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Sample records for oil agglomeration techniques

  1. POC-SCALE TESTING OF OIL AGGLOMERATION TECHNIQUES AND EQUIPMENT FOR FINE COAL PROCESSING

    SciTech Connect

    1998-01-01

    This report covers the technical progress achieved from October 1, 1997 to December 31, 1997 on the POC-Scale Testing of Oil Agglomeration Techniques and Equipment for Fine Coal Processing project. Experimental test procedures and the results related to the processing of coal fines originating from process streams generated at the Shoal Creek Mine preparation plant, owned and operated by the Drummond Company Inc. of Alabama, are described. Two samples of coal fines, namely Cyclone Overflow and Pond Fines were investigated. The batch test results showed that by applying the Aglofloat technology a significant ash removal might be achieved at a very high combustible matter recovery: · for the Cyclone Overflow sample the ash reduction was in the range 50 to 55% at combustible matter recovery about 98% · for the Pond Fines sample the ash reduction was up to 48% at combustible matter recovery up to 85%. Additional tests were carried out with the Alberta origin Luscar Mine coal, which will be used for the parametric studies of agglomeration equipment at the 250 kg/h pilot plant. The Luscar coal is very similar to the Mary Lee Coal Group (processed at Shoal Creek Mine preparation plant) in terms of rank and chemical composition.

  2. POC-scale testing of oil agglomeration techniques and equipment for fine coal processing

    SciTech Connect

    W. Pawlak; K. Szymocha

    1998-04-01

    This report covers the technical progress achieved from January 1, 1998 to April 31, 1998 on the POC-Scale Testing of Oil Agglomeration Techniques and Equipment for Fine Coal Processing. Experimental work was carried out with two coal fines. One sample originated from pond (Drummond Pond Fines) while the second was pulverized Luscar Mine coal. Both samples were tested at the laboratory batch-scale while only Luscar Mine Coal was processed on the 250 kg/h continuous system. Significant progress was made on optimization of process conditions for Pond Fines. The test results showed that ash could be reduced by about 42% at combustible recovery exiting 94%. It was also found that pond fines required significantly longer conditioning time than freshly pulverized run of mine coal. Continuous bench-scale testing carried out with Luscar Mine coal included rod mill calibration, plant equipment and instrumentation check-up, and parametric studies. Compared with batch-scale tests, the continuous bench-scale process required more bridging oil to achieve similar process performance. During the current reporting period work has been commenced on the final engineering and preparation of design package of 3t/h POC-scale unit.

  3. POC-SCALE TESTING OF OIL AGGLOMERATION TECHNIQUES AND EQUIPMENT FOR FINE COAL PROCESSING

    SciTech Connect

    1998-01-01

    This report covers the technical progress achieved from July 01, 1997 to September 30, 1997 on the POC-Scale Testing Agglomeration Techniques and Equipment for Fine Coal Processing project. Experimental procedures and test data for recovery of fine coal from coal fines streams generated at a commercial coal preparation plant are described. Two coal fines streams, namely Sieve Bend Effluent and Cyclone Overflow were investigated. The test results showed that ash was reduced by more than 50% at combustible matter recovery levels exceeding 95%.

  4. Low-rank coal oil agglomeration

    DOEpatents

    Knudson, Curtis L.; Timpe, Ronald C.

    1991-01-01

    A low-rank coal oil agglomeration process. High mineral content, a high ash content subbituminous coals are effectively agglomerated with a bridging oil which is partially water soluble and capable of entering the pore structure, and usually coal derived.

  5. Low-rank coal oil agglomeration

    DOEpatents

    Knudson, C.L.; Timpe, R.C.

    1991-07-16

    A low-rank coal oil agglomeration process is described. High mineral content, a high ash content subbituminous coals are effectively agglomerated with a bridging oil which is partially water soluble and capable of entering the pore structure, and is usually coal-derived.

  6. Selective oil agglomeration of lignite

    SciTech Connect

    Halime Abakay Temel; Volkan Bozkurt; Arun Kumar Majumder

    2009-01-15

    In this study, desulfurization and deashing of Adiyaman-Glbai lignite by the agglomeration method were studied. For this purpose, three groups of agglomeration experiments were made. The effects of solid concentration, bridging liquid type and dosage, pH, and screen size on the agglomeration after desliming were investigated in the first group of experiments. The effects of lake water and sea water (the Mediterranean Sea water, the Aegean Sea water, and the Black Sea water) on the agglomeration were investigated in the second group of experiments. The effects of different salts (NaCl, MgCl{sub 2}, and FeCl{sub 3}) on the agglomeration were investigated in the third group of experiments. Agglomeration results showed that the usage of sea waters and soda lake water in the agglomeration medium had a positive effect on the reduction of total sulfur content of agglomerates. In addition, the usage of NaCl, MgCl{sub 2}, and FeCl{sub 3} in the agglomeration medium had a positive effect on the ash content reduction of the agglomerates. 27 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Flotation of oil-agglomerated coal for ash and pyrite removal -- Simultaneous grinding and agglomeration

    SciTech Connect

    Song, S.; Perkson, A.; Trass, O.

    1996-12-31

    Oil agglomeration is an excellent technique for the beneficiation of fine coal. For separation of the spherical agglomerates by screening, a high level of oil must be used, however. When the subsequent separation is done by flotation, this disadvantage is eliminated. Better pyrite removal is also possible. In this paper, such a fine coal beneficiation process, also called hydrophobic flocculation-flotation (HFF), is described. It features low non-polar oil consumption, intensive mechanical energy input, and smaller agglomerates or looser flocs. This process can be simplified by grinding the coal in water with small amounts of oil added. The excess grinding energy is then used for agglomerating the coal. The Prince coal from Nova Scotia contained 13.3% ash and 3.3% total sulfur, 1.4% pyritic. After four stages of flotation, ash and pyrite removal were 93% and 66% respectively, with 87% combustibles recovery. The parameters affecting the HFF process, such as particle size, dosage of non-polar oil, pH value of the slurry and duration of agitation, were investigated. Simultaneous grinding and agglomeration (SGA) utilizing the Szego Mill was also explored at the very low oil levels used. The intensive agitation/preconditioning step prior to flotation was eliminated. When the other parameters established from the sequential process were used with the SGA process, virtually identical beneficiation results were obtained, but with slightly lower combustibles recovery. While further testing is required to properly optimize the SGA process conditions, significant equipment simplification and energy savings are possible.

  8. Preparation of coal-oil agglomerates using a static mixer

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, F.; Yu, S.; Chiang, S.H.

    1994-12-31

    An experimental study was carried out to investigate the preparation of coal-oil agglomerates using an in-line static mixer. In the experiments, a coal slurry and kerosene (introduced through a metering pump) were pumped to pass through the static mixer. The high shear mixing of the static mixer is capable of producing stable and rigid coal-oil agglomerates. The parameters investigated in this study included the average residence time for the slurry to pass through the static mixer, oil dosage, and solid content. The results have demonstrated that the static mixer can be used as an effective device for coal-oil agglomeration.

  9. Factors affecting the oil agglomeration of Sivas-Divrigi Ulucayir lignite

    SciTech Connect

    Unal, I.; Gorgun Ersan, M.

    2007-07-01

    In the coal industry, the coal particles need to be decreased to a very fine size because of the need of removing inorganic materials from coal. Oil agglomeration is a kind of coal cleaning technique that is used for separation of organic and inorganic parts of fine sized coal. In this study, the oil agglomeration of Sivas-Divrigi (S-D) Ulucayir lignite was carried out by using kerosene, diesel oil, fuel oil, poppy oil, and sunflower oil. The amount of bridging oil was varied from 5% to 25% of the amount of lignite. The effect of oil amount, oil type, solid content, agitation rate and time, pH on agglomeration performance was investigated. Maximum recovery value of 98.18% was observed by using poppy oil. In order to investigate the effect of pH on agglomeration NaOH and HCl is added to the slurry in various amounts. It is decided that the best agglomeration condition is obtained at low pH values. The effect of nonionic surface active agent (Igepal-CA 630) on agglomeration is investigated by adding to the slurry and it is observed that the grade is increased with the amount of surface active agent.

  10. Development of a Gas-Promoted Oil Agglomeration Process

    SciTech Connect

    C. Nelson; F. Zhang; J. Drzymala; M. Shen; R. Abbott; T. D. Wheelock

    1997-11-01

    The preliminary laboratory-scale development of a gas-promoted, oil agglomeration process for cleaning coal was carried out with scale model mixing systems in which aqueous suspensions of ultrafine coal particles were treated with a liquid hydrocarbon and a small amount of air. The resulting agglomerates were recovered by screening. During a batch agglomeration test the progress of agglomeration was monitored by observing changes in agitator torque in the case of concentrated suspensions or by observing changes in turbidity in the case of dilute suspensions. Dilute suspensions were employed for investigating the kinetics of agglomeration, whereas concentrated suspensions were used for determining parameters that characterize the process of agglomeration. A key parameter turned out to be the minimum time te required to produce compact spherical agglomerates. Other important parameters included the projected area mean particle diameter of the agglomerates recovered at the end of a test as well as the ash content and yield of agglomerates. Batch agglomeration tests were conducted with geometrically similar mixing tanks which ranged in volume from 0.346 to 11.07 liters. Each tank was enclosed to control the amount of air present. A variable speed agitator fitted with a six blade turbine impeller was used for agitation. Tests were conducted with moderately hydrophobic Pittsburgh No. 8 coal and with more hydrophobic Upper Freeport coal using either n-heptane, i-octane, or hexadecane as an agglomerant.

  11. Low-rank coal oil agglomeration product and process

    DOEpatents

    Knudson, C.L.; Timpe, R.C.; Potas, T.A.; DeWall, R.A.; Musich, M.A.

    1992-11-10

    A selectively-sized, raw, low-rank coal is processed to produce a low ash and relative water-free agglomerate with an enhanced heating value and a hardness sufficient to produce a non-degradable, shippable fuel. The low-rank coal is treated, under high shear conditions, in the first stage to cause ash reduction and subsequent surface modification which is necessary to facilitate agglomerate formation. In the second stage the treated low-rank coal is contacted with bridging and binding oils under low shear conditions to produce agglomerates of selected size. The bridging and binding oils may be coal or petroleum derived. The process incorporates a thermal deoiling step whereby the bridging oil may be completely or partially recovered from the agglomerate; whereas, partial recovery of the bridging oil functions to leave as an agglomerate binder, the heavy constituents of the bridging oil. The recovered oil is suitable for recycling to the agglomeration step or can serve as a value-added product.

  12. Low-rank coal oil agglomeration product and process

    DOEpatents

    Knudson, Curtis L.; Timpe, Ronald C.; Potas, Todd A.; DeWall, Raymond A.; Musich, Mark A.

    1992-01-01

    A selectively-sized, raw, low-rank coal is processed to produce a low ash and relative water-free agglomerate with an enhanced heating value and a hardness sufficient to produce a non-decrepitating, shippable fuel. The low-rank coal is treated, under high shear conditions, in the first stage to cause ash reduction and subsequent surface modification which is necessary to facilitate agglomerate formation. In the second stage the treated low-rank coal is contacted with bridging and binding oils under low shear conditions to produce agglomerates of selected size. The bridging and binding oils may be coal or petroleum derived. The process incorporates a thermal deoiling step whereby the bridging oil may be completely or partially recovered from the agglomerate; whereas, partial recovery of the bridging oil functions to leave as an agglomerate binder, the heavy constituents of the bridging oil. The recovered oil is suitable for recycling to the agglomeration step or can serve as a value-added product.

  13. POC-scale testing of oil agglomeration techniques and equipment for fine coal processing. Quarterly report, July 1--September 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Ignasiak, B.; Pawlak, W.; Szymocha, K.

    1997-12-31

    This report covers the technical progress achieved from July 1, 1997 to September 30, 1997 on the POC-Scale Testing Agglomeration Techniques and Equipment for Fine Coal Processing project. Experimental procedures and test data for recovery of fine coal from coal fines streams generated at a commercial coal preparation plant are described. Two coal fines streams, namely Sieve Bend Effluent and Cyclone Overflow were investigated. The test results showed that ash was reduced by more than 50% at combustible matter recovery levels exceeding 95%.

  14. Column oil agglomeration of fly ash with ultrasonics

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, M.L.; Champagne, K.J.; Soong, Y.; Finseth, D.H.

    1999-07-01

    A promising oil agglomeration process has been developed for the beneficiation of fly ash using a six-foot agglomeration column. Carbon concentrates have been separated from fly ash with yields greater than 60 % and purities of 55 to 74 %. The parameters examined in the study include ultrasonic exposure, pulse rate, frequency, agitation speed, and blade configuration. The effects of the experimental variables on the quality of separation are discussed.

  15. Preliminary characterization of a gas-promoted oil agglomeration process

    SciTech Connect

    Drzymala, J.; Wheelock, T.D.

    1996-12-31

    The agglomeration of aqueous suspensions of Pittsburgh No. 8 coal particles with i-octane was studied by employing a scale model mixing system which measured both agitator speed and torque. The progress of agglomeration was monitored by observing changes in agitator torque and was confirmed by examining samples of the suspension with an optical microscope. When a suspension containing 30 w/w% solids was degassed and then conditioned with 20 v/w% i-octane (20 ml i-octane/100 g coal), no agglomeration took place until a small amount of air (e.g., 9 v/w%) was introduced. Subsequent changes in agitator torque indicated that the ensuing process of agglomeration was complex and consisted of several stages involving various interactions between coal particles, oil drops, and gas bubbles. The time required to produce spherical agglomerates was determined for different experimental conditions by conducting a number of agglomeration tests involving different mixing tank sizes and different impeller sizes and speeds. The results indicate that agglomeration time decreases with increasing power input per unit volume and increasing gas concentration.

  16. Development of a Gas-Promoted Oil Agglomeration Process

    SciTech Connect

    M. Shen; R. Abbott; T. D. Wheelock

    1998-10-30

    Two series of agglomeration tests were conducted as part of an effort to find a suitable basis for size scale-up of the mixing system used for a gas-promoted oil agglomeration process. In the first series of tests the agitator impeller diameter and speed were varied among runs so as to vary impeller tip speed and agitator power independently while keeping other conditions constant. In the second series of tests the mixing tank size and agitator speed were varied while the ratio of tank diameter to impeller diameter were held constant. All tests were conducted with finely ground Pittsburgh No. 8 coal and with i-octane as the agglomerant. The results of these tests showed that the minimum time te required to produce spherical agglomerates was predominantly a function of the agitator power input per unit volume. In addition, the size of the agglomerates produced in a given time was also strongly dependent on power input. At lower power input levels, the mean size rose as power input increased until a point was reached where agglomerate breakage became important and the mean size decreased. The results also showed that the ash content of the agglomerates produced in a given time tended to decrease with increasing power input. On the other hand, the recovery of clean coal on a dry, ash-free basis was not greatly affected by power input.

  17. Basic principles and mechanisms of selective oil agglomeration

    SciTech Connect

    Wheelock, T.D.; Drzymala, J.; Allen, R.W.; Hu, Y.C.; Tyson, D.; Ziaoping, Qiu, Lessa, A.

    1990-04-01

    The overall objective is to determine the basic principles and mechanisms which underlie a number of selective oil agglomeration processes that have been proposed for beneficiating fine-size coal. An understanding of the basic principles and mechanisms will greatly facilitate technical development and application of such processes to various types of coal. 5 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Basic principles and mechanisms of selective oil agglomeration

    SciTech Connect

    Wheelock, T.D.

    1994-07-01

    The overall objective of this work is to determine the important principles and basic mechanisms which underlie various selective oil agglomeration processes for beneficiating fine-size coal in order to facilitate the technical development and application of such processes to various types of coal. The recent work described herein has involved a more detailed study of the effects of mild oxidation on the surface properties of different types of coal and the relationship between the agglomerability of oxidized coals and their surface properties. In addition, the work has involved developing more effective means for separating coal and pyrite by finding and applying selective depressants for pyrite.

  19. Basic principles and mechanisms of selective oil agglomeration

    SciTech Connect

    Wheelock, T.D.; Drzymala, J.; Allen, R.W.; Hu, Y.-C.; Tyson, D.; Xiaoping, Qiu; Lessa, A.

    1990-01-01

    Numerous measurements of the heat of immersion of coal were conducting using several different particle size fractions of No. 2 Gas Seam coal from Raleigh County, West Virginia. The heat of immersion was determined in water, methanol, heptane, hexadecane and neohexane (2,2-dimethybutane). A comparison of the results with those determined previously for Illinois No. 6 coal is discussed. A number of potential pyrite depressants for use in oil agglomeration of coal were screened by testing the response of sulfidized mineral pyrite to agglomeration with heptane in the presence of the potential depressant. The following were tested; sodium dithionite, sodium thiosulfate, ferrous sulfate, ferric sulfate, titanous chloride, hydrogen peroxide, Oxone (a form of potassium monopersulfate), pyrogallol, quebracho (colloidal dispersant derived from tree bark), milk whey, and several organic thiols. Ferric chloride was applied to mixtures of Upper Freeport coal and sulfidized mineral pyrite before subjecting the mixtures to agglomeration with heptane. 7 refs., 23 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Development of a full scale selective oil agglomeration plant

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, J.C.; Cooney, B.; Hoare, I.; Waugh, B.; Robinson, R.

    1998-12-31

    A research and development program managed by Australian Mining Investments Limited (AMI) on behalf of an investment syndicate was conducted with the objective of improving the efficiency and economy of the Selective Oil Agglomeration Process (SOAP), and developing viable commercial sized operating plants. Fewer than half the coal preparation plants in Australia beneficiate fine coal by froth flotation, the only viable alternative to SOAP for the recovery of low ash, fine and ultra fine coal. Those plants without flotation generally dispose of the ultra fine material, approximately {minus}100{micro}m in size, as tailings to waste. In the majority of cases this ultra fine waste contains more than 50% relatively low ash coal of saleable quality. It is believed that this coal constitutes a loss of 8--10 million tonnes per annum and that the coal mining industry would welcome a recovery process which has low capital and operating costs and will function automatically with minimal operator attention. The authors carried out a comprehensive literature study of selective oil agglomeration in order to gain a full understanding of the process and to plan the research program. Extensive studies were then undertaken on oil dispersion in the water phase, formation of oil water emulsions with surfactants and the optimization of surfactant selection. Oil and emulsion properties were investigated including stability, viscosity, temperature, concentration of components, time of formation, and cost. This work was followed by characterization studies on coals from the Gunnedah Basin and agglomeration test work on these coals. These agglomeration studies were performed firstly at bench level and then by using a small, 200 kg/hr continuous process development unit. The results were sufficiently encouraging to justify the design and construction of a fully instrumented, PLC controlled, 2 tph pilot plant at Gunnedah Colliery Coal Preparation Plant. Extensive trials were carried out on Hoskisson and Melville Seam coals with the 2 tph plant, during which period various design modifications were made as the process was developed and improved.

  1. Field observations of artificial sand and oil agglomerates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dalyander, Patricia (Soupy); Long, Joseph W.; Plant, Nathaniel G.; McLaughlin, Molly R.; Mickey, Rangley C.

    2015-01-01

    Oil that comes into the surf zone following spills, such as occurred during the 2010 Deepwater Horizon (DWH) blowout, can mix with local sediment to form heavier-than-water sand and oil agglomerates (SOAs), at times in the form of mats a few centimeters thick and tens of meters long. Smaller agglomerates that form in situ or pieces that break off of larger mats, sometimes referred to as surface residual balls (SRBs), range in size from sand-sized grains to patty-shaped pieces several centimeters (cm) in diameter. These mobile SOAs can cause beach oiling for extended periods following the spill, on the scale of years as in the case of DWH. Limited research, including a prior effort by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) investigating SOA mobility, alongshore transport, and seafloor interaction using numerical model output, focused on the physical dynamics of SOAs. To address this data gap, we constructed artificial sand and oil agglomerates (aSOAs) with sand and paraffin wax to mimic the size and density of genuine SOAs. These aSOAs were deployed in the nearshore off the coast of St. Petersburg, Florida, during a field experiment to investigate their movement and seafloor interaction. This report presents the methodology for constructing aSOAs and describes the field experiment. Data acquired during the field campaign, including videos and images of aSOA movement in the nearshore (1.5-meter and 0.5-meter water depth) and in the swash zone, are also presented in this report.

  2. Development of a gas-promoted oil agglomeration process: Air-promoted oil agglomeration of moderately hydrophobic coals. 2: Effect of air dosage in a model mixing system

    SciTech Connect

    Drzymala, J.; Wheelock, T.D.

    1996-07-01

    In a selective oil agglomeration process for cleaning coal, fine-size particles are suspended in water and treated with a water-immiscible hydrocarbon which can range from pentane to heavy fuel oil. Vigorous agitation is applied to disperse the oil and to produce frequent contacts between oil-coated particles. In Part 1 of this series of papers, it was shown that a definite amount of air had to be present in a laboratory mixing unit which produced a moderate shear rate in order to form compact, spherical agglomerates in an aqueous suspension of moderately hydrophobic coal using heptane or hexadecane as an agglomerate. In this paper, the effects of different amounts of air including dissolved air are discussed. The results indicate that a small amount of air will trigger the process of agglomeration, and even the air dissolved in water under equilibrium conditions at room temperature and pressure is sufficient to promote agglomeration provided it is released from solution.

  3. Development of a gas-promoted oil agglomeration process. Technical progress report, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Wheelock, T.D.

    1994-10-01

    During the first year of the project two model mixing systems, which differed in size but were similar in design, were constructed and tested. The systems were equipped for measuring agitator speed and torque and for measuring the turbidity of coal particle suspensions undergoing agglomeration. Preliminary measurements of aqueous suspensions of coal particles showed that the Beer-Lambert law applies to such suspensions at least for low concentrations. Therefore, the measured turbidity can be used as an indicator of particle concentration and a means for monitoring the progress of oil agglomeration. However, the method is not applicable for large particle concentrations so a different technique was tested for monitoring the agglomeration of large concentrations. This technique involves measuring agitator torque and observing changes in torque while agitator speed is held constant. The results of preliminary tests of the technique were encouraging. In these tests significant changes in agitator torque were observed when particle agglomeration took place as long as solids concentration of 25 w/v % or more were utilized. A number of agglomeration tests were conducted using either one or the other of the two monitoring techniques. Both methods showed that even very small amounts of air can promote the oil agglomeration of coal particles suspended in water. Even the amount of air dissolved in water at room temperature and pressure can affect the process providing the air is displaced from the solution by a slightly soluble agglomerant such as heptane. The apparent rate of agglomeration was observed to increase as more air was introduced and also as agitator speed was increased.

  4. Nearshore dynamics of artificial sand and oil agglomerates.

    PubMed

    Dalyander, P Soupy; Plant, Nathaniel G; Long, Joseph W; McLaughlin, Molly

    2015-07-15

    Weathered oil can mix with sediment to form heavier-than-water sand and oil agglomerates (SOAs) that can cause beach re-oiling for years after a spill. Few studies have focused on the physical dynamics of SOAs. In this study, artificial SOAs (aSOAs) were created and deployed in the nearshore, and shear stress-based mobility formulations were assessed to predict SOA response. Prediction sensitivity to uncertainty in hydrodynamic conditions and shear stress parameterizations were explored. Critical stress estimates accounting for large particle exposure in a mixed bed gave the best predictions of mobility under shoaling and breaking waves. In the surf zone, the 10-cm aSOA was immobile and began to bury in the seafloor while smaller size classes dispersed alongshore. aSOAs up to 5 cm in diameter were frequently mobilized in the swash zone. The uncertainty in predicting aSOA dynamics reflects a broader uncertainty in applying mobility and transport formulations to cm-sized particles. PMID:25956438

  5. Nearshore dynamics of artificial sand and oil agglomerates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dalyander, P. Soupy; Plant, Nathaniel G.; Long, Joseph W.; McLaughlin, Molly R.

    2015-01-01

    Weathered oil can mix with sediment to form heavier-than-water sand and oil agglomerates (SOAs) that can cause beach re-oiling for years after a spill. Few studies have focused on the physical dynamics of SOAs. In this study, artificial SOAs (aSOAs) were created and deployed in the nearshore, and shear stress-based mobility formulations were assessed to predict SOA response. Prediction sensitivity to uncertainty in hydrodynamic conditions and shear stress parameterizations were explored. Critical stress estimates accounting for large particle exposure in a mixed bed gave the best predictions of mobility under shoaling and breaking waves. In the surf zone, the 10-cm aSOA was immobile and began to bury in the seafloor while smaller size classes dispersed alongshore. aSOAs up to 5 cm in diameter were frequently mobilized in the swash zone. The uncertainty in predicting aSOA dynamics reflects a broader uncertainty in applying mobility and transport formulations to cm-sized particles.

  6. TEM and HRTEM of Soot-in-oil particles and agglomerates from internal combustion engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fay, M. W.; La Rocca, A.; Shayler, P. J.

    2014-06-01

    Over time, the performance of lubricating oil in a diesel engine is affected by the build-up of carbon soot produced by the combustion process. TEM and HRTEM are commonly used to investigate the characteristics of individual and agglomerated particles from diesel exhaust, to understand the structure and distribution of the carbon sheets in the primary particles and the nanostructure morphology. However, high resolution imaging of soot-in-oil is more challenging, as mineral oil is a contaminant for the electron microscope and leads to instability under the electron beam. In this work we compare solvent extraction and centrifugation techniques for removing the mineral oil contaminant, and the effect on particle size distribution.

  7. Desulfurization and deashing of Hazro coal by selective oil agglomeration in various water mediums

    SciTech Connect

    Halime Abakay Temel; Fatma Deniz Ayhan

    2006-10-15

    The aim of this study was to study the effects of various water mediums on desulfurization and deashing of Hazro coal by the agglomeration method. For this purpose, three groups of agglomeration experiments were made. The effects of some parameters that markedly influence the effectiveness of selective oil agglomeration, such as solid concentration, bridging liquid concentration, and pH, on the agglomeration were investigated in the first group of experiments. The effects of different salts (NaCl, MgCl{sub 2}, and FeCl{sub 3}) on the agglomeration were investigated in the second group of experiments. The effects of lake water and sea water on the agglomeration were investigated in the third group of experiments. The influences of the Mediterranean Sea water and Aegean Sea water on the removal of ash and total sulfur were found to be important. 22 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  8. Coal beneficiation kinetics of a gas-promoted oil agglomeration process

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, F.; Wheelock, T.D.

    1996-12-31

    The kinetics of a gas-promoted oil agglomeration process were investigated by monitoring the change in the turbidity of an aqueous particle suspension as the particles were agglomerated with heptane in a closed tank fitted with baffles and an agitator. Measured amounts of air and heptane were added to a suspension of Pittsburgh No. 8 coal under vigorous agitation. The subsequent rate of change of particle concentration was taken to be an indication of the rate of agglomeration. The rate was found to be proportional to the particle number concentration raised to a power and dependent on agitator speed and the amounts of air and oil added.

  9. ECONOMIC EVALUATION OF OIL AGGLOMERATION FOR RECOVERY OF FINE COAL REFUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an evaluation of the economics of an oil-agglomeration process (with and without an oil recovery system) for recovering coal fines from a fine refuse stream of 105 ton/hr from a coal preparation plant. The two base case processes studied are oil-agglom...

  10. Coal oxidation and its effect on oil agglomeration

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, X.; Wheelock, T.D.

    1991-12-31

    Small particles of high volatile bituminous coal from two different sources were oxidized by air at 150 C for up to 72 hrs. As the treatment progressed, samples of coal were recovered and characterized by measuring the heat of immersion of the particles in water and determining the agglomerability of the material with heptane while suspended in water. As oxidation proceeded, the heat of immersion increased and the agglomerability decreased, and a direct relationship between the two was observed.

  11. Remediation of oil-contaminated sand by coal agglomeration using ball milling.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yu-Jen; Shen, Yun-Hwei

    2011-10-01

    The mechanical shear force provided by a less energy intensive device (usually operating at 20-200 rpm), a ball mill, was used toperform coal agglomeration and its effects on remediation of a model fuel oil-contaminated sand were evaluated. Important process parameters such as the amount of coal added, milling time, milling speed and the size of milling elements are discussed. The results suggested that highly hydrophobic oil-coal agglomerates, formed by adding suitable amounts of coal into the oil-contaminated sand, could be mechanically liberated from cleaned sand during ball milling and recovered as a surface coating on the steel balls. Over 90% removal of oil from oil-contaminated sand was achieved with 6 wt% of coal addition and an optimum ball milling time of 20 min and speed of 200 rpm. This novel process has considerable potential for cleaning oil-contaminated sands. PMID:22329146

  12. Method for producing distillable hydrocarbonaceous fuels and carbonaceous agglomerates from a heavy crude oil

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, L. D.; Sage, F. E.; Sooter, M. C.

    1984-09-25

    In a method for producing a distillable hydrocarbonaceous stream and carbonaceous agglomerates from a heavy crude oil by charging the crude oil and finely divided carbonaceous solids to a rotary kiln with the crude oil and carbonaceous solids being charged in a weight ratio from about 0.6 to about 1.5; tumbling the crude oil and finely divided carbonaceous solids in the rotary kiln at a temperature from about 850/sup 0/ to about 1000/sup 0/ F. for up to about 30 minutes to produce a vaporous stream and agglomerate particles containing a residual portion of the crude oil and finely divided carbonaceous solids; separating the agglomerate particles into a product portion of a desired particle size range and a recycle portion; grinding the recycle portion to produce the finely divided carbonaceous solids and heating the finely divided carbonaceous solids prior to recycling the carbonaceous solids to mixture with the crude oil, an improvement comprising: supplying at least a major portion of the heat required in said rotary kiln by heating the crude oil charged to the rotary kiln thereby eliminating the heating of the finely divided carbonaceous solids prior to recycling.

  13. APPLICATION OF OIL AGGLOMERATION FOR EFFLUENT CONTROL FROM COAL CLEANING PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses the potential applicability of oil agglomeration for the control of black water effluents from coal cleaning plants processing four different coals. Removal and recovery of the coal from each of the black waters produced aqueous suspensions of mineral matter ...

  14. FUEL CONTAMINANTS: VOLUME 4. APPLICATION OF OIL AGGLOMERATION TO COAL WASTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study of the application of oil agglomeration to coal wastes. There are an estimated 3000-5000 sizeable active and abandoned coal waste piles and impoundments in the eastern U.S. coal fields alone, containing 3 billion tons of refuse, part of which a...

  15. Development of a gas-promoted oil agglomeration process. Technical progress report, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Wheelock, T.D.

    1995-12-01

    Several scale model mixing systems have been built and are being utilized to study the gas-promoted, oil agglomeration process for cleaning coal. Numerous batch agglomeration tests have been conducted with these systems. During an individual test the progress of agglomeration has been monitored by observing either changes in agitator torque in the case of concentrated particle suspensions or changes in turbidity in the case of dilute suspensions. A mathematical model has been developed for relating the rate of agglomeration of coal particles to the rate of change of turbidity of a dilute particle suspension undergoing agglomeration. The model has been utilized for analyzing and interpreting the results of a number of oil agglomeration tests in which several different system parameters were varied.

  16. Coal cleaning by oil agglomeration. Volume 1. An investigation of the process, with oil recovery. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Y.V.

    1985-06-01

    Bench and pilot scale experiments were carried out to evaluate the spherical oil agglomeration process to clean coal to very low ash levels (less than 1.5%). Seven coals were evaluated on the bench scale at the Canadian National Research Council in Ottawa, Canada and two of the most promising coals were re-evaluated for confirmation on the pilot plant scale in Ontario Hydro's 500 kg/h coal cleaning pilot plant. From this study, it was concluded that to prepare a very low ash coal, the coal must be pre-cleaned by low density separation at 1.30 g/mL followed by very fine grinding to 5 to 6 micron mass median diameter prior to oil agglomeration. After agglomeration at an oil-to-coal ratio of up to 40%, more than 95% of this oil can be recovered by thermal drying at a high temperature (300/sup 0/C) and a long residence time (50 min). A conceptual design for a 100 Mg/h low ash coal plant using this process was prepared and the total operating, maintenance, and capital amortization cost for a plant located at the generating station was estimated to be $US 42/Mg of product. 22 refs., 60 figs., 34 tabs.

  17. Directional Agglomeration Multigrid Techniques for High Reynolds Number Viscous Flow Solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    A preconditioned directional-implicit agglomeration algorithm is developed for solving two- and three-dimensional viscous flows on highly anisotropic unstructured meshes of mixed-element types. The multigrid smoother consists of a pre-conditioned point- or line-implicit solver which operates on lines constructed in the unstructured mesh using a weighted graph algorithm. Directional coarsening or agglomeration is achieved using a similar weighted graph algorithm. A tight coupling of the line construction and directional agglomeration algorithms enables the use of aggressive coarsening ratios in the multigrid algorithm, which in turn reduces the cost of a multigrid cycle. Convergence rates which are independent of the degree of grid stretching are demonstrated in both two and three dimensions. Further improvement of the three-dimensional convergence rates through a GMRES technique is also demonstrated.

  18. Directional Agglomeration Multigrid Techniques for High-Reynolds Number Viscous Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, Dimitri J.

    1998-01-01

    A preconditioned directional-implicit agglomeration algorithm is developed for solving two- and three-dimensional viscous flows on highly anisotropic unstructured meshes of mixed-element types. The multigrid smoother consists of a pre-conditioned point- or line-implicit solver which operates on lines constructed in the unstructured mesh using a weighted graph algorithm. Directional coarsening or agglomeration is achieved using a similar weighted graph algorithm. A tight coupling of the line construction and directional agglomeration algorithms enables the use of aggressive coarsening ratios in the multigrid algorithm, which in turn reduces the cost of a multigrid cycle. Convergence rates which are independent of the degree of grid stretching are demonstrated in both two and three dimensions. Further improvement of the three-dimensional convergence rates through a GMRES technique is also demonstrated.

  19. Mechanisms for selective agglomeration of coals

    SciTech Connect

    Wheelock, T.D.; Drzymala, J.; Allen, R.W.; Hu, Y.-C.; Tyson, D.; Xiaoping, Qiu; Lessa, A.

    1989-05-01

    Work continued on the basic mechanisms which underlie various processes for beneficiating aqueous suspensions of coal by selective agglomeration with oil. A new method was demonstrated for characterizing the agglomerability of coal suspensions. This method utilizes a photometric dispersion analyzer to monitor changes in the turbidity of a particle suspension as increasing amounts of oil are added to the suspension in a batch agglomeration test. Agglomeration of the particles leads to a marked decrease in the turbidity of the suspension. Another experimental technique was also demonstrated for characterizing oil agglomeration. This technique involves measuring the rate of growth of agglomerates in a continuous flow system operating under stead-state conditions. The data are analyzed by means of a population balance. The results of a preliminary set of experiments in which Indiana V seam coal was agglomerated with tetralin seemed to fit a particular growth model very well. Equipment was also constructed for studying the kinetics of agglomeration in a batch process. While earlier work showed that quebracho (a commercially available dispersant) is a strong agglomeration depressant for pyrite, recent experiments with mixtures of Upper Freeport coal and mineral pyrite showed that quebracho does not appear to be sufficiently selective. Further consideration was given to the separation of mixtures of coal and pyrite agglomeration with heptane. 2 refs., 17 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Assessing mobility and redistribution patterns of sand and oil agglomerates in the surf zone.

    PubMed

    Dalyander, P Soupy; Long, Joseph W; Plant, Nathaniel G; Thompson, David M

    2014-03-15

    Heavier-than-water sand and oil agglomerates that formed in the surf zone following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill continued to cause beach re-oiling 3years after initial stranding. To understand this phenomena and inform operational response now and for future spills, a numerical method to assess the mobility and alongshore movement of these "surface residual balls" (SRBs) was developed and applied to the Alabama and western Florida coasts. Alongshore flow and SRB mobility and potential flux were used to identify likely patterns of transport and deposition. Results indicate that under typical calm conditions, cm-size SRBs are unlikely to move alongshore, whereas mobility and transport is likely during storms. The greater mobility of sand compared to SRBs makes burial and exhumation of SRBs likely, and inlets were identified as probable SRB traps. Analysis of field data supports these model results. PMID:24503377

  1. Assessing mobility and redistribution patterns of sand and oil agglomerates in the surf zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dalyander, P. Soupy; Long, Joesph W.; Plant, Nathaniel G.; Thompson, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Heavier-than-water sand and oil agglomerates that formed in the surf zone following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill continued to cause beach re-oiling 3 years after initial stranding. To understand this phenomena and inform operational response now and for future spills, a numerical method to assess the mobility and alongshore movement of these “surface residual balls” (SRBs) was developed and applied to the Alabama and western Florida coasts. Alongshore flow and SRB mobility and potential flux were used to identify likely patterns of transport and deposition. Results indicate that under typical calm conditions, cm-size SRBs are unlikely to move alongshore, whereas mobility and transport is likely during storms. The greater mobility of sand compared to SRBs makes burial and exhumation of SRBs likely, and inlets were identified as probable SRB traps. Analysis of field data supports these model results.

  2. Development of a gas-promoted oil agglomeration process. Technical progress report, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Wheelock, T.D.; Zhang, F.

    1994-12-31

    The overall purpose of this research project is to carry out the preliminary laboratory-scale development of a gas-promoted, oil agglomeration process for cleaning coal using model mixing systems. Research conducted during the preceding year showed the need for a semi-empirical mathematical model for representing and analyzing the kinetics of oil agglomeration of coal particles suspended in water. Such a model would provide the means for comparing and possibly correlating the effects of particle concentration and other parameters on the rate of agglomeration. Various models are being considered. One of the models is described below, and the results of fitting the model to experimental data are presented. These experiments were made not only to test the model, but also to compare the effects of particle concentration and the amount of air present on the rate of agglomeration.

  3. Desulfurization and de-ashing of a mixture of subbituminous coal and gangue minerals by selective oil agglomeration

    SciTech Connect

    Ayhan, F.D.

    2009-11-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate desulfurization and de-ashing of a mixture of subbituminous coal and gangue minerals by the agglomeration method. For this purpose, experimental studies were conducted on a mixture containing subbituminous coal, pyrite, quartz and calcite. The effects of some parameters that markedly influence the effectiveness of selective oil agglomeration, such as solid concentration, pH, bridging liquid type and concentration, and depressant type and amount, were investigated. Agglomeration results showed that the usage of various depressants (Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3}, FeCl3, corn starch, wheat starch) in the agglomeration medium has a positive effect on the reduction of ash and total sulfur content of agglomerates. It was found that an agglomerate product containing 3.03% total sulfur and 25.01% ash with a total sulfur reduction of 56.71% was obtained from a feed that contained 7% total sulfur and 43.58% ash when FeCl{sub 3} was used in the agglomeration medium.

  4. Basic principles and mechanisms of selective oil agglomeration. Fossil energy interim report, October 1, 1983--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Wheelock, T.D.

    1992-12-31

    Numerous agglomeration tests were conducted with several types of low-ash coal and graphite, high grade mineral pyrite, and other materials. Relatively pure hydrocarbons, including heptane and hexadecane, were used as agglomerants. Access of air to the system was controlled. Particle recovery by agglomeration was observed to depend on a number of system parameters. Among the most important parameters are the hydrophobicity of the particles and the oil dosage, so that the, recovery of solids per unit of oil administered is proportional to the hydrophobicity. The pH and ionic strength of the aqueous suspension affect particle recovery in different ways depending on the surface properties of the particles. On the other hand, the presence of air in the system generally improves particle recovery. The greatest effect of air was observed in a closely related study which showed that air had to be present to produce good agglomerates from a moderately hydrophobic coal in a mixer producing a lower shear rate. The rate of agglomeration was found to be much greater for a strongly hydrophobic coal than for a moderately hydrophobic coal, and the rate was observed to be proportional to the oil dosage. Also the rate was enhanced by the presence of air in the, system. For hydrophobic coals, the rate increased with increasing ionic strength of the aqueous medium, but it was not affected greatly by pH over a wide range. The separation of coal and pyrite particles by selective agglomeration was found to depend on the relative hydrophobicity of the materials, the oil dosage, and the properties of the aqueous medium.

  5. The use of starch to enhance sulfur and ash removal from coal by selective oil agglomeration

    SciTech Connect

    Good, R.J.; Badgujar, M.N.

    1990-01-01

    We have found that the use of starch or gelatin, as an additive in the Otisca T-Process of selective oil agglomeration of coal, leads to a considerable improvement in the reduction of pyritic sulfur and of ash-forming minerals. A patent application has been filed; (Good Badgugar). Improvement in rejection of pyritic sulfur by up to 55% has been found, and improvement in ash rejection by up to 28%. Carbon recovery of 97.5 to 99.1% was obtained when the starch concentration was in the range, 30 to 200 ppM in the water. Three different bituminous coals were used: Upper Freeport, Kentucky No. 9, and Illinois No. 6.

  6. Development of a gas-promoted oil agglomeration process. Technical progress report, April 1, 1994--June 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Wheelock, T.D.; Drzymala, J.; Zhang, F.; Nelson, C.

    1994-09-01

    The overall purpose of this research project is to carry out the preliminary laboratory-scale development of a gas-promoted, oil agglomeration process for cleaning coal using model mixing systems. The design and construction of a model mixing system for conducting oil agglomeration tests were reported previously as well as the results of a series of calibration and shakedown tests. The system consists of a flat bottom tank which is fitted with four vertical baffles, a cover, and a turbine agitator. The tank has an inside diameter of 15.24 cm (6.0 in.), height of 15.24 cm (6.0 in.), and net volume of 2.87 L. The tank is connected to a photometric dispersion analyzer so that the turbidity of a coal particle suspension undergoing agglomeration can be monitored. Measuring the turbidity of a particle suspension requires application of the Beer-Lambert law. However, since this law applies for dilute suspensions, it is questionable whether or not it applies to the somewhat more concentrated coal suspensions required for the present project. Therefore, to determine the law`s applicability, a series of turbidity measurements was conducted on particle suspensions which varied in particle concentration over a wide range, and the results were analyzed to see how well they agreed with the law. To determine the effect of air in promoting the oil agglomeration of coal particles in an aqueous suspension, a number of agglomeration tests were conducted with the model mixing system. Finely ground Pittsburgh No. 8 coal was used for these tests, and the amount of air present was controlled carefully. The agglomeration process was monitored by observing the change in turbidity of the system.

  7. Diffusion mediated agglomeration of CdS nanoparticles via Langmuir–Blodgett technique

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Nayan Mani Roy, Dhrubojyoti; Gupta, P.S.

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Diffusion mediated agglomeration of CdS nanoparticles are discussed. • Formation of CdS nanoparticles are confirmed by the change of chain length in XRD. • AFM shows the agglomeration of particles with a film swelling of about 5 Å. • UV–vis absorbance suggests that the grown particles show quantum confinement. • Hexagonal form of particle was confirmed by UV–vis reflectivity. - Abstract: We have reported a diffusion mediated agglomeration of cadmium sulphide (CdS) nanoparticles within cadmium arachidate (CdA{sub 2}) film matrix. The structural morphology and formation of CdS nanoparticles are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray reflectivity (XRR), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy techniques. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results show a change in bilayer difference from 53.04 Å to 43 Å after the sulphidation. An epitaxial growth of the films by ∼5 Å after sulphidation is confirmed from atomic force microscopy studies. The particle size calculated form UV–vis absorption edges are found to be varying from 2.6 nm to 3.3 nm for the different layers. A lateral dimension of 72–80 nm from AFM measurements and a size of 2.6–3.3 nm have confirmed one side flat pseudo two-dimensional disk-like nanoparticles. UV–vis reflectivity peak at E{sub 1} (A) confirms the formation of hexagonal CdS nanoparticles along the c-axis.

  8. Preparation of spherical crystal agglomerates of naproxen containing disintegrant for direct tablet making by spherical crystallization technique.

    PubMed

    Nokhodchi, A; Maghsoodi, M

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to obtain directly compressible agglomerates of naproxen containing disintegrant by spherical crystallization technique. Acetone-water containing hydroxypropyl celloluse (HPC) and disintegrant was used as the crystallization system. In this study croscarmellose sodium (Ac-Di-Sol) was employed as disintegrant. The agglomerates were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), powder X-ray diffraction (XRPD), and scanning electron microscopy and were evaluated for flow, packing and tableting properties and drug release. The growth of particle size and the spherical form of the agglomerates resulted in formation of products with good flow and packing properties. The improved compaction properties of the agglomerated crystals were due to their fragmentation occurred during compression. DSC and XRPD studies showed that naproxen particles, crystallized in the presence of HPC and Ac-Di-Sol did not undergo structural modifications. The dissolution rate of naproxen from tablets made of naproxen-(Ac-Di-Sol) agglomerates was enhanced significantly because of including the disintegrant in to the particles. This was attributed to an increase in the surface area of the practically water insoluble drug is exposed to the dissolution medium. In conclusion the spherical crystallization technique developed in this study is suitable for obtaining agglomerates of drug with disintegrant. PMID:18446461

  9. Development of a gas-promoted oil agglomeration process. Technical progress report, December 1, 1993--February 28, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Wheelock, T.D.; Drzymala, J.; Zhang, F.

    1994-05-01

    The overall purpose of this research project is to carry out the preliminary laboratory-scale development of a gas-promoted, oil agglomeration process for cleaning coal using model mixing systems. A model mixing system has been previously designed and constructed for conducting oil agglomeration tests in such a way that agitator speed and torque can be measured as well as agglomeration performance. Equipment is also provided for monitoring the progress of agglomeration during a batch test. This equipment includes a photometric dispersion analyzer for measuring the turbidity of the particle suspension. In order to measure the turbidity a small stream of material is withdrawn from the mixing tank and conducted through an optical cell associated with the photometric dispersion analyzer. The material is then returned to the mixing tank. A peristaltic pump located between the optical cell and the mixing tank is used for circulating the material. During the past quarter a series of shakedown test were carried out to calibrate the equipment and to determine some of its operating characteristics. The accuracy of the agitator speed and torque measuring instrument was checked. Also the gas dispersing effectiveness of the mixing system was investigated. In addition, the effects of agitator speed and solids concentration on agitator torque and power requirements were studied.

  10. Comparison of stages in oil agglomeration process of quartz with sodium oleate in the presence of Ca(II) and Mg(II) ions.

    PubMed

    Ozkan, Alper; Ucbeyiay, Havvanur; Duzyol, Selma

    2009-01-01

    The oil agglomeration of quartz with sodium oleate in the presence of calcium and magnesium ions comprises three consecutive stages: adsorption of cations onto quartz surfaces, which leads to coagulation of the suspension, shear flocculation with sodium oleate and finally, agglomeration of flocs by kerosene. The effects of pH and cation concentration on these stages were investigated and the results were presented comparatively. It was found that all the stages of oil agglomeration of quartz exhibited sharp dependences on pH and cation concentration. That is, these stages generally took place in the pH and concentration ranges in which hydroxy complexes of the cations existed in the suspension. In the case of magnesium ion, the coagulation, shear flocculation and especially oil agglomeration of quartz improved after precipitation of hydroxide. These species of calcium and magnesium ions formed at high pH were adsorbed on the negatively charged surface of quartz, as a result of which the adsorption of sodium oleate became possible and thus the shear flocculation of the particles was achieved. Thereafter, the hydrophobic quartz flocs could be agglomerated by kerosene as bridging liquid. The increase in the shear flocculation efficiency depending on the increase of surface hydrophobicity enhanced the oil agglomeration of quartz with kerosene. The maximum recoveries for all the stages of the quartz were obtained in the presence of 10(-3) M magnesium and 5x10(-3) M calcium ions at pH 11. However, some differences in the behavior of shear flocculation and oil agglomeration of quartz suspension were observed above 10(-3) M concentration of magnesium ion. PMID:18849046

  11. Improved compaction and packing properties of naproxen agglomerated crystals obtained by spherical crystallization technique.

    PubMed

    Maghsoodi, M; Hassan-Zadeh, D; Barzegar-Jalali, M; Nokhodchi, A; Martin, Gary

    2007-11-01

    Naproxen was crystallized from acetone-water in the presence of different concentrations of hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC). Naproxen particles recrystallized in the presence of HPC exhibited an obvious improvement in their packing, flow, and mechanical properties compared to naproxen recrystallized in the absence of the polymer (control particles). The results showed that the particle size distributions of the treated samples were broader than those obtained when HPC was absent. The agglomerates produced in the presence of 0.25% HPC displayed superior flow characteristics (displaying both a low angle of repose and Carr index) in comparison to samples produced in the presence of other concentrations of HPC. This was attributed to the spherical shape and smooth surface, since the area of contact in the powder bed for spherical agglomerates was smaller than that for other crystal shapes. However it was found that the tensile strength of tablets with the particles isolated in the presence of 1% HPC was increased to a greater extent than tablets produced using the spherical particles. Generally, the tensile strengths of the tablets increased with increasing concentrations of HPC present in the crystallization medium. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray powder diffraction studies showed that naproxen particles, crystallized in the presence of HPC did not undergo structural modifications. PMID:18058318

  12. Technique for tertiary oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Alford, H.E.; Chan, K.S.

    1982-05-11

    The optimal salinity of an emulsifier system comprising an alcohol and a neutralized oxidized solvent extracted oil can be controlled to match the salinity of the brine used in the tertiary oil recovery process by controlling the acid number of the solvent extracted oil during the oxidation procedure, controlling the extent of the neutralization during neutralization of the oxidized solvent extracted oil, or both.

  13. Development of clean coal and clean soil technologies using advanced agglomeration techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ignasiak, B.; Ignasiak, T.; Szymocha, K.

    1990-01-01

    Three major topics are discussed in this report: (1) Upgrading of Low Rank Coals by the Agflotherm Process. Test data, procedures, equipment, etc., are described for co-upgrading of subbituminous coals and heavy oil; (2) Upgrading of Bituminous Coals by the Agflotherm Process. Experimental procedures and data, bench and pilot scale equipments, etc., for beneficiating bituminous coals are described; (3) Soil Clean-up and Hydrocarbon Waste Treatment Process. Batch and pilot plant tests are described for soil contaminated by tar refuse from manufactured gas plant sites. (VC)

  14. Observational Data Analysis and Numerical Model Assessment of the Seafloor Interaction and Mobility of Sand and Weathered Oil Agglomerates (Surface Residual Balls) in the Surf Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalyander, S.; Long, J.; Plant, N. G.; Penko, A.; Calantoni, J.; Thompson, D.; Mclaughlin, M. K.

    2014-12-01

    When weathered oil is transported ashore, such as during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, it can mix with suspended sediment in the surf zone to create heavier-than-water sand and oil agglomerates in the form of mats several centimeters thick and tens of meters long. Broken off pieces of these mats and smaller agglomerates formed in situ (called Surface Residual Balls, SRBs) can cause beach re-oiling months to years after the initial spill. The physical dynamics of these SRBs in the nearshore, where they are larger (cm-scale) and less dense than natural sediment, are poorly understood. In the current study, SRB mobility and seafloor interaction is investigated through a combination of laboratory and field experiments with pseudo-SRBs developed to be physically stable proxies for genuine agglomerates. Formulations for mobility prediction based on comparing estimated shear stress to the critical Shields and modified Shields parameters developed for mixed sediment beds are assessed against observations. Processes such as burial, exhumation, and interaction with bedforms (e.g., migrating ripples) are also explored. The observations suggest that incipient motion estimates based on a modified Shields parameter have some skill in predicting SRB movement, but that other forcing mechanisms such as pressure gradients may be important under some conditions. Additionally, burial and exhumation due to the relatively high mobility of sand grains are confirmed as key processes controlling SRB dynamics in the surf zone. This work has broad implications for understanding surf zone sediment transport at the short timescale associated with mobilizing sand grains and SRBs as well as at the longer timescales associated with net transport patterns, sediment budgets, and bed elevation changes.

  15. Unstructured multigrid through agglomeration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatakrishnan, V.; Mavriplis, D. J.; Berger, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    In this work the compressible Euler equations are solved using finite volume techniques on unstructured grids. The spatial discretization employs a central difference approximation augmented by dissipative terms. Temporal discretization is done using a multistage Runge-Kutta scheme. A multigrid technique is used to accelerate convergence to steady state. The coarse grids are derived directly from the given fine grid through agglomeration of the control volumes. This agglomeration is accomplished by using a greedy-type algorithm and is done in such a way that the load, which is proportional to the number of edges, goes down by nearly a factor of 4 when moving from a fine to a coarse grid. The agglomeration algorithm has been implemented and the grids have been tested in a multigrid code. An area-weighted restriction is applied when moving from fine to coarse grids while a trivial injection is used for prolongation. Across a range of geometries and flows, it is shown that the agglomeration multigrid scheme compares very favorably with an unstructured multigrid algorithm that makes use of independent coarse meshes, both in terms of convergence and elapsed times.

  16. New production techniques for alberta oil sands.

    PubMed

    Carrigy, M A

    1986-12-19

    Low world oil prices represent a serious threat to expanded commercial development of the Canadian oil sands in the near term, as they do to all of the higher cost alternatives to crude oil such as oil shales and coal liquefaction. Nonetheless, research and field testing of new technology for production of oil from oil sands are being pursued by industry and government in Alberta. New production technology is being developed in Canada to produce synthetic oil from the vast resources of bitumen trapped in the oil sands and bituminous carbonates of northern Alberta. This technology includes improved methods of mining, extraction, and upgrading of bitumen from near-surface deposits as well as new drilling and production techniques for thermal production of bitumen from the more deeply buried reservoirs. Of particular interest are the cluster drilling methods designed to reduce surface disturbance and the techniques for horizontal drilling of wells from underground tunnels to increase the contact of injection fluids with the reservoir. PMID:17816505

  17. Proceedings of the 4th international symposium on agglomeration

    SciTech Connect

    Capes, C.E.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains papers presented at the 4th International Symposium on Agglomeration. Topics covered include: Agglomeration of Iron Ore (Balling, Binders and Additives, Pelletizing Plant Practice, Sintering, and Characterization of Pellets and Sinter), Agglomeration Process Technologies (Surveys and Applications, Agglomeration for Recycling, Fluid Bed Systems, Granulation: Food and Pharmaceuticals, Pressure Agglomeration, and Agglomeration in Liquids), Fundamental Aspects (Fundamentals and Modelling, Simulation, and Control), and Coal, Coke and Fuels (Coalmaking and Coke Properties, Oil Agglomeration of Coal, and Fuels). In addition, the book contains plenary lectures and listings of the symposium steering committee, the technical program committee, the international advisory committee and the session chairman.

  18. Ultrasonic techniques in oil well logging

    SciTech Connect

    Havira, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    Oil well logging is used to provide the oil and gas industry with information essential to discovering and extracting hydrocarbons. This paper addresses two ultrasonic measurements that are presently used in oil well logging. The most widely used is an ultrasonic technique that evaluates the integrity of the cement seal after a steel casing has been lowered and cemented in place. This instrument is also capable of monitoring the effects of corrosion both on the inner and outer surfaces of the casing. The measurement is based on a pulsed resonant technique. Less widely used is the Borehole Televiewer, an ultrasonic scanning device based on a pulse-echo technique. It provides an acoustic image of geologic features such as rock layers and fractures.

  19. The use of starch to enhance sulfur and ash removal from coal by selective oil agglomeration. Quarterly technical progress report No. 12, July 1--September 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Good, R.J.; Badgujar, M.N.

    1990-12-31

    We have found that the use of starch or gelatin, as an additive in the Otisca T-Process of selective oil agglomeration of coal, leads to a considerable improvement in the reduction of pyritic sulfur and of ash-forming minerals. A patent application has been filed; (Good & Badgugar). Improvement in rejection of pyritic sulfur by up to 55% has been found, and improvement in ash rejection by up to 28%. Carbon recovery of 97.5 to 99.1% was obtained when the starch concentration was in the range, 30 to 200 ppM in the water. Three different bituminous coals were used: Upper Freeport, Kentucky No. 9, and Illinois No. 6.

  20. POC-scale testing of oil agglomeration techniques and equipment for fine coal processing

    SciTech Connect

    W. Pawlak; K. Szymocha

    1999-07-01

    The information presented in this manual is solely for the purpose of operating the POC-scale equipment for fine coal processing as described herein. This manual provides a general description of the process technology and guidelines for plant operating procedures. It is intended for use by the operators and maintenance personnel who will be responsible for the operations of the plant. No attempt should be made to operate the plant until the principles of the process and operating instructions contained in this manual are fully understood. Operating personnel should thoroughly familiarize themselves with all processing equipment prior to commencing plant operation. All equipment is skid mounted to provide a self-contained unit. The dimensions of the unit are comply with standard guidelines. A minimum distance of 2 feet is provided between equipment for walkway and maintenance.

  1. Fuel agglomerates and method of agglomeration

    DOEpatents

    Wen, Wu-Wey

    1986-01-01

    Solid fuel agglomerates are prepared of particulate coal or other carbonaceous material with a binder having a high humic acid or humate salt content. The humic acid is extracted from oxidized carbonaceous material with a mild aqueous alkali solution of, for instance, ammonia. The particulate material is blended with the extract which serves as the binder for the agglomerates. The water-resistant agglomerates are formed such as by pelletizing, followed by drying to remove moisture and solidify the humic acid binder throughout the agglomerate.

  2. Spatio-temporal variability of surface water quality of fresh water resources in Ranchi Urban Agglomeration, India using geospatial techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Arvind Chandra; Kumar, Amit

    2015-03-01

    Study was conducted in Ranchi Urban Agglomeration (RUA) to assess the surface water quality of major rivers and reservoirs during pre- and post-monsoon periods. Study indicated increase in chemical contaminants and decrease in biological contaminants during monsoon periods and a positive correlation with built-up land within the catchment of surface water sources. The remote sensing-based approach indicated Swarnrekha river and tributaries as more encroached by built-up land (0.73 km2 within 50 m buffer) than Jumar river and its tributaries (0.21 km2). For the proper management of the surface water sources in RUA, government attention and interventions are required to minimize the contamination and safeguard the health of local residents.

  3. Modeling the Asymmetric Burning of Agglomerate Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richmond, Clinton

    2007-06-01

    A model has been developed to describe asymmetric burning effects due to oxide caps or other substances on the surface of agglomerate particles. The model accounts for the burning behavior of single particles when they are combined together in an agglomerate of particles. The model calculates the available surface area that is exposed to burning by the geometric formation of the agglomerate of the combining particles. Averaging analytic techniques are applied to the burning behavior of the agglomerate of particles so that its burning effects can be compared to the burning effects from the uncombined, single particles.

  4. Transfer-free graphene synthesis on sapphire by catalyst metal agglomeration technique and demonstration of top-gate field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, Makoto; Mizuno, Masaya; Arima, Yukinori; Kubo, Toshiharu; Egawa, Takashi; Soga, Tetsuo

    2015-08-01

    Transfer-free graphene synthesis was performed on sapphire substrates by using the catalyst metal agglomeration technique, and the graphene film quality was compared to that synthesized on sputtered SiO2/Si substrates. Raman scattering measurements indicated that the graphene film on sapphire has better structural qualities than that on sputtered SiO2/Si substrates. The cross-sectional transmission microscopic study also revealed that the film flatness was drastically improved by using sapphire substrates instead of sputtered SiO2/Si substrates. These quality improvements seemed to be due the chemical and thermal stabilities of sapphire. Top-gate field-effect transistors were fabricated using the graphene films on sapphire, and it was confirmed that their drain current can be modulated with applied gate voltages. The maximum field-effect mobilities were estimated to be 720 cm2/V s for electrons and 880 cm2/V s for holes, respectively.

  5. Acoustic agglomeration methods and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Methods are described for using acoustic energy to agglomerate fine particles on the order of one micron diameter that are suspended in gas, to provide agglomerates large enough for efficient removal by other techniques. The gas with suspended particles, is passed through the length of a chamber while acoustic energy at a resonant chamber mode is applied to set up one or more acoustic standing wave patterns that vibrate the suspended particles to bring them together so they agglomerate. Several widely different frequencies can be applied to efficiently vibrate particles of widely differing sizes. The standing wave pattern can be applied along directions transversed to the flow of the gas. The particles can be made to move in circles by applying acoustic energy in perpendicular directions with the energy in both directions being of the same wavelength but 90 deg out of phase.

  6. Secondary oil recovery techniques improve remediation projects

    SciTech Connect

    Aminian, K.; Ameri, S.

    1996-01-01

    The petroleum industry has successfully developed sophisticated oil recovery technologies that could be used for effective contaminant removal from soil and/or groundwater. In enhanced recovery, the residual oil is mobilized through injection of a solvent that is miscible with oil. Soil vapor extraction takes advantage of the highly volatile nature of VOCs in air and the relative ease of moving air through the unsaturated zone to effectively remove VOCs from the soil. A similar approach can be used for groundwater decontamination.

  7. New technique for oil backstreaming contamination measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterovitz, S. A.; Speier, H. J.; Sieg, R. M.; Drotos, M. N.; Dunning, J. E.

    1993-01-01

    Due to the large size and the number of diffusion pumps, space simulation chambers cannot be easily calibrated by the usual test dome method for measuring backstreaming from oil diffusion pumps. In addition, location dependent contamination may be an important parameter of the test. The backstreaming contamination in the Space Power Facility (SPF) near Sandusky, Ohio, the largest space simulation vacuum test chamber in the U.S.A. was measured. Small size clean silicon wafers as contamination sensors placed at all desired measurement sites were used. The facility used diffusion pumps with DC 705 oil. The thickness of the contamination oil film was measured using ellipsometry. Since the oil did not wet uniformly the silicon substrate, two analysis models were developed to measure the oil film: continuous, homogeneous film and islands of oil with the islands varying in coverage fraction and height. In both cases, the contamination film refractive index was assumed to be that of DC 705. The second model improved the ellipsometric analysis quality parameter by up to two orders of magnitude, especially for the low coverage cases. Comparison of the two models for our case shows that the continuous film model overestimates the oil volume by less than 50 percent. Absolute numbers for backstreaming are in good agreement with published results for diffusion pumps. Good agreement was also found between the ellipsometric results and measurements done by x ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) on samples exposed to the same vacuum runs.

  8. Agglomeration of Dust

    SciTech Connect

    Annaratone, B. M.; Arnas, C.; Elskens, Y.

    2008-09-07

    The agglomeration of the matter in plasma, from the atomic level up to millimetre size particles, is here considered. In general we identify a continuous growth, due to deposition, and two agglomeration steps, the first at the level of tens of nanometres and the second above the micron. The agglomeration of nano-particles is attributed to electrostatic forces in presence of charge polarity fluctuations. Here we present a model based on discrete currents. With increasing grain size the positive charge permanence decreases, tending to zero. This effect is only important in the range of nanometre for dust of highly dispersed size. When the inter-particle distance is of the order of the screening length another agglomeration mechanism dominates. It is based on attractive forces, shadow forces or dipole-dipole interaction, overcoming the electrostatic repulsion. In bright plasma radiation pressure also plays a role.

  9. A new shock wave assisted sandalwood oil extraction technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arunkumar, A. N.; Srinivasa, Y. B.; Ravikumar, G.; Shankaranarayana, K. H.; Rao, K. S.; Jagadeesh, G.

    A new shock wave assisted oil extraction technique from sandalwood has been developed in the Shock Waves Lab, IISc, Bangalore. The fragrant oil extracted from sandalwood finds variety of applications in medicine and perfumery industries. In the present method sandal wood specimens (2.5mm diameter and 25mm in length)are subjected to shock wave loading (over pressure 15 bar)in a constant area shock tube, before extracting the sandal oil using non-destructive oil extraction technique. The results from the study indicates that both the rate of extraction as well as the quantity of oil obtained from sandal wood samples exposed to shock waves are higher (15-40 percent) compared to non-destructive oil extraction technique. The compressive squeezing of the interior oil pockets in the sandalwood specimen due to shock wave loading appears to be the main reason for enhancement in the oil extraction rate. This is confirmed by the presence of warty structures in the cross-section and micro-fissures in the radial direction of the wood samples exposed to shock waves in the scanning electron microscopic investigation. In addition the gas chromatographic studies do not show any change in the q uality of sandal oil extracted from samples exposed to shock waves.

  10. Bioremediation Techniques of Oil Contaminated Soils in Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Hodges, David

    1996-10-03

    The objective of this project is to develop environmentally sound and cost-effective remediation techniques for crude oil contaminated soils. By providing a guidance manual to oil and gas operators, the Ohio Division of Oil and Gas regulatory authority hopes to reduce remediation costs while improving voluntary compliance with soil clean-up requirements. This shall be accomplished by conducting a series of field tests to define the optimum range for nutrient and organic enhancement to biologically remediate soils contaminated with brines and crude oil having a wide rage of viscosity.

  11. Thermal Effusivity of Vegetable Oils Obtained by a Photothermal Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervantes-Espinosa, L. M.; de L. Castillo-Alvarado, F.; Lara-Hernández, G.; Cruz-Orea, A.; Hernández-Aguilar, C.; Domínguez-Pacheco, A.

    2014-10-01

    Thermal properties of several vegetable oils such as soy, corn, and avocado commercial oils were obtained by using a photopyroelectric technique. The inverse photopyroelectric configuration was used in order to obtain the thermal effusivity of the oil samples. The theoretical equation for the photopyroelectric signal in this configuration, as a function of the incident light modulation frequency, was fitted to the experimental data in order to obtain the thermal effusivity of these samples. The obtained results are in good agreement with the thermal effusivity reported for other vegetable oils. All measurements were done at room temperature.

  12. TECHNIQUES FOR MIXING DISPERSANTS WITH SPILLED OIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effective use of some oil spill dispersants requires the addition of mixing energy to the dispersant-treated slick. Various methods of energy application have included the use of fire hose streams directed to the water surface, outboard motors mounted on work boats, and the f...

  13. Treatment of crude petroleum/water emulsions by agglomeration methods using fine coal

    SciTech Connect

    Capes, C.E.; Coleman, R.D.; Thayer, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    Persistent crude petroleum-water emulsions are produced in the recovery and extraction of heavier oils, for example, in the hot water processing of surface mined oil sands and during in-situ methods such as steam- or water-flooding. Over the past few years, much attention has been directed to the oil agglomeration method as a means of recovering and upgrading fine coal in water suspensions. The work reported here concerns the use of crude petroleum from produced emulsions in the coal agglomeration process. Two problems are addressed in this way. Not only is oil recovered and emulsions broken in the case of the produced emulsions, but the coal is also beneficiated through the rejection of water and inorganic impurities because of the selectivity of the agglomeration technique. Laboratory-scale experiments are reported using the different samples of produced emulsion from western Canada and a fine coal from waste tailings of a coal preparation plant. Results of the experiments are considered from the point-of-view of both the cleaning of the coal and the treatment of the crude emulsions. Concepts for incorporating this separation scheme into a coal-oil co-processing flowsheet are briefly discussed. 11 references.

  14. Agglomeration of ceramic powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cawley, James D.; Larosa, Judith; Dirkse, Fredrick

    1989-01-01

    A research program directed at a critical comparison of numerical models for power agglomeration with experimental observations is currently underway. Central to this program is the quantitative characterization of the distribution of mass within an agglomerate as a function of time. Current experiments are designed to restrict agglomeration to a surface, which is oriented perpendicular to the force of gravity. These experiments are discussed with reference to: their significance to ceramic processing; artifacts which may be avoided in microgravity experiments; and the comparison of information available in real space (from optical microscopy) to that in reciprocal space (from light scattering). The principle machine requirement appears to be a need to obtain information at small scattering angles.

  15. Development and Application of Agglomerated Multigrid Methods for Complex Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Hiroaki; Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.

    2010-01-01

    We report progress in the development of agglomerated multigrid techniques for fully un- structured grids in three dimensions, building upon two previous studies focused on efficiently solving a model diffusion equation. We demonstrate a robust fully-coarsened agglomerated multigrid technique for 3D complex geometries, incorporating the following key developments: consistent and stable coarse-grid discretizations, a hierarchical agglomeration scheme, and line-agglomeration/relaxation using prismatic-cell discretizations in the highly-stretched grid regions. A signi cant speed-up in computer time is demonstrated for a model diffusion problem, the Euler equations, and the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations for 3D realistic complex geometries.

  16. Detecting Oil on Water: A Comparison of Known Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klemas, Vytautas

    1971-01-01

    This paper reviews new developments in oil pollution detection and compares available techniques according to their effectiveness. Emphasis is on in situ and remote sensing techniques, with a potential for real-time, automated operation. No mention is made of traditional methods, requiring that a sample be taken to a laboratory for tests of solubility, chemical reactions, or other properties.

  17. Nondestructive analysis of oil shales with PGNAA technique

    SciTech Connect

    Maly, J.; Bozorgmanesh, H.

    1984-02-01

    The feasibility of nondestructive analysis of oil shales using the prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) technique was studied. The PGNAA technique, developed originally for continuous analysis of coal on the belt, was applied to the analysis of eight oil-shale samples, containing between 9 and 60 gallons of oil per ton and 0.8% to 3.4% hydrogen. The PGNAA technique was modified using four neutron moderation conditions: non-moderated neutrons; non-moderated and partially moderated neutrons reflected from a water box behind the source; neutrons moderated in a water box behind and in front of the source; and neutrons strongly moderated in a polyethylene block placed in front of the source and with reflected neutrons from a water box behind the source. The studied oil shales were measured in their aluminum or wooden (masonite) boxes. The obtained Ge-Li spectra were processed by LSI-11/23 computer, using the modified programs previously developed by SAI for continuous coal analysis. The results of such processing (the peak areas for several gamma lines) were corrected and plotted against the weight percent of each analyzed element (from the chemical analysis). Response curves developed for H, C, N, S, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ti, Ca, Fe and K show generally good linear proportions of peak area to the weight percent of the element. For hydrogen determination, NMD conditions had to be used where the response curve was not linear, but followed a curve whose slope rose with hydrogen concentration. This effect is caused by improving neutron self-moderation in sample boxes of rich oil shales, as compared to poor self-moderation of neutrons in very lean oil shales. The moisture in oil shales was measured by microwave absorption technique in small masonite boxes. This method was calibrated four times using oil-shale samples mixed gradually with larger and larger amounts of water.

  18. Wintergreen oil: a novel method in Wheatley's trichrome staining technique.

    PubMed

    Salleh, Fatmah Md; Anuar, Tengku Shahrul; Yasin, Azlin Mohd; Moktar, Norhayati

    2012-10-01

    Permanent staining of faecal smears by Wheatley's trichrome technique has been used by many scientists for the detection of parasites in the past and it was found to be highly sensitive. This study was conducted to evaluate the use of Wintergreen oil in comparison with xylene in Wheatley's trichrome staining technique, as the reference technique. In a blind comparison study, 500 collected faecal samples from aboriginal communities were examined. Wintergreen oil was found to be more superior than xylene as a clearing agent in the Wheatley's trichrome staining of polyvinyl alcohol-fixed faecal smears for the identification of intestinal protozoa. Elimination of toxic, carcinogenic, and fire hazards makes Wintergreen oil the preferred choice in routine parasitology examinations. PMID:22986100

  19. Micro-agglomerate flotation for deep cleaning of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Chander, S.; Hogg, R.

    1993-04-01

    We are investigating the use of a hybrid process, Micro-agglomerate flotation, which is a combination of oil-agglomeration and froth flotation. The basic concept is to use small quantities of oil to promote the formation of dense micro-agglomerates with minimal entrapment of water and mineral particles, and to use froth flotation to extract these micro-agglomerates from the water/dispersed-mineral phase. Since the floating units are agglomerates (about 30--50 [mu]m in size) rather than individual coal particles (1--10 [mu]m) the problems of froth overload and water/mineral carryover should be significantly alleviated.Micro-agglomerate flotation has considerable potential for the practical deep cleaning of coal on a commercial scale. In principle, it should be possible to achieve both high selectivity and high yield at reasonable cost. The process requires only conventional, off-the-shelf equipment and reagent usage (oil, surfactants, etc.) should be small. There are, however, complications. The process involves at least five phases: two or more solids (coal and mineral), two liquids (oil and water) and one gas (air). It is necessary to maintain precise control over the chemistry of the liquid phases in order to promote the interfacial reactions and interactions between phases necessary to ensure selectivity. Kinetics as well as thermodynamic factors may be critical in determining overall system response.

  20. Micro-agglomerate flotation for deep cleaning of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Chander, S.; Hogg, R.

    1993-01-01

    We are investigating the use of a hybrid process - Micro-agglomerate flotation - which is a combination of oil-agglomeration and froth flotation. The basic concept is to use small quantities of oil to promote the formation of dense micro-agglomerates with minimal entrapment of water and mineral particles, and to use froth flotation to extract these micro-agglomerates from the water/dispersed-mineral phase. Since the floating units are agglomerates (about 30--50 [mu]m in size) rather than individual coal particles (1--10 [mu]m) the problems of froth overload and water/mineral carryover should be significantly alleviated. Micro-agglomerate flotation has considerable potential for the practical deep cleaning of coal on a commercial scale. In principle, it should be possible to achieve both high selectivity and high yield at reasonable cost. The process requires only conventional, off-the-shelf equipment and reagent usage (oil, surfactants, etc.) should be small. There are, however, complications. The process involves at least five phases: two or more solids (coal and mineral), two liquids (oil and water) and one gas (air). It is necessary to maintain precise control over the chemistry of the liquid phases in order to promote the interfacial reactions and interactions between phases necessary to ensure selectivity. Kinetics as well as thermodynamic factors may be critical in determining overall system response.

  1. Thermal properties measurements in biodiesel oils using photothermal techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, M. P. P.; Andrade, A. A.; Franco, R. W. A.; Miranda, P. C. M. L.; Sthel, M.; Vargas, H.; Constantino, R.; Baesso, M. L.

    2005-08-01

    In this Letter, thermal lens and open cell photoacoustic techniques are used to measure the thermal properties of biodiesel oils. The absolute values of the thermal effusivity, thermal diffusivity, thermal conductivity and the temperature coefficient of the refractive index were determined for samples obtained from soy, castor bean, sunflower and turnip. The results suggest that the employed techniques may be useful as complementary methods for biodiesel certification.

  2. Thermal Stability of Oil Palm Empty Fruit Bunch (OPEFB) Nanocrystalline Cellulose: Effects of post-treatment of oven drying and solvent exchange techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indarti, E.; Marwan; Wanrosli, W. D.

    2015-06-01

    Nanocrystallinecellulose (NCC) from biomass is a promising material with huge potentials in various applications. A big challenge in its utilization is the agglomeration of the NCC's during processing due to hydrogen bonding among the cellulose chains when in close proximity to each other. Obtaining NCC's in a non-agglomerated and non-aqueous condition is challenging. In the present work NCC's was isolated from oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) using TEMPO-oxidation reaction method. To obtain non-agglomerated and non-aqueous products, the NCC's underwent post-treatment using oven drying (OD) and solvent exchanged (SE) techniques. The thermal stability of all samples was determined from TGA and DTG profiles whilst FTIR was used to analyzethe chemical modifications that occurred under these conditions. NCC-SE has better thermal stability than the NCC-OD and its on-set degradation temperature and residue are also higher. FTIR analysis shows that NCC-SE has a slightly different chemical composition whereby the absorption band at 1300 cm-1 (due to C-O symmetric stretching) is absent as compared to NCC-OD indicating that in NCC-SE the carboxylate group is in acid form which contribute to its thermal stability

  3. Combustion of an oil palm residue with elevated potassium content in a fluidized-bed combustor using alternative bed materials for preventing bed agglomeration.

    PubMed

    Ninduangdee, Pichet; Kuprianov, Vladimir I

    2015-04-01

    Palm kernel shell (PKS) was burned at 45 kg/s and excess air of 20-80% in a fluidized-bed combustor using alumina, dolomite, and limestone as the bed material. Temperature and gas concentrations were recorded along the reactor centerline as well as at stack. A SEM-EDS analysis was performed to investigate morphology and elemental composition of bed particles. An X-ray fluorescence method was used to determine the composition of used/reused bed materials and PM emitted from the combustor at different operating times. Excess air of 40% seems to be most appropriate for burning PKS in this combustor with an alumina bed, whereas 60% excess air is more suitable when using dolomite and limestone, as ensuring high (98.6-98.9%) combustion efficiency and acceptable CO and NO emissions. By using the selected bed materials, bed agglomeration can be prevented in this combustor. However, the bed materials exhibit substantial time-domain changes in physical and chemical properties. PMID:25704101

  4. Research status and development trend of ultrasonic oil production technique in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenjun; Xu, Yuanming; Suman, Bajracharya

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents an overview of research status and development trend of ultrasonic oil production technique for Enhanced Oil Recovery in China. As one of EOR techniques, ultrasonic oil production attracts more attention due to its simplicity, lower expenses, good applicability and no reservoir pollution. Through the comparison of the development of ultrasonic oil production both in China and other countries, this paper summarize the recent research progress in ultrasonic oil production techniques and practices in China. Finally, the development of oil production equipment and development trend of ultrasonic oil production technique in China are given. PMID:25640683

  5. Agglomeration multigrid for the three-dimensional Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatakrishnan, V.; Mavriplis, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    A multigrid procedure that makes use of coarse grids generated by the agglomeration of control volumes is advocated as a practical approach for solving the three dimensional Euler equations on unstructured grids about complex configurations. It is shown that the agglomeration procedure can be tailored to achieve certain coarse grid properties such as the sizes of the coarse grids and aspect ratios of the coarse grid cells. The agglomeration is done as a preprocessing step and runs in linear time. The implications for multigrid of using arbitrary polyhedral coarse grids are discussed. The agglomeration multigrid technique compares very favorably with existing multigrid procedures both in terms of convergence rates and elapsed times. The main advantage of the present approach is the ease with which coarse grids of any desired degree of coarseness may be generated in three dimensions, without being constrained by considerations of geometry. Inviscid flows over a variety of complex configurations are computed using the agglomeration multigrid strategy.

  6. Micro-agglomerate flotation for deep cleaning of coal. Quarterly progress report, October 1--December 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, S.; Hogg, R.

    1996-04-01

    Goals are to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of a micro-agglomerate flotation process (combination of oil-agglomeration and froth flotation) and to establish the essential criteria for reagent selection and system design and operation. The research program was organized into the following tasks: interfacial studies, emulsification, agglomerate growth and structure, and agglomerate flotation. Work on the first two tasks has been completed.

  7. Fiber optic remote inspecting technique for caverned large oil tanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weilai; Jiang, Desheng; Cao, He

    2000-12-01

    In the management of caverned fuel oil inventory, a strict rule of fire control has always been the first priority due to the special conditions. It is always a challenge to perform automatic measurement by means of conventional electrical devices for inspecting oil tank level there. Introduced in this paper is a fiber optic gauging technique with millimeter precision for automatic measurement in caverned tanks. Instead of using any electrical device, it uses optical encoders and optical fibers for converting and transmitting signals. Its principle, specifications, installation and applications are discussed in detail. Theoretical analysis of the factors affecting its accuracy, stability, and special procedures adopted in the installation of the fiber optic gauge are also discussed.

  8. Robust satellite techniques for oil spill detection and monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casciello, D.; Pergola, N.; Tramutoli, V.

    Discharge of oil into the sea is one of the most dangerous, among technological hazards, for the maritime environment. In the last years maritime transport and exploitation of marine resources continued to increase; as a result, tanker accidents are nowadays increasingly frequent, continuously menacing the maritime security and safety. Satellite remote sensing could contribute in multiple ways, in particular for what concerns early warning and real-time (or near real-time) monitoring. Several satellite techniques exist, mainly based on the use of SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) technology, which are able to recognise, with sufficient accuracy, oil spills discharged into the sea. Unfortunately, such methods cannot be profitably used for real-time detection, because of the low observational frequency assured by present satellite platforms carrying SAR sensors (the mean repetition rate is something like 30 days). On the other hand, potential of optical sensors aboard meteorological satellites, was not yet fully exploited and no reliable techniques have been developed until now for this purpose. Main limit of proposed techniques can be found in the ``fixed threshold'' approach which makes such techniques difficult to implement without operator supervision and, generally, without an independent information on the oil spill presence that could drive the choice of the best threshold. A different methodological approach (RAT, Robust AVHRR Techniques) proposed by Tramutoli (1998) and already successfully applied to several natural and environmental emergencies related to volcanic eruptions, forest fires and seismic activity. In this paper its extension to near real-time detection and monitoring of oil spills by means of NOAA-AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) records will be described. Briefly, RAT approach is an automatic change-detection scheme that considers a satellite image as a space-time process, described at each place (x,y) and time t, by the value of the satellite derived measurements V(x,y,t). Generally speaking an Absolute Local Index of Change of the Environment (ALICE) is computed and this index permits to identify signal anomalies, in the space-time domain, as deviations from a normal state preliminarily defined, for each image pixel, (e.g. in terms of time average and standard deviation) on the base only of satellite observations collected during several year in the past, in similar observational conditions (same time of the day, same month of the year). By this way local (i.e. specific for the place and the time of observation) instead than fixed thresholds are automatically set by RAT which permit to discriminate signal anomalies from those variations due to natural or observational condition variability. Using AVHRR observations in the Thermal (TIR) and Middle (MIR) Infrared region, such an approach has been applied to the extended oil spill event, occurred at the end of January 1991 in the Persian Gulf. Preliminary results will be analysed that confirm as the suggested technique is able to detect and monitoring oil spills also in the most difficult observational conditions. Automatic implementation, intrinsic exportability on whatever geographic zone and/or satellite package, high sensitivity also to low intensity signals (i.e. small or thin spills), no need for ancillary information (different form satellite data at hand), seem the most promising merits of the proposed technique. Although these results should be confirmed by further analyses on different events and extended also to other AVHRR spectral bands (VIS, NIR), this work surely encourages to continue the research in this field. Moreover, the complete independence of the RAT approach on the specific sensor and/or satellite system, will ensure its full exportability on the new generation of Earth observation satellite sensors (e.g. SEVIRI-Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager onboard Meteosat Second generation satellite, with a repetition rate of 15 minutes and 12 spectral bands) which, thanks to their improved capabilities, could

  9. Particle Agglomeration in Bipolar Barb Agglomerator Under AC Electric Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chao; Ma, Xiuqin; Sun, Youshan; Wang, Meiyan; Zhang, Changping; Lou, Yueya

    2015-04-01

    The development of an efficient technology for removing fine particles in flue gas is essential as the haze is becoming more and more serious. To improve agglomeration effectiveness of fine particles, a dual zone electric agglomeration device consisting of a charging chamber and an agglomeration chamber with bipolar barb electrodes was developed. The bipolar barb electric agglomerator with a polar distance of 200 mm demonstrates good agglomeration effectiveness for particles with a size less than 8.0 ?m under applied AC electric field. An optimal condition for achieving better agglomeration effectiveness was found to be as follows: flue gas flow velocity of 3.00 m/s, particle concentration of 2.00 g/m3, output voltage of 35 kV and length of the barb of 16 mm. In addition, 4.0-6.0 ?m particles have the best effectiveness with the variation of particle volume occupancy of -3.2. supported by the Key Technology R&D Program of Hebei, China (No. 13211207D)

  10. Hydrophobic Agglomeration of Mineral Fines in Aqueous Suspensions and its Application in Flotation: a Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bingqiao; Song, Shaoxian

    2014-05-01

    Hydrophobic agglomeration is originated from the hydrophobic attraction between particles, which is essentially different from electrolyte coagulation and polymer flocculation. It is applied to mineral processing in floc-flotation process to improve the recovery of mineral fines. In this paper, the applications of this phenomenon in mineral fines were summarized, including the origin of hydrophobic agglomeration, the main factors affect hydrophobic agglomeration (particle hydrophobicity, shear rate and duration, nonpolar oil and tank geometry), as well as hydrophobic agglomeration based separation processes (carrier flotation and floc-flotation).

  11. Inverse gas chromatography and other chromatographic techniques in the examination of engine oils.

    PubMed

    Fall, Jacek; Voelkel, Adam

    2002-09-01

    The emerging market of engine oils consists of a number of products from different viscosity and quality classes. Determination of the base oil used in manufacturing of the final product (engine oil) as well as estimation of mutual miscibility of oils and their solubility could be crucial problems. Inverse gas chromatography and other chromatographic techniques are presented as an interesting and fruitful extension of normalised standard analytical methods used in the oil industry. PMID:12385390

  12. Recent Advances in Agglomerated Multigrid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Hiroaki; Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.; Hammond, Dana P.

    2013-01-01

    We report recent advancements of the agglomerated multigrid methodology for complex flow simulations on fully unstructured grids. An agglomerated multigrid solver is applied to a wide range of test problems from simple two-dimensional geometries to realistic three- dimensional configurations. The solver is evaluated against a single-grid solver and, in some cases, against a structured-grid multigrid solver. Grid and solver issues are identified and overcome, leading to significant improvements over single-grid solvers.

  13. Coal Cleaning by Gas Agglomeration

    SciTech Connect

    Meiyu Shen; Royce Abbott; T. D. Wheelock

    1998-03-01

    The gas agglomeration method of coal cleaning was demonstrated with laboratory scale mixing equipment which made it possible to generate microscopic gas bubbles in aqueous suspensions of coal particles. A small amount of i-octane was introduced to enhance the hydrophobicity of the coal. Between 1.0 and 2.5 v/w% i-octane was sufficient based on coal weight. Coal agglomerates or aggregates were produced which were bound together by small gas bubbles.

  14. MTCI acoustic agglomeration particulate control

    SciTech Connect

    Chandran, R.R.; Mansour, M.N.; Scaroni, A.W.; Koopmann, G.H.; Loth, J.L.

    1994-10-01

    The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate pulse combination induced acoustic enhancement of coal ash agglomeration and sulfur capture at conditions typical of direct coal-fired turbines and PFBC hot gas cleanup. MTCI has developed an advanced compact pulse combustor island for direct coal-firing in combustion gas turbines. This combustor island comprises a coal-fired pulse combustor, a combined ash agglomeration and sulfur capture chamber (CAASCC), and a hot cyclone. In the MTCI proprietary approach, the pulse combustion-induced high intensity sound waves improve sulfur capture efficiency and ash agglomeration. The resulting agglomerates allow the use of commercial cyclones and achieve very high particulate collection efficiency. In the MTCI proprietary approach, sorbent particles are injected into a gas stream subjected to an intense acoustic field. The acoustic field serves to improve sulfur capture efficiency by enhancing both gas film and intra-particle mass transfer rates. In addition, the sorbent particles act as dynamic filter foci, providing a high density of stagnant agglomerating centers for trapping the finer entrained (in the oscillating flow field) fly ash fractions. A team has been formed with MTCI as the prime contractor and Penn State University and West Virginia University as subcontractors to MTCI. MTCI is focusing on hardware development and system demonstration, PSU is investigating and modeling acoustic agglomeration and sulfur capture, and WVU is studying aerovalve fluid dynamics. Results are presented from all three studies.

  15. Microbial effects on colloidal agglomeration

    SciTech Connect

    Hersman, L.

    1995-11-01

    Colloidal particles are known to enhance the transport of radioactive metals through soil and rock systems. This study was performed to determine if a soil microorganism, isolated from the surface samples collected at Yucca Mountain, NV, could affect the colloidal properties of day particles. The agglomeration of a Wyoming bentonite clay in a sterile uninoculated microbial growth medium was compared to the agglomeration in the medium inoculated with a Pseudomonas sp. In a second experiment, microorganisms were cultured in the succinate medium for 50 h and removed by centrifugation. The agglomeration of the clay in this spent was compared to sterile uninoculated medium. In both experiments, the agglomeration of the clay was greater than that of the sterile, uninoculated control. Based on these results, which indicate that this microorganism enhanced the agglomeration of the bentonite clay, it is possible to say that in the presence of microorganisms colloidal movement through a rock matrix could be reduced because of an overall increase in the size of colloidal particle agglomerates. 32 refs.

  16. Development and scale-up of particle agglomeration processes for coal beneficiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Meiyu

    The development of two modified agglomeration processes for coal beneficiation is presented separately in Parts I and II of this dissertation. Part I is based on research which was conducted to study the mechanism and characteristics of a gas-promoted oil agglomeration process. Part II is based on research which was carried out to develop a newer and more innovative method for agglomerating coal particles with microscopic gas bubbles in aqueous suspensions. In Part I, the development of a gas-promoted oil agglomeration process for cleaning coal was carried out with scale model mixing systems in which aqueous suspensions of ultrafine coal particles were treated with a liquid hydrocarbon and a small amount of air. The resulting agglomerates were recovered by screening. During batch agglomeration tests the progress of agglomeration was monitored by observing changes in agitator torque in the case of concentrated suspension. A key parameter turned out to be the minimum time te required to produce compact spherical agglomerates. Other important parameters included the projected area mean particle diameter of the agglomerates recovered at the end of a test as well as the ash content and yield of agglomerates. Batch agglomeration tests were conducted with geometrically similar mixing tanks which ranged in volume from 0.346 to 11.07 liters. It was shown that gas bubbles trigger the process of agglomeration and participate in a very complex mechanism involving the interaction of particles, oil droplets, and gas bubbles. The process takes place in stages involving dispersion of oil and gas, flocculation, coagulation, and agglomerate building. Numerous agglomeration tests were conducted with two kinds of coal in concentrated suspensions to determine the important characteristics of the process and to study the effects of the following operating parameters: i-octane concentration, air concentration, particle concentration, tank diameter, impeller diameter, and impeller speed. Several excellent correlations between the minimum time required to produce spherical agglomerates or a final agglomerate diameter and the operating parameters were obtained by using the general linear regression method. In addition, the results provided a basis for size scale up of an agglomeration system. In Part II, the technical feasibility of a gas agglomeration method for cleaning coal was demonstrated by means of bench-scale tests conducted with a mixing system which enabled the treatment of ultrafine coal particles with a colloidal suspension of microscopic gas bubbles in water. A suitable suspension of microbubbles was produced by agitation and a small amount of i-octane. When the suspension of microbubbles and coal particles was mixed, agglomeration was rapid and small spherical agglomerates were produced. Since the agglomerates floated, they were separated from the nonfloating tailings in a settling chamber. By employing this method in numerous agglomeration tests of moderately hydrophobic coals with 26 wt. % ash, it was shown that the ash content could be reduced to 6--7 wt. % while achieving a coal recovery of 75 to 85% on a dry, ash-free basis by using a solids concentration of 3 to 5 w/w %, air saturation of 5 to 15 psig, and i-octane concentration of 1.0 v/w % based on the coal weight. It was also shown that the process of agglomeration can be reversed by subjecting an aqueous suspension of agglomerates to a pressure sufficient to redissolve the microbubbles.

  17. Cluster size distribution for free molecular agglomeration

    SciTech Connect

    Mulholland, G.W.; Samson, R.J.; Mountain, R.D.; Ernst, M.H.

    1988-01-01

    Dobbins and Megaridis have observed soot agglomerates in a diffusion flame via thermophoretic sampling. The agglomerates are made up of spherules with a typical diameter of about 30 nm. A characteristic of the agglomerate is the relatively low density of the structure with much open space. This study is concerned with modeling the agglomeration growth process.

  18. Effect of surface oxidation on the properties and agglomeration characteristics of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Druding, J.M.

    1987-06-01

    Oxidation of Upper Freeport coal deleteriously affects the oil agglomeration process for the beneficiation of fine coal. In this process, fine coal is suspended in water and contacted with a small amount of oil or hydrocarbon-liquid such as n-heptane. The latter was used in the work reported here. The hydrophobic nature of the unoxidized coal surface leads to bridging of the coal particles by the oil or heptane, while the ash-forming minerals tend to be more hydrophilic and are not agglomerated. Subsequent recovery of the larger coal aggregates on sieves is then possible. Surface oxidation by air in a laboratory oven at 150/sup 0/C renders the coal surface more hydrophilic and reduces the recovery dramatically from near 100% for the unoxidized coal to as little as 20%. Surface oxidation leads to an increase in oxygen-containing functional groups, which seems to cause the increase in hydrophilicity. Analytical chemical techniques revealed increasing concentrations of both carboxyl and hydroxyl groups over increasing periods of oxidation; FTIR spectroscopy revealed similar trends with the augmentation of the peaks corresponding to the expected oxidative products associated with coal. Incorporation of the anionic surfactant sodium oleate rendered the oxidized coal surface less hydrophilic, leading to enhanced recovery. On the other hand, the cationic surfactant cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) had little effect on oxidized coal recovery. 60 refs., 20 figs.

  19. Flocculation, hydrophobic agglomeration and filtration of ultrafine coal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhimin

    In coal preparation plant circuits, fine coal particles are aggregated either by oil agglomeration or by flocculation. In a new hydrophobic agglomeration process, recently developed hydrophobic latices are utilized. While the selectivity of such aggregation processes determines the beneficiation results, the degree of aggregation has a strong effect on fine coal filtration. The aim of this research was to study the fundamentals and analyze the common grounds for these processes, including the potential effect of the coal surface properties. The selective flocculation tests, in which three types of coal, which differed widely in surface wettability, and three additives (hydrophobic latices, a semi-hydrophobic flocculant and a typical hydrophilic polyelectrolyte) were utilized, showed that coal wettability plays a very important role in selective flocculation. The abstraction of a hydrophobic latex on coal and silica revealed that the latex had a much higher affinity towards hydrophobic coal than to hydrophilic mineral matter. As a result, the UBC-1 hydrophobic latex flocculated only hydrophobic coal particles while the polyelectrolyte (PAM) flocculated all the tested coal samples and minerals, showing no selectivity in the fine coal beneficiation. The oil agglomeration was tested using kerosene emulsified with various surfactants (e.g. cationic, anionic and non-ionic). Surfactants enhance not only oil emulsification, hence reducing oil consumption (down to 0.25--0.5%), but also entirely change the electrokinetic properties of the droplets and affect the interaction energy between oil droplets and coal particles. Consequently, the results found in the course of the experimental work strongly indicate that even oxidized coals can be agglomerated if cationic surfactants are used to emulsify the oil. Oil agglomeration of the Ford-4 ultrafine coal showed that even at extremely low oil consumption (0.25 to 0.5%), a clean coal product with an ash content around 5% at over 99.9% coal recovery could be obtained in a one-stage separation by screening the agglomerated product. If a conventional oil agglomeration process is used instead, oil consumption as high as 30% is needed to obtain comparable results. In the tests on filtration and dewatering of ultrafine and fine coals, the effect of chemical additives and coal surface properties was investigated. The tests revealed very significant differences in the filtration of ultrafine (-45 mum) and fine (-500 mum) coals. The moisture contents in the filter cakes in the tests with ultrafine coal were around 40% (irrespective of the coal surface properties), while for the fine coal the moisture content fluctuated around 18% (Ford-4) and 30% (Ford-13). The results revealed that the hydrophobic latex and the emulsified oils could not only successfully beneficiate the ultrafine coal but also significantly increase filtration rate and/or reduce moisture content of the filter cake. Among the chemicals tested, the emulsified oils were found to be the most promising not only for the beneficiation but also for filtration and dewatering processes. Surfactants were found to only slightly affect the filtration of fine coal. However, they can influence filtration very profoundly if utilized to emulsify the oil which is used to agglomerate coal prior to its filtration.

  20. Investigation of melt agglomeration process with a hydrophobic binder in combination with sucrose stearate.

    PubMed

    Heng, Paul Wan Sia; Wong, Tin Wui; Cheong, Wai See

    2003-08-01

    The melt agglomeration process of lactose powder with hydrogenated cottonseed oil (HCO) as the hydrophobic meltable binder was investigated by studying the physicochemical properties of molten HCO modified by sucrose stearates S170, S770 and S1570. The size, size distribution, micromeritic and adhesion properties of agglomerates as well as surface tension, contact angle, viscosity and specific volume of molten HCO, with and without sucrose stearates, were examined. The viscosity, specific volume and surface tension of molten HCO were found to be modified to varying extents by sucrose stearates which are available in different HLB values and melt properties. The growth of melt agglomerates was promoted predominantly by an increase in viscosity, an increase in specific volume or a decrease in surface tension of the molten binding liquid. The agglomerate growth propensity was higher with an increase in inter-particulate binding strength, agglomerate surface wetness and extent of agglomerate consolidation which enhanced the liquid migration from agglomerate core to periphery leading to an increased surface plasticity for coalescence. The inclusion of high concentrations of completely meltable sucrose stearate S170 greatly induced the growth of agglomerates through increased specific volume and viscosity of the molten binding liquid. On the other hand, the inclusion of incompletely meltable sucrose stearates S770 and S1570 promoted the agglomeration mainly via the reduction in surface tension of the molten binding liquid with declining agglomerate growth propensity at high sucrose stearate concentrations. In addition to being an agglomeration modifier, sucrose stearate demonstrated anti-adherent property in melt agglomeration process. The properties of molten HCO and melt agglomerates were dependent on the type and concentration of sucrose stearate added. PMID:12907289

  1. Evaluation and comparison of residual oil saturation determination techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, M.M.; Maerefat, N.L.; Tomutsa, L.; Honarpour, M.M.

    1988-03-01

    The amount and distribution of residual oil saturation (ROS) are critical parameters for determining whether to apply an EOR process to a reservoir. A brief review of available ROS techniques is presented, indicating advantages, limitations, problems, and possible improvements of each technique. Advantages and disadvantages of each ROS-determination technique are summarized. Screening criteria for determining the best ROS technique under certain wellbore or reservoir conditions are presented. This paper also presents results from comparisons of ROS measurements obtained from the literature as calculated from resistivity logs, pulsed neutron capture (PNC) logs, pressure coring, single-well tracer tests, nuclear magnetism logs (NML), carbon/oxygen (C/O) logs, and electromagnetic propagation tool (EPT) measurements. In this study, the ROS measured by each method is compared with that determined by other methods conducted in the same well. The comparison shows that average values of ROS determined by C/O log, PNC-LIL (log-inject-log), and single-well tracer test do not differ statistically when compared with other methods. The resistivity log tends to give higher than average (2 saturation units (s.u.)) ROS measurements, while pressure coring tends to give lower than average (4 s.u.) ROS values. EPT and NML show deviations of about 8 s.u. of ROS values from other methods, which indicates a statistically significant difference. ROS vertical profiles obtained by two different methods from the same well were compared to eliminate the ROS variation resulting from formation depth. The vertical profiles based on ROS zoning and foot-by-foot measurements were studied to provide more ''resolution'' for comparisons.

  2. COAL CLEANING BY GAS AGGLOMERATION

    SciTech Connect

    T.D. Wheelock

    1999-03-01

    The technical feasibility of a gas agglomeration method for cleaning coal was demonstrated by means of bench-scale tests conducted with a mixing system which enabled the treatment of ultra-fine coal particles with a colloidal suspension of microscopic gas bubbles in water. A suitable suspension of microbubbles was prepared by first saturating water with air or carbon dioxide under pressure then reducing the pressure to release the dissolved gas. The formation of microbubbles was facilitated by agitation and a small amount of i-octane. When the suspension of microbubbles and coal particles was mixed, agglomeration was rapid and small spherical agglomerates were produced. Since the agglomerates floated, they were separated from the nonfloating tailings in a settling chamber. By employing this process in numerous agglomeration tests of moderately hydrophobic coals with 26 wt.% ash, it was shown that the ash content would be reduced to 6--7 wt.% while achieving a coal recovery of 75 to 85% on a dry, ash-free basis. This was accomplished by employing a solids concentration of 3 to 5 w/w%, an air saturation pressure of 136 to 205 kPa (5 to 15 psig), and an i-octane concentration of 1.0 v/w% based on the weight of coal.

  3. COAL CLEANING BY GAS AGGLOMERATION

    SciTech Connect

    MEIYU SHEN; ROYCE ABBOTT; T.D. WHEELOCK

    1998-09-30

    The agglomeration of ultrafine-size coal particles in an aqueous suspension by means of microscopic gas bubbles was demonstrated in numerous experiments with a scale model mixing system. Coal samples from both the Pittsburgh No. 8 Seam and the Upper Freeport Seam were used for these experiments. A small amount of i-octane was added to facilitate the process. Microscopic gas bubbles were generated by saturating the water used for suspending coal particles with gas under pressure and then reducing the pressure. Microagglomerates were produced which appeared to consist of gas bubbles encapsulated in coal particles. Since dilute particle suspensions were employed, it was possible to monitor the progress of agglomeration by observing changes in turbidity. By such means it became apparent that the rate of agglomeration depends on the concentration of microscopic gas bubbles and to a lesser extent on the concentration of i-octane. Similar results were obtained with both Pittsburgh No. 8 coal and Upper Freeport coal.

  4. Characterization of used mineral oil condition by spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Vanhanen, Jarmo; Rinkiö, Marcus; Aumanen, Jukka; Korppi-Tommola, Jouko; Kolehmainen, Erkki; Kerkkänen, Tuula; Törmä, Päivi

    2004-08-20

    Optical absorption, fluorescence, and quantitative 13C NMR spectroscopy have been used to study the degradation of mineral gearbox oil. Samples of used oil were collected from field service. Measured absorption, fluorescence, and quantitative 13C NMR spectra of used oils show characteristic changes from the spectra of a fresh oil sample. A clearly observable, approximately 20-nm blueshift of the fluorescence emission occurs during the early stages of oil use and correlates with changes in intensity of some specific 13C NMR resonance lines. These changes correlate with oil age because of the connection between the blueshift and breaking of the larger conjugated hydrocarbons of oil as a result of use. PMID:15352397

  5. Evaluation of alternative oil spill cleanup techniques in a Spartina alterniflora salt marsh.

    PubMed

    Kiesling, R W; Alexander, S K; Webb, J W

    1988-01-01

    Three oil spill situations which cause long-term impact were simulated in 1 m(2) salt marsh plots to evaluate the effectiveness of alternative cleanup techniques at removing oil and reducing damage to Spartina alterniflora. Cleanup techniques, implemented 18-24 h after oiling, were not effective at removing oil after sediment penetration. When oil remained on the sediment surface, flushing techniques were most effective at removal, reducing levels of added oil by 73% to 83%. The addition of dispersant to the flushing stream only slightly enhanced oil removal. Clipping of vegetation followed by sorbent pad application to sediment was moderately effective, reducing added oil by 36% to 44%. In contrast to flushing and clipping, burning increased the amount of oil in sediment by 27% to 72%. Although flushing and clipping were effective at oil removal, neither technique reduced initial damage to plants or enhanced long-term recovery. While flushed plots sustained no additional plant damage due to cleanup, clipped and burned plots sustained additional initial plant damage. Based on these results, first considerations should be given to natural tidal flushing as the means to remove oil, especially in salt marshes subject to ample tidal inundation. Although our results do not support cleanup in salt marshes with ample tidal inundation, low pressure flushing may be warranted when fuel oils or large quantities of crude oil impact salt marshes subject to reduced tidal flushing. Flushing, when warranted, should be initiated prior to oil penetration into the substrate. Clipping may be considered as a cleanup response only when heavy oil cannot be effectively removed from vegetation by flushing. Burning is not recommended because it enhances oil penetration into sediment and causes substantial initial plant damage. PMID:15092503

  6. Air agglomeration of hydrophobic particles

    SciTech Connect

    Drzymala, J.; Wheelock, T.D.

    1995-12-31

    The agglomeration of hydrophobic particles in an aqueous suspension was accomplished by introducing small amounts of air into the suspension while it was agitated vigorously. The extent of aggregation was proportional both to the air to solids ratio and to the hydrophobicity of the solids. For a given air/solids ratio, the extent of aggregation of different materials increased in the following order: graphite, gilsonite, coal coated with heptane, and Teflon. The structure of agglomerates produced from coarse Teflon particles differed noticeably from the structure of bubble-particle aggregates produced from smaller, less hydrophobic particles.

  7. Development of Extraction Techniques for the Detection of Signature Lipids from Oil

    SciTech Connect

    Borglin, Sharon; Geller, Jil; Chakraborty, Romy; Hazen, Terry; Mason, Olivia

    2010-05-17

    Pure cultures, including Desulfovibrio vulgaris and Methanococcus maripaludus, were combined with model oil samples and oil/diesel mixtures to optimize extraction techniques of signature lipids from oil in support of investigation of microbial communities in oil deposit samples targets for microbial enhanced hydrocarbon recovery. Several techniques were evaluated, including standard phospholipid extraction, ether linked lipid for Archaeal bacterial detection, and high pressure extractiontechniques. Recovery of lipids ranged from 50-80percent as compared to extraction of the pure culture. Extraction efficiency was evaluated by the use of internal standards. Field samples will also be tested for recovery of signature lipids with optimized extraction techniques.

  8. Fluid bed hydrogenation of agglomerating bituminous coals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liss, B.; Welter, C.

    A technique was developed and demonstrated at Union Carbide Corporation in 1977 for the processing of raw caking coals in a fluidized bed without preprocessing, and under severe conditions of high hydrogen partial pressure and low injection-gas/coal ratio. Fluid bed operating limits were explored by sequential dynamic testing of the key operating variables, and it was determined that the energy required to sustain fluid bed operation is less than 1%. The process represents an economically viable and technically feasible approach to processing agglomerating coals such as Illinois No. 6 and Pittsburgh No. 8.

  9. Agglomeration behaviour of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in river waters: A multi-method approach combining light scattering and field-flow fractionation techniques.

    PubMed

    Chekli, L; Roy, M; Tijing, L D; Donner, E; Lombi, E; Shon, H K

    2015-08-15

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) are currently one of the most prolifically used nanomaterials, resulting in an increasing likelihood of release to the environment. This is of concern as the potential toxicity of TiO2 NPs has been investigated in several recent studies. Research into their fate and behaviour once entering the environment is urgently needed to support risk assessment and policy development. In this study, we used a multi-method approach combining light scattering and field-flow fractionation techniques to assess both the aggregation behaviour and aggregate structure of TiO2 NPs in different river waters. Results showed that both the aggregate size and surface-adsorbed dissolved organic matter (DOM) were strongly related to the initial DOM concentration of the tested waters (i.e. R(2) > 0.90) suggesting that aggregation of TiO2 NPs is controlled by the presence and concentration of DOM. The conformation of the formed aggregates was also found to be strongly related to the surface-adsorbed DOM (i.e. R(2) > 0.95) with increasing surface-adsorbed DOM leading to more compact structures. Finally, the concentration of TiO2 NPs remaining in the supernatant after sedimentation of the larger aggregates was found to decrease proportionally with both increasing IS and decreasing DOM concentration, resulting in more than 95% sedimentation in the highest IS sample. PMID:26067894

  10. Micro-agglomerate flotation for deep cleaning of coal. Quarterly progress report, July 1-September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Chander, S.; Hogg, R.

    1996-12-01

    The goals of this research program are to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of a micro-agglomerate flotation process and to establish the essential criteria for reagent selection and system design and operation. We are investigating the use of a hybrid process - Micro-agglomerate flotation - which is a combination of oil-agglomeration and froth flotation. The basic concept is to use small quantities of oil to promote the formation of dense micro- agglomerates with minimal entrapment of water and mineral particles, and to use froth flotation to extract these micro-agglomerates from the water/dispersed-mineral phase. Since the floating units are agglomerates (about 30-50 mm in size) rather than individual coal particles (1-10 mm) the problems of froth overload and water/mineral carryover should be significantly alleviated.

  11. Element Agglomeration Algebraic Multilevel Monte-Carlo Library

    SciTech Connect

    2015-02-19

    ElagMC is a parallel C++ library for Multilevel Monte Carlo simulations with algebraically constructed coarse spaces. ElagMC enables Multilevel variance reduction techniques in the context of general unstructured meshes by using the specialized element-based agglomeration techniques implemented in ELAG (the Element-Agglomeration Algebraic Multigrid and Upscaling Library developed by U. Villa and P. Vassilevski and currently under review for public release). The ElabMC library can support different type of deterministic problems, including mixed finite element discretizations of subsurface flow problems.

  12. Element Agglomeration Algebraic Multilevel Monte-Carlo Library

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2015-02-19

    ElagMC is a parallel C++ library for Multilevel Monte Carlo simulations with algebraically constructed coarse spaces. ElagMC enables Multilevel variance reduction techniques in the context of general unstructured meshes by using the specialized element-based agglomeration techniques implemented in ELAG (the Element-Agglomeration Algebraic Multigrid and Upscaling Library developed by U. Villa and P. Vassilevski and currently under review for public release). The ElabMC library can support different type of deterministic problems, including mixed finite element discretizationsmore » of subsurface flow problems.« less

  13. Micro-agglomerate flotation for deep cleaning of coal. Quarterly progress report, April 1--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Chander, S.; Hogg, R.

    1993-07-01

    The goals of this research program are to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of a micro-agglomerate flotation process and to establish the essential criteria for reagent selection and system design and operation. The development of practical technologies for the deep cleaning of coal has been seriously hampered by the problems of carrying out efficient coal/mineral separations at the very fine sizes (often finer than 10 {mu}m) needed to achieve adequate liberation of the mineral matter from the coal matrix. It is generally recognized that surface-based separation processes such as froth flotation or selective agglomeration offer considerable potential for such applications but there remain many problems in obtaining the required selectivity with acceptable recovery of combustible matter. In froth flotation, selectivity is substantially reduced at fine sizes due, primarily, to overloading of the froth phase which leads to excessive carryover of water and entrained mineral matter. Oil agglomeration, on the other hand, can provide good selectivity at low levels of oil addition but the agglomerates tend to be too fragile for separation by the screening methods normally used. The addition of larger amounts of oil can yield large, strong agglomerates which are easily separated but the selectivity is reduced and reagent costs can become excessive. We are investigating the use of a hybrid process -- Micro-agglomerate flotation -- which is a combination of oil agglomeration and froth flotation. The basic concept is to use small quantities of oil to promote the formation of dense micro-agglomerates.

  14. A Critical Study of Agglomerated Multigrid Methods for Diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Hiroaki; Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.

    2011-01-01

    Agglomerated multigrid techniques used in unstructured-grid methods are studied critically for a model problem representative of laminar diffusion in the incompressible limit. The studied target-grid discretizations and discretizations used on agglomerated grids are typical of current node-centered formulations. Agglomerated multigrid convergence rates are presented using a range of two- and three-dimensional randomly perturbed unstructured grids for simple geometries with isotropic and stretched grids. Two agglomeration techniques are used within an overall topology-preserving agglomeration framework. The results show that multigrid with an inconsistent coarse-grid scheme using only the edge terms (also referred to in the literature as a thin-layer formulation) provides considerable speedup over single-grid methods but its convergence deteriorates on finer grids. Multigrid with a Galerkin coarse-grid discretization using piecewise-constant prolongation and a heuristic correction factor is slower and also grid-dependent. In contrast, grid-independent convergence rates are demonstrated for multigrid with consistent coarse-grid discretizations. Convergence rates of multigrid cycles are verified with quantitative analysis methods in which parts of the two-grid cycle are replaced by their idealized counterparts.

  15. A Critical Study of Agglomerated Multigrid Methods for Diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, James L.; Nishikawa, Hiroaki; Diskin, Boris

    2009-01-01

    Agglomerated multigrid techniques used in unstructured-grid methods are studied critically for a model problem representative of laminar diffusion in the incompressible limit. The studied target-grid discretizations and discretizations used on agglomerated grids are typical of current node-centered formulations. Agglomerated multigrid convergence rates are presented using a range of two- and three-dimensional randomly perturbed unstructured grids for simple geometries with isotropic and highly stretched grids. Two agglomeration techniques are used within an overall topology-preserving agglomeration framework. The results show that multigrid with an inconsistent coarse-grid scheme using only the edge terms (also referred to in the literature as a thin-layer formulation) provides considerable speedup over single-grid methods but its convergence deteriorates on finer grids. Multigrid with a Galerkin coarse-grid discretization using piecewise-constant prolongation and a heuristic correction factor is slower and also grid-dependent. In contrast, grid-independent convergence rates are demonstrated for multigrid with consistent coarse-grid discretizations. Actual cycle results are verified using quantitative analysis methods in which parts of the cycle are replaced by their idealized counterparts.

  16. A new technique for oil backstreaming contamination measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterovitz, S. A.; Speier, H. J.; Sieg, R. M.; Drotos, M. N.; Dunning, J. E.

    1991-01-01

    Due to the large size and the number of diffusion pumps, space simulation chambers cannot be easily calibrated by the usual test dome method for measuring backstreaming from oil diffusion pumps. In addition, location dependent contamination may be an important parameter of the test. The backstreaming contamination was measured in the Space Power Facility (SPF) near Sandusky, OH, the largest space simulation vacuum test chamber in the U.S.. Small clean silicon wafers placed at all desired measurement sites were used as contamination sensors. The facility used diffusion pumps with DC 705 oil. The thickness of the contamination oil film was measured using ellipsometry. Since the oil did not wet the silicon substrate uniformly, two analysis models were developed to measure the oil film: (1) continuous, homogeneous film; and (2) islands of oil with the islands varying in coverage fraction and height. In both cases, the contamination film refractive index was assumed to be that of DC 705. The second model improved the ellipsometric analysis quality parameter by up to two orders of magnitude, especially for the low coverage cases. Comparison of the two models shows that the continuous film model overestimates the oil volume by less than 50 percent. Absolute numbers for backstreaming are in good agreement with published results for diffusion pumps. Good agreement was also found between the ellipsometric results and measurements done by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) on examples exposed to the same vacuum runs.

  17. Thermal diffusivity measurements in vegetable oils with thermal lens technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal-Alvarado, J.; Mansanares, A. M.; da Silva, E. C.; Moreira, S. G. C.

    2003-01-01

    Using a thermal lensing experimental setup the thermal properties of several vegetable oils were obtained. The samples were oils from Amazonian species and olive (the popular identifications are piqui, copaiba, buriti, and babau). The two lasers mismatched mode experimental configuration was used, with a He-Ne laser as the probe and an Ar+ laser as the excitation one. The time resolved spectra were measured using an automatic system, and fitting the aberrant theoretical model to the data, the characteristic relaxation time were obtained, and knowing this value, the thermal property of each oil was solved.

  18. Coal beneficiation by gas agglomeration

    DOEpatents

    Wheelock, Thomas D.; Meiyu, Shen

    2003-10-14

    Coal beneficiation is achieved by suspending coal fines in a colloidal suspension of microscopic gas bubbles in water under atmospheric conditions to form small agglomerates of the fines adhered by the gas bubbles. The agglomerates are separated, recovered and resuspended in water. Thereafter, the pressure on the suspension is increased above atmospheric to deagglomerate, since the gas bubbles are then re-dissolved in the water. During the deagglomeration step, the mineral matter is dispersed, and when the pressure is released, the coal portion of the deagglomerated gas-saturated water mixture reagglomerates, with the small bubbles now coming out of the solution. The reagglomerate can then be separated to provide purified coal fines without the mineral matter.

  19. Coal Beneficiation by Gas Agglomeration

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas D. Wheelock; Meiyu Shen

    2000-03-15

    Coal beneficiation is achieved by suspending coal fines in a colloidal suspension of microscopic gas bubbles in water under atmospheric conditions to form small agglomerates of the fines adhered by the gas bubbles. The agglomerates are separated, recovered and resuspended in water. Thereafter, the pressure on the suspension is increased above atmospheric to deagglomerate, since the gas bubbles are then re-dissolved in the water. During the deagglomeration step, the mineral matter is dispersed, and when the pressure is released, the coal portion of the deagglomerated gas-saturated water mixture reagglomerates, with the small bubbles now coming out of the solution. The reagglomerate can then be separated to provide purified coal fines without the mineral matter.

  20. Agglomeration of food powder and applications.

    PubMed

    Dhanalakshmi, K; Ghosal, S; Bhattacharya, S

    2011-05-01

    Agglomeration has many applications in food processing and major applications include easy flow table salt, dispersible milk powder and soup mix, instant chocolate mix, beverage powder, compacted cubes for nutritional-intervention program, health bars using expanded/puffed cereals, etc. The main purpose of agglomeration is to improve certain physical properties of food powders such as bulk density, flowability, dispersability, and stability. Agglomerated products are easy to use by the consumers and hence are preferred over the traditional non-agglomerated products that are usually non-flowable in nature. The properties of food agglomerates and the process of agglomeration like employing pressure, extrusion, rewetting, spray-bed drying, steam jet, heat/sintering, and binders have been reviewed. The physical and instant properties of agglomerated food products have also been discussed. PMID:21491268

  1. Micro-agglomerate flotation for deep cleaning of coal. Quarterly progress report, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Chander, S.; Hogg, R.

    1995-01-01

    The development of practical technologies for the deep cleaning of coal has been seriously hampered by the problems of carrying out efficient coal/mineral separations at the very fine sizes (often finer than 10 mm) needed to achieve adequate liberation of the mineral matter from the coal matrix. It is generally recognized that surface-based separation processes such as froth flotation or selective agglomeration offer considerable potential for such applications but there remain many problems in obtaining the required selectivity with acceptable recovery of combustible matter. In froth flotation, selectivity is substantially reduced at fine sizes due, primarily, to overloading of the froth phase which leads to excessive carryover of water and entrained mineral matter. Oil agglomeration, on the other hand, can provide good selectivity at low levels of oil addition but the agglomerates tend to be too fragile for separation by the screening methods normally used. The addition of larger amounts of oil can yield large, strong agglomerates which are easily separated but the selectivity is reduced and reagent costs can become excessive. We are investigating the use of a hybrid process - micro-agglomerate flotation - which is a combination of oil-agglomeration and froth flotation. The basic concept is to use small quantities of oil to promote the formation of dense micro-agglomerates with minimal entrapment of water and mineral particles, and to use froth flotation to extract these micro-agglomerates from the water/dispersed-mineral phase. Since the floating units are agglomerates (about 30-50 mm in size) rather than individual coal particles (1-10 mm) the problems of froth overload and water/mineral carryover should be significantly alleviated. Micro-agglomerate flotation has considerable potential for the practical deep cleaning of coal on a commercial scale.

  2. Tests of absorbents and solidification techniques for oil wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, M.; MacKenzie, D. R.

    1983-11-01

    A representative of each of six classes of commonly used adsorbents was chosen for a series of tests. After reviewing ASTM and other related standard tests, uncomplicated procedures were developed for carrying out specific tests to determine absorbency for simulated oil waste and for water, under static and simulated transportation (repetitive shock) conditions. The tests were then applied to the six representative absorbents. Solidification tests were performed using these absorbents saturated with oil and loaded to 50% of saturation. The binders used were Portland I cement and Delaware Custom Material (DCM) cement shale silicate. Samples were checked for proper set, and the amounts of free liquid were measured. Another series of tests was performed on samples of simulated oil waste without absorbent, using Portland cement and DCM cement shale silicate. Samples were checked for proper set, free liquid was measured, and compressive strengths were determined. The state-of-the-art parameters were identified which satisfy NRC disposal criteria for solidified radioactive waste. The literature was reviewed for alternative methods of managing oil wastes. Conclusions are drawn on the relative utility of the various methods. 17 references, 3 tables.

  3. A technique for evaluating the oil/heavy-oil viscosity changes under ultrasound in a simulated porous medium.

    PubMed

    Hamidi, Hossein; Mohammadian, Erfan; Junin, Radzuan; Rafati, Roozbeh; Manan, Mohammad; Azdarpour, Amin; Junid, Mundzir

    2014-02-01

    Theoretically, Ultrasound method is an economical and environmentally friendly or "green" technology, which has been of interest for more than six decades for the purpose of enhancement of oil/heavy-oil production. However, in spite of many studies, questions about the effective mechanisms causing increase in oil recovery still existed. In addition, the majority of the mechanisms mentioned in the previous studies are theoretical or speculative. One of the changes that could be recognized in the fluid properties is viscosity reduction due to radiation of ultrasound waves. In this study, a technique was developed to investigate directly the effect of ultrasonic waves (different frequencies of 25, 40, 68 kHz and powers of 100, 250, 500 W) on viscosity changes of three types of oil (Paraffin oil, Synthetic oil, and Kerosene) and a Brine sample. The viscosity calculations in the smooth capillary tube were based on the mathematical models developed from the Poiseuille's equation. The experiments were carried out for uncontrolled and controlled temperature conditions. It was observed that the viscosity of all the liquids was decreased under ultrasound in all the experiments. This reduction was more significant for uncontrolled temperature condition cases. However, the reduction in viscosity under ultrasound was higher for lighter liquids compare to heavier ones. Pressure difference was diminished by decreasing in the fluid viscosity in all the cases which increases fluid flow ability, which in turn aids to higher oil recovery in enhanced oil recovery (EOR) operations. Higher ultrasound power showed higher liquid viscosity reduction in all the cases. Higher ultrasound frequency revealed higher and lower viscosity reduction for uncontrolled and controlled temperature condition experiments, respectively. In other words, the reduction in viscosity was inversely proportional to increasing the frequency in temperature controlled experiments. It was concluded that cavitation, heat generation, and viscosity reduction are three of the promising mechanisms causing increase in oil recovery under ultrasound. PMID:24075416

  4. Study of Oil spill in Norwegian area using Decomposition Techniques on RISAT-1 Hybrid Polarimetric Data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayasri, P. V.; Usha Sundari, H. S. V.; Kumari, E. V. S. Sita; Prasad, A. V. V.

    2014-11-01

    Over past few years Synthetic Aperture Radar(SAR) has received a considerable attention for monitoring and detection of oil spill due to its unique capabilities to provide wide-area surveillance and day and night measurements, almost independently from atmospheric conditions. The critical part of the oil spill detection is to distinguish oil spills from other natural phenomena. Stokes vector analysis of the image data is studied to estimate the polarized circular and linear components of the backscatter signal which essentially utilize the degree of polarization(m) and relative phase (?) of the target. In a controlled oil spill experiment conducted at Norwegian bay during 17th to 22nd June 2014, RISAT-1 hybrid polarimetry images were utilized to study the characteristics of oil spill in the sea. The preliminary results obtained by using polarimetric decomposition technique on hybrid polarimetric data to decipher the polarimetric characteristics of oil spills from natural waters are discussed in the paper.

  5. Boundary-layer transition and global skin friction measurement with an oil-fringe imaging technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monson, Daryl J.; Mateer, George G.; Menter, Florian R.

    1993-01-01

    A new oil-fringe imaging fkin friction (FISF) technique to measure skin friction on wind tunnel models is presented. In the method used to demonstrate the technique, lines of oil are applied on surfaces that connect the intended sets of measurement points, and then a wind tunnel is run so that the oil thins and forms interference fringes that are spaced proportional to local skin friction. After a run the fringe spacings are imaged with a CCD-array digital camera and measured on a computer. Skin friction and transition measurements on a two-dimensional wing are presented and compared with computational predictions.

  6. Boundary-layer transition and global skin friction measurement with an oil-fringe imaging technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monson, Daryl J.; Mateer, George G.; Menter, Florian R.

    1993-01-01

    A new oil-fringe imaging system skin friction (FISF) technique to measure skin friction on wind tunnel models is presented. In the method used to demonstrate the technique, lines of oil are applied on surfaces that connect the intended sets of measurement points, and then a wind tunnel is run so that the oil thins and forms interference fringes that are spaced in proportion to local skin friction. After a run the fringe spacings are imaged with a CCD-array digital camera and measured on a computer. Skin friction and transition measurements on a two-dimensional wing are presented and compared with computational predictions.

  7. Ignition technique for an in situ oil shale retort

    DOEpatents

    Cha, Chang Y. (Golden, CO)

    1983-01-01

    A generally flat combustion zone is formed across the entire horizontal cross-section of a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles formed in an in situ oil shale retort. The flat combustion zone is formed by either sequentially igniting regions of the surface of the fragmented permeable mass at successively lower elevations or by igniting the entire surface of the fragmented permeable mass and controlling the rate of advance of various portions of the combustion zone.

  8. Improved techniques for fluid diversion in oil recovery. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Seright, R.

    1996-01-01

    This three-year project had two technical objectives. The first objective was to compare the effectiveness of gels in fluid diversion (water shutoff) with those of other types of processes. Several different types of fluid-diversion processes were compared, including those using gels, foams, emulsions, particulates, and microorganisms. The ultimate goals of these comparisons were to (1) establish which of these processes are most effective in a given application and (2) determine whether aspects of one process can be combined with those of other processes to improve performance. Analyses and experiments were performed to verify which materials are the most effective in entering and blocking high-permeability zones. The second objective of the project was to identify the mechanisms by which materials (particularly gels) selectively reduce permeability to water more than to oil. A capacity to reduce water permeability much more than oil or gas permeability is critical to the success of gel treatments in production wells if zones cannot be isolated during gel placement. Topics covered in this report include (1) determination of gel properties in fractures, (2) investigation of schemes to optimize gel placement in fractured systems, (3) an investigation of why some polymers and gels can reduce water permeability more than oil permeability, (4) consideration of whether microorganisms and particulates can exhibit placement properties that are superior to those of gels, and (5) examination of when foams may show placement properties that are superior to those of gels.

  9. Powder agglomeration in a microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cawley, James D.

    1994-01-01

    This is the final report for NASA Grant NAG3-755 entitled 'Powder Agglomeration in a Microgravity Environment.' The research program included both two types of numerical models and two types of experiments. The numerical modeling included the use of Monte Carlo type simulations of agglomerate growth including hydrodynamic screening and molecular dynamics type simulations of the rearrangement of particles within an agglomerate under a gravitational field. Experiments included direct observation of the agglomeration of submicron alumina and indirect observation, using small angle light scattering, of the agglomeration of colloidal silica and aluminum monohydroxide. In the former class of experiments, the powders were constrained to move on a two-dimensional surface oriented to minimize the effect of gravity. In the latter, some experiments involved mixture of suspensions containing particles of opposite charge which resulted in agglomeration on a very short time scale relative to settling under gravity.

  10. Agglomeration multigrid for viscous turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, D. J.; Venkatakrishnan, V.

    1994-01-01

    Agglomeration multigrid, which has been demonstrated as an efficient and automatic technique for the solution of the Euler equations on unstructured meshes, is extended to viscous turbulent flows. For diffusion terms, coarse grid discretizations are not possible, and more accurate grid transfer operators are required as well. A Galerkin coarse grid operator construction and an implicit prolongation operator are proposed. Their suitability is evaluated by examining their effect on the solution of Laplace's equation. The resulting strategy is employed to solve the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations for aerodynamic flows. Convergence rates comparable to those obtained by a previously developed non-nested mesh multigrid approach are demonstrated, and suggestions for further improvements are given.

  11. Analysis and characterization of atmospheric fluidized-bed-combustion agglomerates. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Brekke, D.W.; Karner, F.R.

    1982-06-01

    The combustion of high-sodium low-rank coal in an Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustor (AFBC) can produce agglomeration of varying severity. Agglomerates and bed materials produced by a 0.2 m/sup 2/ AFBC were studied by polarized light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and electron microprobe analysis of thin sections. Bulk samples were studied using x-ray diffraction and x-ray fluorescence techniques. A physio-chemical or geochemical approach was used to characterize the materials and to postulate a mechanism of formation of the agglomerates. Quartz bed materials typically have nodular ash coatings with a matrix of finer sulfate ash richer in calcium and sulfur. Quartz bed agglomerates have additional calcium-rich sulfur-poor glass binding the grains together. Limestone bed materials typically have nodular ash coatings and have concentric alteration zones of calcium-rich areas with additional sulfur, iron, and sodium. Limestone agglomerates have additional sulfation and masses of coarse CaSO/sub 4/ crystals. Agglomerate formation in quartz bed materials follows a 4-stage process: an initial ash coating of about 50 microns thickness; thickened nodular coatings and initial sulfation; initial agglomeration by a cement of sulfated aluminosilicate ash; and bonding by recrystallized sulfated ash which has partly melted and solidified. Agglomerate formation in limestone bed materials follows a 3-stage process: initial bed grain alteration or calcining and sulfation producing concentric zones; thickened nodular ash coatings and continued sulfation; and agglomeration and growth of large CaSO/sub 4/ crystals. The agglomeration process is believed to be dependent upon temperature excursions caused by ash buildup in the bed with accompanying interaction between ash and bed material. Sodium appears to play a critical but presently largely unknown, role in the reactions producing agglomerates.

  12. Modeling the Asymmetric Burning of Agglomerate Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richmond, Clinton T.

    2007-12-01

    A model has been developed to describe asymmetric burning effects on the surface of particles in agglomerate. The model calculates the surface area of the particles that is available to burning from the geometric formation of the agglomerate. Average diameter of particles bonded in agglomerate is shown to have a burning time commensurate to the burning time of a single particle. Nevertheless, the burning time of agglomerate formed by the coalescing of liquid droplets, is shown to be greater than the burning time of a single particle.

  13. An improved theoretical model of acoustic agglomeration

    SciTech Connect

    Song, L. ); Koopmann, G.H. . Center for Acoustics and Vibration); Hoffmann, T.L. )

    1994-04-01

    An improved theoretical model is developed to describe the acoustic agglomeration of particles entrained in a gas medium. The improvements to the present theories are twofold: first, wave scattering is included in the orthokinetic interaction of particles and second, hydrodynamic interaction, shown to be an important agglomeration mechanism for certain operation conditions, is incorporated into the model. The influence of orthokinetic and hydrodynamic interactions introduce associated convergent velocities that cause particles to approach each other and collide. The convergent velocities are related with an acoustic agglomeration frequency function (AAFF) through a semi-statistical method. This function is the key parameter for the theoretical simulation of acoustic agglomeration.

  14. Improved theoretical model of acoustic agglomeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, L.; Koopmann, G. H.; Hoffmann, T. L.

    1994-04-01

    An improved theoretical model is developed to describe the acoustic agglomeration of particles entrained in a gas medium. The improvements to the present theories are twofold: first, wave scattering is included in the orthokinetic interaction of particles and second, hydrodynamic interaction, shown to be an important agglomeration mechanism for certain operation conditions, is incorporated into the model. The influence of orthokinetic and hydrodynamic interactions introduce associated convergent velocities that cause particles to approach each other and collide. The convergent velocities are related with an acoustic agglomeration frequency function (AAFF) through a semi-statistical method. This function is the key parameter for the theoretical simulation of acoustic agglomeration.

  15. Implementation of the JAYCOR model for agglomeration

    SciTech Connect

    Moseley, J.L.; O'Brien, T.J.; Nicoletti, P.

    1983-02-01

    A computer code (FLAG), to describe mixing and agglomeration in coal conversion reactors, was developed by JAYCOR for the Department of Energy. This required the formulation of a mathematical model to describe coal and ash agglomeration. The resulting model was implemented in subroutine DEFORM to describe the agglomeration of colliding ash particles. However, the CPU time required by DEFORM makes it impractical to use with the FLAG code. An improved implementation of JAYCOR's agglomeration model requiring negligible CPU time compared to the rest of the FLAG code is described in this report. 2 figures, 3 tables.

  16. Preparation and, in vitro, preclinical and clinical studies of aceclofenac spherical agglomerates.

    PubMed

    Usha, Achutha Nayak; Mutalik, Srinivas; Reddy, Meka Sreenivasa; Ranjith, Averineni Kumar; Kushtagi, Pralhad; Udupa, Nayanabhirama

    2008-10-01

    Aceclofenac agglomerates were prepared by spherical crystallization technique using a three solvent system comprising acetone: dichloromethane (DCM): water (bridging liquid, good solvent and bad solvent, respectively). Hydroxypropyl methylcellulose-50cps (HPMC) in different concentrations was used as hydrophilic polymer. The effect of speed of rotation and amount of bridging liquid on spherical agglomeration were studied. The agglomerates were subjected to various physicochemical evaluations such as practical yield, drug content, particle size, loss on drying, porosity, IR spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction studies, relative crystallinity, scanning electron microscopy, micromeritic properties, solubility and dissolution studies. The agglomerates showed improved micromeritic properties as well as dissolution behaviour in comparison to conventional drug crystals. The optimized agglomerates (F-9) showed good sphericity as well as high drug release, and hence they were compressed into tablets by direct compression. The tablets were found within the limits with respect to various physicochemical parameters. The dissolution rate of prepared tablets was better than that of marketed tablet and pure drug. The optimized agglomerates and tablet formulations were found to be stable for 6 months under accelerated conditions. The in vivo studies (preclinical pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and toxicity studies, and clinical pharmacokinetics) of optimized agglomerates were carried out. The results of preclinical studies revealed that the agglomerates provided improved pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic profiles of drug besides being nontoxic. The results of pharmacokinetic studies of optimized tablet in human subjects indicated improved pharmacokinetic parameters of drug in comparison with that of marketed tablet. PMID:18606224

  17. Micro-agglomerate flotation for deep cleaning of coal. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Chander, S.; Hogg, R.

    1995-07-01

    The development, of practical technologies for the deep cleaning of coal has been seriously hampered by the problems of carrying out efficient coal/mineral separations at the very fine sizes (often finer than 10 mm) needed to achieve adequate liberation of the mineral matter from the coal matrix. In froth flotation, selectivity is substantially reduced at fine sizes due, primarily, to overloading of the froth phase which leads to excessive carryover of water and entrained mineral matter. Oil agglomeration, on the other hand, can provide good selectivity at low levels of oil addition but the agglomerates tend to be too fragile for separation by the screening methods normally used. This project is concerned with a hydrid process, micro-agglomerate flotation, which is a combination of oil agglomeration and froth flotation.

  18. Reversible or not? Distinguishing agglomeration and aggregation at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, Stanislav V; Tschulik, Kristina; Batchelor-McAuley, Christopher; Jurkschat, Kerstin; Compton, Richard G

    2015-10-01

    Nanoparticles are prone to clustering either via aggregation (irreversible) or agglomeration (reversible) processes. It is exceedingly difficult to distinguish the two via conventional techniques such as dynamic light scattering (DLS), nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA), or electron microscopy imaging (scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM)) as such techniques only generally confirm the presence of large particle clusters. Herein we develop a joint approach to tackle the issue of distinguishing between nanoparticle aggregation vs agglomeration by characterizing a colloidal system of Ag NPs using DLS, NTA, SEM imaging and the electrochemical nanoimpacts technique. In contrast to the conventional techniques which all reveal the presence of large clusters of particles, electrochemical nanoimpacts provide information regarding individual nanoparticles in the solution phase and reveal the presence of small nanoparticles (<30 nm) even in high ionic strength (above 0.5 M KCl) and allow a more complete analysis. The detection of small nanoparticles in high ionic strength media evidence the clustering to be a reversible process. As a result it is concluded that agglomeration rather than irreversible aggregation takes place. This observation is of general importance for all colloids as it provides a feasible analysis technique for a wide range of systems with an ability to distinguish subtly different processes. PMID:26352558

  19. Scaling Relationships in Agglomeration and Annihilation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swift, Michael R.; Colaiori, Francesca; Flammini, Alessandro; Maritan, Amos; Giacometti, Achille; Banavar, Jayanth R.

    1997-10-01

    A relation between two exponents characterizing the scaling behavior of random agglomeration models with particle injection is proposed and verified by numerical simulations. This relation, and a link between diffusion-limited agglomeration models with and without injection combined with an exact solution of the latter, leads to a solution of the former in arbitrary dimensionality.

  20. An effective ostrich oil bleaching technique using peroxide value as an indicator.

    PubMed

    Palanisamy, Uma Devi; Sivanathan, Muniswaran; Radhakrishnan, Ammu Kutty; Haleagrahara, Nagaraja; Subramaniam, Thavamanithevi; Chiew, Gan Seng

    2011-01-01

    Ostrich oil has been used extensively in the cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries. However, rancidity causes undesirable chemical changes in flavour, colour, odour and nutritional value. Bleaching is an important process in refining ostrich oil. Bleaching refers to the removal of certain minor constituents (colour pigments, free fatty acid, peroxides, odour and non-fatty materials) from crude fats and oils to yield purified glycerides. There is a need to optimize the bleaching process of crude ostrich oil prior to its use for therapeutic purposes. The objective of our study was to establish an effective method to bleach ostrich oil using peroxide value as an indicator of refinement. In our study, we showed that natural earth clay was better than bentonite and acid-activated clay to bleach ostrich oil. It was also found that 1 hour incubation at a 150 C was suitable to lower peroxide value by 90%. In addition, the nitrogen trap technique in the bleaching process was as effective as the continuous nitrogen flow technique and as such would be the recommended technique due to its cost effectiveness. PMID:21730920

  1. Micro-agglomerate flotation for deep cleaning of coal. Quarterly progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Chander, S.; Hogg, R.

    1995-04-01

    The development of practical technologies for the deep cleaning of coal has been seriously hampered by the problems of carrying out efficient coal/mineral separations at the very fine sizes (often finer than 10 mm) needed to achieve adequate liberation of the mineral matter from the coal matrix. In froth flotation, selectivity is substantially reduced at fine sizes due, primarily, to overloading of the froth phase which leads to excessive carryover of water and entrained mineral matter. Oil agglomeration, on the other hand, can provide good selectivity at low levels of oil addition but the agglomerates tend to be too fragile for separation by the screening methods normally used. The addition of larger amounts of oil can yield large, strong agglomerates which are easily separated but the selectivity is reduced and reagent costs can become excessive. We are investigating the use of a hybrid process - Micro-agglomerate flotation which is a combination of oil-agglomeration and froth flotation. The basic concept is to use small quantities of oil to promote the formation of dense micro-agglomerates with minimal entrapment of water and mineral particles, and to use froth flotation to extract these micro-agglomerates from the water/dispersed-mineral phase. Since the floating units are agglomerates (about 30-50 mm in size) rather than individual coal particles (1-10 mm) the problems of froth overload and water/mineral carryover should be significantly alleviated. There are, however, complications. The process involves at least five phases: two or more solids (coal and mineral), two liquids (oil and water) and one gas (air). It is necessary to maintain precise control over the chemistry of the liquid phases in order to promote the interfacial reactions and interactions between phases necessary to ensure selectivity. Kinetics as well as thermodynamic factors may be critical in determining overall system response.

  2. Modeling of agglomeration in a fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect

    Rehmat, A.; Huang, C.; Carty, R.; Hariri, H.; Arastoopour, H. )

    1988-01-01

    A fluidized bed containing a central jet was operated with low-temperature melting materials to obtain the rate of agglomeration as well as to measure the temperature distribution within the fluidized bed. The rate of agglomeration was obtained as a function of operating parameters such as temperature and velocity. The agglomeration rate defined, as the rate of change in the number of particles of a particular size, was determined from the particle population balance using the experimental data. The agglomeration model developed to predict the agglomeration rate constant based on the temperature distribution in the fluidized bed and the rate of entrainment of particles into the jet yielded values for the rate constants similar to the experimental values.

  3. Modeling of agglomeration in a fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect

    Rehmat, A.; Huang, C.; Carty, R.; Hariri, H.; Arastoopour, H.

    1988-01-01

    A fluidized bed containing a central jet was operated with low-temperature melting materials to obtain the rate of agglomeration as well as to measure the temperature distribution within the fluidized bed. The rate of agglomeration was obtained as a function of operating parameters such as temperature and velocity. The agglomeration rate defined, as the rate of change in the number of particles of a particular size, was determined from the particle population balance using the experimental data. The agglomeration model developed to predict the agglomeration rate constant based on the temperature distribution in the fluidized bed and the rate of entrainment of particles into the jet yielded values for the rate constants similar to the experimental values. 9 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Modeling of agglomeration in a fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect

    Rehmat, A.; Carty, R. ); Huang, C. ); Hariri, H.; Arastoopour, H. )

    1988-06-01

    A fluidized bed containing a central jet was operated with low-temperature melting materials to obtain the rate of agglomeration as well as to measure the temperature distribution within the fluidized bed. The rate of agglomeration was obtained as a function of operating parameters such as temperature and velocity. The agglomeration rate defined, as the rate of change in the number of particles of a particular size, was determined from the particle population balance using the experimental data. The agglomeration model developed to predict the agglomeration rate constant based on the temperature distribution in the fluidized bed and the rate of entrainment of particles into the jet yielded values for the rate constants similar to the experimental values.

  5. Micro-agglomerate flotation for deep cleaning of coal. Quarterly progress report, 1 April--30 June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Chander, S.; Hogg, R.

    1994-07-01

    The authors are investigating the use of a hybrid process--Micro-agglomerate flotation--which is a combination of oil-agglomeration and froth flotation. The basic concepts is to use small quantities of oil to promote the formation of dense micro-agglomerates with minimal entrapment of water and mineral particles, and to use froth flotation to extract these micro-agglomerates from the water/dispersed-mineral phase. Since the floating units are agglomerates (about 30--50 {mu}m in size) rather than individual coal particles (1--10 {mu}m) the problems of froth overload water/mineral carryover should be significantly alleviated. The process involves at least five phases: two or more solids (coal and mineral), two liquids (oil and water) and one gas (air). It is necessary to maintain precise control over the chemistry of the liquid phases in order to promote the interfacial reactions and interactions between phases necessary to ensure selectivity. Kinetics as well as thermodynamic factors may be critical in determining overall system response. The research program has been organized into several specific tasks: Task 1, interfacial studies; Task 2, emulsification; Task 3, agglomerate growth and structure; and Task 4, agglomerate flotation. This report summarizes the status of Tasks 2, 3, and 4.

  6. Development of Improved Oil Field Waste Injection Disposal Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Terralog Technologies USA Inc.

    2001-12-17

    The goals of this DOE sponsored project are to: (1) assemble and analyze a comprehensive database of past waste injection operations; (2) develop improved diagnostic techniques for monitoring fracture growth and formation changes; (3) develop operating guidelines to optimize daily operations and ultimate storage capacity of the target formation; and (4) to test these improved models and guidelines in the field.

  7. Development of Improved Oil Field Waste Injection Disposal Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Terralog Technologies

    2002-11-25

    The goals of this project have was to: (1) assemble and analyze a comprehensive database of past waste injection operations; (2) develop improved diagnostic techniques for monitoring fracture growth and formation changes; (3) develop operating guidelines to optimize daily operations and ultimate storage capacity of the target formation; and (4) to apply these improved models and guidelines in the field.

  8. Micro-agglomerate flotation for deep cleaning of coal. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chander, S.; Hogg, R.

    1997-01-15

    The development of practical technologies for the deep cleaning of coal has been seriously hampered by the problems of carrying out efficient coal/mineral separations at the very fine sizes (often finer than 10 {micro}m) needed to achieve adequate liberation of the mineral matter from the coal matrix. In this investigation a hybrid process--Micro-agglomerate flotation--which is a combination of oil-agglomeration and froth flotation was studied. The basic concept is to use small quantities of oil to promote the formation of dense micro-agglomerates with minimal entrapment of water and mineral particles and to use froth flotation to separate these micro-agglomerates from the water/dispersed-mineral phase. Since the floating units will be relatively large agglomerates (30--50 {micro}m in size) rather than fine coal particles (1--10 {micro}m) the problems of froth overload and water/mineral carryover should be significantly alleviated. There are, however, complications. The process involves at least five phases: two or more solids (coal and mineral), two liquids (oil and water) and one gas (air). It is demonstrated in this study that the process is very sensitive to fluctuations in operating parameters. It is necessary to maintain precise control over the chemistry of the liquid phases as well as the agitation conditions in order to promote selectivity. Both kinetics as well as thermodynamic factors play a critical role in determining overall system response.

  9. Engineering development of selective agglomeration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    This report presents the findings of the project entitled ``Engineering Development of Selective Agglomeration.`` The purpose is to develop selective agglomeration technology to a commercially acceptable level by 1993. Engineering development included bench-scale process development, component development adaptation or modification of existing unit operations, proof-of-concept (POC) module design, fabrication, testing, data evaluation, and conceptual design of a commercial facility. The information obtained during POC operation resulted in a technical and economic design base sufficient to support construction and operation of a commercial plant. Throughout this project performance targets for the engineering development of selective agglomeration process were to achieve 85% or greater Btu recovery at 85% or greater pyritic sulfur rejection (PSR). Additional objectives included producing a final clean-coal product with an ash content of 6% or less which is suitable for conventional coal handling systems. The selective agglomeration process, as applied to coal cleaning, is based on differences in the surface chemistry of coal and its associated impurities. Coal particles are hydrophobic (i.e., repel water) while the majority of its impurities are hydrophilic (i.e., stabilized in water). During selective agglomeration, a liquid (the agglomerant) that is immiscible with water is introduced into a coal-water slurry and agitated to disperse it in the slurry, thereby allowing it to come into contact with all particles in the slurry. The coal particles, due to their hydrophobic nature, are attracted to the agglomerant phase. The hydrophilic mineral impurities remain in the water phase. Continued agitation of the agglomerant-coated coal particles causes them to coalesce to form agglomerates. Once the agglomerates are formed, they are separated from the mineral matter-bearing aqueous phase by subsequent processing steps.

  10. Statistical evaluation of the performance of a selective agglomeration process for physical cleaning of Kentucky {number_sign}9 coal

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.S.; Morsi, B.I.; Chiang, S.H.

    1994-12-31

    The effects of agglomerant amount, grinding time, slurry pH, and agglomeration time on the Btu recovery and inorganic sulfur rejection of a selective agglomeration process were investigated using Kentucky No. 9 coal. A mixture of n-heptane and a small amount of No. 6 fuel oil was employed as agglomerant. The experimental conditions were selected following a central composite design and regression models were developed to relate the Btu recovery and inorganic sulfur rejection to the operating variables. From the response surfaces constructed with the regression models, it was found that the Btu recovery was poor when the agglomerant/coal weight ratio was lower than 0.3. It was also found that the slurry pH did not have significant effect on the process performances.

  11. Investigation of self-help oil-spill response techniques and equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Enderlin, W I; Downing, J P; Enderlin, C W; Sanquist, T F; Pope, W S

    1992-06-01

    The US Coast Guard commissioned Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to conduct this study of 45 self-help oil-spill response techniques and equipment for oceangoing tankers and inland tank barges to assess the potential effectiveness of the proposed countermeasure categories. This study considers the hypothetical outflow of oil in the case of side damage and bottom damage to single-hull designs. The results will be considered by the Coast Guard in drafting regulations pertaining to the requirement for tanker vessels to carry oil pollution response equipment (i.e., in response to the oil Pollution Act of 1990). PNL's approach to this investigation included: assessing time-dependent oil outflow in the cases of collision and grounding of both tankers and barges; identifying environmental constraints on self-help countermeasure operation; identifying human factor issues, such as crew performance, safety, and training requirements for the self-help countermeasures considered; and assessing each self-help countermeasure with respect to its potential for minimizing oil loss to the environment. Results from the time-dependent oil outflow, environmental limitations, and human factors requirements were input into a simulation model.

  12. Self-consistent photothermal techniques: Application for measuring thermal diffusivity in vegetable oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balderas-Lpez, J. A.; Mandelis, Andreas

    2003-01-01

    The thermal wave resonator cavity (TWRC) was used to measure the thermal properties of vegetable oils. The thermal diffusivity of six commercial vegetable oils (olive, corn, soybean, canola, peanut, and sunflower) was measured by means of this device. A linear relation between both the amplitude and phase as functions of the cavity length for the TWRC was observed and used for the measurements. Three significant figure precisions were obtained. A clear distinction between extra virgin olive oil and other oils in terms of thermal diffusivity was shown. The high measurement precision of the TWRC highlights the potential of this relatively new technique for assessing the quality of this kind of fluids in terms of their thermophysical properties.

  13. Shapes of agglomerates in plasma etching reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, F.Y.; Kushner, M.J.

    1997-05-01

    Dust particle contamination of wafers in reactive ion etching (RIE) plasma tools is a continuing concern in the microelectronics industry. It is common to find that particles collected on surfaces or downstream of the etch chamber are agglomerates of smaller monodisperse spherical particles. The shapes of the agglomerates vary from compact, high fractal dimension structures to filamentary, low fractal dimension structures. These shapes are important with respect to the transport of particles in RIE tools under the influence electrostatic and ion drag forces, and the possible generation of polarization forces. A molecular dynamics simulation has been developed to investigate the shapes of agglomerates in plasma etching reactors. We find that filamentary, low fractal dimension structures are generally produced by smaller ({lt}100s nm) particles in low powered plasmas where the kinetic energy of primary particles is insufficient to overcome the larger Coulomb repulsion of a compact agglomerate. This is analogous to the diffusive regime in neutral agglomeration. Large particles in high powered plasmas generally produce compact agglomerates of high fractal dimension, analogous to ballistic agglomeration of neutrals. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Modeling of particle agglomeration in nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, K. Hari; Neti, S.; Oztekin, A.; Mohapatra, S.

    2015-03-01

    Agglomeration strongly influences the stability or shelf life of nanofluid. The present computational and experimental study investigates the rate of agglomeration quantitatively. Agglomeration in nanofluids is attributed to the net effect of various inter-particle interaction forces. For the nanofluid considered here, a net inter-particle force depends on the particle size, volume fraction, pH, and electrolyte concentration. A solution of the discretized and coupled population balance equations can yield particle sizes as a function of time. Nanofluid prepared here consists of alumina nanoparticles with the average particle size of 150 nm dispersed in de-ionized water. As the pH of the colloid was moved towards the isoelectric point of alumina nanofluids, the rate of increase of average particle size increased with time due to lower net positive charge on particles. The rate at which the average particle size is increased is predicted and measured for different electrolyte concentration and volume fraction. The higher rate of agglomeration is attributed to the decrease in the electrostatic double layer repulsion forces. The rate of agglomeration decreases due to increase in the size of nano-particle clusters thus approaching zero rate of agglomeration when all the clusters are nearly uniform in size. Predicted rates of agglomeration agree adequate enough with the measured values; validating the mathematical model and numerical approach is employed.

  15. Modeling of particle agglomeration in nanofluids

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna, K. Hari; Neti, S.; Oztekin, A.; Mohapatra, S.

    2015-03-07

    Agglomeration strongly influences the stability or shelf life of nanofluid. The present computational and experimental study investigates the rate of agglomeration quantitatively. Agglomeration in nanofluids is attributed to the net effect of various inter-particle interaction forces. For the nanofluid considered here, a net inter-particle force depends on the particle size, volume fraction, pH, and electrolyte concentration. A solution of the discretized and coupled population balance equations can yield particle sizes as a function of time. Nanofluid prepared here consists of alumina nanoparticles with the average particle size of 150 nm dispersed in de-ionized water. As the pH of the colloid was moved towards the isoelectric point of alumina nanofluids, the rate of increase of average particle size increased with time due to lower net positive charge on particles. The rate at which the average particle size is increased is predicted and measured for different electrolyte concentration and volume fraction. The higher rate of agglomeration is attributed to the decrease in the electrostatic double layer repulsion forces. The rate of agglomeration decreases due to increase in the size of nano-particle clusters thus approaching zero rate of agglomeration when all the clusters are nearly uniform in size. Predicted rates of agglomeration agree adequate enough with the measured values; validating the mathematical model and numerical approach is employed.

  16. Micro-agglomerate flotation for deep cleaning of coal. Quarterly progress report, September 30--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Chander, S.; Hogg, R.

    1993-01-01

    We are investigating the use of a hybrid process - Micro-agglomerate flotation - which is a combination of oil-agglomeration and froth flotation. The basic concept is to use small quantities of oil to promote the formation of dense micro-agglomerates with minimal entrapment of water and mineral particles, and to use froth flotation to extract these micro-agglomerates from the water/dispersed-mineral phase. Since the floating units are agglomerates (about 30--50 {mu}m in size) rather than individual coal particles (1--10 {mu}m) the problems of froth overload and water/mineral carryover should be significantly alleviated. Micro-agglomerate flotation has considerable potential for the practical deep cleaning of coal on a commercial scale. In principle, it should be possible to achieve both high selectivity and high yield at reasonable cost. The process requires only conventional, off-the-shelf equipment and reagent usage (oil, surfactants, etc.) should be small. There are, however, complications. The process involves at least five phases: two or more solids (coal and mineral), two liquids (oil and water) and one gas (air). It is necessary to maintain precise control over the chemistry of the liquid phases in order to promote the interfacial reactions and interactions between phases necessary to ensure selectivity. Kinetics as well as thermodynamic factors may be critical in determining overall system response.

  17. Micro-agglomerate location flotation for deep cleaning of coal. Quarterly progress report, October 1--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Chander, S.; Hogg, R.

    1994-01-01

    We are investigating the use of a hybrid process -- Micro-agglomerate flotation which is a combination of oil-agglomeration and froth flotation. The basic concept is to use small quantities of oil to promote the formation of dense micro-agglomerates with minimal entrapment of water and mineral particles, and to use froth flotation to extract these micro-agglomerates from the water/dispersed-mineral phase. Since the floating units are agglomerates (about 30--50 {mu}m in size) rather than individual coal particles (1--10 {mu}m) the problems of froth overload and water/mineral carryover should be significantly alleviated. Micro-agglomerate flotation has considerable potential for the practical deep cleaning of coal on a commercial scale. In principle, it should be possible to achieve both high selectivity and high yield at reasonable cost. The process requires only conventional, off-the-shelf equipment and reagent usage (oil, surfactants, etc.) should be small. There are, however, complications. The process involves at least five phases: two or more solids (coal and mineral), two liquids (oil and water) and one gas (air). It is necessary to maintain precise control over the chemistry of the liquid phases in order to promote the interfacial reactions and interactions between phases necessary to ensure selectivity. Kinetics as well as thermodynamic factors may be critical in determining overall system response.

  18. Micro-agglomerate flotation for deep cleaning of coal. Quarterly progress report, January 1--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Chander, S.; Hogg, R.

    1994-04-01

    We are investigating the use of a hybrid process -- Micro-agglomerate flotation which is a combination of oil-agglomeration and froth flotation. The basic concept is to use small quantities of oil to promote the formation of dense micro-agglomerates with minimal entrapment of water and mineral particles, and to use froth flotation to extract these micro-agglomerates from the water/dispersed-mineral phase. Since the floating units are agglomerates (about 30--50 {mu}m in size) rather than individual coal particles (1--10 {mu}m) the problems of froth overload and water/mineral carryover should be significantly alleviated. Micro-agglomerate flotation has considerable potential for the practical deep cleaning of coal on a commercial scale. In principle, it should be possible to achieve both high selectivity and high yield at reasonable cost. The process requires only conventional, off-the-shelf equipment and reagent usage (oil, surfactants, etc.) should be small. There are, however, complications. The process involves at least five phases- two or more solids (coal and mineral), two liquids (oil and water) and one gas (air). It is necessary to maintain precise control over the chemistry of the liquid phases in order to promote the interfacial reactions and interactions between phases necessary to ensure selectivity. Kinetics as well as thermodynamic factors may be critical in determining overall system response.

  19. Micro-agglomerate flotation for deep cleaning of coal. Quarterly progress report, January 1--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Chander, S.; Hogg, R.

    1993-04-01

    We are investigating the use of a hybrid process, Micro-agglomerate flotation, which is a combination of oil-agglomeration and froth flotation. The basic concept is to use small quantities of oil to promote the formation of dense micro-agglomerates with minimal entrapment of water and mineral particles, and to use froth flotation to extract these micro-agglomerates from the water/dispersed-mineral phase. Since the floating units are agglomerates (about 30--50 {mu}m in size) rather than individual coal particles (1--10 {mu}m) the problems of froth overload and water/mineral carryover should be significantly alleviated.Micro-agglomerate flotation has considerable potential for the practical deep cleaning of coal on a commercial scale. In principle, it should be possible to achieve both high selectivity and high yield at reasonable cost. The process requires only conventional, off-the-shelf equipment and reagent usage (oil, surfactants, etc.) should be small. There are, however, complications. The process involves at least five phases: two or more solids (coal and mineral), two liquids (oil and water) and one gas (air). It is necessary to maintain precise control over the chemistry of the liquid phases in order to promote the interfacial reactions and interactions between phases necessary to ensure selectivity. Kinetics as well as thermodynamic factors may be critical in determining overall system response.

  20. Modeling of Particle Agglomeration in Nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanagala, Hari Krishna

    Nanofluids are colloidal dispersions of nano sized particles (<100nm in diameter) in dispersion mediums. They are of great interest in industrial applications as heat transfer fluids owing to their enhanced thermal conductivities. Stability of nanofluids is a major problem hindering their industrial application. Agglomeration and then sedimentation are some reasons, which drastically decrease the shelf life of these nanofluids. Current research addresses the agglomeration effect and how it can affect the shelf life of a nanofluid. The reasons for agglomeration in nanofluids are attributable to the interparticle interactions which are quantified by the various theories. By altering the governing properties like volume fraction, pH and electrolyte concentration different nanofluids with instant agglomeration, slow agglomeration and no agglomeration can be produced. A numerical model is created based on the discretized population balance equations which analyses the particle size distribution at different times. Agglomeration effects have been analyzed for alumina nanoparticles with average particle size of 150nm dispersed in de-ionized water. As the pH was moved towards the isoelectric point of alumina nanofluids, the particle size distribution became broader and moved to bigger sizes rapidly with time. Particle size distributions became broader and moved to bigger sizes more quickly with time with increase in the electrolyte concentration. The two effects together can be used to create different temporal trends in the particle size distributions. Faster agglomeration is attributed to the decrease in the electrostatic double layer repulsion forces which is due to decrease in the induced charge and the double layer thickness around the particle. Bigger particle clusters show lesser agglomeration due to reaching the equilibrium size. The procedures and processes described in this work can be used to generate more stable nanofluids.

  1. Augmenting a Microbial Selective Plugging Technique with Polymer Flooding to Increase the Efficiency of Oil Recovery - A Search for Synergy

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Lewis R.; Pittman Jr., Charles; Lynch, F. Leo

    2003-02-10

    The overall objective of this project was to improve the effectiveness of a microbial selective plugging technique of improving oil recovery through the use of polymer floods. More specifically, the intent was to increase the total amount of oil recovered and to reduce the cost per barrel of incremental oil.

  2. Agglomerate-of-spheres model: Theoretical considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winsel, A.; Bashtavelova, E.

    1993-10-01

    The 'agglomerate-of-spheres' (AOS) model associates the resistivity and the mechanical strength of PbO2 with the narrow zones between the sphere-like agglomerates. Some fundamentals of the electric contact theory are reported. During the formation of the PbO2 active material a so-called electroformative force is represented. It represents the force, which is needed to create the new order of the agglomerate-of-spheres. The nature of this force is similar to that one which in winter time cracks freezing water pipes.

  3. Oil spill removal techniques and equipment. (Latest citations from Oceanic Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning equipment and techniques used for control, detection, dispersion, and disposal of oil spills particularly within harbors and estuaries. Topics include chemical dispersants, mechanical skimmers, and biodegradation. The citations also explore spill impact on habitats, marine life, and water birds. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  4. Oil-spill removal techniques and equipment. (Latest citations from Oceanic Abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning equipment and techniques used for control, detection, dispersion, and disposal of oil spills particularly within harbors and estuaries. Topics include chemical dispersants, mechanical skimmers, and biodegradation. The citations also explore spill impact on habitats, marine life, and water birds. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  5. Oil spill removal techniques and equipment. (Latest citations from Fluidex (Fluid Engineering Abstracts) database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning equipment and techniques for the control, dispersal, cleanup, and disposal of oil spills. Topics include chemical dispersants, booms, and mechanical skimmers. The citations emphasize spill removal for harbors, estuaries, and shorelines, and examine spill impact on water birds and marine life. (Contains a minimum of 195 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  6. Oil-spill removal techniques and equipment. (Latest citations from Fluidex data base). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning equipment and techniques for the control, dispersal, cleanup, and disposal of oil spills. Topics include chemical dispersants, booms, and mechanical skimmers. The citations emphasize spill removal for harbors, estuaries, and shorelines, and examine spill impact on water birds and marine life. (Contains a minimum of 180 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  7. Oil spill removal techniques and equipment. (Latest citations from Fluidex). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning equipment and techniques for the control, dispersal, cleanup, and disposal of oil spills. Topics include chemical dispersants, booms, and mechanical skimmers. The citations emphasize spill removal for harbors, estuaries, and shorelines, and examine spill impact on water birds and marine life. (Contains a minimum of 195 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  8. Oil spill removal techniques and equipment. (Latest citations from Oceanic abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning equipment and techniques used for control, detection, dispersion, and disposal of oil spills particularly within harbors and estuaries. Topics include chemical dispersants, mechanical skimmers, and biodegradation. The citations also explore spill impact on habitats, marine life, and water birds. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  9. Oil spill removal techniques and equipment. (Latest citations from Oceanic abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning equipment and techniques used for control, detection, dispersion, and disposal of oil spills particularly within harbors and estuaries. Topics include chemical dispersants, mechanical skimmers, and biodegradation. The citations also explore spill impact on habitats, marine life, and water birds. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  10. Successfully use agglomeration for size enlargement

    SciTech Connect

    Pietsch, W.

    1996-04-01

    The processing of fine and ultrafine particles by size enlargement finds an ever increasing application. At the same time, undesirable agglomeration such as buildup, caking, bridging, and uncontrolled aggregation of fine particles can occur during processing and handling of these particulate solids. This article will provide a survey of the phenomena of agglomeration and discuss the unit operation of size enlargement by agglomeration. This article is also an invitation, particularly to young engineers, to become interested in agglomeration. Considering that mechanical process technologies are requiring more energy every year than any other group of consumers and efficiencies are typically in the single digits or teens at best, considerable rewards can be expected from the development of scientifically modified, more energy-efficient methods and equipment.

  11. Bed material agglomeration during fluidized bed combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.C.; Dawson, M.R.; Noble, S.

    1993-02-01

    The purpose of this project is to determine the physical and chemical reactions which led to the undesired agglomeration of bed material during fluidized bed combustion and to relate these reactions to specific causes. Survey of industrial-scale fluidized bed combustors is being conducted to determine the occurrence of bed agglomeration and the circumstances under which agglomeration took place. This task should be finished by the end of February. Samples of bed material, agglomerate material, and boiler deposits are being requested from boiler operators as part of the survey. Once received, these sample will be analyzed to determine chemical and mineralogic composition. The bulk chemical determination will be performed using x-ray fluorescence and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission (ICP). Mineralogy will be detected by x-ray diffraction (XRD). Chemical and mineral reactions will be determined by scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy, and electron microprobe.

  12. Agglomeration of microparticles in complex plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Cheng-Ran; Thomas, Hubertus M.; Ivlev, Alexei V.; Konopka, Uwe; Morfill, Gregor E.

    2010-11-15

    Agglomeration of highly charged microparticles was observed and studied in complex plasma experiments carried out in a capacitively coupled rf discharge. The agglomeration was caused by strong waves triggered in a particle cloud by decreasing neutral gas pressure. Using a high-speed camera during this unstable regime, it was possible to resolve the motion of individual microparticles and to show that the relative velocities of some particles were sufficiently high to overcome the mutual Coulomb repulsion and hence to result in agglomeration. After stabilizing the cloud again through the increase of the pressure, we were able to observe the aggregates directly with a long-distance microscope. We show that the agglomeration rate deduced from our experiments is in good agreement with theoretical estimates. In addition, we briefly discuss the mechanisms that can provide binding of highly charged microparticles in a plasma.

  13. Development of methods to predict agglomeration and disposition in FBCs

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, M.D.; Henderson, A.K.; Swanson, M.K.; Erickson, T.A.

    1995-11-01

    This 3-year, multiclient program is providing the information needed to determine the behavior of inorganic components in FBC units using advanced methods of analysis coupled with bench-scale combustion experiments. The major objectives of the program are as follows: (1) To develop further our advanced ash and deposit characterization techniques to quantify the effects of the liquid-phase components in terms of agglomerate formation and ash deposits, (2) To determine the mechanisms of inorganic transformations that lead to bed agglomeration and ash deposition in FBC systems, and (3) To develop a better means to predict the behavior of inorganic components as a function of coal composition, bed material characteristics, and combustion conditions.

  14. Composite propellant combustion with low aluminum agglomeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullen, Jessica Christine

    Aluminum behavior---accumulation, agglomeration and ignition---is studied in a unique, wide-distribution, ammonium perchlorate/hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (AP/HTPB) propellant formulation that results in low Al agglomeration, even at low pressures (1--30 atm). Variations in formulation---such as fine-AP/binder ratio, Al particle size, Al loading, coarse-AP size---are also examined. A fuel-rich, oxygenated binder matrix highly loaded with fine (2-mum) AP (FAP) at 75/25:FAP/binder (by mass) is found to have premixed flame conditions that produce minimal agglomeration (without ignition) of 15-mum Al. Coarse AP (CAP) is added to the system in the form of either particles (200 or 400 mum) or pressed-AP laminates (simulated CAP). In the 2-D laminate system the CAP/oxyfuel-matrix flame structure is seen to be similar to that previously described for non-aluminized laminates with split (diffusion) and merged (partially-premixed) flame regimes, depending on pressure and fuel-matrix thickness. Both laminate and particulate systems show that with CAP present, Al can agglomerate more extensively on CAP via lateral surface migration from fuel matrix to the CAP region. The particulate CAP system also shows that Al can accumulate/agglomerate via settling on CAP from above (in the direction of burning). Both systems, but more clearly the 2-D laminates, show that with CAP present, Al is ignited by the outer CAP/fuel-matrix canopy flames. Thus, a propellant formulation is proposed for reducing overall Al agglomeration through intrinsically reduced agglomeration in the fuel-matrix and a reduced number of CAP-particle agglomerates via higher FAP/CAP ratio.

  15. Fundamentals of agglomeration in a fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.S.

    1985-01-01

    A visually observable fluidized bed, which can be operated under conditions in which agglomeration of the bed materials occurs, was designed and constructed. Polyethylene particles and silica sand coated with a thin layer of Elvax were chosen as bed materials. The coated particles used were in three different size ranges +180-250, +250-425, +425-600 ..mu..m and had three different coating thicknesses, 1, 3, and 5 ..mu..m. Two types of fluidized gas distributors were used: a porous plate with an independently fed jet at the center. The fluidized bed could be operated in either continuous-feed mode or in batch mode. In the case of polyethylene particles as bed material in the batch system, the amount of agglomerates increased linearly with residence time and increased exponentially with either auxiliary air or jet air temperature. The amount of agglomerates increased with jet nozzle size at the constant jet air flow rate. For a given jet nozzle size the agglomeration rate increased initially with jet air velocity, reached a maximum value and then decreased. In the case of coated particle as bed material, in the batch fluidized bed, the amount of agglomerates increased with residence time and then leveled off. It increased sharply with jet air temperature, coating thickness, concentration of coated particles and decreasing particle sizes. The agglomeration rate constants calculated from the model agree reasonably well with those obtained from experimental data. The model provides the better understanding of the complicated phenomena of agglomeration and could be an initial guide in choosing the operating conditions of an agglomerating fluidized bed.

  16. Alkali-induced agglomeration of aluminosilicate particles during coal combustion and gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Rizeq, R.G.

    1990-01-01

    This study focuses on the effect of alkali adsorption on the agglomeration of particles of bauxite, kaolinite, emathlite, lime, and two types of coal ash. An agglomeration (adhesion) temperature is defined which characterizes the adhesion propensity of particles. Using a small fluidized bed, a unique experimental technique is developed to measure this agglomeration point in-situ. The effects of alkali adsorption on the agglomeration characteristics of the substrates are determined. The agglomeration temperature of all substrates decreases as the alkali content increases. At low alkali loadings, alkali adsorption enhances particle agglomeration by forming new compounds of lower melting points. At high alkali concentrations, adhesion and agglomeration are caused by a layer of molten alkali which covers the exterior of the particles. Alkali surface composition of particles is studied using a Scanning Auger Microprobe (SAM). Results indicate that the alkali surface concentration decreases as agglomeration temperature increases. The use of additives to scavenge alkali vapors is further studied in a pilot scale downflow combustor under more typical combustion conditions. SAM surface analyses of additive particles indicate three mechanisms of alkali capture: alkali adsorption by reaction, alkali surface condensation, and alkali nucleation and coagulation with additive particles. Modeling results indicate that the absorption-reaction process is influenced by diffusion of alkali through the surface product layer. The model predictions of the alkali absorbed as a function of minimum agglomeration temperature agree very well with the experimental results. Alkali-additive interactions in a downflow combustor are also modeled to predict the mechanism of alkali capture and the overall alkali removal efficiency. Model predictions of the alkali capture agree well with the experimental results.

  17. Good techniques optimize control of oil-based mud and solids

    SciTech Connect

    Phelps, J.; Hoopingarner, J.

    1989-02-13

    Effective techniques have been developed from work on dozens of North Sea Wells to minimize the amount of oil-based mud discharged to the sea while maintaining acceptable levels of solids. Pressure to reduce pollution during the course of drilling prompted the development of these techniques. They involve personnel and optimization of mud system and procedures. Case histories demonstrate that regulations may be met with economical techniques using existing technology. The benefits of low solids content are widely known, and are a key part of any successful mud program. Good solids control should result in lower mud costs and better drilling performance. Operators have specified high-performance shakers to accomplish this and have revised their mud programs with lower and lower allowable drilled solids percentages. This will pay off in certain areas. But with the U.K. Department of Energy regulations requiring cuttings oil discharge content (CODC) to be less than 150 g of oil/kg of dry solids discharge that went into effect Jan. 1, 1989, oil-loss control has a higher profile in the U.K. sector of the North Sea.

  18. Oil-field wastewater purification by magnetic separation technique using a novel magnetic nanoparticle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhuonan; Yang, Huihui; Zhang, Hao; Huang, Chuanjun; Li, Laifeng

    2012-12-01

    In the present work, oil-field wastewater purification through superconducting magnetic separation technique using a novel magnetic nanoparticle was investigated. The magnetic nanoparticle, which has a multi-shell structure with ferroferric oxide as core, dense nonporous silica as inter layer and mesoporous silica as outer layer, was synthesized by co-precipitation method. To functionalize the magnetic nanoparticle, plasma polymerization technique was adopted and poly methyl acrylate (PMA) was formed on the surface of the nanoparticle. The multi-shell structure of the nanoparticle was confirmed by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and the characteristic is measurable by FTIR. It is found that most of the pollutants (85% by turbidity or 84% by COD value) in the oil-field wastewater are removed through the superconducting magnetic separation technique using this novel magnetic nanoparticle.

  19. Upgrading of coal liquefaction feedstock by selective agglomeration

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, R.; Sinha, K.; Richardson, A.; Killmeyer, R.; Utz, B.; Hickey, R.; Cillo, D.

    1994-03-01

    The technical feasibility study of using selective agglomeration (with coal-derived oil) to upgrade Illinois No. 6 coal for a liquefaction feedstock was completed. Effects of coal particle size, slurry pH, oil-to-coal ratio, and operating temperature on mineral matter reduction, clean coal weight recovery, and clean coal moisture content were studied. The addition of coal-derived naphtha or kerosene as conditioners to increase hydrophobicity and recovery of coal was also investigated. Results showed that approximately 70% of the mineral matter could be removed from this coal at a clean coal weight recovery of over 85% by grinding the coal to a mean volume diameter of about 10 microns and properly selecting of the operation variables.

  20. A New Screening Methodology for Improved Oil Recovery Processes Using Soft-Computing Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parada, Claudia; Ertekin, Turgay

    2010-05-01

    The first stage of production of any oil reservoir involves oil displacement by natural drive mechanisms such as solution gas drive, gas cap drive and gravity drainage. Typically, improved oil recovery (IOR) methods are applied to oil reservoirs that have been depleted naturally. In more recent years, IOR techniques are applied to reservoirs even before their natural energy drive is exhausted by primary depletion. Descriptive screening criteria for IOR methods are used to select the appropriate recovery technique according to the fluid and rock properties. This methodology helps in assessing the most suitable recovery process for field deployment of a candidate reservoir. However, the already published screening guidelines neither provide information about the expected reservoir performance nor suggest a set of project design parameters, which can be used towards the optimization of the process. In this study, artificial neural networks (ANN) are used to build a high-performance neuro-simulation tool for screening different improved oil recovery techniques: miscible injection (CO2 and N2), waterflooding and steam injection processes. The simulation tool consists of proxy models that implement a multilayer cascade feedforward back propagation network algorithm. The tool is intended to narrow the ranges of possible scenarios to be modeled using conventional simulation, reducing the extensive time and energy spent in dynamic reservoir modeling. A commercial reservoir simulator is used to generate the data to train and validate the artificial neural networks. The proxy models are built considering four different well patterns with different well operating conditions as the field design parameters. Different expert systems are developed for each well pattern. The screening networks predict oil production rate and cumulative oil production profiles for a given set of rock and fluid properties, and design parameters. The results of this study show that the networks are able to recognize the strong correlation between the displacement mechanism and the reservoir characteristics as they effectively forecast hydrocarbon production for different types of reservoir undergoing diverse recovery processes. The artificial neuron networks are able to capture the similarities between different displacement mechanisms as same network architecture is successfully applied in both CO2 and N2 injection. The neuro-simulation application tool is built within a graphical user interface to facilitate the display of the results. The developed soft-computing tool offers an innovative approach to design a variety of efficient and feasible IOR processes by using artificial intelligence. The tool provides appropriate guidelines to the reservoir engineer, it facilitates the appraisal of diverse field development strategies for oil reservoirs, and it helps to reduce the number of scenarios evaluated with conventional reservoir simulation.

  1. Preparation and characteristics of microcapsules containing enoxacin by one continuous process of agglomeration and microencapsulation.

    PubMed

    Ueda, M; Nakamura, Y; Makita, H; Kawashima, Y

    1993-01-01

    A novel microencapsulation technique was carried out with the phase separation of Eudragit RS from the wet spherical agglomeration (WSA) system by non-solvent addition. To elucidate the characteristics of microcapsules the spherical agglomerates containing enoxacin (ENX), lactose or Avicel which are different in their affinity to water (i.e. insoluble, soluble or absorbable properties, respectively), were prepared as core particles in an acetone/n-hexane mixture (volume ratio 3/7) by a WSA technique. The size of all kinds of spherical agglomerates was controlled by the amount of bridging liquid (ammonia water or distilled water) used. In the microencapsulation process encapsulation was performed efficiently at 400-600 rpm. Avicel agglomerates could be coated up to 30 per cent with Eudragit RS with less aggregation. Various additives were compared as additions into the system to avoid the aggregation of encapsulated particles. Addition of more than 3 per cent magnesium stearate based on the core weight in the system, before or at the same time as phase separation of Eudragit RS occurred, resulted in low aggregation of microcapsules for spherical agglomerates containing ENX or lactose. In formulating a water-absorbable excipient such as Avicel in the agglomerates of ENX, adding some 10 per cent Eudragit RS-dichloromethane solution into the WSA system, and using magnesium stearate as a protective agent, the resultant microcapsules could be obtained efficiently without aggregation, showing sustained release of ENX depending on coating level. PMID:8331491

  2. Mechanics and charging of nanoparticle agglomerates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Weon Gyu

    This thesis consists of two parts. The first part concerns studies on mechanics of real agglomerate particles and the second part involves studies on unipolar diffusion charging of agglomerates. Understanding mechanics of real agglomerate particles consisting of multiple primary particles is important for aerosol sizing instrumentation using electrical mobility and nanoparticle manufacturing process where coagulation and sedimentation occur. A key quantity determining transport properties of agglomerates is the friction coefficient. However, quantitative studies for the friction coefficient of agglomerates are very limited. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) image analysis results of silver agglomerates provides a basis for the comparison of experimental data with estimates based on free molecular models. A new quantitative method to determine the dynamic shape factor and the two exponents, eta and Dfm, which characterize the power law dependence of friction coefficient on the number of primary spheres and the mass on the mobility diameter, was developed using Differential Mobility Analyzer (DMA)-Aerosol Particle Mass (APM) analyzer. Model predictions indicate that eta is independent of agglomerate size while Dfm is sensitive to agglomerate size. Experimentally, it appears the opposite is true. Tandem DMA (TDMA) results also show that the mass-mobility diameter scaling exponent is not dependent on mobility size range. Estimates of non-ideal effects on the agglomerate dynamics were computed as perturbations to the Chan-Dahneke agglomerate model. After the corrections, an agreement between experimental data and model predictions becomes significantly improved. Unipolar diffusion charging becomes more attractive because it has higher charging efficiency than bipolar charging as well as important applications in aerosol sizing instrumentation using electrical mobility, powder coating, and the removal of toxic particles from air stream using Electrostatic Precipitator. It has been reported that the particle morphology affects both bipolar and unipolar charging processes. Nevertheless, knowledge about the charging of non-spherical particles such as asbestos fibers and fractal agglomerates is still lacking. From this study it was found that the effect of dielectric constant of materials on unipolar diffusion charging of nanoparticles is very small and the experimental results are in a good agreement with Fuchs (1963)' theory. The effect of agglomerate morphology on unipolar charging characteristic was examined both experimentally and analytically in terms of the mean charge per particle. Both geometric surface area and electrical capacitance are known as two important parameters to determine the mean charge of non-spherical particles. A new model to predict the electrical capacitance of loose agglomerate particles as a function of mobility diameter was developed incorporating electrical mobility and electrostatics theories. This study shows that the electrical capacitance contributes to increase the mean charge per particle of agglomerates more than the geometric surface area, especially in the transition regime. The estimates of geometric surface area and electrical capacitance were used to predict the mean charge from Chang (1981)'s model and the predicted results are reasonably in good agreement with experimental data.

  3. Transformation of Resources to Reserves: Next Generation Heavy-Oil Recovery Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Stanford University; Department of Energy Resources Engineering Green Earth Sciences

    2007-09-30

    This final report and technical progress report describes work performed from October 1, 2004 through September 30, 2007 for the project 'Transformation of Resources to Reserves: Next Generation Heavy Oil Recovery Techniques', DE-FC26-04NT15526. Critical year 3 activities of this project were not undertaken because of reduced funding to the DOE Oil Program despite timely submission of a continuation package and progress on year 1 and 2 subtasks. A small amount of carried-over funds were used during June-August 2007 to complete some work in the area of foamed-gas mobility control. Completion of Year 3 activities and tasks would have led to a more thorough completion of the project and attainment of project goals. This progress report serves as a summary of activities and accomplishments for years 1 and 2. Experiments, theory development, and numerical modeling were employed to elucidate heavy-oil production mechanisms that provide the technical foundations for producing efficiently the abundant, discovered heavy-oil resources of the U.S. that are not accessible with current technology and recovery techniques. Work fell into two task areas: cold production of heavy oils and thermal recovery. Despite the emerging critical importance of the waterflooding of viscous oil in cold environments, work in this area was never sanctioned under this project. It is envisioned that heavy oil production is impacted by development of an understanding of the reservoir and reservoir fluid conditions leading to so-called foamy oil behavior, i.e, heavy-oil solution gas drive. This understanding should allow primary, cold production of heavy and viscous oils to be optimized. Accordingly, we evaluated the oil-phase chemistry of crude oil samples from Venezuela that give effective production by the heavy-oil solution gas drive mechanism. Laboratory-scale experiments show that recovery correlates with asphaltene contents as well as the so-called acid number (AN) and base number (BN) of the crude oil. A significant number of laboratory-scale tests were made to evaluate the solution gas drive potential of West Sak (AK) viscous oil. The West Sak sample has a low acid number, low asphaltene content, and does not appear foamy under laboratory conditions. Tests show primary recovery of about 22% of the original oil in place under a variety of conditions. The acid number of other Alaskan North Slope samples tests is greater, indicating a greater potential for recovery by heavy-oil solution gas drive. Effective cold production leads to reservoir pressure depletion that eases the implementation of thermal recovery processes. When viewed from a reservoir perspective, thermal recovery is the enhanced recovery method of choice for viscous and heavy oils because of the significant viscosity reduction that accompanies the heating of oil. One significant issue accompanying thermal recovery in cold environments is wellbore heat losses. Initial work on thermal recovery found that a technology base for delivering steam, other hot fluids, and electrical heat through cold subsurface environments, such as permafrost, was in place. No commercially available technologies are available, however. Nevertheless, the enabling technology of superinsulated wells appears to be realized. Thermal subtasks focused on a suite of enhanced recovery options tailored to various reservoir conditions. Generally, electrothermal, conventional steam-based, and thermal gravity drainage enhanced oil recovery techniques appear to be applicable to 'prime' Ugnu reservoir conditions to the extent that reservoir architecture and fluid conditions are modeled faithfully here. The extent of reservoir layering, vertical communication, and subsurface steam distribution are important factors affecting recovery. Distribution of steam throughout reservoir volume is a significant issue facing thermal recovery. Various activities addressed aspects of steam emplacement. Notably, hydraulic fracturing of horizontal steam injection wells and implementation of steam trap control that limits steam entry into horizontal production wells overcomes many of the problems associated with implementation of thermal gravity drainage processes in heterogeneous sands. In a steam-assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) well pattern, hydraulically fractured injectors were able to achieve significantly improved reservoir heating and improvements to oil-steam ratio. On the opposite side of the steam injection spectrum, steam often channels through high-permeability zones. Foamed steam stabilized by aqueous surfactants is promising to alter steam flow, but has yet to be tested and simulated under SAGD conditions. The mechanistic population balance method for describing foam flow was extended to a local equilibrium framework that reduces computational costs and is promising for simulation of the effects of foamed steam in 3D.

  4. Comparing Parameter Estimation Techniques for an Electrical Power Transformer Oil Temperature Prediction Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, A. Terry

    1999-01-01

    This paper examines various sources of error in MIT's improved top oil temperature rise over ambient temperature model and estimation process. The sources of error are the current parameter estimation technique, quantization noise, and post-processing of the transformer data. Results from this paper will show that an output error parameter estimation technique should be selected to replace the current least squares estimation technique. The output error technique obtained accurate predictions of transformer behavior, revealed the best error covariance, obtained consistent parameter estimates, and provided for valid and sensible parameters. This paper will also show that the output error technique should be used to minimize errors attributed to post-processing (decimation) of the transformer data. Models used in this paper are validated using data from a large transformer in service.

  5. Increased Oil Production and Reserves from Improved Completion Techniques in the Bluebell Field, Uinta Basin, Utah.

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, C.D.

    1997-12-31

    The objective of this project is to increase oil production and reserves in the Uinta Basin by demonstrating improved completion techniques. Low productivity of Uinta Basin wells is caused by gross production intervals of several thousand feet that contain perforated thief zones, water-bearing zones, and unperforated oil-bearing intervals. Geologic and engineering characterization and computer simulation of the Green River and Wasatch Formations in the Bluebell field will determine reservoir heterogeneities related to fractures and depositional trends. This will be followed by drilling and recompletion of several wells to demonstrate improved completion techniques based on the reservoir characterization. Transfer of the project results will be an ongoing component of the project.

  6. Technical constraints limiting application of enhanced oil recovery techniques to petroleum production in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    In the interval since the publication in September 1980 of the technical constraints that inhibit the application of enhanced oil recovery techniques in the United States, there has been a large number of successful field trials of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) techniques. The Department of Energy has shared the costs of 28 field demonstrations of EOR with industry, and the results have been made available to the public through DOE documents, symposiums and the technical literature. This report reexamines the constraints listed in 1980, evaluates the state-of-the-art and outlines the areas where more research is needed. Comparison of the 1980 constraints with the present state-of-the-art indicates that most of the constraints have remained the same; however, the constraints have become more specific. 26 references, 6 tables.

  7. Increased Oil Production and Reserves from Improved Completion Techniques in the Bluebell Field, Uinta Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Craig

    1999-11-01

    The objective of this project is to increase oil production and reserves in the Uinta Basin by demonstrating improved completion techniques. Low productivity of Uinta Basin wells is caused by gross production intervals of several thousand feet that contain perforated thief zones, water-bearing zones, and unperforated oil-bearing intervals. Geologic and engineering characterization and computer simulation of the Green River and Wasatch Formations in the Bluebell field will determine reservoir heterogeneities related to fractures and depositional trends. This will be followed by drilling and recompletion of several wells to demonstrate improved completion techniques based on the reservoir characterization. Transfer of the project results will be an ongoing component of the project.

  8. Oil spill removal techniques and equipment. (Latest citations from fluidex). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the development and assessment of techniques and equipment used to control and remove oil spills. Chemical dispersants, booms, and mechanical skimmers are reviewed. Topics include recovery operations, emergency response, frogmat systems, bioremediation, and environmental monitoring. The effects of spills on marine life and fishing industries are examined. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  9. Centrifugal air-assisted melt agglomeration for fast-release "granulet" design.

    PubMed

    Wong, Tin Wui; Musa, Nafisah

    2012-07-01

    Conventional melt pelletization and granulation processes produce round and dense, and irregularly shaped but porous agglomerates respectively. This study aimed to design centrifugal air-assisted melt agglomeration technology for manufacture of spherical and yet porous "granulets" for ease of downstream manufacturing and enhancing drug release. A bladeless agglomerator, which utilized shear-free air stream to mass the powder mixture of lactose filler, polyethylene glycol binder and poorly water-soluble tolbutamide drug into "granulets", was developed. The inclination angle and number of vane, air-impermeable surface area of air guide, processing temperature, binder content and molecular weight were investigated with reference to "granulet" size, shape, texture and drug release properties. Unlike fluid-bed melt agglomeration with vertical processing air flow, the air stream in the present technology moved centrifugally to roll the processing mass into spherical but porous "granulets" with a drug release propensity higher than physical powder mixture, unprocessed drug and dense pellets prepared using high shear mixer. The fast-release attribute of "granulets" was ascribed to porous matrix formed with a high level of polyethylene glycol as solubilizer. The agglomeration and drug release outcomes of centrifugal air-assisted technology are unmet by the existing high shear and fluid-bed melt agglomeration techniques. PMID:22531845

  10. Rapid characterization of agglomerate aerosols by in situ mass-mobility measurements.

    PubMed

    Scheckman, Jacob H; McMurry, Peter H; Pratsinis, Sotiris E

    2009-07-21

    Transport and physical/chemical properties of nanoparticle agglomerates depend on primary particle size and agglomerate structure (size, fractal dimension, and dynamic shape factor). This research reports on in situ techniques for measuring such properties. Nanoparticle agglomerates of silica were generated by oxidizing hexamethyldisiloxane in a methane/oxygen diffusion flame. Upon leaving the flame, agglomerates of known electrical mobility size were selected with a differential mobility analyzer (DMA), and their mass was measured with an aerosol particle mass analyzer (APM), resulting in their mass fractal dimension, D(f), and dynamic shape factor, chi. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM/TEM) images were used to determine primary particle diameter and to qualitatively investigate agglomerate morphology. The DMA-APM measurements were reproducible within 5%, as determined by multiple measurements on different days under the same flame conditions. The effects of flame process variables (oxygen flow rate and mass production rate) on particle characteristics (D(f), and chi) were determined. All generated particles were fractal-like agglomerates with average primary particle diameters of 12-93 nm and D(f) = 1.7-2.4. Increasing the oxygen flow rate decreased primary particle size and D(f), while it increased chi. Increasing the production rate increased the agglomerate and primary particle sizes, and decreased chi without affecting D(f). The effects of oxygen flow rate and particle production rate on primary particle size reported here are in agreement with ex situ measurements in the literature, while the effect of process variables on agglomerate shape (chi) is demonstrated for the first time to our knowledge. PMID:19594189

  11. Oil Spill Detection and Tracking Using Lipschitz Regularity and Multiscale Techniques in Synthetic Aperture Radar Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajadi, O. A.; Meyer, F. J.

    2014-12-01

    Automatic oil spill detection and tracking from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images is a difficult task, due in large part to the inhomogeneous properties of the sea surface, the high level of speckle inherent in SAR data, the complexity and the highly non-Gaussian nature of amplitude information, and the low temporal sampling that is often achieved with SAR systems. This research presents a promising new oil spill detection and tracking method that is based on time series of SAR images. Through the combination of a number of advanced image processing techniques, the develop approach is able to mitigate some of these previously mentioned limitations of SAR-based oil-spill detection and enables fully automatic spill detection and tracking across a wide range of spatial scales. The method combines an initial automatic texture analysis with a consecutive change detection approach based on multi-scale image decomposition. The first step of the approach, a texture transformation of the original SAR images, is performed in order to normalize the ocean background and enhance the contrast between oil-covered and oil-free ocean surfaces. The Lipschitz regularity (LR), a local texture parameter, is used here due to its proven ability to normalize the reflectivity properties of ocean water and maximize the visibly of oil in water. To calculate LR, the images are decomposed using two-dimensional continuous wavelet transform (2D-CWT), and transformed into Holder space to measure LR. After texture transformation, the now normalized images are inserted into our multi-temporal change detection algorithm. The multi-temporal change detection approach is a two-step procedure including (1) data enhancement and filtering and (2) multi-scale automatic change detection. The performance of the developed approach is demonstrated by an application to oil spill areas in the Gulf of Mexico. In this example, areas affected by oil spills were identified from a series of ALOS PALSAR images acquired in 2010. The comparison showed exceptional performance of our method. This method can be applied to emergency management and decision support systems with a need for real-time data, and it shows great potential for rapid data analysis in other areas, including volcano detection, flood boundaries, forest health, and wildfires.

  12. DETERMINATION OF STOKES SHAPE FACTOR FOR SINGLE PARTICLES AND AGGLOMERATES

    SciTech Connect

    Matyas, Josef; Schaible, Micah J.; Vienna, John D.

    2011-09-01

    The large octahedral crystals of spinel can precipitate from glass during the high-level waste vitrification process and potentially block the glass discharge riser of electrically heated ceramic melters. To help predict the settling behavior of spinel in the riser, the settling of single particles and agglomerates was studied in stagnant and transparent viscosity oils at room temperature with developed optical particle-dynamics-analyzer. Determined dimensions and terminal settling velocities of particles were used for calculation of their Stokes shape factors. Calculated shape factor for the glass beads was almost identical with the theoretical shape factor of 2/9 for a perfect sphere. The shape factor for single spinel crystal was about 7.6 % higher compare to the theoretically predicted value for octahedron. Stokes shape factor of irregularly shaped multi-particle agglomerates was lower than that of the glass beads and individual spinel crystals because of the higher surface drag caused by the larger surface area to volume ratio.

  13. Selective agglomeration of a Pittsburgh Seam coal with isooctane

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, R.; Killmeyer, R.; Utz, B.; Richardson, A.; Sinha, K.

    1992-01-01

    The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center initiated a research program in 1989 to investigate the fundamentals of selective agglomeration as applied to the cleaning of coals. The results of the initial study with Bruceton mine, Pittsburgh seam coal, using isooctane as an agglomerant, have been published. Subsequent to the successful reduction of the ash content of Bruceton coal to less than 0.9% after two cleaning stages, the study was extended to compare a coal from the same seam, but from Ohio. In the previous parameter optimization tests with Bruceton coal, particle size and slurry pH were found to be important parameters governing coal cleanability. Other researchers have obtained similar conclusions of the effects of particle size and coal slurry pH on the cleanability of various coals. In this study, the effects of these parameters on the cleanability of Powhatan coal were examined. Particle size reduction kinetics was examined first. Effects of size reduction (degree of mineral matter liberation), oil (isooctane)-to-coal ratio, and slurry pH on mineral matter rejection and combustible recovery were also examined. A petrographic comparison was conducted on the Powhatan and Bruceton coals to examine the degree of pyrite liberation as a function of particle size to elucidate why one coal from the same seam can be cleaned significantly better than another. (VC)

  14. Identification of vegetable oil botanical speciation in refined vegetable oil blends using an innovative combination of chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Maria Teresa; Haughey, Simon A; Elliott, Christopher T; Koidis, Anastasios

    2015-12-15

    European Regulation 1169/2011 requires producers of foods that contain refined vegetable oils to label the oil types. A novel rapid and staged methodology has been developed for the first time to identify common oil species in oil blends. The qualitative method consists of a combination of a Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to profile the oils and fatty acid chromatographic analysis to confirm the composition of the oils when required. Calibration models and specific classification criteria were developed and all data were fused into a simple decision-making system. The single lab validation of the method demonstrated the very good performance (96% correct classification, 100% specificity, 4% false positive rate). Only a small fraction of the samples needed to be confirmed with the majority of oils identified rapidly using only the spectroscopic procedure. The results demonstrate the huge potential of the methodology for a wide range of oil authenticity work. PMID:26190602

  15. Engineering model of coal agglomeration during gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Apte, A.J.; Fein, H.L.

    1981-01-01

    This paper has postulated an optimum temperature-time profile in a gasifier that will allow gasification of caking coals at high throughput rates without stirring. The optimum profile is defined by a simple engineering model. The results of these experiments confirmed the predictions of the model, which now can be used to predict the onset of coal agglomeration during gasification. 11 refs.

  16. Comparison of soft computing techniques for a three-phase oil field centrifuge.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R. E.; Parkinson, w; Miller, N.

    2002-01-01

    In this work we compare fuzzy techniques to neural network techniques for building a soft sensor for a three-phase oil field centrifuge. The soft sensor is used in a feed-forward control system that augments a feedback control system. Two approaches were used to develop the soft sensor. The first approach was to use a fuzzy rule based system based upon the experience of an expert operator. The expert operator's experience was supplemented using a computer model of the system. The second approach was to use a neural network to build the inverse of the computer model. The pros and cons of both techniques are discussed. KEYWORDS: fuzzy logic, neural networks, soft sensor, soft computing

  17. Increased Oil Production and Reserves from Improved Completion Techniques in the Bluebell Field, Uinta Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Deo, M.D.; Morgan, C.D.

    1999-04-28

    The objective of the project is to increase oil production and reserves by the use of improved reservoir characterization and completion techniques in the Uinta Basin, Utah. To accomplish this objective, a two-year geologic and engineering characterization of the Bluebell field was conducted. The study evaluated surface and subsurface data, currently used completion techniques, and common production problems. It was determined that advanced case- and open-hole logs could be effective in determining productive beds and that stage-interval (about 500 ft [150 m] per stage) and bed-scale isolation completion techniques could result in improved well performance. In the first demonstration well (Michelle Ute well discussed in the previous technical report), dipole shear anisotropy (anisotropy) and dual-burst thermal decay time (TDT) logs were run before and isotope tracer log was run after the treatment. The logs were very helpful in characterizing the remaining hydrocarbon potential in the well. But, mechanical failure resulted in a poor recompletion and did not result in a significant improvement in the oil production from the well.

  18. The Fluorescent-Oil Film Method and Other Techniques for Boundary-Layer Flow Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loving, Donald L.; Katzoff, S.

    1959-01-01

    A flow-visualization technique, known as the fluorescent-oil film method, has been developed which appears to be generally simpler and to require less experience and development of technique than previously published methods. The method is especially adapted to use in the large high-powered wind tunnels which require considerable time to reach the desired test conditions. The method consists of smearing a film of fluorescent oil over a surface and observing where the thickness is affected by the shearing action of the boundary layer. These films are detected and identified, and their relative thicknesses are determined by use of ultraviolet light. Examples are given of the use of this technique. Other methods that show promise in the study of boundary-layer conditions are described. These methods include the use of a temperature-sensitive fluorescent paint and the use of a radiometer that is sensitive to the heat radiation from a surface. Some attention is also given to methods that can be used with a spray apparatus in front of the test model.

  19. Method for providing improved solid fuels from agglomerated subbituminous coal

    DOEpatents

    Janiak, Jerzy S. (Edmonton, CA); Turak, Ali A. (Edmonton, CA); Pawlak, Wanda (Edmonton, CA); Ignasiak, Boleslaw L. (Edmonton, CA)

    1989-01-01

    A method is provided for separating agglomerated subbituminous coal and the heavy bridging liquid used to form the agglomerates. The separation is performed by contacting the agglomerates with inert gas or steam at a temperature in the range of 250.degree. to 350.degree. C. at substantially atmospheric pressure.

  20. Analysis of Urban Agglomeration and Its Meaning for Rural People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiegelman, Robert G.

    Agglomeration--the clustering of people, businesses, or structures within an area--is investigated for two purposes: (1) defining the nature of agglomeration and erecting a suitable agglomeration theory, and (2) suggesting further research. These two objectives are seen as being vital to help improve the economic well-being of rural people by…

  1. Effect of temperature on wet agglomeration of crystals

    PubMed Central

    Maghsoodi, Maryam; Yari, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): This study dealt with the wet agglomeration process in which a small quantity of binder liquid was added into a suspension of crystals, directly in the stirring vessel where the crystallization took place. The purpose of this investigation was evaluation of the effect of temperature on the agglomeration process in order to gain insight into the mechanism of the formation of the agglomerates. Materials and Methods: Carbamazepine was used as a model drug and water/ethanol and isopropyl acetate were used as crystallization system and binder liquid, respectively. The agglomeration of crystals was carried out at various temperatures and the agglomerates were characterized in terms of size, morphology, density and mechanical strength. Results: Evaluation of the agglomerates along the course of agglomeration shows that the properties of the particles change gradually but substantially. Higher temperature of the system during agglomeration process favors the formation of more regular agglomerates with mechanically stronger and denser structure; this can be explained by the promotion effect of temperature on the agglomeration process. Conclusion: With optimized wet agglomeration temperature, spherical, dense, and strong agglomerates can be obtained. PMID:24967063

  2. Chemical and physicochemial properties of submicron aerosol agglomerates

    SciTech Connect

    Scripsick, R.C.; Ehrman, S.; Friedlander, S.K.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The formation of nanometer-sized aerosol particles in a premixed methane flame from both solid-phase aerosol precursors and gas-phase precursors was investigated. Techniques were developed to determine the distribution of the individual chemical species as a function of agglomerate size by using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). To determine the distribution of chemical species both from particle to particle and within the particles on a nanometer scale, we used the analytical electron microscopy techniques of energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry (EDS) and electron energy loss spectrometry (EELS) coupled with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The observed distribution of individual chemical species as a function of agglomerate size was linked to the material properties of the solid-phase precursors. For aerosol formed from gas-phase precursors by gas-to-particle conversion, the distribution of species on a manometer scale was found to correspond to the equilibrium phase distribution expected from equilibrium for the system at the flame temperatures.

  3. Uncertainty Analysis for Oil-Film Interferometry Skin-Friction Measurement Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naughton, Jonathan W.; Brown, James L.; Merriam, Marshal (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, the use of oil-film interferometry to measure the skin friction coefficient (C(sub f) = tau/q where tau is the surface shear stress and q is the dynamic pressure) has increased. Different forms of this oil-film technique with various levels of accuracy and ease of use have been successfully applied in a wide range of flows. The method's popularity is growing due to its relative ease of implementation and minimal intrusiveness as well as an increased demand for C(sub f) measurements. Nonetheless, the accuracy of these methods has not been rigorously addressed to date. Most researchers have simply shown that the skin-friction measurements made using these techniques compare favorably with other measurements and theory, most of which are only accurate to within 5-20%. The use of skin-friction data in the design of commercial aircraft, whose drag at cruise is 50% skin-friction drag, and in the validation of computational fluid dynamics programs warrants better uncertainty estimates. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  4. Bed material agglomeration in PFB biomass gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Hallgren, A.L.; Padban, N.

    1995-12-31

    Small amounts of alkali compounds can drastically change the behavior of bed materials in fluidized bed gasification systems. Alkali-induced agglomeration and defluidization of the bed may cause severe operational problems and can be detrimental to the overall process. Enhanced tendency for agglomerations in the bed has been found in systems utilizing biomass or so called alternative solid fuels as feed-stock. The fuel alkali may add to the accumulation of alkali compounds in the bed. Adhesion tendencies between the particles seem to increase due to sticky layers of alkali condensations on the particle surfaces. In the present study an endeavor was made to establish a method for investigating suitable bed materials and the effect from biomass ash on the bed behavior in PFB biomass gasification. In this approach first results show that the composition of particles in the bed, the temperature, and the mobility of the particles are of primary importance.

  5. Bed material agglomeration in PFB biomass gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Padban, N.; Kiuru, S.; Hallgren, A.L.

    1995-12-31

    Small amounts of alkali compounds can drastically change the behavior of bed materials in fluidized bed gasification systems. Alkali-induced agglomeration and defluidization of the bed may cause severe operational problems and can be detrimental to the overall process. Enhanced tendency for agglomerations in the bed has been found in systems utilizing biomass or so called alternative solid fuels as feed-stock. The fuel alkali may add to the accumulation of alkali compounds in the bed. Adhesion tendencies between the particles seem to increase due to sticky layers of alkali condensations on the particle surfaces. In the present study an endeavor was made to establish a method for investigating suitable bed materials and the effect from biomass ash on the bed behavior in PFB biomass gasification. In this approach first results show that the composition of the particles in the bed, the temperature, and the mobility of the particles are of primary importance.

  6. Modeling Agglomeration of Dust Particles in Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Lorin S.; Land, Victor; Ma, Qianyu; Perry, Jonathan D.; Hyde, Truell W.

    2011-11-01

    The charge on an aggregate immersed in a plasma environment distributes itself over the aggregate's surface; this can be approximated theoretically by assuming a multipole distribution. The dipole-dipole (or higher order) charge interactions between fractal aggregates lead to rotations of the grains as they interact. Other properties of the dust grains also influence the agglomeration process, such as the monomer shape (spherical or ellipsoidal) or the presence of magnetic material. Finally, the plasma and grain properties also determine the morphology of the resultant aggregates. Porous and fluffy aggregates are more strongly coupled to the gas, leading to reduced collisional velocities, and greater collisional cross sections. These factors in turn can determine the growth rate of the aggregates and evolution of the dust cloud. This paper gives an overview of the numerical and experimental methods used to study dust agglomeration at CASPER and highlights some recent results.

  7. Modeling Agglomeration of Dust Particles in Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Lorin S.; Land, Victor; Ma Qianyu; Perry, Jonathan D.; Hyde, Truell W.

    2011-11-29

    The charge on an aggregate immersed in a plasma environment distributes itself over the aggregate's surface; this can be approximated theoretically by assuming a multipole distribution. The dipole-dipole (or higher order) charge interactions between fractal aggregates lead to rotations of the grains as they interact. Other properties of the dust grains also influence the agglomeration process, such as the monomer shape (spherical or ellipsoidal) or the presence of magnetic material. Finally, the plasma and grain properties also determine the morphology of the resultant aggregates. Porous and fluffy aggregates are more strongly coupled to the gas, leading to reduced collisional velocities, and greater collisional cross sections. These factors in turn can determine the growth rate of the aggregates and evolution of the dust cloud. This paper gives an overview of the numerical and experimental methods used to study dust agglomeration at CASPER and highlights some recent results.

  8. Nanostructure and agglomerate-of-spheres model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winsel, A.; Bashtavelova, E.

    A nanostructure, consisting of particles with nanometer-sized linear dimensions, may be produced by electrocrystallization procedures at low concentrations and temperatures. The agglomeration-of-sphere model has been developed to describe the behaviour of an electrocrystalline network created by a formation process. The model is used to describe and understand observed phenomena during the sintering of metal powders and the properties of electrochemically produced electrodes.

  9. Sonic enhanced ash agglomeration and sulfur capture

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The major objective of the Phase 1 test program is to confirm the feasibility of the Manufacturing and Technology Conversion International, Inc. bimodal particle size approach to enhance particulate control by acoustic ash agglomeration. An ancillary objective of the Phase 1 effort is to demonstrate and confirm the feasibility of an acoustic field to enhance sulfur capture by increasing sorbent reactivity. Phase 1 tests are designed to cover the frequency range between 50 and 1400 Hz, establish monomodal baseline performance as a benchmark from which to measure the degree of enhancement expected from the bimodal approach, and, finally, to confirm the effectiveness of low-frequency fields over high-frequency fields for realistic particulate streams. The program will demonstrate the effectiveness of a unique approach which uses a bimodal distribution composed of large sorbent particles and fine fly ash particles to enhance ash agglomeration and sulfur capture at conditions found in direct coal-fired turbines. Under the impact of high-intensity sound waves, sorbent reactivity and utilization, it is theorized, will increase while agglomerates of fly ash and sorbents are formed which are readily collected in commercial cyclones. The work will extend the concept from the demonstration of feasibility (Phase 1), through proof-of-concept (Phase 2) to the construction (Phase 3) of a coal-fired pulsed combustor with in-furnace sorbent injection. For Phase 1, Pennsylvania State University will conduct studies for enhanced sulfur capture in The Combustion Laboratory and agglomeration tests in the High Intensity Acoustic Laboratory. 2 refs., 43 figs., 7 tabs.

  10. Encapsulation of hazardous wastes into agglomerates

    SciTech Connect

    Guloy, A.

    1992-01-28

    The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using the cementitious properties and agglomeration characteristics of coal conversion byproducts to encapsulate and immobilize hazardous waste materials. The intention was to establish an economical way of co-utilization and co-disposal of wastes. In addition, it may aid in the eradication of air pollution problems associated with the fine-powdery nature of fly ash. Encapsulation into agglomerates is a novel approach of treating toxic waste. Although encapsulation itself is not a new concept, existing methods employ high-cost resins that render them economically unfeasible. In this investigation, the toxic waste was contained in a concrete-like matrix whereby fly ash and other cementitious waste materials were utilized. The method incorporates the principles of solidification, stabilization and agglomeration. Another aspect of the study is the evaluation of the agglomeration as possible lightweight aggregates. Since fly ash is commercially used as an aggregate, it would be interesting to study the effect of incorporating toxic wastes in the strength development of the granules. In the investigation, the fly ash self-cementation process was applied to electroplating sludges as the toxic waste. The process hoped to provide a basis for delisting of the waste as hazardous and, thereby greatly minimize the cost of its disposal. Owing to the stringent regulatory requirements for hauling and disposal of hazardous waste, the cost of disposal is significant. The current practice for disposal is solidifying the waste with portland cement and dumping the hardened material in the landfill where the cost varies between $700--950/ton. Partially replacing portland cement with fly ash in concrete has proven beneficial, therefore applying the same principles in the treatment of toxic waste looked very promising.

  11. Agglomeration and Sedimentation of MWCNTS in Chloroform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremin, Yu. S.; Kolesnikova, A. A.; Grekhov, A. M.

    The kinetics of agglomeration of multiwalled carbon nanotubes dispersed in chloroform has been studied by the methods of optical spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering. With the use of the models of the diffusion of cylindrical particles, the sizes of particles obtained by this method can be recalculated to the DLS data and the concentration at which the dispersion of individual ?WCNTs occurs can be determined.

  12. Voriconazole into PLGA nanoparticles: improving agglomeration and antifungal efficacy.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hai-sheng; Liu, Xi-jun; Lv, Gui-xiang; Sun, Bo; Kong, Qing-fei; Zhai, Dong-xu; Wang, Qi; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Guang-you; Wang, Dan-dan; Li, Hu-lun; Jin, Lian-hong; Kostulas, Nikolaos

    2008-03-20

    This study is concerned with preparing PLGA nanoparticles loaded with voriconazole (PNLV), investigating the burst release and agglomeration of PNLV, and also evaluating antifungal efficacy of PNLV compared with voriconazole (VRC). The emulsion-solvent evaporation technique for nanoparticles and tests against fungi were completed. The amount of VRC in PNLV with sodium hexametaphosphate was 2.01+/-0.27%, and burst release of PNLV was reduced by about 33% using 20% ethanol solution (n=3). The mean D(50) of PNLV with or without this salt was 132.8 nm and 6.3 microm, respectively (n=5). In vitro; the fungal numbers treated with PNLV (3.5 mg/ml, equal amount calculated by VRC) and VRC (70 microg/ml) in tubes at the day 7 were 5.74 log(10) and 6.72 log(10), respectively (P<0.05). In vivo; the fungal burden treated with PNLV and VRC in tissue from mice kidneys at day 7 after administration was 0.64 log(10) and 2.61 log(10), respectively (5 mg/kg, P<0.001). The hematoxylin-eosin stain in mice kidney showed that the pathological lesions treated with PNLV were relieved in contrast with those with VRC. These results suggest that the emulsion-solvent evaporation process is feasible in preparing PNLV. Moreover, ethanol solution decreased burst release and Na-HMP inhibited agglomeration. PNLV could improve the VRC antifungal efficacy. PMID:18053659

  13. Electromagnetic Scattering and Absorption by Aerosol Agglomerates.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsing-Yi.

    Calculation of scattering and absorption by smoke aerosols is required in many applications, including characterization of atmospheric aerosols, prediction of climatic impact of smoke, evaluation of smoke effectiveness in obscuration, calculation of heat transfer from flames, and evaluation of various scenarios of nuclear winter. In this dissertation two procedures were developed to accurately make these calculations utilizing realistic models of smoke agglomerates including oriented chains and fractal geometries. First the Iterative Extended Boundary Condition Method (IEBCM) was utilized to calculate the electromagnetic (EM) scattering and absorption of elongated aerosol particles. The computation efficiency and capability of IEBCM were improved by implementing the sectioning and the segmentation procedures. The sectioning procedure resulted in improving the computational efficiency and the segmentation method made it possible to make calculations for particles with aspect ratios as high as 250. The other procedure employed the Volume Integral Equation Formulation (VIEF) to compute the EM scattering and absorption by agglomerates of complex geometries. The validity of the procedure was checked first by comparing the obtained results with those obtained from the Mie solution for a spherical object and with the IEBCM for nonspherical objects. The comparison between results showed excellent agreement and hence validated the accuracy of the VIEF. The VIEF solution was then used to make calculations for five types of fractal agglomerates of smoke aerosol particles with fractal dimensions in the range from 1.7 to 1.9. The results obtained were compared with those based on the fractal theory recently published by Berry and Percival, and some differences were observed. Specifically it was noted that, unlike the fractal results, the scattering and absorption data are polarization-dependent and that the results from the fractal theory may be in error by as much as 50 percent in the resonance frequency range. Based on the detailed study of the absorption characteristics of agglomerates of realistic geometries of smoke aerosols and to facilitate the use of the obtained results in complicated climate codes such as the General Circulation Model (GCM), the obtained data were used to develop an empirical formula for the absorption. The developed formula is a function of frequency, number of particles in an agglomerate, radius of primary particle, complex permittivity, and the fractal dimension. The developed formula satisfies the frequency dependance of absorption up to resonance with an average error of less than 5 percent. Finally the VIEF method was used to examine the effect of cloud condensation on EM absorption by smoke particles. The obtained results generally showed a significant enhancement in the absorption of carbon aerosols as a result of cloud condensation.

  14. Agglomeration rate and action forces between atomized particles of agglomerator and inhaled-particles from coal combustion.

    PubMed

    Wei, Feng; Zhang, Jun-ying; Zheng, Chu-guang

    2005-01-01

    In order to remove efficiently haled-particles emissions from coal combustions, a new way was used to put forward the process of agglomeration and the atomization was produced by the nozzle and then sprayed into the flue before precipitation devices of power station boiler in order to make inhaled-particles agglomerate into bigger particles, which can be easily removed but not change existing running conditions of boiler. According to this idea, a model is set up to study agglomeration rate and effect forces between fly ash inhaled-particles and atomized agglomerator particles. The developed agglomeration rate was expressed by relative particle number decreasing speed per unit volume. The result showed that viscosity force and flow resistance force give main influences on agglomeration effect of inhaled-particles, while springiness force and gravity have little effect on agglomeration effect of theirs. Factors influencing the agglomeration rate and effect forces are studied, including agglomerator concentration, agglomerator flux and agglomerator density, atomized-particles diameters and inhaled-particles diameter and so on. PMID:16295917

  15. Best available techniques (BATs) for oil spill response in the Mediterranean Sea: calm sea and presence of economic activities.

    PubMed

    Guidi, Giambattista; Sliskovic, Merica; Violante, Anna Carmela; Vukic, Luka

    2016-01-01

    An oil spill is the accidental or intentional discharge of petroleum products into the environment due to human activities. Although oil spills are actually just a little percent of the total world oil pollution problem, they represent the most visible form of it. The impact on the ecosystems can be severe as well as the impact on economic activities. Oil spill cleanup is a very difficult and expensive activity, and many techniques are available for it. In previous works, a methodology based on different kinds of criteria in order to come to the most satisfactory technique was proposed and the relative importance of each impact criterion on the basis of the Saaty's Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) was also evaluated. After a review of the best available techniques (BATs) available for oil spill response, this work suggests criteria for BATs' selection when oil spills occur in the Mediterranean Sea under well-defined circumstances: calm sea and presence of economic activities in the affected area. A group of experts with different specializations evaluated the alternative BATs by means of AHP method taking into account their respective advantages and disadvantages. PMID:26498811

  16. Radiations and biodegradation techniques for detoxifying Carica papaya seed oil for effective dietary and industrial use.

    PubMed

    Afolabi, Israel Sunmola; Bisi-Adeniyi, Tolulope Dorcas; Adedoyin, Toluwalase Ronke; Rotimi, Solomon Oladapo

    2015-10-01

    Benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC) is toxic in high concentration. The capacity of Aspergillus niger, microwave and ultraviolet radiations to reduce the BITC levels in Carica papaya Linn seed oil were assessed in vitro. BITC at different concentrations were periodically exposed to microwave and ultraviolet radiations for 30min and 10h, respectively; and to identify Aspergillus niger for 4days. Microwave radiation significantly reduced (p?techniques are possible models for improving the dietary consumption of the oil. PMID:26396392

  17. Oil whip instability control using μ-synthesis technique on a magnetic actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riemann, Bernd; Araujo Perini, Efrain; Lucchesi Cavalca, Katia; Fiori de Castro, Helio; Rinderknecht, Stephan

    2013-02-01

    Rotating machines have a wide application range and since those machines have high trust levels, several rotor vibrations control methods are investigated in order to avoid sudden cracks, improve rotor performance or even to reach higher operation speeds by controlling some instabilities, critical speeds resonances or oil whip effect. Rotor instabilities are associated to the operation speed and can have structural or dynamic sources from the shaft, bearings and foundation or even from an actuator external force. This work focuses on a strategy that uses the μ-synthesis control technique to attenuate the oil whip instability effect of flexible hydrodynamically supported rotors and allows the rotor to operate in higher speeds. For the identified rotor model and the synthesized controller applied on a magnetic actuator, the control system stability and performance specifications are analyzed with regard to the model uncertainties and μ-synthesis controlled vibration levels are compared to PID controller in vertical and horizontal directions. The performance specifications within the μ-synthesis are optimized to suppress unbalance vibration and, in order to contribute to industrial acceptance, the controller design is presented as a strategy which focuses on a design at reduced effort.

  18. Increased Oil Production and Reserves From Improved Completion Techniques in the Bluebell Field, Uinta Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, C.D.; Deo, M.D.

    1998-04-01

    The Bluebell field is productive from the Tertiary lower Green River and Colton (Wasatch) Formations of the Uinta Basin, Utah. The productive interval consists of thousands of feet of interbedded fractured clastic and carbonate beds deposited in the ancestral Lake Uinta. Wells in the Bluebell field are typically completed by perforating 40 or more beds over 1000 to 3000 vertical ft (300-900 m), then stimulating the entire interval with hydrochloric acid. This technique is often referred to as the shot gun completion. Completion techniques used in the Bluebell field were discussed in detail in the Second Annual Report (Curtice, 1996). The shot-gun technique is believed to leave many potentially productive beds damaged and/or untreated, while allowing water-bearing and low-pressure (thief) zones to communicate with the wellbore. A two-year characterization study involved detailed examination of outcrop, core, well logs, surface and subsurface fractures, produced oil-field waters, engineering parameters of the two demonstration wells, and analysis of past completion techniques and effectiveness. The study was intended to improve the geologic characterization of the producing formations and thereby develop completion techniques specific to the producing beds or facies instead of a shot gun approach to stimulating all the beds. The characterization did not identify predictable-facies or predictable-fracture trends within the vertical stratigraphic column as originally hoped. Advanced logging techniques can identify productive beds in individual wells. A field-demonstration program was developed to use cased-hole advanced logging techniques in two wells and recompletion the wells at two different scales based on the logging. The first well was going to be completed at the interval scale using a multiple stage completion technique (about 500 ft [150 m] per stage). The second well will be recompleted at the bed-scale using bridge plug and packer to isolate three or more beds for stimulation. These recompletion will show which logs are most effective in identifying productive beds and what scale of completion is most cost effective. The third demonstration will be the logging and completion of a new well using the logs and completion scale or technique, most effective in the previous demonstrations.

  19. A landfarming application technique used as environmental remediation for coal oil pollution.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Giasi CI; Morelli A

    2003-08-01

    Since the massive exploitation of the Val d'Agri (Basilicata-Italy) oilfield has started, a lot of environmental pollution accidents have occurred in the same region. This research takes as starting point the heavy accident occurred in the year 2000, when 15,150 kg of coal oil were spilt all over the Agri river bed and the surrounding fields. In that particular case, the environmental reclamation was achieved by the removal of the polluted soil and its dump-storage. This research work suggests an environmental restoration which is an alternative solution to what has been practiced before, and it is achieved by the so called bioremediation methods, particularly the "landfarming on site" technique.

  20. A landfarming application technique used as environmental remediation for coal oil pollution.

    PubMed

    Giasi, Concetta I; Morelli, Annalisa

    2003-08-01

    Since the massive exploitation of the Val d'Agri (Basilicata-Italy) oilfield has started, a lot of environmental pollution accidents have occurred in the same region. This research takes as starting point the heavy accident occurred in the year 2000, when 15,150 kg of coal oil were spilt all over the Agri river bed and the surrounding fields. In that particular case, the environmental reclamation was achieved by the removal of the polluted soil and its dump-storage. This research work suggests an environmental restoration which is an alternative solution to what has been practiced before, and it is achieved by the so called bioremediation methods, particularly the "landfarming on site" technique. PMID:12929808

  1. APPLIED PHYTO-REMEDIATION TECHNIQUES USING HALOPHYTES FOR OIL AND BRINE SPILL SCARS

    SciTech Connect

    M.L. Korphage; Bruce G. Langhus; Scott Campbell

    2003-03-01

    Produced salt water from historical oil and gas production was often managed with inadequate care and unfortunate consequences. In Kansas, the production practices in the 1930's and 1940's--before statewide anti-pollution laws--were such that fluids were often produced to surface impoundments where the oil would segregate from the salt water. The oil was pumped off the pits and the salt water was able to infiltrate into the subsurface soil zones and underlying bedrock. Over the years, oil producing practices were changed so that segregation of fluids was accomplished in steel tanks and salt water was isolated from the natural environment. But before that could happen, significant areas of the state were scarred by salt water. These areas are now in need of economical remediation. Remediation of salt scarred land can be facilitated with soil amendments, land management, and selection of appropriate salt tolerant plants. Current research on the salt scars around the old Leon Waterflood, in Butler County, Kansas show the relative efficiency of remediation options. Based upon these research findings, it is possible to recommend cost efficient remediation techniques for slight, medium, and heavy salt water damaged soil. Slight salt damage includes soils with Electrical Conductivity (EC) values of 4.0 mS/cm or less. Operators can treat these soils with sufficient amounts of gypsum, install irrigation systems, and till the soil. Appropriate plants can be introduced via transplants or seeded. Medium salt damage includes soils with EC values between 4.0 and 16 mS/cm. Operators will add amendments of gypsum, till the soil, and arrange for irrigation. Some particularly salt tolerant plants can be added but most planting ought to be reserved until the second season of remediation. Severe salt damage includes soil with EC values in excess of 16 mS/cm. Operators will add at least part of the gypsum required, till the soil, and arrange for irrigation. The following seasons more gypsum will be added and as the soil EC is reduced, plants can be introduced. If rapid remediation is required, a sufficient volume of topsoil, or sand, or manure can be added to dilute the local salinity, the bulk amendments tilled into the surface with added gypsum, and appropriate plants added. In this case, irrigation will be particularly important. The expense of the more rapid remediation will be much higher.

  2. Olive oil sensory defects classification with data fusion of instrumental techniques and multivariate analysis (PLS-DA).

    PubMed

    Borràs, Eva; Ferré, Joan; Boqué, Ricard; Mestres, Montserrat; Aceña, Laura; Calvo, Angels; Busto, Olga

    2016-07-15

    Three instrumental techniques, headspace-mass spectrometry (HS-MS), mid-infrared spectroscopy (MIR) and UV-visible spectrophotometry (UV-vis), have been combined to classify virgin olive oil samples based on the presence or absence of sensory defects. The reference sensory values were provided by an official taste panel. Different data fusion strategies were studied to improve the discrimination capability compared to using each instrumental technique individually. A general model was applied to discriminate high-quality non-defective olive oils (extra-virgin) and the lowest-quality olive oils considered non-edible (lampante). A specific identification of key off-flavours, such as musty, winey, fusty and rancid, was also studied. The data fusion of the three techniques improved the classification results in most of the cases. Low-level data fusion was the best strategy to discriminate musty, winey and fusty defects, using HS-MS, MIR and UV-vis, and the rancid defect using only HS-MS and MIR. The mid-level data fusion approach using partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) scores was found to be the best strategy for defective vs non-defective and edible vs non-edible oil discrimination. However, the data fusion did not sufficiently improve the results obtained by a single technique (HS-MS) to classify non-defective classes. These results indicate that instrumental data fusion can be useful for the identification of sensory defects in virgin olive oils. PMID:26948620

  3. Micro-agglomerate flotation for deep cleaning of coal. Quarterly progress report, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Chander, S.; Hogg, R.

    1995-07-01

    The development of practical technologies for the deep cleaning of coal has been seriously hampered by the problems of carrying out efficient coal/mineral separations at the very fine sizes (often finer than 10 mm) needed to achieve adequate liberation of the mineral matter from the coal matrix. It is generally recognized that surface-based separation processes such as froth flotation or selective agglomeration offer considerable potential for such applications but there remain many problems in obtaining the required selectivity with acceptable recovery of combustible matter. In froth flotation, selectivity is substantially reduced at fine sizes due, primarily, to overloading of the froth phase which leads to excessive carryover of water and entrained mineral matter. Oil agglomeration, on the other hand, can provide good selectivity at low levels of oil addition but the agglomerates tend to be too fragile for separation by the screening methods normally used. The addition of larger amounts of oil can yield large, strong agglomerates which are easily separated but the selectivity is reduced and reagent costs can become excessive.

  4. Micro-agglomerate flotation for deep cleaning of coal. Quarterly progress report, July 1--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Chander, S.; Hogg, R.

    1993-10-01

    The development of practical technologies for the deep cleaning of coal has been seriously hampered by the problems of carrying out efficient coal/mineral separations at the very fine sizes (often finer than 1 {mu}m) needed to achieve adequate liberation of the mineral matter from the coal matrix. It is generally recognized that surface-based separation processes such as froth flotation or selective agglomeration offer considerable potential for such applications but there remain many problems in obtaining the required selectivity with acceptable recovery of combustible matter. In froth flotation, selectivity is substantially reduced at fine sizes due, primarily, to overloading of the froth phase which leads to excessive carryover of water and entrained mineral matter. Oil agglomeration, on the other hand, can provide good selectivity at low levels of oil addition but the agglomerates tend to be too fragile for separation by the screening methods normally used. The addition of larger amounts of oil can yield large, strong agglomerates which are easily separated but the selectivity is reduced and reagent costs can become excessive.

  5. Agglomeration defects on irradiated carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Steini Moura, Cassio; Balzaretti, Naira Maria; Amaral, Livio; Gribel Lacerda, Rodrigo; Pimenta, Marcos A.

    2012-03-15

    Aligned carbon nanotubes (CNT) were irradiated in the longitudinal and perpendicular directions, with low energy carbon and helium ions in order to observe the formation of defects in the atomic structure. Analysis through Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy indicated bundle rupture and ion track formation on nanotube bundles. Aligned CNT presented a kind of defect comprising ravine formation and tube agglomeration on top of the substrate. The latter structure is possibly caused by static charge accumulation induced by the incoming ions. Fluence plays a role on the short range order. Higher fluence irradiation transforms CNT into amorphous carbon nanowires.

  6. Agglomerate formation during coal combustion; A mechanistic model

    SciTech Connect

    Sarofim, A.F.; Beer, J.M.; Kang, S.W. )

    1991-08-01

    This paper reports that during the plastic stage of coal pyrolysis, there is competition between centrifugal force, which favors the breakup of coal agglomerates, and adhesive force between coal particles. A theoretical model of agglomeration was developed to investigate the adhesive force between contiguous coal particles in an agglomerate. The adhesive force in the process of agglomeration of coal particles was found to be proportional to the duration of plasticity of the particles. It was also found that rapid heating reduces the tendency of coal particles to form agglomerates during the plastic stage of coal pyrolysis. Therefore, whether particles burn individually or as agglomerates can be influenced by the temperature history of the coal or coal-water fuel (CWF) particles and hence by burner design.

  7. Apparatus and method for compacting, degassing and carbonizing carbonaceous agglomerates

    SciTech Connect

    Theodore, F.W.

    1980-08-19

    An apparatus for compacting, degassing and carbonizing carbonaceous agglomerates is described. The apparatus comprises a rotary kiln having an agglomerate inlet means for introducing green agglomerates into the kiln near the inlet of the kiln and a heating medium inlet for introducing a heating medium comprising a finely divided solid into the kiln at a preselected location intermediate the inlet end of the kiln and the outlet end of the kiln to produce a mixture at a temperature above the carbonizing temperature of the agglomerates and a sieve positioned to receive the products from the rotary kiln and separate the heating medium and the compacted, degassed, carbonized agglomerate product. A method for producing compacted, degassed, carbonized carbonaceous agglomerates by the use of the apparatus is also disclosed.

  8. Analysis and synthesis of solutions for the agglomeration process modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babuk, V. A.; Dolotkazin, I. N.; Nizyaev, A. A.

    2013-03-01

    The present work is devoted development of model of agglomerating process for propellants based on ammonium perchlorate (AP), ammonium dinitramide (ADN), HMX, inactive binder, and nanoaluminum. Generalization of experimental data, development of physical picture of agglomeration for listed propellants, development and analysis of mathematical models are carried out. Synthesis of models of various phenomena taking place at agglomeration implementation allows predicting of size and quantity, chemical composition, structure of forming agglomerates and its fraction in set of condensed combustion products. It became possible in many respects due to development of new model of agglomerating particle evolution on the surface of burning propellant. Obtained results correspond to available experimental data. It is supposed that analogical method based on analysis of mathematical models of particular phenomena and their synthesis will allow implementing of the agglomerating process modeling for other types of metalized solid propellants.

  9. Agglomeration of calcium oxalate monohydrate in synthetic urine.

    PubMed

    Grases, F; Masrov, L; Shnel, O; Costa-Bauz, A

    1992-09-01

    The development of agglomerated particles of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) on the semi-batch precipitation from a synthetic urine carried out at physiological conditions (37 degrees C, pH = 5.5) was studied by optical and electron scanning microscopy. COM agglomerates develop by primary and secondary agglomeration proceeding simultaneously; the latter mechanism is, however, less important than the former. Citrate ions modify slightly the COM crystal shape and inhibit primary agglomeration. Mucin particles serve as a substrate for preferential formation (nucleation) of new COM crystals. The structure of formed agglomerates closely resembles that of a certain type of COM renal calculi. A combination of primary agglomeration of crystals forming stones and nucleation of new crystals on a mucoprotein layer partially covering their surface constitutes the possible mechanism of such stone development. Experimental data support this mechanism. PMID:1422681

  10. Advanced analytical techniques for the extraction and characterization of plant-derived essential oils by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Waseem, Rabia; Low, Kah Hin

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, essential oils have received a growing interest because of the positive health effects of their novel characteristics such as antibacterial, antifungal, and antioxidant activities. For the extraction of plant-derived essential oils, there is the need of advanced analytical techniques and innovative methodologies. An exhaustive study of hydrodistillation, supercritical fluid extraction, ultrasound- and microwave-assisted extraction, solid-phase microextraction, pressurized liquid extraction, pressurized hot water extraction, liquid-liquid extraction, liquid-phase microextraction, matrix solid-phase dispersion, and gas chromatography (one- and two-dimensional) hyphenated with mass spectrometry for the extraction through various plant species and analysis of essential oils has been provided in this review. Essential oils are composed of mainly terpenes and terpenoids with low-molecular-weight aromatic and aliphatic constituents that are particularly important for public health. PMID:25403494

  11. Modeling of Acoustic Agglomeration of Fine Aerosol Particles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Limin

    1990-01-01

    Acoustic agglomeration is a process in which sound is used to enhance agglomeration of fine aerosol particles. After acoustic treatment, particles become relatively larger in size and can be effectively removed from gases by conventional removal devices. This thesis presents a theoretical study on the acoustic agglomeration process. A model has been developed to predict the change of particle size distribution in a sound field. The model uses two major acoustic agglomeration mechanisms: orthokinetic and hydrodynamic interactions. As an improvement on the classical theory of the orthokinetic interaction, the effect of scattering interaction between particles has been included. The scattering interaction leads to two important results. The first one is that not all small particles in an agglomeration volume are collected in one acoustic cycle. A collision efficiency has been given explicitly to account for this partial collection. The second one is that the agglomeration volume can be filled up by small particles from outside very quickly after each acoustic cycle. Though the hydrodynamic interaction was recognized a long time ago as an important acoustic agglomeration mechanism when particles are relatively the same in size, its contribution to agglomeration rate is quantitatively established by the author of this thesis for the first time. The hydrodynamic forces between two particles have been derived, which include the effects of both particle entrainment and viscous waves. A general expression for acoustic agglomeration frequency function, which measures the agglomeration rate of particles in a sound field, has been derived through a statistical approach. This expression is valid for any type of acoustic field. The aerosol dynamic equation governing the mean value of the particle size distribution in a one-dimensional acoustic agglomerator has been used to study the dynamics of particles in a sound field. Based on a reduced form of the aerosol dynamic equation, a mass-conserved numerical scheme has been developed. The numerical results of acoustic agglomeration of fly-ash aerosols agree very well with experimental measurements.

  12. Skin friction measurement in complex flows using thin oil film techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The NASA Grant NAG2-261 was initiated to support a program of research to study complex flows that occur in flight and laboratory experiments by building, testing and optimizing an on-board technique for direct measurement of surface shear stress using thin oil film techniques. The program of research has proceeded under the supervision of the NASA Ames Research Center and with further cooperation from the NASA Ames-Dryden and NASA Langley Research Centers. In accordance with the original statement of work, the following research milestones were accomplished: (1) design and testing of an internally mounted one-directional skin friction meter to demonstrate the feasibility of the concept; (2) design and construction of a compact instrument capable of measuring skin friction in two directions; (3) study of transitional and fully turbulent boundary layers over a flat plate with and without longitudinal pressure gradients utilizing the compact two-directional skin friction meter; (4) study of the interaction between a turbulent boundary layer and a shock wave generated by a compression corner using the two-directional meter; and (5) flight qualification of the compact meter and accompanying electronic and pneumatic systems, preliminary installation into flight test fixture.

  13. Method for producing ceramic particles and agglomerates

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Jonathan; Gleiman, Seth S.; Chen, Chun-Ku

    2001-01-01

    A method for generating spherical and irregularly shaped dense particles of ceramic oxides having a controlled particle size and particle size distribution. An aerosol containing precursor particles of oxide ceramics is directed into a plasma. As the particles flow through the hot zone of the plasma, they melt, collide, and join to form larger particles. If these larger particles remain in the hot zone, they continue melting and acquire a spherical shape that is retained after they exit the hot zone, cool down, and solidify. If they exit the hot zone before melting completely, their irregular shape persists and agglomerates are produced. The size and size distribution of the dense product particles can be controlled by adjusting several parameters, the most important in the case of powder precursors appears to be the density of powder in the aerosol stream that enters the plasma hot zone. This suggests that particle collision rate is responsible for determining ultimate size of the resulting sphere or agglomerate. Other parameters, particularly the gas flow rates and the microwave power, are also adjusted to control the particle size distribution.

  14. Agglomeration of supported rhodium on model catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohl, A.; Labich, S.; Taglauer, E.; Knzinger, H.

    2000-05-01

    In heterogenous catalysis the size of the active metal aggregates is very important not only because of the large surface-to-bulk ratio of small clusters, but also because of the different intrinsic activity of clusters of varying size. Using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and low-energy ion-scattering spectroscopy (ISS) we investigated the change in size of supported rhodium clusters on a model catalyst system during temperature treatments in ultrahigh vacuum. The model catalyst consisted of a thin silicon oxide layer, prepared by chemical vapor deposition on a molybdenum substrate, and a nominal load of about two monolayers of rhodium (Rh/SiO 2/Mo). During annealing at 773 K, ISS showed an agglomeration of rhodium and an increase of the cluster height by a factor of four. The changes in intensity and binding energy of the photoelectron spectra during heating up to 873 K (30 K h -1) can be interpreted with a simple agglomeration model. The three procedures allowed a consistent description of the growth of rhodium clusters as a function of temperature. The influence of vanadium oxide, a catalytic promotor material, on the rhodium agglomeraton was studied for a system with two monolayers of vanadium oxide (Rh/VO x/SiO 2/Mo).

  15. Rapid determination of plasmonic nanoparticle agglomeration status in blood.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Samir V; Qu, Haiou; Mudalige, Thilak; Ingle, Taylor M; Wang, Rongrong; Wang, Feng; Howard, Paul C; Chen, Jingyi; Zhang, Yongbin

    2015-05-01

    Plasmonic nanomaterials as drug delivery or bio-imaging agents are typically introduced to biological systems through intravenous administration. However, the potential for agglomeration of nanoparticles in biological systems could dramatically affect their pharmacokinetic profile and toxic potential. Development of rapid screening methods to evaluate agglomeration is urgently needed to monitor the physical nature of nanoparticles as they are introduced into blood. Here, we establish novel methods using darkfield microscopy with hyperspectral detection (hsDFM), single particle inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (spICP-MS), and confocal Raman microscopy (cRM) to discriminate gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and their agglomerates in blood. Rich information about nanoparticle agglomeration in situ is provided by hsDFM monitoring of the plasmon resonance of primary nanoparticles and their agglomerates in whole blood; cRM is an effective complement to hsDFM to detect AuNP agglomerates in minimally manipulated samples. The AuNPs and the particle agglomerates were further distinguished in blood for the first time by quantification of particle mass using spICP-MS with excellent sensitivity and specificity. Furthermore, the agglomeration status of synthesized and commercial NPs incubated in blood was successfully assessed using the developed methods. Together, these complementary methods enable rapid determination of the agglomeration status of plasmonic nanomaterials in biological systems, specifically blood. PMID:25771013

  16. Effect of agglomeration on flowability of baby food powders.

    PubMed

    Szulc, Karolina; Lenart, Andrzej

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the wet agglomeration in a fluidized bed on flowability of agglomerated products, such as baby food powders. The agglomeration process was performed in the fluidized bed. The wetting liquid used to the process was: water, 2% lecithin solution, and 50% sugar solution. Food powders flowability was expressed as: Hausner Ratio, pouring time, angles of sliding and of repose and flow function. The composition of materials, used to prepare mixtures, has a significant influence on tested properties. The higher milk powder of the mixtures caused decreasing of their flowability. Wet agglomeration of baby food powders caused an increase in the mean diameter of particles, which made it possible to receive agglomerates with good flowability and decreased bulk density. The increase of milk powder content from 0 to 73% in the mixture before the agglomeration contributed to improve its flowability. Wet agglomeration with 2% lecithin solution and 50% sugar solution reduced particle size and bulk density, improved flowability of received agglomerates in relation to agglomerates received with water as a wetting liquid. PMID:20629874

  17. Modeling of crushed ore agglomeration for heap leach operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhawan, Nikhil

    The focus of this dissertation is modeling of the evolution of size distribution in batch agglomeration drum. There has been no successful work on modeling of crushed ore agglomeration although the framework for population balance modeling of pelletization and granulation is readily available. In this study three different batch agglomeration drums were used to study the agglomeration kinetics of copper, gold and nickel ores. The agglomerate size distribution is inherently subject to random fluctuation due the very nature of the process. Yet, with careful experimentation and size analysis the evolution of size distribution can be followed. The population balance model employing the random coalesce model with a constant rate kernel was shown to work well in a micro and lab scale agglomerator experiments. In small drums agglomerates begin to break in a short time, whereas the growth is uniform in the lab scale drum. The experimental agglomerate size distributions exhibit self-preserving size spectra which confirms the applicability of coalescence rate based model. The same spectra became a useful fact for predicting the size distribution with an empirical model. Since moisture is a principal variable, the absolute deviation from optimum moisture was used as the primary variable in the empirical model. Having established a model for the size distribution, the next step was to delve into the internal constituents of each agglomerate size class. To this end, an experimental scheme known as dip test was devised. The outcome of the test was the size distribution of progeny particles which make up a given size class of agglomerate. The progeny size distribution was analyzed with a model that partitions the particles into a host and guest category. The ensuing partition coefficient is a valuable in determining how a particle in a size class participates in larger agglomerates. This dissertation lays out the fundamentals for applying the population balance concept to batch agglomeration, specifically crushed ore agglomeration. The experimental difficulties and how to overcome them are described. An empirical model that is readily useful for plant heap leach operations is shown in detail. The analysis of constituent particles within agglomerate size class is done with a partition model. The guest and host nature of particles, thus delineated, helps one to anticipate the nature of agglomerates that would be formed with a given ore size distribution. Thus, all aspects of batch agglomeration are addressed in this work.

  18. Effect of agglomeration on pulverized-coal combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Shampine, R.W.; Cohen, R.D.; Bayazitoglu, Y.; Anderson, C.F.

    1995-04-01

    The effect of coal particle agglomeration during pulverized coal combustion is studied using a plug-flow model of a practical coal combustor. The model incorporates turbulent agglomeration, in addition to the combustion equations, to explore certain combustor and coal parameters that may be used for optimizing a chosen output parameter (e.g., burnout time). This routine has been used to develop relations describing the effects of turbulent agglomeration on pulverized coal combustion as an aid in combustor design or retrofitting. The results of this work indicate that, in agreement with general observations, agglomeration will have little impact on pulverized coal combustion in typical combustors.

  19. Method for recovering light hydrocarbons from coal agglomerates

    DOEpatents

    Huettenhain, Horst; Benz, August D.; Getsoian, John

    1991-01-01

    A method and apparatus for removing light hydrocarbons, such as heptane, from coal agglomerates includes an enclosed chamber having a substantially horizontal perforate surface therein. The coal agglomerates are introduced into a water bath within the chamber. The agglomerates are advanced over the surface while steam is substantially continuously introduced through the surface into the water bath. Steam heats the water and causes volatilization of the light hydrocarbons, which may be collected from the overhead of the chamber. The resulting agglomerates may be collected at the opposite end from the surface and subjected to final draining processes prior to transportation or use.

  20. Separation of oil from oily wastewater by sorption and coalescence technique using ethanol grafted polyacrylonitrile.

    PubMed

    Ji, Fei; Li, Chaolin; Dong, Xiaoqing; Li, Yang; Wang, Dandan

    2009-05-30

    Polyacrylonitrile fiber (PANF) was modified by alcoholysis reaction and the efficiencies of the PANF and the modified polyacrylonitrile fiber (MPANF) for oil removal were investigated. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy revealed that new organophilic functional groups were grafted on the fiber surface. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that the alcoholysis process made the surface of the MPANF rougher than that of the PANF. Oil sorption tests of the PANF and the MPANF for motor oil SAE 30, motor oil SAE 50, and multigrade engine oil (MEO) were carried out in batch tank (in water and in oil without water), and the MPANF showed higher oil sorption capacity compared to the PANF. Dynamic sorption of diesel oil-in-water emulsion (initial oil concentration of 630 mg/dm(3)) was investigated in coalescing bed. The experiments in the coalescing bed indicated that the MPANF could resist higher interstitial velocity, as compared to the PANF. More than 97% of oil content in the influent stream could be removed by the MPANF bed under the optimum condition. The results indicated that reuse of the PANF as oil sorbent was quite feasible. PMID:19022567

  1. Recent improvements in optimizing use of dispersants as a cost-effective oil spill countermeasure technique

    SciTech Connect

    Daling, P.S.; Indrebo, G.

    1996-12-31

    Several oil spill incidents during recent years have demonstrated that the physico-chemical properties of spilled oil and the effectiveness of available combat methods are, in addition to the prevailing environmental and weather conditions, key factors that determine the consequences of an oil spill. Pre-spill analyses of the feasibility and effectiveness of different response strategies, such as mechanical recovery and dispersants, for actual oils under various environmental conditions should therefore be an essential part of any oil spill contingency planning to optimize the overall {open_quotes}Net Environmental Benefit{close_quotes} of a combat operation. During the four-year research program ESCOST ({open_quotes}ESSO-SINTEF Coastal Oil Spill Treatment Program{close_quotes}), significant improvements have been made in oil spill combat methods and in tools for use in contingency planning and decision-making during oil spill operations. This paper will present an overview of the main findings obtained with respect to oil weathering and oil spill dispersant treatment.

  2. Light Scattering by Agglomerates with Varying Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubko, Evgenij; Muinonen, K.; Shkuratov, Y.; Videen, G.

    2012-10-01

    We study light scattering by irregularly shaped agglomerate particles with packing densities of ?=0.169, 0.236, and 0.336. At material densities of cometary refractory materials (i.e., 2-3 g/cm3), the bulk density of target particles is in the range 0.34-1 g/cm3, which is consistent with the Stardust samples [Hrz et al. 2006: Science 314, 1716]. We consider five different refractive indices m=1.313+0i, 1.5+0.1i, 1.855+0.45i, 2.43+0.59i, and 1.6+0.0005i, which represent water ice, organic materials, amorphous carbon, and Mg-rich silicates, i.e., the most abundant cometary species. At a wavelength of 0.684 ?m, the radius of particles is varied from 0.1 ?m to 3.9 ?m (icy particles), 3.5 ?m (carbonaceous particles), and 2.8 ?m (silicate particles). Light-scattering properties are averaged over a minimum 500 particle shapes, and we also average light-scattering properties over particle size using the power-law size distribution r-a, and consider index a to range from 1 to 4. Our computations reveal quite weak impact of particle morphology on the light-scattering response. For instance, the phase dependence of the degree of linear polarization, geometric albedo, efficiencies for extinction and radiation pressure are nearly coincide for all three types of agglomerates having the same m and a. Varying refractive index or power index does alter the light-scattering properties considerably as compared to the morphology of agglomerates. Thus, one can attribute the spatial inhomogeneity of polarization in various comets [Hadamcik & Levasseur-Regourd 2003: J. Quant. Spectr. Rad. Tr., 79-80, 661] to variations in either chemical composition or size distribution of cometary dust, rather than to its morphology. Acknowledgments: This work was supported by the Academy of Finland (contract 127461), NASA programs for Outer Planets Research (grant NNX10AP93G) and Lunar Advanced Science and Exploration Research (grant NNX11AB25G).

  3. Bioremediation techniques on crude oil contaminated soils in Ohio. First quarterly report, October 1, 1995--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Hodges, D.

    1996-03-27

    The objective of this project is to develop environmentally-sound and cost-effective remediation techniques for crude oil contaminated soils. By providing a guidance manual to oil and gas operators, the Ohio Division of Oil and Gas regulatory authority hopes to reduce remediation costs while improving voluntary compliance with soil clean-up requirements. This shall be accomplished by conducting a series of field tests to define the optimum range for nutrient, oxygen and organic enhancement to biologically remediate soils contaminated with brines and crude oil having a wide range of viscosity. Task one of the bioremediation project began on July 3, 1995 with the selection and preparation of a site in Smith township. Mahoning County. The plots were arranged and parameters were varied. Plots, 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 and 11 were contaminated with 159 liters (42 gal. ) of Corning grade crude oil and plots 2, 4, 6, 8 and 12 were contaminated with 159 liters (42 gal.) of Pennsylvania grade crude oil. Plots 13 through 21 were contaminated with 159 liters (42 gal.) of Pennsylvania grade crude oil and 477 liters (126 gal.) of Clinton sandstone brine with a 160,000 mg/liter concentration of chloride. Treatment and administration of variables were conducted from August 17, 1995 to October 26, 1995. During this period samples were collected twice from each plot and analyzed for the parameters specified in the contract. Results from both sampling events of total petroleum hydrocarbons suggest that crude oil spread on surface is not easily mixed into soils as tillage depth, resulting in considerably variable composite samples from plot to plot.

  4. Simple techniques to increase the production yield and enhance the quality of organic rice bran oils.

    PubMed

    Srikaeo, Khongsak; Pradit, Maythawinee

    2011-01-01

    This study develops simple techniques for increasing production yield and refining of crude RBO (CRBO). It was found that pre-heating of rice bran by hot air oven to reach 60C before being extracted by screw press machine increased the yield from 4.8 to 8.3%w/w. This paper suggested three simple steps for refining of organic CRBO: (1) filtering using filter papers (2) sedimentation by adding 4%w/v fuller's earth and (3) bleaching by running through a packed column of activated carbon. These steps significantly enhanced the qualities of RBO when compared to CRBO before treatment. It was found that the lightness of oil as indicated by color value (L*) increased from 22.8 to 28.7, gum and wax decreased from 3.6 to 1.3%w/w. However, the simple refining method had no effect on peroxide value and free fatty acid content. Moreover, it slightly induced the loss of oryzanol content from 2.8 to 2.2%w/w. PMID:21178310

  5. Pulse combusted acoustic agglomeration apparatus and process

    DOEpatents

    Mansour, Momtaz N.

    1993-01-01

    An improved apparatus and process for removal of particulates entrained in a gas stream are provided. The removal process employs a pulse combustor to provide an acoustic pressure wave to acoustically enhance bimodal agglomeration of particulates which may be collected and removed using a conventional separation apparatus. A particulate having a size different from the size of the particulate in the gas stream to be cleaned is introduced into the system to effectuate the bimodal process. The apparatus may be employed as a direct fired system for improved operation of gas-operated equipment such as a gas turbine, or may, alternatively, be employed as an add-on subsystem for combustion exhaust clean-up. Additionally, the added particulate may be a sorbent for effecting sorption of other contaminants such as sulfur. Various other particulates for contaminant removal may also be introduced into the system as exemplified by alkali-gettering agents.

  6. Pulse combusted acoustic agglomeration apparatus and process

    DOEpatents

    Mansour, Momtaz N.; Chandran, Ravi

    1994-01-01

    An improved apparatus and process for removal of particulates entrained in a gas stream are provided. The removal process employs a pulse combustor to provide an acoustic pressure wave to acoustically enhance agglomeration of particulates which may be collected and removed using a conventional separation apparatus. The apparatus may be employed as a direct fired system for improved operation of gas-operated equipment such as a gas turbine, or may, alternatively, be employed as an add-on subsystem for combustion exhaust clean-up. Additionally, added particulates may include a sorbent for effecting sorption of other contaminants such as sulfur. Various other particulates for contaminant removal may also be introduced into the system as exemplified by alkali-gettering agents.

  7. Electrostatic charging during a melt agglomeration process.

    PubMed

    Eliasen, H; Kristensen, H G; Schaefer, T

    1999-07-01

    Lactose monohydrate was melt agglomerated in an 8-l high shear mixer using stearic acid, polyethylene glycol (PEG) 3000, and a mixture of stearic acid and glycerol monostearate as meltable binders. Electrostatic charging during processing at relative air humidities of 35 and 75%, respectively, was estimated from the voltage of a monitoring probe inserted into the mixer. Stearic acid produced a high level of electrostatic charges, whereas PEG 3000 gave rise to a markedly lower level. Addition of glycerol monostearate to the stearic acid reduced the level of electrostatic charges. A correlation was found between the resistivity of the binder and the level of electrostatic charges in the material. With the stearic acid and the binder mixture, the level of electrostatic charges was higher at a low air humidity. The amount of adhesion to the bowl was found to depend on the level of electrostatic charges. PMID:10425354

  8. Soot agglomeration in isolated, free droplet combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, M. Y.; Dryer, F. L.; Green, G. J.; Sangiovanni, J. J.

    1993-01-01

    Under the conditions of an isolated, free droplet experiment, hollow, carbonaceous structures, called soot spheres, were observed to form during the atmospheric pressure, low Reynolds number combustion of 1-methylnaphthalene. These structures which are agglomerates composed of smaller spheroidal units result from both thermophoretic effects induced by the envelope flame surrounding each drop and aerodynamic effects caused by changes in the relative gas/drop velocities. A chemically reacting flow model was used to analyze the process of sootshell formation during microgravity droplet combustion. The time-dependent temperature and gas property field surrounding the droplet was determined, and the soot cloud location for microgravity combustion of n-heptane droplets was predicted. Experiments showed that the sooting propensity of n-alkane fuel droplets can be varied through diluent substitution, oxygen-index variations, and ambient pressure reductions.

  9. Comparison Between Different Flavored Olive Oil Production Techniques: Healthy Value and Process Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Clodoveo, Maria Lisa; Dipalmo, Tiziana; Crupi, Pasquale; Durante, Viviana; Pesce, Vito; Maiellaro, Isabella; Lovece, Angelo; Mercurio, Annalisa; Laghezza, Antonio; Corbo, Filomena; Franchini, Carlo

    2016-03-01

    Three different flavoring methods of olive oil were tested employing two different herbs, thyme and oregano. The traditional method consist in the infusion of herbs into the oil. A second scarcely diffused method is based on the addition of herbs to the crushed olives before the malaxation step during the extraction process. The third innovative method is the implementation of the ultrasound before the olive paste malaxation. The objective of the study is to verify the effect of the treatments on the quality of the product, assessed by means of the chemical characteristics, the phenol composition and the radical scavenging activity of the resulting oils. The less favorable method was the addition of herbs directly to the oil. A positive effect was achieved by the addition of herbs to the olive paste and other advantages were attained by the employment of ultrasound. These last two methods allow to produce oils "ready to sell", instead the infused oils need to be filtered. Moreover, the flavoring methods applied during the extraction process determine a significant increment of phenolic content and radical scavenging activity of olive oils. The increments were higher when oregano is used instead of thyme. Ultrasound inhibited the olive polyphenoloxidase, the endogenous enzyme responsible for olive oil phenol oxidation. This treatment of olive paste mixed with herbs before malaxation was revealed as the most favorable method due to the best efficiency, reduced time consumption and minor labor, enhancing the product quality of flavored olive oil. PMID:26852311

  10. Molecular biologic techniques applied to the microbial prospecting of oil and gas in the Ban 876 gas and oil field in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; She, Yuehui; Zheng, Yong; Zhou, Zhifeng; Kong, Shuqiong; Hou, Dujie

    2010-04-01

    Currently, molecular biologic techniques achieve a great development in studies of soil samples. The objective of this research is to improve methods for microbial prospecting of oil and gas by applying culture-independent techniques to soil sampled from above a known oil and gas field. Firstly, the community structure of soil bacteria above the Ban 876 Gas and Oil Field was analyzed based on 16S rRNA gene clone libraries. The soil bacteria communities were consistently different along the depth; however, Chloroflexi and Gemmatimonadetes were predominant and methanotrophs were minor in both bacteria libraries (DGS1 and DGS2). Secondly, the numbers of methane-oxidizing bacteria, quantified using a culture-dependent procedure and culture-independent group-specific real-time PCR (RT-PCR), respectively, were inconsistent with a quantify variance of one or two orders of magnitude. Special emphasis was given to the counting advantages of RT-PCR based on the methanotrophic pmoA gene. Finally, the diversity and distribution of methanotrophic communities in the soil samples were analyzed by constructing clone libraries of functional gene. All 508-bp inserts in clones phylogenetically belonged to the methanotrophic pmoA gene with similarities from 83% to 100%. However, most of the similarities were below 96%. Five clone libraries of methanotrophs clearly showed that the anomalous methanotrophs (Methylosinus and Methylocystis) occupy the studied area. PMID:20107985

  11. Increased Oil Production and Reserves from Improved Completion Techniques in the Bluebell Field, Uinta Basin, Utah, Class I

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Craig D.; Gwynn, Wallace; Deo, Milind D.; Jarrard, Richard; Curtice, Richard; Morris, Thomas H.; Smouse, DeForrest; Tripp, Carol N.

    2000-01-20

    The objective of this project was to increase oil production and reserves by the use of improved reservoir characterization and completion techniques in the Unita Basin Utah. To accomplish this objective, a two-year geologic and engineering characterization of the Bluebell field was conducted. The study evaluated surface and subsurface data, currently used completion techniques, and common production problems. It was determined that advanced case- and open-hole logs could be effective in determining productive beds and that staged-interval (about 500 ft [150 m] per stage) and bed-scale isolation completion techniques could result in improved well performance.

  12. Estimating primary productivity of tropical oil palm in Malaysia using remote sensing technique and ancillary data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanniah, K. D.; Tan, K. P.; Cracknell, A. P.

    2014-10-01

    The amount of carbon sequestration by vegetation can be estimated using vegetation productivity. At present, there is a knowledge gap in oil palm net primary productivity (NPP) at a regional scale. Therefore, in this study NPP of oil palm trees in Peninsular Malaysia was estimated using remote sensing based light use efficiency (LUE) model with inputs from local meteorological data, upscaled leaf area index/fractional photosynthetically active radiation (LAI/fPAR) derived using UK-DMC 2 satellite data and a constant maximum LUE value from the literature. NPP values estimated from the model was then compared and validated with NPP estimated using allometric equations developed by Corley and Tinker (2003), Henson (2003) and Syahrinudin (2005) with diameter at breast height, age and the height of the oil palm trees collected from three estates in Peninsular Malaysia. Results of this study show that oil palm NPP derived using a light use efficiency model increases with respect to the age of oil palm trees, and it stabilises after ten years old. The mean value of oil palm NPP at 118 plots as derived using the LUE model is 968.72 g C m-2 year-1 and this is 188% - 273% higher than the NPP derived from the allometric equations. The estimated oil palm NPP of young oil palm trees is lower compared to mature oil palm trees (<10 years old), as young oil palm trees contribute to lower oil palm LAI and therefore fPAR, which is an important variable in the LUE model. In contrast, it is noted that oil palm NPP decreases with respect to the age of oil palm trees as estimated using the allomeric equations. It was found in this study that LUE models could not capture NPP variation of oil palm trees if LAI/fPAR is used. On the other hand, tree height and DBH are found to be important variables that can capture changes in oil palm NPP as a function of age.

  13. Novel Binders and Methods for Agglomeration of Ore

    SciTech Connect

    S. K. Kawatra; T. C. Eisele; K. A. Lewandowski; J. A. Gurtler

    2006-09-30

    Heap leaching is one of the methods being used to recover metal from low grade ore deposits. The main problem faced during heap leaching is the migration of fine grained particles through the heap, forming impermeable beds which result in poor solution flow. The poor solution flow leads to less contact between the leach solution and the ore, resulting in low recovery rates. Agglomeration of ore into coarse, porous masses prevents fine particles from migrating and clogging the spaces and channels between the larger ore particles. Currently, there is one facility in the United States which uses agglomeration. This operation agglomerates their ore using leach solution (raffinate), but is still experiencing undesirable metal recovery from the heaps due to agglomerate breakdown. The use of a binder, in addition to the leach solution, during agglomeration would help to produce stronger agglomerates that did not break down during processing. However, there are no known binders that will work satisfactorily in the acidic environment of a heap, at a reasonable cost. As a result, operators of many facilities see a large loss of process efficiency due to their inability to take advantage of agglomeration. Increasing copper recovery in heap leaching by the use of binders and agglomeration would result in a significant decrease in the amount of energy consumed. Assuming that 70% of all the leaching heaps would convert to using agglomeration technology, as much as 1.64*10{sup 12} BTU per year would be able to be saved if a 25% increase in copper recovery was experienced, which is equivalent to saving approximately 18% of the energy currently being used in leaching heaps. For every week a leach cycle was decreased, a savings of as much as 1.23*10{sup 11} BTU per week would result. This project has identified several acid-resistant binders and agglomeration procedures. These binders and experimental procedures will be able to be used for use in improving the energy efficiency of heap leaching.

  14. Bed material agglomeration during fluidized bed combustion. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.C.; Dawson, M.R.; Smeenk, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to determine the physical and chemical reactions which lead to the undesired agglomeration of bed material during fluidized bed combustion of coal and to relate these reactions to specific causes. A survey of agglomeration and deposit formation in industrial fluidized bed combustors (FBCs) indicate that at least five boilers were experiencing some form of bed material agglomeration. Deposit formation was reported at nine sites with deposits most commonly at coal feed locations and in cyclones. Other deposit locations included side walls and return loops. Three general types of mineralogic reactions were observed to occur in the agglomerates and deposits. Although alkalies may play a role with some {open_quotes}high alkali{close_quotes} lignites, we found agglomeration was initiated due to fluxing reactions between iron (II) from pyrites and aluminosilicates from clays. This is indicated by the high amounts of iron, silica, and alumina in the agglomerates and the mineralogy of the agglomerates. Agglomeration likely originated in the dense phase of the FBC bed within the volatile plume which forms when coal is introduced to the boiler. Secondary mineral reactions appear to occur after the agglomerates have formed and tend to strengthen the agglomerates. When calcium is present in high amounts, most of the minerals in the resulting deposits are in the melilite group (gehlenite, melilite, and akermanite) and pyroxene group (diopside and augite). During these solid-phase reactions, the temperature of formation of the melilite minerals can be lowered by a reduction of the partial pressure of CO{sub 2} (Diopside + Calcite {r_arrow}Akermanite).

  15. Oil spill removal techniques and equipment. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning methods and equipment used for the containment and removal of oil as a result of oil spill mishaps. Dispersants, separators, skimmers and absorbants are discussed. Related studies regarding film spreading and dispersion are presented. Studies pertaining to shipboard ballast and bilgewater cleaning are excluded. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  16. Chemical composition of Angelica pancicii essential oil determined by liquid and headspace GC-MS techniques.

    PubMed

    Simonovi?, Strahinja R; Stankov-Jovanovi?, Vesna P; Miti?, Violeta D; Ili?, Marija D; Petrovi?, Goran M; Stojanovi?, Gordana S

    2014-02-01

    The essential oil of the Balkan endemic species, Angelica pancicii, obtained by hydrodistillation, was analyzed by GC and GC-MS, applying the liquid injection mode. These results were compared with the chemical composition of volatiles achieved by the "headspace" injection mode, followed by GC and GC-MS (HS-GC-MS). A total of 40 compounds were identified in the essential oil (98.8% of the total oil) and 44 by HS-GC-MS (99.8% of the total oil). The most abundant class of compounds in both cases was monoterpenoids, which formed 92.7% of the essential oil (97.7% by HS-GC-MS) of total identified compounds. The major components in both cases were beta-phellandrene (54.9% and 60.1%, respectively), alpha-pinene (14.5% and 20.1%, respectively) and alpha-phellandrene (4.5% and 4.3%, respectively). PMID:24689308

  17. Determination and structural elucidation of triacylglycerols in krill oil by chromatographic techniques.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Pedro; Zhu, Han; Breivik, Joar Fjørtoft; Hjelle, Jan Idar; Zeng, Yingxu

    2014-02-01

    The content of triacylglycerols (TAG) in krill oil is generally omitted from the labels of commercial supplements and unacknowledged in studies aimed at proving its health benefits. The present study demonstrates that TAG compounds, in addition to phospholipids and lysophospholipids, are an important lipid class in pure krill oil. The fatty acid composition of TAG molecules from krill oil and their distribution on the backbone of TAG structures were determined by gas chromatography and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometric, respectively. The content of omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) was similar to those reported in the literature for fish oil. It was estimated that 21 % of n-3 PUFA were at the sn-2 position of TAG structures. To our knowledge, this is the first determination and structural characterization of TAG in pure krill oil supplements. PMID:24190513

  18. Differentiation of lemon essential oil based on volatile and non-volatile fractions with various analytical techniques: a metabolomic approach.

    PubMed

    Mehl, Florence; Marti, Guillaume; Boccard, Julien; Debrus, Benjamin; Merle, Philippe; Delort, Estelle; Baroux, Lucie; Raymo, Vilfredo; Velazco, Maria Ins; Sommer, Horst; Wolfender, Jean-Luc; Rudaz, Serge

    2014-01-15

    Due to the importance of citrus lemon oil for the industry, fast and reliable analytical methods that allow the authentication and/or classification of such oil, using the origin of production or extraction process, are necessary. To evaluate the potential of volatile and non-volatile fractions for classification purposes, volatile compounds of cold-pressed lemon oils were analyzed, using GC-FID/MS and FT-MIR, while the non-volatile residues were studied, using FT-MIR, (1)H-NMR and UHPLC-TOF-MS. 64 Lemon oil samples from Argentina, Spain and Italy were considered. Unsupervised and supervised multivariate analyses were sequentially performed on various data blocks obtained by the above techniques. Successful data treatments led to statistically significant models that discriminated and classified cold-pressed lemon oils according to their geographic origin, as well as their production processes. Studying the loadings allowed highlighting of important classes of discriminant variables that corresponded to putative or identified chemical functions and compounds. PMID:24054247

  19. On-line and off-line techniques for monitoring the thermal and oxidative degradations of aircraft turbine engine oils - Part I: Laboratory evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Kauffman, R.E.

    1995-11-01

    This paper presents the results of research to evaluate the feasibility of voltammetric techniques for development into on-line and off-line techniques capable of monitoring the thermal and oxidative degrations of aircraft turbine engine oils. The off-line techniques require less than one milliliter of sample, less than one minute to perform, and very little expertise. The off-line techniques measure the percent of the remaining antioxidant and the conductivity of the oil sample. The on-line techniques require less than 15 seconds to perform, can be performed in static or flowing conditions and can function at operating temperatures up to 300{degrees} C. The on-line techniques measure the electroactivity and the conductivity of the heated oil. The results of this research indicate that both oxidative and thermal degradations of used oils must be monitored to determine the operating conditions of aircraft turbine engines. Oxidative degradation is monitored by determining the percent of remaining antioxidant (off-line) and electroactivity (on-line) of the used oil. Thermal degradation is monitored by determining the conductivity (off-line or on-line) of the used oil. Combined oxidative and thermal degradation evaluations of used oils can be used to predict oil change intervals for normally operating equipment and to detect abnormally operating engines prior to malfunction. 9 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Geographical provenance of palm oil by fatty acid and volatile compound fingerprinting techniques.

    PubMed

    Tres, A; Ruiz-Samblas, C; van der Veer, G; van Ruth, S M

    2013-04-15

    Analytical methods are required in addition to administrative controls to verify the geographical origin of vegetable oils such as palm oil in an objective manner. In this study the application of fatty acid and volatile organic compound fingerprinting in combination with chemometrics have been applied to verify the geographical origin of crude palm oil (continental scale). For this purpose 94 crude palm oil samples were collected from South East Asia (55), South America (11) and Africa (28). Partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was used to develop a hierarchical classification model by combining two consecutive binary PLS-DA models. First, a PLS-DA model was built to distinguish South East Asian from non-South East Asian palm oil samples. Then a second model was developed, only for the non-Asian samples, to discriminate African from South American crude palm oil. Models were externally validated by using them to predict the identity of new authentic samples. The fatty acid fingerprinting model revealed three misclassified samples. The volatile compound fingerprinting models showed an 88%, 100% and 100% accuracy for the South East Asian, African and American class, respectively. The verification of the geographical origin of crude palm oil is feasible by fatty acid and volatile compound fingerprinting. Further research is required to further validate the approach and to increase its spatial specificity to country/province scale. PMID:23200002

  1. Novel Binders and Methods for Agglomeration of Ore

    SciTech Connect

    S. K. Kawatra; T. C. Eisele; K. A. Lewandowski; J. A. Gurtler

    2006-03-31

    Many metal extraction operations, such as leaching of copper, leaching of precious metals, and reduction of metal oxides to metal in high-temperature furnaces, require agglomeration of ore to ensure that reactive liquids or gases are evenly distributed throughout the ore being processed. Agglomeration of ore into coarse, porous masses achieves this even distribution of fluids by preventing fine particles from migrating and clogging the spaces and channels between the larger ore particles. Binders are critically necessary to produce agglomerates that will not break down during processing. However, for many important metal extraction processes there are no binders known that will work satisfactorily at a reasonable cost. A primary example of this is copper heap leaching, where there are no binders currently encountered in this acidic environment process. As a result, operators of many facilities see a large loss of process efficiency due to their inability to take advantage of agglomeration. The large quantities of ore that must be handled in metal extraction processes also means that the binder must be inexpensive and useful at low dosages to be economical. The acid-resistant binders and agglomeration procedures developed in this project will also be adapted for use in improving the energy efficiency and performance of a broad range of mineral agglomeration applications, particularly heap leaching. The active involvement of our industrial partners will help to ensure rapid commercialization of any agglomeration technologies developed by this project.

  2. Engineering development of selective agglomeration. Executive summary: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    Project performance targets for the selective agglomeration process were to achieve 85% or greater Btu recovery at 85% or greater pyritic sulfur rejection (PSR) on a run-of-mine (ROM) coal basis, while producing a final clean-coal product with an ash content of 6% or less which is handleable by conventional coal handling systems. Engineering development of selective agglomeration included: (1) Batch and continuous bench-scale precess development testing; (2) Continuous pilot-scale (3-t/h) component development testing to evaluate the adaptation and/or modification of existing unit operations for selective agglomeration; (3) Continuous pilot-scale (2-t/h) POC testing to optimize the selective agglomeration process and demonstrate precess reliability; (4) Vendor testing to evaluate pelletization and thermal drying precesses as applied to selective agglomeration; (5) Conceptual design of a commercial-scale (200-V/h) selective agglomeration facility; (6) Economic analysis of the selective agglomeration precess at a commercial (200-t/h) scale. The information obtained from the various modes of testing and analysis, particularly POC operations, resulted in a technical and economic design base sufficient to support construction and operation of a commercial plant.

  3. Novel Binders and Methods for Agglomeration of Ore

    SciTech Connect

    S. K. Kawatra; T. C. Eisele; J. A. Gurtler; K. Lewandowski

    2005-09-30

    Many metal extraction operations, such as leaching of copper, leaching of precious metals, and reduction of metal oxides to metal in high-temperature furnaces, require agglomeration of ore to ensure that reactive liquids or gases are evenly distributed throughout the ore being processed. Agglomeration of ore into coarse, porous masses achieves this even distribution of fluids by preventing fine particles from migrating and clogging the spaces and channels between the larger ore particles. Binders are critically necessary to produce agglomerates that will not break down during processing. However, for many important metal extraction processes there are no binders known that will work satisfactorily at a reasonable cost. A primary example of this is copper heap leaching, where there are no binders currently encountered in this acidic environment process. As a result, operators of many facilities see a large loss of process efficiency due to their inability to take advantage of agglomeration. The large quantities of ore that must be handled in metal extraction processes also means that the binder must be inexpensive and useful at low dosages to be economical. The acid-resistant binders and agglomeration procedures developed in this project will also be adapted for use in improving the energy efficiency and performance of a broad range of mineral agglomeration applications, particularly heap leaching. The active involvement of our industrial partners will help to ensure rapid commercialization of any agglomeration technologies developed by this project.

  4. A technique to measure fuel oil viscosity in a fuel power plant.

    PubMed

    Delgadillo, Miguel Angel; Ibargengoytia, Pablo H; Garca, Uriel A

    2016-01-01

    The viscosity measurement and control of fuel oil in power plants is very important for a proper combustion. However, the conventional viscometers are only reliable for a short period of time. This paper proposes an on-line analytic viscosity evaluation based on energy balance applied to a piece of tube entering the fuel oil main heater and a new control strategy for temperature control. This analytic evaluation utilizes a set of temperature versus viscosity graphs were defined during years of analysis of fuel oil in Mexican power plants. Also the temperature set-point for the fuel oil main heater output is obtained by interpolating in the corresponding graph. Validation tests of the proposed analytic equations were carried out in the Tuxpan power plant in Veracruz, Mexico. PMID:26652127

  5. An improved technique for modeling initial reservoir hydrocarbon saturation distributions: Applications in Illinois (USA) aux vases oil reservoirs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Udegbunam, E.; Amaefule, J.O.

    1998-01-01

    An improved technique for modeling the initial reservoir hydrocarbon saturation distributions is presented. In contrast to the Leverett J-function approach, this methodology (hereby termed flow-unit-derived initial oil saturation or FUSOI) determines the distributions of the initial oil saturations from a measure of the mean hydraulic radius, referred to as the flow zone indicator (FZI). FZI is derived from porosity and permeability data. In the FUSOI approach, capillary pressure parameters, S(wir), P(d), and ??, derived from the Brooks and Corey (1966) model [Brooks, R.H., Corey, A.T., 1966. Hydraulic properties of porous media, Hydrology Papers, Colorado State Univ., Ft. Collins, No. 3, March.], are correlated to the FZI. Subsequent applications of these parameters then permit the computation of improved hydrocarbon saturations as functions of FZI and height above the free water level (FWL). This technique has been successfully applied in the Mississippian Aux Vases Sandstone reservoirs of the Illinois Basin (USA). The Aux Vases Zeigler field (Franklin County, IL, USA) was selected for a field-wide validation of this FUSOI approach because of the availability of published studies. With the initial oil saturations determined on a depth-by-depth basis in cored wells, it was possible to geostatistically determine the three-dimensional (3-D) distributions of initial oil saturations in the Zeigler field. The original oil-in-place (OOIP), computed from the detailed initialization of the 3-D reservoir simulation model of the Zeigler field, was found to be within 5.6% of the result from a rigorous material balance method.An improved technique for modeling the initial reservoir hydrocarbon saturation distributions is presented. In contrast to the Leverett J-function approach, this methodology (hereby termed flow-unit-derived initial oil saturation or FUSOI) determines the distributions of the initial oil saturations from a measure of the mean hydraulic radius, referred to as the flow zone indicator (FZI). FZI is derived from porosity and permeability data. In the FUSOI approach, capillary pressure parameters, Swir, Pd, and ??, derived from the Brooks and Corey (1966) model, are correlated to the FZI. Subsequent applications of these parameters then permit the computation of improved hydrocarbon saturations as functions of FZI and height above the free water level (FWL). This technique has been successfully applied in the Mississippian Aux Vases Sandstone reservoirs of the Illinois Basin (USA). The Aux Vases Zeigler field (Franklin County, IL, USA) was selected for a field-wide validation of this FUSOI approach because of the availability of published studies. With the initial oil saturations determined on a depth-by-depth basis in cored wells, it was possible to geostatistically determine the three-dimensional (3-D) distributions of initial oil saturations in the Zeigler field. The original oil-in-place (OOIP), computed from the detailed initialization of the 3-D reservoir simulation model of the Zeigler field, was found to be within 5.6% of the result from a rigorous material balance method.

  6. Review of ash agglomeration in fluidized bed gasifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Matulevicius, E.S.; Golan, L.P.

    1984-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to review the data and mathematical models which describe the phenomena involved in the agglomeration of ash in fluidized bed coal gasifiers (FBG). Besides highlighting the data and theoretical models, this review lists areas where there is a lack of information regarding the actual mechanisms of agglomeration. Also, potential areas for further work are outlined. The work is directed at developing models of agglomeration which could be included in computer codes describing fluidized bed gasifier phenomena, e.g., FLAG and CHEMFLUB which have been developed for the US Department of Energy. 134 references, 24 figures, 13 tables.

  7. Fast and Accurate Technique for Determination of Moisture Content in Oil Palm Fruits using Open-Ended Coaxial Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Zulkifly; Yeow, You Kok; Shaari, Abdul Halim; Zakaria, Azmi; Hassan, Jumiah; Khalid, Kaida; Saion, Elias

    2005-07-01

    A simple, fast and accurate technique employing an open-ended coaxial sensor for the determination of the moisture content in oil palm fruit is presented. For this technique, a calibration equation has been developed based on the relationship between the measured moisture content obtained by the oven drying method and the phase of the reflection coefficient of the sensor for 21 fruits. The moisture content predicted by the sensor was in good agreement with that obtained using the standard oven drying method within 5% accuracy when tested on 145 different fruits samples.

  8. Oil species identification technique developed by Gabor wavelet analysis and support vector machine based on concentration-synchronous-matrix-fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunyan; Shi, Xiaofeng; Li, Wendong; Wang, Lin; Zhang, Jinliang; Yang, Chun; Wang, Zhendi

    2016-03-15

    Concentration-synchronous-matrix-fluorescence (CSMF) spectroscopy was applied to discriminate the oil species by characterizing the concentration dependent fluorescence properties of petroleum related samples. Seven days weathering experiment of 3 crude oil samples from the Bohai Sea platforms of China was carried out under controlled laboratory conditions and showed that weathering had no significant effect on the CSMF spectra. While different feature extraction methods, such as PCA, PLS and Gabor wavelet analysis, were applied to extract discriminative patterns from CSMF spectra, classifications were made via SVM to compare their respective performance of oil species recognition. Ideal correct rates of oil species recognition of 100% for the different types of oil spill samples and 92% for the closely-related source oil samples were achieved by combining Gabor wavelet with SVM, which indicated its advantages to be developed to a rapid, cost-effective, and accurate forensic oil spill identification technique. PMID:26795119

  9. Evolution of Zipf's Law for Indian Urban Agglomerations Vis--Vis Chinese Urban Agglomerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangopadhyay, Kausik; Basu, Banasri

    We investigate into the rank-size distributions of urban agglomerations for India between 1981 to 2011. The incidence of a power law tail is prominent. A relevant question persists regarding the evolution of the power tail coefficient. We have developed a methodology to meaningfully track the power law coefficient over time, when a country experience population growth. A relevant dynamic law, Gibrat's law, is empirically tested in this connection. We argue that these empirical findings for India are in contrast with the findings in case of China, another country with population growth but monolithic political system.

  10. Mechanically durable, superoleophobic coatings prepared by layer-by-layer technique for anti-smudge and oil-water separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Philip S.; Bhushan, Bharat

    2015-03-01

    Superoleophobic surfaces are of interest for anti-fouling, self-cleaning, anti-smudge, low-drag, anti-fog, and oil-water separation applications. Current bioinspired surfaces are of limited use due to a lack of mechanical durability. A so-called layer-by-layer approach, involving charged species with electrostatic interactions between layers, can provide the flexibility needed to improve adhesion to the substrate while providing a low surface tension coating at the air interface. In this work, a polyelectrolyte binder, SiO2 nanoparticles, and a fluorosurfactant are spray deposited separately to create a durable, superoleophobic coating. Polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride (PDDA) polyelectrolyte was complexed with a fluorosurfactant layer (FL), which provides oil repellency while being hydrophilic. This oleophobic/superhydrophilic behavior was enhanced through the use of roughening with SiO2 particles resulting in a superoleophobic coating with hexadecane contact angles exceeding 155 and tilt angles of less than 4. The coating is also superhydrophilic, which is desirable for oil-water separation applications. The durability of these coatings was examined through the use of micro- and macrowear experiments. These coatings currently display characteristics of transparency. Fabrication of these coatings via the layer-by-layer technique results in superoleophobic surfaces displaying improved durability compared to existing work where either the durability or the oil-repellency is compromised.

  11. Mechanically durable, superoleophobic coatings prepared by layer-by-layer technique for anti-smudge and oil-water separation.

    PubMed

    Brown, Philip S; Bhushan, Bharat

    2015-01-01

    Superoleophobic surfaces are of interest for anti-fouling, self-cleaning, anti-smudge, low-drag, anti-fog, and oil-water separation applications. Current bioinspired surfaces are of limited use due to a lack of mechanical durability. A so-called layer-by-layer approach, involving charged species with electrostatic interactions between layers, can provide the flexibility needed to improve adhesion to the substrate while providing a low surface tension coating at the air interface. In this work, a polyelectrolyte binder, SiO2 nanoparticles, and a fluorosurfactant are spray deposited separately to create a durable, superoleophobic coating. Polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride (PDDA) polyelectrolyte was complexed with a fluorosurfactant layer (FL), which provides oil repellency while being hydrophilic. This oleophobic/superhydrophilic behavior was enhanced through the use of roughening with SiO2 particles resulting in a superoleophobic coating with hexadecane contact angles exceeding 155 and tilt angles of less than 4. The coating is also superhydrophilic, which is desirable for oil-water separation applications. The durability of these coatings was examined through the use of micro- and macrowear experiments. These coatings currently display characteristics of transparency. Fabrication of these coatings via the layer-by-layer technique results in superoleophobic surfaces displaying improved durability compared to existing work where either the durability or the oil-repellency is compromised. PMID:25731716

  12. Mechanically durable, superoleophobic coatings prepared by layer-by-layer technique for anti-smudge and oil-water separation

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Philip S.; Bhushan, Bharat

    2015-01-01

    Superoleophobic surfaces are of interest for anti-fouling, self-cleaning, anti-smudge, low-drag, anti-fog, and oil-water separation applications. Current bioinspired surfaces are of limited use due to a lack of mechanical durability. A so-called layer-by-layer approach, involving charged species with electrostatic interactions between layers, can provide the flexibility needed to improve adhesion to the substrate while providing a low surface tension coating at the air interface. In this work, a polyelectrolyte binder, SiO2 nanoparticles, and a fluorosurfactant are spray deposited separately to create a durable, superoleophobic coating. Polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride (PDDA) polyelectrolyte was complexed with a fluorosurfactant layer (FL), which provides oil repellency while being hydrophilic. This oleophobic/superhydrophilic behavior was enhanced through the use of roughening with SiO2 particles resulting in a superoleophobic coating with hexadecane contact angles exceeding 155° and tilt angles of less than 4°. The coating is also superhydrophilic, which is desirable for oil-water separation applications. The durability of these coatings was examined through the use of micro- and macrowear experiments. These coatings currently display characteristics of transparency. Fabrication of these coatings via the layer-by-layer technique results in superoleophobic surfaces displaying improved durability compared to existing work where either the durability or the oil-repellency is compromised. PMID:25731716

  13. Industrial agglomeration and transport accessibility in metropolitan Seoul

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yena; Lee, Keumsook; Anderson, William P.; Lakshmanan, T. R.

    2012-07-01

    This study aims to reveal the relationship between industrial agglomeration and transport accessibility in the Seoul metropolitan area. Our study suggests that in spite of the rapid expansion of the Seoul metropolitan area, central business districts still function as centers of the industry and transportation system; the agglomeration of most industrial subsectors are occurring in central areas and only primary and manufacturing sectors' clusters are located out of these areas; both of subway and road networks show higher level of accessibility in central Seoul and big cities. This implies a strong relationship between the industrial agglomeration and the transport accessibility, and such hypothetical relationship is tested for every industrial subsector using logit analysis. Our findings indicate that although there are industrial variations in the magnitude of impacts and the significance level, transport networks are, in general, positively associated with industrial agglomeration and this is especially true for service sectors.

  14. Three-dimensional simulation of viscous-flow agglomerate sintering.

    PubMed

    Kirchhof, M J; Schmid, H -J; Peukert, W

    2009-08-01

    The viscous-flow sintering of different agglomerate particle morphologies is studied by three-dimensional computer simulations based on the concept of fractional volume of fluid. For a fundamental understanding of particle sintering characteristics, the neck growth kinetics in agglomerate chains and in doublets consisting of differently sized primary particles is investigated. Results show that different sintering contacts in agglomerates even during the first stages are not completely independent from each other, even though differences are small. The neck growth kinetics of differently sized primary particles is determined by the smaller one up to a size difference by a factor of approximately 2, whereas for larger size differences, the kinetics becomes faster. In particular, the agglomerate sintering kinetics is investigated for particle chains of different lengths and for different particle morphologies each having ten primary particles and nine initial sintering contacts. For agglomerate chains, the kinetics approximately can be normalized by using the radius of the fully coalesced sphere. In general, different agglomerate morphologies show equal kinetics during the first sintering stages, whereas during advanced stages, compact morphologies show significantly faster sintering progress than more open morphologies. Hence, the overall kinetics cannot be described by simply using constant morphology correction factors such as fractal dimension or mean coordination number which are used in common sintering models. However, for the first stages of viscous-flow agglomerate sintering, which are the most important for many particle processes, a sintering equation is presented. Although we use agglomerates consisting of spherical primary particles, our methodology can be applied to other aggregate geometries as well. PMID:19792261

  15. Acoustic agglomeration of power plant fly ash. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Reethof, G.; McDaniel, O.H.

    1982-01-01

    The work has shown that acoustic agglomeration at practical acoustic intensities and frequencies is technically and most likely economically viable. The following studies were performed with the listed results: The physics of acoustic agglomeration is complex particularly at the needed high acoustic intensities in the range of 150 to 160 dB and frequencies in the 2500 Hz range. The analytical model which we developed, although not including nonlinear acoustic efforts, agreed with the trends observed. We concentrated our efforts on clarifying the impact of high acoustic intensities on the generation of turbulence. Results from a special set of tests show that although some acoustically generated turbulence of sorts exists in the 150 to 170 dB range with acoustic streaming present, such turbulence will not be a significant factor in acoustic agglomeration compared to the dominant effect of the acoustic velocities at the fundamental frequency and its harmonics. Studies of the robustness of the agglomerated particles using the Anderson Mark III impactor as the source of the shear stresses on the particles show that the agglomerates should be able to withstand the rigors of flow through commercial cyclones without significant break-up. We designed and developed a 700/sup 0/F tubular agglomerator of 8'' internal diameter. The electrically heated system functioned well and provided very encouraging agglomeration results at acoustic levels in the 150 to 160 dB and 2000 to 3000 Hz ranges. We confirmed earlier results that an optimum frequency exists at about 2500 Hz and that larger dust loadings will give better results. Studies of the absorption of acoustic energy by various common gases as a function of temperature and humidity showed the need to pursue such an investigation for flue gas constituents in order to provide necessary data for the design of agglomerators. 65 references, 56 figures, 4 tables.

  16. Dispersion of TiO? nanoparticle agglomerates by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Horst, Allison M; Neal, Andrea C; Mielke, Randall E; Sislian, Patrick R; Suh, Won Hyuk; Mdler, Lutz; Stucky, Galen D; Holden, Patricia A

    2010-11-01

    Engineered nanoparticles are increasingly incorporated into consumer products and are emerging as potential environmental contaminants. Upon environmental release, nanoparticles could inhibit bacterial processes, as evidenced by laboratory studies. Less is known regarding bacterial alteration of nanoparticles, including whether bacteria affect physical agglomeration states controlling nanoparticle settling and bioavailability. Here, the effects of an environmental strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on TiO? nanoparticle agglomerates formed in aqueous media are described. Environmental scanning electron microscopy and cryogenic scanning electron microscopy visually demonstrated bacterial dispersion of large agglomerates formed in cell culture medium and in marsh water. For experiments in cell culture medium, quantitative image analysis verified that the degrees of conversion of large agglomerates into small nanoparticle-cell combinations were similar for 12-h-growth and short-term cell contact experiments. Dispersion in cell growth medium was further characterized by size fractionation: for agglomerated TiO? suspensions in the absence of cells, 81% by mass was retained on a 5-?m-pore-size filter, compared to only 24% retained for biotic treatments. Filtrate cell and agglomerate sizes were characterized by dynamic light scattering, revealing that the average bacterial cell size increased from 1.4 ?m to 1.9 ?m because of nano-TiO? biosorption. High-magnification scanning electron micrographs showed that P. aeruginosa dispersed TiO? agglomerates by preferential biosorption of nanoparticles onto cell surfaces. These results suggest a novel role for bacteria in the environmental transport of engineered nanoparticles, i.e., growth-independent, bacterially mediated size and mass alterations of TiO? nanoparticle agglomerates. PMID:20851981

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF A VIRTUAL INTELLIGENCE TECHNIQUE FOR THE UPSTREAM OIL INDUSTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Iraj A. Salehi; Shahab D. Mohaghegh; Samuel Ameri

    2004-09-01

    The objective of the research and development work reported in this document was to develop a Virtual Intelligence Technique for optimization of the Preferred Upstream Management Practices (PUMP) for the upstream oil industry. The work included the development of a software tool for identification and optimization of the most influential parameters in upstream common practices as well as geological, geophysical and reservoir engineering studies. The work was performed in cooperation with three independent producing companies--Newfield Exploration, Chesapeake Energy, and Triad Energy--operating in the Golden Trend, Oklahoma. In order to protect data confidentiality, these companies are referred to as Company One, Two, Three in a randomly selected order. These producing companies provided geological, completion, and production data on 320 wells and participated in frequent technical discussions throughout the project. Research and development work was performed by Gas Technology Institute (GTI), West Virginia University (WVU), and Intelligent Solutions Inc. (ISI). Oklahoma Independent Petroleum Association (OIPA) participated in technology transfer and data acquisition efforts. Deliverables from the project are the present final report and a user-friendly software package (Appendix D) with two distinct functions: a characterization tool that identifies the most influential parameters in the upstream operations, and an optimization tool that seeks optimization by varying a number of influential parameters and investigating the coupled effects of these variations. The electronic version of this report is also included in Appendix D. The Golden Trend data were used for the first cut optimization of completion procedures. In the subsequent step, results from soft computing runs were used as the guide for detailed geophysical and reservoir engineering studies that characterize the cause-and-effect relationships between various parameters. The general workflow and the main performing units were as follows: (1) Data acquisition. (GTI, OIPA, Participating producers.) (2) Development of the virtual intelligence software. (WVU, ISI); (3) Application of the software on the acquired data. (GTI, ISI); (4) Detailed production analysis using conventional engineering techniques and the DECICE neural network software. (GTI) and (5) Detailed seismic analysis using Inspect spectral decomposition package and Hapmson-Russell's EMERGE inversion package. (GTI) Technology transfer took place through several workshops held at offices of the participating companies, at OIPA offices, and presentations at the SPE panel on soft computing applications and at the 2003 annual meeting of Texas Independent Producers and Royalty Owners Association (TIPRO). In addition, results were exhibited at the SPE annual meeting, published in GasTips, and placed on the GTI web page. Results from the research and development work were presented to the producing companies as a list of recommended recompletion wells and the corresponding optimized operations parameters. By the end of the project, 16 of the recommendations have been implemented the majority of which resulted in increased production rates to several folds. This constituted a comprehensive field demonstration with positive results.

  18. Combined analysis of the root bark oil of Cleistopholis glauca by chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Ouattar, Zana A; Boti, Jean Brice; Ahibo, Coffy Antoine; Tomi, Félix; Casanova, Joseph; Bighelli, Ange

    2013-12-01

    The composition of root bark oil from Cleistopholis glauca Pierre ex Engler & Diels growing wild in Ivory Coast was investigated by GC (in combination with retention indices) and "3C NMR spectroscopy after partition o f hydrocarbons a nd oxygenated compounds on silica g el. Thirty-one compounds havebeen identified. C. glauca produces a sesquiterpene-rich oil, patchoulenone (33.5%), cyperene (9.5%) and germacrene D (6.6%) being the main components. Special attention was paid to the identification and quantification ofgermacrene C (a heat-sensitive compound) and &-elemene, which were achieved by a combination of GC(FID) and 13C NMR spectroscopy. The composition of C. glauca root bark and leaf oils differed drastically. PMID:24555297

  19. Optimization study of Chromalaena odorata essential oil extracted using solventless extraction technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasshorudin, Dalila; Ahmad, Muhammad Syarhabil; Mamat, Awang Soh; Rosli, Suraya

    2015-05-01

    Solventless extraction process of Chromalaena odorata using reduced pressure and temperature has been investigated. The percentage yield of essential oil produce was calculated for every experiment with different experimental condition. The effect of different parameters, such as temperature and extraction time on the yield was investigated using the Response Surface Methodology (RSM) through Central Composite Design (CCD). The temperature and extraction time were found to have significant effect on the yield of extract. A final essential oil yield was 0.095% could be extracted under the following optimized conditions; a temperature of 80 C and a time of 8 hours.

  20. Novel Binders and Methods for Agglomeration of Ore

    SciTech Connect

    S. K. Kawatra; T. C. Eisele; J. A. Gurtler

    2004-03-31

    Many metal extraction operations, such as leaching of copper, leaching of precious metals, and reduction of metal oxides to metal in high-temperature furnaces, require agglomeration of ore to ensure that reactive liquids or gases are evenly distributed throughout the ore being processed. Agglomeration of ore into coarse, porous masses achieves this even distribution of fluids by preventing fine particles from migrating and clogging the spaces and channels between the larger ore particles. Binders are critically necessary to produce agglomerates that will not break down during processing. However, for many important metal extraction processes there are no binders known that will work satisfactorily. A primary example of this is copper heap leaching, where there are no binders that will work in the acidic environment encountered in this process. As a result, operators of acidic heap-leach facilities see a large loss of process efficiency due to their inability to take advantage of agglomeration. The large quantities of ore that must be handled in metal extraction processes also means that the binder must be inexpensive and useful at low dosages to be economical. The acid-resistant binders and agglomeration procedures developed in this project will also be adapted for use in improving the energy efficiency and performance of other agglomeration applications, particularly advanced primary ironmaking.

  1. NOVEL BINDERS AND METHODS FOR AGGLOMERATION OF ORE

    SciTech Connect

    S.K. Kawatra; T.C. Eisele; J.A. Gurtler; C.A. Hardison; K. Lewandowski

    2004-04-01

    Many metal extraction operations, such as leaching of copper, leaching of precious metals, and reduction of metal oxides to metal in high-temperature furnaces, require agglomeration of ore to ensure that reactive liquids or gases are evenly distributed throughout the ore being processed. Agglomeration of ore into coarse, porous masses achieves this even distribution of fluids by preventing fine particles from migrating and clogging the spaces and channels between the larger ore particles. Binders are critically necessary to produce agglomerates that will not break down during processing. However, for many important metal extraction processes there are no binders known that will work satisfactorily. Primary examples of this are copper heap leaching, where there are no binders that will work in the acidic environment encountered in this process, and advanced ironmaking processes, where binders must function satisfactorily over an extraordinarily large range of temperatures (from room temperature up to over 1200 C). As a result, operators of many facilities see a large loss of process efficiency due to their inability to take advantage of agglomeration. The large quantities of ore that must be handled in metal extraction processes also means that the binder must be inexpensive and useful at low dosages to be economical. The acid-resistant binders and agglomeration procedures developed in this project will also be adapted for use in improving the energy efficiency and performance of a broad range of mineral agglomeration applications, particularly heap leaching and advanced primary ironmaking.

  2. Agglomeration in solid rocket propellants: novel experimental and modeling methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggi, F.; Bandera, A.; De Luca, L. T.; Thoorens, V.; Trubert, J. F.; Jackson, T. L.

    2011-10-01

    Metal agglomeration is a key factor affecting the performance of metalized solid propellant rockets since many of the mechanisms that degrade specific impulse can be ascribed to metal powder aggregation and agglomeration. Condensed combustion products are generated at or near the burning surface of the propellant and then released in the gas phase where they are shaped by the core flow viscous forces and oxidized by the reactive environment. On this basis, detailed information about the size of agglomerates as they are generated from the propellant may improve the knowledge of the core flow and, thus, the prediction of its effects (namely, two-phase flow losses). This topic entails both modeling and experimental activities, and the aim of this work is to present some recent developments achieved at the Space Propulsion Laboratory in cooperation with other international institutions. The experimental part shows the application of high-speed and high-resolution imaging of propellant combustion for automated measurement of particle size exploited by means of an ad-hoc image processing tool. The modeling part demonstrates how heterogeneity can explain the agglomeration by means of a pocket model using spatial statistics and two- (2D) or threedimensional (3D) virtual propellants. A definition of a characteristic time that fits the agglomeration data for tested propellants is suggested, and a method for predicting the agglomerate size is given. Both activities are still a matter of research but the maturity level reached so far permits the application in some practical cases.

  3. Visualization of acoustic particle interaction and agglomeration: Theory evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, T.L.; Koopmann, G.H.

    1997-06-01

    In this paper experimentally observed trajectories of particles undergoing acoustically induced interaction and agglomeration processes are compared to and validated with numerically generated trajectories based on existing agglomeration theories. Models for orthokinetic, scattering, mutual radiation pressure, and hydrodynamic particle interaction are considered in the analysis. The characteristic features of the classical orthokinetic agglomeration hypothesis, such as collision processes and agglomerations due to the relative entrainment motion, are not observed in the digital images. The measured entrainment rates of the particles are found to be consistently lower than the theoretically predicted values. Some of the experiments reveal certain characteristics which may possibly be related to mutual scattering interaction. The study`s most significant discovery is the so-called tuning fork agglomeration [T. L. Hoffmann and G. H. Koopmann, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. {bold 99}, 2130{endash}2141 (1996)]. It is shown that this phenomenon contradicts the theories for mutual scattering interaction and mutual radiation pressure interaction, but agrees with the acoustic wake effect model in its intrinsic feature of attraction between particles aligned along the acoustic axis. A model by Dianov {ital et al.} [Sov. Phys. Acoust. {bold 13} (3), 314{endash}319 (1968)] is used to describe this effect based on asymmetric flow fields around particles under Oseen flow conditions. It is concluded that this model is consistent with the general characteristics of the tuning fork agglomerations, but lacks certain refinements with respect to accurate quantification of the effect. {copyright} {ital 1997 Acoustical Society of America.}

  4. NOVEL BINDERS AND METHODS FOR AGGLOMERATION OF ORE

    SciTech Connect

    S.K. Kawatra; T.C. Eisele; J.A. Gurtler; K. Lewandowski

    2005-04-01

    Many metal extraction operations, such as leaching of copper, leaching of precious metals, and reduction of metal oxides to metal in high-temperature furnaces, require agglomeration of ore to ensure that reactive liquids or gases are evenly distributed throughout the ore being processed. Agglomeration of ore into coarse, porous masses achieves this even distribution of fluids by preventing fine particles from migrating and clogging the spaces and channels between the larger ore particles. Binders are critically necessary to produce agglomerates that will not breakdown during processing. However, for many important metal extraction processes there are no binders known that will work satisfactorily. Primary examples of this are copper heap leaching, where there are no binders that will work in the acidic environment encountered in this process. As a result, operators of many facilities see large loss of process efficiency due to their inability to take advantage of agglomeration. The large quantities of ore that must be handled in metal extraction processes also means that the binder must be inexpensive and useful at low dosages to be economical. The acid-resistant binders and agglomeration procedures developed in this project will also be adapted for use in improving the energy efficiency and performance of a broad range of mineral agglomeration applications, particularly heap leaching.

  5. Effect of co-fractionation technique in the preparation of palm oil and sal fat based cocoa butter equivalent.

    PubMed

    Md Ali, A R

    1996-01-01

    Two types of palm oil and sal fat based cocoa butter equivalents, namely fCBE (produced by using co-fractionation method) and mCBE (produced by using conventional method) were prepared. Results showed that the fCBE had triglyceride composition and solidification characteristics closer to the Malaysian cocoa butter than the mCBE produced at the same yield percentage. Increasing acetone washing time had little effect on the fCBE if compared to the effect of increasing palm olein to sal fat blend ratio. Co-fractionation technique increase the compatibility between CBE component triglycerides. Thus, more palm oil can be incorporated in the preparation and the process can be carried out at not low temperature as compared to the conventional method. PMID:8616668

  6. Increased Oil Production and Reserves Utilizing Secondary/Tertiary Recovery Techniques on Small Reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Chidsey Jr., Thomas C.

    2003-02-06

    The primary objective of this project was to enhance domestic petroleum production by field demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced-oil-recovery technology in the Paradox Basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox Basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels (23,850,000-31,800,000 m3) of oil. This project was designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon-dioxide-(CO2-) miscible flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place within the Navajo Nation, San Juan County, Utah.

  7. Increased Oil Production and Reserves Utilizing Secondary/Tertiary Recovery Techniques on Small Reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Jr., Chidsey, Thomas C.; Allison, M. Lee

    1999-11-02

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by field demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced- oil-recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels (23,850,000-31,800,000 m3) of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon-dioxide-(CO2-) miscible flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place within the Navajo Nation, San Juan County, Utah.

  8. Increased Oil Production and Reserves Utilizing Secondary/Terriary Recovery Techniques on Small Reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    David E. Eby; Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.

    1998-04-08

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced oil recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to about 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon dioxide-(CO -) 2 flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place in the Paradox basin within the Navajo Nation. Two activities continued this quarter as part of the geological and reservoir characterization of productive carbonate buildups in the Paradox basin: (1) diagenetic characterization of project field reservoirs, and (2) technology transfer.

  9. Application of Rosenbrock search technique to reduce the drilling cost of a well in Bai-Hassan oil field

    SciTech Connect

    Aswad, Z.A.R.; Al-Hadad, S.M.S.

    1983-03-01

    The powerful Rosenbrock search technique, which optimizes both the search directions using the Gram-Schmidt procedure and the step size using the Fibonacci line search method, has been used to optimize the drilling program of an oil well drilled in Bai-Hassan oil field in Kirkuk, Iran, using the twodimensional drilling model of Galle and Woods. This model shows the effect of the two major controllable variables, weight on bit and rotary speed, on the drilling rate, while considering other controllable variables such as the mud properties, hydrostatic pressure, hydraulic design, and bit selection. The effect of tooth dullness on the drilling rate is also considered. Increasing the weight on the drill bit with a small increase or decrease in ratary speed resulted in a significant decrease in the drilling cost for most bit runs. It was found that a 48% reduction in this cost and a 97-hour savings in the total drilling time was possible under certain conditions.

  10. Anesthesia and liver biopsy techniques for pigeon guillemots (Cepphus columba) suspected of exposure to crude oil in marine environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Degernes, L.A.; Harms, C.A.; Golet, G.H.; Mulcahy, D.M.

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports on the anesthesia and liver biopsy techniques used in adult and nestling pigeon guillemots (Cepphus columba) to test for continued exposure to residual crude oil in the marine environment. Populations of pigeon guillemots have declined significantly in Prince William Sound, Alaska, USA, possibly because of residual effects of crude oil in the environment after the Exxon Valdez oil spill in March 1989. Measurement of hepatic cytochrome P450 1A (CYP1A) is currently the best way to assess crude oil exposure from food sources; however, lethal sampling to obtain adequate liver tissue was not desirable in this declining population of birds. As part of a larger study to identify factors limiting the recovery of pigeon guillemots and other seabird populations, we surgically collected liver samples from adult and nestling guillemots to provide samples for measurement of hepatic CYP1A concentrations. Results from the larger study were reported elsewhere. Liver samples were taken from 26 nestling (1998) and 24 adult (1999) guillemots from a previously oiled site (Naked Island; 12 chicks, 13 adults) and from a nonoiled site (Jackpot Island/Icy Bay; 14 chicks, 11 adults). The birds were anesthetized with isoflurane. No surgical complications occurred with any of the birds and all adult and nestling birds survived after surgery to the point of release or return to the nest. Thirteen out of 14 chicks from the Jackpot Island/Icy Bay and 8 out of 12 chicks from Naked Island fledged. Four chicks at Naked Island were depredated before fledging. All adults abandoned their nests after surgery, so the study sites were revisited the following summer (2000) in an attempt to assess overwinter survival of the adults. All but 1 adult biopsied bird at the nonoiled site (Icy Bay) was found renesting, whereas only 2 birds at the previously oiled site (Naked Island) were similarly observed. The percent of 1999 breeders at Naked Island that returned to their nest sites to breed again in 2000 was low at nests of biopsied birds and nonbiopsied birds alike, suggesting that factors other than the surgical procedure were responsible for the low return rate among this group. These survival results provide strong support lot using experienced veterinarians for nonlethal invasive sample collection from birds to document exposure to crude oil in the marine environment.

  11. A model for fine particle agglomeration in circulating fluidized bed absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, D.; Edwards, J. R.; Kuznetsov, A. V.; Srivastava, R.

    A model for fine particle agglomeration in circulating fluidized bed absorbers (CFBAs) has been developed. It can model the influence of different factors on agglomeration, such as the geometry of a CFBA, the superficial gas velocity, initial particle size distribution (PSD), and type of agglomeration mechanism. It is found that the Brownian agglomeration mechanism can be neglected compared to agglomeration by mean shear and turbulence. Sorbent particles are shown to capture fine particles effectively for certain conditions.

  12. Novel Binders and Methods for Agglomeration of Ore

    SciTech Connect

    S. K. Kawatra; T. C. Eisele; K. A. Lewandowski; J. A. Gurtler

    2006-12-31

    Many metal extraction operations, such as leaching of copper, leaching of precious metals, and reduction of metal oxides to metal in high-temperature furnaces, require agglomeration of ore to ensure that reactive liquids or gases are evenly distributed throughout the ore being processed. Agglomeration of ore into coarse, porous masses achieves this even distribution of fluids by preventing fine particles from migrating and clogging the spaces and channels between the larger ore particles. Binders are critically necessary to produce agglomerates that will not break down during processing. However, for many important metal extraction processes there are no binders known that will work satisfactorily. Primary examples of this are copper heap leaching, where there are no binders that will work in the acidic environment encountered in this process, and advanced ironmaking processes, where binders must function satisfactorily over an extraordinarily large range of temperatures (from room temperature up to over 1200 C). As a result, operators of many facilities see a large loss of process efficiency due to their inability to take advantage of agglomeration. The large quantities of ore that must be handled in metal extraction processes also means that the binder must be inexpensive and useful at low dosages to be economical. The acid-resistant binders and agglomeration procedures developed in this project will also be adapted for use in improving the energy efficiency and performance of a broad range of mineral agglomeration applications, particularly heap leaching and advanced primary ironmaking. This project has identified several acid-resistant binders and agglomeration procedures that can be used for improving the energy efficiency of heap leaching, by preventing the ''ponding'' and ''channeling'' effects that currently cause reduced recovery and extended leaching cycle times. Methods have also been developed for iron ore processing which are intended to improve the performance of pellet binders, and have directly saved energy by increasing filtration rates of the pelletization feed by as much as 23%.

  13. Kinetics of selective agglomeration applied to fine coal cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, H.

    1988-01-01

    A number of experiments have been carried out in a batch coalescing Rushton turbine stirred vessel to examine the effect of pulp density, bridging agent dosage, feed size, mixing intensity and duration on the kinetics of selective agglomeration. In order to determine semiempirical power law correlations of mean size of each component of coals with operating variables, multiple log-linear regressions are performed on the dependent variable mean size for the independent operating variables. A theoretical multicomponent particle population balance model governing agglomerate size distribution and composition utilizing coalescence and breakage mechanisms is also developed. The results show that all operating variables except pulp density within ranges tested significantly affect the size, combustible yield, and grade of product agglomerates. The empirical power law model to describe the mean size of agglomerates as a function of the operation parameters is highly significant. Its ability to be used in extrapolation is untested. Comparison with experimental data for a model form suppressing breakage mechanism and either utilizing N{sub k}(t) (total number concentration of agglomerates for component k) or V{sub k}(t) (total volume concentration of agglomerates for component k) in coalescence mechanism is reasonably satisfactory to predict evolution of coal, pyrite, and ash particle size distribution. A power law correlations of the simulation model constants, a{sub k} (binary-collision efficiency for component k), with operating variables is performed. These relations should guide prediction of yield and grade for a given coal subjected to ultra-comminution and selective agglomeration cleaning.

  14. Colloidal stability of coal-simulated suspensions in selective agglomeration

    SciTech Connect

    Schurger, M.L.

    1989-01-01

    A coal suspension was simulated by using graphite to simulate the carbonaceous fraction and kaolinite clay to simulate the ash fraction. Separate studies on each material established their response to additions of oxidized pyrite (ferrous sulfate) and a humic acid simulate (salicylic acid) in terms of zeta potentials profiles with pH and Ionic strength. Concentrations of iron and salicylic acid evaluated were 4.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} M and 2.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} M, respectively. The zeta potentials profiles of graphite, clay and hexadecane were negative throughout the pH ranges studied. The addition of iron lowered the zeta potentials all of the suspensions under all pH and ionic strength conditions. Salicylic acid decreased the graphite and hexadecane zeta potentials but had no effect on the clay zeta potential profiles. Agglomeration of graphite with bridging liquid shows distinct time dependent rate mechanisms, a initial growth of graphite agglomerates followed by consolidation phase. Graphite agglomeration was rapid with the maximum amount of agglomerate volume growth occurring in under 2-4 minutes. Agglomeration in the first two minutes was characterized by a 1st order rate mechanism. The presence of either Iron and salicylic acid generally improved the first order rates. The addition of clay also improved the first order rates except in the presence of salicylic acid. Heteroagglomeration of graphite with clay was found by hydrodynamic arguments to be unfavored. A multicomponent population balance model which had been developed for evaluating collision efficiencies of coal, ash and pyrite selective agglomeration was evaluated to explain these results. The growth and consolidation characteristics of graphite agglomeration for the experimental conditions examined herein revealed the limitations of such as model for this application.

  15. Boron Particles Agglomeration and Slag Formation During Combustion of Energetic Condensed Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meerov, D.; Monogarov, K.; Bragin, A.; Frolov, Yu.; Nikiforova, Anna

    Boron is a promising component of energetic condensed systems due to its high gravimetric heat value, which is significantly higher than that one of aluminum. In the present work, two non-equilibrium processes, i.e., boron particles agglomeration and framework (slag) formation during combustion of high-energy compositions were investigated experimentally. The quench particle collection bomb technique was used to collect the condensed combustion products formed under nitrogen pressures of 0.1 - 4 MPa. The formation of a framework was visualized using high-speed video registration (1200 fps). Particle size, morphology, and surface structure of collected condensed products were evaluated using laser diffractometry and scanning electron microscopy. In the experiments, the weight of the collected condensed combustion products was about 30% of the initial sample weight, where 26% belonged to the products collected from the gas phase and 4% were remained in a highly-porous framework. The initial amorphous boron powder consisted of 1-micron particles, whereas agglomerated particles, which were collected from the gas phase, were 10 ?m in diameter. The burning rate of compositions without binder was 4 times higher and the diameter of collected agglomerates was 10 times larger than those for compositions with binder.

  16. Choice of solvent extraction technique affects fatty acid composition of pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) oil.

    PubMed

    Abdolshahi, Anna; Majd, Mojtaba Heydari; Rad, Javad Sharifi; Taheri, Mehrdad; Shabani, Aliakbar; Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A

    2015-04-01

    Pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) oil has important nutritional and therapeutic properties because of its high concentration of essential fatty acids. The extraction method used to obtain natural compounds from raw material is critical for product quality, in particular to protect nutritional value. This study compared the fatty acid composition of pistachio oil extracted by two conventional procedures, Soxhlet extraction and maceration, analyzed by a gas chromatography-flame ionization detector (GC-FID). Four solvents with different polarities were tested: n-hexane (Hx), dichloromethane (DCM), ethyl acetate (EtAc) and ethanol (EtOH). The highest unsaturated fatty acid content (88.493 %) was obtained by Soxhlet extraction with EtAc. The Soxhlet method extracted the most oleic and linolenic acids (51.99 % and 0.385 %, respectively) although a higher concentration (36.32 %) of linoleic acid was extracted by maceration. PMID:25829628

  17. Model for coal ash agglomeration based on two-particle dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Moseley, J.L.; O'Brien, T.J.

    1986-01-01

    The agglomeration of coal and coal ash in fluidized-bed gasifiers (FBG's) is of great interest in coal conversion. However, only limited work has been done to develop analytical models in order to understand ash agglomeration in FBG's. This paper focuses on two-particle collision dynamics, which is then used to develop a criterion for the agglutination of the two particles. The main assumption of this mechanism is that the binding force can be modeled as ''piecewise'' conservative. This makes it possible to compute the maximum energy that can be dissipated by the system. Comparison of this quantity with the initial kinetic energy provides the agglutination criteria. A specific version of this model is obtained by making specific choices for the contact force and the binding force. An analytic formula for the critical velocity, the relative collision velocity below which agglutination takes place, is obtained for head-on collisions; a numerical technique is developed for collisions which are not head-on. A process change which increases the critical velocity increases the likelihood of agglutination of particles with random relative velocities. To examine the critical velocity as a function of temperature, the model requires correlations for the shear modulus and surface adhesiveness coefficient of the particles. Although these correlations are derived from limited experimental information, they lead to reasonable results and agreement with existing experimental data on agglomeration and defluidization. By considering the agglutination of particles of average size and temperature, a measure of the agglomeration tendency of a FBG can be obtained. Finally, the sensitivity of the model to system parameters is also investigated and an assessment of needed additional work is made. 35 refs., 12 figs.

  18. Application of chemical, physical and chemometric analytical techniques to the study of ancient ceramic oil lamps.

    PubMed

    Garca Gimnez, R; Vigil de la Villa, R; Petit Domnguez, M D; Rucandio, M I

    2006-02-15

    A chemical, mineralogical and morphological characterization of 54 fragments of oil lamps found in two Spanish archaeological sites (Cordoba and Herrera de Pisuerga (Palencia)) has been performed. Flame atomic absorption and emission spectrometry were used for the determination of Al(2)O(3), CaO, Fe(2)O(3), K(2)O, MgO, MnO, Na(2)O and TiO(2) as major constituents and Cu, Cr, Ni, Pb and Zn as minor and trace selected elements. Physical, mineralogical and morphological analyses were made by using dilatometry at constant heating rate for the thermal behaviour, X-ray diffraction spectrometry for the mineralogical composition and, in a group of selected samples, scanning electron microscopy and polarizing petrographic microscopy for the observation of thin layers and mineral identification. Separations of light and heavy minerals were carried out with bromoform and X-ray diffraction analysis was applied to both fractions. Multivariate statistical analysis was used to establish correlations between variables and to deduce factors which allow the gathering of oil lamp samples in groups as a function of their composition. The results of these analyses allow the comparison among pieces and the establishment of conclusions about several aspects of their manufacture, the origin of the raw materials and the provenance of the oil lamps (local or imported). They provide information supporting certain archaeological hypothesis. For example, some oil lamps found in Herrera de Pisuerga showed a clearly different physicochemical composition. They were probably brought from Italy by the Roman Legions together with their initial furniture household. PMID:18970455

  19. PC and mainframe computer-graphics techniques applied to volumetric evaluation of a mature oil field

    SciTech Connect

    Newell, K.D.; Schoeling, L.G.; Wong, J.C. )

    1990-11-01

    Mapping and volumetric analysis of large reservoirs are important steps in evaluating mature oil fields for secondary and tertiary development. This paper describes how a research group mapped and conducted an extensive volumetric analysis on the Zenith pool, a large, mature oil field in central Kansas, with a Data General MV20000 minicomputer with Surface III mapping software and a PC with Surfer and spreadsheet software. A step-by-step procedure was developed to generate structure, isopach, and porosity maps for the five main reservoirs in the field. Lotus 123{sup TM} spreadsheets were developed to compile locations, formation tops, and other critical data for more than 500 wells. These data were sent to the minicomputer to generate contour maps depicting structure, isopachs, and porosities with output directed to an electrostatic color plotter. Grid-to-grid manipulation and cross multiplication of these contour maps allowed construction of a porosity-foot map for each reservoir. The final contour maps incorporated the effects of oil/water contact (OWC) with a porosity cutoff determined from porosity/permeability crossplots. Integration of the porosity-foot maps facilitated volumetric and spatial comparison with historic production data.

  20. New H NMR-Based Technique To Determine Epoxide Concentrations in Oxidized Oil.

    PubMed

    Xia, Wei; Budge, Suzanne M; Lumsden, Michael D

    2015-06-24

    A new method to determine epoxide concentrations in oxidized oils was developed and validated using (1)H NMR. Epoxides derived from lipid oxidation gave signals between 2.90 and 3.24 ppm, well separated from the signals of other lipid oxidation products. To calibrate, soybean oils with a range of epoxide concentrations were synthesized and analyzed using (1)H NMR by taking the sn-1,3 glycerol protons (4.18, 4.33 ppm) as internal references. The (1)H NMR signals were compared to the epoxide content determined by titration with hydrogen bromide (HBr)-acetic acid solution. As expected, the signal response increased with concentration linearly (R(2) = 99.96%), and validation of the method gave results comparable to those of the HBr method. A study of the oxidative stability of soybean oil was performed by applying this method to monitor epoxides during thermal lipid oxidation. The epoxide content increased over time and showed a different trend compared to peroxide value (PV). A phenomenological model was suggested to model epoxides derived from lipid oxidation. PMID:26035119

  1. Nanoemulsion of orange oil with non ionic surfactant produced emulsion using ultrasonication technique: evaluating against food spoilage yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugumar, Saranya; Singh, Sanjay; Mukherjee, Amitava; Chandrasekaran, N.

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, food industries have shown great interest in developing nanoemulsion (NE) using essential oils (EOs) to prevent food spoilage caused by microorganisms. The hydrophobic properties of EOs have lead to reduced solubilization effect of food, which in turn, created a negative impact on the quality of food and its antimicrobial efficacy. Focusing this issue, we attempted a unique NE preparation using orange oil, Tween 80 (organic phase) and water (aqueous phase) by sonication technique. Based on thermodynamic stability studies, the effective diameter was reported to be in the size range from 20 to 30 nm. Saccharomyces cerevisiae was used in testing the anti-yeast effect. Their activity was studied in both growth medium and apple juice. The minimum inhibitory concentration of this NE was determined using broth dilution method. At 2 ?l/ml, orange oil NE demonstrated inhibition of tested microorganisms. The kinetics of killing curve, have shown that the NE treated cells had lost its viability within 30 min of interaction. Also, SEM image revealed that the treated cells became distorted in comparison to their control cells. NE treated apple juice showed complete loss of viability even on dilution as compared to their controls.

  2. Nanoemulsion of orange oil with non ionic surfactant produced emulsion using ultrasonication technique: evaluating against food spoilage yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugumar, Saranya; Singh, Sanjay; Mukherjee, Amitava; Chandrasekaran, N.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, food industries have shown great interest in developing nanoemulsion (NE) using essential oils (EOs) to prevent food spoilage caused by microorganisms. The hydrophobic properties of EOs have lead to reduced solubilization effect of food, which in turn, created a negative impact on the quality of food and its antimicrobial efficacy. Focusing this issue, we attempted a unique NE preparation using orange oil, Tween 80 (organic phase) and water (aqueous phase) by sonication technique. Based on thermodynamic stability studies, the effective diameter was reported to be in the size range from 20 to 30 nm. Saccharomyces cerevisiae was used in testing the anti-yeast effect. Their activity was studied in both growth medium and apple juice. The minimum inhibitory concentration of this NE was determined using broth dilution method. At 2 μl/ml, orange oil NE demonstrated inhibition of tested microorganisms. The kinetics of killing curve, have shown that the NE treated cells had lost its viability within 30 min of interaction. Also, SEM image revealed that the treated cells became distorted in comparison to their control cells. NE treated apple juice showed complete loss of viability even on dilution as compared to their controls.

  3. Budesonide nanoparticle agglomerates as dry powder aerosols with rapid dissolution

    PubMed Central

    El-Gendy, Nashwa; Gorman, Eric M.; Munson, Eric J.; Berkland, Cory

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Nanoparticle technology represents an attractive approach for formulating poorly water soluble pulmonary medicines. Unfortunately, nanoparticle suspensions used in nebulizers or metered dose inhalers often suffer from physical instability in the form of uncontrolled agglomeration or Ostwald ripening. In addition, processing such suspensions into dry powders can yield broad particle size distributions. To address these encumbrances, a controlled nanoparticle flocculation process has been developed. Method Nanosuspensions of the poorly water soluble drug budesonide were prepared by dissolving the drug in organic solvent containing surfactants followed by rapid solvent extraction in water. Different surfactants were employed to control the size and surface charge of the precipitated nanoparticles. Nanosuspensions were flocculated using leucine and lyophilized. Results Selected budesonide nanoparticle suspensions exhibited an average particle size ranging from ~160230 nm, high yield and high drug content. Flocculated nanosuspensions produced micron-sized agglomerates. Freeze-drying the nanoparticle agglomerates yielded dry powders with desirable aerodynamic properties for inhalation therapy. In addition, the dissolution rates of dried nanoparticle agglomerate formulations were significantly faster than that of stock budesonide. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that nanoparticle agglomerates possess the microstructure desired for lung deposition and the nanostructure to facilitate rapid dissolution of poorly water soluble drugs. PMID:19130469

  4. Theranostic potential of gold nanoparticle-protein agglomerates.

    PubMed

    Sanpui, Pallab; Paul, Anumita; Chattopadhyay, Arun

    2015-11-28

    Owing to the ever-increasing applications, glittered with astonishing success of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) in biomedical research as diagnostic and therapeutic agents, the study of Au NP-protein interaction seems critical for maximizing their theranostic efficiency, and thus demands comprehensive understanding. The mutual interaction of Au NPs and proteins at physiological conditions may result in the aggregation of protein, which can ultimately lead to the formation of Au NP-protein agglomerates. In the present article, we try to appreciate the plausible steps involved in the Au NP-induced aggregation of proteins and also the importance of the proteins' three-dimensional structures in the process. The Au NP-protein agglomerates can potentially be exploited for efficient loading and subsequent release of various therapeutically important molecules, including anticancer drugs, with the unique opportunity of incorporating hydrophilic as well as hydrophobic drugs in the same nanocarrier system. Moreover, the Au NP-protein agglomerates can act as 'self-diagnostic' systems, allowing investigation of the conformational state of the associated protein(s) as well as the protein-protein or protein-Au NP interaction within the agglomerates. Furthermore, the potential of these Au NP-protein agglomerates as a novel platform for multifunctional theranostic application along with exciting future-possibilities is highlighted here. PMID:26508277

  5. Advanced physical fine coal cleaning spherical agglomeration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    The project included process development, engineering, construction, and operation of a 1/3 tph proof-of-concept (POC) spherical agglomeration test module. The POC tests demonstrated that physical cleaning of ultrafine coal by agglomeration using heptane can achieve: (1) Pyritic sulfur reductions beyond that possible with conventional coal cleaning methods; (2) coal ash contents below those which can be obtained by conventional coal cleaning methods at comparable energy recoveries; (3) energy recoveries of 80 percent or greater measured against the raw coal energy content; (4) complete recovery of the heptane bridging liquid from the agglomerates; and (5) production of agglomerates with 3/8-inch size and less than 30 percent moisture. Test results met or exceeded all of the program objectives. Nominal 3/8-inch size agglomerates with less than 20 percent moisture were produced. The clean coal ash content varied between 1.5 to 5.5 percent by weight (dry basis) depending on feed coal type. Ash reductions of the run-of-mine (ROM) coal were 77 to 83 percent. ROM pyritic sulfur reductions varied from 86 to 90 percent for the three test coals, equating to total sulfur reductions of 47 to 72 percent.

  6. Theranostic potential of gold nanoparticle-protein agglomerates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanpui, Pallab; Paul, Anumita; Chattopadhyay, Arun

    2015-11-01

    Owing to the ever-increasing applications, glittered with astonishing success of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) in biomedical research as diagnostic and therapeutic agents, the study of Au NP-protein interaction seems critical for maximizing their theranostic efficiency, and thus demands comprehensive understanding. The mutual interaction of Au NPs and proteins at physiological conditions may result in the aggregation of protein, which can ultimately lead to the formation of Au NP-protein agglomerates. In the present article, we try to appreciate the plausible steps involved in the Au NP-induced aggregation of proteins and also the importance of the proteins' three-dimensional structures in the process. The Au NP-protein agglomerates can potentially be exploited for efficient loading and subsequent release of various therapeutically important molecules, including anticancer drugs, with the unique opportunity of incorporating hydrophilic as well as hydrophobic drugs in the same nanocarrier system. Moreover, the Au NP-protein agglomerates can act as `self-diagnostic' systems, allowing investigation of the conformational state of the associated protein(s) as well as the protein-protein or protein-Au NP interaction within the agglomerates. Furthermore, the potential of these Au NP-protein agglomerates as a novel platform for multifunctional theranostic application along with exciting future-possibilities is highlighted here.

  7. Agglomerating self-cleaning air cleaner. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Treuhaft, M.B.

    1985-10-01

    This report describes an experimental program to evaluate an agglomerating self-cleaning air cleaner concept for application to diesel-powered tactical trucks and combat vehicles. Technical feasibility was evaluated through laboratory testing of candidate agglomerating media and through a design parameter component study of the agglomerator, inertial separator, and final filter integration and system operation. Several factors were used to evaluate media potential: namely, initial resistance as a function of airflow, dust loading, and pressure-drop recovery; the improvement in inertial separator efficiency (an indirect measure of agglomerate transport); overall operating efficiency; and consideration of the physical characteristics of the media with respect to their likely influence on design. Both surface loading and depth-type media were considered, and successful results were obtained with each. Overall, results clearly show that the agglomerating self-cleaning air cleaner concept can provide a significant improvement over standard systems with respect to service life. As a result, an air-cleaner system based on this concept would fill the void between larger self-cleaning air filter (SCAF) units and the smaller cylindrical units currently used on many tactical trucks and small combat vehicles. This will allow the smaller vehicles, which cannot readily accept extended-life units, to function satisfactorily in a combat mission role.

  8. Bird interactions with offshore oil and gas platforms: review of impacts and monitoring techniques.

    PubMed

    Ronconi, Robert A; Allard, Karel A; Taylor, Philip D

    2015-01-01

    Thousands of oil and gas platforms are currently operating in offshore waters globally, and this industry is expected to expand in coming decades. Although the potential environmental impacts of offshore oil and gas activities are widely recognized, there is limited understanding of their impacts on migratory and resident birds. A literature review identified 24 studies and reports of bird-platform interactions, most being qualitative and half having been peer-reviewed. The most frequently observed effect, for seabirds and landbirds, is attraction and sometimes collisions associated with lights and flares; episodic events have caused the deaths of hundreds or even thousands of birds. Though typically unpredictable, anecdotally, it is known that poor weather, such as fog, precipitation and low cloud cover, can exacerbate the effect of nocturnal attraction to lights, especially when coincidental with bird migrations. Other effects include provision of foraging and roosting opportunities, increased exposure to oil and hazardous environments, increased exposure to predators, or repulsion from feeding sites. Current approaches to monitoring birds at offshore platforms have focused on observer-based methods which can offer species-level bird identification, quantify seasonal patterns of relative abundance and distribution, and document avian mortality events and underlying factors. Observer-based monitoring is time-intensive, limited in spatial and temporal coverage, and suffers without clear protocols and when not conducted by trained, independent observers. These difficulties are exacerbated because deleterious bird-platform interaction is episodic and likely requires the coincidence of multiple factors (e.g., darkness, cloud, fog, rain conditions, occurrence of birds in vicinity). Collectively, these considerations suggest a need to implement supplemental systems for monitoring bird activities around offshore platforms. Instrument-based approaches, such as radar, cameras, acoustic recordings, and telemetry, hold promise for continuous monitoring. Recommendations are provided for a rigorous and comprehensive monitoring approach within an adaptive management framework. PMID:25261750

  9. Source rock quality determination from oil biomarkers I: A new geochemical technique

    SciTech Connect

    Dahl, J.E.P. |; Moldowan, J.M.; Teerman, S.C.; McCaffrey, M.A.; Sundararaman, P.; Stelting, C.E.

    1994-10-01

    Biomarker analyses of the Aspen Shale (Mowry Shale equivalent), Skully`s Gap, Wyoming, suggest that vital source rock properties (e.g., kerogen hydrogen-to-carbon [H/C] ratio, Rock-Eval Hydrogen Index (HI), and maceral composition) may be indirectly, yet quantitatively, predicted from the biomarker parameters measured in oils. A strong correlation exists between the {open_quotes}Homohopane Index{close_quotes} of Aspen source rock extracts and both the H/C ratio and HI of the associated kerogen (R{sup 2} = 0.93 and 0.83, respectively). The percentages of C{sub 30} and C{sub 28} 4-desmethyl steranes, relative to total extracted 4-desmethyl steranes, correlate with the percentage of marine-derived amorphous type II organic matter in the kerogen (R{sup 2} = 0.80 and 0.73, respectively), and with kerogen H/C ratio and HI (R{sup 2} = 0.89 and 0.88, respectively, for C{sub 30} steranes; R{sup 2} = 0.89 and 0.83, respectively, for C{sub 28} steranes). The ratio of 4{alpha}-methyl-24-ethylcholestanes to 3{beta}-methyl-24-ethylcholestanes in the extracts also correlates with kerogen H/C ratio and HI (R{sup 2} = 0.93 and 0.92, respectively). In contrast, the percentage of C{sub 29} steranes in the extracts correlates with the percentage of higher-plant-derived vitrinite in the kerogen (R{sup 2} = 0.69), and shows a negative correlation with H/C ratio and HI (R{sup 2} = 0.81 and 0.66, respectively). These relationships were used to determine indirectly the source rock kerogen properties of several Mowry-derived oils. Therefore, prediction of source rock properties from oils in vertically drained basins could prove extremely useful to explorationists seeking to identify the most oil-prone areas in regions such as the US Gulf Coast, the North Sea, the Beaufort Sea, and the Mahakam and Niger deltas. An example from the Beaufort Sea is given in this same issue.

  10. Use of fly ash agglomerates for removal of arsenic.

    PubMed

    Polowczyk, Izabela; Bastrzyk, Anna; Ko?lecki, Tomasz; Sawi?ski, Wojciech; Rudnicki, Piotr; Soko?owski, Adam; Sadowski, Zygmunt

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the application of fly ash adsorbent for removal of arsenite ions from dilute solution (100-1,000 ppm). Experiments were carried out using material from the "Turw" (Poland) brown-coal-burning power plant, which was wetted, then mixed and tumbled in a granulator to form spherical agglomerates. Measurements of arsenic adsorption from aqueous solution were carried out at room temperature and natural pH of fly ash agglomerates, in either a shaken flask or circulating column, to compare two different methods of contacting solution with adsorbent. Adsorption isotherms of arsenic were determined for agglomerated material using the Freundlich equation. Kinetic studies indicated that sorption follows a pseudo-second-order model. Preferable method to carry out the process is continuous circulation of arsenite solution through a column. PMID:20383564

  11. A numerical/empirical technique for history matching and predicting cyclic steam performance in Canadian oil sands reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leshchyshyn, Theodore Henry

    The oil sands of Alberta contain some one trillion barrels of bitumen-in-place, most contained in the McMurray, Wabiskaw, Clearwater, and Grand Rapids formations. Depth of burial is 0--550 m, 10% of which is surface mineable, the rest recoverable by in-situ technology-driven enhanced oil recovery schemes. To date, significant commercial recovery has been attributed to Cyclic Steam Stimulation (CSS) using vertical wellbores. Other techniques, such as Steam Assisted Gravity Drainage (SAGD) are proving superior to other recovery methods for increasing early oil production but at initial higher development and/or operating costs. Successful optimization of bitumen production rates from the entire reservoir is ultimately decided by the operator's understanding of the reservoir in its original state and/or the positive and negative changes which occur in oil sands and heavy oil deposits upon heat stimulation. Reservoir description is the single most important factor in attaining satisfactory history matches and forecasts for optimized production of the commercially-operated processes. Reservoir characterization which lacks understanding can destroy a project. For example, incorrect assumptions in the geological model for the Wolf Lake Project in northeast Alberta resulted in only about one-half of the predicted recovery by the original field process. It will be shown here why the presence of thin calcite streaks within oil sands can determine the success or failure of a commercial cyclic steam project. A vast amount of field data, mostly from the Primrose Heavy Oil Project (PHOP) near Cold Lake, Alberta, enabled the development a simple set of correlation curves for predicting bitumen production using CSS. A previously calibtrated thermal numerical simulation model was used in its simplist form, that is, a single layer, radial grid blocks, "fingering" or " dilation" adjusted permeability curves, and no simulated fracture, to generate the first cycle production correlation curves. The key reservoir property used to develop a specific curve was to vary the initial mobile water saturation. Individual pilot wells were then history-matched using these correlation curves, adjusting for thermal net pay using perforation height and a fundamentally derived "net pay factor". Operating days (injection plus production) were required to complete the history matching calculations. Subsequent cycles were then history-matched by applying an Efficiency Multiplication Factor (EMF) to the original first cycle prediction method as well as selecting the proper correlation curve for the specific cycle under analysis by using the appropriate steam injection rates and slug sizes. History matches were performed on eight PHOP wells (two back-to-back, five-spot patterns) completed in the Wabiskaw and, three single-well tests completed just below in the McMurray Formation. Predictions for the PHOP Wabiskaw Formation first cycle bitumen production averaged within 1% of the actual pilot total. Bitumen recovery from individual wells for second cycle onwards, was within 20% of actual values. For testing the correlations, matching was also performed on cyclic steam data from British Petroleum's Wolf Lake Project, the Esso Cold Lake Project, and the PCEJ Fort McMurray Pilot, a joint venture of Petro-Canada, Cities Services (Canadian Occidental), Esso, and Japan-Canada Oil Sands with reasonable results.

  12. Applying monitoring, verification, and accounting techniques to a real-world, enhanced oil recovery operational CO2 leak

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wimmer, B.T.; Krapac, I.G.; Locke, R.; Iranmanesh, A.

    2011-01-01

    The use of carbon dioxide (CO2) for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) is being tested for oil fields in the Illinois Basin, USA. While this technology has shown promise for improving oil production, it has raised some issues about the safety of CO2 injection and storage. The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) organized a Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting (MVA) team to develop and deploy monitoring programs at three EOR sites in Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky, USA. MVA goals include establishing baseline conditions to evaluate potential impacts from CO2 injection, demonstrating that project activities are protective of human health and the environment, and providing an accurate accounting of stored CO2. This paper focuses on the use of MVA techniques in monitoring a small CO2 leak from a supply line at an EOR facility under real-world conditions. The ability of shallow monitoring techniques to detect and quantify a CO2 leak under real-world conditions has been largely unproven. In July of 2009, a leak in the pipe supplying pressurized CO2 to an injection well was observed at an MGSC EOR site located in west-central Kentucky. Carbon dioxide was escaping from the supply pipe located approximately 1 m underground. The leak was discovered visually by site personnel and injection was halted immediately. At its largest extent, the hole created by the leak was approximately 1.9 m long by 1.7 m wide and 0.7 m deep in the land surface. This circumstance provided an excellent opportunity to evaluate the performance of several monitoring techniques including soil CO2 flux measurements, portable infrared gas analysis, thermal infrared imagery, and aerial hyperspectral imagery. Valuable experience was gained during this effort. Lessons learned included determining 1) hyperspectral imagery was not effective in detecting this relatively small, short-term CO2 leak, 2) even though injection was halted, the leak remained dynamic and presented a safety risk concern during monitoring activities and, 3) the atmospheric and soil monitoring techniques used were relatively cost-effective, easily and rapidly deployable, and required minimal manpower to set up and maintain for short-term assessments. However, characterization of CO2 distribution near the land surface resulting from a dynamic leak with widely variable concentrations and fluxes was challenging. ?? 2011 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Innovative Techniques of Multiphase Flow in Pipeline System for Oil-Gas Gathering and Transportation with Energy-Saving and Emission-Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Bofeng; Guo, Liejin; Zhang, Shaojun; Zhang, Ximin; Gu, Hanyang

    2010-03-01

    Multiphase flow measurement, desanding, dehumidification and heat furnace are critical techniques for the oil and gas gathering and transportation, which influnce intensively the energy-saving and emission-reduction in the petroleum industry. Some innovative techniques were developed for the first time by the present research team, including an online recognation instrument of multiphase flow regime, a water fraction instrument for multuphase flow, a coiled tube desanding separator with low pressure loss and high efficiency, a supersonic swirling natural gas dehumifier, and a vacuum phase-change boiler. With an integration of the above techniques, a new oil gas gathering and transpotation system was proposed, which reduced the establishment of one metering station and several transfer stations compared with the tranditional system. The oil and gas mixture transpotation in single pipes was realized. The improved techniques were applied in the oilfields in China and promoted the productivity of the oilfields by low energy consumption, low emissions, high efficiency and great security.

  14. Continuous air agglomeration method for high carbon fly ash beneficiation

    DOEpatents

    Gray, McMahon L.; Champagne, Kenneth J.; Finseth, Dennis H.

    2000-01-01

    The carbon and mineral components of fly ash are effectively separated by a continuous air agglomeration method, resulting in a substantially carboree mineral stream and a highly concentrated carbon product. The method involves mixing the fly ash comprised of carbon and inorganic mineral matter with a liquid hydrocarbon to form a slurry, contacting the slurry with an aqueous solution, dispersing the hydrocarbon slurry into small droplets within the aqueous solution by mechanical mixing and/or aeration, concentrating the inorganic mineral matter in the aqueous solution, agglomerating the carbon and hydrocarbon in the form of droplets, collecting the droplets, separating the hydrocarbon from the concentrated carbon product, and recycling the hydrocarbon.

  15. Continuous air Agglomeration Method for high Carbon fly ash Beneficiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, McMahan L.; Champagne, Kenneth J.; Finseth, Dennis H.

    1998-09-29

    The carbon and mineral components of fly ash are effectively separated by a continuous air agglomeration method, resulting in a substantially carbon-free mineral stream and a highly concentrated carbon product. The method involves mixing the fly ash comprised of carbon and inorganic mineral matter with a liquid hydrocarbon to form a slurry, contacting the slurry with an aqueous solution, dispersing the hydrocarbon slurry into small droplets within the aqueous solution by mechanical mixing and/or aeration, concentrating the inorganic mineral matter in the aqueous solution, agglomerating the carbon and hydrocarbon in the form of droplets, collecting the droplets, separating the hydrocarbon from the concentrated carbon product, and recycling the hydrocarbon.

  16. A pocket model for aluminum agglomeration in composite propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, N. S.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents a model for the purpose of estimating the fraction of aluminum powder that will form agglomerates at the surface of deflagrating composite propellants. The basic idea is that the fraction agglomerated depends upon the amount of aluminum that melts within effective binder pocket volumes framed by oxidizer particles. The effective pocket depends upon the ability of ammonium perchlorate modals to encapsulate the aluminum and provide a local temperature sufficient to ignite the aluminum. Model results are discussed in the light of data showing effects of propellant formulation variables and pressure.

  17. Agglomeration behavior of solid nickel on polycrystalline barium titanate

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, K Scott; Mast, Eric S; Sprenkle, Vince

    2007-11-01

    This letter describes the phenomenon that takes place between nickel/barium titanate couples when heated under conditions employed in multilayer ceramic capacitor manufacturing practice: a 4hr, 1300°C isothermal anneal in 1% H2 – 99% N2. Dense, sputtered nickel films were observed to dewet the titanate and agglomerate into discrete or interconnected islands via a solid-state process. Up to a critical film thickness value of ~1.4 μm, the degree of agglomeration was found to display an exponential dependence on the thickness of the original nickel film.

  18. Ice slurry cooling research: Storage tank ice agglomeration and extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Kasza, K.; Hayashi, Kanetoshi

    1999-08-01

    A new facility has been built to conduct research and development on important issues related to implementing ice slurry cooling technology. Ongoing studies are generating important information on the factors that influence ice particle agglomeration in ice slurry storage tanks. The studies are also addressing the development of methods to minimize and monitor agglomeration and improve the efficiency and controllability of tank extraction of slurry for distribution to cooling loads. These engineering issues impede the utilization of the ice slurry cooling concept that has been under development by various groups.

  19. 2D Cross Sectional Analysis and Associated Electrochemistry of Composite Electrodes Containing Dispersed Agglomerates of Nanocrystalline Magnetite, Fe?O?.

    PubMed

    Bock, David C; Kirshenbaum, Kevin C; Wang, Jiajun; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Feng; Wang, Jun; Marschilok, Amy C; Takeuchi, Kenneth J; Takeuchi, Esther S

    2015-06-24

    When electroactive nanomaterials are fully incorporated into an electrode structure, characterization of the crystallite sizes, agglomerate sizes, and dispersion of the electroactive materials can lend insight into the complex electrochemistry associated with composite electrodes. In this study, composite magnetite electrodes were sectioned using ultramicrotome techniques, which facilitated the direct observation of crystallites and agglomerates of magnetite (Fe3O4) as well as their dispersal patterns in large representative sections of electrode, via 2D cross sectional analysis by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Further, the electrochemistry of these electrodes were recorded, and Transmission X-ray Microscopy (TXM) was used to determine the distribution of oxidation states of the reduced magnetite. Unexpectedly, while two crystallite sizes of magnetite were employed in the production of the composite electrodes, the magnetite agglomerate sizes and degrees of dispersion in the two composite electrodes were similar to each other. This observation illustrates the necessity for careful characterization of composite electrodes, in order to understand the effects of crystallite size, agglomerate size, and level of dispersion on electrochemistry. PMID:26024206

  20. Phenols and the antioxidant capacity of Mediterranean vegetables prepared with extra virgin olive oil using different domestic cooking techniques.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Anaya, Jessica Del Pilar; Samaniego-Sánchez, Cristina; Castañeda-Saucedo, Ma Claudia; Villalón-Mir, Marina; de la Serrana, Herminia López-García

    2015-12-01

    Potato, tomato, eggplant and pumpkin were deep fried, sautéed and boiled in Mediterranean extra virgin olive oil (EVOO), water, and a water/oil mixture (W/O). We determined the contents of fat, moisture, total phenols (TPC) and eighteen phenolic compounds, as well as antioxidant capacity in the raw vegetables and compared these with contents measured after cooking. Deep frying and sautéing led to increased fat contents and TPC, whereas both types of boiling (in water and W/O) reduced the same. The presence of EVOO in cooking increased the phenolics identified in the raw foods as oleuropein, pinoresinol, hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol, and the contents of vegetable phenolics such as chlorogenic acid and rutin. All the cooking methods conserved or increased the antioxidant capacity measured by DPPH, FRAP and ABTS. Multivariate analyses showed that each cooked vegetable developed specific phenolic and antioxidant activity profiles resulting from the characteristics of the raw vegetables and the cooking techniques. PMID:26041214

  1. Increased Oil Production and Reserves Utilizing Secondary/Tertiary Recovery Techniques on Small Reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah.

    SciTech Connect

    Chidsey, T.C. Jr.; Lorenz, D.M.; Culham, W.E.

    1997-10-15

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced oil recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon dioxide- (CO{sub 2}-) flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place in the Paradox basin within the Navajo Nation. The results of this project will be transferred to industry and other researchers through a petroleum extension service, creation of digital databases for distribution, technical workshops and seminars, field trips, technical presentations at national and regional professional meetings, and publication in newsletters and various technical or trade journals.

  2. Increased Oil Production and Reserves Utilizing Secondary/Tertiary Recovery Techniques on Small Reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, M. Lee; Chidsey, Jr., Thomas

    1999-11-03

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced oil recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to about 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million bbl of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon dioxide-(CO-) flood 2 project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place in the Paradox basin within the Navajo Nation. The results of this project will be transferred to industry and other researchers through a petroleum extension service, creation of digital databases for distribution, technical workshops and seminars, field trips, technical presentations at national and regional professional meetings, and publication in newsletters and various technical or trade journals.

  3. Feasibility study on oil droplet flow investigations inside aero engine bearing chambers -- PDPA techniques in combination with numerical approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Glahn, A.; Kurreck, M.; Willmann, M.; Wittig, S.

    1996-10-01

    The present paper deals with oil droplet flow phenomena in aero engine bearing chambers. An experimental investigation of droplet sizes and velocities utilizing a Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer (PDPA) has been performed for the first time in bearing chamber atmospheres under real engine conditions. Influences of high rotational speeds are discussed for individual droplet size classes. Although this is an important contribution to a better understanding of the droplet flow impact on secondary air/oil system performance, an analysis of the droplet flow behavior requires an incorporation of numerical methods because detailed measurements as performed here suffer from both strong spatial limitations with respect to the optical accessibility in real engine applications and constraints due to the extremely time-consuming nature of an experimental flow field analysis. Therefore, further analysis is based on numerical methods. Droplets characterized within the experiments are exposed to the flow field of the gaseous phase predicted by use of the well-known CFD code EPOS. The droplet trajectories and velocities are calculated within a Lagrangian frame of reference by forward numerical integration of the particle momentum equation. This paper has been initiated rather to show a successful method of bearing chamber droplet flow analysis by a combination of droplet sizing techniques and numerical approaches than to present field values as a function of all operating parameters. However, a first insight into the complex droplet flow phenomena is given and specific problems in bearing chamber heat transfer are related to the droplet flow.

  4. Engineering development of selective agglomeration. Site closeout report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The Selective Agglomeration POC facility consisted of a coal crushing and grinding circuit, followed by an agglomeration circuit and product dewatering. (A plot plan of the facility is shown in Figure 1-2.) The coal crushing and grinding system consisted of a hammermill coal crusher, weigh-belt feeder, two ball mills (primary and secondary), and necessary hoppers, pumps, and conveyors. The mills were capable of providing coal over a range of grinds from a d{sub 50} of 125 to 25 microns. Slurry discharged from the ball mills was pumped to the agglomeration circuit. The agglomeration circuit began with a high-shear mixer, where diesel was added to the slurry to begin the formation of microagglomerates. The high-shear mixer was followed by two stages of conventional flotation cells for microagglomerate recovery. The second-stage-flotation-cell product was pumped to either a rotary-drum vacuum filter or a high-G centrifuge for dewatering. The dewatered product was then convoyed to the product pad from which dump trucks were used to transfer it to the utility plant located next to the facility. Plant tailings were pumped to the water clarifier for thickening and then dewatered in plate-and-frame filter presses. These dewatered tailings were also removed to the utility via dump truck. Clarified water (thickener overflow) was recycled to the process via a head tank.

  5. Universities' Entrepreneurial Performance: The Role of Agglomeration Economies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Ping Penny

    2011-01-01

    In spite of the extensive research on universities' entrepreneurship, whether research strength fosters or dampens their entrepreneurial performance remains controversial. Much research claims an influential role of research universities in regional economy, however, little has been said about what a part that the agglomeration economies may play…

  6. Universities' Entrepreneurial Performance: The Role of Agglomeration Economies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Ping Penny

    2011-01-01

    In spite of the extensive research on universities' entrepreneurship, whether research strength fosters or dampens their entrepreneurial performance remains controversial. Much research claims an influential role of research universities in regional economy, however, little has been said about what a part that the agglomeration economies may play

  7. Using Essential Oils to Teach Advanced-Level Organic Chemistry Separation Techniques and Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bott, Tina M.; Wan, Hayley

    2013-01-01

    Students sometimes have difficulty grasping the importance of when and how basic distillation techniques, column chromatography, TLC, and basic spectroscopy (IR and NMR) can be used to identify unknown compounds within a mixture. This two-part experiment uses mixtures of pleasant-smelling, readily available terpenoid compounds as unknowns to…

  8. Using Essential Oils to Teach Advanced-Level Organic Chemistry Separation Techniques and Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bott, Tina M.; Wan, Hayley

    2013-01-01

    Students sometimes have difficulty grasping the importance of when and how basic distillation techniques, column chromatography, TLC, and basic spectroscopy (IR and NMR) can be used to identify unknown compounds within a mixture. This two-part experiment uses mixtures of pleasant-smelling, readily available terpenoid compounds as unknowns to

  9. Measuring emissions from oil and natural gas well pads using the mobile flux plane technique.

    PubMed

    Rella, Chris W; Tsai, Tracy R; Botkin, Connor G; Crosson, Eric R; Steele, David

    2015-04-01

    We present a study of methane emissions from oil and gas producing well pad facilities in the Barnett Shale region of Texas, measured using an innovative ground-based mobile flux plane (MFP) measurement system, as part of the Barnett Coordinated Campaign.1 Using only public roads, we measured the emissions from nearly 200 well pads over 2 weeks in October 2013. The population of measured well pads is split into well pads with detectable emissions (N = 115) and those with emissions below the detection limit of the MFP instrument (N = 67). For those well pads with nonzero emissions, the distribution was highly skewed, with a geometric mean of 0.63 kg/h, a geometric standard deviation of 4.2, and an arithmetic mean of 1.72 kg/h. Including the population of nonemitting well pads, we find that the arithmetic mean of the well pads sampled in this study is 1.1 kg/h. This distribution implies that 50% of the emissions is due to the 6.6% highest emitting well pads, and 80% of the emissions is from the 22% highest emitting well pads. PMID:25806837

  10. Recovering bioactive compounds from olive oil filter cake by advanced extraction techniques.

    PubMed

    Lozano-Sánchez, Jesús; Castro-Puyana, María; Mendiola, Jose A; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; Cifuentes, Alejandro; Ibáñez, Elena

    2014-01-01

    The potential of by-products generated during extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO) filtration as a natural source of phenolic compounds (with demonstrated bioactivity) has been evaluated using pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) and considering mixtures of two GRAS (generally recognized as safe) solvents (ethanol and water) at temperatures ranging from 40 to 175 °C. The extracts were characterized by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to diode array detection (DAD) and electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC-DAD-ESI-TOF/MS) to determine the phenolic-composition of the filter cake. The best isolation procedure to extract the phenolic fraction from the filter cake was accomplished using ethanol and water (50:50, v/v) at 120 °C. The main phenolic compounds identified in the samples were characterized as phenolic alcohols or derivatives (hydroxytyrosol and its oxidation product), secoiridoids (decarboxymethylated and hydroxylated forms of oleuropein and ligstroside aglycones), flavones (luteolin and apigenin) and elenolic acid derivatives. The PLE extraction process can be applied to produce enriched extracts with applications as bioactive food ingredients, as well as nutraceuticals. PMID:25226536

  11. Recovering Bioactive Compounds from Olive Oil Filter Cake by Advanced Extraction Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Lozano-Snchez, Jess; Castro-Puyana, Mara; Mendiola, Jose A.; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; Cifuentes, Alejandro; Ibez, Elena

    2014-01-01

    The potential of by-products generated during extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO) filtration as a natural source of phenolic compounds (with demonstrated bioactivity) has been evaluated using pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) and considering mixtures of two GRAS (generally recognized as safe) solvents (ethanol and water) at temperatures ranging from 40 to 175 C. The extracts were characterized by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to diode array detection (DAD) and electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC-DAD-ESI-TOF/MS) to determine the phenolic-composition of the filter cake. The best isolation procedure to extract the phenolic fraction from the filter cake was accomplished using ethanol and water (50:50, v/v) at 120 C. The main phenolic compounds identified in the samples were characterized as phenolic alcohols or derivatives (hydroxytyrosol and its oxidation product), secoiridoids (decarboxymethylated and hydroxylated forms of oleuropein and ligstroside aglycones), flavones (luteolin and apigenin) and elenolic acid derivatives. The PLE extraction process can be applied to produce enriched extracts with applications as bioactive food ingredients, as well as nutraceuticals. PMID:25226536

  12. Oscillatory behavior of the agglomeration rate in island copper films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damodara Das, V.; Sastry, M. S. Murali

    1986-05-01

    The post-deposition dc electrical-resistance increase of island copper films deposited on glass substrates at room temperature and at a pressure of 210-5 torr is studied. Films in the resistance range 10-95 M?/? were studied under different conditions to ascertain the role of residual gases and substrate-surface contaminants on the agglomeration rate. Mobility coalescence of small islands of Cu giving rise to an agglomerated film structure is assumed to explain the post-deposition resistance increase. It was found that the logarithm of the normalized resistance [ln(R/R0); R0 is the initial resistance of the film at a time t=0] varies linearly as the logarithm of the time elapsed after the cessation of deposition. The constant of proportionality in the above relationship, termed the agglomeration rate m, shows an interesting oscillatory dependence on the initial resistance of the film and the condition of study. Nearly all the maxima and minima of m for two of the conditions studied in detail as a function of the initial resistance occur at about the same initial resistance values with the films having almost the same structure at these points. An argument is put forward based on the oscillatory nature of the effective tunneling barrier as a function of the island size to explain this unusual behavior. It is found that the presence of a thin film of water vapor on the substrate surface impedes the agglomeration rate to a great extent while the presence of adsorbed O2 and N2 decreases the energy for surface migration of islands of copper thereby increasing the agglomeration rate.

  13. Improving the de-agglomeration and dissolution of a poorly water soluble drug by decreasing the agglomerate strength of the cohesive powder.

    PubMed

    Allahham, Ayman; Stewart, Peter J; Das, Shyamal C

    2013-11-30

    Influence of ternary, poorly water-soluble components on the agglomerate strength of cohesive indomethacin mixtures during dissolution was studied to explore the relationship between agglomerate strength and extent of de-agglomeration and dissolution of indomethacin (Ind). Dissolution profiles of Ind from 20% Ind-lactose binary mixtures, and ternary mixtures containing additional dibasic calcium phosphate (1% or 10%; DCP), calcium sulphate (10%) and talc (10%) were determined. Agglomerate strength distributions were estimated by Monte Carlo simulation of particle size, work of cohesion and packing fraction distributions. The agglomerate strength of Ind decreased from 1.19 MPa for the binary Ind mixture to 0.84 MPa for 1DCP:20Ind mixture and to 0.42 MPa for 1DCP:2Ind mixture. Both extent of de-agglomeration, demonstrated by the concentration of the dispersed indomethacin distribution, and extent of dispersion, demonstrated by the particle size of the dispersed indomethacin, were in descending order of 1DCP:2Ind>1DCP:20Ind>binary Ind. The addition of calcium sulphate dihydrate and talc also reduced the agglomerate strength and improved de-agglomeration and dispersion of indomethacin. While not definitively causal, the improved de-agglomeration and dispersion of a poorly water soluble drug by poorly water soluble components was related to the agglomerate strength of the cohesive matrix during dissolution. PMID:24080334

  14. Acoustic agglomeration of power plant fly ash. Fifth quarterly report, September 8-December 7, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Reethof, G.

    1984-12-07

    This quarterly report summarizes work accomplished on acoustic agglomeration of power plant fly ash. This includes: acoustic modeling, basic acoustic investigations, a 700/sup 0/F agglomerator and the development of a high efficiency siren.

  15. Improved techniques for fluid diversion in oil recovery. First annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Seright, R.S.

    1993-12-01

    This three-year project has two general objectives. The first objective is to compare the effectiveness of gels in fluid diversion with those of other types of processes. Several different types of fluid-diversion processes are being compared, including those using gels, foams, emulsions, and particulates. The ultimate goals of these comparisons are to (1) establish which of these processes are most effective in a given application, and (2) determine whether aspects of one process can be combined with those of other processes to improve performance. Analyses and experiments are being performed to verify which materials are the most effective in entering and blocking high-permeability zones. Another objective of the project is to identify the mechanisms by which materials (particularly gels) selectively reduce permeability to water more than to oil. This report describes work performed during the first year of the project. Following the introduction, Chapters 2 through 5 present several surveys concerning field applications of gel treatments. Based on the results of the surveys, guidelines are proposed in Chapter 5 for the selection of candidates for gel treatments (both injection wells and production wells). Chapters 6, 7, 8, and 11 discuss theoretical work that was performed during the project. Chapter 6 examines whether Hall plots indicated selectivity during gelant placement. Chapter 7 discusses several important theoretical aspects of gel treatments in production wells with water-coning problems. Chapter 8 considers exploitation of density differences during gelant placement. Chapter 11 presents a preliminary consideration of the use of precipitates as blocking agents. Chapters 9 and 10 detail the experimental work for the project. Chapter 9 describes an experimental investigation of gelant placement in fractured systems. Chapter 10 describes experiments that probe the mechanisms for disproportionate permeability reduction by gels.

  16. Oscillatory Dynamics of Single Bubbles and Agglomeration in a Sound Field in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marston, Philip L.; Trinh, Eugene H.; Depew, Jon; Asaki, Thomas J.

    1994-01-01

    A dual-frequency acoustic levitator containing water was developed for studying bubble and drop dynamics in low gravity. It was flown on USML-1 where it was used in the Glovebox facility. High frequency (21 or 63 kHz) ultrasonic waves were modulated by low frequencies to excite shape oscillations on bubbles and oil drops ultrasonically trapped in the water. Bubble diameters were typically close to 1 cm or larger. When such large bubbles are acoustically trapped on the Earth, the acoustic radiation pressure needed to overcome buoyancy tends to shift the natural frequency for quadrupole (n = 2) oscillations above the prediction of Lamb's equation. In low gravity, a much weaker trapping force was used and measurements of n = 2 and 3 mode frequencies were closer to the ideal case. Other video observations in low gravity include: (i) the transient reappearance of a bulge where a small bubble has coalesced with a large one, (ii) observations of the dynamics of bubbles coated by oil indicating that shape oscillations can shift a coated bubble away from the oil-water interface of the coating giving a centering of the core, and (iii) the agglomeration of bubbles induced by the sound field.

  17. Dispersion and Filtration of Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) and Measurement of Nanoparticle Agglomerates in Diesel Exhaust

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Pui, David Y.H.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) tend to form bundles due to their geometry and van der Walls forces, which usually complicates studies of the CNT properties. Dispersion plays a significant role in CNT studies and we summarize dispersion techniques to generate airborne CNTs from suspensions or powders. We describe in detail our technique of CNT aerosolization with controlled degree of agglomeration using an electrospray system. The results of animal inhalation studies using the electrosprayed CNTs are presented. We have performed filtration experiments for CNTs through a screen filter. A numerical model has been established to simulate the CNT filtration experiments. Both the modeling and experimental results show that the CNT penetration is less than the penetration for a sphere with the same mobility diameter, which is mainly due to the larger interception length of the CNTs. There is a need for instruments capable of fast and online measurement of gas-borne nanoparticle agglomerates. We developed an instrument Universal NanoParticle Analyzer (UNPA) and the measurement results for diesel exhaust particulates are presented. The results presented here are pertinent to non-spherical aerosol particles, and illustrate the effects of particle morphology on aerosol behaviors. PMID:23355749

  18. Application of data mining techniques to identify data anomalies: a case study in the oil and gas industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormack, Jenifer S.; Wohlschlaeger, Brian; Lanier, Bryan

    2002-03-01

    This paper presents the application of the AgentMinerTM tool suite to improve the efficiency of detecting data anomalies in oil well log and production data sets, which have traditionally been done by hand or through the use of database business rules. There was a need to verify the data sets, once cleansed and certified to ensure that the existing data certification process was effective. There was also a need to identify more complex relational data anomalies that cannot be addressed by simple business rules. Analysis techniques including statistical clustering, correlation and 3-D data visualization techniques were successfully utilized to identify potential complex data anomalies. A data-preprocessing tool was also applied to automatically detect simple data errors such as missing, out of range, and null values. The pre-processing tools were also used to prepare the data sets for further statistical and visualization analyses. To enhance the discovery of data anomalies two different data visualization tools for the data clusters were applied.

  19. Modified extrusion-spheronization as a technique of microencapsulation for stabilization of choline bitartrate using hydrogenated soya bean oil

    PubMed Central

    Gangurde, Avinash Bhaskar; Sav, Ajay Kumar; Javeer, Sharadchandra Dagadu; Moravkar, Kailas K; Pawar, Jaywant N; Amin, Purnima D

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Choline bitartrate (CBT) is a vital nutrient for fetal brain development and memory function. It is hygroscopic in nature which is associated with stability related problem during storage such as development of fishy odor and discoloration. Aim: Microencapsulation method was adopted to resolve the stability problem and for this hydrogenated soya bean oil (HSO) was used as encapsulating agent. Materials and Methods: Industrially feasible modified extrusion-spheronization technique was selected for microencapsulation. HSO was used as encapsulating agent, hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose E5/E15 as binder and microcrystalline cellulose as spheronization aid. Formulated pellets were evaluated for parameters such as flow property, morphological characteristics, hardness-friability index (HFI), drug content, encapsulation efficiency, and in vitro drug release. The optimized formulations were also characterized for particle size (by laser diffractometry), differential scanning calorimetry, powder X-ray diffractometry (PXRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Results and Discussions: The results from the study showed that coating of 90% and 60% CBT was successful with respect to all desired evaluation parameters. Optimized formulation was kept for 6 months stability study as per ICH guidelines, and there was no change in color, moisture content, drug content, and no fishy odor was observed. Conclusion: Microencapsulated pellets of CBT using HSO as encapsulating agent were developed using modified extrusion spheronization technique. Optimized formulations, CBT 90% (F5), and CBT 60% (F10), were found to be stable for 4M and 6M, respectively, at accelerated conditions. PMID:26682198

  20. Antisolvent-induced agglomeration of mineral matter in coal-derived liquids. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, J.D. Jr.; Verhoff, F.H.

    1981-04-01

    The influence of many of the variables associated with anti-solvent induced agglomeration of mineral matter in coal derived liquids was observed by an indirect x-ray photographic measurement of sedimentation. The primary variables were anti-solvent type, dose, combinations of anti-solvent and gas, anti-solvent addition rate, and mixing properties. Also, the properties of the coal derived liquids have a great influence on the ash agglomeration and sedimentation. A correlation is proposed which relates the effectiveness of various anti-solvents, as evidenced by an increase in the initial settling rate, with their carbon/hydrogen ratio and solubility parameter. The advantage of this correlation over those proposed earlier is that it involves more fundamental and readily available properties of the anti-solvent. Anti-solvent mixture effects can be predicted by using molar weighted averages of the carbon/hydrogen ratio and solubility parameter. Mixing speed is a more important variable than mixing time. Sequential mixing, i.e., a short period of high speed followed by a longer period of low speed mixing produces an increase in the initial settling rate. Mathematical models are proposed to explain the effects of mixing. It was found that increased preasphaltene content of the coal derived liquids greatly increased the efficiency of the anti-solvents for agglomeration and sedimentation. In addition to using the x-ray technique to evaluate vertical sedimentation of ash particles, the experimental apparatus was modified to permit inclined batch sedimentation experiments. As expected, the sedimentation rate greatly increased in the inclined settler. The experimental data compared well with existing theories.

  1. Flow Cytometry: A Promising Technique for the Study of Silicone Oil-Induced Particulate Formation in Protein Formulations

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, D. Brett; Trotter, Joseph T.; Gabrielson, John P.; Carpenter, John F.

    2010-01-01

    Subvisible particles in formulations intended for parenteral administration are of concern in the biopharmaceutical industry. However, monitoring and control of subvisible particulates can be complicated by formulation components, such as the silicone oil used for the lubrication of prefilled syringes, and it is difficult to differentiate microdroplets of silicone oil from particles formed by aggregated protein. In this study, we demonstrate the ability of flow cytometry to resolve mixtures comprising subvisible bovine serum albumin (BSA) aggregate particles and silicone oil emulsion droplets with adsorbed BSA. Flow cytometry was also utilized to investigate the effects of silicone oil emulsions on the stability BSA, lysozyme, abatacept or trastuzumab formulations containing surfactant, sodium chloride or sucrose. To aid in particle characterization, the fluorescence detection capabilities of Flow cytometry were exploited by staining silicone oil with BODIPY 493/503 and model proteins with Alexa Fluor 647. Flow cytometric analyses revealed that silicone oil emulsions induced the loss of soluble protein via protein adsorption onto the silicone oil droplet surface. Addition of surfactant prevented protein from adsorbing onto the surface of silicone oil droplets. There was minimal formation of homogeneous protein aggregates due to exposure to silicone oil droplets, although oil droplets with surface-adsorbed trastuzumab exhibited flocculation. The results of this study demonstrate the utility of flow cytometry as an analytical tool for monitoring the effects of subvisible silicone oil droplets on the stability of protein formulations. PMID:21146492

  2. Exploring Oil Pollution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rillo, Thomas J.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses damages of oil tanker spillage to the marine organisms and scientists' research in oil pollution removal techniques. Included is a list of learning activities concerning the causes and effects of oil pollution and methods of solving the problem. (CC)

  3. Soot oxidation and agglomeration modeling in a microgravity diffusion flame

    SciTech Connect

    Ezekoye, O.A.; Zhang, Z.

    1997-07-01

    The global evolution of a microgravity diffusion flame is detailed. Gas species evolution is computed using a reduced finite rate chemical mechanism. Soot evolution is computed using various combinations of existing soot mechanisms. Radiative transfer is coupled to the soot and gas phase chemistry processes using a P1 spherical harmonics radiation model. The soot agglomeration model was examined to note the dependence of soot growth and oxidation processes on soot surface area predictions. For limiting cases where agglomeration was excluded from the soot evolution model, soot primary particle sizes and number concentrations were calculated, and the number of primary particles per aggregate was inferred. These computations are compared with experimental results for microgravity and nonbuoyant flame conditions.

  4. Multi-level particle packing model of ceramic agglomerates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jong Cheol; Auh, Keun Ho; Martin, David M.

    2000-03-01

    Multi-level packing of spherical ceramic particles is simulated in three dimensions. The packing process is composed of two steps: particles are packed to make clusters and clusters are packed to make aggregates. Cluster rearrangement is simulated by randomly rolling each cluster over its neighbour's surface. The degree of cluster rearrangement during the cluster condensation process controls agglomerate compactness. This approach was possible using the simple assumption that clusters are spheres with radii equal to the mean interparticle distance in the clusters. The clusters which are rearranged have higher packing density than the clusters which are not rearranged. The effect of cluster rearrangement during condensation on the total compactness of agglomerates is found to be comparable to the effect of particle rearrangement during condensation.

  5. Preventing ash agglomeration during gasification of high-sodium lignite

    SciTech Connect

    Robert S. Dahlin; Johnny R. Dorminey; WanWang Peng; Roxann F. Leonard; Pannalal Vimalchand

    2009-01-15

    Various additives were evaluated to assess their ability to prevent ash agglomeration during the gasification of high-sodium lignite. Additives that showed promise in simple muffle furnace tests included meta-kaolin, vermiculite, two types of silica fume, and one type of bauxite. Additives that were tested and rejected included dolomite, calcite, sand flour, kaolinite, fine kaolin, and calcined bauxite. Based on the muffle furnace test results, the meta-kaolin was selected for a follow-on demonstration in a pilot-scale coal gasifier. Pilot-scale testing showed that the addition of coarse (minus 14-mesh, 920-{mu}m mean size) meta-kaolin at a feed rate roughly equivalent to the ash content of the lignite (10 wt %) successfully prevented agglomeration and deposition problems during gasification of high-sodium lignite at a maximum operating temperature of 927{sup o}C (1700{sup o}F). 13 refs., 24 figs., 1 tab.

  6. The impact of agglomeration economies on hospital input prices.

    PubMed

    Friedson, Andrew I; Li, Jing

    2015-12-01

    This paper examines the extent to which agglomeration of the hospital service industry enhances the productivity of producing health care. Specifically, we use a large set of private insurance claims from the FAIR Health database to show that an increasing spatial concentration of hospital services results in a decreased cost of obtaining intermediate medical services. We explicitly test whether the reduced cost at concentrated locations arises from the ability to share intermediate service providers. The identification relies on state variation in medical lab technician licensure requirements, which influence the cost of intermediate services only through the cost of running a lab. Our findings suggest that agglomeration of the hospital service industry attracts specialized medical labs, which in turn help to reduce the cost of producing laboratory tests. PMID:26642802

  7. Engineering development of selective agglomeration: Trace element removal study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    Southern Company Services, Inc., (SCS) was contracted in 1989 by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop a commercially acceptable selective agglomeration technology to enhance the use of high-sulfur coals by 1993. The project scope involved development of a bench-scale process and components, as well as the design, testing, and evaluation of a proof-of-concept (POC) facility. To that end, a two-ton-per-hour facility was constructed and tested near Wilsonville, Alabama. Although it was not the primary focus of the test program, SCS also measured the ability of selective agglomeration to remove trace elements from coal. This document describes the results of that program.

  8. Modeling of colloid agglomeration inhibition inside a slitlike pore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcenas, Mariana; Douda, Janna; Duda, Yurko; Orea, Pedro

    2010-04-01

    An extended particle agglomeration control model and Monte Carlo simulation methodology were used to describe the behavior of the colloidal aggregation process in presence of inhibitor as a confined fluid. In this work results about the mean cluster size, Z, with respect to different variables, temperature, inhibitor concentration and pore size, are presented and showed that Z strongly depends on the slitlike pore size. In addition, a temperature interval where the heating of the system leads to the particle clustering was found.

  9. Parallel Element Agglomeration Algebraic Multigrid and Upscaling Library

    SciTech Connect

    2015-02-19

    ParFELAG is a parallel distributed memory C++ library for numerical upscaling of finite element discretizations. It provides optimal complesity algorithms ro build multilevel hierarchies and solvers that can be used for solving a wide class of partial differential equations (elliptic, hyperbolic, saddle point problems) on general unstructured mesh (under the assumption that the topology of the agglomerated entities is correct). Additionally, a novel multilevel solver for saddle point problems with divergence constraint is implemented.

  10. Nifedipine Nanoparticle Agglomeration as a Dry Powder Aerosol Formulation Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Plumley, Carl; Gorman, Eric M.; Munson, Eric J.; Berkland, Cory

    2009-01-01

    Efficient administration of drugs represents a leading challenge in pulmonary medicine. Dry powder aerosols are of great interest compared to traditional aerosolized liquid formulations in that they may offer improved stability, ease of administration, and simple device design. Particles 15 m in size typically facilitate lung deposition. Nanoparticles may be exhaled as a result of their small size; however, they are desired to enhance the dissolution rate of poorly soluble drugs. Nanoparticles of the hypertension drug nifedipine were co-precipitated with stearic acid to form a colloid exhibiting negative surface charge. Nifedipine nanoparticle colloids were destabilized by using sodium chloride to disrupt the electrostatic repulsion between particles as a means to achieve the agglomerated nanoparticles of a controlled size. The aerodynamic performance of agglomerated nanoparticles was determined by cascade impaction. The powders were found to be well suited for pulmonary delivery. In addition, nanoparticle agglomerates revealed enhanced dissolution of the drug species suggesting the value of this formulation approach for poorly water soluble pulmonary medicines. Ultimately, nifedipine powders are envisioned as an approach to treat pulmonary hypertension. PMID:19015016

  11. Combustion of metal agglomerates in a solid rocket core flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggi, Filippo; Dossi, Stefano; DeLuca, Luigi T.

    2013-12-01

    The need for access to space may require the use of solid propellants. High thrust and density are appealing features for different applications, spanning from boosting phase to other service applications (separation, de-orbiting, orbit insertion). Aluminum is widely used as a fuel in composite solid rocket motors because metal oxidation increases enthalpy release in combustion chamber and grants higher specific impulse. Combustion process of metal particles is complex and involves aggregation, agglomeration and evolution of reacting particulate inside the core flow of the rocket. It is always stated that residence time should be enough in order to grant complete metal oxidation but agglomerate initial size, rocket grain geometry, burning rate, and other factors have to be reconsidered. New space missions may not require large rocket systems and metal combustion efficiency becomes potentially a key issue to understand whether solid propulsion embodies a viable solution or liquid/hybrid systems are better. A simple model for metal combustion is set up in this paper. Metal particles are represented as single drops trailed by the core flow and reacted according to Beckstead's model. The fluid dynamics is inviscid, incompressible, 1D. The paper presents parametric computations on ideal single-size particles as well as on experimental agglomerate populations as a function of operating rocket conditions and geometries.

  12. High-pressure liquid dispersion and fragmentation of flame-made silica agglomerates.

    PubMed

    Wengeler, Robert; Teleki, Alexandra; Vetter, Markus; Pratsinis, Sotiris E; Nirschl, Hermann

    2006-05-23

    The influence of primary particle diameter and the degree of agglomeration of flame-made silica agglomerate suspensions in aqueous solutions is studied by high-pressure dispersion (up to 1500 bar) through a nozzle with a 125 microm inner diameter. These particles were produced (4-15 g/h) by oxidation of hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) in a coflow diffusion flame reactor. Their average primary particle size (10-50 nm) and degree of agglomeration were controlled by varying the oxygen and precursor flow rates. The particles were characterized by nitrogen adsorption, electron microscopy, and small-angle X-ray scattering. Hydrodynamic stresses break up soft agglomerates and yield hard agglomerate sizes in the range of 100-180 nm, as characterized by dynamic light scattering. Soft agglomerates exhibited decreasing light scattering diameters with increasing dispersion pressure, while hard agglomerates were insensitive. PMID:16700577

  13. Crystal agglomeration of europium oxalate in reaction crystallization using double-jet semi-batch reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Woo-Sik; Kim, Woon-Soo; Kim, Kwang-Seok; Kim, Joon-Soo; Ward, Michael D

    2004-02-02

    The particle agglomeration of europium oxalate was investigated in a double-jet semi-batch reactor over a wide range of operating variables, including the agitation speed, reactant feed rate, and reactant concentration. The size of the agglomerates was directly dictated by the particle collision and supersaturation promoting agglomeration and the fluid shear force inhibiting agglomeration. Thus, with a longer feeding time and higher feed concentration for the reaction crystallization, the mean particle size increased, while the corresponding total particle population decreased due to the enhanced chance of particle agglomeration, resulting from a longer residence time and higher supersaturation in the reactor. Agitation was found to exhibit a rather complicated influence on particle agglomeration. Although both particle collision and turbulent fluid shear were promoted by an increase in the mixing intensity, the crystal agglomeration of europium oxalate was maximized at around 500 rpm of agitation speed due to an optimized balance between particle aggregation and breakage.

  14. Development of Impregnated Agglomerate Pelletization (IAP) process for fabrication of (Th,U)O 2 mixed oxide pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khot, P. M.; Nehete, Y. G.; Fulzele, A. K.; Baghra, Chetan; Mishra, A. K.; Afzal, Mohd.; Panakkal, J. P.; Kamath, H. S.

    2012-01-01

    Impregnated Agglomerate Pelletization (IAP) technique has been developed at Advanced Fuel Fabrication Facility (AFFF), BARC, Tarapur, for manufacturing (Th, 233U)O 2 mixed oxide fuel pellets, which are remotely fabricated in hot cell or shielded glove box facilities to reduce man-rem problem associated with 232U daughter radionuclides. This technique is being investigated to fabricate the fuel for Indian Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR). In the IAP process, ThO 2 is converted to free flowing spheroids by powder extrusion route in an unshielded facility which are then coated with uranyl nitrate solution in a shielded facility. The dried coated agglomerate is finally compacted and then sintered in oxidizing/reducing atmosphere to obtain high density (Th,U)O 2 pellets. In this study, fabrication of (Th,U)O 2 mixed oxide pellets containing 3-5 wt.% UO 2 was carried out by IAP process. The pellets obtained were characterized using optical microscopy, XRD and alpha autoradiography. The results obtained were compared with the results for the pellets fabricated by other routes such as Coated Agglomerate Pelletization (CAP) and Powder Oxide Pelletization (POP) route.

  15. Study of ink paper sensor based on aluminum/carbon nanotubes agglomerated nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    dos Reis, Marcos A L; Saraiva, Augusto F; Vieira, Manuel F G; Del Nero, Jordan

    2012-09-01

    Agglomerated nanocomposites based on Aluminum/Carbon Nanotubes (AI/CNT) were produced by an arc discharge technique under argon/acetone atmosphere and ultrasonically dispersed in distilled water to form an ink-like composite. This ink was spread onto commercial paper to produce a conductive thick film. Experimental results show that the electrical resistance of Al/CNT nanocomposite on paper changes when a mechanical stress and/or heat is applied. The multi-sensory properties obtained are the following: (i) piezoresistive effect, electrical resistance shows linear dependence with pressure intensity at room temperature; (ii) polynomial relationship between electrical resistance and temperature; and (iii) high accuracy thermal sensor compared to a K type thermocouple at 25 degrees C. The nanocomposite and paper morphology was analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive Spectrometry (SEM/EDS) and a favorable surface for physisorption was observed. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) was utilized for Al/CNT agglomerated indicating that the ink paper based on nanocomposite shows good performance as a thermo-piezoresistive sensor. PMID:23035420

  16. On the flexibility of agglomeration based physical space discontinuous Galerkin discretizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassi, F.; Botti, L.; Colombo, A.; Di Pietro, D. A.; Tesini, P.

    2012-01-01

    In this work we show that the flexibility of the discontinuous Galerkin (dG) discretization can be fruitfully exploited to implement numerical solution strategies based on the use of elements with very general shapes. Thanks to the freedom in defining the mesh topology, we propose a new h-adaptive technique based on agglomeration coarsening of a fine mesh. The possibility to enhance the error distribution over the computational domain is investigated on a Poisson problem with the goal of obtaining a mesh independent discretization. The main building block of our dG method consists of defining discrete polynomial spaces directly on physical frame elements. For this purpose we orthonormalize with respect to the L2-product a set of monomials relocated in a specific element frame and we introduce an easy way to reduce the cost related to numerical integration on agglomerated meshes. To complete the dG formulation for second order problems, two extensions of the BR2 scheme to arbitrary polyhedral grids, including an estimate of the stabilization parameter ensuring the coercivity property, are here proposed.

  17. Process for converting heavy oil deposited on coal to distillable oil in a low severity process

    DOEpatents

    Ignasiak, Teresa (417 Heffernan Drive, Edmonton, Alberta, CA); Strausz, Otto (13119 Grand View Drive, Edmonton, Alberta, CA); Ignasiak, Boleslaw (417 heffernan Drive, Edmonton, Alberta, CA); Janiak, Jerzy (17820 - 76 Ave., Edmonton, Alberta, CA); Pawlak, Wanda (3046 - 11465 - 41 Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta, CA); Szymocha, Kazimierz (3125 - 109 Street, Edmonton, Alberta, CA); Turak, Ali A. (Edmonton, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A process for removing oil from coal fines that have been agglomerated or blended with heavy oil comprises the steps of heating the coal fines to temperatures over 350.degree. C. up to 450.degree. C. in an inert atmosphere, such as steam or nitrogen, to convert some of the heavy oil to lighter, and distilling and collecting the lighter oils. The pressure at which the process is carried out can be from atmospheric to 100 atmospheres. A hydrogen donor can be added to the oil prior to deposition on the coal surface to increase the yield of distillable oil.

  18. Wear Characterizations of Polyoxymethylene (POM) Reinforced with Carbon Nanotubes (POM/CNTs) Using the Paraffin Oil Dispersion Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousef, Samy; Visco, A. M.; Galtieri, G.; Njuguna, James

    2015-10-01

    The wear of polyoxymethylene (POM) is considered a key design parameter of polymer gears and some mechanical applications, and it determines the service time span. This work investigates the influence of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on the specific wear rate of POM/CNT nanocomposites by using a pin-on-disk test rig (sliding only). The CNTs were synthesized with a fully automatic machine via the arc-discharge multi-electrode technique and subsequently dispersed in a POM matrix to manufacture test specimens. The CNT weight percentages were varied within the range 0-0.03 wt.% in three different operating media (air, distilled water, and mineral oil). The wear mechanism was examined by microscopy. The mechanical and thermal properties of POM/CNT were studied by using calorimetric analysis and by mechanical tensile testing. In addition, the thermal and mechanical properties were improved to an optimum CNT ratio of 0.02 wt.% due to the improvement in crystallinity of POM and a decrease in the fusion defects. The crystallinity degree increased by 7%, and the melting temperature also increased. The results further indicate that the specific wear rate (Ws) for POM/CNT containing 0.03 wt.% CNT in air and water media was improved by 73% and 66%, respectively, compared with virgin POM. In addition, the tensile strength of the mechanical properties and Young's modulus increased by 31% and 29%, respectively.

  19. Wear Characterizations of Polyoxymethylene (POM) Reinforced with Carbon Nanotubes (POM/CNTs) Using the Paraffin Oil Dispersion Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousef, Samy; Visco, A. M.; Galtieri, G.; Njuguna, James

    2016-01-01

    The wear of polyoxymethylene (POM) is considered a key design parameter of polymer gears and some mechanical applications, and it determines the service time span. This work investigates the influence of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on the specific wear rate of POM/CNT nanocomposites by using a pin-on-disk test rig (sliding only). The CNTs were synthesized with a fully automatic machine via the arc-discharge multi-electrode technique and subsequently dispersed in a POM matrix to manufacture test specimens. The CNT weight percentages were varied within the range 0-0.03 wt.% in three different operating media (air, distilled water, and mineral oil). The wear mechanism was examined by microscopy. The mechanical and thermal properties of POM/CNT were studied by using calorimetric analysis and by mechanical tensile testing. In addition, the thermal and mechanical properties were improved to an optimum CNT ratio of 0.02 wt.% due to the improvement in crystallinity of POM and a decrease in the fusion defects. The crystallinity degree increased by 7%, and the melting temperature also increased. The results further indicate that the specific wear rate (Ws) for POM/CNT containing 0.03 wt.% CNT in air and water media was improved by 73% and 66%, respectively, compared with virgin POM. In addition, the tensile strength of the mechanical properties and Young's modulus increased by 31% and 29%, respectively.

  20. A review on risk assessment techniques for hydraulic fracturing water and produced water management implemented in onshore unconventional oil and gas production.

    PubMed

    Torres, Luisa; Yadav, Om Prakash; Khan, Eakalak

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to review different risk assessment techniques applicable to onshore unconventional oil and gas production to determine the risks to water quantity and quality associated with hydraulic fracturing and produced water management. Water resources could be at risk without proper management of water, chemicals, and produced water. Previous risk assessments in the oil and gas industry were performed from an engineering perspective leaving aside important social factors. Different risk assessment methods and techniques are reviewed and summarized to select the most appropriate one to perform a holistic and integrated analysis of risks at every stage of the water life cycle. Constraints to performing risk assessment are identified including gaps in databases, which require more advanced techniques such as modeling. Discussions on each risk associated with water and produced water management, mitigation strategies, and future research direction are presented. Further research on risks in onshore unconventional oil and gas will benefit not only the U.S. but also other countries with shale oil and gas resources. PMID:26386446

  1. Agglomeration processes sustained by dust density waves in Ar/C{sub 2}H{sub 2} plasma: From C{sub 2}H{sub 2} injection to the formation of an organized structure

    SciTech Connect

    Dap, Simon; Hugon, Robert; Poucques, Ludovic de; Briancon, Jean-Luc; Bougdira, Jamal; Lacroix, David

    2013-03-15

    In this paper, an experimental investigation of dust particle agglomeration in a capacitively coupled RF discharge is reported. Carbonaceous particles are produced in an argon plasma using acetylene. As soon as the particle density becomes sufficient, dust density waves (DDWs) are spontaneously excited within the cathode sheath. Recently, it was proven that DDWs can significantly enhance the agglomeration rate between particles by transferring them a significant kinetic energy. Thus, it helps them to overcome Coulomb repulsion. The influence of this mechanism is studied from acetylene injection to the formation of very large agglomerates forming an organized structure after a few dozens of seconds. For this purpose, three diagnostic tools are used: extinction measurements to probe nanometer-sized particles, fast imaging for large agglomerates and a dust extraction technique developed for ex-situ analysis.

  2. Preparation methods for monodispersed garlic oil microspheres in water using the microemulsion technique and their potential as antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hua Ming; Li, Hou Bin; Wang, Da Wei; Liu, Dun

    2013-08-01

    Garlic oil is considered as a natural broad-spectrum antibiotic because of its well-known antimicrobial activity. However, the characteristics of easy volatility and poor aqueous solubility limit the application of garlic oil in industry. The purpose of the present work is to develop and evaluate an oil-free microemulsion by loading garlic oil in microemulsion system. Microemulsions were prepared with ethoxylated hydrogenated castor (Cremophor RH40) as surfactant, n-butanol (or ethanol) as cosurfactant, oleic acid-containing garlic oil as oil phase, and ultrapure water as water phase. The effects of the ratio of surfactant to cosurfactant and different oil concentration on the area of oil-in-water (O/W) microemulsion region in pseudoternary phase diagrams were investigated. The particle size and garlic oil encapsulation efficiency of the formed microemulsions with different formulations were also investigated. In addition, the antimicrobial activity in vitro against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus was assessed. The experimental results show that a stable microemulsion region can be obtained when the mass ratio of surfactant to cosurfactant is, respectively, 1:1, 2:1, and 3:1. Especially, when the mixture surfactants of RH40/n-butanol 2/1 (w/w) is used in the microemulsion formulation, the area of O/W microemulsion region is 0.089 with the particle size 13.29 to 13.85 nm and garlic oil encapsulation efficiency 99.5%. The prepared microemulsion solution exhibits remarkable antibacterial activity against S. aureus. PMID:23957416

  3. Excitation-emission fluorescence spectroscopy combined with three-way methods of analysis as a complementary technique for olive oil characterization.

    PubMed

    Guimet, Francesca; Ferr, Joan; Boqu, Ricard; Vidal, Marta; Garcia, Josep

    2005-11-30

    This paper shows the potential of excitation-emission fluorescence spectroscopy (EEFS) and three-way methods of analysis [parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) and multiway partial least-squares (N-PLS) regression] as a complementary technique for olive oil characterization. The fluorescence excitation-emission matrices of a set of Spanish extra virgin, virgin, pure, and olive pomace oils were measured, and the relationship between them and some of the quality parameters of olive oils (peroxide value, K232, and K270) was studied. N-PLS was found to be more suitable than PARAFAC combined with multiple linear regression for correlating fluorescence and quality parameters, yielding better fits and lower prediction errors. The best results were obtained for predicting K270. EEFS allowed detection of extra virgin olive oils highly degraded at early stages (with high peroxide value) and little oxidized pure olive oils (with low K270). The proposed methodology may be used as an aid to analyze doubtful samples. PMID:16302742

  4. Productivity and quality of volatile oil extracted from Mentha spicata and M. arvensis var. piperascens grown by a hydroponic system using the deep flow technique.

    PubMed

    Vimolmangkang, Sornkanok; Sitthithaworn, Worapan; Vannavanich, Danai; Keattikunpairoj, Sunisa; Chittasupho, Chuda

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the differences between spearmint (Mentha spicata L.) and Japanese mint (M. arvensis L. var. piperascens Malinv.) cultivated in either soil or nutrient solution using the deep flow technique (DFT). The differences were measured in terms of harvest period (full bloom period) and quantity and chemical components of volatile oils. The spearmint and Japanese mint were cultivated in four different nutrient formulas: plant standard nutrient, plant standard nutrient with an amino acid mixture, plant standard nutrient with a sulphur compound, and a combination of plant standard nutrient with an amino acid mixture and a sulphur compound. We observed that cultivation of spearmint and Japanese mint in nutrient solution using DFT is an effective method to provide high production of volatile oil, since it results in an earlier harvest period and higher quantity of volatile oil. We determined that for spearmint an amino acid mixture is an appropriate nutrient supplement to enhance production of volatile oil with optimum carvone content. Finally, we observed high menthol content in Japanese mint grown in all four nutrient formulas; however, supplementation with a combination of sulphur fertilisation and amino acid mixture yields the highest quantity of volatile oil. PMID:19763744

  5. Evaluation of optical and electronic properties of silicon nano-agglomerates embedded in SRO: applying density functional theory

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In systems in atomic scale and nanoscale such as clusters or agglomerates constituted by particles from a few to less than 100 atoms, quantum confinement effects are very important. Their optical and electronic properties are often dependent on the size of the systems and the way in which the atoms in these clusters are bonded. Generally, these nanostructures display optical and electronic properties significantly different to those found in corresponding bulk materials. Silicon agglomerates embedded in silicon rich oxide (SRO) films have optical properties, which have been reported to be directly dependent on silicon nanocrystal size. Furthermore, the room temperature photoluminescence (PL) of SRO has repeatedly generated a huge interest due to its possible applications in optoelectronic devices. However, a plausible emission mechanism has not been widely accepted in the scientific community. In this work, we present a short review about the experimental results on silicon nanoclusters in SRO considering different techniques of growth. We focus mainly on their size, Raman spectra, and photoluminescence spectra. With this as background, we employed the density functional theory with a functional B3LYP and a basis set 6-31G* to calculate the optical and electronic properties of clusters of silicon (constituted by 15 to 20 silicon atoms). With the theoretical calculation of the structural and optical properties of silicon clusters, it is possible to evaluate the contribution of silicon agglomerates in the luminescent emission mechanism, experimentally found in thin SRO films. PMID:25276105

  6. Fabrication, characterization and pharmacokinetic evaluation of doxorubicin-loaded water-in-oil-in-water microemulsions using a membrane emulsification technique.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Roshan; Kim, Yong-Il; Jeong, Jee-Heon; Choi, Han-Gon; Yong, Chul Soon; Kim, Jong Oh

    2014-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W) microemulsions were produced using a shirasu-porous-glass (SPG) membrane emulsification technique. Soybean oil was used as the oil phase; polyglycerol polyricinoleate (PGPR) or tetraglycerol polyricinoleate (TGPR) was used as the surfactant to stabilize the feed W/O emulsions, while Tween 20 was used in the external water phase to stabilize oil droplets containing water droplets. Increasing the feed pressure from 50 to 90?kPa increased the particle size of W/O/W emulsions, whereas it was decreased by increasing the agitator speed. The smallest particle sizes of multiple emulsions were obtained at the feed pressure of 50?kPa and agitator speed of 350?rpm. Under this set of conditions, the increase in the concentration of PGPR or TGPR showed a decrease in the particle size of DOX-loaded W/O/W emulsions. The optimized formulation comprising of 5% w/v PGPR and 3% w/v Tween 20 in the oil phase and external water phase, respectively, with 0.5% w/v of DOX had a particle size of 0.4400.007?m and polydispersity index of 0.2200.087, which was supported by the transmission electron microscopy image. The formulations showed a sustained release profile in phosphate buffer solution (pH 7.4). The plasma concentrations of DOX after intravenous administration to rats were prolonged and gave approximately 17-fold higher area under the drug concentration-time curve (AUC) compared to free DOX solution. Thus, these results demonstrated that the SPG membrane emulsification technique could be used as a promising technique to prepare W/O/W microemulsions for delivering DOX with sustained release characteristics and better bioavailability. PMID:25177016

  7. Investigations on a novel inductive concept frequency technique for the grading of oil palm fresh fruit bunches.

    PubMed

    Harun, Noor Hasmiza; Misron, Norhisam; Sidek, Roslina Mohd; Aris, Ishak; Ahmad, Desa; Wakiwaka, Hiroyuki; Tashiro, Kunihisa

    2013-01-01

    From the Malaysian harvester's perspective, the determination of the ripeness of the oil palm (FFB) is a critical factor to maximize palm oil production. A preliminary study of a novel oil palm fruit sensor to detect the maturity of oil palm fruit bunches is presented. To optimize the functionality of the sensor, the frequency characteristics of air coils of various diameters are investigated to determine their inductance and resonant characteristics. Sixteen samples from two categories, namely ripe oil palm fruitlets and unripe oil palm fruitlets, are tested from 100 Hz up to 100 MHz frequency. The results showed the inductance and resonant characteristics of the air coil sensors display significant changes among the samples of each category. The investigations on the frequency characteristics of the sensor air coils are studied to observe the effect of variations in the coil diameter. The effect of coil diameter yields a significant 0.02643 MHz difference between unripe samples to air and 0.01084 MHz for ripe samples to air. The designed sensor exhibits significant potential in determining the maturity of oil palm fruits. PMID:23435051

  8. Investigations on a Novel Inductive Concept Frequency Technique for the Grading of Oil Palm Fresh Fruit Bunches

    PubMed Central

    Harun, Noor Hasmiza; Misron, Norhisam; Sidek, Roslina Mohd; Aris, Ishak; Ahmad, Desa; Wakiwaka, Hiroyuki; Tashiro, Kunihisa

    2013-01-01

    From the Malaysian harvester's perspective, the determination of the ripeness of the oil palm (FFB) is a critical factor to maximize palm oil production. A preliminary study of a novel oil palm fruit sensor to detect the maturity of oil palm fruit bunches is presented. To optimize the functionality of the sensor, the frequency characteristics of air coils of various diameters are investigated to determine their inductance and resonant characteristics. Sixteen samples from two categories, namely ripe oil palm fruitlets and unripe oil palm fruitlets, are tested from 100 Hz up to 100 MHz frequency. The results showed the inductance and resonant characteristics of the air coil sensors display significant changes among the samples of each category. The investigations on the frequency characteristics of the sensor air coils are studied to observe the effect of variations in the coil diameter. The effect of coil diameter yields a significant 0.02643 MHz difference between unripe samples to air and 0.01084 MHz for ripe samples to air. The designed sensor exhibits significant potential in determining the maturity of oil palm fruits. PMID:23435051

  9. Increased oil production and reserves from improved completion techniques in the Bluebell Field, Uinta Basin, Utah. Seventh quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, C.D.

    1995-09-01

    The objective of this project is to increase oil production and reserves in the Uinta Basin by demonstrating improved completion techniques. Low productivity of Uinta Basin wells is caused by gross production intervals of several thousand feet that contain perforated thief zones, water-bearing zones, and unperforated oil-bearing intervals. Geologic and engineering characterization and computer simulation of the Green River and Wasatch formations in the Bluebell field will determine reservoir heterogeneities related to fractures and depositional trends. This will be followed by drilling and recompletion of several wells to demonstrate improved completion techniques based on the reservoir characterization. Transfer of the project results will be an ongoing component of the project. Technical progress for this quarter are discussed for subsurface and engineering studies.

  10. Generalized flooded agglomerate model for the cathode catalyst layer of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamarajugadda, Sai; Mazumder, Sandip

    2012-06-01

    The flooded agglomerate model has found prolific usage in modeling the oxygen reduction reaction within the cathode catalyst layer of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The assumption made in this model is that the ionomer-coated carbon-platinum agglomerate is spherical in shape and that the spheres are non-overlapping. This assumption is convenient because the governing equations lend themselves to closed-form analytical solution when a spherical shape is assumed. In reality, micrographs of the catalyst layer show that the agglomerates are best represented by sets of overlapping spheres of unequal radii. In this article, the flooded agglomerate is generalized by considering overlapping spheres of unequal radii. As a first cut, only two overlapping spheres are considered. The governing reaction-diffusion equations are solved numerically using the unstructured finite-volume method. The volumetric current density is extracted for various parametric variations, and tabulated. This sub-grid-scale generalized flooded agglomerate model is first validated and finally coupled to a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code for predicting the performance of the PEMFC. Results show that when the agglomerates are small (<200 nm equivalent radius), the effect of agglomerate shape on the overall PEMFC performance is insignificant. For large agglomerates, on the other hand, the effect of agglomerate shape was found to be critical, especially for high current densities for which the mass transport resistance within the agglomerate is strongly dependent on the shape of the agglomerate, and was found to correlate well with the surface-to-volume ratio of the agglomerate.

  11. Bioinspired, roughness-induced, water and oil super-philic and super-phobic coatings prepared by adaptable layer-by-layer technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Philip S.; Bhushan, Bharat

    2015-09-01

    Coatings with specific surface wetting properties are of interest for anti-fouling, anti-fogging, anti-icing, self-cleaning, anti-smudge, and oil-water separation applications. Many previous bioinspired surfaces are of limited use due to a lack of mechanical durability. Here, a layer-by-layer technique is utilized to create coatings with four combinations of water and oil repellency and affinity. An adapted layer-by-layer approach is tailored to yield specific surface properties, resulting in a durable, functional coating. This technique provides necessary flexibility to improve substrate adhesion combined with desirable surface chemistry. Polyelectrolyte binder, SiO2 nanoparticles, and silane or fluorosurfactant layers are deposited, combining surface roughness and necessary chemistry to result in four different coatings: superhydrophilic/superoleophilic, superhydrophobic/superoleophilic, superhydrophobic/superoleophobic, and superhydrophilic/superoleophobic. The superoleophobic coatings display hexadecane contact angles >150° with tilt angles <5°, whilst the superhydrophobic coatings display water contact angles >160° with tilt angles <2°. One coating combines both oleophobic and hydrophobic properties, whilst others mix and match oil and water repellency and affinity. Coating durability was examined through the use of micro/macrowear experiments. These coatings display transparency acceptable for some applications. Fabrication via this novel combination of techniques results in durable, functional coatings displaying improved performance compared to existing work where either durability or functionality is compromised.

  12. Bioinspired, roughness-induced, water and oil super-philic and super-phobic coatings prepared by adaptable layer-by-layer technique

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Philip S.; Bhushan, Bharat

    2015-01-01

    Coatings with specific surface wetting properties are of interest for anti-fouling, anti-fogging, anti-icing, self-cleaning, anti-smudge, and oil-water separation applications. Many previous bioinspired surfaces are of limited use due to a lack of mechanical durability. Here, a layer-by-layer technique is utilized to create coatings with four combinations of water and oil repellency and affinity. An adapted layer-by-layer approach is tailored to yield specific surface properties, resulting in a durable, functional coating. This technique provides necessary flexibility to improve substrate adhesion combined with desirable surface chemistry. Polyelectrolyte binder, SiO2 nanoparticles, and silane or fluorosurfactant layers are deposited, combining surface roughness and necessary chemistry to result in four different coatings: superhydrophilic/superoleophilic, superhydrophobic/superoleophilic, superhydrophobic/superoleophobic, and superhydrophilic/superoleophobic. The superoleophobic coatings display hexadecane contact angles >150° with tilt angles <5°, whilst the superhydrophobic coatings display water contact angles >160° with tilt angles <2°. One coating combines both oleophobic and hydrophobic properties, whilst others mix and match oil and water repellency and affinity. Coating durability was examined through the use of micro/macrowear experiments. These coatings display transparency acceptable for some applications. Fabrication via this novel combination of techniques results in durable, functional coatings displaying improved performance compared to existing work where either durability or functionality is compromised. PMID:26353971

  13. Bioinspired, roughness-induced, water and oil super-philic and super-phobic coatings prepared by adaptable layer-by-layer technique.

    PubMed

    Brown, Philip S; Bhushan, Bharat

    2015-01-01

    Coatings with specific surface wetting properties are of interest for anti-fouling, anti-fogging, anti-icing, self-cleaning, anti-smudge, and oil-water separation applications. Many previous bioinspired surfaces are of limited use due to a lack of mechanical durability. Here, a layer-by-layer technique is utilized to create coatings with four combinations of water and oil repellency and affinity. An adapted layer-by-layer approach is tailored to yield specific surface properties, resulting in a durable, functional coating. This technique provides necessary flexibility to improve substrate adhesion combined with desirable surface chemistry. Polyelectrolyte binder, SiO2 nanoparticles, and silane or fluorosurfactant layers are deposited, combining surface roughness and necessary chemistry to result in four different coatings: superhydrophilic/superoleophilic, superhydrophobic/superoleophilic, superhydrophobic/superoleophobic, and superhydrophilic/superoleophobic. The superoleophobic coatings display hexadecane contact angles >150° with tilt angles <5°, whilst the superhydrophobic coatings display water contact angles >160° with tilt angles <2°. One coating combines both oleophobic and hydrophobic properties, whilst others mix and match oil and water repellency and affinity. Coating durability was examined through the use of micro/macrowear experiments. These coatings display transparency acceptable for some applications. Fabrication via this novel combination of techniques results in durable, functional coatings displaying improved performance compared to existing work where either durability or functionality is compromised. PMID:26353971

  14. Combination Chemotherapeutic Dry Powder Aerosols via Controlled Nanoparticle Agglomeration

    PubMed Central

    El-Gendy, Nashwa; Berkland, Cory

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To develop an aerosol system for efficient local lung delivery of chemotherapeutics where nanotechnology holds tremendous potential for developing more valuable cancer therapies. Concurrently, aerosolized chemotherapy is generating interest as a means to treat certain types of lung cancer more effectively with less systemic exposure to the compound. Methods Nanoparticles of the potent anticancer drug, paclitaxel, were controllably assembled to form low density microparticles directly after preparation of the nanoparticle suspension. The amino acid, L-leucine, was used as a colloid destabilizer to drive the assembly of paclitaxel nanoparticles. A combination chemotherapy aerosol was formed by assembling the paclitaxel nanoparticles in the presence of cisplatin in solution. Results Freeze-dried powders of the combination chemotherapy possessed desirable aerodynamic properties for inhalation. In addition, the dissolution rates of dried nanoparticle agglomerate formulations (~60% to 66% after 8 h) were significantly faster than that of micronized paclitaxel powder as received (~18% after 8 h). Interestingly, the presence of the water soluble cisplatin accelerated the dissolution of paclitaxel. Conclusions Nanoparticle agglomerates of paclitaxel alone or in combination with cisplatin may serve as effective chemotherapeutic dry powder aerosols to enable regional treatment of certain lung cancers. PMID:19415471

  15. Single domain PEMFC model based on agglomerate catalyst geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, N. P.; Ellis, M. W.; Nelson, D. J.; von Spakovsky, M. R.

    A steady two-dimensional computational model for a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell is presented. The model accounts for species transport, electrochemical kinetics, energy transport, current distribution, and water uptake and release in the catalyst layer. The governing differential equations are solved over a single computational domain, which consists of a gas channel, gas diffusion layer, and catalyst layer for both the anode and cathode sides of the cell as well as the solid polymer membrane. The model for the catalyst regions is based on an agglomerate geometry, which requires water species to exist in both dissolved and gaseous forms simultaneously. Data related to catalyst morphology, which was required by the model, was obtained via a microscopic analysis of a commercially available membrane electrode assembly (MEA). The coupled set of differential equations is solved with the commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solver, CFDesign, and is readily adaptable with respect to geometry and material property definitions. The results show that fuel cell performance is highly dependent on catalyst structure, specifically the relative volume fractions of gas pores and polymer membrane contained within the active region as well as the geometry of the individual agglomerates.

  16. Steps Towards a Collision Model of Preplanetary Dust Agglomerates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, J.

    In the earliest phase of the Solar System, fine dispersed dust particles accumulated into larger bodies through frequent inelastic collisions. We performed laboratory simulation experiments on such preplanetary agglomeration processes in which we studied the interaction of small fractal aggregates, consisting of micron-sized dust particles, impacting solid targets at various velocities. Slow bombardment of the target generally results in the formation of fluffy dust layers. At higher impact velocities, compact dust-layer growth is observed. Above a certain collision energy, the dust aggregates are disrupted. These findings are in qualitative agreement with the fractal-aggregate collision model by Dominik and Tielens (1997). Full quantitative accordance between this model and our experiments can be reached if our recently measured values for the rolling-friction force (Heim et al. 1999) and for the break-up energy (Poppe et al. 2000) are used. Our experimental results suggest that aggregate restructuring in the solar nebula becomes an important process when the diameters of the dust agglomerates exceed a few centimeters. Dust aggregates below that size are not subjected to impact compaction.

  17. Threshold characteristics cavityless lasing in composites with agglomerated metal and dielectric nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donchenko, V. A.; Zemlyanov, Al. A.; Trifonova, A. V.; Kharenkov, V. A.

    2015-11-01

    The paper presents results of experimental studies of the threshold characteristics of lasing in thin layers (20 microns) of a solution of rhodamine 6G with agglomerates of metal and dielectric nanoparticles. The maximum decrease in the lasing threshold was more than two orders for a wide range of changes in the concentration of metal agglomerates. For dielectric nanoparticle agglomerates range of maximum lowering of the threshold is 5 times lower. This is due to different mechanisms of formation of lasing in these environments.Comparing the efficiency of lasing in layers with metal agglomerates proves on expediency using them to create a low threshold microlasers.

  18. In Situ Formation and Evolution of Gas Hydrates in Water-in-Oil Emulsions Using Pressure Rheometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rensing, P. J.; Liberatore, M. W.; Tonmukayakul, N.; Koh, C. A.; Sloan, E. D.

    2008-07-01

    In oil and gas production and transportation a major concern is the formation of gas hydrates (crystalline gas-water inclusion compounds that are stable at high pressures and low temperatures). Gas hydrates have a tenacious ability to plug pipelines, and may lead to unscheduled shut downs. The successful operation of pipeline transport with gas hydrates particles will depend on the ability to control gas hydrate agglomerations and depositions. Gas hydrates can be thermodynamically inhibited but this is proving cost ineffective and environmentally unfriendly. For this reason the oil/gas industry is moving to hydrate management rather than traditional methods of thermodynamic inhibition. One intriguing possibility would be to convert the water in the pipelines to non-agglomerating gas hydrates and then flow the slurry. However, this cannot be reliably achieved until basic understanding of hydrate slurry rheology is gained. To develop this fundamental understanding, in situ pressurized gas hydrate formation and rheological measurements from a water-in-oil emulsion have been conducted. In this work, small amplitude oscillatory and steady shear techniques have been used to characterize the rheological properties of these systems. The results demonstrate that hydrate formation can be detected in steady shear and oscillatory measurements, where a large viscosity (and elastic modulus) increase coincides with hydrate formation. Since temperature and pressure affect the thermodynamic stability of hydrates these are particular key variables that need to be tuned for this system.

  19. Crude oil price forecasting based on hybridizing wavelet multiple linear regression model, particle swarm optimization techniques, and principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Shabri, Ani; Samsudin, Ruhaidah

    2014-01-01

    Crude oil prices do play significant role in the global economy and are a key input into option pricing formulas, portfolio allocation, and risk measurement. In this paper, a hybrid model integrating wavelet and multiple linear regressions (MLR) is proposed for crude oil price forecasting. In this model, Mallat wavelet transform is first selected to decompose an original time series into several subseries with different scale. Then, the principal component analysis (PCA) is used in processing subseries data in MLR for crude oil price forecasting. The particle swarm optimization (PSO) is used to adopt the optimal parameters of the MLR model. To assess the effectiveness of this model, daily crude oil market, West Texas Intermediate (WTI), has been used as the case study. Time series prediction capability performance of the WMLR model is compared with the MLR, ARIMA, and GARCH models using various statistics measures. The experimental results show that the proposed model outperforms the individual models in forecasting of the crude oil prices series. PMID:24895666

  20. Influence of extraction techniques on physical-chemical characteristics and volatile compounds of extra virgin olive oil.

    PubMed

    Volpe, Maria Grazia; De Cunzo, Fausta; Siano, Francesco; Paolucci, Marina; Barbarisi, Costantina; Cammarota, Giancarlo

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate three types of extraction methods of extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) from the same cultivar (Ortice olive cultivar): traditional or pressing (T) system, decanter centrifugation (DC) system and a patented horizontal axis decanter centrifugation (HADC) system. Oil samples were subjected to chemical analyses: free acidity, peroxide value, ultraviolet light absorption K232 and K270, total polyphenols, antioxidant capacity, volatile compounds and olfactory characteristics by electronic nose. The two centrifugation systems showed better free acidity and peroxides value but total polyphenol content was particularly high in extra virgin olive oil produced by patented HADC system. Same volatile substances that positively characterize the oil aroma were found in higher amount in the two centrifugation systems, although some differences have been detected between DC and HADC system, other were found in higher amount in extra virgin olive oil produced by T system. The electronic nose analysis confirmed these results, principal component analysis (PCA) and correlation matrix showed the major differences between EVOO produced by T and HADC system. Taken together the results showed that DC and HADC systems produce EVOO with better characteristics than T system and patented HADC is the best extraction system. PMID:25132087

  1. Crude Oil Price Forecasting Based on Hybridizing Wavelet Multiple Linear Regression Model, Particle Swarm Optimization Techniques, and Principal Component Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shabri, Ani; Samsudin, Ruhaidah

    2014-01-01

    Crude oil prices do play significant role in the global economy and are a key input into option pricing formulas, portfolio allocation, and risk measurement. In this paper, a hybrid model integrating wavelet and multiple linear regressions (MLR) is proposed for crude oil price forecasting. In this model, Mallat wavelet transform is first selected to decompose an original time series into several subseries with different scale. Then, the principal component analysis (PCA) is used in processing subseries data in MLR for crude oil price forecasting. The particle swarm optimization (PSO) is used to adopt the optimal parameters of the MLR model. To assess the effectiveness of this model, daily crude oil market, West Texas Intermediate (WTI), has been used as the case study. Time series prediction capability performance of the WMLR model is compared with the MLR, ARIMA, and GARCH models using various statistics measures. The experimental results show that the proposed model outperforms the individual models in forecasting of the crude oil prices series. PMID:24895666

  2. Evaluation of zidovudine encapsulated ethylcellulose microspheres prepared by water-in-oil-in-oil (w/o/o) double emulsion solvent diffusion technique.

    PubMed

    Das, Malay Kumar; Rao, Kalakuntala Rama

    2006-01-01

    The preparation of zidovudine-loaded ethylcellulose microspheres by w/o/o double emulsion solvent diffusion method with high entrapment capacity and sustained release is described. A mixed solvent system (MSS) consisting of acetonitrile and dichloromethane in a 1:1 ratio and light liquid paraffin was selected as primary and secondary oil phases, respectively. Span 80 was used as the secondary surfactant for stabilizing the external oil phase. Spherical free flowing microspheres were obtained. The prepared microspheres were characterized by entrapment efficiency, in vitro release behavior, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The drug-loaded microspheres showed 32 - 55% entrapment capacity. The in vitro release profile could be altered significantly by changing various processing and formulation parameters to give sustained release of drug from the microspheres. The DSC thermograms confirmed the absence of any drug-polymer interaction. SEM studies showed that the microspheres were spherical and porous in nature. The in vitro release profiles from microspheres of different polymer-drug ratios were best fitted to Higuchi model with high correlation coefficient and the n value obtained from Korsmeyer-Peppas model was ranged between 0.23 - 0.54. The drug release was found to be diffusion controlled mechanism. PMID:17514878

  3. The optimization of essential oils supercritical CO2 extraction from Lavandula hybrida through static-dynamic steps procedure and semi-continuous technique using response surface method

    PubMed Central

    Kamali, Hossein; Aminimoghadamfarouj, Noushin; Golmakani, Ebrahim; Nematollahi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to examine and evaluate crucial variables in essential oils extraction process from Lavandula hybrida through static-dynamic and semi-continuous techniques using response surface method. Materials and Methods: Essential oil components were extracted from Lavandula hybrida (Lavandin) flowers using supercritical carbon dioxide via static-dynamic steps (SDS) procedure, and semi-continuous (SC) technique. Results: Using response surface method the optimum extraction yield (4.768%) was obtained via SDS at 108.7 bar, 48.5°C, 120 min (static: 8×15), 24 min (dynamic: 8×3 min) in contrast to the 4.620% extraction yield for the SC at 111.6 bar, 49.2°C, 14 min (static), 121.1 min (dynamic). Conclusion: The results indicated that a substantial reduction (81.56%) solvent usage (kg CO2/g oil) is observed in the SDS method versus the conventional SC method. PMID:25598636

  4. A 3D agglomeration multigrid solver for the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations on unstructured meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvriplis, D. J.; Venkatakrishnan, V.

    1995-01-01

    An agglomeration multigrid strategy is developed and implemented for the solution of three-dimensional steady viscous flows. The method enables convergence acceleration with minimal additional memory overheads, and is completely automated, in that it can deal with grids of arbitrary construction. The multigrid technique is validated by comparing the delivered convergence rates with those obtained by a previously developed overset-mesh multigrid approach, and by demonstrating grid independent convergence rates for aerodynamic problems on very large grids. Prospects for further increases in multigrid efficiency for high-Reynolds number viscous flows on highly stretched meshes are discussed.

  5. Selection of feed coals for production of premium fuel using column flotation and selective agglomeration processes

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, M.C.; Smit, F.J.

    1995-10-01

    Column flotation and selective agglomeration are promising advanced physical cleaning processes that can be developed for preparing premium quality coal-water slurry fuel from coal fines. Such a fuel could either replace oil or natural gas in certain industrial and utility boilers or else could be burned in advanced combustors currently under development. These applications require coal cleaned to sulfur and ash contents below 258 g/GJ and 430--860 g/GJ (0.6 lb/million Btu and 1--2 lb/million Btu), respectively, to meet clean air emission requirements. A highly loaded slurry must be produced in order to avoid derating the boilers, and the total cost of the fuel must be below $2.37/GJ ($2.50/million Btu) in order to penetrate the market by the turn of the century. Achieving these technical and economic goals depend critically on the selection of suitable feed coals. This paper describes the identification and evaluation of 18 coals and final selection of six coals from different regions of the United States as potential feedstock for preparation of premium fuel. The work is being performed under a cost-shared DOE project.

  6. Identification of micro parameters for discrete element simulation of agglomerates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palis, Stefan; Antonyuk, Sergiy; Dosta, Maksym; Heinrich, Stefan

    2013-06-01

    The mechanical behaviour of solid particles like agglomerates, granules or crystals strongly depends on their micro structure, e.g. structural defects and porosity. In order to model the mechanical behaviour of these inhomogeneous media the discrete element method has been proven to be an appropriate tool. The model parameters used are typically micro parameters like bond stiffness, particle-particle contact stiffness, strength of the bonds. Due to the lack of general methods for a direct micro parameter determination, normally laborious parameter adaptation has to be done in order to fit experiment and simulation. In this contribution a systematic and automatic way for parameter adaptation using real experiments is proposed. Due to the fact, that discrete element models are typically systems of differential equations of very high order, gradient based methods are not suitable. Hence, the focus will be on derivative free methods.

  7. Combustion and agglomeration of aluminized high-energy compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotkikh, A. G.; Arkhipov, V. A.; Glotov, O. G.; Slyusarskiy, K. V.

    2015-10-01

    The results of combustion study for high-energy compositions (HECs) based on ammonium perchlorate (AP), butadiene rubber and ultrafine powder (UFP) aluminum Alex, and agglomeration of metal particles on the burning surface and composition of condensed combustion products (CCPs) are presented. It was found that partial replacement 2 wt. % of Alex by iron UFP in HEC increases the burning rate 1.31.4 times at the range of nitrogen pressure 2.0-7.5 MPa and reduces the mean diameter of CCPs particles d43 from 37.4 ?m to 33.5 ?m at pressure ? 4 MPa. Upon partial replacement 2 wt. % of Alex by boron UFP in HEC the recoil force of gasification products outflow from burning surface is increased by 9 % and the burning rate of HEC does not change in the above pressure range, while the mean diameter of CCPs particles is reduced to 32.6 ?m at p ? 4 MPa.

  8. Gravitational agglomeration of post-HCDA LMFBR aerosols: nonspherical particles

    SciTech Connect

    Tuttle, R.F.; Loyalka, S.K.

    1982-12-01

    Aerosol behavior analysis computer programs have shown that temporal aerosol size distributions in nuclear reactor containments are sensitive to shape factors. This research investigates shape factors by a detailed theoretical analysis of hydrodynamic interactions between a nonspherical particle and a spherical particle undergoing gravitational collisions in an LMFBR environment. First, basic definitions and expressions for settling speeds and collisional efficiencies of nonspherical particles are developed. These are then related to corresponding quantities for spherical particles through shape factors. Using volume equivalent diameter as the defining length in the gravitational collision kernel, the aerodynamic shape factor, the density correction factor, and the gravitational collision shape factor, are introduced to describe the collision kernel for collisions between aerosol agglomerates. The Navier-Stokes equation in oblate spheroidal coordinates is solved to model a nonspherical particle and then the dynamic equations for two particle motions are developed. A computer program (NGCEFF) is constructed, and the dynamical equations are solved by Gear's method.

  9. Analysis of essential oil of Satureja thymbra by hydrodistillation, thermal desorber, and headspace GC/MS techniques and its antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Gren, Ahmet C; Topu, Glati; Bilsel, Gkhan; Bilsel, Mine; Wilkinson, Jenny M; Cavanagh, Heather

    2004-04-01

    The essential oil composition of Satureja thymbra was analyzed by direct thermal desorber and Headspace GC/MS analysis methods. Its constituents were determined to be mainly carvacrol (40.15%), gamma-terpinene (26.56%), p-cymene (16.39%), and thymol (13.16%). The other techniques, thermal desorber and Headspace GC/MS, were used for the plant leaves at three different temperature, which showed similar results. The thermal desorber GC/MS gave better and more sensitive results than Headspace GC/MS. The essential oil was found to be active against the bacteria Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhimurium, Shigella sonnei, and Staphylococcus aureus and the yeast Candida albicans. PMID:14984095

  10. Use of electromagnetic geophysical techniques and auger drilling to delineate saline-water plumes in the East Poplar oil field, Fort Peck Indian Reserveration, northeastern Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Thamke, J.N.; Craigg, S.D. ); Mendes, T.M. )

    1993-08-01

    The East Poplar oil field encompasses about 70 mi[sup 2] in the south-central part of the Fort Peck Indian Reservation. Since oil production from the Mississippian Madison Group began in 1952, large quantities of brine (water containing greater than 35,000 mg/L of dissolved solids) have been produced. Most of the brine has been disposed of through injection wells completed in shallower Cretaceous rocks, although some brine has been evaporated in pits. Brine leaking from injection-well casing or evaporation pits has resulted in contamination of shallow water in Quaternary alluvial and glacial deposits along the Poplar River. Electromagnetic geophysical techniques were used to delineate three saline-water plumes in alluvial deposits and one plume in glacial deposits. Data-collection sites were located on 0.1-mi (or sometimes 0.2-mi) centers in grid networks. Apparent conductivity was measured at about [sup [minus

  11. Which Microbial Communities Are Present? Using Fluorescence In Situ Hybridisation (FISH): Microscopic Techniques for Enumeration of Troublesome Microorganisms in Oil and Fuel Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmkvist, Lars; stergaard, Jette Johanne; Skovhus, Torben Lund

    Enumeration of microbes involved in souring of oil fields and microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) with culture-based methods, usually yield inadequate and contradictory results. Any cultivation step will almost certainly alter the population structure of the sample and thus the results of cultivation analysis are not a good basis for mitigation decisions. The need for methods that are cultivation independent has over the past 10 years facilitated the development of several analytical methods for determination of bacterial identity, quantity, and to some extent function, applied directly to samples of the native population. In this chapter, we demonstrate the features and benefits of applying microscopic techniques to a situation often encountered in the oil and petroleum industry: Control of microbial growth in fuel storage tanks. The methods described in this chapter will focus on direct counts of specific groups of microorganisms with microscopy and these are based on the detection of genetic material and not on culturing.

  12. Increased oil production and reserves utilizing secondary/tertiary recovery techniques on small reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah, Class II

    SciTech Connect

    Chidsey, Thomas C.

    2000-07-28

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by field demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced-oil-recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels (23,850,000-31,800,000 m{sup 3}) of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon-dioxide-miscible flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place within the Navajo Nation, San Juan County, Utah.

  13. Mathematical model for the dynamics of agglomeration in an air-fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect

    Nakorchevskii, A.I.

    1995-10-01

    A mathematical model based on the key points of the theory of homogeneous isotropic turbulence and mechanics of collisions between particles is proposed for the agglomeration of particles in trough-type fluidized-bed plants. This model makes it possible to follow the dynamics of agglomeration in time (or along the plant) and, consequently, to solve various optimization problems.

  14. Simulation of acoustic agglomeration processes of poly-disperse solid particles

    SciTech Connect

    Changdong Sheng; Xianglin Shen

    2007-01-15

    This article presents the simulation of acoustic agglomeration of poly-disperse solid particles with the direct simulation Monte Carlo method. The modelled processes include the agglomeration due to the orthokinetic and hydrodynamic mechanisms, Brownian coagulation and wall deposition. The aggregates formed during the agglomeration process were characterised as mass fractal aggregates with an equivalent radius to estimate the average radius of the primary particles in individual aggregates. Acoustic agglomeration of fly ash with a lognormal size distribution and TiO{sub 2} particles with a bimodal size distribution was simulated and validated against the experimental data in the literature. It was found that the acoustic agglomeration process of solid particles could be represented with a modified version of Song's orthokinetic model and Koenig's hydrodynamic equation that account for the fractal-like morphology of the aggregates. The fractal dimensions of around 1.8 and 2.2 were obtained for the fly ash and TiO{sub 2} particles, respectively, consistent with the values reported for the aggregates in the literature. The poly-disperse nature of the primary particles is essential to the simulation; assuming mono-disperse primary particles leads to a significant underestimation of the agglomeration rate and the particle size growth particularly during the early stages of the acoustic agglomeration process. Particle deposition on the chamber walls also has some effect on acoustic agglomeration.

  15. A MODEL FOR FINE PARTICLE AGGLOMERATION IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED ABSORBERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A model for fine particle agglomeration in circulating fluidized bed absorbers (CFBAS) has been developed. It can model the influence of different factors on agglomeration, such as the geometry of CFBAs, superficial gas velocity, initial particle size distribution, and type of ag...

  16. Agglomeration characteristics of river sand and wheat stalk ash mixture at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Linlin; Li, Shiyuan; Lu, Qinggang

    2013-02-01

    The agglomeration characteristics of river sand and wheat stalk ash mixture at various temperatures are investigated using a muffle furnace. The surface structural changes, as well as the elemental makeup of the surface and cross-section of the agglomerates, are analyzed by polarized light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX). Multi-phase equilibrium calculation is performed with FactSage in identifying the melting behavior of the river sand-wheat stalk ash mixture at high temperatures. No indication of agglomeration is detected below 850°C. At a temperature of 900-1000°C, however, obvious agglomeration is observed and the agglomerates solidify further as temperature increases. The presence of potassium and calcium enrichment causes the formation of a sticky sand surface that induces agglomeration. The main component of the agglomerate surface is K2O-CaO-SiO2, which melts at low temperatures. The formation of molten silicates causes particle cohesion. The main ingredient of the binding phase in the cross-section is K2O-SiO2-Na2O-Al2O3-CaO; the agglomeration is not the result of the melting behavior of wheat stalk ash itself but the comprehensive results of chemical reaction and the melting behavior at high temperatures. The multi-phase equilibrium calculations agree well with the experimental results.

  17. Ultrasonic cavitation induced water in vegetable oil emulsion droplets--a simple and easy technique to synthesize manganese zinc ferrite nanocrystals with improved magnetization.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, Manickam; Towata, Atsuya; Yasui, Kyuichi; Tuziuti, Toru; Kozuka, Teruyuki; Iida, Yasuo; Maiorov, Michail M; Blums, Elmars; Bhattacharya, Dipten; Sivakumar, Neelagesi; Ashok, M

    2012-05-01

    In the present investigation, synthesis of manganese zinc ferrite (Mn(0.5)Zn(0.5)Fe(2)O(4)) nanoparticles with narrow size distribution have been prepared using ultrasound assisted emulsion (consisting of rapeseed oil as an oil phase and aqueous solution of Mn(2+), Zn(2+) and Fe(2+) acetates) and evaporation processes. The as-prepared ferrite was nanocrystalline. In order to remove the small amount of oil present on the surface of the ferrite, it was subjected to heat treatment at 300 °C for 3h. Both the as-prepared and heat treated ferrites have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (IR), TGA/DTA, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersion X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) techniques. As-prepared ferrite is of 20 nm, whereas the heat treated ferrite shows the size of 33 nm. In addition, magnetic properties of the as-prepared as well as the heat treated ferrites have also been carried out and the results of which show that the spontaneous magnetization (σ(s)) of the heat treated sample (24.1 emu/g) is significantly higher than that of the as-synthesized sample (1.81 emu/g). The key features of this method are avoiding (a) the cumbersome conditions that exist in the conventional methods; (b) usage of necessary additive components (stabilizers or surfactants, precipitants) and (c) calcination requirements. In addition, rapeseed oil as an oil phase has been used for the first time, replacing the toxic and troublesome organic nonpolar solvents. As a whole, this simple straightforward sonochemical approach results in more phase pure system with improved magnetization. PMID:22113061

  18. Influence of the pan pelletizer rotational velocity and the particles size on the agglomeration of alumina oxide granules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radeva, Zheni; Mller, Peter; Tomas, Juergen

    2013-06-01

    High fraction of agglomerates and better agglomerate strength are main purpose for every agglomeration process. For optimizing the agglomeration process of industrial produced granules, using liquid binders, it is necessary to understand the microinteractions between primary particles and binder and the marcointeractions between the agglomerates themselves. In order to investigate the influence of the rotational velocity of the pan pelletizer and the primary particle size on the fraction of agglomerates and the mechanical properties of the produced agglomerates, the obtained structures have to be basically analyzed. Agglomeration of industrial produced Alumina Oxide (?-Al2O3) granules is carried out in a rotating pan pelletizer. A 6 mass-% solution of viscoelastic polymer - hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) is used as binder. The rotational velocity of the pelletizer pan is previously measured and calibrated. By changing the rotational velocity of the process chamber it was found that there are critical speed limits for the pan. The minimum critical velocity of the pelletizer plate does not provide enough contact collisions between the particles and the necessary kinetic level for agglomeration cannot be reached. The maximum critical velocity leads to higher rotational kinetic energy and this causes breakages of the agglomerates. It was also proven that the breakage strength of the agglomerates decreases with the reduction of the agglomerate size. The conclusions from the experimental work help us to understand the basics of agglomeration process and tend to develop and facilitate the operating with particle collectives in science and industry.

  19. Morphological characterization of diesel soot agglomerates based on the Beer-Lambert law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapuerta, Magín; Martos, Francisco J.; José Expósito, Juan

    2013-03-01

    A new method is proposed for the determination of the number of primary particles composing soot agglomerates emitted from diesel engines as well as their individual fractal dimension. The method is based on the Beer-Lambert law and it is applied to micro-photographs taken in high resolution transmission electron microscopy. Differences in the grey levels of the images lead to a more accurate estimation of the geometry of the agglomerate (in this case radius of gyration) than other methods based exclusively on the planar projections of the agglomerates. The method was validated by applying it to different images of the same agglomerate observed from different angles of incidence, and proving that the effect of the angle of incidence is minor, contrary to other methods. Finally, the comparisons with other methods showed that the size, number of primary particles and fractal dimension (the latter depending on the particle size) are usually underestimated when only planar projections of the agglomerates are considered.

  20. Acoustic agglomeration of power-plant fly ash. A comprehensive semi-annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Reethof, G.

    1980-02-01

    Results obtained during the reporting period are presented. The agglomeration of submicron fly ash particles has been studied as a function of sound pressure level, sound frequency, loading, and exposure time. A second generation model of the agglomeration process is being developed. A high-frequency, high-intensity variable speed siren delivering at least 600 W at frequencies up to 4000 Hz has been developed and tested. Details on the design and operation are presented. The agglomeration chamber has been completely cleaned and the aerosol generating system has been rebuilt. A mathematical model of the acoustics of agglomeration is being developed. Preliminary results of computerized electron microscopic scanning of fly ash particles during agglomeration are presented. (DMC)

  1. Influence of primary-particle density in the morphology of agglomerates.

    PubMed

    Camejo, M D; Espeso, D R; Bonilla, L L

    2014-07-01

    Agglomeration processes occur in many different realms of science, such as colloid and aerosol formation or formation of bacterial colonies. We study the influence of primary-particle density in agglomerate structures using diffusion-controlled Monte Carlo simulations with realistic space scales through different regimes (diffusion-limited aggregation and diffusion-limited colloid aggregation). The equivalence of Monte Carlo time steps to real time scales is given by Hirsch's hydrodynamical theory of Brownian motion. Agglomerate behavior at different time stages of the simulations suggests that three indices (the fractal exponent, the coordination number, and the eccentricity index) characterize agglomerate geometry. Using these indices, we have found that the initial density of primary particles greatly influences the final structure of the agglomerate, as observed in recent experimental works. PMID:25122302

  2. Investigation of the influence of humidity on the ultrasonic agglomeration of submicron particles in diesel exhausts.

    PubMed

    Riera-Franco de Sarabia, E; Elvira-Segura, L; Gonzlez-Gmez, I; Rodrguez-Maroto, J J; Muoz-Bueno, R; Dorronsoro-Areal, J L

    2003-06-01

    Removing very fine particles in the 0.01-1 micro m range generated in diesel combustion is important for air pollution abatement because of the impact such particles have on the environment. By forming larger particles, acoustic agglomeration of submicron particles is presented as a promising process for enhancing the efficiency of the current filtration systems for particle removal. Nevertheless, some authors have pointed out that acoustic agglomeration is much more efficient for larger particles than for smaller particles. This paper studies the effect of humidity on the acoustic agglomeration of diesel exhausts particles in the nanometer size range at 21 kHz. For the agglomeration tests, the experimental facility basically consists of a pilot scale plant with a diesel engine, an ultrasonic agglomeration chamber a dilution system, a nozzle atomizer, and an aerosol sampling and measuring station. The effect of the ultrasonic treatment, generated by a linear array of four high-power stepped-plate transducers on fumes at flow rates of 900 Nm(3)/h, was a small reduction in the number concentration of particles at the outlet of the chamber. However, the presence of humidity raised the agglomeration rate by decreasing the number particle concentration by up to 56%. A numerical study of the agglomeration process as a linear combination of the orthokinetic and hydrodynamic agglomeration coefficients resulting from mutual radiation pressure also found that acoustic agglomeration was enhanced by humidity. Both results confirm the benefit of using high-power ultrasound together with humidity to enhance the agglomeration of particles much smaller than 1 micro m. PMID:12782259

  3. INCREASED OIL PRODUCTION AND RESERVES UTILIZING SECONDARY/TERTIARY RECOVERY TECHNIQUES ON SMALL RESERVOIRS IN THE PARADOX BASIN, UTAH

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.

    2002-11-01

    The Paradox Basin of Utah, Colorado, and Arizona contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from shallow-shelf carbonate buildups or mounds within the Desert Creek zone of the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to four wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m{sup 3}) of oil per field at a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. Five fields in southeastern Utah were evaluated for waterflood or carbon-dioxide (CO{sub 2})-miscible flood projects based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling. Geological characterization on a local scale focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity as well as possible compartmentalization within each of the five project fields. The Desert Creek zone includes three generalized facies belts: (1) open-marine, (2) shallow-shelf and shelf-margin, and (3) intra-shelf, salinity-restricted facies. These deposits have modern analogs near the coasts of the Bahamas, Florida, and Australia, respectively, and outcrop analogs along the San Juan River of southeastern Utah. The analogs display reservoir heterogeneity, flow barriers and baffles, and lithofacies geometry observed in the fields; thus, these properties were incorporated in the reservoir simulation models. Productive carbonate buildups consist of three types: (1) phylloid algal, (2) coralline algal, and (3) bryozoan. Phylloid-algal buildups have a mound-core interval and a supra-mound interval. Hydrocarbons are stratigraphically trapped in porous and permeable lithotypes within the mound-core intervals of the lower part of the buildups and the more heterogeneous supramound intervals. To adequately represent the observed spatial heterogeneities in reservoir properties, the phylloid-algal bafflestones of the mound-core interval and the dolomites of the overlying supra-mound interval were subdivided into ten architecturally distinct lithotypes, each of which exhibits a characteristic set of reservoir properties obtained from outcrop analogs, cores, and geophysical logs. The Anasazi and Runway fields were selected for geostatistical modeling and reservoir compositional simulations. Models and simulations incorporated variations in carbonate lithotypes, porosity, and permeability to accurately predict reservoir responses. History matches tied previous production and reservoir pressure histories so that future reservoir performances could be confidently predicted. The simulation studies showed that despite most of the production being from the mound-core intervals, there were no corresponding decreases in the oil in place in these intervals. This behavior indicates gravity drainage of oil from the supra-mound intervals into the lower mound-core intervals from which the producing wells' major share of production arises. The key to increasing ultimate recovery from these fields (and similar fields in the basin) is to design either waterflood or CO{sub 2}-miscible flood projects capable of forcing oil from high-storage-capacity but low-recovery supra-mound units into the high-recovery mound-core units. Simulation of Anasazi field shows that a CO{sub 2} flood is technically superior to a waterflood and economically feasible. For Anasazi field, an optimized CO{sub 2} flood is predicted to recover a total 4.21 million barrels (0.67 million m3) of oil representing in excess of 89 percent of the original oil in place. For Runway field, the best CO{sub 2} flood is predicted to recover a total of 2.4 million barrels (0.38 million m3) of oil representing 71 percent of the original oil in place. If the CO{sub 2} flood performed as predicted, it is a financially robust process for increasing the reserves in the many small fields in the Paradox Basin. The results can be applied to other fields in the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois Basins, and the Midcontinent.

  4. Successful field evaluation of the efficiency of a gas gravity drainage process by applying recent developments in Sponge coring technique in a major oil field

    SciTech Connect

    Durandeau, M.; El-Emam, M.; Anis, A.H.; Fanti, G.

    1995-11-01

    This paper describes the application and integration of new technologies and recent developments in Sponge coring and presents the methodology used to carry out successfully the various phases of well designed Sponge coring project, including the coring phase, the on-site measurements and the full evaluation of the Sponge core samples. A field case is presented where a Sponge coring project was accomplished to obtain accurate fluids distribution and evaluate the gas gravity drainage efficiency in one of the Arab D sub-reservoirs of a major oil field offshore Abu Dhabi. A Sponge coring technology team was created to optimize the methodology used during Sponge coring an minimize the uncertainties which persisted on some of the previous operations. The effectiveness of the technique is discussed, with comparison to open hole logs and SCAL data. Realistic petrophysical parameters were obtained from non-invaded, native-state core samples. The effective oil saturation obtained from the Sponge core analysis results showed that the gravity segregation mechanism has been very active and efficient to recover the oil in the reservoir.

  5. Effect of extraction technique on the content and antioxidant activity of crude extract of Anacyclus clavatus flowers and their essential oil composition.

    PubMed

    Aliboudhar, Hamza; Tigrine-Kordjani, Nacra

    2014-01-01

    Anacyclus clavatus is a plant used as food and remedy. The objective of this work was to study the effect of extraction technique on the antioxidant property, total phenol and flavonoid contents of crude extracts from A. clavatus flowers and their essential oil composition. 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay, ferric-reducing power, ?-carotene and total antioxidant capacity assays have demonstrated the significant antioxidant ability of different crude extracts obtained by using the following extraction methods: Soxhlet, microwave heating, heat reflux (HRE) and maceration. The activity of the extract obtained by HRE was the highest (112.06 2.89 ?g/mL) evaluated by the DPPH assay. Extraction of essential oil was performed by microwave-assisted hydro-distillation (MAHD) and by hydro-distillation (HD). A significant difference was observed in both essential oils, despite the common main family and major constituents, such as artemisia ketone (10.0 0.8% for MAHD vs. 6.5 0.5 for HD) and pinocarvone (4.1 0.4% for MAHD vs. 1.1 0.1% for HD). PMID:25115624

  6. Heliophrya sp. , a new protozoan biomonitor of pollution: culture techniques, toxin uptake and elimination, and field studies in an oil-polluted stream

    SciTech Connect

    Sayre, P.G.

    1984-01-01

    The stalkless suctorian Heliophyra sp., a sessile ciliated protozoan, was used as a pollution biomonitor. The research objectives were to determine: (1) optimal culture conditions and techniques for biotoxicity testing; (2) ability of Helipophrya to incorporate and eliminate a /sup 14/C oil component and other organic toxins; (3) suitability of Heliophrya as a biomonitor of oil pollution. Selection of culture conditions for Heliophrya were based on survival over a three week period and ability to divide when fed after three weeks. The LC50 (lethal concentration for 50% of the population) for 96 h was 12.4 ppt salinity. Heliophrya were exposed to /sup 14/C toxins for 48 h, then organisms were transferred to nonradioactive water for 96 h. The uptake rate of /sup 14/C octachlorostyrene was higher than /sup 14/C phenanthrene or /sup 14/C diisononyl phthalate. Elimination rates were comparable to other test organisms. Heliophrya and d. pulex were placed at three stations, in a stream which received chronic oil pollution, for periods of 48 h and seven days. A 48 h lab test with dilutions of field water was performed. Water samples were analyzed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Death of Heliophrya at the three polluted stations over 48 h was not significantly greater than at a less polluted tributary; however, all the Daphnia in the polluted stream stations were killed. In the seven day field study, Heliophrya had an estimated LC50 of 1 ppm for the aromatic and 29 ppm for the total hydrocarbons. Compared to other species, Heliophrya is moderately sensitive to oil pollution, and is a good companion biomonitor to the more sensitive Daphnia.

  7. Surface-energy-driven dewetting theory of silicon-on-insulator agglomeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielson, David T.; Sparacin, Daniel K.; Michel, Jurgen; Kimerling, Lionel C.

    2006-10-01

    The thermal agglomeration of ultrathin (<30nm) single crystal silicon-on-insulator (SOI) films is a morphological evolution phenomenon with practical and scientific importance. This materials phenomenon represents both a critical process limitation for the fabrication of advanced ultrathin SOI-based semiconductor devices as well as a scientifically interesting morphological evolution problem. Investigations to date have attributed this phenomenon to a stress-induced morphological instability. In this paper, we demonstrate that SOI agglomeration is a surface-energy-driven dewetting phenomenon. Specifically, we propose that agglomeration occurs via a two-step surface-energy-driven mechanism consisting of (1) defect-mediated film void nucleation and (2) surface-diffusion-limited film dewetting via capillary edge and generalized Rayleigh instabilities. We show that this theory can explain all of the key experimental observations from the SOI agglomeration literature, including the locations of agglomeration initiation, the greater instability of patterned film edges, the destabilizing effect of decreasing silicon layer thickness and increasing temperature, the strikingly periodic silicon finger and island formation agglomeration morphology, and the scaling of agglomerated structure dimensions with the silicon layer thickness. General implications of this theory for the thermal stability of SOI and other common thin-film-on-insulator structures are also discussed.

  8. Evaluation of physico-mechanical properties of drug-excipients agglomerates obtained by crystallization.

    PubMed

    Maghsoodi, M; Tajalli Bakhsh, A S

    2011-06-01

    Spherical crystallization (SC) of carbamazepine (CBZ) was carried out for preparation of the agglomerates using the solvent change method. The potential of the intraagglomerate addition of sodium starch glycolate (SSG) as a disintegrant agent and povidone (PVP) as a hydrophilic polymer was also evaluated. The process of SC involved recrystallization of CBZ and its simultaneous agglomeration with additives. An ethanol:isopropyl acetate:water system was used where isopropyl acetate acted as a bridging liquid and ethanol and water as good and bad solvents, respectively. The agglomerates were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), powder X-ray diffraction (XRPD), and Scanning electron microscopy and were evaluated for yield, flowability, disintegration time and drug release. CBZ agglomerates exhibited significantly improved micromeritic properties as well as dissolution behavior in comparison to conventional drug crystals. The dissolution rate of drug from agglomerates was enhanced by inclusion of SSG, while addition of PVP to CBZ/SSG agglomerates led to reduction in the release rate of CBZ even below that of the conventional drug crystals. SC process can be considered as a suitable alternative to conventional granulation process to obtain agglomerates of CBZ with excipients with improved micromeritic properties and modified dissolution rate. PMID:20175665

  9. Impact milling of pharmaceutical agglomerates in the wet and dry states.

    PubMed

    Schenck, Luke R; Plank, Russell V

    2008-02-01

    This study focused on the milling of wet granulated agglomerates at points before and after drying in a typical high-shear pharmaceutical process train. These steps, referred to here as wet and dry milling, utilized a conical screen mill. Milling of granulation in the wet state eliminated 1-10mm size agglomerates without affecting granule porosity or inducing further agglomeration. These millimeter-size agglomerates broke down during wet milling into moderately sized fragments larger than 125microm. In contrast, when milled after drying, these same 1-10mm-size agglomerates broke down predominantly into fine particles less than 125microm. Data from screen-less milling trials suggest that the mill screen served only as a classifier and did not significantly contribute to the route of breakage for either wet or dry milling. However, in the case of dry milling, mill screens with grated surface textures did result in fewer fines than non-grated screens. This may be a result of reduced residence time in the mill. Experiments varying the size fraction of feed material and the rotational speed of the mill's impeller identified impact attrition as the primary mechanism governing dry granule breakage. The findings in this study shed light into the fundamental breakdown behavior of pharmaceutical agglomerates and demonstrate how breakdown of wet agglomerates via a de-lumping step prior to drying can lead to a reduced level of fine particle generation during dry milling. PMID:17804181

  10. Bed material agglomeration during fluidized bed combustion. Technical progress report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.C.; Dawson, M.R.; Smeenk, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    During this quarter, agglomerates which formed in the FBC at Montana-Dakota Utilities (Heskett Station Unit 2 located in Bismarck, ND) were analyzed by x-ray diffraction analyses (XRD) for mineral determination; bulk chemical composition was determined by inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy; and polished sections were made for optical and scanning electron microscopy. Polarized-light microscopy was performed using a Zeiss research microscope. Individual mineral grains were analyzed using an ARL electron microprobe and a JOEL 840 scanning electron microscope. The agglomerate was found in the mechanical dust collector and was about ten centimeters in diameter with a dark-colored core and a greenish rim. The sample had voids up to ten millimeters in size; however, the agglomerate was hard to break apart. Bulk compositionally, the agglomerate consists primarily of calcium, silica, and alumina with relatively high abundances of iron (8 to 9 wt %), magnesium (5 to 9 wt %) and sodium (3 to 4 wt %). It is likely that the ``root`` cause of this agglomerate originated in the dense phase of the FBC bed. Because fluidized bed combustors work below the ash fusion temperature of coal ash, aluminosilicates (clays) in the ash probably became ``sticky`` due to fluxing reactions with pyrite (FeS{sub 2}) and perhaps alkalies (Na). This is indicated by the high amounts of iron, silica, and alumina in the agglomerate. Because of the size of the deposit, the bed particles probably agglomerated in the dust collector.

  11. Oil concentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Wolde-Michael, G.

    1983-12-27

    In an apparatus for efficiently and thoroughly cleaning tramp oil and contaminants from machine coolant; a tank 12 having three compartments 32, 52 and 66 with a quietener baffle 58 located between the first compartment 32 and the main compartment 52, a torturous path between the main compartment 52 and the clean coolant storage compartment 66, and an agglomeration baffle 76 between the main and storage compartments 52, 66, respectively, is provided. Further, the flow quietener baffle 76 is arranged within the tank 12 so that material flowing from the first compartment 32 to the main compartment 52 will flow generally down the quietener baffle 58 and arrive in the main compartment 52, substantially at the level of the interface 46 between the floating light material 42 and the heavy material 44 with a minimum of disturbance to interface 46. Rapid and complete floatation of oily material containing heavy contaminants is achieved by the addition of aeration bubbles 62 within the first compartment 32.

  12. Increased oil production and reserves from improved completion techniques in the Bluebell Field, Uinta Basin, Utah. Annual report, October 1, 1996--September 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Deo, M.D.; Morgan, C.D.

    1998-05-01

    Wells in the Bluebell field are typically completed by perforating 40 or more beds over 1,000 to 3,000 vertical ft, them stimulating the entire interval with hydrochloric acid. This technique is often referred to as the shot gun completion. The shot-gun technique is believed to leave many potentially productive beds damaged and/or untreated, while allowing water-bearing and low-pressure (thief) zones to communicate with the wellbore. A two-year characterization study involved detailed examination of outcrop, core, well logs, surface and subsurface fractures, produced oil-field waters, engineering parameters of the two demonstration wells, and analysis of past completion techniques and effectiveness. The study was intended to improve the geologic characterization of the producing formations and thereby develop completion techniques specific to the producing beds or facies instead of a shot gun approach to stimulating all the beds. The characterization did not identify predictable-facies or predictable-fracture trends within the vertical stratigraphic column as originally hoped. Advanced logging techniques can identify productive beds in individual wells. A field-demonstration program was developed to use cased-hole advanced logging techniques in two wells and recompletion the wells at two different scales based on the logging. The first well was going to be completed at the interval scale using a multiple stage completion technique (about 500 ft per stage). The second well will be recompleted at the bed-scale using bridge plug and packer to isolate three or more beds for stimulation. These recompletion will show which logs are most effective in identifying productive beds and what scale of completion is most cost effective. The third demonstration will be the logging and completion of a new well using the logs and completion scale or technique most effective in the previous demonstrations.

  13. Increased oil production and reserves from improved completion techniques in the Bluebell field, Uinta Basin, Utah. Tenth quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1996--March 31, 1996. Revised

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, M.L.

    1996-05-13

    The objective of this project is to increase oil production and reserves in the Uinta Basin by demonstrating improved completion techniques. Low productivity of Uinta Basin will is caused by gross production intervals of several thousand feet that contain perforated thief zones, water-bearing zones, and unperforated oil- bearing intervals. Geologic and engineering characterization and computer simulation of the Green River and Wasatch Formations in the Bluefell field will determine reservoir heterogeneities related to fractures and depositional trends. This will be followed by techniques based on the reservoir characterization. Transfer of the project results will be an ongoing component of the project. Data (net pay thickness, porosity, and water saturation) of more than 100 individuals beds in he lower Green River and Wasatch Formations were used to generate geostatistical realization (numerical- representation) of the reservoir properties. The data set was derived from the Michelle Ute and Malnar Pike demonstration wells and 22 other wells in a 20 (52 km{sup 2}) square-mile area. Beds were studied independently of each other. Principles of sequential Gaussian simulations were used to generate geostatistical realizations of the beds.

  14. Improved techniques for fluid diversion in oil recovery. Second annual report, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Seright, R.S.

    1995-03-01

    This project is directed at reducing water production and increasing oil recovery efficiency. Today, the cost of water disposal is typically between $0.25 and $0.50 per bbl. Therefore, there is a tremendous economic incentive to reduce water production if that can be accomplished without sacrificing hydrocarbon production. Environmental considerations also provide a significant incentive to reduce water production during oilfield operations. This three-year project has two technical objectives. The first objective is to compare the effectiveness of gels in fluid diversion (water shutoff) with those of other types of processes. Several different types of fluid-diversion processes are being compared, including those using gels, foams, emulsions, and particulates. The ultimate goals of these comparisons are to (1) establish which of these processes are most effective in a given application and (2) determine whether aspects of one process can be combined with those of other processes to improve performance. Analyses and experiments are being performed to verify which materials are the most effective in entering and blocking high-permeability zones. The second objective of the project is to identify the mechanisms by which materials (particularly gels) selectively reduce permeability to water more than to oil. Topics covered in this report include (1) comparisons of the use of gels, foams, emulsions, and particulates as blocking agents; (2) propagation of aluminum-citrate-HPAM gels through porous rock; (3) gel properties in fractured systems; (4) gel placement in unfractured anisotropic flow systems; and (5) an investigation of why some gels can reduce water permeability more than oil permeability.

  15. Engineering development of selective agglomeration: Task 5, Bench- scale process testing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    Under the overall objectives of DOE Contract ``Engineering Development of Selective Agglomeration,`` there were a number of specific objectives in the Task 5 program. The prime objectives of Task 5 are highlighted below: (1) Maximize process performance in pyritic sulfur rejection and BTU recovery, (2) Produce a low ash product, (3) Compare the performance of the heavy agglomerant process based on diesel and the light agglomerant process using heptane, (4) Define optimum processing conditions for engineering design, (5) Provide first-level evaluation of product handleability, and (6) Explore and investigate process options/ideas which may enhance process performance and/or product handleability.

  16. Engineering development of selective agglomeration: Task 5, Bench- scale process testing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    Under the overall objectives of DOE Contract Engineering Development of Selective Agglomeration,'' there were a number of specific objectives in the Task 5 program. The prime objectives of Task 5 are highlighted below: (1) Maximize process performance in pyritic sulfur rejection and BTU recovery, (2) Produce a low ash product, (3) Compare the performance of the heavy agglomerant process based on diesel and the light agglomerant process using heptane, (4) Define optimum processing conditions for engineering design, (5) Provide first-level evaluation of product handleability, and (6) Explore and investigate process options/ideas which may enhance process performance and/or product handleability.

  17. Agglomeration of Ni-nanoparticles in the gas phase under gravity and microgravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lösch, S.; Iles, G. N.; Schmitz, B.; Günther, B. H.

    2011-12-01

    The agglomeration of metallic nanoparticles can be performed using the well-known inert gas condensation process. Unfortunately, thermal effects such as convection are created by the heating source and as a result the turbulent aerosol avoids ideal conditions. In addition, the sedimentation of large particles and/or agglomerates influences the self-assembly of particles. These negative effects can be eliminated by using microgravity conditions. Here we present the results of the agglomeration of nanoscale Ni-particles under gravity and microgravity conditions, the latter provided by adapted microgravity platforms namely the European sounding rocket MAXUS 8 and the European Parabolic Flight aircraft, Airbus A300 Zero-G.

  18. Magnetic agglomeration method for size control in the synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles

    DOEpatents

    Huber, Dale L.

    2011-07-05

    A method for controlling the size of chemically synthesized magnetic nanoparticles that employs magnetic interaction between particles to control particle size and does not rely on conventional kinetic control of the reaction to control particle size. The particles are caused to reversibly agglomerate and precipitate from solution; the size at which this occurs can be well controlled to provide a very narrow particle size distribution. The size of particles is controllable by the size of the surfactant employed in the process; controlling the size of the surfactant allows magnetic control of the agglomeration and precipitation processes. Agglomeration is used to effectively stop particle growth to provide a very narrow range of particle sizes.

  19. Diffusion-Limited Agglomeration and Defect Generation during Chemical Mechanical Planarization

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, R.; Han, Y.; Karra, P.; Sherman, P.; Chandra, A.

    2008-06-06

    Chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) of copper involves removal of surface asperities with abrasive particles and polishing processes. This leads to copper-containing nanoparticles extruded into the solution. We model the diffusion-limited agglomeration (DLA) of such nanoparticles which can rapidly grow to large sizes. These large particles are detrimental because they can participate in polishing, causing scratches and surface defects during CMP. The agglomeration is much slower in the reaction-limited agglomeration process. Under realistic conditions the defect generation probability can increase significantly over time scales of {approx}10 to 20 min from DLA, unless prevented by slurry rejuvenation or process modification measures.

  20. Assessment of Traffic Noise on Highway Passing from Urban Agglomeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijay, Ritesh; Kori, Chandan; Kumar, Manoj; Chakrabarti, T.; Gupta, Rajesh

    2014-09-01

    Assessment of traffic noise pollution in developing countries is complex due to heterogeneity in traffic conditions like traffic volume, road width, honking, etc. To analyze the impact of such variables, a research study was carried out on a national highway passing from an urban agglomeration. Traffic volume and noise levels (L10, Lmin, Lmax, Leq and L90) were measured during morning and evening peak hours. Contribution of noise by individual vehicle was estimated using passenger car noise unit. Extent of noise pollution and impact of noisy vehicles were estimated using noise pollution level and traffic noise index, respectively. Noise levels were observed to be above the prescribed Indian and International standards. As per audio spectrum analysis of traffic noise, honking contributed an additional 3-4 dB(A) noise. Based on data analysis, a positive relationship was observed between noise levels and honking while negative correlation was observed between noise levels and road width. The study suggests that proper monitoring and analysis of traffic data is required for better planning of noise abatement measures.

  1. Reducing adhesion and agglomeration within a cloud of combustible particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Howard D.

    1988-01-01

    The study of combustible particle clouds inside flame tubes is of fundamental scientific interest as well as a practical concern. Only the suspended concentration is important to the combustion process, so that assurances must be provided that a minimum of particles adheres to the tube wall. This paper demonstrates experimentally the ability to minimize adhesion and agglomeration of acoustically-mixed lycopodium particles within a 5-cm diameter lexan flame tube. The area density of particles (ADP) adhering to the wall of bare lexan tubes was measured at greater than 100 particles/sq mm. The nature of adhesion was found to be clearly electrostatic, with the ADP level aggravated by increased mixing time, vigor, and the concentration of particles. Increases in the conductivity of the air and the tube wall did not affect ADP levels substantially. However, the observed adhesion was reduced to less than 10 p/sq mm when the air was ionized by use of an alpha emitter mounted on the inner walls of the flame tube.

  2. Constraints on chondrule agglomeration from fine-grained chondrule rims

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzler, K.; Bischoff, A.

    1994-01-01

    Fine-grained rims around chondrules, Ca,Al-rich inclusions, and other coarse-grained components occur in most types of unequilibrated chondrites, most prominently in carbonaceous chondrites of the CM group. Based on mineralogical and petrographic investigations, it was suggested that rim structures in unequilibrated ordinary chondrites could have formed in the solar nebula by accretion of dust on the surfaces of the chondrules. Dust mantles in CM chondrites seem to have formed by accretion of dust on the surfaces of chondrules and other components during their passage through dust-rich regions in the solar nebula. Concentric mantles with compositionally different layers prove the existence of various distinct dust reservoirs in the vicinity of the accreting parent body. Despite mineralogical and chemical differences, fine-grained rims from other chondrite groups principally show striking similarities to dust mantle textures in CM chondrite. This implies that the formation of dust mantles was a cosmically significant event like the chondrule formation itself. Dust mantles seem to have formed chronologically between chondrule-producing transient heating events and the agglomeration of chondritic parent bodies. For this reason the investigation of dust mantle structures may help to answer the question of how a dusty solar nebula was transformed into a planetary system.

  3. Agglomeration Multigrid for an Unstructured-Grid Flow Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frink, Neal; Pandya, Mohagna J.

    2004-01-01

    An agglomeration multigrid scheme has been implemented into the sequential version of the NASA code USM3Dns, tetrahedral cell-centered finite volume Euler/Navier-Stokes flow solver. Efficiency and robustness of the multigrid-enhanced flow solver have been assessed for three configurations assuming an inviscid flow and one configuration assuming a viscous fully turbulent flow. The inviscid studies include a transonic flow over the ONERA M6 wing and a generic business jet with flow-through nacelles and a low subsonic flow over a high-lift trapezoidal wing. The viscous case includes a fully turbulent flow over the RAE 2822 rectangular wing. The multigrid solutions converged with 12%-33% of the Central Processing Unit (CPU) time required by the solutions obtained without multigrid. For all of the inviscid cases, multigrid in conjunction with an explicit time-stepping scheme performed the best with regard to the run time memory and CPU time requirements. However, for the viscous case multigrid had to be used with an implicit backward Euler time-stepping scheme that increased the run time memory requirement by 22% as compared to the run made without multigrid.

  4. Branched-linear and agglomerate protein polymers as vaccine platforms

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Leyi; Xia, Ming; Huang, Pengwei; Fang, Hao; Cao, Dianjun; Meng, Xiang-Jin; McNeal, Monica; Jiang, Xi; Tan, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Many viral structural proteins and their truncated domains share a common feature of homotypic interaction forming dimers, trimers, and/or oligomers with various valences. We reported previously a simple strategy for construction of linear and network polymers through the dimerization feature of viral proteins for vaccine development. In this study, technologies were developed to produce more sophisticated polyvalent complexes through both the dimerization and oligomerization natures of viral antigens. As proof of concept, branched-linear and agglomerate polymers were made via fusions of the dimeric glutathione-s-transferase (GST) with either a tetrameric hepatitis E virus (HEV) protruding protein or a 24-meric norovirus (NoV) protruding protein. Furthermore, a monomeric antigen, either the M2e epitope of influenza A virus or the VP8* antigen of rotavirus, was inserted and displayed by the polymer platform. All resulting polymers were easily produced in E. coli at high yields. Immunization of mice showed that the polymer vaccines induced significantly higher specific humoral and T cell responses than those induced by the dimeric antigens. Additional evidence in supporting use of polymer vaccines included the significantly higher neutralization activity and protective immunity of the polymer vaccines against the corresponding viruses than those of the dimer vaccines. Thus, our technology for production of polymers containing different viral antigens offers a strategy for vaccine development against infectious pathogens and their associated diseases. PMID:24985736

  5. The Physics of Protoplanetesimal Dust Agglomerates. V. Multiple Impacts of Dusty Agglomerates at Velocities Above the Fragmentation Threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kothe, Stefan; Gttler, Carsten; Blum, Jrgen

    2010-12-01

    In recent years, a number of new experiments have advanced our knowledge on the early growth phases of protoplanetary dust aggregates. Some of these experiments have shown that collisions between porous and compacted agglomerates at velocities above the fragmentation threshold velocity can lead to growth of the compact body, when the porous collision partner fragments upon impact and transfers mass to the compact agglomerate. To obtain a deeper understanding of this potentially important growth process, we performed laboratory and drop tower experiments to study multiple impacts of small, highly porous dust-aggregate projectiles onto sintered dust targets. The projectile and target consisted of 1.5 ?m monodisperse, spherical SiO2 monomers with volume filling factors of 0.15 0.01 and 0.45 0.05, respectively. The fragile projectiles were accelerated by a solenoid magnet and combined with a projectile magazine with which 25 impacts onto the same spot on the target could be performed in vacuum. We measured the mass-accretion efficiency and the volume filling factor for different impact velocities between 1.5 and 6.0 m s^{-1}. The experiments at the lowest impact speeds were performed in the Bremen drop tower under microgravity conditions to allow partial mass transfer also for the lowest adhesion case. Within this velocity range, we found a linear increase of the accretion efficiency with increasing velocity. In the laboratory experiments, the accretion efficiency increases from 0.12 to 0.21 in units of the projectile mass. The recorded images of the impacts showed that the mass transfer from the projectile to the target leads to the growth of a conical structure on the target after less than 100 impacts. From the images, we also measured the volume filling factors of the grown structures, which ranged from 0.15 (uncompacted) to 0.40 (significantly compacted) with increasing impact speed. The velocity dependency of the mass-transfer efficiency and the packing density of the resulting aggregates augment our knowledge of the aggregate growth in protoplanetary disks and should be taken into account for future models of protoplanetary dust growth.

  6. Remediation technologies for oil-contaminated sediments.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Ashutosh; Liu, Yu

    2015-12-30

    Oil-contaminated sediments pose serious environmental hazards for both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Innovative and environmentally compatible technologies are urgently required to remove oil-contaminated sediments. In this paper, various physical, chemical and biological technologies are investigated for the remediation of oil-contaminated sediments such as flotation and washing, coal agglomeration, thermal desorption, ultrasonic desorption, bioremediation, chemical oxidation and extraction using ionic liquids. The basic principles of these technologies as well as their advantages and disadvantages for practical application have been discussed. A combination of two or more technologies is expected to provide an innovative solution that is economical, eco-friendly and adaptable. PMID:26414316

  7. The Physics of Protoplanetesimal Dust Agglomerates. VII. The Low-velocity Collision Behavior of Large Dust Agglomerates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrpler, Rainer; Blum, Jrgen; Seizinger, Alexander; Kley, Wilhelm

    2012-10-01

    We performed micro-gravity collision experiments in our laboratory drop tower using 5 cm sized dust agglomerates with volume filling factors of 0.3 and 0.4, respectively. This work is an extension of our previous experiments reported in Beitz et al. to aggregates of more than one order of magnitude higher masses. The dust aggregates consisted of micrometer-sized silica particles and were macroscopically homogeneous. We measured the coefficient of restitution for collision velocities ranging from 1 cm s-1 to 0.5 m s-1, and determined the fragmentation velocity. For low velocities, the coefficient of restitution decreases with increasing impact velocity, in contrast to findings by Beitz et al. At higher velocities, the value of the coefficient of restitution becomes constant, before the aggregates break at the onset of fragmentation. We interpret the qualitative change in the coefficient of restitution as the transition from a solid-body-dominated to a granular-medium-dominated behavior. We complement our experiments by molecular-dynamics simulations of porous aggregates and obtain a reasonable match to the experimental data. We discuss the importance of our experiments for protoplanetary disks, debris disks, and planetary rings. This work is an extension to the previous work of our group and gives new insight into the velocity dependency of the coefficient of restitution due to improved measurements, better statistics, and a theoretical approach.

  8. Dynamic forces on agglomerated particles caused by high-intensity ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Knoop, Claas; Fritsching, Udo

    2014-03-01

    In this paper the acoustic forces on particles and agglomerates caused by high-intensity ultrasound in gaseous atmosphere are derived by means of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Sound induced forces cause an oscillating stress scenario where the primary particles of an agglomerate are alternatingly pressed together and torn apart with the frequency of the applied wave. A comparison of the calculated acoustic forces with respect to the inter particle adhesion forces from Van-der-Waals and liquid bridge interactions reveals that the separation forces may reach the same order of magnitude for 80 ?m sized SiO2-particles. Hence, with finite probability acoustically agitated gases may de-agglomerate/disperse solid agglomerate structures. This effect is confirmed by dispersion experiments in an acoustic particle levitation setup. PMID:24152872

  9. Role of Solvents in Improvement of Dissolution Rate of Drugs: Crystal Habit and Crystal Agglomeration

    PubMed Central

    Maghsoodi, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Crystallization is often used for manufacturing drug substances. Advances of crystallization have achieved control over drug identity and purity, but control over the physical form remains poor. This review discusses the influence of solvents used in crystallization process on crystal habit and agglomeration of crystals with potential implication for dissolution. According to literature it has been known that habit modification of crystals by use of proper solvents may enhance the dissolution properties by changing the size, number and the nature of crystal faces exposed to the dissolution medium. Also, the faster dissolution rate of drug from the agglomerates of crystals compared with the single crystals may be related to porous structure of the agglomerates and consequently their better wettability. It is concluded from this review that in-depth understanding of role of the solvents in crystallization process can be applied to engineering of crystal habit or crystal agglomeration, and predictably dissolution improvement in poorly soluble drugs. PMID:25789214

  10. Bed material agglomeration during fluidized bed combustion. Technical progress report, September 30, 1992--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.C.; Dawson, M.R.; Noble, S.

    1993-02-01

    The purpose of this project is to determine the physical and chemical reactions which led to the undesired agglomeration of bed material during fluidized bed combustion and to relate these reactions to specific causes. Survey of industrial-scale fluidized bed combustors is being conducted to determine the occurrence of bed agglomeration and the circumstances under which agglomeration took place. This task should be finished by the end of February. Samples of bed material, agglomerate material, and boiler deposits are being requested from boiler operators as part of the survey. Once received, these sample will be analyzed to determine chemical and mineralogic composition. The bulk chemical determination will be performed using x-ray fluorescence and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission (ICP). Mineralogy will be detected by x-ray diffraction (XRD). Chemical and mineral reactions will be determined by scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy, and electron microprobe.

  11. Discrete element modeling of the microstructure of fine particle agglomerates in sheared dilute suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimbonguila Manounou, A.; Rmond, S.

    2014-10-01

    The fragmentation and restructuring under shear of agglomerates of fine mineral particles are studied with the Distinct Element Method. The model used takes into account contact forces, van der Waals forces, and hydrodynamic forces computed with the free-draining approximation. A loose initial agglomerate is submitted to a constant shear rate until reaching a quasi-stationary state, where the number, size and structure of fragment of agglomerates can be considered as constant. The influence of shear stress and size of particles on the characteristics of agglomerates at equilibrium is studied. Fragmentation is controlled by a non-dimensional number, depending on the radius of the particles, shear rate and maximal adhesion force.

  12. Nanoparticle agglomerates of fluticasone propionate in combination with albuterol sulfate as dry powder aerosols

    PubMed Central

    El-Gendy, Nashwa; Pornputtapitak, Warangkana; Berkland, Cory

    2015-01-01

    Particle engineering strategies remain at the forefront of aerosol research for localized treatment of lung diseases and represent an alternative for systemic drug therapy. With the hastily growing popularity and complexity of inhalation therapy, there is a rising demand for tailor-made inhalable drug particles capable of affording the most proficient delivery to the lungs and the most advantageous therapeutic outcomes. To address this formulation demand, nanoparticle agglomeration was used to develop aerosols of the asthma therapeutics, fluticasone or albuterol. In addition, a combination aerosol was formed by drying agglomerates of fluticasone nanoparticles in the presence of albuterol in solution. Powders of the single drug nanoparticle agglomerates or of the combined therapeutics possessed desirable aerodynamic properties for inhalation. Powders were efficiently aerosolized (~75% deposition determined by cascade impaction) with high fine particle fraction and rapid dissolution. Nanoparticle agglomeration offers a unique approach to obtain high performance aerosols from combinations of asthma therapeutics. PMID:21964203

  13. Plasticity, agglomeration and volatiles secondary reactions in coal pyrolysis. Final technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, J.B.; Fong, W.S.; Serio, M.A.; Beitz, B.R.; Hsu, J.; Lennox, R.B.; Montero-Garcia, J.H.; Sawada, K.; Sontheimer, S.G.; Suzuki, Takeo

    1986-07-01

    Initial softening of the coal is by physical melting of an estimated 25% by weight of the coal. Up to 40% by weight of the coal is further converted to liquids by pyrolytic bond breaking. These liquids can condense or polymerize to give higher molecular weight liquids and solids, and crack to give gas and coke, or escape from the coal particle to give tar. The result is that the liquid weight averaged molecular weight can increase from 570 to above 800, and then decrease to around 600. Experimental viscosity and intraparticle liquid formation/depletion data are described by a global model that accounts for melting, generation and depletion of the liquid, and volatiles formation. The kinetic parameters find quantitative application in modeling coal particle agglomeration and swelling behavior under rapid heating conditions. Predictions of models here developed are in qualitative accord with literature data on swelling. The homogeneous secondary reactions of tar appear to be well-described by a model which includes three ''lumps'' of high, medium, and low reactivity. These lumps imply the existence in tar of three broad classes of bond strengths. Analysis of the data on tar and other products allowed identification of many of the bonds in each group. In general, the homogeneous secondary reactions involve cracking at the periphery of aromatic rings, which remain largely intact, leading to lower molecular weight tars and light products (gases, light oils). The conversion of aromatic rings results in a direct relationship between the fractions of aromatic carbon or aromatic hydrogen and the tar conversion, allowing the determination of kinetic parameters from analytical measurements on surviving tar. 40 refs., 54 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Synthesis of crystalline and amorphous, particle-agglomerated 3-D nanostructures of Al and Si oxides by femtosecond laser and the prediction of these particle sizes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We report a single step technique of synthesizing particle-agglomerated, amorphous 3-D nanostructures of Al and Si oxides on powder-fused aluminosilicate ceramic plates and a simple novel method of wafer-foil ablation to fabricate crystalline nanostructures of Al and Si oxides at ambient conditions. We also propose a particle size prediction mechanism to regulate the size of vapor-condensed agglomerated nanoparticles in these structures. Size characterization studies performed on the agglomerated nanoparticles of fabricated 3-D structures showed that the size distributions vary with the fluence-to-threshold ratio. The variation in laser parameters leads to varying plume temperature, pressure, amount of supersaturation, nucleation rate, and the growth rate of particles in the plume. The novel wafer-foil ablation technique could promote the possibilities of fabricating oxide nanostructures with varying Al/Si ratio, and the crystallinity of these structures enhances possible applications. The fabricated nanostructures of Al and Si oxides could have great potentials to be used in the fabrication of low power-consuming complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor circuits and in Mn catalysts to enhance the efficiency of oxidation on ethylbenzene to acetophenone in the super-critical carbon dioxide. PMID:23140103

  15. Agglomeration and Sintering in Annealed FePt Nanoparticle Assemblies Studied by Small Angle Neutron Scattering and X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, T.

    2005-01-03

    In this work we give a detailed account of the use of small angle neutron scattering to study the properties of polymer mediated, self assembled nanoparticle arrays as a function of annealing temperature. The results from neutron scattering are compared with those obtained from x-ray diffraction. Both techniques show that particle size increases with annealing temperatures of 580 C and above. They also show that the distribution of particle diameters is significant and increases with annealing temperature. The complementary nature of the two measurements allows a comprehensive structural model of the assemblies to be developed in terms of particle sintering and agglomeration. To realize the potential of nanoparticle assemblies as a monodispersed data storage medium the problem of particle separation necessary to avoid sintering and agglomeration during annealing must be addressed.

  16. Encapsulation of bovine serum albumin in poly(lactide-co-glycolide) microspheres by the solid-in-oil-in-water technique.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, I J; Carrasquillo, K G; López, J D; Alvarez, M; Griebenow, K

    2001-02-01

    Non-aqueous protocols to encapsulate pharmaceutical proteins into biocompatible polymers have gained much attention because they allow for the minimization of procedure-induced protein structural perturbations. The aim of this study was to determine if these advantages could be extended to a semi-aqueous encapsulation procedure, namely the solid-in-oil-in-water (s/o/w) technique. The model protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) was encapsulated into poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG) microspheres by first suspending lyophilized BSA in methylene chloride containing PLG, followed by emulsification in a 1% aqueous solution of poly(vinyl alcohol). By variation of critical encapsulation parameters (homogenization intensity, BSA:PLG ratio, emulsifier concentration, ratio of organic to aqueous phase) an encapsulation efficiency of > 90% was achieved. The microspheres obtained showed an initial burst release of < 20%, a sustained release over a period of about 19 days, and a cumulative release of at least 90% of the encapsulated BSA. Different release profiles were observed when using different encapsulation protocols. These differences were related to differences in the microsphere erosion observed using scanning electron microscopy. Release of BSA was mainly due to simple diffusion or to both diffusion and microsphere erosion. Fourier-transform infrared studies were conducted to investigate the secondary structure of BSA during the encapsulation. Quantification of the alpha-helix and beta-sheet content as well as of overall structural changes showed that the secondary structure of encapsulated BSA was not more perturbed than in the lyophilized powder used initially. Thus, the encapsulation procedure did not cause detrimental structural perturbations in BSA. In summary, the results demonstrate that the s/o/w technique is an excellent alternative to the water-in-oil-in-water technique, which is still mainly used in the encapsulation of proteins in PLG microspheres. PMID:11273012

  17. Optimization and comparison of miniaturized extraction techniques for PAHs from crude oil exposed Atlantic cod and haddock eggs.

    PubMed

    Srensen, Lisbet; Silva, Marta S; Booth, Andy M; Meier, Sonnich

    2016-02-01

    Two miniaturized extraction methods for a wide range of 2-6 ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their alkylated homologues in small lipid-rich biota samples (?100mg) have been developed. Both methods utilize liquid extraction (LE) prior to a clean-up step using either normal phase solid phase extraction (SPE) or mixed-phase dispersive SPE (dSPE). Optimization of the methods was achieved by comparing the type and amount of sorbents, drying agents, and solvents used. In order to improve the limits of detection (LOD) of target PAHs under high sensitivity gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis, specific emphasis was given to minimizing lipid co-extraction. The optimized LE-SPE method comprised extraction with dichloromethane/n-hexane (1:1, v/v) and clean-up by silica SPE, whereas the optimized LE-dSPE method comprised extraction with acetonitrile and clean-up with PSA and C18 sorbents. The methods were validated and directly compared through the analysis of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) and haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus) eggs exposed to oil. The LE-SPE method resulted in lower levels of co-extracted lipids (14.1??1.7ng/?L) than the LE-dSPE method (60??14ng/?L). Achieved PAH LODs for the LE-SPE method were typically an order of magnitude lower (<5ng/g) than for the LE-dSPE method (<125ng/g). The LE-SPE method offers the possibility for PAH analysis of small samples of fish eggs (~100mg) exposed to small quantities of crude oil (~1-10?g/L total PAHs). PMID:26677025

  18. The surface properties of nanoparticles determine the agglomeration state and the size of the particles under physiological conditions

    PubMed Central

    Galla, Hans-Joachim; Kirkpatrick, C James; Stauber, Roland H

    2014-01-01

    Summary Due to the recent widespread application of nanomaterials to biological systems, a careful consideration of their physiological impact is required. This demands an understanding of the complex processes at the bionano interface. Therefore, a comprehensive and accurate characterization of the material under physiological conditions is crucial to correlate the observed biological impact with defined colloidal properties. As promising candidates for biomedical applications, two SiO2-based nanomaterial systems were chosen for extensive size characterization to investigate the agglomeration behavior under physiological conditions. To combine the benefits of different characterization techniques and to compensate for their respective drawbacks, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering and asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation were applied. The investigated particle systems were (i) negatively charged silica particles and (ii) poly(organosiloxane) particles offering variable surface modification opportunities (positively charged, polymer coated). It is shown that the surface properties primarily determine the agglomeration state of the particles and therefore their effective size, especially under physiological conditions. Thus, the biological identity of a nanomaterial is clearly influenced by differentiating surface properties. PMID:25383289

  19. The surface properties of nanoparticles determine the agglomeration state and the size of the particles under physiological conditions.

    PubMed

    Bantz, Christoph; Koshkina, Olga; Lang, Thomas; Galla, Hans-Joachim; Kirkpatrick, C James; Stauber, Roland H; Maskos, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Due to the recent widespread application of nanomaterials to biological systems, a careful consideration of their physiological impact is required. This demands an understanding of the complex processes at the bio-nano interface. Therefore, a comprehensive and accurate characterization of the material under physiological conditions is crucial to correlate the observed biological impact with defined colloidal properties. As promising candidates for biomedical applications, two SiO2-based nanomaterial systems were chosen for extensive size characterization to investigate the agglomeration behavior under physiological conditions. To combine the benefits of different characterization techniques and to compensate for their respective drawbacks, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering and asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation were applied. The investigated particle systems were (i) negatively charged silica particles and (ii) poly(organosiloxane) particles offering variable surface modification opportunities (positively charged, polymer coated). It is shown that the surface properties primarily determine the agglomeration state of the particles and therefore their effective size, especially under physiological conditions. Thus, the biological identity of a nanomaterial is clearly influenced by differentiating surface properties. PMID:25383289

  20. A homogeneous/agglomerate model for molten carbonate fuel cell cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, H. R.; Bregoli, L. J.; Szymanski, S. T.

    1984-12-01

    A molten carbonate fuel cell cathode model was developed which enables the estimation of performance as a function of cathode electrolyte content. This model is neither a thin film nor a conventional agglomerate model, but involves the calculation of the effective agglomerate diameter, porosity, tortuosity, and number based on knowledge of the electrode's pore spectrum and electrolyte content. Calculated electrode performance and experimental results are compared for cathodes of different pore spectra over a range of electrolyte contents.

  1. Sonic enhanced ash agglomeration and sulfur capture. Technical progress report, January 1992--March 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    This program will demonstrate the effectiveness of a unique approach which uses a bimodal distribution composed of large sorbent particles and fine fly ash particles to enhance ash agglomeration and sulfur capture at conditions found in direct coal-fired turbines. Under the impact of high-intensity sound waves, sorbent reactivity and utilization, it is theorized, will increase while agglomerates of fly ash and sorbents are formed which are readily collected in commercial cyclones.

  2. Reduced bed agglomeration by co-combustion biomass with peat fuels in a fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect

    Karin Lundholm; Anders Nordin; Marcus Oehman; Dan Bostroem

    2005-12-01

    Fluidized bed combustion is an energy conversion technology that is very suitable for biomass combustion because of its fuel flexibility and low process temperatures. However, agglomeration of bed material may cause severe operating problems. To prevent or at least reduce this, peat has been suggested as an additive to the main fuels. Nevertheless, the characteristics of peat fuels vary and there is limited information of the effect of different peat fuels and of the mechanisms behind the agglomeration prevention. The objectives of the present work were therefore to: (I) quantify the potential positive effect by co-combustion peat with forest fuels in terms of initial agglomeration temperatures; (ii) determine the amount of peat fuel that is needed to significantly reduce the agglomeration tendencies; and, if possible, (iii) elucidate the governing mechanisms. The results showed that all peat fuels prevented agglomeration in the studied interval of 760-1020{sup o}C and even as little as 5% peat fuel was found to have significant effects. The results also indicated that the mechanism of the agglomeration prevention varies between different peat fuels. Possible mechanisms are the minerals in the peat fuel retain alkali, which then is either elutriated up from the bed or captured in the bed; calcium and other refractory elements increase the melting temperature and thereby counteract the melting of alkali; and sulfur reacts with alkali metals and the alkali sulfates is either elutriated up from the bed or prevents agglomeration by increased melting temperature and lowered viscosity. Results from elemental analysis of the coating on bed particles showed that all mixtures with peat fuel resulted in a decreased or unchanged fraction of potassium and an increased fraction of aluminum in the coatings. The results also indicated a complex relationship between the fuel inorganic contents and the agglomeration process. 21 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Effect of the Additives on the Desulphurization Rate of Flash Hydrated and Agglomerated CFB Fly Ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, D. X.; Li, H. L.; Xu, M.; Lu, J. F.; Liu, Q.; Zhang, J. S.; Yue, G. X.

    CFB fly ash from separators was mixed with water or the mixture of water and additives under the temperature of 363K by use of a blender. Then, this compound of fly ash and water or additives was pumped into a CFB combustion chamber by a sludge pump. Because the temperature of flue gas was high in CFB, the fly ash was hydrated fast and agglomerated in the same time. Through this process, the size of agglomerating fly ash is larger than the original particle and the relative residence time of agglomerated fly ash in CFB becomes longer. Therefore, the rate of utility of calcium in fly ash improves and the content of carbon in fly ash decreases. This results in a low Ca/S and low operational cost for CFB boiler. The additive is one key factor, which affects the rate of desulfurization of agglomerated fly ash. Effect of different additives on rate of desulfurization is not same. Cement and limestone are beneficiated to sulfur removal of agglomerated fly ash, but sodium silicate does not devote to the rate of sulfur removal of agglomerated fly ash.

  4. Combined deterministic-stochastic framework for modeling the agglomeration of colloidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortuza, S. M.; Kariyawasam, Lahiru K.; Banerjee, Soumik

    2015-07-01

    We present a multiscale model, based on molecular dynamics (MD) and kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC), to study the aggregation driven growth of colloidal particles. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) simulations are employed to detect key agglomeration events and calculate the corresponding rate constants. The kMC simulations employ these rate constants in a stochastic framework to track the growth of the agglomerates over longer time scales and length scales. One of the hallmarks of the model is a unique methodology to detect and characterize agglomeration events. The model accounts for individual cluster-scale effects such as change in size due to aggregation as well as local molecular-scale effects such as changes in the number of neighbors of each molecule in a colloidal cluster. Such definition of agglomeration events allows us to grow the cluster to sizes that are inaccessible to molecular simulations as well as track the shape of the growing cluster. A well-studied system, comprising fullerenes in NaCl electrolyte solution, was simulated to validate the model. Under the simulated conditions, the agglomeration process evolves from a diffusion limited cluster aggregation (DLCA) regime to percolating cluster in transition and finally to a gelation regime. Overall the data from the multiscale numerical model shows good agreement with existing theory of colloidal particle growth. Although in the present study we validated our model by specifically simulating fullerene agglomeration in electrolyte solution, the model is versatile and can be applied to a wide range of colloidal systems.

  5. Effects of operating conditions on agglomeration and habit of paracetamol crystals in anti-solvent crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Z. Q.; Tan, R. B. H.; Chow, P. S.

    2005-06-01

    Effects of agitation speed and feeding rate on agglomeration and habit of paracetamol crystals in anti-solvent crystallization from water-acetone mixture are reported. Water is used as anti-solvent and is added in a semi-batch manner to a baffled 1-l crystallizer equipped with a marine-type impeller. A simple new method to characterize agglomeration degree has been proposed. Results show that agglomeration degree of crystals depends on particle size and elevated agitation reduces agglomeration degree of big particles. Particle mean size exhibits a maximum with increasing agitation intensity in the range of 200-600 rpm, which is explained from the perspective of anti-solvent dispersion and crystal agglomeration/disruption. Agglomeration degree of products deteriorates with increasing feeding rate ranging from 1 to 20 g/min due to enhanced nucleation. Crystal habit changes when feeding rate is altered, mainly in the faces of [0 0 1] and [1 1 0]. Focused beam reflectance measurement (FBRM) was used to monitor indirectly the particle size distribution in situ. The data demonstrated that FBRM may potentially be used as a tool to control crystallization process.

  6. Quantification of the intensity of virgin olive oil sensory attributes by direct coupling headspace-mass spectrometry and multivariate calibration techniques.

    PubMed

    Lpez-Feria, S; Crdenas, S; Garca-Mesa, J A; Fernndez-Hernndez, A; Valcrcel, M

    2007-04-20

    The main sensory defects of virgin olive oils (rancid, vinegary, winey, muddy sediment, musty and vegetable water) and one positive attribute (fruity) characteristic of three monovarietal extra virgin olive oils (Arbequina, Picual and Frantoio) have been quantified using the direct coupling headspace-mass spectrometry. The results obtained were compared with those provided by the panel test for the same samples. Taking into account that no chromatographic separation exists, multivariate calibration techniques (partial least squares, PLS, and principal components regression, PCR) were used to create the appropriate models. The best results, in terms of standard error of prediction and prediction residual error sum of squares were obtained by PLS and therefore it was used for the prediction of a new set of samples with the above-mentioned positive and negative attributes at different concentration levels. The samples were also assessed by the panel test and good correlations were obtained in all cases. In order to extend the applicability of the model with the time, a multiplicative calibration transfer was used. The benefit of this approach was found to be more marked for the negative than the positive attributes. PMID:17376461

  7. Increased oil production and reserves utilizing secondary/tertiary recovery techniques on small reservoirs in the Paradox basin, Utah. Technical progress report, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, M.L.

    1995-07-14

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced oil recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon dioxide-flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place in the Paradox basin within the Navajo Nation. The results of this project will be transferred to industry and other researchers through a petroleum extension service, creation of digital databases for distribution, technical workshops and seminars, field trips, technical presentations at national and regional professional meetings, and publication in newsletters and various technical or trade journals.

  8. Increased oil production and reserves utilizing secondary/tertiary recovery techniques on small reservoirs in the Paradox basin, Utah. Final technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, M.L.

    1996-01-15

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced oil recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon dioxide-(CO{sub 2}) flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place in the Paradox basin within the Navajo Nation. The results of this project will be transferred to industry and other researchers through a petroleum extension service, creation of digital databases for distribution, technical workshops and seminars, field trips, technical presentations at national and regional professional meeting, and publication in newsletters and various technical or trade journals. Five activities continued this quarter as part of the geological and reservoir characterization of carbonate mound buildups in the Paradox basin: (1) regional facies evaluation, (2) evaluation of outcrop analogues, (3) field-scale geologic analysis, (4) reservoir analysis, and (5) technology transfer.

  9. Increased oil production and reserves utilizing secondary/tertiary recovery techniques on small reservoirs in the Paradox basin, Utah. Quarterly report, October 1--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, M.L.

    1997-02-01

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced oil recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon dioxide-(CO{sub 2}) flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place in the Paradox basin within the Navajo Nation. The results of this project will be transferred to industry and other researchers through a petroleum extension service, creation of digital databases for distribution, technical workshops and seminars, field trips, technical presentations at national and regional professional meetings, and publication in newsletters and various technical or trade journals. Three activities continued this quarter as part of the geological and reservoir characterization of productive carbonate buidups in the Paradox basin: (1) interpretation of new seismic data in the Mule field area, (2) reservoir engineering analysis of the Anasazi field, and (3) technology transfer.

  10. Increased oil production and reserves utilizing secondary/teritiary recovery techniques on small reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah. Quarterly report, July 1 - September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, M.L.

    1996-10-01

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced oil recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon dioxide flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place in the Paradox basin within the Navajo Nation. The results of this project will be transferred to industry and other researchers through a petroleum extension service, creation of digital databases for distribution, technical workshops and seminars, field trips, technical presentations at national and regional professional meeting, and publication in newsletters and various technical or trade journals. Four activities continued this quarter as part of the geological and reservoir characterization: (1) interpretation of outcrop analogues; (2) reservoir mapping, (3) reservoir engineering analysis of the five project fields; and (4) technology transfer.

  11. Increased oil production and reserves utilizing secondary/tertiary recovery techniques on small reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah. Technical progress report, January 1--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, M.L.

    1996-04-30

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced oil recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon dioxide-(CO{sub 2}-)flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place in the Paradox basin within the Navajo Nation. The results of this project will be transferred to industry and other researchers through a petroleum extension service, creation of digital databases for distribution, technical workshops and seminars, field trips, technical presentations at national and regional professional meetings, and publication in newsletters and various technical or trade journals.

  12. Increased oil production and reserves utilizing secondary/tertiary recovery techniques on small reservoirs in the Paradox basin, Utah. Technical progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, M.L.

    1995-05-30

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced oil recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon dioxide-flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place in the Paradox basin within the Navajo Nation. The results of this project will be transferred to industry and other researchers through a petroleum extension service, creation of digital databases for distribution, technical workshops and seminars, field trips, technical presentations at national and regional professional meetings, and publication in newsletters and various technical or trade journals.

  13. Increased oil production and reserves utilizing secondary/tertiary recovery techniques on small reservoirs in the Paradox basin, Utah. Technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, M.L.

    1995-12-01

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced oil recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon dioxide-(CO{sub 2}-) flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place in the Paradox basin within the Navajo Nation. The results of this project will be transferred to industry and other researchers through a petroleum extension service, creation of digital databases for distribution, technical workshops and seminars, field trips, technical presentations at national and regional professional meetings, and publication in newsletters and various technical or trade journals. Four activities continued this quarter as part of the geological and reservoir characterization of carbonate mound buildups in the Paradox basin: (1) field studies, (2) development well completion operations, (3) reservoir analysis and modeling, and (4) technology transfer. This paper reviews the status.

  14. OIL SLICK DISPERSAL MECHANICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study investigates the spreading and dissolution behavior of small oil slicks formed from spills of 12 oils. The increases in area covered by the oils during spreading experiments were determined using photographic techniques. Spreading equations were derived and used to cor...

  15. Heterogeneous Shallow-Shelf Carbonate Buildups in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado: Targets for Increased Oil Production and Reserves Using Horizontal Drilling Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Chidsey, Jr., Thomas C.; Eby, David E.; Wray, Laural L.

    2001-11-26

    The project's primary objective was to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and transfer of horizontal drilling technology in the Paradox Basin, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, then the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox Basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 25 to 50 million barrels (4-8 million m3) of oil. This project was designed to characterize several shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation, choose the best candidate(s) for a pilot demonstration project to drill horizontally from existing vertical wells, monitor well performance(s), and report associated validation activities.

  16. Heterogeneous Shallow-Shelf Carbonate Buildups in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado: Targets for Increased Oil Production and Reserves Using Horizontal Drilling Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Chidsey, Thomas C. Jr.; Eby, David E.; Wray, Laura L.

    2001-04-19

    The primary objective of this project was to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and transfer of horizontal drilling technology in the Paradox basin, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, then the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 25 to 50 million barrels (40-80 million m3) of oil. This project was designed to characterize several shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvania (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation, choose the best candidate(s) for a pilot demonstration project to drill horizontally from existing vertical wells, monitor well performances, and report associated validation activities.

  17. Increased oil production and reserves from improved completion techniques in the Bluebell field, Uinta Basin, Utah. Annual report, October 1, 1995--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, C.D.; Allison, M.L.

    1997-08-01

    The Bluebell field is productive from the Tertiary lower Green River and Wasatch Formations of the Uinta Basin, Utah. The productive interval consists of thousands of feet of interbedded fractured clastic and carbonate beds deposited in a fluvial-dominated lacustrine environment. Wells in the Bluebell field are typically completed by perforating 40 or more beds over 1,000 to 3,000 vertical feet (300-900 m), then stimulating the entire interval. This completion technique is believed to leave many potentially productive beds damaged and/or untreated, while allowing water-bearing and low-pressure (thief) zones to communicate with the wellbore. Geologic and engineering characterization has been used to define improved completion techniques. A two-year characterization study involved detailed examination of outcrop, core, well logs, surface and subsurface fractures, produced oil-field waters, engineering parameters of the two demonstration wells, and analysis of past completion techniques and effectiveness. The characterization study resulted in recommendations for improved completion techniques and a field-demonstration program to test those techniques. The results of the characterization study and the proposed demonstration program are discussed in the second annual technical progress report. The operator of the wells was unable to begin the field demonstration this project year (October 1, 1995 to September 20, 1996). Correlation and thickness mapping of individual beds in the Wasatch Formation was completed and resulted in a. series of maps of each of the individual beds. These data were used in constructing the reservoir models. Non-fractured and fractured geostatistical models and reservoir simulations were generated for a 20-square-mile (51.8-km{sup 2}) portion of the Bluebell field. The modeling provides insights into the effects of fracture porosity and permeability in the Green River and Wasatch reservoirs.

  18. Improved techniques for fluid diversion in oil recovery. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Seright, R.S.

    1994-01-01

    This three-year project has two general objectives. The first objective is to compare the effectiveness of gels in fluid diversion with those of other types of processes. Several different types of fluid-diversion processes will be compared, including those using gels, foams, emulsions, and particulates. The ultimate goals of these comparisons are to (1) establish which of these processes are most effective in a given application, and (2) determine whether aspects of one process can be combined with those of other processes to improve performance. Analyses will be performed to assess where the various diverting agents will be most effective (e.g., in fractured vs. unfractured wells, deep vs. near-wellbore applications, reservoirs with vs. without crossflow, or injection wells vs. production wells). Experiments will be performed to verify which materials are the most effective in entering and blocking high-permeability zones. Another objective of the project is to identify the mechanisms by which materials (particularly gels) selectively reduce permeability to water more than to oil. In addition to establishing why this occurs, our research will attempt to identify materials and conditions that maximize this phenomenon.

  19. Improved techniques for fluid diversion in oil recovery. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Seright, R.S.

    1995-10-01

    This three-year project has two general objectives. The first objective is to compare the effectiveness of gels in fluid diversion with those of other types of processes. Several different types of fluid-diversion processes are being compared, including those using gels, foams, emulsions, and particulates. The ultimate goals of these comparisons are to (1) establish which of these processes is most effective in a given application and (2) determine whether aspects of one process can be combined with those of other processes to improve performance. Analyses are being performed to assess where the various diverting agents will be most effective (e.g., in fractured vs. unfractured wells, deep vs. near-wellbore applications, reservoirs with vs. without crossflow, or injection wells vs. production wells). Experiments are being performed to verify which materials are the most effective in entering and blocking high-permeability zones. Another objective of the project is to identify the mechanisms by which materials (particularly gels) selectively reduce permeability to water more than to oil. In addition to establishing why this occurs, our research attempts to identify materials and conditions that maximize this disproportionate permeability reduction.

  20. Experimental development of a two-stage fluidized-bed/cyclonic agglomerating incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    Mensinger, M.C.; Rehmat, A.; Bryan, B.G.; Lau, F.S. ); Shearer, T.L. ); Duggan, P.A. )

    1991-01-01

    The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) is conducting an experimental program to develop and test through pilot-plant scale of operation, IGT's two-stage fluidized-bed/cyclonic agglomerating incinerator (TSI). The TSI is based on combining the fluidized-bed agglomeration/gasification technology and the cyclonic combustion/incineration technology, which have been developed at IGT over many years. The TSI is a unique and extremely flexible combustor that can operate over a wide range of conditions in the fluidized-bed first stage from low temperature (desorption) to high temperature (agglomeration) including gasification of high-Btu wastes. The TSI can easily and efficiently destroy solid, liquid and gaseous organic wastes, while containing solid inorganic contaminants within an essentially non-leachable glassy matrix, suitable for disposal in an ordinary landfill. This paper presents the results of tests conducted in a batch, fluidized-bed bench-scale unit (BSU) with commercially available clean'' top soil and the same soil spiked with lead and chromium compounds. The objectives of these tests were to determine the operating conditions necessary to achieve soil agglomeration and to evaluate the leaching characteristics of the soil agglomerates formed. 7 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  1. Temperature-Switchable Agglomeration of Magnetic Particles Designed for Continuous Separation Processes in Biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Paulus, Anja S; Heinzler, Raphael; Ooi, Huey Wen; Franzreb, Matthias

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this work was the synthesis and characterization of thermally switchable magnetic particles for use in biotechnological applications such as protein purification and enzymatic conversions. Reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer polymerization was employed to synthesize poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) brushes via a "graft-from" approach on the surface of magnetic microparticles. The resulting particles were characterized by infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis and their temperature-dependent agglomeration behavior was assessed. The influence of several factors on particle agglomeration (pH, temperature, salt type, and particle concentration) was evaluated. The results showed that a low pH value (pH 3-4), a kosmotropic salt (ammonium sulfate), and a high particle concentration (4 g/L) resulted in improved agglomeration at elevated temperature (40 C). Recycling of particles and reversibility of the temperature-switchable agglomeration were successfully demonstrated for ten heating-cooling cycles. Additionally, enhanced magnetic separation was observed for the modified particles. Ionic monomers were integrated into the polymer chain to create end-group functionalized particles as well as two- and three-block copolymer particles for protein binding. The adsorption of lactoferrin, bovine serum albumin, and lysozyme to these ion exchange particles was evaluated and showed a binding capacity of up to 135 mg/g. The dual-responsive particles combined magnetic and thermoresponsive properties for switchable agglomeration, easy separability, and efficient protein adsorption. PMID:26069936

  2. Carbon conversion-ash agglomeration study for the KILnGAS coal gasification process: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    A study of carbon conversion/ash agglomeration in the KILnGAS coal gasification process was conducted jointly by the Allis-Chalmers Corporation and Southern Illinois University-Carbondale. This study, funded by the Electric Power Research Institute was conducted for the purpose of understanding a phenomenon at the KILnGAS Commercial Module (KCM) where ash inside the gasifier agglomerates into large balls, which caused plant operating constraints. This condition was experienced when the process was operating at a level required to achieve design rated carbon conversion. A laboratory-scale ported rotary gasification reactor was built which had the capability to simulate KCM process operating conditions. Gasification tests were run in this reactor with two coals, Illinois No. 6 and Colorado Wadge, to investigate the process conditions which promote agglomeration of ash. It was subsequently determined that the formation of large ash agglomerates can be attributed to high peak bed temperature caused by excessively high air-to-steam (A:S) ratios. It has, therefore, been concluded that the A:S ratio should be used as a primary control parameter in the KCM process operation for limiting peak bed temperature and, in turn, controlling the growth of ash agglomerates. 7 refs., 20 figs., 14 tabs.

  3. Agglomeration and defluidization in fluidized beds due to thermally induced sintering

    SciTech Connect

    Compo, P.; Pfeffer, R.; Tardos, G.I.

    1987-01-01

    The surfaces of fluidizable particles often soften at temperatures well below the material's bulk solid melting point. When particles come into contact at elevated temperatures, there is a tendency for material bridges to form resulting in an interparticle adhesive force. This phenomenon, known as sintering, is driven by the reduction of excess surface energy and for each material is dependent on factors such as particle size and morphology, the interparticle compression force and most importantly, temperature. High temperature fluidization of cohesive powders results in agglomeration, thereby increasing the effective diameter and changing the hydrodynamic properties of the particles. If interparticle forces become significantly greater than forces generated by particle motion, defluidization will occur. In industrial practice, agglomeration is usually undesirable and must be avoided, although there are cases where controlled agglomeration is useful as in fluid-bed coal gasification where the mineral matter agglomerates and is removed from the reactor. The experimental work reported here consists of dilatometry to determine the sintering behavior of a powder as a function of temperature and high temperature fluidization in a pilot size unit to measure the minimum fluidization velocity (defluidization limit) and the voidage at minimum fluidization in the cohesive temperature range of the material. A wide variety of particles have been studied ranging from pure substances including polymers, salts and glass beads to ores and cracking catalysts obtained from industrial reactors where problematic agglomeration at high temperature fluidization was encountered.

  4. Acoustic agglomeration of power plant fly ash for environmental and hot gas cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Reethof, G.; Koopmann, G.H.

    1989-12-01

    This two year research program has the objectives of completing the several investigations associated with the use of high intensity acoustic energy to agglomerate micron and submicron sized particles in fly ash aerosols in order to provide the necessary scientific knowledge and design criteria for the specification of technically and economically viable intermediate flue gas treatment of coal fired power plants. Goals are to further the understanding of certain fundamental processes by means of theoretical and experimental investigations to include this knowledge in an advanced computerized model of the agglomeration processes. Tests with the acoustic agglomeration facilities available in Penn State's new High Intensity Acoustic Laboratory were to be used to verify the results from the acoustic agglomeration simulations. Research work continued on high power, high efficiency sirens with special emphasis on the nonlinear acoustic phenomena and novel means of significantly increasing siren efficiency. A study was carried out to evaluate the economics of conventional coal fired power plant clean-up systems using acoustic agglomeration as an intermediate flue gas treatment. 154 refs., 152 figs., 30 tabs.

  5. Acoustic agglomeration of power plant fly ash: Quarterly technical report, November 5, 1986--February 5, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Reethof, G.

    1987-03-20

    The objective of this project is to complete the investigations on the use of high intensity acoustic energy to agglomerate micron and submicron sized particulates in fly ash aerosols in order to provide the necessary scientific knowledge and design criteria for the specification of technically and economically viable intermediate flue gas treatment of coal fired power plants. The results of the project are to provide technical and economic information for the better development and evaluation of potential fine particulate control systems. The goals of the proposed work are to further the understanding of certain fundamental processes by means of theoretical and experimental investigations, to include this knowledge in an advanced computerized model of the agglomeration processes. Tests with the two acoustic agglomerators available in Penn State's new High Intensity Acoustics Laboratory will be used to verify the results from the agglomeration simulation. Research work will continue on high power, high efficiency sirens with special emphasis on the nonlinear acoustic phenomena and novel means of significantly increasing siren efficiency. A study will be carried out to evaluate the economics of conventional coal fired power plant clean-up systems using acoustic agglomerators as intermediate flue gas treatment.

  6. Acoustic agglomeration of power-plant fly ash. Final technical report, July 18, 1979-October 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Reethof, G.

    1982-02-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate the technical feasibility of using high intensity sound fields to agglomerate submicron fly ash particles into micron sized particles for subsequent removal by conventional particle removal methods such as electrostatic precipitators, bag houses or cyclones. A second generation computerized analytical model of the agglomeration processes was developed and shown to give acceptable results. The P.S.U. agglomerator was rebuilt, modernized and used for further agglomeration studies. A 600 acoustic watt siren was designed, built and tested; performance was fully satisfactory and levels up to 150 dB were achieved in the modified P.S.U. agglomerator as predicted. Scanning electron microscope particle size distribution measurement methods were investigated. Sound field investigation in the agglomeration chamber were completed. The results show up to 30 dB troughs in the sound field for pure tone excitations. The warble tone excitation reduced the variations to about 5 dB. Non linear acoustic and parametric acoustic effects were studied to ascertain their impact on the agglomeration process. The indications are that both phenomena have promise of enhancing acoustic agglomeration and further study is required. A follow-on proposal was prepared to utilize the results of this effort with special emphasis on the realities of the acoustic phenomena at high intensities and the design and development of a 700/sup 0/F agglomerator to study higher temperature effects.

  7. Bio-Friendly Alternatives for Xylene – Carrot oil, Olive oil, Pine oil, Rose oil

    PubMed Central

    Nandan, Surapaneni Rateesh Kumar; Kulkarni, Pavan G.; Rao, Thokala Madhusudan; Palakurthy, Pavan

    2015-01-01

    Background Xylene is a flammable liquid with characteristic petroleum or aromatic odours, it is miscible with most of the organic solvents and paraffin wax. Xylene clears tissues rapidly and renders transparency, facilitating clearing endpoint determination, this made it to be used as a clearing agent in routine histopathological techniques. Even though it is a good clearing agent, it causes damage to the tissues by its hardening effect particularly those fixed in non-protein coagulant fixatives. Apart from these tissue effects, it has severe, long lasting ill effects on health of technicians and pathologists when exposed to longer duration. Hence in order to overcome these effects and replace xylene with a safe alternative agent, the present study was carried out to assess the clearing ability and bio-friendly nature of four different natural oils i.e., Carrot oil, Olive oil, Pine oil and Rose oil in comparison with that of Xylene. According to Bernoulli’s principle of fluid dynamics, to decrease viscosity of these oils and increase penetration into tissues for rapid clearing hot-air oven technique was used. Aims To assess:1) Clearing ability and bio-friendly nature of four different oils i.e., Carrot oil, Olive oil, Pine oil, Rose oil in comparison with that of xylene, 2) Application of Bernoulli’s principle of fluid dynamics in rapid clearing of tissues by using hot-air oven. Materials and Methods Forty different formalin fixed tissue samples were taken. Each sample of tissue was cut into 5 bits (40x5=200 total bits) which were subjected for dehydration in differential alcohol gradients. Later, each bit is kept in 4 different oils such as Carrot oil, Olive oil, Pine oil, Rose oil and xylene and transferred into hot-air oven. Further routine steps of processing, sectioning and staining were done. Individual sections cleared in four different oils were assessed for cellular architecture, staining quality and a comparison was done between them. Results Results showed that all the four oils had ability to clear the tissues similar to that of xylene. Pine oil was superior in its physical and clearing properties, which also maintained good cellular architecture and distinct staining quality, when compared with other oils and xylene. Conclusion Carrot oil, Olive oil, Pine oil, Rose oil, are not only bio friendly and economical but can also be used as clearing agent instead of xylene. In this study stability and longetivity of haematoxyllin and eosin staining was evaluated for over a period of one year and no significant difference in staining quality were observed. PMID:26673687

  8. Bed material agglomeration during fluidized bed combustion. Technical progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.C.; Dawson, M.R.; Smeenk, J.L.

    1995-04-01

    Experiments performed support the hypothesis that a reducing atmosphere during fluidized bed coal combustion contributes to the formation of agglomerates. Reducing conditions are imposed by controlling the amount of combustion air supplied to the combustor, 50% of theoretical in these experiments. These localized reducing conditions may arise from either poor lateral bed mixing or oxygen-starved conditions due to the coal feed locations. Deviations from steady-state operating conditions in bed pressure drop may be used to detect agglomerate formation. Interpretation of the bed pressure drop was made more straightforward by employing a moving average difference method. During steady-state operation, the difference between the moving point averages should be close to zero, within {plus_minus}0.03 inches of water. Instability within the combustor, experienced once agglomerates begin to form, can be recognized as larger deviations from zero, on the magnitude of {plus_minus}0.15 inches of water.

  9. Dry powdered aerosols of diatrizoic acid nanoparticle agglomerates as a lung contrast agent

    PubMed Central

    El-Gendy, Nashwa; Aillon, Kristin L.; Berkland, Cory

    2010-01-01

    Aerosolized contrast agents may improve the resolution of biomedical imaging modalities and enable more accurate diagnosis of lung diseases. Many iodinated compounds, such as diatrizoic acid, have been shown to be safe and useful for radiographic examination of the airways. Formulations of such compounds must be improved in order to allow imaging of the smallest airways. Here, diatrizoic acid nanoparticle agglomerates were created by assembling nanoparticles into inhalable microparticles that may augment deposition in the lung periphery. Nanoparticle agglomerates were fully characterized and safety was determined in vivo. After dry powder insufflation to rats, no acute alveolar tissue damage was observed 2 h post dose. Diatrizoic acid nanoparticle agglomerates possess the characteristics of an efficient and safe inhalable lung contrast agent. PMID:20214960

  10. A Novel Equivalent Agglomeration Model for Heat Conduction Enhancement in Nanofluids

    PubMed Central

    Sui, Jize; Zheng, Liancun; Zhang, Xinxin; Chen, Ying; Cheng, Zhengdong

    2016-01-01

    We propose a multilevel equivalent agglomeration (MEA) model in which all particles in an irregular cluster are treated as a new particle with equivalent volume, the liquid molecules wrapping the cluster and in the gaps are considered to assemble on the surface of new particle as mixing nanolayer (MNL), the thermal conductivity in MNL is assumed to satisfy exponential distribution. Theoretical predictions for thermal conductivity enhancement are highly in agreement with the classical experimental data. Also, we first try to employ TEM information quantitatively to offer probable reference agglomeration ratio (not necessary a very precise value) to just test rational estimations range by present model. The comparison results indicate the satisfactory priori agglomeration ratio estimations range from renovated model. PMID:26777389

  11. Direct observation of nanoscale Pt electrode agglomeration at the triple phase boundary.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chen-Chiang; Kim, Sanwi; Baek, Jong Dae; Li, Yong; Su, Pei-Chen; Kim, Taek-Soo

    2015-03-25

    Nanoporous platinum electrode thin films were delaminated from yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrates via double cantilever beam delamination to reveal the structure located at the interface between electrode and electrolyte. The thermally driven morphological evolution between the electrode top surface and the substrate contact interface of agglomerated nanoporous platinum thin films were compared. We found the temperature required for significant agglomeration to occur was approximately 100 C higher at the electrolyte contact interface side than at the top surface side. Judging the reaction active site from the electrode top surface could be inaccurate because higher resistance of thermal agglomeration at the interface could retain the reaction active site during fuel cell operation. PMID:25756949

  12. On the two principal curvatures as potential barriers in a model of complex matter agglomeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadomski, A.; Rub, J. M.

    2003-09-01

    We show that matter agglomeration mesoscopic phenomena of irreversible type are well described by nonequilibrium thermodynamics formalism. The description assumes that the thermodynamic (internal) state variables are in local equilibrium, and uses the well-known flux-force relations, with the Onsager coefficients involved, ending eventually up at a local conservation law of the Fokker-Planck type. Within the framework of the formalism offered the first two curvatures, characterizing the structure of the agglomerates, are associated with a suitable choice of a physical potential governing the system. It turns out that a certain choice of the potential of power-law type leads to emphasizing the role of the Gaussian curvature while another choice in logarithmic form results in a pronounced role of the mean curvature. The offered modeling has been related successfully with a statistical-mechanical polycrystalline matter evolution introduced for physical-metallurgical purposes, and modified for a use in biophysical soft-matter agglomerations.

  13. A Novel Equivalent Agglomeration Model for Heat Conduction Enhancement in Nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Sui, Jize; Zheng, Liancun; Zhang, Xinxin; Chen, Ying; Cheng, Zhengdong

    2016-01-01

    We propose a multilevel equivalent agglomeration (MEA) model in which all particles in an irregular cluster are treated as a new particle with equivalent volume, the liquid molecules wrapping the cluster and in the gaps are considered to assemble on the surface of new particle as mixing nanolayer (MNL), the thermal conductivity in MNL is assumed to satisfy exponential distribution. Theoretical predictions for thermal conductivity enhancement are highly in agreement with the classical experimental data. Also, we first try to employ TEM information quantitatively to offer probable reference agglomeration ratio (not necessary a very precise value) to just test rational estimations range by present model. The comparison results indicate the satisfactory priori agglomeration ratio estimations range from renovated model. PMID:26777389

  14. Modeling the yield strength of polymer nanocomposites based upon nanoparticle agglomeration and polymer-filler interphase.

    PubMed

    Zare, Yasser

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, some models for yield strength of polymer nanocomposites are developed to determine the properties of interphase and agglomerated nanoparticles. In this regard, "Bagg" parameter is defined assuming the agglomerates size (Dagg) and interphase properties. Additionally, the influences of "Bagg" and "Dagg" on the thickness and strength of interphase are evaluated by the developed equations. The agglomeration of nanoparticles causes contradictory effects on interphase properties in samples with different levels of interfacial bonding. Also, "Bagg" more depends to interphase properties compared to "Dagg". It is found that upon increasing in "Bagg" and "Dagg", the strength of interphase improves and reaches the most level at the highest values of "Bagg" and "Dagg". Therefore, controlling the levels of "Bagg" and "Dagg" is crucial to obtain a strong interphase. PMID:26802275

  15. On the Mechanism of Ultrasound-Driven Deagglomeration of Nanoparticle Agglomerates in Aluminum Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryashova, Olga; Vorozhtsov, Sergey

    2016-02-01

    One of the promising directions in the technology of composite alloys with improved mechanical properties is reinforcement of the metallic matrix with nanopowders introduced in the liquid metal. Ultrasonic processing is known to significantly improve the introduction of submicrone particles to the metallic melt. This study focuses on the mechanisms of deagglomeration and wettability of such particles by the melt under the action of ultrasound. The suggested mechanism involves the penetration of the liquid metal into the pores and cracks of the agglomerates under the excess pressure created by imploding cavitation bubbles and further destruction of the agglomerate by the sound wave. The main dependences connecting the acoustic parameters and processing time with the physical and chemical properties of particles and the melt are obtained through analytical modeling. The mathematical description of the ultrasonic deagglomeration in liquid metal is presented; a dependence of the threshold intensity of ultrasound for the break-up of agglomerates on their size is reported.

  16. A Novel Equivalent Agglomeration Model for Heat Conduction Enhancement in Nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Jize; Zheng, Liancun; Zhang, Xinxin; Chen, Ying; Cheng, Zhengdong

    2016-01-01

    We propose a multilevel equivalent agglomeration (MEA) model in which all particles in an irregular cluster are treated as a new particle with equivalent volume, the liquid molecules wrapping the cluster and in the gaps are considered to assemble on the surface of new particle as mixing nanolayer (MNL), the thermal conductivity in MNL is assumed to satisfy exponential distribution. Theoretical predictions for thermal conductivity enhancement are highly in agreement with the classical experimental data. Also, we first try to employ TEM information quantitatively to offer probable reference agglomeration ratio (not necessary a very precise value) to just test rational estimations range by present model. The comparison results indicate the satisfactory priori agglomeration ratio estimations range from renovated model.

  17. Laser-induced agglomeration of gold nanoparticles dispersed in a liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serkov, A. A.; Shcherbina, M. E.; Kuzmin, P. G.; Kirichenko, N. A.

    2015-05-01

    Dynamics of gold nanoparticles (NPs) ensemble in dense aqueous solution under exposure to picosecond laser radiation is studied both experimentally and theoretically. Properties of NPs are examined by means of transmission electron microscopy, optical spectroscopy, and size-measuring disk centrifuge. Theoretical investigation of NPs ensemble behavior is based on the analytical model taking into account collisions and agglomeration of particles. It is shown that in case of dense NPs colloidal solutions (above 1014 particles per milliliter) the process of laser fragmentation typical for nanosecond laser exposure turns into laser-induced agglomeration which leads to formation of the particles with larger sizes. It is shown that there is a critical concentration of NPs: at higher concentrations agglomeration rate increases tremendously. The results of mathematical simulation are in compliance with experimental data.

  18. Molecular dynamics study of self-agglomeration of charged fullerenes in solvents.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Soumik

    2013-01-28

    The agglomeration of fullerenes in solvents is an important phenomenon that is relevant to controlled synthesis of fullerene-based nanowires as well as fullerene-based composites. The molecular aggregation in solvents depends on the atomistic interactions of fullerene with the solvent and is made complicated by the fact that fullerenes accrue negative surface charges when present in solvents such as water. In the present work, we simulated fullerenes of varying size and shape (C60, C180, C240, and C540) with and without surface charges in polar protic (water), polar aprotic (acetone), and nonpolar (toluene) solvents using molecular dynamics method. Our results demonstrate that uncharged fullerenes form agglomerates in polar solvents such as water and acetone and remain relatively dispersed in nonpolar toluene. The presence of surface charge significantly reduces agglomerate size in water and acetone. Additionally, the relative influence of surface charge on fullerene agglomeration depends on the size and geometry of the fullerene with larger fullerenes forming relatively smaller agglomerates. We evaluated the diffusion coefficients of solvent molecules within the solvation shell of fullerenes and observed that they are much lower than the bulk solvent and are strongly associated with the fullerenes as seen in the corresponding radial distribution functions. To correlate agglomerate size with the binding energy between fullerenes, we evaluated the potential of mean force between fullerenes in each solvent. Consistent with the solubility of fullerenes, binding energy between fullerenes is the greatest in water followed by acetone and toluene. The presence of charge decreases the binding energy of fullerenes in water and thus results in dispersed fullerenes. PMID:23387595

  19. Molecular dynamics study of self-agglomeration of charged fullerenes in solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Soumik

    2013-01-01

    The agglomeration of fullerenes in solvents is an important phenomenon that is relevant to controlled synthesis of fullerene-based nanowires as well as fullerene-based composites. The molecular aggregation in solvents depends on the atomistic interactions of fullerene with the solvent and is made complicated by the fact that fullerenes accrue negative surface charges when present in solvents such as water. In the present work, we simulated fullerenes of varying size and shape (C60, C180, C240, and C540) with and without surface charges in polar protic (water), polar aprotic (acetone), and nonpolar (toluene) solvents using molecular dynamics method. Our results demonstrate that uncharged fullerenes form agglomerates in polar solvents such as water and acetone and remain relatively dispersed in nonpolar toluene. The presence of surface charge significantly reduces agglomerate size in water and acetone. Additionally, the relative influence of surface charge on fullerene agglomeration depends on the size and geometry of the fullerene with larger fullerenes forming relatively smaller agglomerates. We evaluated the diffusion coefficients of solvent molecules within the solvation shell of fullerenes and observed that they are much lower than the bulk solvent and are strongly associated with the fullerenes as seen in the corresponding radial distribution functions. To correlate agglomerate size with the binding energy between fullerenes, we evaluated the potential of mean force between fullerenes in each solvent. Consistent with the solubility of fullerenes, binding energy between fullerenes is the greatest in water followed by acetone and toluene. The presence of charge decreases the binding energy of fullerenes in water and thus results in dispersed fullerenes.

  20. Agglomeration in Stripper Ash Coolers and Its Possible Remedial Solutions: a Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ravi Inder

    2016-03-01

    The bottom ash of circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler contains large amounts of physical heat. When low quality coals are used in these types of boilers, the ash content is normally more than 40 % and the physical heat loss is approximately 3 % if the bottom ash is discharged without cooling. Bottom ash cooler (BAC) is often used to treat the high temperature bottom ash to reclaim heat, and to facilitate the easily handling and transportation of ash. The CFB boiler at BLA Power, Newari, MP (India) is facing problems of clinker formation in strip ash coolers of plant since the installation of unit. These clinkers are basically agglomerates, which leads to defluidization of stripper ash cooler (BAC) units. There are two strip ash coolers in unit. Each strip ash cooler is capable of working independently. The proper functioning of both strip coolers is very important as it is going to increase the combustion efficiency of boiler by stripping of fine unburnt coal particles from ash, which are injected into the furnace. In this paper causes, characterization of agglomerates, thermo gravimetric analysis of fuel used, particular size distribution of coal and sand and possible remedial solution to overcome these agglomerates in strip ash coolers has also been presented. High temperature in compact separators, non uniform supply of coal and not removing small agglomerates from stripper ash cooler are among main causes of agglomeration in stripper ash cooler. Control of compact separator temperature, replacing 10-12 % of bed material and cleaning stripper ash cooler periodically will decrease agglomeration in stripper ash cooler of unit.

  1. Similarity criteria of HOSP formation at plasma processing of agglomerated particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solonenko, O. P.

    2014-11-01

    The theoretical analysis of basic phenomena at plasma processing of the agglomerated powders, in context of hollow microspherical particles production, was fulfilled. With the use of the obtained theoretical solutions for the first time the key similarity criteria were derived that allow to formulate the requirements to plasma flow, characteristics of agglomerate and its material as well as condition of quenching of the formed hollow microdroplet which realization provides the formation of hollow microsphere with necessary characteristics, in particular, of maximal diameter and minimum thickness of shell.

  2. Agglomeration and diffusion in Cu thin films under supercritical CO2 annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Yoshiki; Watanabe, Mitsuhiro; Kondoh, Eiichi

    2015-05-01

    This paper deals with Cu agglomeration and diffusion that occur in Cu thin films during annealing in supercritical CO2. Cu was deposited by using direct current magnetron sputtering on trench-patterned substrates. Annealing was performed in different atmospheres, namely, pure CO2, CO2 mixed with H2, CO2 mixed with hexafluoroacetylacetone (Hhfac), and CO2 mixed with H2 and Hhfac. The conspicuous agglomeration of Cu films was observed after annealing in the H2-mixed supercritical CO2. This is because Cu diffusion is accelerated by reduction and oxidation that proceed simultaneously on the Cu surface.

  3. In-Situ Agglomeration and De-agglomeration by Milling of Nano-Engineered Lubricant Particulate Composites for Cold Spray Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neshastehriz, M.; Smid, I.; Segall, A. E.

    2014-10-01

    Nano-engineered self-lubricating particles comprised of hexagonal-boron-nitride powder (hBN) encapsulated in nickel have been developed for cold spray coating of aluminum components. The nickel encapsulant consists of several nano-sized layers, which are deposited on the hBN particles by electroless plating. In the cold spray deposition, the nickel becomes the matrix in which hBN acts as the lubricant. The coating demonstrated a very promising performance by reducing the coefficient of friction by almost 50% and increasing the wear resistance more than tenfold. The coatings also exhibited higher bond strength, which was directly related to the hardenability of the particles. During the encapsulation process, the hBN particles agglomerate and form large clusters. De-agglomeration has been studied through low- and high-energy ball milling to create more uniform and consistent particle sizes and to improve the cold spray deposition efficiency. The unmilled and milled particles were characterized with Scanning Electron Microscopy, Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy, BET, and hardness tests. It was found that in low-energy ball milling, the clusters were compacted to a noticeable extent. However, the high-energy ball milling resulted in breakup of agglomerations and destroyed the nickel encapsulant.

  4. Survey and evaluation of instream habitat and stock restoration techniques for wild pink and chum salmon. Restoration study number 105-1 (restoration project 93063). Exxon Valdez oil spill state/federal natural resource damage assessment final report

    SciTech Connect

    Willette, T.M.; Dudiak, N.C.; Honnold, S.G.; Carpenter, G.; Dickson, M.

    1995-08-01

    This project is the result of a three-year survey of the Exxon Valdez oil spill impact area to identify appropriate and cost-effective instream habitat restoration techniques for salmon, including spawning channels and improvement of fish passage through fish ladders or step-pool structures to overcome physical or hydrological barriers. Additional wild salmon stock rehabilitation measures include stream-side incubation boxes, remote egg-taking, incubation at existing hatcheries for fry stocking in oil-impacted streams, and fry rearing. Study results include the identification of the most promising instream habitat restoration projects in each of the spill-impacted areas.

  5. Composite propellant aluminum agglomeration reduction using tailored Al/PTFE particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sippel, Travis R.

    Micron aluminum is widely used in propellants; however, performance could be significantly improved if ignition barriers could be disrupted and combustion tailored. In solid propellants for example, aluminum increases theoretical specific impulse performance, yet theoretical levels cannot be achieved largely because of two-phase flow losses. These losses could be reduced if particles quickly ignited, more gaseous products were produced, and if particle breakup occurred during combustion. To achieve altered aluminum ignition and particle combustion, this work explores the use of low level (10-30 wt.%) fluorocarbon (polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) or poly(carbon monofluoride) (PMF)) inclusion inside of aluminum via low or high energy mechanical activation. Aluminum/PTFE particles are found to be amenable to use in binder based energetics, having average particle sizes ranging from 15 to 78 μm, ~2-7 m2/g, specific surface area, and combustion enthalpies as high as 20.2 kJ/g. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) experiments indicate high energy MA reduces both reaction and oxidation onset to ~440 °C that is far below aluminum alone. Safety testing shows these particles have high electrostatic discharge (ESD) (89.9-108 mJ), impact (> 213 cm), and friction (> 360 N) ignition thresholds. The idea of further increasing reactivity and increasing particle combustion enthalpy is explored by reducing fluorocarbon inclusion content to 10 wt.% and through the use of the strained fluorocarbon PMF. Combustion enthalpy and average particle size range from 18.9 to 28.5 kJ/g and 23.0 to 67.5 μm, respectively and depend on MA intensity, duration, and inclusion level. Specific surface areas are high (5.3 to 34.8 m2/g) and as such, Al/PMF particles are appropriate for energetic applications not requiring a curable liquid binder. Mechanical activation reduces oxidation onset (DSC) from 555 to 480 °C (70/30 wt.%). Aluminum/PMF particles are sensitive to ESD (11.5-47.5 mJ) and some can be ignited via optical flash. Propellant aluminum agglomeration is assessed through replacement of reference aluminum powders (spherical, flake, or nanoscale) with Al/PTFE (90/10 or 70/30 wt.%) particles. The effects on burning rate, pressure dependence, and aluminum ignition, combustion, and agglomeration are quantified. Microscopic imaging shows tailored particles promptly ignite at the burning surface and appear to breakup into smaller particles. Replacement of spherical aluminum with Al/PTFE 70/30 wt.% also increases the pressure exponent from 0.36 to 0.58, which results in a 50% increase in propellant burning rate at 13.8 MPa. Combustion products were quench collected using a liquid-free technique at 2.1 and 6.9 MPa. Sizing of products indicates that composite particles result in nominally 25 μm coarse products, which are smaller than the original, average particle size and are also 66% smaller in diameter (96% by volume) than the 76 μm products collected from reference spherical aluminized propellant. Smaller diameter condensed phase products and more gaseous products will likely decrease two-phase flow loss and reduce slag accumulation in solid rocket motors.

  6. An empirical investigation on thermal characteristics and pressure drop of Ag-oil nanofluid in concentric annular tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasian Arani, A. A.; Aberoumand, H.; Aberoumand, S.; Jafari Moghaddam, A.; Dastanian, M.

    2015-10-01

    In this work an experimental study on Silver-oil nanofluid was carried out in order to present the laminar convective heat transfer coefficient and friction factor in a concentric annulus with constant heat flux boundary condition. Silver-oil nanofluid prepared by Electrical Explosion of Wire technique with no nanoparticles agglomeration during nanofluid preparation process and experiments. The average sizes of particles were 20 nm. Nanofluids with various particle Volume fractions of 0.011, 0.044 and 0.171 vol% were employed. The nanofluid flowing between the tubes is heated by an electrical heating coil wrapped around it. The effects of different parameters such as flow Reynolds number, tube diameter ratio and nanofluid particle concentration on heat transfer coefficient are studied. Results show that, heat transfer coefficient increased by using nanofluid instead of pure oil. Maximum enhancement of heat transfer coefficient occurs in 0.171 vol%. In addition the results showed that, there are slight increases in pressure drop of nanofluid by increasing the nanoparticle concentration of nanofluid in compared to pure oil.

  7. Development and Assessment of Oil-in-Water Emulsions for Encapsulation of Reactive Iron Particles for Subsurface Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berge, N. D.; Taghavy, A.; Ramsburg, A.

    2007-12-01

    Reactive iron particles hold promise for use in the destruction of contaminants in the subsurface environment. Application of these nano- to submicron-scale particles, however, may be limited by poor subsurface transport and non-uniform distribution of the reactive material. Delivery issues are particularly important when evaluating the efficacy of iron-based technologies for treatment of dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) source zones. Current approaches for the delivery of reactive iron particles within DNAPL source zones are hindered by particle agglomeration, flow bypassing, and presence of non-target reactions. Encapsulation of the reactive particles within an oil-in-water emulsion is a novel approach that may overcome these limitations. Development of kinetically-stable, iron-laden, oil-in-water emulsions commenced by identifying surfactant-based coatings to increase the stability of commercially-available iron particles within non-polar organic phases (e.g., soy oil). A phase inversion technique was employed to disperse approximately 10% wt of the iron-laden, organic phase within a continuous aqueous phase containing nonionic emulsifiers. Emulsions were designed to ensure emulsifier proportions yielded hydrophilic-lipophilic balances affiliated with oil-in-water emulsions. Micrographs of the oil-in-water emulsions suggest that the average diameter of the oil droplets is approximately one micrometer. The presence of iron within oil droplets was confirmed in the micrographs and supported by an absence of iron agglomeration within the continuous phase. Bulk characteristics of each emulsion (density and viscosity) were used in conjunction with interfacial tension measurements in total trapping number analyses to assess the propensity of these emulsions to mobilize an entrapped trichloroethene (TCE)-DNAPL. Results suggest that the emulsions described herein should not cause significant mobilization of entrapped TCE-DNAPL in fine-to-medium grain sandy media. Column experiments are being conducted to evaluate the transport of these emulsions through sandy media. Preliminary results from experiments with iron-free emulsions suggest conductivity reductions occurring during emulsion flushing are not the result of extensive pore-clogging but rather are due to viscosity changes (emulsion viscosities range from 2 to 10 cP). Current efforts are focused on assessing and comparing both transport and reaction of commercially available iron particles and iron-laden emulsions within sandy porous media.

  8. Quasiparticle agglomerates and environmental effects in the fractional quantum Hall edge states at ? = 5/2

    SciTech Connect

    Braggio, A.; Carrega, M.; Ferraro, D.; Magnoli, N.; Sassetti, M.

    2013-12-04

    We discuss how the presence of environmental effects and quasiparticle agglomerates could better reconcile the edge states theories with the experimental observations for the case of ? = 5/2. The Pfaffian and the anti-Pfaffian models will be compared in connection with experimental results identifying the latter as the best candidate.

  9. Percolation threshold and electrical conductivity of graphene-based nanocomposites with filler agglomeration and interfacial tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yang; Shan, Jerry W.; Weng, George J.

    2015-08-01

    The dispersion state or degree of agglomeration of graphene is known to have a significant influence on the percolation threshold and electrical conductivity of graphene-based polymer nanocomposites. In addition, an imperfectly conducting interface and tunneling-assisted interfacial conductivity can also affect the overall conductivity. In this paper, a continuum theory is developed that considers all these factors. We first present a two-scale composite model consisting of graphene-rich regions serving as the agglomerates and a graphene-poor region as the matrix. We then introduce the effective-medium theory to determine the percolation threshold and electrical conductivity of the agglomerate and the composite. To account for the effect of imperfect interfaces, a thin layer of interphase with low conductivity is introduced to build a thinly coated graphene, while to account for the contribution of electron hopping from one graphene to another, Cauchy's statistical function which can reflect the increased tunneling activity near the percolation threshold is introduced. It is shown that the percolation threshold of the nanocomposite is controlled by two dispersion parameters, a and b, and the aspect ratio of agglomerates, ?R . It is also shown that the overall conductivity of the nanocomposite mainly depends on the intrinsic conductivity of graphene and polymer matrix, the intrinsic interfacial resistivity, and the tunneling-assisted hopping process. We highlight the conceived theory by demonstrating that a set of recently measured data on the percolation threshold and electrical conductivity of graphene/polystyrene nanocomposites can be well captured by it.

  10. Spectral shaping of lasing active medium with agglomerated nanoparticles of metals and dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donchenko, Valeriy A.; Zemlyanov, Alexey A.; Zinoviev, Mihail M.; Kharenkov, Vladimir A.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper presented a series of experiments determine the spectral characteristics of random lasing in lasers with agglomerated nanoparticles metals and dielectrics. The data allowed us to establish that, in the active heterogeneous environment, there are various gain effects of lasing the impact of which is determined nanoparticles concentration.

  11. Do Universities Generate Agglomeration Spillovers? Evidence from Endowment Value Shocks. NBER Working Paper No. 15299

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kantor, Shawn; Whalley, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we quantify the extent and magnitude of agglomeration spillovers from a formal institution whose sole mission is the creation and dissemination of knowledge--the research university. We use the fact that universities follow a fixed endowment spending policy based on the market value of their endowments to identify the causal effect…

  12. Do Universities Generate Agglomeration Spillovers? Evidence from Endowment Value Shocks. NBER Working Paper No. 15299

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kantor, Shawn; Whalley, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we quantify the extent and magnitude of agglomeration spillovers from a formal institution whose sole mission is the creation and dissemination of knowledge--the research university. We use the fact that universities follow a fixed endowment spending policy based on the market value of their endowments to identify the causal effect

  13. Stability of the grain configurations of thin filmsA model for agglomeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rha, J. J.; Park, J. K.

    1997-08-01

    We have calculated the energy of three distinct grain configurations, namely, completely connected, partially connected, and unconnected configurations, evolving during a spheroidization of polycrystalline thin film by extending a geometrical model due to Miller et al. to the case of spheroidization at both the surface and film-substrate interface. "Stability" diagram defining a stable region of each grain configuration has been established in terms of the ratio of grain size to film thickness versus equilibrium wetting or dihedral angles at various interface energy conditions. The occurrence of spheroidization at the film-substrate interface significantly enlarges the stable region of unconnected grain configuration thereby greatly facilitating the occurrence of agglomeration. Complete separation of grain boundary is increasingly difficult with a reduction of equilibrium wetting angle. The condition for the occurrence of agglomeration differs depending on the equilibrium wetting or dihedral angles. The agglomeration occurs, at low equilibrium angles, via partially connected configuration containing stable holes centered at grain boundary vertices, whereas it occurs directly via completely connected configuration at large equilibrium angles except for the case having small surface and/or film-substrate interface energy. The initiation condition of agglomeration is defined by the equilibrium boundary condition between the partially connected and unconnected configurations for the former case, whereas it can, for the latter case, largely deviate from the equilibrium boundary condition between the completely connected and unconnected configurations because of the presence of a finite energy barrier to overcome to reach the unconnected grain configuration.

  14. Agglomeration due to Brownian motion of fractal-structured combustion aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, C.H.

    1987-01-01

    A dynamic Monte-Carlo type lattice model has been developed to simulate the agglomeration of non-spherical chain-line aggregate combustion aerosols due to Brownian motion. Simulations are carried out in the free molecular and continuum regimes, for both initial monodisperse and initial log-normally distributed aerosols, with and without source mechanisms. Preservation of the chain-like structure of the aggregate is accomplished throughout the simulation by describing the agglomerate as fractal, that is, scale-invariant, self-similar with a noninteger dimensionality. Simulation results indicate that cluster growth is more rapid in the free molecular regime than in the continuum. Aerosols and log-normal distributions retain their log-normal characteristics even after long coagulation times. The effect of the clusters' fractal dimension on the cluster growth rate is determined; the rate of agglomeration increases when the structure of the agglomerate is more fragmented (lower fractal dimension). An analytical solution to the coagulation equation is obtained for log-normal aerosols by calculating moments of the distribution and solving sets of moment equations to determine the size distribution parameters. Condition numbers are employed to determine which moments should be calculated to most accurately determine these parameters. Excellent agreement is obtained between the simulations and the solution to the moment equations. Experimental measurements of soot particle velocity in a premixed methane/air flame are made using laser Doppler velocimetry.

  15. Sonic-enhanced ash agglomeration and sulfur capture. Technical progress report, October--December 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    A major concern with the utilization of coal in directly fired gas turbines is the control of particulate emissions and reduction of sulfur dioxide, and alkali vapor from combustion of coal, upstream of the gas turbine. The results of this research and development indicate that both acoustic agglomeration of particulates and direct injection of sorbents have the potential to become a significant emissions control strategy. The Sonic Enhanced Ash Agglomeration and Sulfur Capture program focuses upon the application of an MTCI proprietary invention (Patent No. 5,197,399) for simultaneously enhancing sulfur capture and particulate agglomeration of the combustor effluent. The major objective of the Phase 1 test program is to confirm the feasibility of the MTCI bimodal particle size approach to enhance particulate control by acoustic ash agglomeration and to demonstrate and confirm the feasibility of an acoustic field to enhance sulfur capture by increasing sorbent reactivity. During this reporting period, additional fabrication work was carried out and final report preparation was started.

  16. Sonic enhanced ash agglomeration and sulfur capture. Quarterly report, January 1996--March 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    A major concern with the utilization of coal in directly fired gas turbines is the control of particulate emissions and reduction of sulfur dioxide, and alkali vapor from combustion of coal, upstream of the gas turbine. Much research and development has been sponsored on methods for particulate emissions control and the direct injection of calcium-based sorbents to reduce SO{sub 2} emission levels. The results of this research and development indicate that both acoustic agglomeration of particulates and direct injection of sorbents have the potential to become a significant emissions control strategy. The Sonic Enhanced Ash Agglomeration and Sulfur Capture program focuses upon the application of an MTCI proprietary invention (Patent No. 5,197,399) for simultaneously enhancing sulfur capture and particulate agglomeration of the combustor effluent. This application can be adapted as either a {open_quotes}hot flue gas cleanup{close_quotes} subsystem for the current concepts for combustor islands or as an alternative primary pulse combustor island in which stagging, sulfur capture, particulate agglomeration and control, and alkali gettering as well as NO{sub x} control processes become an integral part of the pulse combustion process.

  17. Are carbon nanotube effects on green algae caused by shading and agglomeration?

    PubMed

    Schwab, Fabienne; Bucheli, Thomas D; Lukhele, Lungile P; Magrez, Arnaud; Nowack, Bernd; Sigg, Laura; Knauer, Katja

    2011-07-15

    Due to growing production, carbon nanotubes (CNT) may soon be found in a broad range of products and thus in the environment. In this work, an algal growth test was developed to determine effects of pristine and oxidized CNT on the green algae Chlorella vulgaris and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata. CNT suspensions were prepared in algal test medium and characterized taking into account the suspension age, the reduced light transmittance of nanoparticle suspensions defined as shading of CNT and quantified by UV/vis spectroscopy, and the agglomeration of the CNT and of the algal cells. Growth inhibition and photosynthetic activity were investigated as end points. Growth of C. vulgaris was inhibited with effect concentrations of 50% (EC(50)) values of 1.8 mg CNT/L and of 24 mg CNT/L in well dispersed and in agglomerated suspensions, respectively, and 20 mg CNT/L and 36 mg CNT/L for P. subcapitata, respectively. However, the photosynthetic activity was not affected. Growth inhibition was highly correlated with the shading of CNT and the agglomeration of algal cells. This suggests that the reduced algal growth might be caused mainly by indirect effects, i.e. by reduced availability of light and different growth conditions caused by the locally elevated algal concentration inside of CNT agglomerates. PMID:21702508

  18. Direct numerical simulations of agglomeration of circular colloidal particles in two-dimensional shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Young Joon; Djilali, Ned

    2016-01-01

    Colloidal agglomeration of nanoparticles in shear flow is investigated by solving the fluid-particle and particle-particle interactions in a 2D system. We use an extended finite element method in which the dynamics of the particles is solved in a fully coupled manner with the flow, allowing an accurate description of the fluid-particle interfaces without the need of boundary-fitted meshes or of empirical correlations to account for the hydrodynamic interactions between the particles. Adaptive local mesh refinement using a grid deformation method is incorporated with the fluid-structure interaction algorithm, and the particle-particle interaction at the microscopic level is modeled using the Lennard-Jones potential. Motivated by the process used in fabricating fuel cell catalysts from a colloidal ink, the model is applied to investigate agglomeration of colloidal particles under external shear flow in a sliding bi-periodic Lees-Edwards frame with varying shear rates and particle fraction ratios. Both external shear and particle fraction are found to have a crucial impact on the structure formation of colloidal particles in a suspension. Segregation intensity and graph theory are used to analyze the underlying agglomeration patterns and structures, and three agglomeration regimes are identified.

  19. Evaluation of melt agglomeration properties of polyethylene glycols using a mixer torque rheometer.

    PubMed

    Johansen, A; Schaefer, T; Kristensen, H G

    1999-06-25

    Lactose was melt agglomerated in a mixer torque rheometer with polyethylene glycol (PEG) 2000, 3000, 6000, 8000, 10 000, or 20 000 as meltable binder. A longer massing time caused an increase in mean torque until a maximum value after which the torque decreased. A smaller particle size of the PEG gave rise to a faster initial rise in mean torque. The higher viscosity of the PEG 20 000 resulted in a higher mean torque, whereas no clear difference in mean torque was obtained with the other PEGs. The binder concentration could be varied within a rather wide range without causing overwetting, the range being wider with PEG 3000 than with PEG 20 000. The mean torque values obtained were found to be related to the liquid saturation of the agglomerates. The reproducibility of the experiments was found to be very dependent on the experimental conditions, the highest binder viscosities and binder concentrations giving rise to a poor reproducibility. The results were compared with a few melt agglomeration experiments with PEG 3000 in a high shear mixer. The mixer torque rheometer was found not to be suitable for predicting melt agglomeration properties in the high shear mixer because of a marked difference in the shear forces in the two mixers. PMID:10361166

  20. Colloidal agglomerates in tank sludge: Impact on waste processing. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Virden, J.W.

    1997-06-01

    'Disposal of millions of gallons of existing radioactive wastes is a major remediation problem for the Department of Energy (DOE). Although radionuclides are the most hazardous waste con- stituents. the components of greatest concern from a waste processing standpoint are insoluble sludges consisting of submicron colloidal particles. Depending on processing conditions, these colloidal particles can form agglomerate networks that could clog transfer lines or interfere with solid-liquid separations such as settle-decant operations. Under different conditions, the particles can be dispersed to form very fine suspended particles that will not create sediment in settle- decant steps and that can foul and contaminate downstream treatment components including ion exchangers or filtrations systems. Given the wide range of tank chemistries present at Hanford and other DOE sites, it is impractical to measure the properties of all potential processing conditions to design effective treatment procedures. Instead. a framework needs to be established to allow sludge property trends to be predicted on a sound scientific basis. The scientific principles of greatest utility in characterizing, understanding, and controlling the physical properties of sludge fall in the realm of colloid chemistry. The objectives of this work are to accomplish the following: understand the factors controlling the nature and extent of colloidal agglomeration under expected waste processing conditions determine how agglomeration phenomena influence physical properties relevant to waste processing including rheology, sedimentation. and filtration develop strategies for optimizing processing conditions via control of agglomeration phenomena.'