (K/sub D/) is created and maintained by using very simple commands. Reports are automatically generated. Familiarity with the LLL Octopus Time-Sharing System and FRAMIS is assumed.

  12. Chemical composition of inks of diverse marine molluscs suggests convergent chemical defenses.

    PubMed

    Derby, Charles D; Kicklighter, Cynthia E; Johnson, P M; Zhang, Xu

    2007-05-01

    Some marine molluscs, notably sea hares, cuttlefish, squid, and octopus, release ink when attacked by predators. The sea hare Aplysia californica releases secretions from the ink gland and opaline gland that protect individuals from injury or death from predatory spiny lobsters through a combination of mechanisms that include chemical deterrence, sensory disruption, and phagomimicry. The latter two mechanisms are facilitated by millimolar concentrations of free amino acids (FAA) in sea hare ink and opaline, which stimulate the chemosensory systems of predators, ultimately leading to escape by sea hares. We hypothesize that other inking molluscs use sensory disruption and/or phagomimicry as a chemical defense. To investigate this, we examined concentrations of 21 FAA and ammonium in the defensive secretions of nine species of inking molluscs: three sea hares (Aplysia californica, Aplysia dactylomela, Aplysia juliana) and six cephalopods (cuttlefish: Sepia officinalis; squid: Loligo pealei, Lolliguncula brevis, Dosidicus gigas; octopus: Octopus vulgaris, Octopus bimaculoides). We found millimolar levels of total FAA and ammonium in these secretions, and the FAA in highest concentration were taurine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, alanine, and lysine. Crustaceans and fish, which are major predators of these molluscs, have specific receptor systems for these FAA. Our chemical analysis supports the hypothesis that inking molluscs have the potential to use sensory disruption and/or phagomimicry as a chemical defense. PMID:17393278

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of the Deinococcus-Thermus Bacterium Meiothermus ruber Strain A

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Thiel, Vera; Tomsho, Lynn P.; Burhans, Richard; Gay, Scott E.; Schuster, Stephan C.; Ward, David M.; Bryant, Donald A.

    2015-03-26

    The draft genome sequence of the Deinococcus-Thermus group bacterium Meiothermus ruber strain A, isolated from a cyanobacterial enrichment culture obtained from Octopus Spring (Yellowstone National Park, WY), comprises 2,968,099 bp in 170 contigs. It is predicted to contain 2,895 protein-coding genes, 44 tRNA-coding genes, and 2 rRNA operons.

  14. Optics clustered to output unique solutions: A multi-laser facility for combined single molecule and ensemble microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, David T.; Botchway, Stanley W.; Coles, Benjamin C.; Needham, Sarah R.; Roberts, Selene K.; Rolfe, Daniel J.; Tynan, Christopher J.; Ward, Andrew D.; Webb, Stephen E. D.; Yadav, Rahul; Zanetti-Domingues, Laura; Martin-Fernandez, Marisa L.

    2011-09-01

    Optics clustered to output unique solutions (OCTOPUS) is a microscopy platform that combines single molecule and ensemble imaging methodologies. A novel aspect of OCTOPUS is its laser excitation system, which consists of a central core of interlocked continuous wave and pulsed laser sources, launched into optical fibres and linked via laser combiners. Fibres are plugged into wall-mounted patch panels that reach microscopy end-stations in adjacent rooms. This allows multiple tailor-made combinations of laser colours and time characteristics to be shared by different end-stations minimising the need for laser duplications. This setup brings significant benefits in terms of cost effectiveness, ease of operation, and user safety. The modular nature of OCTOPUS also facilitates the addition of new techniques as required, allowing the use of existing lasers in new microscopes while retaining the ability to run the established parts of the facility. To date, techniques interlinked are multi-photon/multicolour confocal fluorescence lifetime imaging for several modalities of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and time-resolved anisotropy, total internal reflection fluorescence, single molecule imaging of single pair FRET, single molecule fluorescence polarisation, particle tracking, and optical tweezers. Here, we use a well-studied system, the epidermal growth factor receptor network, to illustrate how OCTOPUS can aid in the investigation of complex biological phenomena.

  15. Radioisotopes Demonstrate the Contrasting Bioaccumulation Capacities of Heavy Metals in Embryonic Stages of Cephalopod Species

    PubMed Central

    Lacoue-Labarthe, Thomas; Villanueva, Roger; Rouleau, Claude; Oberhänsli, François; Teyssié, Jean-Louis; Jeffree, Ross; Bustamante, Paco

    2011-01-01

    Cephalopods play a key role in many marine trophic food webs and also constitute alternative fishery resources in the context of the ongoing decline in finfish stocks. Most coastal cephalopod species of commercial importance migrate into shallow waters during the breeding season to lay their eggs, and are consequently subjected to coastal contamination. Eggs of common cuttlefish Sepia officinalis, European squid Loligo vulgaris, common octopus Octopus vulgaris and the sepiolid Rossia macrosoma were exposed during embryonic development to dissolved 110mAg, 109Cd, 60Co, 54Mn and 65Zn in order to determine their metal accumulation efficiencies and distribution among different egg compartments. Cuttlefish eggs, in which hard shells enclose the embryos, showed the lowest concentration factor (CF) values despite a longer duration of exposure. In contrast, octopus eggs, which are only protected by the chorionic membrane, accumulated the most metal. Uptake appears to be linked to the selective retention properties of the egg envelopes with respect to each element. The study also demonstrated that the octopus embryo accumulated 110mAg directly from the dissolved phase and also indirectly through assimilation of the contaminated yolk. These results raise questions regarding the potential contrasting vulnerability of early life stages of cephalopods to the metallic contamination of coastal waters. PMID:22132123

  16. 78 FR 41033 - Fisheries of the Northeast Region, Southeast Region, North Pacific Region, Pacific Region...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-09

    ...This action serves as a notice that NMFS, on behalf of the Secretary of Commerce (Secretary), has determined that the following stocks are subject to overfishing or are in an overfished state: Georges Bank (GB) yellowtail flounder is subject to overfishing and continues to be in an overfished condition; Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands (BSAI) octopus complex was determined to be subject to......

  17. Continuum robot arms inspired by cephalopods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Ian D.; Dawson, Darren M.; Flash, Tamar; Grasso, Frank W.; Hanlon, Roger T.; Hochner, Binyamin; Kier, William M.; Pagano, Christopher C.; Rahn, Christopher D.; Zhang, Qiming M.

    2005-05-01

    In this paper, we describe our recent results in the development of a new class of soft, continuous backbone ("continuum") robot manipulators. Our work is strongly motivated by the dexterous appendages found in cephalopods, particularly the arms and suckers of octopus, and the arms and tentacles of squid. Our ongoing investigation of these animals reveals interesting and unexpected functional aspects of their structure and behavior. The arrangement and dynamic operation of muscles and connective tissue observed in the arms of a variety of octopus species motivate the underlying design approach for our soft manipulators. These artificial manipulators feature biomimetic actuators, including artificial muscles based on both electro-active polymers (EAP) and pneumatic (McKibben) muscles. They feature a "clean" continuous backbone design, redundant degrees of freedom, and exhibit significant compliance that provides novel operational capacities during environmental interaction and object manipulation. The unusual compliance and redundant degrees of freedom provide strong potential for application to delicate tasks in cluttered and/or unstructured environments. Our aim is to endow these compliant robotic mechanisms with the diverse and dexterous grasping behavior observed in octopuses. To this end, we are conducting fundamental research into the manipulation tactics, sensory biology, and neural control of octopuses. This work in turn leads to novel approaches to motion planning and operator interfaces for the robots. The paper describes the above efforts, along with the results of our development of a series of continuum tentacle-like robots, demonstrating the unique abilities of biologically-inspired design.

  18. A flow visualization study of single-arm sculling movement emulating cephalopod thrust generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazakidi, Asimina; Gnanamanickam, Ebenezer P.; Tsakiris, Dimitris P.; Ekaterinaris, John A.

    2014-11-01

    In addition to jet propulsion, octopuses use arm-swimming motion as an effective means of generating bursts of thrust, for hunting, defense, or escape. The individual role of their arms, acting as thrust generators during this motion, is still under investigation, in view of an increasing robotic interest for alternative modes of propulsion, inspired by the octopus. Computational studies have revealed that thrust generation is associated with complex vortical flow patterns in the wake of the moving arm, however further experimental validation is required. Using the hydrogen bubble technique, we studied the flow disturbance around a single octopus-like robotic arm, undergoing two-stroke sculling movements in quiescent fluid. Although simplified, sculling profiles have been found to adequately capture the fundamental kinematics of the octopus arm-swimming behavior. In fact, variation of the sculling parameters alters considerably the generation of forward thrust. Flow visualization revealed the generation of complex vortical structures around both rigid and compliant arms. Increased disturbance was evident near the tip, particularly at the transitional phase between recovery and power strokes. These results are in good qualitative agreement with computational and robotic studies. Work funded by the ESF-GSRT HYDRO-ROB Project PE7(281).

  19. Hearing characteristics of cephalopods: modeling and environmental impact study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunfeng; Shi, Feng; Song, Jiakun; Zhang, Xugang; Yu, Shiliang

    2015-01-01

    Cephalopods (octopus, squid and cuttlefish) are some of the most intriguing molluscs, and they represent economically important commercial marine species for fisheries. Previous studies have shown that cephalopods are sensitive to underwater particle motion, especially at low frequencies in the order of 10 Hz. The present paper deals with quantitative modeling of the statocyst system in three cephalopod species: Octopus vulgaris, Sepia officinalis and Loligo vulgaris. The octopus's macula/statolith organ was modeled as a 2nd-order dynamic oscillator using parameter values estimated from scanning electron micrograph images. The modeling results agree reasonably well with experimental data (acceleration threshold) in the three cephalopod species. Insights made from quantitative modeling and simulating the particle motion sensing mechanism of cephalopods elucidated their underwater particle motion detection capabilities. Sensitivity to emerging environmental issues, such as low frequency noise caused by near-shore wind farms and increasing levels of carbon dioxide in the ocean, and sensitivity to sounds produced by impending landslides were investigated in octopus using the model. PMID:24920389

  20. Optics clustered to output unique solutions: a multi-laser facility for combined single molecule and ensemble microscopy.

    PubMed

    Clarke, David T; Botchway, Stanley W; Coles, Benjamin C; Needham, Sarah R; Roberts, Selene K; Rolfe, Daniel J; Tynan, Christopher J; Ward, Andrew D; Webb, Stephen E D; Yadav, Rahul; Zanetti-Domingues, Laura; Martin-Fernandez, Marisa L

    2011-09-01

    Optics clustered to output unique solutions (OCTOPUS) is a microscopy platform that combines single molecule and ensemble imaging methodologies. A novel aspect of OCTOPUS is its laser excitation system, which consists of a central core of interlocked continuous wave and pulsed laser sources, launched into optical fibres and linked via laser combiners. Fibres are plugged into wall-mounted patch panels that reach microscopy end-stations in adjacent rooms. This allows multiple tailor-made combinations of laser colours and time characteristics to be shared by different end-stations minimising the need for laser duplications. This setup brings significant benefits in terms of cost effectiveness, ease of operation, and user safety. The modular nature of OCTOPUS also facilitates the addition of new techniques as required, allowing the use of existing lasers in new microscopes while retaining the ability to run the established parts of the facility. To date, techniques interlinked are multi-photon/multicolour confocal fluorescence lifetime imaging for several modalities of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and time-resolved anisotropy, total internal reflection fluorescence, single molecule imaging of single pair FRET, single molecule fluorescence polarisation, particle tracking, and optical tweezers. Here, we use a well-studied system, the epidermal growth factor receptor network, to illustrate how OCTOPUS can aid in the investigation of complex biological phenomena. PMID:21974592

  1. Phylogenetic relationships among Octopodidae species in coastal waters of China inferred from two mitochondrial DNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Lü, Z M; Cui, W T; Liu, L Q; Li, H M; Wu, C W

    2013-01-01

    Octopus in the family Octopodidae (Mollusca: Cephalopoda) has been generally recognized as a "catch-all" genus. The monophyly of octopus species in China's coastal waters has not yet been studied. In this paper, we inferred the phylogeny of 11 octopus species (family Octopodidae) in China's coastal waters using nucleotide sequences of two mitochondrial DNA genes: cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) and 16S rRNA. Sequence analysis of both genes revealed that the 11 species of Octopodidae fell into four distinct groups, which were genetically distant from one another and exhibited identical phylogenetic resolution. The phylogenies indicated strongly that the genus Octopus in China's coastal waters is also not monophyletic, and it is therefore clear that the Octopodidae systematics in this area requires major revision. It is demonstrated that partial sequence information of both the mitochondrial genes 16S rRNA and COI could be used as diagnostic molecular markers in the identification and resolution of the taxonomic ambiguity of Octopodidae species. PMID:24085437

  2. Design, modeling and control of a pneumatically actuated manipulator inspired by biological continuum structures.

    PubMed

    Kang, Rongjie; Branson, David T; Zheng, Tianjiang; Guglielmino, Emanuele; Caldwell, Darwin G

    2013-09-01

    Biological tentacles, such as octopus arms, have entirely flexible structures and virtually infinite degrees of freedom (DOF) that allow for elongation, shortening and bending at any point along the arm length. The amazing dexterity of biological tentacles has driven the growing implementation of continuum manipulators in robotic systems. This paper presents a pneumatic manipulator inspired by biological continuum structures in some of their key features and functions, such as continuum morphology, intrinsic compliance and stereotyped motions with hyper redundant DOF. The kinematics and dynamics of the manipulator are formulated and identified, and a hierarchical controller taking inspiration from the structure of an octopus nervous system is used to relate desired stereotyped motions to individual actuator inputs. Simulations and experiments are carried out to validate the model and prototype where good agreement was found between the two. PMID:23851387

  3. Evolution of multicellular animals as deduced from 5S rRNA sequences: a possible early emergence of the Mesozoa.

    PubMed

    Ohama, T; Kumazaki, T; Hori, H; Osawa, S

    1984-06-25

    The nucleotide sequences of 5S rRNA from a mesozoan Dicyema misakiense and three metazoan species, i.e., an acorn-worm Saccoglossus kowalevskii, a moss-animal Bugula neritina, and an octopus Octopus vulgaris have been determined. A phylogenic tree of multicellular animals has been constructed from 73 5S rRNA sequences available at present including those from the above four sequences. The tree suggests that the mesozoan is the most ancient multicellular animal identified so far, its emergence time being almost the same as that of flagellated or ciliated protozoans. The branching points of planarians and nematodes are a little later than that of the mesozoan but are clearly earlier than other metazoan groups including sponges and jellyfishes. Many metazoan groups seem to have diverged within a relatively short period. PMID:6539911

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of the Deinococcus-Thermus Bacterium Meiothermus ruber Strain A

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, Vera; Tomsho, Lynn P.; Burhans, Richard; Gay, Scott E.; Schuster, Stephan C.; Ward, David M.

    2015-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of the Deinococcus-Thermus group bacterium Meiothermus ruber strain A, isolated from a cyanobacterial enrichment culture obtained from Octopus Spring (Yellowstone National Park, WY), comprises 2,968,099 bp in 170 contigs. It is predicted to contain 2,895 protein-coding genes, 44 tRNA-coding genes, and 2 rRNA operons. PMID:25814606

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of the Deinococcus-Thermus Bacterium Meiothermus ruber Strain A.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Vera; Tomsho, Lynn P; Burhans, Richard; Gay, Scott E; Schuster, Stephan C; Ward, David M; Bryant, Donald A

    2015-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of the Deinococcus-Thermus group bacterium Meiothermus ruber strain A, isolated from a cyanobacterial enrichment culture obtained from Octopus Spring (Yellowstone National Park, WY), comprises 2,968,099 bp in 170 contigs. It is predicted to contain 2,895 protein-coding genes, 44 tRNA-coding genes, and 2 rRNA operons. PMID:25814606

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of the Moderately Thermophilic Bacterium Schleiferia thermophila Strain Yellowstone (Bacteroidetes).

    PubMed

    Thiel, Vera; Hamilton, Trinity L; Tomsho, Lynn P; Burhans, Richard; Gay, Scott E; Ramaley, Robert F; Schuster, Stephan C; Steinke, Laurey; Bryant, Donald A

    2014-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of the moderately thermophilic bacterium Schleiferia thermophila strain Yellowstone (Bacteroidetes), isolated from Octopus Spring (Yellowstone National Park, WY, USA) was sequenced and comprises 2,617,694 bp in 35 contigs. The draft genome is predicted to encode 2,457 protein coding genes and 37 tRNA encoding genes and two rRNA operons. PMID:25169864

  7. Inducibility of human atrial fibrillation in an in silico model reflecting local acetylcholine distribution and concentration.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Minki; Lee, Hyun-Seung; Pak, Hui-Nam; Shim, Eun Bo

    2016-01-01

    Vagal nerve activity has been known to play a crucial role in the induction and maintenance of atrial fibrillation (AF). However, it is unclear how the distribution and concentration of local acetylcholine (ACh) promotes AF. In this study, we investigated the effect of the spatial distribution and concentration of ACh on fibrillation patterns in an in silico human atrial model. A human atrial action potential model with an ACh-dependent K(+) current (IKAch) was used to examine the effect of vagal activation. A simulation of cardiac wave dynamics was performed in a realistic 3D model of the atrium. A model of the ganglionated plexus (GP) and nerve was developed based on the "octopus hypothesis". The pattern of cardiac wave dynamics was examined by applying vagal activation to the GP areas or randomly. AF inducibility in the octopus hypothesis-based GP and nerve model was tested. The effect of the ACh concentration level was also examined. In the single cell simulation, an increase in the ACh concentration shortened APD90 and increased the maximal slope of the restitution curve. In the 3D simulation, a random distribution of vagal activation promoted wavebreaks while ACh secretion limited to the GP areas did not induce a noticeable change in wave dynamics. The octopus hypothesis-based model of the GP and nerve exhibited AF inducibility at higher ACh concentrations. In conclusion, a 3D in silico model of the GP and parasympathetic nerve based on the octopus model exhibited higher AF inducibility with higher ACh concentrations. PMID:26807030

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of the Moderately Thermophilic Bacterium Schleiferia thermophila Strain Yellowstone (Bacteroidetes)

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, Vera; Hamilton, Trinity L.; Tomsho, Lynn P.; Burhans, Richard; Gay, Scott E.; Ramaley, Robert F.; Schuster, Stephan C.; Steinke, Laurey

    2014-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of the moderately thermophilic bacterium Schleiferia thermophila strain Yellowstone (Bacteroidetes), isolated from Octopus Spring (Yellowstone National Park, WY, USA) was sequenced and comprises 2,617,694 bp in 35 contigs. The draft genome is predicted to encode 2,457 protein coding genes and 37 tRNA encoding genes and two rRNA operons. PMID:25169864

  9. [Eye injuries caused by an eclipse of the sun].

    PubMed

    Sefić-Kasumović, S; Firdus, H; Alimanović, E; Ljaljević, S; Sefić, M

    2000-01-01

    Two patients with macula damage following sungazing are reported. Visual acuity was damaged, gentle central scotoma in automated perimetry (Octopus) was presented same as lower A wave in ERG and small macular hyperfluorescency in fluorescein angiography. Funduscopy findings were macular changes similar to macular semirupture. In one month all pathologic symptoms disappeared. The only safe prevention is that by Mylar folia that completely prevent eye injury from sungazing. PMID:10872275

  10. Study of Optimal Perimetric Testing in Children (OPTIC): Feasibility, Reliability and Repeatability of Perimetry in Children

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Dipesh E.; Cumberland, Phillippa M.; Walters, Bronwen C.; Russell-Eggitt, Isabelle; Rahi, Jugnoo S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate feasibility, reliability and repeatability of perimetry in children. Methods A prospective, observational study recruiting 154 children aged 5–15 years, without an ophthalmic condition that affects the visual field (controls), identified consecutively between May 2012 and November 2013 from hospital eye clinics. Perimetry was undertaken in a single sitting, with standardised protocols, in a randomised order using the Humphrey static (SITA 24–2 FAST), Goldmann and Octopus kinetic perimeters. Data collected included test duration, subjective experience and test quality (incorporating examiner ratings on comprehension of instructions, fatigue, response to visual and auditory stimuli, concentration and co-operation) to assess feasibility and reliability. Testing was repeated within 6 months to assess repeatability. Results Overall feasibility was very high (Goldmann=96.1%, Octopus=89% and Humphrey=100% completed the tests). Examiner rated reliability was ‘good’ in 125 (81.2%) children for Goldmann, 100 (64.9%) for Octopus and 98 (63.6%) for Humphrey perimetry. Goldmann perimetry was the most reliable method in children under 9 years of age. Reliability improved with increasing age (multinomial logistic regression (Goldmann, Octopus and Humphrey), p<0.001). No significant differences were found for any of the three test strategies when examining initial and follow-up data outputs (Bland-Altman plots, n=43), suggesting good test repeatability, although the sample size may preclude detection of a small learning effect. Conclusions Feasibility and reliability of formal perimetry in children improves with age. By the age of 9 years, all the strategies used here were highly feasible and reliable. Clinical assessment of the visual field is achievable in children as young as 5 years, and should be considered where visual field loss is suspected. Since Goldmann perimetry is the most effective strategy in children aged 5–8 years and this

  11. Automated static perimetry to evaluate diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Federman, J L; Lloyd, J

    1984-01-01

    The Octopus automated static perimeter was used to evaluate patients with early diabetic retinopathy. It showed islands of threshold sensitivity depression that were equal to areas of nonperfusion seen on fluorescein angiography. The geographic area of the fundus at risk of developing these field defects was found to be between 20 and 45 degrees, representing the central area of the midperiphery. This procedure has potential as an excellent screening test for early diabetic retinopathy. Images FIGURE 1 (Cont'd) C PMID:6549516

  12. New measurements of radial velocities in clusters of galaxies. II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proust, D.; Mazure, A.; Sodre, L.; Capelato, H.; Lund, G.

    1988-03-01

    Heliocentric radial velocities are determined for 100 galaxies in five clusters, on the basis of 380-518-nm observations obtained using a CCD detector coupled by optical fibers to the OCTOPUS multiobject spectrograph at the Cassegrain focus of the 3.6-m telescope at ESO La Silla. The data-reduction procedures and error estimates are discussed, and the results are presented in tables and graphs and briefly characterized.

  13. Corrigendum: First principles calculation of field emission from nanostructures using time-dependent density functional theory: A simplified approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawfik, Sherif A.; El-Sheikh, S. M.; Salem, N. M.

    2016-09-01

    Recently we have become aware that the description of the quantum wave functions in Sec. 2.1 is incorrect. In the published version of the paper, we have stated that the states are expanded in terms of plane waves. However, the correct description of the quantum states in the context of the real space implementation (using the Octopus code) is that states are represented by discrete points in a real space grid.

  14. Water soluble octa-functionalized POSS: all-click chemistry synthesis and efficient host-guest encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Han, Jin; Zheng, Yaochen; Zheng, Shuai; Li, Sipei; Hu, Tiannan; Tang, Aijin; Gao, Chao

    2014-08-14

    A series of water soluble octa-functionalized POSSs were facilely synthesized via thiol-ene and Menschutkin click chemistry. Among them, octa-alkynyl POSS further reacted with azide-terminal alkyl long chains, resulting in a well-defined, amphiphilic octopus-like POSS. For the first time it was used for host-guest encapsulation and it exhibited an ultrahigh loading capability. PMID:24964315

  15. Some LLNL (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) experience on the CRAY X-MP/24

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, H.

    1984-03-01

    The historical situation leading to LLNL's use of an X-P/2 is briefly covered. The configuration of the LLNL machine and its place in the Octopus network is shown. The basic equation of multi-processing performance is introduced and some typical cases are mentioned. The performance of three codes: (1) Tim Axelrods' version of SIMPLE; (2) the Class-7 test; and (3) the Cray-Blitz chess program are discussed.

  16. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of the coccidian cephalopod parasites Aggregata octopiana and Aggregata eberthi (Apicomplexa: Aggregatidae) from the NE Atlantic coast using 18S rRNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Castellanos-Martínez, Sheila; Pérez-Losada, Marcos; Gestal, Camino

    2013-08-01

    The coccidia genus Aggregata is responsible for intestinal coccidiosis in wild and cultivated cephalopods. Two coccidia species, Aggregata octopiana, (infecting the common octopus Octopus vulgaris), and A. eberthi, (infecting the cuttlefish Sepia officinalis), are identified in European waters. Extensive investigation of their morphology resulted in a redescription of A. octopiana in octopuses from the NE Atlantic Coast (NW Spain) thus clarifying confusing descriptions recorded in the past. The present study sequenced the 18S rRNA gene in A. octopiana and A. eberthi from the NE Atlantic coast in order to assess their taxonomic and phylogenetic status. Phylogenetic analyses revealed conspecific genetic differences (2.5%) in 18S rRNA sequences between A. eberthi from the Ria of Vigo (NW Spain) and the Adriatic Sea. Larger congeneric differences (15.9%) were observed between A. octopiana samples from the same two areas, which suggest the existence of two species. Based on previous morphological evidence, host specificity data, and new molecular phylogenetic analyses, we suggest that A. octopiana from the Ria of Vigo is the valid type species. PMID:23498588

  17. Osmotic/ionic status of body fluids in the euryhaline cephalopod suggest possible parallel evolution of osmoregulation

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Tatsuya; Ogawa, Satoshi; Nishiyama, Yudai; Akada, Chiaki; Takahashi, Hideya; Watanabe, Taro; Minakata, Hiroyuki; Sakamoto, Hirotaka

    2015-01-01

    Acclimation from marine to dilute environments constitutes among the dramatic evolutionary transitions in the history of life. Such adaptations have evolved in multiple lineages, but studies of the blood/hemolymph homeostasis mechanisms are limited to those using evolutionarily advanced Deuterostome (chordates) and Ecdysozoa (crustaceans). Here, we examined hemolymph homeostasis in the advanced Lophotrochozoa/mollusc, the other unexplored taxa, and its possible regulation by the vasopressin/oxytocin superfamily peptides known to be implicated in fluid homeostasis in Chordata and Arthropoda. The hemolymph osmotic and ionic status in the euryhaline cephalopod (Octopus ocellatus) following transfer from 30-ppt normal seawater to 20 ppt salinity indicate hyperosmo- and hyperionoregulatory abilities for more than 1 week, as in crustaceans and teleost fish. While ventilation frequency decreased by 1 day, Na+/K+-ATPase activity, which has been generally implicated in ion transport, was induced in two of the eight posterior gills after 1 week. In addition, the octopuses were intravenously injected with 1 or 100 ng/g octopressin or cephalotocin, which are Octopus vasopressin/oxytocin orthologs. After 1 day, octopressin, but not cephalotocin, decreased the hemolymph osmolality and Ca concentrations, as well as urinary Na concentrations. These data provide evidence for possible parallel evolution in hyperionoregulatory mechanisms and coordination by conserved peptides. PMID:26403952

  18. Advantages and limitations of the spatially adaptive program SAPRO in clinical perimetry.

    PubMed

    Fankhauser, F; Funkhouser, A; Kwasniewska, S

    1986-05-01

    The SAPRO program devised for the OCTOPUS 201 automated perimeter, consists of a number of program components. It is designed to be used on the Octopus 201 computer. In its measurement mode, it employs an algorithm which achieves high speed and efficiency. This is made possible by a threshold bracketing strategy which is simpler than the normal OCTOPUS bracketing. Moreover, three grids with test location distributions of increasing resolution are superimposed in succession on the whole or on part of the visual field to be analyzed. Out of the distribution of test locations, only those which fulfill a number of criteria are actually utilized. These criteria must be given and are adaptable to any given clinical problem. As a result, despite the high spatial resolution achieved, only a fraction of the test locations are utilized using SAPRO as compared with a program using a fixed pattern of test locations. The algorithm is thus able to imitate human intelligence, which tends to concentrate stimuli at places which appear to be relevant for the solution of a problem. The results of program SAPRO are disturbed by short- and long-term fluctuations. Their validity is limited, in a manner similar to that encountered in any other threshold determination procedure. A number of printout modes is available which are oriented towards an optimal understanding of the information contained in various examinations. These principles will be illustrated by one case of inactive disseminated chorioretinitis. PMID:3755124

  19. Locomotion by Abdopus aculeatus (Cephalopoda: Octopodidae): walking the line between primary and secondary defenses.

    PubMed

    Huffard, Christine L

    2006-10-01

    Speeds and variation in body form during crawling, bipedal walking, swimming and jetting by the shallow-water octopus Abdopus aculeatus were compared to explore possible interactions between defense behaviors and biomechanics of these multi-limbed organisms. General body postures and patterns were more complex and varied during the slow mode of crawling than during fast escape maneuvers such as swimming and jetting. These results may reflect a trade-off between predator deception and speed, or simply a need to reduce drag during jet-propelled locomotion. Octopuses swam faster when dorsoventrally compressed, a form that may generate lift, than when swimming in the head-raised posture. Bipedal locomotion proceeded as fast as swimming and can be considered a form of fast escape (secondary defense) that also incorporates elements of crypsis and polyphenism (primary defenses). Body postures during walking suggested the use of both static and dynamic stability. Absolute speed was not correlated with body mass in any mode. Based on these findings the implications for defense behaviors such as escape from predation, aggression, and 'flatfish mimicry' performed by A. aculeatus and other octopuses are discussed. PMID:16985187

  20. Interspecific and geographical variations of trace metal concentrations in cephalopods from Tunisian waters.

    PubMed

    Rjeibi, Moncef; Metian, Marc; Hajji, Tarek; Guyot, Thierry; Ben Chaouacha-Chékir, Rafika; Bustamante, Paco

    2014-06-01

    The concentrations of six metals (Ag, Cd, Cu, Hg, Pb, and Zn) were investigated and compared in three tissues (arms, digestive gland, and mantle) of three cephalopod species from the Tunisian waters: the common octopus (Octopus vulgaris), the common cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis), and the European squid (Loligo vulgaris). Whatever the species or the sites, the digestive gland displayed the highest concentrations of Ag, Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn, highlighting its major role in their bioaccumulation and detoxification. This is also true for Hg but only for the digestive gland of O. vulgaris. Muscle from the arms and the mantle contained thus relatively low trace metal concentrations except for Hg in L. vulgaris and S. officinalis. Geographic comparison of metal concentrations in Tunisian cephalopods from three locations indicates that higher concentrations of Ag, Pb, and Hg were observed in cephalopods from northern and eastern coasts, whereas the highest Cd levels were detected in the southeastern, reflecting different conditions of exposure. Comparing the trace element concentrations between species, Ag, Cd, Cu, Hg, and Zn concentrations were the highest in the digestive gland of octopuses. This may be related to the differences in ecological features and swimming behavior among different cephalopod species. Effects of length and sex on metal levels were also considered, indicating a limited influence of sex on metal concentration. PMID:24562415

  1. Diverse Thermus species inhabit a single hot spring microbial mat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nold, S. C.; Ward, D. M.

    1995-01-01

    Through an effort to characterize aerobic chemoorganotrophic bacteria in the Octopus Spring cyano-bacterial mat community, we cultivated four Thermus isolates with unique 16S rRNA sequences. Isolates clustered within existing Thermus clades, including those containing Thermus ruber, Thermus aquaticus, and a subgroup closely related to T. aquaticus. One Octopus Spring isolate is nearly identical (99.9% similar) to isolates from Iceland, and two others are closely related to a T. ruber isolated from Russia. Octopus Spring isolates similar to T. aquaticus and T. ruber exhibited optimal growth rates at high (65-70 degrees C) and low (50 degrees C) temperatures, respectively, with the most abundant species best adapted to the temperature of the habitat (50-55 degrees C). Our results display a diversity of Thermus genotypes defined by 16S rRNA within one hot spring microbial community. We suggest that specialization to temperature and perhaps other local environmental features controls the abundance of Thermus populations.

  2. Seasonal survey of contaminants (Cd and Hg) and micronutrients (Cu and Zn) in edible tissues of cephalopods from Tunisia: assessment of risk and nutritional benefits.

    PubMed

    Rjeibi, Moncef; Metian, Marc; Hajji, Tarek; Guyot, Thierry; Ben Chaouacha-Chekir, Rafika; Bustamante, Paco

    2015-01-01

    Concentrations of cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), mercury (Hg), and zinc (Zn) were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry in the muscle tissues (arms and mantle) of 3 commercial cephalopods (Loligo vulgaris, Octopus vulgaris, and Sepia officinalis) caught in 3 different Tunisian coastal regions. The highest concentrations found correspond to the essential elements Cu and Zn. Octopuses and cuttlefish showed the highest levels of those elements whereas squid presented with significantly higher values of Hg in both muscular tissues. This may be related to different feeding behavior and detoxification processes among benthic and pelagic cephalopods. Variation of element concentrations between seasons was different between species and seemed to be mostly dependent on the sampling site. From a public health standpoint, average concentrations of Cd, Cu, Hg, and Zn measured in edible tissues of cephalopods from this study did not reveal, in general, any risk for consumers. The estimated target hazard quotients for Cd and Hg for consumers of the selected species were below 1 and within the safety range for human health. Moreover, their consumption could provide in an important contribution to the daily dietary intake of Cu for the Tunisian population, especially regarding the consumption of octopus and cuttlefish muscles. PMID:25427969

  3. Osmotic/ionic status of body fluids in the euryhaline cephalopod suggest possible parallel evolution of osmoregulation.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Tatsuya; Ogawa, Satoshi; Nishiyama, Yudai; Akada, Chiaki; Takahashi, Hideya; Watanabe, Taro; Minakata, Hiroyuki; Sakamoto, Hirotaka

    2015-01-01

    Acclimation from marine to dilute environments constitutes among the dramatic evolutionary transitions in the history of life. Such adaptations have evolved in multiple lineages, but studies of the blood/hemolymph homeostasis mechanisms are limited to those using evolutionarily advanced Deuterostome (chordates) and Ecdysozoa (crustaceans). Here, we examined hemolymph homeostasis in the advanced Lophotrochozoa/mollusc, the other unexplored taxa, and its possible regulation by the vasopressin/oxytocin superfamily peptides known to be implicated in fluid homeostasis in Chordata and Arthropoda. The hemolymph osmotic and ionic status in the euryhaline cephalopod (Octopus ocellatus) following transfer from 30-ppt normal seawater to 20 ppt salinity indicate hyperosmo- and hyperionoregulatory abilities for more than 1 week, as in crustaceans and teleost fish. While ventilation frequency decreased by 1 day, Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity, which has been generally implicated in ion transport, was induced in two of the eight posterior gills after 1 week. In addition, the octopuses were intravenously injected with 1 or 100 ng/g octopressin or cephalotocin, which are Octopus vasopressin/oxytocin orthologs. After 1 day, octopressin, but not cephalotocin, decreased the hemolymph osmolality and Ca concentrations, as well as urinary Na concentrations. These data provide evidence for possible parallel evolution in hyperionoregulatory mechanisms and coordination by conserved peptides. PMID:26403952

  4. Polymer brushes in explicit poor solvents studied using a new variant of the bond fluctuation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jentzsch, Christoph; Sommer, Jens-Uwe

    2014-09-01

    Using a variant of the Bond Fluctuation Model which improves its parallel efficiency in particular running on graphic cards we perform large scale simulations of polymer brushes in poor explicit solvent. Grafting density, solvent quality, and chain length are varied. Different morphological structures in particular octopus micelles are observed for low grafting densities. We reconsider the theoretical model for octopus micelles proposed by Williams using scaling arguments with the relevant scaling variable being σ/σc, and with the characteristic grafting density given by σc ˜ N-4/3. We find that octopus micelles only grow laterally, but not in height and we propose an extension of the model by assuming a cylindrical shape instead of a spherical geometry for the micelle-core. We show that the scaling variable σ/σc can be applied to master plots for the averaged height of the brush, the size of the micelles, and the number of chains per micelle. The exponents in the corresponding power law relations for the grafting density and chain length are in agreement with the model for flat cylindrical micelles. We also investigate the surface roughness and find that polymer brushes in explicit poor solvent at grafting densities higher than the stretching transition are flat and surface rippling can only be observed close to the stretching transition.

  5. Polymer brushes in explicit poor solvents studied using a new variant of the bond fluctuation model.

    PubMed

    Jentzsch, Christoph; Sommer, Jens-Uwe

    2014-09-14

    Using a variant of the Bond Fluctuation Model which improves its parallel efficiency in particular running on graphic cards we perform large scale simulations of polymer brushes in poor explicit solvent. Grafting density, solvent quality, and chain length are varied. Different morphological structures in particular octopus micelles are observed for low grafting densities. We reconsider the theoretical model for octopus micelles proposed by Williams using scaling arguments with the relevant scaling variable being σ/σ(c), and with the characteristic grafting density given by σ(c) ~ N(-4/3). We find that octopus micelles only grow laterally, but not in height and we propose an extension of the model by assuming a cylindrical shape instead of a spherical geometry for the micelle-core. We show that the scaling variable σ/σ(c) can be applied to master plots for the averaged height of the brush, the size of the micelles, and the number of chains per micelle. The exponents in the corresponding power law relations for the grafting density and chain length are in agreement with the model for flat cylindrical micelles. We also investigate the surface roughness and find that polymer brushes in explicit poor solvent at grafting densities higher than the stretching transition are flat and surface rippling can only be observed close to the stretching transition. PMID:25217952

  6. Oct-GnRH, the first protostomian gonadotropin-releasing hormone-like peptide and a critical mini-review of the presence of vertebrate sex steroids in molluscs.

    PubMed

    Minakata, Hiroyuki; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi

    2016-02-01

    In protostome and deuterosome invertebrates, neurosecretory cells play major roles in the endocrine system. The optic glands of cephalopods are indicators of sexual maturation. In mature octopuses, optic glands enlarge and secrete a gonadotropic hormone. A peptide with structural features similar to that of vertebrate gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) was isolated from the octopus, Octopus vulgaris, and was named oct-GnRH. The discovery of oct-GnRH has triggered structural determinations and predictions of other mollusc GnRH-like peptides in biochemical and in silico studies. Interestingly, cephalopods studied so far are characterized by a single molecular form of oct-GnRH with a C-terminal -Pro-Gly-NH2 sequence, which is critical for gonadotropin-releasing activity in vertebrates. Other molluscan GnRH-like peptides lack the C-terminal -Pro-Gly-NH2 sequence but have -X-NH2 or -Pro-Gly although all protostome GnRH-like peptides have yet to be sequenced. In marine molluscs, relationships between GnRH-like peptides and sex steroids have been studied to verify the hypothesis that molluscs have vertebrate-type sex steroid system. However, it is currently questionable whether such sex steroids are present and whether they play endogenous roles in the reproductive system of molluscs. Because molluscs uptake and store steroids from the environment and fishes release sex steroids into the external environment, it is impossible to rule out the contamination of vertebrate sex steroids in molluscs. The function of key enzymes of steroidogenesis within molluscs remains unclear. Thus, evidence to deny the existence of the vertebrate-type sex steroid system in molluscs has been accumulated. The elucidation of substances, which regulate the maturation and maintenance of gonads and other reproductive functions in molluscs will require rigorous and progressive scientific study. PMID:26319132

  7. Heavy metals in fish from the Aleutians: interspecific and locational differences.

    PubMed

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Jeitner, Christian; Pittfield, Taryn; Donio, Mark

    2014-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine levels of arsenic, cadmium, lead, mercury and selenium in edible tissue of seven species of marine fish collected from several Aleutian islands (in 2004) to determine: (1) interspecific differences, (2) locational differences (among Aleutian Islands), (3) size-related differences in any metal levels within a species, and (4) potential risk to the fish or to predators on the fish, including humans. We also compared metals levels to those of three other fish species previously examined in detail, as well as examining metals in the edible tissue of octopus (Octopus dofleini). Octopus did not have the highest levels of any metal. There were significant interspecific differences in all metal levels among the fish species, although the differences were less than an order of magnitude, except for arsenic (mean of 19,500 ppb in Flathead sole, Hippoglossoides elassodon). Significant intraisland variation occurred among the four sites on Amchitka, but there was not a consistent pattern. There were significant interisland differences for some metals and species. Mercury levels increased significantly with size for several species; lead increased significantly for only one fish species; and cadmium and selenium decreased significantly with size for halibut (Hippoglossus stenolepis). The Alaskan Department of Health and Social Services supports unrestricted consumption of most Alaskan fish species for all people, including pregnant women. Most mean metal concentrations were well below the levels known to adversely affect the fish themselves, or predators that consume them (including humans), except for mercury in three fish species (mean levels just below 0.3 ppm), and arsenic in two fish species. However, even at low mercury levels, people who consume fish almost daily will exceed guideline values from the Centers for Disease Control and the Environmental Protection Agency. PMID:24727640

  8. Resonance raman spectroscopy of an ultraviolet-sensitive insect rhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Pande, C.; Deng, H.; Rath, P.; Callender, R.H.; Schwemer, J.

    1987-11-17

    The authors present the first visual pigment resonance Raman spectra from the UV-sensitive eyes of an insect, Ascalaphus macaronius (owlfly). This pigment contains 11-cis-retinal as the chromophore. Raman data have been obtained for the acid metarhodopsin at 10/sup 0/C in both H/sub 2/O and D/sub 2/O. The C=N stretching mode at 1660 cm/sup -1/ in H/sub 2/O shifts to 1631 cm/sup -1/ upon deuteriation of the sample, clearly showing a protonated Schiff base linkage between the chromophore and the protein. The structure-sensitive fingerprint region shows similarities to the all-trans-protonated Schiff base of model retinal chromophores, as well as to the octopus acid metarhodopsin and bovine metarhodopsin I. Although spectra measured at -100/sup 0/C with 406.7-nm excitation, to enhance scattering from rhodopsin (lambda/sub max/ 345 nm), contain a significant contribution from a small amount of contaminants (cytochrome(s) and/or accessory pigment) in the sample, the C=N stretch at 1664 cm/sup -1/ suggests a protonated Schiff base linkage between the chromophore and the protein in rhodopsin as well. For comparison, this mode also appears at approx. 1660 cm/sup -1/ in both the vertebrate (bovine) and the invertebrate (octopus) rhodopsins. These data are particularly interesting since the absorption maximum of 345 nm for rhodopsin might be expected to originate from an unprotonated Schiff base linkage. That the Schiff base linkage in the owlfly rhodopsin, like in bovine and in octopus, is protonated suggests that a charged chromophore is essential to visual transduction.

  9. Structures of two molluscan hemocyanin genes: Significance for gene evolution

    PubMed Central

    Lieb, Bernhard; Altenhein, Benjamin; Markl, Jürgen; Vincent, Alexandra; van Olden, Erin; van Holde, Kensal E.; Miller, Karen I.

    2001-01-01

    We present here the description of genes coding for molluscan hemocyanins. Two distantly related mollusks, Haliotis tuberculata and Octopus dofleini, were studied. The typical architecture of a molluscan hemocyanin subunit, which is a string of seven or eight globular functional units (FUs, designated a to h, about 50 kDa each), is reflected by the gene organization: a series of eight structurally related coding regions in Haliotis, corresponding to FU-a to FU-h, with seven highly variable linker introns of 174 to 3,198 bp length (all in phase 1). In Octopus seven coding regions (FU-a to FU-g) are found, separated by phase 1 introns varying in length from 100 bp to 910 bp. Both genes exhibit typical signal (export) sequences, and in both cases these are interrupted by an additional intron. Each gene also contains an intron between signal peptide and FU-a and in the 3′ untranslated region. Of special relevance for evolutionary considerations are introns interrupting those regions that encode a discrete functional unit. We found that five of the eight FUs in Haliotis each are encoded by a single exon, whereas FU-f, FU-g, and FU-a are encoded by two, three and four exons, respectively. Similarly, in Octopus four of the FUs each correspond to an uninterrupted exon, whereas FU-b, FU-e, and FU-f each contain a single intron. Although the positioning of the introns between FUs is highly conserved in the two mollusks, the introns within FUs show no relationship either in location nor phase. It is proposed that the introns between FUs were generated as the eight-unit polypeptide evolved from a monomeric precursor, and that the internal introns have been added later. A hypothesis for evolution of the ring-like quaternary structure of molluscan hemocyanins is presented. PMID:11287637

  10. Physiological adaptation of an Antarctic Na+/K+-ATPase to the cold.

    PubMed

    Galarza-Muñoz, Gaddiel; Soto-Morales, Sonia I; Holmgren, Miguel; Rosenthal, Joshua J C

    2011-07-01

    Because enzymatic activity is strongly suppressed by the cold, polar poikilotherms face significant adaptive challenges. For example, at 0°C the catalytic activity of a typical enzyme from a temperate organism is reduced by more than 90%. Enzymes embedded in the plasma membrane, such as the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, may be even more susceptible to the cold because of thermal effects on the lipid bilayer. Accordingly, adaptive changes in response to the cold may include adjustments to the enzyme or the surrounding lipid environment, or synergistic changes to both. To assess the contribution of the enzyme itself, we cloned orthologous Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase α-subunits from an Antarctic (Pareledone sp.; -1.8°C) and a temperate octopus (Octopus bimaculatus; ∼18°C), and compared their turnover rates and temperature sensitivities in a heterologous expression system. The primary sequences of the two pumps were found to be highly similar (97% identity), with most differences being conservative changes involving hydrophobic residues. The physiology of the pumps was studied using an electrophysiological approach in intact Xenopus oocytes. The voltage dependence of the pumps was equivalent. However, at room temperature the maximum turnover rate of the Antarctic pump was found to be 25% higher than that of the temperate pump. In addition, the Antarctic pump exhibited a lower temperature sensitivity, leading to significantly higher relative activity at lower temperatures. Orthologous Na(+)/K(+) pumps were then isolated from two tropical and two Arctic octopus. The temperature sensitivities of these pumps closely matched those of the temperate and Antarctic pumps, respectively. Thus, reduced thermal sensitivity appears to be a common mechanism driving cold adaptation in the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. PMID:21653810