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Sample records for ohio coals final

  1. Ohio Coal Research Consortium fourth year final summary report, September 1, 1993--August 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    As a part of its efforts to improve the use of high-sulfur Ohio coal within environmental limits, the Ohio Coal Development Office, an entity within the Ohio Department of Development (OCDO/ODOD), in late 1988 established a consortium of four Ohio universities. The purpose of the Ohio Coal Research Consortium is to conduct a multi-year fundamental research program focused on (1) the enhancement or development of dry sorption processes for the economical removal of high levels of SO{sub 2} and other pollutants and (2) an increased understanding of methods for reduction in air toxics emissions from combustion gases produced by burning high-sulfur Ohio coal. This report contains summaries of twelve studies in these areas.

  2. Removal of organic and inorganic sulfur from Ohio coal by combined physical and chemical process. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Attia, Y.A.; Zeky, M.El.; Lei, W.W.; Bavarian, F.; Yu, S.

    1989-04-28

    This project consisted of three sections. In the first part, the physical cleaning of Ohio coal by selective flocculation of ultrafine slurry was considered. In the second part, the mild oxidation process for removal of pyritic and organic sulfur.was investigated. Finally, in-the third part, the combined effects of these processes were studied. The physical cleaning and desulfurization of Ohio coal was achieved using selective flocculation of ultrafine coal slurry in conjunction with froth flotation as flocs separation method. The finely disseminated pyrite particles in Ohio coals, in particular Pittsburgh No.8 seam, make it necessary to use ultrafine ({minus}500 mesh) grinding to liberate the pyrite particles. Experiments were performed to identify the ``optimum`` operating conditions for selective flocculation process. The results indicated that the use of a totally hydrophobic flocculant (FR-7A) yielded the lowest levels of mineral matters and total sulfur contents. The use of a selective dispersant (PAAX) increased the rejection of pyritic sulfur further. In addition, different methods of floc separation techniques were tested. It was found that froth flotation system was the most efficient method for separation of small coal flocs.

  3. Sulfur release from Ohio coals and sorbent kinetics in pulverized coal flames. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Essenhigh, R.

    1992-08-01

    In this report we describe the results of investigations into the structure of combustion and sulfur release profiles from coal burning in One-Dimensional P.C. flames using a furnace of unique design for the measurements. Selected measurements were also-carried out in a special high-intensity furnace also of unique design. The formal project work started in late Fall 1989, with unfunded preliminary work in the months prior to that. The process of limestone injection into the flame to control sulfur oxides emissions is a long-standing concept that has been given particular formulation in the LIMB process, and studies of such systems provide bases for commercial system economics. Problems with LIMB and related systems indicated need for better understanding of, jointly, the sulfur release from the coal and the sorbent behavior by the limestone. The investigations as reported in Vol. 1 of this Report used 14 different coals under a range of different initial and operating conditions, and the resulting measurements have provided a database of major proportions, as tabulated in the attached Volumes 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 of this report. This database consists of sets of measurements totalling about 45,000 entries for all independent and dependent parameters involved. The independent parameters included: coal type (analysis), firing rate, stoichiometry (fuel/air ratio), and sorbent content of the

  4. Extraction of potential pollutants from Ohio coal by synergistic use of supercritical fluids. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.

    1990-08-03

    A synergistic supercritical extraction process was developed and its feasibility demonstrated using a semi-batch extraction process unit. The process was found to be effective in selectively cleaning organic sulfur from Ohio coals. Optimal case involved a mixture of CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and CH{sub 3}OH, and the removal of organic sulfur ranged from 35 to 55%. Combined with pyrite and mineral matter removal by gravity, the resulting coals would have 20--30% increased heating values and SO{sub 2} emissions would be down to 1.2--1.5 pounds per million Btu, thus meeting compliance requirements. Estimated cleaning cost including pyrite removal is $25 to 45 per ton. The most important cost factor is the operation at high pressures.

  5. Technical support for the Ohio Coal Technology Program. Volume 1, Baseline of knowledge concerning by-product characteristics: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Olfenbuttel, R.; Clark, S.; Helper, E.; Hinchee, R.; Kuntz, C.; Means, J.; Oxley, J.; Paisley, M.; Rogers, C.; Sheppard, W.; Smolak, L.

    1989-08-28

    This report was prepared for the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) under Grant Agreement No. CDO/R-88-LRl and comprises two volumes. Volume I presents data on the chemical, physical, and leaching characteristics of by-products from a wide variety of clean coal combustion processes. Volume II consists of a discussion of (a) process modification waste minimization opportunities and stabilization considerations; (b) research and development needs and issues relating to clean coal combustion technologies and by-products; (c) the market potential for reusing or recycling by-product materials; and (d) regulatory considerations relating to by-product disposal or reuse.

  6. Stream water quality in the coal region of Ohio. General technical report (final)

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, K.L.

    1982-01-01

    The report includes data collected in 1977-79 from 19 small streams that drain unmined watersheds and 50 that drain areas where coal has been surface mined. The analysis includes common ions, alkalinity, acidity, pH, 16 trace elements, 5 nitrogen and phosphorous species, specific conductance, suspended solids, turbidity, settleable matter, water temperature, and estimated discharge.

  7. Control of toxic metallic emissions formed during the combustion of Ohio coals. Final report, September 1, 1993--August 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, P.; Owens, T.M.; Wu, Chang-Yu

    1995-02-01

    The objective of the project was to characterize metallic emissions from representative coals and develop strategies for their control. Though metallic emissions from coal combustors have been extensively studied, more studies need to be performed to better characterize the interaction of various species which is required for the selection and design of sorbents for effective control of these emissions. Some coals are rich in sulfur, and utilities using these coals will have to use some form of Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD). A technique for FGD is the use of calcium based sorbents, and the degree of metals capture of these sorbents under different conditions will be researched. The objective of the first year of the study was to understand the evolution of metallic aerosol size distributions and the capture characteristics of various sorbents. Also, the metallic emissions resulting from the combustion of two seams of Ohio coals were to be characterized. Studies on the evolution of the metallic aerosol size distributions have been completed and the use of silicon and calcium based sorbents for capture of lead species has been examined. Co-injection of metallic compounds along with organometallic silicon indicated a high degree of capture of lead in a certain temperature regime. Preliminary results with calcium based sorbents also indicate capture of metallic species. To gain a further understanding of the capture processes, in situ optical diagnostic studies were performed in collaboration with researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Spectroscopic studies (laser induced fluorescence coupled with particle scattering) were performed to help understand the mechanisms of metallic species capture.

  8. Northwest Ohio Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, Kevin

    2015-03-04

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY When the Toledo Lucas County Port Authority (TLCPA) filed for the Department of Energy EECBG grant in late 2009, it was part of a strategic and Board backed objective to expand the organization’s economic development and financing programs into alternative energy and energy efficiency. This plan was filed with the knowledge and support of the areas key economic development agencies. The City of Toledo was also a key partner with the Mayor designating a committee to develop a Strategic Energy Policy for the City. This would later give rise to a Community Sustainability Strategic Plan for Toledo, Lucas County and the surrounding region with energy efficiency as a key pillar. When the TLCPA signed the grant documents with the DOE in June of 2010, the geographic area was severely distressed economically, in the early stages of a recovery from over a 30% drop in business activity and high unemployment. The TLCPA and its partners began identifying potential project areas well before the filing of the application, continuing to work diligently before the formal award and signing of the grant documents. Strong implementation and actions plans and business and financing models were developed and revised throughout the 3 year grant period with the long term goal of creating a sustainable program. The TLCPA and the City of Toledo demonstrated early leadership by forming the energy improvement district and evaluating buildings under their control including transportation infrastructure and logistics, government services buildings and buildings which housed several for profit and not for profit tenants while completing significant energy efficiency projects that created public awareness and confidence and solid examples of various technologies and energy savings. As was stated in the DOE Award Summary, the undertaking was focused as a commercial program delving into Alternative Energy Utility Districts; what are referred to in Ohio Statute as Energy Special

  9. Control of toxic metallic emissions formed during the combustion of Ohio coals. Final report, September 1994--March 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Chang-Yu; Owens, T.M.; Biswas, P.

    1996-03-29

    The objective of this project was to characterize metallic emissions from representative coals and develop strategies for their control. A technique for flue gas desulfurization is the use of calcium based sorbents, and the degree of metals capture of these sorbents under different conditions will be researched. The objective of the first year of the study was to understand the evolution of metallic aerosol size distributions and the capture characteristics of various sorbents. Also, the metallic emissions resulting from the combustion of two seams of Ohio coals were to be characterized. Studies on the evolution of the metallic aerosol size distributions have been completed and the use of silicon and calcium based sorbents for capture of lead species has been examined. Co-injection of metallic compounds along with organometallic silicon indicated a high degree of capture of lead in a certain temperature region. Preliminary results with calcium based sorbents also indicate capture of metallic species. In the second year, the work was extended to examine three different aspects: (1) understanding the mechanisms of capture of metals by vapor phase sorbents; (2) role of chlorine in speciation of metals and its importance in metals capture; and (3) capture of mercury by aerosol transformation. It was established that aerosol formation rates for Hg species is rather slow under typical combustion conditions, and hence would not be an effective way of capture of mercury. However, the use of titania based sorbents have provided exciting results. This is being developed further for effective capture of Hg species in combustion environments. Several theoretical investigations were also carried out to better understand and predict trace metal behavior in combustion environments. Publications and conference presentations resulting from work this year is listed.

  10. Field study for disposal of solid wastes from Advanced Coal Processes: Ohio LIMB Site Assessment. Final report, April 1986--November 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberg, A.; Coel, B.J.; Butler, R.D.

    1994-10-01

    New air pollution regulations will require cleaner, more efficient processes for converting coal to electricity, producing solid byproducts or wastes that differ from conventional pulverized-coal combustion ash. Large scale landfill test cells containing byproducts were built at 3 sites and are to be monitored over at least 3 years. This report presents results of a 3-y field test at an ash disposal site in northern Ohio; the field test used ash from a combined lime injection-multistage burner (LIMB) retrofit at the Ohio Edison Edgewater plant. The landfill test cells used LIMB ash wetted only to control dusting in one cell, and LIMB ash wetted to optimize compaction density in the other cell. Both test cells had adequate load-bearing strength for landfill stability but had continuing dimensional instability. Heaving and expansion did not affect the landfill stability but probably contributed to greater permeability to infiltrating water. Leachate migration occurred from the base, but effects on downgradient groundwater were limited to increased chloride concentration in one well. Compressive strength of landfilled ash was adequate to support equipment, although permeability was higher and strength was lower than anticipated. Average moisture content has increased to about 90% (dry weight basis). Significant water infiltration has occurred; the model suggests that as much as 20% of the incident rainfall will pass through and exit as leachate. However, impacts on shallow ground water is minimal. Results of this field study suggest that LIMB ash from combustion of moderate to high sulfur coals will perform acceptably if engineering controls are used to condition and compact the materials, reduce water influx to the landfill, and minimize leachate production. Handling of the ash did not pose serious problems during cell construction; steaming and heat buildup were moderate.

  11. Coal repository. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-11-01

    The Coal Repository Project was initiated in 1980 by the Department of Energy/Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center to provide a centralized system for the collection of well characterized coal samples, and distribution to organizations involved in the chemical beneficiation of coal and related research. TRW Energy Development Group, together with its subcontractor Commercial Testing and Engineering Company, established the Coal Repository at the TRW Capistrano Chemical Facility, which is the location of the DOE-owned Multi-Use Fuel and Energy Processes Test Plant (MEP). Twenty tons each of three coals (Illinois No. 6, Kentucky No. 11 (West), and Pittsburgh No. 8 (from an Ohio mine)) were collected, characterized, and stored under a nitrogen atmosphere. Ten tons of each coal are 3/8-inch x 0, five tons of each are 14-mesh x 0, and five tons of each are 100-mesh x 0. Although TRW was within budget and on schedule, Department of Energy funding priorities in this area were altered such that the project was terminated prior to completion of the original scope of work. 9 figures, 3 tables.

  12. Development of pilot plant for the production of vapor grown carbon fiber from Ohio coal. Final report, July 1997 to July 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Alig, Robert; Burton, David; Kennel, Elliot; Lake, Max

    2000-11-30

    The objective of this project was to develop, build, and operate a pilot-scale plant for the production of Pyrograf-III™ carbon nanofiber from Ohio high-sulfur coal. The fiber production scale-up program was conducted in three phases. In Phase I, the design parameters were developed using a single reactor system, for a process where sulfur bearing coal replaced hydrogen sulfide as the sulfur source. Optimization trials for different reactor tube dimensions were conducted and compared to theoretical predictions for temperature and flow conditions in the reactor as a function of the reactor dimensions. The process was also refined to optimize intrinsic and surface properties of the carbon fiber. Methods of separating fiber from coal ash and de-bulking the fiber were also developed and demonstrated. Under Phase I, a considerable body of knowledge was developed that yielded valuable data bearing on the design of fiber production and handling equipment. The Phase I effort was comprised of complementary programs sponsored by the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Delphi Chassis Division of General Motors Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Commerce (DOC). In Phase II, equipment was designed based upon the body of knowledge developed under Phase I. The pilot plant equipment was designed to have a production capacity up to 100,000 pounds of fiber per year based on a process (PR-11) that generates a fiber diameter of 200 nm and a model indicating energy throughput as the rate-limiting variable. As the program progressed, it become evident that the near-term customers required a fiber with a much smaller diameter, PR-24 grade, to achieve the required performance in the end product. In order to meet the needs of the initial customer base, modifications were made to the pilot plant reactors to produce the smaller diameter fiber. This change in the intrinsic properties of the fiber caused the production capacity to be cut to a

  13. Technical support for the Ohio Clean Coal Technology Program. Volume 2, Baseline of knowledge concerning process modification opportunities, research needs, by-product market potential, and regulatory requirements: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Olfenbuttel, R.; Clark, S.; Helper, E.; Hinchee, R.; Kuntz, C.; Means, J.; Oxley, J.; Paisley, M.; Rogers, C.; Sheppard, W.; Smolak, L.

    1989-08-28

    This report was prepared for the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) under Grant Agreement No. CDO/R-88-LR1 and comprises two volumes. Volume 1 presents data on the chemical, physical, and leaching characteristics of by-products from a wide variety of clean coal combustion processes. Volume 2 consists of a discussion of (a) process modification waste minimization opportunities and stabilization considerations; (b) research and development needs and issues relating to clean coal combustion technologies and by-products; (c) the market potential for reusing or recycling by-product materials; and (d) regulatory considerations relating to by-product disposal or reuse.

  14. Automated strip mine and reclamation mapping from ERTS. [Ohio coal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettyjohn, W. A.; Rogers, R. H.; Reed, L. E.

    1974-01-01

    In response to the urgent need for a faster and more economical means of generating strip mine and reclamation maps, a study was conducted to evaluate the suitability of using ERTS computer compatible tape for automatic mapping. The procedure uses computer target spectral recognition techniques as a basis for classification. The area encompassed by this investigation includes five counties in eastern Ohio that comprise nearly 7,500 square kilometers (3,000 square miles). The counties have been disrupted by coal mining since the early 1800's, and strip mining has been practiced in all of them. The environmental effects of strip mining are also discussed.

  15. Sulfur-reduction potential of the coals of Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Wizzard, J.T.; Cavallaro, J.A.; Deurbrouck, A.W.

    1983-03-01

    This report presents the results of a washability study of 148 raw coal channel samples with an emphasis on sulfur reduction. These raw coals contained on the average 13.1 percent ash, 2.47 percent pyritic sulfur, 3.86 percent total sulfur, 12,585 Btu/lb, and 6.2 pounds of SO/sub 2/ emissions per million Btu, on a moisture-free basis. The complete washability data and ultimate-proximate data are presented for these samples. Each individual washability analysis is presented in Appendix A. Statistical evaluations of the washability data and ultimate-proximate analyses are presented on a coalbed basis, whenever there are six or more samples from a given coalbed. An additional evaluation is included showing the composite data interpolated at Btu recovery levels of 50, 60, 70, 80, 90, and 100 percent. Potential sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) emissions are calculated for raw and clean coal fractions. These SO/sub 2/ emissions are then compared to EPA regulations governing New Stationary Sources Performance Standards. Graphical representations are given for various coal characteristics of both raw and washed coal fractions for all coalbeds with six or more samples. For coalbeds with 20 or more samples, goodness-of-fit tests were made comparing SO/sub 2/ distributions with both normal and log-normal distributions. Confidence intervals and tolerance limits are calculated and illustrated for the SO/sub 2/ emission values as a function of specific gravity for these coalbeds. In general, ash reduction, pyritic sulfur reduction, total sulfur reduction, and SO/sub 2/ emissions reduction increase as the coal is crushed to smaller top sizes and as the coal is cleaned at lower specific gravities. This report presents the reduction curves for the major coalbeds in Ohio. 39 figures, 13 tables.

  16. Evaluation of reverse coal-pyrite flotation for a proposed Ohio advanced coal-cleaning test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, K.J.

    1989-07-01

    A laboratory test program was conducted at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center with precleaned and classified middlings samples of three high-sulfur Ohio coals. The test program was run to evaluate the possible application of the US Department of Energy's two-stage reverse coal-pyrite flotation process in a new coal-cleaning test facility to be built in Ohio by the Ohio Coal Development Office. Results showed that the pyritic sulfur content of all three of the prepared coal samples could be substantially lowered via the coal-pyrite flotation process. But with two of the three coals, the organic sulfur levels were so high that removal of all of the pyrite would have contributed little to total sulfur reduction. Thus, processes aimed at pyritic sulfur reduction alone (such as the reverse coal-pyrite flotation process) would have limited impact on total sulfur reduction with some Ohio coals. However, with other coals in which sulfur is predominantly in the form of pyrite and marcasite, the process would likely prove beneficial. Therefore, the inclusion of reverse coal-pyrite flotation circuitry in the new facility would be prudent, especially since the proposed advanced coal-cleaning test plant will contain other deep-cleaning circuitry to ensure maximum ash reduction to achieve the lowest possible SO/sub 2/ per Btu emission levels. 13 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. Creating power, technology and products: the role of coal gasification in Ohio's economy and energy future

    SciTech Connect

    2007-12-15

    The study examines how coal gasification (CG) combined with Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) technology could play a role in Ohio's economy and energy future - particularly in Northeast Ohio, a major center of manufacturing in the U.S. This working paper focuses primarily on opportunities for gasification projects to augment Ohio's economy. It examines economic activity factors related to coal gasification and how the location of a number of key support industries in Ohio could provide the state with a competitive advantage in this area. The study focuses on a polygeneration facility that would supply electricity and some other products as an example of the type of gasification facility that could, if a sufficient number of similar facilities were located in the area, serve as the stimulus for a new or expanded industry cluster. Although not further discussed in this paper, any Ohio gasification facility would be in close proximity to oil and gas fields that can serve as sites for sequestering the carbon dioxide separated out from the coal-gasification process. The potential economic impact of locating a polygeneration gasifier in Northeast Ohio is large. A significant portion of the inputs required for one $1.1+ billion facility can be supplied either within northeastern Ohio or from elsewhere in the state. Operation of the facility is estimated to increase annual statewide personal income by $39 million and Ohio output by $161 million. The Northeast Ohio region will account for 98 percent of the operational benefits. The report suggests several possible steps to convert this research to an action plan to build support for, and interest in, a coal-gasification industry cluster in Northeast Ohio. Outreach should focus on engaging industry leaders, foundations, and state and regional economic development leaders. 16 tabs., 3 apps.

  18. The Other Half Speaks: Reminiscences of Coal Town Women, 1900-1950, Athens County, Ohio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horn, Helen, Ed.; Good, Roger, Ed.

    These materials are intended to accompany a videotape, that incorporates stories from 15 women who lived in the coal producing towns of Athens County, Ohio during the first half of the 20th century. Discussion questions, a list of resource volunteers, and background information on mining and Athens County coal towns are included. (DB)

  19. Solar heating system installed at Troy, Ohio. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1980-09-01

    This document is the Final Report of the Solar Energy System located at Troy-Miami County Public Library, Troy, Ohio. The completed system is composed of tree basic subsystems: the collector system consisting of 3264 square feet of Owens Illinois evacuated glass tube collectors; the storage system which includes a 5000-gallon insulated steel tank; and the distribution and control system which includes piping, pumping and control logic for the efficient and safe operation of the entire system. This solar heating system was installed in an existing facility and is, therefore, a retrofit system. This report includes extracts from the site files, specifications, drawings, installation, operation and maintenance instructions.

  20. Nuke-to-coal switch nixed in Texas, still alive in Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-10-01

    A feasibility study found it uneconomical to convert the South Texas Project from nuclear to coal, but the Zimmer plant in Ohio is continuing to pursue the conversion concept. The main issue in Ohio is the accounting treatment of the investment in the 800-MW single unit project that was cancelled in 1984. The owners hope that interested parties can agree on a package stipulating what portion of the costs of the existing plant will be disallowed from the rate base prior to state commission review. A favorable study shows that about 45% of the $1.7 billion investment is usable in a coal plant. Conversion will require an additional $1.7 billion to provide a 1300-MW coal-fired plant. Feasibility for the Zimmer plant is due to its 97% level of completion, while construction at the Texas plant is not as far along.

  1. A LAND USE ANALYSIS OF EXISTING AND POTENTIAL COAL SURFACE MINING AREAS IN THE OHIO RIVER BASIN ENERGY STUDY REGION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report was prepared as part of the Ohio River Basin Energy Study (ORBES), a multidisciplinary policy research program supported by the Environmental Protection Agency. It reports on the land use changes resulting from the surface mining of coal in the Ohio River Basin, which...

  2. The Ohio Schools Pest Management Survey: A Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    In 2001, the Environmental Studies Senior Capstone Seminar class at Denison University helped the state of Ohio work to prevent harmful pesticide use in schools. In cooperation with Ohio State University's Integrated Pest Management (IPM) in Schools Program, Denison conducted a statewide survey of school districts to determine current pest…

  3. Dispersion modeling of mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants at Coshocton and Manchester, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.; Keener, T.C.

    2009-09-15

    Mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants are estimated to contribute to approximately 46% of the total US anthropogenic mercury emissions and required to be regulated by maximum achievable control technology (MACT) standards. Dispersion modeling of mercury emissions using the AERMOD model and the industrial source complex short term (ISCST3) model was conducted for two representative coal-fired power plants at Coshocton and Manchester, Ohio. Atmospheric mercury concentrations, dry mercury deposition rates, and wet mercury deposition rates were predicted in a 5 x 5 km area surrounding the Coonesville and JM Stuart coal-fired power plants. In addition, the analysis results of meteorological parameters showed that wet mercury deposition is dependent on precipitation, but dry mercury deposition is influenced by various meteorological factors. 8 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Characterization of selected Ohio coals to predict their conversion behavior relative to 104 North American Coals. [Factors correlating with liquefaction behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Whitacre, T. P.; Hunt, T. J.; Kneller, W. A.

    1982-02-01

    Twenty-six coal samples from Ohio were collected as washed and seam samples, and lithobodies within the seams. Characterization of these samples included determination of % maceral, % anti R/sub max/, LTA, chlorine content and proximate/ultimate and qualitative mineral analyses. These data were compared to data from a similar project by Yarzab, R.F., et al., 1980 completed at Pennsylvania State University using tetralin as the hydrogen donor solvent. The characteristics of these coals were correlated with liquefaction conversion and other data accrued on 104 North American coals by statistical analyses. Utilizing percent carbon, sulfur, volatile matter, reflectance, vitrinite and total reactive macerals, Q-mode cluster analysis demonstrated that Ohio coals are more similar to the coals of the Interior province than to those of the Appalachian province. Linear multiple regression analysis for the 104 North American coals provided a prediction equation for conversion (R = .96). The predicted conversion values for the samples range from 58.8 to 79.6%, with the Lower Kittanning (No. 5) and the Middle Kittanning (No. 6) coal seams showing the highest predicted percent conversion (respectively, 73.4 and 72.2%). The moderately low FSI values for the No. 5 and No. 6 coals (respectively, 2.5 and 3) and their moderately high alkaline earth content (respectively, 0.69 and 0.74%) suggest that these coals possess the best overall properties for conversion. Stepwise regression has indicated that the most important coal characteristics affecting conversion are, in decreasing order of importance: % volatile matter, % vitrinite and % total sulfur. Conversion processes can be expected to produce higher yields with Ohio coals due to the presence of such mineral catalysts as pyrite and kaolinite. It is believed that the presence of these disposable catalysts increases the marketability of Ohio coals.

  5. Monitoring the fixed FGD sludge landfill, Conesville, Ohio. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hupe, D.W.

    1984-10-01

    The full-scale disposal by landfilling of FGD sludge which has been fixed according to the system developed by Conversion Systems, Inc. (CSI (formerly IU Conversion Systems, Inc.)) has been monitored over a period of roughly four years beginning in early 1979. The investigations have been conducted at the Conesville Power Station of Columbus and Southern Ohio Electric Company where the system was first applied on a full-scale basis starting January, 1977. Principal project objectives (Research Project 1406-2) were to evaluate if full-scale application of the CSI Poz-O-Tec System (1) reflects laboratory and pilot scale projections, (2) causes operating problems, and (3) provides an environmentally acceptable disposal alternative. This report is the final summary document (four total) prepared by Michael Baker, Jr., Inc., for this project. It contains specific data and observations for the last year's (Phase II, Third Interim) activities, summarizes all past water quality and sludge physical testing data, and presents an evaluation of the success of the system with respect to projected results and general environmental acceptability. The subject system for sludge management has generally been determined to be environmentally and operationally sound. Although the fixed sludge permeabilities are slightly higher than desirable, leachate as a result of landfill permeation, if any, has not been detected. The system provides sufficient additional measures other than reduction of sludge permeability to prevent the formation of leachate by permeation. Shear strength of the fixed FGD sludge is significantly improved as compared to that of unfixed sludge. As a result, the landfill area has many potential uses after closure.

  6. Assessment of water quality in streams draining coal-producing areas in Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pfaff, C.L.; Helsel, D.R.; Johnson, D.P.; Angelo, C.G.

    1981-01-01

    Water quality in the coal-producing areas of eastern Ohio was studied in a two-phase investigation between May 1975 and August 1976. Results of phase one, a reconnaissance of water quality at 150 sites, indicated that acid mine drainage generally occurred where abandoned drift or strip mines were located, whereas areas characterized by reclaimed or active strip mines showed few instances of acid drainage. Phase two was a detailed study of four small basins: One contained abandoned drift mines; the second, abandoned strip mines; the third, reclaimed strip mines; the last, active strip mines. Results of phase two were similar to those of phase one. (USGS)

  7. Correlation chart of Pennsylvanian rocks in Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky, Virginia, West Virginia, Ohio, Maryland, and Pennsylvania showing approximate position of coal beds, coal zones, and key stratigraphic units

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruppert, Leslie F.; Trippi, Michael H.; Slucher, Ernie R.

    2010-01-01

    This report contains a simplified provisional correlation chart that was compiled from both published and unpublished data in order to fill a need to visualize the currently accepted stratigraphic relations between Appalachian basin formations, coal beds and coal zones, and key stratigraphic units in the northern, central, and southern Appalachian basin coal regions of Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky, Virginia, West Virginia, Ohio, Maryland, and Pennsylvania. Appalachian basin coal beds and coal zones were deposited in a variety of geologic settings throughout the Lower, Middle, and Upper Pennsylvanian and Pennsylvanian formations were defined on the presence or absence of economic coal beds and coarse-grained sandstones that often are local or regionally discontinuous. The correlation chart illustrates how stratigraphic units (especially coal beds and coal zones) and their boundaries can differ between States and regions.

  8. From in situ coal to the final coal product: A case study of the Danville Coal Member (Indiana)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mastalerz, Maria; Padgett, P.L.

    1999-01-01

    A surface coal mine operation and preparation plant in southwestern Indiana was sampled to examine variations in coal quality and coal petrography parameters for the Danville Coal Member of the Dugger Formation (Pennsylvanian-Desmoinesian, Westphalian D). Representative samples from in situ coal, preparation plant feeds, and a final coal product were collected in order to compare coal quality, coal petrography, trace element concentrations, and ash chemistry of the coal to those of the product. Coal quality parameters of the in situ samples and various feeds, coarse refuse, and final product were variable. The quality of the final coal product was best predicted by the coal quality of the clean coal feed (from the middle portions of the seam). Some trace element contents, especially lead and arsenic, varied between the coal feeds and the product. Lead contents increased in the feeds and product compared to the channel sample of the raw coal, possibly due to contamination in the handling process.A surface coal mine operation and preparation plant in southwestern Indiana was sampled to examine variations in coal quality and coal petrography parameters for the Danville Coal Member of the Dugger Formation (Pennsylvanian-Desmoinesian, Westphalian D). Representative samples from in situ coal, preparation plant feeds, and a final coal product were collected in order to compare coal quality, coal petrography, trace element concentrations, and ash chemistry of the coal to those of the product. Coal quality parameters of the in situ samples and various feeds, coarse refuse, and final product were variable. The quality of the final coal product was best predicted by the coal quality of the clean coal feed (from the middle portions of the seam). Some trace element contents, especially lead and arsenic, varied between the coal feeds and the product. Lead contents increased in the feeds and product compared to the channel sample of the raw coal, possibly due to contamination in

  9. Catalytic coal liquefaction. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, S W

    1981-01-01

    Monolith catalysts of MoO/sub 3/-CoO-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ were prepared and tested for coal liquefaction in a stirred autoclave. In general, the monolith catalysts were not as good as particulate catalysts prepared on Corning alumina supports. Measurement of O/sub 2/ chemisorption and BET surface area has been made on a series of Co/Mo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalysts obtained from PETC. The catalysts were derived from Cyanamid 1442A and had been tested for coal liquefaction in batch autoclaves and continuous flow units. MoO/sub 3/-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalysts over the loading range 3.9 to 14.9 wt % MoO/sub 3/ have been studied with respect to BET surface (before and after reduction), O/sub 2/ chemisorption at -78/sup 0/C, redox behavior at 500/sup 0/C, and activity for cyclohexane dehydrogenation at 500/sup 0/C. In connection with the fate of tin catalysts during coal liquefaction, calculations have been made of the relative thermodynamic stability of SnCl/sub 2/, Sn, SnO/sub 2/, and SnS in the presence of H/sub 2/, HCl, H/sub 2/S and H/sub 2/O. Ferrous sulfate dispersed in methylnaphthalene has been shown to be reduced to ferrous sulfide under typical coal hydroliquefaction conditions (1 hour, 450/sup 0/C, 1000 psi initial p/sub H/sub 2//). This suggests that ferrous sulfide may be the common catalytic ingredient when either (a) ferrous sulfate impregnated on powdered coal, or (b) finely divided iron pyrite is used as the catalyst. Old research on impregnated ferrous sulfate, impregnated ferrous halides, and pyrite is consistent with this assumption. Eight Co/Mo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalysts from commercial suppliers, along with SnCl/sub 2/, have been studied for the hydrotreating of 1-methylnaphthalene (1-MN) in a stirred autoclave at 450 and 500/sup 0/C.

  10. Gate road development at Southern Ohio Coal Company-Meigs Division

    SciTech Connect

    Kidder, N.L.; Latham, J.W. III

    1996-12-31

    Southern Ohio Coal Company`s (SOCCo) Meigs Division, a part of American Electric Power`s Fuel Supply Division, is located in the southeastern Ohio counties of Meigs and Vinton, and consists of two large underground mines and a central coal preparation plant. The division began mining the 54-inch Clarion 4A seam in the early 1970`s, with three underground mines, which first used conventional mining, but changed to continuous mining after only a few years. Longwall mining began in 1978 at the Meigs No. 2 Mine. In 1989, Meigs No. 1 and Raccoon No. 3 Mines were interconnected underground, with the combined mine being named Meigs No. 31. A longwall was installed in Meigs No. 31 in September 1989. The Meigs Division operated three longwalls until 1993, but then reduced to two longwalls (one at each mine) and five continuous miner sections, which are used solely to develop main entries and gateroads for the longwalls. Longwall panel size has steadily increased through the years, growing from the initial 500 ft. wide by 5000 ft. long panels to the present panels which range from 900 to 1100 ft. wide by 10,000 to 13,000 ft. long.

  11. Statistical relationship between pyrite grain size distribution and pyritic sulfur reduction in Ohio coal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mazumdar, M.; Carlton, R.W.; Irdi, G.A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents a statistical relationship between the pyrite particle size distribution and the potential amount of pyritic sulfur reduction achieved by specific-gravity-based separation. This relationship is obtained from data on 26 Ohio coal samples crushed to 14 ?? 28 mesh. In this paper a prediction equation is developed that considers the complete statistical distribution of all the pyrite particle sizes in the coal sample. Assuming that pyrite particles occurring in coal have a lognormal distribution, the information about the particle size distribution can be encapsulated in terms of two parameters only, the mean and the standard deviation of the logarithms of the grain diameters. When the pyritic sulfur reductions of the 26 coal samples are related to these two parameters, a very satisfactory regression equation (R2 = 0.91) results. This equation shows that information on both these parameters is needed for an accurate prediction of potential sulfur reduction, and that the mean and the standard deviation interact negatively insofar as their influence on pyritic sulfur reduction is concerned. ?? 1988.

  12. Determining the Heat Exchange Capacity of Underground Coal Mines in Ohio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, J. J.; Lopez, D. A.; Leftwich, T. E.; Wolfe, M. E.; Angle, M. P.; Fugitt, F. L.

    2013-12-01

    Conventionally, Ground Source Heat Pumps (GSHP) exploit either saturated bedrock/soils or large surface water bodies as the heat source/sink for the heating and cooling systems. In areas with flooded mines or large subsurface water bodies, it is possible to utilize the water within the voids as the heat source/sink in GSHPs. Utilizing the water within subsurface voids a heat exchanger instead of the traditional saturated bedrock/soils has the potential to be more efficient in heating and cooling applications. The water within the void space is a better thermal conductor than bedrock and soils. Additionally, it is possible that, in a saturated void the heat can be carried away from the exchange site at a greater rate, improving the potential for thermal exchange. This study is focused on characterizing the potential overall heat exchange capacity for flooded mine sites within Ohio. To achieve the overall potential exchange capacity, possible maximum and minimum mine water residence times, effective mine volumes, groundwater recharge rates, maximum and minimum possible linear groundwater velocity, groundwater flow direction, and average ambient mine temperatures were calculated using GIS software and groundwater recharge data from the United States Geological Survey, and characteristics of physical parameters for the mines from the Ohio Geological Survey. The potential linear mine water velocities were calculated by creating a theoretical cross sectional area in the direction of estimated groundwater flow with a respective length of the mine in the direction of groundwater flow and width of the coal bed thickness. It was assumed that all of water entering the mine void exited the through the cross sectional area. By dividing the volume of water entering the mine per year by the cross sectional area, the linear groundwater velocities were estimated. By using the specific heat of water at the estimated temperatures and the volumes of water within the mines, possible

  13. 77 FR 15966 - Ohio: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-19

    ...EPA is granting Ohio final authorization of the changes to its hazardous waste program under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The agency published a proposed rule on September 14, 2011 at 76 FR 56708 and provided for public comment. The public comment period ended on October 14, 2011. We received no comments. No further opportunity for comment will be provided. EPA has......

  14. TOXIC SUBSTANCES FROM COAL COMBUSTION--A COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT, PHASE II: ELEMENT MODES OF OCCURRENCE FOR THE OHIO 5/6/7, WYODAK AND NORTH DAKOTA COAL SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Allan Kolker; Stanley J. Mroczkowski; Curtis A. Palmer; Kristen O. Dennen; Robert B. Finkelman; John H. Bullock Jr.

    2002-05-30

    This study reports on the second phase (Phase II) of USGS research activities in support of DOE contract DE-AC22-95PC95101 ''Toxic Substances From Coal Combustion--A Comprehensive Assessment'', funded under DOE Interagency Agreement DE-AI22-95PC95145. The purpose of the study was to provide a quantitative and semi-quantitative characterization of the modes of occurrence of trace elements in coal samples investigated under Phase II, including (1) Ohio 5/6/7, an Ohio bituminous coal sample blended from the No.5, No.6, and No.7 beds; (2) North Dakota, a lignite sample from the Falkirk Mine, Underwood, ND, and (3) Wyodak, a sub-bituminous coal sample from the Cordero Mine, Gillette, WY. Samples from these coal beds were selected for their range in rank and commercial applicability. Results of this research provide basic information on the distribution of elements in Phase II coal samples, information needed for development of a commercial predictive model for trace-element behavior during coal combustion.

  15. Assessment of water quality in streams draining coal-producing areas in Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pfaff, C.L.; Helsel, D.R.; Johnson, D.P.; Angelo, C.G.

    1981-01-01

    Quality of water in 150 sites in the coal-producing areas of eastern Ohio was studied in a two-phase investigation between May 1975 and August 1976. Results of phase one, a reconnaissance to determine the occurrence of certain inorganic and organic constituents and to relate their occurrence to coal mining, indicated that acid mine drainage generally occured where abandoned drift or abandoned strip mines were located. Streams affected by such mines contained concentrations of dissolved sulfate and iron greater than 250 milligrams per liter and 5,000 micrograms per liter, respectively, and exhibited pH values less than 4.5. Areas characterized by reclaimed or active strip mines showed few instances of acid drainage (pH values were generally greater than 7.0). Iron concentrations in these regions generally were less than 500 micrograms per liter, with dissolved-sulfate concentrations ranging from 22 to 7,000 milligrams per liter. Phase two was a detailed study of four small baisn sampled during the first phase and found to represent different types of mining. The objective was to determine whether water-quality degradation within the basins was due to coal mining. Flows from two basins, one containing abandoned drift mines and the other abandoned strip mines, became increasingly acidic (pH values less than 4.5) downstream, and had high iron and dissolved sulfate concentrations (above 5,000 micrograms per liter and 250 milligrams per liter, respectively). Sources of acidity were tributaries that drained directly from the mines. The other two basins, one containing reclaimed strip mines and the other active strip mines, exhibited no acidic drainage; streams in both basins had pH values greater than 7.0 and iron concentrations below 500 micrograms per liter. Presence of active surface mining seemed to have little effect on dissolved sulfate concentrtions, as only streams in the reclaimed basin had high concentrations(usually over 2,000 milligrams per liter).

  16. Landslide remediation on Ohio State Route 83 using clean coal combustion by-products

    SciTech Connect

    Payette, R.; Chen, X.Y.; Wolfe, W.; Beeghly, J.

    1995-12-31

    In the present work, a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-product was used to reconstruct the failed portion of a highway embankment. The construction process and the stability of the repaired embankment are examined. State Route 83 in Cumberland, Ohio has been damaged by a slow moving slide which has forced the Ohio Department of Transportation to repair the roadway several times. In the most recent repair FGD by-products obtained from American Electric Power`s Tidd PFBC plant were used to construct a wall through the failure plane to prevent further slippage. In order to evaluate the utility of using coal combustion by-products in this type of highway project the site was divided into three test sections. In the first repair section, natural soil removed form the slide area was recompacted and replaced according to standard ODOT construction practices. In the second section the natural soil was field mixed with the Tidd PFBC ash in approximately equal proportions. The third section was all Tidd ash. The three test sections were capped by a layer of compacted Tidd ash or crushed stone to provide a wearing surface to allow ODOT to open the roadway before applying a permanent asphalt surface. Measurement of slope movement as well as water levels and quality have begun at the site in order to evaluate long term project performance. The completion of this project should lead to increased acceptance of FGD materials in construction projects. Monetary savings will be realized in avoiding some of the disposal costs for the waste, as well as in the reduced reliance on alternative engineering materials.

  17. A statistical approach to evaluate the relation of coal mining, land reclamation, and surface-water quality in Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hren, Janet; Wilson, K.S.; Helsel, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    Base-flow data from 779 sites in Ohio 's coal region were analyzed statistically to relate land use to selected water-quality characteristics. Sites were classified into five categories: unmined (100 percent unmined land), abandoned (50 percent or more abandoned surface mines), reclaimed (50 percent or more reclaimed surface mines), deep-mined (50 percent or more underground mines), and mixed (all others). Specific conductance , pH, alkalinity, acidity, sulfate, dissolved iron, total iron, and total manganese in streams draining basins in the coal region were the eight characteristics selected for analysis. (USGS)

  18. Origin of epigenetic calcite in coal from Antarctica and Ohio based on isotope compositions of oxygen, carbon and strontium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Faure, G.; Botoman, G.

    1984-01-01

    Isotopic compositions of oxygen, carbon and strontium of calcite cleats in coal seams of southern Victoria Land, Antarctica, and Tuscarawas County, Ohio, contain a record of the conditions a the time of their formation. The Antarctic calcites (?? 18O(SMOW) = +9.14 to +11.82%0) were deposited from waters enriched in 16O whose isotopic composition was consistent with that of meteoric precipitation at low temperature and high latitude. The carbon of the calcite cleats (?? 13C(PDB) = -15.6 to -16.9%0) was derived in part from the coal (?? 13C(PDB) = -23.5 to -26.7%0) as carbon dioxide and by oxidation of methane or other hydrocarbon gases. The strontium ( 87Sr 86Sr = 0.71318-0.72392) originated primarily from altered feldspar grains in the sandstones of the Beacon Supergroup. Calcite cleats in the Kittaning No. 6 coal seam of Ohio (?? 18O(SMOW) = +26.04 to +27.79%0) were deposited from waters that had previously exchanged oxygen, possibly with marine carbonate at depth. The carbon (?? 13C(PDB) = 0.9 to +2.4%0) is enriched in 13C even though that cleats were deposited in coal that is highly enriched in 12C and apparently originated from marine carbonates. Strontium in the cleats ( Sr 87 0.71182-0.71260) is not of marine origin but contains varying amounts of radiogenic 87Sr presumably derived from detrital Rb-bearing minerals in the adjacent sedimentary rocks. The results of this study suggest that calcite cleats in coal of southern Victoria Land, Antarctica, were deposited after the start of glaciation in Cenozoic time and that those in Ohio precipitated from formation waters derived from the underlying marine carbonate rocks, probably in the recent geologic past. ?? 1984.

  19. Hydrothermally treated coals for pulverized coal injection. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, D.E.; Rao, P.D.; Ogunsola, O.; Lin, H.K.

    1995-10-01

    This project investigated the suitability of hydrothermally dried low-rank coals for pulverized fuel injection into blast furnaces in order to reduce coke consumption. Coal samples from the Beluga coalfield and the Usibelli Coal Mine, Alaska, were used for the study. Crushed coal samples were hydrothermally treated at three temperatures, 275, 300 and 325{degrees}C, for residence times of 10, 60 and 120 minutes. Products were characterized to determine their suitability for pulverized coal injection. Characterization included proximate and ultimate analyses, vitrinite reflectance and TGA reactivity. A literature survey was also conducted.

  20. Classification of stream basins in southeastern Ohio according to extent of surface coal mining

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Childress, C.J.

    1985-01-01

    Water-quality data were collected from streams grenadine 35 basins in the southeaster-Ohio coal region to evaluate and categorize the effect of surface coal mining on stream quality. The study area is underlain by rocks of Pennsylvanian age, the most important coal-producing formations of which are the Allegheny and Monogahela Formations. The study area contains 276 data-collection sites, each of which was sampled four times over a 3-year period. Water and bed-material samples were collected. Each site was classified as 'abandoned,' reclaimed,' unmined,' or mixed,' depending on the proportion of the drainage basin disturbed by mining, and if mined, on the present condition of the mine. Of the 130 sites in the Monogahela Formation, 18 percent were classified as abandoned, 2 percent as reclaimed, 10 percent as unmined, and 70 percent as mixed. Of the 146 sites in the Allegheny Formation, 14 percent were classified as abandoned, 11 percent as unmined, and 75 percent as mixed. Streams draining the carbonate-bearing Monogahela Formation have a significantly greater buffering capacity than streams draining the Allegheny Formation. THere are significant differences in specific conductance; pH; alkalinity; acidity; hardness; total and dissolve manganese, and aluminum; dissolved nickel, zinc, and sulfate; and dissolved solids among mining-disturbance types in the Allegheny Formation. However, in stream draining the Monogahela Formation, only hardness, sulfur, dissolved solids, and dissolved manganese are significantly different among mining-disturbance types. Discriminant-function analysis of water-quality data was used to classify each 'mixed' site into one of four categories: Abandoned, reclaimed, unmined, or uncertain. In addition, observations in each of the first three categories were classified as strongly, moderately, or weakly characteristic of that category. The discriminant function was based on specific conductance, pH, acidity, dissolved sulfate, dissolved

  1. Pelletization of fine coals. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sastry, K.V.S.

    1995-12-31

    Coal is one of the most abundant energy resources in the US with nearly 800 million tons of it being mined annually. Process and environmental demands for low-ash, low-sulfur coals and economic constraints for high productivity are leading the coal industry to use such modern mining methods as longwall mining and such newer coal processing techniques as froth flotation, oil agglomeration, chemical cleaning and synthetic fuel production. All these processes are faced with one common problem area--fine coals. Dealing effectively with these fine coals during handling, storage, transportation, and/or processing continues to be a challenge facing the industry. Agglomeration by the unit operation of pelletization consists of tumbling moist fines in drums or discs. Past experimental work and limited commercial practice have shown that pelletization can alleviate the problems associated with fine coals. However, it was recognized that there exists a serious need for delineating the fundamental principles of fine coal pelletization. Accordingly, a research program has been carried involving four specific topics: (i) experimental investigation of coal pelletization kinetics, (ii) understanding the surface principles of coal pelletization, (iii) modeling of coal pelletization processes, and (iv) simulation of fine coal pelletization circuits. This report summarizes the major findings and provides relevant details of the research effort.

  2. Coal Manpower Projections: 1980. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clague, Ewan

    The National Petroleum Council has projected a 1980 bituminous coal production of 910 million tons. On that basis, the study estimates the manpower which will be required to produce that volume of coal. On the assumption of a productivity increase of two percent per year from 1974 onwards, the 1980 coal output will require a work force of…

  3. Radionuclides in Western coal. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, D.T.; Styron, C.E.; Casella, V.R.

    1983-09-23

    The increase in domestic energy production coupled with the switch from oil and natural gas to coal as a boiler-fuel source have prompted various federal agencies to assess the potential environmental and health risks associated with coal-fired power plants. Because it has been suggested that Western coals contain more uranium than Eastern coals, particular concern has been expressed about radioactive emissions from the increasing number of power plants that burn low-sulfur Western coal. As a result, the radionuclides in coal program was established to analyze low-sulfur coal reserves in Western coal fields for radioactivity. Samples from seams of obvious commercial value were taken from 19 operating mines that represented 65% of Western coal production. Although the present study did not delve deeply into underlying causative factors, the following general conclusions were reached. Commercially exploited Western coals do not show any alarming pattern of radionuclide content and probably have lower radioactivity levels than Eastern coals. The materials that were present appeared to be in secular equilibrium in coal, and a detailed dose assessment failed to show a significant hazard associated with the combustion of Western coal. Flue gas desulfurization technology apparently has no significant impact on radionuclide availability, nor does it pose any significant radiologic health risks. This study has also shown that Western coals are not more radioactive than most soils and that most solid combustion products have emanation powers <1%, which greatly reduce dose estimates from this pathway. In summary, the current use of mined, Western coals in fossil-fueled power plants does not present any significant radiological hazard.

  4. Implementation of geographic-information-system technology for use in coal geology investigations at the Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geological Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Axon, A.G.; Crowell, D.L.

    1996-09-01

    Geographic information system technology is being used by the Ohio Division of Geological Survey to link project-specific databases to avoid unnecessary duplication of effort and equipment. Descriptive geologic data from measured sections, drill holes, and geochemical analyses are being computerized in cooperation with the U.S. Geological Survey National Coal Resource Data System. Line and area data, including coal croplines, surface mines, and underground mines, are being digitized into computer-aided mapping systems and transferred to the geographic information system. Computer-generated maps of coal thickness, elevation, and quality also are being integrated into the geographic information system. The Ohio Division of Geological Survey maintains a series of 1:24,000-scale mylar maps showing the outlines of abandoned underground mines. During 1995, these maps were digitized by Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Division of Real Estate and Land Management into a geographic information system. The construction of a database containing geologic and mine information which will be linked to these digitized out- lines is a priority of the Ohio Survey. The Ohio Division of Geological Survey`s Coal Availability cooperative program with the U.S. Geological Survey illustrates the utility of geographic information systems for performing complex analyses of the natural resources in specific areas. Regional databases (nine-quadrangle areas) were created to estimate the coal resources for eight 7.5-minute quadrangles. These databases will be the basis for additional regional coal resource estimations. Stratigraphic data computerized for Coal Availability investigations are also being used for the statewide bedrock geologic mapping program (STATEMAP).

  5. Investigation of coal structure. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Nishioka, Masaharu

    1994-03-01

    A better understanding of coal structure is the first step toward more effective utilization of the most abundant hydrocarbon resource. Detailed characterization of coal structure is very difficult, even with today`s highly developed analytical techniques. This is primarily due to the amorphous nature of these high-molecular-weight mixtures. Coal has a polymeric character and has been popularly represented as a three-dimensional cross-linked network. There is, however, little or no information which positively verifies this model. The principal objective of this research was to further investigate the physical structure of coal and to determine the extent to which coal molecules may be covalently cross-linked and/or physically associated. Two common characterization methods, swellability and extractability, were used. A technique modifying the conventional swelling procedure was established to better determine network or associated model conformation. A new method for evaluating coal swelling involving laser scattering has also been developed. The charge-transfer interaction is relatively strong in high-volatile bituminous coal. Soaking in the presence of electron donors and acceptors proved effective for solubilizing the coal, but temperatures in excess of 200 C were required. More than 70 wt% of the coal was readily extracted with pyridine after soaking. Associative/dissociative equilibria of coal molecules were observed during soaking. From these results, the associated model has gained credibility over the network model as the representative structure of coal. Significant portions of coal molecules are unquestionably physically associated, but the overall extent is not known at this time.

  6. A drowned lycopsid forest above the Mahoning coal (Conemaugh Group, Upper Pennsylvanian) in eastern Ohio, U.S.A

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DiMichele, W.A.; Eble, C.F.; Chaney, D.S.

    1996-01-01

    Over 800 mud-filled casts of upright lycopsid tree stumps have been documented immediately above the Mahoning coal in an active underground mine located in northwestern Jefferson County, Ohio. The coal body originated as a pod-shaped peat body of ??? 60 km2. Trees are rooted at several levels within a thin (15-40 cm) bone coal directly above the banded coal; they extend upward up to 15 cm into overlying, flat-bedded, carbonaceous mudstones that coarsen up. From a maximum basal diameter of 1.2 m, stumps taper upward to diameters no less than 0.3 m. Within single-entry transects, < 6 m wide that total 2585 m in length, stumps are randomly distributed. The trees are identified as lepidodendrids on the basis of gross morphology, external stem patterns, and attached stigmarian root systems, and provisionally as Lepidophloios or Lepidodendron by associated palynology of the enclosing matrix. Palynological analyses of incremental seam samples indicate an initial dominance of lycopsid spores with lepidodendracean affinities (Lycospora granulata from Lepidophloios hallii), replaced upwards by tree-fern spores, with a reoccurrence of lepidodendracean spores in the upper benches; spores of Sigillaria (Crassispora) are abundant only at the base of the coal. Petrographic analyses indicate a parallel trend from vitrinite-rich to inertinite- and liptinite-rich upward in the coal body. All data indicate that the peat represented by the Mahoning coal was drowned slowly. During the earliest stages of inundation, a lycopsid forest was re-established, only to be subsequently drowned.

  7. Fluidized bed coal desulfurization. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ravindram, M.

    1983-08-01

    Laboratory scale experiments were conducted on two high volatile bituminous coals in a bench scale batch fluidized bed reactor. Chemical pretreatment and posttreatment of coals were tried as a means of enhancing desulfurization. Sequential chlorination and dechlorination cum hydrodesulfurization under modest conditions relative to the water slurry process were found to result in substantial sulfur reductions of about 80%. Sulfur forms as well as proximate and ultimate analyses of the processed coals are included. These studies indicate that a fluidized bed reactor process has considerable potential for being developed into a simple and economic process for coal desulfurization.

  8. Utilization of low grade coal. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, C.E.

    1981-12-01

    Purpose was to construct and use a pilot furnace that could utilize low-grade coal (steam coal and coal fines) in place of oil or natural gas. This pilot furnace was tested on a 66-inch Raymond H.S. Roller Mill at the No. 1 plant of the James River Limestone Co. Results indicate that the commercial use is feasible; drying costs average $0.36 per ton with coal vs $0.80 per ton on annual basis when oil fired. Results are applicable to limestone manufacturers producing dry pulverized products. (DLC)

  9. Assessment of underground coal gasification in bituminous coals. Volume I. Executive summary. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-01

    This report describes the bituminous coal resources of the United States, identifies those resources which are potentially amenable to Underground Coal Gasification (UCG), identifies products and markets in the vicinity of selected target areas, identifies UCG concepts, describes the state of the art of UCG in bituminous coal, and presents three R and D programs for development of the technology to the point of commercial viability. Of the 670 billion tons of bituminous coal remaining in-place as identified by the National Coal Data System, 32.2 billion tons or 4.8% of the total are potentially amenable to UCG technology. The identified amenable resource was located in ten states: Alabama, Colorado, Illinois, Kentucky, New Mexico, Ohio, Oklahoma, Utah, Virginia, and West Virginia. The principal criteria which eliminated 87.3% of the resource was the minimum thickness (42 inches). Three R and D programs were developed using three different concepts at two different sites. Open Borehole, Hydraulic Fracture, and Electrolinking concepts were developed. The total program costs for each concept were not significantly different. The study concludes that much of the historical information based on UCG in bituminous coals is not usable due to the poor siting of the early field tests and a lack of adequate diagnostic equipment. This information gap requires that much of the early work be redone in view of the much improved understanding of the role of geology and hydrology in the process and the recent development of analytical tools and methods.

  10. ASSESSMENT OF COAL CLEANING TECHNOLOGY: FINAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of tests at seven coal preparation plants to evaluate the performance of froth flotation cells and dense-medium cyclones in removing ash and sulfur (S) from fine coal (Minus 28 mesh). Flotation circuits tested at four plants showed substantial reductions ...

  11. Biological upgrading of coal liquids. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    A large number of bacterial enrichments have been developed for their ability to utilize nitrogen and sulfur in coal liquids and the model compound naphtha. These bacteria include the original aerobic bacteria isolated from natural sources which utilize heteroatom compounds in the presence of rich media, aerobic nitrogen-utilizing bacteria and denitrifying bacteria. The most promising isolates include Mix M, a mixture of aerobic bacteria; ER15, a pyridine-utilizing isolate; ERI6, an aniline-utilizing isolate and a sewage sludge isolate. Culture optimization experiments have led to these bacteria being able to remove up to 40 percent of the sulfur and nitrogen in naphtha and coal liquids in batch culture. Continuous culture experiments showed that the coal liquid is too toxic to the bacteria to be fed without dilution or extraction. Thus either semi-batch operation must be employed with continuous gas sparging into a batch of liquid, or acid extracted coal liquid must be employed in continuous reactor studies with continuous liquid flow. Isolate EN-1, a chemical waste isolate, removed 27 percent of the sulfur and 19 percent of the nitrogen in fed batch experiments. Isolate ERI5 removed 28 percent of the nitrogen in coal liquid in 10 days in fed batch culture. The sewage sludge isolate removed 22.5 percent of the sulfur and 6.5 percent of the nitrogen from extracted coal liquid in continuous culture, and Mix M removed 17.5 percent of the nitrogen from medium containing extracted coal liquid. An economic evaluation has been prepared for the removal of nitrogen heteroatom compounds from Wilsonville coal liquid using acid extraction followed by fermentation. Similar technology can be developed for sulfur removal. The evaluation indicates that the nitrogen heteroatom compounds can be removed for $0.09/lb of coal liquid treated.

  12. Coal combustion aerothermochemistry research. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Witte, A.B.; Gat, N.; Denison, M.R.; Cohen, L.M.

    1980-12-15

    On the basis of extensive aerothermochemistry analyses, laboratory investigations, and combustor tests, significant headway has been made toward improving the understanding of combustion phenomena and scaling of high swirl pulverized coal combustors. A special attempt has been made to address the gap between scientific data available on combustion and hardware design and scaling needs. Both experimental and theoretical investigations were conducted to improve the predictive capability of combustor scaling laws. The scaling laws derived apply to volume and wall burning of pulverized coal in a slagging high-swirl combustor. They incorporate the findings of this investigation as follows: laser pyrolysis of coal at 10/sup 6/ K/sec and 2500K; effect of coal particle shape on aerodynamic drag and combustion; effect of swirl on heat transfer; coal burnout and slag capture for 20 MW/sub T/ combustor tests for fine and coarse coals; burning particle trajectories and slag capture; particle size and aerodynamic size; volatilization extent and burnout fraction; and preheat level. As a result of this work, the following has been gained: an increased understanding of basic burning mechanisms in high-swirl combustors and an improved model for predicting combustor performance which is intended to impact hardware design and scaling in the near term.

  13. Dewatering fine coal slurries by gel extraction. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gehrke, S.H.; Lyu, Lii-Hurng

    1990-12-31

    A new technology called gel extraction has been evaluated to determine its economic viability in dewatering the fine and ultrafine coal slurries generated upon separation of sulfur and ash from clean coal during the physical coal cleaning process. Water must be removed from such slurries prior to transportation and combustion but the dewatering costs are substantial, especially for the fine particles below 28 mesh (0.6 mm). Gel extraction is a potential breakthrough in slurry dewatering technology. The goal of this project was to acquire the qualitative and quantitative data needed to estimate the potential of gel extraction for dewatering coal slurries. The specific objectives were to determine the maximum extents of dewatering (minimum surface moisture in the coal product), the clarity of the water removed (minimum solids content), the speed of the dewatering cycles, the service lifetime of the gels, and the factors which influence all of these. With the results obtained, an economic analysis of Ohio coal cleaning plant dewatering technologies was carried out. The polymer gel at the heart of this project, poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPA), can swell several times its shrunken weight at 32{degrees}C by absorbing water at 25{degrees}C. In gel extraction, a shrunken NIPA gel is contacted with a slurry at ambient temperature or cooler; the gel swells by absorbing water from the slurry. The gel is then removed from the dewatered slurry and warmed above its critical temperature of 33{degrees}C, which returns it to the shrunken state by releasing the absorbed water. The facts that the gel is reusable and the process is simple and driven by low-grade energy (warm temperatures), and not inherently limited by particle size, made the process an attractive possible alternative to centrifugation, screening, filtration, etc. for slurry dewatering.

  14. THE OHIO RIVER VALLEY CO2 STORAGE PROJECT - PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT OF DEEP SALINE RESERVOIRS AND COAL SEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Michael J. Mudd; Howard Johnson; Charles Christopher; T.S. Ramakrishnan, Ph.D.

    2003-08-01

    This report describes the geologic setting for the Deep Saline Reservoirs and Coal Seams in the Ohio River Valley CO{sub 2} Storage Project area. The object of the current project is to site and design a CO{sub 2} injection facility. A location near New Haven, WV, has been selected for the project. To assess geologic storage reservoirs at the site, regional and site-specific geology were reviewed. Geologic reports, deep well logs, hydraulic tests, and geologic maps were reviewed for the area. Only one well within 25 miles of the site penetrates the deeper sedimentary rocks, so there is a large amount of uncertainty regarding the deep geology at the site. New Haven is located along the Ohio River on the border of West Virginia and Ohio. Topography in the area is flat in the river valley but rugged away from the Ohio River floodplain. The Ohio River Valley incises 50-100 ft into bedrock in the area. The area of interest lies within the Appalachian Plateau, on the western edge of the Appalachian Mountain chain. Within the Appalachian Basin, sedimentary rocks are 3,000 to 20,000 ft deep and slope toward the southeast. The rock formations consist of alternating layers of shale, limestone, dolomite, and sandstone overlying dense metamorphic continental shield rocks. The Rome Trough is the major structural feature in the area, and there may be some faults associated with the trough in the Ohio-West Virginia Hinge Zone. The area has a low earthquake hazard with few historical earthquakes. Target injection reservoirs include the basal sandstone/Lower Maryville and the Rose Run Sandstone. The basal sandstone is an informal name for sandstones that overlie metamorphic shield rock. Regional geology indicates that the unit is at a depth of approximately 9,100 ft below the surface at the project site and associated with the Maryville Formation. Overall thickness appears to be 50-100 ft. The Rose Run Sandstone is another potential reservoir. The unit is located approximately 1

  15. Coal surface structure and thermodynamics. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, J.W.; Wernett, P.C.; Glass, A.S.; Quay, D.; Roberts, J.

    1994-05-01

    Coals surfaces were studied using static surface adsorption measurements, low angle x-ray scattering (LAXS), inverse gas chromatography (IGC) and a new {sup 13}C NMR relaxation technique. A comparison of surface areas determined by hydrocarbon gas adsorption and LAXS led to the twin conclusions that the hydrocarbons had to diffuse through the solid to reach isolated pores and that the coal pores do not form interconnected networks, but are largely isolated. This conclusion was confirmed when IGC data for small hydrocarbons showed no discontinuities in their size dependence as usually observed with porous solids. IGC is capable of providing adsorption thermodynamics of gases on coal surfaces. The interactions of non-polar molecules and coal surfaces are directly proportioned to the gas molecular polarizability. For bases, the adsorption enthalpy is equal to the polarizability interaction plus the heat of hydrogen bond formation with phenol. Amphoteric molecules have more complex interactions. Mineral matter can have highly specific effects on surface interactions, but with most of the molecules studied is not an important factor.

  16. Geochemical and geophysical analysis of shallow aquifer materials in Pennsylvanian coal-bearing strata in east-central Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Haefner, R.J.; Rowe, G.L. Jr. . Water Resources Div.)

    1992-01-01

    Three cores holes were drilled through sandstone, shale, and coal deposits of the Pennsylvanian-age Allegheny Group to provide samples for geochemical and geophysical evaluation of shallow aquifer materials in east-central Ohio. The samples were analyzed for forms of sulfur and carbon, and for more than 40 major and trace elements by inductively coupled plasma scans. Temperature, electrical, caliper, and gamma-ray logs were run in the boreholes to improve definition of the stratigraphy and geohydrologic properties of the shallow aquifers. The stratigraphy in this region is dominated by thick sandstone and shale sequences with minor amounts of limestone and the Middle and Lower Kittanning coal/underclay sequences. Depth profiles of major and trace-element chemistry reveal many trace elements are enriched in the underclay with respect to the overlying sandstone/shale sequences. Pyritic-sulfur contents in the underclay is highly variable and in the shale sequences are less than 1 weight percent. Evaluation of the volume-weighted net-neutralization potential of the entire sampling interval indicates an average deficit of approximately 30 tons of CaCO[sub 3] per 1,000 tons of rock in the resultant spoils after mining of the coal. Aquifer properties were inferred from the interpretation of the geophysical logs. Temperature logs reveal that the coals are the major water-bearing units. Minor fractures were seen in the core; these fractures may control vertical ground-water flow within the sampled interval. Gamma logs proved to be the most effective geophysical tool for correlating stratigraphy between the three holes.

  17. Specifications for medical examinations of coal miners. Interim final rule.

    PubMed

    2014-08-01

    With this action, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), in accordance with a final rule recently published by the Department of Labor's Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA), is amending its regulations to establish standards for the approval of facilities that conduct spirometry examinations and to require that all coal mine operators submit a plan for the provision of spirometry and X-ray examinations to all surface and underground coal miners. PMID:25122943

  18. Rheology of coal slurries. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ulbrecht, J.J.; Ryan, M.E.

    1982-01-01

    Experimental investigations of suspensions of three size distributions of glass spheres in a solution of tetralin and tetrabromoethane were made using a Haake viscometer. The values of viscosity were determined over a range of shear rates from 1 to 1000 sec/sup -1/. The suspending medium is Newtonian with a viscosity of about 9.66 centipoise at 25 +- 1/sup 0/C. At phi less than or equal to 20%, the suspension exhibited Newtonian behavior but at phi greater than or equal to 30%, the suspension exhibited pronounced non-Newtonian behavior. Experimental studies of these three size distributions were also conducted in aqueous solutions of polyvinylpyrrolidone using a pipe loop apparatus. Viscosity was measured over the shear rate range from 600 to 6000 sec./sup -1/. These suspensions having non-Newtonian suspending media, exhibit non-Newtonian behavior at all concentration levels of the solid particles. In the limit of very high shear rates, the suspension viscosity was found to be independent of tube diameter over the range of shear rates and concentrations studied. The rheological behavior of slurries of irregularly-shaped anthracite coal particles was also systematically investigated. The suspending medium consisted of a mixture of anthracene oil and tetrabromoethane. The shear rate was varied from 0.01 to 1000 sec./sup -1/. Volume concentrations range from 0 to 34%. At volume concentrations greater than 29% the slurries exhibited a yield stress and pronounced thixotropic behavior. The relative viscosities of both the model and the coal slurries were found to be dependent on both the shear rate and the particle size. In the case of the coal slurries caution must be exercised with regard to the proper interpretation of the rheological data due to the influences of the measured apparent density of the coal particles, viscometric flow geometry, and time dependent effects.

  19. Streamflow, water-quality, and biological data on streams in an area of longwall coal mining, southern Ohio, water years 1987-89

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coen, A. W., III

    1992-01-01

    This report presents data on the first 3 years of a 5-year study of the effects of longwall coal mining on six streams near a mining complex in Meigs, Gallia, and Vinton Counties, Ohio. Longwall coal mining is method of underground mining in which 75 to 90 percent of the coal is removed; conventional methods, such as room-and-pillar mining, remove only about 50 percent of the coal. Use of the longwall method is expected to increase in Ohio. Collapse or subsidence of the overburden and land surface occurs immediately after the removal of the coal. Such collapse can disrupt surface drainage and the recharge of ground water. The data include streamflow, water quality, and the abundance and diversity of aquatic macroinvertebrates and fish. The data were collected from eight sites on six streams from July 1987 through September 1989. The drainage areas of these sites range from 2.04 to 80.8 square miles and include the major drainages of the area being mined. Total precipitation in 1987 and 1988 in the study area was 78 and 81 percent, respectively, of the annual average (from 1939 to 1989) of 39.59 inches. The total precipitation in 1989 was 135 percent of the annual average. Streams at six of the eight sites were dry for parts of the first 2 years. Specific conductance ranged from 180 to 3,500 microsiemens per centimeter at 25 degrees Celsius, pH ranged from 6.9 to 8.0, and the concentration of total recoverable iron ranged from 80 to 1,800 micrograms per liter. Macroinvertebrate and fish populations indicate a warmwater-habitat rating of fair to good according to Ohio Environmental Protection Agency standards. This information will help provide a data base from which the effects of longwall mining on streams in southern Ohio can be evaluated. Correlations of surface-water quality and quantity with longwall mining were not attempted in this study.

  20. Ohio Clean Fuels, Inc. , prototype commercial coal/oil co-processing plant project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-11-01

    This report discusses the economics of coal as a source of domestic petroleum products and clean power production. The following topics are discussed: Economic incentives for the use of coal; applications of coal/oil coprocessing including (a) integration with a refinery; (b) cost reduction technique for alternate new supplies of oil; (c) power production meeting acid rain controls and comparative economics of copro powered facilities vs conventional power plant technology; costs of non-conventional supplies of crude and costs of coprocessing compared with offshore conventional oil. 10 refs., 1 fig., 20 tabs.

  1. Ohio's NEW Team: Nontraditional Employment for Women. A Cooperative Effort for Positive Change. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Vocational and Adult Education.

    The Ohio NEW (Nontraditional Employment for Women) Team is a collaborative team of public and private agencies that was formed in 1993 to promote nontraditional careers for women in Ohio by offering information on nontraditional career choices to all female customers served in Job Training Partnership Act (JTPA) programs with other partner…

  2. Landslide remediation on Ohio State Route 83 using clean coal combustion by-products

    SciTech Connect

    Payette, R.; Chen, Xi You; Wolfe, W.; Beeghly, J.

    1995-12-31

    The disposal of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products has become a major concern as issues of emission cleansing and landfill costs continue to rise. Laboratory tests conducted at the Ohio State University have shown that dry FGD by-products possess certain engineering properties that have proven desirable in a number of construction uses. As a follow on to the laboratory program, a field investigation into engineering uses of dry FGD wastes was initiated. In the present work, an FGD by-product was used to reconstruct the failed portion of a highway embankment. The construction process and the stability of the repaired embankment are examined.

  3. Surface-water quality of coal-mine lands in Raccoon Creek Basin, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, K.S.

    1985-01-01

    The Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Division of Reclamation, plans to reclaim abandoned surface mines in the Raccoon Creek watershed in southern Ohio. Historic water-quality data collected between 1975 and 1983 were complied and analyzed in terms of eight selected mine-drainage characteristics to develop a data base for individual subbasin reclamation projects. Areas of mine drainage affecting Raccoon Creek basin, the study Sandy Run basin, the Hewett Fork basin, and the Little raccoon Creek basin. Surface-water-quality samples were collected from a 41-site network from November 1 through November 3, 1983, Results of the sampling reaffirmed that the major sources of mine drainage to Raccoon Creek are in the Little Raccoon Creek basin, and the Hewett Fork basin. However, water quality at the mouth of Sandy Run indicated that it is not a source of mine drainage to Raccoon Creek. Buffer Run, Goose Run, an unnamed tributary to Little Raccoon Creek, Mulga Run, and Sugar Run were the main sources of mine drainage sampled in the Little Raccoon Creek basin. All sites sampled in the East Branch Raccoon Creek basin were affected by mine drainage. This information was used to prepare a work plan for additional data collection before, during, and after reclamation. The data will be used to define the effectiveness of reclamation effects in the basin.

  4. Reclamation Strategies and Geomorphic Outcomes in Coal Surface Mines of Eastern Ohio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, M.; Jaeger, K. L.

    2014-12-01

    Coal surface mining is a significant landscape disturbance in the United States. Since 1977, the reclamation of mined lands has been regulated by the Surface Mine Control and Reclamation Act (SMCRA). Prior to the act, many coalfields were left un-reclaimed or partially reclaimed, with highly irregular topology and drainage networks. Under the act, the reverse is often true; adherence to SMCRA often leads to the homogenization of surfaces and channel networks. While both pre and post-SMCRA landscapes are highly altered, they exhibit strongly dissimilar characteristics. We examine pre-SMCRA, post-SMCRA and unmined watersheds at 3 spatial scales in order to compare the geomorphic differences between reclamation strategies. In particular, we attempt to separate anthropogenic factors from pre-existing, natural factors via comparisons to unmined watersheds. Our study design incorporates a 3 scale top-down analysis of 21 independent watersheds (7 of each treatment type). Each watershed has an area of approximately 1km2. All watersheds share similar geography, climate and geology. At the landscape scale, characteristics are derived from 0.762m (2.5ft) resolution Digital Elevation Models (DEMs). At the channel network scale, DEMs, as well as remote sensing data (including the National Wetlands Inventory database) are used. Finally, the reach scale incorporates longitudinal and cross-section surveys (using a total station) as well as a particle size distribution. At each scale, attributes are parameterized for statistical comparison. Post-SMCRA sites are characterized by a general reduction of watershed surface slopes (11.9% median) compared to pre-SMCRA (19.3%) and unmined (19.8%) sites. Both pre and post-SMCRA channel networks are characterized by significant surface impoundments (in the form of remnant headwall trenches on pre-SMCRA sites and engineered retention basins on post-SMCRA sites). Pre-SMCRA outlet reaches have significantly steeper bed slopes (2.79% mean) than

  5. Geophysical investigations of the Western Ohio-Indiana region: Final report, October 1981-September 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, D.H.; Pollack, H.N.; Lay, T.; Schwartz, S.Y.

    1987-03-01

    Earthquake activity in the Western Ohio-Indiana region has been monitored with a precision seismograph network consisting of nine stations located in west-central Ohio and four stations located in Indiana. Five local and near-regional earthquakes have been recorded and located during the 1985-86 fiscal report period, ranging in magnitude from 0.5 to 5.0m/sub b/. The two largest of these events (January 31, 1986, near Cleveland, Ohio, magnitude = 5.0m/sub b/, and July 12, 1986, near St. Marys, Ohio, magnitude = 4.5m/sub b/) were felt with minor damage reported in each case. Focal mechanisms and isoseismal maps for these events are included in this report. These events are the largest to have occurred in Ohio since the events of March 2 and March 9, 1937 (magnitude = 4.5 and 4.9, respectively). The remaining three earthquakes of this report period all occurred in Ohio, north of the array. A total of 42 local and near-regional events, eleven of which have been felt, have now been recorded by the Ohio-Indiana array since its initiation in 1976. Teleseismic P-wave arrival and residual tables have been updated to include newly acquired data. The results are similar to those in previous years. The local velocity structure has been investigated using data acquired during a refraction experiment in the summer of 1984 and travel time data of local and near regional earthquakes.

  6. Population differentiation in Andropogon virginicus L. between abandoned coal strip mine spoil and old field habitats in Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Nellessen, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    Populations of Andropogon virginicus L. from abandoned coal mine spoils and old fields in southeastern Ohio were studied to determine whether ecotypic differentiation had occurred. Three mine spoil and three old field populations were paired for reciprocal transplant studies. A uniform garden was also established. Mine spoil and old field populations were compared for differences in demographic patterns, vegetative growth and phenology, reproductive output, and physiology. There were a greater number of seedlings and smaller individuals in the mine spoils, but seed production was similar between habitats. Seeds disperse farther in mine spoils and there was no or very little seedling establishment in 8 to 35 year old fields. Plants attained greater height in mine spoils. Population differentiation between one of the mine sites and one of the old fields was evident for seed weight, numbers of seeds per plant, and plant biomass. The three old field populations also differed from each other in reproductive characteristics. Mine spoil plants contained significantly more nitrogen within seeds despite the fact that mine soils had only half the available nitrogen as old field soils. Old field plants had a higher magnesium content in leaves. Chlorophyll content of leaves was higher for plants in old fields than for plants in mines. Undisturbed plants from both habitats had significantly higher photosynthetic rates than transplants. Old field plants had significantly greater photosynthetic rates than mine plants when grown in the uniform garden even though transpiration rates were similar. Differentiation between some coal mine spoil and old field populations of A. virginicus was evident for height growth, seed weight, photosynthesis, seed nitrogen content, magnesium content, and seed germination. Local population differentiation in plant height, seed weight, and in the timing of plant maturation was also observed.

  7. Modeling carbon and nitrogen dynamics in disturbed ecosystems: A case study of coal surface-mined lands in eastern Ohio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Tristram Lyf O'brien

    The quantification of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling in ecosystems is important for (a) understanding changes in ecosystem structure and function with changes in land use, (b) determining sustainability of ecosystems, and (c) balancing the global C budget as it relates to global climate change. Estimating future dynamics of C and N is complicated by the projected changes in climate including increased atmospheric CO2 and temperature. Regional climate change can differ significantly from average global change and should be accounted for if accurate changes in C and N budgets are to be obtained. In the State of Ohio, increased precipitation and existing tropospheric aerosols need to be considered in addition to expected increases in CO2 and temperature. A meso-scale study was conducted to determine regional effects of climate change on C and N cycling within disturbed ecosystems. Objectives of the research were to quantify (a) sediment yield, (b) current C storage in vegetation and soils, and (c) C efflux from soils from both abandoned and rehabilitated coal surface-mined lands in Ohio. A process-based, dynamic model was developed to simulate sediment yield, grassland production, and C and N cycling on mined lands. Verification of plant production and soil erosion submodels with data sets from surface-mined lands in the mid-western U.S. showed r2 values of 99.5% and 97%, respectively. A spatial model was developed with land cover and topographic data in a geographic information system to supply the dynamic model with land area, percent slope, and slope aspect values for the study region. From the land cover theme and other documented sources, the estimated extent of surface-mined lands was 102 km2 of abandoned, unvegetated, surface-mined land and 565 km2 of rehabilitated surface-mined land. Simulations from the dynamic model estimated that unvegetated surface-mined lands in Ohio produce approximately 441,325 t yr-1 of sediment and between 2,000 and 20,000 t yr

  8. Health hazard evaluation determination report No. MHETA-81-108-9006, Consolidation Coal Company, central machine shop 20, Cadiz, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Cornwell, R.J.; Hodgson, M.

    1984-01-01

    Employee exposure to welding fumes and solvents at the Consolidation Coal Company Central Machine Shop 20 (SIC-1211), Cadiz, Ohio, was investigated. The Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) requested the study following worker reports of alleged excessive morbidity and mortality. The study was performed on February 22 to 24, 1982. About 75 individuals were employed at the shop. Personal and area air samples were collected. Airborne concentrations of manganese (7439965), iron (7439896), fluorides, ozone (10028156), nitrogen-dioxide (10102440), and carbon-monoxide, (630080) were below applicable NIOSH recommended limits. Twenty percent of the samples for chromium (VI) (18540299) exceeded or equaled the NIOSH standard of 0.001 milligrams per cubic meter (mg/m3), having values of 0.002 and 0.001mg/m3. Three of eight nickel (7440020) samples obtained for welders in the blacksmith shop showed time weighted averages of airborne nickel in excess of the NIOSH standard of 0.015mg/m3. The authors conclude that welders in the blacksmith shop are exposed to chromium (VI) and nickel, both of which are carcinogenic. Recommendations include improved ventilation systems, use of metal fume respirators and tinted spectacles, and worker education.

  9. Field and laboratory assessment of a coal processing effluent in the Leading Creek Watershed, Meigs County, Ohio.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, A J; Cherry, D S; Currie, R J

    2003-04-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has not recommended water quality criteria (WQC) to protect aquatic life from elevated sodium and sulfate concentrations, such as those associated with the coal-processing effluent of Meigs County Mine #31. This discharge, received by a tributary of the Leading Creek Watershed (SE Ohio), had a mean specific conductivity (SC) of 8,109 (7,750-8,750) microS/cm and total metal concentrations below acute WQC. The mean 48-h LC(50) for Ceriodaphnia dubia in the effluent was 6,713 +/- 99 microS/cm; mean 48-h survival was 44% for study sites downstream of the effluent. The best indicators of impairment used in this study were Ceriodaphnia fecundity, in situ Corbicula fluminea growth, EPT minus Hydropsychidae (richness and relative abundance), and relative Ephemeroptera abundance. Mayflies, reduced by more than 99% below the effluent, were absent from all but the furthest downstream study site. SC was strongly correlated with Corbicula growth (r = -0.9755, p = 0.0009) and EPT minus Hydropsychidae richness (r = -0.8756, p < 0.0001), suggesting the effluent was primarily responsible for biotic impairment. Our results indicated that SC levels, a measure of dissolved solids, in the Leading Creek Watershed that exceeded approximately 3,700 microS/cm impaired sensitive aquatic fauna. PMID:12712291

  10. Shell Coal Gasification Project. Final report on eighteen diverse feeds

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.N.; Kiszka, M.B.; Mahagaokar, U.; Krewinghaus, A.B.

    1993-07-01

    This report summarizes the overall performance of the Shell Coal Gasification Process at SCGP-1 in Deer Park, Texas. It covers the four year demonstration and experimental program jointly conducted by Shell oil and Shell Internationale Research Maatschappij, with support from the Electric Power Research Institute. The report describes coal properties and gasification results on eighteen feeds which include seventeen diverse coals from domestic and international markets, and petroleum coke. Comparisons between design premises and actual performance on two key feeds, Illinois No. 5 coal and Texas lignite demonstrate that the plant met and exceeded design targets on all key process parameters. Equipment performance results are discussed for all areas of the plant based on periodic interim inspections, and the final inspection conducted in April 1991 after the end of operations. The report describes process control tests conducted in gasifier lead and turbine lead configurations, demonstrating the ability of the process to meet utility requirements for load following. Environmental result on the process for a wide variety of feedstocks are documented. These results underscore the inherent strength of the SCGP technology in meeting and exceeding all environmental standards for air, water and solids. The excellent applicability of the Shell Coal Gasification Process in integrated combined cycle power generation systems is described in view of the high efficiency derived from this process.

  11. The use of ethanol to remove sulfur from coal. Final report, September 1991--December 1992; Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, R.L.; Lazarov, L.K.; Prudich, M.E.; Lange, C.A.; Kumar, N.

    1994-03-10

    The initial technical goal in the project was to develop a chemical method for the cost effective removal of both inorganic and organic sulfur from Ohio coals. Verifying and using a process of reacting ethanol vapors with coal under conditions disclosed in U.S. Patent 4,888,029, the immediate technical objectives were to convert a small scale laborative batch process to a larger scale continuous process which can serve as the basis for commercial development of the technology. This involved getting as much information as possible from small scale batch autoclave or fluid bed laboratory reactors for use in pilot plant studies. The laboratory data included material balances on the coal and sulfur, temperature and pressure ranges for the reaction, minimum reaction times at different conditions, the effectiveness of different activators such as oxygen and nitric oxide, the amount and nature of by-products such as sulfur dioxide, hydrogen sulfide and acetaldehyde, the effect of coal particle size on the speed and completeness of the reaction, and the effectiveness of the reaction on different Ohio coals. Because the laboratory experiments using the method disclosed in U.S. 4,888,029 were not successful, the objective for the project was changed to develop a new laboratory process to use ethanol to remove sulfur from coal. Using copper as a catalyst and as an H{sub 2}S scavenger, a new laboratory procedure to use ethanol to remove sulfur from coal has been developed at Ohio University and a patent application covering this process was filed in March, 1993. The process is based on the use of copper as a catalyst for the dehydrogenation of ethanol to produce nascent hydrogen to remove sulfur from the coal and the use of copper as a scavenger to capture the hydrogen sulfide formed from the sulfur removed from coal.

  12. Geophysical investigations of the western Ohio-Indiana region. Technical report (final) Nov 75-Sep 81

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, P.L.; Christensen, D.H.; Mauk, F.H.

    1982-01-01

    The geophysical investigations of the Western Ohio and Indiana regions include the maintenance of a precision seismograph network to monitor earthquake activity. Data generated by this network, supplemented with other information, are used to analyze regional seismicity and to interpret the local geologic and seismotectonic structure. Four array stations in Indiana were added to the nine stations near Anna, Ohio, and the Ohio stations were upgraded by replacing seismometers and installing more stable electronic systems. A new digital computer with analog-to-digital convertors was obtained for direct digital recording and other digital analysis. Ten small earthquakes in the Anna region were recorded, six in a very tight cluster near the village of Anna. Only one of the earthquakes was felt. P-wave studies show an azimuthally dependent difference in residuals between stations within the Western Ohio array--a difference which can only be caused by significant variation in local structure. Aftershocks were recorded, public responses obtained and classified, and intensity contours drawn for the 5.1 magnitude earthquake on July 27, 1980, in Sharpsburg, Kentucky.

  13. The Implementation of CETA in Ohio. R&D Monograph 44. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ripley, Randall B.

    This last of a series of reports on the implementation of the Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA) in Ohio, from the inception of the program in 1974 through mid-1976, compares 16 of the 17 prime sponsors in the State. The monograph describes and explains patterns of influence over decisionmaking about CETA at the local level, a…

  14. Ohio's First Ethanol-Fueled Light-Duty Fleet: Final Study Results

    SciTech Connect

    Whalen, P.; Poole, L.; Howard, R.

    1998-12-31

    In 1996, the State of Ohio established a project to demonstrate the use of an ethanol blend transportation fuel in flexible-fuel vehicles. This report presents the data collection and analysis from this project, with particular focus on vehicle performance, cost of operation and limited emissions testing.

  15. DOE-GO-14154-1 OHIO FINAL report Velocys 30Sept08

    SciTech Connect

    Terry J. Mazanec

    2008-09-30

    The overall goal of the OHIO project was to develop a commercially viable high intensity process to produce ethylene by controlled catalytic reaction of ethane with oxygen in a microchannel reactor. Microchannel technology provides a breakthrough solution to the challenges identified in earlier development work on catalytic ethane oxidation. Heat and mass transfer limitations at the catalyst surface create destructively high temperatures that are responsible for increased production of waste products (CO, CO2, and CH4). The OHIO project focused on microscale energy and mass transfer management, designed to alleviate these transport limitations, thereby improving catalyst selectivity and saving energy-rich feedstock. The OHIO project evaluated ethane oxidation in small scale microchannel laboratory reactors including catalyst test units, and full commercial length single- and multi-channel reactors. Small scale catalyst and single channel results met target values for ethylene yields, demonstrating that the microchannel concept improves mass and heat transport compared to conventional reactors and results in improved ethylene yield. Earlier economic sensitivity studies of ethane oxidation processes suggested that only modest improvements were necessary to provide a system that provides significant feedstock, energy, and capital benefits compared to conventional steam ethane cracking. The key benefit derived from the OHIO process is energy savings. Ethylene production consumes more energy than any other U.S. chemical process.1 The OHIO process offers improved feedstock utilization and substantial energy savings due to a novel reaction pathway and the unique abilities of microchannel process technology to control the reaction temperature and other critical process parameters. Based on projected economic benefits of the process, the potential energy savings could reach 150 trillion Btu/yr by the year 2020, which is the equivalent of over 25 million barrels of oil.

  16. Assessment of underground coal gasification in bituminous coals: potential UCG products and markets. Final report, Phase I

    SciTech Connect

    1982-01-31

    The following conclusions were drawn from the study: (1) The US will continue to require new sources of energy fuels and substitutes for petrochemical feedstocks into the foreseeable future. Most of this requirement will be met using coal. However, the cost of mining, transporting, cleaning, and preparing coal, disposing of ash or slag and scrubbing stack gases continues to rise; particularly, in the Eastern US where the need is greatest. UCG avoids these pitfalls and, as such, should be considered a viable alternative to the mining of deeper coals. (2) Of the two possible product gases LBG and MBG, MBG is the most versatile. (3) The most logical use for UCG product in the Eastern US is to generate power on-site using a combined-cycle or co-generation system. Either low or medium Btu gas (LBG or MBG) can be used. (4) UCG should be an option whenever surface gasification is considered; particularly, in areas where deeper, higher sulfur coal is located. (5) There are environmental and social benefits to use of UCG over surface gasification in the Eastern US. (6) A site could be chosen almost anywhere in the Illinois and Ohio area where amenable UCG coal has been determined due to the existence of existing transportation or transmission systems. (7) The technology needs to be demonstrated and the potential economic viability determined at a site in the East-North-Central US which has commercial quantities of amenable bituminous coal before utilities will show significant interest.

  17. Intergrated study of the Devonian-age black shales in eastern Ohio. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, J.D.; Struble, R.A.; Carlton, R.W.; Hodges, D.A.; Honeycutt, F.M.; Kingsbury, R.H.; Knapp, N.F.; Majchszak, F.L.; Stith, D.A.

    1982-09-01

    This integrated study of the Devonian-age shales in eastern Ohio by the Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geological Survey is part of the Eastern Gas Shales Project sponsored by the US Department of Energy. The six areas of research included in the study are: (1) detailed stratigraphic mapping, (2) detailed structure mapping, (3) mineralogic and petrographic characterization, (4) geochemical characterization, (5) fracture trace and lineament analysis, and (6) a gas-show monitoring program. The data generated by the study provide a basis for assessing the most promising stratigraphic horizons for occurrences of natural gas within the Devonian shale sequence and the most favorable geographic areas of the state for natural gas exploration and should be useful in the planning and design of production-stimulation techniques. Four major radioactive units in the Devonian shale sequence are believed to be important source rocks and reservoir beds for natural gas. In order of potential for development as an unconventional gas resource, they are (1) lower and upper radioactive facies of the Huron Shale Member of the Ohio Shale, (2) upper Olentangy Shale (Rhinestreet facies equivalent), (3) Cleveland Shale Member of the Ohio Shale, and (4) lower Olentangy Shale (Marcellus facies equivalent). These primary exploration targets are recommended on the basis of areal distribution, net thickness of radioactive shale, shows of natural gas, and drilling depth to the radioactive unit. Fracture trends indicate prospective areas for Devonian shale reservoirs. Good geological prospects in the Devonian shales should be located where the fracture trends coincide with thick sequences of organic-rich highly radioactive shale.

  18. Chemical quality, benthic organisms, and sedimentation in streams draining coal-mined lands in Raccoon Creek basin, Ohio, July 1984 through September 1986

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, K.S.

    1988-01-01

    The Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Division of Reclamation, plans widespread reclamation of abandoned coal mines in the Raccoon Creek basin in southeastern Ohio. Throughout Raccoon Creek basin, chemical, biological, and suspended-sediment data were collected from July 1984 through September 1986. Chemical and biological data collected at 17 sites indicate that the East Branch, Brushy Creek, Hewett Fork, and Little Raccoon Creek subbasins, including Flint Run, are affected by drainage from abandoned coal mines. In these basins, median pH values ranged from 2.6 to 5.1, median acidity values ranged from 20 to 1,040 mg/L (milligrams per liter) as CaCo3, and median alkalinity values ranged from 0 to 4 mg/L as CaCo3. Biological data indicate that these basins do not support diverse populations because of degraded water systems. Suspended-sediment yields of 70.7 tons per square mile per year at the headwaters of Raccoon Creek and 54.5 tons per square mile per year near the month of Raccoon Creek indicate that cumulative sedimentation from erosion of abandoned-mine lands is not excessive in the basin.

  19. Solar heating and cooling system installed at Columbus, Ohio. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Coy, R. G.; Braden, R. P.

    1980-09-01

    The Solar Energy System installed at Columbus Technical Institute, Columbus, Ohio was installed as a part of a new construction of a college building. The building will house classrooms and laboratories, administrative offices and three lecture halls. The Solar Energy System consists of 4096 square feet (128 panels) Owens/Illinois Evacuated Glass Tube Collector Subsystem, and a 5000 gallon steel tank below ground storage system, hot water is circulated between the collectors and storage tank, passing through a water/lithium bromide absorption chiller to cool the building. Extracts from the site files specification references, drawings, installation, operation and maintenance instructions are included.

  20. Evaluation of the Emission, Transport, and Deposition of Mercury and Fine Particulate Matter from Coal-Based Power Plants in the Ohio River Valley Region

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Crist

    2008-12-31

    As stated in the proposal: Ohio University, in collaboration with CONSOL Energy, Advanced Technology Systems, Inc (ATS) and Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) as subcontractors, evaluated the impact of emissions from coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region as they relate to the transport and deposition of mercury and associated fine particulate matter. This evaluation involved two interrelated areas of effort: ambient air monitoring and regional-scale modeling analysis. The scope of work for the ambient air monitoring included the deployment of a surface air monitoring (SAM) station in southeastern Ohio. The SAM station contains sampling equipment to collect and measure mercury (including speciated forms of mercury and wet and dry deposited mercury), particulate matter (PM) mass, PM composition, and gaseous criteria pollutants (CO, NOx, SO2, O3, etc.). Laboratory analyses of time-integrated samples were used to obtain chemical speciation of ambient PM composition and mercury in precipitation. Nearreal- time measurements were used to measure the ambient concentrations of PM mass and all gaseous species including Hg0 and RGM. Approximately 30 months of field data were collected at the SAM site to validate the proposed regional model simulations for episodic and seasonal model runs. The ambient air quality data provides mercury, and fine particulate matter data that can be used by Ohio Valley industries to assess performance on multi-pollutant control systems. The scope of work for the modeling analysis includes (1) development of updated inventories of mercury emissions from coal plants and other important sources in the modeled domain; (2) adapting an existing 3-D atmospheric chemical transport model to incorporate recent advancements in the understanding of mercury transformations in the atmosphere; (3) analyses of the flux of Hg0, RGM, and fine particulate matter in the different sectors of the study region to identify key transport

  1. EVALUATION OF THE EMISSION, TRANSPORT, AND DEPOSITION OF MERCURY, FINE PARTICULATE MATTER, AND ARSENIC FROM COAL-BASED POWER PLANTS IN THE OHIO RIVER VALLEY REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Crist

    2003-10-02

    Ohio University, in collaboration with CONSOL Energy, Advanced Technology Systems, Inc (ATS) and Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) as subcontractors, is evaluating the impact of emissions from coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region as they relate to the transport and deposition of mercury, arsenic, and associated fine particulate matter. This evaluation will involve two interrelated areas of effort: ambient air monitoring and regional-scale modeling analysis. The scope of work for the ambient air monitoring will include the deployment of a surface air monitoring (SAM) station in southeastern Ohio. The SAM station will contain sampling equipment to collect and measure mercury (including speciated forms of mercury and wet and dry deposited mercury), arsenic, particulate matter (PM) mass, PM composition, and gaseous criteria pollutants (CO, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, etc.). Laboratory analysis of time-integrated samples will be used to obtain chemical speciation of ambient PM composition and mercury in precipitation. Near-real-time measurements will be used to measure the ambient concentrations of PM mass and all gaseous species including Hg{sup 0} and RGM. Approximately of 18 months of field data will be collected at the SAM site to validate the proposed regional model simulations for episodic and seasonal model runs. The ambient air quality data will also provide mercury, arsenic, and fine particulate matter data that can be used by Ohio Valley industries to assess performance on multi-pollutant control systems. The scope of work for the modeling analysis will include (1) development of updated inventories of mercury and arsenic emissions from coal plants and other important sources in the modeled domain; (2) adapting an existing 3-D atmospheric chemical transport model to incorporate recent advancements in the understanding of mercury transformations in the atmosphere; (3) analyses of the flux of Hg{sup 0}, RGM, arsenic, and

  2. Evaluation of the Emission, Transport, and Deposition of Mercury, Fine Particulate Matter, and Arsenic from Coal-Based Power Plants in the Ohio River Valley Region

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Crist

    2006-04-02

    As stated in the proposal: Ohio University, in collaboration with CONSOL Energy, Advanced Technology Systems, Inc (ATS) and Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) as subcontractors, is evaluating the impact of emissions from coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region as they relate to the transport and deposition of mercury, arsenic, and associated fine particulate matter. This evaluation will involve two interrelated areas of effort: ambient air monitoring and regional-scale modeling analysis. The scope of work for the ambient air monitoring will include the deployment of a surface air monitoring (SAM) station in southeastern Ohio. The SAM station will contain sampling equipment to collect and measure mercury (including speciated forms of mercury and wet and dry deposited mercury), arsenic, particulate matter (PM) mass, PM composition, and gaseous criteria pollutants (CO, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, etc.). Laboratory analysis of time-integrated samples will be used to obtain chemical speciation of ambient PM composition and mercury in precipitation. Near-real-time measurements will be used to measure the ambient concentrations of PM mass and all gaseous species including Hg0 and RGM. Approximately 18 months of field data will be collected at the SAM site to validate the proposed regional model simulations for episodic and seasonal model runs. The ambient air quality data will also provide mercury, arsenic, and fine particulate matter data that can be used by Ohio Valley industries to assess performance on multi-pollutant control systems. The scope of work for the modeling analysis will include (1) development of updated inventories of mercury and arsenic emissions from coal plants and other important sources in the modeled domain; (2) adapting an existing 3-D atmospheric chemical transport model to incorporate recent advancements in the understanding of mercury transformations in the atmosphere; (3) analyses of the flux of Hg{sup 0

  3. Evaluation of the Emission, Transport, and Deposition of Mercury, Fine Particulate Matter, and Arsenic from Coal-Based Power Plants in the Ohio River Valley Region

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Crist

    2005-10-02

    Ohio University, in collaboration with CONSOL Energy, Advanced Technology Systems, Inc (ATS) and Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) as subcontractors, is evaluating the impact of emissions from coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region as they relate to the transport and deposition of mercury, arsenic, and associated fine particulate matter. This evaluation will involve two interrelated areas of effort: ambient air monitoring and regional-scale modeling analysis. The scope of work for the ambient air monitoring will include the deployment of a surface air monitoring (SAM) station in southeastern Ohio. The SAM station will contain sampling equipment to collect and measure mercury (including speciated forms of mercury and wet and dry deposited mercury), arsenic, particulate matter (PM) mass, PM composition, and gaseous criteria pollutants (CO, NOx, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, etc.). Laboratory analysis of time-integrated samples will be used to obtain chemical speciation of ambient PM composition and mercury in precipitation. Near-real-time measurements will be used to measure the ambient concentrations of PM mass and all gaseous species including Hg{sup 0} and RGM. Approximately of 18 months of field data will be collected at the SAM site to validate the proposed regional model simulations for episodic and seasonal model runs. The ambient air quality data will also provide mercury, arsenic, and fine particulate matter data that can be used by Ohio Valley industries to assess performance on multi-pollutant control systems. The scope of work for the modeling analysis will include (1) development of updated inventories of mercury and arsenic emissions from coal plants and other important sources in the modeled domain; (2) adapting an existing 3-D atmospheric chemical transport model to incorporate recent advancements in the understanding of mercury transformations in the atmosphere; (3) analyses of the flux of Hg0, RGM, arsenic, and fine

  4. EVALUATION OF THE EMISSION, TRANSPORT, AND DEPOSITION OF MERCURY, FINE PARTICULATE MATTER, AND ARSENIC FROM COAL-BASED POWER PLANTS IN THE OHIO RIVER VALLEY REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Crist

    2004-04-02

    Ohio University, in collaboration with CONSOL Energy, Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS) and Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) as subcontractors, is evaluating the impact of emissions from coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region as they relate to the transport and deposition of mercury, arsenic, and associated fine particulate matter. This evaluation will involve two interrelated areas of effort: ambient air monitoring and regional-scale modeling analysis. The scope of work for the ambient air monitoring will include the deployment of a surface air monitoring (SAM) station in southeastern Ohio. The SAM station will contain sampling equipment to collect and measure mercury (including speciated forms of mercury and wet and dry deposited mercury), arsenic, particulate matter (PM) mass, PM composition, and gaseous criteria pollutants (CO, NOx, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, etc.). Laboratory analysis of time-integrated samples will be used to obtain chemical speciation of ambient PM composition and mercury in precipitation. Near-real-time measurements will be used to measure the ambient concentrations of PM mass and all gaseous species including Hg{sup 0} and RGM. Approximately 18 months of field data will be collected at the SAM site to validate the proposed regional model simulations for episodic and seasonal model runs. The ambient air quality data will also provide mercury, arsenic, and fine particulate matter data that can be used by Ohio Valley industries to assess performance on multi-pollutant control systems. The scope of work for the modeling analysis will include (1) development of updated inventories of mercury and arsenic emissions from coal-fired power plants and other important sources in the modeled domain; (2) adapting an existing 3-D atmospheric chemical transport model to incorporate recent advancements in the understanding of mercury transformations in the atmosphere; (3) analyses of the flux of Hg{sup 0}, RGM, arsenic

  5. EVALUATION OF THE EMISSION, TRANSPORT, AND DEPOSITION OF MERCURY, FINE PARTICULATE MATTER, AND ARSENIC FROM COAL-BASED POWER PLANTS IN THE OHIO RIVER VALLEY REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Crist

    2004-10-02

    Ohio University, in collaboration with CONSOL Energy, Advanced Technology Systems, Inc (ATS) and Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) as subcontractors, is evaluating the impact of emissions from coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region as they relate to the transport and deposition of mercury, arsenic, and associated fine particulate matter. This evaluation will involve two interrelated areas of effort: ambient air monitoring and regional-scale modeling analysis. The scope of work for the ambient air monitoring will include the deployment of a surface air monitoring (SAM) station in southeastern Ohio. The SAM station will contain sampling equipment to collect and measure mercury (including speciated forms of mercury and wet and dry deposited mercury), arsenic, particulate matter (PM) mass, PM composition, and gaseous criteria pollutants (CO, NOx, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, etc.). Laboratory analysis of time-integrated samples will be used to obtain chemical speciation of ambient PM composition and mercury in precipitation. Near-real-time measurements will be used to measure the ambient concentrations of PM mass and all gaseous species including Hg{sup 0} and RGM. Approximately of 18 months of field data will be collected at the SAM site to validate the proposed regional model simulations for episodic and seasonal model runs. The ambient air quality data will also provide mercury, arsenic, and fine particulate matter data that can be used by Ohio Valley industries to assess performance on multi-pollutant control systems. The scope of work for the modeling analysis will include (1) development of updated inventories of mercury and arsenic emissions from coal plants and other important sources in the modeled domain; (2) adapting an existing 3-D atmospheric chemical transport model to incorporate recent advancements in the understanding of mercury transformations in the atmosphere; (3) analyses of the flux of Hg{sup 0}, RGM, arsenic, and fine

  6. EVALUATION OF THE EMISSION, TRANSPORT, AND DEPOSITION OF MERCURY, FINE PARTICULATE MATTER, AND ARSENIC FROM COAL-BASED POWER PLANTS IN THE OHIO RIVER VALLEY REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Crist

    2005-04-02

    Ohio University, in collaboration with CONSOL Energy, Advanced Technology Systems, Inc (ATS) and Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) as subcontractors, is evaluating the impact of emissions from coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region as they relate to the transport and deposition of mercury, arsenic, and associated fine particulate matter. This evaluation will involve two interrelated areas of effort: ambient air monitoring and regional-scale modeling analysis. The scope of work for the ambient air monitoring will include the deployment of a surface air monitoring (SAM) station in southeastern Ohio. The SAM station will contain sampling equipment to collect and measure mercury (including speciated forms of mercury and wet and dry deposited mercury), arsenic, particulate matter (PM) mass, PM composition, and gaseous criteria pollutants (CO, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, etc.). Laboratory analysis of time-integrated samples will be used to obtain chemical speciation of ambient PM composition and mercury in precipitation. Near-real-time measurements will be used to measure the ambient concentrations of PM mass and all gaseous species including Hg{sup 0} and RGM. Approximately of 18 months of field data will be collected at the SAM site to validate the proposed regional model simulations for episodic and seasonal model runs. The ambient air quality data will also provide mercury, arsenic, and fine particulate matter data that can be used by Ohio Valley industries to assess performance on multi-pollutant control systems. The scope of work for the modeling analysis will include (1) development of updated inventories of mercury and arsenic emissions from coal plants and other important sources in the modeled domain; (2) adapting an existing 3-D atmospheric chemical transport model to incorporate recent advancements in the understanding of mercury transformations in the atmosphere; (3) analyses of the flux of Hg{sup 0}, RGM, arsenic, and

  7. Formation and retention of methane in coal. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hucka, V.J.; Bodily, D.M.; Huang, H.

    1992-05-15

    The formation and retention of methane in coalbeds was studied for ten Utah coal samples, one Colorado coal sample and eight coal samples from the Argonne Premium Coal Sample Bank.Methane gas content of the Utah and Colorado coals varied from zero to 9 cm{sup 3}/g. The Utah coals were all high volatile bituminous coals. The Colorado coal was a gassy medium volatile bituminous coal. The Argonne coals cover a range or rank from lignite to low volatile bituminous coal and were used to determine the effect of rank in laboratory studies. The methane content of six selected Utah coal seams and the Colorado coal seam was measured in situ using a special sample collection device and a bubble desorbometer. Coal samples were collected at each measurement site for laboratory analysis. The cleat and joint system was evaluated for the coal and surrounding rocks and geological conditions were noted. Permeability measurements were performed on selected samples and all samples were analyzed for proximate and ultimate analysis, petrographic analysis, {sup 13}C NMR dipolar-dephasing spectroscopy, and density analysis. The observed methane adsorption behavior was correlated with the chemical structure and physical properties of the coals.

  8. Coal surface control for advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies. Final report, September 19, 1988--August 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Morsi, B.I.; Chiang, S.H.; Sharkey, A.; Blachere, J.; Klinzing, G.; Araujo, G.; Cheng, Y.S.; Gray, R.; Streeter, R.; Bi, H.; Campbell, P.; Chiarlli, P.; Ciocco, M.; Hittle, L.; Kim, S.; Kim, Y.; Perez, L.; Venkatadri, R.

    1992-12-31

    This final report presents the research work carried out on the Coal Surface Control for Advanced Physical Fine Coal Cleaning Technologies project, sponsored by the US Department of Energy, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (DOE/PETC). The project was to support the engineering development of the selective agglomeration technology in order to reduce the sulfur content of US coals for controlling SO{sub 2} emissions (i.e., acid rain precursors). The overall effort was a part of the DOE/PETCs Acid Rain Control Initiative (ARCI). The overall objective of the project is to develop techniques for coal surface control prior to the advanced physical fine coal cleaning process of selective agglomeration in order to achieve 85% pyrite sulfur rejection at an energy recovery greater than 85% based on run-of-mine coal. The surface control is meant to encompass surface modification during grinding and laboratory beneficiation testing. The project includes the following tasks: Project planning; methods for analysis of samples; development of standard beneficiation test; grinding studies; modification of particle surface; and exploratory R&D and support. The coal samples used in this project include three base coals, Upper Freeport - Indiana County, PA, Pittsburgh NO. 8 - Belmont County, OH, and Illinois No. 6 - Randolph County, IL, and three additional coals, Upper Freeport - Grant County- WV, Kentucky No. 9 Hopkins County, KY, and Wyodak - Campbell County, WY. A total of 149 drums of coal were received.

  9. The use of ethanol to remove sulfur from coal. Final report, September 1991--December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-15

    In developing the new Ohio University procedure the thermodynamic limitations of the reactions for removal of both pyritic and organic sulfur from coal at 400--600{degrees}C were studied using copper as a very strong H{sub 2}S-acceptor. Copper serves as a catalyst for ethanol dehydrogenation to form nascent hydrogen. Copper also serves as a scavenger to form copper sulfide from the hydrogen sulfide evolved during the reaction. Copper sulfide in turn serves as a catalyst for organic sulfur hydrodesulfurization reactions. If the coal to be desulfurized contains pyrite (FeS{sub 2}) or FeS, the copper scavenger effect reduces any back reaction of hydrogen sulfide with the iron and increases the removal of sulfur from the carbonaceous material. The desired effect of using copper can be achieved by using copper or copper containing alloys as materials of construction or as liners for a regenerable reactor. During the time period that Ohio Coal Development Office supported this work, small scale (560 grams) laboratory experiments with coals containing about 3.5% sulfur have achieved up to 90% desulfurization at temperatures of 500{degrees}C when using a copper reactor. Results from the autoclave experiments have identified the nature of the chemical reactions taking place. Because the process removes both pyritic and organic sulfur in coal, the successful scale up of the process would have important economic significance to the coal industry. Even though this and other chemical processes may be relatively expensive and far from being commercial, the reason for further development is that this process may hold the promise of achieving much greater sulfur reduction and of producing a cleaner coal than other methods. This would be especially important for small or older power plants and industrial boilers.

  10. Coal slurry tanker movements of western coal to east coast utilities. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rieber, M.

    1983-02-01

    From four western coal areas, coal slurry pipelines of 10 MMTY and 25 MMTY are designed and costed (1982 basis) for coal delivery to three ports. Supertankers are routed around South America, Panamax through the Panama Canal. Tanker characteristics are specified statistically and costs determined. A tidewater utility alternative is investigated. Based on western coal prices, adjusted for quality differentials, plus transport costs, delivered coal costs are compared to current east coast delivered steam coal prices. The proposed system is not economically feasible at current prices but may become commercial as steam coal demand increases and eastern coal prices rise.

  11. The "Learning for Leadership" Project: Education That Makes a Difference. Final Evaluation. A Project Involving Middle Schools in the Upper Arlington, Ohio and Worthington, Ohio School Districts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, L. Richard

    Recent national studies have pointed out the changing educational needs of young people as the United States moves from an industrial society to an information society. Selected middle school students in Ohio were involved in a two-year federally-funded program entitled "Learning for Leadership." The objectives of the program were: (1) to involve…

  12. X-ray Computed Tomography of coal: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Maylotte, D.H.; Spiro, C.L.; Kosky, P.G.; Lamby, E.J.

    1986-12-01

    X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is a method of mapping with x-rays the internal structures of coal. The technique normally produces 2-D images of the internal structures of an object. These images can be recast to create pseudo 3-D representations. CT of coal has been explored for a variety of different applications to coal and coal processing technology. In a comparison of CT data with conventional coal analyses and petrography, CT was found to offer a good indication of the total ash content of the coal. The spatial distribution of the coal mineral matter as seen with CT has been suggested as an indicator of coal washability. Studies of gas flow through coal using xenon gas as a tracer have shown the extremely complicated nature of the modes of penetration of gas through coal, with significant differences in the rates at which the gas can pass along and across the bedding planes of coal. In a special furnace designed to allow CT images to be taken while the coal was being heated, the pyrolysis and gasification of coal have been studied. Gasification rates with steam and CO/sub 2/ for a range of coal ranks have been obtained, and the location of the gasification reactions within the piece of coal can be seen. Coal drying and the progress of the pyrolysis wave into coal have been examined when the coal was subjected to the kind of sudden temperature jump that it might experience in fixed bed gasifier applications. CT has also been used to examine stable flow structures within model fluidized beds and the accessibility of lump coal to microbial desulfurization. 53 refs., 242 figs., 26 tabs.

  13. Coal gasification tests at TVA (Tennessee Valley Authority): Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Crim, M.C.; Williamson, P.C.

    1987-02-01

    This report presents the results obtained from the EPRI cofunded tests conducted at TVA's 200 tpd Texaco coal gasification facility equipped with a water quench gasifier. Four US coals were tested at TVA: (1) Utah coal from the SUFCO mine, (2) Illinois No. 6 coal from the Amax Delta mine, (3) Pittsburgh No. 8 coal from the Blacksville No. 2 mine and (4) a high ash-fusion Maryland coal. The TVA tests were of short term duration totaling approximately 10 to 20 days of cumulative operation on each coal. The gasification behavior of each coal was tested under a wide range of process conditions and feed characteristics. All four coals produced carbon conversion of 92% or higher. Utah and Illinois No. 6 coals achieved carbon conversions of 95 to 97%. The high heating value Pittsburgh No. 8 coal had lower carbon conversion because the maximum allowable gasifier temperature was reached at relatively low O/C ratios. The high-ash fusion Maryland coal was gasified with a fluxing agent at temperatures within the design limit of the TVA gasifier. The gasification behavior of the coals was similar to that observed from tests at other Texaco gasifiers. However, earlier experiments at Texaco's Montebello Research Laboratories showed higher values for both carbon conversion and coal gas efficiency. 27 figs., 35 tabs.

  14. Biochemistry of bond breaking in coal: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-08-22

    The goal of this program was to investigate possible biochemical mechanisms by which natural microorganisms solubilize low-rank coals. Specific objectives which were met to attain this goal included: (1) identification of microbes capable of solubilizing low-rank coals; (2) optimization of coal biosolubilization; (3) characterization of the products resulting from microbial coal solubilization; and (4) postulation of biochemical mechanisms involved in coal solubilization using model compound studies to identify bonds which are susceptible to cleavage. Several bacterial and fungal cultures were examined for coal solubilization. A microbial consortium (CP1/plus/2) that was developed at ARCTECH exhibited the best coal solubilization of the cultures tested. This mixture of bacteria and fungi solubilized untreated Leonardite coal as well as pretreated (HNO/sub 3/ or H/sub 2/O/sub 2/) lignites and a Wyodak subbituminous coal. Complex mechanisms of bond breaking are likely involved in coal biosolubilization. The solubilization of coal may be mediated by a combination of biological and non-biological factors. Model compound studies indicated that a variety of bonds thought to be present in coal can potentially be cleaved by the CP1/plus/2 coal solubilizing agents. Solubilization of coals by CP1/plus/2 was most rapid during the initial stages of the reaction. The overall biosolubilization process could not be defined in terms of zero or first order kinetics with respect to product appearance over time. 51 refs., 49 figs., 39 tabs.

  15. Using the sun and waste wood to heat a central Ohio home. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    The description of a house in Ohio built on a south facing slope with two levels above ground on the north, east, and west sides and three levels exposed to the southern winter Sun is presented. The floor plan, a general history of the project, the operation of the system, the backup heat source (wood), the collection of data, and the procedure for determining actual heat loss are described. Additionally, the calculation of the solar contribution percentage and the amount of mass to be included in the greenhouse and problems with an indirect gain wall are discussed. The location of the wood stove in the system is noted. The east wall temperature data are given. Soil temperature, air infiltration, thermal comfort, and energy usage are discussed. (MCW).

  16. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey, Huntington quadrangle: Ohio, West Virginia and Kentucky. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    The Huntington quadrangle of Kentucky, Ohio, and West Virginia covers 7250 square miles of the easternmost Midwestern Physiographic Province. Paleozoic exposures dominate the surface. These Paleozoics deepen toward the east from approximately 500 feet to a maximum depth of 8000 feet. Precambrian basement is thought to underlie the entire area. No known uranium deposits exist in the area. One hundred anomalies were found using the standard statistical analysis. Some high uranium concentration anomalies that may overlie the stratigraphic equivalent of the Devonian-Mississippian New Albany or Chattanooga Shales may represent significant levels of naturally occurring uranium. Future studies should concentrate on this unit. Magnetic data are largely in concurrence with existing structural interpretations but suggest some complexities in the underlying Precambrian.

  17. Coal plasticity at high heating rates and temperatures. Final technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Gerjarusak, S.; Peters, W.A.; Howard, J.B.

    1995-05-01

    Plastic coals are important feedstocks in coke manufacture, coal liquefaction, gasification, and combustion. During these processes, the thermoplastic behavior of these coals is also important since it may contribute to desirable or undesirable characteristics. For example, during liquefaction, the plastic behavior is desired since it leads to liquid-liquid reactions which are faster than solid-liquid reactions. During gasification, the elastic behavior is undesired since it leads to caking and agglomeration of coal particles which result in bed bogging in fixed or fluidized bed gasifiers. The plastic behavior of different coals was studied using a fast-response plastometer. A modified plastometer was used to measure the torque required to turn at constant angular speed a cone-shaped disk embedded in a thin layer of coal. The coal particles were packed between two metal plates which are heated electrically. Heating rates, final temperatures, pressures, and durations of experiment ranged from 200--800 K/s, 700--1300 K, vacuum-50 atm helium, and 0--40 s, respectively. The apparent viscosity of the molten coal was calculated from the measured torque using the governing equation of the cone-and-plate viscometer. Using a concentrated suspension model, the molten coal`s apparent viscosity was related to the quantity of the liquid metaplast present during pyrolysis. Seven coals from Argonne National Laboratory Premium Coal Sample Bank were studied. Five bituminous coals, from high-volatile to low-volatile bituminous, were found to have very good plastic behavior. Coal type strongly affects the magnitude and duration of plasticity. Hvb coals were most plastic. Mvb and lvb coals, though the maximum plasticity and plastic period were less. Low rank coals such as subbituminous and lignite did not exhibit any plasticity in the present studies. Coal plasticity is moderately well correlated with simple indices of coal type such as the elemental C,O, and H contents.

  18. Enhancement of surface properties for coal beneficiation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chander, S.; Aplan, F.F.

    1992-01-30

    This report will focus on means of pyrite removal from coal using surface-based coal cleaning technologies. The major subjects being addressed in this study are the natural and modulated surface properties of coal and pyrite and how they may best be utilized to facilitate their separation using advanced surface-based coal cleaning technology. Emphasis is based on modified flotation and oil agglomerative processes and the basic principles involved. The four areas being addressed are: (1) Collectorless flotation of pyrite; (2) Modulation of pyrite and coal hydrophobicity; (3) Emulsion processes and principles; (4) Evaluation of coal hydrophobicity.

  19. Utilization of high sulfur coal in carbon fiber production. Final report, April 1993--August 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, D.J.; Guth, J.R.

    1994-12-12

    PYROGRAF-III{trademark} is a highly graphitic vapor grown carbon fiber (VGCF) produced by the chemical vapor deposition of carbon on metallic catalysts in the temperature range of 1000{degrees}C. This is entirely different from commercial carbon fiber, which is made by first forming a filament and then graphitizing it in a high temperature oven. For PYROGRAF-III{trademark} small amounts of sulfur in the form of hydrogen sulfide are added to the process to enhance the yield. This method of supplying the necessary sulfur is both expensive and hazardous since hydrogen sulfide is flammable, toxic, and corrosive. To supply the sulfur more economically and safely, high sulfur coal was proposed as a replacement for the hydrogen sulfide gas. Applied Sciences, Inc. is the sole producer of this material in pound quantities. The primary objective of research grant OCDO-922-8 was to demonstrate that Ohio`s high sulfur coal can replace the expensive, toxic hydrogen sulfide in the production of vapor grown carbon fiber as well as become a partial or complete source of carbon. The secondary objective was to analyze the exhaust for the release of harmful sulfur compounds and to project the economic potential of the use of coal.

  20. Mercury and other trace elements in Ohio River fish collected near coal-fired power plants: Interspecific patterns and consideration of consumption risks.

    PubMed

    Reash, Robin J; Brown, Lauren; Merritt, Karen

    2015-07-01

    Many coal-fired electric generating facilities in the United States are discharging higher loads of Hg, Se, and other chemicals to receiving streams due to the installation of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) air pollution control units. There are regulatory concerns about the potential increased uptake of these bioaccumulative trace elements into food webs. We evaluated the concentrations of As, total Hg (THg), methylmercury (MeHg), and Se in Ohio River fish collected proximal to coal-fired power plants, of which 75% operate FGD systems. Fillet samples (n = 50) from 6 fish species representing 3 trophic levels were analyzed. Geometric mean fillet concentrations of THg (wet wt), MeHg (wet wt), and Se (dry wt) in 3 species were 0.136, 0.1181, and 3.19 mg/kg (sauger); 0.123, 0.1013, and 1.56 mg/kg (channel catfish); and 0.127, 0.0914, and 3.30 mg/kg (hybrid striped bass). For all species analyzed, only 3 fillet samples (6% of total) had MeHg concentrations that exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) human health criterion (0.3 mg/kg wet wt); all of these were freshwater drum aged ≥ 19 y. None of the samples analyzed exceeded the USEPA proposed muscle and whole body Se thresholds for protection against reproductive effects in freshwater fish. All but 8 fillet samples had a total As concentration less than 1.0 mg/kg dry wt. Mean Se health benefit values (HBVSe ) for all species were ≥ 4, indicating that potential Hg-related health risks associated with consumption of Ohio River fish are likely to be offset by adequate Se concentrations. Overall, we observed no measurable evidence of enhanced trace element bioaccumulation associated with proximity to power plant FGD facilities, however, some enhanced bioaccumulation could have occurred in the wastewater mixing zones. Furthermore, available evidence indicates that, due to hydraulic and physical factors, the main stem Ohio River appears to have low net Hg methylation potential. PMID:25586716

  1. Collective Negotiations, Work Stoppages, and the Effects of Negotiations on Teachers' Salaries in Ohio's Public Schools. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright State Univ., Dayton, OH.

    This study was designed to investigate the impact that collective negotiations have had on teachers' salaries in Ohio; and the relationships between the incidence of work stoppages and the characteristics of Ohio school districts. Since the focus of this was twofold, it was found necessary to employ several statistical techniques to accomplish the…

  2. Coal conversion processes. Final report, September 13-August 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Cobb, J.T. Jr.; Biloen, P.; Holder, G.D.; Klinzing, G.E.; Tierney, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental work on the following four projects related to coal conversion processes is reported: (1) thermal behavior of slurry reactors used for indirect coal liquefaction; (2) acid gas removal by absorption in organic solvents; (3) cobalt-catalyzed synthesis of hydrocarbons from CO/H/sub 2/, studied with transient kinetics; and (4) extraction and conversion of coal using supercritical fluids. Each section has been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  3. Advanced physical fine coal cleaning spherical agglomeration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    The project included process development, engineering, construction, and operation of a 1/3 tph proof-of-concept (POC) spherical agglomeration test module. The POC tests demonstrated that physical cleaning of ultrafine coal by agglomeration using heptane can achieve: (1) Pyritic sulfur reductions beyond that possible with conventional coal cleaning methods; (2) coal ash contents below those which can be obtained by conventional coal cleaning methods at comparable energy recoveries; (3) energy recoveries of 80 percent or greater measured against the raw coal energy content; (4) complete recovery of the heptane bridging liquid from the agglomerates; and (5) production of agglomerates with 3/8-inch size and less than 30 percent moisture. Test results met or exceeded all of the program objectives. Nominal 3/8-inch size agglomerates with less than 20 percent moisture were produced. The clean coal ash content varied between 1.5 to 5.5 percent by weight (dry basis) depending on feed coal type. Ash reductions of the run-of-mine (ROM) coal were 77 to 83 percent. ROM pyritic sulfur reductions varied from 86 to 90 percent for the three test coals, equating to total sulfur reductions of 47 to 72 percent.

  4. Extraction, separation, and analysis of high sulfur coal. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Olesik, S.V.; Pekay, L.A.; Larkins, W. Jr.

    1992-05-31

    The work described in this report studies the removal of sulfur by oxidative interaction of various cupric salts with coal and also considers the possibility of removing organic sulfur by the selective interaction of supercritical ethanol with the organic coal matrix. Either one of these methods could potentially be used to pretreat coals before burning. The primary purpose of these studies is to ascertain the nature of the chemical reactions occurring, the chemical composition of the resultant products, and information on possible reaction mechanisms. This information should allow prediction of reasonable reaction conditions for the removal of organosulfur compound from coal.

  5. Investigation of the use of fly-ash based autoclaved cellular concrete blocks in coal mines for air duct work. Final report, January 25, 1993--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, M.L.

    1995-06-19

    Coal mines are required to provide ventilation to occupied portions of underground mines. Concrete block is used in this process to construct air duct walls. However, normal concrete block is heavy and not easy to work with and eventually fails dramatically after being loaded due to mine ceiling convergence and/or floor heave. Autoclaved cellular concrete block made from (70{plus_minus}%) coal fly ash is lightweight and less rigid when loaded. It is lighter and easier to use than regular concrete block for underground mine applications. It has also been used in surface construction around the world for over 40 years. Ohio Edison along with eight other electric utility companies, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and North American Cellular Concrete constructed a mobile demonstration plant to produce autoclaved cellular concrete block from utility fly ash. To apply this research in Ohio, Ohio Edison also worked with the Ohio Coal Development Office and CONSOL Inc. to produce autoclaved cellular concrete block not only from coal ash but also from LIMB ash, SNRB ash, and PFBC ash from various clean coal technology projects sponsored by the Ohio Coal Development Office. The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the potential for beneficial use of fly ash and clean coal technology by-products in the production of lightweight block.

  6. Recovery, restoration, and development of an enhancement plan for the Leading Creek watershed after dewatering of the Meigs {number_sign}31 coal mine in Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Cherry, D.S.; Hassel, J.H. Van; Yeager, M.M.; Babendreier, J.E.; Currie, R.J.; Astin, L.E.; Lynde, S.R.

    1995-12-31

    Following the flooding of the Meigs {number_sign}31 deep coal mine in Meigs County, Ohio, a proactive plan was developed to evaluate effects of initial dewatering, recovery, and development of a watershed enhancement plan. Approximately half of the 31-mile Leading Creek mainstem received coal mine discharge of high conductivity, low pH, high metals and total suspended solids loading. Most forms of aquatic life were depleted in the impacted areas of the creek. After three years since the incident, many forms of benthic macroinvertebrates and fish have returned to the creek, and sediments have been purged of metal loading by storm water events. The enhancement plan involves a reconnaissance of the creek and tributaries pinpointing areas of agricultural sedimentation and abandoned mined land (AML) influences in the lower half. Research activities involved sampling water and sediment in 10 stations of the creek and 17 major tributaries. The tributaries were addressed as point source discharges with water/sediment toxicity testing conducted. In-situ testing included growth impairment evaluation of Asian clams at 27 stations in the watershed. Several tributaries were intermittently toxic depending upon rainfall and the degree of AML input. Benthic macroinvertebrate assembles in most tributaries were stressed and comprised 0--3 taxa. Erosion/sedimentation loading was being addressed by hydrological modeling of the creek, land use management/habitat assessment, and data management by geographic information systems.

  7. Near-extinction and final burnout in coal combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Hurt, R.H.; Davis, K.A.

    1994-02-01

    The late stages of char combustion have a special technological significance, as carbon conversions of 99% or greater are typically required for the economic operation of pulverized coal fired boilers. In the present article, two independent optical techniques are used to investigate near-extinction and final burnout phenomenas. Captive particle image sequences, combined with in situ optical measurements on entrained particles, provide dramatic illustration of the asymptotic nature of the char burnout process. Single particle combustion to complete burnout is seen to comprise two distinct stages: (1) a rapid high-temperature combustion stage, consuming about 70% of the char carbon and ending with near-extinction of the heterogeneous reactions due to a loss of global particle reactivity, and (2) a final burnout stage occurring slowly at lower temperatures. For particles containing mineral matter, the second stage can be further subdivided into: (2a) late char combustion, which begins after the near-extinction event, and converts carbon-rich particles to mixed particle types at a lower temperature and a slower rate; and (2b) decarburization of ash -- the removal of residual carbon inclusions from inorganic (ash) frameworks in the very late stages of combustion. This latter process can be extremely slow, requiring over an order of magnitude more time than the primary rapid combustion stage. For particles with very little ash, the loss of global reactivity leading to early near-extinction is clearly related to changes in the carbonaceous char matrix, which evolves over the course of combustion. Current global kinetic models used for the prediction of char combustion rates and carbon burnout in boilers do not predict the asymptotic nature of char combustion. More realistic models accounting for the evolution of char structure are needed to make accurate predictions in the range of industrial interest.

  8. Coal-sand attrition system and its importance in fine coal cleaning. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, R.K.; Zhu, Qinsheng

    1993-08-01

    It is known that ultra-fine coals are prerequisite for the deep cleaning of most US coal seams if environmental pollution arising from the use of such coals is to be minimized. Therefore, the production of finely liberated coal particles in conjunction with reduced heavy metal contaminants at low costs is desirable, if not mandatory. The liberation of intimately disseminated impurities from the coal matrix therefore, demands that the material be ground to a high degree of fineness. Similarily, some technologies for coal utilization require superfine particles (i.e., sizes less than ten microns). This implies additional costs for coal preparation plants due to the high energy and media costs associated with fine grinding operations. Besides, there are problems such as severe product contaminations due to media wear and impairment of the quality of coal. Hence, proper choice of grinding media type is important from the viewpoints of cost reduction and product quality. The use of natural quartz sand as grinding media in the comminution of industrial minerals in stirred ball mills has been indicated. The advantages of natural sand compared to steel media include low specific energy inputs, elimination of heavy metal contaminants and low media costs. In this work, the effect of rotor speed, solids concentration and feed-size are studied on four coals in conjunction with silica sand and steel shot. The results obtained are used to evaluate the suitability of silica sands as an alternative grinding media. for coal. Coal-sand and coal-steel systems are compared in terms of specific energy consumption, product fineness, media/wear contaminationanalysis and calorific values, liberation spectrum and particle shape characteristics. In general cleaner flotation concentrate was obtained from coals when they were ground with sand media. The zeta potential of coals was found to be different and lower when they ground with sand.

  9. Predictors of plasticity in bituminous coals. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, W. G.; Reasoner, J. W.; Hower, J. C.; Yates, L. P.; Clark, C. P.; Davis, E.; Fitzpatrick, A.; Irefin, A.; Jiminez, A.; Jones, T. M.

    1984-02-01

    A group of 40 hvb coals, mostly from western Kentucky fields, has been examined with regard to ASTM Gieseler plastometric properties. Twenty-nine of these coals have also been studied over a range of temperatures by isothermal Gieseler plastometry. Raw Gieseler data provide melting and coking slopes and readily calculable fluidity spans. Maximum fluidity by slope intersection is a more consistent measure than observed maximum fluidity. Isothermal slopes and maximum fluidities follow Arrhenius temperature dependencies, with activation energies related systematically to fluid properties. These freshly sampled coals are also characterized by chemical, physical and petrographic criteria, by quantitative solvent extractions, by pyrolysis gas chromatography, by Fourier Transform infrared analysis of coals and extraction residues, by the HPLC analysis of coal extracts, and by optical microscopy of coals and Gieseler semi-coke residues. Multiple linear regression analysis yields three-term expressions which estimate maximum fluidities (both ASTM and isothermal) with R values of .90 to .92. Slopes and critical temperatures are similarly predictable. Plastometer experiments with selected coals under superatmospheric pressures show both melting slopes and maximum fluidities to be sharply increased, the latter by one to three orders of magnitude. Some suggestions are offered to accommodate this new information into the general body of knowledge concerning the phenomenon of plasticity in mid-ranked coals. 81 references, 28 figures, 40 tables.

  10. Diffusion of gases in New Mexico coals: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, F.L.; Smith, D.M.

    1987-02-01

    As part of the first phase of this study, characterization of the pore volume and surface area of coal was principally undertaken while the more extensive and complex diffusivity and high-pressure adsorption experiments were being built. The careful characterization work resulted in new understanding of the limitations of mercury porosimetry and nitrogen adsorption analysis for coal. Our results indicate that as the size of coal particles in a sample decreases, a spurious, intruded-pore volume is indicated in mercury porosimetry. Furthermore, at higher pressures of Hg, the penetration of Hg may actually be a measure of micropore crushing rather than pore structure information. Nitrogen adsorption measurements do not reflect the total surface area of the coal which is easily accessed and measured by carbon dioxide. At the same time we found that condensation of nitrogen and NMR relaxation experiments may lead to significantly new interpretations of coal porosity. We find that measurements of condensation of nitrogen gives a direct measure of large pore volume that can be contrasted to total pore volumes. Preliminary NMR results show remarkable differences in apparent pore structure for similar New Mexico coals. The extension of basic science of coal structure and development of a potential new method for characterization of coal are major, long range impacts of this work. 41 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. Low-rank coal thermal properties and diffusivity: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, W.F.

    1987-06-01

    This project developed techniques for measuring thermal properties and mass diffusivities of low-rank coals and coal powders. Using the concept of volume averaging, predictive models have been developed for these porous media properties. The Hot Wire Method was used for simultaneously measuring the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of both consolidated and unconsolidated low-rank coals. A new computer-interfaced experiment is presented and sample container designs developed for both coal powders and consolidated coals. A new mathematical model, based upon volume averaging, is presented for the prediction of these porous media properties. Velocity and temperature effects on liquid-phase dispersion through unconsolidated coal were determined. Radioactive tracer data were used to determine mass diffusivities. A new predictive mathematical model is presented based upon volume averaging. Vapor-phase diffusivity measurements of organic solvents in consolidated lignite coal are reported. An unsteady-state pressure response experiment with microcomputed-based data acquisition was developed to estimate dispersion coefficients through consolidated lignite coals. The mathematical analysis of the pressure response data provides the dispersion coefficient and the adsorption coefficient. 48 refs., 59 figs., 17 tabs.

  12. Liquid Tin Anode Direct Coal Fuel Cell Final Program Report

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Thomas

    2012-01-26

    This SBIR program will result in improved LTA cell technology which is the fundamental building block of the Direct Coal ECL concept. As described below, ECL can make enormous efficiency and cost contributions to utility scale coal power. This program will improve LTA cells for small scale power generation. As described in the Commercialization section, there are important intermediate military and commercial markets for LTA generators that will provide an important bridge to the coal power application. The specific technical information from this program relating to YSZ electrolyte durability will be broadly applicable SOFC developers working on coal based SOFC generally. This is an area about which very little is currently known and will be critical for successfully applying fuel cells to coal power generation.

  13. Oxidation of coal and coal pyrite mechanisms and influence on surface characteristics. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, F.M.

    1996-01-26

    Coal oxidation has been studies extensively in previous work. However, there is still no general agreement concerning the mechanisms of oxidation. Moreover, the oxidation behavior of coal and mineral matter have generally been regarded as separate processed. There is appreciable evidence that organic and inorganic oxidation process are actually coupled, consequently the changes in their surface properties induced by oxidation are difficult to predict. This makes the effectively of coal cleaning processes highly sensitive to the extent of weathering and oxidation that the coal has experienced. The objective of this research was to investigate the oxidation behavior of coal and coal pyrite, and to correlate the intrinsic physical and chemical properties of these minerals, along with changes resulting from oxidation, with these surface properties that would influence the behavior in physical cleaning processes.

  14. Gaseous phase coal surface modification. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Okoh, J.M.; Pinion, J.; Thiensatit, S.

    1992-05-07

    In this report, we present an improved, feasible and potentially cost effective method of cleaning and beneficiating ultrafine coal. Increased mechanization of mining methods and the need towards depyritization, and demineralization have led to an increase in the quantity of coal fines generated in recent times. For example, the amount of {minus}100 mesh coal occurring in coal preparation plant feeds now typically varies from 5 to 25% of the total feed. Environmental constraints coupled with the greatly increased cost of coal have made it increasingly important to recover more of these fines. Our method chemically modifies the surface of such coals by a series of gaseous phase treatments employing Friedel-Crafts reactions. By using olefins (ethene, propene and butene) and hydrogen chloride catalyst at elevated temperature, the surface hydrophobicity of coal is enhanced. This increased hydrophobicity is manifest in surface phenomena which reflect conditions at the solid/liquid interphase (zeta potential) and those which reflect conditions at the solid/liquid/gas interphases (contact angle, wettability and floatability).

  15. Coal surface control for advanced fine coal flotation. Final report, October 1, 1988--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerstenau, D.W.; Hanson, J.S.; Diao, J.; Harris, G.H.; De, A.; Sotillo, F.; Somasundaran, P.; Harris, C.C.; Vasudevan, T.; Liu, D.; Li, C.; Hu, W.; Zou, Y.; Chen, W.; Choudhry, V.; Shea, S.; Ghosh, A.; Sehgal, R.

    1992-03-01

    The initial goal of the research project was to develop methods of coal surface control in advanced froth flotation to achieve 90% pyritic sulfur rejection, while operating at Btu recoveries above 90% based on run-of-mine quality coal. Moreover, the technology is to concomitantly reduce the ash content significantly (to six percent or less) to provide a high-quality fuel to the boiler (ash removal also increases Btu content, which in turn decreases a coal`s emission potential in terms of lbs SO{sub 2}/million Btu). (VC)

  16. Inhibition of retrogressive reactions in coal/petroleum co-processing. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Schobert, H.H.; Tomic, J.

    1993-05-25

    The objective of this study was to examine the processes in coal/petroleum coprocessing systems which led to coke formation. Specifically, the interactions between the petroleum residue and coal, leading to retrogressive products, were investigated. Five coals were reacted with five model compounds in order to investigate the coal conversions in a variety of solvents and to determine the role of the solvent in promoting or inhibiting coal conversion. The selected model compounds range from paraffinic to fully aromatic and were chosen as representative of types of compounds that are found in petroleum residua. Coprocessing experiments were conducted using the five coals and three petroleum residua. The effect of temperature on coal conversions was crucial. The coal conversions at 350 and 400{degree}C seem to be governed by the nature of the coal and to a lesser extent by the petroleum residua. Negative coal conversions were observed above 400{degree}C indicating that retrogressive processes had occurred. At temperatures higher than 400{degree}C, the petroleum residua undergo physical and chemical transformations and the influence of the petroleum residua on coal conversions is significant. The structural features of the residues indicated that the residues were predominately coal-derived. An overall increase in aromaticity was observed with increasing temperature which was also accompanied by loss of oxygen functional groups. The retrogressive reactions with non-caking coals involve carbonyl and carboxyl group leading to a final solid characterized by a cross-linked structure. In the case of caking coal, these reactions are governed by loss of aromatic oxygen groups and loss of alkyl groups.

  17. Applied research and evaluation of process concepts for liquefaction and gasification of western coals. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wiser, W. H.

    1980-09-01

    Fourteen sections, including five subsections, of the final report covering work done between June 1, 1975 to July 31, 1980 on research programs in coal gasification and liquefaction have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  18. Petrographic characterization of Kentucky coals. Final report. Part VI. The nature of pseudovitrinites in Kentucky coals

    SciTech Connect

    Trinkle, E.J.; Hower, J.C.

    1984-02-01

    Overall average pseudovitrinite content for 1055 eastern Kentucky coal samples is nearly 9% while average percentage of pseudovitrinite for 551 western Kentucky coals is approximately 4%. Examination of variation in pseudovitrinite content relative to rank changes shows uniformity in pseudovitrinite percentages within the 4 to 7 V-type interval for eastern Kentucky coals but a gradual increase in pseudovitrinite content for western Kentucky coals over the same rank interval. Coals from both coal fields show similar, distinct increases in pseudovitrinite percentage in the highest V-type categories. However, it is suggested here that these supposed increases in pseudovitrinite percentages are not real but rather, indicate distinct increase in the brightness of nitrinite resulting from increased alteration of vitrinite beginning at this stage of coalification and continuing into the higher rank stages. This conclusion is reached when it is found that differences between pseudovitrinite and vitrinite reflectance are least in coals at these high rank intervals of Kentucky and, also, when vitrinite particles are often visually observed having brightness equal to that of pseudovitrinite particles. Relation of pseudovitrinite to other sulfur forms and total sulfur in general shows no significant trends, although the relatively high pyritic sulfur content in western Kentucky coals, coupled with relatively low inert percentages suggest the existence of predominantly reducing, or at least non-oxidizing conditions in the Pennsylvanian peat swamps of western Kentucky. Initial work involving Vicker's microhardness testing of coals indicates that microhardness values for pseudovitrinite are higher than those for vitrinite within the same sample regardless of coal rank or coal field from which the sample was collected. 15 references, 9 figures, 9 tables.

  19. Encoal mild coal gasification project: Final design modifications report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    The design, construction and operation Phases of the Encoal Mild Coal Gasification Project have been completed. The plant, designed to process 1,000 ton/day of subbituminous Power River Basin (PRB) low-sulfur coal feed and to produce two environmentally friendly products, a solid fuel and a liquid fuel, has been operational for nearly five years. The solid product, Process Derived Fuel (PDF), is a stable, low-sulfur, high-Btu fuel similar in composition and handling properties to bituminous coal. The liquid product, Coal Derived Liquid (CDL), is a heavy, low-sulfur, liquid fuel similar in properties to heavy industrial fuel oil. Opportunities for upgrading the CDL to higher value chemicals and fuels have been identified. Significant quantities of both PDF and CDL have been delivered and successfully burned in utility and industrial boilers. A summary of the Project is given.

  20. Solid-liquid separation for liquefied coal industries. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Tiller, F.M.; Leu, W.

    1984-07-01

    This book has been written for engineers concerned with separation processes related to liquefied coal slurries. Difficulties in removing mineral residues and unconverted carbon represent a major obstacle to economic production of liquefied coal products. Reactor slurries in which hydrogenation has been used to upgrade coal generally contain 5 to 10 weight percents of solids which must be removed. Various kinds of equipment employed for particulate removal include rotary drum pressure, candle, and leaf filters, solid bowl centrifuges, hydrocyclones, and critical solvent de-ashers. Although emphasis has been given to filtration of solvent refined coal, much of the material is of a fundamental character and is applicable to other fields. Analysis of filtration data requires an understanding of the principles of frictional flow through compressible beds of particulates. Much of the analysis appearing in the literature must be carefully evaluated as errors and misinterpretations abound.

  1. Dynamic nuclear polarization in coal characterization: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Maciel, G.E.

    1988-12-31

    The overall goal of this project was the development and application of new NMR techniques, based primarily on dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), for elucidating organic structural details in coal samples. 1 fig.

  2. Assessment of coal cleaning for trace element control. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Akers, D.; Arnold, B.

    1998-12-01

    Current methods of cleaning coal already reduce the concentration of most of the elements named as hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) under Title 3 of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments because most of these elements are associated with ash-forming or sulfur-bearing minerals. Advanced methods of physical cleaning may prove even more effective than conventional cleaning technologies, in HAPs control, especially if the coal is crushed before cleaning. The most significant disadvantage of conventional or advanced physical cleaning methods for HAPs control is that reductions of 90% or greater from as-fired coal may not be possible. Chemical and biologic methods of cleaning coal can potentially remove greater amounts of at least some HAPs elements than conventional or advanced physical cleaning methods. At least one promising chemical process (HAPs-Rx) has been developed and tested at laboratory scale that has the potential of removing over half of the mercury and arsenic remaining in coal after conventional cleaning. An assessment of the cost and effectiveness of conventional, advanced, and the HAPs-Rx chemical process was performed using laboratory data and computer simulations. The study found that the cost of removing a pound of mercury from coal by cleaning often compared favorably with cost projections by the Environmental Protection Agency for removing a pound of mercury by activated carbon injection.

  3. Illinois coal reserve assessment and database development. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Treworgy, C.G.; Prussen, E.I.; Justice, M.A.; Chenoweth, C.A.

    1997-11-01

    The new demonstrated reserve base estimate of coal of Illinois is 105 billion short tons. This estimate is an increase from the 78 billion tons in the Energy Information Administration`s demonstrated reserve base of coal, as of January 1, 1994. The new estimate arises from revised resource calculations based on recent mapping in a number of countries, as well as significant adjustments for depletion due to past mining. The new estimate for identified resources is 199 billion tons, a revision of the previous estimate of 181 billion tons. The new estimates incorporate the available analyses of sulfur, heat content, and rank group appropriate for characterizing the remaining coal resources in Illinois. Coal-quality data were examined in conjunction with coal resource mapping. Analyses of samples from exploration drill holes, channel samples from mines and outcrops, and geologic trends were compiled and mapped to allocate coal resource quantities to ranges of sulfur, heat content, and rank group. The new allocations place almost 1% of the demonstrated reserve base of Illinois in the two lowest sulfur categories, in contrast to none in the previous allocation used by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The new allocations also place 89% of the demonstrated reserve base in the highest sulfur category, in contrast to the previous allocation of 69% in the highest category.

  4. Permeability changes in coal resulting from gas desorption. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, J.R.; Johnson, P.W.

    1992-11-30

    This report documents studies on the effects of gas sorption on coal, with the intent of eventually evaluating how sorption and strain affect permeability. These studies were, carried out at the University of Alabama during the period from 1989 through 1992. Two major experimental methods were developed and used. In the strain experiments, electronic strain gauges were attached to polished blocks of coal in order to measure linear and volumetric swelling due to gas sorption. The effects of bedding plane orientation, of gas type, and of coal type were investigated. In the gravimetric experiment the weight of small samples of coal was measured during exposure to high pressure gases. Sample measurements were corrected for buoyancy effects and for sample swelling, and the results were plotted in the form of Langmuir isotherms. Experiments were conducted to determine the effect of grain size, coal type, moisture, and of sorbant gas. The advantage of this method is that it can be applied to very small samples, and it enabled comparison liptinite versus vitrinite concentrates, and kerogen rich versus kerogen depleted oil shales. Also included is a detailed discussion of the makeup of coal and its effect on gas sorption behavior.

  5. Liquid chromatographic analysis of coal surface properties. Final report, September 1991--February 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, K.C.

    1996-03-01

    Experiments on equilibrium adsorption loadings of various probe compounds on 60-200 mesh Illinois {number_sign}6 coal (PSOC-1539), Adaville {number_sign}1 coal (PSOC-1544), Wyodak coal (PSOC-1545) and Pittsburgh {number_sign}8 coal (PSOC-1549) were performed. the probe compounds include m-cresol, p-cresol, o-cresol, phenol, n-octanol, n-heptanol, n-propanol, isopropanol n-butanol, s-butanol, 2-butanol, t-butanol, 2-naphthol, cyclohexanol, 2-methyl-1-pentanol (2M1P), 4-methyl-2-pentanol (4M2P), benzene and toluene. Equilibrium adsorption of various probe compounds on the coals were measured with the inverse liquid chromatography method. Experiments on flotation of various 60-200 mesh treated coals such as Illinois {number_sign}6 coal (PSOC-1539), Adaville {number_sign}1 coal (PSOC-1544), Wyodak coal (PSOC-1545) and Pittsburgh {number_sign}8 coal (PSOC-1549) were performed. The chosen coals were treated with steam, nitrogen and air at 1 atm and 125-225{degrees}C for 24 hours. The coals were treated with water as well as 20-1000 ppm aqueous alcohol solutions for 3-24 hours at 150-225{degrees}C. The coals also were treated with 20-ppm alcohol aqueous solutions for 1-24 hours at the 0.002-g/min mass flow rate of alcohol aqueous solutions and at 225{degrees}C. Flotation experiments were conducted with a 500-cm{sup 3} batch-type micro flotation apparatus, introducing nitrogen at the bottom of the apparatus. This final report was prepared with the experimental data obtained during the period of September 1991-March 1994.

  6. OHIO/KENTUCKY/TVA (TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY) COAL-FIRED UTILITY S02 AND N0X CONTROL RETROFIT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report documents initial results from an ongoing National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) study. The objective is to significantly improve engineering cost estimates for retrofit of the following control technologies at the 1980 'top 200' SO2-emitting coal-fired...

  7. Coal desulfurization by bacterial treatment and column flotation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kawatra, S.K.

    1994-06-01

    A review of the literature showed that bacterial leaching, using the microorganism Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, was a very effective technique for removing pyrite from coal, as it could dissolve even the finest pyrite particles without the need for expensive reagents or extreme processing conditions. Unfortunately, bacterial leaching is also rather slow, and so the initial goal of this research was to decrease the leaching time as much as possible. However, this still left the bacteria needing approximately a week to remove half of the pyritic sulfur, and so a faster technique was sought. Since it had been reported in the literature that T. ferrooxidans could be used to depress the flotation of pyrite during froth flotation of coal, this was investigated further. By studying the recovery mechanisms of coal-pyrite in froth flotation, it was found that pyrite was being recovered by entrainment and by locking to coal particles, not by true flotation of hydrophobic pyrite. Therefore, no pyrite depressant could be of any significant benefit for keeping pyrite out of the coal froth product, and it was much more important to prevent entrainment from occurring. Countercurrent flotation columns were invented to essentially eliminate entrainment effects, by washing the froth and reducing mixing of the froth and tailings products. Existing flotation columns tend to be quite simple, and in order to give reasonable product quality they must be very tall (typically 30--45 feet). As a result, they have difficulty in handling the high froth volumes which occur in coal flotation, and are awkward to install in existing plants. The bulk of this project therefore concentrated on developing an improved coal flotation column, and testing it under actual plant conditions.

  8. Impact of hydrodynamics on coal liquefaction. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, D.; Ying, D.H.S.; Givens, E.N.

    1983-09-01

    We have attempted to determine the hydrodynamic effects of various reactor configurations on coal liquefaction, to help select the optimal reactor configuration and to provide additional understanding of coal liquefaction reaction kinetics, which cannot be definitively determined by a CSTR alone. Only a qualitative understanding of the fluid dynamic effects on product yields has been perceived by operating various sizes of open-column tubular reactors, because the fluid-dynamic characteristics of these reactors were not clearly understood and could not be varied significantly. Indirect studies, by cold-flow simulation, have been of little help in defining the fluid dynamic impact on coal liquefaction. Comparison of actual coal liquefaction data from both the plug-flow reactor and the CSTR showed that the plug-flow configuration had various advantages. Reactor yields improved significantly, especially the primary product conversions. At 840/sup 0/F and residence times of 29 and 40 min, coal and preasphaltene conversions were enhanced approximately 6 and 10%, respectively. At these conditions, the plug-flow reactor also yielded about 10% more oils than the CSTR with significant increase in hydrogen utilization. Also, this study provided an opportunity to examine the soundness of APCI/ICRC's sequential kinetic model, by interfacing the plug-flow and CSTR yield data. Transforming CSTR yields to plug-flow data showed that product yields deviated considerably from the measured plug-flow data, suggesting the need to improve the existing reaction model. Having both CSTR and plug-flow reactor data bases is important for developing a sound coal reaction model and for determining hydrodynamic effects on coal liquefaction in a direct way. The results will lead to an optimized reactor configuration as well as optimized operation. 5 references, 23 figures, 20 tables.

  9. The single electron transfer chemistry of coals. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, J.W.; Flowers, R.A. II

    1994-12-31

    This research addressed electron donar properties and radical reactions in coal. Solid residues from pyridine Soxhlet extractions of Pocahontas No. 3, Upper Freeport, Pittsburgh No. 8, Illinois No. 6 and Wyodak coals were exposed to 4-vinylpyridine vapors and swelled. All of the 4-vinylpyridine could not be removed under vacuum at 100{degree}C. Diffuse reflectance FTIR revealed the presence of poly-(4-vinylpyridine) in the Illinois No. 6 and Wyodak coals. EPR spectra displayed the loss of inertinite radicals in Upper Freeport, Illinois No. 6 and Wyodak residues after exposure to 4-vinylpyridine. There was little change in the vitrinite radical density or environment. The molecule N,N{prime}-Diphenyl-p-phenylene diamine (DPPD) was exposed to the solid residues from pyridine Soxhlet extractions of the above coals. Diffuse reflectance FTIR failed to detect the imine product from radical reaction with DPPD. EPR spectra displayed the loss of inertinite radicals in Upper Freeport and Wyodak residues. 7,7,8,8-Tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) and Tetracyanoethylene (TCNE) were deposited into coals in pyridine. FTIR indicated complete conversion of TCNQ to a material with a singly occupied LUMO. In TCNE the LUMO is about 30% occupied. TCNQ and TCNE were deposited into the pyridine extracts and residues of Illinois No. 6 and Pittsburgh No. 8 coals. Only a small amount of the TCNQ and TCNE displayed nitrile shifts in the IR spectrum of a material with an occupied LUMO. It has been concluded that TCNQ must be part of the aromatic stacks in coal and the TCNQ LUMO is part of an extended band.

  10. Isotopes of uranium and thorium, lead-210, and polonium-210 in the lungs of coal miners of Appalachia and the lungs and livers of residents of central Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, G.E.; Casella, V.R.; Bishop, C.T.; Aguirre, A.G.

    1985-10-21

    The lungs of twelve and the livers of three residents of central Ohio and the lungs of four coal miners of Appalachia were analyzed for uranium-238, uranium-234, thorium-230, lead-210, polonium-210, and thorium-232. Mean and median lung concentrations of uranium-238 and of uranium-234 in the lungs of central Ohioans were essentially the same and were equal to 4 fCi/g dry. Mean concentrations of these isotopes in the lungs of Appalachian coal miners were also essentially the same and were equal to 9 fCi/g. Little uranium was found in the liver. The median concentration of thorium-230 in the lungs of central Ohioans was also 4 fCi/g dry; however, the mean concentration was 8 fCi/g due to the relatively high concentration values in a few persons. The mean concentrations of this isotope in the lungs of central Ohioans and Appalachian coal miners were essentially the same; i.e. 8 fCi/g. The mean and median concentrations of thorium-232 in the lungs of central Ohioans were assentially the same and equal to 4 fCi/g. The mean concentration of this isotope in the lungs of Appalachian coal miners was 9 fCi/g. Little thorium was found in the liver. The mean concentrations of lead-210 in the lungs of the two populations were nearly equal and about 23 fCi/g dry. The mean liver/lung ratio of this isotope was essentially two, and the concentrations appeared to be positively correlated with smoking. Polonium-210 concentrations in the lungs were distributed into three sets of values which are described here as low (2-4 fCi/g), medium (20-30 fCi/g), and high (>100 fCi/g), and also appeared to be correlated with smoking. Mean liver concentrations of this irotope were nearly equal to the mean liver concentrations of lead-210 (50 as opposed to 47 fCi/g). 18 refs., 6 tabs.

  11. Healy Clean Coal Project: Healy coal firing at TRW Cleveland Test Facility. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Koyama, T.; Petrill, E.; Sheppard, D.

    1991-08-01

    A test burn of two Alaskan coals was conducted at TRW`s Cleveland test facility in support of the Healy Clean Coal Project, as part of Clean Coal Technology III Program in which a new power plant will be constructed using a TRW Coal Combustion System. This system features ash slagging technology combined with NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} control. The tests, funded by the Alaska Industrial Development and Export Authority (AIDEA) and TRW, were conducted to verify that the candidate Healy station coals could be successfully fired in the TRW coal combustor, to provide data required for scale-up to the utility project size requirements, and to produce sufficient flash-calcined material (FCM) for spray dryer tests to be conducted by Joy/NIRO. The tests demonstrated that both coals are viable candidates for the project, provided the data required for scale-up, and produced the FCM material. This report describes the modifications to the test facility which were required for the test burn, the tests run, and the results of the tests.

  12. Analysis of chemical coal cleaning processes. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    Six chemical coal cleaning processes were examined. Conceptual designs and costs were prepared for these processes and coal preparation facilities, including physical cleaning and size reduction. Transportation of fine coal in agglomerated and unagglomerated forms was also discussed. Chemical cleaning processes were: Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, Ledgemont, Ames Laboratory, Jet Propulsion Laboratory (two versions), and Guth Process (KVB). Three of the chemical cleaning processes are similar in concept: PETC, Ledgemont, and Ames. Each of these is based on the reaction of sulfur with pressurized oxygen, with the controlling factor being the partial pressure of oxygen in the reactor. All of the processes appear technically feasible. Economic feasibility is less certain. The recovery of process chemicals is vital to the JPL and Guth processes. All of the processes consume significant amounts of energy in the form of electric power and coal. Energy recovery and increased efficiency are potential areas for study in future more detailed designs. The Guth process (formally designed KVB) appears to be the simplest of the systems evaluated. All of the processes require future engineering to better determine methods for scaling laboratory designs/results to commercial-scale operations. A major area for future engineering is to resolve problems related to handling, feeding, and flow control of the fine and often hot coal.

  13. Surface magnetic enhancement for coal cleaning. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, J.Y.

    1992-10-01

    The program consisted of a fundamental study to define the chemistry for the interactions between magnetic reagent and mineral and coal particles, a laboratory study to determine the applicability of this technology on coal cleaning, and a parameter study to evaluate the technical and economical feasibility of this technology for desulfurization and de-ashing under various processing schemes. Surface magnetic enhancement using magnetic reagent is a new technology developed at the Institute. This technology can be applied to separate pyrite and other minerals particles from coal with a magnetic separation after adsorbing magnetic reagent on the surface of pyrite and other minerals particles. Particles which have absorbed magnetic reagent are rendered magnetic. The adsorption can be controlled to yield selectivity. Thus, the separation of traditionally nonmagnetic materials with a magnetic separator can be achieved. Experiments have been performed to demonstrate the theoretical fundamentals and the applications of the technology. Adsorbability, adsorption mechanisms, and adsorption selectivity are included in the fundamental study. The effects of particle size, magnetic reagent dosage, solid contents, magnetic matrix, applied magnetic field strengths, retention times, and feed loading capacities are included in the application studies. Three coals, including Illinois No. 6, Lower Kittanning and Pocahontas seams, have been investigated. More than 90% pyritic sulfur and ash reductions have been achieved. Technical and economic feasibilities of this technology have been demonstrated in this study. Both are competitive to that of the froth flotation approach for coal cleaning.

  14. Studies of low rank coal stabilities. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Pittsburgh Research Center, tested feed coal and product samples from Wyoming and Montana for thermal stability in the adiabatic oven and sealed flask apparatus. The results indicated that the products had higher thermal stabilities in comparison with the feed coals. However, both the products samples and feed coals exhibited high spontaneous combustion potentials. A report on these studies was submitted in December 1995. Experiments were also completed in the adiabatic oven to determine the rate of decrease in the heating rate of a reactive sample on exposure to pulses of moist air, and moist nitrogen. The results indicated that with each succeeding pulse, longer time were required to reach selected elevated temperatures. The results also indicated some level of synergy between water and oxygen in the heat generation reaction. The data and results were transmitted to Dr. Dennis Finseth upon completion of the experiments.

  15. Demonstrated reserve base for coal in New Mexico. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, G.K.

    1995-02-01

    The new demonstrated reserve base estimate of coal for the San Juan Basin, New Mexico, is 11.28 billion short tons. This compares with 4.429 billion short tons in the Energy Information Administration`s demonstrated reserve base of coal as of January 1, 1992 for all of New Mexico and 2.806 billion short tons for the San Juan Basin. The new estimate includes revised resource calculations in the San Juan Basin, in San Juan, McKinley, Sandoval, Rio Arriba, Bernalillo and Cibola counties, but does not include the Raton Basin and smaller fields in New Mexico. These estimated {open_quotes}remaining{close_quotes} coal resource quantities, however, include significant adjustments for depletion due to past mining, and adjustments for accessibility and recoverability.

  16. Surface coal mine emission factor field study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Muleski, G.E.; Garmen, G.; Cowherd, C.

    1994-01-01

    The report presents the results of an emissions sampling program to measure airborne particulate matter released from the activities conducted at open pit coal mines in the western United States. The principal objective of the study was to compare field measurements against available emission factors for surface coal mines and to revise the factors as necessary. The field measurements were conducted during the fall of 1992 at the Cordero surface coal mine in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming. A total of 36 PM-10 emission tests, distributed over various sources and five test sites, was performed. The report presents the sampling methodology used, the emission measurement results, the ambient monitoring results, the results of the reexamination of current emission factors, and recommended emission factor models for haul truck travel, light-duty vehicle travel and scraper travel on upaved roads.

  17. Utilization of coal-associated minerals. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Slonaker, J. F.; Akers, D. J.; Alderman, J. K.

    1980-01-01

    Under contract number DE-AS21-77ET10533 with the US-DOE several methods of utilizing coal associated by-products were examined for potential commercial use. Such use could transform a costly waste disposal situation into new materials for further use and could provide incentive for the adoption of new coal utilization processes. Several utilization processes appear to have merit and are recommended for further study. Each process is discussed separately in the text of this report. Common coal cleaning processes were also examined to determine the effect of such processes on the composition of by-products. Data obtained in this portion of the research effort are reported in the Appendix. Information of this type is required before utilization processes can be considered. A knowledge of the mineral composition of these materials is also required before even simple disposal methods can be considered.

  18. Coal slurry transportation alternatives: Conceptual design and economics: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, C.E.; Manning, S.H.

    1987-07-01

    The Coal Slurry Transportation Alternatives study provides utilities with a decisionmaking tool and necessary cost data to facilitate a systematic and rigorous comparison of slurry, rail, and barge transportation from the mine to the busbar for coal deliveries to both existing and new power plants. Volume 3 summarizes the methodology and results of examining operating and cost differences between slurry and run-of-mine coal. Two objectives of the study are to document the engineering costs and assumptions of the coal slurry pipeline system and to provide comparative estimates of costs and performance for power generation from slurry pipeline and run-of-mine coal. The results indicate that an increase in fuel moisture causes a decrease in boiler efficiency; that is, higher fuel burn rates and higher gas flows. For new plants, major equipment must be sized to accommodate higher fuel, ash, and flue gas flow rates associated with coal slurry. Other impacts include higher auxiliary power requirements, increased scrubber additive requirements, and potential increases in plant maintenance. For existing plants, a more serious concern may be the capability of current fuel transport systems to properly dry and transport the fuel. Flue gas flow rates for slurry should be within the design margins of run-of-mine, but where flue gas flow rates are increased, downstream FGD and particulate removal equipment may be impacted. Of the total levelized busbar costs for new plants, approximately 40 percent of differential costs are associated with capital, with the remaining 60 percent associated with consumables. For existing plants, replacement power costs due to limitations in fuel drying and conveyance may be up to 20 percent of the total generation cost. 40 figs., 62 tabs.

  19. Recovery and reconnaissance of the Leading Creek watershed, Meigs County, Ohio, following a dewatering of Meigs {number_sign}31 coal mine

    SciTech Connect

    Currie, R.J.; Astin, L.E.; Yeager, M.M.; Cherry, D.S.; Hassel, J.H. van |

    1995-12-31

    A database has been developed before and after the dewatering of the Meigs {number_sign}31 deep coal mine in Meigs County, Ohio, three years ago. This strategy was to compare potential recovery of the watershed in the mainstem of Leading Creek as well as to reconnaissance the tributaries for point-source input into the creek. After the dewatering process, {approximately} half of the 31-mile Leading Creek mainstem received a discharge of conductivity, low pH, high metals (iron, manganese, copper, aluminum), and total suspended solids (TSS). Most forms of aquatic life in the creek were depleted in the impacted areas, but recovery has been encouraging. Relative fish abundance has returned to pre-event levels, while benthic macroinvertebrates show recovery in two key stream segments. Reconnaissance of the watershed indicated that the system is uniquely segregated with high sedimentation from agricultural input in the upper half and abandoned mined land (AML) discharges in the lower. The AML-influenced tributaries were intermittently toxic throughout the year with 48-hr LC50 values of 14.6--6.0% effluent at Thomas Fork tributary. Macroinvertebrate assemblages in many of the AML and agriculturally influenced tributaries ranged from 0--3 taxa. The consequence of erosion/sedimentation loading is being addressed relative to autochromous input of in-stream AML/TSS input versus that from allochthomous input from stream bank/land use management.

  20. Coal anion structure and chemistry of coal alkylation. Final report, March 1, 1979-February 29, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, L.M.

    1980-01-01

    In accord with Task 1, some ether cleavage reactions were carried out in two different media - potassium/naphthalene/tetrahydrofuran and potassium/ ammonia - so that the merits and demerits of the two methods could be compared. Preliminary results suggest that both systems yield the same products, and that the ammonia medium is more convenient to work with, because of the absence of by-products such as reduced naphthalenes and tetralin. Dialkyl ethers were found to be least reactive compounds while the benzyl and phenyl ethers were found to be most reactive, as would be expected. The reductive alkylation of coal was carried out in ammonia at 25/sup 0/C. The tetrahydrofuran solubility of the reaction product was surprisingly low. We have obtained additional /sup 13/C)/sup 1/H) nmr data for tetrahydrofuran-soluble butylated coal and some model compounds; obtained additional Styragel(R) chromatography data of tetrahydrofuran-soluble coal labelled with 98%-enriched butyl-1,1-d/sub 2/ iodide; and obtained /sup 2/D nmr spectra of all the deuterium-labelled, tetrahydrofuran-soluble coal products. In accord with Task 4, we have undertaken a review of the information now available concerning the nature of Illinois No. 6 coal. Also, the effects of organic additives on the exchange reactions between tetralin-d/sub 12/ and diphenyl-methane and on the thermal cleavage reactions of several model compounds in tetralin were investigated to probe the relationship between structure and reactivity. The exchange reaction can be accelerated by coal, asphaltene-preasphaltene fractions derived from coal, compounds with labile bonds, or compounds which can be reduced readily. The pyridine-insoluble coal product, acids, and bases are inactive toward the exchange reaction.

  1. Evaluation of coal pulverizer materials: Effect of coal characteristics on wear performance and reliability: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Donais, R.T.; Tyler, A.L.; Dufrane, K.F.; Glaeser, W.R.; Merriman, T.L.; Wright, I.G.

    1988-08-01

    This report deals mainly with abrasive wear in coal pulverizers. Eight coals, including bituminous, subbituminous, and lignite, were analyzed in the laboratory to determine their quartz (SiO/sub 2/) and pyrite (FeS/sub 2/) content. The size distribution of these two minerals was also determined. The wear of Ni-Hard rolls from pulverizers, used to grind the above coals at various utilities, was determined. It was found that wear expressed as mils/1000 ton coal correlated much better with the quartz and pyrite content of the coal than wear expressed as mils/hr. Analysis of the data obtained indicated that the effect of quartz on mill wear is much larger than that of pyrite. Coarser size fractions of both materials also increase wear. Based on the data obtained, an analytical procedure to predict the abrasiveness of coals on their quartz and pyrite content was developed. Laboratory studies were also carried out to compare the wear resistance of various commercially available castings and weld overlays. Little difference was found between two grades of Ni-Hard coatings. The wear resistance of higher chromium weld overlays or cast white irons was found to be about twice as high as that of Ni-Hard castings. This is in good agreement with wear of high chromium weld overlays observed by many utilities. 37 refs., 53 figs., 41 tabs.

  2. Evaluation of hyperbaric filtration for fine coal dewatering. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Parekh, B.K.; Hogg, R.; Fonseca, A.

    1996-08-15

    The main objectives of the project were to investigate the fundamental aspects of particle-liquid interaction in fine coal dewatering, to conduct laboratory and pilot plant studies on the applicability of hyperbaric filter systems and to develop process conditions for dewatering of fine clean coal to less than 20% moisture. The program consisted of three phases, namely Phase 1 -- Model Development, Phase 2 -- Laboratory Studies, Phase 3 -- Pilot Plant Testing. The Pennsylvania State University led efforts in Phase 1, the University of Kentucky in Phase 2, and CONSOL Inc. in Phase 3 of the program. All three organizations were involved in all the three phases of the program. The Pennsylvania State University developed a theoretical model for hyperbaric filtration systems, whereas the University of Kentucky conducted experimental studies to investigate fundamental aspects of particle-liquid interaction and application of high pressure filter in fine coal dewatering. The optimum filtration conditions identified in Phase 1 and 2 were tested in two of the CONSOL Inc. coal preparation plants using an Andritz Ruthner portable hyperbaric filtration unit.

  3. Biological production of ethanol from coal. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    Due to the abundant supply of coal in the United States, significant research efforts have occurred over the past 15 years concerning the conversion of coal to liquid fuels. Researchers at the University of Arkansas have concentrated on a biological approach to coal liquefaction, starting with coal-derived synthesis gas as the raw material. Synthesis gas, a mixture of CO, H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and sulfur gases, is first produced using traditional gasification techniques. The CO, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} are then converted to ethanol using a bacterial culture of Clostridium 1jungdahlii. Ethanol is the desired product if the resultant product stream is to be used as a liquid fuel. However, under normal operating conditions, the ``wild strain`` produces acetate in favor of ethanol in conjunction with growth in a 20:1 molar ratio. Research was performed to determine the conditions necessary to maximize not only the ratio of ethanol to acetate, but also to maximize the concentration of ethanol resulting in the product stream.

  4. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.S.

    1995-08-01

    In an effort to develop new disposable catalysts for direct coal liquefaction, several types of clay-supported pyrrhotite catalysts were prepared and tested. These included iron-pillared montmorillonite, mixed iron/alumina-pillared montmorillonite, iron-impregnated montmorillonite, and iron oxometallate-impregnated montmorillonite.

  5. Basic properties of coals and other solids. Final report, September 1, 1989--August 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Arnett, E.M.

    1992-12-31

    The previous project dissected the heats of interactions of a series of coals into components that represented Bronsted acidity, hydrogen-bonding acidity and dispersion force interactions through comparison with the simple prototype solid acids: sulfonic acid resin, silica, and graphitized carbon black respectively. The present grant has emphasized the interaction of basic components in the coal with strong Bronsted acids and boron trichloride, a very strong Lewis acid, with a brief examination of the interactions of the coals with phenols as weaker hydrogen-bonding acids. We have also compared several coals with liquids derived from them at Wilsonville and Exxon. Finally, we have examined the effect of citric acid washing on several coals.

  6. Coal-fired high performance power generating system. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-31

    As a result of the investigations carried out during Phase 1 of the Engineering Development of Coal-Fired High-Performance Power Generation Systems (Combustion 2000), the UTRC-led Combustion 2000 Team is recommending the development of an advanced high performance power generation system (HIPPS) whose high efficiency and minimal pollutant emissions will enable the US to use its abundant coal resources to satisfy current and future demand for electric power. The high efficiency of the power plant, which is the key to minimizing the environmental impact of coal, can only be achieved using a modern gas turbine system. Minimization of emissions can be achieved by combustor design, and advanced air pollution control devices. The commercial plant design described herein is a combined cycle using either a frame-type gas turbine or an intercooled aeroderivative with clean air as the working fluid. The air is heated by a coal-fired high temperature advanced furnace (HITAF). The best performance from the cycle is achieved by using a modern aeroderivative gas turbine, such as the intercooled FT4000. A simplified schematic is shown. In the UTRC HIPPS, the conversion efficiency for the heavy frame gas turbine version will be 47.4% (HHV) compared to the approximately 35% that is achieved in conventional coal-fired plants. This cycle is based on a gas turbine operating at turbine inlet temperatures approaching 2,500 F. Using an aeroderivative type gas turbine, efficiencies of over 49% could be realized in advanced cycle configuration (Humid Air Turbine, or HAT). Performance of these power plants is given in a table.

  7. Perminalized Alethopteris from the Upper Pennsylvanian of Ohio and Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    Mickle, J.E.; Rothwell, G.W.

    1982-03-01

    Fern-like foliage referable to Alethopteris Steinberg has been discovered in coal balls of Late Pennsylvanian age from near Staubenville, Ohio, and Berryville, Illinois. Pinnule morphology is described from specimens preserved on coal-ball surfaces.

  8. Surface Properties of Photo-Oxidized Bituminous Coals: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    Natural weathering has a detrimental effect on the hydrophobic nature of coal, which in turn can influence clean-coal recovery during flotation. Few techniques are available that can establish the quality of coal surfaces and that have a short analysis time to provide input for process control. Luminescence emissions which can be quantified with an optical microscope and photometer system, are measurably influenced by degree of weathering as well as by mild storage deterioration. In addition, it has been shown that when vitrinite is irradiated with a relatively high intensity flux of violet- or ultraviolet- light in the presence of air, photo-oxidation of the surface occurs. The combination of measuring the change in luminescence emission intensity with degree of surface oxidation provided the impetus for the current investigation. The principal aim of this research was to determine whether clear correlations could be established among surface oxygen functionality, hydrophobicity induced by photo-oxidation, and measurements of luminescence intensity and alteration. If successful, the project would result in quantitative luminescence techniques based on optical microscopy that would provide a measure of the changes in surface properties as a function of oxidation and relate them to coal cleanability. Two analytical techniques were designed to achieve these goals. Polished surfaces of vitrain bands or a narrow size fraction of powdered vitrain concentrates were photo-oxidized using violet or ultraviolet light fluxes and then changes in surface properties and chemistry were measured using a variety of near-surface analytical techniques. Results from this investigation demonstrate that quantitative luminescence intensity measurements can be performed on fracture surfaces of bituminous rank coals (vitrains) and that the data obtained do reveal significant variations depending upon the level of surface oxidation. Photo-oxidation induced by violet or ultraviolet light

  9. The geochemistry of coal origins in relation to coal structure: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Given, P.H.; Spackman, W.; Painter, P.C.

    1987-10-06

    The principal objective of the study is to seek an understanding of the processes involved in the transformation of ligno-cellulosic cell walls of higher plants into coal-forming entities during the early stages of coal formation. It is felt that this is one valid and potentially valuable approach to solving the problems of coal structure and elucidating the origins of coal macerals. The tactical approach has been to select samples of very immature coals that exhibit differing degrees of preservation of woody structure and examine them by optical microscopy, using transmission of light through thin sections with and without polarizing screens, and fluorescence excited by blue or uv light. Specimens characterized in this way were then studied by Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy, /sup 13/C NMR and various pyrolysis/mass spectrometric techniques. Samples from two different sites were available, but most of the work was on a large set of samples collected from the Brandon lignite in Vermont; plants whose remains are seen in this lignite include many of those now populating parts of the Okefenokee Swamp in Georgia and the Everglades of Florida. A number of samples of peatified wood were included in the microscopic studies, in order to document the earliest changes and provide material for comparison.

  10. Development and testing of commercial-scale, coal-fired combustion systems: Phase III. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    Based on studies that indicated a large potential for significantly increased coal-firing in the commercial sector, the U.S. Department of Energy`s Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) sponsored a multi-phase development effort for advanced coal combustion systems. This Final Report presents the results of the last phase (Phase III) of a project for the development of an advanced coal-fired system for the commercial sector of the economy. The project performance goals for the system included dual-fuel capability (i.e., coal as primary fuel and natural gas as secondary fuel), combustion efficiency exceeding 99 percent, thermal efficiency greater than 80 percent, turndown of at least 3:1, dust-free and semi-automatic dry ash removal, fully automatic start-up with system purge and ignition verification, emissions performance exceeding New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) and approaching those produced by oil-fired, Commercial-sized units, and reliability, safety, operability, maintainability, and service life comparable to oil-fired units. The program also involved a site demonstration at a large facility owned by Striegel Supply Company, a portion of which was leased to MTCI. The site, mostly warehouse space, was completely unheated and the advanced coal-fired combustion system was designed and sized to heat this space. Three different coals were used in the project, one low and one high sulfur pulverized Pittsburgh No. 8 coal, and a micronized low volatile, bituminous coal. The sorbents used were Pfizer dolomitic limestone and an Anvil lime. More than 100 hours of screening test`s were performed to characterize the system. The parameters examined included coal firing rate, excess air level, ash recycle rate, coal type, dolomitic limestone feed rate, and steam injection rate. These tests indicated that some additional modifications for coal burning in the system were required.

  11. Investigation of formation of nitrogen compounds in coal combustion. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, D.W.; Crane, I.D.; Wendt, J.O.L.

    1983-10-01

    This is the final report on DOE contract number DE-AC21-80MC14061. It concerns the formation of nitrogen oxide from fuel-bound nitrogen during coal combustion. The work reported was divided into three tasks. They addressed problems of time-resolving pyrolysis rates of coal under simulated combustion conditions, the combustion of the tar that results from such pyrolysis, and theoretical modeling of the pyrolysis process. In all of these tasks, special attention was devoted to the fate of coal nitrogen. The first two tasks were performed by Exxon Research and Engineering Company. 49 references.

  12. Spin-mapping of coal structures with ESE and ENDOR. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Belford, R.L.; Clarkson, R.B.

    1993-06-01

    Several kinds of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of coal (including whole coal, separated macerals, density-gradient separated fractions, and treated coals) and of model organic thought to be molecular constituents of coals were acquired and analyzed in order to probe the molecular structure and surface properties of coals and of model systems. Typically, the model compounds under investigation and their analogues are found in coals as stable free radicals which give rise to an EPR signal. In some cases, the model compounds were selected because they have some characteristic, such as a particular functional group or heteroatom which may be found in coals, which fits them to serve as test materials for methods development. Two critical instruments for this work - the W-band EPR spectrometer and the S-band ESE spectrometer - were built in this laboratory and were both further developed as part of this project. The ENDOR spectrometer also has been improved. During the course of this project, the W-band EPR system has proven to be the most fruitful tool for probing the chemical structures of coal with the ESE system providing the most valuable auxiliary data. The following report summarizes highlights of these studies. It provides some background, rationale, and selected data and results. Finally, a list of papers and presentations is provided together with abstracts of all of them.

  13. A mineralogical and geochemical investigation of street sediment near a coal-fired power plant in Hamilton, Ohio: an example of complex pollution and cause for community health concerns.

    PubMed

    LeGalley, Erin; Krekeler, Mark P S

    2013-05-01

    The Hamilton Municipal Electric Plant is a 125 MW coal-fired power plant, owned and operated by the City of Hamilton in Butler County, Ohio. The plant is located within 110 m of 50 homes. Bulk chemical investigation of street sediment near these homes indicates average concentrations of 25 ppm Cr, 40 ppm Cu, 15 ppm Ni, 215 ppm Pb, and 500 ppm Zn. Lead and Zn have maximum concentrations of 1207 ppm and 1512 ppm, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy indicates coal ash spherules are present in the street sediment as well as a variety of Pb, Ni, Cr, W, and BaSO4 particulates. Transmission electron microscopy indicates heavy metals are sorbed onto clay particles with some preference for illite over chlorite. This investigation shows bulk chemistry and electron microscopy approaches are very effective tools to investigate particulate pollutants and identify contexts in complex urban settings involving coal pollution. PMID:23395990

  14. Mechanisms governing fine particulate emissions from coal flames. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, G.H.; Schieber, C.; Socha, R.G.; Kramlich, J.C.

    1990-04-01

    The primary objective of this program was to provide a basic understanding of the principal processes that govern the formation of particulate matter in the 0.5--10 {mu}m size range in pulverized coal flames. The mechanism that produces ash particles in this size range is not clear. Particle sizes smaller than the 0.5--10 {mu}m size range are generally accepted to result from a vaporization/condensation mechanism while particles larger than this size result from the coalescence of ash in coal particles which may breakup as they burn. This program combined experimental and theoretical studies to understand the mechanisms which control the production of ash in the 0.5--10 {mu}m size range. (VC)

  15. Advanced concepts in coal liquefaction: Optimization of reactor configuration in coal liquefaction. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pradhan, V.R.; Comolli, A.G.; Lee, L.K.

    1994-11-01

    The overall objective of this Project was to find the ways to effectively reduce the cost of coal liquids to about dollar 25 per barrel of crude oil equivalent. The work described herein is primarily concerned with the testing at the laboratory scale of three reactor configuration concepts, namely (1) a fixed-bed plug-flow reactor as a ``finishing reactor`` in coal liquefaction, (2) three-stage well-mixed reactors in series, and (3) interstage stream concentration/product separation. The three reactor configurations listed above were tested during this project using a 20 cc tubing microreactor, a fixed-bed plug flow reactor, and a two-stage modified Robinson-Mahoney reactor system. The reactor schemes were first evaluated based on theoretical modelling studies, then experimentally evaluated at the microautoclave level and laboratory scale continuous operations. The fixed-bed ``finishing reactor`` concept was evaluated in both the upflow and the downflow modes of operation using a partially converted coal-solvent slurry as feed. For most of the testing of concepts at the microautoclave level, simulated coal, recycle oil, and slurry feedstocks were either specially prepared (to represent a specific state of coal/resid conversion) and/or obtained from HRI`s other ongoing bench-scale and PDU scale coal liquefaction experiments. The three-stage continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTR) and interstage product stream separation/concentration concepts were tested using a simulated three-stage CSTR system by employing a laboratory-scale ebullated-bed system and a modified version of the HRI`s existing Robinson-Mahoney fixed catalyst basket reactor system. This testing was conducted as a fourteen day long continuous run, divided into four Conditions to allow for a comparison of the new three-stage CSTR and interstage product concentration concepts with a two-stage CSTR baseline configuration.

  16. Changes in ground-water quality resulting from surface coal mining of small watershed in Jefferson County, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hren, Janet

    1986-01-01

    Two samples were collected from each of six wells in a small watershed in Jefferson County, Ohio, in 1984. The watershed was mined and reclamation begun in 1980. Data collected from 1976 through 1982 indicate that ground-water quality was still changing at that time. The purpose of this study was to determine to what extent ground-water quality continued to change 4 years after mining. The upper saturated zone was destroyed by mining and replaced by spoiled material during reclamation. A new saturated zone then formed in the spoils material. The premining median concentrations of sulfate, manganese, and dissolved solids in the upper saturated zone were 84 milligrams per liter (mg/L). 30 micrograms per liter (?g/L), and 335 mg/L, respectively. The postmining median concentrations of these constituents in the upper-zone wells disturbed by mining were 360 mg/L, 595 ?g/L, and 814 mg/L, respectively. Concentrations of these constituents were still increasing in 1984 in the upper saturated zone. In the area not disturbed by mining, concentrations have remained nearly at premining levels. The premining median concentrations of sulfate, manganese, and dissolved solids in the middle saturated zone were 47 mg/L, 10 ?g/L and 405 mg/L, respectively. The postmining median concentrations were 390 mg/L, 490 ?g/L, and 959 mg/L, respectively. In the middle saturated zone, concentrations of these constituents also were still increasing in 1984, probably due to mixing with water if the upper saturated zone.

  17. Enhanced coal hydrogasification via oxidative pretreatment. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.J.

    1992-04-16

    The gasification of coal char by hydrogen is much slower than in steam or carbon dioxide; moreover, hydrogasification rate in pure hydrogen decreases sharply with conversion for most carbons. To overcome this kinetic behavior, the oxidation of the char prior to and during hydrogasification has been investigated as a means of enhancing hydro gasification rate. Kinetic rate studies under well-characterized conditions have been complemented by careful surface analyses to characterize oxygen on the char surface prior to and during hydrogasification.

  18. Innovative coal-fueled diesel engine injector. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Badgley, P.; Doup, D.

    1991-05-01

    The purpose of this research investigation was to develop an electronic coal water slurry injection system in conjunction with the Thermal Ignition Combustion System (TICS) concept to achieve autoignition of CWS at various engine load and speed conditions without external ignition sources. The combination of the new injection system and the TICS is designed to reduce injector nozzle spray orifice wear by lowering the peak injection pressure requirements. (VC)

  19. Healy Clean Coal Project, Healy, Alaska final Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-14

    This Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) provides the mechanism to evaluate the integrated coal combustion/emission control system being demonstrated by the Healy Clean Coal Project (HCCP) as part-of the third solicitation of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCT-III). The EMP monitoring is intended to satisfy two objectives: (1) to develop the information base necessary for identification, assessment, and mitigation of potential environmental problems arising from replication of the technology and (2) to identify and quantify project-specific and site-specific environmental impacts predicted in the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents (Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision). The EMP contains a description of the background and history of development of the project technologies and defines the processes that will take place in the combustion and spray dryer absorber systems, including the formation of flash-calcined material (FCM) and its use in sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) removal from the flue gases. It also contains a description of the existing environmental resources of the project area. The EMP includes two types of environmental monitoring that are to be used to demonstrate the technologies of the HCCP: compliance monitoring and supplemental monitoring. Compliance monitoring activities include air emissions, wastewater effluents, and visibility. Monitoring of these resources provide the data necessary to demonstrate that the power plant can operate under the required state and federal statutes, regulations, and permit requirements.

  20. CLASSIFICATION OF HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION, HYPERSPECTRAL REMOTE SENSING IMAGERY OF THE LITTLE MIAMI RIVER WATERSHED IN SOUTHWEST OHIO, USA (FINAL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The document and associated land use/land cover (LULC) coverage, entitled Classification of High Spatial Resolution, Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Imagery of the Little Miami River Watershed in Southwest Ohio, USA, is the result of a collaborative effort among an interdisci...

  1. Characterization and evaluation of washability of Alaskan coals: Fifty selected seams from various coal fields: Final technical report, September 30, 1976-February 28, 1986. [50 coal seams

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, P.D.

    1986-09-01

    This final report is the result of a study initiated in 1976 to obtain washability data for Alaskan coals, to supplement the efforts of the US Department of Energy in their ongoing studies on washability of US coals. Washability characteristics were determined for fifty coal samples from the Northern Alaska, Chicago Creek, Unalakleet, Nenana, Matanuska, Beluga, Yentna and Herendeen Bay coal fields. The raw coal was crushed to 1-1/2 inches, 3/8 inch, 14 mesh and 65 mesh top sizes, and float-sink separations were made at 1.30, 1.40 and 1.60 specific gravities. A limited number of samples were also crushed to 200 and 325 mesh sizes prior to float-sink testing. Samples crushed to 65 mesh top size were also separated at 1.60 specific gravity and the float and sink products were characterized for proximate and ultimate analyses, ash composition and ash fusibility. 72 refs., 79 figs., 57 tabs.

  2. 78 FR 26739 - Notice of Final Action on Petition From Earthjustice To List Coal Mines as a Source Category and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-08

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 63 Notice of Final Action on Petition From Earthjustice To List Coal Mines as a Source Category and To Regulate Air Emissions From Coal Mines AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA..., the Acting EPA Administrator, Bob Perciasepe, signed a letter denying a petition to add coal mines...

  3. Development of a Coal Quality Expert. Final technical progress report No. 8

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-16

    During the past quarter, Tasks 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 were active. Data reduction continued for the characterization of raw coal samples collected from five mines located in the Powder Basin in support of the Northern States Power (NSP) King test site. Four flowsheet tests were performed at the CQDC with the Pratt and Utley coals as part of the coal cleanability characterizations being performed for the Alabama Power Company`s (APC) Gaston test site. Babcock and Wilcox (B&W) performed pilot-scale combustion testing of the baseline and alternate coals used for the full-scale test bums at Northern States Power`s King Station. PSI Technology Company (PSIT) and the University of North Dakota`s Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) continued to work under ABB/CE to develop the slogging and fouling models. Work continued on the preparation of final test reports for the field tests performed at Public Service Oklahoma`s Northeastern Unit 4 and Mississippi Power Company`s Watson Unit 4, and plans and test schedules were developed for tests to be conducted later this year at Alabama Power Company`s Gaston Unit 5 and Duquesne Light Company`s Cheswick Unit 1. Task 5 and 6 activities were directed at overall CQE program definition, development of the CQE software specification, completion of the Acid Rain Advisor (ARA), and continued formulation of CQE algorithms and submodels. All laboratory analyses required for the raw-coal characterizations of the Powder River Basin coals--collected in support of the NSP King test program--were completed. Coal cleanability tests were performed with the Pratt and Utley Seam coals obtained from the Pittsburg and Midway Coal Company in support of the baseline coal test performed at APC`S Gaston Unit 5.

  4. Kinetics assisted design of catalysts for coal liquefaction. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, M.T.; Foley, H.C.; Calkins, W.H.; Scouten, C.

    1998-02-01

    The thermal and catalytic reactions of 4-(1-naphthylmethyl)bibenzyl (NBBM), a resid and coal model compound, were examined. Catalytic reaction of NBBM was carried out at 400 C under hydrogen with a series of transition metal-based catalytic materials including Fe(CO){sub 4}PPh{sub 3}, Fe(CO){sub 3}(PPh{sub 3}){sub 2}, Fe(CO){sub 2}(PPh{sub 3}){sub 2}CS{sub 2}, Fe(CO){sub 5}, Mo(CO){sub 6}, Mn{sub 2}(CO){sub 10}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and MoS{sub 2}. Experimental findings and derived mechanistic insights were organized into molecular-level reaction models for NBBM pyrolysis and catalysis. Hydropyrolysis and catalysis reaction families occurring during NBBM hydropyrolysis at 420 C were summarized in the form of reaction matrices which, upon exhaustive application to the components of the reacting system, yielded the mechanistic reaction model. Each reaction family also had an associated linear free energy relationship (LFER) which provided an estimate of the rate constant k{sub i} given a structural property of species i or its reaction. Including the catalytic reaction matrices with those for the pyrolysis model provided a comprehensive NBBM catalytic reaction model and allowed regression of fundamental LFER parameters for the catalytic reaction families. The model also allowed specification of the property of an optimal catalyst. Iron, molybdenum and palladium were predicted to be most effective for model compound consumption. Due to the low costs associated with iron and its disposal, it is a good choice for coal liquefaction catalysis and the challenge remains to synthesize small particles able to access the full surface area of the coal macromolecule.

  5. Lock hopper valves for coal gasification. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    The design, fabrication, and testing of two configurations of Lock Hopper Valves is described. These two configurations are intended to meet the requirements for four typical types of service in coal gasification plants. Operating pressures for either configuration is 1600 psi. One configuration is designed for use at temperatures up to 2000/sup 0/F, and the other for temperatures up to 850/sup 0/F. Several unique construction features are employed, including the extensive use of dense alumina ceramic, especially in the high-temperature valve. The description includes details of construction, and problems encountered during fabrication and testing, and proposed solutions to those problems.

  6. Advanced Coal-Fueled Gas Turbine Program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Horner, M.W.; Ekstedt, E.E.; Gal, E.; Jackson, M.R.; Kimura, S.G.; Lavigne, R.G.; Lucas, C.; Rairden, J.R.; Sabla, P.E.; Savelli, J.F.; Slaughter, D.M.; Spiro, C.L.; Staub, F.W.

    1989-02-01

    The objective of the original Request for Proposal was to establish the technological bases necessary for the subsequent commercial development and deployment of advanced coal-fueled gas turbine power systems by the private sector. The offeror was to identify the specific application or applications, toward which his development efforts would be directed; define and substantiate the technical, economic, and environmental criteria for the selected application; and conduct such component design, development, integration, and tests as deemed necessary to fulfill this objective. Specifically, the offeror was to choose a system through which ingenious methods of grouping subcomponents into integrated systems accomplishes the following: (1) Preserve the inherent power density and performance advantages of gas turbine systems. (2) System must be capable of meeting or exceeding existing and expected environmental regulations for the proposed application. (3) System must offer a considerable improvement over coal-fueled systems which are commercial, have been demonstrated, or are being demonstrated. (4) System proposed must be an integrated gas turbine concept, i.e., all fuel conditioning, all expansion gas conditioning, or post-expansion gas cleaning, must be integrated into the gas turbine system.

  7. Phase equilibrium in coal liquefaction processes. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, K.C.

    1984-08-01

    Gas-liquid equilibrium data have been determined in simulation of coal liquefaction process conditions in mixtures of light gases + heavy hydrocarbons to add to the accumulated data previously reported in EPRI AP-1593. The mixture systems newly investigated are: methane + 9,10 dihydrophenanthrene; hydrogen + methane + 1-methylnaphthalene; hydrogen + carbon dioxide + tetralin; hydrogen + carbon dioxide + 1-methynaphthalene; hydrogen + carbon dioxide + quinoline; nitrogen + tetralin, + n-hexadecane, + 1-methylnaphthalene, + quinoline, and + m-cresol. Correlations for the solubilities of methane and carbon dioxide have been developed from the data based on the use of solubility parameter. The solubility of hydrogen was correlated in EPRI AP-1593. Two equations of state are developed for the description of both the gas solubility and the vaporization of the heavy oil. The Chain-of-Rotators (COR) equation of state explicitly accounts for the rotational molecular motion contribution to the pressure of a fluid. The Cubic-Chain-of-Rotators (CCOR) equation is obtained upon simplifying the COR equation. Interaction constants in the CCOR equation have been determined for the light gases with the heavy hydrocarbons based on data from this project, and the constants are correlated. Equilibrium flash vaporization has been experimentally determined for three coal liquids and for their mixtures with hydrogen. The data are correlated with the CCOR equation of state. 74 figures, 46 tables.

  8. Advanced direct coal liquefaction concepts. Final report, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, D.J.; Parker, R.J.; Simpson, P.L.

    1994-07-01

    Integration of innovative steps into new advanced processes have the potential to reduce costs for producing liquid fuels. In this program, objective is to develop a new approach to liquefaction that generates an all distillate product slate at a reduced cost of about US$25/barrel of crude oil equivalent. A Counterflow Reactor was developed in cooperation with GfK mbH, Germany. Advantages are low hydrogen recycle rates and low feed preheating requirements. Coal/heavy oil slurry is injected into the top of the reactor while the recycle gas and make up hydrogen is introduced into the bottom; hydrogenation products are withdrawn from the top. PU study resulted in distillable oil yields up to 74 wt % on feed (dry ash free) from coprocessing feed slurries containing 40 wt % Vesta subbituminous coal and 60 wt % Cold Lake heavy vacuum tower bottoms. Technologies developed separately by CED and ARC were combined. A 1-kg/hr integrated continuous flow bench scale unit was constructed at the ARC site in Devon, Alberta, based on modifications to a unit at Nisku, Alberta (the modified unit was used in the preliminary economic evaluation).

  9. Highly dispersed catalysts for coal liquefaction. Phase 1 final report, August 23--November 22, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschon, A.S.; Wilson, R.B.; Ghaly, O.

    1995-03-22

    The ultimate goal of this project is to develop novel processes for making the conversion of coal into distillable liquids competitive to that of petroleum products in the range of $25/bbl. The objectives of Phase 1 were to determine the utility of new precursors to highly dispersed catalysts for use of syngas atmospheres in coal liquefaction, and to estimate the effect of such implementation on the cost of the final product. The project is divided into three technical tasks. Tasks 1 and 2 are the analyses and liquefaction experiments, respectively, and Task 3 deals with the economic effects of using these methods during coal liquefaction. Results are presented on the following: Analytical Support--screening tests and second-stage conversions; Laboratory-Scale Operations--catalysts, coal conversion in synthetic solvents, Black Thunder screening studies, and two-stage liquefaction experiments; and Technical and economic Assessment--commercial liquefaction plant description, liquefaction plant cost; and economic analysis.

  10. Re-Use of Clean Coal Technology By-Products in the Construction of Low Permeability Liners. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, William E.; Butalia, Tarunjit S.; Walker, Harold; Mitsch, William

    2005-07-15

    This final project report presents the results of a research program conducted at The Ohio State University from January 3, 2000 to June 30, 2005 to investigate the long-term use of stabilized flue gas desulfurization (FGD) materials in the construction of low permeability liners for ponds and wetlands. The objective of the research program was to establish long-term field-verified time-dependent relationships for the performance of liners constructed from stabilized FGD byproducts generated in Ohio. The project objective was accomplished with a coordinated program of testing and analyzing small-scale laboratory specimens under controlled conditions, mediumscale wetland experiments, and monitoring of a full-scale FGD-lined pond facility. Although the specific uses directly addressed by this report include liners for surface impoundments, the results presented in this study are also useful in other applications especially in the design of daily covers and liners for landfills, seepage cutoff walls and trenches, and for nutrient retention and pollution mitigation wetlands. The small-scale laboratory tests and monitoring of the full-scale FGD lined facility (capacity of one million gallons) shows that stabilized FGD materials can be used as low permeability liners in the construction of water and manure holding ponds. Actual long-term permeability coefficients in the range of 10-7 cm/sec (3 x 10-9 ft/sec) can be obtained in the field by compacting lime and fly ash enriched stabilized FGD materials. Leachate from the FGD material meets Ohio’s non-toxic criteria for coal combustion by-products, and for most potential contaminants the national primary and secondary drinking water standards are also met. The low permeability non-toxic FGD material investigated in this study poses very minimal risks, if any, for groundwater contamination. The FGD wetland experiments indicated no significant differences in phosphorus retention between the clay and FGD

  11. The effect of selective solvent absorption on coal conversion. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, J.W.

    1993-11-01

    Using a pair of different recycle oils from Wilsonville and {sup 1}H NMR, {sup 13}C NMR, gel permeation (GPC) chromatography, high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC), and elemental analysis, no significant differences were observed between the composition of the recycle oil and that portion of the oil not absorbed by the coal. For these complex mixtures, coals are not selective absorbants. Since most of the heteroatoms responsible for most of the specific interactions have been removed by hydrogenolyses, this is perhaps not surprising. To address the issue of the role of hydrogen bond donors in the reused as hydrogen donor coal, tetralin and 2-t-butyltetralin were used as hydrogen donor solvents. This work is reported in detail in Section 2. The basic idea is that the presence of the t-butyl group on the aromatic ring will hinder or block diffusion of the hydrogen donor into the coal resulting in lower conversions and less hydrogen transferred with 2-t-butyltetralin than with tetralin. Observed was identical amounts of hydrogen transfer and nearly identical conversions to pyridine solubles for both hydrogen donors. Diffusion of hydrogen donors into the coal does not seem to play a significant role in coal conversion. Finally, in Section 3 is discussed the unfavorable impact on conversion of the structural rearrangements which occur when Illinois No. 6 coal is swollen with a solvent. We believe this rearrangement results in a more strongly associated solid leading to the diminution of coal reactions. Hydrogen donor diffusion does not seem to be a major factor in coal conversion while the structural rearrangement does. Both areas warrant further exploration.

  12. Thermally induced structural changes in coal combustion. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Flagan, R.C.; Gavalas, G.R.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of the temperature-time history during coal devolitization and oxidation on the physical properties and the reactivity of resulting char were studied experimentally for temperatures and residence times typical of pulverized combustion. Experiments were also carried out at somewhat lower temperatures and correspondingly longer residence times. An electrically heated laminar flow reactor was used to generate char and measure the rates of oxidation at gas temperatures about 1600K. Partially oxidized chars were extracted and characterized by gas adsorption and mercury porosimetry, optical and scanning electron microscopy, and oxidation in a thermogravimetric analysis system (TGA). A different series of experiments was conducted using a quadrople electrodynamic balance. Single particles were suspended electrodynamically and heated by an infrared laser in an inert or oxygen-containing atmosphere. During the laser heating, measurements were taken of particle mass, size/shape, and temperature.

  13. Silica membranes for hydrogen separation from coal gas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gavalas, G.R.

    1996-01-01

    This project is a continuation of a previous DOE-UCR project (DE-FG22- 89PC89765) dealing with the preparation of silica membranes highly permselective to hydrogen at elevated temperatures, suitable for hydrogen separation from coal gas. The membranes prepared in the previous project had very high selectivity but relatively low permeance. Therefore, the general objectives of this project were to improve the permeance of these membranes and to obtain fundamental information about membrane structure and properties. The specific objectives were: (1) to explore new silylation reagents and reaction conditions with the purpose of reducing the thickness and increasing the permeance of silica membranes prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), (2) to characterize the membrane structure, (3) to delineate mechanism and kinetics of deposition, (4) to measure the permeability of silica layers at different extents of deposition, and (5) to mathematically model the relationship between structure and deposition kinetics.

  14. Thermal preconditioning of coal/water mixtures. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Roffe, G.; Miller, G.

    1984-10-01

    Thermal preconditioning of coal/water mixtures is a process proposed for use with stationary gas turbine engines in which the CWM is heated before delivery to the combustor in order to accomplish the water vaporization and coal pyrolysis/devolatilization steps prior to injection. The process offers a number of potential advantages such as the ability to start the engine without the use of an auxiliary fuel system, the elimination of atomizing nozzles, increased flame stability for proper turndown, compatibility with NO/sub x/-control techniques such as rich-burn-quick quench combustors, and potentially faster char burnout. The objective of the program was to obtain information which will allow the feasibility of thermal preconditioning to be evaluated. The economics of the process and its impact on a combined cycle system have been addressed. The slurry heating and boiling processes have been studied and the relationships between fuel properties, temperature and residence time in the processing apparatus and the evolution of combustible gases have been measured. A special apparatus was designed and constructed for the experimental portion of the program. Results indicate that at temperatures above 900/sup 0/F significant devolatilization can be accomplished in residence times on the order of one second. A preliminary economic and performance analysis has been completed for the thermal preconditioning process. Four gas turbine power plant concepts incorporating thermal preconditioning of CWS have been investigated. These concepts differ from one another in the source of heat used for the preconditioning process. Heat paths have been defined and the relationships between the efficiencies and operating conditions of the various components on heat rate and plant output have been determined. The analysis indicates that increases in heat rate of less than 5% can be expected. 4 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Energy Policy Act Transportation Rate Study: Final Report on Coal Transportation

    EIA Publications

    2000-01-01

    This is the final in a series of reports prepared for the U.S. Congress by the Secretary of Energy on coal distribution and transportation rates as mandated by Title XIII, Section 1340, Establishment of Data Base and Study of Transportation Rates, of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102-486).

  16. EMISSION CHARACTERIZATION OF MAJOR FOSSIL FUEL POWER PLANTS IN THE OHIO RIVER VALLEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study characterizes the atmospheric emissions from five major coal-fired power plant units in the Ohio River Valley between Portsmouth, Ohio, and Louisville, Kentucky. This characterization provides data that are representative of the boiler fuel emission control combination...

  17. Encoal mild coal gasification project: Encoal project final report, July 1, 1997--July 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    This document is the summative report on the ENCOAL Mild Coal Gasification Project. It covers the time period from September 17, 1990, the approval date of the Cooperative Agreement between ENCOAL and the US Department of Energy (DOE), to July 17, 1997, the formal end of DOE participation in the Project. The Cooperative Agreement was the result of an application by ENCOAL to the DOE soliciting joint funding under Round III of the Clean Coal Technology Program. By June 1992, the ENCOAL Plant had been built, commissioned and started up, and in October 1994, ENCOAL was granted a two-year extension, carrying the project through to September 17, 1996. No-cost extensions have moved the Cooperative Agreement end date to July 17, 1997 to allow for completion of final reporting requirements. At its inception, ENCOAL was a subsidiary of Shell Mining Company. In November 1992, Shell Mining Company changed ownership, becoming a subsidiary of Zeigler Coal Holding Company (Zeigler) of Fairview Heights, Illinois. Renamed successively as SMC Mining Company and then Bluegrass Coal Development Company, it remained the parent entity for ENCOAL, which has operated a 1,000-ton/day mild coal gasification demonstration plant near Gillette, Wyoming for nearly 5 years. ENCOAL operates at the Buckskin Mine owned by Triton Coal Company (Triton), another Zeigler subsidiary.

  18. Kinetics of coal conversion to soluble products. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, J.W.

    1994-04-12

    The objectives of this work are (1) to measure the kinetics of the conversion of coals to soluble products under model liquefaction conditions using GPS techniques to count the number of bonds broken; (2) to analyze these data using kinetic schemes based on the behavior of crosslinked macromolecular networks. The product was Soxhlet extracted with pyridine until the pyridine solution was clear. A gel permeation chromatogram of the pyridine soluble is shown in Figure 2A. The improved mass sensitive detector system requires only about 500 ng to acquire a chromatogram having fairly good S/N ratio. Apparently, no disturbance is caused by the remaining tetralin and naphthalene formed by dehydrogenation of tetralin. These seriously affect the lower molecular weight region when IR or UV detectors are used. It is a notable advantage of the mass sensitive detector that suitable adjustment of the nebulizer and of the evaporator completely suppressed the contribution of solvent to the chromatogram. The molecular weight distribution of liquefaction product appears to be almost unimodal if the small shoulder at the lower elution volume side is neglected.

  19. The mechanism of hydrogen incorporation in coal liquefaction. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The purpose of the research was to determine the detailed molecular mechanism for the introduction of hydrogen into coal when it is heated in an atmosphere of H{sub 2} in the absence of catalysts and to use this information as a baseline for the study of catalyzed processes. The plan was to study the reaction of model compounds with D{sub 2} in a glass-lined reactor of the authors` design and, by determining the distribution of D atoms in the reaction products, to deduce the reaction mechanism(s). As of the date of this report (Nov. 1995), the authors have, they believe conclusively, demonstrated the mechanism of the thermal process. They have studied several gas-phase reactions and, recently, have extended these to surface-immobilized models. The data are consistent in their support of the proposed sequence. Within the past year, they have begun to look at catalyzed hydrothermolysis and, while the work is at an early stage, they can draw a few significant conclusions, presented in the report.

  20. Biological upgrading of coal-derived synthesis gas: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Barik, S.; Johnson, E.R.; Ko, C.W.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

    1986-10-01

    The technical feasibility of the biological conversion of coal synthesis gas to methane has been demonstrated in the University of Arkansas laboratories. Cultures of microorganisms have been developed which achieve total conversion in the water gas shift and methanation reactions in either mixed or pure cultures. These cultures carry out these conversions at ordinary temperatures and pressures, without sulfur toxicity. Several microorganisms have been identified as having commercial potential for producing methane. These include a mixed culture of unidentified bacteria; P. productus which produces acetate, a methane precursor; and Methanothrix sp., which produces methane from acetate. These cultures have been used in mixed reactors and immobilized cell reactors to achieve total CO and H/sub 2/ conversion in a retention time of less than two hours, quite good for a biological reactor. Preliminary economic projections indicate that a biological methanation plant with a size of 5 x 10/sup 10/ Btu/day can be economically attractive. 42 refs., 26 figs., 86 tabs.

  1. Evaluation of data gathered from unmineable coal seams. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-06-01

    As part of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) programs directed at gas recovery from unconventional sources INTERCOMP Resource Development and Engineering, Inc. (INTERCOMP) is under contract to the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to provide for the reduction of uncertainties in critical parameters related to the methane recovery from unmineable coals in the United States. To accomplish this objective INTERCOMP has assisted in test site selection, planning, and monitoring when requested and evaluated the results of test in terms of methane production potential and economics for selected well sites, geologic settings, and geographical areas. This is a continuation of two earlier contracts in which an optimized test program was specified and in which the results of that program were partially implemented and evaluated. In this report INTERCOMP's effort in assisting the Bureau of Mines to understand the nature of a communication problem between the vertical dewatering hole and the three horizontal degasification legs in the Emerald Mines Horizontal Drilling project is described. Recommendations made by INTERCOMP on how to determine the amount of communication and the answers to several other questions asked are given in the section Assistance in Test Planning. The use of INTERCOMP's numerical simulation model was necessary in this effort. The section entitled Resource Assessment gives the evaluation of each specific well site tested for methane production that furnished to INTERCOMP by METC.

  2. Solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water system installed at Columbia Gas System Service Corp. , Columbus, Ohio. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1980-11-01

    The Solar Energy System located at the Columbia Gas Corporation, Columbus, Ohio, has 2978 ft/sup 2/ of Honeywell single axis tracking, concentrating collectors and provides solar energy for space heating, space cooling and domestic hot water. A 1,200,000 Btu/h Bryan water-tube gas boiler provides hot water for space heating. Space cooling is provided by a 100 ton Arkla hot water fired absorption chiller. Domestic hot water heating is provided by a 50 gallon natural gas domestic storage water heater. Extracts are included from the site files, specification references, drawings, installation, operation and maintenance instructions.

  3. Ultrafine grinding of low-rank coal: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchillon, C.W.; Steele, W.G.

    1986-08-01

    A study of ultrafine grinding of low-rank coals in a fluid-energy mill was undertaken. This report presents the results of the Phase I effort which included a review of the literature on ultrafine grinding, a review of theories of grinding, a combined grinding and drying experiment on Martin Lake Texas lignite, an evaluation of the energy requirements for the process, and an evaluation of the properties of the products from the grinding tests. A sample of Martin Lake Texas lignite was obtained and a series of tests were conducted in a fluid-energy mill at the Ergon, Inc., Micro-Energy Division development facility at Vicksburg, MS. The grinding fluids used were air at 116 F and steam at 225, 310, 350, 400, and 488 F as measured in the mill. The products of these tests were analyzed for volatile mattr, ash, total moisture, equilibrium moisture, heating value, density distribution, aerodynamic particle size classification, angle of repose, porosity, density, and particle size distribution. ASTM test procedures were followed where applicable. Ultimate and ash mineral analyses were also conducted on the samples. Results of the various tests are presented in detail in the report. In general, the fluid energy mill was used succssfully in simultaneous grinding and drying of the lignite. Particle size reduction to less than 10 microns on a population basis was achieved. The equilibrium moisture of the samples decreased with increasing grinding fluid temperatures. Density distribution studies showed that a significant fraction of the ash appeared in the >1.6 specific gravity particles. The energy required for the grinding/drying process increased with increasing mill temperatures. 29 refs., 18 figs., 13 tabs.

  4. Feasibility study for underground coal gasification at the Krabi Coal Mine site, Thailand. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Boysen, J.; Sole, J.; Schmit, C.R.; Harju, J.A.; Young, B.C.

    1997-01-01

    This study, conducted by Energy and Environmental Research Center, was funded by the U.S Trade and Development Agency. The report summarizes the accomplishments of field, analytical data evaluation and modeling activities focused on assessment of underground coal gasification (UCG) feasibility at Krabi over a two year period. The overall objective of the project was to determine the technical issues, environmental impact, and economic of developing and commercializing UCG at the site in Krabi. The report contains an Executive Summary followed by these chapters: (1) Project Overview; (2) Project Site Characterization; (3) Inorganic and Thermal Materials Characterization; (4) Technical and Economic Feasibility of UCG At the Krabi Site; (5) Conclusions and Recommendations; (6) Acknowledgments; (7) References.

  5. Simulated coal gas MCFC power plant system verification. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-30

    The objective of the main project is to identify the current developmental status of MCFC systems and address those technical issues that need to be resolved to move the technology from its current status to the demonstration stage in the shortest possible time. The specific objectives are separated into five major tasks as follows: Stack research; Power plant development; Test facilities development; Manufacturing facilities development; and Commercialization. This Final Report discusses the M-C power Corporation effort which is part of a general program for the development of commercial MCFC systems. This final report covers the entire subject of the Unocal 250-cell stack. Certain project activities have been funded by organizations other than DOE and are included in this report to provide a comprehensive overview of the work accomplished.

  6. Coal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brant, Russell A.; Glass, Gary B.

    1983-01-01

    Principle work of 23 state geological surveys is summarized. Work includes mapping/estimating coal resources, centralizing data in National Coal Resources Data System through cooperative programs, exploration drilling, and others. Comments on U.S. Geological Survey activities, coal-related conferences/meetings, and industry research activities are…

  7. Geophysical investigations of the Western Ohio-Indiana region. Final report, October 1986--September 1992: Volume 10

    SciTech Connect

    Ruff, L.; LaForge, R.; Thorson, R.; Wagner, T.; Goudaen, F.

    1994-01-01

    Earthquake activity in the Western Ohio-Indiana region has been monitored with a seismograph network consisting of nine stations located in west-central Ohio and four stations located in Indiana. Six local and regional earthquakes have been recorded from October 1990 to September 1992 with magnitudes ranging from 0.6 to 5.0. A total of 36 local and regional earthquakes have been recorded in the past 6-year period (October 1986 to September 1992). Overall a total of 78 local and regional earthquakes have been recorded since the network went into operation in 1977. There was a peak in seismicity in 1986, including the July 12, 1986 St. Marys` event (mb=4.5), followed by an anomalously low level of seismicity for about 2 years. The most unusual feature of the seismicity in the past.year is the occurrence of three earthquakes in Indiana. The locations of the felt earthquakes are scattered across central Indiana; an area that had been aseismic. Analysis of arrival time data accumulated over the past 14 years shows that the Anna region crustal structure is ``slower`` than the average mid-continent crustal structure. This implies that the proposed Keewenawan rift in the Anna region has a different structure than that of other Keewenawan rifts in the mid-continent.

  8. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Republic Steel Quarry Site, Elyria, Ohio (first remedial action), September 1988. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-30

    The Republic Steel Quarry site is located in the City of Elyria in Lorain County, Ohio, southwest of Cleveland. From 1950 to 1972, approximately 200,000 gallons of waste pickle liquor (acid wastes used in steel processing) were discharged to a ditch located on the east side of the steel plant, which flowed north into the quarry. From 1972 to 1975 the ditch was used for disposing of rinse water from pickling operations. The primary contaminants of concern affecting surface water, sediments, and soil are VOCs including toluene, and metals including chromium and lead. The selected remedial action for this site includes: excavation and offsite disposal an a RCRA landfill of approximately 100 cu yds of contaminated surface soil from the pickle-liquor discharge ditch and from along the southern end of the quarry; and implementation of a five-year monitoring plan including a fish-species survey.

  9. Getting on Board: A Review of Transportation Options for Ohioans with Disabilities and Recommendations for Systems Change. Final Report to the Ohio Developmental Disabilities Council on Grant Project 98-4, Transportation. [and] Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reardon, Michael J.; Frazier, Dennis G.; Tonks, Gary

    This final report of the Ohio Developmental Disabilities Council's (ODDC) project on transportation presents an evaluation of the current transportation options available to Ohioans with disabilities and offers recommendations to improve these options. The first section provides an overview of the ODDC transportation project including its…

  10. Management of solid wastes from the Limestone Injection Dry Scrubbing (LIDS) clean coal technology. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Musiol, W.F. Jr.; Czuczwa, J.M.

    1993-03-01

    The objectives of this project were to characterize by-products from a pilot Limestone Injection Dry Scrubbing (LIDS) process and to develop processes directed toward the safe and economic use or disposal of these wastes. Because LIDS is a developing Clean Coal technology, a database of chemical and physical characteristics of the by-product was first developed. During the course of this project, it was found that the waste alone did not form high-strength products sufficient for use in construction and engineering applications. Therefore, the project was redirected to evaluate the by-product as a soil-cement and Portland cement raw material, agricultural liming agent, backfill/landfill material component, and mine reclamation/neutralizing agent. Based on these evaluations, the most viable uses for the LIDS byproduct include use in mine reclamation or as a neutralization agent. If soluble sulfites can be minimized by avoiding a dolomitic LIDS reagent, use as an agricultural liming agent has promise. Interest from an Ohio utility in the LIDS process suggests possible application of results at the demonstration or commercial stages.

  11. Combustion of coal/water mixtures with thermal preconditioning. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Novack, M.; Roffe, G.; Miller, G.

    1985-12-01

    Thermal preconditioning is a process in which coal/water mixtures are vaporized to produce coal/steam suspensions, and then superheated to allow the coal to devolatilize producing suspensions of char particles in hydrocarbon gases and steam. This final product of the process can be injected without atomization, and burned directly in a gas turbine combustor. This paper reports on the results of an experimental program in which thermally preconditioned coal/water mixture was successfully burned with a stable flame in a gas turbine combustor test rig. Tests were performed at a mixture flowrate of 300 lb/hr and combustor pressure of 8 atmospheres. The coal/water mixture was thermally preconditioned and injected into the combustor over a temperature range from 350 to 600/sup 0/F, and combustion air was supplied at between 600 to 725/sup 0/F. Test durations generally varied between 10 to 20 minutes. Major results of the combustion testing were that: a stable flame was maintained over a wide equivalence ratio range, between phi = 2.4 (rich) to 0.2 (lean); and, combustion efficiency of over 99% was achieved when the mixture was preconditioned to 600/sup 0/F and the combustion air preheated to 725/sup 0/F. Measurements of ash particulates captured in the exhaust sampling probe located 20 inches from the injector face, show typical sizes collected to be about 1 micron, with agglomerates of these particulates to be not more than 8 microns. The original mean coal particle size for these tests, prior to preconditioning was 25 microns. System studies indicate that preconditioning can be incorporated into either stationary or mobile power plant designs without system derating. On the basis of these results, thermal pretreatment offers a practical alternative to fuel atomization in gas turbine applications. 20 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Appalachian Clean Coal Technology Consortium. Final report, October 10, 1994--March 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Parekh, B.K.; Meloy, T.

    1997-12-31

    The Appalachian Clean Coal Technology Consortium is a group comprised of representatives from the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, West Virginia University, and the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research, that was formed to pursue research in areas related to the treatment and processing of fine coal. Each member performed research in their respective areas of expertise and the report contained herein encompasses the results that were obtained for the three major tasks that the Consortium undertook from October, 1994 through March, 1997. In the first task, conducted by Virginia Polytechnic Institute, novel methods (both mechanical and chemical) for dewatering fine coal were examined. In the second task, the Center for Applied Energy Research examined novel approaches for destabilization of [highly stable] flotation froths. And in the third task, West Virginia University developed physical and mathematical models for fine coal spirals. The Final Report is written in three distinctive chapters, each reflecting the individual member`s task report. Recommendations for further research in those areas investigated, as well as new lines of pursuit, are suggested.

  13. CROP AND FOREST LOSSES DUE TO CURRENT AND PROJECTED EMISSIONS FROM COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS IN THE OHIO RIVER BASIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report was prepared as part of the Ohio River Basin Energy Study (ORBES), a multi-disciplinary research program supported by the Environmental Protection Agency. The major objectives of this part of the ORBES research are to summarize and evaluate the literature on metabolic...

  14. Mulled coal: A beneficiated coal form for use as a fuel or fuel intermediate. Phase 3, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    Energy International Corporation (El) was awarded a contract to evaluate a new concept for utilization of the fine coal wetcake produced by many of the physical beneficiation processes now under development. EI proposed development of a stabilized wetcake with properties that would facilitate storage, handling, transport, and subsequent conversion of the material into Coal-Water Fuel (CWF) at the point of use. The effort was performed in three phases. Phase I established the technical feasibility of stabilizing the fine coal ``wetcake`` in a form that can be readily handled and converted into a desired fuel form at the combustion site. The preferred form of stabilized ``wetcake`` was a granular free flowing material with the moisture encapsulated with the fine coal particles. The product was termed Mulled Coal. Phase I results indicated that the Mulled Coal was not only suitable as a CWF intermediate, but also had potential as a solid fuel. Phase II demonstrated the utilization of the Mulled Coal process to store and move fine coal products as a stable ``wetcake.`` Tasks in this phase tested components of the various systems required for storage, handling and combustion of the fine coals. Phase III expanded the technology by: 1. Evaluating Mulled Coal from representative coals from all producing regions in the US. 2. Development of bench-scale tests. 3. Design, construction, and operation of a 1 ton/hr continuous processing unit. 4. Evaluation of the effects of beneficiation. and 5. Developing an estimate of capital and operating costs for commercial units.

  15. 77 FR 46346 - Ohio Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-03

    ..., Federal Register (41 FR 34688). You can also find later actions concerning Ohio's program and program... Information; Transfer, Assignment, or Sale of Permit Rights; Final Rule'' on December 7, 2007 (72 FR 68000... Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement 30 CFR Part 935 Ohio Regulatory Program...

  16. Rheology of coal-water slurries prepared by the high-pressure roll mill grinding of coal. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerstenau, D.W.; De, A.

    1996-08-01

    The preparation of coal water slurries to replace fuel oil for direct combustion has become an important field in modem coal technology. The U.S. Department of Energy has planned or has underway several demonstration projects to burn coal-water slurries to replace fuel oil is attractive not only because there is an assured domestic supply of coal, but also on various technoeconomic grounds. Coal-water slurries combine the handling flexibility of fuel oil in power plants and various other industrial applications. This report discusses the rheology of coal-water slurries and the correlation to the coal preparation by grinding with a choke-fed high pressure roll mill. Performance of the roll mills and energy consumption are described.

  17. Coal Combustion Products Extension Program

    SciTech Connect

    Tarunjit S. Butalia; William E. Wolfe

    2006-01-11

    This final project report presents the activities and accomplishments of the ''Coal Combustion Products Extension Program'' conducted at The Ohio State University from August 1, 2000 to June 30, 2005 to advance the beneficial uses of coal combustion products (CCPs) in highway and construction, mine reclamation, agricultural, and manufacturing sectors. The objective of this technology transfer/research program at The Ohio State University was to promote the increased use of Ohio CCPs (fly ash, FGD material, bottom ash, and boiler slag) in applications that are technically sound, environmentally benign, and commercially competitive. The project objective was accomplished by housing the CCP Extension Program within The Ohio State University College of Engineering with support from the university Extension Service and The Ohio State University Research Foundation. Dr. Tarunjit S. Butalia, an internationally reputed CCP expert and registered professional engineer, was the program coordinator. The program coordinator acted as liaison among CCP stakeholders in the state, produced information sheets, provided expertise in the field to those who desired it, sponsored and co-sponsored seminars, meetings, and speaking at these events, and generally worked to promote knowledge about the productive and proper application of CCPs as useful raw materials. The major accomplishments of the program were: (1) Increase in FGD material utilization rate from 8% in 1997 to more than 20% in 2005, and an increase in overall CCP utilization rate of 21% in 1997 to just under 30% in 2005 for the State of Ohio. (2) Recognition as a ''voice of trust'' among Ohio and national CCP stakeholders (particularly regulatory agencies). (3) Establishment of a national and international reputation, especially for the use of FGD materials and fly ash in construction applications. It is recommended that to increase Ohio's CCP utilization rate from 30% in 2005 to 40% by 2010, the CCP Extension Program be

  18. Evidence of Ancient Seas in Ohio, Student Guide and Teacher Guide. OEAGLS Investigation 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leach, Susan; Mayer, Victor J.

    This investigation presents activities related to the geological history of Ohio and Ohio's mineral wealth. Energy is discussed briefly as it relates to high sulfer content Ohio coal. The lessons are presented in the form of a teachers' guide and a students' guide. In the teachers' guide, an overview of the study is followed by the prerequisite…

  19. Improved design of room and pillar coal mining. Final technical report, October 1, 1978-March 31, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Bieniawski, Z.T.

    1982-06-30

    The objective of this research grant was to improve upon the design of roof spans and coal pillars in a coal mining technique known as room-and-pillar mining. Essentially, the project consisted of three aspects: determination of stable roof spans; determination of the strength of coal pillars; and determination of safety factors for room-and-pillar coal mining conditions in the United States. The study included a critical review of the available pillar design formulas as well as the design methods for selecting stable roof spans. Three novel approaches were utilized: (1) the petite sismique technique was assessed for possible determination of coal pillar deformability; this was the first use of this technique in the United States since its development in France; (2) the Geomechanics Classification was extended for determination of safe roof spans in room-and-pillar coal mining; and (3) a national survey of the current design practice as well as of the stable and failed coal pillars and roof spans was performed with the aim of determining factors of safety in room-and-pillar coal mining. Research investigations included field studies, laboratory testing and analytical computer simulations. The final outcome of the project is a proposal for a design code for room-and-pillar coal mining in the United States. In the course of this research, seven publications were prepared and three M.S. theses were completed. Practical applications of this research are discussed.

  20. Direct comparison of XAFS spectroscopy and sequential extraction for arsenic speciation in coal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huggins, Frank E.; Huffman, G.P.; Kolker, A.; Mroczkowski, S.; Palmer, C.A.; Finkelman, R.B.

    2000-01-01

    The speciation of arsenic in an Ohio bituminous coal and a North Dakota lignite has been examined by the complementary methods of arsenic XAFS spectroscopy and sequential extraction by aqueous solutions of ammonium acetate, HCl, HF, and HNO3. In order to facilitate a more direct comparison of the two methods, the arsenic XAFS spectra were obtained from aliquots of the coal prepared after each stage of the leaching procedure. For the aliquots, approximately linear correlations (r2 > 0.98 for the Ohio coal, > 0.90 for the ND lignite) were observed between the height of the edge-step in the XAFS analysis and the concentration of arsenic measured by instrumental neutron activation analysis. Results from the leaching sequence indicate that there are two major arsenic forms present in both coals; one is removed by leaching with HCl and the other by HNO3. Whereas the XAFS spectral signatures of the arsenic leached by HCl are compatible with arsenate for both coals, the arsenic leached by HNO3 is identified as arsenic associated with pyrite for the Ohio coal and as an As3+ species for the North Dakota lignite. Minor arsenate forms persist in both coals after the final leaching with nitric acid. The arsenate forms extracted in HCl are believed to be oxidation products derived from the other major arsenic forms upon exposure of the pulverized coals to air.

  1. Improving the Economic Assumption Factors in the Cost-Benefit Study Formulas for Ohio Vocational Education, or A System for the Evaluation of Investment in Vocational Education in Ohio. [Final Report].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghazalah, I. A.

    A localized system for the evaluation of investment in vocational education in Ohio is described in this four part manual. Following an instruction introduction to the manual, part II provides a description of the analytical framework for this system. Vocational education is analyzed as an investment and an explanation of the criteria used in the…

  2. Advanced coal-gasification technical analyses. Appendix 2: coal fines disposal. Final report, December 1982-September 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Cover, A.E.; Hubbard, D.A.; Jain, S.K.; Shah, K.V.

    1986-01-01

    This report is a compilation of several studies conducted by KRSI under the Advanced Coal Gasification Technical Analyses contract with GRI. It addresses the issue of disposal and/or utilization of the coal fines that cannot be used as feedstock for fixed-bed (i.e. Lurgi) gasifiers. Specific items addressed are: (1) Technical, legal and economic aspects of fines burial, (2) Estimation of the premium for fines-free coal delivered to an SNG plant and resulting reduction in SNG production costs, (3) Comparison of the relative advantages and limitations of Winkler and GKT gasifiers to consuming fines, (4) Review of coal-size consist curves in the GRI Guidelines to assess the fines content of ROM coals, (5) a first-pass design and cost estimate using GKT gasifiers in tandem with Lurgi gasifiers in an North Dakota lignite-to-SNG plant to consume full range of coal-size consist, (6) Evaluation of the General Electric technology for extrusion of coal fines and testing of the extrudates in a fixed-bed gasifier, and (7) Investigation of equipment and variables involved in briquetting of coal fines, such that fines could be fed to the gasifiers along with the lump coal.

  3. Ohio EPA Teachers Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Environmental Protection Agency, Columbus.

    In an effort to provide teachers in Ohio with assistance in environmental education, the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has produced this teachers kit. It is designed to describe what the Ohio EPA is doing to protect Ohio's air, land, and water. The background information provides an historical account of some of the events that have…

  4. Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schwalb, J.A.; Ryan, T.W.

    1991-10-01

    Coal fueled diesel engines present unique wear problems in the piston ring/cylinder liner area because of their tendency to contaminate the lube-oil with high concentrations of highly abrasive particles. This program involved a series of bench-scale wear tests and engine tests designed to investigate various aspects of the ring/liner wear problem and to make specific recommendations to engine manufacturers as to how to alleviate these problems. The program was organized into tasks, designed to accomplish the following objectives: (1) define the predominant wear mechanisms causing accelerated wear in the ring/liner area; (2) investigate the effectiveness of traditional approaches to wear prevention to prevent wear in coal-fueled engines; (3) further refine information on the most promising approaches to wear prevention; (4) present detailed information and recommendations to engine manufacturers on the most promising approach to wear prevention; (5) present a final report covering the entire program; (6)complete engine tests with a coal-derived liquid fuel, and investigate the effects of the fuel on engine wear and emissions.

  5. Evaluation of US coal performance in the shell coal gasification process (SCGP). Volume 1. Texas lignite. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Heitz, W.L.; McCullough, G.R.; Gierman, H.; van Kessel, M.M.

    1984-02-01

    The Shell Coal Gasificaton Process was included in the EPRI evaluation of the more promising gasification technologies. This report evaluates the performance of Texas lignite in the SCGP. A companion report (RP2094-1) evaluates the performance of an Illinois No. 5 seam coal. Tests were conducted in the Shell Internationale Research Maatschappij B.V. Amsterdam laboratory process development unit (6 metric ton per day nominal throughput). Shell also has a 150 metric ton per day gasification process development unit at Deutsche Shell's Harburg Refinery, Federal Republic of Germany. These initial tests indicate that Texas lignite is as suitable for the Shell Coal Gasification Process as any bituminous coal previously tested and that only moderate conditions are required for gasification. Process variables included oxygen/MAF (moisture and ash free) coal ratios of 0.82 to 0.96 kg/kg, throughputs of 74 to 207 kg MAF coal/hr, and pressures of 2.1 to 2.8 MPa (1 MPa = 10 bar or 145 psia). Extensive environmental sampling programs were carried out with 50% of normal bleed water recycled to the process via an evaporating venturi. Carbon conversion was nearly complete (99+ %) at reactor outlet temperatures as low as 1250/sup 0/C; at a pressure of 2.1 MPa, a maximum thermal efficiency (76% of LHV-coal) was obtained at an oxygen/MAF coal ratio of 0.90 kg/kg. Process results were only marginally influenced by variations in coal throughput but an increase in pressure at constant throughput increased the cold gas efficiency by two percentage points to 78% of LHV coal (mainly through a reduction in heat loss). In a test on load-following characteristics of the process, the unit pressure remained constant and the flow of product gas responded within one minute to a stepwise change in coal feed rate.

  6. Coal Reserves Data Base report. Final report on the Demonstrated Reserve Base (DRB) of coal in Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.W.; Glass, G.B.

    1991-12-05

    The Coal Reserves Data Base (CRDB) Program is a cooperative data base development program sponsored by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The objective of the CRDB Program is to involve knowledgeable coal resource authorities from the major coal-bearing regions in EIA`s effort to update the Nation`s coal reserves data. This report describes one of two prototype studies to update State-level reserve estimates. The CRDB data are intended for use in coal supply analyses and to support analyses of policy and legislative issues. They will be available to both Government and non-Government analysts. The data also will be part of the information used to supply United States energy data for international data bases and for inquiries from private industry and the public. (VC)

  7. Mulled coal: A beneficiated coal form for use as a fuel or fuel intermediate. Phase 1 feasibility studies: Final

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    Energy International is developing a technology that will create a staged formulation with the first coal form (Mulled Coal) that can be stored, transported, and pumped. Just prior to combustion, the Mulled Coal (MC) would be modified to provide the properties needed for proper atomization. This concept is an alternative to the expensive and energy intensive thermal drying processing of fine coal wet cakes. The material is suitable for both direct feed use in conventional and fluid bed combustors as well as on-site conversion to combustible slurries. By maintaining the coal form relatively close to the feed wet cake, only minor processing with low additive levels and low energy blending needed at the point of production. Its conversion to slurry or other use-feed form is made near the time of use and thus the requirements for stability, climatic control, and other storage, transport, and handling requirements are much less severe.

  8. 75 FR 72947 - Ohio Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ... the August 16, 1982, Federal Register (47 FR 34688). You can also find later actions concerning Ohio's... Comments We asked for public comments on the amendment (Administrative Record No. OH-2188-04) 74 FR 17802... environment from the adverse effects of surface coal mining operations.'' Section 503(a)(1) of SMCRA...

  9. OHIO RIVER BASIN ENERGY STUDY: HEALTH ASPECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report was prepared as part of the Ohio River Basin Energy Study (ORBES), a multi-disciplinary program supported by the Environmental Protection Agency. It attempts to establish health damage functions for energy resource extraction, conversion (i.e., burning of coal to prod...

  10. Repair, Evaluation, Maintenance, and Rehabilitation Research Program. evaluation of the rehabilitation program for relief wells at Leesville dam, Ohio. Final report, May 1986-June 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Leach, R.E.; Hackett, G.

    1992-09-01

    At a relief well and drainage system rehabilitation workshop held in April 1985, it was determined that maintenance methods varied between Districts and that no attempt had been made to document results versus the method used. The Huntington District was planning the rehabilitation of 12 wells at Leesville Dam, Ohio, and agreed to use a composite of the various common Corps of Engineer (CE) cleaning methods along with the extra verification procedures needed to document the results. Therefore, the objectives of the study were to document a commonly used CE well rehabilitation procedure, to provide the needed pre- and post-verification data, and to evaluate the results. For the study, encrustant, bacterial, and water analyses were conducted for use in planning the rehabilitation procedure. Recommended procedures and the final selected procedures for rehabilitation are presented. Planning criteria required that the chemicals be industry accepted and commonly used with economics being the final governing factor. The procedure used at this site incorporated a long linear phosphate and sodium hypochlorite as chemicals with mechanical agitation using a surge block. Several factors were considered during the evaluation: (a) the lake level was lowered between some of the pre- and post-pump tests; (b) there was no bacterial growth in two wells; and (c) there were hydrogeologic boundary conditions that altered groundwater quality, flow, and available bacterial nutrients from well to well. Although there were immediate benefits, post-bacterial analysis showed regrowth had started within 4 months of the rehabilitation. There was no as installed specific capacity on record to evaluate overall results.

  11. Chemical kinetics and transport processes in supercritical fluid extraction of coal. Final report, August 10, 1990--December 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, B.J.; Smith, J.M.; Wang, M.; Zhang, C.J.

    1993-02-01

    The overall objective of this project was to study the supercritical fluid extraction of hydrocarbons from coal. Beyond the practical concern of deriving products from coal, the research has provided insights into the structure, properties, and reactivities of coal. Information on engineering fundamentals of coal thermolysis and extraction, including physical and chemical processes, is presented in this final report. To accomplish the goals of the project we developed continuous-flow experiments for fixed-bed samples of coal that allow two types of analysis of the extract: continuous spectrophotometric absorbance measurements of the lumped concentration of extract, and chromatographic determinations of molecular-weight distributions as a function of time. Thermolysis of coal yields a complex mixture of many extract products whose molecular-weight distribution (MWD) varies with time for continuous-flow, semibatch experiments. The flow reactor with a differential, fixed bed of coal particles contacted by supercritical t-butanol was employed to provide dynamic MWD data by means of HPLC gel permeation chromatography of the extract. The experimental results, time-dependent MWDs of extract molecules, were interpreted by a novel mathematical model based on continuous-mixture kinetics for thermal cleavage of chemical bonds in the coal network. The parameters for the MWDs of extractable groups in the coal and the rate constants for one- and two-fragment reaction are determined from the experimental data. The significant effect of temperature on the kinetics of the extraction was explained in terms of one- and two-fragment reactions in the coal.

  12. Bioprocessing of lignite coals using reductive microorganisms. Final technical report, September 30, 1988--March 29, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, D.L.

    1992-03-29

    In order to convert lignite coals into liquid fuels, gases or chemical feedstock, the macromolecular structure of the coal must be broken down into low molecular weight fractions prior to further modification. Our research focused on this aspect of coal bioprocessing. We isolated, characterized and studied the lignite coal-depolymerizing organisms Streptomyces viridosporus T7A, Pseudomonas sp. DLC-62, unidentified bacterial strain DLC-BB2 and Gram-positive Bacillus megaterium strain DLC-21. In this research we showed that these bacteria are able to solubilize and depolymerize lignite coals using a combination of biological mechanisms including the excretion of coal solublizing basic chemical metabolites and extracellular coal depolymerizing enzymes.

  13. Potential for thermal coal and Clean Coal Technology (CCT) in the Asia-Pacific. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.J.; Long, S.

    1991-11-22

    The Coal Project was able to make considerable progress in understanding the evolving energy situation in Asia and the future role of coal and Clean Coal Technologies. It is clear that there will be major growth in consumption of coal in Asia over the next two decades -- we estimate an increase of 1.2 billion metric tons. Second, all governments are concerned about the environmental impacts of increased coal use, however enforcement of regulations appears to be quite variable among Asian countries. There is general caution of the part of Asian utilities with respect to the introduction of CCT`s. However, there appears to be potential for introduction of CCT`s in a few countries by the turn of the century. It is important to emphasize that it will be a long term effort to succeed in getting CCT`s introduced to Asia. The Coal Project recommends that the US CCT program be expanded to allow the early introduction of CCT`s in a number of countries.

  14. Nitration of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in coal combustors and exhaust streams: Final report, September 1, 1991--September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, L.; Cho, S.; Hildemann, L.; Niksa, S.

    1995-02-01

    The objectives of this three-year project were to (1) identify the conditions which promote the nitration of PAH during primary combustion, reburning, hot gas cleanup, and particulate removal; and (2) investigate the potential relationship between NOx abatement and PAH nitration. Meeting the objectives of this program involved two broad tasks: (1) Preparing the polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) under closely monitored pulverized fuel (p. f.) firing conditions; and, (2) analyzing the PAH samples to monitor extents of nitration, ring number distribution, etc. A novel coal flow reactor burning actual coal products that operates over the domains of heating rates, temperatures, fuel-equivalence ratios, and residence times in utility boilers was used to generate the coal tar samples. The distribution of products obtained from primary, secondary, and oxidative pyrolysis of two coal types, Pittsburgh No. 8 and Dietz, were analyzed, with emphasis on the nitrogen-containing species generated. The coal tax samples collected from the coal flow reactor were fractionated based on their size and polarity using gravity flow column chromatography. After examining how the sample fractionation depended on the coal type and pyrolysis conditions, the relatively nonpolar fraction was further analyzed via high performance liquid chromatography, to characterize the ring number distribution of the polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAC) present. Finally, gas chromatographic techniques were utilized to measure the amount of nitrogen-containing PAC present, and to investigate how much of these nitrogen-containing species consist of nitro-PAH.

  15. Technical data. Final technical report, November 1980-May 1982. [Proposed WyCoalGas project, Converse County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    1982-01-01

    This volume includes a description of the railway to transport the coal; possible unbalance in the electrical power supply is considered in detail, as well as communications, signalling, etc. The railway will also be used to transport ashes and sludges for waste disposal. Coal fines in the coal supply will be burned to generate power. A very brief description of the coal gasification plant and its components is accompanied by a printout of the dates final engineering is to be completed. Permit applications are listed and socio-economic factors are discussed. The financing plan is discussed in some detail: basically, a loan guarantee from the Synthetic Fuels Corporation; equity provided by investment tax credit, deferred taxes, AFUDC and the sponsors; price support; and gas purchase agreement (this whole section includes several legal details.). (LTN)

  16. Effect of coal quality on maintenance costs at utility plants. Final report. [Effect of ash and sulfur content of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, E.C. Jr.

    1980-06-01

    In an attempt to determine if correlation exists between coal quality, as measured by its ash and sulfur contents, and the maintenance cost at utility plants, an examination was made of the actual maintenance cost experience of selected portions of five TVA coal-fired power plants as a function of the fuel quality consumed during an extended period of time. The results indicate that, according to our decision rules developed in compliance with accepted statistical practices, correlation does exist in many portions of the coal-fired plants for which sufficient maintenance cost records were available. The degree of correlation varies significantly among the individual portions of a particular plant as well as among the various plants. However, the indicators are sufficient to confirm that a change (within the design constraints of the unit) in the ash and/or sulfur content of the coal being consumed by a utility boiler will have a proportionate effect on the maintenance cost at the plant. In the cases examined, each percent variation in ash content could have a monetary effect of from $0.05 to $0.10 per ton of coal consumed. Similarly, each percent variation in sulfur content could influence maintenance costs from $0.30 to $0.50 per ton of coal. Since these values are based on preliminary analysis of limited data, they must be approached with caution and not removed from the context in which they are presented. However, if borne out by further study, the potential magnitude of such savings may be sufficient to justify the acquisition of superior coal supplies, either by changing the source and/or using preparation to obtain a lower ash and sulfur fuel.

  17. Mass spectral study of organic sulfur in the polymeric matrix of coal. Final technical report, September 1, 1992--August 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Hanley, L.

    1993-12-31

    These experiments have attempted to examine the chemical environment of organic sulfur in the polymeric matrix of Illinois coal by laser desorption of high molecular weight fragments into an ion trap mass spectrometer. The author has found that the molecular weight distribution of pyridine extracts of Illinois No. 6 coal ranges from 150 to 1500 m/z, with a peak near 500 m/z. No compounds higher than 1500 m/z were observed. The results support the contention that solvent extracts of coal are highly aromatic in nature. However, he has shown that laser desorption mass spectrometry (LDMS) is not capable of analyzing organic sulfur in coal without the addition of liquid chromatography for preseparation. LDMS has also been used to test the validity of the maceral separation method for the analysis of coal. Separated macerals of Ohio No. 5 coal show unique mass spectra in the low mass range, verifying that chemical differences do exist between the macerals. However, liptinite and vitrinite show similar distributions of compounds around 900 m/z which are not seen for inertite. These higher molecular weight compounds might not be detected by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS). LDMS has also been applied to the analysis of coal gasification liquids which have been biodesulfurized by microbial methods. LDMS results indicate that biodesulfurization induces significant chemical changes in these liquids. Changes in molecular weight distributions less than 20% were also observed for some of the samples.

  18. Feasibility study for utilization of landfill gas at the Royalton Road Landfill, Broadview Heights, Ohio. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1983-09-01

    The technical viability of landfill gas recovery has been previously demonstrated at numerous sites. However, the economics of a full scale utilization system are dependent on proper market conditions, appropriate technologies, landfill gas quantity and quality, and public/purchaser acceptance. The specific objectives of this feasibility study were to determine: The available markets which might purchase landfill gas or landfill gas derived energy products; An extraction system concept design and to perform an on-site pumping test program; The landfill gas utilization technologies most appropriate for the site; Any adverse environmental, health, safety, or socioeconomic impacts associated with the various proposed technologies; The optimum project economics, based on markets and processes examined. Findings and recommendations were presented which review the feasibility of a landfill gas utilization facility on the Royalton Road Landfill. The three identified utilization alternatives are indeed technically feasible. However, current market considerations indicate that installation of a full scale system is not economically advisable at this time. This final report encompasses work performed by SCS Engineers from late 1980 to the present. Monitoring data from several extraction and monitoring wells is presented, including pumping rates and gas quality and quantity analysis. The Market Analysis Data Form, local climatological data, and barometric pressure data are included in the appendix section. 33 figures, 25 tables.

  19. Re-Use of Clean Coal Technology By-Products in the Construction of Low Permeability Liners. Final report, 10/1/1996 - 3/31/2000

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, William E.; Butalia, Tarunjit S.; Whitlach, Jr., E. Earl; Mitsch, William

    2000-12-31

    This final project report presents the results of a research program conducted at The Ohio State University from October 1, 1996 to March 31, 2000 to investigate the use of stabilized flue gas desulfurization (FGD) materials in the construction of low permeability liners. The objective of the research program was to establish field-verified time-dependent relationships for the performance of liners constructed from stabilized FGD by-products generated in Ohio. The project objective was accomplished with a coordinated program of testing and analyzing small scale laboratory specimens under controlled conditions, medium-scale wetland mesocosms, and a full-scale pond facility. Although the specific uses directly addressed by this report include liners for surface impoundments, the results presented in this study are also useful in other applications including design of daily cover and liners for landfills, seepage cutoff walls and trenches and for nutrient retention and pollution mitigation wetlands. The small scale laboratory tests, medium scale mesocosm wetland experiments, and construction and monitoring of a full-scale FGD lined facility (capacity of one million gallons) shows that stabilized FGD materials can be used as low permeability liners in the construction of water and manure holding ponds, and constructed wetlands for wastewater treatment. Actual permeability coefficients in the range of 10-7 cm/sec (3 x 10-9 ft/sec) can be obtained in the field by properly compacting lime and fly ash enriched stabilized FGD materials. Leachate from the FGD material meets Ohio’s non-toxic criteria for coal combustion by-products, and for most potential contaminants the national primary and secondary drinking water standards are also met. The low permeability non-toxic FGD material investigated in this study poses very minimal risks, if any, for groundwater contamination. Constructed FGD-lined wetlands offer the opportunity for increased phosphorous

  20. Coal-derived promoters for the liquefaction of Illinois coal. Final technical report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Carty, R.H.; Knight, R.A.

    1992-12-31

    The objective of this program was to investigate the use of liquids derived from coal either by mild gasification or supercritical extraction (SCE) to promote direct liquefaction of Illinois coal. In this two-year program recently developed molecular probe techniques were used to assess the activity of three coal-derived liquids with respect to accelerating (A) hydrogen transfer, (B) carbon-carbon bond cleavage, (C) free radical flux, and (D) hydrocracking activity. Three sample liquids were prepared from IBC-106 coal by: mild gasification in an isothermal free-fall reactor (IFFR), steam treatment/mild gasification in a fixed-bed reactor (ST/FBR), and SCE using toluene. For comparison, tests were also performed on a Wilsonville recycle solvent (RS) and on benzyl phenyl sulfide (BPS), a ``benchmark`` promoter. Sample/blank pairs were tested at 400--425{degrees}C in laboratory microreactors, and effectiveness was based on the increase in extent of a key reaction for each sample containing coal liquid, compared to its blank. In general, the IFFR liquid was the most effective liquid for promoting hydrogen transfer (+21%) and free radical flux (+107%), while the SCE liquid was the most effective promoter of C-C bond cleavage selectivity (+119%) and hydrocracking (+359%). The ST/FBR liquid was slightly less effective than the IFFR liquid in all categories. BPS was used primarily to validate the adequacy of the methods.

  1. Concepts for protection against catastrophic events from coal mining. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, E.T.; Kern, J.R.; Sparks, J.P.; Stingelin, R.W.

    1989-11-06

    The report identifies hazards which may result from coal mining and identifies associated preventive, mitigative, and recovery adjustments. It documents an analysis of the alternatives available to provide protection against catastrophic events. The environmental risks addressed are those that occur beyond the period of time when normal surface and underground mining and reclamation operations have been completed. Residual hazards investigated include: ground water pollution, loss of aquifer, surface water pollution, subsidence, landslides, mine fires, impoundment failures, and mine seal failures. Hazard adjustments investigated include: land use management programs, recovery and restoration programs, insurance programs, special trust funds, bonds and guarantees, disaster assistance programs, regulatory requirements, and litigative approaches. Effective regulation of mine operations to prevent the creation of hazard including the control of final land-form was found to be the most efficient adjustment. The report includes a comprehensive 30-page annotated bibliography of hazards and related adjustments.

  2. Modeling of integrated environmental control systems for coal-fired power plants. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, E.S.; Salmento, J.S.; Frey, H.C.; Abu-Baker, A.; Berkenpas, M.

    1991-05-01

    The Integrated Environmental Control Model (IECM) was designed to permit the systematic evaluation of environmental control options for pulverized coal-fired (PC) power plants. Of special interest was the ability to compare the performance and cost of advanced pollution control systems to ``conventional`` technologies for the control of particulate, SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. Of importance also was the ability to consider pre-combustion, combustion and post-combustion control methods employed alone or in combination to meet tough air pollution emission standards. Finally, the ability to conduct probabilistic analyses is a unique capability of the IECM. Key results are characterized as distribution functions rather than as single deterministic values. (VC)

  3. Evaluation of dense-phase ultrafine coal (DUC) as a fuel alternative for oil- and gas-designed boilers and heaters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-12-01

    Utility and industrial firms currently using oil- and gas-fired boilers have an interest in substitution of coal for oil and gas as the primary boiler fuel. This interest stems from coal`s two main advantages over oil and gas-lower cost and security of supply. Recent efforts in the area of coal conversion have been directed to converting oil- and gas- fired boilers which were originally designed for coal-firing or were designed with some coal-firing capability. Boilers designed exclusively for oil- or gas-firing have not been considered viable candidates for coal conversion because they generally require a significant capacity derating and extensive and costly modifications. As a result, conversion of boilers in this class to coal-firing has generally been considered unattractive. Renewed interest in the prospects for converting boilers designed exclusively for oil- and gas-firing to coal firing has centered around the concept of using ``ultra fine`` coal as opposed to ``conventional grind`` pulverized coal. The main distinction being the finer particle size to which the former is ground. This fuel type may have characteristics which ameliorate many of the boiler problems normally associated with pulverized coal-firing. The overall concept for ultrafine coal utilization is based on a regional large preparation plant with distribution of a ready to fire fuel directly to many small users. This differs from normal practice in which final coal sizing is performed in pulverizers at the user`s site.

  4. Correlation chart of Pennsylvanian rocks in Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky, Virginia, West Virginia, Ohio, Maryland, and Pennsylvania showing approximate position of coal beds, coal zones, and key stratigraphic units: Chapter D.2 in Coal and petroleum resources in the Appalachian basin: distribution, geologic framework, and geochemical character

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruppert, Leslie F.; Trippi, Michael H.; Slucher, Ernie R.

    2014-01-01

    Because of the many names used to identify individual coal beds and coal zones in the historic Appalachian basin coal-mining districts, coal bed designations may differ even more than stratigraphic nomenclature. In eastern Kentucky, northwest of the Pine Mountain thrust fault on the Cumberland overthrust sheet, for example, coal beds or coal zones equivalent to the Lower Elkhorn coal zone (within the Pikeville Formation) are identified also as the Eagle coal zone, Pond Creek coal zone, and Blue Gem coal bed (fig. 1). Southeast of the Pine Mountain thrust fault, yet still in Kentucky, equivalent coals in this same interval are known as the Imboden and Rich Mountain. Moreover, this same interval of coal is identified as the Blue Gem coal in Tennessee, the Imboden coal bed or Campbell Creek or Pond Creek coal zones in Virginia, and the Eagle coal zone in West Virginia.

  5. Impact of government regulations on leadtimes of coal facilities. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, J.; Carboni, J.V.; Shah, D.V.; White, J.M. Jr.

    1980-08-01

    The ability of the US to increase coal use depends on the leadtimes required to bring from inception into operation: (1) new coal use facilities such as powerplants, industrial boilers, coke ovens, and coal-based synfuel plants; and (2) new coal facilities including surface mines, deep mines, coal preparation plants, and railroad lines. This study examines the effect of government regulations on the leadtimes for the following ten facilities: surface mines on federal land; surface mines - private surface/private coal; underground coal mines; coal preparation plants; railroad lines; coal-fired electric generating plants; coal-fired industrial facilities; coke plants; synthetic fuels; and transmission lines. Environmental activities consume a significant portion of critical path time for all facilities. The time spent for obtaining permits and licenses account for as much as 63% of total critical path time in the case of a new railroad line servicing a coal mine in the western US. For surface mines, permitting accounts for 33% of total project critical path; for underground mines, it is 43%. Permitting requires 26 and 42% of the critical paths for new industrial facilities and power plants, respectively. Long durations of critical environmental activities account for much of the uncertainty surrounding the approval of large coal projects. Government regulations have also affected the way companies conduct their business. Dealing with government regulations has become as important to the completion of new coal facilities as project financing, design, and construction.

  6. ARSENIC AND OHIO UTILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation provides information on arsenic removal drinking water treatment systems that are likely to be used in Ohio for arsenic removal. Because most Ohio ground water contain significant amounts of iron, iron removal processes will play a major role in treating Ohio gro...

  7. Water, Ohio's Remarkable Resource.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groves, Carrie J.

    Information on water and water resources in Ohio is presented in seven sections. Water from Ohio streams, water storage, lakes in Ohio, and ground water are discussed in the first section ("Water, A Part of the Earth"). A brief discussion on the ecosystem is provided in the second section ("Water and Life"). Topics discussed in the third section…

  8. Evaluation of technology modifications required to apply clean coal technologies in Russian utilities. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    The report describes the following: overview of the Russian power industry; electric power equipment of Russia; power industry development forecast for Russia; clean coal technology demonstration program of the US Department of Energy; reduction of coal TPS (thermal power station) environmental impacts in Russia; and base options of advanced coal thermal power plants. Terms of the application of clean coal technology at Russian TPS are discussed in the Conclusions.

  9. A new approach in ultrapurification of coal by selective flocculation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Moudgil, B.M.

    1992-04-01

    The specific objective of the present investigation is to develop a mathematical and computational model to elicit values of active sites ({phi}) and fractional surface coverage ({theta}) which would yield optimum separation of coal from coal pyrite and coal refuse. Attempts are to be made to select appropriate flocculants and experimental conditions to obtain {phi} and {theta} values as dictated by the theoretical model so as to achieve the desired separation in naturally occurring samples of fine coal. (VC)

  10. Thermal coal requirements and prospects for clean coal technologies in the Asia-Pacific Region. Final technical report, October 1994--September 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.J.

    1998-03-01

    The overall goal of the Cooperative Agreement (October 1994 to September 1997) was to provide general support and advice to the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy (DOE/FE) on the likely opportunities for U.S. coal trade and potential for U.S. Clean Coal Technologies in the Asia-Pacific Region. Over the three year Cooperative Agreement, assistance evolved toward greater emphasis on support for the U.S. Department of Energy`s role as chair of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation`s (APEC) Experts{close_quote} Group on Clean Fossil Energy. Responsibilities included assistance in arranging for all Technical Seminars, technical papers for these seminars and final editing, publishing and distribution of 500 copies of the proceedings. In addition, the East-West Center was called upon to host annual APEC Subcommittee Meetings, and periodic ad hoc planning meetings. The East-West Center played an active role in working with counterpart APEC and energy policy people throughout Asia, and advising the U.S. Department of Energy on options to enhance energy and Clean Coal Technology cooperation with various Asian nations, particularly People`s Republic of China (hereafter China) Towards the end of the Cooperative Agreement, increased emphasis was placed on the potential for gas fuels in Asian markets (natural gas, coalbed methane and gasification of coal).

  11. Microbially mediated removal of organic sulfur from coal: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    The goals of this project were to develop a microbial coal cleaning process capable of removing a significant fraction of the organic sulfur from coal by optimization of desulfurization using CB1, development of additional microorganisms capable of removing other organic sulfur forms from coal, and to evaluate combined desulfurization using CB1 and CBX to decrease organic sulfur in coal. Optimization studies defined more precisely the conditions required to achieve maximum desulfurization of coal by CB1. No significant differences in desulfurization were noted when coal was ground in a dry mill or in a stirred (wet) ball mill. Desulfurization increased with decreasing particle size. Solids loadings were not found to be limiting when the optimal particle size, retention time and microorganism-to-coal dose were used. The minimum retention time and microbe-to-coal ratios resulting in maximum sulfur removal were determined. A second microorganism, CB2, was selected and characterized. CB2 is capable of removing sulfur from the aryl sulfide model compound, diphenyl sulfide (DPS). Combining the activity of CB1 and CB2 for desulfurization of coals was investigated. The sulfur removing activity(ies) for each microbe was (were) determined to reside in the chromosomal DNA rather than in extrachromosomal, plasmid DNA. Simultaneous growth of the microorganisms for treatment of coal, simultaneous treatment of coal using microbes grown separately, and sequential treatment of coal were investigated. 11 refs., 13 figs., 57 tabs.

  12. Surface electrochemical control for fine coal and pyrite separation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wadsworth, M.E.; Bodily, D.M.; Hu, Weibai; Chen, Wanxiong; Huang, Qinping; Liang, Jun; Riley, A.M.; Li, Jun; Wann, Jyi-Perng; Zhong, Tingke; Zhu, Ximeng

    1993-01-20

    Laboratory flotation tests were carried out on three coals and on coal pyrite. Floatability measurements included natural floatability, flotation with a xanthate collector and salt flotation. The ranking of the floatability of the three coals were: Upper Freeport > Pittsburgh > Illinois. The floatability of mineral pyrite and coal pyrite increased markedly with xanthate concentration, but decreased with increased pH. In general, coal pyrite was more difficult to float than mineral pyrite. This was attributed to the presence of surface carbonaceous and mineral matter, since floatability of coal pyrite improved by acid pretreatment. Flotation tests demonstrated that the floatability of coal and mineral pyrite was greatly enhanced by the presence of an electrolyte. Flotation was also enhanced by the addition of modifiers such as CuSO{sub 4}, Na{sub 2}S, CO{sub 2} and EDTA. Lime additions markedly reduced the floatability of coal pyrite. Enhanced floatability of coal pyrite resulted when the pyrite was anodically oxidized in a specially constructed electrochemical flotation cell Pretreatment in potential ranges previously observed for polysulfide and sulfur film formation resulted in the enhanced floatability. While interesting trends and influences, both chemical and electrochemical, markedly improved the floatability of coal, there is little hope for reverse flotation as an effective technology for coal/coal-pyrite separations. The effects of poor liberation and entrainment appear overriding.

  13. The role of catalyst precursor anions in coal gasification. Final technical report, September 1991--June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Abotsi, G.M.K.

    1995-01-01

    The utilization of coal is currently limited by several factors, including the environmental impacts of coal use and the lack of cost-effective technologies to convert coal into useful gaseous and liquid products. Several catalysts have been evaluated for coal gasification and liquefaction. The activities of the catalysts are dependent on many factors such as the method of catalyst addition to the coal and the catalyst precursor type. Since catalyst addition to coal is frequently conducted in aqueous solution, the surface chemistry of colloidal coal particles will be expected to exert an influence on catalyst uptake. However, the effects of the various coal gasification catalyst precursors on the interfacial properties of coal during catalyst loading from solution has received little attention. The aim of this study is to ascertain the influence of the metal salts (i): calcium acetate (Ca(OOCCH{sub 3}){sub 2}), calcium chloride (CaCl{sub 2}) or calcium nitrate (Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}) and (ii): potassium acetate (KOOCCH{sub 3}), potassium chloride (KCl), potassium nitrate (KNO{sub 3}), potassium carbonate (K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) and potassium sulfate (K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) on the electrokinetic and adsorptive properties of coal and determine the relationship, if any, between coal surface electrokinetic properties, and catalyst loading and eventually its effects on the reactivities of coal chars.

  14. Anaerobic biprocessing of low rank coals. Final technical report, September 12, 1990--August 10, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, M.K.; Narayan, R.

    1993-08-05

    Coal solubilization under aerobic conditions results in oxygenated coal product which, in turn, makes the coal poorer fuel than the starting material. A novel approach has been made in this project is to remove oxygen from coal by reductive decarboxylation. In Wyodak subbituminous coal the major oxygen functionality is carboxylic groups which exist predominantly as carboxylate anions strongly chelating metal cations like Ca{sup 2+} and forming strong macromolecular crosslinks which contribute in large measure to network polymer structure. Removal of the carboxylic groups at ambient temperature by anaerobic organisms would unravel the macromoleculer network, resulting in smaller coal macromolecules with increased H/C ratio which has better fuel value and better processing prospects. These studies described here sought to find biological methods to remove carboxylic functionalities from low rank coals under ambient conditions and to assess the properties of these modified coals towards coal liquefaction. Efforts were made to establish anaerobic microbial consortia having decarboxylating ability, decarboxylate coal with the adapted microbial consortia, isolate the organisms, and characterize the biotreated coal products. Production of CO{sup 2} was used as the primary indicator for possible coal decarboxylation.

  15. Low-rank coal research: Volume 3, Combustion research: Final report. [Great Plains

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, M. D.; Hajicek, D. R.; Zobeck, B. J.; Kalmanovitch, D. P.; Potas, T. A.; Maas, D. J.; Malterer, T. J.; DeWall, R. A.; Miller, B. G.; Johnson, M. D.

    1987-04-01

    Volume III, Combustion Research, contains articles on fluidized bed combustion, advanced processes for low-rank coal slurry production, low-rank coal slurry combustion, heat engine utilization of low-rank coals, and Great Plains Gasification Plant. These articles have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  16. Impact of government regulations on leadtimes of coal facilities. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-08-01

    The ability of the US to increase coal use depends on the leadtimes required to bring from inception into operation: (1) new coal use facilities such as powerplants, industrial boilers, coke ovens, and coal-based synfuel plants; and (2) new coal facilities including surface mines, deep mines, coal preparation plants, and railroad lines. This study examines the effect of government regulations on the leadtimes for the following ten facilities: surface mines on federal land; surface mines - private surface/private coal; underground coal mines; coal preparation plants; railroad lines; coal-fired electric generating plants; coal-fired industrial facilities; coke plants; synthetic fuels; and transmission lines. These appendices contain summaries of legislation affecting the above coal facilities. Discussed are: the Clean Air Act; National Environmental Policy Act; Federal Coal Leasing Amendments Act; Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act; Federal Land Policy and Management Act; River and Harbors Act; Federal Mine Health and Safety Amendments Act; Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act; National Historic Preservation Act; Endangered Species Act; the Clear Water Act; and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. (DMC)

  17. Combustion characteristics of dry coal-powder-fueled adiabatic diesel engine: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kakwani, R.M.; Kamo, R.

    1989-01-01

    This report describes the progress and findings of a research program aimed at investigating the combustion characteristics of dry coal powder fueled diesel engine. During this program, significant achievements were made in overcoming many problems facing the coal-powder-fueled engine. The Thermal Ignition Combustion System (TICS) concept was used to enhance the combustion of coal powder fuel. The major coal-fueled engine test results and accomplishments are as follows: design, fabrication and engine testing of improved coal feed system for fumigation of coal powder to the intake air; design, fabrication and engine testing of the TICS chamber made from a superalloy material (Hastelloy X); design, fabrication and engine testing of wear resistant chrome oxide ceramic coated piston rings and cylinder liner; lubrication system was improved to separate coal particles from the contaminated lubricating oil; control of the ignition timing of fumigated coal powder by utilizing exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and variable TICS chamber temperature; coal-fueled engine testing was conducted in two configurations: dual fuel (with diesel pilot) and 100% coal-fueled engine without diesel pilot or heated intake air; cold starting of the 100% coal-powder-fueled engine with a glow plug; and coal-fueled-engine was operated from 800 to 1800 rpm speed and idle to full load engine conditions.

  18. Development and Dissemination of a Manual for Developing Coal Mining Curricula. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oglesby, Elizabeth H.; Katz, D. S.

    This report describes and summarizes the purposes, activities, major findings, and recommendations of three coal-related study reports: (1) An Assessment of Employment and Training needs for Coal and Gasification Occupations, (2) A Manual for Competency-Matched Instructional Resources for Developing Coal Mining Curricula, and (3) The Preparation…

  19. Catalytic hydrogenation of bituminous coal and various coal extracts: Final report for the 1987--1988 SOMED project year

    SciTech Connect

    Kispert, L.D.

    1988-01-01

    Naphthalene (II), quinoline (III), isoquinoline (IV), 6-methylquinoline (V) and 2-methylquinoline (VI) can be hydrogenated selectively to form 1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene (VII) (100% yield at 22/degree/C), 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinoline (VIII) (73% yield at 22/degree/C), 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline (IX) (70% yield at 90/degree/C), 6-methyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinoline (X) (100% at 90/degree/C), and 2-methyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinoline (XI) (76% at 90/degree/C) by use of the Ziegler-type catalyst Co(stearate)/sub 2/-AlEt/sub 3/ (I) in a hexane solvent at a hydrogen pressure of 700 psi. Catalyst (I) does not hydrogenate dibenzothiophene, nitroquinolines or 4-chloro-2-methylquinoline. By extrapolating these results, a maximum yield of hydrogenation product from low sulfur coal using catalyst (I) was achieved by either maintaining the temperatures as low as 100/degree/C for a long period of time or by conducting the process at high temperature (/approximately/150/degree/C) for a short period of time. Hydrogenation of low sulfur coal resulted in a hydrogenated liquid product equal to 20% of the initial coal weight at 100/degree/C and 800 psi hydrogen pressure. Microanalysis of the product showed the hydrogen content had doubled. On the other hand, attempts to hydrogenate high sulfur content coal (Illinois No. 6), gave unsatisfactory results. 27 refs., 3 tabs.

  20. Development of advanced, dry, SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} emission control technologies for high-sulfur coal. Final report, April 1, 1993--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Amrhein, G.T.

    1994-12-23

    Dry Scrubbing is a common commercial process that has been limited to low- and medium-sulfur coal applications because high-sulfur coal requires more reagent than can be efficiently injected into the process. Babcock & Wilcox has made several advances that extend dry scrubbing technologies to higher sulfur coals by allowing deposit-free operation at low scrubber exit temperatures. This not only increases the amount of reagent that can be injected into the scrubber, but also increases SO{sub 2} removal efficiency and sorbent utilization. The objectives of this project were to demonstrate, at pilot scale, that advanced, dry-scrubbing-based technologies can attain the performance levels specified by the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments for SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions while burning high-sulfur coal, and that these technologies are economically competitive with wet scrubber systems. The use of these technologies by utilities in and around Ohio, on new or retrofit applications, will ensure the future of markets for high-sulfur coal by creating cost effective options to coal switching.

  1. Analytical method for the evaluation of sulfur functionalities in American coals. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Attar, A.

    1983-05-01

    This investigation consisted of the following 6 tasks: (1) improve the instrumentation for the sulfur functional groups analysis and make it more reliable. (2) create a set of reference standards of sulfur-containing compounds. (3) examine the sulfur groups distribution in untreated and desulfurized coals. (4) examine the sulfur functionalities in raw and processed coals, i.e., liquefied coals. (5) determine the distribution of sulfur functionalities in modified coals. (6) prepare computer programs for calculations related to the distribution of sulfur functional groups in coal. Each task is discussed and results are presented. Appendix A contains the computer program used to interpret the data. 31 references, 56 figures, 17 tables.

  2. Cooperative research in coal liquefaction. Final report, May 1, 1990-- April 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Huffman, G.P.

    1992-02-15

    The Consortium for Fossil Fuel Liquefaction Science (CFFLS) is currently engaged in a three year contract with the US Department of Energy investigating a range of research topics dealing with direct coal liquefaction. This report summarizes the results of this program in its second year, from May 1, 1990 to April 30, 1991. Accomplishments for this period are presented for the following tasks: Iron-based catalysts for coal liquefaction, exploratory research on coal conversion, novel coal liquefaction concepts, and novel catalysts for coal liquefaction.

  3. Characterization and supply of coal based fuels. Volume 1, Final report and appendix A (Topical report)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    Studies and data applicable for fuel markets and coal resource assessments were reviewed and evaluated to provide both guidelines and specifications for premium quality coal-based fuels. The fuels supplied under this contract were provided for testing of advanced combustors being developed under Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) sponsorship for use in the residential, commercial and light industrial (RCLI) market sectors. The requirements of the combustor development contractors were surveyed and periodically updated to satisfy the evolving needs based on design and test experience. Available coals were screened and candidate coals were selected for further detailed characterization and preparation for delivery. A team of participants was assembled to provide fuels in both coal-water fuel (CWF) and dry ultrafine coal (DUC) forms. Information about major US coal fields was correlated with market needs analysis. Coal fields with major reserves of low sulfur coal that could be potentially amenable to premium coal-based fuels specifications were identified. The fuels requirements were focused in terms of market, equipment and resource constraints. With this basis, the coals selected for developmental testing satisfy the most stringent fuel requirements and utilize available current deep-cleaning capabilities.

  4. Draft final feasibility study report and proposed plan for Operable Unit 4, response to comments: Fernald Environmental Management Project, Fernald, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    This report contains questions and comments regarding a risk evaluation and possible remedial action of Operable Unit 4 at the Feed Materials Production Center at Fernald, Ohio. Attention is focused on the US EPA Region V feasibility study and on the CRARE. The CRARE is a post-remediation time frame document.

  5. Job Training and Fulfillment Study. An Examination of Aspirations, Needs and Solutions for ADC Mothers in the Cincinnati, Ohio Area. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Innovative Consultants, Inc., Cincinnati, OH.

    A study was conducted to provide much-needed, in-depth qualitative information and direction regarding the experiences, attitudes, value systems, and aspirations of various segments of the Aid to Dependent Children (ADC) recipients. Eight focus groups, each composed of 8 to 10 persons, were conducted in May 1990 in Cincinnati, Ohio. Discussion…

  6. Semiconductor electrochemistry of coal pyrite. Final technical report, September 1990--September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Osseo-Asare, K.; Wei, Dawei

    1996-01-01

    This project seeks to advance the fundamental understanding of the physico-chemical processes occurring at the pyrite/aqueous interface, in the context of coal cleaning, coal desulfurization, and acid mine drainage. Central to this research is the use of synthetic microsize particles of pyrite as model microelectrodes to investigate the semiconductor electrochemistry of pyrite. The research focuses on: (a) the synthesis of microsize particles of pyrite in aqueous solution at room temperature, (b) the formation of iron sulfide complex, the precursor of FeS or FeS{sub 2}, and (c) the relationship between the semiconductor properties of pyrite and its interfacial electrochemical behavior in the dissolution process. In Chapter 2, 3 and 4, a suitable protocol for preparing microsize particles of pyrite in aqueous solution is given, and the essential roles of the precursors elemental sulfur and ``FeS`` in pyrite formation are investigated. In Chapter 5, the formation of iron sulfide complex prior to the precipitation of FeS or FeS{sub 2} is investigated using a fast kinetics technique based on a stopped-flow spectrophotometer. The stoichiometry of the iron sulfide complex is determined, and the rate and formation constants are also evaluated. Chapter 6 provides a summary of the semiconductor properties of pyrite relevant to the present study. In Chapters 7 and 8, the effects of the semiconductor properties on pyrite dissolution are investigated experimentally and the mechanism of pyrite dissolution in acidic aqueous solution is examined. Finally, a summary of the conclusions from this study and suggestions for future research are presented in Chapter 9.

  7. Structure of coal: new approaches to characterizing organonitrogen and organosulfur functionalities in coal and coal liquids. Final report. [Finnigan triple quadrupole mass spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Cooks, R.G.

    1983-01-01

    This report describes the application of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) to the analysis of coal-related materials. A Finnigan Triple State Quadrupole mass spectrometer was used for most of the results obtained in this study. Both collision energy (0 to 30 eV) and collision gas pressure (0 to 2.5 mtorr, typically argon) have significant effects on the spectra. Increasing the collision energy or collision pressure results in an increased fragmentation of the selected ion. The analytical utility of different chemical ionization (CI) reagent gases is shown. The MS/MS spectra of a selected ion obtained by isobutane and ammonia CI are identical, which paves the way for development of MS/MS libraries. A library is being developed especially for the analysis of coal-related materials. Three principal MS/MS scan modes (daughter, parent and neutral loss) are utilized in the analysis of coal-related materials. Parent and neutral loss scans characterize the complex mixture for particular chemical moieties (functional groups, structure type), while daughter scans are used for identification of specific components. SRC II was the principal sample studied by CI. Laser desorption methodology for coal analysis was developed. Other fuel-related materials were examined to generalize the analytical methodology being developed for the coal-related materials, including shale oil and diesel exhaust particulates. 35 references, 50 figures, 3 tables.

  8. Catalytic reduction of SO[sub x]-NO[sub x] in coal flue gas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    Almost half of the coal purchased by the utilities that year was not Ohio coal. The 20-plus million tons/year of non-Ohio coal consumed by Ohio generators is an indication of the order of magnitude of the potential market incentive for Ohio to supply its power plants from its indigenous coal mine. The major reason for the drop in Ohio coal production rate is that the average content of Ohio coal is 3.5 weight percent, with a range of one to six percent. Use of high-sulfur coal introduces environmental problems due to the high SO[sub 2] emission rate in the boiler flue gas. Potential solutions include use of alternative low-sulfur non-Ohio coal and addition of SO[sub 2] (and NO[sub x]) removal facilities. The substitution of non-Ohio low-sulfur coal for Ohio coal is a strong negative for the state and its coal mining industry; it means further shrinkage of the state's coal industry accompanied by loss of Ohio jobs. The Parsons FGC process is a candidate for the alternative solution, i.e., to provide high efficiency post-combustion removal of SO[sub 2] (and NO[sub x]). The Phase 2 pilot plant test results have demonstrated that the Parsons FGC process is capable to remove 99-plus percent of SO[sub 2] and 95-plus percent of NO[sub x] from coal-fired boiler flue gas. The Parsons FGC process will permit Ohio coal fired power plants to burn high-sulfur Ohio coal and achieve conformance with provisions of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Because SO[sub 2] reduction using the Parsons FGC process will be greater than the amendment requirement, its use will provide the affected Ohio power plant with marketable net allowances having a definite economic value.

  9. Coal desulfurization during the combustion of coal/oil/water emulsions: an economic alternative clean liquid fuel. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-04-01

    This report presents the Phase II results of a combustion program designed to assess the feasibility of utilizing coal/oil/water (COW) emulsions as a fuel for fire tube package boilers. Also examined was the effect of the addition of alkaline absorbents to the fuel for sulfur dioxide capture. Presented are the findings of testing involving optimizing sulfur dioxide removal while still maintaining a rheologically favorable fuel. Overall performance of COW as a boiler fuel was evaluated over long term operation. Emphasis was placed on burner design as well as coal characteristics. Three different bituminous coals were used during this program. Results indicate that COW emulsions may be a feasible alternative for oil in industrial fire tube boilers if the major problem, deposition buildup, can be resolved. This appears possible with a proper soot blower design. Soda ash is a viable means for obtaining at least 80% removal, using a 1:1 molar ratio. However, the deposition problem with soda ash indicated that stack injection may be a more feasible approach.

  10. Coal unit trains: operations, maintenance, and technology. Volume 3. Maintenance of unit-train coal cars. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mattison, P.D.

    1984-11-01

    This report is intended to help users of coal unit trains to understand what factors influence coal car maintenance costs, what are the expected ranges of those costs, and what options are available to car owners to control maintenance costs. To accomplish these objectives, car maintenance records were examined in light of car designs, car use, and certain characteristics of the railroads and utilities handling the cars, such as climate, terrain, and coal source. The cost of repairs and maintenance per car mile for the important mechanical subassemblies are identified and compared according to the organizations performing those repairs; the railroads, private repair shops, or utility-owned shops. To lend some further light on the advantages and disadvantages of utility-owned maintenance facilities, the cost of establishing and operating a hypothetical facility is analyzed. Important conclusions are that, in general, contract shops currently offer the greatest economy. Owner-operated shops show some advantages when the cost of capital is low and when particularly large fleets are to be maintained. Pooling of facilities to serve several separate but similar fleets may be one method for utilities to take advantage of economies of scale. 5 figures, 18 tables.