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Sample records for off-vertical axis rotation

  1. Tilt and Translation Motion Perception during Off Vertical Axis Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Scott J.; Reschke, Millard F.; Clement, Gilles

    2006-01-01

    The effect of stimulus frequency on tilt and translation motion perception was studied during constant velocity off-vertical axis rotation (OVAR), and compared to the effect of stimulus frequency on eye movements. Fourteen healthy subjects were rotated in darkness about their longitudinal axis 10deg and 20deg off-vertical at 0.125 Hz, and 20deg offvertical at 0.5 Hz. Oculomotor responses were recorded using videography, and perceived motion was evaluated using verbal reports and a joystick with four degrees of freedom (pitch and roll tilt, mediallateral and anteriorposterior translation). During the lower frequency OVAR, subjects reported the perception of progressing along the edge of a cone. During higher frequency OVAR, subjects reported the perception of progressing along the edge of an upright cylinder. The modulation of both tilt recorded from the joystick and ocular torsion significantly increased as the tilt angle increased from 10deg to 20deg at 0.125 Hz, and then decreased at 0.5 Hz. Both tilt perception and torsion slightly lagged head orientation at 0.125 Hz. The phase lag of torsion increased at 0.5 Hz, while the phase of tilt perception did not change as a function of frequency. The amplitude of both translation perception recorded from the joystick and horizontal eye movements was negligible at 0.125 Hz and increased as a function of stimulus frequency. While the phase lead of horizontal eye movements decreased at 0.5 Hz, the phase of translation perception did not vary with stimulus frequency and was similar to the phase of tilt perception during all conditions. During dynamic linear acceleration in the absence of other sensory input (canal, vision) a change in stimulus frequency alone elicits similar changes in the amplitude of both self motion perception and eye movements. However, in contrast to the eye movements, the phase of both perceived tilt and translation motion is not altered by stimulus frequency. We conclude that the neural processing

  2. Motion sickness induced by off-vertical axis rotation (OVAR)

    PubMed Central

    Sofroniou, Sofronis; Kunin, Mikhail; Raphan, Theodore; Cohen, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that motion sickness is produced by an integration of the disparity between eye velocity and the yaw-axis orientation vector of velocity storage. Disparity was defined as the magnitude of the cross product between these two vectors. OVAR, which is known to produce motion sickness, generates horizontal eye velocity with a bias level related to velocity storage, as well as cyclic modulations due to re-orientation of the head re gravity. On average, the orientation vector is close to the spatial vertical. Thus, disparity can be related to the bias and tilt angle. Motion sickness sensitivity was defined as a ratio of maximum motion sickness score to the number of revolutions, allowing disparity and motion sickness sensitivity to be correlated. Nine subjects were rotated around axes tilted 10°–30° from the spatial vertical at 30°/s–120°/s. Motion sickness sensitivity increased monotonically with increases in the disparity due to changes in rotational velocity and tilt angle. Maximal motion sickness sensitivity and bias (6.8°/s) occurred when rotating at 60°/s about an axis tilted 30° Modulations in eye velocity during OVAR were unrelated to motion sickness sensitivity. The data were predicted by a model incorporating an estimate of head velocity from otolith activation, which activated velocity storage, followed by an orientation disparity comparator that activated a motion sickness integrator. These results suggest that the sensory-motor conflict that produces motion sickness involves coding of the spatial vertical by the otolith organs and body tilt receptors and processing of eye velocity through velocity storage. PMID:20535456

  3. Modeling human vestibular responses during eccentric rotation and off vertical axis rotation.

    PubMed

    Merfeld, D M

    1995-01-01

    A mathematical model has been developed to help explain human multi-sensory interactions. The most important constituent of the model is the hypothesis that the nervous system incorporates knowledge of sensory dynamics into an "internal model" of these dynamics. This internal model allows the nervous system to integrate the sensory information from many different sensors into a coherent estimate of self-motion. The essence of the model is unchanged from a previously published model of monkey eye movement responses; only a few variables have been adjusted to yield the prediction of human responses. During eccentric rotation, the model predicts that the axis of eye rotation shifts slightly toward alignment with gravito-inertial force. The model also predicts that the time course of the perception of tilt following the acceleration phase of eccentric rotation is much slower than that during deceleration. During off vertical axis rotation (OVAR) the model predicts a small horizontal bias along with small horizontal, vertical, and torsional oscillations. Following OVAR stimulation, when stopped right- or left-side down, a small vertical component is predicted that decays with the horizontal post-rotatory response. All of the predictions are consistent with measurements of human responses. PMID:8749160

  4. Modeling human vestibular responses during eccentric rotation and off vertical axis rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merfeld, D. M.; Paloski, W. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    A mathematical model has been developed to help explain human multi-sensory interactions. The most important constituent of the model is the hypothesis that the nervous system incorporates knowledge of sensory dynamics into an "internal model" of these dynamics. This internal model allows the nervous system to integrate the sensory information from many different sensors into a coherent estimate of self-motion. The essence of the model is unchanged from a previously published model of monkey eye movement responses; only a few variables have been adjusted to yield the prediction of human responses. During eccentric rotation, the model predicts that the axis of eye rotation shifts slightly toward alignment with gravito-inertial force. The model also predicts that the time course of the perception of tilt following the acceleration phase of eccentric rotation is much slower than that during deceleration. During off vertical axis rotation (OVAR) the model predicts a small horizontal bias along with small horizontal, vertical, and torsional oscillations. Following OVAR stimulation, when stopped right- or left-side down, a small vertical component is predicted that decays with the horizontal post-rotatory response. All of the predictions are consistent with measurements of human responses.

  5. Off-vertical axis rotation: a test of the otolith-ocular reflex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furman, J. M.; Schor, R. H.; Schumann, T. L.

    1992-01-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflex was studied via off-vertical axis rotation (OVAR) in the dark. The axis of the turntable could be tilted from vertical by up to 30 degrees. Eye movements were measured with electro-oculography. Results from healthy asymptomatic subjects indicated that 1) a reliable otolith-induced response could be obtained during constant velocity OVAR using a velocity of 60 degrees/s with a tilt of 30 degrees; 2) constant velocity OVAR rotation was nausea-producing and, especially if subjects were rotated in the dark about an earth-vertical axis prior to being tilted, disorienting; and 3) sinusoidal OVAR produced minimal nausea; the eye movement response appeared to be the result of a combination of semicircular canal and otolith components. We conclude that OVAR has the potential of becoming a useful method for clinically assessing both the otolith-ocular reflex and semicircular canal-otolith interaction.

  6. Translational Vestibulo-Ocular Reflexes During Off-Vertical Axis Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Scott J.; Clement, Gilles

    2009-01-01

    The translational vestibulo-ocular reflex (tVOR) is an otolith-mediated response that stabilizes near vision during linear acceleration at higher frequencies where visually mediated reflexes are not adequate. The modulation of horizontal and vergence eye movements during Off-Vertical Axis Rotation (OVAR) are presumed to reflect the tVOR in response to the continuously varying linear acceleration in the interaural and nasooccipital axes, respectively. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of frequency and fixation distance on the modulation of slow phase eye velocity (SPV) as further evidence that the tVOR is elicited during OVAR. Eighteen subjects were rotated about their longitudinal axis tilted by 30 deg off-vertical. Rotational velocities varied between 18 and 288 deg/sec corresponding to a frequency range of 0.05 to 0.8 Hz. Fixation distance was altered by asking subjects to imagine stationary targets that were briefly presented at 0.5, 1 and 2 m during some rotation cycles. The target flash was 40 msec in the nose-up position at eye level. Oculomotor responses were recorded in the dark using infrared binocular videography. Sinusoidal curve fits were used to derive amplitude, phase and bias velocity of the eye movements across multiple rotation cycles. Consistent with previous studies, the modulation of both horizontal and vergence SPV increased with stimulus frequency. The effect of fixation distance was negligible at lower frequencies. The modulation of horizontal and vergence SPV was; however, proportional to fixation distance during OVAR at 0.8 Hz. This increasing sensitivity and dependence on fixation distance of horizontal and vergence SPV during OVAR is consistent with tVOR characteristics measured during other types of linear motion. We conclude that the modulation of horizontal and vergence SPV will be diagnostically more useful at higher stimulus frequencies where the tVOR is more robust.

  7. Modification of Eye Movements and Motion Perception during Off-Vertical Axis Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, S. J.; Reschke, M. F.; Denise, P.; CLement, G.

    2006-01-01

    Constant velocity Off-Vertical Axis Rotation (OVAR) imposes a continuously varying orientation of the head and body relative to gravity. The ensuing ocular reflexes include modulation of both torsional and horizontal eye movements as a function of the varying linear acceleration along the lateral plane, and modulation of vertical and vergence eye movements as a function of the varying linear acceleration along the sagittal plane. Previous studies have demonstrated that tilt and translation otolith-ocular responses, as well as motion perception, vary as a function of stimulus frequency during OVAR. The purpose of this study is to examine normative OVAR responses in healthy human subjects, and examine adaptive changes in astronauts following short duration space flight at low (0.125 Hz) and high (0.5 Hz) frequencies. Data was obtained on 24 normative subjects (14 M, 10 F) and 14 (13 M, 1F) astronaut subjects. To date, astronauts have participated in 3 preflight sessions (n=14) and on R+0/1 (n=7), R+2 (n= 13) and R+4 (n= 13) days after landing. Subjects were rotated in darkness about their longitudinal axis 20 deg off-vertical at constant rates of 45 and 180 deg/s, corresponding to 0.125 and 0.5 Hz. Binocular responses were obtained with video-oculography. Perceived motion was evaluated using verbal reports and a two-axis joystick (pitch and roll tilt) mounted on top of a two-axis linear stage (anterior-posterior and medial-lateral translation). Eye responses were obtained in ten of the normative subjects with the head and trunk aligned, and then with the head turned relative to the trunk 40 deg to the right or left of center. Sinusoidal curve fits were used to derive amplitude, phase and bias of the responses over several cycles at each stimulus frequency. Eye responses during 0.125 Hz OVAR were dominated by modulation of torsional and vertical eye position, compensatory for tilt relative to gravity. While there is a bias horizontal slow phase velocity (SPV), the

  8. Phase-linking and the perceived motion during off-vertical axis rotation

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Scott J.; McCollum, Gin

    2010-01-01

    Human off-vertical axis rotation (OVAR) in the dark typically produces perceived motion about a cone, the amplitude of which changes as a function of frequency. This perception is commonly attributed to the fact that both the OVAR and the conical motion have a gravity vector that rotates about the subject. Little-known, however, is that this rotating-gravity explanation for perceived conical motion is inconsistent with basic observations about self-motion perception: (a) that the perceived vertical moves toward alignment with the gravito-inertial acceleration (GIA) and (b) that perceived translation arises from perceived linear acceleration, as derived from the portion of the GIA not associated with gravity. Mathematically proved in this article is the fact that during OVAR these properties imply mismatched phase of perceived tilt and translation, in contrast to the common perception of matched phases which correspond to conical motion with pivot at the bottom. This result demonstrates that an additional perceptual rule is required to explain perception in OVAR. This study investigates, both analytically and computationally, the phase relationship between tilt and translation at different stimulus rates—slow (45°/s) and fast (180°/s), and the three-dimensional shape of predicted perceived motion, under different sets of hypotheses about self-motion perception. We propose that for human motion perception, there is a phase-linking of tilt and translation movements to construct a perception of one’s overall motion path. Alternative hypotheses to achieve the phase match were tested with three-dimensional computational models, comparing the output with published experimental reports. The best fit with experimental data was the hypothesis that the phase of perceived translation was linked to perceived tilt, while the perceived tilt was determined by the GIA. This hypothesis successfully predicted the bottom-pivot cone commonly reported and a reduced sense of tilt

  9. Phase-linking and the perceived motion during off-vertical axis rotation.

    PubMed

    Holly, Jan E; Wood, Scott J; McCollum, Gin

    2010-01-01

    Human off-vertical axis rotation (OVAR) in the dark typically produces perceived motion about a cone, the amplitude of which changes as a function of frequency. This perception is commonly attributed to the fact that both the OVAR and the conical motion have a gravity vector that rotates about the subject. Little-known, however, is that this rotating-gravity explanation for perceived conical motion is inconsistent with basic observations about self-motion perception: (a) that the perceived vertical moves toward alignment with the gravito-inertial acceleration (GIA) and (b) that perceived translation arises from perceived linear acceleration, as derived from the portion of the GIA not associated with gravity. Mathematically proved in this article is the fact that during OVAR these properties imply mismatched phase of perceived tilt and translation, in contrast to the common perception of matched phases which correspond to conical motion with pivot at the bottom. This result demonstrates that an additional perceptual rule is required to explain perception in OVAR. This study investigates, both analytically and computationally, the phase relationship between tilt and translation at different stimulus rates-slow (45 degrees /s) and fast (180 degrees /s), and the three-dimensional shape of predicted perceived motion, under different sets of hypotheses about self-motion perception. We propose that for human motion perception, there is a phase-linking of tilt and translation movements to construct a perception of one's overall motion path. Alternative hypotheses to achieve the phase match were tested with three-dimensional computational models, comparing the output with published experimental reports. The best fit with experimental data was the hypothesis that the phase of perceived translation was linked to perceived tilt, while the perceived tilt was determined by the GIA. This hypothesis successfully predicted the bottom-pivot cone commonly reported and a reduced sense

  10. Eye movements and motion perception induced by off-vertical axis rotation (OVAR) at small angles of tilt after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clement, G.; Darlot, C.; Petropoulos, A.; Berthoz, A.

    1995-01-01

    The nystagmus and motion perception of two astronauts were recorded during Earth-vertical axis rotation and during off-vertical axis rotation (OVAR) before and after 7 days of spaceflight. Postflight, the peak velocity and duration of per- and postrotatory nystagmus during velocity steps about the Earth-vertical axis were the same as preflight values. During OVAR at constant velocity (45/s, tilt angles successively 5, 10, and 15 degrees), the mean horizontal slow-phase eye velocity (bias), produced by the 'velocity storage mechanism' in the vestibular system, and the peak-to-peak amplitude (modulation) in horizontal eye velocity and position, generated from the output of otolith afferents, were also the same before as after flight. There were, however, changes in the vertical eve position and in the perceived body motion during OVAR. The angle of the perceived body path described as a cone was larger in both astronauts postflight. One astronaut experienced either a large cone angle with its axis upright, or a smaller cone angle with its axis tilted backwards, accompanied by an upward vertical eye drift. These results suggest an increase in the sensitivity of the otolithic system after spaceflight and a longer period of readaptation to Earth's gravity for otolith-induced responses than for canal-induced responses. Our data support the hypothesis that just after spaceflight the CNS generally interprets changes in the otolith signals to be due to translation rather than to tilt.

  11. Ocular Reflex Phase During Off-Vertical Axis Rotation In Humans Is Modified By Head-On-Trunk Position

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Scott; Clement, Gilles; Denise, Pierre; Reschke, Millard

    2005-01-01

    Constant velocity Off-Vertical Axis Rotation (OVAR) imposes a continuously varying orientation of the head and body relative to gravity. The ensuing ocular reflexes include modulation of both horizontal and torsional eye velocity as a function of the varying linear acceleration along the lateral plane. The purpose of this study was to examine whether the modulation of these ocular reflexes would be modified by different head-on-trunk positions. Ten human subjects were rotated in darkness about their longitudinal axis 20 deg off-vertical at constant rates of 45 and 180 deg/s, corresponding to 0.125 and 0.5 Hz. Binocular responses were obtained with video-oculography with the head and trunk aligned, and then with the head turned relative to the trunk 40 deg to the right or left of center. Sinusoidal curve fits were used to derive amplitude, phase and bias velocity of the eye movements across multiple cycles for each head-on-trunk position. Consistent with previous studies, the modulation of torsional eye movements was greater at 0.125 Hz while the modulation of horizontal eye movements was greater at 0.5 Hz. Neither amplitude nor bias velocities were significantly altered by head-on-trunk position. The phases of both torsional and horizontal ocular reflexes, on the other hand, shifted towards alignment with the head. These results are consistent with the modulation of torsional and horizontal ocular reflexes during OVAR being primarily mediated by the otoliths in response to the sinusoidally varying linear acceleration along the interaural head axis.

  12. Modulation of vergence by off-vertical yaw axis rotation in the monkey: normal characteristics and effects of space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, M.; Raphan, T.; Kozlovskaya, I.; Cohen, B.

    1996-01-01

    Horizontal movements of both eyes were recorded simultaneously using scleral search coils in 2 rhesus monkeys before and after the COSMOS 2229 space-flight of 1992-1993. Another 9 monkeys were tested at comparable time intervals and served as controls. Ocular vergence, defined as the difference in horizontal position between the left and right eyes, was measured during off-vertical yaw axis rotation (OVAR) in darkness. Vergence was modulated sinusoidally as a function of head position with regard to gravity during OVAR. The amplitude of peak-to-peak modulation increased with increments in tilt of the angle of the rotational axis (OVAR tilt angle) that ranged from 15 degrees to 90 degrees. Of the 11 monkeys tested, 1 had no measurable modulation in vergence. In the other 10, the mean amplitude of the peak to peak modulation was 5.5 degrees +/- 1.3 degrees at 90 degrees tilt. Each of these monkeys had maximal vergence when its nose was pointed close to upward (gravity back; mean phase: -0.9 degree +/- 26 degrees). After space flight, the modulation in vergence was reduced by over 50% for the two flight monkeys, but the phase of vergence modulation was not altered. The reduction in vergence modulation was sustained for the 11-day postflight testing period. We conclude that changes in vergence are induced in monkeys by the sinusoidal component of gravity acting along the naso-occipital axis during yaw axis OVAR, and that the modulation of the vergence reflex is significantly less sensitive to linear acceleration after space flight.

  13. Role of irregular otolith afferents in the steady-state nystagmus during off-vertical axis rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelaki, D. E.; Perachio, A. A.; Mustari, M. J.; Strunk, C. L.

    1992-01-01

    1. During constant velocity off-vertical axis rotations (OVAR) in the dark a compensatory ocular nystagmus is present throughout rotation despite the lack of a maintained signal from the semicircular canals. Lesion experiments and canal plugging have attributed the steady-state ocular nystagmus during OVAR to inputs from the otolith organs and have demonstrated that it depends on an intact velocity storage mechanism. 2. To test whether irregularly discharging otolith afferents play a crucial role in the generation of the steady-state eye nystagmus during OVAR, we have used anodal (inhibitory) currents bilaterally to selectively and reversibly block irregular vestibular afferent discharge. During delivery of DC anodal currents (100 microA) bilaterally to both ears, the slow phase eye velocity of the steady-state nystagmus during OVAR was reduced or completely abolished. The disruption of the steady-state nystagmus was transient and lasted only during the period of galvanic stimulation. 3. To distinguish a possible effect of ablation of the background discharge rates of irregular vestibular afferents on the velocity storage mechanism from specific contributions of the dynamic responses from irregular otolith afferents to the circuit responsible for the generation of the steady-state nystagmus, bilateral DC anodal galvanic stimulation was applied during optokinetic nystagmus (OKN) and optokinetic afternystagmus (OKAN). No change in OKN and OKAN was observed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  14. Human Ocular Counter-Rolling and Roll Tilt Perception during Off-Vertical Axis Rotation after Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clement, Gilles; Denise, Pierre; Reschke, Millard; Wood, Scott J.

    2007-01-01

    Ocular counter-rolling (OCR) induced by whole body tilt in roll has been explored after spaceflight as an indicator of the adaptation of the otolith function to microgravity. It has been claimed that the overall pattern of OCR responses during static body tilt after spaceflight is indicative of a decreased role of the otolith function, but the results of these studies have not been consistent, mostly due to large variations in the OCR within and across individuals. By contrast with static head tilt, off-vertical axis rotation (OVAR) presents the advantage of generating a sinusoidal modulation of OCR, allowing averaged measurements over several cycles, thus improving measurement accuracy. Accordingly, OCR and the sense of roll tilt were evaluated in seven astronauts before and after spaceflight during OVAR at 45 /s in darkness at two angles of tilt (10 and 20 ). There was no significant difference in OCR during OVAR immediately after landing compared to preflight. However, the amplitude of the perceived roll tilt during OVAR was significantly larger immediately postflight, and then returned to control values in the following days. Since the OCR response is predominantly attributed to the shearing force exerted on the utricular macula, the absence of change in OCR postflight suggests that the peripheral otolith organs function normally after short-term spaceflight. However, the increased sense of roll tilt indicates an adaptation in the central processing of gravitational input, presumably related to a re-weigthing of the internal representation of gravitational vertical as a result of adaptation to microgravity.

  15. Neural basis for eye velocity generation in the vestibular nuclei of alert monkeys during off-vertical axis rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reisine, H.; Raphan, T.; Cohen, B. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Activity of "vestibular only" (VO) and "vestibular plus saccade" (VPS) units was recorded in the rostral part of the medial vestibular nucleus and caudal part of the superior vestibular nucleus of alert rhesus monkeys. By estimating the "null axes" of recorded units (n = 79), the optimal plane of activation was approximately the mean plane of reciprocal semicircular canals, i.e., lateral canals, left anterior-right posterior (LARP) canals or right anterior-left posterior (RALP) canals. All units were excited by rotation in a direction that excited a corresponding ipsilateral semicircular canal. Thus, they all displayed a "type I" response. With the animal upright, there were rapid changes in firing rates of both VO and VPS units in response to steps of angular velocity about a vertical axis. The units were bidirectionally activated during vestibular nystagmus (VN), horizontal optokinetic nystagmus (OKN), optokinetic after-nystagmus (OKAN) and off-vertical axis rotation (OVAR). The rising and falling time constants of the responses to rotation indicated that they were closely linked to velocity storage. There were differences between VPS and VO neurons in that activity of VO units followed the expected time course in response to a stimulus even during periods of drowsiness, when eye velocity was reduced. Firing rates of VPS units, on the other hand, were significantly reduced in the drowsy state. Lateral canal-related units had average firing rates that were linearly related to the bias or steady state level of horizontal eye velocity during OVAR over a range of +/- 60 deg/s. These units could be further divided into two classes according to whether they were modulated during OVAR. Non-modulated units (n = 5) were VO types and all modulated units (n = 5) were VPS types. There was no significant difference between the bias level sensitivities relative to eye velocity of the units with and without modulation (P > 0.05). The modulated units had no sustained change in

  16. Human otolith-ocular reflexes during off-vertical axis rotation: effect of frequency on tilt-translation ambiguity and motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Scott J.; Paloski, W. H. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how the modulation of tilt and translation otolith-ocular responses during constant velocity off-vertical axis rotation varies as a function of stimulus frequency. Eighteen human subjects were rotated in darkness about their longitudinal axis 30 degrees off-vertical at stimulus frequencies between 0.05 and 0.8 Hz. The modulation of torsion decreased while the modulation of horizontal slow phase velocity (SPV) increased with increasing frequency. It is inferred that the ambiguity of otolith afferent information is greatest in the frequency region where tilt (torsion) and translational (horizontal SPV) otolith-ocular responses crossover. It is postulated that the previously demonstrated peak in motion sickness susceptibility during linear accelerations around 0.3 Hz is the result of frequency segregation of ambiguous otolith information being inadequate to distinguish between tilt and translation.

  17. Three-dimensional organization of vestibular-related eye movements to off-vertical axis rotation and linear translation in pigeons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, J. D.; Angelaki, D. E.

    1999-01-01

    During linear accelerations, compensatory reflexes should continually occur in order to maintain objects of visual interest as stable images on the retina. In the present study, the three-dimensional organization of the vestibulo-ocular reflex in pigeons was quantitatively examined during linear accelerations produced by constant velocity off-vertical axis yaw rotations and translational motion in darkness. With off-vertical axis rotations, sinusoidally modulated eye-position and velocity responses were observed in all three components, with the vertical and torsional eye movements predominating the response. Peak torsional and vertical eye positions occurred when the head was oriented with the lateral visual axis of the right eye directed orthogonal to or aligned with the gravity vector, respectively. No steady-state horizontal nystagmus was obtained with any of the rotational velocities (8-58 degrees /s) tested. During translational motion, delivered along or perpendicular to the lateral visual axis, vertical and torsional eye movements were elicited. No significant horizontal eye movements were observed during lateral translation at frequencies up to 3 Hz. These responses suggest that, in pigeons, all linear accelerations generate eye movements that are compensatory to the direction of actual or perceived tilt of the head relative to gravity. In contrast, no translational horizontal eye movements, which are known to be compensatory to lateral translational motion in primates, were observed under the present experimental conditions.

  18. Three-dimensional organization of otolith-ocular reflexes in rhesus monkeys. I. Linear acceleration responses during off-vertical axis rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelaki, D. E.; Hess, B. J.

    1996-01-01

    1. The dynamic properties of otolith-ocular reflexes elicited by sinusoidal linear acceleration along the three cardinal head axes were studied during off-vertical axis rotations in rhesus monkeys. As the head rotates in space at constant velocity about an off-vertical axis, otolith-ocular reflexes are elicited in response to the sinusoidally varying linear acceleration (gravity) components along the interaural, nasooccipital, or vertical head axis. Because the frequency of these sinusoidal stimuli is proportional to the velocity of rotation, rotation at low and moderately fast speeds allows the study of the mid-and low-frequency dynamics of these otolith-ocular reflexes. 2. Animals were rotated in complete darkness in the yaw, pitch, and roll planes at velocities ranging between 7.4 and 184 degrees/s. Accordingly, otolith-ocular reflexes (manifested as sinusoidal modulations in eye position and/or slow-phase eye velocity) were quantitatively studied for stimulus frequencies ranging between 0.02 and 0.51 Hz. During yaw and roll rotation, torsional, vertical, and horizontal slow-phase eye velocity was sinusoidally modulated as a function of head position. The amplitudes of these responses were symmetric for rotations in opposite directions. In contrast, mainly vertical slow-phase eye velocity was modulated during pitch rotation. This modulation was asymmetric for rotations in opposite direction. 3. Each of these response components in a given rotation plane could be associated with an otolith-ocular response vector whose sensitivity, temporal phase, and spatial orientation were estimated on the basis of the amplitude and phase of sinusoidal modulations during both directions of rotation. Based on this analysis, which was performed either for slow-phase eye velocity alone or for total eye excursion (including both slow and fast eye movements), two distinct response patterns were observed: 1) response vectors with pronounced dynamics and spatial/temporal properties

  19. Canal and otolith vestibulo-ocular reflexes to vertical and off vertical axis rotations in children learning to walk.

    PubMed

    Wiener-Vacher, S R; Toupet, F; Narcy, P

    1996-09-01

    In order to determine the characteristics of the vestibulo-ocular reflexes (VORs) as a function of age and posturo-motor development, a group of 26 normal children (6 to 25 months old) were tested at three different stages of posturo-motor control: prior to as well as during the first attempts to walk without support, and during the first year of independent walking. The test consisted of electro-oculographic (EOG) recordings of the VOR responses to horizontal semi-circular canal and otolith stimulations. The canal VOR was elicited in seated subjects by rotatory impulsions about a vertical axis (acceleration and deceleration both at 40 degrees/s2, separated by a rotation at 60 degrees/s velocity). The otolith VOR was elicited by inclining the rotating chair by 9 degrees respect to gravity. For the canal VOR, the time constant and the highest initial slow phase velocity were measured. The otolith VOR was characterized by the amplitude of the modulation and the bias (offset of baseline from zero) of the slow phase velocity averaged over 10 to 20 rotation cycles, for both the horizontal and vertical components of the response. The pooled values of these data show that canal VOR parameters did not vary significantly either with age of the children or with their stage of posturo-motor control. However, the otolith VOR parameters changed during the period of learning to walk: the modulation of the horizontal component increased and the modulation of the vertical component decreased significantly. Thus the ability to walk without support is marked by a significant change in the otolith but not canal responses; since the vestibular sensory organs develop anatomically at the same rate these results indicate that central nervous system processors of canal and otolith information develop independently. PMID:8908240

  20. Off-vertical rotation produces conditioned taste aversion and suppressed drinking in mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, R. A.; Lauber, A. H.; Daunton, N. G.; Phillips, M.; Diaz, L.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of off-vertical rotation upon the intake of tap water immediately after rotation and upon conditioned taste aversion were assessed in mice with the tilt of the rotation axis varying from 5 to 20 deg from the earth-vertical. Conditioned taste aversion occurred in all mice that were rotated, but the intake of tap water was suppressed only in mice that were rotated at 15 or 20 deg of tilt. The greater suppression of tap-water intake and the stronger conditioned aversion in the mouse as the angle of tilt was increased in this experiment are consistent with predictions from similar experiments with human subjects, where motion sickness develops more rapidly as the angle of tilt is increased. It was suggested that off-vertical rotation may be a useful procedure for insuring experimental control over vestibular stimulation in animal studies of motion sickness.

  1. Perception of the upright and susceptibility to motion sickness as functions of angle of tilt and angular velocity in off-vertical rotation. [human tolerance to angular accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, E. F., II; Graybiel, A.

    1973-01-01

    Motion sickness susceptibility of four normal subjects was measured in terms of duration of exposure necessary to evoke moderate malaise (MIIA) as a function of velocity in a chair rotated about a central axis tilted 10 deg with respect to gravitational upright. The subjects had little or no susceptibility to this type of rotation at 2.5 and 5.0 rpm, but with further increases in rate, the MIIA endpoint was always reached and with ever shorter test durations. Minimal provocative periods for all subjects were found at 15 or 20 rpm. Higher rotational rates dramatically reversed the vestibular stressor effect, and the subjects as a group tended to reach a plateau of relatively low susceptibility at 40 and 45 rpm. At these higher velocities, furthermore, the subjects essentially lost their sensation of being tilted off vertical. In the second half of the study, the effect of tilt angle was varied while the rotation rate was maintained at a constant 17.5 rpm. Two subjects were completely resistant to symptoms of motion sickness when rotated at 2.5 deg off vertical; with greater off-vertical angles, the susceptibility of all subjects increased sharply at first, then tapered off in a manner reflecting a Fechnerian function.

  2. Solar rotating magnetic dipole?. [around axis perpendicular to rotation axis of the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonucci, E.

    1974-01-01

    A magnetic dipole rotating around an axis perpendicular to the rotation axis of the sun can account for the characteristics of the surface large-scale solar magnetic fields through the solar cycle. The polarity patterns of the interplanetary magnetic field, predictable from this model, agree with the observed interplanetary magnetic sector structure.

  3. Actuator assembly including a single axis of rotation locking member

    DOEpatents

    Quitmeyer, James N.; Benson, Dwayne M.; Geck, Kellan P.

    2009-12-08

    An actuator assembly including an actuator housing assembly and a single axis of rotation locking member fixedly attached to a portion of the actuator housing assembly and an external mounting structure. The single axis of rotation locking member restricting rotational movement of the actuator housing assembly about at least one axis. The single axis of rotation locking member is coupled at a first end to the actuator housing assembly about a Y axis and at a 90.degree. angle to an X and Z axis providing rotation of the actuator housing assembly about the Y axis. The single axis of rotation locking member is coupled at a second end to a mounting structure, and more particularly a mounting pin, about an X axis and at a 90.degree. angle to a Y and Z axis providing rotation of the actuator housing assembly about the X axis. The actuator assembly is thereby restricted from rotation about the Z axis.

  4. Interplay between tilted and principal axis rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, Pradip

    2014-08-14

    At IUAC-INGA, our group has studied four neutron rich nuclei of mass-110 region, namely {sup 109,110}Ag and {sup 108,110}Cd. These nuclei provide the unique platform to study the interplay between Tilted and Principal axis rotation since these are moderately deformed and at the same time, shears structures are present at higher spins. The salient features of the high spin behaviors of these nuclei will be discussed which are the signatures of this interplay.

  5. Spin-stabilized magnetic levitation without vertical axis of rotation

    DOEpatents

    Romero, Louis; Christenson, Todd; Aaronson, Gene

    2009-06-09

    The symmetry properties of a magnetic levitation arrangement are exploited to produce spin-stabilized magnetic levitation without aligning the rotational axis of the rotor with the direction of the force of gravity. The rotation of the rotor stabilizes perturbations directed parallel to the rotational axis.

  6. Registration of the rotation axis in X-ray tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yimeng; Yang, Feifei; Hingerl, Ferdinand F.; Xiao, Xianghui; Liu, Yijin; Wu, Ziyu; Benson, Sally M.; Toney, Michael F.; Andrews, Joy C.; Pianetta, Piero A.

    2015-01-01

    There is high demand for efficient, robust and automated routines for tomographic data reduction, particularly for synchrotron data. Registration of the rotation axis in data processing is a critical step affecting the quality of the reconstruction and is not easily implemented with automation. Existing methods for calculating the center of rotation have been reviewed and an improved algorithm to register the rotation axis in tomographic data is presented. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated using synchrotron-based microtomography data on geological samples with and without artificial reduction of the signal-to-noise ratio. The proposed method improves the reconstruction quality by correcting both the tilting error and the translational offset of the rotation axis. The limitation of this promising method is also discussed.

  7. Abrupt change of rotation axis in {sup 109}Ag

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, P.; Pal, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Goswami, A.; Sarkar, M. Saha; Sun, Y.; Rao, P. V. Madhusudhana; Bhowmik, R. K.; Kumar, R.; Madhavan, N.; Muralithar, S.; Singh, R. P.; Jain, H. C.; Joshi, P. K.; Amita

    2008-08-15

    The electromagnetic transition rates for all the high spin levels of the yrast sequence of {sup 109}Ag have been measured. The observed behavior of the magnetic dipole transition rates as a function of angular momentum establishes that there is a sudden change in rotation axis associated with rotational alignment of two neutrons. The projected shell model calculations give a consistent picture of the observed phenomena in {sup 109}Ag.

  8. Rotation axis demultiplexer enabling simultaneous computed tomography of multiple samples

    PubMed Central

    Trtik, Pavel; Geiger, Fabian; Hovind, Jan; Lang, Udo; Lehmann, Eberhard; Vontobel, Peter; Peetermans, Steven

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a device that allows for simultaneous tomographic imaging of samples on three independent rotational axes. This rotation axis demultiplexer (POLYTOM) is equipped with anti-backlash gears and placed on a standard sample rotation stage thus allowing for the transformation of the input rotation axis onto two additional parallel vertical axes. Consequently, three times the number of samples can be investigated within a given time period, thereby reducing the acquisition time of multiple sample tomographic investigations by a factor of three. The results of our pilot experiments using neutron tomographic imaging are presented. We foresee that the device will be of particular use for tomographic imaging of elongated samples at low-flux (e.g. neutron) sources; however, its use for the more widespread types of imaging techniques (e.g. X-rays) is not ruled out. The highlights of this new device for the purpose of the (neutron) computed tomography are: • Anti-backlash transformation of the input rotation onto two additional rotational axes. • Reduction of the acquisition time of the multiple sample tomographic investigations by a factor of three. • Low-cost. PMID:27158597

  9. Rotation axis demultiplexer enabling simultaneous computed tomography of multiple samples.

    PubMed

    Trtik, Pavel; Geiger, Fabian; Hovind, Jan; Lang, Udo; Lehmann, Eberhard; Vontobel, Peter; Peetermans, Steven

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a device that allows for simultaneous tomographic imaging of samples on three independent rotational axes. This rotation axis demultiplexer (POLYTOM) is equipped with anti-backlash gears and placed on a standard sample rotation stage thus allowing for the transformation of the input rotation axis onto two additional parallel vertical axes. Consequently, three times the number of samples can be investigated within a given time period, thereby reducing the acquisition time of multiple sample tomographic investigations by a factor of three. The results of our pilot experiments using neutron tomographic imaging are presented. We foresee that the device will be of particular use for tomographic imaging of elongated samples at low-flux (e.g. neutron) sources; however, its use for the more widespread types of imaging techniques (e.g. X-rays) is not ruled out. The highlights of this new device for the purpose of the (neutron) computed tomography are: •Anti-backlash transformation of the input rotation onto two additional rotational axes.•Reduction of the acquisition time of the multiple sample tomographic investigations by a factor of three.•Low-cost. PMID:27158597

  10. A rotating inertial navigation system with the rotating axis error compensation consisting of fiber optic gyros

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Feng; Hu, Bai-qing; Qin, Fang-jun; Luo, Yin-bo

    2012-03-01

    An effective and flexible rotation and compensation scheme is designed to improve the accuracy of rotating inertial navigation system (RINS). The accuracy of single-axial RINS is limited by the errors on the rotating axis. A novel inertial measurement unit (IMU) scheme with error compensation for the rotating axis of fiber optic gyros (FOG) RINS is presented. In the scheme, two couples of inertial sensors with similar error characteristics are mounted oppositely on the rotating axes to compensate the sensors error. Without any change for the rotation cycle, this scheme improves the system's precision and reliability, and also offers the redundancy for the system. The results of 36 h navigation simulation prove that the accuracy of the system is improved notably compared with normal strapdown INS, besides the heading accuracy is increased by 3 times compared with single-axial RINS, and the position accuracy is improved by 1 order of magnitude.

  11. Precision grip responses to unexpected rotational perturbations scale with axis of rotation.

    PubMed

    De Gregorio, Michael; Santos, Veronica J

    2013-04-01

    It has been established that rapid, pulse-like increases in precision grip forces ("catch-up responses") are elicited by unexpected translational perturbations and that response latency and strength scale according to the direction of linear slip relative to the hand as well as gravity. To determine if catch-up responses are elicited by unexpected rotational perturbations and are strength-, axis-, and/or direction-dependent, we imposed step torque loads about each of two axes which were defined relative to the subject's hand: the distal-proximal axis away from and towards the subject's palm, and the grip axis which connects the two fingertips. Precision grip responses were dominated initially by passive mechanics and then by active, unimodal catch-up responses. First dorsal interosseous activity, marking the start of the catch-up response, began 71-89 ms after the onset of perturbation. The onset latency, shape, and duration (217-231 ms) of the catch-up response were not affected by the axis, direction, or magnitude of the rotational perturbation, while strength was scaled by axis of rotation and slip conditions. Rotations about the grip axis that tilted the object away from the palm and induced rotational slip elicited stronger catch-up responses than rotations about the distal-proximal axis that twisted the object between the digits. To our knowledge, this study is the first to investigate grip responses to unexpected torque loads and to show characteristic, yet axis-dependent, catch-up responses for conditions other than pure linear slip. PMID:23499162

  12. X- And y-axis driver for rotating microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Weinstein, Berthold W.

    1979-01-01

    Apparatus for precise control of the motion and position of microspheres for examination of their interior and/or exterior. The apparatus includes an x- and y-axis driver mechanism controlled, for example, by a minicomputer for selectively rotating microspheres retained between a pair of manipulator arms having flat, smooth end surfaces. The driver mechanism includes an apertured plate and ball arrangement which provided for coupled equal and opposite movement of the manipulator arms in two perpendicular directions.

  13. 24. UPPER STATION, LOWER FLOOR, MOTOR ROOM, OFF VERTICAL DEFLECTOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. UPPER STATION, LOWER FLOOR, MOTOR ROOM, OFF VERTICAL DEFLECTOR SHEAVE, MOTOR, BRAKE, PINION SHAFT, DRIVE WHEEL. - Monongahela Incline Plane, Connecting North side of Grandview Avenue at Wyoming Street with West Carson Street near Smithfield Street, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  14. A Singular Limit Problem for Rotating Capillary Fluids with Variable Rotation Axis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanelli, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    In the present paper we study a singular perturbation problem for a Navier-Stokes-Korteweg model with Coriolis force. Namely, we perform the incompressible and fast rotation asymptotics simultaneously, while we keep the capillarity coefficient constant in order to capture surface tension effects in the limit. We consider here the case of variable rotation axis: we prove the convergence to a linear parabolic-type equation with variable coefficients. The proof of the result relies on compensated compactness arguments. Besides, we look for minimal regularity assumptions on the variations of the axis.

  15. Lightcurves and the axis of rotation of 433 Eros

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunlap, J. L.

    1976-01-01

    Ten lightcurves and UBV photometry of 433 Eros were obtained between August 1972 and May 1975. The absolute magnitude of the lightcurve maximum is 10.75 and the phase coefficient is 0.025 mag/deg. There may be a small difference in B-V color between the northern and southern hemispheres. The pole of the axis of rotation is directed toward 16 deg, ecliptic longitude and 12 deg ecliptic latitude, respectively, and the rotation is direct with a sidereal period of 5 hr 16 min 13.4 sec. The dimensions derived from the polarimetric albedo and the lightcurve amplitudes are 12 km by 12 km by 31 km for a smooth cylinder with hemispherical ends.

  16. Characteristics of Friedel pairs and diffraction contrast tomography with non-perpendicular rotation axis.

    PubMed

    Yi, Qiru; Li, Gang; Zhang, Jie; Luo, Sheng Nian; Fan, Duan; Gao, Zhenhua; Wang, Yanping; Gao, Guanfeng; Jiang, Shiping; Jiang, Xiaoming

    2015-07-01

    The characteristics of Friedel pairs in diffraction contrast tomography (DCT) are studied in the condition that the rotation axis of the sample is not exactly perpendicular to the incident X-ray direction. For the rotation axis approximately aligned along the vertical direction, the Friedel pairs close to the horizontal plane are insensitive to the non-perpendicularity of the rotation axis, and can be used to refine the sample-to-detector distance and X-ray energy, while the Friedel pairs close to the vertical direction are sensitive to the non-perpendicularity of the rotation axis, and can be used to determine the rotation axis orientation. The correct matching proportion of Friedel pairs decreases with increasing non-perpendicularity of the rotation axis. A method of data processing considering rotation axis misalignment is proposed, which significantly increases the correct matching and indexing proportions of the diffraction spots. A pure aluminium polycrystalline sample is investigated using DCT at beamline 4W1A of Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility. Based on the analysis of Friedel pairs, the sample-to-detector distance and X-ray energy are refined to be 8.67 mm and 20.04 keV, respectively. The non-perpendicular angle of the rotation axis is calculated to be 0.10°. With these refined geometric parameters, the matching proportion of the spatial position of diffraction spots is 90.62%. Three-dimensional reconstruction of the sample with 13 grains is realised using the algebraic reconstruction technique. It is demonstrated that the precise correction of the orientation of the sample rotation axis is effective in DCT suffering from rotation axis misalignment, and the higher accuracy in determining the rotation axis is expected to improve the reconstruction precision of grains. PMID:26134812

  17. Sequence-dependent rotation axis changes and interaction torque use in overarm throwing.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Clint; Rezzoug, Nasser; Gorce, Philippe; Venture, Gentiane; Isableu, Brice

    2016-01-01

    We examined the role of rotation axes during an overarm throwing task. Participants performed such task and were asked to throw a ball at maximal velocity at a target. The purpose of this study was to examine whether the minimum inertia axis would be exploited during the throwing phases, a time when internal-external rotations of the shoulder are particularly important. A motion capture system was used to evaluate the performance and to compute the potential axes of rotation (minimum inertia axis, shoulder-centre of mass axis and the shoulder-elbow axis). More specifically, we investigated whether a velocity-dependent change in rotational axes can be observed in the different throwing phases and whether the control obeys the principle of minimum inertia resistance. Our results showed that the limbs' rotational axis mainly coincides with the minimum inertia axis during the cocking phase and with the shoulder-elbow axis during the acceleration phase. Besides these rotation axes changes, the use of interaction torque is also sequence-dependent. The sequence-dependent rotation axes changes associated with the use of interaction torque during the acceleration phase could be a key factor in the production of hand velocity at ball release. PMID:26264114

  18. Vertical Axis Rotational Motion Cues in Hovering Flight Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, Jeffrey A.; Johnson, Walter W.; Showman, Robert D. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    representative of the AH-64 pilot location. Six test pilots flew three tasks that were specifically designed to represent a broad class of situations in which both lateral and yaw motion cues may be useful. For the first task, the pilot controlled only the yaw axis and was required to rapidly acquire a North heading from 15 deg yaw offsets to either the East or West. This task allowed for full, or 1:1, motion to be used in all axes (yaw, lateral, and longitudinal). The second task was a 10 sec., 180 deg. pedal turn over a runway, but with the pilot only controlling the yaw degree-of-freedom. The position of the vehicle's center-of-mass remained fixed. This maneuver was taken from a current U.S. Army rotary wing design standard5 and is representative of a maneuver performed for acceptance of military helicopters; however, it does not allow for full 1:1 motion, since the simulator cab cannot rotate 180 deg. The third task required the pilot to perform a rapid 9 ft climb at a constant heading. This task was challenging, because rapid collective lever movement in the unaugmented AH64 results in a substantial yawing moment (due to engine torque) that must be countered by the pilot. This task also had full motion in all axes, but, in this case, the pilot had two axes to control simultaneously, rather than one as in the previous tasks. Four motion configurations were examined for each task: full motion (except for the 180 deg turn, for which the motion system was configured to provide as much motion as possible), full linear with no yaw motion, full yaw with no linear motion, and no motion. Each configuration was flown four times in a randomized test matrix, and the pilots were not informed of the configuration given. Vehicle state data were recorded for objective performance comparisons, and pilots provided subjective comments and ratings. As part of the pilots' evaluation, they were asked to rate the compensation required, the overall fidelity of the motion as compared to real flight

  19. Coupling of rotational cortical flow, asymmetric midbody positioning, and spindle rotation mediates dorsoventral axis formation in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Singh, Deepika; Pohl, Christian

    2014-02-10

    Cortical flows mediate anteroposterior polarization in Caenorhabditis elegans by generating two mutually exclusive membrane domains. However, factors downstream of anteroposterior polarity that establish the dorsoventral axis remain elusive. Here, we show that rotational cortical flow orthogonal to the anteroposterior axis during the division of the AB blastomere in the two-cell embryo positions the cytokinetic midbody remnant of the previous division asymmetrically at the future ventral side of the embryo. In the neighboring P1 blastomere, astral microtubules contact a transient PAR-2-dependent actin coat that forms asymmetrically onto the midbody remnant-P1 interface. Ablation of the midbody remnant or perturbation of rotational cortical flow reveals that microtubule-midbody remnant contacts are crucial for P1 spindle rotation and dorsoventral axis formation. Thus, our findings suggest a mechanism for dorsoventral patterning that relies on coupling of anteroposterior polarity, rotational cortical flow, midbody remnant positioning, and spindle orientation. PMID:24525186

  20. Effects of the axis of rotation and primordially solicited limb of high level athletes in a mental rotation task.

    PubMed

    Habacha, Hamdi; Lejeune-Poutrain, Laure; Margas, Nicolas; Molinaro, Corinne

    2014-10-01

    A recent set of studies has investigated the selective effects of particular physical activities that require full-body rotations, such as gymnastics and wrestling (Moreau, Clerc, Mansy-Dannay, & Guerrien, 2012; Steggemann, Engbert, & Weigelt, 2011), and demonstrated that practicing these activities imparts a clear advantage in in-plane body rotation performance. Other athletes, such as handball and soccer players, whose activities do require body rotations may have more experience with in-depth rotations. The present study examined the effect of two components that are differently solicited in sport practices on the mental rotation ability: the rotation axis (in-plane, in-depth) and the predominantly used limb (arms, legs). Handball players, soccer players, and gymnasts were asked to rotate handball and soccer strike images mentally, which were presented in different in-plane and in-depth orientations. The results revealed that handball and soccer players performed the in-depth rotations faster than in-plane rotations; however, the two rotation axes did not differ in gymnasts. In addition, soccer players performed the mental rotations of handball strike images slower. Our findings suggest that the development of mental rotation tasks that involve the major components of a physical activity allows and is necessary for specifying the links between this activity and the mental rotation performance. PMID:25064695

  1. Tilted axis rotation in odd-odd {sup 164}Tm

    SciTech Connect

    Reviol, W.; Riedinger, L.L.; Wang, X.Z.; Zhang, J.Y.

    1996-12-31

    Ten band structures are observed in {sup 164}Tm, among them sets of parallel and anti-parallel couplings of the proton and neutron spins. The Tilted Axis Cranking scheme is applied for the first time to an odd-odd nucleus in a prominent region of nuclear deformation.

  2. Rotation Angle for the Optimum Tracking of One-Axis Trackers

    SciTech Connect

    Marion, W. F.; Dobos, A. P.

    2013-07-01

    An equation for the rotation angle for optimum tracking of one-axis trackers is derived along with equations giving the relationships between the rotation angle and the surface tilt and azimuth angles. These equations are useful for improved modeling of the solar radiation available to a collector with tracking constraints and for determining the appropriate motor revolutions for optimum tracking.

  3. Vertical-axis rotations determined from paleomagnetism of Mesozoic and Cenozoic strata of the Bolivian Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, David R.; Butler, Robert F.; Sempere, Thierry

    2004-07-01

    Thermal demagnetization and principal component analysis allowed determination of characteristic remanent magnetization (ChRM) directions from 256 sites at 22 localities in Mesozoic and Cenozoic sedimentary strata of the Bolivian Altiplano and Eastern Cordillera. An inclination-only fold test of site-mean ChRM directions from Cenozoic units (principally the Santa Lucía Formation) indicates optimum unfolding at 97.1% unfolding, consistent with a primary origin for the ChRM. For Mesozoic strata, optimum unfolding occurred at 89.2%, perhaps indicating secondary remagnetization at some locations. For Cenozoic units, comparison of locality-mean directions with expected paleomagnetic directions indicates vertical-axis rotations from 33° counterclockwise to 24° clockwise. Euler pole analysis of along-strike variation in crustal shortening within the Subandean and Interandean zones indicates 18° clockwise rotation south of the axis of curvature of the Bolivian Andes and 6° counterclockwise rotation northwest of the axis during the past 10 m.y. Along-strike variation of shortening within the Eastern Cordillera indicates 8° clockwise rotation south of the axis and 8° counterclockwise rotation northwest of the axis from 35 to 10 Ma. These vertical-axis rotations produced by along-strike variations in crustal shortening during development of the Bolivian fold-thrust belt agree well with observed rotations determined from paleomagnetism of Cenozoic rocks in the Eastern Cordillera and in the Subandean and Interandean zones. However, local rotations are required to account for complex rotations in the Cochabamba Basin and within the Altiplano. The curvature of the Bolivian Andes has been progressively enhanced during Cenozoic fold-thrust belt deformation.

  4. Long-axis rotation: a missing degree of freedom in avian bipedal locomotion.

    PubMed

    Kambic, Robert E; Roberts, Thomas J; Gatesy, Stephen M

    2014-08-01

    Ground-dwelling birds are typically characterized as erect bipeds having hind limbs that operate parasagittally. Consequently, most previous research has emphasized flexion/extension angles and moments as calculated from a lateral perspective. Three-dimensional (3D) motion analyses have documented non-planar limb movements, but the skeletal kinematics underlying changes in foot orientation and transverse position remain unclear. In particular, long-axis rotation of the proximal limb segments is extremely difficult to measure with topical markers. Here, we present six degree of freedom skeletal kinematic data from maneuvering guineafowl acquired by marker-based XROMM (X-ray Reconstruction of Moving Morphology). Translations and rotations of the hips, knees, ankles and pelvis were derived from animated bone models using explicit joint coordinate systems. We distinguished sidesteps, sidestep yaws, crossover yaws, sidestep turns and crossover turns, but birds often performed a sequence of blended partial maneuvers. Long-axis rotation of the femur (up to 38 deg) modulated the foot's transverse position. Long-axis rotation of the tibiotarsus (up to 65 deg) also affected medio-lateral positioning, but primarily served to either re-orient a swing phase foot or yaw the body about a stance phase foot. Tarsometatarsal long-axis rotation was minimal, as was hip, knee and ankle abduction/adduction. Despite having superficially hinge-like joints, birds coordinate substantial long-axis rotations of the hips and knees to execute complex 3D maneuvers while striking a diversity of non-planar poses. PMID:24855675

  5. Displacements and rotations of a body moving about an arbitrary axis in a global reference frame

    SciTech Connect

    Hollerbach, K.; Hollister, A.

    1995-11-01

    Measurement of human joint motion frequently involves the use of markers to describe joint motion in a global reference frame. Results may be quite arbitrary if the reference frame is not properly chosen with respect to the joint`s rotational axis(es). In nature joint axes can exist at any orientation and location relative to an arbitrarily chosen global reference frame. An arbitrary axis is any axis that is not coincident with a reference coordinate. Calculations are made of the errors that result when joint motion occurs about an arbitrary axis in a global reference frame.

  6. Binocular Coordination of the Human Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex during Off-axis Pitch Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, S. J.; Reschke, M. F.; Kaufman, G. D.; Black, F. O.; Paloski, W. H.

    2006-01-01

    Head movements in the sagittal pitch plane typically involve off-axis rotation requiring both vertical and horizontal vergence ocular reflexes to compensate for angular and translational motion relative to visual targets of interest. The purpose of this study was to compare passive pitch VOR responses during rotation about an Earth-vertical axis (canal only cues) with off-axis rotation (canal and otolith cues). Methods. Eleven human subjects were oscillated sinusoidally at 0.13, 0.3 and 0.56 Hz while lying left-side down with the interaural axis either aligned with the axis of rotation or offset by 50 cm. In a second set of measurements, twelve subjects were also tested during sinusoidally varying centrifugation over the same frequency range. The modulation of vertical and horizontal vergence ocular responses was measured with a binocular videography system. Results. Off-axis pitch rotation enhanced the vertical VOR at lower frequencies and enhanced the vergence VOR at higher frequencies. During sinusoidally varying centrifugation, the opposite trend was observed for vergence, with both vertical and vergence vestibulo-ocular reflexes being suppressed at the highest frequency. Discussion. These differential effects of off-axis rotation over the 0.13 to 0.56 Hz range are consistent with the hypothesis that otolith-ocular reflexes are segregated in part on the basis of stimulus frequency. At the lower frequencies, tilt otolith-ocular responses compensate for declining canal input. At higher frequencies, translational otolith-ocular reflexes compensate for declining visual contributions to the kinematic demands required for fixating near targets.

  7. Off-axis illumination in object-rotation diffraction tomography for enhanced alignment and resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostencka, Julianna; Kozacki, Tomasz

    2015-05-01

    Optical diffraction tomography (ODT) is a non-invasive method for quantitative measurement of micrometre-sized samples. In ODT a series of multiple holograms captured for various illumination directions with respect to a sample is processed using a tomographic reconstruction algorithm. The result of tomographic evaluation is 3D distribution of refractive index. Data acquisition in ODT is commonly realized in two ways, either by rotating a sample under fixed illumination and observation directions (object rotation configuration - ORC), or by scanning the illumination direction of a fixed sample (illumination scanning configuration - ISC). From the purely theoretical standpoint, the ORC configuration is superior to ISC due to larger (in terms of volume) and more isotropic optical transfer function. However, the theoretical maximal resolution achievable with ORC is lower than that provided with ISC. Moreover, the quality of tomographic reconstructions in ORC is significantly degraded due to experimental difficulties, including problematic determination of location of the rotation axis. This applies particularly to displacement of the rotation axis from the infocus plane that is either disregarded or detected with object-dependent autofocusing algorithms, which do not provide sufficient accuracy. In this paper we propose a new ODT approach, which provides solution to the both mentioned problems of ORC - the resolution limit and the rotation axis misalignment problem. The proposed tomographic method, besides rotating a sample in a full angle of 360°, uses simultaneous illumination from two fixed, highly off-axis directions. This modification enables enlarging the ORC optical transfer function up to the ISC limit. Moreover, the system enables implementation of an accurate, efficient and object-independent autofocusing method, which takes advantage of the off-axis illumination. The autofocusing method provides accurate and reliable detection of axial location of the

  8. Nystagmus responses in a group of normal humans during earth-horizontal axis rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, Conrad, III; Furman, Joseph M. R.

    1989-01-01

    Horizontal eye movement responses to earth-horizontal yaw axis rotation were evaluated in 50 normal human subjects who were uniformly distributed in age (20-69 years) and each age group was then divided by gender. Subjects were rotated with eyes open in the dark, using clockwise and counter-clockwise 60 deg velocity trapezoids. The nystagmus slow component velocity is analyzed. It is shown that, despite large intersubject variability, parameters which describe earth-horizontal yaw axis responses are loosely interrelated, and some of them vary significantly with gender and age.

  9. Earth horizontal axis rotational responses in patients with unilateral peripheral vestibular deficits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furman, Joseph M. R.; Kamerer, Donald B.; Wall, Conrad, III

    1989-01-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) of five patients with surgically confirmed unilateral peripheral vestibular lesions is evaluated. Testing used both earth vertical axis (EVA) and earth horizontal axis (EHA) yaw rotation. Results indicated that the patients had short VOR time constants, asymmetric responses to both EVA and EHA rotation, and normal EHA modulation components. These findings suggest that unilateral peripheral vestibular loss causes a shortened VOR time constant even with the addition of dynamic otolithic stimulation and causes an asymmetry in semicircular canal-ocular reflexes and one aspect of otolith-ocular reflexes.

  10. Measurement errors induced by axis tilt of biplates in dual-rotating compensator Mueller matrix ellipsometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Honggang; Zhang, Chuanwei; Jiang, Hao; Chen, Xiuguo; Li, Weiqi; Liu, Shiyuan

    2015-06-01

    Dual-rotating compensator Mueller matrix ellipsometer (DRC-MME) has been designed and applied as a powerful tool for the characterization of thin films and nanostructures. The compensators are indispensable optical components and their performances affect the precision and accuracy of DRC-MME significantly. Biplates made of birefringent crystals are commonly used compensators in the DRC-MME, and their optical axes invariably have tilt errors due to imperfect fabrication and improper installation in practice. The axis tilt error between the rotation axis and the light beam will lead to a continuous vibration in the retardance of the rotating biplate, which further results in significant measurement errors in the Mueller matrix. In this paper, we propose a simple but valid formula for the retardance calculation under arbitrary tilt angle and azimuth angle to analyze the axis tilt errors in biplates. We further study the relations between the measurement errors in the Mueller matrix and the biplate axis tilt through simulations and experiments. We find that the axis tilt errors mainly affect the cross-talk from linear polarization to circular polarization and vice versa. In addition, the measurement errors in Mueller matrix increase acceleratively with the axis tilt errors in biplates, and the optimal retardance for reducing these errors is about 80°. This work can be expected to provide some guidences for the selection, installation and commissioning of the biplate compensator in DRC-MME design.

  11. Long-axis rotation: the missing link in proximal-to-distal segmental sequencing.

    PubMed

    Marshall, R N; Elliott, B C

    2000-04-01

    Most assessments of segmental sequencing in throwing, striking or kicking have indicated a proximal-to-distal sequencing of end-point linear speeds, joint angular velocities, segment angular velocities and resultant joint moments. However, the role of long-axis rotations has not been adequately quantified and located in the proximal-to-distal sequence. The timing and importance of upper arm internal-external rotation and pronation-supination in the development of racquet head speed have been examined in the tennis serve and squash forehand drive and considered in relation to conventional concepts of proximal-to-distal sequencing. Both long-axis rotations reached their peak angular speeds late in both strokes, typically after shoulder flexion-extension, shoulder abduction-adduction and elbow extension. These results clarify and confirm the importance of upper limb long-axis rotations in the production of racquet head speed. It appears that traditional proximal-to-distal sequencing concepts are inadequate to describe accurately the complexity of the tennis serve or squash forehand drive. It is essential to consider upper arm and forearm longitudinal axis rotations in explaining the mechanics of these movements and in developing coaching emphases, strength training schedules and injury prevention programmes. PMID:10824641

  12. Triaxial shape with rotation around the longest principal axis in {sup 142}Gd

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsson, B. G.; Ragnarsson, I.; Bengtsson, R.; Lieder, E. O.; Lieder, R. M.; Pasternak, A. A.

    2008-09-15

    The cranking model is used to describe rotational bands. We investigate the approach of using diabatic configurations and minimizing the particle-number projected energy in a mesh of both {lambda},{delta} and deformation parameters. We use the method to interpret recent experimental data in {sup 142}Gd and conclude that for the highest spin states observed (I{approx_equal}30), the nucleus is triaxial and builds spin by rotating around the classically unfavored longest axis.

  13. Visual-vestibular interaction in humans during earth-horizontal axis rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, Conrad, III; Furman, Joseph M. R.

    1990-01-01

    Visual-vestibular interaction using 60 percent constant velocity earth horizontal axis yaw rotation, simulating both the horizontal semicircular canals and the otolith organs, was measured in seven human subjects. Subjects were tested with their eyes open in the dark (EOD) while fixating upon a target rotating with them (FIX), and while observing stationary optokinetic stripes (VVR). Resulting nystagmus slow component velocity (SCV) was analyzed for EOD, FIX, and VVR conditions. It is concluded that the visual-vestibular interactions during EHA differ significantly from those during rotation about the vertical; specifically, there is a nonlinear interaction between linear acceleration and optokinetic nystagmus.

  14. Forced vibration analysis of rotating structures with application to vertical axis wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobitz, D. W.

    Predictive methods for the dynamic analysis of wind turbine systems are important for assessing overall structural integrity and fatigue life. For the former, the identification of resonance points (spectral analysis) is of primary concern. For the latter forced vibration analysis is necessary. These analyses are complicated by the fact that, for a spinning turbine, the stress-producing deformations take place in both fixed and rotating reference systems simultaneously. As an example, the tower of a horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT) must be analyzed in a fixed frame, and the rotor in a rotating one. Forced vibration analysis is further complicated in that accurate models need to be developed for aeroload prediction. Methods which are available for forced vibration analysis of both horizontal and vertical axis machines are identified and the method which was developed for vertical axis wind turbines is emphasized, with some comparisons of the predictions to experimental data.

  15. Measurement of angle and axis of rotation in a carousel interferometer: a detailed analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, Ghazanfar; Ikram, Masroor

    2010-02-20

    A detailed analysis of a carousel interferometer is presented for the measurement of an unknown angle and axis of rotation. The technique exploits a set of compensator glass plates and a right-angle prism that is placed in each of the two arms of the interferometer. The two sets are placed at the same rotational stage, while the end mirrors of the interferometer are static. When rotation takes place, individual and relative optical path differences are generated in the two beams of the interferometer. The generated phase differences contribute toward finding the angle and axis of rotation. The analysis is presented for any initial position of the interferometer, i.e., the radial vector from the axis of rotation to the apex of one of the prisms used. The results show the slight variations in the error and nonlinearity when different parameters are manipulated. Moreover, the trade-off between the maximum size of the prisms and the radial distances are also presented.

  16. Attitude Heading Reference System Using MEMS Inertial Sensors with Dual-Axis Rotation

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Li; Ye, Lingyun; Song, Kaichen; Zhou, Yang

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a low cost and small size attitude and heading reference system based on MEMS inertial sensors. A dual-axis rotation structure with a proper rotary scheme according to the design principles is applied in the system to compensate for the attitude and heading drift caused by the large gyroscope biases. An optimization algorithm is applied to compensate for the installation angle error between the body frame and the rotation table's frame. Simulations and experiments are carried out to evaluate the performance of the AHRS. The results show that the proper rotation could significantly reduce the attitude and heading drifts. Moreover, the new AHRS is not affected by magnetic interference. After the rotation, the attitude and heading are almost just oscillating in a range. The attitude error is about 3° and the heading error is less than 3° which are at least 5 times better than the non-rotation condition. PMID:25268911

  17. Antimagnetic rotation in 108,110In with tilted axis cranking relativistic mean-field approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wu-Ji; Xu, Hai-Dan; Li, Jian; Liu, Yong-Hao; Ma, Ke-Yan; Yang, Dong; Lu, Jing-Bing; Ma, Ying-Jun

    2016-08-01

    Based on tilted axis cranking relativistic mean-field theory within point-coupling interaction PC-PK1, the rotational structure and the characteristic features of antimagnetic rotation for ΔI = 2 bands in 108,110In are studied. Tilted axis cranking relativistic mean-field calculations reproduce the experimental energy spectrum well and are in agreement with the experimental I ∼ ω plot, although the calculated spin overestimates the experimental values. In addition, the two-shears-like mechanism in candidate antimagnetic rotation bands is clearly illustrated and the contributions from two-shears-like orbits, neutron (gd) orbits above Z = 50 shell and Z = 50, N = 50 core are investigated microscopically. The predicted B(E2), dynamic moment of inertia ℑ(2), deformation parameters β and γ, and ℑ(2)/B(E2) ratios in tilted axis cranking relativistic mean-field calculations are discussed and the characteristic features of antimagnetic rotation for the bands before and after alignment are shown. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11205068, 11205069, 11405072, 11475072, 11547308) and China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (2012M520667)

  18. Is the earth's dipole actually inclined with respect to the rotation axis?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akasofu, S.-I.; Saito, T.

    1990-01-01

    Planetary exploration by deep space probes in recent years has shown that the dipole moment of some magnetized planets has a surprisingly large inclination angle with respect to the rotation axis. Applying the method developed for the source surface magnetic field of the sun (a spherical surface of 2.5 solar radii), it is suggested that the main dipole of the earth and the magnetized planets may actually be axial (the magnetic moment being parallel or antiparallel to the rotation axis), and that two or three smaller dipoles near the core surface could be responsible for the apparent inclination of the main dipole. In formulating a dynamo theory of the planetary magnetic field, such a possibility should be considered, as well as the inclined dipole case.

  19. Measurements of isocenter path characteristics of the gantry rotation axis with a smartphone application

    SciTech Connect

    Schiefer, H. Peters, S.; Plasswilm, L.; Ingulfsen, N.; Kluckert, J.

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: For stereotactic radiosurgery, the AAPM Report No. 54 [AAPM Task Group 42 (AAPM, 1995)] requires the overall stability of the isocenter (couch, gantry, and collimator) to be within a 1 mm radius. In reality, a rotating system has no rigid axis and thus no isocenter point which is fixed in space. As a consequence, the isocenter concept is reviewed here. It is the aim to develop a measurement method following the revised definitions. Methods: The mechanical isocenter is defined here by the point which rotates on the shortest path in the room coordinate system. The path is labeled as “isocenter path.” Its center of gravity is assumed to be the mechanical isocenter. Following this definition, an image-based and radiation-free measurement method was developed. Multiple marker pairs in a plane perpendicular to the assumed gantry rotation axis of a linear accelerator are imaged with a smartphone application from several rotation angles. Each marker pair represents an independent measuring system. The room coordinates of the isocenter path and the mechanical isocenter are calculated based on the marker coordinates. The presented measurement method is by this means strictly focused on the mechanical isocenter. Results: The measurement result is available virtually immediately following completion of measurement. When 12 independent measurement systems are evaluated, the standard deviations of the isocenter path points and mechanical isocenter coordinates are 0.02 and 0.002 mm, respectively. Conclusions: The measurement is highly accurate, time efficient, and simple to adapt. It is therefore suitable for regular checks of the mechanical isocenter characteristics of the gantry and collimator rotation axis. When the isocenter path is reproducible and its extent is in the range of the needed geometrical accuracy, it should be taken into account in the planning process. This is especially true for stereotactic treatments and radiosurgery.

  20. Simulation of winds as seen by a rotating vertical axis wind turbine blade

    SciTech Connect

    George, R.L.

    1984-02-01

    The objective of this report is to provide turbulent wind analyses relevant to the design and testing of Vertical Axis Wind Turbines (VAWT). A technique was developed for utilizing high-speed turbulence wind data from a line of seven anemometers at a single level to simulate the wind seen by a rotating VAWT blade. Twelve data cases, representing a range of wind speeds and stability classes, were selected from the large volume of data available from the Clayton, New Mexico, Vertical Plane Array (VPA) project. Simulations were run of the rotationally sampled wind speed relative to the earth, as well as the tangential and radial wind speeds, which are relative to the rotating wind turbine blade. Spectral analysis is used to compare and assess wind simulations from the different wind regimes, as well as from alternate wind measurement techniques. The variance in the wind speed at frequencies at or above the blade rotation rate is computed for all cases, and is used to quantitatively compare the VAWT simulations with Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine (HAWT) simulations. Qualitative comparisons are also made with direct wind measurements from a VAWT blade.

  1. Prone breast tumor imaging using vertical axis-of-rotation (VAOR) SPECT systems: An initial study

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Huili; Scarfone, C.; Greer, K.L.; Coleman, R.E.

    1996-12-31

    We propose the use of a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system equipped with multiple cameras revolving around a vertical axis-of-rotation (VAOR) to image tumors in a prone-dependent breast. This innovative breast imaging approach has the advantages of a small attenuation volume between breast lesions and gamma detector as well as a minimal radius-of-rotation compared to conventional (horizontal axis-of-rotation) breast SPECT. Small attenuation volume results in improved detected counts and minimal radius-of-rotation leads to increased collimator resolution. Because of no VAOR SPECT system currently available, we conducted our experiments on a conventional SPECT system using an isolated breast phantom to investigate the proposed VAOR breast SPECT. Our experimental setup simulated a VAOR SPECT study with a prone-dependent breast in the camera`s field-of-view. The results of our experiment indicate that VAOR breast SPECT with Trionix LESR parallel hole collimator is capable of detecting a breast lesion with a diameter of 10 mm and a lesion-to-background concentration ratio of 6 to 1. The results also demonstrate that VAOR breast SPECT provides improved lesion visualization over planar scintimammography and conventional breast SPECT.

  2. Wall transpiration on mixed convection heat transfer in a square duct rotating about a parallel axis

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, W.M.; Lee, K.T.

    1997-07-01

    A detailed numerical study, using the vorticity-velocity method, has been carried out to examine the wall transpiration on mixed convection flow and heat transfer in a square duct rotating about a parallel axis. The prediction was presented for various parameters, wall Reynolds number Re{sub w}, rotational Reynolds number J, and rotational Grashof number Gr{sub {Omega}}. Typical developments of axial velocity, secondary flow, and temperature at various axial locations in the entrance region are presented. Both local circumferentially averaged friction factors f Re and Nusselt number N u in the developing region are examined. The predicted results disclosed that the wall transpiration effect has considerable impact on the flow and heat transfer characteristics. Results also showed that both circumferentially averaged friction factor and Nusselt number are enhanced with an increase in J or Gr{sub {Omega}}, except for the range of J < 400 or Gr{sub {Omega}} < 1,000.

  3. Vestibulo-ocular reflex of the squirrel monkey during eccentric rotation with centripetal acceleration along the naso-occipital axis.

    PubMed

    Merfeld, D M

    1996-01-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflexes (VOR) are determined not only by angular acceleration, but also by the presence of gravity and linear acceleration. This phenomenon was studied by measuring three-dimensional nystagmic eye movements, with implanted search coils, in four male squirrel monkeys. Monkeys were rotated in the dark at 200 degrees/s, centrally or 79 cm off-axis, with the axis of rotation always aligned with gravity and the spinal axis of the upright monkeys. The monkey's position relative to the centripetal acceleration (facing center or back to center) had a dramatic influence on the VOR. These studies show that a torsional response was always elicited that acted to shift the axis of eye rotation toward alignment with gravito-inertial force. On the other hand, a slow phase downward vertical response usually existed, which shifted the axis of eye rotation away from the gravito-inertial force. These findings were consistent across all monkeys. In another set of tests, the same monkeys were rapidly tilted about their interaural (pitch) axis. Tilt orientations of 45 degrees and 90 degrees were maintained for 1 min. Other than a compensatory angular VOR during the rotation, no consistent eye velocity response was ever observed during or following the tilt. The absence of any response following tilt proves that the observed torsional and vertical responses were not a positional nystagmus. Model simulations qualitatively predict all components of these eccentric rotation and tilt responses. These simulations support the conclusion that the VOR during eccentric rotation may consist of two components: a linear VOR and a rotational VOR. The model predicts a slow phase downward, vertical, linear VOR during eccentric rotation even though there was never a change in the force aligned with monkey's spinal (Z) axis. The model also predicts the torsional components of the response that shift the rotation axis of the angular VOR toward alignment with gravito-inertial force

  4. Vestibulo-ocular reflex of the squirrel monkey during eccentric rotation with centripetal acceleration along the naso-occipital axis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merfeld, D. M.; Paloski, W. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflexes (VOR) are determined not only by angular acceleration, but also by the presence of gravity and linear acceleration. This phenomenon was studied by measuring three-dimensional nystagmic eye movements, with implanted search coils, in four male squirrel monkeys. Monkeys were rotated in the dark at 200 degrees/s, centrally or 79 cm off-axis, with the axis of rotation always aligned with gravity and the spinal axis of the upright monkeys. The monkey's position relative to the centripetal acceleration (facing center or back to center) had a dramatic influence on the VOR. These studies show that a torsional response was always elicited that acted to shift the axis of eye rotation toward alignment with gravito-inertial force. On the other hand, a slow phase downward vertical response usually existed, which shifted the axis of eye rotation away from the gravito-inertial force. These findings were consistent across all monkeys. In another set of tests, the same monkeys were rapidly tilted about their interaural (pitch) axis. Tilt orientations of 45 degrees and 90 degrees were maintained for 1 min. Other than a compensatory angular VOR during the rotation, no consistent eye velocity response was ever observed during or following the tilt. The absence of any response following tilt proves that the observed torsional and vertical responses were not a positional nystagmus. Model simulations qualitatively predict all components of these eccentric rotation and tilt responses. These simulations support the conclusion that the VOR during eccentric rotation may consist of two components: a linear VOR and a rotational VOR. The model predicts a slow phase downward, vertical, linear VOR during eccentric rotation even though there was never a change in the force aligned with monkey's spinal (Z) axis. The model also predicts the torsional components of the response that shift the rotation axis of the angular VOR toward alignment with gravito-inertial force.

  5. Model for simulation of turbulence at a point rotating as on a horizontal-axis wind turbine or a vertical-axis wind turbine blade

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, D.C.; Connell, J.R.

    1985-11-01

    Previous theoretical work has examined turbulence at a point rotating in a vertical plane, as in a horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT). The present paper extends the theoretical model to apply to the vertical-axis wind turbine (VAWT). The model's results, as simulated by computer, are compared with corresponding results obtained by analyzing field data, confirming the model's usefulness. Finally, suggestions are made for future applications of the model.

  6. Single-cell diffraction tomography with optofluidic rotation about a tilted axis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Paul; Schürmann, Mirjam; Chan, Chii J.; Guck, Jochen

    2015-08-01

    Optical diffraction tomography (ODT) is a tomographic technique that can be used to measure the three-dimensional (3D) refractive index distribution within living cells without the requirement of any marker. In principle, ODT can be regarded as a generalization of optical projection tomography which is equivalent to computerized tomography (CT). Both optical tomographic techniques require projection-phase images of cells measured at multiple angles. However, the reconstruction of the 3D refractive index distribution post-measurement differs for the two techniques. It is known that ODT yields better results than projection tomography, because it takes into account diffraction of the imaging light due to the refractive index structure of the sample. Here, we apply ODT to biological cells in a microfluidic chip which combines optical trapping and microfluidic flow to achieve an optofluidic single-cell rotation. In particular, we address the problem that arises when the trapped cell is not rotating about an axis perpendicular to the imaging plane, but is instead arbitrarily tilted. In this paper we show that the 3D reconstruction can be improved by taking into account such a tilted rotational axis in the reconstruction process.

  7. Effects of body orientation and rotation axis on pitch visual-vestibular interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clement, G.; Wood, S. J.; Lathan, C. E.; Peterka, R. J.; Reschke, M. F.

    1999-01-01

    Spatial transformations of the vestibular-optokinetic system must account for changes in head position with respect to gravity in order to produce compensatory oculomotor responses. The purpose of this experiment was to study the influence of gravity on the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) in darkness and on visual-vestibular interaction in the pitch plane in human subjects using two different comparisons: (1) Earth-horizontal axis (EHA) rotation about an upright versus a supine body orientation, and (2) Earth-horizontal versus Earth-vertical (EVA) rotation axes. Visual-vestibular responses (VVR) were evaluated by measuring the slow phase velocity of nystagmus induced during sinusoidal motion of the body in the pitch plane (at 0.2 Hz and 0.8 Hz) combined with a constant-velocity vertical optokinetic stimulation (at +/- 36 degrees/s). The results showed no significant effect on the gain or phase of the VOR in darkness or on the VVR responses at 0.8 Hz between EHA upright and EHA supine body orientations. However, there was a downward shift in the VOR bias in darkness in the supine orientation. There were systematic changes in VOR and VVR between EHA and EVA for 0.2 Hz, including a reduced modulation gain, increased phase lead, and decreased bias during EVA rotation. The same trend was also observed at 0.8 Hz, but at a lesser extent, presumably due to the effects of eccentric rotation in our EVA condition and/or to the different canal input across frequencies. The change in the bias at 0.2 Hz between rotation in darkness and rotation with an optokinetic stimulus was greater than the optokinetic responses without rotation. During EHA, changes in head position relative to gravity preserve graviceptor input to the VVR regardless of body orientation. However, the modifications in VVR gain and phase when the rotation axis is aligned with gravity indicate that this graviceptive information is important for providing compensatory eye movements during visual

  8. Sun-Relative Pointing for Dual-Axis Solar Trackers Employing Azimuth and Elevation Rotations

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Daniel; Hansen, Clifford W.

    2014-12-30

    Dual axis trackers employing azimuth and elevation rotations are common in the field of photovoltaic (PV) energy generation. Accurate sun-tracking algorithms are widely available. However, a steering algorithm has not been available to accurately point the tracker away from the sun such that a vector projection of the sun beam onto the tracker face falls along a desired path relative to the tracker face. We have developed an algorithm which produces the appropriate azimuth and elevation angles for a dual axis tracker when given the sun position, desired angle of incidence, and the desired projection of the sun beam onto the tracker face. Development of this algorithm was inspired by the need to accurately steer a tracker to desired sun-relative positions in order to better characterize the electro-optical properties of PV and CPV modules.

  9. Sun-Relative Pointing for Dual-Axis Solar Trackers Employing Azimuth and Elevation Rotations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Riley, Daniel; Hansen, Clifford W.

    2014-12-30

    Dual axis trackers employing azimuth and elevation rotations are common in the field of photovoltaic (PV) energy generation. Accurate sun-tracking algorithms are widely available. However, a steering algorithm has not been available to accurately point the tracker away from the sun such that a vector projection of the sun beam onto the tracker face falls along a desired path relative to the tracker face. We have developed an algorithm which produces the appropriate azimuth and elevation angles for a dual axis tracker when given the sun position, desired angle of incidence, and the desired projection of the sun beam ontomore » the tracker face. Development of this algorithm was inspired by the need to accurately steer a tracker to desired sun-relative positions in order to better characterize the electro-optical properties of PV and CPV modules.« less

  10. Postural illusions experienced during Z-axis recumbent rotation and their dependence upon somatosensory stimulation of the body surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lackner, J. R.; Graybiel, A.

    1978-01-01

    A blindfolded recumbent subject experiences a variety of postural illusions when rotated about his Z axis. Initially, during the acceleratory phase of rotation, turning about his Z axis is experienced; but, as rotary velocity increases, a spiraling of the body outward in the direction opposite to true rotation is experienced as well. Above 15-20 rpm, only orbital motion of the body is experienced, with the subject feeling that he is always facing in the same direction. One cycle of the apparent orbit is completed each time the subject actually rotates 360 deg. The reverse sequence of illusory motion is experienced during deceleration. The illusory motion all subjects experience during Z-axis recumbent rotation is shown to depend upon the touch and pressure stimulation of the body surface generated by contact forces of support.

  11. Fast axis servo for the fast and precise machining of non-rotational symmetric optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Fujing; Yin, Ziqiang; Li, Shengyi

    2014-08-01

    A new long range tool servo-fast axis servo is developed, which is used for fabricating the non-rotational symmetric optics surface with millimeters' sag. The mechanism design, motion modeling and development of FAS device were studied. The FAS consists of a linear motor, aerostatic bearings, high-resolution encoder and a motion controller. A control strategy consists of a proportional, integral and derivative (PID) feedback controller and velocity/acceleration feedforward controller is implemented to accommodate the system control performance. Experimental tests have been carried out to verify the performance of the FAS system.

  12. Late Cretaceous paleomagnetism of the Tucson Mountains: implications for vertical axis rotations in south central Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hagstrum, J.T.; Lipman, P.W.

    1991-01-01

    The Tucson Mountains of southern Arizona are the site of an Upper Cretaceous caldera from which the rhyolitic Cat Mountain Tuff was erupted at about 72 Ma. Two magnetic units within the Cat Mountain Tuff are distinguished by paleomagnetic data in both the northern and southern Tucson Mountains. The available paleomagnetic data indicate that rocks in southern Arizona have not remained unrotated with respect to North America since Late Cretaceous time and that vertical axis rotations may have played an important role in the region during Laramide deformation. -from Authors

  13. Development of a model counter-rotating type horizontal-axis tidal turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, B.; Yoshida, K.; Kanemoto, T.

    2016-05-01

    In the past decade, the tidal energies have caused worldwide concern as it can provide regular and predictable renewable energy resource for power generation. The majority of technologies for exploiting the tidal stream energy are based on the concept of the horizontal axis tidal turbine (HATT). A unique counter-rotating type HATT was proposed in the present work. The original blade profiles were designed according to the developed blade element momentum theory (BEMT). CFD simulations and experimental tests were adopted to the performance of the model counter-rotating type HATT. The experimental data provides an evidence of validation of the CFD model. Further optimization of the blade profiles was also carried out based on the CFD results.

  14. Relation between perception of vertical axis rotation and vestibulo-ocular reflex symmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterka, Robert J.; Benolken, Martha S.

    1991-01-01

    Subjects seated in a vertical axis rotation chair controlled their rotational velocity by adjusting a potentiometer. Their goal was to null out pseudorandom rotational perturbations in order to remain perceptually stationary. Most subjects showed a slow linear drift of velocity (a constant acceleration) to one side when they were deprived of an earth-fixed visual reference. The amplitude and direction of this drift can be considered a measure of a static bias in the subject's perception of rotation. The presence of a perceptual bias is consistent with a small, constant imbalance of vestibular function which could be of either central or peripheral origin. Deviations from perfect vestibulocular reflex (VOR) symmetry are also assumed to be related to imbalances in either peripheral or central vestibular function. Researchers looked for correlations between perceptual bias and various measures of vestibular reflex symmetry that might suggest a common source for both reflective and perceptual imbalances. No correlations were found. Measurement errors could not account for these results since repeated tests on the same subjects of both perceptual bias and VOR symmetry were well correlated.

  15. Relation between perception of vertical axis rotation and vestibulo-ocular reflex symmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterka, Robert J.; Benolken, Martha S.

    1992-01-01

    Subjects seated in a vertical axis rotation chair controlled their rotational velocity by adjusting a potentiometer. Their goal was to null out pseudorandom rotational perturbations in order to remain perceptually stationary. Most subjects showed a slow linear drift of velocity (a constant acceleration) to one side when they were deprived of an earth-fixed visual reference. The amplitude and direction of this drift can be considered a measure of a static bias in the subject's perception of rotation. The presence of a perceptual bias is consistent with a small, constant imbalance of vestibular function which could be of either central or peripheral origin. Deviations from perfect vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) symmetry are also assumed to be related to imbalances in either peripheral or central vestibular function. Researchers looked for correlations between perceptual bias and various measures of vestibular reflex symmetry that might suggest a common source for both reflective and perceptual imbalances. No correlations were found. Measurement errors could not account for these results since repeated tests on the same subjects of both perceptual bias and VOR symmetry were well correlated.

  16. Real-time iris detection on faces with coronal and transversal axis rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Claudio A.; Lazcano, Vanel A.

    2005-12-01

    Real-time face and iris detection on video sequences is important in diverse applications such as, study of the eye function, drowsiness detection, man-machine interfaces, face recognition, security and multimedia retrieval. In this work we present and extension to our previous method to incorporate face and iris detection in faces with coronal and transversal axis rotations in real time. The method is based on anthropometric templates and consists of three stages: coarse face detection, fine face detection and iris detection. In the coarse face detection, a directional image is computed and the contribution of each directional vector is weighted into an accumulator. The highest score in the accumulator is taken as the coarse face position. Then, a high-resolution directional image is computed. Face templates were constructed off-line for face coronal and transversal rotation, using face features such as elliptical shape, location of the eyebrows, nose and lips. A line integral is computed using these templates over the fine directional image to find the actual face location, size and rotation angle. This information provides a region to search for the eyes and the iris boundary is detected within this region by a ratio among to line integrals using a semicircular template. Results computed on five video sequences which include coronal and transversal rotations with over 1900 frames show correct face detection rate above 92% and iris detection rate above 86%.

  17. Comet C/2013 X1 (PanSTARRS): Spin axis and rotation period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzini, Federico; Oldani, Virginio; Behrend, Raoul; Ochner, Paolo; Baransky, Alexandr; Starkey, Donn

    2016-09-01

    Applying image processing and enhancement techniques to our CCD images we could investigate the structures of the inner coma of comet C/2013 X1; the dust tail and a broad fan-shaped structure that originated from a different area of the nucleus than the tail were clearly detected. The triangular shape of the fan suggested that it was the result of a continuous outflow of dust from a single active source located at mid-high latitude (about 60° on a supposed spherical nucleus) on the surface of the comet's nucleus oriented in sunward direction, and that the comet's spin axis was placed near the sky plane. This allowed us to estimate its orientation at RA 240°±10° (=16h00 m) and declination +00°±10°. The fan structure remained quite stable in the 4-months observation period, indicating that the comet's spin axis remained steadily lying near the sky plane; a slow clockwise rotation of the fan in sunward direction appeared to be directly connected with the geometrical conditions of observation. Differential photometry applied to the inner coma, near the cometary nucleus, showed a light curve with an amplitude of 0.053 magnitudes, characterized by a highly repetitive periodicity throughout the entire observation period, and most likely related to the comet's rotation period, estimated at 0.498±0.015 days. Computer simulations of the coma features, as well as of the tail and spin axis positions, are fairly comparable with our observations, confirming the correctness of the findings.

  18. Accuracy assessment of novel two-axes rotating and single-axis translating calibration equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bo; Ye, Dong; Che, Rensheng

    2009-11-01

    There is a new method that the rocket nozzle 3D motion is measured by a motion tracking system based on the passive optical markers. However, an important issue is required to resolve-how to assess the accuracy of rocket nozzle motion test. Therefore, calibration equipment is designed and manufactured for generating the truth of nozzle model motion such as translation, angle, velocity, angular velocity, etc. It consists of a base, a lifting platform, a rotary table and a rocket nozzle model with precise geometry size. The nozzle model associated with the markers is installed on the rotary table, which can translate or rotate at the known velocity. The general accuracy of rocket nozzle motion test is evaluated by comparing the truth value with the static and dynamic test data. This paper puts emphasis on accuracy assessment of novel two-axes rotating and single-axis translating calibration equipment. By substituting measured value of the error source into error model, the pointing error reaches less than 0.005deg, rotation center position error reaches 0.08mm, and the rate stability is less than 10-3. The calibration equipment accuracy is much higher than the accuracy of nozzle motion test system, thus the former can be used to assess and calibrate the later.

  19. Equilibrium structures of heterocyclic molecules with large principal axis rotations upon isotopic substitution.

    PubMed

    Demaison, Jean; Császár, Attila G; Margulès, Laurent D; Rudolph, Heinz Dieter

    2011-12-01

    Equilibrium structures, r(e), of the heterocyclic molecules oxirane, furazan, furan, ethylene ozonide, and 1,3,4-oxadiazole have been determined using three different, somewhat complementary techniques: a completely experimental technique (r(m)), a semiexperimental technique (r(e)(SE), whereby equilibrium rotational constants are derived from experimental effective ground-state rotational constants and corrections based principally on an ab initio cubic force field), and an ab initio technique (r(e)(BO), whereby geometry optimizations are usually performed at the coupled cluster level of theory including single and double excitations augmented by a perturbational estimate of the effects of connected triple excitations [CCSD(T)] using quadruple-ζ Gaussian basis sets). All these molecules are asymmetric tops with the moment of inertia I(c) much larger than the other two moments of inertia, I(a) and I(b). Molecules of this shape experience a large rotation of the principal axis system upon certain isotopic substitutions. For such isotopologues it is difficult to obtain a good structural fit to the semiexperimental moments of inertia I(a) and I(b), which may significantly reduce the accuracy of the r(e)(SE) structural parameters. The origin of this difficulty is explained. For the heavy-atom skeleton of these molecules it was possible to determine a rather accurate empirical mass-dependent structure without a priori knowledge of the equilibrium structure. PMID:22032750

  20. How does lever length and the position of its axis of rotation influence human performance during lever wheelchair propulsion?

    PubMed

    Fiok, Krzysztof; Mróz, Anna

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate empirically how lever length and its axis of rotation position influences human performance during lever wheelchair propulsion. In order to fulfill this goal, a dedicated test stand allowing easy implementation of various lever positions was created. In the experiment, 10 young, healthy, male subjects performed 8 tests consisting of propulsion work with levers of different lengths and lever axis of rotation positions. During tests heart rate, oxygen consumption and EMG assessment of 6 muscles was carried out. Measurements of power output on the test stand were done as well. Together with oxygen consumption analysis, this allowed calculation of human work efficiency. The results show significant (p<0.05 and p<0.001) differences between lever configurations when comparing various parameters values. From the carried out experiments, the authors conclude that levers' length and their axis of rotation position significantly influence human performance during lever wheelchair propulsion. For the examined subjects, placing the levers' axis of rotation close behind the back wheels axis of rotation offered advantageous work conditions. PMID:26142018

  1. Differential timing of vertical-axis block rotations in the northern Ryukyu Arc: Paleomagnetic evidence from the Koshikijima Islands, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonai, Satoshi; Suganuma, Yusuke; Ashi, Juichiro; Itaya, Tetsumaru; Oiwane, Hisashi; Kiyokawa, Shoichi

    2011-01-01

    Over 300 samples for paleomagnetic analysis and K-Ar dating were collected from 27 sites at NW-SE and NE-SW trending dike swarms (herein, NW dikes and NE dikes, respectively) in the Koshikijima Islands, northern Ryukyu Arc. The NW dikes are Middle Miocene in age and have directions (D = - 37.7 ∘, I = 51.8 ∘, α95 = 9.6 ∘, and κ = 40.8) that are deflected westward relative to the stable eastern Asian continent. Conversely, the NE dikes, of Late Miocene age, have directions (D = 16.1 ∘, I = 57.7 ∘, α95 = 7.1 ∘, and κ = 41.9) that show no such deflection. These differences are interpreted as indicating that the Koshikijima Islands underwent approximately 40 ∘ of counter-clockwise rotation during the Middle to Late Miocene. A synthesis of the paleomagnetic and structural data suggests a three-stage history of extensional deformation: (1) displacement upon normal faults (F 1 faults) without vertical-axis block rotation, (2) strike-slip reactivation of F 1 faults and oblique-normal displacement on NE-SW-trending faults (F 2 faults) with vertical-axis block rotation, and (3) oblique-normal displacement on F 2 faults without vertical-axis block rotation. Regional differences in the timing and amount of counter-clockwise vertical-axis block rotations indicate that the northern Ryukyu Arc rotated as several distinct rigid blocks.

  2. Three-dimensional velocity measurements around a rotating vertical axis wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coletti, Filippo; Ryan, Kevin; Dabiri, John; Eaton, John

    2013-11-01

    Vertical axis wind turbines (VAWT) can be more closely spaced than conventional horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWT), which points to a potentially greater power that can be extracted from a given wind farm footprint. In order to optimize the inter-turbine spacing and to investigate the potential for constructive aerodynamic interactions, the complex dynamics of VAWT wakes need to be analyzed. To date, only single-point or at best two-dimensional measurements of such wakes have been documented. We have measured the full three-component mean velocity field around and downstream the scaled-down model of a rotating VAWT by Magnetic Resonance Velocimetry (MRV). The high spatial resolution allows to quantitatively explore the structure of the wake, its interaction with the floor, and its development. The flow is shown to be highly three-dimensional and asymmetric for the whole investigated region (up to 7 diameters downstream of the turbine). These results can inform low-order models to predict the performance of turbine arrays.

  3. Patella Dislocation with Vertical Axis Rotation: The “Dorsal Fin” Patella

    PubMed Central

    Gamble, David; Carrothers, Andrew D.; Khanduja, Vikas

    2015-01-01

    A 44-year-old woman presented following minor trauma to her right knee. While dancing she externally rotated around a planted foot and felt sudden pain in her right knee. She presented with her knee locked in extension with a “dorsal fin” appearance of the soft tissues tented over the patella. This was diagnosed as a rare case of an intraarticular patella dislocation, which was rotated 90 degrees about the vertical axis. Closed reduction in the emergency room was unsuccessful but was achieved in theatre under general anaesthetic with muscle relaxation. Postreduction arthroscopy demonstrated that no osteochondral or soft tissue damage to the knee had been sustained. In patients presenting with a knee locked in extension with tenting of skin over the patella (the “dorsal fin” appearance), intra-articular patella dislocation should be suspected. Attempts to reduce vertical patella dislocations under sedation with excessive force or repeatedly without success should be avoided to prevent unnecessary damage to the patellofemoral joint. In this clinical situation we recommend closed reduction under general anaesthetic followed by immediate knee arthroscopy under the same anaesthetic to ensure that there is no chondral damage to the patella or femoral trochlea and to rule out an osteochondral fracture. PMID:25883819

  4. Plasma rotation and the radial electric field during off-axis NBI in the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Gohil, P.; Burrell, K.H.; Osborne, T.H.; Hassam, A.B.

    1995-12-01

    Experiments have been carried out on the DIII-D tokamak to investigate whether off-axis NBI can: (a) drive significant perpendicular flow to lead to increased suppression of turbulence and improved confinement, and (b) be used to control the radial electric field profile. Measurements of both impurity ion poloidal and toroidal rotation profiles were made using charge exchange recombination spectroscopy. These experiments used a low current, low elongation (I{sub p} = 0.5 MA, {kappa} = 1.2) plasma whose magnetic axis was shifted 36 cm vertically upward from the vessel midplane and then shifted downward to be centered on the midplane later in the discharge. 10.7 MW of beam power was applied to maximize NBI effect while operating at low target densities and high temperature to minimize poloidal damping. Results from these experiments show a slight increase in impurity ion poloidal rotation velocity during the vertical shifted phase of off-axis NBI discharge. The toroidal rotation profile is more peaked during off-axis NBI. Both these effects lead to a change in the V x B contribution to the radial electric field during off-axis NBI.

  5. Vortex breakdown in a slowly varying tube impulsively rotated about its axis with constant angular velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, D. A.

    2003-11-01

    For time t¯<0 viscous fluid is in slow flow through a long straight axially symmetric tube whose radius, ā(x¯), varies slowly with axial distance, x¯. When t¯=0 the tube is impulsively rotated about its axis with angular velocity, Ω¯, at which angular speed it is thereafter maintained. When Re=Wa/ν=O(1) and ɛ=W¯ā02/νL¯→0, λ=Ωa/W→∞ with Γ=ɛλ2 finite, MacDonald [Phys. Fluids 12, 3168 (2000)] has shown that during the transition from zero angular velocity to solid body rotation the flow in the tube is strikingly different for a diverging and a converging tube, when Γ is sufficiently large. Here, ɛ is the Blasius parameter for slowly varying tubes and ā0 and W denote a reference radius and velocity, respectively. When the tube is diverging, a bubble of recirculating fluid, centered on the axis can occur. This bubble satisfies the definitions of vortex breakdown. When the tube is converging, a toroid of recirculating fluid can occur adjacent to the wall of the tube. Streamlines for each of these cases have been presented [D. A. MacDonald, Phys. Fluids 12, 3168 (2000)]. In this article we shall determine Γ0, the lowest value of Γ for which the toroid will occur, and t¯0, the corresponding instant of time at which it first appears in converging tubes. The wall shear stress is shown to become of large magnitude and graphs of its behavior with x¯/L, where L is a representative length in the axial direction, are presented, when νt¯/ā02=0.1, for representative wall profiles. It is found that incipient flow reversal at the walls of the converging tube ā=(ā0/2)[3-tanh(x¯/L)] occurs at x¯/L=-0.5750, and the critical swirl and the time of occurrence are determined. A figure showing the wall stress against axial distance is also presented for a typical diverging tube when t≡t¯ν/ā02=0.1.

  6. The variability in the external rotation axis of the distal femur: an MRI-based anatomical study.

    PubMed

    Jones, Carl; Nawaz, Zuhair; Hassan, Abdel; White, Simon; Khaleel, Arshad

    2016-02-01

    Commonly used total knee arthroplasty (TKA) systems utilising measured resection techniques default to 5°-7° valgus for the distal cut relative to the anatomical axis and 3° external rotation of the femoral component relative to posterior condylar axis (PCA). Rotational errors of the femoral component are associated with pain, patella maltracking and a poorer outcome. We analysed MRI scans from patients undergoing TKA using patient-specific instrumentation to assess coronal and rotational alignment from landmarks identified on the scans. One hundred and eight scans in 59 males and 49 females were studied with age range 35-93 years (mean 67.9 years). We found 91 % of patients had a femoral valgus angle between 5° and 7° (mean angles 5.9°), while only 24 % had an external rotation angle between 2.5° and 3.5° relative to PCA. There was no statistical significance in rotation between males and females although outliers tended to be female. Mean Whiteside's angle was 92.9° (87.8-98). This study highlights the variations in external rotation between patients undergoing TKA using the PCA as a reference for rotation. This may be a contributing factor in implant malalignment and patient dissatisfaction. PMID:26530410

  7. A kinematically distinct core and minor-axis rotation: the MUSE perspective on M87

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emsellem, Eric; Krajnović, Davor; Sarzi, Marc

    2014-11-01

    We present evidence for the presence of a low-amplitude kinematically distinct component in the giant early-type galaxy M87, via data sets obtained with the SAURON and MUSE integral-field spectroscopic units. The MUSE velocity field reveals a strong twist of ˜140° within the central 30 arcsec connecting outwards such a kinematically distinct core to a prolate-like rotation around the large-scale photometric major axis of the galaxy. The existence of these kinematic features within the apparently round central regions of M87 implies a non-axisymmetric and complex shape for this galaxy, which could be further constrained using the presented kinematics. The associated orbital structure should be interpreted together with other tracers of the gravitational potential probed at larger scales (e.g. globular clusters, ultra-compact dwarfs, planetary nebulae): it would offer an insight in the assembly history of one of the brightest galaxies in the Virgo cluster. These data also demonstrate the potential of the MUSE spectrograph to uncover low-amplitude spectral signatures.

  8. Rotational kinematics of a rigid body about a fixed axis: development and analysis of an inventory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashood, K. K.; Singh, Vijay A.

    2015-07-01

    We present the development, administration, and analysis of a focused inventory on the rotational kinematics of a rigid body around a fixed axis. The inventory, which is made up of 13 multiple-choice questions, was developed on the basis of interactions with students and teachers. The systematic and iterative aspects of the construction of the inventory are illustrated. The questions, which were validated, were administered to a set of teachers (N = 25) and two groups of preuniversity students (N = 74 and 905) in India. Students, as well as teachers, exhibited difficulties in applying the operational definition of angular velocity to a rigid body. Many erroneously assumed that an angular acceleration cannot exist without a net torque. Patterns of reasoning resulting in errors were identified and categorized under four broad themes. These include inappropriate extensions of familiar procedural practices, reasoning cued by primitive elements in thought, lack of differentiation between related but distinct concepts, and indiscriminate use of equations. The inventory was also administered to introductory-level students (N = 384) at the University of Washington. Popular distractors to most items were similar to the Indian students.

  9. Frequency analysis of the non-principal-axis rotation of uniaxial space debris in circular orbit subjected to gravity-gradient torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hou-Yuan; Zhao, Chang-Yin; Zhang, Ming-Jiang

    2016-03-01

    The non-principal-axis rotational motion of uniaxial space debris can be decomposed into periodic motions associated with two frequencies: the polhode frequency of the space debris rotating around the symmetry axis, and the tumbling frequency of the symmetry axis rotating around the angular momentum. To determine from optical measurements the rotational motion of upper rocket stages in circular orbits subjected to gravity-gradient torque, the evolutions of these two frequencies need to be analyzed. Taking into account only the long-term changes in the long-period variables, the differential equations of the non-principal axis rotational motion of the uniaxial space debris are averaged and reduced, from which the evolutions of the polhode and tumbling frequencies are then obtained analytically. The theoretical results are verified by numerical simulations of the diffuse reflection model. The frequencies in the variation of the reflected light intensity in the simulation are analyzed using the frequency map analysis (FMA) method. Errors of these results are found to be less than 1%. Based on the theoretical expressions, the rotational state of the uniaxial space debris can be estimated in the simulation without any prior information except the orbital parameters. A series of state variables are estimated, including the ratio of the moments of inertia about the transverse axis and the symmetry axis, the instantaneous rotation velocity, the orientation of the angular momentum, and the precession cone of the symmetry axis.

  10. Dual-core photonic crystal fiber Doppler velocimeter for small horizontal axis wind turbine blade rotational speed measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xue-Feng; Li, Sheng-Ji; Wang, Wei-Chih

    2014-03-01

    The blades are crucial components of a wind turbine, and its steady and reliable operation is directly related to the power output. Thus, condition monitoring and fault diagnosis of the wind turbine blades is highly beneficial to the operational cost. This paper presents a study of small horizontal axis wind turbine blade rotational speed measurement by laser Doppler velocimeter based on dual-core photonic crystal fiber (DC-PCF). The theory on the DC-PCF Doppler velocimeter is presented, and the measurement system is designed and tested. Experimental results show that the DC-PCF Doppler velocimeter has been proved to work successfully. The uncertainty of the rotational speed is about 0 ~ 4 rpm. The accuracy can meet the requirements for monitoring the rotational operation of the wind turbine.

  11. Method and device for determining the position of a cutting tool relative to the rotational axis of a spindle-mounted workpiece

    DOEpatents

    Williams, R.R.

    1980-09-03

    The present invention is directed to a method and device for determining the location of a cutting tool with respect to the rotational axis of a spindle-mounted workpiece. A vacuum cup supporting a machinable sacrificial pin is secured to the workpiece at a location where the pin will project along and encompass the rotational axis of the workpiece. The pin is then machined into a cylinder. The position of the surface of the cutting tool contacting the machine cylinder is spaced from the rotational axis of the workpiece a distance equal to the radius of the cylinder.

  12. Sensation of rotation about a vertical axis with a fixed visual field in different illuminations and in the dark

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, J.; Young, L. R.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of the oculogyro illusion of the relative motion of a spot fixed with respect to the subject during subject rotation and of a fixed striped peripheral visual field under different levels of illumination on perceptions of rotation about a vertical axis are investigated. Subjects were seated in a rotatable flight trainer cockpit with visual fields consisting of darkness, a dim peripheral field, and a bright peripheral field, all fixed with respect to the subject, and subject perceptual thresholds, frequency responses and sensations of displacement and velocity were measured during trainer rotation at constant and varying angular accelerations. The perception of angular acceleration is found to exhibit a significantly lower threshold and a reduced latency time in the illuminated visual fields which was independent of the level of illumination. Subjective frequency responses showed a higher gain in the illuminated presentations, while subjective displacements during triangular velocity stimuli exhibited no difference for the different visual cues. Finally, magnitude estimations of the after-rotation associated with deceleration from a constant velocity showed a greater rising speed, larger velocity and longer duration under illumination. Results show that, for low accelerations, the visual input enhances sensitivity to self-motion, an effect explained by the oculogyral illusion.

  13. Radial forces analysis and rotational speed test of radial permanent magnetic bearing for horizontal axis wind turbine applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriswanto, Jamari

    2016-04-01

    Permanent magnet bearings (PMB) are contact free bearings which utilize the forces generated by the magnets. PMB in this work is a type of radial PMB, which functions as the radial bearings of the Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine (HAWT) rotor shaft. Radial PMB should have a greater radial force than the radial force HAWT rotor shaft (bearing load). This paper presents a modeling and experiments to calculate the radial force of the radial PMB. This paper also presents rotational speed test of the radial PMB compared to conventional bearings for HAWT applications. Modeling using COMSOL Multiphysics 4.3b with the magnetic fields physics models. Experiments were conducted by measuring the displacement of the rotor to the stator for a given load variation. Results of the two methods showed that the large displacement then the radial force would be greater. Radial forces of radial PMB is greater than radial forces of HAWT rotor shaft. The rotational speed test results of HAWT that used radial PMB produced higher rotary than conventional bearings with an average increase of 87.4%. Increasing rotational speed occured because radial PMB had no friction. HAWT that used radial PMB rotated at very low wind speeds are 1.4 m/s with a torque of 0.043 Nm, while the HAWT which uses conventional bearing started rotating at a wind speed of 4.4 m/s and required higher torque of 0.104 N.

  14. Dike orientations in the late jurassic independence dike swarm and implications for vertical-axis tectonic rotations in eastern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hopson, R.F.; Hillhouse, J.W.; Howard, K.A.

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of the strikes of 3841 dikes in 47 domains in the 500-km-long Late Jurassic Independence dike swarm indicates a distribution that is skewed clockwise from the dominant northwest strike. Independence dike swarm azimuths tend to cluster near 325?? ?? 30??, consistent with initial subparallel intrusion along much of the swarm. Dike azimuths in a quarter of the domains vary widely from the dominant trend. In domains in the essentially unrotated Sierra Nevada block, mean dike azimuths range mostly between 300?? and 320??, with the exception of Mount Goddard (247??). Mean dike azimuths in domains in the Basin and Range Province in the Argus, Inyo, and White Mountains areas range from 291?? to 354?? the mean is 004?? in the El Paso Mountains. In the Mojave Desert, mean dike azimuths range from 318?? to 023??, and in the eastern Transverse Ranges, they range from 316?? to 051??. Restoration for late Cenozoic vertical-axis rotations, suggested by paleodeclinations determined from published studies from nearby Miocene and younger rocks, shifts dike azimuths into better agreement with azimuths measured in the tectonically stable Sierra Nevada. This confirms that vertical-axis tectonic rotations explain some of the dispersion in orientation, especially in the Mojave Desert and eastern Transverse Ranges, and that the dike orientations can be a useful if imperfect guide to tectonic rotations where paleomagnetic data do not exist. Large deviations from the main trend of the swarm may reflect (1) clockwise rotations for which there is no paleomagnetic evidence available, (2) dike intrusions of other ages, (3) crack filling at angles oblique or perpendicular to the main swarm, (4) pre-Miocene rotations, or (5) unrecognized domain boundaries between dike localities and sites with paleomagnetic determinations. ?? 2008 The Geological Society of America.

  15. Development of a Low-Cost Attitude and Heading Reference System Using a Three-Axis Rotating Platform

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Ying-Chih; Jan, Shau-Shiun; Hsiao, Fei-Bin

    2010-01-01

    A development procedure for a low-cost attitude and heading reference system (AHRS) with a self-developed three-axis rotating platform has been proposed. The AHRS consists of one 3-axis accelerometer, three single-axis gyroscopes, and one 3-axis digital compass. Both the accelerometer and gyroscope triads are based on micro electro-mechanical system (MEMS) technology, and the digital compass is based on anisotropic-magnetoresistive (AMR) technology. The calibrations for each sensor triad are readily accomplished by using the scalar calibration and the least squares methods. The platform is suitable for the calibration and validation of the low-cost AHRS and it is affordable for most laboratories. With the calibrated parameters and data fusion algorithm for the orientation estimation, the self-developed AHRS demonstrates the capabilities of compensating for the sensor errors and outputting the estimated orientation in real-time. The validation results show that the estimated orientations of the developed AHRS are within the acceptable region. This verifies the practicability of the proposed development procedure. PMID:22319258

  16. The influence of correlation between initial axis curvature and cross-section rotation on the beam static resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Valeš, Jan

    2015-03-10

    The paper deals with statistical analysis of the resistance of simply supported I-beams subjected to bending. The resistance was solved by applying the geometrically nonlinear solution. The influence of lateral-beam buckling on resistance is studied. Initial geometrical imperfections originating from the first eigenmode of lateral-beam buckling and from the cross section rotation at the stability lost were ascribed to the beams. These imperfections consist of initial axial lateral buckling and rotation of cross sections along the beam axis length. The correlation between the amplitudes of these imperfections is considered to be the parameter of solutions within the interval from -1 to 1. The influence of this correlation on the change of mean values and standard deviations of random resistance of beams with nondimensional slenderness close to 1 is studied. The imperfections mentioned were considered, together with geometrical and material characteristics of cross section and material characteristics of steel, to be random quantities.

  17. A Paleomagnetic Investigation of Large-Scale Vertical Axis Rotations in Coastal Sonora: Evidence for Transtensional Proto-Gulf Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, S. W.; Gans, P. B.

    2006-12-01

    A paleomagnetic investigation into possible vertical axis rotations has been conducted in the Sierra el Aguaje and Sierra Tinajas del Carmen, Sonora, Mexico, in order assess proposed styles for oblique continental rifting in the Gulf of California. Two styles of rifting have been proposed; (1) strain partitioning (Stock and Hodges, 89), and (2) transtension (Gans, 97), for the Proto-Gulf period of the Gulf of California. The presence of large- scale vertical axis rotations would lend weight to the argument for transtension. The Sierra el Aguaje and Sierra Tinajas del Carmen are located in southwestern coastal Sonora, Mexico. The ranges represent the eastern-rifted margin of the central Gulf of California. This is one of the few areas of that margin which is entirely above water, with new ocean crust of the Guaymas basin lying immediately offshore of the western edge of the ranges. The ranges are composed of volcanic units and their corresponding volcaniclastic units that are the result of persistent magmatic activity between 20 and 8.8 Ma, including three packages of basalt and andesite that make excellent paleomagnetic recorders. Based on cross cutting relations and geochronologic data for pre-, syn-, and post-tectonic volcanic units, most of the faulting and tilting in the Sierra El Aguaje and Sierra Tinajas del Carmen is bracketed between 11.9 and 9.0 Ma, thus falling entirely within Proto-Gulf time. Existing field relations suggest the presence of large (>45°) vertical axis rotations in this region. This evidence includes: a) abrupt changes in the strike of tilted strata in different parts of the range b) ubiquitous NE-SW striking faults with left lateral-normal oblique slip, that terminate against major NW-trending right lateral faults, and c) obliquity between the general strike of tilted strata and the strike of faults. The results of the paleomagnetic investigation are consistent with the field evidence and show large clockwise rotations between ~30° and

  18. Asymmetric basin subsidence and horizontal-axis block rotations in the Miocene North Whipple Basin, SE California and W Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Dorsey, R.J.; Roberts, P. . Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    A thick, faulted sequence of post-18.5-Ma Miocene sedimentary and volcanic rocks is well exposed in the Aubrey Hills, W Arizona, and the northeastern Whipple Mountains, SE California. These strata were deposited in alluvial fans and playa lakes of a syntectonic sedimentary basin (North Whipple Basin), which evolved in the upper plate of the Whipple detachment fault on the north flank of the growing proto-Whipple Mountains. Sedimentary deposits reveal substantial lateral changes in thickness and depositional facies (lacustrine to proximal-fan) that provide a record of asymmetric basin subsidence and upper-plate block rotations during strong regional extension. Final uplift, exhumation and unroofing of lower-plate rocks occurred during this time, as evidenced by sandstone-petrographic and conglomerate clast-count studies. Two horizontal orthogonally oriented axes of synbasinal crustal rotation are recognized: extension-perpendicular (NW-SE), and extension-parallel (NE-SW). Rotation about extension-perpendicular axes occurred by displacements on NW-striking normal faults that formed classic half-graben basins in the extending upper plate. Evidence for rotation about an extension-parallel axis is seen in pronounced lateral thickening and coarsening of sedimentary lithofacies toward the SE in the Aubrey Hills. This was likely controlled by synbasinal growth of an extension-parallel syncline, which formed on the NW flank of the Whipple Mountain extension-parallel antiform.

  19. Alignment of the Earth's Magnetic Field with the Axis of Rotation and Reversals of Polarity: Laboratory Experiments on a Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Crane, H. R.

    1974-01-01

    A mechanism that can cause the earth's external magnetic field to be aligned with the axis of rotation and to reverse at random times is described. It depends upon two arbitrary assumptions: (a) A dipole magnetic source, of unspecified nature, deep within the core, wanders randomly in direction. (b) The conducting fluid at the outer boundary of the core circulates in a pattern that is symmetrical with respect to the earth's axis of rotation. It is shown that such a circulating layer will act as an anisotropic screen, which will suppress the field of the transverse component of the source dipole. The field observed outside the core will be mainly that of the axial component of the source, and it will reverse abruptly whenever the direction of the source crosses the equatorial plane. Quantitative experimental studies, made on small-scale models, of the effects and their properties are described. The only datum that even suggests a value that may be used for the angular velocity of the circulating outer layer with respect to the source is the angular velocity of the westward drift of the earth's nondipolar field. If that value is used, the anisotropic screening effect comes out to be strong enough to give alignment and reversal characteristics that are similar to those found from paleomagnetic studies. PMID:16592194

  20. General Relativistic Effect on the Energy Deposition Rate for Neutrino Pair Annihilation above the Equatorial Plane Along the Symmetry Axis Near a Rotating Neutron Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallick, Ritam; Bhattacharyya, Abhijit; Ghosh, Sanjay K.; Raha, Sibaji

    2013-02-01

    The estimate of the energy deposition rate (EDR) for neutrino pair annihilation has been carried out. The EDR for the neutrinos coming from the equatorial plane of a rotating neutron star is calculated along the rotation axis using the Cook-Shapiro-Teukolsky metric. The neutrino trajectories and hence the neutrinos emitted from the disk are affected by the redshift due to disk rotation and gravitation. The EDR is very sensitive to the value of the temperature and its variation along the disk. The rotation of the star has a negative effect on the EDR; it decreases with increase in rotational velocity.

  1. Method and device for determining the position of a cutting tool relative to the rotational axis of a spindle-mounted workpiece

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Richard R.

    1982-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a method and device for determining the location of a cutting tool with respect to the rotational axis of a spindle-mounted workpiece. A vacuum cup supporting a machinable sacrifical pin is secured to the workpiece at a location where the pin will project along and encompass the rotational axis of the workpiece. The pin is then machined into a cylinder. The position of the surface of the cutting tool contacting the machine cylinder is spaced from the rotational aixs of the workpiece a distance equal to the radius of the cylinder.

  2. A novel method for defining the Greyhound talocrural joint axis of rotation for hinged transarticular external skeletal fixation.

    PubMed

    Colborne, G R; Hadley, N R; Wallace, A M

    2013-01-01

    In order to apply hinged transarticular external skeletal fixation for stabilization of the injured canine tarsal joint, knowledge of the three-dimensional (3D) location and orientation of the transverse axis is necessary. This method of immobilization may be used as a primary or adjunctive method of stabilisation for a large number of traumatic conditions. Using pin-mounted markers in the cadaveric Greyhound crus and talus, a closed-form solution of absolute orientation was used to identify, on radiographs, the lateral and medial locations of the transverse axis by tracking the 3D excursions of the markers during flexion and extension. A line was drawn across the dorsal aspect of the calcaneus from the most dorsal point on the distal articular surface(proximal intertarsal joint: PIJ) to the most dorsal point on its proximal articulation with the body of the talus, and the location of the centre of rotation was expressed in terms of the length of that line. In seven Greyhound tarsal joints, the medial end of the axis was located 73 ± 10% proximal to the PIJ and 11 ± 7% dorsal to the line. The lateral end was 73 ± 9% proximal tothe PIJ and -2 ± 3% plantar to the line. PMID:23612749

  3. Asymmetric rotational axis reconstruction of grating-based x-ray phase contrast tomography of the human cerebellum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Georg; Weitkamp, Timm; Zanette, Irene; Pfeiffer, Franz; Müller-Gerbl, Magdalena; David, Christian; Müller, Bert

    2012-10-01

    The brain has an outstanding functional importance in the human organism. Therefore, there is a strong need for three-dimensional brain imaging modalities. Magnetic resonance imaging provides deep insights but its spatial resolution is insufficient to study the structure on the cellular level. X-ray absorption microtomography yields the necessary spatial resolution, but shows only marginal contrast between the different types of brain tissue. Alternatively, differential X-ray phase contrast obtained with grating interferometry, which is known for much better differentiations between soft tissues can be used for the visualization of the human brain. As important structures of the human brain such as the human thalamus have dimensions of several centimeters, a large field of view is required. In the present communication, we report an evaluation of grating-based X-ray phase contrast microtomography in the off-axis modus which allows to expand the field of view up to a factor of two but may reduce the image quality. We demonstrate that tomograms with comparable contrast-to-noise values, about 10%, and 50% inferior spatial resolution can be generated with off-axis measurements. As one can reduce the effective pixel size up to a factor of two, the choice of an asymmetrical rotation axis can give rise to an improvement of the spatial resolution by 20%.

  4. Baselines for three-dimensional perception of combined linear and angular self-motion with changing rotational axis.

    PubMed

    Holly, J E

    2000-01-01

    The laws of physics explain many human misperceptions of whole-body passive self-motion. One classic misperception occurs in a rotating chair in the dark: If the chair is decelerated to a stop after a period of counterclockwise rotation, then a subject will typically perceive clockwise rotation. The laws of physics show that, indeed, a clockwise rotation would be perceived even by a perfect processor of angular acceleration information, assuming that the processor is initialized (prior to the deceleration) with a typical subject's initial perception - of no rotation in this case. The motion perceived by a perfect acceleration processor serves as a baseline by which to judge human self-motion perception; this baseline makes a rough prediction and also forms a basis for comparison, with uniquely physiological properties of perception showing up as deviations from the baseline. These same principles, using the motion perceived by a perfect acceleration processor as a baseline, are used in the present paper to investigate complex motions that involve simultaneous linear and angular accelerations with a changing axis of rotation. Baselines - motions that would be perceived by a perfect acceleration processor, given the same initial perception (prior to the motion of interest) as that of a typical subject - are computed for the acceleration and deceleration stages of centrifuge runs in which the human carriage tilts along with the vector resultant of the centripetal and gravity vectors. The computations generate a three-dimensional picture of the motion perceived by a perfect acceleration processor, by simultaneously using all six interacting degrees of freedom (three angular and three linear) and taking into account the non-commutativity of rotations in three dimensions. The resulting three-dimensional baselines predict stronger perceptual effects during deceleration than during acceleration, despite the equal magnitudes (with opposite direction) of forces on the

  5. Design, Analysis, Hybrid Testing and Orientation Control of a Floating Platform with Counter-Rotating Vertical-Axis Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanner, Samuel Adam Chinman

    The design and operation of two counter-rotating vertical-axis wind turbines on a floating, semi-submersible platform is studied. The technology, called the Multiple Integrated and Synchronized Turbines (MIST) platform has the potential to reduce the cost of offshore wind energy per unit of installed capacity. Attached to the platform are closely-spaced, counter-rotating turbines, which can achieve a higher power density per planform area because of synergistic interaction effects. The purpose of the research is to control the orientation of the platform and rotational speeds of the turbines by modifying the energy absorbed by each of the generators of the turbines. To analyze the various aspects of the platform and wind turbines, the analysis is drawn from the fields of hydrodynamics, electromagnetics, aerodynamics and control theory. To study the hydrodynamics of the floating platform in incident monochromatic waves, potential theory is utilized, taking into account the slow-drift yaw motion of the platform. Steady, second-order moments that are spatially dependent (i.e., dependent on the platform's yaw orientation relative to the incident waves) are given special attention since there are no natural restoring yaw moment. The aerodynamics of the counter-rotating turbines are studied in collaboration with researchers at the UC Berkeley Mathematics Department using a high-order, implicit, large-eddy simulation. An element flipping technique is utilized to extend the method to a domain with counter-rotating turbines and the effects from the closely-spaced turbines is compared with existing experimental data. Hybrid testing techniques on a model platform are utilized to prove the controllability of the platform in lieu of a wind-wave tank. A 1:82 model-scale floating platform is fabricated and tested at the UC Berkeley Physical-Model Testing Facility. The vertical-axis wind turbines are simulated by spinning, controllable actuators that can be updated in real-time of

  6. Numerical Investigation of Capability of Self-Starting and Self-Rotating of a Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Hsieh-Chen; Colonius, Tim

    2015-11-01

    The immersed boundary method is used to simulate the incompressible flow around two-dimensional airfoils at low Reynolds numbers in order to investigate the self-starting and self-rotating capability of a vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) with NACA 0018 blades. By examining the torque generated by a three-bladed VAWT fixed at various orientations, a stable equilibrium and the optimal starting orientation that produces the largest torque have been observed. When Reynolds number is below a critical value, the VAWT oscillates around a stable equilibrium. However, the VAWT goes into continuous rotation from the optimal orientation when Reynolds number is above this critical value. It is also shown that VAWT with more blades is easier to self-start due to a wilder range of positive starting torques. Moreover, with a proper choice of load model, a VAWT is able to self-rotate and generate a designed averaged power. This project is supported by Caltech FLOWE center/Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.

  7. Paleomagnetic Determination of Vertical-Axis Block Rotation and Magnetostratigraphy in the Coachella Valley, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitroff, C.; Housen, B. A.; McNabb, J. C.; Dorsey, R. J.; Burmester, R. F.; Messe, G. T.

    2015-12-01

    Here, we report new paleomagnetism and magnetostratigraphy data from the Palm Spring Fm of the Mecca Hills, the Pleistocene conglomeratic sandstone in Desert Hot Springs and the Plio-Pleistocene San Timoteo beds from Live Oak Canyon. From the Mecca Hills, new data are from 29 sites and 112 samples. The paleomagnetic results yielded well-defined components of magnetization- defining seven polarity zones within the Ocotillo and upper Palm Spring Fm. Correlation to the geomagnetic polarity timescale, using the Bishop Ash near the top of the section as a tie point, places the Brunhes-Matuyama boundary near the base of the Ocotillo Fm, and the Jaramillo, Olduvai, and Reunion normal polarity sub-chrons in the upper Palm Spring Fm. This indicates the upper Palm Spring Fm in the Mecca Hills was deposited between 2.3 and 0.9 Ma. Sites from the Mecca Hills section have mean directions of D = 343, I = 53, α95 =11.3 N = 5 for normal sites, D = 175, I = -50, α95 = 4.9 N = 24 for reverse sites, and normal and reverse sites combined have a mean direction of D = 353, I = 51 α95 = 4.4. This indicates modest (7 degrees) CCW rotation of the section. Results from 19 sites (53 samples) of the Pleistocene conglomeritic sandstone from Desert Hot Springs have very well-defined paleomagnetic components. Six of the sites have normal polarity- 13 sites have reverse polarity. Sites with normal polarity have a mean direction of D = 358, I = 45, α95 = 13 and reverse sites have a mean of D = 182, I = -50, α95 = 6.6.The combined mean direction (in tilt-corrected coordinates) is D = 0.7, I = 49, α95 = 5.6 and indicates that 3.1° ± 2.3° of CW rotation has occurred at this location since ~1 to 1.5 Ma. Results from 8 sites (35 samples) of the upper-most San Timoteo beds from Live Oak Canyon also have well-defined paleomagnetic components for 6 sites. All of the results have normal polarity, and one site has a direction that is >40 degree from the other sites- the mean of the remaining 5

  8. Reconstruction of polar magnetic field from single axis tomography of Faraday rotation in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Flacco, A.; Rax, J.-M.; Malka, V.

    2012-10-15

    An integral back-transform has been developed to retrieve the polar magnetic component in a cylindrically symmetric plasma from a single projection. The formula is derived from parallel forward Radon transform (Abel transform) of a source-free vector field. Two numerical schemes are proposed to solve the backward transform. These schemes have been tested successfully with predefined plasma parameters. The practical application to the analysis of experimental Faraday rotation measurements is also presented, leading to the reconstruction of the transverse profile of the magnetic field.

  9. Off-axis cooling of rotating devices using a crank-shaped heat pipe

    DOEpatents

    Jankowski, Todd A.; Prenger, F. Coyne; Waynert, Joseph A.

    2007-01-30

    The present invention is a crank-shaped heat pipe for cooling rotating machinery and a corresponding method of manufacture. The crank-shaped heat pipe comprises a sealed cylindrical tube with an enclosed inner wick structure. The crank-shaped heat pipe includes a condenser section, an adiabatic section, and an evaporator section. The crank-shape is defined by a first curve and a second curve existing in the evaporator section or the adiabatic section of the heat pipe. A working fluid within the heat pipe provides the heat transfer mechanism.

  10. Intersegmental dynamics of 3D upper arm and forearm longitudinal axis rotations during baseball pitching.

    PubMed

    Naito, Kozo; Takagi, Hiroyasu; Yamada, Norimasa; Hashimoto, Shinichi; Maruyama, Takeo

    2014-12-01

    The shoulder internal rotation (IR) and forearm pronation (PR) are important elements for baseball pitching, however, how rapid rotations of IR and PR are produced by muscular torques and inter-segmental forces is not clear. The aim of this study is to clarify how IR and PR angular velocities are maximized, depending on muscular torque and interactive torque effects, and gain a detailed knowledge about inter-segmental interaction within a multi-joint linked chain. The throwing movements of eight collegiate baseball pitchers were recorded by a motion capture system, and induced-acceleration analysis was used to assess the respective contributions of the muscular (MUS) and interactive torques associated with gyroscopic moment (GYR), and Coriolis (COR) and centrifugal forces (CEN) to maximum angular velocities of IR (MIRV) and PR (MPRV). The results showed that the contribution of MUS account for 98.0% of MIRV, while that contribution to MPRV was indicated as negative (-48.1%). It was shown that MPRV depends primarily on the interactive torques associated with GYR and CEN, but the effects of GYR, COR and CEN on MIRV are negligible. In conclusion, rapid PR motion during pitching is created by passive-effect, and is likely a natural movement which arises from 3D throwing movement. Applying the current analysis to IR and PR motions is helpful in providing the implications for improving performance and considering conditioning methods for pitchers. PMID:25303496

  11. Post-middle Miocene Tuffs of Bodie Hills and Mono Basin, California: Paleomagnetic Reference Directions and Vertical Axis Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindeman, J. R.; Pluhar, C. J.; Farner, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    The relative motions of the Pacific and North American plates about the Sierra Nevada-North American Euler pole is accommodated by dextral slip along the San Andreas Fault System (~75%) and the Walker Lane-Eastern California Shear Zone system of faults, east of the Sierra Nevada microplate (~25%). The Bodie Hills and Mono Basin regions lie within the Walker Lane and partially accommodate deformation by vertical axis rotation of up to 60o rotation since ~9.4 Ma. This region experienced recurrent eruptive events from mid to late Miocene, including John et al.'s (2012) ~12.05 Ma Tuff of Jack Springs (TJS) and Gilbert's (1968) 11.1 - 11.9 Ma 'latite ignimbrite' east of Mono Lake. Both tuffs can be identified by phenocrysts of sanidine and biotite in hand specimens, with TJS composed of a light-grey matrix and the latite ignimbrite composed of a grey-black matrix. Our paleomagnetic results show these units to both be normal polarity, with the latite ignimbrite exhibiting a shallow inclination. TJS's normal polarity is consistent with emplacement during subchron C5 An. 1n (12.014 - 12.116 Ma). The X-ray fluorescence analyses of fiamme from TJS in Bodie Hills and the latite ignimbrite located east of Mono Lake reveal them both to be rhyolites with the latite ignimbrite sharing elevated K composition seen in the slightly younger Stanislaus Group (9.0 - 10.2 Ma). We establish a paleomagnetic reference direction of D = 352.8o I = 42.7o α95 = 7.7o n = 5 sites (42 samples) for TJS in the Bodie Hills in a region hypothesized by Carlson (2012) to have experienced low rotation. Our reference for Gilbert's latite ignimbrite (at Cowtrack Mountain) is D = 352.9o I = 32.1o α95 = 4.7o. This reference locality is found on basement highland likely to have experienced less deformation then the nearby Mono Basin since ignimbrite emplacement. Paleomagnetic results from this latite ignimbrite suggests ~98.2o × 5.5o of clockwise vertical axis rotation of parts of eastern Mono Basin since

  12. Post-Cimmerian (Jurassic-Cenozoic) paleogeography and vertical axis tectonic rotations of Central Iran and the Alborz Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattei, Massimo; Cifelli, Francesca; Muttoni, Giovanni; Rashid, Hamideh

    2015-04-01

    According to previous paleomagnetic analyses, the northward latitudinal drift of Iran related to the closure of the Paleo-Tethys Ocean resulted in the Late Triassic collision of Iran with the Eurasian plate and Cimmerian orogeny. The post-Cimmerian paleogeographic and tectonic evolution of Iran is instead less well known. Here we present new paleomagnetic data from the Upper Jurassic Bidou Formation of Central Iran, which we used in conjunction with published paleomagnetic data to reconstruct the history of paleomagnetic rotations and latitudinal drift of Iran during the Mesozoic and Cenozoic. Paleomagnetic inclination values indicate that, during the Late Jurassic, the Central-East-Iranian Microcontinent (CEIM), consisting of the Yazd, Tabas, and Lut continental blocks, was located at low latitudes close to the Eurasian margin, in agreement with the position expected from apparent polar wander paths (APWP) incorporating the so-called Jurassic massive polar shift, a major event of plate motion occurring in the Late Jurassic from 160 Ma to 145-140 Ma. At these times, the CEIM was oriented WSW-ENE, with the Lut Block bordered to the south by the Neo-Tethys Ocean and to the southeast by the Neo-Sistan oceanic seaway. Subsequently, the CEIM underwent significant counter-clockwise (CCW) rotation during the Early Cretaceous. This rotation may have resulted from the northward propagation of the Sistan rifting-spreading axis during Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous, or to the subsequent (late Early Cretaceous?) eastward subduction and closure of the Sistan oceanic seaway underneath the continental margin of the Afghan Block. No rotations of, or within, the CEIM occurred during the Late Cretaceous-Oligocene, whereas a second phase of CCW rotation occurred after the Middle-Late Miocene. Both the Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous and post Miocene CCW rotations are confined to the CEIM and do not seem to extend to other tectonic regions of Iran. Finally, an oroclinal bending

  13. Retrograde diurnal motion of the instantaneous rotation axis observed by a large ring laser gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, W.

    2016-07-01

    Ring laser gyroscope technique directly senses the Earth's instantaneous rotation pole (IRP), whose polar motion contains strong retrograde diurnal components induced by external torques due to the gravitational attraction of the Moon and Sun. The first direct measurement of this retrograde diurnal motion with three large ring lasers was reported by Schreiber et al. (J Geophys Res 109(B18):B06405, 2004). Since then many technical improvements led to a significant increase in precision and stability of ring laser gyroscopes; however, precise determination of amplitude and phase at main partial waves has not been given in the literature. In this paper, I will report on determination of the retrograde diurnal motion of the IRP at main partial waves (Oo_1, J_1, K_1, M_1, O_1, Q_1 ) by the ring laser "G", located in Wettzell, Germany, which is the most stable one amongst the currently running large ring laser gyroscopes.

  14. Developing a 6-DOF robot to investigate multi-axis ACL injuries under valgus loading coupled with tibia internal rotation.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yupeng; Jacobs, Benjamin J; Nuber, Gordon W; Koh, Jason L; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2010-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries have become more common in recent years as more young people participate in risky sporting activities [1]. Most ACL injuries occur as a result of noncontact mechanisms. Previous in vitro studies of ACL strain have found significant increases in ACL strain primarily with anterior directed force on the tibia relative to the femur and with internal rotation and often with valgus torque [2,3]. However, there remains significant controversy over the mechanisms of ACL failure and the forces on the knee that lead to injury. Some studies have also shown that isolated valgus loading may not load the ACL strongly. The goal of this study was to investigate the mechanism underlying valgus-related ACL injuries. An improved understanding of ACL failure may lead to improved ACL injury prevention programs. A novel 6 degrees of freedom (DOF) knee driving robot was developed in this study with a unique multi-axis simultaneous torque/position control. It was found that pure valgus torque caused a torque that internally rotated the tibia and thus increased ACL strain markedly, which may be an important mechanism underlying the rather common seemingly valgus-related ACL injuries. PMID:21097089

  15. Modeling direction discrimination thresholds for yaw rotations around an earth-vertical axis for arbitrary motion profiles.

    PubMed

    Soyka, Florian; Giordano, Paolo Robuffo; Barnett-Cowan, Michael; Bülthoff, Heinrich H

    2012-07-01

    Understanding the dynamics of vestibular perception is important, for example, for improving the realism of motion simulation and virtual reality environments or for diagnosing patients suffering from vestibular problems. Previous research has found a dependence of direction discrimination thresholds for rotational motions on the period length (inverse frequency) of a transient (single cycle) sinusoidal acceleration stimulus. However, self-motion is seldom purely sinusoidal, and up to now, no models have been proposed that take into account non-sinusoidal stimuli for rotational motions. In this work, the influence of both the period length and the specific time course of an inertial stimulus is investigated. Thresholds for three acceleration profile shapes (triangular, sinusoidal, and trapezoidal) were measured for three period lengths (0.3, 1.4, and 6.7 s) in ten participants. A two-alternative forced-choice discrimination task was used where participants had to judge if a yaw rotation around an earth-vertical axis was leftward or rightward. The peak velocity of the stimulus was varied, and the threshold was defined as the stimulus yielding 75 % correct answers. In accordance with previous research, thresholds decreased with shortening period length (from ~2 deg/s for 6.7 s to ~0.8 deg/s for 0.3 s). The peak velocity was the determining factor for discrimination: Different profiles with the same period length have similar velocity thresholds. These measurements were used to fit a novel model based on a description of the firing rate of semi-circular canal neurons. In accordance with previous research, the estimates of the model parameters suggest that velocity storage does not influence perceptual thresholds. PMID:22623095

  16. Canine hip dysplasia radiographic screening. Prevalence of rotation of the pelvis along its length axis in 7,012 conventional hip extended radiographs.

    PubMed

    Genevois, J-P; Cachon, T; Fau, D; Carozzo, C; Viguier, E; Collard, F; Remy, D

    2007-01-01

    The prevalence of rotation of the pelvis along its length axis was noted, as was the number of rotations towards the right or left hand side of the dog, on 7,012 conventional hip extended radiographs, which were sent for official screening. 29.8% of the radiographs showed a rotation the pelvis. The rotation was statistically more frequent towards the left hand side of the dog. The number of rejected radiographs for too important pelvis rotation was only 5.2%. The consequences of the pelvis rotation on the Norberg-Olsson angle, on the dorsal femoral head coverage, and in the aspect of cranial acetabular edge have to be taken into account when scoring the dog for hip dysplasia. PMID:18038007

  17. Three-dimensional flow field around and downstream of a subscale model rotating vertical axis wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Kevin J.; Coletti, Filippo; Elkins, Christopher J.; Dabiri, John O.; Eaton, John K.

    2016-03-01

    Three-dimensional, three-component mean velocity fields have been measured around and downstream of a scale model vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) operated at tip speed ratios (TSRs) of 1.25 and 2.5, in addition to a non-rotating case. The five-bladed turbine model has an aspect ratio (height/diameter) of 1 and is operated in a water tunnel at a Reynolds number based on turbine diameter of 11,600. Velocity fields are acquired using magnetic resonance velocimetry (MRV) at an isotropic resolution of 1/50 of the turbine diameter. Mean flow reversal is observed immediately behind the turbine for cases with rotation. The turbine wake is highly three-dimensional and asymmetric throughout the investigated region, which extends up to 7 diameters downstream. A vortex pair, generated at the upwind-turning side of the turbine, plays a dominant role in wake dynamics by entraining faster fluid from the freestream and aiding in wake recovery. The higher TSR case shows a larger region of reverse flow and greater asymmetry in the near wake of the turbine, but faster wake recovery due to the increase in vortex pair strength with increasing TSR. The present measurement technique also provides detailed information about flow in the vicinity of the turbine blades and within the turbine rotor. The details of the flow field around VAWTs and in their wakes can inform the design of high-density VAWT wind farms, where wake interaction between turbines is a principal consideration.

  18. Analysis of response delay of the attitude in a single-axis rotation INS/GPS system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jing; Wang, Xingshu; Wang, Jun; Dai, Dongkai; Xiong, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Deflections of the vertical (DOV) are normally ignored in the gravity compensation procedure, which become one of the primary error sources in inertial navigation. In a single-axis rotation INS/GPS system, bias of the gyro and the accelerometer can be ignored, the attitude error is mainly affected by DOV. In this paper, the ideal system assumption is abandoned and the influence of DOV on the attitude is comprehensively discussed, which can be divided into two parts i.e. the direct influence and the indirect influence. The attitude error tracks the DOV along the trajectory belongs to the former. A relatively fixed delay between the attitude error and the DOV belongs to the latter. The delay is essentially induced by the weak observability of the system to the violent DOV. Factors which affect the delay are carefully analyzed. The simulation results show that the delay is mainly affected by accuracies of the inertial sensors and the GPS. It decreases with the GPS accuracy increasing, but increases with the inertial sensor accuracy increasing. The process noise covariance matrix Q plays an important role. With analysis of the characteristics of the delay, influence of the DOV on attitude is studied further, which is necessary for the attitude correction in future.

  19. Development of a Robotic Assembly for Analyzing the Instantaneous Axis of Rotation of the Foot Ankle Complex

    PubMed Central

    Salb, Kelly N.; Wido, Daniel M.; Stewart, Thomas E.; DiAngelo, Denis J.

    2016-01-01

    Ankle instantaneous axis of rotation (IAR) measurements represent a more complete parameter for characterizing joint motion. However, few studies have implemented this measurement to study normal, injured, or pathological foot ankle biomechanics. A novel testing protocol was developed to simulate aspects of in vivo foot ankle mechanics during mid-stance gait in a human cadaveric specimen. A lower leg was mounted in a robotic testing platform with the tibia upright and foot flat on the baseplate. Axial tibia loads (ATLs) were controlled as a function of a vertical ground reaction force (vGRF) set at half body weight (356 N) and a 50% vGRF (178 N) Achilles tendon load. Two specimens were repetitively loaded over 10 degrees of dorsiflexion and 20 degrees of plantar flexion. Platform axes were controlled within 2 microns and 0.008 degrees resulting in ATL measurements within ±2 N of target conditions. Mean ATLs and IAR values were not significantly different between cycles of motion, but IAR values were significantly different between dorsiflexion and plantar flexion. A linear regression analysis showed no significant differences between slopes of plantar flexion paths. The customized robotic platform and advanced testing protocol produced repeatable and accurate measurements of the IAR, useful for assessing foot ankle biomechanics under different loading scenarios and foot conditions. PMID:27099456

  20. Distribution and mechanism of Neogene to present-day vertical axis rotations, Pacific-Australian Plate Boundary Zone, South Island, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Timothy A.; Roberts, Andrew P.

    1997-01-01

    Remarkably little knowledge exists about mechanisms of vertical axis rotation in continental crust. Steeply dipping basement rocks in South Island, New Zealand, provide an opportunity to map the distribution of rotations across the Pacific-Australian plate boundary zone, and to delineate boundaries of rotated blocks in unusual detail. We synthesize new structural data with new and existing paleomagnetic data, with geodetic data, and with patterns of Neogene-Quaternary faulting in the strike-slip Marlborough fault system. For the past 20 m.y., vertical axis rotations have been hinged about two crustal-scale boundaries near the east coast. The NE hinge accommodated ˜50° of early-middle Miocene clockwise rotation, which caused deformation of the eastern ends of the Alpine-Wairau and Clarence strike-slip faults. The SW hinge has accommodated a further 30°-50° of finite clockwise rotation since ˜4 Ma and deflects active fault traces. The locus of rotation has shifted southwestward astride a subduction margin that is lengthening in that direction. Rotating rocks are pinned to the south against a locked collision zone where the continental Chatham Rise impinges against the margin. Slip on inland strike-slip faults is transformed seaward across a zone of fault termination into rigid body rotation of a large continental block that has been thrust eastward over the downgoing subducted slab of the Pacific plate. The rotation mechanism is a "migrating hinge," which resembles a flexed telephone book. Strike-slip faults are translated through a brecciated hinge region that does not coincide with a fixed material line in the rock.

  1. Numerical study of mixed convection around a sphere rotating about its vertical axis in a Newtonian fluid at rest and subject to a heat flux

    SciTech Connect

    Hatem, N.; Philippe, C.; Mbow, C.; Kabdi, Z.; Najoua, S.; Daguenet, M.

    1996-03-01

    The authors study numerically the steady state laminar mixed convection around a sphere heated by a nonuniform flux in a Newtonian fluid. The sphere rotates around its vertical axis. The governing transfer equations in this three-dimensional problem are solved by using the method of Cebeci-Keller. Three types of convection are considered: pure rotation, pure natural convection, and mixed convection. The profiles of the coefficients of heat transfer and local friction, as well as the profiles of temperature, will be determined for various distributions of a heat flux. In the case of a two-dimensional problem, the results agree with those in the literature.

  2. Radiographic anatomy of the rabbit skull with particular reference to the tympanic bulla and temporomandibular joint: Part 1: Lateral and long axis rotational angles.

    PubMed

    King, A M; Cranfield, F; Hall, J; Hammond, G; Sullivan, M

    2010-11-01

    Radiography is frequently used to investigate otitis media and dental disease in rabbits, although there are few detailed reports regarding the radiographic anatomy of the rabbit skull. The aim of this study was to document rabbit skull radiographic anatomy, with particular reference to the tympanic bulla (TB) and temporomandibular joint (TMJ), and to identify views that allowed optimal assessment of these areas. Equipment was used that allowed repeatable positioning of skulls at known rotational angles in lateral (lateral to rostrocaudal) and long axis (lateral to ventrodorsal) directions. The views were repeated with lead markers attached to anatomical features and cadaver heads. The TB could be best examined between 30° and 60° in both planes. The TMJ was best visualised between 70° and 90° in a lateral direction, particularly along a true rostrocaudal plane, but could not be imaged well at any of the long axis rotational angles. Similar images were obtained using cadavers. PMID:19853482

  3. Derivation of the coupled equations of motion for a circular ring rotating about an axis in the plane of the ring

    SciTech Connect

    Benedetti, G.A.

    1996-03-01

    The coupled equations of motion for a circular ring or circular ring segment are developed for the case where the ring is rotating about an axis in its plane and subjected to an angular velocity as well as an angular acceleration. Coupling results from bending in and out of the plane of the ring as well as from extension and torsion of the ring. These equations are then applied to special cases to determine the coupled equations of motion for a ring, beam and cable rotating at a constant angular speed. Coupled equations of motion for a non-rotating circular ring or circular ring segment are developed for the cases of extensional motion and inextensional motion. These equations are subsequently linearized and uncoupled for extensional and inextensional motion in the plane of the ring as well as for uncoupled motion out of the plane of the ring. The critical angular speed for lateral dynamic instability is determined for a rotating circular shaft which supports several rotating circular ring segments.

  4. Triggering Collapse of the Presolar Dense Cloud Core and Injecting Short-lived Radioisotopes with a Shock Wave. IV. Effects of Rotational Axis Orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boss, Alan P.; Keiser, Sandra A.

    2015-08-01

    Both astronomical observations of the interaction of Type II supernova remnants (SNRs) with dense interstellar clouds as well as cosmochemical studies of the abundances of daughter products of short-lived radioisotopes (SLRIs) formed by supernova nucleosynthesis support the hypothesis that the Solar System's SLRIs may have been derived from a supernova. This paper continues a series devoted to examining whether or not such a shock wave could have triggered the dynamical collapse of a dense, presolar cloud core and simultaneously injected sufficient abundances of SLRIs to explain the cosmochemical evidence. Here, we examine the effects of shock waves striking clouds whose spin axes are oriented perpendicular, rather than parallel, to the direction of propagation of the shock front. The models start with 2.2 {M}⊙ cloud cores and shock speeds of 20 or 40 km s-1. Central protostars and protoplanetary disks form in all models, although with their disk spin axes aligned somewhat randomly. The disks derive most of their angular momentum not from the initial cloud rotation, but from the Rayleigh-Taylor fingers that also inject shock wave SLRIs. Injection efficiencies, fi, the fraction of the incident shock wave material injected into the collapsing cloud core, are ˜0.04-0.1 in these models, similar to when the rotation axis is parallel to the shock propagation direction. Evidently, altering the rotation axis orientation has only a minor effect on the outcome, strengthening the case for this scenario as an explanation for the Solar System's SLRIs.

  5. Vertical axis rotations in fold and thrust belts: Comparison of AMS and paleomagnetic data in the Western External Sierras (Southern Pyrenees)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pueyo Anchuela, Ó.; Pueyo, E. L.; Pocoví Juan, A.; Gil Imaz, A.

    2012-04-01

    Geometry and kinematics of fold-and-thrust belts can be complex settings when oblique structures and vertical-axis rotations (VAR) take place during thrust emplacement. Many techniques can be used to unravel such complex tectonic histories, from classic ones like strain analysis and changes of paleocurrents, to more modern approaches such as paleomagnetism and calcite twin analysis. In this paper, anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility is compared to vertical axis rotations deduced from paleomagnetic data along three cross-sections in the External Sierras and the Jaca Basin (southwestern Pyrenees). These data enable us to state that: 1) AMS represents pre-tilting deformation fabrics and magnetic lineation behaves like a passive marker during later deformation; and 2) a primary record of the paleomagnetic field can be found in the area. Therefore, the difference with the paleomagnetic reference is the local VAR. The comparison of the two datasets allows us to draw the following conclusions: A) the changes in both paleomagnetic VAR and magnetic lineation orientation between neighbouring sites are similar; and B) there is a significant linear regression between VAR and trend changes in magnetic lineation. Deviations in magnetic lineation with respect to the expected local magnetic lineation permit vertical axis rotations to be quantified using the AMS dataset. The combined analysis of paleomagnetic and AMS data enables: 1) a quicker comparison of the kinematic evolution in areas with similar AMS patterns; 2) the identification of anomalous orientations of magnetic lineation linked to VARs; and 3) the use of AMS analysis as a homogeneity test for VARs determined from other techniques. AMS is proposed as a suitable preliminary technique to select further sites for paleomagnetic analysis since paleomagnetic laboratory procedures are much more time-consuming than AMS measurements, AMS does not usually modify sample remanence and hence samples can be used for both types of

  6. On the rotation rates and axis ratios of the smallest known near-Earth asteroids-The archetypes of the Asteroid Redirect Mission targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatch, Patrick; Wiegert, Paul A.

    2015-06-01

    NASA's Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM) has been proposed with the aim to capture a small asteroid a few meters in size and redirect it into an orbit around the Moon. There it can be investigated at leisure by astronauts aboard an Orion or other spacecraft. The target for the mission has not yet been selected, and there are very few potential targets currently known. Though sufficiently small near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) are thought to be numerous, they are also difficult to detect and characterize with current observational facilities. Here we collect the most up-to-date information on near-Earth asteroids in this size range to outline the state of understanding of the properties of these small NEAs. Observational biases certainly mean that our sample is not an ideal representation of the true population of small NEAs. However our sample is representative of the eventual target list for the ARM mission, which will be compiled under very similar observational constraints unless dramatic changes are made to the way near-Earth asteroids are searched for and studied. We collect here information on 88 near-Earth asteroids with diameters less than 60 m and with high quality light curves. We find that the typical rotation period is 40 min. Relatively few axis ratios are available for such small asteroids, so we also considered the 92 smallest NEAs with known axis ratios. This sample includes asteroids with diameters up to 300 m. The mean and median axis ratios were 1.43 and 1.29, respectively. Rotation rates much faster than the spin barrier are seen, reaching below 30 s, and implying that most of these bodies are monoliths. Non-principal axis rotation is uncommon. Axial ratios often reach values as high as two, though no undisputed results reach above three. We find little correlation of axis ratio with size. The most common spectral type in the sample of small NEAs is S-type (> 90 %), with only a handful of C and X types known.

  7. Rates and timing of vertical-axis block rotations across the Sierra Nevada-Walker Lane transition in the Bodie Hills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rood, D. H.; Herman, S.; Burbank, D.; Bogue, S.

    2008-12-01

    We use paleomagnetic data from Tertiary volcanic rocks to address the rates and timing of vertical-axis block rotation across the Sierra Nevada-Walker Lane transition in the Bodie Hills, California/Nevada. In zones of continental deformation, block rotations are an important mechanism for permanent stain accommodation, and thus may be crucial to testing geodetic block models and resolving geologic-geodetic slip discrepancies. In our study, data included in the paleomagetic site means are high quality AF demagnetization results (least squared fits that generally include 5-7 points with MAD values less than 1). Thermal demagnetization results match the AF directions, and both thermal demag and rockmag results indicate strong ChRM, mostly carried by single domain magnetite. The site means used to calculate the VGPs all have a95 values less than 10 (mostly 2-5) and include 6-11 sites each. Each site (and thus site mean) has a reasonably well-known structural correction. The VGP scatter values range from 12 to 16 degrees, indicating that they include appropriate secular variation. The mean declinations and 95 percent confidence limits for each VGP timeslice are statistically distinct from one another (71 ± 9, 39 ± 13, and 11 ± 11 degrees). The slope of a linear regression fit to the age versus declination data gives a rate of vertical axis block rotation of approximately 3-4 degrees/Myr. Fitting two separate lines to the age vs. declination data would indicate an increase in the rates of rotation since ~10 Ma. Two possible interpretations of the data are: (1) the rotations began during or before the Middle Miocene, or (2) rates of rotation were high initially (e.g. ~10 Ma) and decelerated until the Pliocene. These data have implications for the (1) timing and spatial extent of distributed strain accumulation related to the initiation of the San Andreas Fault-Eastern California Shear Zone-Walker Lane transform plate boundary, (2) transfer of transform plate boundary

  8. The Vallenar Discontinuity and the Maipo Orocline: Regional significance of clockwise vertical-axis rotations in the central Chilean Andes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arriagada, C.; Roperch, P.; Mpodozis, C.; Charrier, R.; Yanez, G.; Farias, M.

    2009-05-01

    One of the most prominent tectonic features of the Andes is the Central Andean Rotation Pattern (CARP), which is closely related to the Bolivian Orocline and characterized by paleomagnetically determined clockwise rotations in northern Chile and counterclockwise rotations in southern Peru (Arriagada et al., 2008). Along the Chilean margin, between 29°S and 38°S, three prominent curvatures are observed. The Vallenar Discontinuity near ˜29°S corresponds to the southern limit of the Bolivian Orocline. North of 29°S the major structural elements (Paleozoic basement highs and thrusts) are NNE oriented while from 29°S down to 32°S the structures are mainly NS. The central Chilean margin presents also significant bends near Santiago (˜33°S, Maipo Orocline) and in the Arauco region (˜38°S). Near Santiago, the Maipo bend coincides with the subduction of the Juan Fernandez Ridge (JFR). During the last five years we have undertaken new paleomagnetic and structural studies along the forearc of northern and central Chile in order to understand the origin of the bends in the Chilean margin and the consequence of its indentation by the JFR. Clockwise rotations are, consistently large (30°S- 45°) north of the Vallenar discontinuity, but south of the Vallenar discontinuity, the segment between 29°S to 32°S was not subjected to significant clockwise rotation. South of ˜33°S, significant clockwise deflections up to 39° of the declinations are again observed. Rotations occur both in Mesozoic rocks of the Coastal Cordillera and Tertiary rocks of the Main Cordillera. Whereas most of the CARP rotations, involving bending of the Bolivian Orocline and clockwise rotations north of the Vallenar Discontinuity, occurred essentially during the Paleogene, the paleomagnetic rotations obtained in Tertiary formations of central Chile constrain the maximum possible age for the occurrence of rotations of the Maipo Orocline to the Miocene. Neogene shortening in the foreland belt

  9. En echelon Miocene rifting in the southwestern United States and model for vertical-axis rotation in continental extension

    SciTech Connect

    Bartley, J.M. ); Glazner, A.F. )

    1991-12-01

    Two areas of intense early Miocene crustal extension in the southwestern United States, the Colorado River trough and the central Mojave Desert, are separated by a weakly deformed area in the eastern Mojave Desert. The authors propose that these areas form a left-stepping en echelon rift system linked by a ductile detachment at depth. The en echelon geometry explains the southward loss of displacement in the central Mojave Desert and northward loss of coeval displacement in the Colorado River trough, and it incorporates seismic reflection evidence that mid-crustal Tertiary extensional mylonites continue beneath the weakly deformed area. This geometry also explains clockwise paleomagnetic declination anomalies from lower Miocene rocks as recording thin-skinned, detached rotations; large-scale block rotations are not required. Obliquity of the northeast-trending crustal-extension vector to the east-west-trending early Miocene synextensional volcanic belt may have caused the en echelon pattern to develop.

  10. Vertical-axis rotations and deformation along the active strike-slip El Tigre Fault (Precordillera of San Juan, Argentina) assessed through palaeomagnetism and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazzito, Sabrina Y.; Rapalini, Augusto E.; Cortés, José M.; Terrizzano, Carla M.

    2016-05-01

    Palaeomagnetic data from poorly consolidated to non-consolidated late Cenozoic sediments along the central segment of the active El Tigre Fault (Central-Western Precordillera of the San Juan Province, Argentina) demonstrate broad cumulative deformation up to ~450 m from the fault trace and reveal clockwise and anticlockwise vertical-axis rotations of variable magnitude. This deformation has affected in different amounts Miocene to late Pleistocene samples and indicates a complex kinematic pattern. Several inherited linear structures in the shear zone that are oblique to the El Tigre Fault may have acted as block boundary faults. Displacement along these faults may have resulted in a complex pattern of rotations. The maximum magnitude of rotation is a function of the age of the sediments sampled, with largest values corresponding to middle Miocene-lower Pliocene deposits and minimum values obtained from late Pleistocene deposits. The kinematic study is complemented by low-field anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility data to show that the local strain regime suggests a N-S stretching direction, subparallel to the strike of the main fault.

  11. Bending and shear stresses developed by the instantaneous arrest of the root of a cantilever beam rotating with constant angular velocity about a transverse axis through the root

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stowell, Elbridge Z; Schwartz, Edward B; Houbolt, John C

    1945-01-01

    A theoretical investigation was made of the behavior of a cantilever beam in rotational motion about a transverse axis through the root determining the stresses, the deflections, and the accelerations that occur in the beam as a result of the arrest of motion. The equations for bending and shear stress reveal that, at a given percentage of the distance from root to tip and at a given trip velocity, the bending stresses for a particular mode are independent of the length of the beam and the shear stresses vary inversely with the length. When examined with respect to a given angular velocity instead of a given tip velocity, the equations reveal that the bending stress is proportional to the length of the beam whereas the shear stress is independent of the length. Sufficient experimental verification of the theory has previously been given in connection with another problem of the same type.

  12. The Research of Variation of the Period and Precession of the Rotation Axis of EGS (AJISAI) Satellite by Using Photometric Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burlak, N.; Koshkin, N.; Korobeynikova, E.; Melikyants, S.; Shakun, L.; Strakhova, S.

    The light curves of EGS Ajisai with temporal resolution of 20 ms referred to the time scale UTC (GPS) with an error of at most 0.1 ms were obtained. The observed flashes are produced when the mirrors which cover the spinning satellite's surface reflect off the sunlight. In previous paper the analysis of sequence of flashes allowed of reconstructing the arrangement and orientation of the mirrors, i.e. developing an optogeometric model of the satellite (Korobeynikova et al., 2012), and to apply that model along with new photometric observations to determine the satellite's sidereal rotational period with an accuracy that was previously unachievable. A new technique for determination of the spin-axis orientation during each passage of the satellite over an observation site was developed. The secular slowdown of the satellite's spin rate (Psid = 1.4858*EXP(0.000041099*T), where T is measured in days counted from the date of the satellite launch) and its variations correlating with the average duration of the satellite orbit out of the Earth's shadow were refined. New parameters of the spin-axis precession were estimated: the period Pprec = 116.44 days, αprec = 18.0h, δprec = 87.66°, the nutation angle θ = 1.78°.

  13. A conformal mapping technique to correlate the rotating flow around a wing section of vertical axis wind turbine and an equivalent linear flow around a static wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akimoto, Hiromichi; Hara, Yutaka; Kawamura, Takafumi; Nakamura, Takuju; Lee, Yeon-Seung

    2013-12-01

    In a vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT), turbine blades are subjected to the curved flow field caused by the revolution of turbine. However, performance prediction of VAWT is usually based on the fluid dynamic coefficients obtained in wind tunnel measurements of the two-dimensional static wing. The difference of fluid dynamic coefficients in the curved flow and straight flow deteriorates the accuracy of performance prediction. To find the correlation between the two conditions of curved and straight flow, the authors propose a conformal mapping method on complex plane. It provides bidirectional mapping between the two flow fields. For example, the flow around a symmetric wing in the curved flow is mapped to that around a curved (cambered) wing in the straight flow. Although the shape of mapped wing section is different from the original one, its aerodynamic coefficients show a good correlation to those of the original in the rotating condition. With the proposed method, we can reproduce the local flow field around a rotating blade from the flow data around the mapped static wing in the straight flow condition.

  14. Kinematics of a sigmoidal fold and vertical axis rotation in the east of the Zagros Makran syntaxis (southern Iran): Paleomagnetic, magnetic fabric and microtectonic approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, B.; Aubourg, C.; Guézou, J. C.; Nazari, H.; Molinaro, M.; Braud, X.; Guya, N.

    2005-12-01

    The Zagros Simple Fold Belt is characterized by elongated, curved, or sigmoidal folds. The trend of these structures together with the structural style, change suddenly across the Zagros-Makran syntaxis which separates the continental collision domain of Zagros from the oceanic subduction one in Makran. This work focuses on the Minab anticline, outcropping in the easternmost part of Zagros. In order to understand the kinematics of a sigmoidal fold and underscore possible vertical axis rotations in the eastern side of the syntaxis, we performed a joint study of magnetic fabric, microtectonics and paleomagnetism of the northern termination of this fold. The two limbs have been sampled (7 sites, 134 samples) along three cross-sections corresponding to three different orientations of the fold axis. The rocks are weakly deformed fine-grained Mio-Pliocene reddish siltstones. The shortening directions deduced from both magnetic fabric analysis and microtectonic observations are consistent with each other, they are horizontal and roughly perpendicular to the local fold axis, following the torsion of the fold hinge line, and indicating a tectonic origin of the magnetic fabric. Rockmagnetic analyses (thermomagnetic curves, hysteresis loops) point to the presence of magnetite in the PSD and MD ranges as the main magnetic carriers, together with a minor contribution from hematite. Apart from a post-tilting sub-actual VRM and/or CRM (component A), paleomagnetic analyses yield mainly two pre-tilting magnetization components: Component B is carried by magnetite, spanning the intermediate to high unblocking temperature range (300 °C ≤ Tubs ≤ 580 °C). Component C has unblocking temperatures characteristic of hematite (580 °C ≤ Tubs ≤ 680 °C). Both are ante-folding, based on positive reversal and fold tests, inside each of the cross-section but also for the three sections together. However, because component C is biased by some inclination flattening, only component B is

  15. Dual-Axis Rotational Angiography is Safe and Feasible to Detect Coronary Allograft Vasculopathy in Pediatric Heart Transplant Patients: A Single-Center Experience.

    PubMed

    Rios, Rodrigo; Loomba, Rohit S; Foerster, Susan R; Pelech, Andrew N; Gudausky, Todd M

    2016-04-01

    Coronary allograft vasculopathy (CAV) is the leading cause of graft failure in pediatric heart transplant recipients, also adding to mortality in this patient population. Coronary angiography is routinely performed to screen for CAV, with conventional single-plane or bi-plane angiography being utilized. Dual-axis rotational coronary angiography (RA) has been described, mostly in the adult population, and may offer reduction in radiation dose and contrast volume. Experience with this in the pediatric population is limited. This study describes a single-institution experience with RA for screening for CAV in pediatric patients. The catheterization database at our institution was used to identify pediatric heart transplant recipients having undergone RA to screen for CAV. Procedural data including radiation dose, fluoroscopy time, contrast volume, and procedure time were collected for each catheterization. The number of instances in which RA was not successful, ECG changes were present, and CAV was detected were also collected for each catheterization. A total of 97 patients underwent 345 catheterizations utilizing RA. Median radiation dose-area product per kilogram was found to be 341.7 (mGy cm(2)/kg), total air kerma was 126.8 (mGy), procedure time was 69 min, fluoroscopy time was 9.9 min, and contrast volume was 13 ml. A total of 17 (2 %) coronary artery injections out of 690 could not be successfully imaged using RA. A total of 14 patients had CAV noted at any point, 10 of whom had progressive CAV. Electrocardiographic changes were documented in a total of 10 (3 %) RA catheterizations. Procedural characteristics did not differ between serial catheterizations. RA is safe and feasible for CAV screening in pediatric heart transplant recipients while offering coronary imaging in multiple planes compared to conventional angiography. PMID:26846123

  16. Rotatable shear plate interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Duffus, Richard C.

    1988-01-01

    A rotatable shear plate interferometer comprises a transparent shear plate mounted obliquely in a tubular supporting member at 45.degree. with respect to its horizontal center axis. This tubular supporting member is supported rotatably around its center axis and a collimated laser beam is made incident on the shear plate along this center axis such that defocus in different directions can be easily measured.

  17. Mars: destruction of the tropical belt and building up extra tropics is a physical requirement of angular momentum equilibration between zones with different distances to the rotation axis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G. G.

    2012-09-01

    Often observed a sensible difference in appearance and structure between tropical and extra-t ropical zones of various heavenly bodies including rocky and gas planets, satellites and Sun (Fig. 6) compels to look for a common reason of such phenomenon [1-3]. All bodies rotate and their spherical shape makes zones at different lat itudes to have differing angular momenta as a distance to the rotation axis diminishes gradually from the equator to the poles (Fig. 1) (this is felt particularly when one launches rockets into space -preferable cheaper launches are from the equatorial regions - Kourou in the French Guyana is better than Baikonur in Kazakhstan). One of remarkable changes occurs at tropics. As a total rotating planetary body tends to have angular momenta of its tectonic blocks equilibrated it starts mechanisms leveling this basic physical property. At tropical zones (bulged also due to the rotation ellipsoid) the outer shell - crust as a consequence tends to be destroyed, sunk, subsided and shrunk; a density of crust material changes; the atmosphere reacts changing chemistry and structure; in terrestrial anthroposphere man looses its mass and stature (well known pygmioidness process). Ext ratropical belts, on the contrary, tend to add material and increase radius. Thus, a body tends to be like a cucumber but mighty gravity always makes it globular. According to the Le Chatelier rule mechanisms with opposing tendencies also begin to act. However, traces of this cosmic "struggle" very often are seen on surfaces of heavenly bodies as structurally distinguished tropical and extra-t ropical zones (Fig. 1, 6) [1-3]. At Mars the widespread "enigmatic" chaotic and fretted terrains at the highland-lowland boundary could be considered as traces of the crust destruction along the wide tropical belt (Fig. 2-4). A system of hillocks and their relics, mesas, ridges, cliffs and separating them depressions or plains (deep up to 1-2 km) is controlled by a crosscutting

  18. Paleomagnetic evidence for vertical-axis rotations of crustal blocks in the Woodlark Rift, SE Papua New Guinea: Miocene to present-day kinematics in one of the world's most rapidly extending plate boundary zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cairns, Elizabeth A.; Little, Timothy A.; Turner, Gillian M.; Wallace, Laura M.; Ellis, Susan

    2015-07-01

    The continental Woodlark Rift, in SE Papua New Guinea lies west of a propagating oceanic spreading center in the Woodlark Basin and is currently one of few places on Earth where active continental breakup is thought to be occurring. Here north-south extension is localized on a few major normal faults. We determined characteristic remanent magnetization (ChRM) components from demagnetization profiles of >300 individual specimens. From these, 157 components contribute to paleomagnetic directions for six formations. We compare Early Miocene (˜20 Ma) to Late Pliocene (3.0 ± 0.5) ChRM mean directions, at four localities, with contemporaneous expected field directions corresponding to the Australian Plate. Time-varying finite rotations from Cape Vogel Peninsula (28-12°) suggest anticlockwise rotation had begun by ˜15 Ma. This rotation may have been accompanied by rifting, ˜7 Ma earlier than previously inferred. Furthermore, that early extension may have occurred south of the present rift, and that deformation later migrated north of the Peninsula. Pliocene vertical-axis rotations are consistent with GPS-determined plate motions, suggesting that contemporary rift kinematics were established by ˜3 Ma. Finite anticlockwise rotation (10.1 ± 7.6°) in the Amphlett Islands is accordant with seafloor spreading in the Woodlark Basin, suggesting this locality has seen the full Woodlark plate motion since 3 Ma. Clockwise rotation of the Goodenough Bay Block (-6.5 ± 11.2°) since the Late Miocene has accomplished transfer of deformation between major extensional corridors, and an especially rapid local rotation (-16.3 ± 9.5°) in NW Normanby Island may suggest an incipient dextral transfer fault.

  19. Helical axis stellarator with noninterlocking planar coils

    DOEpatents

    Reiman, Allan; Boozer, Allen H.

    1987-01-01

    A helical axis stellarator using only noninterlocking planar, non-circular coils, generates magnetic fields having a magnetic well and large rotational transform with resultant large equilibrium beta.

  20. Aeroelastically coupled blades for vertical axis wind turbines

    DOEpatents

    Paquette, Joshua; Barone, Matthew F.

    2016-02-23

    Various technologies described herein pertain to a vertical axis wind turbine blade configured to rotate about a rotation axis. The vertical axis wind turbine blade includes at least an attachment segment, a rear swept segment, and optionally, a forward swept segment. The attachment segment is contiguous with the forward swept segment, and the forward swept segment is contiguous with the rear swept segment. The attachment segment includes a first portion of a centroid axis, the forward swept segment includes a second portion of the centroid axis, and the rear swept segment includes a third portion of the centroid axis. The second portion of the centroid axis is angularly displaced ahead of the first portion of the centroid axis and the third portion of the centroid axis is angularly displaced behind the first portion of the centroid axis in the direction of rotation about the rotation axis.

  1. A rotating condenser and off-axis zone plate monochromator for the TXM at the undulator U41 at BESSY II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemann, B.; Guttmann, P.; Hambach, D.; Schneider, G.; Weiß, D.; Schmahl, G.

    2001-07-01

    The Göttingen transmission X-ray microscope at the low emittance electron storage ring BESSY II uses the concept of dynamical aperture synthesis (Reynolds, DeVelis, Parrent, Thomson (Eds.), The New Physical Optics Notebook, SPIE, 1990, pp. 536-548) for the object illumination. The concept is well suited as a condenser, as it can match any required numerical aperture of the TXM objective. Furthermore, a novel off-axis transmission zone-plate monochromator is included, which can generate a monochromaticity of several thousand in the object illumination.

  2. A paleomagnetic investigation of vertical-axis rotations in coastal Sonora, Mexico: Evidence for distributed transtensional deformation during the Proto-Gulf shift from a subduction-dominated to transform-dominated plate boundary in the Gulf of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Scott William

    The history of late Miocene (Proto-Gulf) deformation on the Sonoran margin of the Gulf of California is key to understanding how Baja California was captured by the Pacific plate and how strain was partitioned during the Proto-Gulf period (12.5-6 Ma). The Sierra el Aguaje and Sierra Tinajas del Carmen are located in southwestern coastal Sonora, Mexico, and represent the eastern rifted margin of the central Gulf of California. The ranges are composed of volcanic units and their corresponding volcaniclastic units which are the result of persistent magmatic activity between 20 and 8.8 Ma, including three packages of basalt and andesite that make excellent paleomagnetic recorders. Based on cross cutting relations and geochronologic data for pre-, syn-, and post-tectonic volcanic units, most of the faulting and tilting in the Sierra El Aguaje is bracketed between 11.9 and 9.0 Ma, thus falling entirely within Proto-Gulf time. A paleomagnetic investigation into possible vertical axis rotations in the Sierra el Aguaje has uncovered evidence of clockwise rotations between ~13º and ~105º with possible translations. These results are consistent with existing field relations, which suggest the presence of large (>45°) vertical axis rotations in this region. This evidence includes: a) abrupt changes in the strike of tilted strata in different parts of the range, including large domains characterized by E-W strikes b) ubiquitous NE-SW striking faults with left lateral-normal oblique slip, that terminate against major NW-trending right lateral faults, and c) obliquity between the general strike of tilted strata and the strike of faults. These rotations occurred after 12 Ma and largely prior to 9 Ma, thus falling into the Proto-Gulf period. Such large-scale rotations lend credence to the theory that the area inboard of Baja California was experiencing transtension during the Proto-Gulf period, rather than the pure extension that would be the result of strain partitioning

  3. Paleomagnetism of the Miocene Columbia River Basalt Group in Oregon and Washington from the Pacific Coast to the Columbia Plateau: Magnetostratigraphy, Vertical-Axis Rotations, Paleosecular Variation, and Remagnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagstrum, J. T.; Wells, R. E.; Evarts, R. C.; Niem, A. R.; Sawlan, M. G.; Blakely, R. J.

    2008-12-01

    Identification of individual flows within the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) has mostly relied on minor differences in geochemistry, but magnetic polarity has also proved useful in differentiating flows and establishing a temporal framework. Within the thick, rapidly erupted Grande Ronde Basalt four major polarity chrons (R1 to N2) have been identified. Because cooling times of CRBG flows are brief compared to rates of paleosecular variation (PSV), within-flow paleomagnetic directions are expected to be constant across the extensive east-west reaches of these flows. Vertical-axis rotations in OR and WA, driven by northward-oblique subduction of the Juan de Fuca plate, thus can be measured by comparing directions for western sampling localities to directions for the same flow units on the relatively stable Columbia Plateau. Clockwise rotations calculated for outcrop locations within the Coast Range (CR) block are uniformly about 30° (N=102 sites). East of the northwest-trending en échelon Mt. Angel-Gales Creek, Portland Hills, and northern unnamed fault zones, as well as north of the CR block's northern boundary (~Columbia River), clockwise rotations abruptly drop to about 15° (N=39 sites), with offsets in these bounding fault zones corresponding to the Portland and Willamette pull-apart basins. The general agreement of vertical- axis rotation rates estimated from CRBG magnetizations with those determined from modern GPS velocities indicates a relatively steady rate over the last 10 to 15 Myr. Unusual directions due to PSV, field excursions, or polarity transitions could provide useful stratigraphic markers. Individual flow directions, however, have not been routinely used to identify flows. One reason this has been difficult is that remagnetization is prevalent, particularly in the Coast Ranges, coupled with earlier demagnetization techniques that did not completely remove overprint components. Except for the Ginkgo and Pomona flows of the Wanapum and Saddle

  4. Evidence of Vibrational-Induced Rotational Axis Switching for HD 12C 16O: New High-Resolution Analysis of the ν 5 and ν 6 Bands and First Analysis of the ν 4 Band (10-μm Region)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, A.; Flaud, J.-M.; Smirnov, M.; Lock, M.

    2000-09-01

    Using new high-resolution Fourier transform spectra recorded in Giessen in the 8-12 μm region, a more extended analysis of the ν5 and ν6 bands and the first high-resolution study of the ν4 band of HDCO were performed. As pointed out previously [M. Allegrini, J. W. C. Johns, and A. R. W. McKellar, Can. J. Phys. 56, 859-864 (1978)], the energy levels of the 51 and 61 states are strongly coupled by A- and B-type Coriolis interactions. On the other hand, it appeared that weaker resonances involving the energy levels of the 41 state with those of the 51 and 61 states also had to be accounted for. Consequently, the calculation of the energy levels was performed taking into account the Coriolis-type resonances linking the energy levels of the {61, 51, 41} resonating states. Because of the unusually strong Coriolis interaction between ν5 and ν6, a nonclassical behavior of the rotational levels of the 51 and 61 states was observed and it was necessary to use a new Hamiltonian matrix which possesses, as usual, both A- and B-type Coriolis operators in the 51 ⇔ 61 and 61 ⇔ 41 off diagonal blocks but differs from the classical reduced Hamiltonian which is used commonly for planar Cs-type molecules. More precisely, it proved necessary to include non-orthorhombic terms in the expansion of the rotational Hamiltonian of the 51 and 61 states. According to the considerations developed by Watson [J. K. G. Watson, in 'Vibrational Spectra and Structure,' (J. Durig, Ed.), Chap. 1, Elsevier, Amsterdam, 1977], these non-orthorhombic operators which are not symmetry forbidden are usually removed for semirigid Cs-type molecules by rotational contact transformations. In the present study, the occurrence of terms in {Jx, Jz} in the expansions of the rotational Hamiltonians for the 51 and 61 states indicates that the inertial system of HDCO differs for each of the three {61, 51, 41} resonating states. Therefore, HDCO becomes a good example of vibrational-induced rotational axis

  5. Subduction tractions and vertical axis rotations in the Zagros-Makran transition zone, SE Iran: the 2013 May 11 Mw 6.1 Minab earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penney, Camilla; Copley, Alex; Oveisi, Behnam

    2015-08-01

    The source parameters and slip distribution of the 2013 May 11 Mw 6.1 Minab earthquake are studied using seismology, geodesy and field observations. We observe left-lateral strike-slip motion on a fault striking ENE-WSW; approximately perpendicular to previously studied faults in the Minab-Zendan-Palami fault zone. The fault that ruptured in 2013 is one of a series of ˜E-W striking left-lateral faults visible in the geology and geomorphology. These accommodate a velocity field equivalent to right-lateral shear on ˜N-S striking planes by clockwise rotations about vertical axes. The presence of these faults can reconcile differences in estimates of fault slip rates in the western Makran from GPS and Quaternary dating. The longitudinal range of shear in the western Makran is likely to be controlled by the distance over which the underthrusting Arabian lithosphere deepens in the transition from continent-continent collision in the Zagros to oceanic subduction in the Makran.

  6. Two-axis angular effector

    DOEpatents

    Vaughn, Mark R.; Robinett, III, Rush D.; Phelan, John R.; Van Zuiden, Don M.

    1997-01-21

    A new class of coplanar two-axis angular effectors. These effectors combine a two-axis rotational joint analogous to a Cardan joint with linear actuators in a manner to produce a wider range of rotational motion about both axes defined by the joint. This new class of effectors also allows design of robotic manipulators having very high strength and efficiency. These effectors are particularly suited for remote operation in unknown surroundings, because of their extraordinary versatility. An immediate application is to the problems which arise in nuclear waste remediation.

  7. Earth Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickey, Jean O.

    1995-01-01

    The study of the Earth's rotation in space (encompassing Universal Time (UT1), length of day, polar motion, and the phenomena of precession and nutation) addresses the complex nature of Earth orientation changes, the mechanisms of excitation of these changes and their geophysical implications in a broad variety of areas. In the absence of internal sources of energy or interactions with astronomical objects, the Earth would move as a rigid body with its various parts (the crust, mantle, inner and outer cores, atmosphere and oceans) rotating together at a constant fixed rate. In reality, the world is considerably more complicated, as is schematically illustrated. The rotation rate of the Earth's crust is not constant, but exhibits complicated fluctuations in speed amounting to several parts in 10(exp 8) [corresponding to a variation of several milliseconds (ms) in the Length Of the Day (LOD) and about one part in 10(exp 6) in the orientation of the rotation axis relative to the solid Earth's axis of figure (polar motion). These changes occur over a broad spectrum of time scales, ranging from hours to centuries and longer, reflecting the fact that they are produced by a wide variety of geophysical and astronomical processes. Geodetic observations of Earth rotation changes thus provide insights into the geophysical processes illustrated, which are often difficult to obtain by other means. In addition, these measurements are required for engineering purposes. Theoretical studies of Earth rotation variations are based on the application of Euler's dynamical equations to the problem of finding the response of slightly deformable solid Earth to variety of surface and internal stresses.

  8. Omni-directional and holonomic rolling platform with decoupled rotational and translational degrees of freedom

    DOEpatents

    Pin, Francois G.; Killough, Stephen M.

    1994-01-01

    A wheel assembly includes a support, a cage rotatably mounted on the support and having a longitudinal rotation axis, a first ball wheel rotatably mounted in the cage and having a rotation axis orthogonal to the rotation axis of the cage, and a second ball wheel rotatably mounted in the cage and having a rotation axis orthogonal to the rotation axis or the cage and to the rotation axis of the first ball wheel. A control circuit includes a photodetector signal which indicates ground contact for each ball wheel, and a tachometer which indicates actual drive shaft velocity.

  9. Omni-directional and holonomic rolling platform with decoupled rotational and translational degrees of freedom

    DOEpatents

    Pin, F.G.; Killough, S.M.

    1994-12-20

    A wheel assembly includes a support, a cage rotatably mounted on the support and having a longitudinal rotation axis, a first ball wheel rotatably mounted in the cage and having a rotation axis orthogonal to the rotation axis of the cage, and a second ball wheel rotatably mounted in the cage and having a rotation axis orthogonal to the rotation axis or the cage and to the rotation axis of the first ball wheel. A control circuit includes a photodetector signal which indicates ground contact for each ball wheel, and a tachometer which indicates actual drive shaft velocity. 6 figures.

  10. Vertical axis wind turbine airfoil

    DOEpatents

    Krivcov, Vladimir; Krivospitski, Vladimir; Maksimov, Vasili; Halstead, Richard; Grahov, Jurij Vasiljevich

    2012-12-18

    A vertical axis wind turbine airfoil is described. The wind turbine airfoil can include a leading edge, a trailing edge, an upper curved surface, a lower curved surface, and a centerline running between the upper surface and the lower surface and from the leading edge to the trailing edge. The airfoil can be configured so that the distance between the centerline and the upper surface is the same as the distance between the centerline and the lower surface at all points along the length of the airfoil. A plurality of such airfoils can be included in a vertical axis wind turbine. These airfoils can be vertically disposed and can rotate about a vertical axis.

  11. Three axis attitude control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, Philip A. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A three-axis attitude control system for an orbiting body comprised of a motor driven flywheel supported by a torque producing active magnetic bearing is described. Free rotation of the flywheel is provided about its central axis and together with limited angular torsional deflections of the flywheel about two orthogonal axes which are perpendicular to the central axis. The motor comprises an electronically commutated DC motor, while the magnetic bearing comprises a radially servoed permanent magnet biased magnetic bearing capable of producing cross-axis torques on the flywheel. Three body attitude sensors for pitch, yaw and roll generate respective command signals along three mutually orthogonal axes (x, y, z) which are coupled to circuit means for energizing a set of control coils for producing torques about two of the axes (x and y) and speed control of the flywheel about the third (z) axis. An energy recovery system, which is operative during motor deceleration, is also included which permits the use of a high-speed motor to perform effectively as a reactive wheel suspended in the magnetic bearing.

  12. Electrical-Discharge Machining With Additional Axis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malinzak, Roger M.; Booth, Gary N.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed electrical-discharge-machining (EDM) apparatus uses moveable vertical wire as electrode. Wire positionable horizontally along one axis as it slides vertically past workpiece. Workpiece indexed in rotation about horizontal axis. Because of symmetry of parts, process used to make two such parts at a time by defining boundary between them. Advantages: cost of material reduced, imparts less residual stress to workpiece, and less time spent machining each part when parts produced in such symmetrical pairs.

  13. Three-Axis Attitude Control With a Single Wheel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, P. A.

    1987-01-01

    Single-device attitude-control system provides stabilization along three axes. Flywheel connected to electronically controlled motor rotates on magnetic bearing. At high rotational speed, small angular displacements about x and y axes, in response to control signals enable storage of relatively large amounts of angular momentum. Angular momentum about z axis stored in changes in rotational speed.

  14. Rotational joint assembly and method for constructing the same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandera, Pablo (Inventor); Buchele, Paul (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A rotational joint assembly and a method for constructing a rotational joint assembly are provided. The rotational joint assembly includes a first rotational component, a second rotational component coupled to the first rotational component such that the second rotational component is rotatable relative to the first rotational component in first and second rotational directions about an axis, and a flexure member, being deflectable in first and second deflection directions, coupled to at least one of the first and second rotational components such that when the second rotational component is rotated relative to the first rotational component in each of the first and second rotational directions about the axis, the flexure member is deflected in the first deflection direction and exerts a force on the second rotational component opposing the rotation.

  15. Flexible helical-axis stellarator

    DOEpatents

    Harris, Jeffrey H.; Hender, Timothy C.; Carreras, Benjamin A.; Cantrell, Jack L.; Morris, Robert N.

    1988-01-01

    An 1=1 helical winding which spirals about a conventional planar, circular central conductor of a helical-axis stellarator adds a significant degree of flexibility by making it possible to control the rotational transform profile and shear of the magnetic fields confining the plasma in a helical-axis stellarator. The toroidal central conductor links a plurality of toroidal field coils which are separately disposed to follow a helical path around the central conductor in phase with the helical path of the 1=1 winding. This coil configuration produces bean-shaped magnetic flux surfaces which rotate around the central circular conductor in the same manner as the toroidal field generating coils. The additional 1=1 winding provides flexible control of the magnetic field generated by the central conductor to prevent the formation of low-order resonances in the rotational transform profile which can produce break-up of the equilibrium magnetic surfaces. Further, this additional winding can deepen the magnetic well which together with the flexible control provides increased stability.

  16. Dual Axis Light Sensor for Tracking Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Miki; Tambo, Toyokazu

    We have developed convenient light sensors to control a platform of solar cell panel. Dual axis light sensor in the present paper has structure of 5 PD (photodiode) light sensor which is composed of 5 photodiodes attached on a frustum of pyramid(1). Light source can be captured in front of the sensor by rotating the X and Y axis as decreasing the output deviation between two pairs of outside photodiodes. We here report the mechanism of sun tacking using the dual axis 5 PD light sensor and the fundamental results performed in the dark room.

  17. Centrifugally activated bearing for high-speed rotating machinery

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F.

    1994-01-01

    A centrifugally activated bearing is disclosed. The bearing includes an annular member that extends laterally and radially from a central axis. A rotating member that rotates about the central axis relative to the annular member is also included. The rotating member has an interior chamber that surrounds the central axis and in which the annular member is suspended. Furthermore, the interior chamber has a concave shape for retaining a lubricant therein while the rotating member is at rest and for retaining a lubricant therein while the rotating member is rotating. The concave shape is such that while the rotating member is rotating a centrifugal force causes a lubricant to be forced away from the central axis to form a cylindrical surface having an axis collinear with the central axis. This centrifugally displaced lubricant provides restoring forces to counteract lateral displacement during operation.

  18. Centrifugally activated bearing for high-speed rotating machinery

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.

    1994-02-15

    A centrifugally activated bearing is disclosed. The bearing includes an annular member that extends laterally and radially from a central axis. A rotating member that rotates about the central axis relative to the annular member is also included. The rotating member has an interior chamber that surrounds the central axis and in which the annular member is suspended. Furthermore, the interior chamber has a concave shape for retaining a lubricant therein while the rotating member is at rest and for retaining a lubricant therein while the rotating member is rotating. The concave shape is such that while the rotating member is rotating a centrifugal force causes a lubricant to be forced away from the central axis to form a cylindrical surface having an axis collinear with the central axis. This centrifugally displaced lubricant provides restoring forces to counteract lateral displacement during operation. 4 figures.

  19. Progress in geophysical aspects of the rotation of the earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambeck, K.

    1978-01-01

    The geophysical causes and consequences of the Earth's rotation are reviewed. Specific topics covered include: (1) the motion of the rotation axis in space, precession and nutation; (2) the motion of the rotation axis relative to the Earth, polar motion; and (3) the rate of rotation about this axis, or changes in the length of day. Secular decrease in obliquity and evolution of the Earth-Moon system are also discussed.

  20. Rotating reactor studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Glyn O.

    1991-01-01

    Undesired gravitational effects such as convection or sedimentation in a fluid can sometimes be avoided or decreased by the use of a closed chamber uniformly rotated about a horizontal axis. In a previous study, the spiral orbits of a heavy or buoyant particle in a uniformly rotating fluid were determined. The particles move in circles, and spiral in or out under the combined effects of the centrifugal force and centrifugal buoyancy. A optimization problem for the rotation rate of a cylindrical reactor rotated about its axis and containing distributed particles was formulated and solved. Related studies in several areas are addressed. A computer program based on the analysis was upgraded by correcting some minor errors, adding a sophisticated screen-and-printer graphics capability and other output options, and by improving the automation. The design, performance, and analysis of a series of experiments with monodisperse polystyrene latex microspheres in water were supported to test the theory and its limitations. The theory was amply confirmed at high rotation rates. However, at low rotation rates (1 rpm or less) the assumption of uniform solid-body rotation of the fluid became invalid, and there were increasingly strong secondary motions driven by variations in the mean fluid density due to variations in the particle concentration. In these tests the increase in the mean fluid density due to the particles was of order 0.015 percent. To a first approximation, these flows are driven by the buoyancy in a thin crescent-shaped depleted layer on the descending side of the rotating reactor. This buoyancy distribution is balanced by viscosity near the walls, and by the Coriolis force in the interior. A full analysis is beyond the scope of this study. Secondary flows are likely to be stronger for buoyant particles, which spiral in towards the neutral point near the rotation axis under the influence of their centrifugal buoyancy. This is because the depleted layer is

  1. Rotatable prism for pan and tilt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ball, W. B.

    1980-01-01

    Compact, inexpensive, motor-driven prisms change field of view of TV camera. Camera and prism rotate about lens axis to produce pan effect. Rotating prism around axis parallel to lens produces tilt. Size of drive unit and required clearance are little more than size of camera.

  2. Rotating turbulence under "precession-like" perturbation.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Kartik P; Mazzitelli, Irene; Bonaccorso, Fabio; Pouquet, Annick; Biferale, Luca

    2015-12-01

    The effects of changing the orientation of the rotation axis on homogeneous turbulence is considered. We perform direct numerical simulations on a periodic box of 1024(3) grid points, where the orientation of the rotation axis is changed (a) at a fixed time instant (b) regularly at time intervals commensurate with the rotation time scale. The former is characterized by a dominant inverse energy cascade whereas in the latter, the inverse cascade is stymied due to the recurrent changes in the rotation axis resulting in a strong forward energy transfer and large-scale structures that resemble those of isotropic turbulence. PMID:26637337

  3. Interferometry for rotating sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velle, S.; Mehrabi Pari, S.; Csernai, L. P.

    2016-06-01

    The two particle interferometry method to determine the size of the emitting source after a heavy ion collision is extended. Following the extension of the method to spherical expansion dynamics, here we extend the method to rotating systems. It is shown that rotation of a cylindrically symmetric system leads to modifications, which can be perceived as spatial asymmetry by the "azimuthal HBT" method. We study an exact rotating and expanding solution of the fluid dynamical model of heavy ion reactions. We consider a source that is azimuthally symmetric in space around the axis of rotation, and discuss the features of the resulting two particle correlation function. This shows the azimuthal asymmetry arising from the rotation. We show that this asymmetry leads to results similar to those given by spatially asymmetric sources.

  4. Cross-axis adaptation of torsional components in the yaw-axis vestibulo-ocular reflex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trillenberg, P.; Shelhamer, M.; Roberts, D. C.; Zee, D. S.

    2003-01-01

    The three pairs of semicircular canals within the labyrinth are not perfectly aligned with the pulling directions of the six extraocular muscles. Therefore, for a given head movement, the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) depends upon central neural mechanisms that couple the canals to the muscles with the appropriate functional gains in order to generate a response that rotates the eye the correct amount and around the correct axis. A consequence of these neural connections is a cross-axis adaptive capability, which can be stimulated experimentally when head rotation is around one axis and visual motion about another. From this visual-vestibular conflict the brain infers that the slow-phase eye movement is rotating around the wrong axis. We explored the capability of human cross-axis adaptation, using a short-term training paradigm, to determine if torsional eye movements could be elicited by yaw (horizontal) head rotation (where torsion is normally inappropriate). We applied yaw sinusoidal head rotation (+/-10 degrees, 0.33 Hz) and measured eye movement responses in the dark, and before and after adaptation. The adaptation paradigm lasted 45-60 min, and consisted of the identical head motion, coupled with a moving visual scene that required one of several types of eye movements: (1) torsion alone (-Roll); (2) horizontal/torsional, head right/CW torsion (Yaw-Roll); (3) horizontal/torsional, head right/CCW torsion (Yaw+Roll); (4) horizontal, vertical, torsional combined (Yaw+Pitch-Roll); and (5) horizontal and vertical together (Yaw+Pitch). The largest and most significant changes in torsional amplitude occurred in the Yaw-Roll and Yaw+Roll conditions. We conclude that short-term, cross-axis adaptation of torsion is possible but constrained by the complexity of the adaptation task: smaller torsional components are produced if more than one cross-coupling component is required. In contrast, vertical cross-axis components can be easily trained to occur with yaw head

  5. Off-axis vortex breakdown in a shallow whirlpool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrada, Miguel A.; Shtern, Vladimir N.; López-Herrera, José María

    2013-06-01

    The off-axis emergence of vortex breakdown (VB) is revealed. The steady axisymmetric flow in a vertical sealed cylinder, which is partially filled with water and the rest is filled with air, is driven by the rotating bottom disk. The numerical simulations show that VB can emerge away from the rotation axis, interface, and walls. As the rotation intensifies, VB first develops in the water region. If the water height is less (larger) than nearly one half of the cylinder radius, VB emerges off (on) the axis. As the rotation further increases, the off-axis VB ring touches the interface and then a thin countercirculation layer develops in the air flow above the water VB domain. This two-fluid VB ring shrinks (it even disappears in a very shallow whirlpool) as the interface approaches the bottom disk.

  6. Major and minor axis kinematics of 22 ellipticals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franx, Marijn; Illingworth, Garth; Heckman, Timothy

    1989-09-01

    Rotation curves and velocity dispersion profiles have been determined for the major and the minor axes of 22 elliptical galaxies. Rotation was detected in all but one galaxy, even though the sample was biased toward round ellipticals. Minor axis rotation larger than major axis rotation was measured in two galaxies, NGC 4406 and NGC 7507. Roughly 10 percent of ellipticals may show large minor axis velocities relative to those on the major axis. A simple model is used to derive a rotational axis from the observed minor and major axis velocities to a typical accuracy of 6 deg. The rotational and photometric minor axes aligned to better than 10 deg for 60 percent of the sample, implying that the direction of the angular momentum is related to the orientation of the figure of the galaxy. IC 1459 has a kinematically distinct core with its angular momentum opposite to the angular momentum of the outer parts, and NGC 4406 has a core with its angular momentum perpendicular to that of the outer parts.

  7. Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2002-04-01

    Blade fatigue life is an important element in determining the economic viability of the Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT). VAWT-SAL Vertical Axis Wind Turbine- Stochastic Aerodynamic Loads Ver 3.2 numerically simulates the stochastic (random0 aerodynamic loads of the Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) created by the atomspheric turbulence. The program takes into account the rotor geometry, operating conditions, and assumed turbulence properties.

  8. Rotating sample holder without mechanical linkages.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, L J

    1979-02-01

    A sample rotator which operates in applied magnetic fields is described. The design eliminates mechanical linkages by magnetically orienting a gimbal ring. Three mutually orthogonal coils mounted on the gimbal provide a magnetic moment which is aligned along the field direction. The rotator is useful from room temperature down to the liquid helium range. Rotations about any desired axis are possible. PMID:18699475

  9. Modeling rigid magnetically rotated microswimmers: Rotation axes, bistability, and controllability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshkati, Farshad; Fu, Henry Chien

    2014-12-01

    Magnetically actuated microswimmers have recently attracted attention due to many possible biomedical applications. In this study we investigate the dynamics of rigid magnetically rotated microswimmers with permanent magnetic dipoles. Our approach uses a boundary element method to calculate a mobility matrix, accurate for arbitrary geometries, which is then used to identify the steady periodically rotating orbits in a co-rotating body-fixed frame. We evaluate the stability of each of these orbits. We map the magnetoviscous behavior as a function of dimensionless Mason number and as a function of the angle that the magnetic field makes with its rotation axis. We describe the wobbling motion of these swimmers by investigating how the rotation axis changes as a function of experimental parameters. We show that for a given magnetic field strength and rotation frequency, swimmers can have more than one stable periodic orbit with different rotation axes. Finally, we demonstrate that one can improve the controllability of these types of microswimmers by adjusting the relative angle between the magnetic field and its axis of rotation.

  10. Vertical-axis wind turbines -- The current status of an old technology

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, D.E.

    1996-12-31

    Vertical-axis wind turbine technology is not well understood, even though the earliest wind machines rotated about a vertical axis. The operating environment of a vertical-axis wind turbine is quite complex, but detailed analysis capabilities have been developed and verified over the last 30 years. Although vertical-axis technology has not been widely commercialized, it exhibits both advantages and disadvantages compared to horizontal-axis technology, and in some applications, it appears to offer significant advantages.

  11. Paleomagnetic Correlation of Late Miocene-Pliocene Basalt Flows in the Northwestern Basin and Range: Documenting Timing of Faulting, Volcanism and Vertical-axis Rotation in Surprise Valley, Northeastern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritzinger, B. T.; Glen, J. M. G.; Egger, A. E.

    2014-12-01

    Examining the temporal and spatial relationship between basaltic volcanism and extensional faulting can help delineate the influence of faulting on the location of source vents and distribution of subsequent lava flows. Young extensional environments offer a unique opportunity to resolve the interdependence of faulting and volcanism as faults have not yet been buried and precise ages can be acquired on volcanic rocks. The Larkspur Hills, located along the northwestern margin of the Basin and Range in northeastern California preserve flow-on-flow basalt sequences exposed in the footwalls of numerous normal faults. The eruption of these 3 to 8 Ma flows was coeval with the development and progression of extensional faulting, but the detailed relationship was not clear. Although several flows have previously been dated using 40Ar/39Ar geochronology, individual flows cannot easily be identified in outcrop or geochemically. Paleomagnetic analyses have allowed us to differentiate individual flows possessing unique remanence directions, and to correlate flow sequences. Nearly 1,300 paleomagnetic core samples from 167 flows were collected within the Larkspur Hills. Generalized magnetostratigraphy and detailed remanent magnetic directions were analyzed in conjunction with the existing geochronology to correlate flows and constrain the relative timing of faulting and volcanism. Results indicate that volcanic activity occurred during four distinct episodes between 3 to 8 Ma, and suggest that contemporaneous faulting likely influenced the distribution of subsequent flows by producing topographic barriers or pathways to the flows. In addition, when compared to the expected reference direction for stable North America, the paleomagnetic data indicate that the region has undergone 11.9 ± 4.5˚ of clockwise rotation. This result agrees favorably with studies that have inferred appreciable rotation of our study area associated with clockwise rotation of the Oregon coastal block.

  12. Method for spinning up a three-axis controlled spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vorlicek, Preston L. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A three-axis controlled spacecraft (1), typically a satellite, is spun up about its roll axis (20) prior to firing a motor (2), i.e., a perigee kick motor, to achieve the requisite degree of angular momentum stiffness. Thrusters (21) for imparting rotation about the roll axis (20) are activated in open-loop fashion, typically at less than full duty cycle. Cross-axis torques induced by this rotational motion are compensated for by means of closed control loops for each of the pitch and yaw axes (30, 40, respectively). Each closed control loop combines a prebias torque (72) with torques (75, 74) representative of position and rate feedback information, respectively. A deadband (52) within each closed control loop can be widened during the spinup, to conserve fuel. Position feedback information (75) in each of the control loops is disabled upon saturation of the gyroscope associated with the roll axis (20).

  13. Global Rotation of Non-Rotating Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, T.

    2001-11-01

    At its 24th General Assembly held at Manchester last year, the IAU has adopted the Celestial Ephemeris Origin (CEO) as a new longitude origin of the celestial coordinate system (Capitaine et al. 2000, IAU 2001). The CEO is the application of Guinot's non-rotating origin (NRO) to the Earth's equator (Guinot 1979, Capitaine et al. 1986, Capitaine 1990). By using the current IAU precession/nutation theory, we integrated the global orbit of CEO. It is a slightly curved zigzag pattern of the amplitude of around 23o moving secularly along the ecliptic. Among its kinematical features, we note that CEO has a large secular component of rotation with respect to the inertial reference frame. The current speed of this global rotation is as large as around -4.15 ''/yr. The negative sign shows that CEO rotates clockwise with respect to the inertial frame when viewed from the north celestial pole. Unfortunately this is a general property of NROs. On the other hand, such secular rotation does not exist for some geometrically-defined longitude origins like K, H, and Σ already discussed in Kovalevsky and McCarthy (1998). We think that the existence of a global secular rotaion means that the CEO, and NROs in general, is not appropriate to be specified as the x-axis of celestial coordinate systems.

  14. Centration axis in refractive surgery.

    PubMed

    Arba Mosquera, Samuel; Verma, Shwetabh; McAlinden, Colm

    2015-01-01

    The human eye is an asymmetric optical system and the real cornea is not a rotationally symmetrical volume. Each optical element in the eye has its own optical and neural axes. Defining the optimum center for laser ablation is difficult with many available approaches. We explain the various centration approaches (based on these reference axes) in refractive surgery and review their clinical outcomes. The line-of-sight (LOS) (the line joining the entrance pupil center with the fixation point) is often the recommended reference axis for representing wavefront aberrations of the whole eye (derived from the definition of chief ray in geometrical optics); however pupil centration can be unstable and change with the pupil size. The corneal vertex (CV) represents a stable preferable morphologic reference which is the best approximate for alignment to the visual axis. However, the corneal light reflex can be considered as non-constant, but dependent on the direction of gaze of the eye with respect to the light source. A compromise between the pupil and CV centered ablations is seen in the form of an asymmetric offset where the manifest refraction is referenced to the CV while the higher order aberrations are referenced to the pupil center. There is a need for a flexible choice of centration in excimer laser systems to design customized and non-customized treatments optimally. PMID:26605360

  15. ScaphoLunate Axis Method.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jeffrey; Zlotolow, Dan A; Lee, Steve K

    2016-03-01

    Background Treating chronic scapholunate ligament injuries without the presence of arthritis remains an unsolved clinical problem facing wrist surgeons. This article highlights a technique for reconstructing the scapholunate ligament using novel fixation, the ScaphoLunate Axis Method (SLAM). Materials and Methods In a preliminary review of the early experience of this technique, 13 patients were evaluated following scapholunate ligament reconstruction utilizing the SLAM technique. Description of Techinque The scapholunate interval is reconstructed utilizing a palmaris longus autograft passed between the scaphoid and lunate along the axis of rotation in the sagittal plane. It is secured in the lunate using a graft anchor and in the scaphoid utilizing an interference screw. The remaining graft is passed dorsally to reconstruct the dorsal scapholunate ligament. Results At an average follow-up of 11 months, the mean postoperative scapholunate gap was 2.1 mm. The mean postoperative scapholunate angle was 59 degrees. The mean postoperative wrist flexion and extension was 45 and 56 degrees, respectively. The mean grip strength was 24.9 kg, or 62% of the contralateral side. The mean pain score (VAS) was 1.7. There was 1 failure with recurrence of the pathologic scapholunate gap and the onset of pain. Conclusion While chronic scapholunate ligament instability remains an unsolved problem facing wrist surgeons, newer techniques are directed toward restoring the normal relationships of the scaphoid and lunate in both the coronal and sagittal planes. The SLAM technique has demonstrated promise in preliminary clinical studies. PMID:26855838

  16. Stability of vertical and horizontal axis Levitrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaelis, M. M.; Taylor, D. B.

    2015-11-01

    The stability of the new horizontal axis Levitron3 is compared with that of the vertical axis device. The rotation frequency ranges are similar because they are determined by the same precessional micro-trap, for which some theory is given. But the macro-trap of the horizontal axis system gives it far greater mechanical stability. Field-line studies allow this to be more easily visualized. The greater stability allows for educational experiments which could only be contemplated with the old Levitron: driven precession and nutation and motion along the field lines. These experiments illustrate some very fundamental space dynamics and several other topics. The enhanced stability may also lead to electro-mechanical applications.

  17. DEVICE FOR CONVEYING AND ROTATING OBJECTS

    DOEpatents

    Frantz, C.E.; Roslund, J.

    1958-01-21

    A device is described for conveying cylindrical material with a combined rotary and axial motion. The material rides on a series of balls which are retained in a guide plate and rotated by bearing against a rotating drum. The drum has a series of conical sections or grooves cut in its outer surface on which the balls ride. The grooves and balls match in such a way that all the balls are caused to rotate about an axis at an angle to the drum axis. This skewed rotation of the ball imparts a longitudinal as well as a rotary motion to the cylinders being conveyed.

  18. Rotating Apparatus for Isoelectric Focusing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bier, M.

    1986-01-01

    Remixing of separated fractions prevented. Improved isoelectric focusing apparatus helps to prevent electro-osmosis and convection, both of which cause remixing of separated fractions. Fractionating column segmented and rotated about horizontal axis: Only combined effects of both features fully effective in making good separations. Improved apparatus slowly rotated continuously or rocked (at rotational amplitude of at least 180 degrees) about its horizontal axis so average gravitational vector experienced by fluid is zero and convection is therefore suppressed. Electro-osmosis suppressed and convection further suppressed by separating column into disklike compartments along its length with filters. Experiments have shown dimensions of apparatus not critical. Typical compartment and column volumes are 2 and 40 ml, respectively. Rotation speeds lie between 3 and 30 rpm.

  19. Rotatable non-circular forebody flow controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moskovitz, Cary A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The invention is a rotatable, non-circular forebody flow controller. The apparatus comprises a small geometric device located at a nose of a forebody of an aircraft and a non-circular cross-sectional area that extends toward the apex of the aircraft. The device is symmetrical about a reference plane and preferably attaches to an axle which in turn attaches to a rotating motor. The motor rotates the device about an axis of rotation. Preferably, a control unit connected to an aircraft flight control computer signals to the rotating motor the proper rotational positioning of the geometric device.

  20. Heat transfer in rotating coolant channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Baoguan; Zheng, Jirui; Ding, Xiaojiang

    The effect of cooling channels' rotation on the local and mean heat transfer is investigated using an experimental simulation of three types of flow in rotating circular tubes: (1) flow parallel to the rotating axis, (2) radially outward flow perpendicular to the rotating axis, and (3) radially inward flow perpendicular to the rotating axis. Theoretical analysis uses the boundary layer model method, in which the flow in a tube is divided into the core and boundary layer zones with different assumptions for each zone, and the equations are solved using the momentum integration method. Experimental results were obtained using a specially designed facility incorporating all three modes of flow. The results confirm that rotation of the flow in a tube can enhance the heat transfer processes whether the flow is parallel or perpendicular to the rotating axis. The incremental increase in heat transfer rate due to rotation was found to be more pronounced at low rotational speeds than at high speeds. The variation of local heat transfer coefficients along axial direction is affected by the inlet and outlet sections and by the ratio of length to diameter.

  1. Rotational moulding.

    PubMed

    Crawford, R J; Kearns, M P

    2003-10-01

    Rotational moulding promises designers attractive economics and a low-pressure process. The benefits of rotational moulding are compared here with other manufacturing methods such as injection and blow moulding. PMID:14603714

  2. Rotating Vesta

    NASA Video Gallery

    Astronomers combined 146 exposures taken by NASA's Hubble SpaceTelescope to make this 73-frame movie of the asteroid Vesta's rotation.Vesta completes a rotation every 5.34 hours.› Asteroid and...

  3. Single-beam three-axis atomic magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Haichao; Dong, Haifeng; Chen, Lin; Gao, Yang

    2016-08-01

    A single-beam atomic magnetometer being operated near zero-field and measuring three-axis fields simultaneously is demonstrated. We produce a rotating field on the x-0-y plane with the frequency of 90 Hz and a modulation field in the z axis at 130 Hz. The rotating field enables a nonzero z axis output when the transverse fields are zeroed using feedback systems. Based on the phase difference of π / 2 , x and y axes fields can be measured using one lock-in amplifier. Magnetic field sensitivities of 300 fT/Hz1/2 in x and y axes and 3 pT/Hz1/2 in the z axis are achieved.

  4. The rotation of comet nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, F. L.

    1982-01-01

    Spin-vector research on cometary nuclei is reviewed with emphasis on the actual determination of rotation period and spin-axis orientation. The rotation periods of 47 comets are compared with those of 41 asteroids with diameters of not more than 40 km. It is shown that the median periods for the comets is 15.0 hr as compared with 6.8 hr for the asteroids and that the preliminary distribution curve for the logarithms of the comet periods is not Gaussian and is flatter than the corresponding curve for the asteroids. Slow accumulation at low relative velocities is suggested as the cause of the longer comet rotation periods.

  5. Theoretical three-and four-axis gimbal robot wrists

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, L. K.; Houck, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    In high-performance flight simulations, a four-axis gimbal system allows all possible rotations with acceptable gimbal angle rates while it avoids the so-callled 'gimbal lock' that occurs when gimbal rotational axes are colinear. In this paper, pertinent equations (including quaternions) are assembled for a hypothetical robot wrist, functionally equivalent to this four-axis gimbal system, and also for a true three-axis gimbal robot wrist. These equations are used to simulate the rotation of a robot hand by the robot wrist in response to operator rotational velocity commands to the robot hand. Near gimbal lock (wrist singularity), excessive rotational rates occur. Scaling the rates, which is necessary for the three-gimbal robot wrist to prevent rate limiting, introduces an undesirable time delay in the robot hand rotation with respect to the commanded rotation. However, the merit of the four-gimbal robot wrist is that the fourth gimbal angle keeps the robot wrist away from the singularity so that the robot hand moves exactly as commanded. It appears that in a 'worst-type' maneuver of the robot hand, the fourth gimbal angle can be defined so that none of the gimbal angle rates exceed about twice the commanded rates.

  6. Finding the Orientation of the Stellar Spin Axis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Tessa D.; Lesage, Anna-Lea

    2016-01-01

    The stellar position angle is defined as the projection of the stellar spin axis on the night sky, as measured from North to East. Measuring the stellar position angle gives information that can be used for stellar spin axis evolution and binary formation theories. Current methods to find this angle use imaging with long baseline interferometry for fast rotating stars. There is a lack of observational techniques to find the orientation of the stellar rotation axis for slow rotating stars, which make up the vast majority of stellar population. We developed a new method for determining the absolute stellar position angle for slow rotating stars using a spectro-astrometric analysis of high resolution long-slit spectra. We used the 2m Thueringer Landessternwarte (TLS) telescope to obtain high resolution spectra (R=60,000) with multiple slit orientations to test this method. The stellar rotation causes a tilt in the stellar lines, and the angle of this tilt depends on the stellar position angle and the orientation of the slit. We used a cross-correlation method to compare the subpixel displacements of the position of the photocenter at each slit orientation with telluric lines to obtain the tilt amplitude. We report the results of finding the position angle of the slow rotating K giant Aldebaran and fast rotating reference stars like Vega.

  7. Three-axis force actuator for a magnetic bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gondhalekar, Vijay (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    This invention features a three-axis force actuator that axially, radially and rotatably supports a bearing member for frictionless rotation about an axis of rotation generally coincident with a Z-axis. Also featured is a magnetic bearing having such an actuator. The actuator includes an inner member, a magnetic member and a pole assembly having a ring member and four pole extending therefrom. The poles are equi-angular spaced from each other and radially spaced about the Z-axis. The inner member extends along the Z-axis and is a highly magnetic permeable material. The magnetic member is formed about the inner member outer surface, extends along the Z-axis and is configured so one magnetic pole polarity is located at its outer surface and the other polarity pole is located at its inner surface. Preferably, the magnetic member is a radially magnetized permanent magnet. The inner surface of the ring member is magnetically coupled to the magnetic member and a face of each pole is coupled to the bearing member. The magnetic member, the pole assembly, the inner member and the bearing member cooperate to generate a magnetic field that radially and rotatably supports a rotating member secured to the bearing member. The actuator further includes a plurality of electromagnetic coils. Preferably, a coil is formed about each pole and at least 2 coils are formed about the inner member. When energized, the electromagnetic coils generate a modulated magnetic field that stabilizes the rotating member in the desired operational position.

  8. Controlled sample orientation and rotation in an acoustic levitator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin B. (Inventor); Gaspar, Mark S. (Inventor); Trinh, Eugene H. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A system is described for use with acoustic levitators, which can prevent rotation of a levitated object or control its orientation and/or rotation. The acoustic field is made nonsymmetrical about the axis of the levitator, to produce an orienting torque that resists sample rotation. In one system, a perturbating reflector is located on one side of the axis of the levitator, at a location near the levitated object. In another system, the main reflector surface towards which incoming acoustic waves are directed is nonsymmetrically curved about the axis of the levitator. The levitated object can be reoriented or rotated in a controlled manner by repositioning the reflector producing the nonsymmetry.

  9. Development of methodology for horizontal axis wind turbine dynamic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugundji, J.

    1982-01-01

    Horizontal axis wind turbine dynamics were studied. The following findings are summarized: (1) review of the MOSTAS computer programs for dynamic analysis of horizontal axis wind turbines; (2) review of various analysis methods for rotating systems with periodic coefficients; (3) review of structural dynamics analysis tools for large wind turbine; (4) experiments for yaw characteristics of a rotating rotor; (5) development of a finite element model for rotors; (6) development of simple models for aeroelastics; and (7) development of simple models for stability and response of wind turbines on flexible towers.

  10. Computer Assisted Mechanical Axis and Kinematic TKA

    PubMed Central

    McEwen, Peter; Mahoharan, Varaguna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has traditionally been and largely continues to be aligned mechanically, that being with a neutral coronal plane mechanical tibiofemoral axis and a joint line orientated at 900 to this axis. Femoral component rotation is set by gap balancing or by externally rotating 30 from any of a number femoral reference lines. This produces a rectangular flexion gap and relaxes patellar tracking. Kinematic alignment (KA) is an alternative technique that aims to restore premorbid alignment, joint orientation and ligament tension. The basic premise for this technique is based on evidence that the medial and lateral femoral condyles consistently equate to cylinders of equal or near equal size and that therefore with a fixed radius, cruciate retaining implant, matched distal femoral, posterior femoral and proximal tibial resections, accounting for bone and cartilage already lost will reproduce the premorbid joint line and restore native premorbid kinematics. Femoral rotation is therefore referenced off the prearthritic posterior condylar axis (PCA) that is on average internally rotated to the AP axis. Kinematic alignment therefore has the potential to challenge patellar tracking, increase patellar load and potentially increase patellar complications. Method: Case control study – level of evidence III-2. Between November 2012 and June 2013 the senior author completed 104 consecutive computer assisted (CAS) kinematically aligned total knee arthroplasties (TKA) with a cruciate retaining, fixed bearing, single radius implant. The results of these surgeries were compared with the results of 91 consecutive CAS mechanically aligned TKA done between November 2011 and October 2012 using the same navigation system and implant Implant sizing and positioning as well as gap measurement and ligament balance was done with computer assistance in all cases. Data was collected prospectively and analysed retrospectively. Results: The Oxford Knee Score

  11. Dual Axis Target Mapping and Automated Sequential Acquisition of Dual Axis EM Tomographic Data

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Shawn Q.; Matsuda, Atsushi; Braunfeld, Michael B.; Sedat, John W.; Agard, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Dual-axis electron microscopic tomography minimizes the missing wedge-induced resolution loss by taking two complementary tilt data sets of the same target along two orthogonal axes. The potential of this powerful approach has been hampered by the practical challenges inherent in finding the original targets that are dramatically displaced due to non-eucentric specimen rotation. Not only is the manual search for the original targets time consuming and tedious but the added dose during manual searching is uncontrollable. We have developed a hierarchical alignment scheme that allows tomographic data to be collected from an arbitrary number of target sites in one grid orientation and then to find and collect orthogonal data sets with little or no user intervention. Inspired by the successful multi-scale mapping in Leginon, our alignment is performed in three levels to gradually pinpoint the original targets. At the lowest level the grid lattice is used to determine the rotation angle and translational shift resulting from specimen rotation via auto- and cross-correlative analysis of a pair of atlas maps constructed before and after specimen rotation. The target locations are further refined at the next level using a pair of smaller atlas maps. The final refinement of target positions is done by aligning the target contained image tiles. Given the batch processing nature of this hierarchical alignment, multiple targets are initially selected in a group and then sequentially acquired. Upon completion of the data collection on all the targets along the first axis and after specimen rotation, the hierarchical alignment is performed to relocate the original targets. The data collection is then resumed on these targets for the second axis. Therefore, only one specimen rotation is needed for collecting multiple dual-axis tomographic data sets. The experiment of acquiring 20S Proteasomes dual-axis tomographic data sets in vitreous ice at 86000x CCD magnification on our FEI

  12. [Localization and registration of the hinge axis in black Africans].

    PubMed

    Assi, K D; N'Guessan, K S; N'Dindin, C; Bamba, A

    2003-06-01

    The study of the cinematic method using "SAM" and "Quick Axis of FAG" added to mandibular condyle palpation for the hinge axis limited points, show that the Black Africans mandibular condyle rotation axis position is higher (3.5 mm) and backer (2 mm) than the Caucasians. The axial points are located to between 11 and 12 mm in front of the tragus and between 7 and 8 mm below on the perpendicular line to the furrow defining the tragus superior side to the Ectocanthus. PMID:14560683

  13. Multiple axis reticle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barns, Chris E.; Gunter, William D.

    1990-09-01

    A reticle permits the alignment of three orthogonal axes (X, Y and Z) that intersect at a common target point. Thin, straight filaments are supported on a frame. The filaments are each contained in a different orthogonal plane (S sub xy, S sub xz, and S sub yz) and each filament intersects two of the three orthogonal axes. The filaments, as viewed along the frame axis, give the appearance of a triangle with a V extending from each triangle vertex. When axial alignment is achieved, the filament portions adjacent to a triangle vertex are seen (along the axis of interest) as a right-angle cross, whereas these filament portions are seen to intersect at an oblique angle when axial misalignment occurs. The reticle is open in the region near the target point leaving ample space for alignment aids such as a pentaprism or a cube mirror.

  14. Angle between principal axis triples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tape, Walter; Tape, Carl

    2012-09-01

    The principal axis angle ξ0, or Kagan angle, is a measure of the difference between the orientations of two seismic moment tensors. It is the smallest angle needed to rotate the principal axes of one moment tensor to the corresponding principal axes of the other. This paper is a conceptual review of the main features of ξ0. We give a concise formula for calculating ξ0, but our main goal is to illustrate the behaviour of ξ0 geometrically. When the first of two moment tensors is fixed, the angle ξ0 between them becomes a function on the unit ball. The level surfaces of ξ0 can then be depicted in the unit ball, and they give insights into ξ0 that are not obvious from calculations alone. We also include a derivation of the known probability density inline image of ξ0. The density inline image is proportional to the area of a certain surface inline image. The easily seen variation of inline image with t then explains the rather peculiar shape of inline image. Because the curve inline image is highly non-uniform, its shape needs to be considered when analysing distributions of empirical ξ0 values. We recall an example of Willemann which shows that ξ0 may not always be the most appropriate measure of separation for moment tensor orientations, and we offer an alternative measure.

  15. Two-axis joint assembly and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, Thang D. (Inventor); Lewis, James L. (Inventor); Carroll, Monty B. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    In an embodiment, a two-axis joint that utilizes planar reactions to handle moments applied to the side of the joint thereby allowing the device to remain low profile and compact with minimal intrusion to the mounting surface of the two-axis joint. To handle larger moments, the diameter of the planar member can be increased without increasing the overall height of the joint assembly thereby retaining the low profile thereof. Upper and lower antifriction bearings may be positioned within a housing engage the planar member to reduce rotational friction. The upper and lower bearings and a hub which supports the planar member transfer forces produced by moments applied to the side of the joint so as to spread the forces over the area of the housing.

  16. Diamond Machining of an Off-Axis Biconic Aspherical Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohl, Raymond G.; Preuss, Werner; Sohn, Alex; MacKenty, John

    2009-01-01

    Two diamond-machining methods have been developed as part of an effort to design and fabricate an off-axis, biconic ellipsoidal, concave aluminum mirror for an infrared spectrometer at the Kitt Peak National Observatory. Beyond this initial application, the methods can be expected to enable satisfaction of requirements for future instrument mirrors having increasingly complex (including asymmetrical), precise shapes that, heretofore, could not readily be fabricated by diamond machining or, in some cases, could not be fabricated at all. In the initial application, the mirror is prescribed, in terms of Cartesian coordinates x and y, by aperture dimensions of 94 by 76 mm, placements of -2 mm off axis in x and 227 mm off axis in y, an x radius of curvature of 377 mm, a y radius of curvature of 407 mm, an x conic constant of 0.078, and a y conic constant of 0.127. The aspect ratio of the mirror blank is about 6. One common, "diamond machining" process uses single-point diamond turning (SPDT). However, it is impossible to generate the required off-axis, biconic ellipsoidal shape by conventional SPDT because (1) rotational symmetry is an essential element of conventional SPDT and (2) the present off-axis biconic mirror shape lacks rotational symmetry. Following conventional practice, it would be necessary to make this mirror from a glass blank by computer-controlled polishing, which costs more than diamond machining and yields a mirror that is more difficult to mount to a metal bench. One of the two present diamond machining methods involves the use of an SPDT machine equipped with a fast tool servo (FTS). The SPDT machine is programmed to follow the rotationally symmetric asphere that best fits the desired off-axis, biconic ellipsoidal surface. The FTS is actuated in synchronism with the rotation of the SPDT machine to generate the difference between the desired surface and the best-fit rotationally symmetric asphere. In order to minimize the required stroke of the FTS

  17. Interferometric rotation sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, T. M. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An interferometric rotation sensor and control system is provided which includes a compound prism interferometer and an associated direction control system. Light entering the interferometer is split into two paths with the light in the respective paths being reflected an unequal number of times, and then being recombined at an exit aperture in phase differing relationships. Incoming light is deviated from the optical axis of the device by an angle, alpha. The angle causes a similar displacement of the two component images at the exit aperture which results in a fringe pattern. Fringe numbers are directly related to angle alpha. Various control systems of the interferometer are given.

  18. ROTATING PLASMA DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Boyer, K.; Hammel, J.E.; Longmire, C.L.; Nagle, D.E.; Ribe, F.L.; Tuck, J.L.

    1961-10-24

    ABS>A method and device are described for obtaining fusion reactions. The basic concept is that of using crossed electric and magnetic fields to induce a plasma rotation in which the ionized particles follow a circumferential drift orbit on wldch a cyclotron mode of motion is superimposed, the net result being a cycloidal motion about the axis of symmetry. The discharge tube has a radial electric field and a longitudinal magnetic field. Mirror machine geometry is utilized. The device avoids reliance on the pinch effect and its associated instability problems. (AEC)

  19. Deep cytoplasmic rearrangements in axis-respecified Xenopus embryos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denegre, J. M.; Danilchik, M. V.

    1993-01-01

    In fertilized eggs of the frog Xenopus, the vegetal yolk mass rotates away from the future dorsal side (J. P. Vincent and J. Gerhart, 1987, Dev. Biol. 123, 526-539), and a major rearrangement of the deep animal hemisphere cytoplasm produces a characteristic swirl in the prospective dorsal side (M. V. Danilchik and J. M. Denegre, 1991, Development 111, 845-856). The relationship between this swirl and determination of the dorsal-ventral axis was further investigated by attempting to experimentally separate the positions of the swirl and the dorsal-ventral axis. Eggs were obliquely oriented in the gravity field to respecify the direction of yolk mass rotation and the position of the dorsal-ventral axis. When yolk mass rotation occurred in the absence of a sperm, as in activated eggs, a swirl pattern formed on the side away from which the yolk mass had rotated. In fertilized eggs tipped with the sperm entry point (SEP) down or to the side, swirl patterns were always found to form on the side away from which the yolk mass was displaced. However, in eggs tipped SEP up, in which the yolk mass was forced to rotate away from the SEP, more complicated rearrangements were observed in addition to the rotation-oriented swirl. Because the direction of yolk mass rotation was found to be influenced by both gravity and the actual position of the SEP in obliquely oriented eggs (SEP to the side), such complicated rearrangement patterns may result from opposing forces generated by both yolk mass rotation and the expanding sperm aster. Thus, except in cases in which the influences of SEP position and unit gravity opposed each other, it was not possible to experimentally separate the position of the deep cytoplasmic swirl from the direction of yolk mass rotation, and therefore the position of the prospective dorsal side.

  20. Single Axis Piezoceramic Gimbal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horner, Garnett C.; Taleghani, Barmac K.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the fabrication, testing, and analysis of a single axis piezoceramic gimbal. The fabrication process consist of pre-stressing a piezoceramic wafer using a high-temperature thermoplastic polyimide and a metal foil. The differential thermal expansion between the ceramic and metal induces a curvature. The pre-stressed, curved piezoceramic is mounted on a support mechanism and a mirror is attached to the piezoceramic. A plot of gimbal angle versus applied voltage to the piezoceramic is presented. A finite element analysis of the piezoceramic gimbal is described. The predicted gimbal angle versus applied voltage is compared to experimental results.

  1. Single Axis Piezoceramic Gimbal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horner, Garnett; Taleghani, Barmac

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the fabrication, testing, and analysis of a single axis piezoceramic gimbal. The fabrication process consists of pre-stressing a piezoceramic wafer using a high-temperature thermoplastic polyimide and a metal foil. The differential thermal expansion between the ceramic and metal induces a curvature. The pre-stressed, curved piezoceramic is mounted on a support mechanism and a mirror is attached to the piezoceramic. A plot of gimbal angle versus applied voltage to the piezoceramic is presented. A finite element analysis of the piezoceramic gimbal is described. The predicted gimbal angle versus applied voltage is compared to experimental results.

  2. Vertical axis wind turbines

    DOEpatents

    Krivcov, Vladimir; Krivospitski, Vladimir; Maksimov, Vasili; Halstead, Richard; Grahov, Jurij

    2011-03-08

    A vertical axis wind turbine is described. The wind turbine can include a top ring, a middle ring and a lower ring, wherein a plurality of vertical airfoils are disposed between the rings. For example, three vertical airfoils can be attached between the upper ring and the middle ring. In addition, three more vertical airfoils can be attached between the lower ring and the middle ring. When wind contacts the vertically arranged airfoils the rings begin to spin. By connecting the rings to a center pole which spins an alternator, electricity can be generated from wind.

  3. Rotating Wavepackets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lekner, John

    2008-01-01

    Any free-particle wavepacket solution of Schrodinger's equation can be converted by differentiations to wavepackets rotating about the original direction of motion. The angular momentum component along the motion associated with this rotation is an integral multiple of [h-bar]. It is an "intrinsic" angular momentum: independent of origin and…

  4. Decrease of the Atmospheric Co-Rotation with Height

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Membrado, M.; Pacheco, A. F.

    2010-01-01

    Considering our atmosphere as a steady viscous gaseous envelope that co-rotates with the Earth, we obtain a solution for the form in which this induced rotational effect decreases as a function of the distances to the centre of the Earth and to the rotation axis. (Contains 1 figure.)

  5. Control system for a vertical axis windmill

    DOEpatents

    Brulle, Robert V.

    1983-10-18

    A vertical axis windmill having a rotating structure is provided with a series of articulated vertical blades whose positions are controlled to maintain a constant RPM for the rotating structure, when wind speed is sufficient. A microprocessor controller is used to process information on wind speed, wind direction and RPM of the rotating structure to develop an electrical signal for establishing blade position. The preferred embodiment of the invention, when connected to a utility grid, is designed to generate 40 kilowatts of power when exposed to a 20 mile per hour wind. The control system for the windmill includes electrical blade actuators that modulate the blades of the rotating structure. Blade modulation controls the blade angle of attack, which in turn controls the RPM of the rotor. In the preferred embodiment, the microprocessor controller provides the operation logic and control functions. A wind speed sensor provides inputs to start or stop the windmill, and a wind direction sensor is used to keep the blade flip region at 90.degree. and 270.degree. to the wind. The control system is designed to maintain constant rotor RPM when wind speed is between 10 and 40 miles per hour.

  6. Semimajor Axis Estimation Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    How, Jonathan P.; Alfriend, Kyle T.; Breger, Louis; Mitchell, Megan

    2004-01-01

    This paper extends previous analysis on the impact of sensing noise for the navigation and control aspects of formation flying spacecraft. We analyze the use of Carrier-phase Differential GPS (CDGPS) in relative navigation filters, with a particular focus on the filter correlation coefficient. This work was motivated by previous publications which suggested that a "good" navigation filter would have a strong correlation (i.e., coefficient near -1) to reduce the semimajor axis (SMA) error, and therefore, the overall fuel use. However, practical experience with CDGPS-based filters has shown this strong correlation seldom occurs (typical correlations approx. -0.1), even when the estimation accuracies are very good. We derive an analytic estimate of the filter correlation coefficient and demonstrate that, for the process and sensor noises levels expected with CDGPS, the expected value will be very low. It is also demonstrated that this correlation can be improved by increasing the time step of the discrete Kalman filter, but since the balance condition is not satisfied, the SMA error also increases. These observations are verified with several linear simulations. The combination of these simulations and analysis provide new insights on the crucial role of the process noise in determining the semimajor axis knowledge.

  7. Transepicondylar axis accuracy in computer assisted knee surgery: a comparison of the CT-based measured axis versus the CAS-determined axis.

    PubMed

    van der Linden-van der Zwaag, Henrica M J; Valstar, Edward R; van der Molen, Aart J; Nelissen, Rob G H H

    2008-07-01

    Rotational malalignment is recognized as one of the major reasons for knee pain after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Although Computer Assisted Orthopaedic Surgery (CAOS) systems have been developed to enable more accurate and consistent alignment of implants, it is still unknown whether they significantly improve the accuracy of femoral rotational alignment as compared to conventional techniques. We evaluated the accuracy of the intraoperatively determined transepicondylar axis (TEA) with that obtained from postoperative CT-based measurement in 20 navigated TKA procedures. The intraoperatively determined axis was marked with tantalum (RSA) markers. Two observers measured the posterior condylar angle (PCA) on postoperative CT scans. The PCA measured using the intraoperatively determined axis showed an inter-observer correlation of 0.93. The intra-observer correlation, 0.96, was slightly better than when using the CT-based angle. The PCA had a range of -6 degrees (internal rotation) to 8 degrees (external rotation) with a mean of 3.6 degrees for observer 1 (SD = 4.02 degrees ) and 2.8 degrees for observer 2 (SD = 3.42 degrees ). The maximum difference between the two observers was 4 degrees . All knees had a patellar component inserted with good patellar tracking and no anterior knee pain. The mean postoperative flexion was 113 degrees (SD = 12.9 degrees ). The mean difference between the two epicondylar line angles was 3.1 degrees (SD = 5.37 degrees ), with the CT-based PCA being larger. During CT-free navigation in TKA, a systematic error of 3 degrees arose when determining the TEA. It is emphasized that the intraoperative epicondylar axis is different from the actual CT-based epicondylar axis. PMID:18622794

  8. Supergranulation rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schou, Jesper; Beck, John G.

    2001-01-01

    Simple convection models estimate the depth of supergranulation at approximately 15,000 km which suggests that supergranules should rotate at the rate of the plasma in the outer 2% of the Sun by radius. Previous measurements (Snodgrass & Ulrich, 1990; Beck & Schou, 2000) found that supergranules rotate significantly faster than this, with a size-dependent rotation rate. We expand on previous work and show that the torsional oscillation signal seen in the supergranules tracks that obtained for normal modes. We also find that the amplitudes and lifetimes of the supergranulation are size dependent.

  9. Intraplate rotational deformation induced by faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dembo, Neta; Hamiel, Yariv; Granot, Roi

    2015-11-01

    Vertical axis rotations provide important constraints on the tectonic history of plate boundaries. Geodetic measurements can be used to calculate interseismic rotations, whereas paleomagnetic remanence directions provide constraints on the long-term rotations accumulated over geological timescales. Here we present a new mechanical modeling approach that links between intraplate deformational patterns of these timescales. We construct mechanical models of active faults at their locked state to simulate the presumed to be elastic interseismic deformation rate observed by GPS measurements. We then apply a slip to the faults above the locking depth to simulate the long-term deformation of the crust from which we derive the accumulated rotations. We test this approach in northern Israel along the Dead Sea Fault and Carmel-Gilboa fault system. We use 12 years of interseismic GPS measurements to constrain a slip model of the major faults found in this region. Next, we compare the modeled rotations against long-term rotations determined based on new primary magnetic remanence directions from 29 sites with known age. The distributional pattern of site mean declinations is in general agreement with the vertical axis rotations predicted by the mechanical model, both showing anomalously high rotations near fault tips and bending points. Overall, the results from northern Israel validate the effectiveness of our approach and indicate that rotations induced by motion along faults may act in parallel (or alone) to rigid block rotations. Finally, the new suggested method unravels important insights on the evolution (timing, magnitude, and style) of deformation along major faults.

  10. Rotation Invariant Vortices for Flow Visualization.

    PubMed

    Günther, Tobias; Schulze, Maik; Theisel, Holger

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new class of vortex definitions for flows that are induced by rotating mechanical parts, such as stirring devices, helicopters, hydrocyclones, centrifugal pumps, or ventilators. Instead of a Galilean invariance, we enforce a rotation invariance, i.e., the invariance of a vortex under a uniform-speed rotation of the underlying coordinate system around a fixed axis. We provide a general approach to transform a Galilean invariant vortex concept to a rotation invariant one by simply adding a closed form matrix to the Jacobian. In particular, we present rotation invariant versions of the well-known Sujudi-Haimes, Lambda-2, and Q vortex criteria. We apply them to a number of artificial and real rotating flows, showing that for these cases rotation invariant vortices give better results than their Galilean invariant counterparts. PMID:26390472

  11. Solar rotation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziembowski, W.

    Sunspot observations made by Johannes Hevelius in 1642 - 1644 are the first ones providing significant information about the solar differential rotation. In modern astronomy the determination of the rotation rate is done in a routine way by measuring positions of various structures on the solar surface as well as by studying the Doppler shifts of spectral lines. In recent years a progress in helioseismology enabled determination of the rotation rate in the layers inaccessible for direct observations. There are still uncertainties concerning, especially, the temporal variations of the rotation rate and its behaviour in the radiative interior. We are far from understanding the observations. Theoretical works have not yet resulted in a satisfactory model for the angular momentum transport in the convective zone.

  12. Rotational aerophones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, N. H.; Tarnopolsky, A. Z.; Lai, J. C. S.

    2002-03-01

    Free rotational aerophones such as the bullroarer, which consists of a wooden slat whirled around on the end of a string, and which emits a loud pulsating roar, have been used in many ancient and traditional societies for ceremonial purposes. This article presents an experimental and theoretical investigation of this instrument. The aerodynamics of rotational behavior is elucidated, and relates slat rotation frequency to slat width and velocity through the air. Analysis shows that sound production is due to generation of an oscillating-rotating dipole across the slat, the role of the vortices shed by the slat being relatively minor. Apparent discrepancies between the behavior of a bullroarer slat and a slat mounted on an axle in a wind tunnel are shown to be due to viscous friction in the bearings of the wind-tunnel experiment.

  13. Rotation period of comet Donati

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, F. L.

    1978-01-01

    Consideration is given to the rotation period of comet Donati (1858 VI) whose haloes were approximate parabolic envelopes having foci near the apparent nucleus and vertices toward the sun forward from the tail axis. The regularity and sharpness of the halves suggest that they represent the repetitive ejection of material from an active area which is exposed to solar radiation as the cometary nucleus rotates. Bobrovnikov's results (1954) are used to evaluate the linear expansion velocity of such haloes. This calculation is applied to the comet and a linear correction is used to assess the results.

  14. The Dissipation Range in Rotating Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubinstein, Robert; Zhou, Ye

    1999-01-01

    The dissipation range energy balance of the direct interaction approximation is applied to rotating turbulence when rotation effects persist well into the dissipation range. Assuming that RoRe (exp 1/2) is much less than 1 and that three-wave interactions are dominant, the dissipation range is found to be concentrated in the wavevector plane perpendicular to the rotation axis. This conclusion is consistent with previous analyses of inertial range energy transfer in rotating turbulence, which predict the accumulation of energy in those scales.

  15. An algorithm for the systematic disturbance of optimal rotational solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunwald, Arthur J.; Kaiser, Mary K.

    1989-01-01

    An algorithm for introducing a systematic rotational disturbance into an optimal (i.e., single axis) rotational trajectory is described. This disturbance introduces a motion vector orthogonal to the quaternion-defined optimal rotation axis. By altering the magnitude of this vector, the degree of non-optimality can be controlled. The metric properties of the distortion parameter are described, with analogies to two-dimensional translational motion. This algorithm was implemented in a motion-control program on a three-dimensional graphic workstation. It supports a series of human performance studies on the detectability of rotational trajectory optimality by naive observers.

  16. Micromachined dual input axis rate gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juneau, Thor Nelson

    The need for inexpensive yet reliable angular rate sensors in fields ranging from automotive to consumer electronics has motivated prolific micromachined rate gyroscope research. The vast majority of research has focused on single input axis rate gyroscopes based upon either translational resonance, such as tuning forks, or structural mode resonance, such as vibrating rings. However, this work presents a novel, contrasting approach based on angular resonance of a rotating rigid rotor suspended by torsional springs. The inherent symmetry of the circular design allows angular rate measurement about two axes simultaneously, hence the name micromachined dual-axis rate gyroscope. The underlying theory of operation, mechanical structure design optimization, electrical interface circuitry, and signal processing are described in detail. Several operational versions were fabricated using two different fully integrated surface micromachining processes as proof of concept. The heart of the dual-axis rate gyroscope is a ˜2 mum thick polysilicon disk or rotor suspended above the substrate by a four beam suspension. When this rotor in driven into angular oscillation about the axis perpendicular to the substrate, a rotation rate about the two axes parallel to the substrate invokes an out of plane rotor tilting motion due to Coriolis acceleration. This tilting motion is capacitively measured and on board integrated signal processing provides two output voltages proportional to angular rate input about the two axes parallel to the substrate. The design process begins with the derivation of gyroscopic dynamics. The equations suggest that tuning sense mode frequencies to the drive oscillation frequency can vastly increase mechanical sensitivity. Hence the supporting four beam suspension is designed such that electrostatic tuning can match modes despite process variations. The electrostatic tuning range is limited only by rotor collapse to the substrate when tuning-voltage induced

  17. Rotation Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    In aircraft turbine engine research, certain investigations require extremely precise measurement of the position of a rotating part, such as the rotor, a disc-like part of the engine's compressor which revolves around a shaft at extremely high speeds. For example, in studies of airflow velocity within a compressor, researchers need to know-for data correlation the instantaneous position of a given spot on the rotor each time a velocity measurement is made. Earlier methods of measuring rotor shaft angle required a physical connection to the shaft, which limited the velocity of the rotating object.

  18. Acoustic streaming flows and sample rotation control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh, Eugene

    1998-11-01

    Levitated drops in a gas can be driven into rotation by altering their surrounding convective environment. When these drops are placed in an acoustic resonant chamber, the symmetry characteristics of the steady streaming flows in the vicinity of the drops determine the rotational motion of the freely suspended fluid particles. Using ultrasonic standing waves around 22 kHz and millimeter-size electrostatically levitated drops, we have investigated the correlation between the convective flow characteristics and their rotational behavior. The results show that accurate control of the drop rotation axis and rate can be obtained by carefully modifying the symmetry characteristics of the chamber, and that the dominant mechanism for rotation drive is the drag exerted by the air flow over the drop surface. In addition, we found that the rotational acceleration depends on the drop viscosity, suggesting that this torque is initially strongly influenced by differential flows within the drop itself. [Work sponsored by NASA].

  19. Use of the Humphrey Lens Analyzer for off-axis measurements of spectacle lenses.

    PubMed

    Atchison, D A; Kris, M; Sheedy, J E; Bailey, I L

    1991-04-01

    Automated focimeters can be used to make quick, precise measurements of off-axis power and prismatic effects corresponding to an eye rotating behind a spectacle lens. An automated focimeter, the Humphrey Lens Analyzer, was assessed in this regard. The Humphrey Lens Analyzer can be used to give a valid measure of off-axis power of lenses with low power, but not of lenses with moderate to higher power (greater than 3 D). For 3 D spherical lenses discrepancies of the order of 0.1 D occur at 30 degrees rotation, and 6 D spheres give discrepancies of 0.5 D at the same rotation. Small discrepancies were found for measurements of prism. The Humphrey Lens Analyzer was also used in a mode where the lens being tested is rotated about the center of curvature of its back surface. This is the mode often used to assess aberrations and prism of progressive-addition lenses. In this mode, the instrument provides reasonable accuracy in estimating off-axis power corresponding to eye rotation for lenses with low power, but not for lenses with moderate to higher power (greater than 3 D). However, it provides accurate values of the variation in off-axis surface power for low powered lenses with aspheric front surfaces. There were considerable systematic errors associated with the measurement of prism. A simple raytracing method was developed to predict the results of measurements with the Humphrey Lens Analyzer. Predictions of off-axis power were good when lenses were rotated about a position corresponding to the center-of-rotation of an eye, but were poorer when lenses were rotated about the center of curvature of their back surfaces. Predictions of primatic efforts were good in both situations. A method by which the Humphrey Lens Analyzer should provide an accurate measurement of off-axis powers corresponding to eye rotation behind a spectacle lens is described, but has not been tested. PMID:2052286

  20. Forced vibration analysis of rotating cyclic structures in NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elchuri, V.; Gallo, A. M.; Skalski, S. C.

    1981-01-01

    A new capability was added to the general purpose finite element program NASTRAN Level 17.7 to conduct forced vibration analysis of tuned cyclic structures rotating about their axis of symmetry. The effects of Coriolis and centripetal accelerations together with those due to linear acceleration of the axis of rotation were included. The theoretical, user's, programmer's and demonstration manuals for this new capability are presented.

  1. Rotating Gravity Gradiometer Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forward, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    The application of a Rotating Gravity Gradiometer (RGG) system on board a Lunar Polar Orbiter (LPO) for the measurement of the Lunar gravity field was investigated. A data collection simulation study shows that a gradiometer will give significantly better gravity data than a doppler tracking system for the altitudes under consideration for the LOP, that the present demonstrated sensitivity of the RGG is adequate for measurement of the Lunar gravity gradient field, and that a single RGG instrument will provide almost as much data for geophysical interpretation as an orthogonal three axis RGG system. An engineering study of the RGG sensor/LPO spacecraft interface characteristics shows that the RGG systems under consideration are compatible with the present models of the LPO spacecraft.

  2. Retrograde closed orbits in a rotating triaxial potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heisler, J.; Merritt, D.; Schwarzschild, M.

    1982-07-01

    Four closed periodic orbit sequences are determined numerically, and their stability is investigated by the standard Floquet method, for the case of a specific, triaxial rotating potential. The sequences comprise (1) stable anomalous orbits that are tipped to the long axis which they circle, so that they also circle the short rotation axis, (2) unstable, anomalous orbits circling the intermediate axis, otherwise behaving like (1), (3) stable, normal retrograde orbits lying in the equatorial plane, which become unstable against perpendicular perturbations in Binney's instability strip, and (4) Z-axis orbits lying on the rotation axis, which, although stable in their inner section, become unstable to perturbations parallel to the intermediate axis farther out, and to the long axis farther out still. The entire set contains one composite sequence which is stable over the entire energy range, consisting of the outer section of the normal retrograde orbits, the sequence of the anomalous orbits, and the inner section of the Z-axis orbits. It is suggested that the composite sequence may be relevant to the dynamics of gas masses captured by rotating triaxial galaxies.

  3. Modified Denavit-Hartenberg parameters for better location of joint axis systems in robot arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, L. K.

    1986-01-01

    The Denavit-Hartenberg parameters define the relative location of successive joint axis systems in a robot arm. A recent justifiable criticism is that one of these parameters becomes extremely large when two successive joints have near-parallel rotational axes. Geometrically, this parameter then locates a joint axis system at an excessive distance from the robot arm and, computationally, leads to an ill-conditioned transformation matrix. In this paper, a simple modification (which results from constraining a transverse vector between successive joint rotational axes to be normal to one of the rotational axes, instead of both) overcomes this criticism and favorably locates the joint axis system. An example is given for near-parallel rotational axes of the elbow and shoulder joints in a robot arm. The regular and modified parameters are extracted by an algebraic method with simulated measurement data. Unlike the modified parameters, extracted values of the regular parameters are very sensitive to measurement accuracy.

  4. Dynamic modulation of ocular orientation during visually guided saccades and smooth-pursuit eye movements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, Bernhard J M.; Angelaki, Dora E.

    2003-01-01

    Rotational disturbances of the head about an off-vertical yaw axis induce a complex vestibuloocular reflex pattern that reflects the brain's estimate of head angular velocity as well as its estimate of instantaneous head orientation (at a reduced scale) in space coordinates. We show that semicircular canal and otolith inputs modulate torsional and, to a certain extent, also vertical ocular orientation of visually guided saccades and smooth-pursuit eye movements in a similar manner as during off-vertical axis rotations in complete darkness. It is suggested that this graviceptive control of eye orientation facilitates rapid visual spatial orientation during motion.

  5. Fixed geometry self starting transverse axis wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Dereng, V.G.

    1981-04-28

    This invention relates to a fixed geometry self starting wind turbine having a blade rotatable about a vertical axis. The blade is of a wide streamlined cambered airfoil shape and has a forward portion that includes a well rounded leading edge and thickness distribution that is conducive to high lift to drag ratios and having a high drag characteristic in reversed flows. The concave curvature of this camber line of said airfoil is directed to the rotational axis. The wide blade in combination with the well rounded leading edge, camber and airfoil thickness gives the turbine improved self-starting characteristics and causes the turbine to have improved acceleration characteristics through the intermediate speed range and up to full operating speed.

  6. The Wake of a Single Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsky, Danielle

    Vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) pose various advantages over traditional horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWTs), including their smaller size and footprint, quiet operation, and ability to produce power under a greater variety of wind directions and wind speeds. To determine the optimal spacing of an array of VAWTs for maximum power output, an understanding of the fundamental wake structure of a single VAWT is needed. This study is among the first attempts to experimentally visualize the wake of a VAWT using stereo particle image velocimetry (PIV). A scale VAWT is placed inside a wind tunnel and a motor rotates the scale model at a constant rotational speed. Wake data at several Reynolds numbers and tip speed ratios indicate that vortices are shed by each blade of the spinning VAWT, demonstrating significant differences between the wake of a VAWT and a spinning cylinder.

  7. Six-Axis Inertial Sensor Using Cold-Atom Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Canuel, B.; Leduc, F.; Holleville, D.; Gauguet, A.; Fils, J.; Virdis, A.; Clairon, A.; Dimarcq, N.; Borde, Ch.J.; Landragin, A.; Bouyer, P.

    2006-07-07

    We have developed an atom interferometer providing a full inertial base. This device uses two counterpropagating cold-atom clouds that are launched in strongly curved parabolic trajectories. Three single Raman beam pairs, pulsed in time, are successively applied in three orthogonal directions leading to the measurement of the three axis of rotation and acceleration. In this purpose, we introduce a new atom gyroscope using a butterfly geometry. We discuss the present sensitivity and the possible improvements.

  8. Estimation of power in low velocity vertical axis wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampath, S. S.; Shetty, Sawan; Chithirai Pon Selvan, M.

    2015-06-01

    The present work involves in the construction of a vertical axis wind turbine and the determination of power. Various different types of turbine blades are considered and the optimum blade is selected. Mechanical components of the entire setup are built to obtain maximum rotation per minute. The mechanical energy is converted into the electrical energy by coupling coaxially between the shaft and the generator. This setup produces sufficient power for consumption of household purposes which is economic and easily available.

  9. Miniature rotating transmissive optical drum scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Robert (Inventor); Parrington, Lawrence (Inventor); Rutberg, Michael (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A miniature rotating transmissive optical scanner system employs a drum of small size having an interior defined by a circumferential wall rotatable on a drum axis, an optical element positioned within the interior of the drum, and a light-transmissive lens aperture provided at an angular position in the circumferential wall of the drum for scanning a light beam to or from the optical element in the drum along a beam azimuth angle as the drum is rotated. The miniature optical drum scanner configuration obtains a wide scanning field-of-view (FOV) and large effective aperture is achieved within a physically small size.

  10. Unusual rotation modes of minor planetary satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mel'Nikov, A. V.; Shevchenko, I. I.

    2007-12-01

    An analysis of the character of the possible dynamics of all hitherto known planetary satellites shows two satellites—Amalthea (J5) and Prometheus (S16)—to have the most unusual structure of the phase space of possible rotational motion. These are the only satellites whose phase space of planar rotation may host synchronous resonances of three different kinds: the α resonance, the β resonance, and a mode corresponding to the period doubling bifurcation of the α resonance. We analyze the stability of these states against the tilt of the rotational axis.

  11. Rotation and particle loss in Tore Supra

    SciTech Connect

    R. B. White; F. W. Perkins; X. Garbet; C. Bourdelle; V. Basiuk; L. G. Eriksson

    2000-06-13

    Although plasma heating with ICRF imparts negligible angular momentum to a tokamak plasma, the high energy particles give significant torque to the plasma through diamagnetic effects. This effect has been directly modeled through guiding center simulations. It is found that heating in Tore Supra, with the location of the resonance surface on the high field side of the magnetic axis, can produce negative central rotation of up to 40 km/sec. Particle loss also contributes to negative rotation, but this is not the dominant effect in most discharges. In this work the authors examine the effect of collisions and strong plasma rotation on the loss of high energy particles.

  12. Rotating drum filter

    DOEpatents

    Anson, Donald

    1990-01-01

    A perforated drum (10) rotates in a coaxial cylindrical housing (18) having three circumferential ports (19,22,23), and an axial outlet (24) at one end. The axis (11) is horizontal. A fibrous filter medium (20) is fed through a port (19) on or near the top of the housing (81) by a distributing mechanism (36) which lays a uniform mat (26) of the desired thickness onto the rotating drum (10). This mat (26) is carried by the drum (10) to a second port (23) through which dirty fluid (13) enters. The fluid (13) passes through the filter (26) and the cleaned stream (16) exits through the open end (15) of the drum (10) and the axial port (24) in the housing (18). The dirty filter material (20) is carried on to a third port (22) near the bottom of the housing (18) and drops into a receiver (31) from which it is continuously removed, cleaned (30), and returned (32) to the charging port (36) at the top. To support the filter mat, the perforated cylinder may carry a series of tines (40), shaped blades (41), or pockets, so that the mat (26) will not fall from the drum (10) prematurely. To minimize risk of mat failure, the fluid inlet port (23) may be located above the horizontal centerline (11).

  13. Static Atmospheres in a Rotating Space Habitat.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinley, John M.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses O'Neill's proposal for the colonization of space as it offers new problems in pure physics. Addresses specifically the distribution of the atmosphere in O'Neill's habitat and whether there will be enough air at the axis of rotation to allow human-powered flight, with particular reference to the habitat's "artificial gravity." (CS)

  14. Automated shell theory for rotating structures (ASTROS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, B. J.; Thomas, J. M.

    1971-01-01

    A computer program for analyzing axisymmetric shells with inertial forces caused by rotation about the shell axis is developed by revising the STARS II shell program. The basic capabilities of the STARS II shell program, such as the treatment of the branched shells, stiffened wall construction, and thermal gradients, are retained.

  15. Insights from the rotational braking of solar twins: is the Sun a regular rotator?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dos Santos, Leonardo Augusto; Melendez, Jorge

    2016-06-01

    Although the Sun is widely used as a reference star in astrophysics, it is still unclear how regular it is when compared to other similar stars in regards to some of its physical properties, such as its rotation. We analyze the rotational velocities (limited by the unknown rotation axis inclination angle) of an unprecedented sample of solar twins in order to study how common the Sun is in its rotation. We use high-resolution (R = 115000) spectra obtained with the HARPS spectrograph and ESO’s 3.6 m telescope at La Silla Observatory. The projected rotational velocities for 71 solar twins are estimated through line profile fitting using synthetic spectra. We take into account the macroturbulence velocities in a separate analysis, for they are known to be difficult to disentangle from rotation. Our sample of solar twins include some spectroscopic binaries with enhanced rotational velocities, and we do not find any non-spectroscopic binaries with unusually high rotation velocities. The Sun does not have a peculiar rotation, but the solar twins exhibit rotational velocities that depart from the tried and tested Skumanich’s law. We conclude that the Sun is a regular rotator when compared to solar twins with a similar age, and obtain a rotational braking law that better describes the stars in our sample when compared to previous, often-used scalings.

  16. Error motion compensating tracking interferometer for the position measurement of objects with rotational degree of freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holler, Mirko; Raabe, Jörg

    2015-05-01

    The nonaxial interferometric position measurement of rotating objects can be performed by imaging the laser beam of the interferometer to a rotating mirror which can be a sphere or a cylinder. This, however, requires such rotating mirrors to be centered on the axis of rotation as a wobble would result in loss of the interference signal. We present a tracking-type interferometer that performs such measurement in a general case where the rotating mirror may wobble on the axis of rotation, or even where the axis of rotation may be translating in space. Aside from tracking, meaning to measure and follow the position of the rotating mirror, the interferometric measurement errors induced by the tracking motion of the interferometer itself are optically compensated, preserving nanometric measurement accuracy. As an example, we show the application of this interferometer in a scanning x-ray tomography instrument.

  17. Finite element forced vibration analysis of rotating cyclic structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elchuri, V.; Smith, G. C. C.

    1981-01-01

    A capability was added to the general purpose finite element program NASTRAN Level 17.7 to conduct forced vibration analysis of tuned cyclic structures rotating about their axes of symmetry. The effects of Coriolis and centripetal accelerations together with those due to linear acceleration of the axis of rotation were included. The theoretical development of this capability is presented.

  18. Rotation of Axes and the Mean Value Theorem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, David

    2004-01-01

    This article provides a proof of the Mean Value Theorem by rotating a coordinate system through a specified angle. The use of this approach makes it easy to visualize why the Mean Value Theorem is true. An instructor can use the proof as another illustration of the rotation of axis technique in addition to the standard one of simplifying equations…

  19. Infrared spectroscopic study of the rotation of chemisorbed methoxy species on an alumina surface

    SciTech Connect

    Beebe, T.P. Jr.; Crowell, J.E.; Yates, J.T. Jr. )

    1990-04-15

    We present experimental and calculated vibration--rotation spectra as a function of temperature for the methoxy species (--OCH{sub 3} and --OCD{sub 3}) chemisorbed on an alumina surface. The axis of rotation is the C--O bond axis. The model for our calculations is that of free rotation, and we describe the methods employed here in full detail. The qualitative agreement between the calculated and experimental spectra suggests that the adsorbed methoxy species is undergoing free rotational motion about the C--O bond axis.

  20. Microgyroscope with Vibrating Post as Rotation Transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Tony K.; Gutierrez, Roman

    2003-01-01

    The figure depicts a micromachined silicon vibratory gyroscope that senses rotation about its z axis. The rotation-sensitive vibratory element is a post oriented (when at equilibrium) along the z axis and suspended at its base by thin, flexible silicon bands oriented along the x and y axes, respectively. Unlike in the vibratory microgyroscopes described in the immediately preceding article ["Cloverleaf Vibratory Microgyroscope With Integrated Post" (NPO-20688)] and other previous articles in NASA Tech Briefs, the rotation-sensitive vibratory element does not include a cloverleaf-shaped structure that lies (when at equilibrium) in the x-y plane. As in the cases of the previously reported vibratory microgyroscopes, vibrations of the rotation-sensitive vibratory element are excited electrostatically, the vibrations are measured by use of capacitive proximity sensors, and the rate of rotation along the axis of sensitivity is deduced from the effect of the Coriolis force upon the vibrations. To create electrodes for electrostatic excitation and capacitive sensing of vibrations, portions of the facing surfaces of the post and of the four stationary members that surround the post are rendered electrically conductive; this can be accomplished by either depositing metal films or else doping the silicon in the affected areas.

  1. Shadow of rotating wormhole in plasma environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdujabbarov, Ahmadjon; Juraev, Bakhtinur; Ahmedov, Bobomurat; Stuchlík, Zdeněk

    2016-07-01

    The massless particle motion around rotating wormhole in the presence of plasma environment has been studied. It has been shown that the presence of the plasma decreases the inner radius of the circular orbits of photons around rotating wormhole. The shadow cast by rotating wormhole surrounded by inhomogeneous plasma with the radial power-law density has been explored. It has been shown that the shape and size of the wormhole shadow is distorted and changed depending on i) plasma parameters, ii) wormhole rotation and iii) inclination angle between observer plane and axis of rotation of wormhole. As an example we have considered an inverse radial distribution of the plasma density and different types of the wormhole solution.

  2. Transformation of complex spherical harmonics under rotations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanowski, Zbigniew; Krukowski, Stanislaw

    2007-12-01

    The algorithm rotating the complex spherical harmonics is presented. The convenient and ready to use formulae for ell = 0, 1, 2, 3 are listed. Any rotation in {\\bb R}^3 space is determined by the rotation axis and the rotation angle. The complex spherical harmonics defined in the fixed coordinate system is expanded as a linear combination of the spherical harmonics defined in the rotated coordinate system having 2ell + 1 terms, which are given explicitly. The derived formulae could be applied in quantum molecular calculations. The algorithm is based on the Cartesian representation of the spherical harmonics. The possible application of the algorithm to the evaluation of molecular integrals between slater type orbitals (STO) is described.

  3. Energy Transfer in Rotating Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambon, Claude; Mansour, Nagi N.; Godeferd, Fabien S.; Rai, Man Mohan (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The influence or rotation on the spectral energy transfer of homogeneous turbulence is investigated in this paper. Given the fact that linear dynamics, e.g. the inertial waves regime tackled in an RDT (Rapid Distortion Theory) fashion, cannot Affect st homogeneous isotropic turbulent flow, the study of nonlinear dynamics is of prime importance in the case of rotating flows. Previous theoretical (including both weakly nonlinear and EDQNM theories), experimental and DNS (Direct Numerical Simulation) results are gathered here and compared in order to give a self-consistent picture of the nonlinear effects of rotation on tile turbulence. The inhibition of the energy cascade, which is linked to a reduction of the dissipation rate, is shown to be related to a damping due to rotation of the energy transfer. A model for this effect is quantified by a model equation for the derivative-skewness factor, which only involves a micro-Rossby number Ro(sup omega) = omega'/(2(OMEGA))-ratio of rms vorticity and background vorticity as the relevant rotation parameter, in accordance with DNS and EDQNM results fit addition, anisotropy is shown also to develop through nonlinear interactions modified by rotation, in an intermediate range of Rossby numbers (Ro(omega) = (omega)' and Ro(omega)w greater than 1), which is characterized by a marco-Rossby number Ro(sup L) less than 1 and Ro(omega) greater than 1 which is characterized by a macro-Rossby number based on an integral lengthscale L and the micro-Rossby number previously defined. This anisotropy is mainly an angular drain of spectral energy which tends to concentrate energy in tile wave-plane normal to the rotation axis, which is exactly both the slow and the two-dimensional manifold. In Addition, a polarization of the energy distribution in this slow 2D manifold enhances horizontal (normal to the rotation axis) velocity components, and underlies the anisotropic structure of the integral lengthscales. Finally is demonstrated the

  4. Buckling and vibration of a rotating beam†

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nachman, A.

    1986-09-01

    The equations for the vibration of a rotating beam, such as a helicopter blade, are exhibited. The beam is elastic (in general non-linearly so), the description is geometrically exact, the axis of rotation does not necessarily pass through the beam's clamped end (precession) and cross-sectional shearing is accounted for by using a director theory. Particular attention is paid to the impossibility of vibration (or buckling) confined to a plane making an angle β to the axis of rotation unless β=π/2 (orπ/2 or 0) or rotatory inertia is neglected. For purposed of illustration the analysis is specialized to describe Euler-Bernoulli and Timoshenko beams.

  5. Heart-shaped nuclei: Condensation of rotational-aligned octupole phonons

    SciTech Connect

    Frauendorf, S.

    2008-02-15

    The strong octupole correlations in the mass region A{approx_equal}226 are interpreted as rotation-induced condensation of octupole phonons having their angular momentum aligned with the rotational axis. Discrete phonon energy and parity conservation generate oscillations of the energy difference between the lowest rotational bands with positive and negative parity. Anharmonicities tend to synchronize the rotation of the condensate and the quadrupole shape of the nucleus forming a rotating heart shape.

  6. Nonlinear Rayleigh-Taylor instability of rotating inviscid fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, J. J.; He, X. T.; Ye, W. H.; Busse, F. H.

    2013-01-01

    It is demonstrated theoretically that the nonlinear stage of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability can be retarded at arbitrary Atwood numbers in a rotating system with the axis of rotation normal to the acceleration of the interface between two uniform inviscid fluids. The Coriolis force provides an effective restoring force on the perturbed interface, and the uniform rotation will always decrease the nonlinear saturation amplitude of the interface at any disturbance wavelength.

  7. Method for culturing mammalian cells in a horizontally rotated bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, Ray P. (Inventor); Wolf, David A. (Inventor); Trinh, Tinh T. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A bio-reactor system where cell growth microcarrier beads are suspended in a zero head space fluid medium by rotation about a horizontal axis and where the fluid is continuously oxygenated from a tubular membrane which rotates on a shaft together with rotation of the culture vessel. The oxygen is continuously throughput through the membrane and disbursed into the fluid medium along the length of the membrane.

  8. Rotation of vertically oriented objects during earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinzen, Klaus-G.

    2012-10-01

    Vertically oriented objects, such as tombstones, monuments, columns, and stone lanterns, are often observed to shift and rotate during earthquake ground motion. Such observations are usually limited to the mesoseismal zone. Whether near-field rotational ground motion components are necessary in addition to pure translational movements to explain the observed rotations is an open question. We summarize rotation data from seven earthquakes between 1925 and 2009 and perform analog and numeric rotation testing with vertically oriented objects. The free-rocking motion of a marble block on a sliding table is disturbed by a pulse in the direction orthogonal to the rocking motion. When the impulse is sufficiently strong and occurs at the `right' moment, it induces significant rotation of the block. Numeric experiments of a free-rocking block show that the initiation of vertical block rotation by a cycloidal acceleration pulse applied orthogonal to the rocking axis depends on the amplitude of the pulse and its phase relation to the rocking cycle. Rotation occurs when the pulse acceleration exceeds the threshold necessary to provoke rocking of a resting block, and the rocking block approaches its equilibrium position. Experiments with blocks subjected to full 3D strong motion signals measured during the 2009 L'Aquila earthquake confirm the observations from the tests with analytic ground motions. Significant differences in the rotational behavior of a monolithic block and two stacked blocks exist.

  9. Modal testing of a rotating wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Carne, T.G.; Nord, A.R.

    1982-11-01

    A testing technique has been developed to measure the modes of vibration of a rotating vertical-axis wind turbine. This technique has been applied to the Sandia Two-Meter Turbine, where the changes in individual modal frequencies as a function of the rotational speed have been tracked from 0 rpm (parked) to 600 rpm. During rotational testing, the structural response was measured using a combination of strain gages and accelerometers, passing the signals through slip rings. Excitation of the turbine structure was provided by a scheme which suddenly released a pretensioned cable, thus plucking the turbine as it was rotating at a set speed. In addition to calculating the real modes of the parked turbine, the modes of the rotating turbine were also determined at several rotational speeds. The modes of the rotating system proved to be complex due to centrifugal and Coriolis effects. The modal data for the parked turbine were used to update a finite-element model. Also, the measured modal parameters for the rotating turbine were compared to the analytical results, thus verifying the analytical procedures used to incorporate the effects of the rotating coordinate system.

  10. Nuclear chiral and magnetic rotation in covariant density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Jie; Zhao, Pengwei

    2016-05-01

    Excitations of chiral rotation observed in triaxial nuclei and magnetic and/or antimagnetic rotations (AMR) seen in near-spherical nuclei have attracted a lot of attention. Unlike conventional rotation in well-deformed or superdeformed nuclei, here the rotational axis is not necessary coinciding with any principal axis of the nuclear density distribution. Thus, tilted axis cranking (TAC) is mandatory to describe these excitations self-consistently in the framework of covariant density functional theory (CDFT). We will briefly introduce the formalism of TAC–CDFT and its application for magnetic and AMR phenomena. Configuration-fixed CDFT and its predictions for nuclear chiral configurations and for favorable triaxial deformation parameters are also presented, and the discoveries of the multiple chiral doublets in 133Ce and 103Rh are discussed.