Science.gov

Sample records for odontogenic myxoma reconstructive

  1. Recurrent Maxillary Odontogenic Myxoma Following Partial Maxillary Resection and Consecutive Osseous Reconstruction Including Tooth Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Reinhard E; Scheuer, Hanna A; Höltje, Wolf

    2016-06-01

    Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is a rare tumour arising in the jaws. The tumour is purported to be odontogenic in origin due to the frequent localisation of the tumour inside the jaws in close relation to teeth. The aim of this report was to detail the course of a patient who developed OM of the maxilla, underwent adequate ablative surgery and reconstruction, including tooth transplantation to the original tumour site, and subsequently developed a local recurrence in close proximity to the teeth transplanted to the reconstructed maxilla 6 years after the first diagnosis. Once again, a partial maxillary resection was performed, with no reconstruction. The patient has been free from tumour recurrence for over 20 years. We discuss the current hypothesis on OM pathogenesis and the possible impact of actively dividing cells on tumour re-growth. PMID:27272841

  2. Odontogenic myxoma: Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Sridhar P; Naag, Ananth; Kashyap, Bina

    2010-07-01

    Odontogenic tumors represents a broad spectrum of lesions ranging from benign to malignant to dental hamartomas all arising from odontogenic residues, that is, the odontogenic epithelium, ectomesenchyme with variable amounts of dental hard tissues formed in the same sequence as in normal tooth development. We report two cases of myxoma, which were misdiagnosed initially and latter, reported as odontogenic myxoma; and were treated by conservative surgical excision in one case and radical resection with hemimandibulectomy in the other case. PMID:22442596

  3. Surgical and prosthetic management of maxillary odontogenic myxoma

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Haroon; Bashir, Atif

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic myxomas are uncommon tumors of comprising of 3% of all the tumors of odontogenic origin. They usually occur during the second and third decades of life and are more commonly seen in females. The current case report sheds light upon the surgical treatment of a myxoma of odontogenic origin in posterior maxilla of a young female patient. Prosthodontic rehabilitation stages are also briefly described following complete healing of the lesion after surgery. PMID:26038664

  4. Odontogenic Myxoma in Children: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Dalbo Contrera Toro, Mariana; Siqueira Barreto, Icléia; Amstalden, Eliane Maria Ingrid; Takahiro Chone, Carlos; Nizam Pfeilsticker, Leopoldo

    2016-01-01

    Benign odontogenic lesions are rare entities but are very important due to their locally aggressive nature. Odontogenic myxoma is even rarer in children than in adults. There is no evidence in the literature in regard to the best treatment approach, in terms of conservative or aggressive surgery, for this type of tumor. This paper reports a case of odontogenic myxoma in a child treated with a compromised approach through bone osteotomies and a review of the literature about this disease, especially in pediatric patients. PMID:27064694

  5. Odontogenic Myxoma in Children: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Dalbo Contrera Toro, Mariana; Siqueira Barreto, Icléia; Amstalden, Eliane Maria Ingrid; Takahiro Chone, Carlos; Nizam Pfeilsticker, Leopoldo

    2016-01-01

    Benign odontogenic lesions are rare entities but are very important due to their locally aggressive nature. Odontogenic myxoma is even rarer in children than in adults. There is no evidence in the literature in regard to the best treatment approach, in terms of conservative or aggressive surgery, for this type of tumor. This paper reports a case of odontogenic myxoma in a child treated with a compromised approach through bone osteotomies and a review of the literature about this disease, especially in pediatric patients. PMID:27064694

  6. Odontogenic myxoma: Report of three cases and retrospective review of literature in Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Zainab; Sharma, Pankaj; Gupta, Shalini; Mohanty, Sujata; Naithani, Manish; Jain, Anshul

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To review the clinical pattern and treatment modalities meted out to patients of odontogenic myxoma (OM) in Indian population in last 30 years and also to report 3 cases of OM. Method: A retrospective review of radiograph and histopathology of three cases of odontogenic myxoma treated between 2005 and 2011 was done. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed to examine the pattern of vimentin and NSE. Also a computerized literature search using Medline and Google scholar was conducted for published articles on OM in Indian population in last 30 years. Result: A total of 32 OM cases reviewed from 25 articles retrieved. Out of them 24 myxomas were present in maxilla, only 8 were in mandible and a single case was present in supraglottic region (larynx). Surgical procedure carried out was excision and curettage in 16 patients and resection with safe margin followed by reconstruction 13 patients. All the three reported cases were successfully treated by tumor enucleation and peripheral ostectomy with no recurrence after 3 to 7 years. Conclusion: Odontogenic myxoma is a rare odontogenic tumor with inconclusive clinical and radiographic features, hence histopathological examination is mandatory to confirm its diagnosis. Although the immunohistochemical analysis may help in diagnosis but plays no role in guiding treatment planning or predicting the rate of recurrence. Currently we lack data on number of reported OM cases in Indian population as author feels more patients must have been treated then reported. PMID:26681859

  7. Assessment of CD-105 as an Angiogenic Modulator in Odontogenic Myxomas and Dental Follicles.

    PubMed

    Del Carmen González-Galván, María; Aguirre-Urizar, José Manuel; Bologna-Molina, Ronell; Farfán-Morales, J Eduardo; Gainza-Cirauqui, Maria Luisa; Marichalar-Mendia, Xabier; Mosqueda-Taylor, Adalberto

    2016-06-01

    Aim Odontogenic myxoma is a benign intraosseous neoplasm of the jaws, with a locally aggressive behavior and a high recurrence rate. CD-105 is a homodimeric cell membrane glycoprotein and is a component of the TGF-β1 growth factor receptor complex that modulates angiogenesis by regulating the proliferation, differentiation and cellular migration. The aim of this study is to quantify the microvascular density of the odontogenic myxoma based on the expression of CD-105. Materials and Methods The analysis included 18 odontogenic myxoma and 18 dental follicles as controls. A standard immunohistochemical procedure was performed with the CD-105 antibody. Five representative fields (40×) of the odontogenic myxoma and the dental follicles were selected to determine the microvascular density, which was then followed by a descriptive and comparative statistical analysis. Results Dental follicles presented a significantly higher microvascular density compared with odontogenic myxoma (P = .001). The odontogenic myxoma smaller than 3 cm showed a greater microvascular density than those larger than 3 cm in size (P > .05), and the microvascular density was lower in large odontogenic myxomas as compared with the dental follicles (P = .003). Conclusion A weaker expression of CD-105 in odontogenic myxoma might indicate a lower angiogenic activity, suggesting that vascular proliferation has a limited role in the growth mechanisms and in the aggressive behavior of this neoplasm. PMID:26888956

  8. Diagnosis and management of odontogenic myxoma in a dog.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Bruce; Boy, Sonja C; Steenkamp, Gerhard

    2007-09-01

    A three-year-old Jack Russell terrier dog was presented with a large gingival mass of the right mandible extending from the fourth premolar to the first molar teeth. Radiographic examination of the expansile mass revealed moth-eaten, honeycomb-like lyses of the mandible and extended into the mandibular alveolar canal based on computed tomography. The histopathological diagnosis of the biopsy was odontogenic fibromyxoma. Mandibulectomy with resection of the associated soft tissues was performed. Surgical management was curative with no clinical signs of disease 2-years after treatment. These neoplasms are slow growing, locally destructive tumors of odontogenic origin that have been described in the jaw of only one dog. In this paper, the clinico-radiological and pathologic features, diagnostic modalities as well as the factors that might influence treatment outcome of odontogenic myxomas are discussed. These odontogenic tumors are currently excluded from the WHO classification of odontogenic tumors in domestic animals and inclusion in future classifications systems is proposed. PMID:17985692

  9. Odontogenic myxoma in a 52-year-old woman

    PubMed Central

    Ram, Hari; Mehta, Gagan; Kumar, Manoj; Lone, Parveen

    2014-01-01

    Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is a rare benign but locally aggressive tumour of the jaws. It is usually seen in the second to third decade of life. Women are more frequently affected than men and it has more predilections for the mandible rather than the maxilla. OM presents as an asymptomatic swelling in most of the cases. Owing to the non-capsulated and aggressive nature of OM, a high rate of recurrence has been reported. Here we present a case of OM in a 52-year-old woman managed by segmental mandibulectomy. Sign of recurrence was seen after 18 months of follow-up. PMID:24859552

  10. Problems in diagnosing odontogenic myxoma: case report.

    PubMed

    Butt, F M A; Chindia, M L; Wakoli, K A

    2007-03-01

    Tumours and tumour-like growths arising from odontogenic tissues constitute a heterogenous group of lesions whose diagnosis can be particularly challenging on the part of both surgeons and pathologists. In children, these lesions are even more difficult to clinically and histopathologically diagnose definitively because of the concurrent diverse embryologic differentiation of dental tissues. A case is presented of a 12 year-old boy who was subjected to inappropriate primary management of a left mandibular mass, due apparently to inadequate consultation to establish an accurate diagnosis. PMID:17600984

  11. Rare appearance of an odontogenic myxoma in cone-beam computed tomography: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Dabbaghi, Arash; Nikkerdar, Nafiseh; Bayati, Soheyla; Golshah, Amin

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is an infiltrative benign bone tumor that occurs almost exclusively in the facial skeleton. The radiographic characteristics of odontogenic myxoma may produce several patterns, making diagnosis difficult. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) may prove extremely useful in clarifying the intraosseous extent of the tumor and its effects on surrounding structures. Here, we report a case of odontogenic myxoma of the mandible in a 27-year-old female. The patient exhibited a slight swelling in the left mandible. Surgical resection was performed. No recurrence was noted. In the CBCT sections, we observed perforation of the cortical plate and radiopaque line that extended from the periosteum, resembling "sunray" appearance—a rare feature of OM—which could not be assessed by panoramic radiography. PMID:27092217

  12. Rare appearance of an odontogenic myxoma in cone-beam computed tomography: a case report.

    PubMed

    Dabbaghi, Arash; Nikkerdar, Nafiseh; Bayati, Soheyla; Golshah, Amin

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is an infiltrative benign bone tumor that occurs almost exclusively in the facial skeleton. The radiographic characteristics of odontogenic myxoma may produce several patterns, making diagnosis difficult. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) may prove extremely useful in clarifying the intraosseous extent of the tumor and its effects on surrounding structures. Here, we report a case of odontogenic myxoma of the mandible in a 27-year-old female. The patient exhibited a slight swelling in the left mandible. Surgical resection was performed. No recurrence was noted. In the CBCT sections, we observed perforation of the cortical plate and radiopaque line that extended from the periosteum, resembling "sunray" appearance-a rare feature of OM-which could not be assessed by panoramic radiography. PMID:27092217

  13. The orosomucoid 1 protein (α1 acid glycoprotein) is overexpressed in odontogenic myxoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is a benign, but locally invasive, neoplasm occurring in the jaws. However, the molecules implicated in its development are unknown. OM as well as Dental Follicle (DF), an odontogenic tissue surrounding the enamel organ, is derived from ectomesenchymal/mesencyhmal elements. To identify some protein that could participate in the development of this neoplasm, total proteins from OM were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis and the profiles were compared with those obtained from DF, used as a control. Results We identified eight proteins with differential expression; two of them were downregulated and six upregulated in OM. A spot consistently overexpressed in odontogenic myxoma, with a molecular weight of 44-kDa and a pI of 3.5 was identified as the orosomucoid 1 protein. Western blot experiments confirmed the overexpression of this protein in odontogenic myxoma and immunohistochemical assays showed that this protein was mainly located in the cytoplasm of stellate and spindle-shaped cells of this neoplasm. Conclusion Orosomucoid 1, which belongs to a group of acute-phase proteins, may play a role in the modulation of the immune system and possibly it influences the development of OM. PMID:22888844

  14. Unusual presentation of localized gingival enlargement associated with a slow-growing odontogenic myxoma

    PubMed Central

    Miranda Rius, Jaume; Nadal, Alfons; Lahor, Eduard; Mtui, Beatus; Brunet, Lluís

    2013-01-01

    Unusual presentation of localized gingival enlargement associated with a subjacent tumoural pathology is reported. The patient was a 55-year-old black male, whose chief complaint was a progressive gingival overgrowth for more than ten years, in the buccal area of the anterior left mandible. According to the clinical features and the radiological diagnosis of odontogenic keratocyst, a conservative surgery with enucleation and curettage was performed. Tissue submitted for histopathological analysis rendered the diagnosis of odontogenic myxoma. After 12-month of follow-up, no evidence of recurrence was found. Clinicians should be cautious when facing any gingival enlargement to avoid diagnostic pitfalls and to indicate the appropriate treatment. PMID:23722914

  15. Surgical treatment of odontogenic myxoma and facial deformity in the same procedure

    PubMed Central

    Mayrink, Gabriela; Luna, Anibal Henrique Barbosa; Olate, Sergio; Asprino, Luciana; De Moraes, Marcio

    2013-01-01

    Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is an uncommon benign tumor with aggressive and invasive behavior. Predominant symptoms are usually slow and painless swelling, sometimes resulting in perforation of the cortical borders of the affected bone. In this paper, a case report of a patient with an OM on the right maxillary sinus and a vertical excess of maxilla will be presented. The treatment chosen was tumor resection in association with orthognathic surgery with biomodels assessment for surgical planning. A 3-year follow-up showed disease free and stability of the new position of maxilla. The international literature is evaluated to discuss this case report. PMID:24124313

  16. Novel Association of Odontogenic Myxoma with Constitutional Chromosomal 1q21 Microduplication: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Best-Rocha, Alejandro; Patel, Kalyani; Hicks, John; Edmonds, Joseph L; Paldino, Michael J; Wu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is a rare, benign, and locally aggressive tumor. It tends to occur in the posterior maxilla and mandible and is often associated with root resorption and perforation of cortex. Histopathologically, there is a proliferation of spindle, bipolar, and stellate cells, with bland nuclei within a myxoid to infrequently fibromyxoid extracellular matrix. Long, thin residual bony trabeculae are often seen floating within the spindle cell proliferation because of the infiltrating nature of this tumor, and these trabeculae impart a "soap bubble" or "tennis-racket" radiologic appearance. No syndromic association of OM has been reported. Although similar histopathologic features are shared with cardiac myxoma and soft tissue myxoma, mutations in the GNAS gene have not been identified in OM to date, and only 2 of 17 OMs showed mutations in the PRKAR1A gene. In this report, we describe a case of OM in a patient with constitutional 1q21 microduplication, a locus that harbors genes encoding certain proteins in the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway, including G-protein-coupled receptors and 1 phosphodiesterase interacting protein. Review of the literature describes the key clinical features and molecular pathogenesis of 1q21 microduplication, as well as highlighting the role of PKA signaling pathway in the pathogenesis of myxomas in general. PMID:26230961

  17. Odontogenic myxoma: clinico-pathological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural findings of a multicentric series.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Mata, Guillermo; Mosqueda-Taylor, Adalberto; Carlos-Bregni, Roman; de Almeida, Oslei Paes; Contreras-Vidaurre, Elisa; Vargas, Pablo Agustin; Cano-Valdéz, Ana María; Domínguez-Malagón, Hugo

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the clinico-pathological and immunohistochemical features of 62 cases of odontogenic myxoma (OM) diagnosed in three Oral Pathology Diagnostic Services in Latin America, as well as to describe the ultrastructural features of three of these cases. OM showed a wide age range (9-71 years), with a mean of 27.97 yr (SD: 11.01) and a male to female ratio of 1:2.2. Mandible was affected in 37 cases (59.6%) and maxilla in 25 (40.4%), with 61.3% located in the posterior region. Thirty-nine cases (62.9%) were multilocular and 23 (37.1%) unilocular. Size ranged from 1 to 13 cm, (mean: 5.2 cm). Thirty-seven multilocular (54.8%) and 6 unilocular lesions (26%) were larger than 4 cm (p<0.05). Epithelial islands were identified in 5 cases (8%) on H&E stained sections, but AE1/AE3 and CK14 disclosed these structures in 15 cases each (24.2%); CK5 was positive in 8 (12.9%); CK7 in 2 (3.2%) and CK19 in only 3 cases (4.8%). All cases were negative for CKs 8 and 18, S-100 protein, NSE and CD68, and showed a low index of expression of Bcl2 and ki-67 proteins (<1%). Mast cell antibodies showed these cells in 45 cases (72.6%). Myofibroblastic differentiation evidenced by myofilaments and fibronexi was found in one case out of the three studied by TEM and 29 cases (46.7%) were positive by immunohistochemistry for alpha actin. In conclusion, only a minority of OM had epithelial islands, and only 3 cases expressed CK 19, indicating an odontogenic epithelium origin. Immunohistochemical and ultrastructural findings suggest that OM is a mesenchymal neoplasm in which several factors may contribute to its pathogenesis, including myofibroblastic differentiation and the participation of mast cell products. However, further investigations are needed to better understand the participation of these elements in this particular neoplasm. PMID:17996487

  18. Odontogenic lesions in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Fang, Qi-Gen; Shi, Shuang; Sun, Chang-Fu

    2014-05-01

    The purpose was to evaluate our 20-year experience of pediatric odontogenic lesions. Pediatric patients with a diagnosis of odontogenic lesion were identified. Three hundred ten patients were odontogenic; dentigerous cyst was seen in 62.0% of the cases. Most (70.2%) of them occurred in mixed dentition period, and it had a male preponderance. Odontogenic keratocystic tumor occurred in the permanent dentition period. It had an equal site distribution. Odontoma was seen in 20.0% of the cases. Its site of predilection was the mandible. Ameloblastoma was the most common odontogenic tumor. Most of the cases occurred in the permanent dentition period. It affected the male and female equally. Calcifying epithelioma odontogenic tumor was seen in 11.8% of the cases. All the lesions occurred in the primary dentition period. It had no sex or site preponderance. Myxoma was seen in 3.6% of the cases. It was most common in the permanent dentition period, and it was more frequent in the male. Iliac crest bone graft was successfully performed in 28 patients, postoperative infection occurred in 2 patients, and no donor-site dysfunctions were reported. The observed differences in lesion type and distribution in this study compared with previous researches may be attributable to genetic and geographic variation in the populations studied. Iliac crest bone graft was suggested for pediatric mandible reconstruction. PMID:24785745

  19. [Myxoma Originating from the Tricuspid Annulus Requiring Annular Reconstruction and Valve Replacement;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Hattori, Masashi; Matsumura, Yu; Yamaki, Fumitaka

    2016-07-01

    A 66-year-old woman who had had coughing and worsening dyspnea for 3 weeks was admitted to our hospital. Echocardiography showed a solid round mass (72×49 mm in diameter) attached to the tricuspid septal annulus with a short stalk. A right atrial myxoma was suspected and operation was performed under cardiopulmonary bypass after heart failure symptoms subsided. The tumor was extirpated along with the tricuspid valve annulus. We performed reconstruction of the tricuspid annulus, tricuspid valve replacement with a bioprosthetic valve and pacemaker implantation. The histopathologic diagnosis was myxoma. The postoperative course was uneventful, and no recurrence has been noted for 1 year after surgery. PMID:27365071

  20. Reconstruction of defects of maxillary sinus wall after removal of a huge odontogenic lesion using prebended 3D titanium-mesh and CAD/CAM technique

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A 63 year-old male with a huge odontogenic lesion of sinus maxillaris was treated with computer-assisted surgery. After resection of the odontogenic lesion, the sinus wall was reconstructed with a prebended 3D titanium-mesh using CAD/CAM technique. This work provides a new treatment device for maxillary reconstruction via rapid prototyping procedures. PMID:22070833

  1. Intramuscular myxoma

    SciTech Connect

    McCook, T.A.; Martinez, S.; Korobkin, M.; Ram, P.C.; Breiman, R.S.; Gehweiler, J.A.; Bowen, J.H.; Harrelson, J.M.; Harrelson, J.M.

    1981-10-01

    Two patients with intramuscular myxoma (IMM) were evaluated preoperatively using radiography and computed tomography (CT). In both patients CT demonstrated a homogeneous mass with an attenuation value (density) slightly greater than water but less than surrounding muscle. Dystrophic amorphous calcification, previously unreported in this condition, was present in one case. The differential diagnosis of low density intramuscular masses is discussed.

  2. Immunohistochemical evaluation of myofibroblast density in odontogenic cysts and tumors.

    PubMed

    Kouhsoltani, Maryam; Halimi, Monireh; Jabbari, Golchin

    2016-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to investigate myofibroblast (MF) density in a broad spectrum of odontogenic cysts and tumors and the relation between the density of MFs and the clinical behavior of these lesions. Methods. A total of 105 cases of odontogenic lesions, including unicystic ameloblastoma (UAM), solid ameloblastoma (SA), odontogenic keratocyst (OKC), dentigerous cyst (DC), radicular cyst (RC) (15 for each category), and odontogenic myxoma (OM), adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT), calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) (10 for each category), were immunohistochemically stained with anti-α-smooth muscle actin antibody. The mean percentage of positive cells in 10 high-power fields was considered as MF density for each case. Results. A statistically significant difference was observed in the mean scores between the study groups (P < 0.001). The intensity of MFs was significantly higher in odontogenic tumors compared to odontogenic cysts (P < 0.001). There was no statistically significant difference between odontogenic tumors, except between UAM and OM (P = 0.041). The difference between OKC and odontogenic tumors was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). The number of MFs was significantly higher in OKC and lower in COC compared to other odontogenic cysts (P = 0.007 and P = 0.045, respectively). Conclusion. The results of the present study suggest a role for MFs in the aggressive behavior of odontogenic lesions. MFs may represent an important target of therapy, especially for aggressive odontogenic lesions. Our findings support the classification of OKC in the category of odontogenic tumors. PMID:27092213

  3. Immunohistochemical evaluation of myofibroblast density in odontogenic cysts and tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kouhsoltani, Maryam; Halimi, Monireh; Jabbari, Golchin

    2016-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to investigate myofibroblast (MF) density in a broad spectrum of odontogenic cysts and tumors and the relation between the density of MFs and the clinical behavior of these lesions. Methods. A total of 105 cases of odontogenic lesions, including unicystic ameloblastoma (UAM), solid ameloblastoma (SA), odontogenic keratocyst (OKC), dentigerous cyst (DC), radicular cyst (RC) (15 for each category), and odontogenic myxoma (OM), adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT), calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) (10 for each category), were immunohistochemically stained with anti-α-smooth muscle actin antibody. The mean percentage of positive cells in 10 high-power fields was considered as MF density for each case. Results. A statistically significant difference was observed in the mean scores between the study groups (P < 0.001). The intensity of MFs was significantly higher in odontogenic tumors compared to odontogenic cysts (P < 0.001). There was no statistically significant difference between odontogenic tumors, except between UAM and OM (P = 0.041). The difference between OKC and odontogenic tumors was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). The number of MFs was significantly higher in OKC and lower in COC compared to other odontogenic cysts (P = 0.007 and P = 0.045, respectively). Conclusion. The results of the present study suggest a role for MFs in the aggressive behavior of odontogenic lesions. MFs may represent an important target of therapy, especially for aggressive odontogenic lesions. Our findings support the classification of OKC in the category of odontogenic tumors. PMID:27092213

  4. Unusual Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marina Reis; Gabrielli, Marisa Aparecida Cabrini; Gabrielli, Mario Francisco Real; Andrade, Cleverton Roberto de; Silva, Breno Nogueira; Pereira-Filho, Valfrido Antonio

    2016-03-01

    The adenomatoid odontogenic tumor is a rare benign neoplasm. It can, however, have locally aggressive behavior. This is a case of an adenomatoid odontogenic tumor of unusual location and behavior in a 15-year-old female patient. A panoramic radiograph revealed a large radiolucent lesion involving the retained tooth 33. Teeth involved in this lesion were displaced and with apparent root resorption. A prototype of the mandible showed a marked expansion of cortical bone, fenestration points in the lingual cortex, and fragility of the base of the mandible. Therefore, because of the risk of postoperative pathologic fracture the placement of a 2.4-mm reconstruction plate was indicated. Total enucleation of the lesion, as well as placement of a reconstruction plate were performed. Despite the large bone destruction, with the correct surgical procedure and the use of the reconstruction plate the patient recovered without incidents and a 24-month postoperative radiography showed satisfactory bone formation. PMID:26963303

  5. Pediatric Odontogenic Tumors.

    PubMed

    Abrahams, Joshua M; McClure, Shawn A

    2016-02-01

    Pediatric odontogenic tumors are rare, and are often associated with impacted teeth. Although they can develop anywhere in the jaws, odontogenic tumors mainly occur in the posterior mandible. This article discusses the diagnosis and treatment of the most common pediatric odontogenic tumors, such as ameloblastoma, keratocystic odontogenic tumor, odontoma, and cementoblastoma. PMID:26614700

  6. Atrial mass: a myxoma?

    PubMed

    Chatzis, Andrew C; Kostopanagiotou, Kostas; Kousi, Theofili; Mitropoulos, Fotios

    2016-08-01

    A middle-aged woman with a history of resected colorectal cancer and receiving chemotherapy presented with a right atrial mass and the provisional diagnosis of myxoma supported by echocardiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. Successful surgical removal revealed organized thrombus instead. Atrial thrombus may be mistaken for myxoma and long-term intracardiac indwelling catheters can be thrombogenic. PMID:27525099

  7. CT findings of atrial myxoma

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchiya, F.; Kohno, A.; Saitoh, R.; Shigeta, A.

    1984-04-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) appearance of six atrial myxomas was analyzed. Five of the myxomas were located in the left atrium and one was in the right atrium. The margin of the myxoma was at least slightly lobulated in five cases and the content was inhomogeneous in all. Calcification was demonstrated in three cases. The site of attachment of the myxoma was demonstrated by CT to be the arial septum in all cases. The CT finding correlated well with the operative findings. It is concluded that it is possible with CT to diagnose atrial myxoma by the location and nature of the intracardiac mass and to differentiate it from thrombus.

  8. Right Ventricular Myxoma.

    PubMed

    Vadivelmurugan, S; Senthamarai; Sakthimohan; Janarthanan; Balanayagam; Anand, Vijay; Venkateswaran, K J; Ramkumar; Selvaraj

    2015-10-01

    We report a case of 30 year female who presented with complaints of intermittent chest pain and breathlessness for 8 months, Diagnosed to have right ventricular mass protruding into main pulmonary artery during each systole. The mass was completely excised. Histopathological examination showed myxoma. PMID:27608701

  9. Confocal laser scanning microscopy of liesegang rings in odontogenic cysts: analysis of three-dimensional image reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Scivetti, Michele; Lucchese, Alberta; Crincoli, Vito; Pilolli, Giovanni Pietro; Favia, Gianfranco

    2009-01-01

    Liesegang rings are concentric noncellular lamellar structures, occasionally found in inflammatory tissues. They have been confused with various parasites, algas, calcification, and psammoma bodies. The authors examined Liesegang rings from oral inflammatory cysts by both optical and confocal laser scanning microscopy, and perfomed a three-dimensional reconstruction. These investigations indicate that Liesegang rings are composed of multiple birefringent concentric rings, resulting from a progressive deposition of organic substances, with an unclear pathogenesis. PMID:19274580

  10. Defects of the Carney complex gene (PRKAR1A) in odontogenic tumors.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Sílvia F; Gomez, Ricardo S; Diniz, Marina G; Bernardes, Vanessa F; Soares, Flávia F C; Brito, João Artur R; Liu, Sophie; Pontes, Hélder Antônio R; Stratakis, Constantine A; Gomes, Carolina C

    2015-06-01

    The surgical treatment of some odontogenic tumors often leads to tooth and maxillary bone loss as well as to facial deformity. Therefore, the identification of genes involved in the pathogenesis of odontogenic tumors may result in alternative molecular therapies. The PRKAR1A gene displays a loss of protein expression as well as somatic mutations in odontogenic myxomas, an odontogenic ectomesenchymal neoplasm. We used a combination of quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR), immunohistochemistry, loss of heterozygosity (LOH) analysis, and direct sequencing of all PRKAR1A exons to assess if this gene is altered in mixed odontogenic tumors. Thirteen tumors were included in the study: six ameloblastic fibromas, four ameloblastic fibro-odontomas, one ameloblastic fibrodentinoma, and two ameloblastic fibrosarcomas. The epithelial components of the tumors were separated from the mesenchymal by laser microdissection in most of the cases. We also searched for odontogenic pathology in Prkar1a(+) (/) (-) mice. PRKAR1A mRNA/protein expression was decreased in the benign mixed odontogenic tumors in association with LOH at markers around the PRKAR1A gene. We also detected a missense and two synonymous mutations along with two 5'-UTR and four intronic mutations in mixed odontogenic tumors. Prkar1a(+) (/) (-) mice did not show evidence of odontogenic tumor formation, which indicates that additional genes may be involved in the pathogenesis of such tumors, at least in rodents. We conclude that the PRKAR1A gene and its locus are altered in mixed odontogenic tumors. PRKAR1A expression is decreased in a subset of tumors but not in all, and Prkar1a(+) (/) (-) mice do not show abnormalities, which indicates that additional genes play a role in this tumor's pathogenesis. PMID:25870248

  11. Odontogenic epithelial stem cells: hidden sources.

    PubMed

    Padma Priya, Sivan; Higuchi, Akon; Abu Fanas, Salem; Pooi Ling, Mok; Kumari Neela, Vasantha; Sunil, P M; Saraswathi, T R; Murugan, Kadarkarai; Alarfaj, Abdullah A; Munusamy, Murugan A; Kumar, Suresh

    2015-12-01

    The ultimate goal of dental stem cell research is to construct a bioengineered tooth. Tooth formation occurs based on the well-organized reciprocal interaction of epithelial and mesenchymal cells. The dental mesenchymal stem cells are the best explored, but because the human odontogenic epithelium is lost after the completion of enamel formation, studies on these cells are scarce. The successful creation of a bioengineered tooth is achievable only when the odontogenic epithelium is reconstructed to produce a replica of natural enamel. This article discusses the untapped sources of odontogenic epithelial stem cells in humans, such as those present in the active dental lamina in postnatal life, in remnants of dental lamina (the gubernaculum cord), in the epithelial cell rests of Malassez, and in reduced enamel epithelium. The possible uses of these stem cells in regenerative medicine, not just for enamel formation, are discussed. PMID:26367485

  12. Defects of the Carney complex's gene (PRKAR1A) in odontogenic tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Sílvia F; Gomez, Ricardo S; Diniz, Marina G; Bernardes, Vanessa F; Soares, Flávia FC; Brito, João Artur R; Liu, Sophie; Pontes, Hélder Antônio R; Stratakis, Constantine A; Gomes, Carolina C

    2015-01-01

    The surgical treatment of some odontogenic tumors often leads to tooth and maxillary bone loss as well as facial deformity. Therefore, the identification of genes involved in their pathogenesis may result in alternative molecular therapies. The PRKAR1A gene shows loss of protein expression, as well as somatic mutations in odontogenic myxomas, an odontogenic ectomesenchymal neoplasm. We used a combination of qRT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, LOH analysis and direct sequencing of all PRKAR1A exons to assess if this gene is altered in mixed odontogenic tumors. Thirteen tumors were included, being six ameloblastic fibromas, four ameloblastic fibro-odontomas, one ameloblastic fibrodentinoma and two ameloblastic fibrosarcomas. The epithelial component of the tumors was separated from the mesenchymal by laser microdissection in most of the cases. We also searched for odontogenic pathology in Prkar1a+/− mice. PRKAR1A mRNA/protein expression was decreased in the benign mixed odontogenic tumors in association with LOH at markers around PRKAR1A gene. We also detected a missense and two synonymous mutations, besides two 5’-UTR and four intronic mutations in the mixed odontogenic tumors. Prkar1a+/− mice did not show evidence of odontogenic tumor formation, suggesting that additional genes may be involved in their pathogenesis, at least in rodents. We conclude that the PRKAR1A gene and its locus are altered in mixed odontogenic tumors. PRKAR1A's expression is decreased in a subset of tumors but not in all, and Prkar1a+/− mice do not show abnormalities, suggesting that additional genes play a role in this tumor's pathogenesis. PMID:25870248

  13. Odontogenic tumors: A collaborative study of 218 cases diagnosed over 12 years and comprehensive review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Nazlım, Sinan; Etoz, Meryem; Denız, Kemal; Yasa, Yasin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to analyze the frequency and distribution of odontogenic tumors (OTs) in the Cappadocia region of Turkey, and to compare the findings with those reported in the literature. Study Design: The records of the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Pathology Departments at Erciyes University, with histologic diagnosis of odontogenic tumors (based on the World Health Organization classification, 2005), over a 12-year period, were analyzed. The relative frequency of different types of tumors was also analyzed and compared with the literature. Results: OTs in the present study constituted 2.74% of all the 7,942 registered biopsies. A total of 218 cases of OTs were collected and reviewed. Of these, (94.04%) were benign and (5.96%) were malignant. The mandible was the most commonly affected anatomic location, with 170 cases (77.9%). Ameloblastoma with a predilection for the posterior mandible was the most frequent odontogenic tumor (30.28%), followed by keratocystic odontogenic tumor (19.5%), odontoma (13.4%), and odontogenic myxoma (8.5%). Conclusions: OTs are rare neoplasms and appear to show geographic variations in the world. In Cappadocia, Turkey, they are more common in the mandible, with ameloblastoma followed by keratocystic odontogenic tumors with the incidences observed in the present study being similar to those of previous studies from Asia and Africa, and in contrast to those reported from American countries. Key words:Odontogenic tumors, WHO classification, prevalence, jaws. PMID:25481228

  14. Surgical Treatment of Atrial Myxomas

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Bum Koo; Lee, Doo Yun; Pezzella, A. Thomas; Hong, Sung Nok; Hong, Pill Whoon

    1989-01-01

    Twenty atrial myxomas were resected in 20 patients with the use of cardiopulmonary bypass, from the beginning of July 1966 through the end of June 1985, at Severance Hospital, Seoul, Korea. Nineteen patients had left atrial myxomas; 1 had a right atrial myxoma. Left atrial myxomas arose from the intra-atrial septum in 17 patients and from the left atrial appendage in 2 patients. The right atrial myxoma arose from the fossa ovalis. The 13 female and 7 male patients ranged in age from 14 to 63 years. Symptoms most often reported on presentation were those associated with mitral valve obstruction; other symptoms were associated with systemic embolization. The 1st 4 patients were tested with angiocardiography alone, and 3 of these were misdiagnosed. The last 16 were tested by angiocardiography, M-mode echocardiography, and 2-dimensional echocardiography, alone or in various combinations, and there were no further misdiagnoses. In our experience, 2-dimensional echocardiography was the most accurate method of diagnosing cardiac tumors. In 19 patients, surgical approach was through a median sternotomy; in the 20th patient, approach was through a left thoracotomy, due to a preoperative misdiagnosis of mitral stenosis. No intraoperative embolizations or deaths occurred. On follow-up of 17 patients during periods ranging from 6 months to 6 years, we had no late deaths, and only 2 patients suffered late complications: 1 had sudden right hemiparesis caused by an embolus 4 months after surgery (this improved upon conservative treatment); and 1 had a recurrence of tumor 3 years after surgery (the new myxoma was successfully resected). We conclude that patients who have undergone complete excision of benign myxomas now have an excellent prognosis, with minimal risk of intraoperative embolization and late recurrence. We conclude also that 2-dimensional echocardiography is an extremely accurate tool both in early diagnosis of intracardiac myxomas and in late follow-up after

  15. Odontogenic carcinosarcoma of the mandible: a case report and review

    PubMed Central

    Pae, Sang-Pill; Cho, Hyun-Young; Cho, Hyun-Woo; Seo, Ji-Hoon; Lee, Dong-Hwan; Park, In-Shu

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic carcinosarcoma is an extremely rare malignant odontogenic tumor with only a few reported cases. It is characterized by a true mixed tumor showing malignant cytology of both epithelial and mesenchymal components. It has been assumed to arise from pre-existing lesions such as ameloblastoma, ameloblastic fibroma, and ameloblastic fibrosarcoma. To date, the reported cases have exhibited considerably aggressive clinical behavior. The case of an odontogenic carcinosarcoma in the mandible of a 61-year-old male is described herein. The tumor destroyed the cortex of the mandible and invaded the adjacent tissues. Treatment was performed by surgical resection and reconstruction. The purposes of this article are to introduce odontogenic carcinosarcoma through this case study, to distinguish it from related diseases and to discuss features of the tumor in the existing literature. PMID:26131431

  16. Cystic Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Sonal; Rahim, Ahmed Mujib Bangalore; Parakkat, Nithin Kavassery; Kapoor, Shekhar; Mittal, Kumud; Sharma, Bhushan; Shivappa, Anil Bangalore

    2015-01-01

    Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor (AOT) is a well-established benign epithelial lesion of odontogenic origin. Rightfully called “the master of disguise,” this lesion has been known for its varied clinical and histoarchitectural patterns. Not only does AOT predominantly present radiologically as a unilocular cystic lesion enclosing the unerupted tooth (which is commonly mistaken as a dentigerous cyst) but the lesion also presents rarely with a cystic component histopathologically. We present one such unusual case of cystic AOT associated with an impacted canine, mimicking a dentigerous cyst. The present case aims to highlight the difference between cystic AOT and dentigerous cyst radiographically. The exact histogenesis of AOT and its variants still remains obscure. An attempt has been made to hypothesize the new school of thought regarding the origin of AOT. PMID:26579317

  17. Computed tomography of intramuscular myxoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ekelund, L.; Herrlin, K.; Rydholm, A.

    1982-11-01

    Computed tomography (CT) was performed in seven patients with intramuscular myxoma. All lesions were well demarcated, of homogeneous appearance and attenuation values ranging from 10 to 60 (HU). The tumor size, as estimated at CT, correlated well with the size of the surgical specimen, which is in contrast to the findings in some high grade malignant sarcomas.

  18. Central odontogenic fibroma

    PubMed Central

    Venugopal, Sanjay; Radhakrishna, Satish; Raj, Akshatha; Sawhney, Anshul

    2014-01-01

    Central odontogenic fibroma (COF), which has been categorized under the subheading of odontogenic tumors of ectomesenchyme, is such an uncommon neoplasm that much of its nature is left uncharted. COF is a rare tumor that accounts for 0.1% of all odontogenic tumors. Clinically, the lesion grows slowly and leads to cortical expansion. Radiologically, the lesion may be unilocular or multilocular. In some cases, it may be associated with root resorption or displacement. Histopathologically, the lesion is characterized by mature collagen fibers and numerous fibroblasts. A case of COF of the mandible in a male patient aged 49 years is described in this report. The patient showed no symptoms, no history of swelling discomfort or pain, and was unaware of the presence of the lesion. Orthopantomogram (OPG) showed generalized bone loss along with a unilocular radiolucent area, with a clear sclerotic lining and angular bone loss. Surgical enucleation of the lesion along with placement of osseo-graft, which is a bioresorbable demineralized bone matrix (DMBM), and platelet-rich fibrin was carried out in the defect site. Following surgery, patient was recalled for revaluation of the lesion; the surgical site showed good healing and an increase in bone height was seen. PMID:24872637

  19. Right Atrial Myxoma.

    PubMed

    Sikri, T; Sharma, R K; Singh, P; Tibdewal, P; Sharma, A

    2015-09-01

    A 54 yr old man, non-smoker, non-alcoholic, and non-diabetic, non-hypertensive, non-obese, with moderate daily activity and no significant past medical history, presented with chief complaints of dyspnoea NYHA Class III, which was associated with diaphoresis and restlessness. On examination, a long systolic murmur of grade III-IV, increasing on inspiration, was audible in the tricuspid area. The murmur did not have any postural relation. An abnormal thud-like sound was audible in left parasternal region. There was no evidence of any pleuro-pericardial rub. Transthoracic echocardiography showed a large (7×4 cm), mobile mass arising in the right atrium superiorly, prolapsing through tricuspid valve, into the right ventricle, resulting in moderate tricuspid regurgitation. 2D echo (Figure 1) and cardiac MRI (Figure 2) of the heart showed a isointense to mildly hypointense mass from the right atrium prolapsing through the tricuspid valves into the right ventricle on T2 weighted images. There was abscence of any enhancement of the mass after administration of IV gadolinium. The patient underwent excision of the myxoma. Histopathological examination showed a tumour with extensive myxomatous matrix with dispersed cellular components. The tumour cells were arranged in single or multiple layers surrounding vascular channels, which were lined by endothelium. The tumour cells had spindle-shaped nuclei with occasionaly vacuolated eosinophilic cytoplasm. There was no increase in mitosis. In addition there was background of lympho-plasmacytic infiltrate (Figure 3). The patient remained asymptomatic for the period of one and a half years of follow up post-operatively. PMID:27608869

  20. Bilateral Atrial Myxoma: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Susupaus, Attapoom; Foofuengmonkolkit, Kumpoo

    2016-02-01

    Among the rare cardiac tumors, myxoma, which is mostly located in the left atrium, is the most common type. Bilateral atrial myxoma is extremely rare, and requires urgent surgery. The authors report the case of a 34-year-old male, who presented with one month of right hemiparesis and aphasia and subsequently diagnosed with bilateral atrial myxoma based on transthoracic echocardiography. An urgent operation for intra-cardiac tumor removal was performed with the biatrial approach. Once a diagnosis of myxoma has been made, an urgent operation for tumor removal is necessary due to the risk of serious complications, including sudden death from normal blood flow obstruction. PMID:27266240

  1. The Strange Case of the Infarcted Myxoma.

    PubMed

    Pergolini, Amedeo; Zampi, Giordano; Tinti, Maria Denitza; Pontillo, Daniele; Di Paolo, Barbara; Buffa, Vitaliano; Pulignano, Giovanni; Pino, Paolo Giuseppe; Minardi, Giovanni; Musumeci, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    In the setting of an acute coronary syndrome, the differential diagnosis between a thrombus and a myxoma may be cumbersome. We describe the case of a patient presenting with an acute coronary syndrome associated with an aneurysmatic apical left ventricular myxoma. PMID:26593682

  2. Familial recurrent atrial myxoma: Carney's complex.

    PubMed

    Shetty Roy, A Nagesh; Radin, Michael; Sarabi, Dennis; Shaoulian, Emanuel

    2011-02-01

    We report on a family of 4 members, all of whom have had multifocal, recurrent atrial myxomas associated with skin pigmentation, melanotic schwannomas, mucocutaneous myxomas, and tumors of the ovary and pituitary, adrenal, and thyroid glands. Immunochemistry of the myxoma cells is positive for calretinin, confirming their neuroendocrine origin. Genetic studies confirmed mutations in the gene coding protein kinase A, regulatory subunit 1-α (PRKAR1α). This is Carney's complex, characterized by multiple, mucocutaneous myxomas; pigmented lesions over the lips, conjunctiva, and genitalia; adenomas of the breast and thyroid; schwannomas; and endocrinal abnormalities including Cushing syndrome and acromegaly. Members of the family require vigorous screening, including urinary free cortisol, plasma transforming growth factor-β(1) and thyrotropin-releasing hormone, testicular ultrasound, routine echocardiographic screening, searches for cardiac and mucocutaneous myxomas in multiple locations, and genetic studies for the PRKAR1α gene sequence. PMID:21298650

  3. Report of Two Cases of Combined Odontogenic Tumors: Ameloblastoma with Odontogenic Keratocyst and Ameloblastic Fibroma with Calcifying Odontogenic Cyst.

    PubMed

    Neuman, Ashley Nicole; Montague, Lindsay; Cohen, Donald; Islam, Nadim; Bhattacharyya, Indraneel

    2015-09-01

    Combined odontogenic neoplasms have rarely been documented. Such tumors have also been described by other researchers as "hybrid" lesions. The histologic features are often identical to other individually well-established odontogenic neoplasms such as ameloblastoma, adenomatoid odontogenic tumor, ameloblastic fibroma (AF), and ameloblastic fibro-odontoma. Their clinical presentation is variable, ranging from cysts to neoplasms showing varying degrees of aggressive behavior. Most combined tumors contain features of one of the odontogenic tumors in combination with either a calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) or a calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor. We present two new cases of combined odontogenic tumors: an ameloblastoma with an odontogenic keratocyst and an AF with COC. Predicting clinical outcome is challenging when a combination tumor is encountered due to the paucity of such lesions. One must understand salient features of these entities and differentiate them from the more common conventional neoplasms to expand classification and provide prognostic criteria. PMID:25552434

  4. Carney complex with biatrial cardiac myxoma.

    PubMed

    Havrankova, Eniko; Stenova, Emoke; Olejarova, Ingrid; Sollarova, Katarina; Kinova, Sona

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac myxomas make up approximately 50% of all benign cardiac tumors and represented 86% of all surgically treated cardiac tumors. Most of them originated from the left atrium, in some cases from both of atria. We report a case of male patient with biatrial myxomas and other extra-cardiac involvement: hypophyseal adenoma, enlargement of thyroid gland, tubular adenoma polyp of colon and bilateral large cell calcifying Sertoli cell tumor (LCCSCT) of testis. These findings led to the diagnosis of Carney's complex, which is a syndrome with multiple neoplasias, cardiac myxomas, lentigines, and endocrine abnormalities. A genetic test confirm this diagnosis. PMID:24088910

  5. Current diagnosis and management of cardiac myxomas.

    PubMed

    Jain, Sonia; Maleszewski, Joseph J; Stephenson, Christopher R; Klarich, Kyle W

    2015-04-01

    Cardiac myxoma is the most common cardiac neoplasm. In the majority of cases, it is isolated (non-syndromic) and located in the left atrium. In up to 10% cases, it is seen in syndromic association with the Carney complex where it is encountered in younger patients, with atypical and multiple locations, such as the right atrium or ventricles, and carries a high risk of recurrence. Imaging is pivotal in the diagnosis, management guidance and surveillance. Surgical excision is the established definitive treatment. Further research should address management strategies in incidentally discovered small myxomas in asymptomatic patients and the role of genetic testing and screening in syndromic myxomas. PMID:25797902

  6. Odontogenic tumors in Port Harcourt: South–South geopolitical zone of Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Iyogun, CA; Omitola, OG; Ukegheson, GE

    2016-01-01

    Aim: A retrospective study of odontogenic tumors (OTs) in Port Harcourt was undertaken to establish its prevalence and compare with known data in the literature from Nigeria and elsewhere. Materials and Methods: All pathologically diagnosed OTs between 2008 and 2013 at the archives of the Department of Oral Pathology and Oral Biology of the University of Port Harcourt/University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital were retrospectively studied and classified according to the 2005 WHO classification of OTs and allied diseases. These were recorded into a computer and analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS 21.0, Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Results: A total of sixty-three cases of OTs were recorded for the period under review. Fifty-two of these were cases of ameloblastoma (82.54%). This was followed by adenomatoid odontogenic tumour (AOT) 4 (6.35%) and odontogenic myxoma 3 (4.76%). Most lesions were seen within the second to fourth decades of life and mandible was most frequently affected. Conclusion: It is concluded that the pattern of occurrence of OTs in Port Harcourt followed a general pattern in Nigeria and other African countries but slightly differs from findings from other parts of the world. PMID:27601807

  7. Myxoma of the kidney associated with hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Shah, Abhishek; Sun, Wenbin; Cao, Dianbo

    2013-06-01

    Myxomas are relatively rare tumors and most of them occur in the heart, skin, and soft tissues and bones. Renal myxomas are extremely rare neoplasms and very few cases have been reported in the literature. A review of medical literatures reveals no previous description of renal myxoma complicated with extensive areas of hemorrhage. So, we report such a case in a 43-year-old female. She had a left renal mass incidentally discovered during ultrasonography at a regular health checkup, and further computed tomography scan showed 4.9 × 3.1 cm mass with circular septal enhancement and ill-defined margin with the left psoas major muscle. Radical nephrectomy was performed because of suspected malignant renal tumor. Postoperative histopathology of resected specimen revealed the typical appearance of a myxoma associated with extensive hemorrhage. PMID:24426654

  8. Odontogenic maxillary sinusitis: a review.

    PubMed

    Simuntis, Regimantas; Kubilius, Ričardas; Vaitkus, Saulius

    2014-01-01

    Maxillary sinusitis of odontogenic origin is a well-known condition in both the dental and otolaryngology communities. It occurs when the Schneiderian membrane is violated by conditions arising from dentoalveolar unit. This type of sinusitis differs in its pathophysiology, microbiology, diagnostics and management from sinusitis of other causes, therefore, failure to accurately identify a dental cause in these patients usually lead to persistent symptomatology and failure of medical and surgical therapies directed toward sinusitis. Unilateral recalcitrant disease associated with foul smelling drainage is a most common feature of odontogenic sinusitis. Also, high-resolution CT scans and cone-beam volumetric computed tomography can assist in identifying dental disease. Sometimes dental treatment alone is adequate to resolve the odontogenic sinusitis and sometimes concomitant or subsequent functional endoscopic sinus surgery or Caldwell-Luc operation is required. The aim of this article is to give a review of the most common causes, symptoms, diagnostic and treatment methods of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis. Search on Cochrane Library, PubMed and Science Direct data bases by key words resulted in 35 articles which met our criteria. It can be concluded that the incidence of odontogenic sinusitis is likely underreported in the available literature. PMID:25209225

  9. Infected Cardiac Myxoma: an Updated Review

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Shi-Min

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study aims to present an updated clinical picture of the infected cardiac myxoma. Revankar & Clark made a systematic review of infected cardiac myxoma based on the literature before 1998. Since then, there has not been any updated information describing its recent changing trends. METHODS A comprehensive literature search of infected cardiac myxoma was conducted on MEDLINE, Highwire Press and Google between 1998 and 2014. RESULTS In comparison with Revankar & Clark's series, the present series disclosed a significantly decreased overall mortality. It is believed that refinement of the prompt diagnosis and timely management (use of sensitive antibiotics and surgical resection of the infected myxoma) have resulted in better outcomes of such patients. CONCLUSION The present series of infected cardiac myxoma illustrated some aggravated clinical manifestations (relative more occasions of high-grade fever, multiple embolic events and the presence of refractory microorganisms), which should draw enough attention to careful diagnosis and treatment. In general, the prognosis of infected cardiac myxoma is relatively benign and the long-term survival is always promising. PMID:26735605

  10. An unusually large aggressive adenomatoid odontogenic tumor of maxilla involving the third molar: A clinical case report

    PubMed Central

    Dhupar, Vikas; Akkara, Francis; Khandelwal, Pulkit

    2016-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is a rare tumor comprising only 3% of all odontogenic tumors. It is a benign, encapsulated, noninvasive, nonaggressive, slowly growing odontogenic lesion associated with an impacted tooth. These lesions may go unnoticed for years. The usual treatment is enucleation and curettage, and the lesion does not recur. Here, we present a rare case of an unusually large aggressive AOT of maxilla associated with impacted third molar. The authors also discuss clinical, radiographic, histopathologic, and therapeutic features of the case. Subtotal maxillectomy with simultaneous reconstruction of the surgical defect with temporalis myofascial flap was planned and carried out. PMID:27095910

  11. A rare presentation of hybrid odontogenic tumor involving calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor and plexiform ameloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Chaubey, Snehal S.; Mishra, Sunil S.; Degwekar, Shirish S.; Chaubey, Saujanya

    2013-01-01

    A hybrid odontogenic tumor comprising two distinct lesions is extremely rare. We presented a hybrid odontogenic tumor composed of a calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor (CCOT) and a plexiform ameloblastoma. This tumor was observed in the anterior area of the mandible of a 17-year-old Indian male. Masses of ghost epithelial cells with the characteristics of CCOT were seen in the lining of the cyst. The odontogenic epithelia with the features of plexiform ameloblastoma were also observed. PMID:24124318

  12. Odontogenic carcinoma with dentinoid: a new odontogenic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mosqueda-Taylor, Adalberto; Neville, Brad W; Tatemoto, Yukihiro; Ogawa, Ikuko; Takata, Takashi

    2014-12-01

    Dentinoid is an integral part of some odontogenic tumors. This article describes the clinico-pathological features of three cases of odontogenic carcinomas with dentinoid (OCD). A comparison of these with previously reported cases of dentinoid-producing epithelial odontogenic tumors allowed us to identify another six cases that may be considered as examples of OCD. Six cases occurred in the mandible and three in the maxilla, all developing behind the canines. There was no sex predilection (five men and four women; age range 14-61 years, mean 38.1). Pain or discomfort was mentioned in five cases, four of which showed tooth resorption. All cases appeared initially as well-defined radiolucencies, five of which showed variable amounts of calcified material. Recurrences were recorded in three instances, but no evidence of metastasis has been found. Seven cases were composed predominantly or entirely of clear cells, usually with minimal cellular atypia and variable mitotic activity; however, in all cases there was evidence of tumor infiltration into adjacent tissues, including the presence of perineural invasion in two tumors. Those cases in which no reference was made to the presence of clear cells exhibited evident mitotic activity and cellular pleomorphism. The epithelium in OCD does not produce buds or enamel organ-like structures such as those found in ameloblastic fibro-dentinoma and this tumor does not contain a mesenchyme-like connective tissue resembling dental papilla as observed in several mixed odontogenic tumors. Based on the existing data and the present series of cases, OCD appears to represent a distinct entity. PMID:25409850

  13. Stroke of a cardiac myxoma origin

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Shi-Min; Humuruola, Gulimila

    2015-01-01

    Objective The clinical features of cardiac myxoma stroke have not been sufficiently described. Debates remain concerning the options and timing of treatment and the clinical outcomes are unknown. This article aims to highlight the pertinent aspects of this rare condition. Methods Data source of the present study came from a comprehensive literature collection of cardiac myxoma stroke in PubMed, Google search engine and Highwire Press for the year range 2000-2014. Results Young adults, female predominance, single cerebral vessel (mostly the middle cerebral artery), multiple territory involvements and solitary left atrial myxoma constituted the outstanding characteristics of this patient setting. The most common affected cerebral vessel (the middle cerebral artery) and areas (the basal ganglion, cerebellum and parietal and temporal regions) corresponded well to the common manifestations of this patient setting, such as conscious alteration, ataxia, hemiparesis and hemiplegia, aphasia and dysarthria. Initial computed tomography scan carried a higher false negative rate for the diagnosis of cerebral infarction than magnetic resonance imaging did. A delayed surgical resection of cardiac myxoma was associated with an increased risk of potential consequences in particular otherwise arterial embolism. The mortality rate of this patient population was 15.3%. Conclusion Cardiac myxoma stroke is rare. Often does it affect young females. For an improved diagnostic accuracy, magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and echocardiography are imperative for young stroke patients in identifying the cerebral infarct and determining the stroke of a cardiac origin. Immediate thrombolytic therapy may completely resolve the cerebral stroke and improve the neurologic function of the patients. An early surgical resection of cardiac myxoma is recommended in patients with not large territory cerebral infarct. PMID:26107455

  14. Synchronous Fibrolamellar Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Auricular Myxoma

    PubMed Central

    González-Cantú, Yessica M.; Rodriguez-Padilla, Cristina; Tena-Suck, Martha Lilia; García de la Fuente, Alberto; Mejía-Bañuelos, Rosa María; Díaz Mendoza, Raymundo; Quintanilla-Garza, Samuel; Batisda-Acuña, Yolaester

    2015-01-01

    Synchronic occurrence of benign and malignant tumors is extremely rare. Fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma represents 1% to 2% of all hepatocarcinomas, while myxomas represent about half of all the cases of primary tumors of the heart. We present the case of a 53-year-old woman with a left atrial myxoma that was surgically removed. Several weeks later, the patient returned to the hospital with abdominal pain. CT scan showed a mass in the left lobe of the liver that was resected and diagnosed as fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma. As of this writing, the patient is healthy. PMID:26509093

  15. Synchronous Fibrolamellar Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Auricular Myxoma.

    PubMed

    González-Cantú, Yessica M; Rodriguez-Padilla, Cristina; Tena-Suck, Martha Lilia; García de la Fuente, Alberto; Mejía-Bañuelos, Rosa María; Díaz Mendoza, Raymundo; Quintanilla-Garza, Samuel; Batisda-Acuña, Yolaester

    2015-01-01

    Synchronic occurrence of benign and malignant tumors is extremely rare. Fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma represents 1% to 2% of all hepatocarcinomas, while myxomas represent about half of all the cases of primary tumors of the heart. We present the case of a 53-year-old woman with a left atrial myxoma that was surgically removed. Several weeks later, the patient returned to the hospital with abdominal pain. CT scan showed a mass in the left lobe of the liver that was resected and diagnosed as fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma. As of this writing, the patient is healthy. PMID:26509093

  16. Treatment options in odontogenic infection.

    PubMed

    Maestre-Vera, Juan Ramón

    2004-01-01

    Most infections of the oral cavity are primary, odontogenic infections, with dental caries, gingivitis, and periodontitis the most common. Treating these infections will encompass odontologic, antimicrobial, surgical or combined treatment. Antimicrobial treatment includes the use of betalactams, macrolydes, tetracyclins, metronidazole, clindamycin, or combined treatment. The most commonly used ones are administered orally. PK/ PD parameters predict THE clinical and microbiological efficacy of the antibiotic. The three indices that are generally used to measure clinical efficacy are: T >MIC (time during which the concentration is above the minimum inhibitory concentration), Cmax/ MIC (ratio between peak concentration and the minimum inhibitory concentration) and AUC/ MIC (ratio between the area under the curve and the minimum inhibitory concentration). Amoxicillin/ clavulanic acid is one of the antibiotics recommended for the treatment of odontogenic infections due to its wide spectrum, low incidence of resistance, pharmacokinetic profile, tolerance and dosage. PMID:15580134

  17. Transcriptome Variability in Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor Suggests Distinct Molecular Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shijia; Divaris, Kimon; Parker, Joel; Padilla, Ricardo; Murrah, Valerie; Wright, John Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor (KCOT) is a locally aggressive developmental cystic neoplasm thought to arise from the odontogenic epithelium. A high recurrence rate of up to 30% has been found following conservative treatment. Aggressive tumor resection can lead to the need for extensive reconstructive surgery, resulting in significant morbidity and impacting quality of life. Most research has focused on candidate-genes with a handful of studies employing whole transcriptome approaches. There is also the question of which reference tissue is most biologically-relevant. This study characterizes the transcriptome of KCOT using whole genome microarray and compare it with gene expression of different odontogenic tissues (“dentome”). Laser capture microdissection was used to isolate the neoplastic epithelial tissue in 20 cases. KCOT gene expression was compared with the “dentome” and relevant pathways were examined. Cluster analysis revealed 2 distinct molecular subtypes of KCOT. Several inflammatory pathways were activated in both subtypes. The AKT pathway was activated in one subtype while MAP kinase pathway was activated in the other. Additionally, PTCH1 expression was downregulated in both clusters suggesting involvement in KCOT tumorigenesis. In conclusion, this study provides new insights into the transcriptome of KCOT and highlights pathways that could be of diagnostic and prognostic value. PMID:27066764

  18. [Modern clinical and radiological approach to diagnostics of odontogenic sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Khomutova, E Yu; Ignat'ev, Yu T; Demyanchuk, A N; Demyanchuk, A B

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory diseases of the maxillary sinuses affect up to 70% of the adult population. Odontogenic maxillary sinusitis represents 13-86% of the inflammatory processes of maxillofacial area, with the incidence range being explained rather by varying diagnosis criteria than the true incidence difference of odontogenic lesions. The aim of the study was to summarize the clinical and radiological characteristics of odontogenic sinusitis according to patients records in the Department of Maxillofacial Surgery of Omsk Clinical Hospital No11 and the oral surgery department of BUZ GKSP No1 in 2009-2014. A total of 948 records of patient (aged 17 to 68 years) with maxillary sinusitis were identified. X-ray examinations were performed by CT PISASSO TRIO ("KoYo", South Korea) and MSCT Brillians 6 and Brillians 64 ((Philips HealthCare), Netherlands). Images were obtained in axial projection with slice thickness of 0.2-0.6 mm with multiplanar reconstructions (MPR) in a variety of direct and oblique projections. Altogether 664 patients were diagnosed with foreign bodies in the maxillary sinuses (filling material in 569 cases, roots or root fragments? implants, rubber drains, fragments of endodontic instruments in 95 cases). In 284 persons odontogenic cysts were found. Almost every fifth case was complicated by mycotic infection. Analysis of the results showed that only a multidisciplinary approach including dentists, maxillofacial surgeons, otolaryngologists and radiologists, as well as dental volumetric tomography or multislice CT can ensure the correct clinical and radiological approaches to determine the tactics of treatment in patients with sinusitis, reduce the incidence of relapses and chronic inflammatory processes in the maxillary sinuses. PMID:26953424

  19. Left ventricular mass: Myxoma or thrombus?

    PubMed Central

    Raut, Monish S.; Maheshwari, Arun; Dubey, Sumir; Joshi, Sandip

    2015-01-01

    Patient with embolic episode should always be evaluated for cardiac mass. Mass in left ventricular can be a myxoma or thrombus even in a normal functioning heart. In either case, mobile mass with embolic potential should be surgically resected. PMID:25566719

  20. Maxillary sinus disease of odontogenic origin.

    PubMed

    Mehra, Pushkar; Murad, Haitham

    2004-04-01

    Odontogenic sinusitis is a well-recognized condition and accounts for approximately 10% to 12% of cases of maxillary sinusitis. An odontogenic source should be considered in patients with symptoms of maxillary sinusitis who give a history positive for odontogenic infection or dentoalveolar surgery or who are resistant to standard sinusitis therapy. Diagnosis usually requires a thorough dental and clinical evaluation with appropriate radiographs. Common causes of odontogenic sinusitis include dental abscesses and periodontal disease perforating the Schneidarian membrane, sinus perforations during tooth extraction, or irritation and secondary infection caused by intra-antral foreign bodies. The typical odontogenic infection is now considered to be a mixed aerobic-anaerobic infection, with the latter outnumbering the aerobic species involved. Most common organisms include anaerobic streptococci, Bacteroides, Proteus, and Coliform bacilli. Typical treatment of atraumatic odontogenic sinusitis is a 3- to 4- week trial of antibiotic therapy with adequate oral and sinus flora coverage. When indicated, surgical removal of the offending odontogenic foreign body (primary or delayed) or treatment of the odontogenic pathologic conditions combined with medical therapy is usually sufficient to cause resolution of symptoms. If an oroantral communication is suspected, prompt surgical management is recommended to reduce the likelihood of causing chronic sinus disease. PMID:15064067

  1. Aspergillus infection in pulmonary cavitating lesions with right atrial myxoma.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Divyesh; Dorgan, Eileen; Douglas, Hannah; Trouton, Tom; McMullan, Ronan; Parissis, Haralabos

    2014-11-01

    Cardiac myxomas are rare primary tumors with varied clinical presentations that may pose a diagnostic challenge. Here, we describe the case of a 21-year-old man with multiple cavitating lung lesions with aspergillosis and underlying right atrial myxoma, who presented with hemoptysis and weight loss. He was successfully treated with right atrial myxoma resection and antifungal agents, with no recurrence or complications after one year of follow-up. PMID:24887845

  2. Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor radiographically mimicking a sinus mucocele.

    PubMed

    de Santana Santos, Thiago; Frota, Riedel; de Souza Andrade, Emanuel Sávio; de Oliveira E Silva, Emanuel Dias

    2013-03-01

    The calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor or Gorlin cyst is an uncommon lesion with a variable clinical behavior and considerable histopathologic diversity. The authors report a case of calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor that was being treated as a maxillary sinus mucocele. The possibility of mimicking numerous odontogenic and nonodontogenic lesions makes the calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor difficult for a clinical diagnosis. The present case demonstrates that a specific knowledge in oral pathology is required to differentiate odontogenic lesions. PMID:23524811

  3. Cerebral abscess potentially of odontogenic origin.

    PubMed

    Ben Hadj Hassine, Marouene; Oualha, Lamia; Derbel, Amine; Douki, Nabiha

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic origins are rarely implicated in the formation of brain abscesses. The relative paucity of this kind of infection and the difficulty in matching the causative microorganisms of a brain abscess to an odontogenic source can explain the late management of patients. We herein describe a case of a 46-year-old man with a cerebellar abscess that was probably due to an odontogenic infection. The diagnosis supported by imaging and microscopic identification, mini craniectomy for abscess drainage followed by eradication of all potential dental infectious foci, and an antibiotic regimen based on cephalosporins, metronidazole, and vancomycine contributed to a successful outcome. PMID:25705523

  4. A Large Extragnathic Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumour

    PubMed Central

    Bavle, Radhika M.; Muniswamappa, Sudhakara; Narasimhamurthy, Srinath

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs) are developmental cysts which occur typically in the jawbones. They present more commonly in the posterior mandible of young adults than the maxilla. OKCs have been reclassified under odontogenic tumours in 2005 by the WHO and have since been termed as keratocystic odontogenic tumours (KCOTs). Here we report a case of a recurrent buccal lesion in a 62-year-old man which was provisionally diagnosed as a space infection (buccal abscess) but surprisingly turned out to be a soft tissue KCOT in an unusual location on histopathologic examination. PMID:26770859

  5. Delay in diagnosis of right atrial myxoma

    SciTech Connect

    Northcote, R.J.; Sethia, B.; Ballantyne, D.

    1985-02-01

    Clinical, echocardiographic, and nuclear angiographic findings in a 51-year-old woman who presented with a history of dyspnea are discussed. Initial echocardiography revealed no abnormality. However, a subsequent radionuclide angiogram revealed a filling defect on the right side of the heart. This represented a right atrial myxoma. Radionuclide angiography can provide a useful noninvasive tool in the diagnosis of intracardiac tumors when echocardiography has not been helpful.

  6. Intramuscular myxoma of the deltoid muscle: report of a case

    PubMed Central

    Costamagna, Daniela; Erra, Stefania; Durando, Riccardo

    2009-01-01

    Intramuscular myxoma is a rare, benign lesion of mesenchymal origin, affecting the skeletal muscles. We report the case of a 75-year-old woman presenting with a mass of the right deltoid region. On the MRI examination it was interpreted as a lipomatous lesion. She underwent marginal excision. The pathological examination revealed the diagnosis of intramuscular myxoma. PMID:21686685

  7. [Cardiac myxoma in the elderly. Clinical study].

    PubMed

    Pentimone, F; Del Corso, L; Siuti, E; Verunelli, F; Bortolotti, U; Salvatore, L

    1997-01-01

    Cardiac mixoma in the elderly. A clinical study. The clinical features of 13 cardiac myxomas surgically resected are presented. The mean age at presentation was 68 years. Ten were in the left atrium, 5 near the fossa ovalis, 3 at the base of the atrial septum, 1 at the inferior wall and 1 on the anterior leaflet of mitral valve, 3 were in the right atrium, 1 of these was accompanied with a myxoma at the apex of left ventricle. The ECG and the chest X-ray were normal in 9 and in 8 patients, respectively. In 3 patients, the diagnosis was occasionally made by routine 2-dimensional echocardiography. 5 patients presented with fever of unknown origin, arthralgias, weakness, weight loss. None had intracardiac or extracardiac recurrence in the 73 months follow-up. The presentation with constitutional symptoms only like fever of UO, may mimic collagen and neoplastic diseases, vasculitis, lymphomas: the 2-dimensional echocardiography is mandatory to esclude a cardiac myxoma in the elderly. PMID:9213810

  8. Nerve sheath myxoma: report of a rare case.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Amoolya; Narasimha, Apaparna; C, Vijaya; Vk, Sundeep

    2015-04-01

    Nerve sheath myxoma defined by Harkin and Reed is an uncommon benign neoplasm with nerve sheath like features. It has several cytological and histological differential diagnoses. One such lesion is neurothekeoma, which can be differentiated using immunohistochemistry. In most of the previous reports nerve sheath myxoma and neurothekeoma were considered synonymous and were often confused for one another. This case report separates the two using immunohistochemistry. Also, the cytological features of nerve sheath myxoma are not well documented in the past. This case report attempts to display the cyto-morphology of nerve sheath myxoma. We report a rare case of nerve sheath myxoma diagnosed on cytological features confirmed by histopathology and immunohistochemistry in a 32-year-old lady who presented with an asymptomatic nodule over the left cervical area and discuss its cyto-histological mimics. PMID:26023558

  9. Dentigerous Cyst Associated with Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumour

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Sumit; Uppala, Divya; Talasila, Sunil; Babu, Mahesh

    2015-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumour (AOT), a tumour composed of odontogenic epithelium, is an uncommon tumour of odontogenic origin that accounts for only 2.2- 7.1% of all odontogenic tumours. Very few cases of AOT associated with Dentigerous cyst (DC) have been reported till date, most cases are in females and have a striking tendency to occur in the anterior maxilla. The present case is that of a 14-year-old female who revealed a large radiolucent lesion associated with the crown of an unerupted canine located in the left maxillary anterior region. The microscopic examination revealed the presence of AOT in the fibrous capsule of a DC. In this paper, we describe the importance of grossing, sectioning and complete examination of the slide to diagnose such hybrid lesions. PMID:26155575

  10. Odontogenic tumors that mimic a dentigerous cyst.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, E M; Sewall, S R; Dohse, A; Novak, T S

    1995-05-01

    Hyperplastic follicular tissue and a dentigerous cyst are the two most common entities associated with the crown of an impacted tooth. However, other diagnostic possibilities, including odontogenic tumors should also be considered in the differential diagnosis of a pericoronal radiolucency. This article presents three cases of radiolucent lesions that were histologically diagnosed as an odontogenic tumor, and stresses the importance of histological evaluation of all pericoronal radiolucencies. PMID:8624989

  11. Odontogenic Keratocyst Mimicking Paradental Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Borgonovo, Andrea Enrico; Bernardini, Luigi; Francinetti, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this paper is to present an uncommon clinical and radiographic aspect of odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) mimicking paradental cyst. Methods. A 32-year-old female patient showed a well-delimited radiolucent lesion connected with the root of the left third molar with close anatomical relationship with the mandibular canal. The clinical, radiographic, and anamnestic features lead us to diagnose a paradental cyst that was treated by enucleation after extraction of the partially impacted tooth. Results. Histological analysis showed typical histological features of PKC such as the presence of a lining of stratified squamous epithelium with a well-defined basal layer of palisading columnar of cuboidal cells. Conclusion. Initial X-ray analysis and the position of the lesion related to the third mandibular tooth caused us to mistakenly diagnose a paradental cyst. We were only able to identify the cyst as an PKC rather than a paradental cyst after histological analysis. PMID:25114809

  12. Atypical presentation of clear cell odontogenic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Infante-Cossio, Pedro; Torres-Carranza, Eusebio; Gonzalez-Perez, Luis-Miguel; Gonzalez-Cardero, Eduardo; Sanchez-Gallego, Felicia

    2012-09-01

    Clear cell odontogenic carcinoma (CCOC) is a rare malignant neoplasm of odontogenic origin. The usual clinical presentation of CCOC is a mass of progressive growth in the mandible sometimes accompanied with loss of teeth, pain, or bleeding. We describe a rare case of CCOC that showed an atypical presentation not previously described in the literature like a fast-growing painless mass in the retromolar area that reached a considerable size in a few days that caused obstruction of the airway. The presence of airway obstruction required immediate treatment, which consisted of a surgical excision of the tumor via a hemimandibulectomy. This clinical report highlights the possibility of odontogenic tumors presenting like a rapid-growing mass and the importance of clinical differential diagnosis of such presentation. PMID:22976710

  13. Glandular odontogenic cyst: A diagnostic dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Amisha A.; Sangle, Amit; Bussari, Smita; Koshy, Ajit V.

    2016-01-01

    Glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC) is a rare and uncommon jaw bone cyst of odontogenic origin described in 1987 by Gardener et al. as a distinct entity. It is a cyst having an unpredictable, potentially aggressive behavior, and has the propensity to grow in large size with relatively high recurrence rate. It poses a diagnostic challenge as it can be clinically and histopathologically confused with lateral periodontal cyst, botryoid odontogenic cyst, radicular and residual cysts with mucous metaplasia, and low-grade mucoepidermoid carcinoma. The present case report describes GOC in both male and female patients with intra-oral swelling following extraction of 36 and 46, respectively. Careful histopathological examination is needed to diagnose GOC, and a careful long-term follow-up is advocated. PMID:27134453

  14. A review of complications of odontogenic infections.

    PubMed

    Bali, Rishi Kumar; Sharma, Parveen; Gaba, Shivani; Kaur, Avneet; Ghanghas, Priya

    2015-01-01

    Life-threatening infections of odontogenic or upper airway origin may extend to potential spaces formed by fascial planes of the lower head and upper cervical area. Complications include airway obstruction, mediastinitis, necrotizing fascitis, cavernous sinus thrombosis, sepsis, thoracic empyema, Lemierre's syndrome, cerebral abscess, orbital abscess, and osteomyelitis. The incidence of these "space infections" has been greatly reduced by modern antibiotic therapy. However, serious morbidity and even fatalities continue to occur. This study reviews complications of odontogenic infections. The search done was based on PubMed and Google Scholar, and an extensive published work search was undertaken. Advanced MEDLINE search was performed using the terms "odontogenic infections," "complications," and "risk factors." PMID:27390486

  15. Glandular odontogenic cyst: A diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Shah, Amisha A; Sangle, Amit; Bussari, Smita; Koshy, Ajit V

    2016-01-01

    Glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC) is a rare and uncommon jaw bone cyst of odontogenic origin described in 1987 by Gardener et al. as a distinct entity. It is a cyst having an unpredictable, potentially aggressive behavior, and has the propensity to grow in large size with relatively high recurrence rate. It poses a diagnostic challenge as it can be clinically and histopathologically confused with lateral periodontal cyst, botryoid odontogenic cyst, radicular and residual cysts with mucous metaplasia, and low-grade mucoepidermoid carcinoma. The present case report describes GOC in both male and female patients with intra-oral swelling following extraction of 36 and 46, respectively. Careful histopathological examination is needed to diagnose GOC, and a careful long-term follow-up is advocated. PMID:27134453

  16. Central odontogenic fibroma of the maxilla

    PubMed Central

    Veeravarmal, V; Madhavan, R Nirmal; Nassar, M Mohamed; Amsaveni, R

    2013-01-01

    The central odontogenic fibroma (COF) is a rare benign odontogenic mesenchymal tumor of jaw bones. The World Health Organization (WHO) recognizes two variants of COF namely: 1) Epithelial-rich type (WHO) and 2) epithelial-poor type (simple type). Rare variants like ossifying COF, COF associated with giant cell lesions, and amyloid have been documented. This article presents a case of an epithelial-rich variant of COF in a 24-year-old female. It presented as a bony swelling of the maxilla and appeared as a mixed lesion in radiographs. Histopathology showed a highly cellular fibrous connective tissue stroma with plump fibroblasts and long strands of odontogenic epithelium exhibiting mild eosinophilic to clear cytoplasm. Numerous cementum-like hematoxyphilic calcifications of various sizes akin to dentin or acellular cementum were observed. We believe that clinical and radiographic features of this case may add valuable knowledge to the already existing literature. PMID:24250106

  17. A review of complications of odontogenic infections

    PubMed Central

    Bali, Rishi Kumar; Sharma, Parveen; Gaba, Shivani; Kaur, Avneet; Ghanghas, Priya

    2015-01-01

    Life-threatening infections of odontogenic or upper airway origin may extend to potential spaces formed by fascial planes of the lower head and upper cervical area. Complications include airway obstruction, mediastinitis, necrotizing fascitis, cavernous sinus thrombosis, sepsis, thoracic empyema, Lemierre's syndrome, cerebral abscess, orbital abscess, and osteomyelitis. The incidence of these “space infections” has been greatly reduced by modern antibiotic therapy. However, serious morbidity and even fatalities continue to occur. This study reviews complications of odontogenic infections. The search done was based on PubMed and Google Scholar, and an extensive published work search was undertaken. Advanced MEDLINE search was performed using the terms “odontogenic infections,” “complications,” and “risk factors.” PMID:27390486

  18. Central odontogenic fibroma of the maxilla.

    PubMed

    Veeravarmal, V; Madhavan, R Nirmal; Nassar, M Mohamed; Amsaveni, R

    2013-05-01

    The central odontogenic fibroma (COF) is a rare benign odontogenic mesenchymal tumor of jaw bones. The World Health Organization (WHO) recognizes two variants of COF namely: 1) Epithelial-rich type (WHO) and 2) epithelial-poor type (simple type). Rare variants like ossifying COF, COF associated with giant cell lesions, and amyloid have been documented. This article presents a case of an epithelial-rich variant of COF in a 24-year-old female. It presented as a bony swelling of the maxilla and appeared as a mixed lesion in radiographs. Histopathology showed a highly cellular fibrous connective tissue stroma with plump fibroblasts and long strands of odontogenic epithelium exhibiting mild eosinophilic to clear cytoplasm. Numerous cementum-like hematoxyphilic calcifications of various sizes akin to dentin or acellular cementum were observed. We believe that clinical and radiographic features of this case may add valuable knowledge to the already existing literature. PMID:24250106

  19. Glandular odontogenic cyst: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Karjodkar, Freny R.; Yadav, Archana; Sansare, Kaustubh; Sontakke, Subodh

    2014-01-01

    Glandular odontogenic cysts (GOCs) are rare intrabony solitary or multiloculated cysts of odontogenic origin. The importance of GOCs lies in the fact that they exhibit a propensity for recurrence similar to keratocystic odontogenic tumors and that they may be confused microscopically with central mucoepidermoid carcinoma. Thus, the oral and maxillofacial radiologists play an important role in definitive diagnosis of GOC based on distinctive cases; though they are rare. In large part, this is due to the GOC's complex and frequently non-specific histopathology. This report describes a case of GOC occurrence in the posterior mandibular ramus region in a 17-year-old female, which is a rare combination of site, age, and gender for occurrence. PMID:24701462

  20. Multicentric Biatrial Myxoma in a Young Female Patient: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sang Jeong; Park, Soon Chang; You, Yun Pyo; Kim, Bum Yong; Kim, Myong Kon; Jeong, Kyung Tae; Lee, Jae Won

    2000-01-01

    We report a case of multicentric, biatrial cardiac myxoma in a 29-year-old female who complained of exertional dyspnea, abdominal distension and peripheral edema. Any other associated skin lesions, breast mass or endocrine disorder presenting complex form were not seen on her. Also, there was no contributory medical history, hypertension and diabetes mellitus. By using transthoracic echocardiography, we identified a biatrial myxoma attached to the interatrial septum. During surgical excision, we found a large right atrial myxoma with extension through the fossa ovalis into the left atrium and small myxoma attached to the right atrial free wall. After successful resection of interatrial septum and free wall, atrial septal defect was created during the resection and safely repaired by bovine pericardial patch. PMID:11242813

  1. Clinical Characteristics of Odontogenic Cutaneous Fistulas

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun-Young; Kang, Ji-Yeon; Kim, Kyung-Won; Choi, Ki Hwa; Yoon, Tae Young

    2016-01-01

    Background Odontogenic cutaneous fistula appears as dimpling or a nodule with purulent discharge, usually in the chin or jaw. Affected patients usually seek help from dermatologists or surgeons rather than from dentists. However, clinical symptoms of facial skin fistula without dental problems can lead to misdiagnosis. Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical characteristics of patients with odontogenic cutaneous fistulas. Methods This retrospective observational study was performed at Chungbuk National University Hospital by analyzing patients who visited from April 1994 to September 2014. Following clinical and radiographic examinations, the paths and origins of sinus fistulas were determined. Investigated factors were gender, age, morphology, location, originating tooth, time to evolution, recurrence, and treatment method. Results Thirty-three patients (22 males, 11 females; average age 49.2 years) were examined during the investigation period. Thirty-four fistulas were diagnosed as odontogenic cutaneous fistulas. The most common morphology was dimpling (n=14, 41.2%). The various locations observed were related to the originating tooth. The most common site was the mandibular body related to mandibular molars. The referral clinical diagnosis was of odontogenic origin in 6 cases (18.2%). The majority of patients had experienced recurrence after treatment in previous clinics that had failed to diagnose odontogenic cutaneous fistula. Surgical fistulectomy and/or tooth treatment were performed in all cases. All patients were followed-up for 1 year. None showed signs of recurrence. Conclusion Extraoral and dental examinations are required to make a diagnosis of odontogenic cutaneous fistula. Thus, cooperation between dermatologists and dentists is essential. PMID:27489421

  2. Primary intraosseous squamous cell carcinoma in pre-existing keratocystic odontogenic tumor: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    BAI, MING-RU; SHEN, TING; CHEN, YU; GENG, NING

    2016-01-01

    Primary intraosseous squamous cell carcinoma (PIOSCC) is a rare type of odontogenic carcinoma that arises within the jaws. PIOSCC has no initial connection with oral mucosa and possibly develops from the residues of the odontogenic epithelium or from an odontogenic cyst or tumor. The diagnosis of PIOSCC can be difficult as it must be differentiated from other odontogenic carcinomas, such as malignant ameloblastoma, from SCCs arising from the overlying oral mucosa, from the primary tumors of the maxillary sinus or nasal mucosa, and from the tumors that have metastasized to the jaws from other primary sites. The present study reported a rare case of a 59-year-old male patient with a course of keratocystic odontogenic tumor for 25 years, between 1988 and 2013, which eventually transformed into PIOSCC after at least five recurrences and corresponding treatments. The mandible excision and titanium plate reconstruction was performed. Follow-up examinations have revealed no sign of recurrence thus far. The present study discussed this case from three aspects of clinical history, radiological examination and pathological features. PMID:26893858

  3. Two-time recurrence of a right atrial myxoma

    PubMed Central

    Madhavan, Suresh; Akhil, P. C.; Jayaprakash, K.; George, Raju

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a second recurrence of a right atrial myxoma in a 38-year-old woman who had surgical excision in March 2008 and excision of a recurrence in August 2012. She presented with a similar clinical picture in December 2014 and again underwent surgical excision. The case is unusual both for its location in the right atrium and its multiple recurrences in a sporadic form without any sign of the myxoma complex. PMID:26424957

  4. Preoperative Emboli in a Pregnant Woman with Myxoma.

    PubMed

    Sabzi, Freidoun; Faraji, Reza

    2016-07-01

    The left atrium is the most common location of myxomas, which are benign tumors. Only a few cases of myxomas in pregnancies have been reported. Our thorough medical literature search showed only 17 reported cases in the course of pregnancy. Myxomas during pregnancy and in the preterm period constitute a serious phenomenon that can mimic an early sign of a life-threatening pathology like severe mitral stenosis. We describe a 33-year-old woman, who presented with acute dyspnea to a gynecology center and was referred to our hospital for further evaluation of pulmonary embolism. Transthoracic echocardiography showed a huge left atrial myxoma, and computed tomography scan illustrated paradoxical pulmonary embolism in the left upper lung lobe via a large patent foramen ovale. The tumor required urgent cardiac surgery. In this article, we review causes of dyspnea in pregnancy and the cardiovascular effects of myxomas in pregnancy. We also describe the pathophysiological effects of cardiopulmonary bypass on the mother, fetus, and the feto-placental system during open-heart surgery. We performed a successful surgical resection of a myxoma in a pregnant woman. Given the rarity of such cases, individual multidisciplinary assessment and management strategies are essential. PMID:27365558

  5. Preoperative Emboli in a Pregnant Woman with Myxoma

    PubMed Central

    Sabzi, Freidoun; Faraji, Reza

    2016-01-01

    The left atrium is the most common location of myxomas, which are benign tumors. Only a few cases of myxomas in pregnancies have been reported. Our thorough medical literature search showed only 17 reported cases in the course of pregnancy. Myxomas during pregnancy and in the preterm period constitute a serious phenomenon that can mimic an early sign of a life-threatening pathology like severe mitral stenosis. We describe a 33-year-old woman, who presented with acute dyspnea to a gynecology center and was referred to our hospital for further evaluation of pulmonary embolism. Transthoracic echocardiography showed a huge left atrial myxoma, and computed tomography scan illustrated paradoxical pulmonary embolism in the left upper lung lobe via a large patent foramen ovale. The tumor required urgent cardiac surgery. In this article, we review causes of dyspnea in pregnancy and the cardiovascular effects of myxomas in pregnancy. We also describe the pathophysiological effects of cardiopulmonary bypass on the mother, fetus, and the feto-placental system during open-heart surgery. We performed a successful surgical resection of a myxoma in a pregnant woman. Given the rarity of such cases, individual multidisciplinary assessment and management strategies are essential. PMID:27365558

  6. Intra-arterial thrombolysis of embolic proximal middle cerebral artery occlusion from presumed atrial myxoma.

    PubMed

    Bekavac, I; Hanna, J P; Wallace, R C; Powers, J; Ratliff, N B; Furlan, A J

    1997-08-01

    The role of thrombolysis in brain ischemia in patients with atrial myxoma is unknown. A patient with acute brain ischemia and previously undiagnosed atrial myxoma recanalized an occluded middle cerebral artery with intra-arterial thrombolysis. Arterial occlusion from presumed myxoma may be amenable to fibrinolysis. Angiography before treatment in patients with atrial myxoma excludes a myxomatous pseudoaneurysm and permits site-specific thrombolytic instillment. PMID:9270611

  7. Odontogenic epithelial hamartomas in periodontal structures.

    PubMed

    Moskow, B S; Baden, E

    1989-02-01

    4 hamartomas apparently derived from remnants of the dental lamina and enamel organ are reported in a collection of human jaw specimens. These epithelial lesions represent a transitional stage between a developmental anomaly and a distinct odontogenic neoplasm. Earlier reports indicated that such lesions with clinical symptoms are rare; however, this study suggests a more common occurrence on a microscopic level. PMID:2921378

  8. Mechanical thrombectomy in cardiac myxoma stroke: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yoon Sang; Lee, Woong Jae; Hong, Joonhwa; Byun, Jun Soo; Kim, Jae Kyun; Chae, Soo Ahn

    2016-06-01

    Cardiac myxoma is the most common primary tumor of the heart. It is a rare cause of acute ischemic stroke and commonly not detected until after the stroke. There is no current guideline for the treatment of cardiac myxoma stroke and only a few cases of mechanical thrombectomy have been reported. We present a case of cardiac myxoma stroke in a 4-year-old boy treated with a stent-retrieval device and review the literature describing the safety and efficacy of mechanical thrombectomy in cardiac myxoma stroke. We also describe imaging features of the myxoma clot on susceptibility weighted images. PMID:27040551

  9. Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor associated with ameloblastic fibro-odontoma of the anterior mandible.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun; Song, Young-Gook; Moon, Seong-Yong; Choi, Boyoung; Kim, Bong Chul; Yoon, Jung-Hoon

    2014-05-01

    Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor, which was formerly named calcifying odontogenic cyst, is a benign odontogenic tumor containing clusters of ghost cells within ameloblastic epithelium. Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumors have been associated with other odontogenic tumors, a finding that is a rare event in other types of odontogenic cysts or tumors. This report describes a case of hybrid odontogenic tumor composed of calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor and ameloblastic fibroma-odontoma of the anterior mandible that occurred in a 4-year-old Korean girl. PMID:24785751

  10. Amelogenin in odontogenic cysts and tumors: An immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Anigol, Praveen; Kamath, Venkatesh V.; Satelur, Krishnanand; Anand, Nagaraja; Yerlagudda, Komali

    2014-01-01

    Background: Amelogenins are the major enamel proteins that play a major role in the biomineralization and structural organization of enamel. Aberrations of enamel-related proteins are thought to be involved in oncogenesis of odontogenic epithelium. The expression of amelogenin is possibly an indicator of differentiation of epithelial cells in the odontogenic lesions. Aims and Objectives: The present study aimed to observe the expression of amelogenin immunohistochemically in various odontogenic lesions. Materials and Methods: Paraffin sections of 40 odontogenic lesions were stained immunohistochemically with amelogenin antibodies. The positivity, pattern and intensity of expression of the amelogenin antibody were assessed, graded and statistically compared between groups of odontogenic cysts and tumors. Results: Almost all the odontogenic lesions expressed amelogenin in the epithelial component with the exception of an ameloblastic carcinoma. Differing grades of intensity and pattern were seen between the cysts and tumors. Intensity of expression was uniformly prominent in all odontogenic lesions with hard tissue formation. Statistical analysis however did not indicate significant differences between the two groups. Conclusion: The expression of amelogenin antibody is ubiquitous in odontogenic tissues and can be used as a definitive marker for identification of odontogenic epithelium. PMID:25937729

  11. Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor with an Ectopic Tooth in Maxilla

    PubMed Central

    Bhagawati, Basavaraj T.; Gupta, Manish; Narang, Gaurav; Bhagawati, Sharanamma

    2013-01-01

    The term odontogenic keratocyst was first used by Philipsen in the year 1956. The lesion was renamed by him as keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) and reclassified as odontogenic neoplasm in the World Health Organization's 2005 edition that occurs commonly in the jaws having a predilection for the angle and ascending ramus of mandible. In contrast, KCOTs arising in the maxillary premolar region are relatively rare. Here, we discuss a rare case of keratocystic odontogenic tumor occurring in the maxilla with an ectopic tooth position. PMID:24396609

  12. Expression of cytokeratins in the epithelium of canine odontogenic tumours.

    PubMed

    Arzi, B; Murphy, B; Nemec, A; Vapniarsky, N; Naydan, D K; Verstraete, F J M

    2011-11-01

    Odontogenic tumours are considered to be relatively rare; however, several histologically distinct types have been identified in dogs. The more common canine odontogenic tumours are peripheral odontogenic fibroma and canine acanthomatous ameloblastoma. The expression of cytokeratins (CKs) has been established for the human dental germ and odontogenic tumours. The aim of the present study was to describe the immunohistochemical expression of a panel of CKs in the epithelium of the canine dental germ, normal gingiva and odontogenic tumours arising in this species. Samples from 20 odontogenic tumours, 12 tooth germs and three normal gingival tissues were obtained. Each sample was stained with haematoxylin and eosin and subjected to immunohistochemistry for CK expression. The typical expression pattern of CKs in the odontogenic epithelium and gingiva of dogs was CK14 and CK5/6. CKs 7, 8, 18 and 20 were generally absent from the canine dental germ, gingiva and odontogenic tumours. Dogs and man therefore exhibit similar CK expression in the odontogenic epithelium. PMID:21511272

  13. Delayed diagnosed posterior interosseous nerve palsy due to intramuscular myxoma

    PubMed Central

    Kursumovic, A; Mattiassich, G; Rath, S

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of posterior interosseous nerve palsy after bowel surgery associated with intramuscular myxoma of the supinator muscle. The initial symptoms of swelling of the forearm made it difficult to distinguish the condition from extravasations after intravenous cannulation. The diagnosis was finally established with nerve conduction studies and MRI 3 months after symptom onset. The patient underwent surgery for removal of the tumour and decompression of the posterior interosseous nerve. The histological examination identified the tumour as intramuscular myxoma and the patient made a full recovery with no recurrence of the lesion until present. Every swelling on the forearm causing neurological disorders is tumour suspected and should be examined clinically as well as electrophysically and radiographically. Early surgery and nerve decompression should follow immediately after the diagnosis. In case of intramuscular myxoma, good recovery of function after surgery with low recurrence risk may be expected. PMID:23576649

  14. Progressive wheeze: atrial myxoma masquerading as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Aish; Apps, Andrew; Liong, Wei Chuen; Firoozan, Soroosh

    2015-01-01

    Atrial myxoma, the commonest primary cardiac neoplasm, presents with symptoms of heart failure, embolic phenomena or constitutional upset. We present an atypical case, with wheeze and symptomatic exacerbations typical of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. With no early clinical evidence of heart failure, the patient was managed with inhaled steroids and bronchodilators, with little relief. Only when the patient was in extremis requiring intubation, due to respiratory failure, did clinical evidence of left heart failure become apparent, with echocardiography demonstrating a massive left atrial myxoma obstructing the mitral valve annulus. Following successful surgical resection, the patient's symptoms fully abated. This case highlights the importance of considering cardiac wheeze in those initially managed as obstructive airway disease not responding in a typical fashion to initial bronchodilator therapy, and particularly in those with rapidly progressive symptoms. Such patients should be referred early for cardiac imaging. The excellent prognosis and quick recovery after timely surgical resection of a myxoma are also highlighted. PMID:26206781

  15. An adenomatoid odontogenic tumor in disguise.

    PubMed

    Dhirawani, Rajesh B; Pathak, Sanyog; Mallikaarjuna, K; Sharma, Ankit

    2016-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is a slowly growing benign tumor of the oral cavity. It accounts of 3-7% of all odontogenic tumors. It is seen to occur commonly in the anterior maxilla. The tumor is usually associated with an impacted tooth with maxillary canine being the most common tooth. AOT is seen in a younger group, especially below 20 years with a female preponderance. AOT occurs in two main variants: Central or intraosseous which is more common and second is peripheral which is rare. Radiologically, it represents as a radiolucent lesion with radiopaque foci usually an impacted or a supernumerary tooth. With a close clinical and radiographic resemblance to dentigerous cyst correct diagnosis and treatment is necessary. AOT being benign in nature requires a conservative management with enucleation. This is a case report of a 13-year-old girl with an AOT occurring in the anterior maxillary region. PMID:27461816

  16. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor, an uncommon tumor

    PubMed Central

    Vasudevan, K.; Kumar, Senthil; Vijayasamundeeswari; Vigneswari, Srivel

    2012-01-01

    Here we report a case of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) in the maxilla in a young girl aged 14 years and its surgical management. We also review the literature and variations in the nomenclature and classifications of this interesting tumor. The review of literature gives an interesting picture regarding terminologies in the past and dilemma in classifying this tumor. The introduction of the name adenomatoid odontogenic tumour has resulted in the simpler and fruitful surgical management like enucleation and curettage with no reports of recurrences. In the past, similar lesion with the terminology like adeno ameloblastoma has resulted in unnecessary mutilating surgery. The conflicting views whether the lesion is being neoplasm or an anomalous hamartomatous growth is also being discussed. PMID:22919236

  17. Orthokeratinised odontogenic cyst mimicking periapical cyst

    PubMed Central

    Rajalakshmi, R; Sreeja, C; Vijayalakshmi, D; Leelarani, V

    2013-01-01

    Orthokeratinised odontogenic cyst (OOC) denotes the odontogenic cyst that microscopically has an orthokeratinised epithelial lining. OOC is characterised by a less-aggressive behaviour and a low rate of recurrence. This report describes a case of OOC involving posterior part of the mandible that mimicked periapical cyst in a 14-year-old boy. The initial clinical diagnosis was given as periapical cyst based on the clinical and radiographical features. Enucleation of the cyst was performed and the specimen was sent for histopathological examination. A definite diagnosis of OOC was made by histopathological examination of the biopsy specimen. This case emphases on including OOC in the differential diagnosis of radiolucencies occurring in the periapical region of non-vital tooth. PMID:24099763

  18. Glandular Odontogenic Cyst of the Anterior Mandible

    PubMed Central

    Raju, Srinivasa Pathapati; Reddy, Sridhar Padala; Ananthnag, Jakkula

    2015-01-01

    Context: Glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC) is a rare cyst occurring in the middle-age people with mandibular anterior as the common site of occurrence. Case Report: We report a case of massive GOC in a 65-year-old female with an emphasis on its clinical course, histological features, and treatment modalities. Conclusion: The aggressiveness and recurrences of GOC warrants clinicians for the careful examination, treatment, and long-term follow-up. PMID:25789251

  19. Recurrent Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor After Effective Decompression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Li, Wei; Han, Fangkai; Huang, Xiaofeng; Yang, Xudong

    2016-07-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) has potential aggressive and infiltrative behavior. Decompression has been widely preferred for large KCOTs due to safety and lower recurrence rates. However, KCOT is still likely to recur even after effective decompression. Here, we present a rare and interesting case of recurrent KCOT after effective decompression with adjunctive enucleation. Redecompression was then performed again, and the effect was still satisfactory on long-term follow-up. PMID:27391520

  20. Epithelial odontogenic tumours in domestic animals.

    PubMed

    Walsh, K M; Denholm, L J; Cooper, B J

    1987-09-01

    Epithelial odontogenic tumours are uncommon, poorly understood and often difficult to diagnose, oral neoplasms. Dental organ pre-ameloblasts and basal lamina induce development of mesenchymal cells into odontoblasts, which produce dentin and induce pre-ameloblasts to mature into secretory ameloblasts. These reciprocal sequential inductive interactions between dental epithelium and mesenchyme form the basis for classifying epithelial odontogenic tumours. There are three tumours classified as non-inductive: ameloblastoma characterized by cords and islands of stellate reticulum with peripheral palisades of polarized columnar cells, adenomatoid ameloblastoma which has acini, rosettes and ducts of polarized columnar cells and stellate reticulum and calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour which contains foci of Congo-red-positive material surrounded by pleomorphic polygonal epithelial cells. There are five tumours in which induction of mesenchymal tissue is evident: ameloblastic fibroma with characteristics of ameloblastoma plus proliferation of closely associated pulp-like mesenchyme; dentinoma consisting of masses of dentin, often with minimal cellular component; ameloblastic odontoma which contains palisaded epithelium and stellate reticulum as in ameloblastoma, as well as foci of dentin and/or enamel; complex odontoma which is a disorderly array of dentin, enamel, ameloblastic epithelium and odontoblasts; and compound odontoma containing denticles with well-organized tooth morphology. This paper reviews the embryogenesis of teeth and describes six types of epithelial odontogenic tumours in 13 animals. The literature concerning these tumours in nearly 250 animals is reviewed. The most commonly reported tumour is ameloblastoma and the species in which all types are most commonly reported is the dog. PMID:3316314

  1. Classification of odontogenic cysts and tumors - Antecedents.

    PubMed

    Imran, Aesha; Jayanthi, P; Tanveer, Shahela; Gobu, Sreeja C

    2016-01-01

    Pierre Paul Broca produced a monograph on tumor classification which also included the classification of odontogenic tumors (OTs). The terminology used to describe malignant epithelial OTs has varied since the World Health Organization published the initial consensus on the taxonomy of OTs. Minor changes were introduced in the second edition. It is only in the very recent years that additional knowledge has accumulated and refined the classification. This review emphasizes on reasons for modification by each author and the recent acceptance. PMID:27601821

  2. Classification of odontogenic tumours. A historical review.

    PubMed

    Philipsen, Hans Peter; Reichart, Peter A

    2006-10-01

    Using the term odontome for any tumour arising from the dental formative tissues, Broca suggested a classification of odontogenic tumours (OTs) in 1869. From 1888 to 1914, Bland-Sutton and Gabell, James and Payne modified tumour terminology, while maintaining Broca's odontome concept. Thoma and Goldman's classification (1946) divided the OTs into tumours of ectodermal, mesodermal and mixed origin and abolished the general term odontome. The Pindborg and Clausen classification (1958) based on the idea that the reciprocal epithelial-mesenchymal tissue interactions were also operating in the pathogenesis of OTs. In 1966, WHO established a Collaborating Centre for the Histological Classification of Odontogenic Tumours and Allied Lesions (including jaw cysts) headed by Dr Jens Pindborg. In 1971, the first authoritative WHO guide to the classification of OTs and cysts appeared followed in 1992 by a second edition. In 2002, Philipsen and Reichart produced a revision of the 1992-edition and in 2003, the editors of the WHO Blue Book series: 'WHO Classification of Tumours' decided to produce a volume on the Head and Neck Tumours including a chapter on Odontogenic Tumours and Bone Related Lesions. In July of 2005 this volume was published by IARC, Lyon. PMID:16968232

  3. Peri-implant squamous odontogenic tumor.

    PubMed

    Agostini, Tommaso; Sacco, Roberto; Bertolai, Roberto; Acocella, Alessandro; Colafranceschi, Maurizio; Lazzeri, Davide

    2011-05-01

    Squamous odontogenic tumor (SOT) is a benign, locally infiltrative intraosseous tumor composed of well-differentiated squamous epithelium in a fibrous stroma. It seems to derive from the epithelial rests of Malassez in the periodontal ligament space. It presents an odontogenic origin, involving both the upper and lower maxillary bone, mainly areas without teeth or connective tissue of the odontogenic cysts. Clinically, SOT could be asymptomatic (3 cases), notwithstanding it is mainly characterized by pain, swelling, and tooth/teeth mobility. The most typical presentation of SOT is a slowly growing endobony lesion arising within a single periodontal location. Frequent misdiagnosis concerns either ameloblastoma and squamous cell carcinoma and fibroma. Since its first description in 1975, less than 50 cases have been identified. In light of the few reported cases, there are no consistently recorded clinical and radiographic features of SOT, and there is no predictable sex or site predilection. Diagnosis is predicated on recognition of the histopathologic features of SOT to obviate possible misdiagnosis of malignancy or ameloblastoma.We report the first case of SOT that arose in the vicinity of an implant. Through a meticulous review of literature, we discuss current etiology, pathogenesis, and treatment. PMID:21586976

  4. Odontogenic Keratocyst in Children: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Kamil, Ahmed H.; Tarakji, Bassel

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Is to highlight the characteristics and management of odontogenic keratocyst in children only Material and Method: Computerized search in pubmed between (2005-2015) using specific words such as odontogenic keratocyst in children, odontogenic keratocyst association with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome with abstract written in English only. Result: During computerized literature search 77 articles in the years (2005-2015) were found. All these publications were miscellaneous studies including case series and case reports. Only 35 papers were selected which conform to our criteria. Most of the papers indicate that the histological type of keratocyst prevalent in children was parakeratinized variant, and most of the cases occurred in maxilla rather than mandible. Conclusion: We recommend that the surgeons who treat keratocysts in children take into consideration the late presentation in addition to the destructive nature and high recurrence rate. General practitioners face difficulty in early detection and referral of children with keratocysts or Gorlin syndrome. Treatment by multidiscplinary team is important if associated with Gorlin's syndrome Postoperative follow up is advised every 6 months. PMID:27335612

  5. Esophageal ulcer of unknown origin complicated by left atrial myxoma.

    PubMed

    Nishizaki, Yuji; Yamagami, Shinichiro; Hayakawa, Daisuke; Takashima, Shiori; Nomura, Osamu; Sai, Eiryu; Kon, Kazuyoshi; Matsuyama, Shujiro; Watanabe, Sumio; Daida, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Myxoma induces the onset of paraneoplastic syndromes by excreting various humoral mediators and is therefore known to present with diverse symptoms. A 40-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for the treatment of an esophageal ulcer, the cause of which could not be identified on various examinations. Notably, a left atrial tumor was incidentally found on chest enhanced computed tomography. The esophageal ulcer, which was intractable to conventional therapy, improved with the administration of 5-aminosalicylate, a drug known to inhibit IL-1β. This inhibitory action effectively suppressed the development of myxoma-induced paraneoplastic syndrome. PMID:26027988

  6. Left Atrial Myxoma in a Late Case of Lung Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M M; Ranjan, R; Khan, O S; Aftabuddin, M; Hoque, M R

    2016-04-01

    Concomitant occurrence of lung carcinoma and an atrial myxoma is rare. We are reporting such a case, a 55 year old male, farmer, smoker for 30 years was under evaluation for his recent episode of stroke with hemiparesis during which an echocardiography showed presence of a left atrial myxoma and chest x-ray showed a lesion in the midzone of right lung. Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) from enlarged right supraclavicular lymphnode revealed metastatic adenocarcinoma. Patient was referred to a tertiary cancer care hospital thereafter. PMID:27277375

  7. Myxoma virus: propagation, purification, quantification, and storage.

    PubMed

    Smallwood, Sherin E; Rahman, Masmudur M; Smith, Dorothy W; McFadden, Grant

    2010-05-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is a member of the Poxviridae family and prototype for the genus Leporipoxvirus. It is pathogenic only for European rabbits, in which it causes the lethal disease myxomatosis, and two North American species, in which it causes a less severe disease. MYXV replicates exclusively in the cytoplasm of the host cell. Although not infectious in humans, its genome encodes proteins that can interfere with or modulate host defense mechanisms; it is able to productively infect a number of human cancer cell lines, but not normal human cells, and has also been shown to increase survival time in mouse models of human glioma. These characteristics suggest that MYXV could be a viable therapeutic agent, e.g., in anti-inflammatory or anti-immune therapy, or as an oncolytic agent. MYXV is also an excellent model for poxvirus biology, pathogenesis, and host tropism studies. It is easily propagated in a number of cell lines, including adherent cells and suspension cultures, and minimal purification is required to provide a stock for in vivo and in vitro studies. PMID:20440681

  8. Oncolytic Myxoma Virus: The path to clinic

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Winnie M.; Rahman, Masmudur M.; McFadden, Grant

    2013-01-01

    Many common neoplasms are still noncurative with current standards of cancer therapy. More therapeutic modalities need to be developed to significantly prolong the lives of patients and eventually cure a wider spectrum of cancers. Oncolytic virotherapy is one of the promising new additions to clinical cancer therapeutics. Successful oncolytic virotherapy in the clinic will be those strategies that best combine tumor cell oncolysis with enhanced immune responses against tumor antigens. The current candidate oncolytic viruses all share the common property that they are relatively nonpathogenic to humans, yet they have the ability to replicate selectively in human cancer cells and induce cancer regression by direct oncolysis and/or induction of improved anti-tumor immune responses. Many candidate oncolytic viruses are in various stages of clinical and preclinical development. One such preclinical candidate is myxoma virus (MYXV), a member of the Poxviridae family that, in its natural setting, exhibits a very restricted host range and is only pathogenic to European rabbits. Despite its narrow host range in nature, MYXV has been shown to productively infect various classes of human cancer cells. Several preclinical in vivo modeling studies have demonstrated that MYXV is an attractive and safe candidate oncolytic virus, and hence, MYXV is currently being developed as a potential therapeutic for several cancers, such as pancreatic cancer, glioblastoma, ovarian cancer, melanoma, and hematologic malignancies. This review highlights the preclinical cancer models that have shown the most promise for translation of MYXV into human clinical trials. PMID:23726825

  9. Glandular Odontogenic Cyst of Mandible: A Rare Entity

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Ankur; Kaur, Gursheen; Sood, Neena

    2015-01-01

    Glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC) is a rare developmental odontogenic cyst. It is a slow growing and asymptomatic swelling, usually affecting middle aged men and has tendency to reoccur. Here, we report a case of GOC in the anterior portion of mandible diagnosed by histopathology. PMID:26813085

  10. The management of odontogenic infections. A rationale for appropriate chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Baker, K A; Fotos, P G

    1994-10-01

    Odontogenic infections are one of the most frequently occurring infectious processes known to health practice. Significant changes have occurred in the use of antibiotics and antimicrobials since the use of chemotherapeutic agents became widespread. This article provides some important considerations for selecting appropriate chemotherapeutic agents during the management of odontogenic infections. PMID:7805942

  11. JAB1 accelerates odontogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lian, Min; Zhang, Ye; Shen, Qijie; Xing, Jing; Lu, Xiaohui; Huang, Dan; Cao, Peipei; Shen, Shuling; Zheng, Ke; Zhang, Jinlong; Chen, Jie; Wang, Yi; Feng, Guijuan; Feng, Xingmei

    2016-06-01

    Jun activation domain-binding protein 1 (JAB1) is a multifunctional protein that participates in the control of cell proliferation and the stability of multiple proteins. JAB1 regulates several key proteins, and thereby produces varied effects on cell cycle progression, genome stability and cell survival. Some studies have shown that the loss of JAB1 in osteochondral progenitor cells severely impairs embryonic limb development in mice. However, the biological significance of JAB1 activity in the odontogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) remains unclear. This study aimed to determine the role of JAB1, a key player in tooth development, in reparative dentin formation, especially odontogenic differentiation. We found that increased expression of JAB1 promoted odontogenic differentiation of DPSCs via Wnt/β-catenin signaling. The role of JAB1 in the odontogenic differentiation of DPSCs was further confirmed by knocking down JAB1. Our findings provide novel insights on odontogenic differentiation of DPSCs. PMID:26989054

  12. Molecular and genetic aspects of odontogenic tumors: a review.

    PubMed

    Garg, Kavita; Chandra, Shaleen; Raj, Vineet; Fareed, Wamiq; Zafar, Muhammad

    2015-06-01

    Odontogenic tumors contain a heterogeneous collection of lesions that are categorized from hamartomas to benign and malignant neoplasms of inconstant aggressiveness. Odontogenic tumors are usually extraordinary with assessed frequency of short of 0.5 cases/100,000 population for every year. The lesions such as odontogenic tumors are inferred from the components of the tooth-structuring contraption. They are discovered solely inside the maxillary and mandibular bones. This audit speaks to experiences and cooperation of the molecular and genetic variations connected to the development and movement of odontogenic tumors which incorporate oncogenes, tumor-silencer genes, APC gene, retinoblastoma genes, DNA repair genes, onco-viruses, development components, telomerase, cell cycle controllers, apoptosis-related elements, and regulators/conttrollers of tooth development. The reasonable and better understanding of the molecular components may prompt new ideas for their detection and administrating a better prognosis of odontogenic tumors. PMID:26221475

  13. Molecular and genetic aspects of odontogenic tumors: a review

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Kavita; Chandra, Shaleen; Raj, Vineet; Fareed, Wamiq; Zafar, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic tumors contain a heterogeneous collection of lesions that are categorized from hamartomas to benign and malignant neoplasms of inconstant aggressiveness. Odontogenic tumors are usually extraordinary with assessed frequency of short of 0.5 cases/100,000 population for every year. The lesions such as odontogenic tumors are inferred from the components of the tooth-structuring contraption. They are discovered solely inside the maxillary and mandibular bones. This audit speaks to experiences and cooperation of the molecular and genetic variations connected to the development and movement of odontogenic tumors which incorporate oncogenes, tumor-silencer genes, APC gene, retinoblastoma genes, DNA repair genes, onco-viruses, development components, telomerase, cell cycle controllers, apoptosis-related elements, and regulators/conttrollers of tooth development. The reasonable and better understanding of the molecular components may prompt new ideas for their detection and administrating a better prognosis of odontogenic tumors. PMID:26221475

  14. Central odontogenic fibroma: Retrospective study of 8 clinical cases

    PubMed Central

    Hrichi, Radia; Gargallo-Albiol, Jordi; Berini-Aytés, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    Introduction and Objectives: The central odontogenic fibroma (COF) is a benign odontogenic tumour derived from the dental mesenchymal tissues. It is a rare tumour and only 70 cases of it have been published. Bearing in mind the rareness of the tumour, 8 new cases of central odontogenic fibroma have been found by analyzing the clinical, radiological and histopathological characteristics of COF. Patients and Method: A retrospective study was carried out on 3011 biopsies in the Service of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery of the Dental Clinic of Barcelona University between January 1995 and March 2008. 85 odontogenic tumours were diagnosed of which 8 were central odontogenic fibroma. The radiological study was based on orthopantomographs, periapical and occlusal radiographies and computerised tomographics. The variables collected were: sex, age, clinical characteristics of the lesion, treatment received and possible reappearances of the tumour. Results: The central odontogenic fibroma represents 9.4% of all odontogenic tumours. Of the 8 cases, 5 were diagnosed in men and 3 in women. The average age was 19.9 years with an age range of 11 to 38 years. The most common location of the tumour was in the mandible. All cases were associated with unerupted teeth. Of the 8 tumours, 3 provoked rhizolysis of the adjacent teeth and 4 cases caused cortical bone expansion. 50% of the patients complained of pain associated to the lesion. No case of recurrence was recorded up to 2 years after the treatment. Conclusions: Central odontogenic fibromas usually evolve asymptomatically although they can manifest very aggressively provoking dental displacement and rhizolysis. Radiologically, COF manifest as a uni or multilocular radiotransparent image although they can be indistinguishable from other radiotransparent lesions making diagnosis more difficult. COF treatment involves conservative surgery as well as follow-up patient checks. Key words: Odontogenic tumour, central odontogenic

  15. Sequence mapping of the Californian MSW strain of Myxoma virus.

    PubMed

    Labudovic, A; Perkins, H; van Leeuwen, B; Kerr, P

    2004-03-01

    Partial sequence mapping of the MSW Californian strain of Myxoma virus was performed by cloning EcoRI and SalI restriction fragments of viral DNA and sequencing the ends of these. In this way, regions of 74 MSW open reading frames were sequenced and mapped onto the complete genome sequences of the related leporipoxviruses South American Myxoma virus and Rabbit fibroma virus to form a partial map of the MSW strain. In general, gene locations and sequences were conserved between the three viruses. However the Californian Myxoma virus was more closely related to South American myxoma virus than to Rabbit fibroma virus based on sequence comparisons and the presence of three genes that have been lost from the Rabbit fibroma virus genome. Compared to the other two viruses, the main difference found in the MSW genome was that the terminal inverted repeats were extended with the duplication of 5 complete open reading frames (M151R, M152R, M153R, M154L, M156R) and partial duplication of one open reading frame (M150R). This rearrangement was associated with the loss of the majority of the M009L open reading frame. Three known virulence genes, including the serine proteinase inhibitor (SERPIN) genes M151R and M152R and leukemia associated protein (LAP) gene M153R, and the potential virulence gene M156R are now present in two copies. PMID:14991443

  16. Sporadic Multicentric Right Atrial and Right Ventricular Myxoma Presenting as Acute Pulmonary Thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Singh, Satyajit; Tripathy, Mahendra Prasad; Mohanty, Bipin Bihari; Biswas, Sutapa

    2016-01-01

    Multicentric cardiac myxoma is a rare syndrome; usually it is familial. We report a rare case of sporadic right atrium (RA) and right ventricle (RV) myxoma in a 26-year-old female presenting to our hospital for the evaluation of sudden onset of dyspnea and left precordial pain attributed to the embolization of degenerating tumor fragments to the pulmonary artery (PA). The exact incidence of sporadic multicentric RA and RV myxoma presenting as acute pulmonary embolism is unknown as multicentric RA and RV myxoma are very rare. Myxomas presenting as pulmonary embolism is <10%. Majority of cardiac myxomas present as exertional dyspnea, chest pain, positional syncope, fever, weight loss and other constitutional symptoms. Any young patient presenting with acute onset dyspnea with multiple cardiac masses may have tumor embolization to the PA diagnosis with transthoracic echocardiography and high-resolution computed tomography of thorax, fast-tracks patient transfer for urgent cardiac surgery to prevent further embolization. PMID:27293525

  17. Fourth Recurrence of Cardiac Myxoma in a Patient with the Carney Complex

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, O Young; Kim, Gun Jik; Jang, Woo Sung; Lee, Young Ok; Cho, Jun Yong; Lee, Jong Tae

    2016-01-01

    Although cardiac myxoma is the most commonly encountered benign cardiac tumor in cardiac surgery practice, recurrent cardiac myxoma is very rare, is most commonly related to the Carney complex, and usually requires multiple cardiac operations with specific requirements in terms of perioperative management. In this report, we describe a patient who experienced the fourth recurrence of cardiac myxoma and review the diagnostic criteria of the Carney complex. This is the first report of such a case in Korea. PMID:27066435

  18. Fourth Recurrence of Cardiac Myxoma in a Patient with the Carney Complex.

    PubMed

    Kwon, O Young; Kim, Gun Jik; Jang, Woo Sung; Lee, Young Ok; Cho, Jun Yong; Lee, Jong Tae

    2016-04-01

    Although cardiac myxoma is the most commonly encountered benign cardiac tumor in cardiac surgery practice, recurrent cardiac myxoma is very rare, is most commonly related to the Carney complex, and usually requires multiple cardiac operations with specific requirements in terms of perioperative management. In this report, we describe a patient who experienced the fourth recurrence of cardiac myxoma and review the diagnostic criteria of the Carney complex. This is the first report of such a case in Korea. PMID:27066435

  19. [Inflammatory odontogenic lesions of the jaws].

    PubMed

    Gallini, G; Merlini, C; Martelossi, L; Benetti, C

    1991-04-15

    The apical granuloma, the periapical abcess and the radicular cyst are the most frequent between the inflammatory odontogenic lesions of the jaws. These three lesions are caused by the necrosis of the pulp but are very different between each other from an histological point of view and they can correspond to different stages of the same pathological process considering the fact that from a granuloma can arise a periapical abcess or a radicular cyst and from a radicular cyst and abcess can originate. About these three pathological processes we discuss in this article the clinical, radiographical, ethiological, microscopical features, we suggest the treatment and the differential diagnosis. PMID:2070926

  20. Odontogenic maxillary sinusitis obscured by midfacial trauma.

    PubMed

    Simuntis, Regimantas; Kubilius, Ričardas; Ryškienė, Silvija; Vaitkus, Saulius

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis whose sinonasal symptomatology was thought to be the consequence of a previous midfacial trauma. The patient was admitted to the Clinic of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery after more than 10 years of exacerbations of sinonasal symptoms, which began to plague soon after a facial contusion. We decided to perform CT of paranasal sinuses, and despite the absence dental symptomatology, the dental origin of sinusitis was discovered. The majority of sinonasal symptoms resolved after appropriate dental treatment, and there was no need for nasal or sinus surgery. PMID:26183855

  1. Oral Cavity Clear Cell Odontogenic Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ginat, Daniel Thomas; Villaflor, Victoria; Cipriani, Nicole A

    2016-06-01

    A case of clear cell odontogenic carcinoma of the oral cavity is described in this sine qua non radiology-pathology correlation article. CT demonstrated a solid and cystic mass arising from the mandible. Histology demonstrated variably-sized nests of clear to pale eosinophilic cells with occasional central necrosis embedded in a hyalinized to fibrocellular stroma. The specimen was also positive for the characteristic rearrangement of the EWSR1 (22q12) locus in 93.5 % of interphase cells. PMID:25994920

  2. A Huge Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor of Maxilla

    PubMed Central

    Shreedhar, Balasundari; Ali, Iqbal; Agarwal, Anshita; Alam, Sarwar

    2012-01-01

    The adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is a benign, nonneoplastic (hamartomatous) lesion with a slow progressing growth. It occurs in both intraosseous and peripheral forms. This paper reports the case of a female aged 16 years who presented with a swelling in anterior maxilla; canine was missing, and a supernumerary tooth was present in the mid line. Radiology revealed a well-defined radiolucent area associated with impacted canine and root resorption of adjacent teeth, which was diagnosed histopathologically as AOT. The patient was treated surgically and later rehabilitated with fixed prosthesis. PMID:22481948

  3. Vaccination of cats with an attenuated recombinant myxoma virus expressing feline calicivirus capsid protein.

    PubMed

    McCabe, Victoria J; Tarpey, Ian; Spibey, Norman

    2002-06-01

    Myxoma virus, a member of the Poxviridae family (genus Leporipoxvirus) is the agent responsible for myxomatosis in the European rabbit. Recombinant myxoma viruses expressing the capsid gene of an F9 strain of feline calicivirus (FCV) were constructed from an apathogenic, laboratory attenuated, isolate of myxoma virus. The FCV capsid genes were recombined into the myxoma growth factor (MGF) locus of the myxoma genome and expressed from synthetic poxvirus promoters. Myxoma virus is unable to replicate productively in feline cells in vitro, however, cells infected with recombinant viruses do express the heterologous antigens from both late and early/late synthetic promoters. Cats immunised with myxoma-FCV recombinant virus generated high levels of serum neutralising antibody and were protected from disease on subsequent challenge with virulent FCV. Furthermore, there was no evidence of transmission of myxoma-FCV recombinant virus from vaccinated to non-vaccinated cats. These results demonstrate the potential of myxoma virus as a safe vaccine vector for use in non-lepori species and in particular the cat. PMID:12057600

  4. Systemic embolisation as presentation and recurrence of cardiac myxoma two years after surgery.

    PubMed

    Liesting, C; Ramjankhan, F Z; van Herwerden, L A; Kofflard, M J M

    2010-10-01

    Primary cardiac tumours are rare when compared with metastatic involvement. The majority of primary cardiac tumours are benign and in adults the majority of these masses are myxomas. The treatment is surgical removal because of the risk of embolisation and/or cardiovascular complications. We describe a female presenting with systemic embolisation and recurrence of cardiac myxoma after surgery. Recurrence of myxoma is rare after surgery in case of solitary tumours but more frequent in patients with familial myxomas in association with the Carney complex. Genetic analysis revealed a mutation in the PRKAR1A gene that has never been described before. (Neth Heart J 2010;18:499502.). PMID:20978595

  5. A Giant Left Atrial Myxoma Neovascularized from the Right Coronary Artery

    PubMed Central

    Gerede, Demet Menekse; Akbulut, Irem Muge; Ersoz, Sadık; Kilıckap, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Myxomas are benign and the most common tumors of the cardiac muscle (Reynen, 1995). They are predominantly located in the left atrium. Clinical manifestations may vary according to the localization and the size of the myxoma. On the other hand, imaging of a myxoma by contrast dye during coronary angiography is a rare sign, which displays the vascular supply of the tumor. Here, we report the case of a 51-year-old man presenting with presyncope and palpitations due to a giant left atrial myxoma having its vascular supply from the right coronary artery (RCA). PMID:25960891

  6. A giant left atrial myxoma neovascularized from the right coronary artery.

    PubMed

    Gerede, Demet Menekse; Akbulut, Irem Muge; Ersoz, Sadık; Kilıckap, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Myxomas are benign and the most common tumors of the cardiac muscle (Reynen, 1995). They are predominantly located in the left atrium. Clinical manifestations may vary according to the localization and the size of the myxoma. On the other hand, imaging of a myxoma by contrast dye during coronary angiography is a rare sign, which displays the vascular supply of the tumor. Here, we report the case of a 51-year-old man presenting with presyncope and palpitations due to a giant left atrial myxoma having its vascular supply from the right coronary artery (RCA). PMID:25960891

  7. Peripheral Calcifying Cystic Odontogenic Tumour - A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Shenoi, Ramakrishna; Gadve, Vandana; Rajderkar, Anand; Dive, Alka

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic lesions are derived from remnants of the components of the developing tooth germ. The calcifying cystic odontogenic tumour (CCOT) is a benign cystic neoplasm of odontogenic origin that is characterized by ameloblastoma-like epithelial cells and ghost cells. Most peripheral CCOTs are located in the anterior gingiva of the mandible or maxilla. This is a rare case report of CCOT. The rare feature in our case was its peripheral nature of existence and its location in the left buccal vestibule and retromolar region. Based on the radiological, cytological and histopathological findings the lesion was surgically excised. PMID:26393218

  8. Ameloblastomatous Calcifying Cystic Odontogenic Tumour: A Rare Variant

    PubMed Central

    Devaraju, Rama Raju; Duggi, Lakshmi Srujana; Sanjeevareddygari, Shylaja; Potturi, Abhinand

    2015-01-01

    Calcifying Cystic Odontogenic Tumor (CCOT) was previously described by Gorlin et al., in 1962 as Calcifying odontogenic cyst. CCOT is a rare lesion which accounts for 2% of all odontogenic pathological changes in the jaws. One of the variants, Ameloblastomatous proliferating type of CCOT is even more rare and very few cases have been reported in the light of literature review. This case report is an effort to bring forth a case of ameloblastomatous proliferating type of CCOT in a 65 year male, who presented with a painful swelling in the right jaw crossing midline causing facial asymmetry and confirmed by histopathological evaluation. PMID:25954714

  9. Odontogenic ghost cell carcinoma with pulmonary metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Sukumaran, Renu; Somanathan, Thara; Kattoor, Jayasree

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic ghost cell carcinoma (OGCC) is an exceptionally rare malignant odontogenic epithelial tumor. It is characterized by ameloblastic-like islands of epithelial cells with aberrant keratinization in the form of ghost cells with varying amounts of dysplastic dentin. Malignant histological characteristics include infiltration, cellular pleomorphism, numerous mitosis and necrosis. Its biological behavior varies from slow-growing locally invasive lesions to rapidly growing highly aggressive tumors. OGCC metastasizing to distant sites is extremely rare. Only three cases of metastasis have been reported in literature. We are reporting the case of a 54-year-old male patient who presented with tender swelling in the malar region. Histopathological examination revealed OGCC and he received postoperative radiotherapy. Two years later, he presented with a lung mass. Biopsy from the lung lesion showed the same morphology as that of maxillary tumor with scattered ghost cells. This case points to the aggressive behavior of OGCC and its metastatic potential. It also highlights the need for long-term follow-up of these patients. PMID:26980967

  10. Not all pain in the left iliac fossa is diverticular disease: A case study of a psoas myxoma and review.

    PubMed

    Dormand, E L; Prabhu-Desai, A; Rice, A J; Rosin, R D

    2006-08-01

    Intramuscular myxomas are rare, benign, mesenchymal tumours that may present to a wide variety of specialties. We present a case study of an intramuscular myxoma in the psoas muscle, followed by a review of the literature regarding the diagnosis and treatment of intramuscular myxomas PMID:16892842

  11. Recurrent right ventricular cardiac myxoma in a patient with Carney complex: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Carney complex is a multiple neoplasia syndrome involving cardiac, endocrine, neural and cutaneous tumors with a variety of pigmented skin lesions. It has an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. Approximately 7% of cardiac myxomas are related to the Carney complex. Myxomas that occur as part of the Carney complex affect both sexes with equal frequency. Cardiac myxomas with Carney complex are reported mostly in the left side of the heart and are less common on the right side. As per our review, this is the first reported case of Carney complex with right ventricle cardiac myxoma. Case presentation We present a rare case of recurrent cardiac myxoma in a patient later diagnosed to have Carney complex. A 46-year-old Caucasian man with a history of thyroid hyperplasia came to out-patient cardiology department with new onset atrial fibrillation. A transthoracic echocardiogram revealed a right ventricular mass attached to his interventricular septum, which was later seen on a transesophageal echocardiogram and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. He underwent resection of the ventricular mass which on pathology revealed myxoma. He later developed skin lesions, pituitary adenoma and Sertoli cell tumor suggesting Carney complex. Two years later he developed a new mass within his right atrium which was later resected. Conclusions Carney complex is a rare autosomal dominant disease with variable penetrance. Since it involves multiple organs, patients diagnosed with Carney complex should undergo serial endocrine workup, neural assessments, echocardiograms and testicular ultrasounds. Of the total number of cases of Carney complex, 65% are linked to PRKAR1A gene mutation. It is important for clinicians to be cognizant of a link between cardiac myxoma and Carney complex. The use of multi-imaging modalities allows better delineation of the mass before planned resection. Carney complex-related cardiac myxoma comprises 7% of all cardiac myxomas. Right ventricular

  12. Current Concepts and Occurrence of Epithelial Odontogenic Tumors: I. Ameloblastoma and Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeon Sook

    2013-01-01

    Ameloblastomas and adenomatoid odontogenic tumors (AOTs) are common epithelial tumors of odontogenic origin. Ameloblastomas are clinico-pathologically classified into solid/multicystic, unicystic, desmoplastic, and peripheral types, and also divided into follicular, plexiform, acanthomatous, granular types, etc., based on their histological features. Craniopharyngiomas, derived from the remnants of Rathke's pouch or a misplaced enamel organ, are also comparable to the odontogenic tumors. The malignant transformation of ameloblastomas results in the formation of ameloblastic carcinomas and malignant ameloblastomas depending on cytological dysplasia and metastasis, respectively. AOTs are classified into follicular, extrafollicular, and peripheral types. Ameloblastomas are common, have an aggressive behavior and recurrent course, and are rarely metastatic, while AOTs are hamartomatous benign lesions derived from the complex system of the dental lamina or its remnants. With advances in the elucidation of molecular signaling mechanisms in cells, the cytodifferentiation of epithelial tumor cells in ameloblastomas and AOTs can be identified using different biomarkers. Therefore, it is suggested that comprehensive pathological observation including molecular genetic information can provide a more reliable differential diagnosis for the propagation and prognosis of ameloblastomas and AOTs. This study aimed to review the current concepts of ameloblastomas and AOTs and to discuss their clinico-pathological features relevant to tumorigenesis and prognosis. PMID:23837011

  13. Keratin metaplasia in the epithelial lining of odontogenic cysts

    PubMed Central

    Maheswaran, Thangadurai; Ramesh, Venkatapathy; Oza, Nirima; Panda, Abikshyeet; Balamurali, P. D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To find the prevalence of keratin metaplasia and its relation with clinico-pathological profile of the odontogenic cyst. Materials and Methods: Odontogenic cysts were studied histologically with special stains to identify the presence of keratin and compared with various parameters such as underlying connective tissue inflammation, average epithelial thickness, and site of the cyst, type of the cyst, age and the sex of the patient. Results: Of 71 cases of various odontogenic cysts, 26 (36.6%) cases exhibited keratinization in the epithelial lining. In cysts with severe inflammation there is absence of keratinization. Conclusions: This study reveals higher prevalence of keratin metaplasia in the odontogenic cysts. Furthermore, inflammation is found to be one of factor influencing keratin metaplasia. PMID:25210349

  14. Comparision of Immunohistochemical Expression of CD10 in Odontogenic Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Munisekhar, M.S.; Suri, Charu; Rajalbandi, Santosh Kumar; M.R., Pradeep; Gothe, Pavan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Expression of CD10 has been documented in various tumors like nasopharyngeal carcinoma, gastric carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, odontogenic tumors. Aim: To evaluate and compare CD10 expression in odontogenic cysts like radicular cyst, dentigerous cyst and odontogenic keratocyst (OKC). Materials and Methods: Total 60 cases were included in the study, comprising 20 cases each of radicular, dentigerous and odontogenic keratocyst. Each case was evaluated and compared for immunohistochemical expression of CD10. Results obtained were statistically analysed using ANOVA test followed by post hoc test Tukey-Kramer Multiple Comparisons Test for continuous variable and Chi-square test for discrete variable. Results: More number of cases showing sub-epithelial stromal CD10 expression were found in OKC among the cysts. Conclusion: CD10 expression was more in OKC compared to radicular and dentigerous cysts. PMID:25584313

  15. Renal Myxoma- A Rare Variety of Benign Genitourinary Tumour

    PubMed Central

    Vanikar, Aruna V.; Patel, Rashmi D.; Kanodia, Kamal V.

    2015-01-01

    Renal myxomas are rare neoplasms and very few cases have been reported in literature. Here we report a renal myxoma in a 48-year-old lady with hypothyroidism who presented with abdominal pain. She was found to have a mass lesion of 67 x 61 x 74 mm with exophytic component in the right kidney on ultrasonography and computed tomography. Right radical nephrectomy was performed due to suspicion of malignancy. Grossly the resected kidney showed a gelatinous, semi-translucent mass involving the mid and lower poles. Microscopy revealed marked hypocellular appearance of loose myxoid tissue with foamy histiocytes. Tumour cells were reactive for vimentin. At eight months of follow-up, patient is doing well. PMID:26557531

  16. Follicular Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor in Mandible: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Belgaumi, UI; Parkar, MI; Malik, NA; Suresh, KV; Havewala, AM; Bhalinge, PM

    2015-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is a relatively rare, benign, hamartomatous, and cystic odontogenic neoplasm that was first described more than a century ago. The lesion still continues to intrigue experts with its varied histomorphology and controversies regarding its development. The present article describes a case of cystic AOT with an unusual histomorphology associated with an impacted 44 in a 21-year-old male. PMID:27057389

  17. Bilateral keratocystic odontogenic tumor: A report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Srivatsan, K S; Kumar, Vikas; Mahendra, Ashish; Singh, Preeti

    2014-01-01

    The designation "keratocyst" was used to describe any jaw cyst in which keratin was formed to a large extent. A rare incidence of bilateral mandibular cysts (odontogenic keratocysts) was related to third molar teeth. Herein, we report two cases of bilateral keratocystic odontogenic tumor in a 22-year-old male and 15-year-old female, which was diagnosed by a series of investigations and treated appropriately. PMID:25298727

  18. Recurrent stroke in a case of left atrial myxoma masquerading vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Prashant K; Sureka, R K; Sharma, Anjani K; Bhuyan, Sushant; Gupta, Vikas

    2013-12-01

    We report a case of left atrial myxoma presenting as recurrent neurological deficits with absent peripheral pulses mimicking systemic vasculitis. Due to absence of cardiac signs and symptoms, there was one year delay in diagnosis from initial symptom. Left atrial myxomas are rare but treatable cause of recurrent stroke. PMID:24968552

  19. Simultaneous resection of left atrial myxoma and esophageal carcinoma via right thoraco-abdominal approach.

    PubMed

    Ni, Buqing; Lu, Xiaohu; Gong, Qixing; Shao, Yongfeng

    2016-07-01

    Concomitant occurrence of atrial myxoma and esophageal carcinoma is an extremely rare entity. Here we present two cases of synchronously suffered left atrial myxoma and esophageal carcinoma. Both patients underwent simultaneous resection of two tumors via the right thoraco-abdominal approach and recovered well. PMID:27499990

  20. GIANT-CELL RICH ATRIAL MYXOMA: REPORT OF TWO CASES AND REVIEW OF LITERATURE.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Hina; Mamoon, Nadira

    2016-01-01

    The cases of two middle age males are presented who were incidentally diagnosed to have atrial myxoma. Both of them underwent successful surgical interventions. Histologically, both myxomas showed abundant multinucleated giant cells, in addition to typical myxoid stroma with stellate and cord-like structures. PMID:27323595

  1. A Late Case of Ischemic Cerebral Event after Resection of a Left Atrial Myxoma.

    PubMed

    Lafleur, Reginald; Watkowska, Justyna; Zhou, Guoping; Alcide, Phenix; Saint-Jacques, Henock

    2016-01-01

    Atrial myxoma is one of the most common primary cardiac tumors reported in the literature. In very rare instances, stroke has been the sequelae after a myxomatous tumor resection. We report this unique case of late ischemic cerebral event in a 46-year-old female some days after resection of a left atrial myxoma. PMID:27403129

  2. Simultaneous resection of left atrial myxoma and esophageal carcinoma via right thoraco-abdominal approach

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Buqing; Lu, Xiaohu; Gong, Qixing

    2016-01-01

    Concomitant occurrence of atrial myxoma and esophageal carcinoma is an extremely rare entity. Here we present two cases of synchronously suffered left atrial myxoma and esophageal carcinoma. Both patients underwent simultaneous resection of two tumors via the right thoraco-abdominal approach and recovered well. PMID:27499990

  3. A Late Case of Ischemic Cerebral Event after Resection of a Left Atrial Myxoma

    PubMed Central

    Lafleur, Reginald; Watkowska, Justyna; Zhou, Guoping; Alcide, Phenix; Saint-Jacques, Henock

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Atrial myxoma is one of the most common primary cardiac tumors reported in the literature. In very rare instances, stroke has been the sequelae after a myxomatous tumor resection. We report this unique case of late ischemic cerebral event in a 46-year-old female some days after resection of a left atrial myxoma. PMID:27403129

  4. Transoral Resection of a Retropharyngeal Myxoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    White, James R.; Weiss, Sean; Anderson, Dwayne; Mason, Stephen E.; Schexnaildre, Mell A.; Nuss, Daniel W.; Walvekar, Rohan R.

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted to describe a retropharyngeal myxoma and discuss clinical concerns regarding this pathology and a retropharyngeal site of occurrence. We present a case report and review of literature. A 71-year-old woman presented with mild right neck pressure for 3 weeks. Imaging studies and head neck examination confirmed a 5.3 × 3.1 × 1.0 cm retropharyngeal mass with no communication to the vertebral column but was intimately involved with the pharyngeal mucosa. A transoral fine needle aspiration biopsy suggested a possible spindle cell neoplasm. A presurgical swallowing consultation was obtained. A transoral excision of the tumor was possible with no intraoperative complications. Histopathology was a cellular myxoma. Postoperative dysphagia required swallowing therapy and nasogastric tube feeding for 2 weeks before oral intake was possible. The patient has no evidence of clinical or radiological recurrence more than 1 year after surgical intervention. We present the second case of a myxoma in the retropharynx reported in English literature. Transoral excision was safe, feasible, and cosmetically appealing option in our patient. Additional clinical data are required to valid its safety and utility as an approach to tumors in the retropharynx. Postoperative dysphagia can be significant and consequently we recommend preoperative swallowing evaluation and counseling. PMID:23984217

  5. Nasolabial Cyst Associated with Odontogenic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Martini, Eveline Claudia; Coppla, Fabiana Madalozzo; Campagnoli, Eduardo Bauml; Bortoluzzi, Marcelo Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The nasolabial cyst or Klestadt cyst is a relatively uncommon nonodontogenic cyst that develops in the nasal alar region; it has uncertain pathogenesis. This lesion has slow growth and variable dimensions and is characterized clinically by a floating tumefaction in the nasolabial fold area around the bridge of the nose, causing an elevation of the upper lip and relative facial asymmetry. Diagnosis is primarily made clinically; if necessary, this is complemented by imaging. This paper reports the case of a 39-year-old male patient who complained of pain in the right upper premolar region and poor aesthetics due to a firm tumor in the right wing of the nose. Initially, this was thought to be due to an odontogenic abscess; however, the differential diagnosis was that a nasolabial cyst was communicating with the apex of teeth 14 and 15. Surgical treatment was carried out, followed by histopathological examination and concomitant endodontic treatment of the teeth involved. PMID:26904312

  6. Primordial Odontogenic Tumor: Report of a Case.

    PubMed

    Slater, Lee J; Eftimie, Liviu F; Herford, Alan S

    2016-03-01

    Primordial odontogenic tumor (POT) was first described in 2014. It typically presents in the posterior mandible of a child or adolescent as a "dentigerous cyst-like" well-circumscribed radiolucency associated with an unerupted molar. POT consists of an ellipsoidal mass of dental papilla-like myxoid connective tissue entirely enveloped in a delicate membrane of ameloblastic epithelium. It shows features of a developing tooth with a huge dental papilla, and because it is devoid of dental hard tissue, it could be regarded a soft tissue odontoma. The lesion histologically mimics early (primordial) stages of tooth development. This report describes a case of POT and POT-like proliferations in an unrelated complex odontoma. PMID:26408843

  7. Nasolabial Cyst Associated with Odontogenic Infection.

    PubMed

    Martini, Eveline Claudia; Coppla, Fabiana Madalozzo; Campagnoli, Eduardo Bauml; Bortoluzzi, Marcelo Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The nasolabial cyst or Klestadt cyst is a relatively uncommon nonodontogenic cyst that develops in the nasal alar region; it has uncertain pathogenesis. This lesion has slow growth and variable dimensions and is characterized clinically by a floating tumefaction in the nasolabial fold area around the bridge of the nose, causing an elevation of the upper lip and relative facial asymmetry. Diagnosis is primarily made clinically; if necessary, this is complemented by imaging. This paper reports the case of a 39-year-old male patient who complained of pain in the right upper premolar region and poor aesthetics due to a firm tumor in the right wing of the nose. Initially, this was thought to be due to an odontogenic abscess; however, the differential diagnosis was that a nasolabial cyst was communicating with the apex of teeth 14 and 15. Surgical treatment was carried out, followed by histopathological examination and concomitant endodontic treatment of the teeth involved. PMID:26904312

  8. Asymptomatic Left Ventricular Myxoma in a 12-Year-Old Male.

    PubMed

    Chlebowski, Meghan; O'Brien, James; Hertzenberg, Casey; Wagner, Jonathan

    2016-06-01

    Cardiac myxoma is the most common cardiac tumor in patients of all ages; the majority are encountered as single left atrial tumors. Left ventricular myxomas are exceedingly rare, having been recorded in a small number of case reports involving children worldwide. We report a case of a left ventricular myxoma with left ventricular outflow tract obstruction in a previously healthy, asymptomatic adolescent black male. Transthoracic echocardiograms revealed a single, large (2.5 × 5-cm), lobulated, mobile mass within the left ventricular cavity that oscillated into the outflow tract, thereby causing moderate obstruction during systole. Advanced images delineated the location and tissue composition of the mass, characterizing it as a myxoma. Complete surgical excision of the mass was accomplished via aortotomy. Gross examination and histology confirmed the diagnosis of myxoma. PMID:27303249

  9. Asymptomatic Left Ventricular Myxoma in a 12-Year-Old Male

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, James; Hertzenberg, Casey; Wagner, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac myxoma is the most common cardiac tumor in patients of all ages; the majority are encountered as single left atrial tumors. Left ventricular myxomas are exceedingly rare, having been recorded in a small number of case reports involving children worldwide. We report a case of a left ventricular myxoma with left ventricular outflow tract obstruction in a previously healthy, asymptomatic adolescent black male. Transthoracic echocardiograms revealed a single, large (2.5 × 5-cm), lobulated, mobile mass within the left ventricular cavity that oscillated into the outflow tract, thereby causing moderate obstruction during systole. Advanced images delineated the location and tissue composition of the mass, characterizing it as a myxoma. Complete surgical excision of the mass was accomplished via aortotomy. Gross examination and histology confirmed the diagnosis of myxoma. PMID:27303249

  10. [Left atrial myxomas: clinical characteristics, evaluation and considerations in classifying tumors].

    PubMed

    Shimono, T; Komada, T; Kusagawa, H; Shinpo, H; Yada, I; Yuasa, H; Kusagawa, M; Takeuchi, Y; Yamazaki, Y; Takigawa, K

    1992-07-01

    Eleven patients underwent surgical excision for left atrial myxomas. Clinical symptoms, coronary angiographic findings and operative procedures were evaluated. Myxomas were classified into two types based on macroscopical findings, and clinical characteristics of these two types were analyzed. Seven cases (64%) classified as "lobular-type myxomas" were seen as lobulated, gelatinous and fragile. Four cases (36%) were classified as "round-type myxomas" were round and elastic soft. Primary symptoms included dyspnea on exertion in five cases (45%) and neurological disturbances in six cases (55%). Brain emboli were found in four patients by CT scan, and were classified as lobular-type myxomas. These eleven myxomas successfully removed in all cases. Four of these myxomas, which were pedunculated with fine fibrous stalks, were shaved along the base at the atrial septum or free wall. Others were excised completely along with a portion of the adjacent septum. Microscopic examination of the operative specimens revealed that two lobular-type myxomas with broad-based attachment to left atrial septum had invaded the atrial septum. All patients are doing well and have had no signs of myxoma recurrence at postoperative periods ranging from 10 months to 12 years (mean follow-up 5.3 years). Seven patients underwent selective coronary angiography due to a diagnosis of a coronary artery disease. All coronary angiograms were normal in all cases. In five (71%) of these seven, abnormally dilated atrial branches were seen as supplying the tumor. In two cases with round-type myxomas, neovascularity was evident and was made up of clusters of tortuous vessels with tumor blush.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1506697

  11. Intraosseous verrucous carcinoma arising from an orthokeratinized odontogenic keratocyst: A report of a rarest entity

    PubMed Central

    Kamarthi, Nagaraju; Palakshappa, Suhasini Gotur; Wadhwan, Vijay; Mohan, Raviprakash Sasankoti

    2016-01-01

    Intraosseous verrucous carcinomas (VCs) arising from odontogenic cysts are a rare entity. An unusual case of a VC arising from the orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst is described for the first time. The microscopic features of the lesion are presented.

  12. A case of odontogenic brain abscess arising from covert dental sepsis.

    PubMed

    Clifton, T C; Kalamchi, S

    2012-01-01

    Odontogenic infections can spread to any organ of the body and in some cases cause life threatening infections. We report a case of multiple odontogenic brain abscesses resulting from undetected tooth decay. Whereas most odontogenic brain abscesses occur following dental treatment, this report documents brain abscesses prior to dental treatment, signifying the dangers of covert dental infections. This case report updates the literature on the topic of odontogenic brain abscesses. PMID:22524927

  13. The Echocardiographic Spectrum of Atrial Myxoma: A Ten-Year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Pechacek, Leonard W.; Gonzalez-Camid, Felipe; Hall, Robert J.; Garcia, Efrain; De Castro, Carlos M.; Leachman, Robert D.; Montiel-Amoroso, Gilberto

    1986-01-01

    We analyzed the echocardiograms of 28 patients with a left atrial myxoma and two with a right atrial myxoma. Our purpose was to evaluate the value of echocardiography for the diagnosis of these cardiac masses. Only 59% of the m-mode echocardiograms in patients with a left atrial myxoma showed the characteristic findings of multiple diastolic echoes within the mitral orifice as well as abnormal systolic echoes within the left atrium. M-mode echocardiograms were atypical for left atrial myxoma in the remaining patients, and a definitive diagnosis could not be established on the basis of this procedure in six of the patients (22%). Two-dimensional echocardiography showed the presence of a left atrial mass in all 16 patients who had the procedure, and aided in understanding the atypical m-mode recordings. There was a close relationship (r = .82) between two-dimensional echocardiographic measurements of the myxomas' size and pathologic measurements. Both right atrial myxomas could be identified on the m-mode echocardiogram. Our experience indicates that two-dimensional echocardiography is superior to the m-mode technique for the diagnosis and characterization of left atrial myxomas. Images PMID:15227359

  14. Giant left atrial myxoma in an elderly patient: natural history over a 7-year period.

    PubMed

    Bajraktari, Gani; Emini, Merita; Berisha, Venera; Gashi, Fitnete; Beqiri, Arton; Zahiti, Bedri; Selmani, Hamza; Shatri, Faik; Manaj, Rexhep

    2006-01-01

    We present the case of a 71-year-old woman with a 7-year history of a giant left atrial myxoma. The myxoma was attached to the atrial septum and occupied almost the entire left atrial cavity. The patient was hospitalized 4 times because of dyspnea on exertion, palpitations, fatigue, general asthenia, and weight loss. During prior hospitalizations, the patient had refused cardiac surgery. She developed several complications, including atrial fibrillation, mitral and tricuspid regurgitation, mesenteric embolism, pulmonary edema, and thrombotic stroke. We herein describe the natural history of left atrial myxoma in an elderly patient over a 7-year period. PMID:17024671

  15. [Treatment of Right Atrial Myxoma Complicated with Pulmonary Embolism;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Jinnouchi, Kouki; Rikitake, Kazuhisa; Furutachi, Akira; Yoshida, Nozomi

    2016-07-01

    Myxomas are account for approximately half of primary cardiac tumors, 75% of which originate in the left atrium. We report a case of a right atrial myxoma complicated with bilateral pulmonary embolism. A 54-year-old woman was admitted to the hospital with a complaint of dyspnea. Echocardiography and computed tomography angiography showed a right atrial tumor and bilateral pulmonary embolism. We performed an emergency surgery to remove both the right atrial tumor and the pulmonary emboli. Histopathologically, the tumor was revealed to be myxoma. The postoperative course was uneventful. She is now doing well without any symptoms. PMID:27365068

  16. Pleomorphic rhabdomyosarcoma of the left atrium mimicking myxoma.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Tanvi; Goyal, Surbhi; Zaheer, Sufian

    2016-01-01

    Primary rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) of the heart is a rare malignant tumor which has poor prognosis and survival despite surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy. The preoperative diagnosis is often difficult in view of nonspecific clinicoradiological findings. This report describes a case of a 60-year-old woman who was clinically diagnosed as left atrial myxoma. A diagnosis of pleomorphic RMS was made on histopathology after excision. Our case discusses the clinicopathological features and treatment options of cardiac RMS emphasizing the fact that histopathology and immunohistochemistry are essential to confirm the diagnosis of such an aggressive malignant tumor. PMID:27510683

  17. Etiologies and Treatments of Odontogenic Maxillary Sinusitis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Akhlaghi, Fahimeh; Esmaeelinejad, Mohammad; Safai, Pooria

    2015-01-01

    Context: Maxillary sinusitis is an important issue in dentistry and maxillofacial surgery. This study aims to present a systematic review of etiologies and treatments of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis. Evidence Acquisition: An electronic database search was performed based on related MeSH keywords. Articles published between January 2001 and December 2014 was selected according to the inclusion criteria. The information extracted from various studies was categorized in various tables. Results: The study selected 19 studies. In most studies, oroantral fistula (OAF) was the most common etiology of odontogenic sinusitis. Alpha-hemolytic streptococcus was the most common flora in sinusitis with dental origin. The literature shows that the Caldwell-Luc approach may be the best method for treating sinusitis in cases of displaced teeth. Conclusions: OAF is a common cause of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis and may easily be treated by endoscopy and fistula closure. Maxillofacial surgeons and dentists should consider this problem to avoid misdiagnosis and prevent complications. PMID:26756016

  18. Decompression for management of keratocystic odontogenic tumor in the mandible.

    PubMed

    Morais de Melo, Willian; Pereira-Santos, Darklilson; Sonoda, Celso Koogi; Hochuli-Vieira, Eduardo

    2012-11-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) is a benign intraosseous neoplasm of odontogenic origin with high recurrence rate. To date, various conservative or aggressive management strategies have been suggested as a method of treatment. Decompression is a conservative method that has been used in the treatment of large odontogenic cysts. The present paper reports a case of KCOT located in the mandible and discusses the importance of its management using conservative methods. The authors present a case of a 38-year-old patient with a KCOT located in the right mandibular angle and ascending ramus, which was treated by decompression followed by enucleation and curettage. The lesion did not recur during a follow-up period of 3 years after surgery. Preserving important structures of the bone and soft tissue decompression is a method with low morbidity. In addition, according to the literature, decompression has a success rate at least as high as the one of most aggressive treatments. PMID:23172507

  19. Odontogenic calcificant cystic tumor: a report of two clinical cases.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Daniel; Villanueva, Julio; Espinosa, Sebastián; Cornejo, Marco

    2007-03-01

    Odontogenic Calcificant Cystic Tumor (OCCT) is an infrequent injury. It arises from odontogenic epithelial rests present in the maxilla, jaw or gum. Gorlin and col. described the OCCT for first time as an own pathological entity in 1962. Clinically, the OCCT represents 1% of the odontogenic injuries. It is possible to be found from the first decade to the eighth decade. It affects in same proportion the maxilla and the jaw, being the most common in the dented zones, with greater incidence in the first molar area. Two case reports of OCCT in two different ages, both in female individuals, one at 5 years old and the other at 35 years old are presented. Enucleation of the tumor was the treatment chosen. The purpose of this article is to present a review of the literature related to these two cases of OCCT and its treatment, putting an emphasis on its aetiology, biological behaviour and treatment. PMID:17322800

  20. The diagnostic usefulness of immunohistochemistry for odontogenic lesions.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Keith D; Speight, Paul M

    2014-12-01

    The diagnosis of odontogenic tumors can be challenging, largely due to their rarity and consequent difficulties in gaining experience in their assessment. In most cases, careful attention to morphology, in conjunction with clinical and radiological features will allow a diagnosis to be made. However, in some cases, immunohistochemical analysis of the tumor may be useful. In this review we will outline the immunohistochemical expression profile of normal developing odontogenic tissues and a range of odontogenic tumors. In many cases the immunohistochemical markers are neither specific nor sensitive enough to be of help in diagnosis, but in some cases such analysis may prove very useful. Thus we have outlined a limited number of circumstances where immunohistochemistry may be of use to the practicing diagnostic pathologist. PMID:25409846

  1. Intraosseous calcifying epithelial odontogenic (Pindborg) tumor: A rare entity

    PubMed Central

    More, Chandramani B; Vijayvargiya, Ritika

    2015-01-01

    Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT) is a locally aggressive, rare benign odontogenic neoplasm that accounts for <1% of all odontogenic tumors. It was first described by a Dutch pathologist Jens Jorgen Pindborg in 1955. It is most often located in the posterior mandible. The tumor usually appears between the second and sixth decade of life and has no gender predilection. It is slow-growing neoplasm with a recurrence rate of 10–15% and with rare malignant transformation. Early diagnosis is essential to avoid oro-maxillofacial deformation and destruction. CEOT is rarely reported in India. We, herewith present a rare case of CEOT with unusual features associated with an impacted right third molar in the posterior mandible of 35 years male, with an emphasis on clinical, radiographic, histopathology and immunohistochemical features. PMID:26604515

  2. Suspect Odontogenic Infection Etiology for Canine Lymphoplasmacytic Rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Stepaniuk, Kevin S; Gingerich, Wade

    2015-01-01

    The role of odontogenic infection as an etiology for lymphoplasmacytic rhinitis in dogs was evaluated. An association between odontogenic infection and inflammatory rhinitis was identified in 55% of cases evaluated. Odontogenic infection was unlikely or undetermined in 10% and 35% of the cases, respectively. Cases of lymphoplasmacytic rhinitis had roentgen signs associated with endodontic disease, periodontal disease, or retained tooth roots in 60%, 45%, and 25% of the cases, respectively. A collaborative team based approach assessing inflammatory nasal disease is recommended. Based on the history and signalment of the individual patient, diagnostic modalities should be chosen wisely. In some cases, oral examination and intraoral radiographs may be a more direct and cost effective approach for diagnosis and treatment of inflammatory rhinitis. PMID:26197687

  3. Squamous odontogenic tumor-like proliferation in a radicular cyst: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Marco-Molina, Vicente; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2013-01-01

    The squamous odontogenic tumour is a rare benign neoplasm whose aetiology remains unknown. It usually appears in the jaw and its origin could be related to the ephitelial remnants of Malassez. Histologically comprises numerous islets of squamous, non-keratinized, well-differentiated and rounded epithelial cells a fibrous stroma without signs of atypical cells. There is a non-neoplastic lesion with the same histological pattern than the squamous odontogenic tumour. This entity is characterized by squamous odontogenic tumour proliferations isolated into the cyst wall of an odontogenic cyst. It is rare and has a benign behavior. It has been suggested that these epithelial proliferations could be the former expression of the neoplastic form. It is very important to carry out clinical and radiological controls periodically. So far it has not been documented any change towards a squamous odontogenic tumour nor toward malignancy in a squamous odontogenic tumour like proliferation. Key words:Radicular cyst, squamous odontogenic tumour. PMID:24455099

  4. Fate of pulpectomized deciduous teeth: Bilateral odontogenic cyst?

    PubMed

    Sandhyarani, B; Noorani, Hina; Shivaprakash, P K; Dayanand, A Huddar

    2016-01-01

    Pulpectomy is preferably more conservative treatment option than the extraction of deciduous teeth despite few undesirable consequences of obturating materials of which odontogenic cysts are one. This article aims to report a case of an 11-year-old female child having bilateral odontogenic cysts, i.e., radicular and infected dentigerous cyst followed by pulpectomy of deciduous molars using zinc oxide eugenol which was surgically enucleated and followed up to 6 months until satisfactory healing of bone was observed. The article also emphasizes on the importance of regular follow-up of the pulpectomized tooth which can be harmful otherwise. PMID:27307677

  5. Large, expansile odontogenic cyst with bilateral maxillary sinus involvement.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Maxine; Singer, Steven R; Rinaggio, Joseph; Kim, Irene H; Mupparapu, Muralidhar

    2013-03-01

    Residual cysts are common odontogenic lesions of the tooth-bearing areas of the jaws. A case of an unusually large residual cyst that crosses the maxillary midline and occupies portions of the maxillary sinuses is being reported. Investigations included a panoramic radiograph, CT scan and a biopsy. The differential diagnoses were common odontogenic lesions, including cysts and benign tumors. The value of advanced imaging modalities is stressed when determining the presence and extent of lesions in complex structures such as the maxilla. The need to visualize the entire lesion beyond what may be seen on intraoral views, as well as panoramic radiographs, is discussed. PMID:23691727

  6. Fate of pulpectomized deciduous teeth: Bilateral odontogenic cyst?

    PubMed Central

    Sandhyarani, B.; Noorani, Hina; Shivaprakash, P. K.; Dayanand, A. Huddar

    2016-01-01

    Pulpectomy is preferably more conservative treatment option than the extraction of deciduous teeth despite few undesirable consequences of obturating materials of which odontogenic cysts are one. This article aims to report a case of an 11-year-old female child having bilateral odontogenic cysts, i.e., radicular and infected dentigerous cyst followed by pulpectomy of deciduous molars using zinc oxide eugenol which was surgically enucleated and followed up to 6 months until satisfactory healing of bone was observed. The article also emphasizes on the importance of regular follow-up of the pulpectomized tooth which can be harmful otherwise.

  7. Use of decompression tubes in the management of excessively large odontogenic keratocyst.

    PubMed

    Garde, Janardan B; Kulkarni, Adwait Uday; Dadhe, Dattaprasad P; Deshmukh, Vikramsinh B

    2012-01-01

    Odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) is a unique cyst because of its locally aggressive behaviour, high recurrence rate and characteristic histological appearance. A radical surgical approach is commonly advocated with morbid and disfiguring results. This approach also presents several reconstructive obstacles especially in anterior mandible. In this case report the authors present a 25-year-old male patient with a large OKC and treatment with decompression followed by enucleation, and chemical cauterisation. This approach though demanding prolonged treatment time and postoperative follow-up decreases the morbidity to a great extent in a young individual. At the same time, it allows an opportunity for the maxillofacial surgeon to preserve the natural dentition, maintain function and safeguard cosmesis. In our case, the authors effectively achieved all the aforementioned objectives. At the same time a radical option of treatment is still left in the armoury if required at a later date. PMID:22605822

  8. An unusual case of mesenteric ischemia in a patient with cardiac myxoma.

    PubMed

    Pérez Baztarrica, Gabriel; Bornancini, Norberto; Salvaggio, Flavio; Porcile, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Symptoms related to peripheral embolism are experienced in 2%-15% of cases of cardiac myxoma. We present a rare case of a 54-year-old man admitted due to sudden abdominal pain. A computed tomography (CT) scan showed occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA). As the patient's response to support treatment was favorable, a non-invasive approach was adopted, with prescription of oral anticoagulation (OAC) therapy. Transesophageal echocardiography revealed a tumor in the left atrium. The cardiac mass was completely removed and diagnosed as myxoma by histopathological analysis. As periodic CT scans showed progressive improvement of blood flow through the SMA, OAC was continued. OAC may have been beneficial due to the nature of emboli originating from a cardiac myxoma: thrombi covering the surface of the tumor. At present, there is no explanation in the literature for the benefits of OAC in patients with embolism associated with cardiac myxoma. PMID:23890757

  9. Surviving catastrophic disintegration of a large left atrial myxoma: the importance of multi-disciplinary team.

    PubMed

    Habbab, Louay; Alfaraidi, Haifa; Lamy, Andre

    2014-01-01

    Atrial myxomas are the most common primary cardiac tumors, representing ∼50% of all benign cardiac tumors. Patients with a left atrial myxoma (LAM) generally present with symptoms of mechanical obstruction of blood flow, systemic emboli or constitutional symptoms. Embolic complications may occur any time with progression of the tumor; therefore, myxoma is usually considered an indication for urgent surgery. This report describes a patient with mobile large LAM who survived multiple emboli to the brain, spleen, kidneys, abdominal aorta and lower limbs during hospitalization for surgery, illustrating the critical nature of this finding and its possible catastrophic complications and demonstrating the importance of multi-disciplinary team in the decision-making process and the management of such complications and supporting the hypothesis that intravenous thrombolysis may be safely used in the treatment of embolic stroke due to cardiac myxoma. PMID:25217477

  10. Primary Multiple Cardiac Myxomas in a Patient without the Carney Complex.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Shohei; Otsuka, Masato; Goto, Masayuki; Kahata, Mitsuru; Kumagai, Asako; Inoue, Koji; Koganei, Hiroshi; Enta, Kenji; Ishii, Yasuhiro

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac tumors are rare, and multiple myxomas are even rarer. The latter phenomenon is mostly associated with the Carney complex, a dominantly inherited disease characterized by multiple primary cardiac myxomas, endocrinopathy, and spotty pigmentation of the skin. We report the rare case of a patient who did not have the Carney complex but had multiple primary cardiac tumors. A 78-year-old woman with a past history of breast cancer was referred to our hospital for further examination of multiple cardiac tumors. Echocardiography showed 4 tumors in the left atrium and left ventricle. We could not diagnose them preoperatively and decided to resect them surgically because they were mobile and could have caused embolism and obstruction. The postoperative pathological findings of all 4 tumors were myxomas, although the patient did not meet the diagnostic criteria of the Carney complex. Therefore, a rare case of multiple primary cardiac myxomas was diagnosed. PMID:27081449

  11. Primary Multiple Cardiac Myxomas in a Patient without the Carney Complex

    PubMed Central

    Otsuka, Masato; Goto, Masayuki; Kahata, Mitsuru; Kumagai, Asako; Inoue, Koji; Koganei, Hiroshi; Enta, Kenji; Ishii, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac tumors are rare, and multiple myxomas are even rarer. The latter phenomenon is mostly associated with the Carney complex, a dominantly inherited disease characterized by multiple primary cardiac myxomas, endocrinopathy, and spotty pigmentation of the skin. We report the rare case of a patient who did not have the Carney complex but had multiple primary cardiac tumors. A 78-year-old woman with a past history of breast cancer was referred to our hospital for further examination of multiple cardiac tumors. Echocardiography showed 4 tumors in the left atrium and left ventricle. We could not diagnose them preoperatively and decided to resect them surgically because they were mobile and could have caused embolism and obstruction. The postoperative pathological findings of all 4 tumors were myxomas, although the patient did not meet the diagnostic criteria of the Carney complex. Therefore, a rare case of multiple primary cardiac myxomas was diagnosed. PMID:27081449

  12. Myxoma of the upper leg originating from an appendiceal mucinous neoplasm: A case report

    PubMed Central

    LI, JUN; ZHANG, XUE-YAN; WANG, BIN; CAO, QING-YONG

    2015-01-01

    Myxoma is rare in the upper leg. The current study presents the case of a large tumor in the right upper leg. The tumor extended to pelvic cavity and was found to be connected with a cystic and solid neoplasm that was adjacent to the ascending colon in the right lower quadrant. The large tumor of the upper leg had existed for 15 years and had ulcerated through the skin 4 days prior to admittance. Palliative surgery was performed, with histological findings of a myxoma. Since appendiceal mucinous neoplasms may invade organizations outside of the mucous layer of the appendix and cause secondary peritoneal myxoma, this myxoma of the upper leg probably originated from an appendiceal mucinous neoplasm. PMID:26622844

  13. Benign Nerve Sheath Myxoma in an Infant Misdiagnosed as Infantile Digital Fibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Güngör, Şule; Şişman, Servet; Kocaturk, Emek; Oguz Topal, Ilteris; Yıldırım, Selda

    2016-07-01

    Herein we present the case of a 16-month boy, clinically diagnosed with infantile digital fibromatosis, but 9 months after continued growth, the mass was excised and the histopathologic diagnosis was that of a benign nerve sheath myxoma. We present this case to emphasize that nerve sheath myxomas (also known as myxoid neurothekeoma) should be included in the differential diagnosis of dermal nodules in infants. PMID:27196676

  14. Targeting Human Medulloblastoma: Oncolytic Virotherapy with Myxoma Virus Is Enhanced by Rapamycin

    PubMed Central

    Lun, Xue Qing; Zhou, Hongyuan; Alain, Tommy; Sun, Beichen; Wang, Limei; Barrett, John W.; Stanford, Marianne M.; McFadden, Grant; Bell, John; Senger, Donna L.; Forsyth, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    We have shown previously the oncolytic potential of myxoma virus in a murine xenograft model of human glioma. Here, we show that myxoma virus used alone or in combination with rapamycin is effective and safe when used in experimental models of medulloblastoma in vitro and in vivo. Nine of 10 medulloblastoma cell lines tested were susceptible to lethal myxoma virus infection, and pretreatment of cells with rapamycin increased the extent of in vitro oncolysis. Intratumoral injection of live myxoma virus when compared with control inactivated virus prolonged survival in D341 and Daoy orthotopic human medulloblastoma xenograft mouse models [D341 median survival: 21 versus 12.5 days; P = 0.0008; Daoy median survival: not reached (three of five mice apparently “cured” after 223 days) versus 75 days; P = 0.0021]. Rapamycin increased the extent of viral oncolysis, “curing” most Daoy tumor-bearing mice and reducing or eliminating spinal cord and ventricle metastases. Rapamycin enhanced tumor-specific myxoma virus replication in vivo and prolonged survival of D341 tumor-bearing mice (median survival of mice treated with live virus (LV) and rapamycin, versus LV alone, versus rapamycin alone, versus inactivated virus: 25 days versus 19, 13, and 11 days, respectively; P < 0.0001). Rapamycin increased the levels of constitutively activated Akt in Daoy and D341 cells, which may explain its ability to enhance myxoma virus oncolysis. These observations suggest that myxoma virus may be an effective oncolytic agent against medulloblastoma and that combination therapy with signaling inhibitors that modulate activity of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway will further enhance the oncolytic potential of myxoma virus. PMID:17875723

  15. [About a case of a recurrent glandular cardiac myxoma in a child].

    PubMed

    Meurgey, Alexandra; Henaine, Roland; Bouvagnet, Patrice; Chalabreysse, Lara

    2016-06-01

    Primary cardiac tumors are extremely rare and mainly benign. The majority of these are myxomas (40%). Myxoma are generally sporadic tumors which occur most commonly in adult females between 30 and 40 years, and are seldom found in the paediatric population (5%). Seven percent are associated with igenetic diseases. We report the case of an eight-year-old boy presenting a recurrent glandular cardiac myxoma. In 2011, he presented a deterioration of the general state. An echocardiography highlighted a left atrial mass on the interatrial septum, with a pedicular insertion. On the microscope, it consisted of a proliferation of stellate cells isolated or clustered in rudimentary vessels in a myxoid stroma presenting haemorrhage changes. These cells expressed CD34 and calretinine. Glandular elements without atypia were clustered within the myxomatous proliferation. They expressed cytokeratin (CK) 7. Surgical resection was macroscopically complete. In 2014, the boy had a sudden neurological deficit during a football match. An echocardiography revealed a recurrence at the same location. The lesion was excised and addressed in several fragments. Classical myxoma was associated with glands without atypia. This last component expressed CKAE1/AE3 and CK7. Ki67 index of proliferation was low. The surgical reintervention was macroscopically complete. The final diagnosis was glandular cardiac myxoma. A genetic survey was conducted, showing the presence of Carney complex. This is the first description in the litterature of a recurrent glandular cardiac myxoma occuring in a child. PMID:27234518

  16. Ancient cardiac myxomas - another point of view in the light of tetraspanins.

    PubMed

    Lewitowicz, P; Bernaczyk, P; Horecka-Lewitowicz, A; Leszczyńska, U; Reszeć, J; Hirnle, T; Wincewicz, A

    2016-03-01

    Myxomas are the most common non-invasive but life-threatening cardiac neoplasms due to obstruction of heart chambers and risk of embolism in a manner resembling thromboembolism as well. They can occasionally disseminate via their detached fragments into the bloodstream to seed and grow as secondary still benign tumors. In this study we evaluated morphological and clinical aspects of 14 ancient, degenerated left or right-sided cardiac atrial myxomas with expression of CD9 and CD63, which are found to contribute to platelet activation, aggregation and, as a result, intratumoral thrombosis or fragmentation. The appearance of tumors varied from sessile to polypoid revealing that a higher rate of endocardial thrombosis was associated with sessile compared to polypoid myxomas and left-sided tumors compared to right-sided ones in our study. In the general aspect of ancient calcifications, amorphous calcification with intra-tumor thrombosis was noted more frequently in sessile tumors, while well-formed osseous metaplasia was usually a feature of polypoid tumors. In our material osseous metaplasia did not coexist with massive thrombosis and was found in polypoid, pedunculated myxomas. Most importantly, CD9 overexpression was recorded in every studied myxoma and CD63 gave a weak reaction in myxoma cells. PMID:27179277

  17. Antimicrobial Therapy in Management of Odontogenic Infections in General Dentistry.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Curtis J; Pellecchia, Robert

    2016-04-01

    This article focuses on the diagnosis and management of odontogenic infections. Current antibiotic regimens are reviewed and discussed including use of alternative antibiotics with patients known to have a penicillin allergy. Emphasis is made on proper examination of the patient with use of diagnostic aids to provide the correct treatment of choice. PMID:27040298

  18. CT imaging findings of a calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour

    PubMed Central

    Venkateswarlu, M; Geetha, P; Lakshmi Kavitha, N

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour (CEOT), also known as a Pindborg tumour, with local aggressive behaviour. CT imaging showed a large expansile bone-forming lesion in the mandible, which showed the exact extent and nature of the lesion. We briefly discuss the imaging features of CEOT and the relevant literature. PMID:22190756

  19. [The glandular odontogenic cyst--a rare entity].

    PubMed

    Brauer, H U; Manegold-Brauer, G

    2014-05-01

    In this short communication, the very rare glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC) is presented as an independent entity. The GOC is a jawbone cyst of the maxilla and mandible. The typical radiological and histopathological characteristics of the GOC are described. Furthermore, differential diagnoses, current treatment options and the recurrence rates of this of entity are discussed. PMID:24633391

  20. Central odontogenic fibroma of the mandible: A case report with diagnostic considerations

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Angela; Pannone, Giuseppe; Ramaglia, Luca; Bufo, Pantaleo; Lo Muzio, Lorenzo; Saviano, Raffaele

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Odontogenic fibroma (OF), a rare odontogenic tumor of mesodermal origin, has been thought to originate from either dental follicle, periodontal ligament, or dental papilla [1]. Different studies reported high variability in the incidence rate as being between 3 and 23% of all odontogenic tumors [2,3]. OF manifests a dual character at the histopathological examination showing odontogenic epithelial structures mimicking those observed in biopsy of ameloblastoma and, in addition, peculiar fragments of cellular stroma. The clinical and radiological features of OF are similar to other odontogenic and/or non-odontogenic tumours and the differential diagnosis may first occur at fine-needle aspiration biopsy. Presentation of case In the case reported, a young patient showed a localized gingival enlargement involving radiologically the superior margin of the right angle of the mandible and associated with an un-erupted tooth. The morphological characteristics together with clinical and radiologic findings confirmed the tumor to be a central odontogenic fibroma (COF) with secondary gingival involvement. Discussion and conclusion Benign odontogenic tumors may be distinguished from other odontogenic/non-odontogenic neoplasias and from malignant tumours through a cytologic differential diagnosis as treatment differs accordingly. PMID:26793312

  1. Computed tomographic characteristics of odontogenic neoplasms in dogs.

    PubMed

    Amory, Joseph T; Reetz, Jennifer A; Sánchez, Melissa D; Bradley, Charles W; Lewis, John R; Reiter, Alexander M; Mai, Wilfried

    2014-01-01

    Odontogenic neoplasms are locally invasive oral tumors in dogs. The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe CT characteristics for varying histopathologic types of canine odontogenic neoplasms. A board-certified veterinary radiologist who was unaware of histologic findings reviewed and scored imaging studies. A total of 29 dogs were included in the study. Twenty-three of these dogs had concurrent dental radiographs. The most common CT characteristics for all tumor types were a direct association with or in the region of multiple teeth in 96.4% (27/28), contrast enhancement in 96.3% (26/27), alveolar bone lysis in 93.1% (27/29), and mass-associated tooth displacement in 85.2% (23/27). Mass-associated cyst-like structures were identified in 53.6% (15/28) and were only present in tumors containing odontogenic epithelium. Canine acanthomatous ameloblastomas (n = 15) appeared as extra-osseous (10/15) or intra-osseous (5/15) masses. Intra-osseous canine acanthomatous ameloblastomas were more likely to have mass-associated cyst-like structures and were subjectively more aggressive when compared with extra-osseous canine acanthomatous ameloblastomas. Amyloid-producing odontogenic tumors (n = 3) had subjectively uniform CT imaging characteristics and consisted of round soft tissue and mineral attenuating masses with multiple associated cyst-like structures. Fibromatous epulides of periodontal ligament origin (n = 4) were contrast enhancing extra-osseous masses that were rarely referred for CT examinations and 25% (1/4) were not visible with CT. Other odontogenic tumors were less represented or had more variable CT imaging characteristics. Mass-associated tooth destruction was appreciated more often with dental radiographs and extra-oral tumor extension was identified more often with CT. PMID:24102949

  2. PRKAR1A in the development of cardiac myxoma: a study of 110 cases including isolated and syndromic tumors.

    PubMed

    Maleszewski, Joseph J; Larsen, Brandon T; Kip, Nefize Sertac; Castonguay, Mathieu C; Edwards, William D; Carney, J Aidan; Kipp, Benjamin R

    2014-08-01

    Cardiac myxoma usually occurs as a solitary mass, but occasionally develops as part of a familial syndrome, the Carney complex (CNC). Two thirds of CNC-associated cardiac myxomas exhibit mutations in PRKAR1A. PRKAR1A mutations occur in both familial and sporadic forms of CNC but have not been described in isolated (nonsyndromic) cardiac myxomas. A total of 127 consecutive cardiac myxomas surgically resected at Mayo Clinic (1993 to 2011) from 110 individuals were studied. Clinical, radiologic, and pathologic findings were reviewed. Of these, 103 patients had isolated cardiac myxomas, and 7 patients had the tumor as a component of CNC. Age and sex distributions were different for CNC (mean 26 y, range 14 to 44 y, 71% female) and non-CNC (mean 62 y, range 18 to 92 y, 63% female) patients. PRKAR1A immunohistochemical analysis (IHC) was performed, and myxoma cell reactivity was graded semiquantitatively. Bidirectional Sanger sequencing was performed in 3 CNC patients and 29 non-CNC patients, to test for the presence of mutations in all coding regions and intron/exon boundaries of the PRKAR1A gene. IHC staining showed that all 7 CNC cases lacked PRKAR1A antigenicity and that 33 (32%) isolated cardiac myxomas were similarly nonreactive. Of tumors subjected to sequencing analysis, 2 (67%) CNC myxomas and 9 (31%) non-CNC myxomas had pathogenic PRKAR1A mutations. No germline mutations were found in 4 non-CNC cases tested. PRKAR1A appears to play a role in the development of both syndromic and nonsyndromic cardiac myxomas. Routine IHC evaluation of cardiac myxomas for PRKAR1A expression may be useful in excluding a diagnosis of CNC. PMID:24618615

  3. Right atrial myxoma mistaken for recurrent pulmonary thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Jardine, D; Lamont, D

    1997-01-01

    A 69 year old man was admitted for investigation of right sided pleuritic chest pain and dyspnoea, both of which began suddenly four days before admission. Acute pulmonary embolism was diagnosed. Six months after discharge while on warfarin he died. Necropsy found a 50 mm diameter myxoid tumour arising on the right atrial side of the interatrial septum. This lesion may have been discovered earlier by echocardiography although there were no clear indications for this investigation. Presentation was that of recurrent pulmonary embolism with no obvious source or cause of thrombosis. Patients who are thought to have idiopathic pulmonary embolism should undergo early echocardiography to exclude the rare but treatable diseases of the right heart that may be responsible

 Keywords: atrial myxoma PMID:9415015

  4. Primary intraosseous squamous cell carcinoma in odontogenic keratocyst: A rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Chitrapriya; Aggarwal, Pooja; Wadhwan, Vijay; Bansal, Vishal

    2015-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) arising from the wall of an odontogenic cyst (also known as primary intraosseous carcinoma) is a rare tumor which occurs only in jaw bones. This tumor was first described by Loos in 1913 as a central epidermoid carcinoma of the jaw. Primary intraosseous carcinomas (PIOC) may theoretically arise from the lining of an odontogenic cyst or de novo from presumed odontogenic cell rests. According to the new histological classification of tumors of the World Health Organization, odontogenic keratocyst is nowadays considered a specific odontogenic tumor and the PIOC derived from it is considered as a specific entity which is different from other PIOCs derived from the odontogenic cysts. The following report describes a case of such extremely rare entity that is primary intraosseous SCC of the mandible derived from an OKC in a 60-year-old male patient with brief review of literature. PMID:26980976

  5. Current Management of Atrial Myxoma with Emphasis on a New Diagnostic Technique

    PubMed Central

    Donahoo, James S.; Weiss, James L.; Gardner, Timothy J.; Fortuin, Nicholas J.; Brawley, Robert K.

    1979-01-01

    Sixteen patients aged 22-64 years have undergone removal of atrial myxoma at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. The first two patients had myxomas removed by closed surgical approach, and both died. Fourteen consecutive patients have undergone operation with the aid of cardiopulmonary bypass, and all survived. There has been one late death unrelated to myxoma. Current surgical approach is excision of the tumor and its stalk or base and resection of the portion of intra-atrial septum to ensure complete removal. Recently a new diagnostic technique of two-dimensional phased array real time echocardiography has been used in four patients, including a pregnant woman, to confirm the clinical diagnosis of atrial myxoma. This technique provides a two-dimensional view of both atria and ventricles in cross section or sagittal view. This noninvasive method is painless, is independent of cardiac function and carries no risk or radiation hazard. The two-dimensional echocardiogram is superior to the standard one-dimensional or M-mode echocardiogram for diagnosis of myxoma in that it can evaluate simultaneously both right and left atria, can detect smaller space-occupying lesions because of better resolution and can more readily determine the size of the lesion and its stalk, can evaluate the mobility of the tumor and can determine more accurately the extent of tumor obstruction. Because of these qualities, we have relied on two-dimensional echocardiography as the definitive diagnostic procedure for detection of atrial myxoma. Currently operation for atrial myxoma is performed without cardiac catheterization or angiocardiography. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4.Fig. 5.Fig. 6. PMID:556184

  6. [A case of the calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (Pindborg's tumor). Reported and literature review].

    PubMed

    Peña-Torres, Leandro Miguel; Monterrubio-Guerrero, Alejandro; Díaz de León-Sandoval, Laura Alejandra

    2010-01-01

    The calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor known as Pindborg's tumor, is a rare odontogenic neoplasm of the jaws. One of their characteristics is the cortical expansion and the relationship with a non erupted tooth. Since the original description in 1955, only 200 cases approximately have been described in the world literature. This article reviews the literature and describes a case of patient who presented calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor in the jaw undergoing surgical excision treatment with an evolution without complications. PMID:20929626

  7. Squamous Odontogenic Tumor: Literature Review Focusing on the Radiographic Features and Differential Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Mardones, Nilson do Rosário; Gamba, Thiago de Oliveira; Flores, Isadora Luana; de Almeida, Solange Maria; Lopes, Sérgio Lúcio Pereira de Castro

    2015-01-01

    Since its first publication in 1975, the squamous odontogenic tumor remains the rarest odontogenic lesion, with around 50 cases in the English-language literature in which the microscopic characteristics are frequently very well demonstrated. However, articles which discuss the radiographic aspects are scarce, especially with emphasis on the differential diagnosis. The present treatise proposes an assessment of jaw lesions with the same radiographic characteristics of the squamous odontogenic tumor to clarify the main findings for dental clinicians during routine diagnosis. PMID:26140060

  8. Fibromatous epulis in dogs and peripheral odontogenic fibroma in human beings: two equivalent lesions.

    PubMed

    Gardner, D G; Baker, D C

    1991-03-01

    This article compares the clinical and histopathologic features of the peripheral odontogenic fibroma in human beings and the fibromatous epulis in dogs. They are apparently equivalent lesions. Both are odontogenic tumors of limited growth potential that do not recur if adequately excised; both occur in middle and late adulthood of the species concerned. The one difference is that the peripheral odontogenic fibroma is a rare condition, whereas the canine fibromatous epulis is common. PMID:2011354

  9. Surgical management of peripheral variant of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor: A rare case report with review

    PubMed Central

    Jindwani, Karuna; Paharia, Y. K.; Kushwah, Atul Pratap Singh

    2015-01-01

    The adenomatoid odontogenic tumour (AOT) is a relatively uncommon lesion constituting around 3% of all odontogenic tumours and often misdiagnosed as an odontogenic cyst. It manifests as a beningn growth which affects young individuals, with a female predeliction usually in the second decade of life, exhibiting more often in the anterior region of maxilla. The current article enumerates the clinical, radiographic and histopathological features of a rare case of extraosseous AOT with its therapeutic consideration PMID:25684929

  10. Monosotic fibrous dysplasia and solitary intramuscular myxoma of the head and neck: A unique presentation of Mazabraud's syndrome and a literature review

    PubMed Central

    FU, SHUITING; TIAN, ZHUOWEI; ZHANG, CHENPING; HE, YUE

    2015-01-01

    Mazabraud's syndrome (MS) is a rare disease that is a combination of fibrous dysplasia and intramuscular myxomas. MS is a benign lesion and there is little data on the disease due to its low incidence. In the present study, the case of a 38-year-old patient who presented with a soft-tissue mass involving the masseter and swelling at the mandibular body and mandibular ramus is reported. Since the mandible is an important aesthetic and functional organ in the oral and maxillofacial region, surgery was primarily aimed at resecting the tumor, with good safety margins, and reconstructing the resultant defect. The lesions were pathologically diagnosed as MS. The unique features of this case included the painless and monostotic fibrous dysplasia, the solitary intramuscular myxomas involving the jaw and the male gender of the patient. MS usually occurs in the lower extremities, with an unusual predilection for the right limb; however, it rarely occurs in the head and neck region. A retrospective analysis of the clinical features and management of MS was also performed in the present study, together with a literature review. From the literature, it was concluded that the incidence of MS is ~2.3-fold greater in female patients than in male patients, and that the age of onset of MS ranges between 17 and 82 years, with an average age of 46.25 years. PMID:26722294

  11. A study of 1177 odontogenic lesions in a South Kerala population

    PubMed Central

    Deepthi, PV; Beena, VT; Padmakumar, SK; Rajeev, R; Sivakumar, R

    2016-01-01

    Context: A study on odontogenic cysts and tumors. Aims: The aim of this study is to determine the frequency of odontogenic cysts and tumors and their distribution according to age, gender, site and histopathologic types of those reported over a period of 1998–2012 in a Tertiary Health Care Center at South Kerala. Settings and Design: The archives of Department of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, were retrospectively analyzed. Subjects and Methods: Archival records were reviewed and all the cases of odontogenic cysts and tumors were retrieved from 1998 to 2012. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive statistical analysis was performed using the computer software, Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) IBM SPSS Software version 16. Results: Of 7117 oral biopsies, 4.29% were odontogenic tumors. Ameloblastoma was the most common odontogenic tumor comprising 50.2% of cases, followed by keratocystic odontogenic tumor (24.3%). These tumors showed a male predilection (1.19: 1). Odontogenic tumors occurred in a mean age of 33.7 ± 16.8 years. Mandible was the most common jaw affected (76.07%). Odontogenic cysts constituted 12.25% of all oral biopsies. Radicular cyst comprised 75.11% of odontogenic cysts followed by dentigerous cyst (17.2%). Conclusions: This study showed similar as well as contradictory results compared to other studies, probably due to geographical and ethnic variations which is yet to be corroborated. PMID:27601809

  12. Host-specificity of myxoma virus: Pathogenesis of South American and North American strains of myxoma virus in two North American lagomorph species.

    PubMed

    Silvers, L; Barnard, D; Knowlton, F; Inglis, B; Labudovic, A; Holland, M K; Janssens, P A; van Leeuwen, B H; Kerr, P J

    2010-03-24

    The pathogenesis of South American and North American myxoma viruses was examined in two species of North American lagomorphs, Sylvilagus nuttallii (mountain cottontail) and Sylvilagus audubonii (desert cottontail) both of which have been shown to have the potential to transmit the South American type of myxoma virus. Following infection with the South American strain (Lausanne, Lu), S. nuttallii developed both a local lesion and secondary lesions on the skin. They did not develop the classical myxomatosis seen in European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus). The infection at the inoculation site did not resolve during the 20-day time course of the trial and contained transmissible virus titres at all times. In contrast, S. audubonii infected with Lu had very few signs of disseminated infection and partially controlled virus replication at the inoculation site. The prototype Californian strain of myxoma virus (MSW) was able to replicate at the inoculation site of both species but did not induce clinical signs of a disseminated infection. In S. audubonii, there was a rapid response to MSW characterised by a massive T lymphocyte infiltration of the inoculation site by day 5. MSW did not reach transmissible titres at the inoculation site in either species. This might explain why the Californian myxoma virus has not expanded its host-range in North America. PMID:19836172

  13. Isolated Myxoma in the External Auditory Canal of a 10-Year-Old Girl.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Hee; Jeong, Su Hee; Kim, Hojong; Shin, Eunhye

    2015-12-01

    Myxoma is a benign connective tissue tumor that is most commonly found in the heart. Because myxoma of the external ear is extremely rare, its diagnosis may be easily delayed or it may be misdiagnosed as another disease. Moreover, because it can be a part of Carney complex (autosomal dominant syndrome), its correct diagnosis is very important. We experienced a 10-year-old girl who had a mass on the posterior surface of the tragus at the entrance of the left ear canal. Fine-needle aspiration revealed mucoid content of the cystic mass, but its cytology did not confirm the diagnosis. The whole mass was surgically removed, and the diagnosis was confirmed as myxoma with a stellate spindle cell proliferation in the hypocellular matrix. Thorough examination failed to determine any presentation of Carney complex, and her final diagnosis was isolated myxoma of the external auditory canal. This is the first reported study regarding myxoma of the external auditory canal in the Korean literature. PMID:26915162

  14. Effective mechanical thrombectomy in a patient with hyperacute ischemic stroke associated with cardiac myxoma.

    PubMed

    Baek, Seol-Hee; Park, Soonchan; Lee, Nam Joon; Kang, Youngjin; Cho, Kyung-Hee

    2014-10-01

    Ischemic stroke is the most common neurologic manifestation of cardiac myxoma. However, there has been no current guideline on the treatment of hyperacute ischemic stroke due to cardiac myxoma. We describe a patient with hyperacute stroke caused by cardiac myxoma who had a good outcome with rapid recanalization through mechanical thrombectomy. A 46-year-old man was admitted with acute symptoms of right side hemiplegia and global aphasia. Brain computed tomography (CT) angiography showed a T occlusion of the left internal carotid artery. Intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator was administered. However, his clinical symptoms did not improve. Thus, we performed endovascular treatment and had a successful outcome. A pathologic examination of the retrieved clot revealed a tumor emboli from a cardiac myxoma. Transthoracic echocardiogram revealed a left atrial myxoma in which a large mass was attached to the posterior wall of the aorta. The patient's neurologic deficits recovered with the exception of left eye blindness. Reperfusion therapy with mechanical thrombectomy might be safe and effective for the rapid revascularization of large vessel occlusions in hyperacute ischemic stroke, from which the tumor thrombi can be retrieved. PMID:25174564

  15. Recurrent Glandular Odontogenic Cyst of Maxilla- A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Jafarian, Amir Hosein; Rahpeyma, Amin; Khajehahmadi, Saeedeh

    2015-01-01

    The glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC) is a rare lesion with odontogenic origin. It shows a propensity for recurrence revealed in 30% of all case. This investigation reports a case of recurrent GOC in a 35-year-old female in the anterior region of the maxilla, which is uncommon and discusses about IHC finding, surgical methods, and differential diagnosis. Under general anesthesia, peripheral bone ostectomy via large round bur for removal of remaining epithelium of the cyst wall was done. Finally liquid nitrogen was used to remaining bone. This article recommends that soft tissue adjacent to the cortical bone perforation should be excised, as well as peripheral bone ostectomy by large round bur for removal of remaining epithelium of the cyst and liquid nitrogen application to the bony cavity. Because of high recurrence rate of the lesion close follow up of the patients is needed. PMID:26351478

  16. Carnoy's solution in the mangement of odontogenic keratocyst

    PubMed Central

    Sivanmalai, Sivaraj; Kandhasamy, Kohila; Prabu, Neetika; Prince, Christo Naveen; Prabu, Chandrakala Shekarappa Annapurna Pannaikadu Somasundaram

    2012-01-01

    Carnoy's solution is a substance used as a complementary treatment after the conservative excision of odontogenic keratocyst. The application of Carnoy's solution promotes a superficial chemical necrosis and is intended to reduce recurrence rates. However, the inferior alveolar vascular–nervous plexus can occasionally be exposed after the removal of a lesion. The safety of the application of Carnoy's solution over this plexus has been reported, but to date, no clinical report has been made. The authors present a case that was given Carnoy's solution over the inferior alveolar vascular–nervous plexus as a complementary treatment for the keratocystic odontogenic tumor. Effective control of recurrence with low and transient neural morbidity was suggested with this technique. PMID:23066248

  17. Carnoy's solution in the mangement of odontogenic keratocyst.

    PubMed

    Sivanmalai, Sivaraj; Kandhasamy, Kohila; Prabu, Neetika; Prince, Christo Naveen; Prabu, Chandrakala Shekarappa Annapurna Pannaikadu Somasundaram

    2012-08-01

    Carnoy's solution is a substance used as a complementary treatment after the conservative excision of odontogenic keratocyst. The application of Carnoy's solution promotes a superficial chemical necrosis and is intended to reduce recurrence rates. However, the inferior alveolar vascular-nervous plexus can occasionally be exposed after the removal of a lesion. The safety of the application of Carnoy's solution over this plexus has been reported, but to date, no clinical report has been made. The authors present a case that was given Carnoy's solution over the inferior alveolar vascular-nervous plexus as a complementary treatment for the keratocystic odontogenic tumor. Effective control of recurrence with low and transient neural morbidity was suggested with this technique. PMID:23066248

  18. Minor trauma triggering cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis from odontogenic abscess.

    PubMed

    Jain, Shraddha; Nagpure, Prakash S; Singh, Roohie; Garg, Deepika

    2008-07-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) of the face and neck is a very rare complication of dental infection. Otolaryngologists and dentists should be familiar with this condition because of its similarity to odontogenic deep neck space infection in the initial stages, its rapid spread, and its life-threatening potential. Trauma has been reported to be an important predisposing factor for NF of the face. In this paper, we describe the presentation and treatment of a 62-year-old man who developed NF of the face and neck following bilateral odontogenic deep neck space abscesses. The disease progressed rapidly, with necrosis of the skin, after the patient inflicted minor trauma in the form of application of heated medicinal leaves. The organism isolated in culture from pus was Acinetobacter sp. The comorbid conditions in our patient were anemia and chronic alcoholism. The patient was managed by immediate and repeated extensive debridements and split-skin grafting. PMID:19561990

  19. Orthokeratinized Odontogenic Cyst (OOC) of Condylar Head: A Rare Entity.

    PubMed

    Managutti, Anil; Managutti, Sunita; Patel, Harsh; Menat, Shailesh

    2016-07-01

    Orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst (OOC) is a rare developmental jaw cyst, considered as distinct entity from odontogenic keratocysts as it exhibits a less aggressive behaviour and a very low rate of recurrence. Most commonly occurs in mandibular molar and ramus region, rarely seen in maxilla and mandibular premolar area. But till now never reported in condyle, this article describes a case of OOC involving the mandibular condylar head in a 41-year-old male. The initial clinical diagnosis was given as TMD based on the clinical features, but radiographic evaluation revealed osteolytic lesion in right side condylar head. Condylotomy was performed and the specimen was sent for histopathological examination. A definite diagnosis of OOC was made by histopathological examination of the biopsy specimen. We report a rare entity in this article with its management. PMID:27408460

  20. Central Cemento-Ossifying Fibroma: Primary Odontogenic or Osseous Neoplasm?

    PubMed

    Woo, Sook-Bin

    2015-12-01

    Currently, central cemento-ossifying fibroma is classified by the World Health Organization as a primary bone-forming tumor of the jaws. However, histopathologically, it is often indistinguishable from cemento-osseous dysplasias in that it forms osteoid and cementicles (cementum droplets) in varying proportions. It is believed that pluripotent cells within the periodontal membrane can be stimulated to produce either osteoid or woven bone and cementicles when stimulated. If this is true, cemento-ossifying fibroma would be better classified as a primary odontogenic neoplasm arising from the periodontal ligament. Cemento-ossifying fibromas also do not occur in the long bones. The present report compares several entities that fall within the diagnostic realm of benign fibro-osseous lesions and reviews the evidence for reclassifying central cemento-ossifying fibroma as a primary odontogenic neoplasm. PMID:26608158

  1. Mixed odontogenic tumour with dentinoid and ghost cells.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pavan; Jayam, Cheranjeevi; Patil, Shruthi; Zingade, Jyoti

    2015-01-01

    Ameloblastomas do not generally show evidence of induction, however, rare cases associated with odontome have been reported and are referred to as odontoameloblastomas. We report an unusual case of an ameloblastoma with features of an adenomatoid odontogenic tumour, showing evidence of induction of dentinoid by tumour cells--but without concomitant formation of enamel--and with features of ghost cells. The lesion occurred on the left side of the maxilla in a 31-year-old woman. PMID:26698201

  2. Targeting the sonic hedgehog pathway in keratocystic odontogenic tumor.

    PubMed

    Ren, Changchun; Amm, Hope M; DeVilliers, Patricia; Wu, Yixin; Deatherage, Joseph R; Liu, Zhongyu; MacDougall, Mary

    2012-08-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOT) may occur sporadically or associated with the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. It is a benign aggressive tumor of odontogenic epithelial origin with a high rate of recurrence. A primary human keratocystic odontogenic tumor cell population, KCOT-1, has been established from a tumor explant culture. The KCOT-1 cells were characterized by growth rate, gene expression profiles of major tooth enamel matrix proteins (EMPs), amelogenin (AMELX), enamelin (ENAM), ameloblastin (AMBN), amelotin (AMTN), tumor-related proteins enamelysin (MMP-20), kallikrein-4 (KLK-4), and odontogenic ameloblast-associated protein (ODAM) using quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Cytokeratin 14 (CK14) was examined by immunohistochemistry. In addition, expression of the members of the sonic hedgehog (SHH) pathway, SHH, patched (PTCH-1), smoothened (SMO), GLI-1, and GLI-2 and of the NOTCH signaling pathway, NOTCH-1, NOTCH-2, NOTCH-3, JAG-2 (Jagged-2), and Delta-like-1 (DLL-1) were evaluated. KCOT-1 cells were treated with SMO antagonist cyclopamine. We found that cyclopamine significantly arrested the growth of KCOT-1 cells in a dose-dependent manner and that the effects of cyclopamine were abolished by adding SHH protein. The protein expression of the SHH pathway was down-regulated by cyclopamine, further confirming that cyclopamine inhibits the SHH signaling pathway; SHH down-regulation correlated with the down-regulation of the NOTCH signaling pathway as well. In conclusion, using an established KCOT-1 cell population, we characterized the gene expression profiles related to the EMPs, SHH, and NOTCH signaling pathway and confirmed that cyclopamine significantly arrested the growth of KCOT-1 cells and may be a viable agent as a novel therapeutic. PMID:22679015

  3. Classification of odontogenic cysts and tumors – Antecedents

    PubMed Central

    Imran, Aesha; Jayanthi, P; Tanveer, Shahela; Gobu, Sreeja C

    2016-01-01

    Pierre Paul Broca produced a monograph on tumor classification which also included the classification of odontogenic tumors (OTs). The terminology used to describe malignant epithelial OTs has varied since the World Health Organization published the initial consensus on the taxonomy of OTs. Minor changes were introduced in the second edition. It is only in the very recent years that additional knowledge has accumulated and refined the classification. This review emphasizes on reasons for modification by each author and the recent acceptance. PMID:27601821

  4. Immunohistochemical Assessment of HER3 Expression in Odontogenic Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Honarmand, Marieh; Saravani, Shirin; Kamyab, Nazanin; Jahantigh, Mehdi; Torabi Parizi, Molouk

    2015-01-01

    Background: It has been demonstrated that HER3 plays an important role in some human cancers and the HER3 expression is associated with worse survival in solid tumors. Objectives: This study was conducted to compare HER3 expression in epithelial lining of radicular cysts (RCs), dentigerous cysts (DCs) and odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs). Materials and Methods: This was a descriptive-analytical study, which assessed all 57 paraffin blocks of RCs, DCs and OKCs (21 RCs, 16 DCs, 20 OKC) from pathological archive of Dentistry College of Zahedan, Iran. The HER3 expression in cytoplasm and membrane was examined by immunohistochemical method. The data collected was analyzed using SPSS16 by ANOVA and Chi-square. P < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: The HER3 expression had positive results in 52.4% of OKC, 50% of DC and only 20% of RC samples. There was a significant difference between HER3 expression in OKCs and RCs. Conclusions: The HER3 expression in developmental odontogenic cysts was higher than that in inflammatory odontogenic cysts. The higher rate of HER3 expression in OKC may justify inherent growth potential, stimulation-independent proliferation capability, invasive growth and high recurrence rate of the cyst accepted today as a tumor. PMID:26734469

  5. Mandibular adenomatoid odontogenic tumor: Radiographic and pathologic correlation

    PubMed Central

    More, Chandramani B.; Das, Sunanda; Gupta, Swati; Bhavsar, Khushbu

    2013-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is a rare tumor of epithelial origin comprising 3% of all the odontogenic tumors. It is a benign, painless, noninvasive, and slow-growing lesion, with a relative frequency of 2.2-13% and often misdiagnosed as an odontogenic cyst on clinical examination. AOT affects young individuals with a female predominance, occurs mainly in the second decade, and usually surrounds the crown of unerupted teeth. This lesion is most commonly located in the anterior maxilla and rarely in the mandible. It is usually associated with an impacted canine. AOT frequently resembles lesions like dentigerous cyst or ameloblastoma. AOT has three variants, follicular, extrafollicular, and peripheral. The intraoral periapical radiograph is the best radiograph to show radiopacities in AOT as discrete foci having a flocculent pattern within radiolucency even with minimal calcified deposits. These calcified deposits are seen in approximately 78% of the lesions. Herewith, we present the report of four unusual cases of AOT located in the mandible, with an emphasis on radiographic findings and on pathologic correlation, and on reviewing the existing literature on this tumor. PMID:24082751

  6. The adenomatoid odontogenic tumour: an update of selected issues.

    PubMed

    Philipsen, Hans Peter; Khongkhunthiang, Pathawee; Reichart, Peter A

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this update was to present the recent notable progress within remaining questions relating to the adenomatoid odontogenic tumour (AOT). Selected issues that were studied included the following: (i) AOT history and terminology, (ii) the so-called peripheral AOT, (iii) AOT and the gubernaculum dentis and (iv) the so-called adenomatoid odontogenic cyst (AOC). The earliest irrefutable European case of AOT was described in 1915 by Harbitz as 'cystic adamantoma'. Recently, Ide et al. have traced two Japanese cases with irrefutable proof described by Nakayama in 1903. The so-called peripheral (gingival) variant of AOT seems to cover a dual pathogenesis, both an 'erupted intraosseous' and an 'extraosseous' (gingival) one. In 1992, we theorized that the generally unnoticed gubernaculum dentis (cord and canal) seems to be involved in the development of AOT. Ide et al. have concluded that the dental lamina in the gubernacular cord seems to be an embryonic source of the vast majority of AOTs. The suggestion by Marx and Stern to change the nomenclature of AOT to adenomatoid odontogenic cyst (AOC) is critically discussed. The present authors agree on the background of the work of several groups of researchers and WHO/IARC classifications that the biology of the follicular variant of AOT is already fully explained and does not make room for any change in diagnostic terms. Further, there is no reason to change terminology in this case where improvements or conditions to better clinical management are not an issue. PMID:26865435

  7. The role of stroma in the expansion of odontogenic cysts and adenomatoid odontogenic tumor: A polarized microscopy study

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Aarti M.; Mahajan, Mahendra C.; Ganvir, S. M.; Hazarey, V. K.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the polarization colors of collagen fibers of odontogenic keratocyst (OKC), radicular cyst, dentigerous cyst, and adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) with reference to their biological behavior. Study Design: Twenty cases each of OKC, radicular cyst, dentigerous cyst, and AOT were stained with picrosirius red stain and studied under polarized light. Results: A predominance of green to greenish yellow thick fibers was noted in OKC and AOT as compared to dentigerous cyst and radicular cyst. There was no significant difference between the polarization colors of the thin fibers in all the three groups. Conclusion: The stroma of OKC and AOT consists of poorly packed or pathologic collagen and plays a role in its neoplastic behavior. PMID:24082724

  8. Intravenous thrombolysis in a patient with left atrial myxoma with acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Girish Baburao; Yadav, Ravi; Mustare, Veerendrakumar; Modi, Sailesh

    2014-01-01

    Intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) is an accepted therapy in patients with acute ischemic stroke presenting within 3-4.5 hours of symptom onset. Selection of the patient for thrombolysis depends on the careful assessment for the risk of post thrombolysis symptomatic haemorrhage (6.2-8.9%) which may be fatal. Atrial myxomas which are the commonest tumors of the heart are associated with stroke due to tumor/clot embolism. There are very few case reports of IVT and its outcome in patients with atrial myxoma with stroke. Some have reported successful thrombolysis, while others have reported intracerebral bleeding. In this report we describe our experience of IVT in atrial myxoma patient with ischemic stroke and review the relevant literature. PMID:25506173

  9. Left atrial myxoma: new perspectives in the diagnosis of murmur free cases.

    PubMed Central

    Nihoyannopoulos, P; Venkatesan, P; David, J; Hackett, D; Valantine, H; Oakley, C M

    1986-01-01

    No cardiological signs or symptoms were seen in three patients with left atrial myxomas. The diagnosis was established by cross sectional echocardiography. In two patients this investigation was performed to exclude a cardiac source of systemic emboli. The third patient had constitutional signs only. All three had raised erythrocyte sedimentation rates and C reactive protein concentrations. In two patients the myxomas were successfully excised; the third patient who had presented with massive peripheral and central embolisation died during emergency operation. Cross sectional echocardiography is the technique of choice for detecting atrial myxomas and the absence of the cardiological signs should not preclude referral for diagnostic echocardiography. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3 Fig 4 Fig 5 Fig 6 PMID:3801247

  10. Genome sequence of SG33 strain and recombination between wild-type and vaccine myxoma viruses.

    PubMed

    Camus-Bouclainville, Christelle; Gretillat, Magalie; Py, Robert; Gelfi, Jacqueline; Guérin, Jean Luc; Bertagnoli, Stéphane

    2011-04-01

    Myxomatosis in Europe is the result of the release of a South America strain of myxoma virus in 1952. Several attenuated strains with origins in South America or California have since been used as vaccines in the rabbit industry. We sequenced the genome of the SG33 myxoma virus vaccine strain and compared it with those of other myxoma virus strains. We show that SG33 genome carries a large deletion in its right end. Furthermore, our data strongly suggest that the virus isolate from which SG33 is derived results from an in vivo recombination between a wild-type South America (Lausanne) strain and a California MSD-derived strain. These findings raise questions about the use of insufficiently attenuated virus in vaccination. PMID:21470452

  11. Single-Stage Minimally Invasive Surgery for Synchronous Primary Pulmonary Adenocarcinoma and Left Atrial Myxoma.

    PubMed

    van der Merwe, Johan; Beelen, Roel; Martens, Sebastiaan; Van Praet, Frank

    2015-12-01

    We report the first successful short-term outcome of single-stage combined video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery lobectomy and port access surgery in a patient with operable primary right lower lobe adenocarcinoma and a synchronous cardiac myxoma. The video-assisted thoracic surgery right lower lobectomy with systematic lymph node dissection was performed first, followed by myxoma excision by port access surgery through the same working port incision. The histopathologic analysis confirmed a pT2a N0 M0 R0 (TNM 7th edition) primary poorly differentiated pulmonary adenocarcinoma and a completely excised cardiac myxoma. Postoperative recovery was uneventful, and follow-up at 6 weeks confirmed an excellent surgical and oncologic outcome. PMID:26652533

  12. Mitral valve regurgitation due to annular dilatation caused by a huge and floating left atrial myxoma

    PubMed Central

    Ersoy, Burak; Yeniterzi, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of mitral valve annular dilatation caused by a huge left atrial myxoma obstructing the mitral valve orifice. A 50-year-old man presenting with palpitation was found to have a huge left atrial myxoma protruding into the left ventricle during diastole, causing severe mitral regurgitation. The diagnosis was made with echocardiogram. Transoesophageal echocardiography revealed a solid mass of 75 × 55 mm. During operation, the myxoma was completely removed from its attachment in the atrium. We preferred to place a mechanical heart valve after an annuloplasty ring because of severely dilated mitral annulus and chordae elongation. The patient had an uneventful recovery. Our case suggests that immediate surgery, careful evaluation of mitral valve annulus preoperatively is recommended. PMID:26702283

  13. Myxoma of the ear lobe in a 23-month-old girl with Carney complex.

    PubMed

    Briassoulis, George; Quezado, Martha; Lee, Chyi-Chia Richard; Xekouki, Paraskevi; Keil, Meg; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2012-01-01

    Myxomas of the ear are extremely uncommon, especially in young children. A 23-month-old girl born to a family with known Carney complex, a condition that predisposes to multiple myxomas, presented with a large, cauliflower-like mass located on the back of her right ear. Histopathologically, the lesion was composed of scattered spindle-shaped or stellate cells with abundant associated mucin and a very sparse inflammatory infiltrate containing lymphocytes and neutrophils. The patient was a carrier of a protein kinase A regulatory subunit 1A (PRKAR1A) mutation; PRKAR1A mutations cause Carney complex in most patients with this rare disorder. This is the earliest presentation of an ear lobe myxoma reported in the literature. PMID:21880053

  14. Peripheral Tumor with Osteodentin and Cementum-like Material in an Infant: Odontogenic Hamartoma or Odontoma?

    PubMed

    Sfakianou, Aikaterini; Emmanouil, Dimitris E; Tosios, Konstantinos I; Sklavounou, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe a peripheral tumor on the mandibular alveolar ridge of a seven-month-old Caucasian boy, consisting of ectomesencymal odontogenic tissues, in particular osteodentin and cementum-like material, in a cellular or loose vascular connective tissue stroma. This case may be considered either a peripheral odontogenic hamartoma or a peripheral odontoma. PMID:27098720

  15. Bi-atrial myxomas presenting as recurrent pulmonary emboli in a girl.

    PubMed Central

    Hanly, J.; de Buitleir, M.; Shaw, K.; Maurer, B.; FitzGerald, M. X.

    1984-01-01

    A 14-year-old girl whose sole presenting features were symptoms of pulmonary embolism, was found to have bi-atrial myxomas. The diagnosis was made preoperatively, and the patient had a successful outcome following elective surgery. The absence of other features such as systemic embolism, atrioventricular valvular obstruction, fever and constitutional symptoms makes this a most unusual case. Right atrial myxoma should be considered in any patient presenting with pulmonary embolism for which there is no obvious source. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:6709549

  16. Development and validation of a Myxoma virus real-time polymerase chain reaction assay.

    PubMed

    Albini, Sarah; Sigrist, Brigitte; Güttinger, Regula; Schelling, Claude; Hoop, Richard K; Vögtlin, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    To aid in the rapid diagnosis of myxomatosis in rabbits, a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the specific detection of Myxoma virus is described. Primers and probe were designed to amplify a 147-bp fragment within the Serp2 gene. The assay was able to detect 23 copies of a synthesized oligo indicating a reliable sensitivity. In addition, the real-time PCR did not detect the Rabbit fibroma virus used in myxomatosis vaccines. The novel PCR was shown to be able to detect Myxoma virus in fresh and paraffin-embedded rabbit tissues originating from myxomatosis cases from various regions in Switzerland. PMID:22362943

  17. The prevention of circulatory collapse in left atrial myxoma or left atrail thrombus patients.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jie; Ding, Zhengnian

    2016-05-01

    Some patients with myxoma or thrombus may develop to severe hypotension or sudden death. In this article, we hypothesize a clinical scenario that when the myxoma or thrombus blocks in the mitral valve and causes significant hypotension during anesthesia or surgery. Increasing cardiac preload will be an effective preventive method to increasing the mitral valve annulus and decreasing the severity of stenosis, as a result it will prevent circulatory collapse. Our hypothesis will decrease the possibility of lethal mitral valve stenosis induced by left atrial mass blocking the mitral valve area. In addition, we should also maintain a relative slow heart rate and a relative high systemic vascular resistance. PMID:27063074

  18. Coincidence of congenital infiltrative facial lipoma and lingual myxoma in a newborn Holstein calf.

    PubMed

    Hobbenaghi, R; Dalir-Naghadeh, B; Nazarizadeh, A

    2015-01-01

    A one-day-old male Holstein calf was presented with a palpable subcutaneous mass, extending from the parotid to the orbital region, involving the entire right side of the face and a large flabby mass without any evidence of inflammation or edema on the tongue. Macroscopically, the cut surface of the lingual mass appeared slightly lobulated, pink, with a mucoid appearance and gelatinous consistency. Histopathological examination confirmed the infiltrative subcutaneous lipoma and lingual myxoma evidenced by low cellularity and abundant basophilic, mucinous stroma. In this report, clinical and detailed histhopathological findings of congenital infiltrative myxoma and its coincidence with infiltrative facial lipoma is reported in a newborn calf. PMID:27175195

  19. Prevention of EBV lymphoma development by oncolytic myxoma virus in a murine xenograft model of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Manbok; Rahman, Masmudur M.; Cogle, Christopher R.

    2015-07-10

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) has been associated with a variety of epithelial and hematologic malignancies, including B-, T- and NK cell-lymphomas, Hodgkin's disease (HD), post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases (LPDs), nasopharyngeal and gastric carcinomas, smooth muscle tumors, and HIV-associated lymphomas. Currently, treatment options for EBV-associated malignancies are limited. We have previously shown that myxoma virus specifically targets various human solid tumors and leukemia cells in a variety of animal models, while sparing normal human or murine tissues. Since transplant recipients of bone marrow or solid organs often develop EBV-associated post-transplant LPDs and lymphoma, myxoma virus may be of utility to prevent EBV-associated malignancies in immunocompromised transplant patients where treatment options are frequently limited. In this report, we demonstrate the safety and efficacy of myxoma virus purging as a prophylactic strategy for preventing post-transplant EBV-transformed human lymphomas, using a highly immunosuppressed mouse xenotransplantation model. This provides support for developing myxoma virus as a potential oncolytic therapy for preventing EBV-associated LPDs following transplantation of bone marrow or solid organ allografts. - Highlights: • Myxoma virus effectively infects and purges EBV lymphoma cells in vivo. • Oncolytic myxoma virus effectively eradicates oncogenic EBV tumorigenesis. • Ex vivo pre-treatment of myxoma virus can be effective as a preventive treatment modality for post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases.

  20. Er:YAG Laser Assisted Treatment of Central Odontogenic Fibroma of the Mandible

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Luis Silva; Martins, Marco; Pacheco, José Júlio; Salazar, Filomena; Magalhães, João; Vescovi, Paolo; Meleti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Central odontogenic fibroma is a very rare benign odontogenic tumour characterized by a fibrous mature stroma with variable strands or islands of inactive-looking odontogenic epithelium. Our aim is to report a case of a central odontogenic fibroma and describe the clinical usefulness of Er:YAG laser for the surgical treatment of this tumour. A 74-year-old woman presented with an expansive lesion located in a mandible with multilocular and mixed radiographic appearance. A conservative excision using Er:YAG laser was performed. Complete removal was obtained. There were no postoperative complications. The histopatologic features were consistent with the diagnosis of central odontogenic fibroma of rich-epithelium type. No recurrence was observed during follow-up. PMID:26457211

  1. Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor associated with an odontome – a diverse lesion encountered

    PubMed Central

    Radheshyam, Chourasia; Alokenath, Bandyopadhyay; Kumar, Harish; Abikshyeet, Panda

    2015-01-01

    The human jaw is an exclusive habitat for odontogenic lesions. Ghost cells associated odontogenic lesions are a diverse group with a variety of presentations in the jaws. Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor is a benign cystic neoplasm of odontogenic origin which demonstrates ghost cells in the epithelial component. This tumor sometimes mimics the features of a cyst clinically and radiographically, but histopathologically as well as behavior-wise shows the features of a tumor. Many classification systems have been proposed and revised from time to time. Presently a dualistic concept is highlighted to classify this group of lesions. The present case highlights a case of calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor associated with a complex composite odontome, which appeared like a cyst clinically and radiographically. PMID:26345145

  2. Molecular characterisation of virulence graded field isolates of myxoma virus

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Myxoma virus (MV) has been endemic in Europe since shortly after its deliberate release in France in 1952. While the emergence of more resistant hosts and more transmissible and attenuated virus is well documented, there have been relatively few studies focused on the sequence changes incurred by the virus as it has adapted to its new host. In order to identify regions of variability within the MV genome to be used for phylogenetic studies and to try to investigate causes of MV strain attenuation we have molecularly characterised nine strains of MV isolated in Spain between the years 1992 and 1995 from wide ranging geographic locations and which had been previously graded for virulence by experimental infection of rabbits. Results The findings reported here show the analysis of 16 genomic regions accounting for approximately 10% of the viral genomes. Of the 20 genes analysed 5 (M034L, M069L, M071L, M130R and M135R) were identical in all strains and 1 (M122R) contained only a single point mutation in an individual strain. Four genes (M002L/R, M009L, M036L and M017L) showed insertions or deletions that led to disruption of the ORFs. Conclusions The findings presented here provide valuable tools for strain differentiation and phylogenetic studies of MV isolates and some clues as to the reasons for virus attenuation in the field. PMID:20187925

  3. Evolutionary history and attenuation of myxoma virus on two continents.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Peter J; Ghedin, Elodie; DePasse, Jay V; Fitch, Adam; Cattadori, Isabella M; Hudson, Peter J; Tscharke, David C; Read, Andrew F; Holmes, Edward C

    2012-01-01

    The attenuation of myxoma virus (MYXV) following its introduction as a biological control into the European rabbit populations of Australia and Europe is the canonical study of the evolution of virulence. However, the evolutionary genetics of this profound change in host-pathogen relationship is unknown. We describe the genome-scale evolution of MYXV covering a range of virulence grades sampled over 49 years from the parallel Australian and European epidemics, including the high-virulence progenitor strains released in the early 1950s. MYXV evolved rapidly over the sampling period, exhibiting one of the highest nucleotide substitution rates ever reported for a double-stranded DNA virus, and indicative of a relatively high mutation rate and/or a continually changing selective environment. Our comparative sequence data reveal that changes in virulence involved multiple genes, likely losses of gene function due to insertion-deletion events, and no mutations common to specific virulence grades. Hence, despite the similarity in selection pressures there are multiple genetic routes to attain either highly virulent or attenuated phenotypes in MYXV, resulting in convergence for phenotype but not genotype. PMID:23055928

  4. Odontogenic sinus tract to the chin: a diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Magliocca, Kelly R; Minehart, Stephen J; Brown, David L; Ward, Brent B

    2010-07-01

    Sinus tracts of odontogenic origin most commonly open into the oral cavity but occasionally may drain extraorally. The diagnosis is more difficult when necrosis of the tooth occurs in the absence of dental caries. We report a 23-year-old man with a long-standing chronic wound on the inferior aspect of the chin that was refractory to treatment. This case demonstrates the use of a simple technique to identify a necrotic mandibular incisor tooth as the source of infection. PMID:21049765

  5. Myxoma Virus and the Leporipoxviruses: An Evolutionary Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Peter J.; Liu, June; Cattadori, Isabella; Ghedin, Elodie; Read, Andrew F.; Holmes, Edward C.

    2015-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is the type species of the Leporipoxviruses, a genus of Chordopoxvirinae, double stranded DNA viruses, whose members infect leporids and squirrels, inducing cutaneous fibromas from which virus is mechanically transmitted by biting arthropods. However, in the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus), MYXV causes the lethal disease myxomatosis. The release of MYXV as a biological control for the wild European rabbit population in Australia, initiated one of the great experiments in evolution. The subsequent coevolution of MYXV and rabbits is a classic example of natural selection acting on virulence as a pathogen adapts to a novel host species. Slightly attenuated mutants of the progenitor virus were more readily transmitted by the mosquito vector because the infected rabbit survived longer, while highly attenuated viruses could be controlled by the rabbit immune response. As a consequence, moderately attenuated viruses came to dominate. This evolution of the virus was accompanied by selection for genetic resistance in the wild rabbit population, which may have created an ongoing co-evolutionary dynamic between resistance and virulence for efficient transmission. This natural experiment was repeated on a continental scale with the release of a separate strain of MYXV in France and its subsequent spread throughout Europe. The selection of attenuated strains of virus and resistant rabbits mirrored the experience in Australia in a very different environment, albeit with somewhat different rates. Genome sequencing of the progenitor virus and the early radiation, as well as those from the 1990s in Australia and Europe, has shown that although MYXV evolved at high rates there was no conserved route to attenuation or back to virulence. In contrast, it seems that these relatively large viral genomes have the flexibility for multiple pathways that converge on a similar phenotype. PMID:25757062

  6. Myxoma virus and the Leporipoxviruses: an evolutionary paradigm.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Peter J; Liu, June; Cattadori, Isabella; Ghedin, Elodie; Read, Andrew F; Holmes, Edward C

    2015-03-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is the type species of the Leporipoxviruses, a genus of Chordopoxvirinae, double stranded DNA viruses, whose members infect leporids and squirrels, inducing cutaneous fibromas from which virus is mechanically transmitted by biting arthropods. However, in the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus), MYXV causes the lethal disease myxomatosis. The release of MYXV as a biological control for the wild European rabbit population in Australia, initiated one of the great experiments in evolution. The subsequent coevolution of MYXV and rabbits is a classic example of natural selection acting on virulence as a pathogen adapts to a novel host species. Slightly attenuated mutants of the progenitor virus were more readily transmitted by the mosquito vector because the infected rabbit survived longer, while highly attenuated viruses could be controlled by the rabbit immune response. As a consequence, moderately attenuated viruses came to dominate. This evolution of the virus was accompanied by selection for genetic resistance in the wild rabbit population, which may have created an ongoing co-evolutionary dynamic between resistance and virulence for efficient transmission. This natural experiment was repeated on a continental scale with the release of a separate strain of MYXV in France and its subsequent spread throughout Europe. The selection of attenuated strains of virus and resistant rabbits mirrored the experience in Australia in a very different environment, albeit with somewhat different rates. Genome sequencing of the progenitor virus and the early radiation, as well as those from the 1990s in Australia and Europe, has shown that although MYXV evolved at high rates there was no conserved route to attenuation or back to virulence. In contrast, it seems that these relatively large viral genomes have the flexibility for multiple pathways that converge on a similar phenotype. PMID:25757062

  7. Myxoma and Vaccinia Viruses Bind Differentially to Human Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Winnie M.; Bartee, Eric C.; Moreb, Jan S.; Dower, Ken; Connor, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) and vaccinia virus (VACV), two distinct members of the family Poxviridae, are both currently being developed as oncolytic virotherapeutic agents. Recent studies have demonstrated that ex vivo treatment with MYXV can selectively recognize and kill contaminating cancerous cells from autologous bone marrow transplants without perturbing the engraftment of normal CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. However, the mechanism(s) by which MYXV specifically recognizes and eliminates the cancer cells in the autografts is not understood. While little is known about the cellular attachment factor(s) exploited by MYXV for entry into any target cells, VACV has been shown to utilize cell surface glycosaminoglycans such as heparan sulfate (HS), the extracellular matrix protein laminin, and/or integrin β1. We have constructed MYXV and VACV virions tagged with the Venus fluorescent protein and compared their characteristics of binding to various human cancer cell lines as well as to primary human leukocytes. We report that the binding of MYXV or VACV to some adherent cell lines could be partially inhibited by heparin, but laminin blocked only VACV binding. In contrast to cultured fibroblasts, the binding of MYXV and VACV to a wide spectrum of primary human leukocytes could not be competed by either HS or laminin. Additionally, MYXV and VACV exhibited very different binding characteristics against certain select human leukocytes, suggesting that the two poxviruses utilize different cell surface determinants for the attachment to these cells. These results indicate that VACV and MYXV can exhibit very different oncolytic tropisms against some cancerous human leukocytes. PMID:23388707

  8. Characterisation of immunosuppression in rabbits after infection with myxoma virus.

    PubMed

    Jeklova, Edita; Leva, Lenka; Matiasovic, Jan; Kovarcik, Kamil; Kudlackova, Hana; Nevorankova, Zora; Psikal, Ivan; Faldyna, Martin

    2008-05-25

    Myxoma virus (MXV) causes the systemic disease myxomatosis in the European rabbit. Despite many in vitro studies on the function of MXV immunomodulatory proteins and detailed molecular knowledge of virus, little is known about the dynamics of interaction of the virus with the integrated host-immune system during infection. In this study changes in haematological profile, changes in lymphocyte subset distribution and non-specific proliferation activity of lymphocytes from different lymphoid compartments on the 2nd, 4th, 6th, 9th and 11th day after experimental infection of rabbits with MXV strain Lausanne was characterised. The relationship between alterations of immune parameters and dynamic of virus dissemination through the body was investigated. Haematological changes included moderate leucopenia with significant lymphopenia, neutrophilia, monocytosis and eosinopenia. A decrease of T cells including CD4+ and CD8+ and increase of CD79alpha+ were observed in draining popliteal lymph node 4 days after virus inoculation. From day 6, comparable changes were seen in collateral popliteal lymph node, spleen and peripheral blood. From day 9, the mentioned lymphocyte subsets tended to reach their original state in all of these lymphocyte compartments except draining popliteal lymph node. In thymus, MXV infection affected mainly CD4+CD8+ double positive thymocytes. On the other hand, proliferation activity of lymphocytes determined by the proliferation assay with plant-derived mitogens was significantly reduced from day 4 or 6 and remained reduced until the end of experiment in all observed lymphoid organs. Presence of MXV in respective lymphoid compartments preceded changes in lymphocyte subset distribution or lymphocyte activity. PMID:18222052

  9. A case of cerebral embolism due to cardiac myxoma presenting with multiple cerebral microaneurysms detected on first MRI scans.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takahiro; Saji, Naoki; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Shibazaki, Kensaku; Kimura, Kazumi

    2016-03-01

    A 64-year-old man developed right arm weakness and dysarthria, and was admitted to our hospital. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed a high intensity area in the frontal lobe. T2*-weighted images showed multiple spotty low intensity lesions in bilateral cerebral hemispheres, mimicking cerebral microbleeds. Cerebral angiography showed multiple aneurysms in the anterior, middle, posterior cerebral arteries and cerebellar arteries. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed a floating structure in the left atrial chamber, indicating cardiac myxoma. We diagnosed cardioembolic ischemic stroke due to left atrial myxoma. Cardiac surgery for excision of a left atrial myxoma was performed on the 3rd hospital day. Multiple aneurysms should be taken into account for differential diagnosis in patients with cardiac myxoma and with atypical spotty low intensity on T2*-weighted images. PMID:26797485

  10. Remission for Loss of Odontogenic Potential in a New Micromilieu In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yunfei; Cai, Jinglei; Hutchins, Andrew Paul; Jia, Lingfei; Liu, Pengfei; Yang, Dandan; Chen, Shubin; Ge, Lihong; Pei, Duanqing; Wei, Shicheng

    2016-01-01

    During embryonic organogenesis, the odontogenic potential resides in dental mesenchyme from the bud stage until birth. Mouse dental mesenchymal cells (mDMCs) isolated from the inductive dental mesenchyme of developing molars are frequently used in the context of tooth development and regeneration. We wondered if and how the odontogenic potential could be retained when mDMCs were cultured in vitro. In the present study, we undertook to test the odontogenic potential of cultured mDMCs and attempted to maintain the potential during culturing. We found that cultured mDMCs could retain the odontogenic potential for 24 h with a ratio of 60% for tooth formation, but mDMCs were incapable of supporting tooth formation after more than 24 h in culture. This loss of odontogenic potential was accompanied by widespread transcriptomic alteration and, specifically, the downregulation of some dental mesenchyme-specific genes, such as Pax9, Msx1, and Pdgfrα. To prolong the odontogenic potential of mDMCs in vitro, we then cultured mDMCs in a serum-free medium with Knockout Serum Replacement (KSR) and growth factors (fibroblastic growth factor 2 and epidermal growth factor). In this new micromilieu, mDMCs could maintain the odontogenic potential for 48 h with tooth formation ratio of 50%. Moreover, mDMCs cultured in KSR-supplemented medium gave rise to tooth-like structures when recombined with non-dental second-arch epithelium. Among the supplements, KSR is essential for the survival and adhesion of mDMCs, and both Egf and Fgf2 induced the expression of certain dental mesenchyme-related genes. Taken together, our results demonstrated that the transcriptomic changes responded to the alteration of odontogenic potential in cultured mDMCs and a new micromilieu partly retained this potential in vitro, providing insight into the long-term maintenance of odontogenic potential in mDMCs. PMID:27050091

  11. Multimodality imaging of a subtotally obstructive right ventricular myxoma in an asymptomatic 10-year-old girl

    PubMed Central

    Wiegand, Gesa; Sieverding, Ludger; Kramer, Ulrich; Haen, Susanne; Hofbeck, Michael

    2014-01-01

    A 10-year-old girl presented with a supraventricular tachycardia. A heart murmur was detected during a clinical examination; therefore, echocardiography was performed. This revealed a giant right ventricular myxoma that subtotally obstructed the right ventricular outflow tract. A myxoma in the right ventricle is uncommon in children. This rare intracardiac tumor was examined using multimodality imaging, and the patient underwent surgical resection. The pathologic features confirmed our suspicion and revealed an encapsulated tumor with myxomatoid stroma containing focal hemorrhages. PMID:24987268

  12. Odontogenic maxillary sinusitis with oro-nasal fistula: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Carini, Fabrizio; Longoni, Salvatore; Amosso, Ernesto; Carini, Stefania; Garavello, Werner; Porcaro, Gianluca

    2014-01-01

    Summary Aim of the study The odontogenic sinusitis has an incidence between 38 and 40.6%. Increased risk of maxillary sinusitis has been reported with the presence of periapical abscesses, periodontal disease, dental trauma, tooth extraction and implant placement when the sinusal membrane is perforated. Materials and methods A patient with odontogenic maxillary sinusitis associated with oro-nasal fistula was treated. Results The follow-up at six months showed the complete resolution of maxillary sinusitis, palatal fistula got closed and pain symptoms disappeared. Conclusion This case report describes a rare complication of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis: the oro-nasal fistula. PMID:25678949

  13. Atypical odontalgia misdiagnosed as odontogenic pain: a case report and discussion of treatment.

    PubMed

    Lilly, J P; Law, A S

    1997-05-01

    Atypical odontalgia is characterized by prolonged periods of throbbing or burning pain in the teeth or alveolar process, which occurs in the absence of any identifiable odontogenic etiology. The pain may be bilateral and change in location. This article presents two cases of atypical odontalgia that were misdiagnosed and initially treated as pain of odontogenic origin. A therapeutic regimen of tricyclic antidepressants alleviated the pain in one patient and was unsuccessful in the second. These two cases demonstrate the importance of having a thorough knowledge of both odontogenic and nonodontogenic causes of orofacial pain as well as the need for careful diagnosis before undertaking any treatment. PMID:9545940

  14. Conservative management of a large keratocystic odontogenic tumor in the maxilla.

    PubMed

    de Melo, Willian Morais; Pereira-Santos, Darklilson; Brêda-Júnior, Marcus Antônio; Hochuli-Vieira, Eduardo; Gabrielli, Marisa Aparecida Cabrini; Gabrielli, Mario Francisco Real

    2012-05-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumor is characterized by high recurrence rates. Conservative or aggressive management has been suggested as a method of treatment. Decompression is a conservative treatment that has been used in the treatment of large odontogenic cysts. The authors report a case of a 14-year-old patient with a keratocystic odontogenic tumor located in the right maxilla, which was treated by decompression followed by enucleation with curettage. The lesion did not recur on follow-up for 3 years after the enucleation surgery. PMID:22627427

  15. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor with dentigerous cyst: Report of a rare case with review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vikramjeet; Goyal, Sunder; Sheikh, Soheyl; Shambulingappa, P.; Singh, Balwinder; Singh, Ravinder

    2012-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is a benign lesion derived from the complex system of dental lamina or its remnant. It is categorized into three variants (follicular, extrafollicular, and peripheral). We present a rare case of AOT arising from a dentigerous cyst around the unerupted canine in a 28-year-old female. We believe that this case z an odontogenic cyst with neoplastic development, containing both epithelial and mesenchymal components. As more cases accumulate, we will be able to study these rare lesions further whether the AOTs derived from an odontogenic cyst could represent a distinct “hybrid” variant separate to the three variants described thus far. PMID:23230373

  16. Odontogenic Tumors: A Review of 675 Cases in Eastern Libya

    PubMed Central

    Goteti, Saravana HL

    2016-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study was to determine the relative frequency of odontogenic tumors (OTs) in an Eastern Libyan population based on the 2005 World Health Organization (WHO) classification, and also to compare the actual data with previous studies. Materials and Methods: We retrieved and analyzed 85 OTs from a total of 675 tumors and tumor-like lesions of the oral and perioral structures, for gender, age, tumor site, and frequency. The diagnosis was based on the most recent WHO (2005) classification of OTs. Results: OTs constituted 12.6% of all oral/jaw tumors and tumor-like lesions. Ameloblastoma (28.2%) was the most common type, followed by keratocystic odontogenic tumor (25.2%) and odontoma (19.9%). The male: female ratio was 1.2:1, and maxilla: mandible ratio 1:2. The mean age of occurrence of tumors was 29 years with a peak incidence between 10 and 40 years. Conclusions: OTs are relatively common lesion in this Libyan Population, but the incidence of tumors is neither similar to Caucasians nor Sub-Saharan population. PMID:27013857

  17. Retrospective study of 289 odontogenic tumors in a Brazilian population

    PubMed Central

    Serpa, Marianna-Sampaio; Tenório, Jefferson-da-Rocha; do Nascimento, George-João-Ferreira; de Souza-Andrade, Emanuel-Sávio; Veras-Sobral, Ana-Paula

    2016-01-01

    Background Odontogenic tumors (OTs) are considered important among oral lesions because of their clinicopathological heterogeneity, and variable biological behavior. This paper aims to determine the frequency and distribution of OTs, over a period of 10 years, at a public university in Northeastern Brazil and compare this data with previous reports. Material and Methods We reviewed all cases of OTs from oral pathology laboratory of University of Pernambuco (UPE), from 2004 to 2014. Diagnoses were re-evaluated and the tumors were classified according to the latest (2005) World Health Organization Classification of Tumors. In addition, we searched in the English-language literature retrospective studies on OTs that used the same classification. Results Data was obtained allowing the analysis of the tissue hemodynamics. We were able to map the vascularization of the face and it was possible to access three arteries of small diameter (0,60mm angular artery; 0,55mm greater palatine artery; 0,45mm infraorbital artery). Conclusions OTs are uncommon neoplasms with geographic variation. Our clinicopathological features are according to literature. In the present study, KCOT was the most frequent one, showing that the new classification of OTs altered the distribution of these lesions and possibly made KCOT the most common OT observed in diagnostic services worldwide. Key words:Odontogenic tumors, jaw neoplasms, epidemiology, oral pathology. PMID:26827068

  18. Disseminated necrotic mediastinitis spread from odontogenic abscess: our experience

    PubMed Central

    Filiaci, Fabio; Riccardi, Emiliano; Mitro, Valeria; Piombino, Pasquale; Rinna, Claudio; Agrillo, Alessandro; Ungari, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Summary Aims Deep neck infections are rare but potentially fatal complication of pulpal abscess of the teeth. If an infection can progress rapidly from a toothache to a life threatening infection, then it is critical that dentists be able to recognize the danger signs and identify the patients who are at risk. Mediastinitis is a severe inflammatory process involving the connective tissues that fills the intracellular spaces and surrounds the organs in the middle of the chest. This pathology has both an acute and a chronic form and, in most cases, it has an infectious etiology. This study want to expose the experience acquired in the Oral and Maxillo-facial Sciences Department, Policlinico Umberto I, “Sapienza” University of Rome, regarding two clinical cases of disseminated necrotizing mediastinitis starting from an odontogenic abscess. Methods We report two clinical cases of disseminated necrotic mediastinitis with two different medical and surgical approaches. The radiographic and photographic documentation of the patients was collected in the pre-and post-operatively. All patients underwent a CT scan and MRI. Results Mediastinitis can result from a serious odontogenic abscess, and the extent of its inflammation process must be never underestimated. Dental surgeons play a key role as a correct diagnosis can prevent further increasing of the inflammation process. Conclusions A late diagnosis and an inadequate draining represent the major causes of the elevated mortality rate of disseminated necrotizing mediastinitis. PMID:26330907

  19. The central odontogenic fibroma: How difficult can be making a preliminary diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Pippi, Roberto; Santoro, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    Central odontogenic fibroma (COF) is a rare benign odontogenic tumor derived from the dental ectomesenchymal tissues. A 16-year-old Caucasian female patient was referred by her dentist for a radiolucent asymptomatic area associated with the crown of the impacted lower right third molar. A preliminary diagnosis of a follicular cyst was supposed. The lesion was surgically removed under general anesthesia together with the impacted tooth. The microscopic diagnosis of the excised tissue revealed an odontogenic fibroma. No clinical or radiographic signs of recurrence were found five years after surgical excision. Despite the various differential diagnoses of homogeneous unilocular and well delimited radiolucencies of the jaws, enucleation with peripheral curettage, without any other pre-operative imaging exams or biopsies, can be considered as the treatment of choice. Key words:Differential diagnosis, impacted third molar, radiographic imaging, microscopic diagnosis, odontogenic fibroma. PMID:27034766

  20. Differential expression of Cyclin D1 in keratin-producing odontogenic cysts

    PubMed Central

    Vera-Sirera, Beatriz; Forner-Navarro, Leopoldo

    2015-01-01

    Objetives: The aim of the present study was to analyze the expression levels of Cyclin D1 (CCD1), a nuclear protein that plays a crucial role in cell cycle progression, in a series of keratin-producing odontogenic cysts. Study Design: A total of 58 keratin-producing odontogenic cysts, diagnosed over ten years and classified according to the WHO 2005 criteria, were immunohistochemically analyzed in terms of CCD1 expression, which was quantified in the basal, suprabasal and intermediate/superficial epithelial compartments. The extent of immunostaining was measured as a proportion of total epithelial thickness. Quantified immunohistochemical data were correlated with clinicopathological features and clinical recurrence. Results: Keratin-producing odontogenic cysts were classified as 6 syndromic keratocystic odontogenic tumors (S-KCOT), 40 sporadic or non-syndromic KCOT (NS-KCOT) and 12 orthokeratinized odontogenic cysts (OOC). Immunohistochemically, CCD1 staining was evident predominantly in the parabasal region of all cystic lesions, but among-lesion differences were apparent, showing a clear expansion of parabasal compartment especially in the S-KCOT, followed to a lesser extent in the NS-KCOT, and being much more reduced in the OOC, which had the greatest average epithelial thickness. Conclusions: The differential expression of CCD1 noted in the present study suggests that dysregulation of cell cycle progression from G1 to the S phase contributes to the different aggressiveness of these lesions. However, CCD1 expression levels did not predict NS-KCOT recurrence, which is likely influenced by factors unrelated to lesion biology. Key words:Keratin-producing odontogenic cyst, keratocyst, keratocystic odontogenic tumor, nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst, cyclin D1, immunohistochemistry. PMID:25475773

  1. A survey of epithelial odontogenic tumors and cysts in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Poulet, F M; Valentine, B A; Summers, B A

    1992-09-01

    A retrospective histologic study of 12 canine and eight feline epithelial odontogenic tumors and cysts was conducted from oral masses (n = 3,917) obtained between 1980 and 1990. No sex or breed predilection was identified. Ameloblastoma was observed in two dogs (case Nos. 1, 2) 6 and 8 months of age. Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumors were seen in a dog (case No. 3) and in two cats (case Nos. 4, 5) between 8 and 16 years of age. Ameloblastic fibroma (or fibroameloblastoma) was observed in cats (case Nos. 6-10) only. Inductive fibroameloblastoma was observed in four cats (case Nos. 6-9) up to 1 year of age, whereas ameloblastic fibroma was seen in a 14-year-old cat (case No. 10). A single ameloblastic odontoma was identified in a 20-month-old dog (case No. 11). Two complex odontomas occurred in a 6-month-old (case No. 12) and a 4-year-old (case No. 13) dog. Odontogenic cysts were identified in five dogs (case Nos. 14-18) aged 4.5 months to 16 years and in a 1-year-old cat (case No. 19) and have not been previously reported in these species. These cysts were lined by a stratified epithelium reminiscent of the appearance of ameloblastic epithelium. An odontogenic keratocyst with prominent central parakeratotic keratinization was identified in one 9-year-old female dog (case No. 20). Almost all epithelial odontogenic tumors were circumscribed, benign tumors that warranted a good prognosis for survival, although local recurrence may have followed (or may follow) incomplete excision. Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumors may be locally invasive. Of six odontogenic cysts (case Nos. 14-19), two (case Nos. 15, 18) gave rise to basi-squamous carcinomas. The classification and behavior of epithelial odontogenic tumors and cysts in human beings, dogs, and cats are discussed. PMID:1413403

  2. Conservative Treatment Protocol for Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumour: a Follow-up Study of 3 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Gülsün; Ataoglu, Hanife; Kalayci, Abdullah; Kucuk, Korhan; Esen, Alparslan

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background The keratocystic odontogenic tumour is classified as a developmental cyst derived from the enamel organ or from the dental lamina. The treatment of keratocystic odontogenic tumour of the jaw remains controversial. The aim of this study was to report the outcome of our conservative treatment protocol for keratocystic odontogenic tumour. Methods Three patients with different complaints referred to Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinic, Faculty of Dentistry, Selçuk University. Initial biopsy was carried out in all patients and keratocystic odontogenic tumours was diagnosed subsequent to histopathological examination. The patients with keratocystic odontogenic tumours were treated by enucleation followed by open packing. This conservative treatment protocol was selected because of existing young aged patients. The average follow-up duration of the cases was 2 years. Results Out of 3 cases, 2 lesions were present in mandible and 1 lesion in maxilla. There was no evidence of recurrence during follow-up. All the cases were monitored continuously with panoramic radiographs, computed tomography and clinical evaluations. Conclusions This conservative treatment protocol for keratocystic odontogenic tumours, based on enucleation followed by open packing would be a possible choice with a view of offering low recurrence rate and low morbidity rate particularly in young patients. PMID:24421977

  3. Multiple keratocystic odontogenic tumors in nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Treville; Tamgadge, Avinash; Sapdhare, Swati; Pujar, Ashwini

    2015-01-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) is of particular interest because its recurrence rate is high and its behavior is aggressive. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), which is also known as Gorlin syndrome, is a hereditary condition characterized by a wide range of developmental abnormalities and with a predisposition to neoplasms. These multiple KCOTs have warranted an aggressive treatment at the earliest because of the damage and possible complications. Recurrence of these lesions is a characteristic feature that has to be considered while explaining the prognosis to the patient. Here, we report a case of a 14-year-old boy with clinical features of basal cell nevus syndrome and multiple KCOTs. In addition to the other common features, congenitally missing third molars in all the four quadrants is a feature which has not been previously reported in association with NBCCS in Indian patients. PMID:26981489

  4. Nasal Sinus Tract of Odontogenic Origin: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Sareen, Sagar; Pathak, Anjani Kumar; Purwar, Parth; Dixit, Jaya; Singhal, Divya; Sajjanhar, Isha; Goel, Kopal; Gupta, Vaibhav Sheel

    2015-01-01

    Extraoral sinus tract often poses a diagnostic challenge to the clinician owing to its rare occurrence and absence of symptoms. The accurate diagnosis and comprehensive management are inevitable as the aetiology of such lesions is often masked and requires holistic approach. The present case report encompasses the management of an extraoral discharging sinus tract at the base of the right nostril in a chronic smoker. The lesion which was earlier diagnosed to be of nonodontogenic origin persisted even after erratic treatment modalities. Our investigations showed the aetiology of sinus tract to be odontogenic. Initially, a five-step program as recommended by the Agency for Health Care Research and Quality was used for smoking cessation followed by root canal therapy (RCT) and surgical management of the sinus tract. The patient has been under stringent follow-up and no reoccurrence has been noted. PMID:26649208

  5. Syndromic odontogenic keratocyst: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Arshad, Fazil

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs) may occur in two different forms, either as solitary (nonsyndromic OKCs) or as multiple OKCs (syndromic OKCs). Multiple OKCs usually occur as one of the findings in Gorlin–Goltz syndrome with other features such as skin carcinomas and rib, eye, and neurologic abnormalities. We report a rare case of Gorlin–Goltz syndrome in a 20-year-old male patient who presented with a slow growing swelling on lower right and left back teeth region since 2 months. Apart from these, other findings were frontal bossing, depressed nasal bridge, ocular hypertelorism, prominent supra orbital ridge, and mild mandibular prognathism. Excision was done and microscopic study revealed OKC and the follow-up could not be carried out for the complete management. We also presented a review of its pathogenesis, criterion, and differences between syndromic and nonsyndromic OKCs and suggest to thoroughly examine any patient who presents with multiple OKCs to rule out syndromic variety. PMID:27011939

  6. Ossifying cystic odontogenic and Schneiderian choristoma of the orbit.

    PubMed

    Mudhar, Hardeep Singh; Nurrudin, Murtuza

    2014-02-01

    A 12-year-old girl presented with a left infraorbital lesion, causing upward globe displacement. Imaging confirmed a mass between the globe and the orbital floor. The lesion was removed via a sub-ciliary approach and histology revealed a a mature tooth along with a periodontal ligament, oral-type mucinous glands and bone. Six years later a mass recurred at exactly the same site and on this occasion, revealed cysts containing mucin and lined by Schneiderian type epithelium. A rather complex combination of a tooth, lamellar bone, mucinous oral type glands and Schneiderian cystic epithelium is highly unusual and we have called the lesion "ossifying cystic odontogenic and Schneiderian choristoma of the orbit." PMID:24171664

  7. Central Odontogenic Fibroma of the Gingiva: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Soolari, Ahmad; Khan, Asghar

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a case of an uncommon and slow-growing tumor known as a central odontogenic fibroma (COF). The patient in question is a 53-year-old African-American man who was referred for periodontal evaluation of asymptomatic space formation between the mandibular central incisors. Clinical and radiological evaluations disclosed tumor-like tissue expanding the alveolar ridge in the buccolingual dimension, along with thinning of the cortical plates. Surgical excision was performed, and the specimen was sent for histopathology, which later confirmed that the lesion was a COF. Periodontal regenerative therapy was performed to rebuild the hard and soft tissue that had been compromised as a result of tumor expansion. The site was grafted, with excellent results. PMID:25646136

  8. Cellular neurothekeoma: case report and its (un) relation with nerve sheath myxoma.

    PubMed

    Navarrete-Dechent, Cristián; Curi-Tuma, Maximiliano; Marín, Celeste; González, Sergio; Sandoval-Osses, Mauricio

    2015-01-01

    Neurothekeoma is an uncommon, benign neoplasm presenting in young adults, primarily on the head and neck. It was initially related to nerve sheath myxoma but with the advent of immunohistochemistry, new insights into its cellular differentiation and origin have emerged, unlinking Neurothekeoma and nerve sheath myxoma. Herein we describe a 19-year-old male who had had a frontal, flesh-colored, asymptomatic papule for 2 years. Histology showed a dermal fusocellular-spindle cell tumor, including an eosinophilic cytoplasm with mild cellular pleomorphism and moderately dense fibrous stroma. IHQ was positive for CD10 and negative for S100 and Claudin-1. These findings were compatible with cellular Neurothekeoma. The lesion was completely extirpated and at the 6-month follow-up, the patient was asymptomatic and had experienced no recurrences. PMID:26312702

  9. An Unusual ST Elevation in a Case of Left Atrial Myxoma.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Nikunj; Ghatanatti, Ravi; Nerlikar, Amrutraj; Gan, Mohan; Dixit, Mahadev

    2016-02-01

    Myxomas are the most common and potentially dangerous benign tumours of the heart. They may have either smooth or papillary surfaces and may have thrombus adherent. As both the papillary excrescences and the surface thrombi are friable in nature hence may undergo embolization. We report a case of left atrial myxoma, which underwent excision of the tumour for mitral valve obstructive features. In the immediate postoperative period patient developed ST elevation in lead II, III and aVF. Coronary angiogram revealed normal coronary pattern. Patient was treated with aspirin, heparin and IABP for 48 hours and recovered well. We conclude that there is a tendency for spontaneous recanalization of the obstructed coronary vessels by tumour emboli, hence patient can be managed conservatively. PMID:27042520

  10. [Perioperative Multiple Pulmonary Embolism in a Patient with Giant Right Atrial Myxoma: Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Koki; Hanayama, Naoji; Kitamura, Tadashi; Sakaki, Kenjiro; Nie, Masaki; Miyaji, Kagami

    2016-02-01

    It is reported that 20% of cardiac myxomas are located in the right atrium. An 81-year-old man presented with dyspnea, general fatigue and leg edema lasting for a year. Echocardiography revealed an 80 mm tumor occupying the right atrium and the right ventricle. At surgery, the tumor attached to the atrial septum was removed with the surrounding septal wall. As the tricuspid annulus was dilated, tricuspid annuloplasty with an artificial ring was also carried out. After coming off cardiopulmonary bypass, the patient developed pulmonary hypertension with the pulmonary arterial pressure being 80% of the systemic pressure, which subsided gradually day by day. Histopathological diagnosis was cardiac myxoma. Postoperative lung perfusion scintigraphy revealed postoperative multiple defects. It was considered that multiple tumor embolisms in the distal pulmonary artery caused postoperative pulmonary hypertension. Careful follow-up for remote recurrence would be essential. PMID:27075159