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Sample records for octupole traps structural

  1. Crystallization of ion clouds in octupole traps: Structural transitions, core melting, and scaling laws

    SciTech Connect

    Calvo, F.; Champenois, C.; Yurtsever, E.

    2009-12-15

    The stable structures and melting properties of ion clouds in isotropic octupole traps are investigated using a combination of semianalytical and numerical models, with a particular emphasis at finite-size scaling effects. Small-size clouds are found to be hollow and arranged in shells corresponding approximately to the solutions of the Thomson problem. The shell structure is lost in clusters containing more than a few thousands of ions, the inner parts of the cloud becoming soft and amorphous. While melting is triggered in the core shells, the melting temperature follows the rule expected for three-dimensional dense particles, with a depression scaling linearly with the inverse radius.

  2. Structure and dynamics of ion clusters in linear octupole traps: Phase diagrams, chirality, and melting mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Yurtsever, E.; Onal, E. D.; Calvo, F.

    2011-05-15

    The stable structures and melting dynamics of clusters of identical ions bound by linear octupole radiofrequency traps are theoretically investigated by global optimization methods and molecular dynamics simulations. By varying the cluster sizes in the range of 10-1000 ions and the extent of trap anisotropy by more than one order of magnitude, we find a broad variety of stable structures based on multiple rings at small sizes evolving into tubular geometries at large sizes. The binding energy of these clusters is well represented by two contributions arising from isotropic linear and octupolar traps. The structures generally exhibit strong size effects, and chiral arrangements spontaneously emerge in many crystals. Sufficiently large clusters form nested, coaxial tubes with different thermal stabilities. As in isotropic octupolar clusters, the inner tubes melt at temperatures that are lower than the overall melting point.

  3. Periodic orbits and shell structure in octupole deformed potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Heiss, W.D. ); Nazmitdinov, R.G. ); Radu, S. )

    1995-01-15

    The effect of an octupole term in a quadrupole deformed single-particle potential is studied from the classical and quantum-mechanical viewpoint. Whereas the problem is nonintegrable, the quantum-mechanical spectrum nevertheless shows some shell structure in the superdeformed prolate case for particular, yet fairly large octupole strengths; for spherical or oblate deformation the shell structure disappears. This result is associated with classical periodic orbits that are found by employing the removal of resonances method; this approximation method allows determination of the shape of the orbit and of the approximate octupole coupling strength for which it occurs. The validity of the method is confirmed by solving numerically the classical equations of motion. The quantum-mechanical shell structure is analyzed using the particle-number dependence of the fluctuating part of the total energy. In accordance with the classical result, this dependence turns out to be very similar for a superdeformed prolate potential plus octupole term and a hyperdeformed prolate potential without octupole term. In this way the shell structure is explained at least for some few hundred levels. The Fourier transform of the level density further corroborates these findings.

  4. Measuring the Nuclear Magnetic Octupole Moment of a Single Trapped Barium-137 Ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleczewski, Adam; Fortson, Norval; Blinov, Boris

    2009-05-01

    Recent measurements of hyperfine structure in the cesium-133 atom resolved a nuclear magnetic octupole moment φ much larger than expected from the nuclear shell model[1]. To explore this issue further, we are undertaking an experiment to measure the hyperfine structure in the 5D manifold of a single trapped barium-137 ion which, together with reliable calculations in alkali-like Ba^+, should resolve φ with sensitivity better than the shell model value [2]. We use a TmHo:YLF laser tuned to 2051 nm and a fiber laser tuned to 1762 nm to drive the 6S1/2 to 5D3/2 and 6S1/2 to 5D5/2 electric quadrupole transitions. These lasers allow us to selectively populate any hyperfine sub-level in the 5D manifold. We will then perform RF spectroscopy on the 5D states to make a precision measurement of the hyperfine frequency intervals. We report on the development of the laser and RF spectroscopy systems. [1] V. Gerginov, A. Derevianko, and C. E. Tanner, Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 072501 [2] K. Beloy, A. Derevianko, V. A. Dzuba, G. T. Howell, B. B. Blinov, E. N. Fortson, arXiv:0804.4317v1 [physics.atom-ph] 28 Apr 2008

  5. Construction and Operational Experience with a Superconducting Octupole Used to Trap Antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Wanderer P.; Escallier, J.; Marone, A.; Parker, B.

    2011-09-06

    A superconducting octupole magnet has seen extensive service as part of the ALPHA experiment at CERN. ALPHA has trapped antihydrogen, a crucial step towards performing precision measurements of anti-atoms. The octupole was made at the Direct Wind facility by the Superconducting Magnet Division at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The magnet was wound with a six-around-one NbTi cable about 1 mm in diameter. It is about 300 mm long, with a radius of 25 mm and a peak field at the conductor of 4.04 T. Specific features of the magnet, including a minimal amount of material in the coil and coil ends with low multipole content, were advantageous to its use in ALPHA. The magnet was operated for six months a year for five years. During this time it underwent about 900 thermal cycles (between 4K and 100K). A novel operational feature is that during the course of data-taking the magnet was repeatedly shut off from its 950 A operating current. The magnet quenches during the shutoff, with a decay constant of 9 ms. Over the course of the five years, the magnet was deliberately quenched many thousands of times. It still performs well.

  6. Structural traps 5

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, N.H.; Beaumont, E.A.

    1991-01-01

    This book contains studies of oil and gas fields that are mainly structural in nature. Stratigraphy controls the extend of the reservoir in the traps of several fields, but overall, the main trapping features within the group of fields in this volume are structural. Fields covered in this volume include: Endicott Field, Point Arguello Field, West Puerto Chiquito Field, Dukhan Field, Sendji Field, Ruston Field, Raudhatain Field, Hassi Messaoud Field, Snapper Field, Tirrawarra Field, and Sacha Field.

  7. Octupole correlations in the heavy elements

    SciTech Connect

    Chasman, R.R.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of octupole correlations on the nuclear structure of the heavy elements are discussed. The cluster model description of the heavy elements is analyzed. The relevance of 2/sup 6/-pole deformation and fast El transitions to an octupole model is considered. 30 refs., 21 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Modified octupoles for damping coherent instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Cornacchia, M. . Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab.); Corbett, W.J. ); Halbach, K. )

    1991-05-01

    The introduction tune spread in circular e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} accelerators with modified octupoles to reduce the loss of dynamic aperture is discussed. The new magnet design features an octupole of field component on-axis and a tapered field structure off-axis to minimize loss of dynamic aperture. Tracking studies show that the modified octupoles can produce the desired tune spread in SPEAR without compromising confinement of the beam. The technique for designing such magnets is presented, together with an example of magnets that give the required field distribution. 7 refs., 7 figs.

  9. Octupole collectivity in nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, P. A.

    2016-07-01

    The experimental and theoretical evidence for octupole collectivity in nuclei is reviewed. Recent theoretical advances, covering a wide spectrum from mean-field theory to algebraic and cluster approaches, are discussed. The status of experimental data on the behaviour of energy levels and electric dipole and electric octupole transition moments is reviewed. Finally, an outlook is given on future prospects for this field.

  10. Octupole shapes in heavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.

    1994-08-01

    Theoretical calculations and measurements show the presence of strong octupole correlations in thecyround states and low-lying states of odd-mass and odd-odd nuclei in the RaPa region. Evidence for octupole correlations is provided by the observation of parity doublets and reductions in M1 matrix elements, decoupling parameters, and Coriolis matrix elements Involving high-j states. Enhancement of E1 transition rates has also been observed for some of the octupole deformed nuclei. The most convincing argument for octupole deformation is provided by the similarities of the reduced alpha decay rates to the two members of parity doublets.

  11. Octupole correlation effects in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Chasman, R.R.

    1992-08-01

    Octupole correlation effects in nuclei are discussed from the point of view of many-body wavefunctions as well as mean-field methods. The light actinides, where octupole effects are largest, are considered in detail. Comparisons of theory and experiment are made for energy splittings of parity doublets; E1 transition matrix elements and one-nucleon transfer reactions.

  12. Octupole correlation effects in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Chasman, R.R.

    1992-01-01

    Octupole correlation effects in nuclei are discussed from the point of view of many-body wavefunctions as well as mean-field methods. The light actinides, where octupole effects are largest, are considered in detail. Comparisons of theory and experiment are made for energy splittings of parity doublets; E1 transition matrix elements and one-nucleon transfer reactions.

  13. High-precision Penning-trap mass measurements of heavy xenon isotopes for nuclear structure studies

    SciTech Connect

    Neidherr, D.; Cakirli, R. B.; Audi, G.; Lunney, D.; Minaya-Ramirez, E.; Naimi, S.; Beck, D.; Herfurth, F.; Blaum, K.; Boehm, Ch.; George, S.; Breitenfeldt, M.; Rosenbusch, M.; Schweikhard, L.; Casten, R. F.; Herlert, A.; Kowalska, M.; Kellerbauer, A.; Schwarz, S.

    2009-10-15

    With the double Penning-trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP at ISOLDE/CERN the masses of the neutron-rich isotopes {sup 136-146}Xe were measured with a relative uncertainty of the order of 10{sup -8} to 10{sup -7}. In particular, the masses of {sup 144-146}Xe were measured for the first time. These new mass values allow one to extend calculations of the mass surface in this region. Proton-Neutron interaction strength, obtained from double differences of binding energies, relate to subtle structural effects, such as the onset of octupole correlations, the growth of collectivity, and its relation to the underlying shell model levels. In addition, they provide a test of density functional calculations.

  14. Supershell structure in trapped dilute Fermi gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Y.; Ögren, M.; Åberg, S.; Reimann, S. M.; Brack, M.

    2005-11-01

    We show that a dilute harmonically trapped two-component gas of fermionic atoms with a weak repulsive interaction has a pronounced super-shell structure: The shell fillings due to the spherical harmonic trapping potential are modulated by a beat mode. This changes the “magic numbers” occurring between the beat nodes by half a period. The length and amplitude of this beating mode depend on the strength of the interaction. We give a simple interpretation of the beat structure in terms of a semiclassical trace formula for the symmetry breaking U(3)→SO(3) .

  15. Supershell structure in trapped dilute Fermi gases

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Y.; Oegren, M.; Aaberg, S.; Reimann, S. M.; Brack, M.

    2005-11-15

    We show that a dilute harmonically trapped two-component gas of fermionic atoms with a weak repulsive interaction has a pronounced super-shell structure: The shell fillings due to the spherical harmonic trapping potential are modulated by a beat mode. This changes the ''magic numbers'' occurring between the beat nodes by half a period. The length and amplitude of this beating mode depend on the strength of the interaction. We give a simple interpretation of the beat structure in terms of a semiclassical trace formula for the symmetry breaking U(3){yields}SO(3)

  16. Enhanced optical trapping via structured scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Michael A.; Waleed, Muhammad; Stilgoe, Alexander B.; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina; Bowen, Warwick P.

    2015-10-01

    Interferometry can completely redirect light, providing the potential for strong and controllable optical forces. However, small particles do not naturally act like interferometric beamsplitters and the optical scattering from them is not generally thought to allow efficient interference. Instead, optical trapping is typically achieved via deflection of the incident field. Here, we show that a suitably structured incident field can achieve beamsplitter-like interactions with scattering particles. The resulting trap offers order-of-magnitude higher stiffness than the usual Gaussian trap in one axis, even when constrained to phase-only structuring. We demonstrate trapping of 3.5-10.0 μm silica spheres, achieving a stiffness up to 27.5 ± 4.1 times higher than was possible using Gaussian traps as well as a two-orders-of-magnitude higher measured signal-to-noise ratio. These results are highly relevant to many applications, including cellular manipulation, fluid dynamics, micro-robotics and tests of fundamental physics.

  17. Observation of the Nuclear Magnetic Octupole Moment of 137Ba+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Matthew

    Single trapped ions are ideal systems in which to test atomic physics at high precision, which can in turn be used for searches for violations of fundamental symmetries and physics beyond the standard model, in addition to quantum computation and a number of other applications. The ion is confined in ultra-high vacuum, is laser cooled to mK temperatures, and kept well isolated from the environment which allows these experimental efforts. In this thesis, a few diagnostic techniques will be discussed, covering a method to measure the linewidth of a narrowband laser in the presence of magnetic field noise, as well as a procedure to measure the ion's temperature using such a narrowband laser. This work has led to two precision experiments to measure atomic structure in 138Ba+, and 137Ba+ discussed here. First, employing laser and radio frequency spectroscopy techniques in 138Ba+, we measured the Lande- gJ factor of the 5D5/2 level at the part-per-million level, the highest precision to date. Later, the development of apparatus to efficiently trap and laser cool 137Ba+ has enabled a measurement of the hyperfine splittings of the 5D3/2 manifold, culminating in the observation of the nuclear magnetic octupole moment of 137Ba+.

  18. Proposed s =±1 octupole bands in 140Xe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y.; Zhu, S. J.; Hamilton, J. H.; Wang, E. H.; Ramayya, A. V.; Xiao, Z. G.; Li, H. J.; Luo, Y. X.; Rasmussen, J. O.; Ter-Akopian, G. M.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.

    2016-06-01

    Level structures of neutron-rich 140Xe nucleus have been reinvestigated by using a triple γ coincidence study from the spontaneous fission of 252Cf. Several new levels and transitions are identified. The previously observed s =+1 octupole band structure is confirmed and expanded. Another set of the Δ I =2 positive and negative parity bands connected by strong E 1 transitions is proposed as the s =-1 octupole band structure. Thus, the s =±1 doublet octupole bands are completed in 140Xe. The experimental B (E 1 )/B (E 2 ) branching ratios indicate that the octupole correlations in 140Xe are weak. The other characteristics of the s =±1 octupole bands have been discussed.

  19. Trapping and reaction on inhomogeneous structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassi, Davide

    2011-05-01

    We consider the problem of two chemical species, A and B, undergoing an annihilation process A + B → B, on generic discrete inhomogeneous structures, such as disordered solids, glasses, fractals, polymer networks and gels. Two particular cases are analysed: in the fist one A is immobile and B is diffusing (target decay process); in the second one A is diffusing and B is immobile (trapping process). The survival probability of A is analytically calculated in the limit of large times, showing that, while for the target decay it is related to the spectral dimension ? of the structure, for the trapping problem it depends, in general, on a different anomalous dimension, which we call the exploration dimension.

  20. Octupole correlations in the 144Ba nucleus described with symmetry-conserving configuration-mixing calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Rémi N.; Robledo, Luis M.; Rodríguez, Tomás R.

    2016-06-01

    We study the interplay of quadrupole and octupole degrees of freedom in the structure of the isotope 144Ba. A symmetry-conserving configuration-mixing method (SCCM) based on a Gogny energy density functional (EDF) has been used. The method includes particle number, parity, and angular momentum restoration as well as axial quadrupole and octupole shape mixing within the generator coordinate method. Predictions both for excitation energies and electromagnetic transition probabilities are in good agreement with the most recent experimental data.

  1. Octupole Deformation and Signature Inversion in 145Ba

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Sheng-jiang; Sakhaee, M.; Hamilton H., J.; Ramayya V., A.; Gan, Cui-yun; Zhu, Ling-yan; Yang, Li-ming; Long, Gui-lu; Pau, San-li; Babu R. S., B.; Hwang K., J.; Ma C., W.; Komicki, J.; Zhang Q., X.; Jones F., E.; Cole D., J.; Aryaeinejad, R.; Drigert W., M.; Rasmussen O., J.; Stoyer A., M.; Chu Y., S.; Gregorich E., K.; Mohar F., M.; Prussin G., S.; Lee Y., I.; Yu., Oganessian Ts.; Ter-Akopian M., G.; Daniel V., A.

    1999-10-01

    High spin states in neutron-rich odd-N 145Ba nucleus have been investigated from study of prompt γ-rays in spontaneous fission of 252Cf. The alternating parity bands are identified indicating octupole deformation with simplex quantum number s = -i. The ground state band shows signature splitting and inversion at low spin. These collective band structures exhibit the competition and co-existence between symmetric and asymmetric shapes.

  2. Octupole correlations in low-lying states of 150Nd and 150Sm and their impact on neutrinoless double-β decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, J. M.; Engel, J.

    2016-07-01

    We present a generator-coordinate calculation, based on a relativistic energy-density functional, of the low-lying spectra in the isotopes 150Nd and 150Sm and of the nuclear matrix element that governs the neutrinoless double-β decay of the first isotope to the second. We carefully examine the impact of octupole correlations on both nuclear structure and the double-β decay matrix element. Octupole correlations turn out to reduce quadrupole collectivity in both nuclei. Shape fluctuations, however, dilute the effects of octupole deformation on the double-β decay matrix element, so that the overall octupole-induced quenching is only about 7 % .

  3. Octupole collectivity in 94Zr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toh, Y.; Oshima, M.; Koizumi, M.; Osa, A.; Kimura, A.; Sugawara, M.; Goto, J.

    2009-01-01

    The Zr isotopes between 90Zr and 96Zr are expected to be spherical based on the almost complete subshell closures at Z = 40 and N = 50, 56. On the other hand, they have low-lying 3- states and show the characteristics of low frequency octupole oscillation which arise as a superposition of particle-hole excitations. A 380 MeV 94Zr beam from the tandem accelerator at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) was excited on a self-supporting natPb target. The gamma-ray detector array GEMINI-II was used to detect deexcitation gamma rays. The scattered beam (94Zr) was detected with a position-sensitive particle detector system. The gamma-ray intensities were used as an input to the least-squares search code GOSIA to determine the E3 matrix element of the first 3- excited state of 94Zr. The B(E3;0+→3-) value of 0.21(6) e2b3 in 94Zr has been obtained by Coulomb excitation experiment.

  4. Trapping of branched DNA in microfabricated structures.

    PubMed Central

    Volkmuth, W D; Duke, T; Austin, R H; Cox, E C

    1995-01-01

    We have observed electrostatic trapping of tribranched DNA molecules undergoing electrophoresis in a microfabricated pseudo-two-dimensional array of posts. Trapping occurs in a unique transport regimen in which the electrophoretic mobility is extremely sensitive to polymer topology. The arrest of branched polymers is explained by considering their center-of-mass motion; in certain conformations, owing to the constraints imposed by the obstacles a molecule cannot advance without the center of mass first moving a short distance backwards. The depth of the resulting local potential well can be much greater than the thermal energy so that escape of an immobilized molecule can be extremely slow. We summarize the expected behavior of the mobility as a function of field strength and topology and point out that the microfabricated arrays are highly suitable for detecting an extremely small number of branched molecules in a very large population of linear molecules. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7624337

  5. Octupole Deformation Bands of πh11/2 in Neutron-Rich 145,147La Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Sheng-jiang; S, Zhu J.; Wang, Mu-ge; J, Hamilton H.; A, Ramayya V.; B, Babu R. S.; W, Ma C.; Long, Gui-lu; Zhu, Ling-yan; Li, Ming; A, Sakhaee; Gan, Cui-yun; Yang, Li-ming; J, Komicki; J, Cole D.; R, Aryaeinejad; M, Drigert W.; J, Rasmussen O.; M, Stoyer A.; S, Chu Y.; K, Gregorich E.; M, Mohar F.; S, Prussin G.; I, Lee Y.; Yu, Oganessian Ts; G, Ter-Akopian M.; A, Daniel V.

    1999-03-01

    Octupole deformation bands built on πh11/2 orbital in neutron-rich odd-Z 145,147La nuclei have been investigated by measuring the prompt γ-rays emitted from the 252Cf source. The alternating parity band structures and strong E1 transitions observed between negative- and positive-parity bands in both nuclei indicate the octupole deformation enhanced by the h11/2 single proton coupling. According to observed energy displacements the octupole deformation becomes stable at the intermediate spin states.

  6. Search for octupole correlations in 147Nd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruchowska, E.; Mach, H.; Kowal, M.; Skalski, J.; Płóciennik, W. A.; Fogelberg, B.

    2015-09-01

    Properties of excited states in 147Nd have been studied with the multispectra and γ γ coincidence measurements. Twenty-four new γ lines and three new levels have been introduced into the level scheme of 147Nd. Using the advanced time-delayed β γ γ (t ) method, we measured lifetimes of eight excited levels in 147Nd, populated via the β decay of 147Pr. We have determined reduced transition probabilities for 30 γ transitions. Multidimensional potential energy surface calculations performed for 147Nd suggest two single-quasiparticle configurations with nonzero octupole deformation, with K =1 /2 and K =5 /2 . Our calculations also predict a sizable value of the electric dipole moment | D0|=0.26 e fm for this nucleus, while experimentally, a lower limit of | D0|≥0.02 e fm has been evaluated for the supposed K =1 /2 parity doublet. In contrast to the theoretical results, we do not observe the parity doublet bands with K =5 /2 . This, and the lack of theoretically expected E 1 strength in Nd,149147 may signal some poorly understood structural effect in the odd-N lanthanides.

  7. Nonaxial-octupole effect in superheavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.-S.; Sun, Yang; Gao Zaochun

    2008-06-15

    The triaxial-octupole Y{sub 32} correlation in atomic nuclei has long been expected to exist but experimental evidence has not been clear. We find, in order to explain the very low-lying 2{sup -} bands in the transfermium mass region, that this exotic effect may manifest itself in superheavy elements. Favorable conditions for producing triaxial-octupole correlations are shown to be present in the deformed single-particle spectrum, which is further supported by quantitative Reflection Asymmetric Shell Model calculations. It is predicted that the strong nonaxial-octupole effect may persist up to the element 108. Our result thus represents the first concrete example of spontaneous breaking of both axial and reflection symmetries in the heaviest nuclear systems.

  8. A novel antiproton radial diagnostic based on octupole induced ballistic loss

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, G. B.; Bowe, P. D.; Hangst, J. S.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Charlton, M.; Humphries, A. J.; Jenkins, M. J.; Joergensen, L. V.; Madsen, N.; Werf, D. P. van der; Bray, C. C.; Chapman, S.; Fajans, J.; Povilus, A.; Wurtele, J. S.; Cesar, C. L.; Lambo, R.; Silveira, D. M.; Fujiwara, M. C.

    2008-03-15

    We report results from a novel diagnostic that probes the outer radial profile of trapped antiproton clouds. The diagnostic allows us to determine the profile by monitoring the time history of antiproton losses that occur as an octupole field in the antiproton confinement region is increased. We show several examples of how this diagnostic helps us to understand the radial dynamics of antiprotons in normal and nested Penning-Malmberg traps. Better understanding of these dynamics may aid current attempts to trap antihydrogen atoms.

  9. Crystal structure of unliganded TRAP: implications for dynamic allostery.

    PubMed

    Malay, Ali D; Watanabe, Masahiro; Heddle, Jonathan G; Tame, Jeremy R H

    2011-03-15

    Allostery is vital to the function of many proteins. In some cases, rather than a direct steric effect, mutual modulation of ligand binding at spatially separated sites may be achieved through a change in protein dynamics. Thus changes in vibrational modes of the protein, rather than conformational changes, allow different ligand sites to communicate. Evidence for such an effect has been found in TRAP (trp RNA-binding attenuation protein), a regulatory protein found in species of Bacillus. TRAP is part of a feedback system to modulate expression of the trp operon, which carries genes involved in tryptophan synthesis. Negative feedback is thought to depend on binding of tryptophan-bound, but not unbound, TRAP to a specific mRNA leader sequence. We find that, contrary to expectations, at low temperatures TRAP is able to bind RNA in the absence of tryptophan, and that this effect is particularly strong in the case of Bacillus stearothermophilus TRAP. We have solved the crystal structure of this protein with no tryptophan bound, and find that much of the structure shows little deviation from the tryptophan-bound form. These data support the idea that tryptophan may exert its effect on RNA binding by TRAP through dynamic and not structural changes, and that tryptophan binding may be mimicked by low temperature. PMID:21175426

  10. Collective states of odd nuclei in a model with quadrupole-octupole degrees of freedom

    SciTech Connect

    Minkov, N. Drenska, S. B.; Yotov, P.; Bonatsos, D. Scheid, W.

    2007-08-15

    We apply the collective axial quadrupole-octupole Hamiltonian to describe the rotation-vibration motion of odd nuclei with Coriolis coupling between the even-even core and the unpaired nucleon.We consider that the core oscillates coherently with respect to the quadrupole and octupole axialdeformation variables. The coupling between the core and the unpaired nucleon provides a split paritydoublet structure of the spectrum. The formalism successfully reproduces the parity-doublet splitting in a wide range of odd-A nuclei. It provides model estimations for the third angular-momentum projection K on the intrinsic symmetry axis and the related intrinsic nuclear structure.

  11. Enhanced light trapping in periodically truncated cone silicon nanowire structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kai, Qiu; Yuhua, Zuo; Tianwei, Zhou; Zhi, Liu; Jun, Zheng; Chuanbo, Li; Buwen, Cheng

    2015-10-01

    Light trapping plays an important role in improving the conversion efficiency of thin-film solar cells. The good wideband light trapping is achieved using our periodically truncated cone Si nanowire (NW) structures, and their inherent mechanism is analyzed and simulated by FDTD solution software. Ordered cylinder Si NW structure with initial size of 80 nm and length of 200 nm is grown by pattern transfer and selective epitaxial growth. Truncated cone Si NW array is then obtained by thermal oxidation treatment. Its mean reflection in the range of 300-900 nm is lowered to be 5% using 140 nm long truncated cone Si NW structure, compared with that of 20% using cylinder counterparts. It indicates that periodically truncated Si cone structures trap the light efficiently to enhance the light harvesting in a wide spectral range and have the potential application in highly efficient NW solar cells. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51072194, 61021003, 61036001, 61376057).

  12. First Attempts at Antihydrogen Trapping in ALPHA

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, G. B.; Bowe, P. D.; Hangst, J. S.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Charlton, M.; Humphries, A. J.; Jenkins, M. J.; Joergensen, L. V.; Madsen, N.; Werf, D. P. van der; Bray, C. C.; Chapman, S.; Fajans, J.; Povilus, A.; Wurtele, J. S.; Cesar, C. L.; Lambo, R.; Silveira, D. M.; Fujiwara, M. C.

    2008-08-08

    The ALPHA apparatus is designed to produce and trap antihydrogen atoms. The device comprises a multifunction Penning trap and a superconducting, neutral atom trap having a minimum-B configuration. The atom trap features an octupole magnet for transverse confinement and solenoidal mirror coils for longitudinal confinement. The magnetic trap employs a fast shutdown system to maximize the probability of detecting the annihilation of released antihydrogen. In this article we describe the first attempts to observe antihydrogen trapping.

  13. Hitting and trapping times on branched structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agliari, Elena; Sartori, Fabio; Cattivelli, Luca; Cassi, Davide

    2015-05-01

    In this work we consider a simple random walk embedded in a generic branched structure and we find a close-form formula to calculate the hitting time H (i ,f ) between two arbitrary nodes i and j . We then use this formula to obtain the set of hitting times {H (i,f)} for combs and their expectation values, namely, the mean first-passage time, where the average is performed over the initial node while the final node f is given, and the global mean first-passage time, where the average is performed over both the initial and the final node. Finally, we discuss applications in the context of reaction-diffusion problems.

  14. Hitting and trapping times on branched structures.

    PubMed

    Agliari, Elena; Sartori, Fabio; Cattivelli, Luca; Cassi, Davide

    2015-05-01

    In this work we consider a simple random walk embedded in a generic branched structure and we find a close-form formula to calculate the hitting time H(i,f) between two arbitrary nodes i and j. We then use this formula to obtain the set of hitting times {H(i,f)} for combs and their expectation values, namely, the mean first-passage time, where the average is performed over the initial node while the final node f is given, and the global mean first-passage time, where the average is performed over both the initial and the final node. Finally, we discuss applications in the context of reaction-diffusion problems. PMID:26066144

  15. Experiments on Structure and Trapping of Coulomb balls

    SciTech Connect

    Block, D.; Arp, O.; Piel, A.; Melzer, A.

    2006-10-18

    This paper gives a survey of recent experiments on Coulomb balls. Starting with typical observations to introduce the Coulomb ball experiment and its diagnostic potential, their structural properties are discussed. Further, the trapping mechanism for the dust is quantified to allow for a systematic comparison of experiment and simulations. Finally, the presented results focus on the question how screening influences the structural properties and how Coulomb balls and other strongly coupled systems are related.

  16. Evolution of octupole correlations in 123Ba

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X. C.; Zhao, J.; Xu, C.; Hua, H.; Shneidman, T. M.; Zhou, S. G.; Wu, X. G.; Li, X. Q.; Zhang, S. Q.; Li, Z. H.; Liang, W. Y.; Meng, J.; Xu, F. R.; Qi, B.; Ye, Y. L.; Jiang, D. X.; Cheng, Y. Y.; He, C.; Sun, J. J.; Han, R.; Niu, C. Y.; Li, C. G.; Li, P. J.; Wang, C. G.; Wu, H. Y.; Li, Z. H.; Zhou, H.; Hu, S. P.; Zhang, H. Q.; Li, G. S.; He, C. Y.; Zheng, Y.; Li, C. B.; Li, H. W.; Wu, Y. H.; Luo, P. W.; Zhong, J.

    2016-08-01

    High-spin states of 123Ba have been studied via the 108Cd(19F,3 n p )123Ba fusion-evaporation reaction at a beam energy of 90 MeV. Several E 1 transitions linking the positive-parity ν (d5 /2+g7 /2) band and negative-parity ν h11 /2 band are observed in 123Ba for the first time. Evidence for the existence of octupole correlations in 123Ba is presented based on the systematic comparisons of the B (E 1 )/B (E 2 ) branching ratios and the energy displacements in odd-A Ba isotopes. The characteristics of octupole correlation in the odd-A Ba,125123 are explained by the state-of-the-art multidimensionally-constrained relativistic mean-field model and cluster model based on the dinuclear system concept.

  17. Structural ordering of trapped colloids with competing interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa Campos, L. Q.; Apolinario, S. W. S.; Löwen, H.

    2013-10-01

    The structure of colloids with competing interactions which are confined in a harmonic external trap potential is analyzed numerically by energy minimization in two spatial dimensions. A wealth of different cluster structures is found to be stable including clusters with a fringed outer rim (reminiscent to an ornamental border), clusters perforated with voids, as well as clusters with a crystalline core and a disordered rim. All cluster structures occur in a two-dimensional parameter space. The structural ordering can therefore be efficiently tuned by changing few parameters only providing access to a controlled fabrication of colloidal clusters.

  18. Precision Penning Trap Mass Measurements for Nuclear Structure at Triumf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiatkowski, A. A.; Dilling, J.; Andreoiu, C.; Brunner, T.; Chaudhuri, A.; Chowdhury, U.; Delheij, P.; Ettenauer, S.; Frekers, D.; Gallant, A. T.; Grossheim, A.; Gwinner, G.; Lennarz, A.; Mané, E.; Pearson, M. R.; Schultz, B. E.; Simon, M. C.; Simon, V. V.

    2013-03-01

    Precision determinations of ground state or even isomeric state masses reveal fingerprints of nuclear structure. In particular at the limits at existence for very neutron-rich or deficient isotopes, this allows one to find detailed information about nuclear structure from separation energies or binding energies. This is important to test theoretical predictions or to refine model approaches, for example for new "magic numbers," as predicted around N = 34, where strong indications exist that the inclusion of NNN forces in theoretical calculations for Ca isotopes leads to significantly better predictions for ground state binding energies. Similarly, halo nuclei present an excellent application for ab-initio theory, where ground state properties, like masses and radii, present prime parameters for testing our understanding of nuclear structure. Precision mass determinations at TRIUMF are carried out with the TITAN (TRIUMF's Ion Trap for Atomic and Nuclear science) system. It is an ion trap setup coupled to the on-line facility ISAC. TITAN has measured masses of isotopes as short-lived as 9 ms (almost an order of magnitude shorter-lived than any other Penning trap system) and the only one with charge breeding capabilities, a feature that allows us to boost the precision by almost 2 orders of magnitude. We recently were able to make use of this feature by measuring short-lived Rb-isotopes, up to 74Rb, and reaching the 12+ charge state, which together with other improvements lead to an increase in precision by a factor 36.

  19. Trapped-mode resonances in asymmetric terahertz subwavelength structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Zhou, Qingli; Shi, Yulei; Li, Chenyu; Zhang, Cunlin

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate that the trapped-mode resonance with Fano-shaped spectrum can be induced in terahertz metamaterial with asymmetric double-bar structure. Spacing between two bars permits the tuning of resonant position and lineshape in a controlled manner, showing an anomalous increased coupling strength with spacing. The steep phase change around transparency region indicates slow-light effect proved by the retrieved group delays. Simulated results verify the coupling that exists between the bars of the same unit cell and those of the neighbouring cells. Our simplified structure offers the potential application in terahertz modulators and slow-light devices.

  20. Anharmonicity of the excited octupole band in actinides using supersymmetric quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolos, R. V.; von Brentano, P.; Casten, R. F.

    2013-09-01

    Background: Low-lying octupole collective excitations play an important role in the description of the structure of nuclei in the actinide region. Ground state alternating parity rotational bands combining both positive and negative parity states are known in several nuclei. However, only recently it has been discovered in 240Pu an excited positive parity rotational band having an octupole nature and demonstrating strong anharmonicity of the octupole motion in the band head energies.Purpose: To suggest a model describing both ground state and excited alternating parity bands, which includes a description of the anharmonic effects in the bandhead excitation energies and can be used to predict the energies of the excited rotational bands of octupole nature and the E1 transition probabilities.Methods: The mathematical technique of the supersymmetric quantum mechanics with a collective Hamiltonian depending only on the octupole collective variable which keeps axial symmetry is used to describe the ground state and excited alternating parity rotational bands.Results: The excitation energies of the states belonging to the lowest negative parity and the excited positive parity bands are calculated for 232Th, 238U, and 240Pu. The E1 transition matrix elements are also calculated for 240Pu.Conclusions: It is shown that the suggested model describes the excitation energies of the states of the lowest negative parity band with the accuracy around 10 keV. The anharmonicity in the bandhead energy of the excited positive parity band is described also. The bandhead energy of the excited positive parity band is described with the accuracy around 100 keV.

  1. Search for two-phonon octupole excitations in 146Gd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orce, J. N.; Kumar Raju, M.; Khumalo, N. A.; Dinoko, T. S.; Jones, P.; Bark, R. A.; Lawrie, E. A.; Majola, S. N. T.; Robledo, L. M.; Rubio, B.; Wiedeking, M.; Easton, J.; Khaleel, E. A.; Kheswa, B. V.; Kheswa, N.; Herbert, M. S.; Lawrie, J. J.; Masiteng, P. L.; Nchodu, M. R.; Ndayishimye, J.; Negi, D.; Noncolela, S. P.; Ntshangase, S. S.; Papka, P.; Roux, D. G.; Shirinda, O.; Sithole, P. S.; Yates, S. W.

    2016-06-01

    The low-spin structure of the nearly spherical nucleus 146Gd was studied using the 144Sm(4He, 2n) fusion-evaporation reaction. High-statistics γ - γ coincidence measurements were performed at iThemba LABS with 7× 109 γ- γ coincidence events recorded. Gated γ-ray energy spectra show evidence for the 6+2 → 3-1 → 0+1 cascade of E3 transitions in agreement with recent findings by Caballero and co-workers, but with a smaller branching ratio of I_{γ} = 4.7(10) for the 6+2 → 3-1 1905.1 keV γ ray. Although these findings may support octupole vibrations in spherical nuclei, sophisticated beyond mean-field calculations including angular-momentum projection are required to interpret in an appropriate way the available data due to the failure of the rotational model assumptions in this nucleus.

  2. Geometry and evolution of structural traps formed by inversion structures

    SciTech Connect

    Mitra, S. )

    1994-07-01

    Inversion structures form by compressional reactivation of preexisting extensional structures. Experimental models and observations of natural structures are used to develop quantitative models for the geometry and kinematic evolution of inversion structures. Two main mechanisms of formation of inversion structures are analyzed: (1) fault-propagation folding on planar faults, and (2) fault-bend folding on listric faults. Inversion structures formed by fault-propagation folding are characterized by the upward termination of a basement fault into a tight fold and thickening of synextensional units into the basin. Inversion structures formed by fault-bend folding are characterized by open-fold geometries and thickening of synextensional units into the fault zone. Characteristic variations in fold geometry and bed thickness provide predictive models for interpreting the subsurface geometries of these two classes of inversion structures in areas with poor seismic data. Examples of both types of structures are described from the Taranaki basin, the southern North Sea, and the Kangean Basin.

  3. Application of the triaxial quadrupole-octupole rotor to the ground and negative-parity levels of actinide nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadirbekov, M. S.; Minkov, N.; Strecker, M.; Scheid, W.

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we examine the possibility to describe yrast positive- and negative-parity excitations of deformed even-even nuclei through a collective rotation model in which the nuclear surface is characterized by triaxial quadrupole and octupole deformations. The nuclear moments of inertia are expressed as sums of quadrupole and octupole parts. By assuming an adiabatic separation of rotation and vibration degrees of freedom, we suppose that the structure of the positive- and negative-parity bands may be determined by the triaxial-rigid-rotor motion of the nucleus. By diagonalizing the Hamiltonian in a symmetrized rotor basis with embedded parity, we obtain a model description for the yrast positive- and negative-parity bands in several actinide nuclei. We show that the energy displacement between the opposite-parity sequences can be explained as the result of the quadrupole-octupole triaxiality.

  4. Octupole and hexadecapole bands in 152Sm

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, P E; Kulp, W D; Wood, J L; Bandyopadhyay, D; Christen, S; Choudry, S; Dewald, A; Fitzler, A; Fransen, C; Jessen, K; Jolie, J; Kloezer, A; Kudejova, P; Kumar, A; Lesher, S R; Linnemann, A; Lisetskiy, A; Martin, D; Masur, M; McEllistrem, M T; Moller, O; Mynk, M; Orce, J N; Pejovic, P; Pissulla, T; Regis, J; Schiller, A; Tonev, D; Yates, S W

    2005-05-13

    The nucleus {sup 152}Sm is characterized by a variety of low-energy collective modes, conventionally described as rotations, {beta} vibrations, and {gamma} vibrations. Recently, it has been suggested that {sup 152}Sm is at a critical point between spherical and deformed collective phases. Consequently, {sup 152}Sm is being studied by a variety of techniques, including radioactive decay, multi-step Coulomb excitation, in-beam ({alpha},2n{gamma}) {gamma}-ray spectroscopy, and (n,n'{gamma}) spectroscopy. The present work focuses on the latter two reactions; these have been used to investigate the low-lying bands associated with the octupole degree of freedom, including one built on the first excited 0{sup +} band. In addition, the K{sup {pi}} = 4{sup +} hexadecapole vibrational band has been identified.

  5. Extraterrestrial Helium Trapped in Fullerenes in the Sudbury Impact Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Luann; Poreda, Robert J.; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    1996-01-01

    Fullerenes (C60 and C70) in the Sudbury impact structure contain trapped helium with a He-3/He-4 ratio of 5.5 x 10(exp -4) to 5.9 x 10(exp -4). The He-3/He-4 ratio exceeds the accepted solar wind value by 20 to 30 percent and is higher by an order of magnitude than the maximum reported mantle value. Terrestrial nuclear reactions or cosmic-ray bombardment are not sufficient to generate such a high ratio. The He-3/He-4 ratios in the Sudbury fullerenes are similar to those found in meteorites and in some interplanetary dust particles. The implication is that the helium within the C60 molecules at Sudbury is of extraterrestrial origin.

  6. Glassy Structural Trapping in Soft Multi-Face Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priestley, Rodney

    Nanoparticles with soft, heterogeneously patterned surfaces often exhibit unique, multi-functional behaviors in response to environmental stimuli. The soft, polymeric nature of the particle surface, moreover, allows for the tailoring of both surface architecture and chemical composition towards particular applications. We have recently demonstrated that Precipitation-Induced Self Assembly (PISA) can be used to form soft Janus colloids as well as multi-faceted colloids in a scalable approach in which many colloidal characteristics can be controlled independently. Here, we present evidence not only of kinetic trapping in the formation of rapidly precipitated, multi-surface polymer particles; but also delineate the role of polymer vitrification in the determination of multi-faceted particle structures.

  7. Structure of the signal transduction protein TRAP (target of RNAIII-activating protein)

    PubMed Central

    Henrick, Kim; Hirshberg, Miriam

    2012-01-01

    The crystal structure of the signal transduction protein TRAP is reported at 1.85 Å resolution. The structure of TRAP consists of a central eight-stranded β-­barrel flanked asymmetrically by helices and is monomeric both in solution and in the crystal structure. A formate ion was found bound to TRAP identically in all four molecules in the asymmetric unit. PMID:22750855

  8. Evidence for Octupole Correlations in Multiple Chiral Doublet Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Wang, S. Y.; Bark, R. A.; Zhang, S. Q.; Meng, J.; Qi, B.; Jones, P.; Wyngaardt, S. M.; Zhao, J.; Xu, C.; Zhou, S.-G.; Wang, S.; Sun, D. P.; Liu, L.; Li, Z. Q.; Zhang, N. B.; Jia, H.; Li, X. Q.; Hua, H.; Chen, Q. B.; Xiao, Z. G.; Li, H. J.; Zhu, L. H.; Bucher, T. D.; Dinoko, T.; Easton, J.; Juhász, K.; Kamblawe, A.; Khaleel, E.; Khumalo, N.; Lawrie, E. A.; Lawrie, J. J.; Majola, S. N. T.; Mullins, S. M.; Murray, S.; Ndayishimye, J.; Negi, D.; Noncolela, S. P.; Ntshangase, S. S.; Nyakó, B. M.; Orce, J. N.; Papka, P.; Sharpey-Schafer, J. F.; Shirinda, O.; Sithole, P.; Stankiewicz, M. A.; Wiedeking, M.

    2016-03-01

    Two pairs of positive-and negative-parity doublet bands together with eight strong electric dipole transitions linking their yrast positive- and negative-parity bands have been identified in 78Br. They are interpreted as multiple chiral doublet bands with octupole correlations, which is supported by the microscopic multidimensionally-constrained covariant density functional theory and triaxial particle rotor model calculations. This observation reports the first example of chiral geometry in octupole soft nuclei.

  9. Chaos in axially symmetric potentials with octupole deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Heiss, W.D.; Nazmitdinov, R.G.; Radu, S. Departamento de Fisica Teorica C-XI, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049, Madrid )

    1994-04-11

    Classical and quantum mechanical results are reported for the single particle motion in a harmonic oscillator potential which is characterized by a quadrupole deformation and an additional octupole deformation. The chaotic character of the motion is strongly dependent on the quadrupole deformation in that for a prolate deformation virtually no chaos is discernible while for the oblate case the motion shows strong chaos when the octupole term is turned on.

  10. Evidence for Octupole Correlations in Multiple Chiral Doublet Bands.

    PubMed

    Liu, C; Wang, S Y; Bark, R A; Zhang, S Q; Meng, J; Qi, B; Jones, P; Wyngaardt, S M; Zhao, J; Xu, C; Zhou, S-G; Wang, S; Sun, D P; Liu, L; Li, Z Q; Zhang, N B; Jia, H; Li, X Q; Hua, H; Chen, Q B; Xiao, Z G; Li, H J; Zhu, L H; Bucher, T D; Dinoko, T; Easton, J; Juhász, K; Kamblawe, A; Khaleel, E; Khumalo, N; Lawrie, E A; Lawrie, J J; Majola, S N T; Mullins, S M; Murray, S; Ndayishimye, J; Negi, D; Noncolela, S P; Ntshangase, S S; Nyakó, B M; Orce, J N; Papka, P; Sharpey-Schafer, J F; Shirinda, O; Sithole, P; Stankiewicz, M A; Wiedeking, M

    2016-03-18

    Two pairs of positive-and negative-parity doublet bands together with eight strong electric dipole transitions linking their yrast positive- and negative-parity bands have been identified in ^{78}Br. They are interpreted as multiple chiral doublet bands with octupole correlations, which is supported by the microscopic multidimensionally-constrained covariant density functional theory and triaxial particle rotor model calculations. This observation reports the first example of chiral geometry in octupole soft nuclei. PMID:27035296

  11. Coherent quadrupole-octupole modes and split parity-doublet spectra in odd-A nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Minkov, N.; Drenska, S.; Yotov, P.; Lalkovski, S.; Bonatsos, D.; Scheid, W.

    2007-09-15

    A collective model describing coherent quadrupole-octupole oscillations and rotations with a Coriolis coupling between the even-even core and the unpaired nucleon is applied to odd nuclei. The particle-core coupling provides a parity-doublet structure of the spectrum, whereas the quadrupole-octupole motion leads to a splitting of the doublet energy levels. The formalism successfully reproduces the split parity-doublet spectra and the attendant B(E1) and B(E2) transition probabilities in a wide range of odd-A nuclei. It provides estimations for the influence of the Coriolis interaction on the collective motion and subsequently for the value of angular momentum projection K on which the spectrum is built. The analysis of the energy splitting and B(E1) transition probabilities between opposite parity counterparts suggests degenerate doublet structures at high angular momenta. The study provides information about the evolution of quadrupole-octupole collectivity in odd-mass nuclei.

  12. Spectroscopy of quadrupole and octupole states in rare-earth nuclei from a Gogny force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, K.; Rodríguez-Guzmán, R.; Robledo, L. M.

    2015-07-01

    Collective quadrupole and octupole states are described in a series of Sm and Gd isotopes within the framework of the interacting boson model (IBM), whose Hamiltonian parameters are deduced from mean-field calculations with the Gogny energy density functional. The link between both frameworks is the (β2β3 ) potential energy surface computed within the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov framework in the case of the Gogny force. The diagonalization of the IBM Hamiltonian provides excitation energies and transition strengths of an assorted set of states including both positive- and negative-parity states. The resultant spectroscopic properties are compared with the available experimental data and also with the results of the configuration mixing calculations with the Gogny force within the generator coordinate method (GCM). The structure of excited 0+ states and its connection with double-octupole phonons is also addressed. The model is shown to describe the empirical trend of the low-energy quadrupole and octupole collective structure fairly well and turns out to be consistent with GCM results obtained with the Gogny force.

  13. Trapping, Anomalous Transport, and Quasi-coherent Structures in Magnetically Confined Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlad, Madalina; Spineanu, Florin

    Strong electrostatic turbulence in magnetically confined plasmas is characterized by trapping or eddying of particle trajectories produced by the E × B stochastic drift. Trapping is shown to produce strong effects on test particles and on test modes by causing nonstandard trajectory statistics: non-Gaussian distribution, memory effects, and coherence. Trapped trajectories form quasi-coherent structure. Trajectory trapping has strong nonlinear effects on the test modes on turbulent plasmas. We determine the growth rate of drift modes as function of the statistical characteristics of the background turbulence. We show that trapping provides the physical mechanism for the inverse cascade observed in drift turbulence and for the zonal flow generation.

  14. Octupole shaps in nuclei, and some rotational consequences thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Nazarewicz, W.; Olanders, P.; Ragnarsson, I.; Dudek, J.; Leander, G.A.

    1984-01-01

    During the last years a large number of experimental papers presenting spectroscopic evidence for collective dipole and octupole deformations have appeared. Many theoretical attempts have been made to explain the observed spectroscopic properties in terms of stable octupole deformations. The coupling by the octupole potential, being proportional to Y/sub 30/, is strongest for those subshells for which ..delta..1 = 3. Therefore the tendency towards octupole deformation occurs just beyond closed shells where the high-j intruder subshells (N,1,j) lie very close to the normal parity subshells (N-1,1-3,j-3), i.e. for the particle numbers 34 (g/sub 9/2/-p/sub 3/2/), 56 (h/sub 11/2/-d/sub 5/2/). 9C (i/sub 13/2/-f/sub 7/2/) and 134 (j/sub 15/2/-g/sub 9/2/). Empirically, it is specifically for the particle numbers listed above that negative parity states are observed at relatively low energies in doubly even nuclei. From the different combinations of octupole-driving particle numbers four regions of likely candidates for octupole deformed equilibrium shapes emerge, namely the neutron-deficient nuclei with Z approx. = 90, N approx. = 134 (light actinides) and Z approx. = 34, N approx. = 34 (A approx. = 70) and the neutron-rich nuclei with Z approx. = 56, N approx. = 90 (heavy Ba) and Z approx. = 34, N/sup 56/ (A approx. = 90). In our calculations we searched for octupole unstable nuclei in these four mass regions. The Strutinsky method with the deformed Woods-Saxon potential was employed. The macroscopic part consists of a finite-range liquid drop energy, where both the surface and Coulomb terms contain a diffuseness correction.

  15. High-accuracy optical clock based on the octupole transition in 171Yb+.

    PubMed

    Huntemann, N; Okhapkin, M; Lipphardt, B; Weyers, S; Tamm, Chr; Peik, E

    2012-03-01

    We experimentally investigate an optical frequency standard based on the 467 nm (642 THz) electric-octupole reference transition (2)S(1/2)(F=0)→(2)F(7/2)(F=3) in a single trapped (171)Yb(+) ion. The extraordinary features of this transition result from the long natural lifetime and from the 4f(13)6s(2) configuration of the upper state. The electric-quadrupole moment of the (2)F(7/2) state is measured as -0.041(5)ea(0)(2), where e is the elementary charge and a(0) the Bohr radius. We also obtain information on the differential scalar and tensorial components of the static polarizability and of the probe-light-induced ac Stark shift of the octupole transition. With a real-time extrapolation scheme that eliminates this shift, the unperturbed transition frequency is realized with a fractional uncertainty of 7.1×10(-17). The frequency is measured as 642 121 496 772 645.15(52) Hz. PMID:22463621

  16. High-Accuracy Optical Clock Based on the Octupole Transition in Yb+171

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huntemann, N.; Okhapkin, M.; Lipphardt, B.; Weyers, S.; Tamm, Chr.; Peik, E.

    2012-03-01

    We experimentally investigate an optical frequency standard based on the 467 nm (642 THz) electric-octupole reference transition S1/22(F=0)→F7/22(F=3) in a single trapped Yb+171 ion. The extraordinary features of this transition result from the long natural lifetime and from the 4f136s2 configuration of the upper state. The electric-quadrupole moment of the F7/22 state is measured as -0.041(5)ea02, where e is the elementary charge and a0 the Bohr radius. We also obtain information on the differential scalar and tensorial components of the static polarizability and of the probe-light-induced ac Stark shift of the octupole transition. With a real-time extrapolation scheme that eliminates this shift, the unperturbed transition frequency is realized with a fractional uncertainty of 7.1×10-17. The frequency is measured as 642 121 496 772 645.15(52) Hz.

  17. Experimental progress with novel surface electrode ion trap structures for quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Craig; Blain, Matthew; Benito, Francisco; Chou, Chin-Wen; Descour, Mike; Ellis, Rob; Haltli, Ray; Heller, Edwin; Kemme, Shanalyn; Sterk, Jon; Tabakov, Boyan; Tigges, Chris; Maunz, Peter; Stick, Daniel

    2013-05-01

    Segmented surface electrode ion traps are one of the most mature platforms among candidates for scalable quantum information processing. In this poster, an overview of current results from four specific projects will be presented. Two projects involve increased light collection from trapped ion for state detection and/or remote entangling of distant ions. The first involves cavity integration into a linear surface trap, and the second, involves integration of diffractive optical elements into a linear surface trap for increased light collection. Another project involves a trap with a ring geometry which could be used to trap long chains of equally spaced ions. Finally, we report on initial testing of a trap structure with vastly improved in-plane optical access. In this structure in-plane beams can be focused to less than 8 microns while keeping a distance of at least 5 beam radii to the trap structure. Along with these projects other relevant progress from Sandia National Laboratory's ion trap group will be presented. This work was supported by Sandia's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) and the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA). Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  18. Two-phonon octupole excitation in {sup 146}Gd

    SciTech Connect

    Caballero, L.; Rubio, B.; Nacher, E.; Kleinheinz, P.; Yates, S. W.; Algora, A.; Dewald, A.; Fitzler, A.; Jolie, J.; Linnemann, A.; Moeller, O.; Gadea, A.; Julin, R.; Piiparinen, M.; Lunardi, S.; Menegazzo, R.; Blomqvist, J.

    2010-03-15

    Based on experimental evidence from the {sup 144}Sm({alpha},2n) reaction, the 3484.7-keV 6{sup +} state in {sup 146}Gd is identified as the highest-spin member of the 3{sup -} x 3{sup -} two-phonon octupole quartet. A previously unknown {gamma} line of 1905.8 keV and E3 character feeding the 3{sup -} octupole state has been observed. These results represent the first observation of a 6{sup +}->3{sup -}->0{sup +} cascade of two E3 transitions in an even-even nucleus and provide strong support for the interpretation of the 6{sup +} state as a two-phonon octupole excitation.

  19. Ion trap array mass analyzer: structure and performance.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoxu; Jiang, Gongyu; Luo, Chan; Xu, Fuxing; Wang, Yuanyuan; Ding, Li; Ding, Chuan-Fan

    2009-06-15

    An ion trap array (ITA) mass analyzer--a novel ion trap mass analyzer with multiple ion trapping and analyzing channels--was designed and constructed. Its property and performance were investigated and reported in this paper. The ITA was built with several planar electrodes including two parallel printed circuit board (PCB) plates. Each PCB plate was fabricated to several identical rectangular electric strips based on normal PCB fabrication technology and was placed symmetrically to those on the opposite plate. There is no electrode between any two adjacent strips. Every strip was supplied with an rf voltage while the polarity of the voltage applied to the adjacent two strips was opposite. So the electric potential at the central plane between two adjacent strips is zero. Multiple identical electric field regions that contain the dominant quadrupole plus some other high-order fields were produced between the two PCB plates. The multiple identical electric field regions will have the property of ion trapping, ion storage, and mass analysis functions. So an ITA could work as multiple ion trap mass analyzers. It could perform multiple sample ion storage, mass-selected ion isolation, ion ejection, and mass analysis simultaneously. The ITA was operated at both "digital ion trap mode" and "conventional rf mode" experimentally. A preliminary mass spectrum has been carried out in one of the ion trap channels, and it shows a mass resolution of over 1000. Additional functions such as mass-selected ion isolation and mass-selected ion ejection have also been tested. Furthermore, the ITA has a small size and very low cost. An ITA with four channels is less than 30 cm(3) in total volume, and it shows a great promise for the miniaturization of the whole mass spectrometer instrument and high-throughput mass analysis. PMID:19441854

  20. Precise rainbow trapping for low-frequency acoustic waves with micro Mie resonance-based structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chen; Yuan, Baoguo; Cheng, Ying; Liu, Xiaojun

    2016-02-01

    We have realized the acoustic rainbow trapping in the low frequency region (200-500 Hz) through micro Mie resonance-based structures. The structure has eight channels with a high refractive index obtained by coiling space, that can excite strong interactions with incident waves and support various orders of multipoles due to the Mie resonances of the microstructure. By utilizing the structure, the precise spatial modulation of the acoustic wave is demonstrated both theoretically and experimentally. The effect of trapping broadband acoustic waves and spatially separating different frequency components are ascribed to the monopolar Mie resonances of the structures. The trapping frequency is derived and the trapping positions can be tuned arbitrarily. With enhanced wave-structure interactions and tailored frequency responses, such micro structures show precise spectral-spatial control of acoustic waves and open a diverse venue for high performance acoustic wave detection, sensing, filtering, and a nondestructive test.

  1. Comparison of plume structures of carbon dioxide emitted from different mosquito traps.

    PubMed

    Cooperband, Miriam F; Cardé, Ring T

    2006-03-01

    A large field wind tunnel was used to compare four types of CO2-baited mosquito traps. This study compared the plume structure and concentration of CO2 emitted by each trap, flow of suction into the trapping systems, flow of CO2 being released, trap shape and configuration, differences in visual appearance, and differences in temperature and humidity of emissions at the source of CO2 compared to ambient air. The structure of the CO2 plumes emitted by each trap differed considerably. All four plumes were turbulent, causing the concentration of CO2 within several metres of the source to attenuate to between 375 and 875 p.p.m. The Encephalitis Virus Surveillance (EVS) trap emitted concentrations of CO2 exceeding 20,000 p.p.m., the detection limits of our equipment, whereas the Mosquito Magnet Freedom (MMF), Mosquito Magnet Liberty (MML) and Mosquito Magnet X (MMX) traps released CO2 at peaks of about 3500, 7200 and 8700 p.p.m., respectively. The MMX trap produced the greatest air velocity at both the suction inlet and CO2 outlet, followed by the MMF, MML and the EVS traps, respectively. PMID:16608485

  2. Surface ion trap structures with excellent optical access for quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maunz, P.; Blain, M.; Benito, F.; Chou, C.; Clark, C.; Descour, M.; Ellis, R.; Haltli, R.; Heller, E.; Kemme, S.; Sterk, J.; Tabakov, B.; Tigges, C.; Stick, D.

    2013-05-01

    Microfabricated surface electrode ion traps are necessary for the advancement of trapped ion quantum information processing as it offers a scalable way for realizing complex trap structures capable of storing and controlling many ions. The most promising way of performing two-qubit quantum gates in a chain of trapped ions is to focus laser beams on individual ions of the chain to drive gates. However, in surface ion traps the close proximity of the ions to the surface and the size of the chips usually cannot accommodate the tightly focused laser beams necessary to address individual ions parallel to the chip surface. Here we present a surface electrode ion trap monolithically fabricated in standard silicon technology that implements a linear quadrupole trap on a bowtie shaped chip with a narrow section that is only 1.2 mm wide. Laser beams parallel to the surface can be focused down to a waist of 4 μm with enough separation from the trap chip to prevent light scattering. The trap structure incorporates two Y-junctions for reordering ions and is optimized for quantum information processing. This work was supported by the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA). Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  3. Perfect light trapping in mid-IR using patterned ZnO structures (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vangala, Shivashankar R.; Nader, Nima; Cleary, Justin W.; Guo, Junpeng; Leedy, Kevin D.; Hendrickson, Joshua R.

    2015-09-01

    Plasmonic assisted mid-IR light trapping using 1D grating structures patterned in Ga-ZnO is demonstrated. FDTD simulations of these structures with proper grating period and depth show the light trapping into a resonant mode resulting in a close to 100% reflection dip in the 4-8 µm wavelength regime. The 1D grating structures of different periods are fabricated using standard photolithography followed by etching. The resonant reflection dips in the experimentally measured spectra well agree with the FDTD simulation, exhibiting light trapping in the mid-IR as predicted.

  4. First Atomic Electric Dipole Moment Limit Derived from an Octupole-Deformed Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Richard; Bishof, Michael; Kalita, Mukut; Lemke, Nathan; Dietrich, Matt; Bailey, Kevin; Greene, John; Holt, Roy; Korsch, Wolfgang; Lu, Zheng-Tian; Mueller, Peter; O'Connor, T. P.; Singh, Jaideep

    2015-05-01

    Ra-225 (half-life = 15 d, nuclear spin = 1/2) is a promising isotope for a measurement of the EDM of a diamagnetic atom. Due to its large nuclear octupole deformation and high atomic mass, the EDM sensitivity of Ra-225 is expected to be 2-3 orders of magnitude larger than that of Hg-199. We demonstrate an efficient multiple-stage apparatus in which radium atoms are first loaded into a MOT, then transferred into a movable optical-dipole trap (ODT) that carries the atoms over 1 m to a magnetically-shielded science chamber, loaded into a standing-wave ODT, polarized, and then allowed to precess in magnetic and electric fields. We will discuss our first measurement of the EDM of Ra-225, as well as plans for future improvements. This work is supported by DOE, Office of Nuclear Physics (DE-AC02-06CH11357).

  5. Particle trapping: A key requisite of structure formation and stability of Vlasov–Poisson plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Schamel, Hans

    2015-04-15

    Particle trapping is shown to control the existence of undamped coherent structures in Vlasov–Poisson plasmas and thereby affects the onset of plasma instability beyond the realm of linear Landau theory.

  6. Octupole strength in the neutron-rich calcium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, L. A.; McPherson, D. M.; Agiorgousis, M. L.; Baugher, T. R.; Bazin, D.; Bowry, M.; Cottle, P. D.; DeVone, F. G.; Gade, A.; Glowacki, M. T.; Gregory, S. D.; Haldeman, E. B.; Kemper, K. W.; Lunderberg, E.; Noji, S.; Recchia, F.; Sadler, B. V.; Scott, M.; Weisshaar, D.; Zegers, R. G. T.

    2016-04-01

    Low-lying excited states of the neutron-rich calcium isotopes Ca-5248 have been studied via γ -ray spectroscopy following inverse-kinematics proton scattering on a liquid hydrogen target using the GRETINA γ -ray tracking array. The energies and strengths of the octupole states in these isotopes are remarkably constant, indicating that these states are dominated by proton excitations.

  7. Trapping indirect excitons in a GaAs quantum-well structure with a diamond-shaped electrostatic trap.

    PubMed

    High, A A; Thomas, A K; Grosso, G; Remeika, M; Hammack, A T; Meyertholen, A D; Fogler, M M; Butov, L V; Hanson, M; Gossard, A C

    2009-08-21

    We report on the principle and realization of a new trap for excitons--the diamond electrostatic trap--which uses a single electrode to create a confining potential for excitons. We also create elevated diamond traps which permit evaporative cooling of the exciton gas. We observe the collection of excitons towards the trap center with increasing exciton density. This effect is due to screening of disorder in the trap by the excitons. As a result, the diamond trap behaves as a smooth parabolic potential which realizes a cold and dense exciton gas at the trap center. PMID:19792761

  8. Highly Efficient Light-Trapping Structure Design Inspired By Natural Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chen; Yu, Shuangcheng; Chen, Wei; Sun, Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in nanophotonic light trapping open up the new gateway to enhance the absorption of solar energy beyond the so called Yablonovitch Limit. It addresses the urgent needs in developing low cost thin-film solar photovoltaic technologies. However, current design strategy mainly relies on the parametric approach that is subject to the predefined topological design concepts based on physical intuition. Incapable of dealing with the topological variation severely constrains the design of optimal light trapping structure. Inspired by natural evolution process, here we report a design framework driven by topology optimization based on genetic algorithms to achieve a highly efficient light trapping structure. It has been demonstrated that the optimal light trapping structures obtained in this study exhibit more than 3-fold increase over the Yablonovitch Limit with the broadband absorption efficiency of 48.1%, beyond the reach of intuitive designs. PMID:23289067

  9. Structure of Two-Dimensional Plasma Crystals in Anharmonic Penning Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubin, D. H. E.

    2013-10-01

    In several recent experiments charged particles have been trapped and cooled in two-dimensional (2D) crystalline configurations using a Penning trap. Usually in such traps the applied trap potential is harmonic (i.e. depending quadratically on position), and consequently the 2D crystal structure is nonuniform and riddled with defects. This poster derives a closed-form analytic expression for the density per unit area of the 2D crystal when an arbitrary anharmonic trap potential is employed, expressed as a multipole expansion. This expression is used to find the optimum potential, with a given number of multipoles, for trapping a plasma crystal with the most uniform possible density per unit area. Image charge effects are included to lowest order in (plasma size)/(electrode radius). Minimum energy states in such an optimized trap potential (including only quadrupole and octopole terms) are evaluated numerically and the resulting crystals are shown to be defect-free over the central region where the density is most nearly uniform. The poster also explores using an l = 3 rotating wall trap potential in order to produce near-perfect crystals with triangular boundaries and no defects. Supported by PHY-0903877 and DE-SC0002541.

  10. Coupling of nuclear quadrupole and octupole degrees of freedom in an angular momentum dependent potential of two deformation variables

    SciTech Connect

    Minkov, N.; Yotov, P.; Drenska, S.; Scheid, W.; Bonatsos, Dennis; Lenis, D.; Petrellis, D.

    2006-04-26

    We propose a collective rotation-vibration Hamiltonian of nuclei in which the axial quadrupole {beta}2 and octupole {beta}3 variables are coupled through the centrifugal interaction. We consider that the system oscillates between positive and negative {beta}3-values by rounding a potential core in the ({beta}2,{beta}3)- space. We examine the effect of the 'rounding' in the structure of the spectrum.

  11. Structured interfaces for flexural waves - trapped modes and transmission resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haslinger, S. G.; McPhedran, R. C.; Movchan, N. V.; Movchan, A. B.

    2013-07-01

    The article combines the analytical models of scattering and Bloch waves for a stack of periodic gratings in an infinite elastic plate. The waves represent flexural deflections of the plate governed by a fourth-order partial differential equation. The emphasis is on the analysis of trapped modes and transmission resonances for different configurations of the grating stack and physical parameters of the flexural waves. Special attention is given to the phenomenon of Elasto-Dynamically Inhibited Transmission (EDIT). The analytical model is supplemented with comprehensive numerical examples.

  12. Shallow seismic trapping structure in the San Jacinto fault zone near Anza, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, M. A.; Peng, Z.; Ben-Zion, Y.; Vernon, F. L.

    2005-09-01

    We analyse fault zone trapped waves, generated by ~500 small earthquakes, for high-resolution imaging of the subsurface structure of the Coyote Creek, Clark Valley and Buck Ridge branches of the San Jacinto fault zone near Anza, California. Based on a small number of selected trapped waves within this data set, a previous study concluded on the existence of a low-velocity waveguide that is continuous to a depth of 15-20 km. In contrast, our systematic analysis of the larger data set indicates a shallow trapping structure that extends only to a depth of 3-5 km. This is based on the following lines of evidence. (1) Earthquakes clearly outside these fault branches generate fault zone trapped waves that are recorded by stations within the fault zones. (2) A traveltime analysis of the difference between the direct S arrivals and trapped wave groups shows no systematic increase (moveout) with increasing hypocentral distance or event depth. Estimates based on the observed average moveout values indicate that the propagation distances within the low-velocity fault zone layers are 3-5 km. (3) Quantitative waveform inversions of trapped wave data indicate similar short propagation distances within the low-velocity fault zone layers. The results are compatible with recent inferences on shallow trapping structures along several other faults and rupture zones. The waveform inversions also indicate that the shallow trapping structures are offset to the northeast from the surface trace of each fault branch. This may result from a preferred propagation direction of large earthquake ruptures on the San Jacinto fault.

  13. Hyperfine-induced electric dipole contributions to the electric octupole and magnetic quadrupole atomic clock transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2016-05-01

    Hyperfine-induced electric dipole contributions may significantly increase probabilities of otherwise very weak electric octupole and magnetic quadrupole atomic clock transitions (e.g., transitions between s and f electron orbitals). These transitions can be used for exceptionally accurate atomic clocks, quantum information processing, and the search for dark matter. They are very sensitive to new physics beyond the standard model, such as temporal variation of the fine-structure constant, the Lorentz invariance, and Einstein equivalence principle violation. We formulate conditions under which the hyperfine-induced electric dipole contribution dominates and perform calculations of the hyperfine structure and E3, M2 and the hyperfine-induced E1 transition rates for a large number of atoms and ions of experimental interest. Due to the hyperfine quenching the electric octupole clock transition in +173Yb is 2 orders of magnitude stronger than that in currently used +171Yb. Some enhancement is found in 13+143Nd, 14+149Pm, 14+147Sm, and 15+147Sm ions.

  14. Modeling of metal-ferroelectric-insulator-semiconductor structure considering the effects of interface traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jing; Shi, Xiao Rong; Zheng, Xue Jun; Tian, Li; Zhu, Zhe

    2015-06-01

    An improved model, in which the interface traps effects are considered, is developed by combining with quantum mechanical model, dipole switching theory and silicon physics of metal-oxide-semiconductor structure to describe the electrical properties of metal-ferroelectric-insulator-semiconductor (MFIS) structure. Using the model, the effects of the interface traps on the surface potential (ϕSi) of the semiconductor, the low frequency (LF) capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics and memory window of MFIS structure are simulated, and the results show that the ϕSi- V and LF C-V curves are shifted toward the positive-voltage direction and the memory window become worse as the density of the interface trap states increases. This paper is expected to provide some guidance to the design and performance improvement of MFIS structure devices. In addition, the improved model can be integrated into electronic design automation (EDA) software for circuit simulation.

  15. Stability and structure of an anisotropically trapped dipolar Bose-Einstein condensate: Angular and linear rotons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, A. D.; Blakie, P. B.

    2012-11-01

    We study theoretically Bose-Einstein condensates with polarized dipolar interactions in anisotropic traps. We map the parameter space by varying the trap frequencies and dipolar interaction strengths and find an irregular-shaped region of parameter space in which density-oscillating condensate states occur, with maximum density away from the trap center. These density-oscillating states may be biconcave (red-blood-cell-shaped), or have two or four peaks. For all trap frequencies, the condensate becomes unstable to collapse for sufficiently large dipole interaction strength. The collapse coincides with the softening of an elementary excitation. When the condensate mode is density oscillating, the character of the softening excitation is related to the structure of the condensate. We classify these excitations by linear and angular characteristics. We also find excited solutions to the Gross-Pitaevskii equation, which are always unstable.

  16. Ion Trapping, Storage, and Ejection in Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xinyu; Garimella, Venkata BS; Prost, Spencer A.; Webb, Ian K.; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Tang, Keqi; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Baker, Erin Shammel; Anderson, Gordon A.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-06-16

    A structure for lossless ion manipulation (SLIM) module was constructed with electrode arrays patterned on a pair of parallel printed circuit boards (PCB) separated by 5 mm and utilized to investigate capabilities for ion trapping at 4 Torr. Positive ions were confined by application of RF having alternating phases on a series of inner rung electrodes and by positive DC potentials on surrounding guard electrodes on each PCB. An axial DC field was also introduced by stepwise varying the DC potential of the inner rung electrodes so as to control the ion transport and accumulation inside the ion trap. We show that ions could be trapped and accumulated with 100% efficiency, stored for at least 5 hours with no losses, and could be rapidly ejected from the SLIM trap.

  17. Ion Trapping, Storage, and Ejection in Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinyu; Garimella, Sandilya V B; Prost, Spencer A; Webb, Ian K; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Tang, Keqi; Tolmachev, Aleksey V; Norheim, Randolph V; Baker, Erin S; Anderson, Gordon A; Ibrahim, Yehia M; Smith, Richard D

    2015-06-16

    A new Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations (SLIM) module, having electrode arrays patterned on a pair of parallel printed circuit boards (PCB), was constructed and utilized to investigate capabilities for ion trapping at a pressure of 4 Torr. Positive ions were confined by application of RF voltages to a series of inner rung electrodes with alternating phase on adjacent electrodes, in conjunction with positive DC potentials on surrounding guard electrodes on each PCB. An axial DC field was also introduced by stepwise varying the DC potentials applied to the inner rung electrodes to control the ion transport and accumulation inside the ion trapping region. We show that ions can be trapped and accumulated with up to 100% efficiency, stored for at least 5 h with no significant losses, and then could be rapidly ejected from the SLIM trap. The present results provide a foundation for the development of much more complex SLIM devices that facilitate extended ion manipulations. PMID:25971536

  18. Length dependent folding kinetics of phenylacetylene oligomers: Structural characterization of a kinetic trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmer, Sidney P.; Pande, Vijay S.

    2005-03-01

    Using simulation to study the folding kinetics of 20-mer poly-phenylacetylene (pPA) oligomers, we find a long time scale trapped kinetic phase in the cumulative folding time distribution. This is demonstrated using molecular dynamics to simulate an ensemble of over 100 folding trajectories. The simulation data are fit to a four-state kinetic model which includes the typical folded and unfolded states, along with an intermediate state, and most surprisingly, a kinetically trapped state. Topologically diverse conformations reminiscent of α helices, β turns, and sheets in proteins are observed, along with unique structures in the form of knots. The nonhelical conformations are implicated, on the basis of structural correlations to kinetic parameters, to contribute to the trapped kinetic behavior. The strong solvophobic forces which mediate the folding process and produce a stable helical folded state also serve to overstabilize the nonhelical conformations, ultimately trapping them. From our simulations, the folding time is predicted to be on the order of 2.5-12.5 μs in the presence of the trapped kinetic phase. The folding mechanism for these 20-mer chains is compared with the previously reported folding mechanism for the pPA 12-mer chains. A linear scaling relationship between the chain length and the mean first passage time is predicted in the absence of the trapped kinetic phase. We discuss the major implications of this discovery in the design of self-assembling nanostructures.

  19. Possible ground-state octupole deformation in /sup 229/Pa

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.; Gindler, J.E.; Betts, R.R.; Chasman, R.R.; Friedman, A.M.

    1982-12-13

    Evidence is presented for the occurrence of a (5/2)/sup + -/ parity doublet as the ground state of /sup 229/Pa, in agreement with a previous theoretical prediction. The doublet splitting energy is measured to be 0.22 +- 0.05 keV. The relation of this doublet to ground-state octupole deformation is discussed. .ID LV2109 .PG 1762 1764

  20. Mobility-Selected Ion Trapping and Enrichment Using Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chen, Tsung-Chi; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Webb, Ian K.; Garimella, Sandilya V. B.; Zhang, Xing; Hamid, Ahmed M.; Deng, Liulin; Karnesky, William E.; Prost, Spencer A.; Sandoval, Jeremy A.; et al

    2016-01-11

    The integration of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) with mass spectrometry (MS) and the ability to trap ions in IMS-MS measurements is of great importance for performing reactions, accumulating ions, and increasing analytical measurement sensitivity. The development of Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations (SLIM) offers the potential for ion manipulations in a more reliable and cost-effective manner, while opening opportunities for much more complex sequences of manipulations. Here, we demonstrate an ion separation and trapping module and a method based upon SLIM that consists of a linear mobility ion drift region, a switch/tee and a trapping region that allows the isolationmore » and accumulation of mobility-separated species. The operation and optimization of the SLIM switch/tee and trap are described and demonstrated for the enrichment of the low abundance ions. Lastly, we observed a linear increase in ion intensity with the number of trapping/accumulation events using the SLIM trap, illustrating its potential for enhancing the sensitivity of low abundance or targeted species.« less

  1. Mechanism of DNA Trapping in Nanoporous Structures during Asymmetric Pulsed-Field Electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ya; Harrison, D. Jed

    2014-03-01

    DNA molecules (>100kbp) are trapped in separation sieves when high electric fields are applied in pulsed field electrophoresis, seriously limiting the speed of separation. Using crystalline particle arrays, to generate interstitial pores for molecular sieving, allows higher electric fields than in gels, (e.g 40 vs 5 V/cm), however trapping still limits the field strength. Using reverse pulses, which release DNA from being fully-stretched, allows higher fields (140 V/cm). We investigate the trapping mechanism of individual DNA molecules in ordered nanoporous structures. Two prerequisites for trapping are revealed by the dynamics of single trapped DNA, hernia formation and fully-stretched U/J shapes. Fully stretched DNA has longer unhooking times than expected by simple models. We propose a dielectrophoretic (DEP) force reduces the mobility of segments at the apex of the U or J, where field gradients are highest, based on simulations. A modified model for unhooking time is obtained after the DEP force is introduced. The new model explains the unhooking time data by predicting an infinite trapping time when the ratio of arm length differences (of the U or J) to molecule length Δx / L < β . β is a DEP parameter that is found to strongly increase with electric field. The work was supported by grant from Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) and the National Institute for Nanotechnology (NINT).

  2. Advances in ion trap mass spectrometry: Photodissociation as a tool for structural elucidation

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, J.L. Jr.; Booth, M.M.; Eyler, J.R.; Yost, R.A.

    1995-12-01

    Photo-induced dissociation (PID) is the next most frequently used method (after collisional activation) for activation of Polyatomic ions in tandem mass spectrometry. The range of internal energies present after the photon absorption process are much narrower than those obtained with collisional energy transfer. Therefore, the usefulness of PID for the study of ion structures is greatly enhanced. The long storage times and instrumental configuration of the ion trap mass spectrometer are ideally suited for photodissociation experiments. This presentation will focus on both the fundamental and analytical applications of CO{sub 2} lasers in conjunction with ion trap mass spectrometry. The first portion of this talk will examine the fundamental issues of wavelength dependence, chemical kinetics, photoabsorption cross section, and collisional effects on photodissociation efficiency. The second half of this presentation will look at novel instrumentation for electrospray/ion trap mass spectrometry, with the concurrent development of photodissociation as a tool for structural elucidation of organic compounds and antibiotics.

  3. Novel Trapping and Scattering of Light in Resonant Nanophotonic Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chia Wei

    Nanophotonic structures provide unique ways to control light and alter its behaviors in ways not possible in macroscopic structures. In this thesis, we explore novel behaviors of light created by nanophotonic structures, with a common theme on resonance effects. The first half of the thesis focuses on a peculiar type of electromagnetic resonance, where the resonance lifetime diverges to infinity. These states, called bound states in the continuum, remain localized in space even though their frequency lie within a continuum of extended modes. We find such states in photonic crystal slabs and the surface of bulk photonic crystals. We show the conditions necessary for them to exist, and provide the first experimental observation of these unusual states. We also show that these states have a topological nature, with conserved and quantized topological charges that govern their generation, evolution, and annihilation. The second half of the thesis concerns light scattering from resonant nanophotonic structures, where resonances can enhance or suppress scattering at particular wavelengths and angles. We show that multiple resonances in one nanostructure and in the same multipole channel generally lead to a scattering dark state where the structure becomes transparent. Based on the coherent interference from multiple scatterers, we show there are geometries that can achieve a sharp structural color where the hue, saturation, and brightness are all viewing-angle independent. We also invent a new type of transparent display based on wavelength-selective light scattering from nanostructures.

  4. Structural, Bioinformatic, and In Vivo Analyses of Two Treponema pallidum Lipoproteins Reveal a Unique TRAP Transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Deka, Ranjit K.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Goldberg, Martin; Schuck, Peter; Tomchick, Diana R.; Norgard, Michael V.

    2012-05-25

    Treponema pallidum, the bacterial agent of syphilis, is predicted to encode one tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic transporter (TRAP-T). TRAP-Ts typically employ a periplasmic substrate-binding protein (SBP) to deliver the cognate ligand to the transmembrane symporter. Herein, we demonstrate that the genes encoding the putative TRAP-T components from T. pallidum, tp0957 (the SBP), and tp0958 (the symporter), are in an operon with an uncharacterized third gene, tp0956. We determined the crystal structure of recombinant Tp0956; the protein is trimeric and perforated by a pore. Part of Tp0956 forms an assembly similar to those of 'tetratricopeptide repeat' (TPR) motifs. The crystal structure of recombinant Tp0957 was also determined; like the SBPs of other TRAP-Ts, there are two lobes separated by a cleft. In these other SBPs, the cleft binds a negatively charged ligand. However, the cleft of Tp0957 has a strikingly hydrophobic chemical composition, indicating that its ligand may be substantially different and likely hydrophobic. Analytical ultracentrifugation of the recombinant versions of Tp0956 and Tp0957 established that these proteins associate avidly. This unprecedented interaction was confirmed for the native molecules using in vivo cross-linking experiments. Finally, bioinformatic analyses suggested that this transporter exemplifies a new subfamily of TPATs (TPR-protein-associated TRAP-Ts) that require the action of a TPR-containing accessory protein for the periplasmic transport of a potentially hydrophobic ligand(s).

  5. Structural, bioinformatic, and in vivo analyses of two Treponema pallidum lipoproteins reveal a unique TRAP transporter

    PubMed Central

    Deka, Ranjit K.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Goldberg, Martin; Schuck, Peter; Tomchick, Diana R.; Norgard, Michael V.

    2012-01-01

    Treponema pallidum, the bacterial agent of syphilis, is predicted to encode one tripartite ATP- independent periplasmic transporter (TRAP-T). TRAP-Ts typically employ a periplasmic substrate-binding protein (SBP) to deliver the cognate ligand to the transmembrane symporter. Herein, we demonstrate that the genes encoding the putative TRAP-T components from T. pallidum, tp0957 (the SBP) and tp0958 (the symporter) are in an operon with an uncharacterized third gene, tp0956. We determined the crystal structure of recombinant Tp0956; the protein is trimeric and perforated by a pore. Part of Tp0956 forms an assembly similar to those of “tetratricopeptide repeat” (TPR) motifs. The crystal structure of recombinant Tp0957 was also determined; like the SBPs of other TRAP-Ts, there are two lobes separated by a cleft. In these other SBPs, the cleft binds a negatively charged ligand. However, the cleft of Tp0957 has a strikingly hydrophobic chemical composition, indicating that its ligand may be substantially different and likely hydrophobic. Analytical ultracentrifugation of the recombinant versions of Tp0956 and Tp0957 established that these proteins associate avidly. This unprecedented interaction was confirmed for the native molecules using in vivo cross-linking experiments. Finally, bioinformatic analyses suggested that this transporter exemplifies a new subfamily of TPR-protein associated TRAP transporters (TPATs) that require the action of a TPR-containing accessory protein for the periplasmic transport of a potentially hydrophobic ligand(s). PMID:22306465

  6. Single-Molecule Vibrational Spectroscopy Adds Structural Resolution to the Optical Trap

    PubMed Central

    Ganim, Ziad

    2013-01-01

    The ability to apply forces on single molecules with an optical trap is combined with the endogenous structural resolution of Raman spectroscopy in an article in this issue, and applied to measure the Raman spectrum of ds-DNA during force-extension. PMID:23332052

  7. Timing of structural development of oil traps in Gulf of Suez, Egypt

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhary, L.R.; Shaheen, S.

    1988-01-01

    To date, more than 40 oil fields with an estimated 25billion bbl of oil in place have been discovered in the Gulf of Suez, Egypt. These oil accumulations are present both in the pre-graben and graben-fill cycles which are separated by Oligocene tectonic phase, hitherto considered to be responsible for differentiation and formation of oil traps. In the present study, the structural development of many oil traps is related to intra-Rudeis tectonic phase of late early Miocene age. Presence of an astructures. In other structures (Ras Bakr, Ras Gharib, Ras Fanar, Belayim Marine, S. July, Hurgada. Zeit Bay, etc), the exhumed pre-Miocene strata ranging in age from Paleozoic to Eocene (or even Precambrian basement as in Zeit Bay) are in unconformable contact with graben-fill deposits of middle Miocene age. Structural development of these structural-unconformity traps can be related to either Oligocene or intra-Rudeis tectonic phase. However, a study of the development of erosional profiles would favor an intra-Rudeis origin of these structures. A few structures with oil accumulations in grabenfill sandstone reservoirs, such as Morgan, W. Bakr, etc, were primarily formed following intra-Rudeis tectonic phase as a sedimentary drape and compaction structures over preexisting relief features.

  8. Interplay between octupole and quasiparticle excitations in {sup 178}Hg and {sup 180}Hg

    SciTech Connect

    Kondev, F. G.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Carpenter, M. P.; Abu Saleem, K.; Ahmad, I.; Alcorta, M.; Amro, H.; Bhattacharyya, P.; Brown, L. T.; Caggiano, J.

    2000-10-01

    Excited structures in the Z=80, {sup 178}Hg (N=98), and {sup 180}Hg (N=100) isotopes have been investigated with the Gammasphere spectrometer in conjunction with the recoil-decay tagging technique. The present data extend the previously known ground-state bands to higher spin and excitation energy. Negative parity bands with a complex decay towards the low spin states arising from both the prolate-deformed and the nearly spherical coexisting minima have been observed for the first time in both nuclei. It is shown that these sequences have characteristics in common with negative-parity bands in the heavier even-even Hg isotopes as well as in the Os and Pt isotones. These structures are interpreted as being associated at low spin with an octupole vibration which is crossed at moderate frequency by a shape driving, two-quasiproton excitation.

  9. Time-dependent evolution of radiation-induced interface traps in MOS structures

    SciTech Connect

    da Silva Junior, E.F.

    1988-01-01

    A detailed study of the dynamic processes of the interface traps in MOS structures after exposure to ionizing radiation or hot electrons is presented. Among the important results reported here, a two-peaked: interface trap distributor is shown to be characteristic in all the samples studied, and has been found to arise from a defect transformation process in which a peak located at {approximately}E{sub v} + 0.75 eV, which is the only peak observed immediately after irradiation, gradually converts into a second peak located at {approximately}E{sub v} + 0.35 eV. In general, the time evolution of the interface traps has been found to present a complex behavior involving three competing processes: defect generation, annealing and transformation. These processes depend strongly on the device's processing history and radiation treatments. The incorporation of impurities such as fluorine and chlorine into the oxide drastically affects the susceptibility of these MOS structures to ionizing radiation and hot electrons. If proper amounts of these impurities are present in the oxide, an improvement of about one order of magnitude may be obtained on the interface trap densities generated by ionizing radiation and hot electrons throughout the silicon bandgap. A model based on an intrinsic strain relaxation mechanism is proposed to explain most of the experimental results. The initial, post-irradiation density of interface traps has been found to be a key factor determining their subsequent long term dependence. Strong evidence will be presented which indicates that hot electron induced interface traps behave very similarly to those generated by ionizing radiation.

  10. Dynamic interfacial trapping of flexural waves in structured plates

    PubMed Central

    Craster, R. V.; Movchan, A. B.; Movchan, N. V.; Jones, I. S.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents new results on the localization and transmission of flexural waves in a structured plate containing a semi-infinite two-dimensional array of rigid pins. In particular, localized waves are identified and studied at the interface boundary between the homogeneous part of the flexural plate and the part occupied by rigid pins. A formal connection has been made with the dispersion properties of flexural Bloch waves in an infinite doubly periodic array of rigid pins. Special attention is given to regimes corresponding to standing waves of different types as well as Dirac-like points that may occur on the dispersion surfaces. A single half-grating problem, hitherto unreported in the literature, is also shown to bring interesting solutions. PMID:27118892

  11. Octupole deformation in sup 221 Fr; E1 transition rates

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, C.F.; Peghaire, A. ); Sheline, R.K. )

    1990-07-10

    Experimental data following the alpha decay of{sup 225}Ac are interpreted in terms of a spectroscopy in {sup 221}Fr consistent with octupole deformation. However, the measured E1 transition probabilities suggest that the low lying bands in {sup 221}Fr are considerably more mixed than in nuclei with slightly higher mass number. It is suggested that this mixing of states in {sup 221}Fr is indicative of the partial collapse of Nilsson-like orbitals into more degenerate shell model orbitals.

  12. High. beta. studies in the Wisconsin Toroidal Octupole

    SciTech Connect

    Halle, J. H.; Kellman, A.; Post, R. S.; Prager, S. C.; Strait, E. J.; Zarnstorff, M. C.

    1980-09-01

    A wide range of MHD stable high ..beta.. plasmas is produced in the Wisconsin Levitated Octupole. At or near the single fluid regime we obtain, in the bad curvature region, ..beta.. = nk(T/sub e/ + T/sub i/)8..pi../B/sup 2/ approx. = 8%, twice the theoretical single fluid ballooning instability limit of 4%. We also obtain stable plasmas at ..beta.. approx. = 35%, 9 times the theoretical limit, in a regime in which both finite ion gyroradius and gyroviscosity effects are important.

  13. Two-Phonon Octupole Excitation in 146Gd

    SciTech Connect

    Caballero, L.; Rubio, B.; Algora, A.; Nacher, E.; Kleinheinz, P.; Dewald, A.; Fitzler, A.; Jolie, J.; Linnemann, A.; Moeller, O.; Gadea, A.; Julin, R.; Piiparinen, M.; Lunardi, S.; Menegazzo, R.; Yates, S.W.

    2005-11-21

    The excited states in 146Gd have been re-investigated with the 144Sm({alpha},2n) reaction using a modern Ge {gamma}-ray array including a polarimeter. Amongst the non-yrast states populated in this reaction we have identified the aligned 6+ member of the two-phonon octupole quartet from the observation of the E3 branching to the one phonon 3- state. Our results represent the first observation of a 6+{yields}3-{yields}0+ E3 cascade in an even-even nucleus.

  14. Two-Phonon Octupole Excitation in 146Gd

    SciTech Connect

    Caballero, L.; Rubio, B.; Nacher, E.; Kleinheinz, P.; Algora, A.; Blomqvist, J.; Dewald, A.; Fitzler, A.; Jolie, J.; Linnemann, A.; Moeller, O.; Gadea, A.; Julin, R.; Piiparinen, M.; Lunardi, S.; Menegazzo, R.; Yates, S. W.

    2006-04-26

    The excited states in 146Gd have been re-investigated with the 144Sm({alpha},2n) reaction using a modern Ge {gamma}-ray array including a polarimeter. Amongst the non-yrast states populated in this reaction we have identified the aligned 6+ member of the two-phonon octupole quartet from the observation of the E3 branching to the one phonon 3- state. Our results represent the first observation of a 6+{yields}3-{yields}0+ E3 cascade in an even-even nucleus.

  15. A highly efficient light-trapping structure for thin-film silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, L.; Zuo, Y.H.; Zhou, C.L.; Li, H.L.; Diao, H.W.; Wang, W.J.

    2010-01-15

    A highly efficient light-trapping structure, consisting of a diffractive grating, a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) and a metal reflector was proposed. As an example, the proposed light-trapping structure with an indium tin oxide (ITO) diffraction grating, an a-Si:H/ITO DBR and an Ag reflector was optimized by the simulation via rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA) for a 2.0-{mu}m-thick c-Si solar cell with an optimized ITO front antireflection (AR) layer under the air mass 1.5 (AM1.5) solar illumination. The weighted absorptance under the AM1.5 solar spectrum (A{sub AM1.5}) of the solar cell can reach to 69%, if the DBR is composed of 4 pairs of a-Si:H/ITOs. If the number of a-Si:H/ITO pairs is up to 8, a larger A{sub AM1.5} of 72% can be obtained. In contrast, if the Ag reflector is not adopted, the combination of the optimized ITO diffraction grating and the 8-pair a-Si:H/ITO DBR can only result in an A{sub AM1.5} of 68%. As the reference, A{sub AM1.5} = 31% for the solar cell only with the optimized ITO front AR layer. So, the proposed structure can make the sunlight highly trapped in the solar cell. The adoption of the metal reflector is helpful to obtain highly efficient light-trapping effect with less number of DBR pairs, which makes that such light-trapping structure can be fabricated easily. (author)

  16. Structural evolution of the Permian-Triassic Cooper basin, Australia: Relation to hydrocarbon trap styles

    SciTech Connect

    Apak, S.N.; Stuart, W.J.; Lemon, N.M.; Wood, G.

    1997-04-01

    The structural and depositional history of the Cooper basin in eastern central Australia has revealed that the basin is a mildly compressional structural depression controlled by northwestrending and northeast-trending pre-Permian basement features. Pronounced pre-Permian compressions are indicated by northeast-trending major structures, the Gidgealpa-Merrimelia-Innamincka and Murteree-Nappacoongee trends. Detailed chronostratigraphic facies analysis, with closely spaced palynological control, of the Patchawarra Formation revealed that two pronounced phases of uplift occurred during the Sakmarian. The major intrabasin highs were rejuvenated during these tectonic events, as documented by crestal unconformities (middle and upper Patchawarra unconformities). Evidence of each event is dominantly tectonic in character, with similar depositional patterns over these highs related to each event. These events are also recognizable in midflank areas and basin margins with contemporaneous deposition in deeper parts of the basin. Results from this research show potential for future hydrocarbon discoveries within structural, stratigraphic, and structural/stratigraphic traps in the Cooper basin. Various trap styles are closely associated with faults, unconformities, and lateral facies changes. Lowside fault closures, onlap plays, and unconformity traps are expected to be well developed along intrabasinal highs, basin margins, and preexisting structures. The primary reservoir targets would be deltaic sequences comprising shoreline sandstones, distributary and delta-mouth bar deposits that may be well developed in synclinal areas, and flanks of intrabasin highs in the Copper basin.

  17. Secondary Fast Magnetoacoustic Waves Trapped in Randomly Structured Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Ding; Li, Bo; Walsh, Robert W.

    2016-09-01

    Fast magnetoacoustic waves are an important tool for inferring parameters of the solar atmosphere. We numerically simulate the propagation of fast wave pulses in randomly structured plasmas that mimic the highly inhomogeneous solar corona. A network of secondary waves is formed by a series of partial reflections and transmissions. These secondary waves exhibit quasi-periodicities in both time and space. Since the temporal and spatial periods are related simply through the speed of the fast wave, we quantify the properties of secondary waves by examining the dependence of the average temporal period (\\bar{p}) on the initial pulse width (w 0) and studying the density contrast ({δ }ρ ) and correlation length (L c ) that characterize the randomness of the equilibrium density profiles. For small-amplitude pulses, {δ }ρ does not alter \\bar{p} significantly. Large-amplitude pulses, on the other hand, enhance the density contrast when {δ }ρ is small but have a smoothing effect when {δ }ρ is sufficiently large. We found that \\bar{p} scales linearly with L c and that the scaling factor is larger for a narrower pulse. However, in terms of the absolute values of \\bar{p}, broader pulses generate secondary waves with longer periods, and this effect is stronger in random plasmas with shorter correlation lengths. Secondary waves carry the signatures of both the leading wave pulse and the background plasma. Our study may find applications in magnetohydrodynamic seismology by exploiting the secondary waves detected in the dimming regions after coronal mass ejections or extreme ultraviolet waves.

  18. High-spin octupole yrast levels in {sup 216}Rn{sub 86}

    SciTech Connect

    Debray, M.E.; Davidson, J.; Davidson, M.; Kreiner, A. J.; Cardona, M. A.; Hojman, D.; Napoli, D.R.; De Angelis, G.; De Poli, M.; Gadea, A.; Lenzi, S.; Bazzacco, D.; Lunardi, S.; Rossi-Alvarez, C.; Ur, C.A.; Medina, N.

    2006-02-15

    The yrast level structure of {sup 216}Rn has been studied using in-beam spectroscopy {alpha}-{gamma}-{gamma} coincidence techniques through the {sup 208}Pb({sup 18}O, 2{alpha}2n) reaction in the 91-93 MeV energy range, using the 8{pi} GASP-ISIS spectrometer at Legnaro. The level scheme of {sup 216}Rn resulting from this study shows alternating parity bands only above a certain excitation energy. From this result, the lightest nucleus showing evidence of octupole collectivity at low spins is still {sup 216}Fr, thereby defining the lowest-mass corner for this kind of phenomenon as N{>=}129 and Z{>=}87.

  19. Disulfide Trapping for Modeling and Structure Determination of Receptor:Chemokine Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Kufareva, Irina; Gustavsson, Martin; Holden, Lauren G.; Qin, Ling; Zheng, Yi; Handel, Tracy M.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the recent breakthrough advances in GPCR crystallography, structure determination of protein-protein complexes involving chemokine receptors and their endogenous chemokine ligands remains challenging. Here we describe disulfide trapping, a methodology for generating irreversible covalent binary protein complexes from unbound protein partners by introducing two cysteine residues, one per interaction partner, at selected positions within their interaction interface. Disulfide trapping can serve at least two distinct purposes: (i) stabilization of the complex to assist structural studies, and/or (ii) determination of pairwise residue proximities to guide molecular modeling. Methods for characterization of disulfide-trapped complexes are described and evaluated in terms of throughput, sensitivity, and specificity towards the most energetically favorable cross-links. Due to abundance of native disulfide bonds at receptor:chemokine interfaces, disulfide trapping of their complexes can be associated with intramolecular disulfide shuffling and result in misfolding of the component proteins; because of this, evidence from several experiments is typically needed to firmly establish a positive disulfide crosslink. An optimal pipeline that maximizes throughput and minimizes time and costs by early triage of unsuccessful candidate constructs is proposed. PMID:26921956

  20. Cambrian-Ordovician Knox production in Ohio: Three case studies of structural-stratigraphic traps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riley, R.A.; Wicks, J.; Thomas, Joan

    2002-01-01

    The Knox Dolomite (Cambrian-Ordovician) in Ohio consists of a mixed carbonate-siliciclastic sequence deposited in a tidal-flat to shallow-marine environment along a broad continental shelf. Knox hydrocarbon production occurs in porous sandstone and dolomite reservoirs in the Copper Ridge dolomite, Rose Run sandstone, and Beekmantown dolomite. In Ohio, historical Knox exploration and development have been focused on paleogeomorphic traps within the prolific Morrow Consolidated field, and more recently, within and adjacent to the Rose Run subcrop. Although these paleogeomorphic traps have yielded significant Knox production, structural and stratigraphic traps are being largely ignored. Three Knox-producing pools demonstrate structural and stratigraphic traps: the Birmingham-Erie pool in southern Erie and southwestern Lorain counties, the South Canaan pool in northern Wayne County, and the East Randolph pool in south-central Portage County. Enhanced porosity and permeability from fractures, as evident in the East Randolph pool, are also an underexplored mechanism for Knox hydrocarbon accumulation. An estimated 800 bcf of gas from undiscovered Knox resources makes the Knox one of the most attractive plays in the Appalachian basin.

  1. [Size structure, selectivity and specific composition of the catch in traps for marine fish in the Gulf of California].

    PubMed

    Nevárez-Martínez, Manuel O; Balmori-Ramírez, Alejandro; Miranda-Mier, Everardo; Santos-Molina, J Pablo; Méndez-Tenorio, Francisco J; Cervantes-Valle, Celio

    2008-09-01

    We analyzed the performance of three traps for marine fish between October 2005 and August 2006 in the Gulf of California, Mexico. The performance was measured as difference in selectivity, fish diversity, size structure and yield. The samples were collected with quadrangular traps 90 cm wide, 120 cm long and 50 cm high. Trap type 1 had a 5 x 5 cm mesh (type 2: 5 x 5 cm including a rear panel of 5 x 10 cm; trap 3: 5 x 10 cm). Most abundant in our traps were: Goldspotted sand bass (Paralabrax auroguttatus), Ocean whitefish (Caulolatilus princeps), Spotted sand bass (P. maculatofaciatus) and Bighead tilefish (C. affinis); there was no bycatch. The number offish per trap per haul decreased when mesh size was increased. We also observed a direct relationship between mesh size and average fish length. By comparing our traps with the authorized fishing gear (hooks-and-line) we found that the size structure is larger in traps. Traps with larger mesh size were more selective. Consequently, we recommend adding traps to hooks-and-line as authorized fishing gear in the small scale fisheries of the Sonora coast, Mexico. PMID:19419053

  2. Dynamic Structure Factor of an Optically Trapped Dipolar Bose—Einstein Condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Wei; Liang, Zhao-Xin; Zhang, Zhi-Dong

    2014-02-01

    Motivated by the recent experimental achievements in using the Bragg spectroscopy to measure the excitation spectrum of an ultra-cold atomic system with long-range interactions, we investigate the dynamic structure factor of a cigar-shaped dipolar Bose condensate trapped in a one-dimensional optical lattices. Our results show that the Bogoliubov bands of the system, particularly the lowest one, can be significantly influenced when one tunes the dipole orientation. Consequently, the calculated static structure factor of an optically trapped dipolar Bose gas shows marked difference from the non-dipolar one. Moreover, we show that the effects of dipole-dipole interaction on the dynamic structure factor is also strongly affected by the strength of the optical confinement.

  3. Super-shell structure in harmonically trapped fermionic gases and its semi-classical interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ögren, M.; Yu, Y.; Åberg, S.; Reimann, S. M.; Brack, M.

    2006-07-01

    It was recently shown in self-consistent Hartree-Fock calculations that a harmonically trapped dilute gas of fermionic atoms with a repulsive two-body interaction exhibits a pronounced super-shell structure: the shell fillings due to the spherical harmonic trapping potential are modulated by a beat mode. This changes the 'magic numbers' occurring between the beat nodes by half a period. The length and amplitude of the beating mode depends on the strength of the interaction. We give a qualitative interpretation of the beat structure in terms of a semi-classical trace formula that uniformly describes the symmetry breaking U(3) → SO(3) in a three-dimensional harmonic oscillator potential perturbed by an anharmonic term ~r4 with arbitrary strength. We show that at low Fermi energies (or particle numbers), the beating gross-shell structure of this system is dominated solely by the twofold degenerate circular and (diametrically) pendulating orbits.

  4. Experimental comparison of light-trapping structures for silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, S. P.; Keavney, C. J.; Geoffroy, L. M.; Sanfacon, M. M.

    Silicon solar cells and test structures were made with etched V-grooves on both the front and the back. The light trapping in these structures was compared to that of control samples with polished and textured surfaces. It was found, in agreement with theoretical predictions, that the structure in which the grooves on the front and the back are perpendicular showed the greatest degree of light trapping, i.e., absorbed the most light in the near-bandgap region. Furthermore, the V-groove front surface makes possible a reduction in effective shadow loss by allowing reflection of light from the metal grid lines onto the active area; this reduction was measured at 41 percent in a typical cell. An 0.25 sq cm bifacial concentrator cell with a short-circuit current density of 41.5 mA/sq cm was made by this method.

  5. Formation of granular structures in trapped Bose-Einstein condensates under oscillatory excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukalov, V. I.; Novikov, A. N.; Bagnato, V. S.

    2014-09-01

    We present experimental observations and numerical simulations of nonequilibrium spatial structures in a trapped Bose-Einstein condensate subject to oscillatory perturbations. In experiment, first, there appear collective excitations, followed by quantum vortices. Increasing the amount of the injected energy leads to the formation of vortex tangles representing quantum turbulence. We study what happens after the regime of quantum turbulence, with increasing further the amount of injected energy. In such a strongly nonequilibrium Bose-condensed system of trapped atoms, vortices become destroyed and there develops a new kind of spatial structure exhibiting essentially heterogeneous spatial density. The structure is reminiscent of fog consisting of high-density droplets, or grains, surrounded by the regions of low density. The grains are randomly distributed in space, where they move. They live for a sufficiently long time to be treated as a type of metastable object. Such structures have been observed in nonequilibrium trapped Bose gases of 87Rb, subject to the action of alternating fields. Here we present experimental results and support them by numerical simulation. The granular, or fog structure is essentially different from the state of wave turbulence that develops after increasing further the amount of injected energy.

  6. Structure Determination of Noble Metal Clusters by Trapped Ion Electron Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schooss, Detlef

    2006-03-01

    The structures of noble metal cluster ions have been studied by the recently developed technique of trapped ion electron diffraction (TIED)^1. In brief, cluster ions are generated by a magnetron sputter source and injected into a cooled (95 K) quadrupole ion trap. After mass selection and thermalization, the trapped ions are irradiated with a 40 keV electron beam. The resulting diffraction pattern is integrated with a CCD detector. The assignment of the structural motif is done via a comparison of the experimental and simulated scattering function, calculated from density functional theory structure calculations. The structures of mass selected silver cluster cations Ag19^+, Ag38^+, Ag55^+, Ag59^+, Ag75^+ and Ag79^+ have been investigated^2. The resulting experimental data are best described by structures based on the icosahedral motif, while closed packed structures could be ruled out. Additionally, we present a comparison of the structures of Cu20^+/-, Ag20^+/- and Au20^+/-. Our findings show unambiguously that the structure of Au20^- is predominantly given by a tetrahedron in agreement with the results of L.S. Wang et al.^3 In contrast, structures of Ag20^- and Cu20^- based on the icosahedral motif agree best with the experimental data. Small structural differences between the charge states are observed. The possibilities and limitations of the TIED method are discussed. (1) M. Maier-Borst, D. B. Cameron, M. Rokni, and J. H. Parks, Physical Review A 59 (5), R3162 (1999); S. Krückeberg, D. Schooss, M. Maier-Borst, and J. H. Parks, Physical Review Letters 85 (21), 4494 (2000). (2) D. Schooss, M.N. Blom, B. v. Issendorff, J. H. Parks, and M.M. Kappes, Nano Letters 5 (10), 1972 (2005). (3) J. Li, X. Li, H. J. Zhai, and L. S. Wang, Science 299, 864 (2003)

  7. Quantitative analysis of seismic trapped waves in the rupture zone of the Landers, 1992, California earthquake: Evidence for a shallow trapping structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Z.; Ben-Zion, Y.; Michael, A. J.; Zhu, L.

    2002-12-01

    Waveform modeling of seismic fault zone (FZ) trapped waves has been claimed to provide a high resolution imaging of FZ structure at seismogenic depth. We analyze quantitatively a waveform data set generated by 238 Landers aftershocks recorded by a portable seismic array (Lee, 1999). The array consists of 33 three-component L-22 seismometers, 22 of which on a line crossing the surface rupture zone of the mainshock. A subset of 93 aftershocks were also recorded by the Southern California Seismic Network, while the other events were recorded only by the FZ array. We locate the latter subset of events with a "grid-search relocation method" using accurately picked P and S arrival times, a half-space velocity model, and back-azimuth adjustment to correct the effect of low velocity FZ material on phase arrivals. Next we determine the quality of FZ trapped wave generation from the ratio of trapped waves to S-wave energy for stations relatively close to and far from the FZ. Energy ratios exceeding 4, between 2 and 4, and less than 2, are assigned quality A, B, and C of trapped wave generation. We find that about 70% of nearby events with S-P time less than 2 sec, including many clearly off the fault, generate FZ trapped waves with quality A or B. This distribution is in marked contrast with previous claims that trapped waves at Landers are generated only by sources close to or inside the fault zone (Li et al., 1994, 2000). The existence of trapped waves due to sources outside the Landers rupture zone indicates that the generating structure is shallow, as demonstrated in recent 3D calculations of wave propagation in irregular FZ structures (Fohrmann et al., 2002). The time difference between the S arrivals and trapped wave group does not grow systematically with increasing source-receiver distance along the fault, in agreement with the above conclusion. The dispersion of trapped waves at Landers is rather weak, again suggesting a short propagation distance inside the low

  8. Laser machined macro and micro structures on glass for enhanced light trapping in solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, David; Rahman, Mahfujur; Dowling, Denis P.; McNally, Patrick J.; Brabazon, Dermot

    2013-03-01

    In order to increase the efficiency of solar cell modules it is necessary to make the optimum use of light incident upon them. Much research has been done on improving light absorption through front surface texturisation and light trapping schemes. Laser light is commonly used in industry for various applications including marking and texturisation. By controlling laser parameters, it is possible to tailor macro and micro structures in most materials. The CO2 laser used in this investigation emits radiation at 10.6 μm with the ability to pulse in the micro-second range. The laser was used to ablate grooved textures in the fused quartz material, used in this study as the light trapping medium, following which an analysis of the effects of the laser parameters on the texture geometry and surface morphology was performed through a combination of cross sectioning and scanning electron microscopy. Transmission through the textured glass was improved for most samples after acid etching. The light trapping effects of the best performing textures were analysed by investigating the effects on a silicon solar cell's performance at varying angles of incidence. Results indicated a significant increase in light trapping when light was incident at acute angles. For an angle of incidence of 10∘ a relative increase in efficiency of up to 51 % was observed.

  9. Octupole deformation properties of the Barcelona-Catania-Paris energy density functionals

    SciTech Connect

    Robledo, L. M.; Baldo, M.; Schuck, P.; Vinas, X.

    2010-03-15

    We discuss the octupole deformation properties of the recently proposed Barcelona-Catania-Paris (BCP) energy density functionals for two sets of isotopes, those of radium and barium, in which it is believed that octupole deformation plays a role in the description of the ground state. The analysis is carried out in the mean field framework (Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov approximation) by using the axially symmetric octupole moment as a constraint. The main ingredients entering the octupole collective Hamiltonian are evaluated and the lowest-lying octupole eigenstates are obtained. In this way we restore, in an approximate way, the parity symmetry spontaneously broken by the mean field and also incorporate octupole fluctuations around the ground-state solution. For each isotope the energy of the lowest lying 1{sup -} state and the B(E1) and B(E3) transition probabilities have been computed and compared to both the experimental data and the results obtained in the same framework with the Gogny D1S interaction, which are used here as a well-established benchmark. Finally, the octupolarity of the configurations involved in the way down to fission of {sup 240}Pu, which is strongly connected to the asymmetric fragment mass distribution, is studied. We confirm with this thorough study the suitability of the BCP functionals to describe octupole-related phenomena.

  10. Effect of dust charging and trapped electrons on nonlinear solitary structures in an inhomogeneous magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Ravinder; Malik, Hitendra K.; Singh, Khushvant

    2012-01-15

    Main concerns of the present article are to investigate the effects of dust charging and trapped electrons on the solitary structures evolved in an inhomogeneous magnetized plasma. Such a plasma is found to support two types of waves, namely, fast wave and slow wave. Slow wave propagates in the plasma only when the wave propagation angle {theta} satisfies the condition {theta}{>=}tan{sup -1}{l_brace}({radical}((1+2{sigma})-[(n{sub dlh}({gamma}{sub 1}-1))/(1+n{sub dlh}{gamma}{sub 1})])-v{sub 0}/u{sub 0}){r_brace}, where v{sub 0}(u{sub 0}) is the z- (x-) component of ion drift velocity, {sigma} = T{sub i}/T{sub eff}, n{sub dlh} = n{sub d0}/(n{sub el0} + n{sub eh0}), and {gamma}{sub 1}=-(1/{Phi}{sub i0})[(1-{Phi}{sub i0}/1+{sigma}(1-{Phi}{sub i0}))] together with T{sub i} as ion temperature, n{sub el0}(n{sub eh0}) as the density of trapped (isothermal) electrons, {Phi}{sub i0} as the dust grain (density n{sub d0}) surface potential relative to zero plasma potential, and T{sub eff}=(n{sub elo}+n{sub eho})T{sub el}T{sub eh}/(n{sub elo}T{sub eh}+n{sub eho}T{sub el}), where T{sub el}(T{sub eh}) is the temperature of trapped (isothermal) electrons. Both the waves evolve in the form of density hill type structures in the plasma, confirming that these solitary structures are compressive in nature. These structures are found to attain higher amplitude when the charge on the dust grains is fluctuated (in comparison with the case of fixed charge) and also when the dust grains and trapped electrons are more in number; the same is the case with higher temperature of ions and electrons. Slow solitary structures show weak dependence on the dust concentration. Both types of structures are found to become narrower under the application of stronger magnetic field. With regard to the charging of dust grains, it is observed that the charge gets reduced for the higher trapped electron density and temperature of ions and electrons, and dust charging shows weak dependence on the ion

  11. Self-Trapping of Charge Carriers in Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes: Structural Analysis.

    PubMed

    Adamska, Lyudmyla; Nazin, George V; Doorn, Stephen K; Tretiak, Sergei

    2015-10-01

    The spatial extent of charged electronic states in semiconducting carbon nanotubes with indices (6,5) and (7,6) was evaluated using density functional theory. It was observed that electrons and holes self-trap along the nanotube axis on length scales of about 4 and 8 nm, respectively, which localize cations and anions on comparable length scales. Self-trapping is accompanied by local structural distortions showing periodic bond-length alternation. The average lengthening (shortening) of the bonds for anions (cations) is expected to shift the G-mode frequency to lower (higher) values. The smaller-diameter nanotube has reduced structural relaxation due to higher carbon-carbon bond strain. The reorganization energy due to charge-induced deformations in both nanotubes is found to be in the 30-60 meV range. Our results represent the first theoretical simulation of self-trapping of charge carriers in semiconducting nanotubes, and agree with available experimental data. PMID:26722885

  12. Crustal seismic structure beneath the Deccan Traps area (Gujarat, India), from local travel-time tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prajapati, Srichand; Kukarina, Ekaterina; Mishra, Santosh

    2016-03-01

    The Gujarat region in western India is known for its intra-plate seismic activity, including the Mw 7.7 Bhuj earthquake, a reverse-faulting event that reactivated normal faults of the Mesozoic Kachchh rift zone. The Late Cretaceous Deccan Traps, one of the largest igneous provinces on the Earth, cover the southern part of Gujarat. This study is aimed at bringing light to the crustal rift zone structure and likely origin of the Traps based on the velocity structure of the crust beneath Gujarat. Tomographic inversion of the Gujarat region was done using the non-linear, passive-source tomographic algorithm, LOTOS. We use high-quality arrival times of 22,280 P and 22,040 S waves from 3555 events recorded from August 2006 to May 2011 at 83 permanent and temporary stations installed in Gujarat state by the Institute of Seismological Research (ISR). We conclude that the resulting high-velocity anomalies, which reach down to the Moho, are most likely related to intrusives associated with the Deccan Traps. Low velocity anomalies are found in sediment-filled Mesozoic rift basins and are related to weakened zones of faults and fracturing. A low-velocity anomaly in the north of the region coincides with the seismogenic zone of the reactivated Kachchh rift system, which is apparently associated with the channel of the outpouring of Deccan basalt.

  13. Fabrication of the replica templated from butterfly wing scales with complex light trapping structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Zhiwu; Li, Bo; Mu, Zhengzhi; Yang, Meng; Niu, Shichao; Zhang, Junqiu; Ren, Luquan

    2015-11-01

    The polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) positive replica templated twice from the excellent light trapping surface of butterfly Trogonoptera brookiana wing scales was fabricated by a simple and promising route. The exact SiO2 negative replica was fabricated by using a synthesis method combining a sol-gel process and subsequent selective etching. Afterwards, a vacuum-aided process was introduced to make PDMS gel fill into the SiO2 negative replica, and the PDMS gel was solidified in an oven. Then, the SiO2 negative replica was used as secondary template and the structures in its surface was transcribed onto the surface of PDMS. At last, the PDMS positive replica was obtained. After comparing the PDMS positive replica and the original bio-template in terms of morphology, dimensions and reflectance spectra and so on, it is evident that the excellent light trapping structures of butterfly wing scales were inherited by the PDMS positive replica faithfully. This bio-inspired route could facilitate the preparation of complex light trapping nanostructure surfaces without any assistance from other power-wasting and expensive nanofabrication technologies.

  14. Multiple trapping on a comb structure as a model of electron transport in disordered nanostructured semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibatov, R. T.; Morozova, E. V.

    2015-05-01

    A model of dispersive transport in disordered nanostructured semiconductors has been proposed taking into account the percolation structure of a sample and joint action of several mechanisms. Topological and energy disorders have been simultaneously taken into account within the multiple trapping model on a comb structure modeling the percolation character of trajectories. The joint action of several mechanisms has been described within random walks with a mixture of waiting time distributions. Integral transport equations with fractional derivatives have been obtained for an arbitrary density of localized states. The kinetics of the transient current has been calculated within the proposed new model in order to analyze time-of-flight experiments for nanostructured semiconductors.

  15. Analysis of InAsSb nBn spectrally filtering photon-trapping structures.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Jonathan; D'Souza, Arvind; Bellotti, Enrico

    2014-08-11

    We have numerically analyzed the electromagnetic and electrical characteristics of InAsSb nBn infrared detectors employing a photon-trapping (PT) structure realized with a periodic array of pyramids intended to provide broadband operation. The three-dimensional numerical simulation model was verified by comparing the simulated dark current and quantum efficiency to experimental data. Then, the power and flexibility of the nBn PT design was used to engineer spectrally filtering PT structures. That is, detectors that have a predetermined spectral response to be more sensitive in certain spectral ranges and less sensitive in others. PMID:25320985

  16. Multiple trapping on a comb structure as a model of electron transport in disordered nanostructured semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Sibatov, R. T. Morozova, E. V.

    2015-05-15

    A model of dispersive transport in disordered nanostructured semiconductors has been proposed taking into account the percolation structure of a sample and joint action of several mechanisms. Topological and energy disorders have been simultaneously taken into account within the multiple trapping model on a comb structure modeling the percolation character of trajectories. The joint action of several mechanisms has been described within random walks with a mixture of waiting time distributions. Integral transport equations with fractional derivatives have been obtained for an arbitrary density of localized states. The kinetics of the transient current has been calculated within the proposed new model in order to analyze time-of-flight experiments for nanostructured semiconductors.

  17. Plasma resistivity measurements in the Wisconsin levitated octupole

    SciTech Connect

    Brouchous, D. A.

    1980-11-01

    Resistivity measurements parallel to the magnetic field were made on gun injected plasmas ranging in density from 10/sup 9/cm/sup -3/ to 10/sup 1/parallelcm/sup -3/ in the Wisconsin levitated octupole with toroidal and poloidal magnetic fields. The 10/sup 9/cm/sup -3/ plasma was collisionless with lambda/sub mfp/ > 100 mirror lengths, had T/sub e/ = 10 eV, T/sub i/ = 30 eV and was found to have anomalous resistivity scaling like eta = ..sqrt..T/sub e//n/sub e/ when E/sub parallel/ > E/su c/ is the Dreicer critical field. The 10/sup 12/cm/sup -3/ plasma was collisional with lambda/sub mfp/ < mirror length, had T/sub e/ = T/sub i/ approx. = .2 eV and was found to have Spitzer resistivity when E/sub parallel/ < E/sub c/.

  18. On the structural denaturation of biological analytes in trapped ion mobility spectrometry - mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fanny C; Kirk, Samuel R; Bleiholder, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Key to native ion mobility/mass spectrometry is to prevent the structural denaturation of biological molecules in the gas phase. Here, we systematically assess structural changes induced in the protein ubiquitin during a trapped ion mobility spectrometry (TIMS) experiment. Our analysis shows that the extent of structural denaturation induced in ubiquitin ions is largely proportional to the amount of translational kinetic energy an ion gains from the applied electric field between two collisions with buffer gas particles. We then minimize the efficiency of the structural denaturation of ubiquitin ions in the gas phase during a TIMS experiment. The resulting "soft" TIMS spectra of ubiquitin are found largely identical to those observed on "soft" elevated-pressure ion mobility drift tubes and the corresponding calibrated cross sections are consistent with structures reported from NMR experiments for the native and A-state of ubiquitin. Thus, our analysis reveals that TIMS is useful for native ion mobility/mass spectrometry analysis. PMID:26998732

  19. Shallow Seismic Trapping Structure in the San Jacinto Fault Zone, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, M. A.; Peng, Z.; Ben-Zion, Y.; Vernon, F.

    2003-12-01

    We analyze a waveform data set generated by 385 events and recorded by linear seismic arrays across the Clark Valley and Coyote Creek faults in the trifurcation area of the San Jacinto fault zone (FZ). The goal is to obtain structural information from a comprehensive analysis of FZ trapped waves in the data. A previous work based on selected waveforms suggested a low-velocity waveguide continuous to a depth of at least 18 km (Li and Vernon, JGR, 2001). If so, events located clearly outside the FZ proper should not generate any FZ trapped waves. On the other hand, a shallow FZ waveguide can produce (Fohrmann et al., PAGEOPH, 2003) trapped waves for events clearly off the fault. Our analysis of trapped waves in the larger considered data set is compatible with the existence of shallow non continuous waveguide layers along both the Clark Valley and Coyote Creek faults. Ben-Zion et al. (GJI, 2003) found in the context of the North Anatolian fault that many events off the fault produce FZ trapped waves and suggested that a better term for such data may be FZ related site effects. Within a distance of roughly 90 km, a subset of 159 events including many off the fault are suitably recorded by the arrays for analysis. A spectral ratio method is used to calculate the concentration of seismic energy within the FZ stations, producing a systematic measure of the quality of trapped waves or FZ related site effects. We find that FZ site effects are observed at FZ stations for the majority of the earthquakes, with the generating events located at various distances from the fault trace and various angles and distances from the receivers. The distribution of the events implies that the trapping structures are not continuous along the strike of either fault branch and do not extend bellow the depth of the shallowest events (e.g., 5 km). A travel time analysis of the difference between the direct S and trapped wave group arrivals shows no systematic increase with hypocentral distance

  20. Building spatially-structured biofilms with single-cell control using laser trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodesney, Christopher; Hutchison, Jaime; Kaushik, Karishma; Le, Henry; Hurwitz, Daniel; Irie, Yasuhiko; Gordon, Vernita

    2015-03-01

    Biofilms are sessile communities of microbes adhered to each other and to an interface. Biofilm infections are notoriously difficult to eradicate, and this arises in part from phenotypic changes due to the spatial structure of the biofilm. Spatial structure controls the microenvironment and intercellular associations, which in turn controls gene expression, virulence, and antibiotic resistance. There are few tools available for elucidating the role of spatial structure in biofilms. We present a method for controlling the positions of bacteria on a surface using optical trapping without impinging cell viability. Initial positions propagate into the developing biofilm, creating spatial structure. The native growth, motility, and surface adhesion of positioned cells are preserved, as shown for model organisms Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. We demonstrate statistically-significant effects of spatial structure on the growth of monoculture P. aeruginosa biofilms and for co-culture biofilms of P. aeruginosa and S. aureus. Because the laser trap we use is very basic and the other equipment required is inexpensive and standard, we believe that our technique will be a widely-usable tool for biological and physical collaborators at many types of institutions.

  1. Heart-shaped nuclei: Condensation of rotational-aligned octupole phonons

    SciTech Connect

    Frauendorf, S.

    2008-02-15

    The strong octupole correlations in the mass region A{approx_equal}226 are interpreted as rotation-induced condensation of octupole phonons having their angular momentum aligned with the rotational axis. Discrete phonon energy and parity conservation generate oscillations of the energy difference between the lowest rotational bands with positive and negative parity. Anharmonicities tend to synchronize the rotation of the condensate and the quadrupole shape of the nucleus forming a rotating heart shape.

  2. Sediment storage dam: A structural gully erosion control and sediment trapping measure, northern Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekonnen, Mulatie; Keesstra, Saskia; Baartman, Jantiene; Ritsema, Coen

    2014-05-01

    Gully erosion is a prime problem in Ethiopia. This study assessed the severity of gully erosion and the role of sediment storage dams (SSD) in restoring gullies and preventing further gully development, its sediment trapping efficacy (STE) and its capacity in converting degraded gully lands to productive land. On average 2.5 m deep, 6.6 m wide and 28.3 m long gullies were formed in Minizr watershed, northwest Ethiopia, in 2013. Concentrated surface runoff, traditional ditches, graded terraces without suitable water ways and road construction are the main causes of such serious gully erosion. Over grazing, tunnel flow and lack of proper immediate gully treatment actions after gully initiation are found to be additional causes of the problem. Gully erosion was also found as the major source of sediment for downstream rivers and water reservoirs. The annual volume of soil eroded from only four gullies was 1941.3 m3. To control gully erosion, SSDs were found to be important physical structures, which can trap significant amount of sediment within gullies and they can convert unproductive gully land to productive agricultural land for fruit and crop production. Eight SSDs trapped about 44*103 m3 of sediment within 2 to 8 years. Two representative SSDs constructed using gabion and stone were tested for their STE. Results showed that their efficacy was 74.1% and 66.4% for the gabion and stone SSDs, respectively. Six of the older SSDs were already full of sediment and created 0.75 ha of productive land within 2 to 8 years. SSDs best fits to treat large size and deep gullies where other gully control measures, check dams, could not function well. To prevent gully formation, controlling its causes that is avoiding traditional ditches, practicing grassed water ways to safely remove runoff water from graded terraces, integrated watershed and road side management practices are important solutions. KEY WORDS: Sediment storage dam, gully erosion, sediment trapping efficacy

  3. Coulomb structures of charged macroparticles in static magnetic traps at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliev, M. M.; Petrov, O. F.; Statsenko, K. B.

    2015-12-01

    Electrically charged (up to 107 e) macroscopic superconducting particles with sizes in the micrometer range confined in a static magnetic trap in liquid nitrogen and in nitrogen vapor at temperatures of 77-91 K are observed experimentally. The macroparticles with sizes up to 60 μm levitate in a nonuniform static magnetic field B ~ 2500 G. The formation of strongly correlated structures comprising as many as ~103 particles is reported. The average particle distance in these structures amounts to 475 μm. The coupling parameter and the Lindemann parameter of these structures are estimated to be ~107 and ~0.03, respectively, which is characteristic of strongly correlated crystalline or glasslike structures.

  4. Influence of the octupole mode on nuclear high-K isomeric properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minkov, Nikolay; Walker, Phil

    2014-05-01

    The influence of quadrupole-octupole deformations on the energy and magnetic properties of high-K isomeric states in even-even actinide (U, Pu, Cm, Fm, No), rare-earth (Nd, Sm and Gd), and superheavy (^{270}\\text{Ds}) nuclei is examined within a deformed shell model with pairing interaction. The neutron two-quasiparticle (2qp) isomeric energies and magnetic dipole moments are calculated over a wide range in the plane of quadrupole and octupole deformations. In most cases the magnetic moments exhibit a pronounced sensitivity to the octupole deformation. At the same time, the calculations outline three different groups of nuclei: with pronounced, shallow, and missing minima in the 2qp energy surfaces with respect to the octupole deformation. The result indicates regions of nuclei with octupole softness as well as with possible octupole deformation in the high-K isomeric states. These findings show the need for further theoretical analysis as well as of detailed experimental measurements of magnetic moments in heavy deformed nuclei.

  5. Plasmonic light trapping in an ultrathin photovoltaic layer with film-coupled metamaterial structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hao; Wang, Liping

    2015-02-01

    A film-coupled metamaterial structure is numerically investigated for enhancing the light absorption in an ultrathin photovoltaic layer of crystalline gallium arsenide (GaAs). The top subwavelength concave grating and the bottom metallic film could not only effectively trap light with the help of wave interference and magnetic resonance effects excited above the bandgap, but also practically serve as electrical contacts for photon-generated charge collection. The energy absorbed by the active layer is greatly enhanced with the help of the film-coupled metamaterial structure, resulting in significant improvement on the short-circuit current density by three times over a free-standing GaAs layer at the same thickness. The performance of the proposed light trapping structure is demonstrated to be little affected by the grating ridge width considering the geometric tolerance during fabrication. The optical absorption at oblique incidences also shows direction-insensitive behavior, which is highly desired for efficiently converting off-normal sunlight to electricity. The results would facilitate the development of next-generation ultrathin solar cells with lower cost and higher efficiency.

  6. Plasmonic light trapping in an ultrathin photovoltaic layer with film-coupled metamaterial structures

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hao; Wang, Liping

    2015-02-15

    A film-coupled metamaterial structure is numerically investigated for enhancing the light absorption in an ultrathin photovoltaic layer of crystalline gallium arsenide (GaAs). The top subwavelength concave grating and the bottom metallic film could not only effectively trap light with the help of wave interference and magnetic resonance effects excited above the bandgap, but also practically serve as electrical contacts for photon-generated charge collection. The energy absorbed by the active layer is greatly enhanced with the help of the film-coupled metamaterial structure, resulting in significant improvement on the short-circuit current density by three times over a free-standing GaAs layer at the same thickness. The performance of the proposed light trapping structure is demonstrated to be little affected by the grating ridge width considering the geometric tolerance during fabrication. The optical absorption at oblique incidences also shows direction-insensitive behavior, which is highly desired for efficiently converting off-normal sunlight to electricity. The results would facilitate the development of next-generation ultrathin solar cells with lower cost and higher efficiency.

  7. Escherichia coli and Candida albicans Induced Macrophage Extracellular Trap-Like Structures with Limited Microbicidal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chengshui; Liu, Xiaolei; Du, Jing; Shi, Haining; Wang, Xuelin; Bai, Xue; Peng, Peng; Yu, Lu; Wang, Feng; Zhao, Ying; Liu, Mingyuan

    2014-01-01

    The formation of extracellular traps (ETs) has recently been recognized as a novel defense mechanism in several types of innate immune cells. It has been suggested that these structures are toxic to microbes and contribute significantly to killing several pathogens. However, the role of ETs formed by macrophages (METs) in defense against microbes remains little known. In this study, we demonstrated that a subset of murine J774A.1 macrophage cell line (8% to 17%) and peritoneal macrophages (8.5% to 15%) form METs-like structures (METs-LS) in response to Escherichia coli and Candida albicans challenge. We found only a portion of murine METs-LS, which are released by dying macrophages, showed detectable killing effects on trapped E. coli but not C. albicans. Fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy analyses revealed that, in vitro, both microorganisms were entrapped in J774A.1 METs-LS composed of DNA and microbicidal proteins such as histone, myeloperoxidase and lysozyme. DNA components of both nucleus and mitochondrion origins were detectable in these structures. Additionally, METs-LS formation occurred independently of ROS produced by NADPH oxidase, and this process did not result in cell lysis. In summary, our results emphasized that microbes induced METs-LS in murine macrophage cells and that the microbicidal activity of these METs-LS differs greatly. We propose the function of METs-LS is to contain invading microbes at the infection site, thereby preventing the systemic diffusion of them, rather than significantly killing them. PMID:24587206

  8. Shell Structure, Melting and Dynamics of Ion Clusters Confined in an Octupolar Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Calvo, F.; Yurtsever, E.

    2009-12-03

    The stable structures of clusters of identical ions trapped in an isotropic octupolar trap are investigated using global optimization methods. These clusters form well defined shells of ions that are approximately solutions of the Thomson problem. In particular, magic numbers are found to correlate with highly symmetric configurations. Using Monte Carlo simulations, finite temperature properties are also investigated. Melting proceeds from the core, and takes place through a very progressive loss of the shell structure. The hollow shape is eventually lost at very high temperatures, where the ions essentially feel the confinement but not the Coulomb repulsion. The vibrational density of states shows marked differences with the harmonic case, but also with bulk Wigner crystals. The variations of the maximal Lyapunov exponent obtained from additional molecular dynamics trajectories reveals that the dynamics becomes increasingly chaotic as the temperature increases. With the decreasing influence of the Coulomb interaction, a more regular behavior is found at very high temperatures but, contrary to the quadrupolar case, still highly chaotic.

  9. Antimatter plasmas in a multipole trap for antihydrogen.

    PubMed

    Andresen, G; Bertsche, W; Boston, A; Bowe, P D; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Chartier, M; Deutsch, A; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Gill, D R; Gomberoff, K; Hangst, J S; Hayano, R S; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jørgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Telle, H H; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2007-01-12

    We have demonstrated storage of plasmas of the charged constituents of the antihydrogen atom, antiprotons and positrons, in a Penning trap surrounded by a minimum-B magnetic trap designed for holding neutral antiatoms. The neutral trap comprises a superconducting octupole and two superconducting, solenoidal mirror coils. We have measured the storage lifetimes of antiproton and positron plasmas in the combined Penning-neutral trap, and compared these to lifetimes without the neutral trap fields. The magnetic well depth was 0.6 T, deep enough to trap ground state antihydrogen atoms of up to about 0.4 K in temperature. We have demonstrated that both particle species can be stored for times long enough to permit antihydrogen production and trapping studies. PMID:17358606

  10. Application of linker technique to trap transiently interacting protein complexes for structural studies

    PubMed Central

    Reddy Chichili, Vishnu Priyanka; Kumar, Veerendra; Sivaraman, J.

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are key events controlling several biological processes. We have developed and employed a method to trap transiently interacting protein complexes for structural studies using glycine-rich linkers to fuse interacting partners, one of which is unstructured. Initial steps involve isothermal titration calorimetry to identify the minimum binding region of the unstructured protein in its interaction with its stable binding partner. This is followed by computational analysis to identify the approximate site of the interaction and to design an appropriate linker length. Subsequently, fused constructs are generated and characterized using size exclusion chromatography and dynamic light scattering experiments. The structure of the chimeric protein is then solved by crystallization, and validated both in vitro and in vivo by substituting key interacting residues of the full length, unlinked proteins with alanine. This protocol offers the opportunity to study crucial and currently unattainable transient protein interactions involved in various biological processes. PMID:26985443

  11. Structural features of northern Tarim basin: Implications for regional tectonics and petroleum traps

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Jia; Juafu Lu; Dongsheng Cai

    1998-01-01

    The rhombus-shaped Tarim basin in northwestern China is controlled mainly by two left-lateral strike-slip systems: the northeast-trending Altun fault zone along its southeastern side and the northeast-trending Aheqi fault zone along its northwestern side. In this paper, we discuss the northern Tarim basin`s structural features, which include three main tectonic units: the Kalpin uplift, the Kuqa depression, and the North Tarim uplift along the northern margin of the Tarim basin. Structural mapping in the Kalpin uplift shows that a series of imbricated thrust sheets have been overprinted by strike-slip faulting. The amount of strike-slip displacement is estimated to be 148 km by restoration of strike-slip structures in the uplift. The Kuqa depression is a Mesozoic-Cenozoic foredeep depression with well-developed flat-ramp structures and fault-related folds. The Baicheng basin, a Quaternary pull-apart basin, developed at the center of the Kuqa depression. Subsurface structures in the North Tarim uplift can be divided into the Mesozoic-Cenozoic and the Paleozoic lithotectonic sequences in seismic profiles. The Paleozoic litho-tectonic sequence exhibits the interference of earlier left-lateral and later right-lateral strike-slip structures. Many normal faults in the Mesozoic-Cenozoic litho-tectonic sequence form the negative flower structures in the North Tarim uplift; these structures commonly directly overlie the positive flower structures in the Paleozoic litho-tectonic sequence. The interference regions of the northwest-trending and northeast-trending folds in the Paleozoic tectonic sequence have been identified to have the best trap structures. Our structural analysis indicates that the Tarim basin is a transpressional foreland basin rejuvenated during the Cenozoic.

  12. Structure of cyclin G-associated kinase (GAK) trapped in different conformations using nanobodies

    PubMed Central

    Chaikuad, Apirat; Keates, Tracy; Vincke, Cécile; Kaufholz, Melanie; Zenn, Michael; Zimmermann, Bastian; Gutiérrez, Carlos; Zhang, Rong-guang; Hatzos-Skintges, Catherine; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Muyldermans, Serge; Herberg, Friedrich W.; Knapp, Stefan; Müller, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    GAK (cyclin G-associated kinase) is a key regulator of clathrin-coated vesicle trafficking and plays a central role during development. Additionally, due to the unusually high plasticity of its catalytic domain, it is a frequent ‘off-target’ of clinical kinase inhibitors associated with respiratory side effects of these drugs. In the present paper, we determined the crystal structure of the GAK catalytic domain alone and in complex with specific single-chain antibodies (nanobodies). GAK is constitutively active and weakly associates in solution. The GAK apo structure revealed a dimeric inactive state of the catalytic domain mediated by an unusual activation segment interaction. Co-crystallization with the nanobody NbGAK_4 trapped GAK in a dimeric arrangement similar to the one observed in the apo structure, whereas NbGAK_1 captured the activation segment of monomeric GAK in a well-ordered conformation, representing features of the active kinase. The presented structural and biochemical data provide insight into the domain plasticity of GAK and demonstrate the utility of nanobodies to gain insight into conformational changes of dynamic molecules. In addition, we present structural data on the binding mode of ATP mimetic inhibitors and enzyme kinetic data, which will support rational inhibitor design of inhibitors to reduce the off-target effect on GAK. PMID:24438162

  13. Stable and Vibrational Octupole Modes in Mo, Xe, Ba, La, Ce and Nd

    SciTech Connect

    Gore, P.M.; Hamilton, J.H.; Hwang, J.K.; Jones, E.F.; Peker, L.K.; Ramayya, A.V.; Zhang, X.Q.; Zhu, S.J.

    1998-05-18

    Evidence is presented for stable octupole deformation in neutron-rich nuclei, bounded by Z = 54-58 and N = 85-92. To either side of this region negative parity bands built on more vibrational type octupole modes are observed in {sup 140}Ba and {sup 152,154}Nd. The largest stable octupole deformation ({beta}{sub s} {approximately} 0.1) is found in {sup 144}Ba{sub as}. The theoretically predicted quenching ({beta}{sub s} {approximately} 0) of stable octupole deformation at higher spins is found in {sup 140}Ba. There is good agreement between theory and experiment for the strongly varying electric dipole moments as a function of mass for {sup 142-141}Ba. In odd-A {sup 142}Ba and odd-Z {sup 140}La, we observe parity doublets, two pairs of positive and negative parity bands with opposite spins. In {sup 145}La a strong coupled ground band with symmetric shape coexists with the asymmetric octupole shape which stabilizes above about spin 19/2. In {sup 145,147}La a strong reduction in E2 strength around 25/2 from band crossing is observed. The isotope {sup 109}Mo was identified and a new region of stable uctpole deformation is identified in {sup 107,108}Mo centered around N = 64-66 as earlier predicted. This is the first case of stable uctpole deformation involving only one pair of orbitals.

  14. Search for stable octupole deformation in the nucleus /sup 225/Fr

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, D.G.; Kurcewicz, W.; Loevhoeiden, G.; Nyboe, K.; Thorsteinsen, T.F.; Gietz, H.; Kaffrell, N.; Rogowski, J.; Naumann, R.A.; Borge, M.J.G.; and others

    1987-12-10

    The level structure of /sup 225/Fr has been studied from the /sup 225/Rn(..beta../sup -/) decay in on-line experiments at the ISOLDE facility. A level scheme was constructed on the basis of gamma--gamma coincidence data, and the multipolarities of many transitions were established by conversion electron measurements. Levels in /sup 225/Fr were also studied with the /sup 226/Ra(t,..cap alpha..)/sup 225/Fr reaction at the McMaster University Accelerator Laboratory, using a target of /sup 226/Ra(T/sub 1/2/ = 1600y) and a magnetic spectrograph to analyze the alpha spectra. The first three excited states, at 28.5, 82.5 and 128.2 keV, are interpreted as rotational band members based on the ground state, which is known to have I = 3/2. The (t,..cap alpha..) strengths to these levels indicate a 3/2/sup -/(532) assignment to the ground state. No evidence for an octupole deformation in /sup 225/Fr has been found so far, although analysis of data for other excited states is continuing.

  15. Search for the two-phonon octupole vibrational state in {sup 208}Pb

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenthal, D.J.; Henning, W.; Janssens, R.V.F.

    1995-08-01

    We performed an experiment to search for the two-phonon octupole vibrational state in {sup 208}Pb. Thick targets of {sup 208}Pb, {sup 209}Bi, {sup 58,64}Ni, and {sup 160}Gd were bombarded with 1305 MeV beams of were bombard {sup 208}Pb supplied by ATLAS. Gamma rays were detected using the Argonne-Notre Dame BGO gamma-ray facility, consisting of 12 Compton-suppressed germanium detectors surrounding an array of 50 BGO scintillators. We identified some 30 known gamma rays from {sup 208}Pb in the spectra gated by the 5{sup -} {yields} 3{sup -} and 3{sup -} {yields} 0{sup +} transitions in {sup 208}Pb. In addition, after unfolding these spectra for Compton response, we observed broad coincident structures in the energy region expected for the 2-phonon states. Furthermore, we confirmed the placement of a 2485 keV line observed previously in {sup 207}Pb and find no evidence consistent with the placement of this line in {sup 208}Pb. We are currently in the process of investigating the origin of the broadened lines observed in the spectra, extracting the excitation probability of states in {sup 208}Pb, and determining the relative probability of mutual excitation and neutron transfer in this reaction. An additional experiment is also being performed to collect much higher statistics germanium-germanium coincidence data for the thick {sup 208}Pb target.

  16. Enhancing the absorption capabilities of thin-film solar cells using sandwiched light trapping structures.

    PubMed

    Abdellatif, S; Kirah, K; Ghannam, R; Khalil, A S G; Anis, W

    2015-06-10

    A novel structure for thin-film solar cells is simulated with the purpose of maximizing the absorption of light in the active layer and of reducing the parasitic absorption in other layers. In the proposed structure, the active layer is formed from an amorphous silicon thin film sandwiched between silicon nanowires from above and photonic crystal structures from below. The upper electrical contact consists of an indium tin oxide layer, which serves also as an antireflection coating. A metal backreflector works additionally as the other contact. The simulation was done using a new reliable, efficient and generic optoelectronic approach. The suggested multiscale simulation model integrates the finite-difference time-domain algorithm used in solving Maxwell's equation in three dimensions with a commercial simulation platform based on the finite element method for carrier transport modeling. The absorption profile, the external quantum efficient, and the power conversion efficiency of the suggested solar cell are calculated. A noticeable enhancement is found in all the characteristics of the novel structure with an estimated 32% increase in the total conversion efficiency over a cell without any light trapping mechanisms. PMID:26192857

  17. Extension-related structural traps in fault basins of eastern Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, C.T.; Dennis, J.G.; Lumsden, W.W.

    1989-04-01

    Low-angle younger-over-older faults have been widely reported in eastern Nevada, although no general agreement exists on their origin. Three preferred models are (1) local gravity sliding, (2) mid-crustal ductile extension, and (3) a master detachment possibly extending into the mantle. None are fully supported by field evidence. Some low-angle faults in the White Pine, Duck Creek and Schell Creek Ranges involve ductile extension along incompetent sedimentary units and brittle extension of intercalated competent units to form lenticular stretch structures. Upper crustal extension may be an indirect response to midcrustal ductile extension that occurred during a Tertiary heating event. Between the Duck Creek and Schell Creek Ranges, extension attenuated the pre-carboniferous section, creating a depression in which Carboniferous rocks were preserved. Since this structure, termed a pseudograben, can be traced northward into a typical graben, basins may be initiated by attenuation, with rifting occurring later. In such basins, subsurface detachments should be expected. Some low-angle faults resemble megalandslides because fragmented competent units slid into depressions created by attenuation. With retreat of the geotherms, ductile extension was confined to deep crustal levels and rifting replaced low-angle faulting at higher levels. Potential extension traps in basins are large-scale stretch structures, porous and permeable units truncated and sealed by detachment, and tilted blocks cut by steep faults. Best prospects are likely to occur in basins subjected only to Tertiary heating because oil generated at that time would be tapped in developing extension structures.

  18. Investigation of charge trapping mechanism for nanocrystal-based organic nonvolatile floating gate memory devices by band structure analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong-Hoon; Lim, Ki-Tae; Park, Eung-Kyu; Shin, Ha-Chul; Kim, Chung Soo; Park, Kee-Chan; Ahn, Joung-Real; Bang, Jin Ho; Kim, Yong-Sang

    2016-05-01

    This paper investigates the charge trapping mechanism and electrical performance of CdSe nanocrystals, such as nanoparticles and nanowires in organic floating gate memory devices. Despite of same chemical component, each nanocrystals show different electrical performances with distinct trapping mechanism. CdSe nanoparticles trap holes in the memory device; on the contrary, nanowires trap electrons. This phenomenon is mainly due to the difference of energy band structures between nanoparticles and nanowires, measured by the ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. Also, we investigated the memory performance with C- V characteristics, charging and discharging phenomena, and retention time. The nanoparticle based hole trapping memory device has large memory window while the nanowire based electron trapping memory shows a narrow memory window. In spite of narrow memory window, the nanowire based memory device shows better retention performance of about 55% of the charge even after 104 sec of charging. The contrasting performance of nanoparticle and nanowire is attributed to the difference in their energy band and the morphology of thin layer in the device. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  19. Characterization and FDTD simulation analysis on light trapping structures of amorphous silicon thin films by laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lu; Jin, Jing; Yuan, Zhijun; Yang, Weiguang; Wang, Linjun; Shi, Weimin; Zhou, Jun; Lou, Qihong

    2016-05-01

    The effect of laser energy density on the light-trapping structures of amorphous silicon (α-Si) thin films is studied both theoretically and experimentally. The thin films are irradiated by a frequency-doubled (λ = 532 nm) Nd:YAG pulsed nanosecond laser. An effective finite difference time domain (FDTD) model is built to find the optimized laser energy density (EL) for the light trapping structures of α-Si. Based on the simulation analysis, it shows the variation of reflection spectra with laser energy density. The optimized reflection spectra at EL = 1000 mJ/cm2 measured by UV-visible spectroscopy confirms to agree well with that corresponding to the depth to diameter ratio (h/D) in the FDTD simulation. The surface morphology characterization by optical microscope (OM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) accords fairly well to of light-trapping modeling in the simulation.

  20. Stress influenced trapping processes in Si based multi-quantum well structures and heavy ions implanted Si

    SciTech Connect

    Ciurea, Magdalena Lidia Lazanu, Sorina

    2014-10-06

    Multi-quantum well structures and Si wafers implanted with heavy iodine and bismuth ions are studied in order to evaluate the influence of stress on the parameters of trapping centers. The experimental method of thermostimullatedcurrents without applied bias is used, and the trapping centers are filled by illumination. By modeling the discharge curves, we found in multilayered structures the parameters of both 'normal' traps and 'stress-induced' ones, the last having a Gaussian-shaped temperature dependence of the cross section. The stress field due to the presence of stopped heavy ions implanted into Si was modeled by a permanent electric field. The increase of the strain from the neighborhood of I ions to the neighborhood of Bi ions produces the broadening of some energy levels and also a temperature dependence of the cross sections for all levels.

  1. Chemical and Structural Analysis of an Antibody Folding Intermediate Trapped during Glycan Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Human IgG Fc glycosylation modulates immunological effector functions such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and phagocytosis. Engineering of Fc glycans therefore enables fine-tuning of the therapeutic properties of monoclonal antibodies. The N-linked glycans of Fc are typically complex-type, forming a network of noncovalent interactions along the protein surface of the Cγ2 domain. Here, we manipulate the mammalian glycan-processing pathway to trap IgG1 Fc at sequential stages of maturation, from oligomannose- to hybrid- to complex-type glycans, and show that the Fc is structurally stabilized following the transition of glycans from their hybrid- to complex-type state. X-ray crystallographic analysis of this hybrid-type intermediate reveals that N-linked glycans undergo conformational changes upon maturation, including a flip within the trimannosyl core. Our crystal structure of this intermediate reveals a molecular basis for antibody biogenesis and provides a template for the structure-guided engineering of the protein–glycan interface of therapeutic antibodies. PMID:23025485

  2. Experimental and theoretical study of dielectrophoretic particle trapping in arrays of insulating structures: Effect of particle size and shape.

    PubMed

    Saucedo-Espinosa, Mario A; Lapizco-Encinas, Blanca H

    2015-05-01

    Insulator-based dielectrophoresis (iDEP) employs insulating structures embedded in a microchannel to produce electric field gradients. This contribution presents a detailed analysis of the regions within an iDEP system where particles are likely to be retained due to dielectrophoretic trapping in a microchannel with an array of cylindrical insulating structures. The effects of particle size and shape on dielectrophoretic trapping were analyzed by employing 1 and 2 μm polystyrene particles and Escherichia coli cells. This research aims to study the mechanism behind dielectrophoretic trapping and develop a deeper understanding of iDEP systems. Mathematical modeling with COMSOL Multiphysics was employed to assess electrokinetic and dielectrophoretic particle velocities. Experiments were carried out to determine the location of dielectrophoretic barriers that block particle motion within an iDEP microchannel; this supported the estimation of a correction factor to match experiments and simulations. Particle velocities were predicted with the model, demonstrating how the different forces acting on the particles are in equilibrium when particle trapping occurs. The results showed that particle size and shape have a significant effect on the magnitude, location, and shape of the regions of dielectrophoretic trapping of particles, which are defined by DEP isovelocity lines and EK isovelocity lines. PMID:25487065

  3. Morphing structures of the Dionaea muscipula Ellis during the trap opening and closing

    PubMed Central

    Volkov, Alexander G; Forde-Tuckett, Victoria; Volkova, Maya I; Markin, Vladislav S

    2014-01-01

    The Venus flytrap is a marvelous plant that has intrigued scientists since the times of Charles Darwin. This carnivorous plant is capable of very fast movements to catch a prey. We found that the maximal speed of the trap closing in the Dionaea muscipula Ellis is about 130 000 times faster than the maximal speed of the trap opening. The mechanism and kinetics of this movement was debated for a long time. Here, the most recent Hydroelastic Curvature Model is applied to the analysis of this movement during closing and opening of the trap with or without a prey. Equations describing the trap movement were derived and verified with experimental data. Chloroform and ether, both anesthetic agents, induce action potentials and close the trap without the mechanical stimulation of trigger hairs. We tested this by dropping 10 μL of ether on the midrib inside the trap without touching any of the mechanosensitive trigger hairs. The trap closed slowly in 10 s. This is at least 20 times slower than the closing of the trap mechanically or electrically. The similar effect can be induced by placing 10 μL of chloroform on the midrib inside the trap, however, the lobes closing time in this case is as fast as closing after mechanical stimulation of the trigger hairs. PMID:24618927

  4. Possible octupole deformation in Cs and Ba nuclei from their differential radii

    SciTech Connect

    Sheline, R.K.; Jain, A.K.; Jain, K.

    1988-12-01

    The odd-even staggering of the differential radii of Fr and Ra and the Cs and Ba nuclei is compared. This staggering is inverted in the region of known octupole deformation in the Fr and Ra nuclei. The normal staggering is eliminated in the Cs nuclei and attenuated in the Ba nuclei for neutron numbers 85--88. This fact is used to suggest the possible existence of octupole deformation and its neutron number range in the Cs and Ba nuclear ground states.

  5. Influence of octupole interactions on the behavior of negative-parity states at low spins

    SciTech Connect

    Sitdikov, A. S. Safarov, R. Kh.; Kvasil, J.

    2006-12-15

    The energies of negative-parity levels based on two-particle states exhibit a nonlinear behavior at low spins versus the core-rotation energy because the alignment process has not yet been completed for them. This behavior of negative-parity levels in the low-spin region is satisfactorily described upon the inclusion of octupole-octupole interactions. This is demonstrated within the rotational model involving the Coriolis mixing of states for the even-even isotopes {sup 162-168}Hf.

  6. Specifications of the octupole magnets required for the ATF2 ultra-low ß* lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Marin, E.; Modena, M.; Tauchi, T.; Terunuma, N.; Tomas, R.; White, G.R.; /SLAC

    2014-05-28

    The Accelerator Test Facility 2 (ATF2) aims to test the novel chromaticity correction for higher chromaticity lattices as the one of CLIC. To this end the ATF2 ultra-low ß* lattice is designed to vertically focus the beam at the focal point or usually referred to as interaction point (IP), down to 23 nm. However when the measured multipole components of the ATF2 magnets are considered in the simulations, the evaluated spot sizes at the IP are well above the design value. The designed spot size is effectively recovered by inserting a pair of octupole magnets. In this note we address the technical specifications required for these octupole magnets.

  7. Spin structure of harmonically trapped one-dimensional atoms with spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Q.; Blume, D.

    2015-08-01

    We introduce a theoretical approach to determine the spin structure of harmonically trapped atoms with two-body zero-range interactions subject to an equal mixture of Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling created through Raman coupling of atomic hyperfine states. The spin structure of bosonic and fermionic two-particle systems with finite and infinite two-body interaction strength g is calculated. Taking advantage of the fact that the N -boson and N -fermion systems with infinitely large coupling strength g are analytically solvable for vanishing spin-orbit coupling strength kso and vanishing Raman coupling strength Ω , we develop an effective spin model that is accurate to second order in Ω for any kso and infinite g . The three- and four-particle systems are considered explicitly. It is shown that the effective spin Hamiltonian, which contains a Heisenberg exchange term and an anisotropic Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya exchange term, describes the transitions that these systems undergo with the change of kso as a competition between independent spin dynamics and nearest-neighbor spin interactions.

  8. One-step femtosecond laser patterning of light-trapping structure on dye-sensitized solar cell photoelectrodes†

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xi; Liu, Hewei; Huang, Xuezhen; Jiang, Hongrui

    2015-01-01

    Light-trapping patterns were constructed in TiO2 photoelectrodes for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) by a one-step femtosecond laser structuring method that utilized ablation to create patterns at the surface of nanostructured TiO2 films. As a result, much more light was trapped in the photoelectrodes. Grating and orthogonal-grid patterns were studied, and the light trapping performance was optimized through the adjustment of pattern spacing, which was easily realized in the laser ablation process. With a 5-μm-spacing orthogonal-grid pattern, DSSCs showed a highest photon-to-electron conversion efficiency of 9.32% under AM 1.5G, a 13.5% improvement compared to the same cell without laser ablation. This simple and universal laser ablation method could be used to process many kinds of nanomaterials, and could be applied for various devices with nanostructures. PMID:26113977

  9. Trapping and amplification of quasi-longitudinal whistler wave in kinetic Alfvén wave localized structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Rajesh Kumar; Sharma, Swati; Gaur, Nidhi; Sharma, R. P.

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we have studied the trapping of obliquely propagating (with respect to the ambient magnetic field) weak whistler wave due to inhomogeneity created by 3D kinetic Alfvén wave (KAW) in a magnetized plasma (magnetotail region). The nonlinearity arises due to ponderomotive effects associated with 3D KAW, consequently, the background density gets modified. The weak whistler wave propagating in this modified density gets either trapped or localized. The study has been carried out numerically and semi-analytically. The semi-analytical analysis show that the typical scale size of localized 3D KAW is of the order of ion gyroradius and that of the trapped whistler is even less than that. The relevance of the results is also pointed out in the context of the recent CLUSTER observations in magnetized plasmas where whistler waves have been detected along with coherent ion-scale magnetic structures.

  10. Time-resolved soft-x-ray spectroscopy of a magnetic octupole transition in nickel-like xenon, cesium, and barium ions

    SciTech Connect

    Trabert, E; Beiersdorfer, P; Brown, G V; Boyce, K; Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A; Porter, F S; Szymkowiak, A

    2005-11-11

    A microcalorimeter with event mode capability for time-resolved soft-x-ray spectroscopy, and a high-resolution flat-field EUV spectrometer have been employed at the Livermore EBIT-I electron beam ion trap for observations and wavelength measurements of M1, E2, and M3 decays of long-lived levels in the Ni-like ions Xe{sup 26+}, Cs{sup 27+}, and Ba{sup 28+}. Of particular interest is the lowest excited level, 3d{sup 9}4s {sup 3}D{sub 3}, which can only decay via a magnetic octupole (M3) transition. For this level in Xe an excitation energy of (590.40 {+-} 0.03eV) and a level lifetime of (11.5 {+-} 0.5 ms) have been determined.

  11. Extraterrestrial Helium (He@C60) Trapped in Fullerenes in the Sudbury Impact Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, L.; Bada, J. L.; Poreda, R. J.; Bunch, T. E.

    1997-01-01

    Fullerenes (C60 and C70) have recently been identified in a shock-produced breccia (Onaping Formation) associated with the 1.85-Ga Sudbury Impact Crater. The presence of parts-per-million levels of fullerenes in this impact structure raises interesting questions about the processes that led to the formation of fullerenes and the potential for delivery of intact organic material to the Earth by a large bolide (e.g., asteroid or comet). Two possible scenarios for the presence of fullerenes in the Sudbury impact deposits are that (1) fullerenes are synthesized within the impact plume from the C contained in the bolide; or (2) fullerenes are already present in the bolide and survived the impact event. The correlation of C and trapped noble gas atoms in meteorites is well established. Primitive meteorites contain several trapped noble gas components that have anomalous isotopic compositions, some of which may have a presolar origin. Several C-bearing phases, including SiC, graphite, and diamond, have been recognized as carriers of trapped noble gases. It has also been suggested that fullerenes (C60 and C70) might be a carrier of noble gas components in carbonaceous chondrites. Recently, fullerenes have been detected in separate samples in the Allende meteorite. Carbon-60 is large enough to enclose the noble gases He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe, but it is too small to contain diatomic gases such as N2 or triatomic gases such as CO2. Recent experimental work has demonstrated that noble gases of a specific isotopic composition can be introduced into synthetic fullerenes at high temperatures and pressures; these encapsulated gases can then be released by the breaking of one or more C bonds during step-heating under vacuum. These thermal-release patterns for He encapsulated within the C60 molecule (He@C60) are similar to the patterns for acid residues of carbonaceous chondrites, suggesting that fullerenes could be an additional carrier of trapped noble gases in acid residues of

  12. Superdeformed nuclei: Shells-vs-liquid drop, pairing-vs-thermal excitations, triaxial-vs-octupole shapes, super-superdeformation

    SciTech Connect

    Dudek, J.

    1987-01-01

    Mechanisms influencing the behavior of superdeformed nuclei are studied using several well established nuclear structure techniques. In particular: pairing, thermal excitation, shell and liquid-drop mechanisms are considered. The effects of quadrupole and hexadecapole (both axial and non-axial), and octupole deformation degrees of freedom are studied. Most of the results are illustrated using the case of /sup 152/Dy nucleus in which a superdeformed band extending up to I approx. 60 h-bar has been found in experiment. Some comparisons between /sup 152/Dy and the nuclei in the neighborhood are given. Calculations show that pairing ''de-aligns'' typically 6 to 8 units of angular momentum, as compared to the corresponding rigid rotation. This takes place for spins extending up to the highest limit, and thus diminishes the effective moments of inertia. Predicted octupole shape susceptibility is extremely large, significantly stronger than the susceptibilities known in the ground-states of many Actinide nuclei. Consequences of this result for the near-constancy of the dynamical moments of inertia are pointed out. Nuclear level densities calculated in function of spin, excitation energy and deformation explain the ''unusual'' side feeding pattern of the /sup 152/Dy superdeformed states. Predictions of super-superdeformed nuclear states (axis ratio varying between 2:1 and 3:1 or more) are given and exemplified for Erbium nuclei. Finally, the problem of superdeformation stability and the influence of increased collective inertia on a barrier penetration are examined. An analytical expression for the effective inertia parameter is obtained and its derivation outlined. 35 refs., 9 figs.

  13. Octupole Resonance in the AGS at High Intensity: A SIMBAD study

    SciTech Connect

    Luccio, A.U.; D'Imperio, N.L.

    2005-06-08

    We studied the Octupole (Montague) resonance in the AGS, in its high intensity mode, by tracking with the PIC code SIMBAD. We calculated, turn-by-turn, the betatron tune footprint from the eigenvalues of the one-turn matrix. We show that one should exercise particular caution when the betatron tunes are close together, since the matrix gives ambiguous results at the resonance.

  14. Betatron tune spread generation and differential chromaticity control by octupole families at Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, P.M.; Alexahin, Y.; Annala, J.; Lebedev, V.A.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    Existing Tevatron octupoles have been rearranged into four functional families. Two of these families generate betatron tune spreads in the vertical and horizontal planes whereas the other two control the differential chromaticity between the proton and antiproton helices. The calculated effect on the tunes and chromaticity is compared with direct measurements. Analytical formulas for betatron tune distribution functions are presented.

  15. Octupole deformation in 144,146Ba measured by Coulomb excitation of radioactive beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucher, Brian; Zhu, Shaofei; ANL, LBNL, LLNL, Rochester, Florida State, Liverpool, Maryland, Notre Dame, Ohio, W. Scotland Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The exotic, neutron-rich 144Ba (t1 / 2 = 11.5 s) and 146Ba (t1 / 2 = 2.2 s) nuclei are expected to exhibit some of the strongest octupole correlations in A < 200 systems. Up to now, evidence for such strong octupole correlations has been inferred from observations of low-lying negative-parity states and from the interleaving of positive- and negative-parity levels in the ground-state band. However, the E1 transition strengths are very different in these two nuclei, with two orders of magnitude reduction in 146Ba. In this experiment, we measure the octupole strength directly by Coulomb excitation of post-accelerated 144,146Ba beams produced at CARIBU using CHICO2 and GRETINA. In 144Ba, we found B(E3;3 -->0) = 48(-34+ 25) W.u., a value considerably larger than theoretical predictions, while preliminary results for 146Ba are also indicative of strong octupole collectivity. The experimental conditions, the analysis, and the results from these challenging new measurements will be presented. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Physics, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357 (ANL), DE-AC02-05CH11231 (LBNL, GRETINA), DOE DE-AC52-07NA27344 (LLNL), and NSF.

  16. Direct evidence of octupole deformation in neutron-rich 144Ba

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bucher, B.; Zhu, S.; Wu, C. Y.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Cline, D.; Hayes, A. B.; Albers, M.; Ayangeakaa, A. D.; Butler, P. A.; Campbell, C. M.; et al

    2016-03-17

    Here, the neutron-rich nucleus 144Ba (t1/2 = 11.5 s) is expected to exhibit some of the strongest octupole correlations among nuclei with mass numbers A less than 200. Until now, indirect evidence for such strong correlations has been inferred from observations such as enhanced E1 transitions and interleaving positive- and negative-parity levels in the ground-state band. In this experiment, the octupole strength was measured directly by sub-barrier, multistep Coulomb excitation of a post-accelerated 650-MeV 144Ba beam on a 1.0–mg/cm2 208Pb target. The measured value of the matrix element, < 31–∥M(E3)∥01+ >= 0.65(+17–23) eb3/2, corresponds to a reduced B(E3) transition probabilitymore » of 48(+25–34) W.u. This result represents an unambiguous determination of the octupole collectivity, is larger than any available theoretical prediction, and is consistent with octupole deformation.« less

  17. Direct Evidence of Octupole Deformation in Neutron-Rich ^{144}Ba.

    PubMed

    Bucher, B; Zhu, S; Wu, C Y; Janssens, R V F; Cline, D; Hayes, A B; Albers, M; Ayangeakaa, A D; Butler, P A; Campbell, C M; Carpenter, M P; Chiara, C J; Clark, J A; Crawford, H L; Cromaz, M; David, H M; Dickerson, C; Gregor, E T; Harker, J; Hoffman, C R; Kay, B P; Kondev, F G; Korichi, A; Lauritsen, T; Macchiavelli, A O; Pardo, R C; Richard, A; Riley, M A; Savard, G; Scheck, M; Seweryniak, D; Smith, M K; Vondrasek, R; Wiens, A

    2016-03-18

    The neutron-rich nucleus ^{144}Ba (t_{1/2}=11.5  s) is expected to exhibit some of the strongest octupole correlations among nuclei with mass numbers A less than 200. Until now, indirect evidence for such strong correlations has been inferred from observations such as enhanced E1 transitions and interleaving positive- and negative-parity levels in the ground-state band. In this experiment, the octupole strength was measured directly by sub-barrier, multistep Coulomb excitation of a post-accelerated 650-MeV ^{144}Ba beam on a 1.0-mg/cm^{2} ^{208}Pb target. The measured value of the matrix element, ⟨3_{1}^{-}∥M(E3)∥0_{1}^{+}⟩=0.65(+17/-23) eb^{3/2}, corresponds to a reduced B(E3) transition probability of 48(+25/-34)  W.u. This result represents an unambiguous determination of the octupole collectivity, is larger than any available theoretical prediction, and is consistent with octupole deformation. PMID:27035298

  18. Direct Evidence of Octupole Deformation in Neutron-Rich 144Ba

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucher, B.; Zhu, S.; Wu, C. Y.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Cline, D.; Hayes, A. B.; Albers, M.; Ayangeakaa, A. D.; Butler, P. A.; Campbell, C. M.; Carpenter, M. P.; Chiara, C. J.; Clark, J. A.; Crawford, H. L.; Cromaz, M.; David, H. M.; Dickerson, C.; Gregor, E. T.; Harker, J.; Hoffman, C. R.; Kay, B. P.; Kondev, F. G.; Korichi, A.; Lauritsen, T.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Pardo, R. C.; Richard, A.; Riley, M. A.; Savard, G.; Scheck, M.; Seweryniak, D.; Smith, M. K.; Vondrasek, R.; Wiens, A.

    2016-03-01

    The neutron-rich nucleus 144Ba (t1 /2=11.5 s ) is expected to exhibit some of the strongest octupole correlations among nuclei with mass numbers A less than 200. Until now, indirect evidence for such strong correlations has been inferred from observations such as enhanced E 1 transitions and interleaving positive- and negative-parity levels in the ground-state band. In this experiment, the octupole strength was measured directly by sub-barrier, multistep Coulomb excitation of a post-accelerated 650-MeV 144Ba beam on a 1.0 -mg /cm2 208Pb target. The measured value of the matrix element, ⟨31 -∥M (E 3 )∥01 +⟩=0.65 (+17/-23) e b3 /2, corresponds to a reduced B (E 3 ) transition probability of 48 (+25/-34) W .u . This result represents an unambiguous determination of the octupole collectivity, is larger than any available theoretical prediction, and is consistent with octupole deformation.

  19. Observation of hyperfine mixing in measurements of a magnetic octupole decay in isotopically pure nickel-like 129Xe and 132Xe ions

    SciTech Connect

    Trabert, E; Beiersdorfer, P; Brown, G V

    2006-12-21

    We present measurements of high statistical significance of the rate of the magnetic octupole (M3) decay in nickel-like ions of isotopically pure {sup 129}Xe and {sup 132}Xe. On {sup 132}Xe, an isotope with zero nuclear spin and therefore without hyperfine structure, the lifetime of the metastable level was established as (15.06 {+-} 0.24) ms. On {sup 129}Xe, an additional fast (2.7 {+-} 0.1 ms) decay component was established that represents hyperfine mixing with a level that decays by electric quadrupole (E2) radiation.

  20. Mismatch repair inhibits homeologous recombination via coordinated directional unwinding of trapped DNA structures.

    PubMed

    Tham, Khek-Chian; Hermans, Nicolaas; Winterwerp, Herrie H K; Cox, Michael M; Wyman, Claire; Kanaar, Roland; Lebbink, Joyce H G

    2013-08-01

    Homeologous recombination between divergent DNA sequences is inhibited by DNA mismatch repair. In Escherichia coli, MutS and MutL respond to DNA mismatches within recombination intermediates and prevent strand exchange via an unknown mechanism. Here, using purified proteins and DNA substrates, we find that in addition to mismatches within the heteroduplex region, secondary structures within the displaced single-stranded DNA formed during branch migration within the recombination intermediate are involved in the inhibition. We present a model that explains how higher-order complex formation of MutS, MutL, and DNA blocks branch migration by preventing rotation of the DNA strands within the recombination intermediate. Furthermore, we find that the helicase UvrD is recruited to directionally resolve these trapped intermediates toward DNA substrates. Thus, our results explain on a mechanistic level how the coordinated action between MutS, MutL, and UvrD prevents homeologous recombination and maintains genome stability. PMID:23932715

  1. Symmetry of the CMB sky as a new test of its statistical isotropy. Non cosmological octupole?

    SciTech Connect

    Naselsky, P.; Hansen, M.; Kim, J. E-mail: kirstejn@nbi.dk

    2011-09-01

    In this article we propose a novel test for statistical anisotropy of the CMB ΔT( n-circumflex = (θ,φ)). The test is based on the fact, that the Galactic foregrounds have a remarkably strong symmetry with respect to their antipodal points with respect to the Galactic plane, while the cosmological signal should not be symmetric or asymmetric under these transitions. We have applied the test for the octupole component of the WMAP ILC 7 map, by looking at a{sub 3,1} and a{sub 3,3}, and their ratio to a{sub 3,2} both for real and imaginary values. We find abnormal symmetry of the octupole component at the level of 0.58%, compared to Monte Carlo simulations. By using the analysis of the phases of the octupole we found remarkably strong cross-correlations between the phases of the kinematic dipole and the ILC 7 octupole, in full agreement with previous results. We further test the multipole range 2 < l < 100, by investigating the ratio between the l+m = even and l+m = odd parts of power spectra. We compare the results to simulations of a Gaussian random sky, and find significant departure from the statistically isotropic and homogeneous case, for a very broad range of multipoles. We found that for the most prominent peaks of our estimator, the phases of the corresponding harmonics are coherent with phases of the octupole. We believe, our test would be very useful for detections of various types of residuals of the foreground and systematic effects at a very broad range of multipoles 2 ≤ l ≤ 1500−3000 for the forthcoming PLANCK CMB map, before any conclusions about primordial non-Gaussianity and statistical anisotropy of the CMB.

  2. Impact of structural heterogeneity on upscaled models for large-scale CO2 migration and trapping in saline aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasda, Sarah E.; Nilsen, Halvor M.; Dahle, Helge K.

    2013-12-01

    Structural heterogeneity of the caprock surface influences both migration patterns and trapping efficiency for CO2 injected in open saline aquifers. Understanding these mechanisms relies on appropriate modeling tools to simulate CO2 flow over hundreds of square kilometers and several hundred years during the postinjection period. Vertical equilibrium (VE) models are well suited for this purpose. However, topographical heterogeneity below the scale of model resolution requires upscaling, for example by using traditional flow-based homogenization techniques. This can significantly simplify the geologic model and reduce computational effort while still capturing the relevant physical processes. In this paper, we identify key structural parameters, such as dominant amplitude and wavelength of the traps, that determine the form of the upscaled constitutive functions. We also compare the strength of these geologic controls on CO2 migration and trapping to other mechanisms such as capillarity. This allows for a better understanding of the dominant physical processes and their impact on storage security. It also provides intuition on which upscaling approach is best suited for the system of interest. We apply these concepts to realistic structurally heterogeneous surfaces that have been developed using different geologic depositional models. We show that while amplitude is important for determining the amount of CO2 trapped, the spacing between the traps, distribution of spillpoint locations, large-scale formation dip angle affect the shape of the functions and thus the dynamics of plume migration. We also show for these cases that the topography characterized by shorter wavelength features is better suited for upscaling, while the longer wavelength surface can be sufficiently resolved. These results can inform the type of geological characterization that is required to build the most reliable upscaled models for large-scale CO2 migration.

  3. Observation of structural relaxation during exciton self-trapping via excited-state resonant impulsive stimulated Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mance, J G; Felver, J J; Dexheimer, S L

    2015-02-28

    We detect the change in vibrational frequency associated with the transition from a delocalized to a localized electronic state using femtosecond vibrational wavepacket techniques. The experiments are carried out in the mixed-valence linear chain material [Pt(en)2][Pt(en)2Cl2]⋅(ClO4)4 (en = ethylenediamine, C2H8N2), a quasi-one-dimensional system with strong electron-phonon coupling. Vibrational spectroscopy of the equilibrated self-trapped exciton is carried out using a multiple pulse excitation technique: an initial pump pulse creates a population of delocalized excitons that self-trap and equilibrate, and a time-delayed second pump pulse tuned to the red-shifted absorption band of the self-trapped exciton impulsively excites vibrational wavepacket oscillations at the characteristic vibrational frequencies of the equilibrated self-trapped exciton state by the resonant impulsive stimulated Raman mechanism, acting on the excited state. The measurements yield oscillations at a frequency of 160 cm(-1) corresponding to a Raman-active mode of the equilibrated self-trapped exciton with Pt-Cl stretching character. The 160 cm(-1) frequency is shifted from the previously observed wavepacket frequency of 185 cm(-1) associated with the initially generated exciton and from the 312 cm(-1) Raman-active symmetric stretching mode of the ground electronic state. We relate the frequency shifts to the changes in charge distribution and local structure that create the potential that stabilizes the self-trapped state. PMID:25725733

  4. Observation of structural relaxation during exciton self-trapping via excited-state resonant impulsive stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mance, J. G.; Felver, J. J.; Dexheimer, S. L.

    2015-02-28

    We detect the change in vibrational frequency associated with the transition from a delocalized to a localized electronic state using femtosecond vibrational wavepacket techniques. The experiments are carried out in the mixed-valence linear chain material [Pt(en){sub 2}][Pt(en){sub 2}Cl{sub 2}]⋅(ClO{sub 4}){sub 4} (en = ethylenediamine, C{sub 2}H{sub 8}N{sub 2}), a quasi-one-dimensional system with strong electron-phonon coupling. Vibrational spectroscopy of the equilibrated self-trapped exciton is carried out using a multiple pulse excitation technique: an initial pump pulse creates a population of delocalized excitons that self-trap and equilibrate, and a time-delayed second pump pulse tuned to the red-shifted absorption band of the self-trapped exciton impulsively excites vibrational wavepacket oscillations at the characteristic vibrational frequencies of the equilibrated self-trapped exciton state by the resonant impulsive stimulated Raman mechanism, acting on the excited state. The measurements yield oscillations at a frequency of 160 cm{sup −1} corresponding to a Raman-active mode of the equilibrated self-trapped exciton with Pt-Cl stretching character. The 160 cm{sup −1} frequency is shifted from the previously observed wavepacket frequency of 185 cm{sup −1} associated with the initially generated exciton and from the 312 cm{sup −1} Raman-active symmetric stretching mode of the ground electronic state. We relate the frequency shifts to the changes in charge distribution and local structure that create the potential that stabilizes the self-trapped state.

  5. Artificially Structured Boundary For Antihydrogen Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ordonez, C. A.

    2011-06-01

    It may be possible to confine antiprotons using an artificially structured boundary, as part of a process for synthesizing antihydrogen. An artificially structured boundary is defined at present as one that produces a spatially periodic static field, such that the spatial period and range of the field is much smaller than the dimensions of a cloud, plasma or beam of charged particles that is confined by the boundary. A modified Kingdon trap could employ an artificially structured boundary at the location of inner electrodes. The artificially structured boundary would produce a multipole magnetic field that keeps confined particles from reaching the inner electrodes. The magnetic field would be sufficiently short in range to affect the particle trajectories only in close proximity to the inner electrodes. The conditions for producing such a magnetic field have been assessed. The results indicate that the magnetic field must be an octupole or higher order field.

  6. Universal, non-monotonic structure in the saturation curves of a linear Paul trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, James; Kwolek, Jonathan; Goodman, Douglas; Blümel, Reinhold; Smith, Winthrop

    2016-05-01

    A common technique to measure ion-atom collision rates in a hybrid trap if the ions have no optical transitions (e.g. alkalis) is to monitor the fluorescence of the neutrals in the presence of a saturated linear Paul trap (LPT). We present numerical simulations, analytical calculations, and experimental results that show that the steady-state ion capacity of an LPT, Ns, exhibits nonlinear, nonmonotonic behavior as a function of ion loading rate, Λ. The steady state as a function of loading rate, Ns(Λ) , shows four distinct regions. In Region I, at the lowest Λ, Ns(Λ) increases monotonically. Then, Ns(Λ) reaches a plateau in Region II, before decreasing to a local minimum in Region III. Finally, in Region IV, Ns(Λ) once again increases monotonically. This behavior appears universal to any Paul trap, regardless of geometry or species trapped. We examine this behavior experimentally as a function of the q stability parameter of the Paul trap and simulate numerically the effect of the particular trap geometry on the onset of each of the four regions. Funding from NSF Grant PHY-1307874.

  7. Decay of quadrupole-octupole 1- states in 40Ca and 140Ce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derya, V.; Tsoneva, N.; Aumann, T.; Bhike, M.; Endres, J.; Gooden, M.; Hennig, A.; Isaak, J.; Lenske, H.; Löher, B.; Pietralla, N.; Savran, D.; Tornow, W.; Werner, V.; Zilges, A.

    2016-03-01

    Background: Two-phonon excitations originating from the coupling of two collective one-phonon states are of great interest in nuclear structure physics. One possibility to generate low-lying E 1 excitations is the coupling of quadrupole and octupole phonons. Purpose: In this work, the γ -decay behavior of candidates for the (21+⊗31-)1- state in the doubly magic nucleus 40Ca and in the heavier and semimagic nucleus 140Ce is investigated. Methods: (γ ⃗,γ') experiments have been carried out at the High Intensity γ -ray Source (HI γ S ) facility in combination with the high-efficiency γ -ray spectroscopy setup γ3 consisting of HPGe and LaBr3 detectors. The setup enables the acquisition of γ -γ coincidence data and, hence, the detection of direct decay paths. Results: In addition to the known ground-state decays, for 40Ca the decay into the 31- state was observed, while for 140Ce the direct decays into the 21+ and the 02+ state were detected. The experimentally deduced transition strengths and excitation energies are compared to theoretical calculations in the framework of EDF theory plus QPM approach and systematically analyzed for N =82 isotones. In addition, negative parities for two J =1 states in 44Ca were deduced simultaneously. Conclusions: The experimental findings together with the theoretical calculations support the two-phonon character of the 11- excitation in the light-to-medium-mass nucleus 40Ca as well as in the stable even-even N =82 nuclei.

  8. Role of bioengineering structures made of willow cuttings in marly sediment trapping: a real size experiment in the Francon catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, Freddy; Labonne, Sophie

    2013-04-01

    Improving the understanding of the role of vegetation and bioengineering structures on erosion and sedimentation control is a key issue today for the scientific community working both in geosciences and restoration ecology. In the Southern French Alps, ecological rehabilitation works were carried out in April 2008 in a marly basin (Francon, 73 ha) belonging to an experimental catchment of the Draix-Bléone complex, labellized Observatoire of Research in Environment (ORE). It focused on 30 gullies on 20 ha and consisted in the set-up of 672 bioengineering structures of two different types: brush layers of cuttings on deadwood microdams (BL) and brush layers and brush mats of cuttings on deadwood microdams (BLM). 25.000 cuttings of willows (Salix purpurea and S. eleagnos) were used for this purpose. Our objective was to validate former results and to improve the knowledge on the performance of bioengineering structures for sediment trapping during heavy rainfall events. Measurements were made on 305 structures (38 BL and 267 BLM) in 25 gullies. After 5 years (2008 to 2012), results revealed a mean annual trapping of 0.05 m3.yr-1 of sediment per structure, with 0.03 m3.yr-1 for BL and 0.06 m3.yr-1 for BLM. These results show lower values compared to those obtained in previous studies, due to damages on a large part of the structures by high intensity rainfall events. These damages have been mainly observed in case of low vegetation cover on gully sides and when gully floors showed steep slopes. On opposite cases, works were not damaged due to vegetation roughness which limits runoff concentration. We observed that 78 of these structures annually trapped more than 0.05 m3, with maximum values of up to 0.25 m3 per structure, thus showing the potential of efficient structures for sediment trapping. The bioengineering strategy has therefore been improved by implanting vegetation on bare gully sides to avoid damages and allow efficient sediment trapping. Measurements will

  9. The nature of the TRAP-Anti-TRAP complex.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masahiro; Heddle, Jonathan G; Kikuchi, Kenichi; Unzai, Satoru; Akashi, Satoko; Park, Sam-Yong; Tame, Jeremy R H

    2009-02-17

    Tryptophan biosynthesis is subject to exquisite control in species of Bacillus and has become one of the best-studied model systems in gene regulation. The protein TRAP (trp RNA-binding attenuation protein) predominantly forms a ring-shaped 11-mer, which binds cognate RNA in the presence of tryptophan to suppress expression of the trp operon. TRAP is itself regulated by the protein Anti-TRAP, which binds to TRAP and prevents RNA binding. To date, the nature of this interaction has proved elusive. Here, we describe mass spectrometry and analytical centrifugation studies of the complex, and 2 crystal structures of the TRAP-Anti-TRAP complex. These crystal structures, both refined to 3.2-A resolution, show that Anti-TRAP binds to TRAP as a trimer, sterically blocking RNA binding. Mass spectrometry shows that 11-mer TRAP may bind up to 5 AT trimers, and an artificial 12-mer TRAP may bind 6. Both forms of TRAP make the same interactions with Anti-TRAP. Crystallization of wild-type TRAP with Anti-TRAP selectively pulls the 12-mer TRAP form out of solution, so the crystal structure of wild-type TRAP-Anti-TRAP complex reflects a minor species from a mixed population. PMID:19164760

  10. INFLUENCE OF FILM STRUCTURE AND LIGHT ON CHARGE TRAPPING AND DISSIPATION DYNAMICS IN SPUN-CAST ORGANIC THIN-FILM TRANSISTORS MEASURED BY SCANNING KELVIN PROBE MICROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Teague, L.; Moth, M.; Anthony, J.

    2012-05-03

    Herein, time-dependent scanning Kelvin probe microscopy of solution processed organic thin film transistors (OTFTs) reveals a correlation between film microstructure and OTFT device performance with the location of trapped charge within the device channel. The accumulation of the observed trapped charge is concurrent with the decrease in I{sub SD} during operation (V{sub G}=-40 V, V{sub SD}= -10 V). We discuss the charge trapping and dissipation dynamics as they relate to the film structure and show that application of light quickly dissipates the observed trapped charge.

  11. Numerical simulation of crosstalk in reduced pitch HgCdTe photon-trapping structure pixel arrays.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Jonathan; Bellotti, Enrico

    2013-06-17

    We have investigated crosstalk in HgCdTe photovoltaic pixel arrays employing a photon trapping (PT) structure realized with a periodic array of pillars intended to provide broadband operation. We have found that, compared to non-PT pixel arrays with similar geometry, the array employing the PT structure has a slightly higher optical crosstalk. However, when the total crosstalk is evaluated, the presence of the PT region drastically reduces the total crosstalk; making the use of the PT structure not only useful to obtain broadband operation, but also desirable for reducing crosstalk in small pitch detector arrays. PMID:23787659

  12. The effect of trapping on hydrogen-induced plasticity and fracture in structural alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, I. M.; Dollar, M.

    1990-01-01

    It has previously been noted that, for a given alloy system, microstructural manipulation may result in large variations in hydrogen susceptibility at a given strength level; it may even be possible to obtain inversions of susceptibility in which higher strengths may be associated with greater embrittlement resistance. An examination is presently conducted of the consequences of hydrogen-heterogeneity interactions, or 'trapping', in several alloy systems; these will include both conventional ferrous and nonferrous ones, and novel alloy systems. Deleterious trapping dominates behavior in the presence of large local concentrations of hydrogen; plasticity modifications due to hydrogen exercise a dominant influence on embrittlement susceptibility when relatively weak traps are present, as well as when a more uniform distribution of hydrogen is present.

  13. Coulomb Excitation with CARIBU Beams: Octupole Strength in 144Ba Measured with GRETINA and CHICO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucher, Brian; Zhu, Shaofei; ANL, LBNL, LLNL, Rochester, Florida St, Liverpool, Maryland, Notre Dame, Ohio,; W. Scotland Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    The neutron-rich barium isotopes sit in one of the few mass regions on the nuclear chart observed to display octupole correlations. These isotopes are challenging to study since they lie far from stability and are thus difficult to produce in large quantities. In particular, this region is interesting for studying the evolution of octupole correlations since the enhancement of the E1 strength drops by an order of magnitude from 144Ba to 146Ba, where shell corrections appear to play a significant role. To provide unambiguous insight into the octupole correlations, B(E3) strengths have been measured using Coulomb excitation of 144Ba beams at 650 MeV on a 1 mg/cm2 208Pb target. This experiment represents the first successful measurement utilizing re-accelerated CARIBU beams combined with the γ-ray tracking array GRETINA and the auxiliary charged-particle detector CHICO2. Preliminary results from the experiment will be presented. The neutron-rich barium isotopes sit in one of the few mass regions on the nuclear chart observed to display octupole correlations. These isotopes are challenging to study since they lie far from stability and are thus difficult to produce in large quantities. In particular, this region is interesting for studying the evolution of octupole correlations since the enhancement of the E1 strength drops by an order of magnitude from 144Ba to 146Ba, where shell corrections appear to play a significant role. To provide unambiguous insight into the octupole correlations, B(E3) strengths have been measured using Coulomb excitation of 144Ba beams at 650 MeV on a 1 mg/cm2 208Pb target. This experiment represents the first successful measurement utilizing re-accelerated CARIBU beams combined with the γ-ray tracking array GRETINA and the auxiliary charged-particle detector CHICO2. Preliminary results from the experiment will be presented. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Physics, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH

  14. A differentially pumped dual linear quadrupole ion trap (DLQIT) mass spectrometer: a mass spectrometer capable of MS(n) experiments free from interfering reactions.

    PubMed

    Owen, Benjamin C; Jarrell, Tiffany M; Schwartz, Jae C; Oglesbee, Rob; Carlsen, Mark; Archibold, Enada F; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I

    2013-12-01

    A novel differentially pumped dual linear quadrupole ion trap (DLQIT) mass spectrometer was designed and built to facilitate tandem MS experiments free from interfering reactions. The instrument consists of two differentially pumped Thermo Scientific linear quadrupole ion trap (LQIT) systems that have been connected via an ion transfer octupole encased in a machined manifold. Tandem MS experiments can be performed in the front trap and then the resulting product ions can be transferred via axial ejection into the back trap for further, independent tandem MS experiments in a differentially pumped area. This approach allows the examination of consecutive collision-activated dissociation (CAD) and ion-molecule reactions without unwanted side reactions that often occur when CAD and ion-molecule reactions are examined in the same space. Hence, it greatly facilitates investigations of ion structures. In addition, the overall lower pressure of the DLQIT, as compared to commercial LQIT instruments, results in a reduction of unwanted side reactions with atmospheric contaminants, such as water and oxygen, in CAD and ion-molecule experiments. PMID:24171553

  15. Octupole deformation in the ground states of even-even nuclei: A global analysis within the covariant density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agbemava, S. E.; Afanasjev, A. V.; Ring, P.

    2016-04-01

    A systematic investigation of octupole-deformed nuclei is presented for even-even systems with Z ≤106 located between the two-proton and two-neutron driplines. For this study we use five most-up-to-date covariant energy density functionals of different types, with a nonlinear meson coupling, with density-dependent meson couplings, and with density-dependent zero-range interactions. Pairing correlations are treated within relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov theory based on an effective separable particle-particle interaction of finite range. This allows us to assess theoretical uncertainties within the present covariant models for the prediction of physical observables relevant for octupole-deformed nuclei. In addition, a detailed comparison with the predictions of nonrelativistic models is performed. A new region of octupole deformation, centered around Z ˜98 ,N ˜196 is predicted for the first time. In terms of its size in the (Z ,N ) plane and the impact of octupole deformation on binding energies this region is similar to the best known region of octupole-deformed nuclei centered at Z ˜90 ,N ˜136 . For the later island of octupole-deformed nuclei, the calculations suggest substantial increase of its size as compared with available experimental data.

  16. Evidence for charge-trapping inducing polymorphic structural-phase transition in pentacene.

    PubMed

    Ando, Masahiko; Kehoe, Tom B; Yoneya, Makoto; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Duffy, Claudia M; Minakata, Takashi; Phillips, Richard T; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2015-01-01

    Trapped-charge-induced transformation of pentacene polymorphs is observed by using in situ Raman spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations reveal that the charge should be localized in pentacene molecules at the interface with static intermolecular disorder along the long axis. Quantum chemical calculations of the intermolecular transfer integrals suggest the disorder to be large enough to induce Anderson-type localization. PMID:25382806

  17. High Spin States and Octupole Deformation in Neutron-Rich ^145,147La Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, S. J.; Hamilton, J. H.; Ramayya, A. V.; Babu, B. R. S.; Jones, E. F.; Kormicki, J.; Daniel, A. V.; Hwang, J. K.; Beyer, C. J.; Wang, M. G.; Long, G. L.; Li, M.; Zhu, L. Y.; Gan, C. Y.; Ma, W. C.; Cole, J. D.; Aryaeinejad, R.; Dardenne, Y. X.; Drigert, M. W.; Rasmussen, J. O.; Asztalos, S.; Lee, I. Y.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Chu, S. Y.; Gregorich, K. E.; Mohar, M. F.; Stoyer, M. A.; Lougheed, R. W.; Moody, K. J.; Wild, J. F.; Prussin, S. G.

    1998-04-01

    High spin states in neutron-rich odd-Z nuclei ^145,147La have been investigated from the study of prompt γ- rays in spontaneous fission of ^252Cf by using γ-γ- and γ-γ-γ- coincidence techniques. Alternating parity bands are extended up to spins I=(41/2) and I=(43/2) in ^145La and ^147La, respectively. Strong E1 transitions between the negative and positive parity bands give evidence for stable octupole deformation. The new higher spin levels give evidence for rotational enhancement of the stability of the octupole deformation. These collective bands show competition and co-existence between symmetric and asymmetric shapes in ^145La. Band crossing was found around hbarω≈ 0.26 ~0.30 MeV in both nuclei and these backbends are related to the alignment of two i_13/2 neutron from cranked shell model calculations.

  18. High-power ion-cyclotron heating on the levitated octupole

    SciTech Connect

    Dexter, R.N.; Fortgang, C.M.; Prager, S.C.; Sprott, J.C.; Strait, E.J.; Twichell, J.C.

    1982-03-01

    Experiments are underway in the Wisconsin Levitated Toroidal Octupole to create hot, dense plasmas to facilitate the study of ..beta.. limits and related phenomena such as Pfirsch-Schlueter and bootstrap currents. The question of ballooning mode instability limits on ..beta.. = 8 ..pi..nk(T/sub i/+T/sub e/)/B/sup 2/ is of general importance for all toroidal systems, and ICRF heating should permit study of high ..beta.. plasmas with lower collisionality and smaller gyroradii than those of the high ..beta.. gun-injected plasmas currently under study in the Octupole. To these ends we are developing sources capable of delivering 4 MW to the plasma (1.5 MW coupled to the plasma to date, the rest under development).

  19. Trapping a translocating protein within the anthrax toxin channel: implications for the secondary structure of permeating proteins

    PubMed Central

    Jennings-Antipov, Laura D.; Jakes, Karen S.; Finkelstein, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Anthrax toxin consists of three proteins: lethal factor (LF), edema factor (EF), and protective antigen (PA). This last forms a heptameric channel, (PA63)7, in the host cell’s endosomal membrane, allowing the former two (which are enzymes) to be translocated into the cytosol. (PA63)7 incorporated into planar bilayer membranes forms a channel that translocates LF and EF, with the N terminus leading the way. The channel is mushroom-shaped with a cap containing the binding sites for EF and LF, and an ∼100 Å–long, 15 Å–wide stem. For proteins to pass through the stem they clearly must unfold, but is secondary structure preserved? To answer this question, we developed a method of trapping the polypeptide chain of a translocating protein within the channel and determined the minimum number of residues that could traverse it. We attached a biotin to the N terminus of LFN (the 263-residue N-terminal portion of LF) and a molecular stopper elsewhere. If the distance from the N terminus to the stopper was long enough to traverse the channel, streptavidin added to the trans side bound the N-terminal biotin, trapping the protein within the channel; if this distance was not long enough, streptavidin did not bind the N-terminal biotin and the protein was not trapped. The trapping rate was dependent on the driving force (voltage), the length of time it was applied, and the number of residues between the N terminus and the stopper. By varying the position of the stopper, we determined the minimum number of residues required to span the channel. We conclude that LFN adopts an extended-chain configuration as it translocates; i.e., the channel unfolds the secondary structure of the protein. We also show that the channel not only can translocate LFN in the normal direction but also can, at least partially, translocate LFN in the opposite direction. PMID:21402886

  20. Mixed-symmetry octupole and hexadecapole excitations in N=52 isotones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennig, Andreas; Spieker, Mark; Werner, Volker; Ahn, Tan; Anagnostatou, Vassia; Cooper, Nathan; Derya, Vera; Elvers, Michael; Endres, Janis; Goddard, Phil; Heinz, Andreas; Hughes, Richard O.; Ilie, Gabriela; Mineva, Milena N.; Pickstone, Simon G.; Petkov, Pavel; Pietralla, Norbert; Radeck, Desirée; Ross, Tim J.; Savran, Deniz; Zilges, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    In addition to the well-established quadrupole mixed-symmetry states, octupole and hexadecapole excitations with mixed-symmetry character have been recently proposed for the N = 52 isotones 92Zr and 94Mo. We performed two inelastic proton-scattering experiments to study this kind of excitations in the heaviest stable N = 52 isotone 96Ru. From the combined experimental data of both experiments absolute transition strengths were extracted.

  1. 2.4 Å resolution crystal structure of human TRAP1NM, the Hsp90 paralog in the mitochondrial matrix.

    PubMed

    Sung, Nuri; Lee, Jungsoon; Kim, Ji Hyun; Chang, Changsoo; Tsai, Francis T F; Lee, Sukyeong

    2016-08-01

    TRAP1 is an organelle-specific Hsp90 paralog that is essential for neoplastic growth. As a member of the Hsp90 family, TRAP1 is presumed to be a general chaperone facilitating the late-stage folding of Hsp90 client proteins in the mitochondrial matrix. Interestingly, TRAP1 cannot replace cytosolic Hsp90 in protein folding, and none of the known Hsp90 co-chaperones are found in mitochondria. Thus, the three-dimensional structure of TRAP1 must feature regulatory elements that are essential to the ATPase activity and chaperone function of TRAP1. Here, the crystal structure of a human TRAP1NM dimer is presented, featuring an intact N-domain and M-domain structure, bound to adenosine 5'-β,γ-imidotriphosphate (ADPNP). The crystal structure together with epitope-mapping results shows that the TRAP1 M-domain loop 1 contacts the neighboring subunit and forms a previously unobserved third dimer interface that mediates the specific interaction with mitochondrial Hsp70. PMID:27487821

  2. Fabrication of broadband antireflective black metal surfaces with ultra-light-trapping structures by picosecond laser texturing and chemical fluorination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Buxiang; Wang, Wenjun; Jiang, Gedong; Mei, Xuesong

    2016-06-01

    A hybrid method consisting of ultrafast laser-assisted texturing and chemical fluorination treatment was applied for efficiently enhancing the surface broadband antireflection to fabricate black titanium alloy surface with ultra-light-trapping micro-nanostructure. Based on the theoretical analysis of surface antireflective principle of micro-nanostructures and fluoride film, the ultra-light-trapping micro-nanostructures have been processed using a picosecond pulsed ultrafast laser on titanium alloy surfaces. Then fluorination treatment has been performed by using fluoroalkyl silane solution. According to X-ray diffraction phase analysis of the surface compositions and measurement of the surface reflectance using spectrophotometer, the broadband antireflective properties of titanium alloy surface with micro-nano structural characteristics were investigated before and after fluorination treatment. The results show that the surface morphology of micro-nanostructures processed by picosecond laser has significant effects on the antireflection of light waves to reduce the surface reflectance, which can be further reduced using chemical fluorination treatment. The high antireflection of over 98 % in a broad spectral range from ultraviolet to infrared on the surface of metal material has been achieved for the surface structures, and the broadband antireflective black metal surfaces with an extremely low reflectance of ultra-light-trapping structures have been obtained in the wavelength range from ultraviolet-visible to near-infrared, middle-wave infrared. The average reflectance of microgroove groups structured surface reaches as low as 2.43 % over a broad wavelength range from 200 to 2600 nm. It indicates that the hybrid method comprising of picosecond laser texturing and chemical fluorination can effectively induce the broadband antireflective black metal surface. This method has a potential application for fabricating antireflective surface used to improve the

  3. Mathieu Function Solutions for the Photoacoustic Effect in Two- and Three-Dimensional Structures and Optical Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Binbin; Diebold, Gerald J.

    2012-11-01

    The wave equation for the photoacoustic effect in a three-dimensional spherically symmetric, or two-dimensional structure where the compressibility or density varies sinusoidally in space reduces to an inhomogeneous Mathieu equation. As such, exact solutions for the photoacoustic pressure can be found in terms of either Mathieu functions, integer order Mathieu functions, or fractional order Mathieu functions, the last of these being of importance for problems pertaining to structures of finite dimensions. Here, frequency domain solutions are given for a spherical structure with material properties varying radially, and a two-dimensional structure with material variations in one direction. Solutions for the acoustic pressure are found that give closed form expressions for the resonance frequencies. It is also shown that Mathieu functions give solutions for the motion of an optically levitated sphere trapped in an intensity modulated, Gaussian laser beam. By determining the frequencies at which the motions of the sphere are largest, that is, where the Mathieu functions become unstable, it is shown that the trap can act to determine the radiation force relative to the gravitational force on the sphere.

  4. The impact of pore structure and surface roughness on capillary trapping for 2-D and 3-D porous media: Comparison with percolation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geistlinger, Helmut; Ataei-Dadavi, Iman; Mohammadian, Sadjad; Vogel, Hans-Jörg

    2015-11-01

    We study the impact of pore structure and surface roughness on capillary trapping of nonwetting gas phase during imbibition with water for capillary numbers between 10-7 and 5 × 10-5, within glass beads, natural sands, glass beads monolayers, and 2-D micromodels. The materials exhibit different roughness of the pore-solid interface. We found that glass beads and natural sands, which exhibit nearly the same grain size distribution, pore size distribution, and connectivity, showed a significant difference of the trapped gas phase of about 15%. This difference can be explained by the microstructure of the pore-solid interface. Based on the visualization of the trapping dynamics within glass beads monolayers and 2-D micromodels, we could show that bypass trapping controls the trapping process in glass beads monolayers, while snap-off trapping controls the trapping process in 2-D micromodels. We conclude that these different trapping processes are the reason for the different trapping efficiency, when comparing glass beads packs with natural sand packs. Moreover, for small capillary numbers of 10-6, we found that the cluster size distribution of trapped gas clusters of all 2-D and 3-D porous media can be described by a universal power law behavior predicted from percolation theory. This cannot be expected a priori for 2-D porous media, because bicontinuity of the two bulk phases is violated. Obviously, bicontinuity holds for the thin-film water phase and the bulk gas phase. The snap-off trapping process leads to ordinary bond percolation in front of the advancing bulk water phase and is the reason for the observed universal power law behavior in 2-D micromodels with rough surfaces.

  5. An experimental technique for the study of non-avalanche charge injection or trapping in MIS structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolk, J.; Heasell, E.

    1980-03-01

    In the study of charge injection in the insulator-silicon system, variation of the electric field in the insulator, caused by charge trapping during a measurement, makes the interpretation and analysis of experimental data difficult. A measuring system and test device structure are described in which it is possible to monitor any change of the device threshold voltage and to adjust the applied gate voltage so as to maintain a constant electric field at the insulator-silicon interface. Experimental results will be presented which show the advantages stemming from this mode of operation.

  6. Trapped Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senovilla, José M. M.

    I review the definition and types of (closed) trapped surfaces. Surprising global properties are shown, such as their "clairvoyance" and the possibility that they enter into flat portions of the spacetime. Several results on the interplay of trapped surfaces with vector fields and with spatial hypersurfaces are presented. Applications to the quasi-local definition of Black Holes are discussed, with particular emphasis set onto marginally trapped tubes, trapping horizons and the boundary of the region with closed trapped surfaces. Finally, the core of a trapped region is introduced, and its importance discussed.

  7. Trapped Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senovilla, José M. M.

    2013-03-01

    I review the definition and types of (closed) trapped surfaces. Surprising global properties are pointed out, such as their "clairvoyance" and the possibility that they enter into flat portions of the spacetime. Several results on the interplay of trapped surfaces with vector fields and with spatial hypersurfaces are presented. Applications to the quasi-local definition of Black Holes are analyzed, with particular emphasis set onto marginally trapped tubes, trapping horizons and the boundary of the region with closed trapped surfaces. Finally, the core of a trapped region is introduced, and its importance briefly discussed.

  8. Nanophotonic light trapping in polycrystalline silicon thin-film solar cells using periodically nanoimprint-structured glass substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Christiane; Xavier, Jolly; Preidel, Veit; Wyss, Philippe; Sontheimer, Tobias; Rech, Bernd; Probst, Jürgen; Hülsen, Christoph; Löchel, Bernd; Erko, Alexei; Burger, Sven; Schmidt, Frank; Back, Franziska; Rudigier-Voigt, Eveline

    2013-09-01

    A smart light trapping scheme is essential to tap the full potential of polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) thin-film solar cells. Periodic nanophotonic structures are of particular interest as they allow to substantially surpass the Lambertian limit from ray optics in selected spectral ranges. We use nanoimprint-lithography for the periodic patterning of sol-gel coated glass substrates, ensuring a cost-effective, large-area production of thin-film solar cell devices. Periodic crystalline silicon nanoarchitectures are prepared on these textured substrates by high-rate silicon film evaporation, solid phase crystallization and chemical etching. Poly-Si microhole arrays in square lattice geometry with an effective thickness of about 2μm and with comparatively large pitch (2 μm) exhibit a large absorption enhancement (A900nm = 52%) compared to a planar film (A900nm ~ 7%). For the optimization of light trapping in the desired spectral region, the geometry of the nanophotonic structures with varying pitch from 600 nm to 800 nm is tailored and investigated for the cases of poly-Si nanopillar arrays of hexagonal lattice geometry, exhibiting an increase in absorption in comparison to planar film attributed to nanophotonic wave optic effects. These structures inspire the design of prospective applications such as highly-efficient nanostructured poly-Si thin-film solar cells and large-area photonic crystals.

  9. Evaluation of Quantum Efficiency, Crosstalk, and Surface Recombination in HgCdTe Photon-Trapping Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, Jonathan; Bellotti, Enrico

    2014-08-01

    The quantum efficiency (QE) in HgCdTe photovoltaic pixel arrays employing a photon-trapping (PT) structure realized with a periodic array of pillars intended to provide broadband operation was investigated. It was found that the QE depends heavily on the passivation of the pillar surface. This is due to the presence of large fixed positive charge on the surface of pillars passivated with anodic oxide. A three-dimensional numerical simulation model was used to study the effect of the surface charge density and surface recombination velocity on the exterior of the pillars. Then, the QE of this structure was evaluated subject to different surface conditions. It was found that alone the surface charge density or surface recombination is detrimental to the QE but that the QE is recovered when both phenomena are present. Subsequently, the crosstalk was analyzed and the superior performance of the PT structure was demonstrated by evaluating the modulation transfer function.

  10. Trapped antihydrogen.

    PubMed

    Andresen, G B; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jonsell, S; Jørgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; el Nasr, S Seif; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2010-12-01

    Antimatter was first predicted in 1931, by Dirac. Work with high-energy antiparticles is now commonplace, and anti-electrons are used regularly in the medical technique of positron emission tomography scanning. Antihydrogen, the bound state of an antiproton and a positron, has been produced at low energies at CERN (the European Organization for Nuclear Research) since 2002. Antihydrogen is of interest for use in a precision test of nature's fundamental symmetries. The charge conjugation/parity/time reversal (CPT) theorem, a crucial part of the foundation of the standard model of elementary particles and interactions, demands that hydrogen and antihydrogen have the same spectrum. Given the current experimental precision of measurements on the hydrogen atom (about two parts in 10(14) for the frequency of the 1s-to-2s transition), subjecting antihydrogen to rigorous spectroscopic examination would constitute a compelling, model-independent test of CPT. Antihydrogen could also be used to study the gravitational behaviour of antimatter. However, so far experiments have produced antihydrogen that is not confined, precluding detailed study of its structure. Here we demonstrate trapping of antihydrogen atoms. From the interaction of about 10(7) antiprotons and 7 × 10(8) positrons, we observed 38 annihilation events consistent with the controlled release of trapped antihydrogen from our magnetic trap; the measured background is 1.4 ± 1.4 events. This result opens the door to precision measurements on anti-atoms, which can soon be subjected to the same techniques as developed for hydrogen. PMID:21085118

  11. Volume calculation of subsurface structures and traps in hydrocarbon exploration — a comparison between numerical integration and cell based models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavinić, Petra; Cvetković, Marko

    2016-01-01

    The volume calculation of geological structures is one of the primary goals of interest when dealing with exploration or production of oil and gas in general. Most of those calculations are done using advanced software packages but still the mathematical workflow (equations) has to be used and understood for the initial volume calculation process. In this paper a comparison is given between bulk volume calculations of geological structures using trapezoidal and Simpson's rule and the ones obtained from cell-based models. Comparison in calculation is illustrated with four models; dome - 1/2 of ball/sphere, elongated anticline, stratigraphic trap due to lateral facies change and faulted anticline trap. Results show that Simpson's and trapezoidal rules give a very accurate volume calculation even with a few inputs(isopach areas - ordinates). A test of cell based model volume calculation precision against grid resolution is presented for various cases. For high accuracy, less the 1% of an error from coarsening, a cell area has to be 0.0008% of the reservoir area

  12. Spill-point analysis and structural trapping capacity in saline aquifers using MRST-co2lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Møll Nilsen, Halvor; Lie, Knut-Andreas; Møyner, Olav; Andersen, Odd

    2015-02-01

    Geological carbon storage represents a substantial challenge for the subsurface geosciences. Knowledge of the subsurface can be captured in a quantitative form using computational methods developed within petroleum production. However, to provide good estimates of the likely outcomes over thousands of years, traditional 3D simulation methods should be combined with other techniques developed specifically to study large-scale, long-term migration problems, e.g., in basin modeling. A number of such methods have been developed as a separate module in the open-source Matlab Reservoir Simulation Toolbox (MRST). In this paper, we present a set of tools provided by this module, consisting of geometrical and percolation type methods for computing structural traps and spill paths below a sealing caprock. Using concepts from water management, these tools can be applied on large-scale aquifer models to quickly estimate potential for structural trapping, determine spill paths from potential injection points, suggest optimal injection locations, etc. We demonstrate this by a series of examples applied on publicly available datasets. The corresponding source code is provided along with the examples.

  13. Study of the energy distribution of the interface trap density in a GeSn MOS structure by numerical simulation of the electrical characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baert, B.; Schmeits, M.; Nguyen, N. D.

    2014-02-01

    Using a custom-made numerical simulation tool, we performed a systematic study of the energy distribution of the interface trap density in a GeSn MOS structure and of their effect on the electrical characteristics such as C-V and impedance spectra. Interface traps with various densities of states and energies in the bandgap have been investigated and the application of the conductance method was assessed.

  14. Concentric Magnetic Structures for Magnetophoretic Bead Collection, Cell Trapping and Analysis of Cell Morphological Changes Caused by Local Magnetic Forces

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chen-Yu; Wei, Zung-Hang

    2015-01-01

    Concentric magnetic structures (ring and square) with domain wall (DW) pinning geometry are designed for biological manipulation. Magnetic beads collection was firstly demonstrated to analyse the local magnetic field generated by DWs and the effective regions to capture magnetic targets of size 1 μm. Primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) are magnetically labeled by internalizing poly (styrene sulfonic acid) stabilized magnetic nanoparticles (PSS-MNPs) and then are selectively trapped by head-to-tail DWs (HH DWs) or tail-to-tail DWs (TT DWs) to be arranged into linear shape or cross shape. The morphologies and the nuclear geometry of the cells growing on two kinds of concentric magnetic structures are shown to be distinctive. The intracellular magnetic forces generated by the local magnetic field of DWs are found to influence the behaviour of cells. PMID:26270332

  15. Numerical simulation of quantum efficiency and surface recombination in HgCdTe IR photon-trapping structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, Jonathan; Bellotti, Enrico

    2013-06-01

    We have investigated the quantum effiency in HgCdTe photovoltaic pixel arrays employing a photon-trapping structure realized with a periodic array of pillars intended to provide broadband operation. We have found that the quantum efficiency depends heavily on the passivation of the pillar surface. Pillars passivated with anodicoxide have a large fixed positive charge on the pillar surface. We use our three-dimensional numerical simulation model to study the effect of surface charge and surface recombination velocity on the exterior of the pillars. We then evaluate the quantum efficiency of this structure subject to different surface conditions. We have found that by themselves, the surface charge and surface recombination are detrimental to the quantum efficiency but the quantum efficiency is recovered when both phenomena are present. We will discuss the effects of these phenomena and the trade offs that exist between the two.

  16. Effective Light Trapping in Thin Film Silicon Solar Cells with Nano- and Microscale Structures on Glass Substrate.

    PubMed

    Bong, Sungjae; Ahn, Shihyun; Anh, Le Huy Tuan; Kim, Sunbo; Park, Hyeongsik; Shin, Chonghoon; Park, Jinjoo; Lee, Younjung; Yi, Junsin

    2016-05-01

    For thin film silicon-based solar cells, effective light trapping at a broad range of wavelengths (400-1100 nm) is necessary. Normally, etching is only carried out with TCOs, such as SnO2:F and impurity doped ZnO, to form nano-sized craters in the surface morphology to confer a light trapping effect. However, in this study, prior to ZnO:Al etching, periodic structures on the glass substrates were made by photolithography and wet etching to increase the light scattering and internal reflection. The use of periodic structures on the glass substrate resulted in higher haze ratios in the range from 550 nm to 1100 nm, which is the optical absorption wavelength region for thin film silicon solar cells, than obtained by simple ZnO:Al etching. The periodically textured glass with micro-sized structures compensates for the low haze ratio at the middle and long wavelengths of wet etched ZnO:Al. ZnO:Al was deposited on the periodically textured glass, after which the ZnO:Al surface was also etched randomly using a mixed acid solution to form nano-sized craters. The thin film silicon solar cells with 350-nm-thick amorphous silicon absorber layer deposited on the periodic structured glass and etched ZnO:Al generated up to 10.68% more photocurrent, with 11.2% increase of the conversion efficiency compared to the cell deposited on flat glass and etched ZnO:Al. PMID:27483855

  17. Charge Carriers in Planar and Meso-Structured Organic-Inorganic Perovskites: Mobilities, Lifetimes, and Concentrations of Trap States.

    PubMed

    Hutter, Eline M; Eperon, Giles E; Stranks, Samuel D; Savenije, Tom J

    2015-08-01

    Efficient solar cells have been obtained using thin films of solution-processed organic-inorganic perovskites. However, there remains limited knowledge about the relationship between preparation route and optoelectronic properties. We use complementary time-resolved microwave conductivity (TRMC) and photoluminescence (PL) measurements to investigate the charge carrier dynamics in thin planar films of CH3NH3PbI(3-x)Cl(x), CH3NH3PbI3, and their meso-structured analogues. High mobilities close to 30 cm(2)/(V s) and microsecond-long lifetimes are found in thin films of CH3NH3PbI(3-x)Cl(x), compared to lifetimes of only a few hundred nanoseconds in CH3NH3PbI3 and meso-structured perovskites. We describe our TRMC and PL experiments with a global kinetic model, using one set of kinetic parameters characteristic for each sample. We find that the trap density is less than 5 × 10(14) cm(-3) in CH3NH3PbI(3-x)Cl(x), 6 × 10(16) cm(-3) in the CH3NH3PbI3 thin film and ca. 10(15) cm(-3) in both meso-structured perovskites. Furthermore, our results imply that band-to-band recombination is enhanced by the presence of dark carriers resulting from unintentional doping of the perovskites. Finally, our general approach to determine concentrations of trap states and dark carriers is also highly relevant to other semiconductor materials. PMID:26267206

  18. Quantitative analysis of seismic fault zone waves in the rupture zone of the 1992 Landers, California, earthquake: Evidence for a shallow trapping structure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peng, Z.; Ben-Zion, Y.; Michael, A.J.; Zhu, L.

    2003-01-01

    We analyse quantitatively a waveform data set of 238 earthquakes recorded by a dense seismic array across and along the rupture zone of the 1992 Landers earthquake. A grid-search method with station delay corrections is used to locate events that do not have catalogue locations. The quality of fault zone trapped waves generated by each event is determined from the ratios of seismic energy in time windows corresponding to trapped waves and direct S waves at stations close to and off the fault zone. Approximately 70 per cent of the events with S-P times of less than 2 s, including many clearly off the fault, produce considerable trapped wave energy. This distribution is in marked contrast with previous claims that trapped waves are generated only by sources close to or inside the Landers rupture zone. The time difference between the S arrival and trapped waves group does not grow systematically with increasing hypocentral distance and depth. The dispersion measured from the trapped waves is weak. These results imply that the seismic trapping structure at the Landers rupture zone is shallow and does not extend continuously along-strike by more than a few kilometres. Synthetic waveform modelling indicates that the fault zone waveguide has depth of approximately 2-4 km, a width of approximately 200 m, an S-wave velocity reduction relative to the host rock of approximately 30-40 per cent and an S-wave attenuation coefficient of approximately 20-30. The fault zone waveguide north of the array appears to be shallower and weaker than that south of the array. The waveform modelling also indicates that the seismic trapping structure below the array is centred approximately 100 m east of the surface break.

  19. Non-Axial Octupole Deformations and Tetrahedral Symmetry in Heavy Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Mazurek, Katarzyna; Dudek, Jerzy

    2005-11-21

    The total energies of about 120 nuclei in the Thorium region have been calculated within the macroscopic-microscopic method in the 5-dimensional space of deformation parameters {alpha}20, {alpha}22, {alpha}30, {alpha}32 and {alpha}40. The macroscopic energy term contains the nuclear surface-curvature dependence as proposed within the LSD approach. The microscopic energies are calculated with the Woods-Saxon single particle potential employing the universal set of parameters.We study a possible presence of the octupole axial and non-axial degrees of freedom all-over in the ({beta}, {gamma})-plane focussing on the ground-states, secondary minima and in the saddle points. In fact, a competition between axial and tri-axial octupole deformation parameters is obtained at the saddle points and in the secondary minima for many isotones with N > 136. The presence of the tetrahedral symmetry minima is predicted in numerous nuclei in the discussed region, although most of the time at relatively high excitation energies.

  20. Optical trapping

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Keir C.; Block, Steven M.

    2006-01-01

    Since their invention just over 20 years ago, optical traps have emerged as a powerful tool with broad-reaching applications in biology and physics. Capabilities have evolved from simple manipulation to the application of calibrated forces on—and the measurement of nanometer-level displacements of—optically trapped objects. We review progress in the development of optical trapping apparatus, including instrument design considerations, position detection schemes and calibration techniques, with an emphasis on recent advances. We conclude with a brief summary of innovative optical trapping configurations and applications. PMID:16878180

  1. COLD TRAPS

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, W.I.

    1958-09-30

    A cold trap is presented for removing a condensable component from a gas mixture by cooling. It consists of a shell, the exterior surface of which is chilled by a refrigerant, and conductive fins welded inside the shell to condense the gas, and distribute the condensate evenly throughout the length of the trap, so that the trap may function until it becomes completely filled with the condensed solid. The contents may then be removed as either a gas or as a liquid by heating the trap. This device has particuinr use as a means for removing uranium hexafluoride from the gaseous diffusion separation process during equipment breakdown and repair periods.

  2. Atomic structure of Hsp90-Cdc37-Cdk4 reveals that Hsp90 traps and stabilizes an unfolded kinase.

    PubMed

    Verba, Kliment A; Wang, Ray Yu-Ruei; Arakawa, Akihiko; Liu, Yanxin; Shirouzu, Mikako; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Agard, David A

    2016-06-24

    The Hsp90 molecular chaperone and its Cdc37 cochaperone help stabilize and activate more than half of the human kinome. However, both the mechanism by which these chaperones assist their "client" kinases and the reason why some kinases are addicted to Hsp90 while closely related family members are independent are unknown. Our structural understanding of these interactions is lacking, as no full-length structures of human Hsp90, Cdc37, or either of these proteins with a kinase have been elucidated. Here we report a 3.9 angstrom cryo-electron microscopy structure of the Hsp90-Cdc37-Cdk4 kinase complex. Surprisingly, the two lobes of Cdk4 are completely separated with the β4-β5 sheet unfolded. Cdc37 mimics part of the kinase N lobe, stabilizing an open kinase conformation by wedging itself between the two lobes. Finally, Hsp90 clamps around the unfolded kinase β5 strand and interacts with exposed N- and C-lobe interfaces, protecting the kinase in a trapped unfolded state. On the basis of this structure and an extensive amount of previously collected data, we propose unifying conceptual and mechanistic models of chaperone-kinase interactions. PMID:27339980

  3. A shallow fault-zone structure illuminated by trapped waves in the Karadere-Duzce branch of the North Anatolian Fault, western Turkey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ben-Zion, Y.; Peng, Z.; Okaya, D.; Seeber, L.; Armbruster, J.G.; Ozer, N.; Michael, A.J.; Baris, S.; Aktar, M.

    2003-01-01

    We discuss the subsurface structure of the Karadere-Duzce branch of the North Anatolian Fault based on analysis of a large seismic data set recorded by a local PASSCAL network in the 6 months following the Mw = 7.4 1999 Izmit earthquake. Seismograms observed at stations located in the immediate vicinity of the rupture zone show motion amplification and long-period oscillations in both P- and S-wave trains that do not exist in nearby off-fault stations. Examination of thousands of waveforms reveals that these characteristics are commonly generated by events that are well outside the fault zone. The anomalous features in fault-zone seismograms produced by events not necessarily in the fault may be referred to generally as fault-zone-related site effects. The oscillatory shear wave trains after the direct S arrival in these seismograms are analysed as trapped waves propagating in a low-velocity fault-zone layer. The time difference between the S arrival and trapped waves group does not grow systematically with increasing source-receiver separation along the fault. These observations imply that the trapping of seismic energy in the Karadere-Duzce rupture zone is generated by a shallow fault-zone layer. Traveltime analysis and synthetic waveform modelling indicate that the depth of the trapping structure is approximately 3-4 km. The synthetic waveform modelling indicates further that the shallow trapping structure has effective waveguide properties consisting of thickness of the order of 100 m, a velocity decrease relative to the surrounding rock of approximately 50 per cent and an S-wave quality factor of 10-15. The results are supported by large 2-D and 3-D parameter space studies and are compatible with recent analyses of trapped waves in a number of other faults and rupture zones. The inferred shallow trapping structure is likely to be a common structural element of fault zones and may correspond to the top part of a flower-type structure. The motion amplification

  4. Protein crystallography for aspiring crystallographers or how to avoid pitfalls and traps in macromolecular structure determination

    PubMed Central

    Wlodawer, Alexander; Minor, Wladek; Dauter, Zbigniew; Jaskolski, Mariusz

    2014-01-01

    The number of macromolecular structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank now approaches 100 000, with the vast majority of them determined by crystallographic methods. Thousands of papers describing such structures have been published in the scientific literature, and 20 Nobel Prizes in chemistry or medicine have been awarded for discoveries based on macromolecular crystallography. New hardware and software tools have made crystallography appear to be an almost routine (but still far from being analytical) technique and many structures are now being determined by scientists with very limited experience in the practical aspects of the field. However, this apparent ease is sometimes illusory and proper procedures need to be followed to maintain high standards of structure quality. In addition, many noncrystallographers may have problems with the critical evaluation and interpretation of structural results published in the scientific literature. The present review provides an outline of the technical aspects of crystallography for less experienced practitioners, as well as information that might be useful for users of macromolecular structures, aiming to show them how to interpret (but not overinterpret) the information present in the coordinate files and in their description. A discussion of the extent of information that can be gleaned from the atomic coordinates of structures solved at different resolution is provided, as well as problems and pitfalls encountered in structure determination and interpretation. PMID:24034303

  5. Optical trapping of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Jarrah; Zehtabi-Oskuie, Ana; Ghaffari, Saeedeh; Pang, Yuanjie; Gordon, Reuven

    2013-01-01

    Optical trapping is a technique for immobilizing and manipulating small objects in a gentle way using light, and it has been widely applied in trapping and manipulating small biological particles. Ashkin and co-workers first demonstrated optical tweezers using a single focused beam. The single beam trap can be described accurately using the perturbative gradient force formulation in the case of small Rayleigh regime particles. In the perturbative regime, the optical power required for trapping a particle scales as the inverse fourth power of the particle size. High optical powers can damage dielectric particles and cause heating. For instance, trapped latex spheres of 109 nm in diameter were destroyed by a 15 mW beam in 25 sec, which has serious implications for biological matter. A self-induced back-action (SIBA) optical trapping was proposed to trap 50 nm polystyrene spheres in the non-perturbative regime. In a non-perturbative regime, even a small particle with little permittivity contrast to the background can influence significantly the ambient electromagnetic field and induce a large optical force. As a particle enters an illuminated aperture, light transmission increases dramatically because of dielectric loading. If the particle attempts to leave the aperture, decreased transmission causes a change in momentum outwards from the hole and, by Newton's Third Law, results in a force on the particle inwards into the hole, trapping the particle. The light transmission can be monitored; hence, the trap can become a sensor. The SIBA trapping technique can be further improved by using a double-nanohole structure. The double-nanohole structure has been shown to give a strong local field enhancement. Between the two sharp tips of the double-nanohole, a small particle can cause a large change in optical transmission, thereby inducing a large optical force. As a result, smaller nanoparticles can be trapped, such as 12 nm silicate spheres and 3.4 nm hydrodynamic radius

  6. Optical Trapping of Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Bergeron, Jarrah; Zehtabi-Oskuie, Ana; Ghaffari, Saeedeh; Pang, Yuanjie; Gordon, Reuven

    2013-01-01

    Optical trapping is a technique for immobilizing and manipulating small objects in a gentle way using light, and it has been widely applied in trapping and manipulating small biological particles. Ashkin and co-workers first demonstrated optical tweezers using a single focused beam1. The single beam trap can be described accurately using the perturbative gradient force formulation in the case of small Rayleigh regime particles1. In the perturbative regime, the optical power required for trapping a particle scales as the inverse fourth power of the particle size. High optical powers can damage dielectric particles and cause heating. For instance, trapped latex spheres of 109 nm in diameter were destroyed by a 15 mW beam in 25 sec1, which has serious implications for biological matter2,3. A self-induced back-action (SIBA) optical trapping was proposed to trap 50 nm polystyrene spheres in the non-perturbative regime4. In a non-perturbative regime, even a small particle with little permittivity contrast to the background can influence significantly the ambient electromagnetic field and induce a large optical force. As a particle enters an illuminated aperture, light transmission increases dramatically because of dielectric loading. If the particle attempts to leave the aperture, decreased transmission causes a change in momentum outwards from the hole and, by Newton's Third Law, results in a force on the particle inwards into the hole, trapping the particle. The light transmission can be monitored; hence, the trap can become a sensor. The SIBA trapping technique can be further improved by using a double-nanohole structure. The double-nanohole structure has been shown to give a strong local field enhancement5,6. Between the two sharp tips of the double-nanohole, a small particle can cause a large change in optical transmission, thereby inducing a large optical force. As a result, smaller nanoparticles can be trapped, such as 12 nm silicate spheres7 and 3.4 nm

  7. Lenticular stretch structures in eastern Nevada - possible trapping mechanism in supposed graben

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, C.T.; Dennis, J.G.; Lumsden, W.W.

    1986-04-01

    Eastern Nevada is widely recognized as a region of tectonic extension. The dominant structures are generally agreed to be low-dipping, younger over older faults and steeper listric faults that are responsible for the basins (grabens) and ranges (horsts). In the Schell Creek-Duck Creek Range, east of Ely, and in the White Pine Range, southwest of Ely, small lenticular structures bounded by tectonic discontinuities can be clearly seen in the field. These lenticular units, or stretch structures, range in length from a few meters to more than 200 m. All lenticular stretch structures that can be clearly seen in the field are stratigraphically restricted; the stretched formations are the Eureka Quartzite, the Pilot Shale, the Joana Limestone, and the Chainman Shale. Still larger stretch structures, which may include several formations, are inferred, and the authors suggest that extension has created lenticular structures at all scales. The Duck Creek and Schell Creek Ranges east of Ely consist mostly of Devonian and older rocks. They are separated by a topographically lower area containing mostly Mississippian and Pennsylvanian rocks. This structure, which separates the ranges, has been referred to as a graben, but field evidence suggests that it is a large-scale lenticular stretch structure. Unlike a true graben, the structure does not extend downward. For example, in several places within the supposed graben, Cambrian and Ordovician rocks project through a cover of Carboniferous Chainman Shale and Ely Limestone, suggesting the Chainman-Ely is a thin sheet underlain by Cambrian-Ordovician rocks. Accordingly, they suggest that extension in the Duck Creek-Schell Creek Ranges stretched the formations into lenticular bodies. Between the Duck Creek and Schell Creek Ranges, the Cambrian-Ordovician is attenuated, and the resulting tectonic depression is occupied by a lenticular mass of Carboniferous rocks.

  8. Enhanced photo-sensitivity through an increased light-trapping on Si by surface nano-structuring using MWCNT etch mask

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate an enhanced photo-sensitivity (PS) through an increased light-trapping using surface nano-structuring technique by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching on multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) etch masked Si with hexamethyl-disilazane (HMDS) dispersion. In order for a systematic comparison, four samples are prepared, respectively, by conventional photolithography and ICP etching using MWCNT as a etch mask. MWCNT-etched Si with HMDS dispersion shows the highest RMS roughness and the lowest reflectance of the four. Two test device structures are fabricated with active regions of bare-Si as a reference and MWCNT etch masked Si with HMDS dispersion. The increased light-trapping was most significant at mid-UV, somewhat less at visible and less noticeable at infrared. With an ICP-etched Si using CNT HMDS dispersion, PS is very sharply increased. This result can lead to applications in optoelectronics where the enhancement in light-trapping is important. PMID:22040026

  9. Oxygen trapped by rare earth tetrahedral clusters in Nd{sub 4}FeOS{sub 6}: Crystal structure, electronic structure, and magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Qisheng; Taufour, Valentin; Zhang, Yuemei; Wood, Max; Drtina, Thomas; Bud’ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.; Miller, Gordon J.

    2015-09-15

    Single crystals of Nd{sub 4}FeOS{sub 6} were grown from an Fe–S eutectic solution. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis revealed a Nd{sub 4}MnOSe{sub 6}-type structure (P6{sub 3}mc, a=9.2693(1) Å, c=6.6650(1)Å, V=495.94(1) Å{sup 3}, Z=2), featuring parallel chains of face-sharing [FeS{sub 6×1/2}]{sup 4−} trigonal antiprisms and interlinked [Nd{sub 4}OS{sub 3}]{sup 4+} cubane-like clusters. Oxygen atoms were found to be trapped by Nd{sub 4} clusters in the [Nd{sub 4}OS{sub 3}]{sup 4{sub +}} chains. Structural differences among Nd{sub 4}MnOSe{sub 6}-type Nd{sub 4}FeOS{sub 6} and the related La{sub 3}CuSiS{sub 7}− and Pr{sub 8}CoGa{sub 3}-type structures have been described. Magnetic susceptibility measurements on Nd{sub 4}FeOS{sub 6} suggested the dominance of antiferromagnetic interactions at low temperature, but no magnetic ordering down to 2 K was observed. Spin-polarized electronic structure calculations revealed magnetic frustration with dominant antiferromagnetic interactions. - Graphical abstract: Trapping of oxygen in Nd{sub 4} tetrahedral clusters results in the formation of the Nd{sub 4}MnOSe{sub 6}-type Nd{sub 4}FeOS{sub 6}, in contrast to the La{sub 3}CuSiS{sub 7}-type oxygen-free Nd{sub 4}FeS{sub 7} and related Pr{sub 8}CoGa{sub 3}-type structures. Complex magnetic frustration inhibits magnetic ordering at low temperature. - Highlights: • Single crystals of Nd{sub 4}FeOS{sub 6} were grown using self-flux method. • Oxygen was found trapped by Nd{sub 4} tetrahedral clusters. • Comparison with two closely related structural types were discussed. • Magnetic measurements revealed antiferromagnetic (AFM) interaction. • VASP calculations confirmed strong magnetic frustration in AFM model.

  10. One-phonon octupole vibrational states in 211At, 212Rn, 213Fr and 214Ra with N = 126

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, J. K.; Hamilton, J. H.; Ramayya, A. V.

    2013-12-01

    Excited high spin states in 211At, 212Rn, 213Fr and 214Ra with N = 126 are reorganized and interpreted in terms of the stretched weak coupling of an octupole 3- phonon. Nearly identical sequences of levels with ΔI = 3 and the parity change are found, for the first time, up to 25- for 20 states of 214Ra, up to 35- for 36 states of 212Rn and up to 53/2+ for 16 states of 213Fr. The stretched weak coupling of an octupole phonon is extended up to the highest excitation energy of 11355 keV for 212Rn which has the largest experimental B( E3) value of 44.1(88) W.u. for the 11- → 8{2/+} transition. The stretched weak coupling of an octupole 3- phonon needs to be considered when single particle configurations are assigned to high spin states. Average octupole excitation energies of 657(51) keV for 211At, 1101(28) keV for 212Rn, 667(25) keV for 213Fr, and 709(25) keV for 214Ra are obtained. The calculated level enegies are in a good agreement with the experimental level energies within the error limit of 4.3%.

  11. Stratigraphic traps 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This volume contains studies of fields with traps that are mainly stratigraphic in nature. Structure plays a role in the traps of several fields, but overall, it is clear that the main trapping features with the group of fields in this volume are stratigraphic. The first six fields in this volume, Alabama Ferry, Rospo Mare, Walker Creek, Bindley, Lexington, and Newburg/South Westhope, have carbonate reservoirs. The latter two of these, Lexington and Newburg/South Westhope, also have sandstone reservoirs. The remaining fields, East Texas, East Clinton, Stockholm Southwest, Sorrento, Port Acres, and Lagoa Parda, have only sandstone reservoirs.

  12. Structural style and hydrocarbon trap of Karbasi anticline, in the Interior Fars region, Zagros, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleki, Z.; Arian, M.; Solgi, A.

    2014-07-01

    Karbasi anticline between west-northwest parts of Jahrom town is located in northwest 40 km distance of Aghar gas anticline in interior Fars region. This anticline has asymmetric structure and some faults with large strike separation observed in its structure. The operation of Nezamabad sinistral strike slip fault in west part of this anticline caused fault plunge change in this region. Because of complication increasing of structures geometry in Fars region and necessity to exploration activities for deeper horizons especially the Paleozoic ones, the analysis of fold style elements, which is known as one of the main parts in structural studies seems necessary. In this paper because of some reasons such as Karbasi anticline structural complication, importance of drilling and hydrocarbon explorations in Fars region, it is proceed to analysis and evaluation of fold style elements and geometry with emphasis on Nezamabad fault operation in Interior Fars region. According to fold style elements analysis results, it became clear that in east part of anticline the type of fold horizontal moderately inclined and in west part it is upright moderately plunging, so west evaluation of anticline is affected by more deformation. In this research the relationship present faults especially the Nezamabad sinistral strike slip one with folding and its affection on Dehram horizon and Bangestan group were modeled. Based on received results may be the Nezamabad fault is located between G-G' and E-E' structural sections and this fault in this area operated same as fault zone. In different parts of Karbasi anticline, Dashtak formation as a middle detachment unit plays an important role in connection to folding geometry, may be which is affected by Nezamabad main fault.

  13. Novel light trapping concepts for crystalline silicon solar cells using diffractive rear side structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenlohr, J.; Tucher, N.; Bett, Alexander; Hauser, H.; Graf, M.; Benick, J.; Goldschmidt, J. C.; Bläsi, B.; Hermle, M.

    2014-05-01

    Crystalline silicon solar cells absorb light in the near infrared only weakly. To utilize also the infrared light of the solar spectrum with energies still greater than the band gap of silicon, the effective path of the light inside the solar cell has to be enhanced. Light paths can be manipulated at the front side as well as at the rear side of a solar cell. For the front side, pyramidal textures that also show anti-reflection properties are widely used. These anti-reflection properties, however, can also be achieved with planar dielectric coatings or nanostructured surfaces. In this case, the path length enhancement can be achieved with rear side structures that are especially optimized for this purpose, thus de-coupling anti-reflection and path-length enhancement functionalities. This de-coupling creates leeway to optimize not only the optical properties but also the electrical properties of the optically active structures, and to realize structures that are compatible with very thin silicon wafers. To this end, this paper investigates two kinds of diffractive rear side structures, both, theoretically and experimentally. First, hexagonal sphere gratings that are produced by a self-organized growth process using spin coating, and second, binary gratings produced via nano-imprint lithography. Both process chains are potentially scalable to large areas. In optical measurements we determined potential photocurrent density gains of over 1 mA/cm2 for 250 μm thick wafers for both structures. Furthermore, we developed a process for contact formation as one key step to fully processed solar cells with diffractive rear side structures.

  14. Structural phases of trapped colloids with competing interactions in two and three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva Apolinário, Sérgio Wlademir; de Queiroz da Costa Campos, Lucas; Oliveira Lima, Everton; Löwen, Hartmut

    2014-03-01

    By employing Brownian dynamics simulation we analyzed the spatial configurations resulting from a self-assembly process of colloidal particles interacting via a competive isotropic pair potential both in two and three dimensions. A wide variety of different spacial configurations is found to be stable which includes, for two dimensions, clusters with a fringed outer rim (reminiscent to an ornamental border), clusters perforated with voids as well as clusters with a crystalline core and a disordered rim, and, for three dimensions, clusters perforated with channels and helical fringes. All cluster structures occur in a two-dimensional parameter space. The structural ordering can therefore be efficiently tuned by changing few parameters only providing access to a controlled fabrication of colloidal clusters. FACEPE and CNPq

  15. Carrier trapping and escape times in p-i-n GaInNAs MQW structures

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We used a semi-classical model to describe carrier capture into and thermionic escape from GaInNAs/GaAs multiple quantum wells (MQWs) situated within the intrinsic region of a GaAs p-i-n junction. The results are used to explain photocurrent oscillations with applied bias observed in these structures, in terms of charge accumulation and resonance tunnelling. PMID:24417767

  16. Structure of fully liganded Hb ζ2β2 s trapped in a tense conformation

    PubMed Central

    Safo, Martin K.; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Abdulmalik, Osheiza; He, Zhenning; Wang, Andrew H.-J.; Schreiter, Eric R.; Russell, J. Eric

    2013-01-01

    A variant Hb ζ2β2 s that is formed from sickle hemoglobin (Hb S; α2β2 s) by exchanging adult α-globin with embryonic ζ-globin subunits shows promise as a therapeutic agent for sickle-cell disease (SCD). Hb ζ2β2 s inhibits the polymerization of deoxy­genated Hb S in vitro and reverses characteristic features of SCD in vivo in mouse models of the disorder. When compared with either Hb S or with normal human adult Hb A (α2β2), Hb ζ2β2 s exhibits atypical properties that include a high oxygen affinity, reduced cooperativity, a weak Bohr effect and blunted 2,3-­diphosphoglycerate allostery. Here, the 1.95 Å resolution crystal structure of human Hb ζ2β2 s that was expressed in complex transgenic knockout mice and purified from their erythrocytes is presented. When fully liganded with carbon monoxide, Hb ζ2β2 s displays a central water cavity, a ζ1–βs2 (or ζ2–βs1) interface, intersubunit salt-bridge/hydrogen-bond interactions, C-terminal βHis146 salt-bridge interactions, and a β-cleft, that are highly unusual for a relaxed hemoglobin structure and are more typical of a tense conformation. These quaternary tense-like features contrast with the tertiary relaxed-like conformations of the ζ1βs1 dimer and the CD and FG corners, as well as the overall structures of the heme cavities. This crystallographic study provides insights into the altered oxygen-transport properties of Hb ζ2β2 s and, moreover, decouples tertiary- and quaternary-structural events that are critical to Hb ligand binding and allosteric function. PMID:24100324

  17. XAS study of mercury(II) ions trapped in mercaptan-functionalized mesostructured silicate with a wormhole framework structure.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Chen; McKimmy, Emily J; Pinnavaia, Thomas J; Hayes, Kim F

    2004-09-15

    Directly assembled wormhole mesostructures with high level functionalized mercaptan (MP-HMS) have been shown to be effective mercury(II) (Hg2+) trapping agents. Sorption of Hg2+ onto MP-HMS was investigated using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to identify the structural coordination of the adsorbed Hg. Samples with different fractions of mercaptan functionalized groups (i.e., x = 0.1 and 0.5) with various Hg/S molar ratios ranging from 0.05 to 1.4 were investigated. XAS analysis indicates that adsorbed Hg first coordination shell is best fitted with an Hg-O path and an Hg-S path. The Hg-S atomic distance (R(Hg-S)) remained relatively constant while the Hg-S coordination numbers (CN) decreased as Hg/S loading increased. For the Hg-O path, both the CN and the R(Hg-O) increased with increasing Hg loading. XAS results suggest that at low Hg loadings, adsorbed Hg2+ forms mostly monodentate sulfur complexes (-S-Hg-OH) with the sulfur functional groups on the MP-HMS surfaces. At high Hg loadings, the Hg coordination environment is consistent with the formation of a double-layer structure of Hg attached to sulfur binding sites (-S-Hg-O-Hg-OH). PMID:15487784

  18. Structural style variation and its impact on hydrocarbon traps in central Fars, southern Zagros folded belt, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motamedi, Hossein; Sherkati, Shahram; Sepehr, Mohammad

    2012-04-01

    The Fars area is the main target for Permian gas exploration in the Zagros fold belt. It contains approximately 15 percent of the world's proven gas reserves. The geometrical characteristics of the folded structures change dramatically across the N-S trending Gavbandi High. We used seismic profiles, well data, magnetic survey information and field observations to show that thickness variation of the sedimentary pile inherited from basement geometry is the main reason behind structural style variation in this area which occurred during the Zagros folding. Differences in thickness were more significant in Early-Middle Paleozoic time and decreased considerably upward in time. The total thickness of the Lower Paleozoic succession in the eastern side of the Gavbandi High is approximately 40-50% thicker than on the summit of this basement high. Sedimentary pinch-outs through Cretaceous and Tertiary times indicate that the activity of the basement faults decreased but did not stop. The impact on hydrocarbon traps of the pre-folding basin architecture and the differences in the behavior of the sedimentary cover after Miocene folding is discussed and documented.

  19. New Aspects on the Structure of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps from Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and In Vitro Generation

    PubMed Central

    Krautgartner, Wolf-Dietrich; Klappacher, Michaela; Kofler, Barbara; Steinbacher, Peter; Vitkov, Ljubomir; Grabcanovic-Musija, Fikreta; Studnicka, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils have in recent years attracted new attention due to their ability to release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). These web-like extracellular structures deriving from nuclear chromatin have been depicted in ambiguous roles between antimicrobial defence and host tissue damage. NETs consist of DNA strands of varying thickness and are decorated with microbicidal and cytotoxic proteins. Their principal structure has in recent years been characterised at molecular and ultrastructural levels but many features that are of direct relevance to cytotoxicity are still incompletely understood. These include the extent of chromatin decondensation during NET formation and the relative amounts and spatial distribution of the microbicidal components within the NET. In the present work, we analyse the structure of NETs found in induced sputum of patients with acutely exacerbated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) using confocal laser microscopy and electron microscopy. In vitro induced NETs from human neutrophils serve for purposes of comparison and extended analysis of NET structure. Results demonstrate that COPD sputa are characterised by the pronounced presence of NETs and NETotic neutrophils. We provide new evidence that chromatin decondensation during NETosis is most extensive and generates substantial amounts of double-helix DNA in ‘beads-on-a-string’ conformation. New information is also presented on the abundance and location of neutrophil elastase (NE) and citrullinated histone H3 (citH3). NE occurs in high densities in nearly all non-fibrous constituents of the NETs while citH3 is much less abundant. We conclude from the results that (i) NETosis is an integral part of COPD pathology; this is relevant to all future research on the etiology and therapy of the disease; and that (ii) release of ‘beads-on-a-string’ DNA studded with non-citrullinated histones is a common feature of in vivo NETosis; this is of relevance to both

  20. Evolution of the hourglass structures in the Laminaria High, Timor Sea: Implications for hydrocarbon traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çiftçi, N. Bozkurt; Langhi, Laurent

    2012-03-01

    In cross-section, an hourglass structure can be visualized as an older horst block and superimposed, younger graben. Bounding faults of the horst and graben blocks represent separate conjugate fault systems formed by two distinct episodes of extension in the Timor Sea during Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous (1st-phase) and Middle Miocene - Pliocene (2nd-phase); with an ∼120 My hiatus of limited or no fault activity in-between. Horst blocks were formed by the 1st-phase of extension and buried post-deformation. With the onset of the 2nd-phase of extension, the hourglass geometry began to form by nucleation of the graben-bounding faults in the shallow sedimentary section, in isolation from the horst-bounding faults. Location of the graben is biased by the buried horst block and graben-bounding faults grew down-dip from the shallow locus of nucleation toward the underlying horst block on which only minor reactivation occurred. Detachment of the two systems in this way was predominantly controlled by the first-order mechanical layering. A thick, shale-rich, ductile layer separates the horst- and graben-bounding fault systems and acts as a barrier to vertical fault propagation. Confinement of the graben-bounding faults into the shallow section was also facilitated by outer-arc style extension due to lithospheric flexure controlling the 2nd-phase strain in the region. The complex evolution history and the composite nature of the hourglass structures resulted in systematic along-dip variation of displacement. This variation predominantly relates to syn-kinematic deposition and location of fault tips that are controlled by the ductile layer. The presented evolution model of the hourglass structures concentrates fault tips and related stress perturbation onto the top seal and is likely to be detrimental to top-seal integrity.

  1. Structural Plasticity of the Protein Plug That Traps Newly Packaged Genomes in Podoviridae Virions.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Anshul; Sankhala, Rajeshwer S; Olia, Adam S; Brooke, Dewey; Casjens, Sherwood R; Taylor, Derek J; Prevelige, Peter E; Cingolani, Gino

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial viruses of the P22-like family encode a specialized tail needle essential for genome stabilization after DNA packaging and implicated in Gram-negative cell envelope penetration. The atomic structure of P22 tail needle (gp26) crystallized at acidic pH reveals a slender fiber containing an N-terminal "trimer of hairpins" tip. Although the length and composition of tail needles vary significantly in Podoviridae, unexpectedly, the amino acid sequence of the N-terminal tip is exceptionally conserved in more than 200 genomes of P22-like phages and prophages. In this paper, we used x-ray crystallography and EM to investigate the neutral pH structure of three tail needles from bacteriophage P22, HK620, and Sf6. In all cases, we found that the N-terminal tip is poorly structured, in stark contrast to the compact trimer of hairpins seen in gp26 crystallized at acidic pH. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry, limited proteolysis, circular dichroism spectroscopy, and gel filtration chromatography revealed that the N-terminal tip is highly dynamic in solution and unlikely to adopt a stable trimeric conformation at physiological pH. This is supported by the cryo-EM reconstruction of P22 mature virion tail, where the density of gp26 N-terminal tip is incompatible with a trimer of hairpins. We propose the tail needle N-terminal tip exists in two conformations: a pre-ejection extended conformation, which seals the portal vertex after genome packaging, and a postejection trimer of hairpins, which forms upon its release from the virion. The conformational plasticity of the tail needle N-terminal tip is built in the amino acid sequence, explaining its extraordinary conservation in nature. PMID:26574546

  2. Structural changes in isometrically contracting insect flight muscle trapped following a mechanical perturbation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shenping; Liu, Jun; Reedy, Mary C; Perz-Edwards, Robert J; Tregear, Richard T; Winkler, Hanspeter; Franzini-Armstrong, Clara; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Lucaveche, Carmen; Goldman, Yale E; Reedy, Michael K; Taylor, Kenneth A

    2012-01-01

    The application of rapidly applied length steps to actively contracting muscle is a classic method for synchronizing the response of myosin cross-bridges so that the average response of the ensemble can be measured. Alternatively, electron tomography (ET) is a technique that can report the structure of the individual members of the ensemble. We probed the structure of active myosin motors (cross-bridges) by applying 0.5% changes in length (either a stretch or a release) within 2 ms to isometrically contracting insect flight muscle (IFM) fibers followed after 5-6 ms by rapid freezing against a liquid helium cooled copper mirror. ET of freeze-substituted fibers, embedded and thin-sectioned, provides 3-D cross-bridge images, sorted by multivariate data analysis into ~40 classes, distinct in average structure, population size and lattice distribution. Individual actin subunits are resolved facilitating quasi-atomic modeling of each class average to determine its binding strength (weak or strong) to actin. ~98% of strong-binding acto-myosin attachments present after a length perturbation are confined to "target zones" of only two actin subunits located exactly midway between successive troponin complexes along each long-pitch helical repeat of actin. Significant changes in the types, distribution and structure of actin-myosin attachments occurred in a manner consistent with the mechanical transients. Most dramatic is near disappearance, after either length perturbation, of a class of weak-binding cross-bridges, attached within the target zone, that are highly likely to be precursors of strong-binding cross-bridges. These weak-binding cross-bridges were originally observed in isometrically contracting IFM. Their disappearance following a quick stretch or release can be explained by a recent kinetic model for muscle contraction, as behaviour consistent with their identification as precursors of strong-binding cross-bridges. The results provide a detailed model for

  3. Structural Changes in Isometrically Contracting Insect Flight Muscle Trapped following a Mechanical Perturbation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shenping; Liu, Jun; Perz-Edwards, Robert J.; Tregear, Richard T.; Winkler, Hanspeter; Franzini-Armstrong, Clara; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Goldman, Yale E.; Reedy, Michael K.; Taylor, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    The application of rapidly applied length steps to actively contracting muscle is a classic method for synchronizing the response of myosin cross-bridges so that the average response of the ensemble can be measured. Alternatively, electron tomography (ET) is a technique that can report the structure of the individual members of the ensemble. We probed the structure of active myosin motors (cross-bridges) by applying 0.5% changes in length (either a stretch or a release) within 2 ms to isometrically contracting insect flight muscle (IFM) fibers followed after 5–6 ms by rapid freezing against a liquid helium cooled copper mirror. ET of freeze-substituted fibers, embedded and thin-sectioned, provides 3-D cross-bridge images, sorted by multivariate data analysis into ∼40 classes, distinct in average structure, population size and lattice distribution. Individual actin subunits are resolved facilitating quasi-atomic modeling of each class average to determine its binding strength (weak or strong) to actin. ∼98% of strong-binding acto-myosin attachments present after a length perturbation are confined to “target zones” of only two actin subunits located exactly midway between successive troponin complexes along each long-pitch helical repeat of actin. Significant changes in the types, distribution and structure of actin-myosin attachments occurred in a manner consistent with the mechanical transients. Most dramatic is near disappearance, after either length perturbation, of a class of weak-binding cross-bridges, attached within the target zone, that are highly likely to be precursors of strong-binding cross-bridges. These weak-binding cross-bridges were originally observed in isometrically contracting IFM. Their disappearance following a quick stretch or release can be explained by a recent kinetic model for muscle contraction, as behaviour consistent with their identification as precursors of strong-binding cross-bridges. The results provide a detailed model

  4. Octupole Magnet For Soft X Ray Magnetic Dichroism Experiments: Design and Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Arenholz, Elke; Prestemon, Soren O.

    2004-05-12

    An octupole magnet endstation for soft x ray magnetic dichroism measurements has been developed at the Advanced Light Source. The system consists of an eight pole electromagnet that surrounds a small vacuum chamber. The magnet provides fields up to 0.9 T that can be applied in any direction relative to the incoming x ray beam. High precision magnetic circular and linear dichroism spectra can be obtained reversing the magnetic field for each photon energy in an energy scan. Moreover, the field dependence of all components of the magnetization vector can be studied in detail by choosing various angles of x ray incidence while keeping the relative orientation of magnetic field and sample fixed.

  5. Octupole magnet for soft X ray magnetic dichroism experiments: Design and performance

    SciTech Connect

    Arenholz, Elke; Prestemon, Soren O.

    2003-08-24

    An octupole magnet endstation for soft x-ray magnetic dichroism measurements has been developed at the Advanced Light Source. The system consists of an eight pole electromagnet that surrounds a small vacuum chamber. The magnet provides fields up to 0.9 T that can be applied in any direction relative to the incoming x-ray beam. High precision magnetic circular and linear dichroism spectra can be obtained reversing the magnetic field for each photon energy in an energy scan. Moreover, the field dependence of all components of the magnetization vector can be studied in detail by choosing various angles of x-ray incidence while keeping the relative orientation of magnetic field and sample fixed.

  6. Test of the transport properties of a helical electrostatic quadrupole and quasi-octupole

    SciTech Connect

    Xiu, L.; Ohnuma, Shoroku; Wang, K. . Dept. of Physics); Meitzler, C.R.; Xu, Y. . Dept. of Physics)

    1993-01-01

    A third-generation continuous helical electrostatic quadrupole (HESQ) lens has been built and tested. The new HESQ is 21.5 cm long and has a 3.6 cm diameter aperture. The HESQ has been tested under two separate conditions: with a pulsed 25 keV, 0.5 mA proton beam; and a 25 keV, 10 mA proton beam. The input emittance was fixed using a multi-aperture collimator. A comparison is made between experiment and numerical simulations for a wide variety of operating conditions. A second possible operating mode is the quasi-octupole mode, which offers significantly reduced aberration when compared to the quadrupole mode. The results of preliminary tests in this operating mode will be presented.

  7. Test of the transport properties of a helical electrostatic quadrupole and quasi-octupole

    SciTech Connect

    Xiu, L.; Ohnuma, Shoroku; Wang, K.; Meitzler, C.R.; Xu, Y.

    1993-06-01

    A third-generation continuous helical electrostatic quadrupole (HESQ) lens has been built and tested. The new HESQ is 21.5 cm long and has a 3.6 cm diameter aperture. The HESQ has been tested under two separate conditions: with a pulsed 25 keV, 0.5 mA proton beam; and a 25 keV, 10 mA proton beam. The input emittance was fixed using a multi-aperture collimator. A comparison is made between experiment and numerical simulations for a wide variety of operating conditions. A second possible operating mode is the quasi-octupole mode, which offers significantly reduced aberration when compared to the quadrupole mode. The results of preliminary tests in this operating mode will be presented.

  8. Rotation induced octupole correlations in the neutron-deficient 109Te nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Angelis, G.; Fahlander, C.; Gadea, A.; Farnea, E.; Bazzacco, D.; Belcari, N.; Blasi, N.; Bizzeti, P. G.; Bizzeti-Sona, A.; de Acuña, D.; de Poli, M.; Grawe, H.; Johnson, A.; Lo Bianco, G.; Lunardi, S.; Napoli, D. R.; Nyberg, J.; Pavan, P.; Persson, J.; Rossi Alvarez, C.; Rudolph, D.; Schubart, R.; Spolaore, P.; Wyss, R.; Xu, F.

    1998-10-01

    High spin states in the neutron deficient nucleus 109Te have been populated with the 58Ni+54Fe reaction at 220 MeV and investigated through γ-spectroscopy methods at the GASP spectrometer making use of reaction channel selection with the ISIS Si-ball. The level scheme has been extended up to an excitation energy of ~12.1 MeV. The spins and parities of the observed levels are assigned tentatively supporting the identification of two bands of opposite parity connected by strong dipole transitions inferred to be of E1 character. Octupole correlations in 109Te induced by rotation are suggested as the cause of this effect.

  9. Structural characterization of toxic oligomers that are kinetically trapped during α-synuclein fibril formation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Serene W.; Drakulic, Srdja; Deas, Emma; Ouberai, Myriam; Aprile, Francesco A.; Arranz, Rocío; Ness, Samuel; Roodveldt, Cintia; Guilliams, Tim; De-Genst, Erwin J.; Klenerman, David; Wood, Nicholas W.; Knowles, Tuomas P.J.; Alfonso, Carlos; Rivas, Germán; Abramov, Andrey Y.; Valpuesta, José María; Dobson, Christopher M.; Cremades, Nunilo

    2015-01-01

    We describe the isolation and detailed structural characterization of stable toxic oligomers of α-synuclein that have accumulated during the process of amyloid formation. Our approach has allowed us to identify distinct subgroups of oligomers and to probe their molecular architectures by using cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) image reconstruction techniques. Although the oligomers exist in a range of sizes, with different extents and nature of β-sheet content and exposed hydrophobicity, they all possess a hollow cylindrical architecture with similarities to certain types of amyloid fibril, suggesting that the accumulation of at least some forms of amyloid oligomers is likely to be a consequence of very slow rates of rearrangement of their β-sheet structures. Our findings reveal the inherent multiplicity of the process of protein misfolding and the key role the β-sheet geometry acquired in the early stages of the self-assembly process plays in dictating the kinetic stability and the pathological nature of individual oligomeric species. PMID:25855634

  10. Two-dimensional binary clusters in a hard-wall trap: Structural and spectral properties

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Wen; Kong Minghui; Milosevic, M. V.; Zeng Zhi; Peeters, F. M.

    2007-10-15

    Within the Monte Carlo formalism supplemented by the modified Newton-Raphson optimization technique, we investigated structural and dynamical properties of two-dimensional binary clusters confined in an external hard-wall potential. Two species of differently charged classical particles, interacting through the repulsive Coulomb force are confined in the cluster. Subtle changes in the energy landscape and the stable cluster configurations are investigated as a function of the total number of particles and the relative number of each of the two particle species. The excitation spectrum and the normal modes corresponding to the ground-state configuration of the system are discussed, and the lowest nonzero eigenfrequency as a measure of the stability of the cluster is analyzed. The influence of the particle mass on the eigenfrequencies and eigenmodes are studied, i.e., we study a binary system of particles with different charge and different mass. Several unique features distinct from a monodisperse system are obtained.

  11. Safe trapping of cesium into pollucite structure by hot-pressing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omerašević, Mia; Matović, Ljiljana; Ružić, Jovana; Golubović, Željko; Jovanović, Uroš; Mentus, Slavko; Dondur, Vera

    2016-06-01

    A simple one-step method with direct thermal conversion at lower temperatures for preparing a stabile Cs-aluminsilicate phase, known as pollucite, is presented. Cs-exchanged form of Na, Ca-LTA type of zeolite (Cs-LTA) was pressureless sintered and hot pressed at certain temperatures in order to obtain pollucite. XRD and FTIR analysis were used to study structural changes of Cs-LTA before and after thermal treatments. Pressureless sintered sample recrystallized into pollucite phase after heat treatment at 1000 °C (3 h) (PLS1000) and hot pressed sample at 750 °C (3 h) using pressure of 35 MPa (HP750), indicating reduced temperature of 250°. SEM micrographs confirmed that HP750 has higher density than PLS1000 which leads to higher value of compressive strength. The HP750 showed better resistance to Cs leaching than the PLS1000. Base on these results one can conclude that hot pressing is the promising method for the permanent disposal of Cs radionuclides.

  12. Structure and trapping of three-dimensional dust clouds in a capacitively coupled rf-discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Arp, O.; Block, D.; Piel, A.

    2005-10-31

    In this survey the recently found 'Coulomb balls' are discussed, which show an unusual kind of crystalline order. These three-dimensional dust clouds consisting of hundreds or thousands of micrometer-sized dust particles have a spherical shape and exist in a wide range of plasma conditions. Coulomb balls are optically highly transparent and have macroscopic dimensions of several millimeters in diameter. The clouds allow for the observation of each single particle and thus the complete reconstruction of the crystal structure by means of video microscopy techniques. The particles are arranged in distinct nested shells in which they form patterns with mostly five and six neighbors. The confinement of Coulomb balls by dielectric walls involves electric forces, surface charges, ion drag forces, and thermophoretic levitation. The thermophoretic force field is measured with tracer particles and particle image velocimetry (PIV). The electric forces are derived from simulations with the two-dimensional SIGLO-2D code. It is shown the the sum of all confining forces results in a stable potential well that describes levitation and spherical confinement of the Coulomb ball.

  13. Crystal structures of nitroalkane oxidase: insights into the reaction mechanism from a covalent complex of the flavoenzyme trapped during turnover.

    PubMed

    Nagpal, Akanksha; Valley, Michael P; Fitzpatrick, Paul F; Orville, Allen M

    2006-01-31

    Nitroalkane oxidase (NAO) from Fusarium oxysporum catalyzes the oxidation of neutral nitroalkanes to the corresponding aldehydes or ketones with the production of H(2)O(2) and nitrite. The flavoenzyme is a new member of the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACAD) family, but it does not react with acyl-CoA substrates. We present the 2.2 A resolution crystal structure of NAO trapped during the turnover of nitroethane as a covalent N5-FAD adduct (ES*). The homotetrameric structure of ES* was solved by MAD phasing with 52 Se-Met sites in an orthorhombic space group. The electron density for the N5-(2-nitrobutyl)-1,5-dihydro-FAD covalent intermediate is clearly resolved. The structure of ES was used to solve the crystal structure of oxidized NAO at 2.07 A resolution. The c axis for the trigonal space group of oxidized NAO is 485 A, and there are six subunits (1(1)/(2) holoenzymes) in the asymmetric unit. Four of the active sites contain spermine (EI), a weak competitive inhibitor, and two do not contain spermine (E(ox)). The active-site structures of E(ox), EI, and ES* reveal a hydrophobic channel that extends from the exterior of the protein and terminates at Asp402 and the N5 position on the re face of the FAD. Thus, Asp402 is in the correct position to serve as the active-site base, where it is proposed to abstract the alpha proton from neutral nitroalkane substrates. The structures for NAO and various members of the ACAD family overlay with root-mean-square deviations between 1.7 and 3.1 A. The homologous region typically spans more than 325 residues and includes Glu376, which is the active-site base in the prototypical member of the ACAD family. However, NAO and the ACADs exhibit differences in hydrogen-bonding patterns between the respective active-site base, substrate molecules, and FAD. These likely differentiate NAO from the homologues and, consequently, are proposed to result in the unique reaction mechanism of NAO. PMID:16430210

  14. Crystal Structures of Nitroalkane Oxidase: Insights into the Reaction Mechanism of a Covalent Complex of the Flavoenzyme Trapped During Turnover

    SciTech Connect

    Nagpal,A.; Valley, M.; Fitzpatrick, P.; Orville, A.

    2006-01-01

    Nitroalkane oxidase (NAO) from Fusarium oxysporum catalyzes the oxidation of neutral nitroalkanes to the corresponding aldehydes or ketones with the production of H2O2 and nitrite. The flavoenzyme is a new member of the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACAD) family, but it does not react with acyl-CoA substrates. We present the 2.2 Angstroms resolution crystal structure of NAO trapped during the turnover of nitroethane as a covalent N5-FAD adduct (ES*). The homotetrameric structure of ES* was solved by MAD phasing with 52 Se-Met sites in an orthorhombic space group. The electron density for the N5-(2-nitrobutyl)-1,5-dihydro-FAD covalent intermediate is clearly resolved. The structure of ES* was used to solve the crystal structure of oxidized NAO at 2.07 Angstroms resolution. The c axis for the trigonal space group of oxidized NAO is 485 Angstroms, and there are six subunits (11/2 holoenzymes) in the asymmetric unit. Four of the active sites contain spermine (EI), a weak competitive inhibitor, and two do not contain spermine (E{sup ox}). The active-site structures of E{sup ox}, EI, and ES* reveal a hydrophobic channel that extends from the exterior of the protein and terminates at Asp402 and the N5 position on the re face of the FAD. Thus, Asp402 is in the correct position to serve as the active-site base, where it is proposed to abstract the {alpha} proton from neutral nitroalkane substrates. The structures for NAO and various members of the ACAD family overlay with root-mean-square deviations between 1.7 and 3.1 Angstroms. The homologous region typically spans more than 325 residues and includes Glu376, which is the active-site base in the prototypical member of the ACAD family. However, NAO and the ACADs exhibit differences in hydrogen-bonding patterns between the respective active-site base, substrate molecules, and FAD. These likely differentiate NAO from the homologues and, consequently, are proposed to result in the unique reaction mechanism of NAO.

  15. Crystal Structures of Nitroalkane Oxidase: Insights into the Reaction Mechanism from a Covalent Complex of the Flavoenzyme Trapped during Turnover‡

    PubMed Central

    Nagpal, Akanksha; Valley, Michael P.; Fitzpatrick, Paul F.; Orville, Allen M.

    2006-01-01

    Nitroalkane oxidase (NAO) from Fusarium oxysporum catalyzes the oxidation of neutral nitroalkanes to the corresponding aldehydes or ketones with the production of H2O2 and nitrite. The flavoenzyme is a new member of the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACAD) family, but it does not react with acyl-CoA substrates. We present the 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of NAO trapped during the turnover of nitroethane as a covalent N5–FAD adduct (ES*). The homotetrameric structure of ES* was solved by MAD phasing with 52 Se-Met sites in an orthorhombic space group. The electron density for the N5-(2-nitrobutyl)-1,5-dihydro-FAD covalent intermediate is clearly resolved. The structure of ES* was used to solve the crystal structure of oxidized NAO at 2.07 Å resolution. The c axis for the trigonal space group of oxidized NAO is 485 Å, and there are six subunits (1½ holoenzymes) in the asymmetric unit. Four of the active sites contain spermine (EI), a weak competitive inhibitor, and two do not contain spermine (Eox). The active-site structures of Eox, EI, and ES* reveal a hydrophobic channel that extends from the exterior of the protein and terminates at Asp402 and the N5 position on the re face of the FAD. Thus, Asp402 is in the correct position to serve as the active-site base, where it is proposed to abstract the α proton from neutral nitroalkane substrates. The structures for NAO and various members of the ACAD family overlay with root-mean-square deviations between 1.7 and 3.1 Å. The homologous region typically spans more than 325 residues and includes Glu376, which is the active-site base in the prototypical member of the ACAD family. However, NAO and the ACADs exhibit differences in hydrogen-bonding patterns between the respective active-site base, substrate molecules, and FAD. These likely differentiate NAO from the homologues and, consequently, are proposed to result in the unique reaction mechanism of NAO. PMID:16430210

  16. PAD4 mediated histone hypercitrullination induces heterochromatin decondensation and chromatin unfolding to form neutrophil extracellular trap-like structures

    PubMed Central

    Leshner, Marc; Wang, Shu; Lewis, Carrie; Zheng, Han; Chen, Xiangyun Amy; Santy, Lorraine; Wang, Yanming

    2012-01-01

    NETosis, the process wherein neutrophils release highly decondensed chromatin called neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), has gained much attention as an alternative means of killing bacteria. In vivo, NETs are induced by bacteria and pro-inflammatory cytokines. We have reported that peptidylarginine deiminase 4 (PAD4), an enzyme that converts Arg or monomethyl-Arg to citrulline in histones, is essential for NET formation. The areas of extensive chromatin decondensation along the NETs were rich in histone citrullination. Here, upon investigating the effect of global citrullination in cultured cells, we discovered that PAD4 overexpression in osteosarcoma U2OS cells induces extensive chromatin decondensation independent of apoptosis. The highly decondensed chromatin is released to the extracellular space and stained strongly by a histone citrulline-specific antibody. The structure of the decondensed chromatin is reminiscent of NETs but is unique in that it occurs without stimulation of cells with pro-inflammatory cytokines and bacteria. Furthermore, histone citrullination during chromatin decondensation can dissociate heterochromatin protein 1 beta (HP1β) thereby offering a new molecular mechanism for understanding how citrullination regulates chromatin function. Taken together, our study suggests that PAD4 mediated citrullination induces chromatin decondensation, implicating its essential role in NET formation under physiological conditions in neutrophils. PMID:23060885

  17. Structure of a RING E3 Trapped in Action Reveals Ligation Mechanism for the Ubiquitin-like Protein NEDD8

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Daniel C.; Sviderskiy, Vladislav O.; Monda, Julie K.; Lydeard, John R.; Cho, Shein Ei; Harper, J. Wade; Schulman, Brenda A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Most E3 ligases use a RING domain to activate a thioester-linked E2~ubiquitin-like protein (UBL) intermediate and promote UBL transfer to a remotely bound target protein. Nonetheless, RING E3 mechanisms matching a specific UBL and acceptor lysine remain elusive, including for RBX1, which mediates NEDD8 ligation to cullins and >10% of all ubiquitination. We report the structure of a trapped RING E3-E2~UBL-target intermediate representing RBX1-UBC12~NEDD8-CUL1-DCN1, which reveals the mechanism of NEDD8 ligation and how a particular UBL and acceptor lysine are matched by a multifunctional RING E3. Numerous mechanisms specify cullin neddylation while preventing noncognate ubiquitin ligation. Notably, E2-E3-target and RING-E2~UBL modules are not optimized to function independently, but instead require integration by the UBL and target for maximal reactivity. The UBL and target regulate the catalytic machinery by positioning the RINGE2~UBL catalytic center, licensing the acceptor lysine, and influencing E2 reactivity, thereby driving their specific coupling by a multifunctional RING E3. PMID:24949976

  18. Oxygen trapped by rare earth tetrahedral clusters in Nd4FeOS6: Crystal structure, electronic structure, and magnetic properties

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lin, Qisheng; Taufour, Valentin; Zhang, Yuemei; Wood, Max; Drtina, Thomas; Bud’ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.; Miller, Gordon J.

    2015-05-22

    Single crystals of Nd4FeOS6 were grown from an Fe-S eutectic solution. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis revealed a Nd4MnOSe6-type structure (P63mc, a = 9.2693(1) Å, c = 6.6650(1) Å, V = 495.94(1) Å3, Z = 2), featuring parallel chains of face-sharing [FeS6x1/2]4- trigonal antiprisms and interlinked [Nd4OS3]4+ cubane-like clusters. Oxygen atoms were found to be trapped by Nd4 clusters in the [Nd4OS3]4+ chains. Structural differences among Nd4MnOSe6-type Nd4FeOS6 and the related La3CuSiS7- and Pr8CoGa3-type structures have been described. Magnetic susceptibility measurements on Nd4FeOS6 suggested the dominance of antiferromagnetic interactions at low temperature, but no magnetic ordering down to 2 Kmore » was observed. Spin-polarized electronic structure calculations revealed magnetic frustration with dominant antiferromagnetic interactions.« less

  19. Oxygen trapped by rare earth tetrahedral clusters in Nd4FeOS6: Crystal structure, electronic structure, and magnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Qisheng; Taufour, Valentin; Zhang, Yuemei; Wood, Max; Drtina, Thomas; Bud'ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.; Miller, Gordon J.

    2015-09-01

    Single crystals of Nd4FeOS6 were grown from an Fe-S eutectic solution. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis revealed a Nd4MnOSe6-type structure (P63mc, a=9.2693(1) Å, c=6.6650(1)Å, V=495.94(1) Å3, Z=2), featuring parallel chains of face-sharing [FeS6×1/2]4- trigonal antiprisms and interlinked [Nd4OS3]4+ cubane-like clusters. Oxygen atoms were found to be trapped by Nd4 clusters in the [Nd4OS3]4+ chains. Structural differences among Nd4MnOSe6-type Nd4FeOS6 and the related La3CuSiS7- and Pr8CoGa3-type structures have been described. Magnetic susceptibility measurements on Nd4FeOS6 suggested the dominance of antiferromagnetic interactions at low temperature, but no magnetic ordering down to 2 K was observed. Spin-polarized electronic structure calculations revealed magnetic frustration with dominant antiferromagnetic interactions.

  20. Multi-functional stacked light-trapping structure for stabilizing and boosting solar-electricity efficiency of hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wen-Hsien; Shieh, Jia-Min; Pan, Fu-Ming; Shen, Chang-Hong; Huang, Jung Y.; Wu, Tsung-Ta; Kao, Ming-Hsuan; Hsiao, Tzu-Hsuan; Yu, Peichen; Kuo, Hao-Chung; Lee, Ching-Ting

    2013-08-01

    A sandwiched light-trapping electrode structure, which consists of a capping aluminum-doped ZnO (AZO) layer, dispersed plasmonic Au-nanoparticles (Au-NPs), and a micro-structured transparent conductive substrate, is employed to stabilize and boost the conversion-efficiency of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cells. The conformal AZO ultrathin layer (5 nm) smoothened the Au-NP-dispersed electrode surface, thereby reducing defects across the AZO/a-Si:H interface and resulting in a high resistance to photo-degradation in the ultraviolet-blue photoresponse band. With the plasmonic light-trapping structure, the cell has a high conversion-efficiency of 10.1% and the photo-degradation is as small as 7%.

  1. Using Fault-Zone Trapped Waves from Teleseismic Earthquakes to Document Deep Structure of the Calico Fault in Mojave Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y. G.; Chen, P.; Lee, E. J.

    2014-12-01

    Fault-zone trapped waves (FZTWs) are observed at a square seismic array consisting of 40 intermediate-period stations deployed adjacent to the Calico Fault (CF) in Mojave Desert, California for teleseismic earthquakes and used to characterize the deep structure of fault damage zone. In the previous study, traveltimes inverse, FZTWs generated by explosions and local earthquakes, and InSAR observations have been used to document the seismic velocity structure of the CF zone, within which velocities are reduced to ~40% in the center of a 1.5-km-wide compliant zone along the fault strike and extending to 5-6 km depth at the array site [Cochran, et al., 2009]. In order to better address the deep portion of the CF beyond the depth coverage of local earthquakes, we use FZTWs recorded at this array atop the CF for teleseismic earthquakes which have great promise for providing unprecedented constrains of the depth extension of fault-zone damage structure because the FZTWs arise from teleseismic waves incident at the fault bottom at deep level. We examined the data from 72 M≥6 teleseismic earthquakes recorded at the Calico array, and identified significant FZTWs with much larger amplitudes and longer wavetrains starting ~5-s after the first-arrivals at stations located within the compliant zone along the CF strike than those registered at farther stations for teleseismic earthquakes occurring at great depths with less surface wave affect. We interpret observed FZTWs being formed by S-waves converted from P waves at the Moho (~30-km depth) and entering the bottom of the CF. The FZTWs from teleseismic earthquakes show consistent longer wavetrains (~12-s) than those (3-8-s) recorded at same stations for local earthquakes at shallow depths, indicating that the CF low-velocity compliant zone likely extends throughout much of the seismogenic zone as a result of the portion of energy expended during rupture in historical earthquakes to drive cracking and yielding of rock and

  2. Coupled optical-thermal-fluid and structural analyses of novel light-trapping tubular panels for concentrating solar power receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Jesus D.; Christian, Joshua M.; Yellowhair, Julius E.; Ho, Clifford K.

    2015-09-01

    Traditional tubular receivers used in concentrating solar power are formed using tubes connected to manifolds to form panels; which in turn are arranged in cylindrical or rectangular shapes. Previous and current tubular receivers, such as the ones used in Solar One, Solar Two, and most recently the Ivanpah solar plants, have used a black paint coating to increase the solar absorptance of the receiver. However, these coatings degrade over time and must be reapplied, increasing the receiver maintenance cost. This paper presents the thermal efficiency evaluation of novel receiver tubular panels that have a higher effective solar absorptance due to a light-trapping effect created by arranging the tubes in each panel into unique geometric configurations. Similarly, the impact of the incidence angle on the effective solar absorptance and thermal efficiency is evaluated. The overarching goal of this work is to achieve effective solar absorptances of ~90% and thermal efficiencies above 85% without using an absorptance coating. Several panel geometries were initially proposed and were down-selected based on structural analyses considering the thermal and pressure loading requirements of molten salt and supercritical carbon-dioxide receivers. The effective solar absorptance of the chosen tube geometries and panel configurations were evaluated using the ray-tracing modeling capabilities of SolTrace. The thermal efficiency was then evaluated by coupling computational fluid dynamics with the ray-tracing results using ANSYS Fluent. Compared to the base case analysis (flat tubular panel), the novel tubular panels have shown an increase in effective solar absorptance and thermal efficiency by several percentage points.

  3. Broadband perfect light trapping in the thinnest monolayer graphene-MoS2 photovoltaic cell: the new application of spectrum-splitting structure

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yun-Ben; Yang, Wen; Wang, Tong-Biao; Deng, Xin-Hua; Liu, Jiang-Tao

    2016-01-01

    The light absorption of a monolayer graphene-molybdenum disulfide photovoltaic (GM-PV) cell in a wedge-shaped microcavity with a spectrum-splitting structure is investigated theoretically. The GM-PV cell, which is three times thinner than the traditional photovoltaic cell, exhibits up to 98% light absorptance in a wide wavelength range. This rate exceeds the fundamental limit of nanophotonic light trapping in solar cells. The effects of defect layer thickness, GM-PV cell position in the microcavity, incident angle, and lens aberration on the light absorptance of the GM-PV cell are explored. Despite these effects, the GM-PV cell can still achieve at least 90% light absorptance with the current technology. Our proposal provides different methods to design light-trapping structures and apply spectrum-splitting systems. PMID:26864749

  4. Broadband perfect light trapping in the thinnest monolayer graphene-MoS2 photovoltaic cell: the new application of spectrum-splitting structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yun-Ben; Yang, Wen; Wang, Tong-Biao; Deng, Xin-Hua; Liu, Jiang-Tao

    2016-02-01

    The light absorption of a monolayer graphene-molybdenum disulfide photovoltaic (GM-PV) cell in a wedge-shaped microcavity with a spectrum-splitting structure is investigated theoretically. The GM-PV cell, which is three times thinner than the traditional photovoltaic cell, exhibits up to 98% light absorptance in a wide wavelength range. This rate exceeds the fundamental limit of nanophotonic light trapping in solar cells. The effects of defect layer thickness, GM-PV cell position in the microcavity, incident angle, and lens aberration on the light absorptance of the GM-PV cell are explored. Despite these effects, the GM-PV cell can still achieve at least 90% light absorptance with the current technology. Our proposal provides different methods to design light-trapping structures and apply spectrum-splitting systems.

  5. Broadband perfect light trapping in the thinnest monolayer graphene-MoS2 photovoltaic cell: the new application of spectrum-splitting structure.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yun-Ben; Yang, Wen; Wang, Tong-Biao; Deng, Xin-Hua; Liu, Jiang-Tao

    2016-01-01

    The light absorption of a monolayer graphene-molybdenum disulfide photovoltaic (GM-PV) cell in a wedge-shaped microcavity with a spectrum-splitting structure is investigated theoretically. The GM-PV cell, which is three times thinner than the traditional photovoltaic cell, exhibits up to 98% light absorptance in a wide wavelength range. This rate exceeds the fundamental limit of nanophotonic light trapping in solar cells. The effects of defect layer thickness, GM-PV cell position in the microcavity, incident angle, and lens aberration on the light absorptance of the GM-PV cell are explored. Despite these effects, the GM-PV cell can still achieve at least 90% light absorptance with the current technology. Our proposal provides different methods to design light-trapping structures and apply spectrum-splitting systems. PMID:26864749

  6. Structural and thermodynamic characterization of the interaction between two periplasmic Treponema pallidum lipoproteins that are components of a TPR-protein-associated TRAP transporter (TPAT)

    PubMed Central

    Brautigam, Chad A.; Deka, Ranjit K.; Schuck, Peter; Tomchick, Diana R.; Norgard, Michael V.

    2012-01-01

    Tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic transporters (TRAP-Ts) are bacterial transport systems that have been implicated in the import of small molecules into the cytoplasm. A newly discovered subfamily of TRAP-Ts (TPATs) has four components. Three are common to both TRAP-Ts and TPATs: the P component, a ligand-binding protein, and a transmembrane symporter apparatus comprising the M and Q components (M and Q are sometimes fused to form a single polypeptide). TPATs are distinguished from TRAP-Ts by the presence of a unique protein called the “T component”. In Treponema pallidum, this protein (TatT) is a water-soluble trimer whose protomers are each perforated by a pore. Its respective P component (TatPT) interacts with the TatT in vitro and in vivo. In this work, we further characterized this interaction. Co-crystal structures of two complexes between the two proteins confirm that up to three monomers of TatPT can bind to the TatT trimer. A putative ligand-binding cleft of TatPT aligns with the pore of TatT, strongly suggesting ligand transfer between T and PT. We used a combination of site-directed mutagenesis and analytical ultracentrifugation to derive thermodynamic parameters for the interactions. These observations confirm that the observed crystallographic interface is recapitulated in solution. These results prompt a hypothesis of the molecular mechanism(s) of hydrophobic ligand transport by the TPATs. PMID:22504226

  7. Percolation mechanism through trapping/de-trapping process at defect states for resistive switching devices with structure of Ag/Si{sub x}C{sub 1−x}/p-Si

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yanhong; Gao, Ping; Li, La; Peng, Wei; Jiang, Xuening; Zhang, Jialiang

    2014-08-14

    Pure Si{sub x}C{sub 1−x} (x > 0.5) and B-containing Si{sub x}C{sub 1−x} (x > 0.5) based resistive switching devices (RSD) with the structure of Ag/Si{sub x}C{sub 1−x}/p-Si were fabricated and their switching characteristics and mechanism were investigated systematically. Percolation mechanism through trapping/ de-trapping at defect states was suggested for the switching process. Through the introduction of B atoms into Si{sub x}C{sub 1−x}, the density of defect states was reduced, then, the SET and RESET voltages were also decreased. Based on the percolation theory, the dependence of SET/RESET voltage on the density of defect states was analyzed. These results supply a deep understanding for the SiC-based RSD, which have a potential application in extreme ambient conditions.

  8. Oxygen trapped by rare earth tetrahedral clusters in Nd4FeOS6: Crystal structure, electronic structure, and magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Qisheng; Taufour, Valentin; Zhang, Yuemei; Wood, Max; Drtina, Thomas; Bud’ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.; Miller, Gordon J.

    2015-05-22

    Single crystals of Nd4FeOS6 were grown from an Fe-S eutectic solution. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis revealed a Nd4MnOSe6-type structure (P63mc, a = 9.2693(1) Å, c = 6.6650(1) Å, V = 495.94(1) Å3, Z = 2), featuring parallel chains of face-sharing [FeS6x1/2]4- trigonal antiprisms and interlinked [Nd4OS3]4+ cubane-like clusters. Oxygen atoms were found to be trapped by Nd4 clusters in the [Nd4OS3]4+ chains. Structural differences among Nd4MnOSe6-type Nd4FeOS6 and the related La3CuSiS7- and Pr8CoGa3-type structures have been described. Magnetic susceptibility measurements on Nd4FeOS6 suggested the dominance of antiferromagnetic interactions at low temperature, but no magnetic ordering down to 2 K was observed. Spin-polarized electronic structure calculations revealed magnetic frustration with dominant antiferromagnetic interactions.

  9. Evidence for octupole vibration in the superdeformed well of {sup 190}Hg from eurogam

    SciTech Connect

    Crowell, B.; Carpenter, M.P.; Janssens, R.V.F.

    1995-08-01

    Gammasphere experiments in 1993-94 brought to light the existence of an excited superdeformed (SD) band in {sup 190}Hg with the unusual property of decaying entirely to the lowest (yrast) SD band over 3-4 transitions, rather than to the normally deformed states as is usually the case in the A {approximately} 150 and A {approximately} 190 regions of superdeformation. Although M1 transitions between signature-partner SD bands were previously observed in {sup 193}Hg, no such mechanism was available to explain the situation in the even-even nucleus {sup 190}Hg, whose yrast SD band has no signature partner. The best explanation appears to lie in long-standing theoretical predictions that the SD minimum in the potential energy surface would be quite soft with respect to octupole vibrations. This would lead to enhanced E1 transitions connecting the one-phonon and zero-phonon states. The data and this interpretation were published. A shortcoming of the Gammasphere experiments was that they did not allow the definitive measurement of the energies of the gamma-ray transitions connecting the two bands, due to the very weak population of the excited band ({approximately}0.05% of the {sup 190}Hg channel) and also partly, we believed, to the angular distributions of the transitions, which were peaked near 90 degrees, where Gammasphere had few detectors.

  10. Ripple Trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    3 April 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows the margin of a lava flow on a cratered plain in the Athabasca Vallis region of Mars. Remarkably, the cratered plain in this scene is essentially free of bright, windblown ripples. Conversely, the lava flow apparently acted as a trap for windblown materials, illustrated by the presence of the light-toned, wave-like texture over much of the flow. That the lava flow surface trapped windblown sand and granules better than the cratered plain indicates that the flow surface has a rougher texture at a scale too small to resolve in this image.

    Location near: 10.7oN, 204.5oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Winter