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Sample records for oil nanocapsules frozen

  1. All natural cellulose acetate-Lemongrass essential oil antimicrobial nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Liakos, Ioannis L; D'autilia, Francesca; Garzoni, Alice; Bonferoni, Cristina; Scarpellini, Alice; Brunetti, Virgilio; Carzino, Riccardo; Bianchini, Paolo; Pompa, Pier Paolo; Athanassiou, Athanassia

    2016-08-30

    Nanocapsules and nanoparticles play an essential role in the delivery of pharmaceutical agents in modern era, since they can be delivered in specific tissues and cells. Natural polymers, such as cellulose acetate, are becoming very important due to their availability, biocompatibility, absence of toxicity and biodegradability. In parallel, essential oils are having continuous growth in biomedical applications due to the inherent active compounds that they contain. A characteristic example is lemongrass oil that has exceptional antimicrobial properties. In this work, nanocapsules of cellulose acetate with lemongrass oil were developed with the solvent/anti-solvent method with resulting diameter tailored between 95 and 185nm. Various physico-chemical and surface analysis techniques were employed to investigate the formation of the nanocapsules. These all-natural nanocapsules found to well bioadhere to mucous membranes and to have very good antimicrobial properties at little concentrations against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:26827919

  2. Polylactic Acid-Lemongrass Essential Oil Nanocapsules with Antimicrobial Properties.

    PubMed

    Liakos, Ioannis L; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Holban, Alina Maria; Florin, Iordache; D'Autilia, Francesca; Carzino, Riccardo; Bianchini, Paolo; Athanassiou, Athanassia

    2016-01-01

    Polylactic acid was combined with lemongrass essential oil (EO) to produce functional nanocapsules (NCs). The obtained polylactic acid nanoparticles showed antimicrobial activity both with and without the presence of lemongrass oil; however, the presence of EO improved the activity of the NCs. The presence of lemongrass assisted the formation of well-separated NCs and also provided enhanced antimicrobial properties, since lemongrass is known for its antimicrobial character. Fluorescence microscopy was used to optically observe the nanoparticles and NCs and revealed the attachment of lemongrass oil with the polylactic acid NCs. Dynamic light scattering was used to determine their size. UV absorption was used to determine the exact amount of lemongrass oil found in the polylactic acid-lemongrass oil NCs, which was important for understanding the minimum inhibitory concentration for the antimicrobial experiments. A series of clinically important microbial species were used in the study and the obtained NCs proved to have very good antimicrobial properties against all tested strains. Such NCs can be used for the design of ecological strategies, based on natural alternatives, which may be efficient against severe infections, including those that involve resistant pathogens and biofilms or those with difficult to reach localization. PMID:27399724

  3. Vegetable Oil-Loaded Nanocapsules: Innovative Alternative for Incorporating Drugs for Parenteral Administration.

    PubMed

    Venturinil, C G; Bruinsmann, A; Oliveira, C P; Contri, R V; Pohlmann, A R; Guterres, S S

    2016-02-01

    An innovative nanocapsule formulation for parenteral administration using selected vegetable oils (mango, jojoba, pequi, oat, annatto, calendula, and chamomile) was developed that has the potential to encapsulate various drugs. The vegetable oil-loaded nanocapsules were prepared by interfacial deposition and compared with capric/caprylic triglyceride-loaded lipid core nanocapsules. The major objective was to investigate the effect of vegetable oils on particle size distribution and physical stability and to determine the hemolytic potential of the nanocapsules, considering their applicability for intravenous administration. Taking into account the importance of accurately determining particle size for the selected route of administration, different size characterization techniques were employed, such as Laser Diffraction, Dynamic Light Scattering, Multiple Light Scattering, Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis, and Transmission Electronic Microscopy. Laser diffraction studies indicated that the mean particle size of all nanocapsules was below 300 nm. For smaller particles, the laser diffraction and multiple light scattering data were in agreement (D[3,2]-130 nm). Dynamic light scattering and nanoparticle tracking analysis, two powerful techniques that complement each other, exhibited size values between 180 and 259 nm for all nanoparticles. Stability studies demonstrated a tendency of particle creaming for jojoba-nanocapsules and sedimentation for the other nanoparticles; however, no size variation occurred over 30 days. The hemolysis test proved the hemocompatibility of all nanosystems, irrespective of the type of oil. Although all developed nanocapsules presented the potential for parenteral administration, jojoba oil-loaded nanocapsules were selected as the most promising nanoformulation due to their low average size and high particle size homogeneity. PMID:27433581

  4. Superparamagnetic-oil-filled nanocapsules of a ternary graft copolymer.

    PubMed

    Miao, Lei; Liu, Feng; Lin, Shudong; Hu, Jiwen; Liu, Guojun; Yang, Yang; Tu, Yuanyuan; Hou, Chengmin; Li, Fei; Hu, Meilong; Luo, Hongsheng

    2014-04-15

    Stearic and oleic acid-coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles were dispersed in decahydronaphthalene (DN). This oil phase was dispersed in water using ternary graft copolymer poly(glycidyl methacrylate)-graft-[polystyrene-ran-(methoxy polyethylene glycol)-ran-poly(2-cinnamoyloxyethyl methacrylate)] or PGMA-g-(PS-r-MPEG-r-PCEMA) to yield capsules. The walls of these capsules were composed of PCEMA chains that were soluble in neither water nor DN, and the DN-soluble PS chains stretched into the droplet phase and the water-soluble MPEG chains extended into the aqueous phase. Structurally stable capsules were prepared by photolyzing the capsules with UV light to cross-link the PCEMA layer. Both the magnetite particles and the magnetite-containing capsules were superparamagnetic. The sizes of the capsules increased as they were loaded with more magnetite nanoparticles, reaching a maximal loading of ~0.5 mg of ligated magnetite nanoparticles per mg of copolymer. But the radii of the capsules were always <100 nm. Thus, a novel nanomaterial--superparamagnetic-oil-filled polymer nanocapsules--was prepared. The more heavily loaded capsules were readily captured by a magnet and could be redispersed via shaking. Although the cross-linked capsules survived this capturing and redispersing treatment many times, the un-cross-linked capsules ruptured after four cycles. These results suggest the potential to tailor-make capsules with tunable wall stability for magnetically controlled release applications. PMID:24684287

  5. Antimicrobial Lemongrass Essential Oil-Copper Ferrite Cellulose Acetate Nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Liakos, Ioannis L; Abdellatif, Mohamed H; Innocenti, Claudia; Scarpellini, Alice; Carzino, Riccardo; Brunetti, Virgilio; Marras, Sergio; Brescia, Rosaria; Drago, Filippo; Pompa, Pier Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Cellulose acetate (CA) nanoparticles were combined with two antimicrobial agents, namely lemongrass (LG) essential oil and Cu-ferrite nanoparticles. The preparation method of CA nanocapsules (NCs), with the two antimicrobial agents, was based on the nanoprecipitation method using the solvent/anti-solvent technique. Several physical and chemical analyses were performed to characterize the resulting NCs and to study their formation mechanism. The size of the combined antimicrobial NCs was found to be ca. 220 nm. The presence of Cu-ferrites enhanced the attachment of LG essential oil into the CA matrix. The magnetic properties of the combined construct were weak, due to the shielding of Cu-ferrites from the polymeric matrix, making them available for drug delivery applications where spontaneous magnetization effects should be avoided. The antimicrobial properties of the NCs were significantly enhanced with respect to CA/LG only. This work opens novel routes for the development of organic/inorganic nanoparticles with exceptional antimicrobial activities. PMID:27104514

  6. Association of Borage Oil and Betamethasone Dipropionate in Lipid-Core Nanocapsules: Characterization, Photostability and In Vitro Irritation Test.

    PubMed

    Weber, Julia; Funk, Nadine L; Motta, Mariana H; Guedes, Alessandra M; Visintainer, Ana Paula C; Tedesco, Solange B; Da Silva, Cristiane de B

    2016-02-01

    The association of vegetable products to nanostructured systems has attracted the attention of researchers due to several advantages, such as drug photoprotection, as well as the improvement of the pharmacological and therapeutic activities because of synergistic action, which can provide their topical application. In this work, lipid-core nanocapsules containing borage oil as oil core and betamethasone dipropionate were developed, and nanocapsules without the drug were prepared for comparison. The suspensions were characterized in relation to mean particle size, zeta potential, pH, drug content, and encapsulation efficiency. A photodegradation study was carried out and the in vitro release profile as well as the irritation potential of the drug after nanoencapsulation were also evaluated. In addition, the antiproliferative activity of the free borage oil as well as loaded in nanocapsules was studied. Lipid-core nanocapsules showed nanometric mean size (185-210 nm); polydispersity index below 0.10; negative zeta potential and pH slightly acid (6.0-6.2). Moreover, the drug content was close to theoretical concentration (0.50 +/- 0.03 mg/ml of betamethasone), and the encapsulation efficiency was approximately 100%. The study of the antiproliferative activity of borage oil showed ability to reduce cell growth of Allium cepa. The nanoencapsulation of betamethasone dipropionate provided greater protection against UVC light and decreased the irritation potential of the drug. The release profile of betamethasone dipropionate from nanocapsules followed monoexponential model. PMID:27433586

  7. Formulation and in vitro evaluation of coconut oil-core cationic nanocapsules intended for vaginal delivery of clotrimazole.

    PubMed

    Santos, Sara S; Lorenzoni, Alessandra; Pegoraro, Natháli S; Denardi, Laura B; Alves, Sydney H; Schaffazick, Scheila R; Cruz, Letícia

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this work was to propose coconut oil-core nanocapsules prepared from Eudragit(®) RS100, a cationic polymer, and to evaluate their potential for vaginal delivery of clotrimazole in candidiasis. Nanocapsule suspensions loaded with clotrimazole at 1.0 and 3.0mg/mL were prepared by interfacial deposition of Eudragit(®) RS100. The physicochemical characterization showed average diameter lower than 200 nm, low polydispersity index, positive zeta potential (+10.94 to +14.57 mV), acid pH values (5.4-5.7) and encapsulation efficiencies close to 100%. After 60 days of storage at room temperature and protected from light, the nanocapsules were reasonably stable. Photodegradation studies showed that nanoencapsulation improved clotrimazole stability against UV radiation. The in vitro drug release at pH 4.5 was characterized by a prolonged release with no burst effect. The nanocapsules were more active than free clotrimazole against Candida albicans and Candida glabrata strains susceptible and resistant to fluconazole. Hence, clotrimazole-loaded coconut oil-core nanocapsules represent promising alternatives to the treatment of vulvovaginal candidiasis. PMID:24503350

  8. The stability and controlled release of I-ascorbic acid encapsulated in poly (ethyl-2-cyanoacrylate) nanocapsules prepared by interfacial polymerization of water-in-oil microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Su-Ning; Chen, Tao; Guo, Yi-Guang; Zhang, Jian; Song, Xiaoqiu; Zhou, Lei

    2015-01-01

    The L-ascorbic acid (AA) was encapsulated into biodegradable and biocompatible poly(ethyl-2-cyanoacrylate) (PECA) nanocapsules by interfacial polymerization of water-in-oil (W/O) microemulsions. The influences of surfactant concentration, pH value of the dispersed aqueous phase, and W/O ratio on nanocapsule size were discussed. The stability and in vitro release of encapsulated AA were also investigated. The results show that nanocapsules could be obtained under the conditions with low pH value, high fraction of aqueous phase, and appropriate surfactant concentration. The encapsulated AA was protected by nanocapsules from oxidation and presented superior storage stability in aqueous medium than pure AA. Releasing AA from the inner core of nanocapsules could be controlled by adjusting the enzyme hydrolysis extent of the PECA wall. PMID:26665980

  9. Cisplatin nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    de Kroon, Anton I P M; Staffhorst, Rutger W H M; Kruijff, Ben de; Burger, Koert N J

    2005-01-01

    Cisplatin nanocapsules represent a novel lipid formulation of the anticancer drug cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II), in which nanoprecipitates of cisplatin are covered by a phospholipid bilayer coat consisting of an equimolar mixture of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylserine. Cisplatin nanocapsules are characterized by an unprecedented cisplatin-to-lipid molar ratio and exhibit strongly improved cytotoxicity against tumor cells in vitro compared with the free drug. Here, methods for preparing and characterizing cisplatin nanocapsules are reported. PMID:15721377

  10. Synergistic interactions between doxycycline and terpenic components of essential oils encapsulated within lipid nanocapsules against gram negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Valcourt, C; Saulnier, P; Umerska, A; Zanelli, M P; Montagu, A; Rossines, E; Joly-Guillou, M L

    2016-02-10

    The combination of essential oils (EOs) with antibiotics provides a promising strategy towards combating resistant bacteria. We have selected a mixture of 3 major components extracted from EOs: carvacrol (oregano oil), eugenol (clove oil) and cinnamaldehyde (cinnamon oil). These compounds were successfully encapsulated within lipid nanocapsules (LNCs). The EOs-loaded LNCs were characterised by a noticeably high drug loading of 20% and a very small particle diameter of 114nm. The in vitro interactions between EOs-loaded LNCs and doxycycline were examined via checkerboard titration and time-kill assay against 5 Gram-negative strains: Acinetobacter baumannii SAN, A. baumannii RCH, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. No growth inhibition interactions were found between EOs-loaded LNCs and doxycycline (FIC index between 0.7 and 1.30). However, when bactericidal effects were considered, a synergistic interaction was observed (FBC index equal to 0.5) against all tested strains. A synergistic effect was also observed in time-kill assay (a difference of at least 3 log between the combination and the most active agent alone). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to visualise the changes in the bacterial membrane. The holes in bacterial envelope and leakage of cellular contents were observed in SE micrographs after exposure to the EOs-LNCs and the doxycycline combination. PMID:26631640

  11. Oxidative stability of red palm oils blended chicken nuggets during frozen storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamaruzaman, Nurkhuzaiah; Babji, Abdul Salam

    2014-09-01

    The effects of red palm oils known as Naturally Vitamin Rich Oil (NVRO) on the lipid stability of chicken nuggets were determined. Lipid oxidation was analyzed during frozen storage (-18 °C) for up to 4 months. Thiobarbituric acid (TBA) values and peroxide value (PV) for all samples chicken nuggets increased throughout 3 months of frozen storage and then start to decrease thereafter. Chicken nuggets formulated with NVRO, NVRO-100 and NVRO-50 showed lower TBA values and PV compared to the samples prepared with chicken fat. However, among NVRO, there were not significantly different for most of the months. It was concluded that the utilization of red palm oils in chicken nuggets significantly reduced the oxidation of lipid, which was indicated by the PV throughout 4 months of frozen storage.

  12. Development of a frozen yogurt fortified with a nano-emulsion containing purple rice bran oil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of this study were to develop and evaluate a frozen yogurt (FY) fortified with a nano-emulsion containing purple rice bran oil (NPRBO). A nano-emulsion with a droplet size range of 150-300 nm was produced by sonication followed by ultra-shear homogenization. The nano-emulsion was mi...

  13. Influence of the type of vegetable oil on the drug release profile from lipid-core nanocapsules and in vivo genotoxicity study.

    PubMed

    Rigo, Lucas Almeida; Frescura, Viviane; Fiel, Luana; Coradini, Karine; Ourique, Aline Ferreira; Emanuelli, Tatiana; Quatrin, Andréia; Tedesco, Solange; Silva, Cristiane B da; Guterres, Silvia Staniçuaski; Pohlmann, Adriana Raffin; Beck, Ruy Carlos Ruver

    2014-11-01

    The use of rice bran (RB), soybean (SB) or sunflower seed (SF) oils to prepare lipid-core nanocapsules (LNCs) as controlled drug delivery systems was investigated. LNCs were prepared by interfacial deposition using the preformed polymer method. All formulations showed negative zeta potential and adequate nanotechnological characteristics (particle size 220-230  nm, polydispersity index < 0.20). The environmental safety was evaluated through an in vivo protocol (Allium cepa test) and LNCs containing RB, SB or SF oils did not present genotoxic potential. Clobetasol propionate (CP) was selected as a model drug to evaluate the influence of the type of vegetable oil on the control of the drug release from LNCs. Biphasic drug release profiles were observed for all formulations. After 168  h, the concentration of drug released from the formulation containing SF oil was lower (0.36  mg/mL) than from formulations containing SB (0.40  mg/mL) or RB oil (0.45  mg/mL). Good correlations between the consistency indices for the LNC cores and the burst and sustained drug release rate constants were obtained. Therefore, the type of the vegetal oil was shown as an important factor governing the control of drug release from LNCs. PMID:23978050

  14. Oleophobicity of Biomimetic Micropatterned Surface and Its Effect on the Adhesion of Frozen Oil.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zihe; Zhang, Wei; Kowalski, Andrew; Zhao, Boxin

    2015-09-15

    The relationship between the oleophobicity of micropatterned surfaces and the reduction of oil adhesion at low temperatures was explored by using siloxane elastomer surfaces as a model system. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surfaces were fabricated with varying oleophobicity from oleophilic to superoleophobic by combing the blending of trichloro(1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyl)silane (FDTS) into PDMS with the construction of bioinspired micropillars. The oil contact angles of micropillars were >130°, with the largest contact angle measured to be 146°. The micropillared surface showed remarkable self-cleaning properties; the contact angle hysteresis was <15°. The transparent oil droplets on PDMS surfaces of varied oleophobicity were frozen into a white-colored solid at -25 °C with the aid of a cooling system. Adhesion forces of the frozen oil droplets were obtained from the knock-off tests, showing that the adhesion forces dropped with the increased oleophobicity. The largest adhesion force was observed on the oleophilic flat surface, while the lowest adhesion force was on the highest oleophobic micropillared surface. The relative effectiveness of chemical and physical modifications on adhesion strength reduction was studied in terms of FDTS and micropillars, respectively. The results showed that a reduction of adhesion strength by 4% was reached by blending FDTS into flat PDMS, while a much more pronounced reduction of frozen oil adhesion strength by 60% was achieved by blending FDTS into PDMS micropillars; these results suggested a possible synergic effect of the FDTS chemistry and micropillar on the reduction of adhesion strength of frozen oil droplets. PMID:26300446

  15. Olive Oil Based Emulsions in Frozen Puff Pastry Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriele, D.; Migliori, M.; Lupi, F. R.; de Cindio, B.

    2008-07-01

    Puff pastry is an interesting food product having different industrial applications. It is obtained by laminating layers of dough and fats, mainly shortenings or margarine, having specific properties which provides required spreading characteristic and able to retain moisture into dough. To obtain these characteristics, pastry shortenings are usually saturated fats, however the current trend in food industry is mainly oriented towards unsatured fats such as olive oil, which are thought to be safer for human health. In the present work, a new product, based on olive oil, was studied as shortening replacer in puff pastry production. To ensure the desired consistency, for the rheological matching between fat and dough, a water-in-oil emulsion was produced based on olive oil, emulsifier and a hydrophilic thickener agent able to increase material structure. Obtained materials were characterized by rheological dynamic tests in linear viscoelastic conditions, aiming to setup process and material consistency, and rheological data were analyzed by using the weak gel model. Results obtained for tested emulsions were compared to theological properties of a commercial margarine, adopted as reference value for texture and stability. Obtained emulsions are characterized by interesting rheological properties strongly dependent on emulsifier characteristics and water phase composition. However a change in process temperature during fat extrusion and dough lamination seems to be necessary to match properly typical dough rheological properties.

  16. Mechanism of nanocapsules of Matricaria recutita L. extract formation by the emulsion-diffusion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaeili, Akbar; Saremnia, Betsabe; Koohian, Ata; Rezazadeh, Shamsali

    2011-10-01

    Nanocapsules coated by medicinal plants have many applications in drug manufacturing. Medicinal plants can be loaded on nanocapsules with polyesteric triblock copolymer poly ethylene glycol-poly butylene adipate-poly ethylene glycol (PEG-PBA-PEG) as shell and olive oil can be introduced as a core of nanocapsules by a method known as polymer deposition solvent evaporation method. In this research, first, certain amount of polymer, Matricaria recutita extract and olive oil were mixed with acetone and then, water was added to the solution using magnetic stirrer. After which the acetone was removed by vacuuming and finally nanocapsules were found by freezing-drier. The study showed the size of nanocapsules depends on variety of factors such as the ratio of polymer to oil and concentration of polymers and plant extract. The nanocapsules were identified by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and zeta potential sizer (ZPS), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR).

  17. Function of ram spermatozoa frozen in diluents supplemented with casein and vegetable oils.

    PubMed

    Del Valle, I; Souter, A; Maxwell, W M C; Muiño-Blanco, T; Cebrián-Pérez, J A

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess biologically safer components as alternatives to egg yolk for the frozen storage of ram semen using casein, coconut or palm oil in either Salamon's diluent (S) or a swim-up medium (SU). Ejaculates were frozen as pellets and sperm motility (subjectively) and acrosome integrity (FITC-PNA/PI) by flow cytometry were assessed at 0, 3 and 6h after thawing and incubation at 37°C. Three experiments were done: different concentrations of palm oil (5%, 10% and 20%); casein added as emulsifier and protective agent; and differences between egg yolk, coconut and palm oil in S and SU. 20% of oil added to SU accounted for a lesser percentage (P<0.05) of motile cells compared to rest while no differences were found between different oil levels on viable cells. When casein was added to diluents containing 5% of palm oil, no differences were found between palm or casein (P>0.05). No differences were found when S and SU were compared neither as groups nor between S alone and containing coconut or palm oil; however, SU alone yielded less motility than SU 5% coconut. However, in both groups, S and SU, egg yolk accounted for the greatest values in both bases. These results indicate that none of biologically safer media components (casein, palm or coconut oil) used in this study maintained the function of ram spermatozoa after freeze-thawing better than S-containing egg yolk. The application of vegetable oils as substitutes for egg yolk in diluents for the cryopreservation of ram spermatozoa requires further research. PMID:23561943

  18. Effect of the treatment with Achyrocline satureioides (free and nanocapsules essential oil) and diminazene aceturate on hematological and biochemical parameters in rats infected by Trypanosoma evansi.

    PubMed

    Do Carmo, Guilherme M; Baldissera, Matheus D; Vaucher, Rodrigo A; Rech, Virginia Cielo; Oliveira, Camila B; Sagrillo, Michele Rorato; Boligon, Aline A; Athayde, Margareth L; Alves, Marta P; França, Raqueli T; Lopes, Sonia T A; Schwertz, Claiton I; Mendes, Ricardo E; Monteiro, Silvia G; Da Silva, Aleksandro S

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to verify the effect of the treatment with A. satureioides essential oil (free and nanoencapsulated forms) and diminazene aceturate on hematological and biochemical variables in rats infected by Trypanosoma evansi. The 56 rats were divided into seven groups with eight rats each. Groups A, C and D were composed by uninfected animals, and groups B, E, F and G were formed by infected rats with T. evansi. Rats from groups A and B were used as negative and positive control, respectively. Rats from the groups C and E were treated with A. satureioides essential oil, and groups D and F were treated with A. satureioides nanoencapsulated essential oil. Groups C, D, E and F received one dose of oil (1.5 mL kg(-1)) during five consecutive days orally. Group G was treated with diminazene aceturate (D.A.) in therapeutic dose (3.5 mg kg(-1)) in an only dose. The blood samples were collected on day 5 PI for analyses of hematological (erythrocytes and leukocytes count, hemoglobin concentration, hematocrit, mean corpuscular and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration) and biochemical (glucose, triglycerides, cholesterol, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), albumin, urea and creatinine) variables. A. satureioides administered was able to maintain low parasitemia, mainly the nanoencapsulated form, on 5 days post infection. On the infected animals with T. evansi treated with A. satureioides essential oil (free and nanocapsules) the number of total leucocytes, lymphocytes and monocytes present was similar to uninfected rats, and different from infected and not-treated animals (leukocytosis). Treatment with A. satureioides in free form elevated levels of ALT and AST, demonstrating liver damage; however, treatment with nanoencapsulated form did not cause elevation of these enzymes. Finally, treatments inhibited the increase in creatinine levels caused by infection for T. evansi. In summary, the nanoencapsulated

  19. Scale-up of polyamide and polyester Parsol® MCX nanocapsules by interfacial polycondensation and solvent diffusion method.

    PubMed

    Stumpo, Marianna; Anselmi, Cecilia; Vauthier, Christine; Mitri, Khalil; Hanno, Ibrahim; Huang, Nicolas; Bouchemal, Kawthar

    2013-10-01

    The scale-up of oil-containing polyamide nanocapsules produced by simultaneous interfacial polycondensation and solvent diffusion was successfully achieved. Up to 1,500 mL were produced by using a Y-shaped mixer device. The sizes of nanocapsules containing olive oil were modulated from 646 to 211 nm by changing process parameters without modification of the formulation composition. All the results of nanocapsule diameters (dsc) expressed as a function of the Reynolds number (Re) showed the existence of a typical power-law relationship. It was demonstrated that the high turbulences created upon nanocapsule formation are the most important parameter allowing to nanocapsule size to be controlled without modifying the formulation composition. Finally, the power-law relationship was used to predict the size of nanocapsules composed of polyamide or polyester and loaded with Parsol(®) MCX. The physico-chemical properties of both polyamide and polyester nanocapsules at the laboratory scale were compared to the ones obtained at the pilot scale. The encapsulation efficiency was higher than 98% in both types of nanocapsules at the laboratory and the pilot scales. The in vitro releases of Parsol(®) MCX from polyester nanocapsules were reproducible at both scales. This is the first time such a power-law was described for the preparation of nanocapsules by interfacial polycondensation and solvent diffusion. PMID:23834834

  20. Eco-friendly aqueous core surface-modified nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Carbone, C; Musumeci, T; Lauro, M R; Puglisi, G

    2015-01-01

    In this work, positively charged nanocapsules have been developed for potential ocular delivery exploiting the deposition of PLA onto the droplet surface of a W/O nanoemulsion prepared by the reversed procedure of the PIT method. PLA in combination with different amounts of various oils and surfactants have been studied in order to select the best formulation for polymeric nanocapsule preparation. The traditional visual observation together with the Turbiscan(®) technology were exploited in order to identify the best combination of polymer/oil for nanocapsule preparation. Two different primary surfactants (Span(®) 60 and Span(®) 80) have been tested to select their influence on the field of existence of the nanoemulsion by the construction of the pseudoternary phase diagrams. Cationic hybrid NC have been prepared by the addition of a coating layer of DDAB. The physico-chemical and morphological properties of all the prepared nanocapsules have been evaluated and compared by PCS, DSC and AFM. Therefore, positively charged nanocapsules can be easily prepared by a simple eco-friendly technique that exploits biocompatible materials avoiding a large input of mechanical energy as a potential ocular delivery systems for hydrophilic compounds or gene materials. PMID:25497291

  1. Preparation of polyamide nanocapsules of Aloe vera L. delivery with in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Esmaeili, Akbar; Ebrahimzadeh, Maryam

    2015-04-01

    Aloe vera is the oldest medicinal plant ever known and the most applied medicinal plant worldwide. The purpose of this study was to prepare polyamide nanocapsules containing A. vera L. by an emulsion diffusion technique with in vivo studies. Diethyletriamine (DETA) was used as the encapsulating polymer with acetone ethyl acetate and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as the organic solvents and Tween and gelatin in water as the stabilizers. Sebacoyl chloride (SC) monomer, A. vera L. extract, and olive oil were mixed with the acetone and then water containing DETA monomer was added to the solution using a magnetic stirrer. Finally, the acetone was removed under vacuum, and nanocapsules were obtained using a freeze drier. This study showed that the size of the nanocapsule depends on a variety of factors such as the ratio of polymer to oil, the concentration of polymers, and the plant extract. The first sample is without surfactant and the size of nanocapsules in the sample is 115 nm. By adding surfactant, nanocapsules size was reduced to 96 nm. Nanocapsules containing A. vera were administered to rats and the effects were compared with a normal control group. The results showed that in the A. vera group, the effect is higher. The nanocapsules were identified by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), zeta potential sizer (ZPS), and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). PMID:25273024

  2. Nanocapsules templated on liquid cores stabilized by graft amphiphilic polyelectrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szafraniec, Joanna; Janik, Małgorzata; Odrobińska, Joanna; Zapotoczny, Szczepan

    2015-03-01

    A surfactant-free method of preparation of nanocapsules templated on liquid cores using amphiphilic graft polyelectrolytes was developed. A model photoactive copolymer, poly(sodium 2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonate) with grafted poly(vinylnaphthalene) chains (PAMPS-graft-PVN) was used to stabilize toluene droplets in an aqueous emulsion. The macromolecules, due to their amphiphilic character and the presence of strong ionic groups, tend to undergo intramolecular aggregation in water but at the water-oil interface less compact conformation is preferred with PVN grafts anchoring in the oil phase and the charged PAMPS main chains residing in the aqueous phase, thus stabilizing the nanoemulsion droplets. Formation of such nanocapsules was confirmed by dynamic light scattering measurements as well as SEM and cryo-TEM imaging. Grafting density and content of the chromophores in the graft copolymers were varied in order to achieve high stability of the coated nanodroplets. It was shown that the capsules are better stabilized by the copolymers with many short hydrophobic grafts than with fewer but longer ones. Use of photoactive polyelectrolytes enabled spectroscopic investigation of the relationship between conformation of the macromolecules and stabilization of the oil-core nanocapsules. Long-term stability of the nanocapsules was achieved and further increased by multilayer shell formation using polyelectrolytes deposited via the layer-by-layer approach. The obtained capsules served as efficient nanocontainers for a hydrophobic fluorescent probe. The proposed strategy of nanocapsule preparation may be easily extended to biologically relevant polymers and applied to fabricate liquid core nanodelivery systems without the need of using low molecular weight additives which may have adverse effects in numerous biomedical applications.A surfactant-free method of preparation of nanocapsules templated on liquid cores using amphiphilic graft polyelectrolytes was developed

  3. The effect of monomers on the formulation of polymeric nanocapsules based on polyureas and polyamides.

    PubMed

    Montasser, I; Briançon, S; Fessi, H

    2007-04-20

    Formulation of nanocapsules based on polyureas and polyamides have been tested using a patented process. This method based on polycondensation reaction of two complementary monomers and spontaneous formation of oil in water emulsion, is an alternative concept to the known technique based on the same type of reaction used for the formulation of microcapsules, and in which the lipophilic monomer was emulsified in the organic phase before the formation of the polymeric membrane. Nanocapsules can be prepared from different monomers. Wall based on cross-linked polymer contributes to the stability of nanocapsules during and after formulation. The permeability of the polymeric wall is related to its crystallinity and contributes to the growth of nanocapsule membrane by the diffusion of the hydrophilic monomers to get stable colloidal suspensions. PMID:17174494

  4. Labeling the oily core of nanocapsules and lipid-core nanocapsules with a triglyceride conjugated to a fluorescent dye as a strategy to particle tracking in biological studies.

    PubMed

    Fiel, Luana Almeida; Contri, Renata Vidor; Bica, Juliane Freitas; Figueiró, Fabrício; Battastini, Ana Maria Oliveira; Guterres, Sílvia Stanisçuaski; Pohlmann, Adriana Raffin

    2014-01-01

    The synthesis of novel fluorescent materials represents a very important step to obtain labeled nanoformulations in order to evaluate their biological behavior. The strategy of conjugating a fluorescent dye with triacylglycerol allows that either particles differing regarding supramolecular structure, i.e., nanoemulsions, nanocapsules, lipid-core nanocapsules, or surface charge, i.e., cationic nanocapsules and anionic nanocapsules, can be tracked using the same labeled material. In this way, a rhodamine B-conjugated triglyceride was obtained to prepare fluorescent polymeric nanocapsules. Different formulations were obtained, nanocapsules (NC) or lipid-core nanocapsules (LNC), using the labeled oil and Eudragit RS100, Eudragit S100, or poly(caprolactone) (PCL), respectively. The rhodamine B was coupled with the ricinolein by activating the carboxylic function using a carbodiimide derivative. Thin layer chromatography, proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H-NMR), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), UV-vis, and fluorescence spectroscopy were used to identify the new product. Fluorescent nanocapsule aqueous suspensions were prepared by the solvent displacement method. Their pH values were 4.6 (NC-RS100), 3.5 (NC-S100), and 5.0 (LNC-PCL). The volume-weighted mean diameter (D 4.3) and polydispersity values were 150 nm and 1.05 (NC-RS100), 350 nm and 2.28 (NC-S100), and 270 nm and 1.67 (LNC-PCL). The mean diameters determined by photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) (z-average) were around 200 nm. The zeta potential values were +5.85 mV (NC-RS100), -21.12 mV (NC-S100), and -19.25 mV (LNC-PCL). The wavelengths of maximum fluorescence emission were 567 nm (NC-RS100 and LNC-PCL) and 574 nm (NC-S100). Fluorescence microscopy was used to evaluate the cell uptake (human macrophage cell line) of the fluorescent nanocapsules in order to show the applicability of the approach. When the cells were treated with the fluorescent nanocapsules, red emission was

  5. Labeling the oily core of nanocapsules and lipid-core nanocapsules with a triglyceride conjugated to a fluorescent dye as a strategy to particle tracking in biological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiel, Luana Almeida; Contri, Renata Vidor; Bica, Juliane Freitas; Figueiró, Fabrício; Battastini, Ana Maria Oliveira; Guterres, Sílvia Stanisçuaski; Pohlmann, Adriana Raffin

    2014-05-01

    The synthesis of novel fluorescent materials represents a very important step to obtain labeled nanoformulations in order to evaluate their biological behavior. The strategy of conjugating a fluorescent dye with triacylglycerol allows that either particles differing regarding supramolecular structure, i.e., nanoemulsions, nanocapsules, lipid-core nanocapsules, or surface charge, i.e., cationic nanocapsules and anionic nanocapsules, can be tracked using the same labeled material. In this way, a rhodamine B-conjugated triglyceride was obtained to prepare fluorescent polymeric nanocapsules. Different formulations were obtained, nanocapsules (NC) or lipid-core nanocapsules (LNC), using the labeled oil and Eudragit RS100, Eudragit S100, or poly(caprolactone) (PCL), respectively. The rhodamine B was coupled with the ricinolein by activating the carboxylic function using a carbodiimide derivative. Thin layer chromatography, proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), UV-vis, and fluorescence spectroscopy were used to identify the new product. Fluorescent nanocapsule aqueous suspensions were prepared by the solvent displacement method. Their pH values were 4.6 (NC-RS100), 3.5 (NC-S100), and 5.0 (LNC-PCL). The volume-weighted mean diameter ( D 4.3) and polydispersity values were 150 nm and 1.05 (NC-RS100), 350 nm and 2.28 (NC-S100), and 270 nm and 1.67 (LNC-PCL). The mean diameters determined by photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) ( z-average) were around 200 nm. The zeta potential values were +5.85 mV (NC-RS100), -21.12 mV (NC-S100), and -19.25 mV (LNC-PCL). The wavelengths of maximum fluorescence emission were 567 nm (NC-RS100 and LNC-PCL) and 574 nm (NC-S100). Fluorescence microscopy was used to evaluate the cell uptake (human macrophage cell line) of the fluorescent nanocapsules in order to show the applicability of the approach. When the cells were treated with the fluorescent nanocapsules, red emission was detected

  6. Nanoparticles: A very versatile nanocapsule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuykendall, Darrell W.; Zimmerman, Steven C.

    2007-04-01

    Numerous copies of a pumpkin-shaped molecule can be linked together to form a nanocapsule shell that can trap compounds inside. The outer surface of this capsule can be decorated with other species by plugging them into the cavities of the hollowed-out pumpkins.

  7. Insights into the Role of Biomineralizing Peptide Surfactants on Making Nanoemulsion-Templated Silica Nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Hui, Yue; Wibowo, David; Zhao, Chun-Xia

    2016-01-26

    We recently developed a novel approach for making oil-core silica-shell nanocapsules using designed bifunctional peptides (also called biomineralizing peptide surfactants) having both surface activity and biomineralization activity. Using the bifunctional peptides, oil-in-water nanoemulsion templates can be readily prepared, followed by the silicification directed exclusively onto the oil droplet surfaces and thus the formation of the silica shell. To explore their roles in the synthesis of silica nanocapsules, two bifunctional peptides, AM1 and SurSi, were systematically studied and compared. Peptide AM1, which was designed as a stimuli-responsive surfactant, demonstrated quick adsorption kinetics with a rapid decrease in the oil-water interfacial tension, thus resulting in the formation of nanoemulsions with a droplet size as small as 38 nm. Additionally, the nanoemulsions showed good stability over 4 weeks because of the formation of a histidine-Zn(2+) interfacial network. In comparison, the SurSi peptide that was designed by modularizing an AM1-like surface-active module with a highly cationic biosilicification-active module was unable to effectively reduce the oil-water interfacial tension because of its high molecular charge at neutral pH. The slow adsorption resulted in the formation of less stable nanoemulsions with a larger size (60 nm) than that of AM1. Besides, both AM1 and SurSi were found to be able to induce biomimetic silica formation. SurSi produced well-dispersed and uniform silica nanospheres in the bulk solution, whereas AM1 generated only irregular silica aggregates. Consequently, well-defined silica nanocapsules were synthesized using SurSi nanoemulsion templates, whereas silica aggregates instead of nanocapsules predominated when templating AM1 nanoemulsions. This finding indicated that the capability of peptide surfactants to form isolated silica nanospheres might play a role in the successful fabrication of silica nanocapsules. This

  8. Influence of different physicochemical conditions on the release of indium oxine from nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Kedzierewicz, F; Thouvenot, P; Monot, I; Hoffman, M; Maincent, P

    1998-03-15

    The main purpose of this study was to determine the influence of factors (pH, enzymes, etc.) chosen partially to mimic in vivo conditions on the release of a model drug, indium oxine, from polyepsiloncaprolactone (PCL) nanocapsules in vitro. A nanocapsule suspension, an emulsion (O/W), and a solution in olive oil were prepared in order to compare the release of a radioactive tracer, indium oxine, as a function of time by an in vitro dialysis method. Nanocapsules were prepared by interfacial deposition of PCL and characterized by particle size distribution (laser light scattering) and determination of the polymer molecular weight by gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The results of this study suggest that the partition coefficient between the acceptor medium and the olive oil is the major parameter governing the release of the isotope, at least in the absence of significant enzyme activity. The PCL wall of nanocapsules is a barrier that does not seem to retard the release of indium. The addition of porcine liver esterases accelerated the degradation of PCL. This study confirms that the release of a drug from nanocapsules may be very different depending on the in vivo location, that is, the administration site. PMID:9492220

  9. Antioxidant activity of dietary oregano essential oil and alpha-tocopheryl acetate supplementation in long-term frozen stored turkey meat.

    PubMed

    Botsoglou, Nikolaos A; Govaris, Alexandros; Botsoglou, Evropi N; Grigoropoulou, Sophia H; Papageorgiou, George

    2003-05-01

    The effects of dietary oregano essential oil and alpha-tocopheryl acetate supplementation on the oxidative stability of long-term frozen stored turkey meat were investigated. Thirty 12-week-old turkeys, randomly divided into five groups, were given a basal diet or a basal diet supplemented with 200 mg of alpha-tocopheryl acetate kg(-1), or 100 or 200 mg of oregano oil kg(-1), or 100 mg of oregano oil plus 100 mg of alpha-tocopheryl acetate kg(-1) for 4 weeks prior to slaughter. Lipid oxidation in breast and thigh meat was assessed after 1, 3, 6, and 9 months of frozen storage at -20 degrees C prior to or following 7 days of refrigerated storage at 4 degrees C. Results showed that oregano oil increased the oxidative stability of breast and thigh meat during the frozen storage. Dietary oregano oil at the inclusion level of 200 mg kg(-1) feed was significantly (p < 0.05) more effective in delaying lipid oxidation compared to the level of 100 mg kg(-1), but equivalent to dietary alpha-tocopheryl acetate supplementation at 200 mg kg(-1), which in turn was inferior to dietary supplementation of 100 mg kg(-1) oregano essential oil plus 100 mg kg(-1) alpha-tocopheryl acetate that was significantly (p < 0.05) superior to all other treatments. Thigh meat was more susceptible to oxidation than breast meat, although the former contained alpha-tocopherol at markedly higher levels. Mean alpha-tocopherol levels in breast and thigh meat from all treatments decreased during the frozen storage, the decrease being sharper between 1 and 3 months of frozen storage for breast and between 3 and 6 months for thigh meat. Oregano oil supplementation increased (p < 0.05) the retention of alpha-tocopherol in meat, the increase being positively correlated with the supplementation level. However, the retention of alpha-tocopherol in meat could only partly elucidate the antioxidant activity exhibited by dietary oregano oil supplementation. PMID:12720373

  10. Synthesis of hollow and mesoporous polycaprolactone nanocapsules,

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paik, Pradip; Zhang, Yong

    2011-05-01

    New polycaprolactone (PCL) nanocapsules with a hollow core and mesoporous shell have been synthesized. The PCL nanocapsules have an average size of about 100nm and a mesopores shell of about 20nm. The size of the mesopores on the shell is about 4nm. Fluorescent dye Rhodamin 6G was loaded into the nanocapsules to demonstrate the mesoporous structure of the capsules and their ability to load small molecules. The nanocapsules with such a structure can be used in many areas for various applications such as drug and gene delivery.New polycaprolactone (PCL) nanocapsules with a hollow core and mesoporous shell have been synthesized. The PCL nanocapsules have an average size of about 100nm and a mesopores shell of about 20nm. The size of the mesopores on the shell is about 4nm. Fluorescent dye Rhodamin 6G was loaded into the nanocapsules to demonstrate the mesoporous structure of the capsules and their ability to load small molecules. The nanocapsules with such a structure can be used in many areas for various applications such as drug and gene delivery. Dr. Pradip Paik is currently an assistant professor at the University of Hyderabad (Central University), India.

  11. Frozen Frozen CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    2 October 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a view of frozen carbon dioxide in the south polar residual cap of Mars. Much of the south polar residual cap exhibits terrain that resembles stacks of sliced Swiss cheese, but this portion of the cap lacks the typical, circular depressions that characterize much of the region. Carbon dioxide on Mars freezes at a temperature of around 148 Kelvins, which is -125oC or about -193oF.

    Location near: 87.2oS, 28.4oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  12. Fabrication of polymeric nanocapsules from curcumin-loaded nanoemulsion templates by self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Shabbar; Karangwa, Eric; Bashari, Mohanad; Hayat, Khizar; Hong, Xiao; Sharif, Hafiz Rizwan; Zhang, Xiaoming

    2015-03-01

    In this study, biodegradable polymeric nanocapsules were prepared by sequential deposition of food-grade polyelectrolytes through the self-assembling process onto the oil (medium chain triglycerides) droplets enriched with curcumin (lipophilic bioactive compound). Optimum conditions were used to prepare ultrasound-assisted nanoemulsions stabilized by octenyl-succinic-anhydride (OSA)-modified starch. Negatively charged droplets (-39.4 ± 1.84 mV) of these nanoemulsions, having a diameter of 142.7 ± 0.85 nm were used as templates for the fabrication of nanocapsules. Concentrations of layer-forming cationic (chitosan) and anionic (carboxymethylcellulose) biopolymers were optimized based on the mean droplet/particle diameter (MDD/MPD), polydispersity index (PDI) and net charge on the droplets/capsules. Prepared core-shell structures or nanocapsules, having MPD of 159.85 ± 0.92 nm, were characterized by laser diffraction (DLS), ζ-potential (ZP), atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Furthermore, physical stability of curcumin-loaded nanocapsules in suspension was determined and compared at different storage temperatures. This study may provide information regarding the formation of ultrasound-assisted polymeric nanocapsules from the nanoemulsion templates which could be helpful in the development of delivery systems for lipophilic food bioactives. PMID:25453208

  13. Multifunctional Bi2S3/PLGA nanocapsule for combined HIFU/radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Yao, Ming-hua; Ma, Ming; Chen, Yu; Jia, Xiao-qing; Xu, Guang; Xu, Hui-xiong; Chen, Hang-rong; Wu, Rong

    2014-09-01

    A multifunctional organic-inorganic hybrid nanocapsule based on Bi2S3-embedded poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanocapsule has been elaborately designed to combine the merits of both polymeric shell structure and Bi2S3 nanoparticles. Hydrophobic Bi2S3 nanoparticles were successfully introduced into the PLGA nanocapsules via a facile and efficient water/oil/water (W/O/W) emulsion strategy. The elastic polymeric PLGA shell provides the excellent capability of ultrasound contrast imaging to the Bi2S3/PLGA. Meanwhile, the potential of these microcapsules to enhance the high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy was demonstrated. Importantly, this research provided the first example of both in vitro and in vivo to demonstrate the radiosensitization effect of Bi2S3-embedded PLGA hybrid nanocapsules against prostate cancer under external X-ray irradiation. Thus, the successful integration of the Bi2S3 and PLGA nanocapsules provided an alternative strategy for the highly efficient ultrasound guided HIFU/RT synergistic therapy. PMID:24973300

  14. Producing Light Oil from a Frozen Reservoir: Reservoir and Fluid Characterization of Umiat Field, National Petroleum Reserve, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Hanks, Catherine

    2012-12-31

    Umiat oil field is a light oil in a shallow, frozen reservoir in the Brooks Range foothills of northern Alaska with estimated oil-in-place of over 1 billion barrels. Umiat field was discovered in the 1940’s but was never considered viable because it is shallow, in the permafrost, and far from any transportation infrastructure. The advent of modern drilling and production techniques has made Umiat and similar fields in northern Alaska attractive exploration and production targets. Since 2008 UAF has been working with Renaissance Alaska Inc. and, more recently, Linc Energy, to develop a more robust reservoir model that can be combined with rock and fluid property data to simulate potential production techniques. This work will be used to by Linc Energy as they prepare to drill up to 5 horizontal wells during the 2012-2013 drilling season. This new work identified three potential reservoir horizons within the Cretaceous Nanushuk Formation: the Upper and Lower Grandstand sands, and the overlying Ninuluk sand, with the Lower Grandstand considered the primary target. Seals are provided by thick interlayered shales. Reserve estimates for the Lower Grandstand alone range from 739 million barrels to 2437 million barrels, with an average of 1527 million bbls. Reservoir simulations predict that cold gas injection from a wagon-wheel pattern of multilateral injectors and producers located on 5 drill sites on the crest of the structure will yield 12-15% recovery, with actual recovery depending upon the injection pressure used, the actual Kv/Kh encountered, and other geologic factors. Key to understanding the flow behavior of the Umiat reservoir is determining the permeability structure of the sands. Sandstones of the Cretaceous Nanushuk Formation consist of mixed shoreface and deltaic sandstones and mudstones. A core-based study of the sedimentary facies of these sands combined with outcrop observations identified six distinct facies associations with distinctive permeability

  15. Development, characterization, and photocytotoxicity assessment on human melanoma of chloroaluminum phthalocyanine nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Siqueira-Moura, Marigilson P; Primo, Fernando L; Espreafico, Enilza M; Tedesco, Antonio C

    2013-04-01

    In this work we have developed nanocapsules containing chloroaluminum phthalocyanine (ClAlPc) and assessed their phototoxic action on WM1552C, WM278, and WM1617 human melanoma cell lines. The ClAlPc-loaded nanocapsules were prepared by the nanoprecipitation method and optimized by means of a 2(3) full factorial design. The ClAlPc nanocapsules were characterized by particle size and distribution, zeta potential, morphology, encapsulation efficiency, singlet oxygen production, stability, and phototoxic action on melanoma cells. Both the development and optimization studies revealed that stable colloidal formulations could be obtained by using 1.75% (w/v) soybean lecithin, 1.25% (w/v) Poloxamer 188, 2.5% (v/v) soybean oil, and 0.75% (w/v) poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide). The nanocapsules had a mean diameter of 230 nm, homogeneous size distribution (polydispersity index<0.3), and negative zeta potential (about -30 mV). Their morphology was spherical, with evident polymer membrane coating droplet. The encapsulation efficiency was 70%, as expected for hydrophobic drugs, and the nanoencapsulated ClAlPc was able to produce high singlet oxygen quantum yield. ClAlPc nanocapsules exhibited good physical stability over a 12-month period. WM1552C primary melanoma cells were more sensitive (p<0.05) to the phototoxic effect elicited by ClAlPc nanocapsules (0.3 μg ml(-1)) under light irradiation at 20 mJ cm(-2). On the other hand, the cell survival percentage for all the melanoma cell lines treated with the highest light dose (150 mJ cm(-2)) was lower than 10%. In summary, ClAlPc nanoencapsulation could enable application of this hydrophobic photosensitizer in the treatment of malignant melanoma with the use of both low sensitizer drug concentration and light dose. PMID:23827632

  16. Design of Lipid Nanocapsule Delivery Vehicles for Multivalent Display of Recombinant Env Trimers in HIV Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Immunization strategies that elicit antibodies capable of neutralizing diverse virus strains will likely be an important part of a successful vaccine against HIV. However, strategies to promote robust humoral responses against the native intact HIV envelope trimer structure are lacking. We recently developed chemically cross-linked lipid nanocapsules as carriers of molecular adjuvants and encapsulated or surface-displayed antigens, which promoted follicular helper T-cell responses and elicited high-avidity, durable antibody responses to a candidate malaria antigen. To apply this system to the delivery of HIV antigens, Env gp140 trimers with terminal his-tags (gp140T-his) were anchored to the surface of lipid nanocapsules via Ni-NTA-functionalized lipids. Initial experiments revealed that the large (409 kDa), heavily glycosylated trimers were capable of extracting fluid phase lipids from the membranes of nanocapsules. Thus, liquid-ordered and/or gel-phase lipid compositions were required to stably anchor trimers to the particle membranes. Trimer-loaded nanocapsules combined with the clinically relevant adjuvant monophosphoryl lipid A primed high-titer antibody responses in mice at antigen doses ranging from 5 μg to as low as 100 ng, whereas titers dropped more than 50-fold over the same dose range when soluble trimer was mixed with a strong oil-in-water adjuvant comparator. Nanocapsule immunization also broadened the number of distinct epitopes on the HIV trimer recognized by the antibody response. These results suggest that nanocapsules displaying HIV trimers in an oriented, multivalent presentation can promote key aspects of the humoral response against Env immunogens. PMID:25020048

  17. BLOOD TRIGGERED RAPID RELEASE POROUS NANOCAPSULES

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, Tiffany P.; Dergunov, Sergey A.; Akers, Walter J.; Cao, Qian; Magalotti, Selena; Achilefu, Samuel; Pinkhassik, Eugene; Berezin, Mikhail Y.

    2013-01-01

    Rapid-release drug delivery systems present a new paradigm in emergency care treatments. Such systems combine a long shelf life with the ability to provide a significant dose of the drug to the bloodstream in the shortest period of time. Until now, development of delivery formulations has concentrated on slow release systems to ensure a steady concentration of the drug. To address the need for quick release system, we created hollow polyacrylate nanocapsules with nanometer-thin porous walls. Burst release occurs upon interaction with blood components that leads to escape of the cargo. The likely mechanism of release involves a conformational change of the polymer shell caused by binding albumin. To demonstrate this concept, a near-infrared fluorescent dye indocyanine green (ICG) was incorporated inside the nanocapsules. ICG-loaded nanocapsules demonstrated remarkable shelf life in aqueous buffers with no release of ICG for twelve months. Rapid release of the dye was demonstrated first in vitro using albumin solution and serum. SEM and light scattering analysis demonstrated the retention of the nanocapsule architecture after the release of the dye upon contact with albumin. In vivo studies using fluorescence lifetime imaging confirmed quick discharge of ICG from the nanocapsules following intravenous injection. PMID:23606942

  18. Frozen shoulder

    MedlinePlus

    Frozen shoulder is a condition in which the shoulder is painful and loses motion because of inflammation. ... The capsule of the shoulder joint has ligaments that hold the shoulder bones to each other. When the capsule becomes inflamed, the shoulder bones are ...

  19. Microwave absorption properties of Ni/(C, silicides) nanocapsules

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The microwave absorption properties of Ni/(C, silicides) nanocapsules prepared by an arc discharge method have been studied. The composition and the microstructure of the Ni/(C, silicides) nanocapsules were determined by means of X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectric spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscope observations. Silicides, in the forms of SiOx and SiC, mainly exist in the shells of the nanocapsules and result in a large amount of defects at the ‘core/shell’ interfaces as well as in the shells. The complex permittivity and microwave absorption properties of the Ni/(C, silicides) nanocapsules are improved by the doped silicides. Compared with those of Ni/C nanocapsules, the positions of maximum absorption peaks of the Ni/(C, silicides) nanocapsules exhibit large red shifts. An electric dipole model is proposed to explain this red shift phenomenon. PMID:22548846

  20. A general strategy for biocompatible, high-effective upconversion nanocapsules based on triplet-triplet annihilation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qian; Yin, Baoru; Yang, Tianshe; Yang, Yongchao; Shen, Zhen; Yao, Ping; Li, Fuyou

    2013-04-01

    A general strategy for constructing high-effective upconversion nanocapsules based on triplet-triplet annihilation (TTA) was developed by loading both sensitizer and annihilator into BSA-dextran stabilized oil droplets. This strategy can maintain high translational mobility of the chromophores, avoid luminescence quenching of chromophore by aggregation, and decrease the O2-induced quenching of TTA-based upconversion emission. Pt(II)-tetraphenyl-tetrabenzoporphyrin (PtTPBP) and BODIPY dyes (BDP-G and BDP-Y with the maximal fluorescence emission at 528 and 546 nm, respectively) were chosen as sensitizer/annihilator couples to fabricate green and yellow upconversion luminescent emissive nanocapsules, named UCNC-G and UCNC-Y, respectively. In water under the atmospheric environment, interestingly, UCNC-G and UCNC-Y exhibit intense upconversion luminescence (UCL) emission (λex = 635 nm) with the quantum efficiencies (ΦUCL) of 1.7% and 4.8%, respectively, whereas very weak UCL emission (ΦUCL < 0.1%) was observed for the corresponding previous reported SiO2-coating nanosystems because of aggregation-induced fluorescence quenching of annihilators. Furthermore, application of theses upconversion nanocapsules for high-contrast UCL bioimaging in vivo of living mice without removing the skin was demonstrated under 635-nm excitation with low power density of 12.5 mW cm(-2). PMID:23464990

  1. [Long circulating nanocapsules: interest in the treatment of severe malaria with halofantrine].

    PubMed

    Legrand, P; Mosqueira, V; Loiseau, P; Bories, C; Barratt, G

    2003-05-01

    The aim of the work was to develop a new submicronic delivery system that can be used with poorly water soluble drugs for which sustained circulating concentrations are necessary. This system consists of oily core surrounded by a shell made of a copolymer of poly (D,L-lactid) and poly (ethylene glycol). Covalent coupling between the hydrophylic poly (ethylene glycol) and poly (D,L lactid) and high molecular weight of the poly (ethylene glycol) chains yield long circulating particles after intra-venous administration in mice. Halofantrine, a very effective drug administrated for the treatment of severe malaria caused by Plasmodium, for which no injectable preparation exists. Results showed that percentage of loading, yield of encapsulation and physical stability were more favourable with surface modified nanocapsules. Release of halofantrine was clearly related to partition between oil and external medium. Serum proteins in the medium, increased halofantrine release from nanocapsules and poly (ethylene glycol) grafted nanocapsules reduced this phenomenum. The pharmacokinetics of the free drug was modified to maintain it in blood circulation. It is important to note that high plasma concentrations of halofantrine were correlated with higher activity against parasites in mice infected with Plasmodium berghei. PMID:12714932

  2. Preparation of polyurethane nanocapsules by miniemulsion polyaddition.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, Heidi; Schmid, Ruth B

    2007-12-01

    The encapsulation of organic liquids in polyurethane nanocapsules by interfacial miniemulsion polycondensation of isophorone diisocyanate and propanetriol has been performed. The influence of type and amount of encapsulated organic liquid has been studied and it was found that the encapsulation efficiency is dependent on the water solubility of the organic liquids, their interfacial tension against water and their compatibility with polyurethane. It was also shown how different types of surfactants and variations in pH and ionic strength of the continuous phase affected the stability during polymerization and the diameter of the miniemulsion droplets and the resulting nanocapsules. The long-chained anionic surfactant Disponil FES77 can be utilized over a larger pH range than SDS due to the contribution of steric stabilization. Relatively narrow size distributions were obtained. PMID:17852652

  3. Design of fluorescent nanocapsules as ratiometric nanothermometers.

    PubMed

    Zhegalova, Natalia G; Dergunov, Sergey A; Wang, Steven T; Pinkhassik, Eugene; Berezin, Mikhail Y

    2014-08-11

    We have developed a novel design of optical nanothermometers that can measure the surrounding temperature in the range of 20-85 °C. The nanothermometers comprise two organic fluorophores encapsulated in a crosslinked polymethacrylate nanoshell. The role of the nanocapsule shell around the fluorophores is to form a well-defined and stable microenvironment to prevent other factors besides temperature from affecting the dyes' fluorescence. The two fluorophores feature different temperature-dependent emission profiles; a fluorophore with relatively insensitive fluorescence (rhodamine 640) serves as a reference whereas a sensitive fluorophore (indocyanine green) serves as a sensor. The sensitivity of the nanothermometers depends on the type of nanocapsule-forming lipid and is affected by the phase transition temperature. Both the fluorescence intensity and the fluorescence lifetime can be utilized to measure the temperature. PMID:25044240

  4. Balancing the effect of corona on therapeutic efficacy and macrophage uptake of lipid nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Moreno, P; Buzón, P; Boulaiz, H; Peula-García, J M; Ortega-Vinuesa, J L; Luque, I; Salvati, A; Marchal, J A

    2015-08-01

    Several studies have shown the potential of biocompatible lipid nanocapsules as hydrophobic drug delivery systems. Understanding the factors that determine the interactions of these oil-in-water nanoemulsions with cells is a necessary step to guide the design of the most effective formulations. The aim of this study was to probe the ability of two surfactants with a markedly different nature, a non-ionic poloxamer, and a charged phospholipid, to prepare formulations with shells of different composition and different surface properties. Thus we determined their effects on the interaction with biological environments. In particular, we investigated how the shell formulation affected the adsorption of biomolecules from the surrounding biological fluids on the nanocapsule surface (corona formation). A complete physicochemical characterization including an isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) study revealed that the use of poloxamer led to nanocapsules with a marked reduction in the number of protein-binding sites. Surface hydrophilicity and changes in corona formation strongly correlated to changes in uptake by cancer cells and by macrophages. Our results indicate that the nature and concentration of surfactants in the nanocapsules can be easily manipulated to effectively modulate their surface architecture with the aim of controlling the environmental interactions, thus optimizing functionality for in vivo applications. In particular, addition of surfactants that reduce protein binding can modulate nanoparticle clearance by the immune system, but also screens the desired interactions with cells, leading to lower uptake, thus lower therapeutic efficacy. The two effects need to be balanced in order to obtain successful formulations. PMID:26005765

  5. Gold nanoshelled liquid perfluorocarbon nanocapsules for combined dual modal ultrasound/CT imaging and photothermal therapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Ke, Hengte; Yue, Xiuli; Wang, Jinrui; Xing, Sen; Zhang, Qian; Dai, Zhifei; Tian, Jie; Wang, Shumin; Jin, Yushen

    2014-03-26

    The integration of multimodal contrast-enhanced diagnostic imaging and therapeutic capabilities could utilize imaging guided therapy to plan the treatment strategy based on the diagnostic results and to guide/monitor the therapeutic procedures. Herein, gold nanoshelled perfluorooctylbromide (PFOB) nanocapsules with PEGylation (PGsP NCs) are constructed by oil-in-water emulsion method to form polymeric PFOB nanocapsules, followed by the formation of PEGylated gold nanoshell on the surface. PGsP NCs could not only provide excellent contrast enhancement for dual modal ultrasound and CT imaging in vitro and in vivo, but also serve as efficient photoabsorbers for photothermal ablation of tumors on xenografted nude mouse model. To our best knowledge, this is the first report of gold nanoshell serving as both CT contrast agents and photoabsorbers for photothermal therapy. The novel multifunctional nanomedicine would be of great value to offer more comprehensive diagnostic information to guide more accurate and effective cancer therapy. PMID:24500926

  6. Smart vaults: thermally-responsive protein nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Nicholas M; Prabhakaran, Panchami; Rome, Leonard H; Maynard, Heather D

    2013-01-22

    Synthetic modification of a recombinant protein cage called a vault with stimuli-responsive smart polymers provides access to a new class of biohybrid materials; the polymer nanocapsules retain the structure of the protein cage and exhibit the responsive nature of the polymer. Vaults are naturally occurring ubiquitous ribonucleoprotein particles 41 × 41 × 72.5 nm composed of a protein shell enclosing multiple copies of two proteins and multiple copies of one or more small untranslated RNAs. Recombinant vaults are structurally identical but lack the vault content. Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAAm), a polymer responsive to heat, was conjugated to recombinant vaults that were composed of ~78 copies of the major vault protein (MVP) modified to contain a cysteine rich region at the N-terminus (CP-MVP). The polymer was synthesized using reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization to have a dansyl group at the alpha end and modified to have a thiol-reactive pyridyl disulfide at the omega end, which readily coupled to CP-MVP vaults. The resulting vault nanocapsules underwent reversible aggregation upon heating above the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of the polymer as determined by electron microscopy (EM), dynamic light scattering experiments, and UV-vis turbidity analysis. The vault structure remained entirely intact throughout the phase transition; suggesting its use in a myriad of biomedical and biotechnology applications. PMID:23259767

  7. Nanoencapsulation of Rose-Hip Oil Prevents Oil Oxidation and Allows Obtainment of Gel and Film Topical Formulations.

    PubMed

    Contri, Renata V; Kulkamp-Guerreiro, Irene C; da Silva, Sheila Janine; Frank, Luiza A; Pohlmann, Adriana R; Guterres, Silvia S

    2016-08-01

    The rose-hip oil holds skin regenerating properties with applications in the dermatological and cosmetic area. Its nanoencapsulation might favor the oil stability and its incorporation into hydrophilic formulations, besides increasing the contact with the skin and prolonging its effect. The aim of the present investigation was to develop suitable rose-hip-oil-loaded nanocapsules, to verify the nanocapsule effect on the UV-induced oxidation of the oil and to obtain topical formulations by the incorporation of the nanocapsules into chitosan gel and film. The rose-hip oil (500 or 600 μL), polymer (Eudragit RS100®, 100 or 200 mg), and acetone (50 or 100 mL) contents were separately varied aiming to obtain an adequate size distribution. The results led to a combination of the factors acetone and oil. The developed formulation showed average diameter of 158 ± 6 nm with low polydispersity, pH of 5.8 ± 0.9, zeta potential of +9.8 ± 1.5 mV, rose-hip oil content of 54 ± 1 μL/mL and tendency to reversible creaming. No differences were observed in the nanocapsules properties after storage. The nanoencapsulation of rose-hip oil decreased the UVA and UVC oxidation of the oil. The chitosan gel and film containing rose-hip-oil-loaded nanocapsules showed suitable properties for cutaneous use. In conclusion, it was possible to successfully obtain rose-hip-oil-loaded nanocapsules and to confirm the nanocapsules effect in protecting the oil from the UV rays. The chitosan gel and film were considered interesting alternatives for incorporating the nanoencapsulated rose-hip oil, combining the advantages of the nanoparticles to the advantages of chitosan. PMID:26381915

  8. Highly fluorescent resorcinarene cavitand nanocapsules with efficient renal clearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadevan, Kalpana; Patthipati, Venkata Suresh; Han, Sangbum; Swanson, R. James; Whelan, Eoin C.; Osgood, Christopher; Balasubramanian, Ramjee

    2016-08-01

    Nanomaterial based imaging approaches hold substantial promise in addressing current diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. One of the key requirements for the successful clinical translation of nanomaterials is their complete clearance from the body within a reasonable time period preferably via the renal filtration route. This article describes the synthesis of highly fluorescent, water soluble, resorcinarene cavitand nanocapsules and demonstrates their effective renal clearance in mice. The synthesis and functionalization of nanocapsules was accomplished in a one-pot operation via thiol-ene reactions without involving self-assembly, sacrificial templates or emulsions. Water soluble resorcinarene cavitand nanocapsules obtained by this approach were covalently functionalized with Alexa Fluor 750. Highly fluorescent nanocapsules with hydrodynamic diameters of 122 nm and 68 nm and extinction coefficients of 1.3 × 109 M‑1 cm‑1 and 1.5 × 108 M‑1 cm‑1 respectively were prepared by varying the reaction conditions. The in vivo biodistribution and clearance of these nanocapsules in mice followed by whole-body fluorescence imaging showed that they were both cleared renally within a few hours. Given the inherent encapsulation capabilities of nanocapsules, the renal clearance demonstrated in this work opens up new opportunities for their theranostic applications especially for targeting and treating the urinary tract.

  9. Highly fluorescent resorcinarene cavitand nanocapsules with efficient renal clearance.

    PubMed

    Mahadevan, Kalpana; Patthipati, Venkata Suresh; Han, Sangbum; Swanson, R James; Whelan, Eoin C; Osgood, Christopher; Balasubramanian, Ramjee

    2016-08-19

    Nanomaterial based imaging approaches hold substantial promise in addressing current diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. One of the key requirements for the successful clinical translation of nanomaterials is their complete clearance from the body within a reasonable time period preferably via the renal filtration route. This article describes the synthesis of highly fluorescent, water soluble, resorcinarene cavitand nanocapsules and demonstrates their effective renal clearance in mice. The synthesis and functionalization of nanocapsules was accomplished in a one-pot operation via thiol-ene reactions without involving self-assembly, sacrificial templates or emulsions. Water soluble resorcinarene cavitand nanocapsules obtained by this approach were covalently functionalized with Alexa Fluor 750. Highly fluorescent nanocapsules with hydrodynamic diameters of 122 nm and 68 nm and extinction coefficients of 1.3 × 10(9) M(-1) cm(-1) and 1.5 × 10(8) M(-1) cm(-1) respectively were prepared by varying the reaction conditions. The in vivo biodistribution and clearance of these nanocapsules in mice followed by whole-body fluorescence imaging showed that they were both cleared renally within a few hours. Given the inherent encapsulation capabilities of nanocapsules, the renal clearance demonstrated in this work opens up new opportunities for their theranostic applications especially for targeting and treating the urinary tract. PMID:27378394

  10. Nucleic-Acid Delivery Using Lipid Nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Lagarce, Frederic; Passirani, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Lipid nanocapsules (LNCs) were designed more than 15 years ago to deliver lipophilic drugs to cells with non toxic excipients by mimicking lipoproteins. During the last 5 years these promising nanocarriers were re-designed to deliver nucleic acids to cancer cells. This short review sums up the features of LNCs and describes how DNAs or RNAs can be associated or encapsulated in these lipid carriers. The results of transfection effects on cells in vitro or in vivo are also presented. These new therapeutic strategies have been mainly proposed for glioma and melanoma treatment because these cancers are characterized by multiple acquired resistances, which can be reversed by DNA transfection or siRNA interference as it is discussed in this paper. In conclusion, LNCs are very good candidates to deliver nucleic acids to cells in the course of anti-cancer therapies. PMID:27033510

  11. Development and Optimization of Polymeric Self-Emulsifying Nanocapsules for Localized Drug Delivery: Design of Experiment Approach

    PubMed Central

    Wadhwa, Jyoti; Asthana, Abhay; Gupta, Sumeet; Shilkari Asthana, Gyati; Singh, Ranjit

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to formulate polymeric self-emulsifying curcumin nanocapsules with high encapsulation efficiency, good emulsification ability, and optimal globule size for localized targeting in the colon. Formulations were prepared using modified quasiemulsion solvent diffusion method. Concentration of formulation variables, namely, X1 (oil), X2 (polymeric emulsifier), and X3 (adsorbent), was optimized by design of experiments using Box-Behnken design, for its impact on mean globule size (Y1) and encapsulation efficiency (Y2) of the formulation. Polymeric nanocapsules with an average diameter of 100–180 nm and an encapsulation efficiency of 64.85 ± 0.12% were obtained. In vitro studies revealed that formulations released the drug after 5 h lag time corresponding to the time to reach the colonic region. Pronounced localized action was inferred from the plasma concentration profile (Cmax 200 ng/mL) that depicts limited systemic absorption. Roentgenography study confirms the localized presence of carrier (0–2 h in upper GIT; 2–4 h in small intestine; and 4–24 h in the lower intestine). Optimized formulation showed significantly higher cytotoxicity (IC50 value 20.32 μM) in HT 29 colonic cancer cell line. The present study demonstrates systematic development of polymeric self-emulsifying nanocapsule formulation of curcumin for localized targeting in colon. PMID:25525620

  12. Preparation and spectral characterization of polymeric nanocapsules containing DR1 organic dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifimehr, Mohammad Reza; Ghanbari, Khadijeh; Ayoubi, Kazem; Mohajerani, Ezedin

    2015-07-01

    In order to provide necessary degree of freedom for organic dye molecules in optical applications and also for safety improvement, water insoluble Disperse Red 1 (DR1) dye molecules were placed inside the polymeric nanocapsules along with suitable surfactants and using controlled phase-separation method. TEM images were used to investigate the morphology of prepared nanocapsules. Total dye concentration for a solution consist of obtained polymeric nanocapsules was determined using decomposition of nanocapsules and a reference absorption spectrum. Absorption spectrum of a solution containing DR1 and dichloromethane was also compared with prepared nanocapsules at the same dye concentration, thereby a red-shift in absorption spectrum was detected.

  13. Nanocapsules with glycerol monolaurate: Effects on Candida albicans biofilms.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Leonardo Quintana Soares; Santos, Cayane Genro; Vaucher, Rodrigo de Almeida; Raffin, Renata Platcheck; Santos, Roberto Christ Vianna

    2016-08-01

    Candida albicans does not only occur in the free living planktonic form but also grows in surface-attached biofilm communities. Moreover, these biofilms appear to be the most common lifestyle and are involved in the majority of human Candida infections. Nanoparticles can be used as an alternative to conventional antimicrobial agents and can also act as carriers for antibiotics and other drugs. In view of this, the aim of the study was develop, characterize and verify the anti-biofilm potential of GML Nanocapsules against C. albicans. The GML Nanocapsules showed mean diameter of 193.2 nm, polydispersion index of 0.044, zeta potential of -23.3 mV and pH 6.32. The microdilution assay showed MIC of 15.5 μg mL(-1) to GML Nanocapsules and 31.25 μg mL(-1) to GML. The anti-biofilm assay showed the significantly reduction of biomass of C. albicans biofilm treated with GML Nanocapsules while the GML does not exhibit effect. The kinetic assay demonstrated that at 48 h, the GML Nanocapsules reduce 94% of formed biofilm. The positive results suggest the promisor alternative for this public health problem that is biofilm infections. PMID:27241236

  14. Temperature Sensitive Nanocapsule of Complex Structural Form for Methane Storage

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The processes of methane adsorption, storage and desorption by the nanocapsule are investigated with molecular-dynamic modeling method. The specific nanocapsule shape defines its functioning uniqueness: methane is adsorbed under 40 MPa and at normal temperature with further blocking of methane molecules the K@C601+ endohedral complex in the nanocapsule by external electric field, the storage is performed under normal external conditions, and methane desorption is performed at 350 K. The methane content in the nanocapsule during storage reaches 11.09 mass%. The nanocapsule consists of tree parts: storage chamber, junction and blocking chamber. The storage chamber comprises the nanotube (20,20). The blocking chamber is a short nanotube (20,20) with three holes. The junction consists of the nanotube (10,10) and nanotube (8,8); moreover, the nanotube (8,8) is connected with the storage chamber and nanotube (10,10) with the blocking chamber. The blocking chamber is opened and closed by the transfer of the K@C601+ endohedral complex under electrostatic field action. PMID:20652146

  15. In vitro interaction of polyelectrolyte nanocapsules with model cells.

    PubMed

    Łukasiewicz, Sylwia; Szczepanowicz, Krzysztof

    2014-02-01

    The nanocapsules based on a liquid core with polyelectrolyte shells prepared by the technique of sequential adsorption of polyelectrolytes (LbL) were investigated to verify capsules bioacceptance. Using AOT (docusate sodium salt) as emulsifier, we obtained liquid cores, stabilized by the interfacial complex AOT/PLL (poly-l-lysine hydrobromide). These liquid cores were encapsulated by sequential adsorption of polyelectrolytes using biocompatible polyanion PGA (poly-l-glutamic acid sodium salt) and biocompatible polycation PLL. The average size of the formed capsules was 60-80 nm. The influence of a number of polyelectrolytes layer in the shell (thickness of polyelectrolytes shell), surface charge, and capsule doses on cell viability was studied in a cellular coculture assay. In order to improve nanocapsules biocompatibility, the PEG-ylated external layers were prepared using PGA-g-PEG (PGA grafted by PEG poly(ethylene glycol)). For the most toxic nanocapsules (with only one polycation layer) about 90% of cells could survive when the concentration of nanocapsules was below 0.2 × 10(6) per one cell. That suggests that they use as a delivery vehicles is quite safe for living cells. Analysis of internalization of AOT(PLL/PGA)4-g-PEG in HEK 293 cells indicates that tested nanocapsules can easily penetrate cells membrane. PMID:24410319

  16. Resveratrol-loaded nanocapsules inhibit murine melanoma tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Carletto, Bruna; Berton, Juliana; Ferreira, Tamara Nascimento; Dalmolin, Luciana Facco; Paludo, Katia Sabrina; Mainardes, Rubiana Mara; Farago, Paulo Vitor; Favero, Giovani Marino

    2016-08-01

    In this study, resveratrol-loaded nanocapsules were developed and its antitumor activity tested on a melanoma mice model. These nanocapsules were spherically-shaped and presented suitable size, negative charge and high encapsulation efficiency for their use as a modified-release system of resveratrol. Nanoencapsulation leads to the drug amorphization. Resveratrol-loaded nanoparticles reduced cell viability of murine melanoma cells. There was a decrease in tumor volume, an increase in the necrotic area and inflammatory infiltrate of melanoma when resveratrol-loaded nanocapsules were compared to free resveratrol in treated mice. Nanoencapsulation of resveratrol also prevented metastasis and pulmonary hemorrhage. This modified-release technology containing resveratrol can be used as a feasible approach in order to inhibit murine melanoma tumor growth. PMID:27070053

  17. Nanocapsules: The Weapons for Novel Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Kothamasu, Pavankumar; Kanumur, Hemanth; Ravur, Niranjan; Maddu, Chiranjeevi; Parasuramrajam, Radhika; Thangavel, Sivakumar

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Nanocapsules, existing in miniscule size, range from 10 nm to 1000 nm. They consist of a liquid/solid core in which the drug is placed into a cavity, which is surrounded by a distinctive polymer membrane made up of natural or synthetic polymers. They have attracted great interest, because of the protective coating, which are usually pyrophoric and easily oxidized and delay the release of active ingredients. Methods Various technical approaches are utilized for obtaining the nanocapsules; however, the methods of interfacial polymerization for monomer and the nano-deposition for preformed polymer are chiefly preferred. Most important characteristics in their preparation is particle size and size distribution which can be evaluated by using various techniques like X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, high-resolu¬tion transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, superconducting quantum interference device, multi angle laser light scattering and other spectroscopic techniques. Results Nanocapsules possessing extremely high reproducibility have a broad range of life science applications. They may be applied in agrochemicals, genetic engineering, cosmetics, cleansing products, wastewater treatments, adhesive component applications, strategic delivery of the drug in tumors, nanocapsule bandages to fight infec¬tion, in radiotherapy and as liposomal nanocapsules in food science and agriculture. In addition, they can act as self-healing materials. Conclusion The enhanced delivery of bio¬active molecules through the targeted delivery by means of a nanocapsule opens numerous challenges and opportunities for the research and future development of novel improved therapies. PMID:23678444

  18. Production of a transparent lavender flavour nanocapsule aqueous solution and pyrolysis characteristics of flavour nanocapsule.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guangyong; Xiao, Zuobing; Zhou, Rujun; Feng, Nienie

    2015-07-01

    Flavour plays an important role and has been widely used in many products. Usually, the components of flavour are volatile and the sensory perception can be changed as a result of volatilization, heating, oxidation and chemical interactions. Encapsulation can prevent the loss of volatile aromatic ingredients, provide protection and enhance the stability of the core materials. This work concentrated on production of a transparent lavender flavour nanocapsule aqueous solution. The results showed that a transparent lavender flavour microcapsule aqueous solution can be produced using hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD) as wall material. The combination and interaction of flavour and wall materials were investigated by pyrolysis. Pyrolysis characteristics and kinetic parameters of the flavour nanocapsule were determined. During thermal degradation of blank HP-β-CD and flavour-HP-β-CD inclusion complex, three main stages can be distinguished. Due to the vaporization of lavender flavour encapsulated in HP-β-CD, the thermogravimetric (TG) curve of blank HP-β-CD shows a leveling-off from room temperature to 269 °C, while the TG curve of flavour-HP-β-CD inclusion complex is downward sloping in this temperature range. The kinetic parameters are helpful in understanding the mechanism of molecular recognition between hosts and guests. PMID:26139932

  19. The gastrointestinal stability of lipid nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Roger, E; Lagarce, F; Benoit, J-P

    2009-09-11

    The in vitro gastrointestinal stability of lipid nanocapsules (LNCs) was studied in different media. The size of LNCs was determined in simulated gastric and intestinal media. In updated fasted state simulated intestinal fluid (FaSSIF-V2) and updated fed state simulated intestinal fluid (FeSSIF-V2) media, the encapsulation ratio of paclitaxel-loaded LNCs was also measured. The size of LNCs was not modified after 3h in simulated gastric fluid and simulated intestinal fluid described by the United States Pharmacopeia, in FaSSIF, FaSSIF-V2, and in FeSSIF. Moreover, in the presence of pancreatin in FeSSIF-V2, a decreased above 30% of the loading of paclitaxel was observed. This was attributed to the presence of lipase in pancreatin that could interact with Lipoid (a mixture of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine), present on the shell of LNC. As a conclusion, LNCs were stable on gastric medium and fasted state intestinal medium. PMID:19524655

  20. Enhancement of the spectral selectivity of complex samples by measuring them in a frozen state at low temperatures in order to improve accuracy for quantitative analysis. Part II. Determination of viscosity for lube base oils using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mooeung; Chung, Hoeil

    2013-03-01

    The use of selectivity-enhanced Raman spectra of lube base oil (LBO) samples achieved by the spectral collection under frozen conditions at low temperatures was effective for improving accuracy for the determination of the kinematic viscosity at 40 °C (KV@40). A collection of Raman spectra from samples cooled around -160 °C provided the most accurate measurement of KV@40. Components of the LBO samples were mainly long-chain hydrocarbons with molecular structures that were deformable when these were frozen, and the different structural deformabilities of the components enhanced spectral selectivity among the samples. To study the structural variation of components according to the change of sample temperature from cryogenic to ambient condition, n-heptadecane and pristane (2,6,10,14-tetramethylpentadecane) were selected as representative components of LBO samples, and their temperature-induced spectral features as well as the corresponding spectral loadings were investigated. A two-dimensional (2D) correlation analysis was also employed to explain the origin for the improved accuracy. The asynchronous 2D correlation pattern was simplest at the optimal temperature, indicating the occurrence of distinct and selective spectral variations, which enabled the variation of KV@40 of LBO samples to be more accurately assessed. PMID:23342358

  1. Graphene oxide nanocapsules within silanized hydrogels suitable for electrochemical pseudocapacitors.

    PubMed

    Kataky, R; Hadden, J H L; Coleman, K S; Ntola, C N M; Chowdhury, M; Duckworth, A R; Dobson, B P; Campos, R; Pyner, S; Shenton, F

    2015-06-28

    Soft biocompatible gels comprised of rolled up graphene oxide nanocapsules within the pores of silanized hydrogels may be used as electrochemical pseudocapacitors with physiological glucose or KOH as a reducing agent, affording a material suitable for devices requiring pulses with characteristic time less than a second. PMID:25977943

  2. The encapsulation of DNA molecules within biomimetic lipid nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Vonarbourg, Arnaud; Passirani, Catherine; Desigaux, Léa; Allard, Emilie; Saulnier, Patrick; Lambert, Olivier; Benoit, Jean-Pierre; Pitard, Bruno

    2009-06-01

    Most of DNA synthetic complexes result from the self-assembly of DNA molecules with cationic lipids or polymers in an aqueous controlled medium. However, injection of such self-assembled complexes in medium like blood that differ from that of their formulation leads to strong instability. Therefore, DNA vectors that have physico-chemical properties and structural organisation that will not be sensitive to a completely different medium in terms of ionic and protein composition are actively sought. To this end, the goal here was to discover and optimize a nanostructured system where DNA molecules would be encapsulated in nanocapsules consisting in an oily core and a shell covered by PEG stretches obtained through a nanoemulsion process in the absence of organic solvent. This encapsulation form of DNA molecules would prevent interactions with external hostile biological fluid. The results show the entrapment of lipoplexes into lipid nanocapsules, leading to the formation of neutral 110 nm-DNA nanocapsules. They were weakly removed by the immune system, displaying an increased blood half-life, and improved carcinoma cell transfection, in comparison to the parent lipoplexes. Our results demonstrate that the fabrication of nanocapsules encapsulating hydrophilic DNA in an oily core that meet criteria for blood injection is possible. PMID:19329183

  3. A Nanocapsule-Based Approach Toward Physical Thermolatent Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Bijlard, Ann-Christin; Hansen, Anne; Lieberwirth, Ingo; Landfester, Katharina; Taden, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    Performance under pressure is utilized as a key concept for colloidal control of reaction kinetics. Barrier nanocapsules containing a catalyst and a low-boiling-point release agent enable a highly desired, adjustable, and distinct non-Arrhenius behavior for thermoset curing. PMID:27168524

  4. Encapsulation of curcumin in polyelectrolyte nanocapsules and their neuroprotective activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczepanowicz, Krzysztof; Jantas, Danuta; Piotrowski, Marek; Staroń, Jakub; Leśkiewicz, Monika; Regulska, Magdalena; Lasoń, Władysław; Warszyński, Piotr

    2016-09-01

    Poor water solubility and low bioavailability of lipophilic drugs can be potentially improved with the use of delivery systems. In this study, encapsulation of nanoemulsion droplets was utilized to prepare curcumin nanocarriers. Nanosize droplets containing the drug were encapsulated in polyelectrolyte shells formed by the layer-by-layer (LbL) adsorption of biocompatible polyelectrolytes: poly-L-lysine (PLL) and poly-L-glutamic acid (PGA). The size of synthesized nanocapsules was around 100 nm. Their biocompatibility and neuroprotective effects were evaluated on the SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cell line using cell viability/toxicity assays (MTT reduction, LDH release). Statistically significant toxic effect was clearly observed for PLL coated nanocapsules (reduction in cell viability about 20%–60%), while nanocapsules with PLL/PGA coating did not evoke any detrimental effects on SH-SY5Y cells. Curcumin encapsulated in PLL/PGA showed similar neuroprotective activity against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced cell damage, as did 5 μM curcumin pre-dissolved in DMSO (about 16% of protection). Determination of concentration of curcumin in cell lysate confirmed that curcumin in nanocapsules has cell protective effect in lower concentrations (at least 20 times) than when given alone. Intracellular mechanisms of encapsulated curcumin-mediated protection engaged the prevention of the H2O2-induced decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) but did not attenuate Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) formation. The obtained results indicate the utility of PLL/PGA shell nanocapsules as a promising, alternative way of curcumin delivery for neuroprotective purposes with improved efficiency and reduced toxicity.

  5. Encapsulation of curcumin in polyelectrolyte nanocapsules and their neuroprotective activity.

    PubMed

    Szczepanowicz, Krzysztof; Jantas, Danuta; Piotrowski, Marek; Staroń, Jakub; Leśkiewicz, Monika; Regulska, Magdalena; Lasoń, Władysław; Warszyński, Piotr

    2016-09-01

    Poor water solubility and low bioavailability of lipophilic drugs can be potentially improved with the use of delivery systems. In this study, encapsulation of nanoemulsion droplets was utilized to prepare curcumin nanocarriers. Nanosize droplets containing the drug were encapsulated in polyelectrolyte shells formed by the layer-by-layer (LbL) adsorption of biocompatible polyelectrolytes: poly-L-lysine (PLL) and poly-L-glutamic acid (PGA). The size of synthesized nanocapsules was around 100 nm. Their biocompatibility and neuroprotective effects were evaluated on the SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cell line using cell viability/toxicity assays (MTT reduction, LDH release). Statistically significant toxic effect was clearly observed for PLL coated nanocapsules (reduction in cell viability about 20%-60%), while nanocapsules with PLL/PGA coating did not evoke any detrimental effects on SH-SY5Y cells. Curcumin encapsulated in PLL/PGA showed similar neuroprotective activity against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced cell damage, as did 5 μM curcumin pre-dissolved in DMSO (about 16% of protection). Determination of concentration of curcumin in cell lysate confirmed that curcumin in nanocapsules has cell protective effect in lower concentrations (at least 20 times) than when given alone. Intracellular mechanisms of encapsulated curcumin-mediated protection engaged the prevention of the H2O2-induced decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) but did not attenuate Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) formation. The obtained results indicate the utility of PLL/PGA shell nanocapsules as a promising, alternative way of curcumin delivery for neuroprotective purposes with improved efficiency and reduced toxicity. PMID:27454207

  6. Frozen shoulder - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Adhesive capsulitis - aftercare; Frozen shoulder syndrome - aftercare ... Krabak BJ, Banks NL. Adhesive capsulitis. In: Frontera WR, Silver JK, eds. Essentials of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation . 2nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders;2008: ...

  7. Chlorhexidine Nanocapsule Drug Delivery Approach to the Resin-Dentin Interface.

    PubMed

    Priyadarshini, B M; Selvan, S T; Lu, T B; Xie, H; Neo, J; Fawzy, A S

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we are introducing a new drug-delivery approach to demineralized dentin substrates through microsized dentinal tubules in the form of drug-loaded nanocapsules. Chlorhexidine (CHX) is widely used in adhesive dentistry due to its nonspecific matrix metalloproteinase inhibitory effect and antibacterial activities. Poly(ε-caprolactone) nanocapsules (nano-PCL) loaded with CHX were fabricated by interfacial polymer deposition at PCL/CHX ratios of 125:10, 125:25, and 125:50. Unloaded nanocapsules (blank) were fabricated as control. The fabricated nanocapsules were characterized in vitro in terms of particle size, surface charges, particle recovery, encapsulation efficiency, and drug loading. Nanocapsule morphology, drug inclusion, structural properties, and crystallinity were investigated by scanning and transmission electron microscopes (SEM/TEM), energy-dispersive x-ray analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction. Initial screening of the antibacterial activities and the cytotoxicity of the nanocapsules were also conducted. Nanocapsules, as carried on ethanol/water solution, were delivered to demineralized dentin specimens connected to an ex vivo model setup simulating the pulpal pressure to study their infiltration, penetration depth, and retention inside the dentinal tubules by SEM/TEM. Nanocapsules were Ag labeled and delivered to demineralized dentin, followed by the application of a 2-step etch-and-rinse dentin adhesive. CHX-release profiles were characterized in vitro and ex vivo up to 25 d. Spherical nanocapsules were fabricated with a CHX core coated with a thin PCL shell. The blank nanocapsules exhibited the largest z-average diameter with negatively charged ζ-potential. With CHX incorporation, the nanocapsule size was decreased with a positive shift in ζ-potential. Nano-PCL/CHX at 125:50 showed the highest drug loading, antibacterial effect, and CHX release both in vitro and ex vivo. SEM and TEM revealed the deep

  8. Multilayered silica-biopolymer nanocapsules with a hydrophobic core and a hydrophilic tunable shell thickness.

    PubMed

    Vecchione, Raffaele; Luciani, Giuseppina; Calcagno, Vincenzo; Jakhmola, Anshuman; Silvestri, Brigida; Guarnieri, Daniela; Belli, Valentina; Costantini, Aniello; Netti, Paolo A

    2016-04-21

    Stable, biocompatible, multifunctional and multicompartment nanocarriers are much needed in the field of nanomedicine. Here, we report a simple, novel strategy to design an engineered nanocarrier system featuring an oil-core/hybrid polymer/silica-shell. Silica shells with a tunable thickness were grown in situ, directly around a highly mono-disperse and stable oil-in-water emulsion system, stabilized by a double bio-functional polyelectrolyte heparin/chitosan layer. Such silica showed a complete degradation in a physiological medium (SBF) in a time frame of three days. Moreover, the outer silica shell was coated with polyethyleneglycol (PEG) in order to confer antifouling properties to the final nanocapsule. The outer silica layer combined its properties (it is an optimal bio-interface for bio-conjugations and for the embedding of hydrophilic drugs in the porous structure) with the capability to stabilize the oil core for the confinement of high payloads of lipophilic tracers (e.g. CdSe quantum dots, Nile Red) and drugs. In addition, polymer layers - besides conferring stability to the emulsion while building the silica shell - can be independently exploited if suitably functionalized, as demonstrated by conjugating chitosan with fluorescein isothiocyanate. Such numerous features in a single nanocarrier system make it very intriguing as a multifunctional platform for smart diagnosis and therapy. PMID:27065306

  9. Optimization and preparation of nanocapsules for food applications using two methodologies.

    PubMed

    Esmaeili, Akbar; Gholami, Masoomeh

    2015-07-15

    This study investigated preparation of nanocapsules (NCs) containing food-grade ingredients using two experimental designs: a one-factor-at-a-time method (OFATM) and an optimization method (OM). Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to optimize the process. The variables explored were concentration and type of polymer wall, using polycaprolactone (PCL) and polyethylene glycol-polybutylene adipate-polyethylene glycol (PEG-PBA-PEG) (1.0-4.0 mg) polyester triblock copolymer; food oil, using olive and avocado oil (0.5-2.0 mg); solvent, using acetone and ethyl acetate (6-12 ml); and surfactant concentration, using Tween 80 and Tween 60 (1-5 mg). The optimum conditions to obtain NCs were found to be 2.0 mg of PCL and 1.65 mg of PEG-PBA-PEG, olive oil (0.5 and 0.88 mg), acetone (6 and 10.25 ml), and Tween 60 (3.0 and 4.25 mg), with 90.9 and 71.9 nm for OFATM and OM, respectively. This research was conducted to investigate the use of NCs in the manufacture of fruits. PMID:25722135

  10. Passively Targeted Curcumin-Loaded PEGylated PLGA Nanocapsules for Colon Cancer Therapy In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Klippstein, Rebecca; Wang, Julie Tzu-Wen; El-Gogary, Riham I; Bai, Jie; Mustafa, Falisa; Rubio, Noelia; Bansal, Sukhvinder; Al-Jamal, Wafa T; Al-Jamal, Khuloud T

    2015-09-01

    Clinical applications of curcumin for the treatment of cancer and other chronic diseases have been mainly hindered by its short biological half-life and poor water solubility. Nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems have the potential to enhance the efficacy of poorly soluble drugs for systemic delivery. This study proposes the use of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)-based polymeric oil-cored nanocapsules (NCs) for curcumin loading and delivery to colon cancer in mice after systemic injection. Formulations of different oil compositions are prepared and characterized for their curcumin loading, physico-chemical properties, and shelf-life stability. The results indicate that castor oil-cored PLGA-based NC achieves high drug loading efficiency (≈18% w(drug)/w(polymer)%) compared to previously reported NCs. Curcumin-loaded NCs internalize more efficiently in CT26 cells than the free drug, and exert therapeutic activity in vitro, leading to apoptosis and blocking the cell cycle. In addition, the formulated NC exhibits an extended blood circulation profile compared to the non-PEGylated NC, and accumulates in the subcutaneous CT26-tumors in mice, after systemic administration. The results are confirmed by optical and single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) imaging. In vivo growth delay studies are performed, and significantly smaller tumor volumes are achieved compared to empty NC injected animals. This study shows the great potential of the formulated NC for treating colon cancer. PMID:26140363

  11. Passively Targeted Curcumin-Loaded PEGylated PLGA Nanocapsules for Colon Cancer Therapy In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Klippstein, Rebecca; Wang, Julie Tzu-Wen; El-Gogary, Riham I; Bai, Jie; Mustafa, Falisa; Rubio, Noelia; Bansal, Sukhvinder; Al-Jamal, Wafa T; Al-Jamal, Khuloud T

    2015-01-01

    Clinical applications of curcumin for the treatment of cancer and other chronic diseases have been mainly hindered by its short biological half-life and poor water solubility. Nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems have the potential to enhance the efficacy of poorly soluble drugs for systemic delivery. This study proposes the use of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)-based polymeric oil-cored nanocapsules (NCs) for curcumin loading and delivery to colon cancer in mice after systemic injection. Formulations of different oil compositions are prepared and characterized for their curcumin loading, physico-chemical properties, and shelf-life stability. The results indicate that castor oil-cored PLGA-based NC achieves high drug loading efficiency (≈18% w(drug)/w(polymer)%) compared to previously reported NCs. Curcumin-loaded NCs internalize more efficiently in CT26 cells than the free drug, and exert therapeutic activity in vitro, leading to apoptosis and blocking the cell cycle. In addition, the formulated NC exhibits an extended blood circulation profile compared to the non-PEGylated NC, and accumulates in the subcutaneous CT26-tumors in mice, after systemic administration. The results are confirmed by optical and single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) imaging. In vivo growth delay studies are performed, and significantly smaller tumor volumes are achieved compared to empty NC injected animals. This study shows the great potential of the formulated NC for treating colon cancer. PMID:26140363

  12. Reversible PH Lability of Cross-Linked Vault Nanocapsules

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, M.; Ng, B.C.; Rome, L.H.; Tolbert, S.H.; Monbouquette, H.G.

    2009-05-28

    Vaults are ubiquitous, self-assembled protein nanocapsules with dimension in the sub-100 nm range that are conserved across diverse phyla from worms to humans. Their normal presence in humans at a copy number of over 10 000/cell makes them attractive as potential drug delivery vehicles. Toward this goal, bifunctional amine-reactive reagents are shown to be useful for the reversible cross-linking of recombinant vaults such that they may be closed and opened in a controllable manner.

  13. Cardiotoxicity reduction induced by halofantrine entrapped in nanocapsule devices.

    PubMed

    Leite, Elaine Amaral; Grabe-Guimarães, Andrea; Guimarães, Homero Nogueira; Machado-Coelho, George Luiz Lins; Barratt, Gillian; Mosqueira, Vanessa C F

    2007-03-13

    The main objective of the present study was to evaluate the reduction in halofantrine (Hf) toxicity, an antimalarial drug frequently associated with QT interval prolongation in electrocardiogram, by its entrapment in poly-epsilon-caprolactone nanocapsules (NC). The acute lethal dose (LD(100)) of Hf.HCl experimentally observed was 200 mg/kg whereas the calculated LD(50) was 154 mg/kg. In contrast, the LD(100) for Hf-NC was 300 mg/kg with a longer mean time to death than Hf.HCl. The calculated LD(50) was 249 mg/kg for Hf-NC. The Hf entrapped in PCL NC presented a greater efficacy than PLA-PEG NC and than Hf solution in P. berghei-infected mice at 1 mg/kg. The cardiovascular parameters, ECG and arterial blood pressure, were evaluated in anaesthetized Wistar rats after the IV administration of a single, especially high dose (100 and 150 mg/kg) of halofantrine base loaded-nanocapsules (Hf-NC) or halofantrine chlorhydrate (Hf.HCl) solution. It was observed that Hf solution caused prolongation of the QT and PR intervals of the ECG; however, this effect was significantly (P<0.001) reduced when Hf was administered entrapped in nanocapsules. The treatment with Hf.HCl induced a pronounced bradycardia and severe hypotension leading to death. The effect of Hf-NC upon heart rate was reduced from 58 to 75% for 100 and 150 mg/kg, respectively, when compared with Hf.HCl solution. These findings show that the encapsulation of halofantrine reduces the QT interval prolongation of ECG in rats and suggest that a modification of drug distribution was possible by using nanocapsules. Hf encapsulation was the main factor responsible for the significant reduction in cardiac toxicity observed. PMID:17303179

  14. Selol-loaded magnetic nanocapsules: A new approach for hyperthermia cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falqueiro, A. M.; Primo, F. L.; Morais, P. C.; Mosiniewicz-Szablewska, E.; Suchocki, P.; Tedesco, A. C.

    2011-04-01

    Polylactic-co-glycolic nanocapsules, loaded with nanosized magnetic particles and Selol (a selenium-based anticancer drug), were successfully prepared by the precipitation method. Maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) nanoparticles were incorporated into the nanocapsules using a highly stable ionic magnetic fluid sample. The obtained nanocapsules presented no agglomeration, negative surface charge while revealing a narrow monomodal size distribution. All the nanocapsule formulations exhibited a good physical stability at 4 °C during 3 month storage period. The in vitro antitumoral activity of Selol-magnetic nanocapsules was assessed using a murine melanoma cell line. The influence of nanocapsules on cell viability was investigated by spectrophotometric assay. The results demonstrated that Selol-loaded magnetic nanocapsules (at 100 μg/ml/5 × 109 particle/ml) showed antitumoral activity of 50% on melanoma cells (absence of magnetic field). These results clearly indicate that the loaded nanocapsules represent a novel and promising magnetic drug delivery system suitable for cancer treatment via the active drug and magnetohyperthermia.

  15. Evaluation of photodynamic activity, photostability and in vitro drug release of zinc phthalocyanine-loaded nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Thiane Deprá; Ziembowicz, Francieli Isa; Müller, Debora Friedrich; Lauermann, Sâmera Cristina; Kloster, Carmen Luisa; Santos, Roberto Christ Vianna; Lopes, Leonardo Quintana Soares; Ourique, Aline Ferreira; Machado, Giovanna; Villetti, Marcos Antonio

    2016-02-15

    Nanocapsule formulations containing zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) were investigated as drug delivery systems for use in photodynamic therapy (PDT). ZnPc loaded chitosan, PCL, and PCL coated with chitosan nanocapsules were prepared and characterized by means of their physicochemical properties, photodynamic activity, photostability and drug release profile. All formulations presented nanometric hydrodynamic radius, around 100 nm, low polydispersity index (0.08-0.24), slightly negative zeta potential for PCL nanoparticles and positive zeta potential for suspension containing chitosan. Encapsulation efficiencies were higher than 99%. The capacity of ZnPc loaded nanocapsules to produce cytotoxic singlet oxygen ((1)O2) by irradiation with red laser was monitored using 1.3-diphenylisobenzofuran as a probe. The singlet oxygen quantum yields (ΦΔ) for ZnPc loaded chitosan nanocapsules were high and similar to that of the standard (ZnPc in DMSO), displaying excellent ability to generate (1)O2. The photosensitizer loaded nanocapsules are photostable in the timescale usually utilized in PDT and only a small photobleaching event was observed when a light dose of 610J/cm(2) was applied. The in vitro drug release studies of ZnPc from all nanocapsules demonstrated a sustained release profile controlled by diffusion, without burst effect. The nature of the polymer and the core type of the nanocapsules regulated ZnPc release. Thus, the nanocapsules developed in this work are a promising strategy to be employed in PDT. PMID:26678154

  16. Layer-by-layer engineered nanocapsules of curcumin with improved cell activity.

    PubMed

    Kittitheeranun, Paveenuch; Sajomsang, Warayuth; Phanpee, Sarunya; Treetong, Alongkot; Wutikhun, Tuksadon; Suktham, Kunat; Puttipipatkhachorn, Satit; Ruktanonchai, Uracha Rungsardthong

    2015-08-15

    Nanocarriers based on electrostatic Layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly of CaCO3 nanoparticles (CaCO3 NPs) was investigated. These inorganic nanoparticles was used as templates to construct nanocapsules made from films based on two oppositely charged polyelectrolytes, poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride), and poly (sodium 4-styrene-sulfonate sodium salt), followed by core dissolution. The naked CaCO3 NPs, CaCO3 NPs coated with the polyelectrolytes and hollow nanocapsules were found with hexagonal shape with average sizes of 350-400 nm. A reversal of the surface charge between positive to negative zeta potential values was found, confirming the adsorption of polyelectrolytes. The loading efficiency and release of curcumin were controlled by the hydrophobic interactions between the drug and the polyelectrolyte matrix of the hollow nanocapsules. The quantity of curcumin released from hollow nanocapsules was found to increase under acidic environments, which is a desirable for anti-cancer drug delivery. The hollow nanocapsules were found to localize in the cytoplasm and nucleus compartment of Hela cancer cells after 24 h of incubation. Hollow nanocapsules were non-toxic to human fibroblast cells. Furthermore, curcumin loaded hollow nanocapsules exhibited higher in vitro cell inhibition against Hela cells than that of free curcumin, suggesting that polyelectrolyte based-hollow nanocapsules can be utilized as new carriers for drug delivery. PMID:26143232

  17. Polyaminoacid nanocapsules for drug delivery to the lymphatic system: Effect of the particle size.

    PubMed

    Abellan-Pose, Raquel; Teijeiro-Valiño, Carmen; Santander-Ortega, Manuel J; Borrajo, Erea; Vidal, Anxo; Garcia-Fuentes, Marcos; Csaba, Noémi; Alonso, María José

    2016-07-25

    Previous work by our group showed the possibility to reduce the toxicity of docetaxel upon its encapsulation in polyaminoacid nanocapsules with a size of 200nm. The objective of this study was to elucidate whether a reduction in the nanocapsules size might facilitate their access to the lymphatic system. To do so, we analyzed the effect of several formulation parameters on the characteristics of polyglutamic acid, PEGylated polyglutamic acid and polyasparagine nanocapsules. From these experiments, we could identify the best conditions to produce nanocapsules with a small size (close to 100nm) and adequate capacity to encapsulate and sustain the release of the antitumor drug docetaxel. Moreover, the results of the stability study made evident the critical role of the polyaminoacid shell on the colloidal stability of the nanocapsules in biologically relevant media. Finally, we studied the influence of the particle size (100nm vs. 200nm) on the biodistribution of PGA-PEG nanocapsules following subcutaneous injection. The results showed that the 100 nm-size nanocapsules accumulate faster in the lymph nodes, than those with a size of 200nm. In summary, these data suggest the potential of 100nm-size polyaminoacid nanocapsules as lymphatic drug delivery carriers. PMID:27210735

  18. Biocompatible lutein-polymer-lipid nanocapsules: Acute and subacute toxicity and bioavailability in mice.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, Arunkumar; Hindupur, Ravi; Vallikannan, Baskaran

    2016-12-01

    Lutein-poly-(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)-phospholipid (PL) nanocapsules were prepared (henceforth referred as lutein nanocapsules) and studied for acute, subacute oral toxicity and bioavailability of lutein in mice. Prior to examining the safety of lutein nanocapsules, particle size, zeta potential, surface morphology and interaction between lutein, PLGA and PL were studied. In acute study, mice were gavaged with a single dose of lutein nanocapsules at 0.1, 1, 10 and 100mg/kg body weight (BW) and examined for 2weeks, while in subacute study, daily mice were gavaged with a dose of 1 and 10mg/kg BW for 4weeks. Results revealed that mean size and zeta value of lutein nanocapsules were 140nm and -44mV, respectively. Acute and subacute toxicity studies did not show any mortality or treatment related adverse effect in clinical observations, ophthalmic examinations, body and organ weights. No toxicity related findings were observed in hematology, histopathology and other blood and tissue clinical chemistry parameters. In subacute study, no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) of lutein nanocapsules was found to be at a dose of 10mg/kg BW. Feeding lutein nanocapsules resulted in a significant (p<0.01) increase in lutein level in plasma and tissue compared to the control group. Lutein nanocapsules did not cause toxicity in mice. However, human trials are warranted. PMID:27612832

  19. Intracellular Delivery of Bioactive Molecules using Light-Addressable Nanocapsules

    PubMed Central

    Gregersen, Kimberly A. D.; Hill, Zachary B.; Gadd, Jennifer C.; Fujimoto, Bryant S.; Maly, Dustin J.; Chiu, Daniel T.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a method by which molecules that are impermeable to cells are encapsulated in dye-sensitized lipid nanocapsules for delivery into cells via endocytosis. Once inside the cells, the molecules are released from the lipid nanocapsules into the cytoplasm with a single nanosecond pulse from a laser in the far red (645nm). We demonstrate this method with the intracellular release of the second messenger IP3 in CHO-M1 cells, and report that calcium responses from the cells changed from a sustained increase to a transient spike when the average number of IP3 released is decreased below 50 molecules per nanocapsule. We also demonstrate the delivery of a 23 kDa AGT fusion protein into Ba/F3 cells to inhibit a key player BCR-ABL in the apoptotic pathway. We show that an average of ~ 8 molecules of the inhibitor is sufficient to induce apoptosis in the majority of Ba/F3 cells. PMID:21117640

  20. Nanocapsules of perfluorooctyl bromide for theranostics: from formulation to targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diou, O.; Fattal, E.; Payen, T.; Bridal, S. L.; Valette, J.; Tsapis, N.

    2014-03-01

    The need to detect cancer at its early stages, as well as, to deliver chemotherapy to targeted site motivates many researchers to build theranostic platforms which combine diagnostic and therapy. Among imaging modalities, ultrasonography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) are widely available, non invasive and complement each other. Both techniques often require the use of contrast agents. We have developed nanocapsules of perfluorooctyl bromide as dual contrast agent for both imaging modalities. The soft, amorphous polymer shell provides echogenicity, while the high-density perfluorinated liquid core allows detection by 19F MRI. We have used a shell of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) since this polymer is biodegradable, biocompatible and can be loaded with drugs. These capsules were shown to be efficient in vitro as contrast agents for both 19F MRI and ultrasonography. In addition, for in vivo applications a poly(ethyleneglycol) (PEG) coating promotes stability and prolonged circulation. Being stealth, nanocapsule can accumulate passively into implanted tumors by the EPR effect. We will present nanocapsule formulation and characterization, and will show promising in vivo results obtained for both ultrasonography and 19F MRI.

  1. Nanocapsules for drug delivery through the skin barrier by tissue-tolerable plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lademann, J.; Patzelt, A.; Richter, H.; Lademann, O.; Baier, G.; Breucker, L.; Landfester, K.

    2013-08-01

    For many years, several attempts have been made to enhance skin penetration by chemical, physical or mechanical manipulation to reduce the barrier function of the skin. The present study demonstrates the possibility of penetration enhancement for 400 nm sized nanocapsules loaded with a model drug consisting of a fluorescent dye by the application of tissue-tolerable plasma (TTP). Therefore, the stability of the nanocapsules and their penetration through the skin barrier prior to and in combination with TTP application was evaluated. The results revealed that the penetration of the nanocapsules could be effectively enhanced when applied in combination with TTP, hence delivering the model drug unaffected by plasma into deeper skin layers. The stability testing showed no significant structural changes of the nanocapsules after contact with TTP. Thus, the present study introduces a new strategy for the penetration enhancement of substances by the combined utilization of nanocapsules and TTP.

  2. Frozen-intensity test research of frozen coal with steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaopeng; Huang, Cheng; Liu, Weibo

    2002-05-01

    As a sort of multiple component, and dispersed state granule aggregation, frozen coal behaves similar to frozen soil. On the basis of its unique ice-cementation effect and not-frozen water along with dynamical balance state between the frameworks of mineral granule, the mechanical behavior of frozen coal is more complex than usual in compact medium, restrictedly with force amount, process time period and temperature. In all factors which impact on frozen intensity of frozen coal frozen with steel plate, water content is relatively easy to control. From results of this test research, values of frozen intensity is changeable under different water content. Up to the critical water content, the value of frozen intensity increase rapidly till a certain steady value. Under a certain temperature and water content condition, the granule component of frozen coal has somewhat effect on the frozen intensity. Usually, the frozen intensity of large granule coal is greater than the small granule's However, the distributing of coal granule size present a steady probability rule. So the effect from granule size is tiny.

  3. The Frozen Price Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alden, Lori

    2003-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the educational frozen price game she developed to teach the basic economic principle of price allocation. In addition to demonstrating the advantages of price allocation, the game also illustrates such concepts as opportunity costs, cost benefit comparisons, and the trade-off between efficiency and equity.…

  4. Foods - fresh vs. frozen or canned

    MedlinePlus

    Frozen foods vs. fresh or canned; Fresh foods vs. frozen or canned; Frozen vegetables versus fresh ... a well-balanced diet. Many people wonder if frozen and canned vegetables are as healthy for you ...

  5. Texture of Frozen Food

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wani, Kohmei

    Quantitative determination of textural quality of frozen food due to freezing and storage conditions is complicated,since the texture is consisted of multi-dimensiona1 factors. The author reviewed the importance of texture in food quality and the factors which is proposed by a priori estimation. New classification of expression words of textural properties by subjective evaluation and an application of four elements mechanical model for analysis of physical characteristics was studied on frozen meat patties. Combination of freezing-thawing condition on the subjective properties and physiochemical characteristics of beef lean meat and hamachi fish (Yellow-tail) meat was studied. Change of the plasticity and the deformability of these samples differed by freezing-thawing rate and cooking procedure. Also optimum freezing-thawing condition was differed from specimens.

  6. Curation of Frozen Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, L. A.; Allen, C. C.; Bastien, R.

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC) and the Astromaterials Curator are charged by NPD 7100.10D with the curation of all of NASA s extraterrestrial samples, including those from future missions. This responsibility includes the development of new sample handling and preparation techniques; therefore, the Astromaterials Curator must begin developing procedures to preserve, prepare and ship samples at sub-freezing temperatures in order to enable future sample return missions. Such missions might include the return of future frozen samples from permanently-shadowed lunar craters, the nuclei of comets, the surface of Mars, etc. We are demonstrating the ability to curate samples under cold conditions by designing, installing and testing a cold curation glovebox. This glovebox will allow us to store, document, manipulate and subdivide frozen samples while quantifying and minimizing contamination throughout the curation process.

  7. FROZEN HYDROCARBONS IN COMETS

    SciTech Connect

    Simonia, Irakli

    2011-02-15

    Recent investigations of the luminescence of frozen hydrocarbon particles of icy cometary halos have been carried out. The process of luminescence of organic icy particles in a short-wavelength solar radiation field is considered. A comparative analysis of observed and laboratory data leads to 72 luminescent emission lines in the spectrum of the comet 153P/Ikeya-Zhang. The concept of cometary relict matter is presented, and the creation of a database of unidentified cometary emission lines is proposed.

  8. Frozen cultural plasticity.

    PubMed

    Houdek, Petr; Novakova, Julie

    2016-01-01

    We discuss cultural group selection under the view of the frozen plasticity theory and the different explanatory power and predictions of this framework. We present evidence that cultural adaptations and their influence on the degree of cooperation may be more complex than presented by Richerson et al., and conclude with the gene-environment-culture relationship and its impacts on cultural group selection. PMID:27561647

  9. Nanoemulsion-templated polylelectrolyte multifunctional nanocapsules for DNA entrapment and bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Bazylińska, Urszula; Saczko, Jolanta

    2016-01-01

    The emerging field of bionanotechnology aims at advancing colloidal and biomedical research via introduction of multifunctional nanoparticle-based containers intended for both gene therapy and bioimaging. In the present contribution we entrapped the model genetic material (herring testes DNA) in the newly-designed non-viral vectors, i.e., multifunctional nanocapsules obtained by layer-by-layer (LbL) adsorption of DNA and oppositely charged polysaccharide-based chitosan (CHIT) on the nanoemulsion core, loaded by IR-780 indocyanine (used as the fluorescent marker) and stabilized by gemini-type ammonium salts: N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-N,N'-di(dodecyl)-ethylenediammonium bromide, d(DDA)PBr and N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-N,N'-di(dodecyl)-butylenediammonium d(DDA)BBr. Ternary phase diagrams of the surfactant-oil-water systems were determined by titration method. Then, the stability of the nanoemulsions obtained with IR-780 solubilized in the oleic acid (OA) or isopropyl myristate (IPM) phase was evaluated by backscattering (BS) profiles and ζ-potential measurements. In the next step, CHIT and DNA layers were subsequently deposited on the kinetically stable nanoemulsion cores. The IR-780-loaded nanocarriers covered by (DNA/CHIT)4 bilayers shown the high ζ-potential value (about +43mV provided by Doppler electrophoresis), the size <120nm and the spherical shape as analyzed by dynamic light scattering (DLS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Finally, the long-lasting nanosystems were subjected to in vitro biological studies on human cancer cell lines - doxorubicin-sensitive breast (MCF-7/WT), epithelial lung adenocarcinoma (A549) and skin melanoma (MEWO). Biological response of the cell culture was expressed as cytotoxic activity evaluated by MTT-based proliferation assay as well as bioimaging of intracellular localization of IR-780 molecules loaded in the multilayer DNA-deposited nanocontainers - provided by confocal laser scanning microscopy

  10. Preparation and stability of lipid-coated nanocapsules of cisplatin: anionic phospholipid specificity.

    PubMed

    Velinova, Maria J; Staffhorst, Rutger W H M; Mulder, Willem J M; Dries, Arno S; Jansen, Bart A J; de Kruijff, Ben; de Kroon, Anton I P M

    2004-05-27

    Cisplatin nanocapsules represent a novel lipid formulation of the anti-cancer drug cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (cisplatin), in which nanoprecipitates of cisplatin are coated by a phospholipid bilayer consisting of a 1:1 mixture of zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine (PC) and negatively charged phosphatidylserine (PS). Cisplatin nanocapsules are characterized by an unprecedented cisplatin-to-lipid ratio and exhibit increased in vitro cytotoxicity compared to the free drug [Nat. Med. 8, (2002) 81]. In the present study, the stability of the cisplatin nanocapsules was optimized by varying the lipid composition of the bilayer coat and monitoring in vitro cytotoxicity and the release of contents during incubations in water and in mouse serum. The release of cisplatin from the PC/PS (1:1) nanocapsules in water increased with increasing temperature with a t(1/2) of 6.5 h at 37 degrees C. At 4 degrees C, cisplatin was retained in the nanocapsules for well over 8 days. Replacement of PS by either phosphatidylglycerol or phosphatidic acid revealed that nanocapsules prepared of PS were more stable, which was found to be due to the ability of PS to form a stable cisplatin-PS coordination complex. Mouse serum had a strong destabilizing effect on the cisplatin nanocapsules. The PC/PS formulation lost over 80% of cisplatin within minutes after resuspension in serum. Incorporation of poly(ethylene glycol 2000) (PEG)-derivatized phosphatidylethanolamine and cholesterol in the bilayer coat extended the lifetime of the cisplatin nanocapsules in mouse serum to almost an hour. The results demonstrate that specificity in the interaction of cisplatin with anionic phospholipids is an important criterium for the formation and stability of cisplatin nanocapsules. PMID:15157616

  11. Efficacy and Pharmacokinetics of Intravenous Nanocapsule Formulations of Halofantrine in Plasmodium berghei-Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mosqueira, Vanessa C. F.; Loiseau, Philippe M.; Bories, Christian; Legrand, Philippe; Devissaguet, Jean-Philippe; Barratt, Gillian

    2004-01-01

    The efficacy and pharmacokinetics of a new parenteral formulation of halofantrine were studied in mice infected with Plasmodium berghei. The formulation consisted of nanocapsules with an oily core, prepared from either poly(d,l-lactide) (PLA) homopolymer or PLA that was surface modified with grafted polyethylene glycol chains. They were compared with a previously described intravenous halofantrine preparation. No toxic effects were observed with halofantrine in form of nanocapsules after intravenous administration for doses of up to 100 mg/kg, whereas the solubilized form in polyethylene glycol-dimethylacetamide was toxic at this dose. The halofantrine-loaded nanocapsules showed activity that was similar to or better than that of the solution in the 4-day test and as a single dose in severely infected mice, with only minimal differences between the two nanocapsule formulations. Halofantrine pharmacokinetics were determined in parallel with parasite development in severely infected mice. Nanocapsules increased the area under the curve for halofantrine in plasma more than sixfold compared with the solution throughout the experimental period of 70 h. Furthermore, nanocapsules induced a significantly faster control of parasite development than the solution in the first 48 h posttreatment. While the parasitemia fell more rapidly with PLA nanocapsules, the effect was more sustained with the surface-modified ones. This is consistent with surface-modified nanocapsules remaining longer in the circulation. These results suggest that nanocapsule formulations could provide a more favorable halofantrine profile in the plasma and reduce the intravenous dose necessary and therefore the toxicity, thus suggesting the use of halofantrine by a parenteral route in severe malaria. PMID:15047523

  12. Efficacy and pharmacokinetics of intravenous nanocapsule formulations of halofantrine in Plasmodium berghei-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Mosqueira, Vanessa C F; Loiseau, Philippe M; Bories, Christian; Legrand, Philippe; Devissaguet, Jean-Philippe; Barratt, Gillian

    2004-04-01

    The efficacy and pharmacokinetics of a new parenteral formulation of halofantrine were studied in mice infected with Plasmodium berghei. The formulation consisted of nanocapsules with an oily core, prepared from either poly(D,L-lactide) (PLA) homopolymer or PLA that was surface modified with grafted polyethylene glycol chains. They were compared with a previously described intravenous halofantrine preparation. No toxic effects were observed with halofantrine in form of nanocapsules after intravenous administration for doses of up to 100 mg/kg, whereas the solubilized form in polyethylene glycol-dimethylacetamide was toxic at this dose. The halofantrine-loaded nanocapsules showed activity that was similar to or better than that of the solution in the 4-day test and as a single dose in severely infected mice, with only minimal differences between the two nanocapsule formulations. Halofantrine pharmacokinetics were determined in parallel with parasite development in severely infected mice. Nanocapsules increased the area under the curve for halofantrine in plasma more than sixfold compared with the solution throughout the experimental period of 70 h. Furthermore, nanocapsules induced a significantly faster control of parasite development than the solution in the first 48 h posttreatment. While the parasitemia fell more rapidly with PLA nanocapsules, the effect was more sustained with the surface-modified ones. This is consistent with surface-modified nanocapsules remaining longer in the circulation. These results suggest that nanocapsule formulations could provide a more favorable halofantrine profile in the plasma and reduce the intravenous dose necessary and therefore the toxicity, thus suggesting the use of halofantrine by a parenteral route in severe malaria. PMID:15047523

  13. Growth-Factor Nanocapsules That Enable Tunable Controlled Release for Bone Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Tian, Haijun; Du, Juanjuan; Wen, Jing; Liu, Yang; Montgomery, Scott R; Scott, Trevor P; Aghdasi, Bayan; Xiong, Chengjie; Suzuki, Akinobu; Hayashi, Tetsuo; Ruangchainikom, Monchai; Phan, Kevin; Weintraub, Gil; Raed, Alobaidaan; Murray, Samuel S; Daubs, Michael D; Yang, Xianjin; Yuan, Xu-Bo; Wang, Jeffrey C; Lu, Yunfeng

    2016-08-23

    Growth factors are of great potential in regenerative medicine. However, their clinical applications are largely limited by the short in vivo half-lives and the narrow therapeutic window. Thus, a robust controlled release system remains an unmet medical need for growth-factor-based therapies. In this research, a nanoscale controlled release system (degradable protein nanocapsule) is established via in situ polymerization on growth factor. The release rate can be finely tuned by engineering the surface polymer composition. Improved therapeutic outcomes can be achieved with growth factor nanocapsules, as illustrated in spinal cord fusion mediated by bone morphogenetic protein-2 nanocapsules. PMID:27227573

  14. Multilayered silica-biopolymer nanocapsules with a hydrophobic core and a hydrophilic tunable shell thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vecchione, Raffaele; Luciani, Giuseppina; Calcagno, Vincenzo; Jakhmola, Anshuman; Silvestri, Brigida; Guarnieri, Daniela; Belli, Valentina; Costantini, Aniello; Netti, Paolo A.

    2016-04-01

    Stable, biocompatible, multifunctional and multicompartment nanocarriers are much needed in the field of nanomedicine. Here, we report a simple, novel strategy to design an engineered nanocarrier system featuring an oil-core/hybrid polymer/silica-shell. Silica shells with a tunable thickness were grown in situ, directly around a highly mono-disperse and stable oil-in-water emulsion system, stabilized by a double bio-functional polyelectrolyte heparin/chitosan layer. Such silica showed a complete degradation in a physiological medium (SBF) in a time frame of three days. Moreover, the outer silica shell was coated with polyethyleneglycol (PEG) in order to confer antifouling properties to the final nanocapsule. The outer silica layer combined its properties (it is an optimal bio-interface for bio-conjugations and for the embedding of hydrophilic drugs in the porous structure) with the capability to stabilize the oil core for the confinement of high payloads of lipophilic tracers (e.g. CdSe quantum dots, Nile Red) and drugs. In addition, polymer layers - besides conferring stability to the emulsion while building the silica shell - can be independently exploited if suitably functionalized, as demonstrated by conjugating chitosan with fluorescein isothiocyanate. Such numerous features in a single nanocarrier system make it very intriguing as a multifunctional platform for smart diagnosis and therapy.Stable, biocompatible, multifunctional and multicompartment nanocarriers are much needed in the field of nanomedicine. Here, we report a simple, novel strategy to design an engineered nanocarrier system featuring an oil-core/hybrid polymer/silica-shell. Silica shells with a tunable thickness were grown in situ, directly around a highly mono-disperse and stable oil-in-water emulsion system, stabilized by a double bio-functional polyelectrolyte heparin/chitosan layer. Such silica showed a complete degradation in a physiological medium (SBF) in a time frame of three days

  15. Spectroscopic investigations of ADMA encapsulated in pyrogallol[4]arene nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Bassil, Daniel B; Dalgarno, Scott J; Cave, Gareth W V; Atwood, Jerry L; Tucker, Sheryl A

    2007-08-01

    Pyrogallol[4]arenes form stable hydrogen-bonded nanocapsules that have unique properties that may make them suitable for diverse applications, such as catalysts and molecular transporters. Little is known about the behavior of the interior of these new materials in solution, and by using the solvent-dependent properties of 1-(9-anthryl)-3-(4-dimethylaniline) propane (ADMA), the inner phase properties of the hexamers are investigated. Steady-state and dynamic spectrofluorometric results are in agreement, are consistent with solid-state studies, and indicate that the majority of ADMA is sequestered in an extended conformation with the crystallization solvent. The conformational flexibility of ADMA is attributed to lower capsule occupancies ( approximately 50%, i.e., 1 molecule per 2 capsules, one occupied and one empty) relative to our previous study with pyrene butyric acid (occupancy of 150%, i.e., 1.5 molecules per capsule) in which the probe was restricted within a nanocapsule. The nature of the encapsulated ADMA complexes are found to change with time, as there is either fluorophore leaching from the capsule or endo-exo-capsule solvent exchange. However, the choice of crystallizing solvent (ethyl acetate or acetonitrile) and PgC(n) alkyl tail (C(6) or C(10)) does not influence experimental outcomes. These research findings give a better understanding of the encapsulation versatility of these unique supramolecular assemblies and the protective nanopockets that can exist for guest molecules. PMID:17602580

  16. Docetaxel in cationic lipid nanocapsules for enhanced in vivo activity.

    PubMed

    Jain, Ankitkumar S; Makhija, Dinesh T; Goel, Peeyush N; Shah, Sanket M; Nikam, Yuvraj; Gude, Rajiv P; Jagtap, Aarti G; Nagarsenker, Mangal S

    2016-01-01

    The usefulness of Docetaxel (DT) as an anti-cancer agent is limited to parenteral route owing to its very poor oral bioavailability. Thus, to improve its oral efficacy, DT was loaded in novel cationic lipid nanocapsules (DT CLNC). The DT CLNC possessed size of 130-150 nm, zeta potential of +72mV, adequate DT loading and over 95% encapsulation efficiency. TEM revealed capsular structure of DT CLNC. Lipolysis study indicated improved solubilization of DT by nanocapsules in comparison to DT solution. DT CLNC exhibited significantly higher release of DT in comparison to DT solution during in vitro permeation studies employing non-reverted rat-intestinal sac. Superior uptake of DT in zebra fishes exposed to DT CLNC resulted in greater apoptosis-based cell death as compared to those exposed to DT solution. This correlated well with the significantly superior (p < 0.05) anti-angiogenic activity of DT CLNC system over DT solution, in zebra fish model. DT CLNC also inhibited tumor growth in melanoma cell line induced tumors in C57BL/6 mice significantly, as compared to DT solution (p < 0.05). The DT CLNC system demonstrated adequate stability, with tremendous potential to improve oral efficacy of DT and can serve as an alternative to existing DT formulations available commercially for parenteral use. PMID:25329444

  17. Frozen Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    1 August 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a south polar residual cap landscape, formed in frozen carbon dioxide. There is no place on Earth that one can go to visit a landscape covering thousands of square kilometers with frozen carbon dioxide, so mesas, pits, and other landforms of the martian south polar region are as alien as they are beautiful. The scarps of the south polar region are known from thousands of other MGS MOC images to retreat at a rate of about 3 meters (3 yards) per martian year, indiating that slowly, over the course of the MGS mission, the amount of carbon dioxide in the martian atmosphere has probably been increasing.

    Location near: 86.9oS, 25.5oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  18. Preparation and properties of dysprosium nanocapsules coated with boron, carbon, and dysprosium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Si, P.Z.; Brueck, E.; Zhang, Z.D.; Skorvanek, I.; Kovac, J.; Zhang, M

    2004-06-08

    Boron-coated dysprosium/dysprosium oxide, carbon-coated dysprosium/DyC{sub 2}, and dysprosium oxide-coated dysprosium nanocapsules were prepared using an arc discharge method in diborane, methane, and argon, respectively. The magnetization of these nanocapsules has been measured at temperatures between 4 and 290 K, in applied fields up to 6 T. The transition temperature of nanocrystalline Dy from the helical phase to the ferromagnetic phase is much lower than that of bulk Dy. The linear temperature dependence of the inverse susceptibility of these nanocapsules, being a mixture of superparamagnetic Dy and paramagnetic dysprosium oxide or carbide, can be explained within the molecular field theory with magnetic moments with the total angular momentum J=15/2 and the Lande factor g=4/3. We discuss the relations between the structure and the magnetization of these nanocapsules.

  19. Synthesis of magnetic and upconversion nanocapsules as multifunctional drug delivery system

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Shanshan; Chen, Yinyin; Liu, Bei; He, Fei; Ma, Ping’an; Deng, Xiaoran; Cheng, Ziyong Lin, Jun

    2015-09-15

    Multifunctional hollow nanocapsules with magnetic and upconversion luminescence properties were synthesized. Hollow Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2} was firstly prepared by using rodlike β-FeOOH as the template followed by silica coating, calcinations and reduction. Then Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2}@α-NaYF{sub 4}:Yb{sup 3+},Er{sup 3+} nanocapsules (FeSiUCNP) were synthesized by the hydrothermal transformation of the Y(Yb{sup 3+}, Er{sup 3+})(OH)CO{sub 3} (YOC) deposited onto the surface of nanocapsules through a urea-assisted homogeneous precipitation method. The hollow nanocapsules with porous structure provide space and entrance for the drug molecules. Due to the outside shell of α-NaYF{sub 4}:Yb{sup 3+}, Er{sup 3+}, the nanomaterial shows upconverting red emission upon 980 nm NIR-light excitation. Moreover, the nanocomposites with hollow magnetite core exhibit a high relaxivity with r{sub 2} value of 183 mM{sup −1} s{sup −1}, which reveal the potential as T{sub 2}-weighted contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The as-prepared nanocapsules can be performed as anti-cancer drug carriers for investigation of drug loading/release properties, which demonstrated a sustained drug release pattern and a comparable cytotoxicity with free doxorubicin (DOX). The multifunctional nanocapsules incorporated upconverting luminescence, T{sub 2}-weighted MRI imaging and drug targeting delivery modalities have great potential for theranostic applications in cancer treatment. - Graphical abstract: Multifunctional hollow nanocapsules with upconverting luminescence, T{sub 2}-weighted MRI imaging and drug targeting delivery modalities were synthesized for cancer treatment. - Highlights: • Multifunctional porous Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2}@α-NaYF{sub 4}:Yb{sup 3+},Er{sup 3+} nanocapsules were synthesized. • The nanocapsules show upconverting red emission upon 980 nm NIR-light excitation. • The nanocapsules exihibit potential as T{sub 2}-weighted contrast agents

  20. 21 CFR 160.110 - Frozen eggs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Frozen eggs. 160.110 Section 160.110 Food and... CONSUMPTION EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Eggs and Egg Products § 160.110 Frozen eggs. (a) Frozen eggs, frozen whole eggs, frozen mixed eggs is the food prepared by...

  1. 21 CFR 160.110 - Frozen eggs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Frozen eggs. 160.110 Section 160.110 Food and... CONSUMPTION EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Eggs and Egg Products § 160.110 Frozen eggs. (a) Frozen eggs, frozen whole eggs, frozen mixed eggs is the food prepared by...

  2. 21 CFR 160.110 - Frozen eggs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Frozen eggs. 160.110 Section 160.110 Food and... CONSUMPTION EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Eggs and Egg Products § 160.110 Frozen eggs. (a) Frozen eggs, frozen whole eggs, frozen mixed eggs is the food prepared by...

  3. 21 CFR 160.110 - Frozen eggs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Frozen eggs. 160.110 Section 160.110 Food and... CONSUMPTION EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Eggs and Egg Products § 160.110 Frozen eggs. (a) Frozen eggs, frozen whole eggs, frozen mixed eggs is the food prepared by...

  4. 21 CFR 160.110 - Frozen eggs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Frozen eggs. 160.110 Section 160.110 Food and... CONSUMPTION EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Eggs and Egg Products § 160.110 Frozen eggs. (a) Frozen eggs, frozen whole eggs, frozen mixed eggs is the food prepared by...

  5. A surface modification of clozapine-loaded nanocapsules improves their efficacy: A study of formulation development and biological assessment.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Simone M; Michels, Luana R; Roversi, Katiane; Metz, Vinícia G; Moraes, Barbra K S; Piegas, Eduarda M; Freddo, Rodrigo J; Gundel, André; Costa, Teresa Dalla; Burger, Marilise E; Colomé, Letícia M; Haas, Sandra E

    2016-09-01

    This work aimed to develop nanocapsules (NC) coated with polysorbate 80 (P80), cationic chitosan (CS) or polyethylene glycol (PEG) using clozapine (CZP) as the drug model. The zeta potential, pH and encapsulation efficiency were directly affected by the CS coating. Using the bag dialysis method, the in vitro CZP release from CS-coated nanocapsules was similar to the PEG-coated at pH 7.4. Nanocapsules coated with PEG and CS exhibited an increased action duration compared to the P80-coated nanocapsules in pseudo-psychosis induced by d,l-amphetamine in rats. When comparing both groups, the group administered CS-coated nanocapsules showed better activity than the PEG-coated nanocapsules at 6, 10 and 12h after d,l-amphetamine administration. The pharmacokinetic assessment in rats demonstrated that the observed half-lives were free CZPnanocapsules. Both the P80- and PEG-coated nanocapsules showed a statistically significant increase in their volume of distribution compared to free CZP. On the other hand, the cationic nanocapsules showed a decrease in total clearance. Together, these results indicate that the PEG and CS coatings are a promising delivery system for CZP in the treatment of schizophrenia. PMID:27295491

  6. Synthesis of magnetic and upconversion nanocapsules as multifunctional drug delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shanshan; Chen, Yinyin; Liu, Bei; He, Fei; Ma, Ping'an; Deng, Xiaoran; Cheng, Ziyong; Lin, Jun

    2015-09-01

    Multifunctional hollow nanocapsules with magnetic and upconversion luminescence properties were synthesized. Hollow Fe3O4@SiO2 was firstly prepared by using rodlike β-FeOOH as the template followed by silica coating, calcinations and reduction. Then Fe3O4@SiO2@α-NaYF4:Yb3+,Er3+ nanocapsules (FeSiUCNP) were synthesized by the hydrothermal transformation of the Y(Yb3+, Er3+)(OH)CO3 (YOC) deposited onto the surface of nanocapsules through a urea-assisted homogeneous precipitation method. The hollow nanocapsules with porous structure provide space and entrance for the drug molecules. Due to the outside shell of α-NaYF4:Yb3+, Er3+, the nanomaterial shows upconverting red emission upon 980 nm NIR-light excitation. Moreover, the nanocomposites with hollow magnetite core exhibit a high relaxivity with r2 value of 183 mM-1 s-1, which reveal the potential as T2-weighted contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The as-prepared nanocapsules can be performed as anti-cancer drug carriers for investigation of drug loading/release properties, which demonstrated a sustained drug release pattern and a comparable cytotoxicity with free doxorubicin (DOX). The multifunctional nanocapsules incorporated upconverting luminescence, T2-weighted MRI imaging and drug targeting delivery modalities have great potential for theranostic applications in cancer treatment.

  7. The performance of PEGylated nanocapsules of perfluorooctyl bromide as an ultrasound contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Díaz-López, Raquel; Tsapis, Nicolas; Santin, Mathieu; Bridal, Sharon Lori; Nicolas, Valérie; Jaillard, Danielle; Libong, Danielle; Chaminade, Pierre; Marsaud, Véronique; Vauthier, Christine; Fattal, Elias

    2010-03-01

    The surface of polymeric nanocapsules used as ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) was modified with PEGylated phospholipids in order to escape recognition and clearance by the mononuclear phagocyte system and achieve passive tumor targeting. Nanocapsules consisted of a shell of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) encapsulating a liquid core of perfluorooctyl bromide (PFOB). They were decorated with poly(ethylene glycol-2000)-grafted distearoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DSPE-PEG) incorporated in the organic phase before the solvent emulsification-evaporation process. The influence of DSPE-PEG concentration on nanocapsule size, surface charge, morphology, hydrophobicity and complement activation was evaluated. Zeta potential measurements, Hydrophobic interaction chromatography and complement activation provide evidence of DSPE-PEG presence at nanocapsule surface. Electronic microscopy reveals that the core/shell structure is preserved up to 2.64 mg of DSPE-PEG for 100 mg PLGA. In vivo ultrasound imaging was performed in mice bearing xenograft tumor with MIA PaCa-2 cells, either after an intra-tumoral or intravenous injection of nanocapsules. Tumor was observed only after the intra-tumoral injection. Despite the absence of echogenic signal in the tumor after intravenous injection of nanocapsules, histological analysis reveals their accumulation within the tumor tissue demonstrating that tissue distribution is not the unique property required for ultrasound contrast agents to be efficient. PMID:19948357

  8. Chitosan/fucoidan multilayer nanocapsules as a vehicle for controlled release of bioactive compounds.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Ana C; Bourbon, Ana I; Cerqueira, Miguel A; Maricato, Élia; Nunes, Cláudia; Coimbra, Manuel A; Vicente, António A

    2015-01-22

    Hollow multilayer nanocapsules were successfully prepared through layer-by-layer assembly of two bioactive polysaccharides, chitosan and fucoidan. The stepwise adsorption of 10 chitosan/fucoidan layers and the consequent formation of a multilayer film on polystyrene nanoparticles (used as templates) were followed through ζ-potential measurement and the removal of the polystyrene core was confirmed by FTIR analysis. The chitosan/fucoidan nanocapsules morphology and size were evaluated by SEM and TEM, which showed that after the core removal, the nanocapsules maintained their spherical shape and a decrease of size occurred. A cationic bioactive compound, poly-L-lysine (PLL), was chosen to evaluate the loading and release behaviour of the nanocapsules. The chitosan/fucoidan nanocapsules showed a good capacity for the encapsulation and loading of PLL, which shows to be influenced by the initial PLL concentration and the method of encapsulation used. The results of fitting the linear superimposition model to the experimental data of PLL release suggest an anomalous behaviour, with one main polymer relaxation. The PLL release was found to be pH-dependent: at pH 2 relaxation is the governing phenomenon and at pH 7 Fick's diffusion is the main mechanism of PLL release. Chitosan/fucoidan nanocapsules is a promising delivery system for water soluble bioactive compounds, such as PLL, showing a great potential of application in food and pharmaceutical industries. PMID:25439860

  9. Serum-stable quantum dot--protein hybrid nanocapsules for optical bio-imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeong Yu; Nam, Dong Heon; Oh, Mi Hwa; Kim, Youngsun; Choi, Hyung Seok; Jeon, Duk Young; Beum Park, Chan; Nam, Yoon Sung

    2014-05-01

    We introduce shell cross-linked protein/quantum dot (QD) hybrid nanocapsules as a serum-stable systemic delivery nanocarrier for tumor-targeted in vivo bio-imaging applications. Highly luminescent, heavy-metal-free Cu0.3InS2/ZnS (CIS/ZnS) core-shell QDs are synthesized and mixed with amine-reactive six-armed poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) in dichloromethane. Emulsification in an aqueous solution containing human serum albumin (HSA) results in shell cross-linked nanocapsules incorporating CIS/ZnS QDs, exhibiting high luminescence and excellent dispersion stability in a serum-containing medium. Folic acid is introduced as a tumor-targeting ligand. The feasibility of tumor-targeted in vivo bio-imaging is demonstrated by measuring the fluorescence intensity of several major organs and tumor tissue after an intravenous tail vein injection of the nanocapsules into nude mice. The cytotoxicity of the QD-loaded HSA-PEG nanocapsules is also examined in several types of cells. Our results show that the cellular uptake of the QDs is critical for cytotoxicity. Moreover, a significantly lower level of cell death is observed in the CIS/ZnS QDs compared to nanocapsules loaded with cadmium-based QDs. This study suggests that the systemic tumor targeting of heavy-metal-free QDs using shell cross-linked HSA-PEG hybrid nanocapsules is a promising route for in vivo tumor diagnosis with reduced non-specific toxicity.

  10. Remotely Triggered Cisplatin Release from Carbon Nanocapsules by Radiofrequency Fields

    PubMed Central

    Raoof, Mustafa; Cisneros, Brandon T.; Guven, Adem; Corr, Stuart J.; Wilson, Lon J.; Curley, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery is limited by its peri-vascular sequestration, thus necessitating a strategy to trigger drug release from such intra-tumoral nanocarrier-drug depots. In our efforts to explore remotely-activated nanocarriers, we have developed carbon nanocapsules comprised of an ultrashort carbon nanotube shell (US-tubes) loaded with cisplatin (CDDP@US-tubes) and covered with a Pluronic surfactant wrapping to minimize passive release. We demonstrate here that non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) field activation of the CDDP@US-tubes produces heat that causes Pluronic disruption which triggers cisplatin release in an RF-dependent manner. Furthermore, release-dependent cytotoxicity is demonstrated in human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines. PMID:23228421

  11. Polymeric Nanoparticles, Nanospheres and Nanocapsules, for Cutaneous Applications

    PubMed Central

    Guterres, Sílvia S.; Alves, Marta P.; Pohlmann, Adriana R.

    2007-01-01

    This review presents an overview about pharmaceutical and cosmetic topical products containing polymeric nanoparticles (nanospheres and nanocapsules), reporting the main preparation and characterization methods and the studies of penetration and transport of substances through the skin. The penetration and transport extent of those systems through the skin depends on the ingredients chemical composition, on the encapsulation mechanism influencing the drug release, on the size of nanoparticles and on the viscosity of the formulations. The polymeric nanoparticles are able to modify the activity of drugs, delay and control the drug release, and increase the drug adhesivity or its time of permanence in the skin. Briefly, the nanoparticles can be useful as reservoirs of lipophilic drugs to deliver them in the stratum corneum becoming an important strategy to control their permeation into the skin. PMID:21901071

  12. Docetaxel-loaded polyglutamic acid-PEG nanocapsules for the treatment of metastatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Borrajo, Erea; Abellan-Pose, Raquel; Soto, Atenea; Garcia-Fuentes, Marcos; Csaba, Noemi; Alonso, Maria J; Vidal, Anxo

    2016-09-28

    The design of nanomedicines with suitable physicochemical characteristics for the lymphatic targeting of drugs is critical in order to reach the lymph nodes, where metastatic cells often accumulate. Based on the known effect of particle size and surface hydrophilicity on the capacity of nanocarriers to reach the lymph nodes, here we report the formation and characterization of 100nm polyglutamic acid-polyethylene glycol (PGA-PEG) nanocapsules together with the assessment of their potential for the treatment of cancer with lymphatic metastatic spread. To this purpose, we first studied the biodistribution of fluorescently labeled PGA-PEG nanocapsules (100nm), following, either intravenous or subcutaneous administration. The results confirmed the accumulation of nanocapsules in the lymphatic system, especially upon subcutaneous administration. Next, we evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of the docetaxel-loaded nanocapsules in an orthotopic lung cancer model that metastasizes to the lymph nodes. As expected from the rational design, DCX-loaded PGA-PEG nanocapsules exhibited a greatly enhanced antitumoral efficacy and a reduced toxicity when compared with the commercial formulation Taxotere®. Furthermore, the administration of DCX-loaded PGA-PEG nanocapsules resulted in the practical elimination of the metastatic load in the mediastinal lymph nodes, whereas the treatment with the commercial formulation had a minor effect. Overall, these findings underscore the potential of PGA-PEG nanocapsules for the delivery of anticancer drugs to both, the tumor tissue and the metastatic lymph nodes. Therefore, they represent a promising therapy for the treatment of lung metastatic cancer. PMID:27476608

  13. Frozen beverage machine

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.D.

    1988-04-12

    A frozen beverage machine is described, comprising: a. a frame having an exterior, an interior, a front and a back; b. a cylinder, having an interior and an exterior as well as first and second ends and further having an opening in each of the ends, the cylinder being horizontally and fixedly positioned within the interior of the frame with the second end facing the front of the frame; c. a means, sealingly attached to the opening in the second end of the cylinder, for emptying the cylinder; d. a means, positioned within the frame and communicating with the exterior of the cylinder, for removing heat from the cylinder; e. at least one support bracket; f. a shaft, rotatably attached within the opening in the support bracket and rotatably and sealingly attached within the opening in the first end of the cylinder and extending to the interior of the cylinder; g. a motor assembly, operatively connected to a portion of the shaft exterior to the cylinder and suspended from the shaft such that the weight of the motor assembly is supported only by the shaft; h. a contact switch; and i. a resilient means, connected to the frame and the motor assembly, for maintaining the position of the motor assembly relative to the shaft until a desired threshold resistance to rotation of the shaft within the cylinder occur, and then allowing the motor assembly to rotate to a desired position relative to the shaft.

  14. Skin penetration and dermal tolerability of acrylic nanocapsules: Influence of the surface charge and a chitosan gel used as vehicle.

    PubMed

    Contri, R V; Fiel, L A; Alnasif, N; Pohlmann, A R; Guterres, S S; Schäfer-Korting, M

    2016-06-30

    For an improved understanding of the relevant particle features for cutaneous use, we studied the effect of the surface charge of acrylic nanocapsules (around 150nm) and the effect of a chitosan gel vehicle on the particle penetration into normal and stripped human skin ex vivo as well as local tolerability (cytotoxicity and irritancy). Rhodamin-tagged nanocapsules penetrated and remained in the stratum corneum. Penetration of cationic nanocapsules exceeded the penetration of anionic nanocapsules. When applied on stripped skin, however, the fluorescence was also recorded in the viable epidermis and dermis. Cationic surface charge and embedding the particles into chitosan gel favored access to deeper skin. Keratinocytes took up the nanocapsules rapidly. Cytotoxicity (viability<80%), following exposure for ≥24h, appears to be due to the surfactant polysorbate 80, used for nanocapsuleś stabilization. Uptake by fibroblasts was low and no cytotoxicity was observed. No irritant reactions were detected in the HET-CAM test. In conclusion, the surface charge and chitosan vehicle, as well as the skin barrier integrity, influence the skin penetration of acrylic nanocapsules. Particle localization in the intact stratum corneum of normal skin and good tolerability make the nanocapsules candidates for topical use on the skin, provided that the polymer wall allows the release of the active encapsulated substance. PMID:27130364

  15. Size and core content optimization of epoxy nanocapsules by response surface methodology for use in self-healing coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoee, Sepideh; Hosein Payandeh, Seyed; Jafarzadeh, Parinaz; Asadi, Hamed

    2016-08-01

    A model is provided to estimate the effect of different factors on the synthesis of nanocapsules containing epoxy resin. Producing nanocapsules with different sizes and core-contents for different applications is made possible by using this model. The three parameters that have the most important effect on the properties of the nanocapsules: the surfactant concentration, agitation rate and sonication time are selected and the response surface methodology is used to determine the effect of these parameters on the nanocapsule size and core content. These parameters are modified to prepare nanoparticles with a high core content (68.7%) and small size (165 nm). The nanocapsules were stable up to 150 °C and these properties have made them applicable for future use in self-healing coatings and composites. The modified epoxy nanocapsules were mixed with amine-filled nanocapsules and were incorporated in an epoxy coating. This coating was scratched and kept in a corrosive environment and even after 30 days it still showed a high corrosion resistance, proving that the nanocapsules were able to successfully heal the scratches in the coating. After 30 days of immersion in 3.5 wt% NaCl environment, the corrosion resistance of the coating with healing particles was 38 times higher than the pure coating.

  16. Laser Photolysis of Dye-Sensitized Nanocapsules Occurs via a Photothermal Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Dendramis, Kimberly A.; Chiu, Daniel T.

    2009-01-01

    Light-addressable nanocapsules offer a powerful method for delivering spatiotemporally precise signals to cells. Thus far, the mechanism involved in the photolysis of nanocapsules has been opaque. This paper presents experimental evidence that rules out a photochemical pathway in favor of a photothermal mechanism in the far-red photolysis of dye-sensitized, lipid-vesicle based nanocapsules. Photolysis efficiency was unaffected by the presence of radical inhibitors, and mass spectrometry measurements confirmed that the photolytic process did not produce dye radicals. Measurements of dye quantum yield in the lipid membrane showed an inverse correlation between quantum yield of the dye and photolysis efficiency of the vesicle. The result is consistent with the notion that a decrease in quantum yield translates into more vibrational relaxation and thermal motion of the dye molecules in the membrane and thus more efficient photothermal disruption of the vesicle. Furthermore, we observed that the decrease in quantum yield and increase in photolysis efficiency was caused by the formation of raft-like domains that clustered the dye molecules into concentrated regions. Based on this information, we were able to design new nanocapsules using ternary mixtures of lipid and cholesterol that promoted the formation of raft domains and dye clustering. These nanocapsules showed improved photolysis efficiency over the best results we obtained previously. PMID:19874014

  17. Ecotoxicological evaluation of poly(epsilon-caprolactone) nanocapsules containing triazine herbicides.

    PubMed

    Clemente, Z; Grillo, R; Jonsson, M; Santos, N Z P; Feitosa, L O; Lima, R; Fraceto, L F

    2014-07-01

    The triazine class of herbicides includes the compounds ametryn, atrazine, and simazine, which are used to control weeds in plantations of crops such as maize, sorghum, and sugar cane. Despite their acceptance in agriculture, these herbicides can be dangerous to the environment, depending on their toxicity, the degree of contamination, and the duration of exposure. Controlled release systems are increasingly used to mitigate problems of toxicity and minimize environmental impacts, and can also increase herbicide efficiency. The objective of this work was to prepare poly(epsilon-caprolactone) nanocapsules containing ametryn and atrazine, and evaluate their toxicity to aquatic organisms as well as in cytogenetic tests employing human lymphocyte cultures. The PCL nanocapsules were prepared according to the interfacial deposition of pre-formed polymer method. Ecotoxicological assays were performed with the alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and the microcrustacean Daphnia similis. The cytogenetic tests consisted of observing mitotic index alterations after exposing lymphocyte cell cultures to different formulations. Encapsulation of the herbicides in the nanocapsules resulted in lower toxicity to the alga and higher toxicity to the microcrustacean, compared to the herbicides alone. The cytogenetic tests showed that formulations of nanocapsules containing the herbicides were less toxic than the herbicides alone. The findings indicate the potential of the nanocapsule formulations in agricultural applications, where they could help to reduce the quantities of herbicides used as well as impacts on the environment and human health. PMID:24757962

  18. Development and evaluation of alginate-chitosan nanocapsules for controlled release of acetamiprid.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep; Chauhan, Neetu; Gopal, Madhuban; Kumar, Rajesh; Dilbaghi, Neeraj

    2015-11-01

    Smart formulations based on nanomaterials have the capability to reduce the consumption of hazardous pesticides and their impact on human health and environment. Nanoformulations of agrochemicals have the potential to improve food productivity without compromising with the ecosystem. In the present work, controlled release nanocapsules containing acetamiprid were prepared by polyelectrolyte complexation of two natural macromolecules, i.e. alginate and chitosan. The size, morphology and chemical interaction studies of the prepared nanocapsules were investigated by Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). The zetapotential studies revealed stability of the nanocapsules. TEM results show spherical morphology of the nanocapsules. The encapsulation efficiency was found to be 62% as quantified by Ultra High Pressure Liquid Chromatography (UHPLC). Nanocapsules were analysed for controlled release in vitro at three different pH. Maximum release was observed at pH 10 followed by pH 7 and 4, respectively. A non-Fickian release mechanism was found to be followed by the nanoformulation. A controlled release pattern was also found from nanoformulation as compared to commercial formulation in soil. Thus this formulation can reduce the frequency of application of pesticides by controlling the release and will subsequently reduce their side effects. PMID:26321424

  19. 21 CFR 158.170 - Frozen peas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Frozen peas. 158.170 Section 158.170 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION FROZEN VEGETABLES Requirements for Specific Standardized Frozen Vegetables § 158.170 Frozen...

  20. 21 CFR 158.170 - Frozen peas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Frozen peas. 158.170 Section 158.170 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION FROZEN VEGETABLES Requirements for Specific Standardized Frozen Vegetables § 158.170 Frozen peas. (a) Identity—(1) Product...

  1. 21 CFR 158.170 - Frozen peas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Frozen peas. 158.170 Section 158.170 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION FROZEN VEGETABLES Requirements for Specific Standardized Frozen Vegetables § 158.170 Frozen...

  2. 21 CFR 158.170 - Frozen peas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Frozen peas. 158.170 Section 158.170 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION FROZEN VEGETABLES Requirements for Specific Standardized Frozen Vegetables § 158.170 Frozen...

  3. 21 CFR 158.170 - Frozen peas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Frozen peas. 158.170 Section 158.170 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION FROZEN VEGETABLES Requirements for Specific Standardized Frozen Vegetables § 158.170 Frozen...

  4. Surface-modified and conventional nanocapsules as novel formulations for parenteral delivery of halofantrine.

    PubMed

    Mosqueira, Vanessa Carla Furtado; Legrand, Philippe; Barratt, Gillian

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a stable injectable formulation of the antimalarial drug halofantrine (Hf) based on nanocapsules (NC) prepared from biodegradable polymers with Miglyol 810N as the oily core. Poly(D,L-lactide) PLA and its copolymers with poly(ethyleneglycol) (PLA-PEG) were used together with the surfactants poloxamer 188 and lecithin to yield NC with different surface properties. Highly efficient loading of the free base form of Hf was obtained; zeta potential measurements indicated that a part of the associated Hf was at the NC surface, interacting with the lecithin. NC were 150-250 nm in diameter and more stable on storage than nanoemulsions formed from oil and lecithin without polymer. The most stable NC, showing minimal size changes and flocculation, were those with a high density of 20-kDa PEG chains covalently grafted at the surface. Hf release from NC occurred mainly by partition with the external medium. In PBS, even when Tween 80 was added, release was limited to 20% of the total content, whatever the formulation. Addition of serum to the medium allowed complete and rapid release from PLA NC stabilized with adsorbed poloxamer 188, because of the high affinity of Hf for lipoproteins. However, the presence of covalently grafted PEG chains at the surface limited release by providing a hydrophilic steric barrier at the particle surface. A dense coverage with long PEG chains provided the best reduction of release. Such systems could constitute a long-circulating intravenous formulation of Hf for treating severe malaria. PMID:17048536

  5. Multifunctional Nanocapsules for Simultaneous Encapsulation of Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Compounds and On-Demand Release

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shang-Hsiu; Chen, San-Yuan; Gao, Xiaohu

    2012-01-01

    Cocktail therapy by delivering multiple drugs to diseased cells can elicit synergistic therapeutic effects and better modulate the complex cell signaling network. Besides selection of drug combinations, a difficulty in delivery is how to encapsulate drugs with various solubility into a common vehicle, particularly when both hydrophobic and hydrophilic compounds are involved. Furthermore, it is highly desirable that the drug release profile can be controlled in an on-demand fashion for balanced therapeutic and side effects. Based on a simple and scalable double-emulsion approach, we report a new class of nanocapsules that can solve these problems simultaneously. Further linking the nanocapsules with peptides targeting cell surface integrins leads to significantly enhanced cell uptake of the nanocapsules. Intracellular drug release triggered by external stimuli has also been achieved without affecting cell viability. Further development of this technology should open exciting opportunities in treating tough diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular diseases, neurological disorders, and infectious diseases. PMID:22339040

  6. Formulation of chitosan-TPP-pDNA nanocapsules for gene therapy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspar, V. M.; Sousa, F.; Queiroz, J. A.; Correia, I. J.

    2011-01-01

    The encapsulation of DNA inside nanoparticles meant for gene delivery applications is a challenging process where several parameters need to be modulated in order to design nanocapsules with specific tailored characteristics. The purpose of this study was to investigate and improve the formulation parameters of plasmid DNA (pDNA) loaded in chitosan nanocapsules using tripolyphosphate (TPP) as polyanionic crosslinker. Nanocapsule morphology and encapsulation efficiency were analyzed as a function of chitosan degree of deacetylation and chitosan-TPP ratio. The manipulation of these parameters influenced not only the particle size but also the encapsulation and release of pDNA. Consequently the transfection efficiency of the nanoparticulated systems was also enhanced with the optimization of the particle characteristics. Overall, the differently formulated nanoparticulated systems possess singular properties that can be employed according to the desired gene delivery application.

  7. Preparation of highly dispersed core/shell-type titania nanocapsules containing a single Ag nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Hideki; Kanda, Takashi; Shibata, Hirobumi; Ohkubo, Takahiro; Abe, Masahiko

    2006-04-19

    Core/shell-type titania nanocapsules containing a single Ag nanoparticle were prepared. Ag nanoparticles were prepared using the reduction of silver nitrate with hydrazine in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as protective agent. The sol-gel reaction of titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) was used to prepare core/shell-type titania nanocapsules with CTAB-coated Ag nanoparticles as the core. TEM observations revealed that the size of the core (Ag particle) and the thickness of the shell (titania) of the core/shell particles obtained are about 10 nm and 5-10 nm, respectively. In addition, the nanocapsules were found to be dispersed in the medium as individual particles without aggregation. Moreover, titania coating caused the surface plasmon absorption of Ag nanoparticles to shift toward the longer wavelength side. PMID:16608315

  8. Nanocapsules based on carbon nanotubes-graft-polyglycerol hybrid materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adeli, Mohsen; Mirab, Narjes; Zabihi, Fatemeh

    2009-12-01

    In this work the effect of a conjugated macromolecule on the conformation of CNT was studied. Typically polyglycerol (PG) was covalently grafted onto the surface of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and MWCNT-graft-PG (MWCNT- g-PG) hybrid materials were obtained. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) experiments showed an average diameter around 100 nm for MWCNT- g-PG hybrid materials in water. The difference between this size and the expected size for MWCNT- g-PG hybrid materials (the length of pristine MWCNTs was several micrometers) was assigned to the effect of the grafted PG on the conformation of MWCNT in the solution state. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) evaluations showed a change in the shape and conformation of MWCNT- g-PG hybrid materials during the time so that they were in a core-shell shape in a fresh sample but over time they changed to dendritic- and finally nanocapsule-like structures. According to ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) experiments it was found that MWCNT- g-PG hybrid materials were able to encapsulate small guest molecules such as ferrocene, confirming nanocapsule-like structures for hybrid materials in the solution state. Based on these observations it was suggested that non-covalent interactions between highly hydrophilic PG and highly hydrophobic MWCNT led to changes in the conformation of MWCNT from a linear to nonlinear state. In order to investigate the role of hydroxyl end functional groups of PG as being responsible for non-covalent interactions such as hydrogen bonding, they were reacted with opened MWCNTs (MWCNT-COOH) to achieve MWCNT- g-PG- g-(MWCNT)n structures. TEM images showed an extended conformation for MWCNT- g-PG- g-(MWCNT)n hybrid materials which confirmed the key role of hydroxyl end functional groups of PG on the conformation of MWCNTs. To evaluate the ability of MWCNT- g-PG- g-(MWCNT)n hybrid materials to encapsulate and support guest molecules, palladium nanoparticles were loaded and transported by these hybrid

  9. Evaluation of the side effects of poly(epsilon-caprolactone) nanocapsules containing atrazine towards maize plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Halley; Stolf-Moreira, Renata; Martinez, Cláudia; Sousa, Gustavo; Grillo, Renato; de Jesus, Marcelo; Fraceto, Leonardo

    2015-10-01

    Poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) nanocapsules have been used as a carrier system for the herbicide atrazine, which is commonly applied to maize. We demonstrated previously that these atrazine containing polymeric nanocapsules were ten-fold more effective in the control of mustard plants (a target species), as compared to a commercial atrazine formulation. Since atrazine can have adverse effects on non-target crops, here we analyzed the effect of encapsulated atrazine on growth, physiological and oxidative stress parameters of soil-grown maize plants (Zea mays L.). One day after the post-emergence treatment with PCL nanocapsules containing atrazine (1 mg mL-1), maize plants presented 15 and 21 % decreases in maximum quantum yield of photosystem II and in net CO2 assimilation rate, respectively, as compared to water-sprayed plants. The same treatment led to a 1.8-fold increase in leaf lipid peroxidation in comparison with control plants. However, all of these parameters were unaffected four and eight days after the application of encapsulated atrazine. These results suggested that the negative effects of atrazine were transient, probably due to the ability of maize plants to detoxify the herbicide. When encapsulated atrazine was applied at a ten-fold lower concentration (0.1 mg mL-1), a dosage that is still effective for weed control, no effects were detected even shortly after application. Regardless of the herbicide concentration, neither pre- nor post-emergence treatment with the PCL nanocapsules carrying atrazine resulted in the development of any macroscopic symptoms in maize leaves, and there were no impacts on shoot growth. Additionally, no effects were observed when plants were sprayed with PCL nanocapsules without atrazine. Overall, these results suggested that the use of PCL nanocapsules containing atrazine did not lead to persistent side effects in maize plants, and that the technique could offer a safe tool for weed control without affecting crop growth.

  10. Evaluation of the side effects of poly(epsilon-caprolactone) nanocapsules containing atrazine toward maize plants.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Halley C; Stolf-Moreira, Renata; Martinez, Cláudia B R; Sousa, Gustavo F M; Grillo, Renato; de Jesus, Marcelo B; Fraceto, Leonardo F

    2015-01-01

    Poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) nanocapsules have been used as a carrier system for the herbicide atrazine, which is commonly applied to maize. We demonstrated previously that these atrazine containing polymeric nanocapsules were 10-fold more effective in the control of mustard plants (a target species), as compared to a commercial atrazine formulation. Since atrazine can have adverse effects on non-target crops, here we analyzed the effect of encapsulated atrazine on growth, physiological and oxidative stress parameters of soil-grown maize plants (Zea mays L.). One day after the post-emergence treatment with PCL nanocapsules containing atrazine (1 mg mL(-1)), maize plants presented 15 and 21% decreases in maximum quantum yield of photosystem II (PSII) and in net CO2 assimilation rate, respectively, as compared to water-sprayed plants. The same treatment led to a 1.8-fold increase in leaf lipid peroxidation in comparison with control plants. However, all of these parameters were unaffected 4 and 8 days after the application of encapsulated atrazine. These results suggested that the negative effects of atrazine were transient, probably due to the ability of maize plants to detoxify the herbicide. When encapsulated atrazine was applied at a 10-fold lower concentration (0.1 mg mL(-1)), a dosage that is still effective for weed control, no effects were detected even shortly after application. Regardless of the herbicide concentration, neither pre- nor post-emergence treatment with the PCL nanocapsules carrying atrazine resulted in the development of any macroscopic symptoms in maize leaves, and there were no impacts on shoot growth. Additionally, no effects were observed when plants were sprayed with PCL nanocapsules without atrazine. Overall, these results suggested that the use of PCL nanocapsules containing atrazine did not lead to persistent side effects in maize plants, and that the technique could offer a safe tool for weed control without affecting crop growth

  11. Evaluation of the side effects of poly(epsilon-caprolactone) nanocapsules containing atrazine toward maize plants

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Halley C.; Stolf-Moreira, Renata; Martinez, Cláudia B. R.; Sousa, Gustavo F. M.; Grillo, Renato; de Jesus, Marcelo B.; Fraceto, Leonardo F.

    2015-01-01

    Poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) nanocapsules have been used as a carrier system for the herbicide atrazine, which is commonly applied to maize. We demonstrated previously that these atrazine containing polymeric nanocapsules were 10-fold more effective in the control of mustard plants (a target species), as compared to a commercial atrazine formulation. Since atrazine can have adverse effects on non-target crops, here we analyzed the effect of encapsulated atrazine on growth, physiological and oxidative stress parameters of soil-grown maize plants (Zea mays L.). One day after the post-emergence treatment with PCL nanocapsules containing atrazine (1 mg mL−1), maize plants presented 15 and 21% decreases in maximum quantum yield of photosystem II (PSII) and in net CO2 assimilation rate, respectively, as compared to water-sprayed plants. The same treatment led to a 1.8-fold increase in leaf lipid peroxidation in comparison with control plants. However, all of these parameters were unaffected 4 and 8 days after the application of encapsulated atrazine. These results suggested that the negative effects of atrazine were transient, probably due to the ability of maize plants to detoxify the herbicide. When encapsulated atrazine was applied at a 10-fold lower concentration (0.1 mg mL−1), a dosage that is still effective for weed control, no effects were detected even shortly after application. Regardless of the herbicide concentration, neither pre- nor post-emergence treatment with the PCL nanocapsules carrying atrazine resulted in the development of any macroscopic symptoms in maize leaves, and there were no impacts on shoot growth. Additionally, no effects were observed when plants were sprayed with PCL nanocapsules without atrazine. Overall, these results suggested that the use of PCL nanocapsules containing atrazine did not lead to persistent side effects in maize plants, and that the technique could offer a safe tool for weed control without affecting crop growth

  12. Polyelectrolyte-coated nanocapsules containing undecylenic acid: Synthesis, biocompatibility and neuroprotective properties.

    PubMed

    Piotrowski, Marek; Jantas, Danuta; Szczepanowicz, Krzysztof; Łukasiewicz, Sylwia; Lasoń, Władysław; Warszyński, Piotr

    2015-11-01

    The main objectives of the present study were to investigate the biocompatibility of polyelectrolyte-coated nanocapsules and to evaluate the neuroprotective action of the nanoencapsulated water-insoluble neuroprotective drug-undecylenic acid (UDA), in vitro. Core-shell nanocapsules were synthesized using nanoemulsification and the layer-by-layer (LbL) technique (by saturation method). The average size of synthesized nanocapsules was around 80 nm and the concentration was 2.5 × 10(10) particles/ml. Their zeta potential values ranged from less than -30 mV for the ones with external polyanion layers through -4 mV for the PEG-ylated layers to more than 30 mV for the polycation layers. Biocompatibility of synthesized nanocarriers was evaluated in the SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cell line using cell viability/toxicity assays (MTT reduction, LDH release). The results obtained showed that synthesized nanocapsules coated with PLL and PGA (also PEG-ylated) were non-toxic to SH-SY5Y cells, therefore, they were used as nanocarriers for UDA. Moreover, studies with ROD/FITC-labeled polyelectrolytes demonstrated approximately 20% cellular uptake of synthetized nanocapsules. Further studies showed that nanoencapsulated form of UDA was biocompatible and protected SH-SY5Y cells against the staurosporine-induced damage in lower concentrations than those of the same drug added directly to the culture medium. These data suggest that designed nanocapsules might serve as novel, promising delivery systems for neuroprotective agents. PMID:26231861

  13. Dry Zones Around Frozen Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisbano, Caitlin; Nath, Saurabh; Boreyko, Jonathan; Nature-Inspired Fluids; Interfaces Team

    2015-11-01

    The saturation pressure of water vapor above supercooled water exceeds that above ice at the same temperature. A frozen droplet will therefore grow by harvesting water vapor from neighboring supercooled condensate, which has recently been demonstrated to be a primary mechanism of in-plane frost growth on hydrophobic surfaces. The underlying physics of this source-sink interaction is still poorly understood. In this work, a deposited water droplet is frozen on a dry hydrophobic surface initially held above the dew point. We demonstrate that when the surface is then cooled beneath the dew point, the frozen droplet harvests nearby water vapor in the air. This results in an annular dry zone that forms between the frozen droplet and the forming supercooled condensation. For a given ambient temperature and humidity, the length of the dry zone varied strongly with surface temperature and weakly with droplet volume. The dependence of the dry zone on surface temperature is due to the fact that the vapor pressure gradients between the ambient and the surface and between the liquid and frozen water are both functions of temperature.

  14. Data supporting the physico-chemical characterization, cellular uptake and cytotoxicity of lipid nanocapsules

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Moreno, P.; Ortega-Vinuesa, J.L.; Boulaiz, H.; Marchal, J.A.; Peula-García, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this data article is to provide data for a basic knowledge of the properties of lipid nanocapsules, a new colloidal system with very promising applications in drug delivery. Firstly, we pay attention on how it is possible to determine their surface composition by means of electrokinetics measurements. On the other hand, we provide experimental evidences for a better understanding of the factors that determine the interactions of these nanoparticles with cells as a necessary step to guide the design of the most effective formulations. Additionally, we supply information about encapsulation efficiency of docetaxel, a potent chemotherapy drug, inside nanocapsules supporting the experimental cytotoxicity results of these nanosystems. PMID:26217803

  15. Third order optical nonlinearities characteristics of Disperse Red1 organic dye molecules inside of polymeric nanocapsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifimehr, Mohammad Reza; Ayoubi, Kazem; Mohajerani, Ezeddin

    2015-11-01

    Measuring nonlinear optical response of a specific material in a mixture, not only leads to investigate the behavior of a particular component in various circumstances, but also can be a way to select suitable combination and optimum concentration of additives and therefore obtaining the maximum nonlinear optical signals. In this work, by using dual-arm Z-scan technique, the nonlinear refractive index of Disperse Red1 (DR1) organic dye molecules inside the core of prepared polymeric nanocapsules was measured among various materials which prepared nanocapsules were made of them. Then the measured value was compared with nonlinear refractive index of DR1 solved in dichloromethane.

  16. Effects of Two Types of Melatonin-Loaded Nanocapsules with Distinct Supramolecular Structures: Polymeric (NC) and Lipid-Core Nanocapsules (LNC) on Bovine Embryo Culture Model

    PubMed Central

    Komninou, Eliza Rossi; Remião, Mariana Härter; Lucas, Caroline Gomes; Domingues, William Borges; Basso, Andrea Cristina; Jornada, Denise Soledade; Deschamps, João Carlos; Beck, Ruy Carlos Ruver; Pohlmann, Adriana Raffin; Bordignon, Vilceu; Seixas, Fabiana Kömmling; Campos, Vinicius Farias; Guterres, Silvia Stanisçuaski; Collares, Tiago

    2016-01-01

    Melatonin has been used as a supplement in culture medium to improve the efficiency of in vitro produced mammalian embryos. Through its ability to scavenge toxic oxygen derivatives and regulate cellular mRNA levels for antioxidant enzymes, this molecule has been shown to play a protective role against damage by free radicals, to which in vitro cultured embryos are exposed during early development. In vivo and in vitro studies have been performed showing that the use of nanocapsules as active substances carriers increases stability, bioavailability and biodistribution of drugs, such as melatonin, to the cells and tissues, improving their antioxidant properties. These properties can be modulated through the manipulation of formula composition, especially in relation to the supramolecular structures of the nanocapsule core and the surface area that greatly influences drug release mechanisms in biological environments. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of two types of melatonin-loaded nanocapsules with distinct supramolecular structures, polymeric (NC) and lipid-core (LNC) nanocapsules, on in vitro cultured bovine embryos. Embryonic development, apoptosis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and mRNA levels of genes involved in cell apoptosis, ROS and cell pluripotency were evaluated after supplementation of culture medium with non-encapsulated melatonin (Mel), melatonin-loaded polymeric nanocapsules (Mel-NC) and melatonin-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules (Mel-LNC) at 10−6, 10−9, and 10−12 M drug concentrations. The highest hatching rate was observed in embryos treated with 10−9 M Mel-LNC. When compared to Mel and Mel-NC treatments at the same concentration (10−9 M), Mel-LNC increased embryo cell number, decreased cell apoptosis and ROS levels, down-regulated mRNA levels of BAX, CASP3, and SHC1 genes, and up-regulated mRNA levels of CAT and SOD2 genes. These findings indicate that nanoencapsulation with LNC increases the protective effects of

  17. Hydrogels containing redispersible spray-dried melatonin-loaded nanocapsules: a formulation for transdermal-controlled delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmeister, Cristiane RD; Durli, Taís L.; Schaffazick, Scheila R.; Raffin, Renata P.; Bender, Eduardo A.; Beck, Ruy CR; Pohlmann, Adriana R.; Guterres, Sílvia S.

    2012-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop a transdermal system for controlled delivery of melatonin combining three strategies: nanoencapsulation of melatonin, drying of melatonin-loaded nanocapsules, and incorporation of nanocapsules in a hydrophilic gel. Nanocapsules were prepared by interfacial deposition of the polymer and were spray-dried using water-soluble excipients. In vitro drug release profiles were evaluated by the dialysis bag method, and skin permeation studies were carried out using Franz cells with porcine skin as the membrane. The use of 10% ( w/ v) water-soluble excipients (lactose or maltodextrin) as spray-drying adjuvants furnished redispersible powders (redispersibility index approximately 1.0) suitable for incorporation into hydrogels. All formulations showed a better controlled in vitro release of melatonin compared with the melatonin solution. The best controlled release results were achieved with hydrogels prepared with dried nanocapsules (hydrogels > redispersed dried nanocapsules > nanocapsule suspension > melatonin solution). The skin permeation studies demonstrated a significant modulation of the transdermal melatonin permeation for hydrogels prepared with redispersible nanocapsules. In this way, the additive effect of the different approaches used in this study (nanoencapsulation, spray-drying, and preparation of semisolid dosage forms) allows not only the control of melatonin release, but also transdermal permeation.

  18. Poly(ε-caprolactone)nanocapsules as carrier systems for herbicides: physico-chemical characterization and genotoxicity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Grillo, Renato; dos Santos, Nathália Zocal Pereira; Maruyama, Cíntia Rodrigues; Rosa, André Henrique; de Lima, Renata; Fraceto, Leonardo Fernandes

    2012-09-15

    The toxicity of herbicides used in agriculture is influenced by their chemical stability, solubility, bioavailability, photodecomposition, and soil sorption. Possible solutions designed to minimize toxicity include the development of carrier systems able to modify the properties of the compounds and allow their controlled release. Polymeric poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) nanocapsules containing three triazine herbicides (ametryn, atrazine, and simazine) were prepared and characterized in order to assess their suitability as controlled release systems that could reduce environmental impacts. The association efficiencies of the herbicides in the nanocapsules were better than 84%. Assessment of stability (considering particle diameter, zeta potential, polydispersity, and pH) was conducted over a period of 270 days, and the particles were found to be stable in solution. In vitro release kinetics experiments revealed controlled release of the herbicides from the nanocapsules, governed mainly by relaxation of the polymer chains. Microscopy analyses showed that the nanocapsules were spherical, dense, and without aggregates. In the infrared spectra of the PCL nanocapsules containing herbicides, there were no bands related to the herbicides, indicating that interactions between the compounds had occurred. Genotoxicity tests showed that formulations of nanocapsules containing the herbicides were less toxic than the free herbicides. The results indicate that the use of PCL nanocapsules is a promising technique that could improve the behavior of herbicides in environmental systems. PMID:22795586

  19. Core/shell-structured nickel/nitrogen-doped onion-like carbon nanocapsules with improved electromagnetic wave absorption properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Niandu; Liu, Xianguo; Or, Siu Wing

    2016-05-01

    Core/shell-structured nickel/nitrogen-doped onion-like carbon (Ni/(C, N)) nanocapsules are synthesized by a modified arc-discharge method using N2 gas as the source of N atoms. Core/shell-structured Ni/C nanocapsules are also prepared for comparison. The Ni/(C, N) nanocapsules with diameters of 10-80 nm exhibit a clear core/shell structure. The doping of N atoms introduces more lattice defects into the (C, N) shells and creates more disorderly C in the (C, N) shells. This leads to a slight shift in the dielectric resonance peak to the lower frequency side and an increase in the dielectric loss tangent for the Ni/(C, N) nanocapsules in comparison with the Ni/C nanocapsules. The magnetic permeability of both types of nanocapsules remains almost unaltered since the N atoms exist only in the (C, N) shells. The reflection loss (RL) of the Ni/(C, N) nanocapsules not only reaches a high value of -35 dB at 13.6 GHz, but also is generally improved in the low-frequency S and C microwave bands covering 2-8 GHz as a result of the N-doping-induced additional dipolar polarization and dielectric loss from the (C, N) shells.

  20. Encapsulation of clozapine in polymeric nanocapsules and its biological effects.

    PubMed

    Łukasiewicz, Sylwia; Szczepanowicz, Krzysztof; Podgórna, Karolina; Błasiak, Ewa; Majeed, Nather; Ogren, Sven Ove Ögren; Nowak, Witold; Warszyński, Piotr; Dziedzicka-Wasylewska, Marta

    2016-04-01

    Clozapine is an effective atypical antipsychotic drug that unfortunately exhibits poor oral bioavailability. Moreover, the clinical use of the compound is limited because of its numerous unfavorable and unsafe side effects. Therefore, the aim of the present study was the development of a new nanocarrier for a more effective clozapine delivery. Here, clozapine was encapsulated into polymeric nanocapsules (NCs). Polyelectrolyte multilayer shells were constructed by the technique of sequential adsorption of polyelectrolytes (LbL) using biocompatible polyanion PGA (Poly-L-glutamic acid, sodium salt) and polycation PLL (poly-L-lysine) on clozapine-loaded nanoemulsion cores. Pegylated external layers were prepared using PGA-g-PEG (PGA grafted by PEG (polyethylene glycol)). Clozapine was successfully loaded into the PLL-PGA nanocarriers (CLO-NCs) with an average size of 100 nm. In vitro analysis of the interactions of the CLO-NCs with the cells of the mononuclear phagocytic system (MPS) was conducted. Cell biocompatibility, phagocytosis potential, and cellular uptake were studied. Additionally, the biodistribution and behavioral effects of the encapsulated clozapine were also studied. The results indicate that surface modified (by PEG grafting) polymeric PLL-PGA CLO-NCs are very promising nanovehicles for improving clozapine delivery. PMID:26774571

  1. Permeability profile of poly(alkyl cyanoacrylate) nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Erdmann, Christian; Mayer, Christian

    2016-09-15

    The permeability profile of poly(alkyl cyanoacrylate) nanocapsules is studied using pulsed-field gradient NMR on a variety of tracer molecules of different size and polarity. In addition, the influence of the surfactant layer and of organic tracer molecules on the capsule membrane permeability for water is examined. The aim of the study is a detailed understanding of the dependencies between molecular properties of a given tracer and its capability to permeate the polymer membrane. As expected, the results clearly show that the capsule membrane permeability depends on the size of the tracer molecule: the exchange rate of polyethylene glycols continuously decreases with increasing chain length. However, the permeation rate also varies with the polarity of the tracer molecule: molecules of lower polarity exchange faster than more polar ones. In turn, the capsule membrane permeability is influenced by added organic compounds. Focusing on water as a characteristic permeate and depending on the type of the additive, the permeability can be varied by almost an order of magnitude, offering an opportunity to reversibly switch the uptake and release properties of the capsules. PMID:27343463

  2. Eugenol nanocapsule for enhanced therapeutic activity against periodontal infections.

    PubMed

    Pramod, Kannissery; Aji Alex, M R; Singh, Manisha; Dang, Shweta; Ansari, Shahid H; Ali, Javed

    2016-01-01

    Eugenol is a godsend to dental care due to its analgesic, local anesthetic, and anti-inflammatory and antibacterial effects. The aim of the present research work was to prepare, characterize and evaluate eugenol-loaded nanocapsules (NCs) against periodontal infections. Eugenol-loaded polycaprolactone (PCL) NCs were prepared by solvent displacement method. The nanometric size of the prepared NCs was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The in vitro drug release was found to follow a biphasic pattern and followed Michaelis-Menten like model. The percentage cell viability values near to 100 in the cell viability assay indicated that the NCs are not cytotoxic. In the in vivo studies, the eugenol NC group displayed significant difference in the continuity of epithelium of the interdental papilla in comparison to the untreated, pure eugenol and placebo groups. The in vivo performance of the eugenol-loaded NCs using ligature-induced periodontitis model in rats indicated that eugenol-loaded NCs could prevent septal bone resorption in periodontitis. On the basis of our research findings it could be concluded that eugenol-loaded PCL NCs could serve as a novel colloidal drug delivery system for enhanced therapeutic activity of eugenol in the treatment of periodontal infections. PMID:26079717

  3. Microheterogeneity in Frozen Protein Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Twomey, Alan; Kurata, Kosaku; Nagare, Yutaka; Takamatsu, Hiroshi; Aksan, Alptekin

    2015-01-01

    In frozen and lyophilized systems, the biological to be stabilized (e.g. therapeutic protein, biomarker, drug-delivery vesicle) and the cryo-/lyoprotectant should be co-localized for successful stabilization. During freezing and drying, many factors cause physical separation of the biological from the cryo-/lyoprotectant, called microheterogeneity (MH), which may result in poor stabilization efficiency. We have developed a novel technique that utilized confocal Raman microspectroscopy in combination with counter-gradient freezing to evaluate the effect of a wide range of freezing temperatures (−20 < TF < 0°C) on the MH generated within a frozen formulation in only a few experiments. The freezing experiments conducted with a model system (albumin and trehalose) showed the presence of different degrees of MH in the freeze-concentrated liquid (FCL) in all solutions tested. Mainly, albumin tended to accumulate near the ice interface, where it was physically separated from the cryoprotectant. In frozen 10 wt% trehalose solutions, heterogeneity in FCL was relatively low at any TF. In frozen 20 wt% trehalose solutions, the optimum albumin to trehalose ratio in the FCL can only be ensured if the solution was frozen within a narrow range of temperatures (−16 < TF < −10°C). In the 30 wt% trehalose solutions, freezing within a much more narrow range (−12 < TF < −10°C) was needed to ensure a fairly homogeneous FCL. The method developed here will be helpful for the development of uniformly frozen and stable formulations and freezing protocols for biological as MH is presumed to directly impact stability. PMID:25888798

  4. Microheterogeneity in frozen protein solutions.

    PubMed

    Twomey, Alan; Kurata, Kosaku; Nagare, Yutaka; Takamatsu, Hiroshi; Aksan, Alptekin

    2015-06-20

    In frozen and lyophilized systems, the biological to be stabilized (e.g. therapeutic protein, biomarker, drug-delivery vesicle) and the cryo-/lyo-protectant should be co-localized for successful stabilization. During freezing and drying, many factors cause physical separation of the biological from the cryo-/lyo-protectant, called microheterogeneity (MH), which may result in poor stabilization efficiency. We have developed a novel technique that utilized confocal Raman microspectroscopy in combination with counter-gradient freezing to evaluate the effect of a wide range of freezing temperatures (-20frozen formulation in only a few experiments. The freezing experiments conducted with a model system (albumin and trehalose) showed the presence of different degrees of MH in the freeze-concentrated liquid (FCL) in all solutions tested. Mainly, albumin tended to accumulate near the ice interface, where it was physically separated from the cryoprotectant. In frozen 10wt% trehalose solutions, heterogeneity in FCL was relatively low at any TF. In frozen 20wt% trehalose solutions, the optimum albumin to trehalose ratio in the FCL can only be ensured if the solution was frozen within a narrow range of temperatures (-16frozen and stable formulations and freezing protocols for biological as MH is presumed to directly impact stability. PMID:25888798

  5. Core/shell structured hollow mesoporous nanocapsules: a potential platform for simultaneous cell imaging and anticancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Chen, Hangrong; Zeng, Deping; Tian, Yunbo; Chen, Feng; Feng, Jingwei; Shi, Jianlin

    2010-10-26

    A potential platform for simultaneous anticancer drug delivery and MRI cell imaging has been demonstrated by uniform hollow inorganic core/shell structured multifunctional mesoporous nanocapsules, which are composed of functional inorganic (Fe(3)O(4), Au, etc.) nanocrystals as cores, a thin mesoporous silica shell, and a huge cavity in between. The synthetic strategy for the creation of huge cavities between functional core and mesoporous silica shell is based on a structural difference based selective etching method, by which solid silica middle layer of Fe(2)O(3)@SiO(2)@mSiO(2) (or Au@SiO(2)@mSiO(2)) composite nanostructures was selectively etched away while the mesoporous silica shell could be kept relatively intact. The excellent biocompatibility of obtained multifunctional nanocapsules (Fe(3)O(4)@mSiO(2)) was demonstrated by very low cytotoxicity against various cell lines, low hemolyticity against human blood red cells and no significant coagulation effect against blood plasma. The cancer cell uptake and intracellular location of the nanocapsules were observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy and bio-TEM. Importantly, the prepared multifunctional inorganic mesoporous nanocapsules show both high loading capacity (20%) and efficiency (up to 100%) for doxorubicin simultaneously because of the formation of the cavity, enhanced surface area/pore volume and the electrostatic interaction between DOX molecules and mesoporous silica surface. Besides, the capability of Fe(3)O(4)@mSiO(2) nanocapsules as contrast agents of MRI was demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo, indicating the simultaneous imaging and therapeutic multifunctionalities of the composite nanocapsules. Moreover, the concept of multifunctional inorganic nanocapsules was extended to design and prepare Gd-Si-DTPA grafted Au@mSiO(2) nanocapsules for nanomedical applications, further demonstrating the generality of this strategy for the preparation of various multifunctional mesoporous nanocapsules

  6. Frozen Scope and Grammatical Optimization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freedman, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The literature on quantifier scope has repeatedly observed that some otherwise expected permutations of scope taking elements are unavailable. Various methods have been proffered explaining these facts. This thesis aims to unify three disparate areas where the scope of operators seems to be frozen: the interaction of universal quantifiers with…

  7. Frozen shoulder: a sympathetic dystrophy?

    PubMed

    Müller, L P; Müller, L A; Happ, J; Kerschbaumer, F

    2000-01-01

    Diagnostic and clinical features of the frozen shoulder syndrome and the Sudeck syndrome are similar in many aspects. Radioisotope bone scan shows an increased uptake in affected areas in both diseases, while native radiographs show a progressive demineralisation. Measurement of bone mineral density (BMD) by quantitative digital radiography objectified these local decalcification processes in an early stage of the frozen shoulder syndrome; 10 of 12 patients with primary frozen shoulder had BMD decreases greater 21% in the humeral head of the affected shoulder compared to the non-affected side. In the immobilised control group with degenerative changes of the rotator cuff, calcifying tendinitis and shoulder instability (n = 12) and in the group of healthy probands (n = 20), the difference between the affected and non-affected side (left and right humerus of the healthy probands) was only more than 21% in one case each. There are several references in the literature that assume frozen shoulder to be an algoneurodystrophic process; our observations support this hypothesis, possibly leading to earlier diagnoses and extended therapeutic management. PMID:10653111

  8. Manageable cytotoxicity of nanocapsules immobilizing D-amino acid oxidase via exogenous administration of nontoxic prodrug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yang; Zhu, Yingchun; Fu, Jingke

    2014-02-01

    D-Amino acid oxidase (DAO), which could catalyze generation of hydrogen peroxide with strong oxidbility and cytotoxicity, has become of interest as a biocatalyst for therapeutic treatments. Herein we report that amino-functional hollow mesoporous silica with large pore size (10.27 nm) and positively charged surface effectively immobilize DAO with negative charge. The adsorption, activity and stability of DAO are demonstrated to depend mainly on the amino-functionalization of surface. Significant cancer cell killing effect is observed when the cells are treated by the nanocapsules entrapping DAO together with D-alanine, showing distinct dose-dependency on concentration of the nanocapsules entrapping DAO or D-alanine. Nevertheless, the toxicity is completely neutralized by the addition of catalase, and anti-tumor effect is not observed when either the nanocapsules entrapping DAO or D-alanine is applied alone. The results indicate that cytotoxicity of the nanocapsules entrapping DAO could be managed by exogenous administration of nontoxic prodrug to tumor tissue, due to the stereoselectivity of DAO and the scarcity of its substrates in mammalian organisms. Thus, the method might be exploited as a potential treatment for cancer therapy.

  9. PVM/MA-shelled selol nanocapsules promote cell cycle arrest in A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Selol is an oily mixture of selenitetriacylglycerides that was obtained as a semi-synthetic compound containing selenite. Selol is effective against cancerous cells and less toxic to normal cells compared with inorganic forms of selenite. However, Selol’s hydrophobicity hinders its administration in vivo. Therefore, the present study aimed to produce a formulation of Selol nanocapsules (SPN) and to test its effectiveness against pulmonary adenocarcinoma cells (A549). Results Nanocapsules were produced through an interfacial nanoprecipitation method. The polymer shell was composed of poly(methyl vinyl ether-co-maleic anhydride) (PVM/MA) copolymer. The obtained nanocapsules were monodisperse and stable. Both free Selol (S) and SPN reduced the viability of A549 cells, whereas S induced a greater reduction in non-tumor cell viability than SPN. The suppressor effect of SPN was primarily associated to the G2/M arrest of the cell cycle, as was corroborated by the down-regulations of the CCNB1 and CDC25C genes. Apoptosis and necrosis were induced by Selol in a discrete percentage of A549 cells. SPN also increased the production of reactive oxygen species, leading to oxidative cellular damage and to the overexpression of the GPX1, CYP1A1, BAX and BCL2 genes. Conclusions This study presents a stable formulation of PVM/MA-shelled Selol nanocapsules and provides the first demonstration that Selol promotes G2/M arrest in cancerous cells. PMID:25149827

  10. Carboplatin nanocapsules: a highly cytotoxic, phospholipid-based formulation of carboplatin.

    PubMed

    Hamelers, Irene H L; van Loenen, Esther; Staffhorst, Rutger W H M; de Kruijff, Ben; de Kroon, Anton I P M

    2006-08-01

    Platinum-based drugs are widely used in cancer chemotherapy. However, their clinical use is limited by systemic toxicity, rapid blood clearance, and the occurrence of resistance. Our research is aimed at increasing the therapeutic index of these drugs by encapsulation in a lipid formulation. Previously, we developed a method for efficient encapsulation of cisplatin in a lipid formulation, yielding cisplatin nanocapsules. Here, we show that carboplatin, a cisplatin-derived anticancer drug with different chemical properties, can be efficiently encapsulated in a lipid formulation by a similar method. The carboplatin nanocapsules exhibit a very high cytotoxicity in vitro: the IC(50) value of carboplatin nanocapsules is up to a 1,000-fold lower than that of conventional carboplatin when tested on a panel of carcinoma cell lines. Cellular platinum content analysis and confocal fluorescent imaging of the interaction of the carboplatin nanocapsules with IGROV-1 cells indicate that the improved cytotoxicity is due to increased platinum accumulation in the cells, resulting from uptake of the formulation by endocytosis. PMID:16928821

  11. Modulation of Gene Expression by Polymer Nanocapsule Delivery of DNA Cassettes Encoding Small RNAs.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ming; Wen, Jing; Liang, Min; Lu, Yunfeng; Kamata, Masakazu; Chen, Irvin S Y

    2015-01-01

    Small RNAs, including siRNAs, gRNAs and miRNAs, modulate gene expression and serve as potential therapies for human diseases. Delivery to target cells remains the fundamental limitation for use of these RNAs in humans. To address this challenge, we have developed a nanocapsule delivery technology that encapsulates small DNA molecules encoding RNAs into a small (30 nm) polymer nanocapsule. For proof of concept, we transduced DNA expression cassettes for three small RNAs. In one application, the DNA cassette encodes an shRNA transcriptional unit that downregulates CCR5 and protects from HIV-1 infection. The DNA cassette nanocapsules were further engineered for timed release of the DNA cargo for prolonged knockdown of CCR5. Secondly, the nanocapsules provide an efficient means for delivery of gRNAs in the CRISPR/Cas9 system to mutate integrated HIV-1. Finally, delivery of microRNA-125b to mobilized human CD34+ cells enhances survival and expansion of the CD34+ cells in culture. PMID:26035832

  12. The Eccentric Behavior of Nearly Frozen Orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweetser, Theodore H.; Vincent, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Frozen orbits are orbits which have only short-period changes in their mean eccentricity and argument of periapse, so that they basically keep a fixed orientation within their plane of motion. Nearly frozen orbits are those whose eccentricity and argument of periapse have values close to those of a frozen orbit. We call them "nearly" frozen because their eccentricity vector (a vector whose polar coordinates are eccentricity and argument of periapse) will stay within a bounded distance from the frozen orbit eccentricity vector, circulating around it over time. For highly inclined orbits around the Earth, this distance is effectively constant over time. Furthermore, frozen orbit eccentricity values are low enough that these orbits are essentially eccentric (i.e., off center) circles, so that nearly frozen orbits around Earth are bounded above and below by frozen orbits.

  13. Chitosan gel containing polymeric nanocapsules: a new formulation for vaginal drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Luiza A; Sandri, Giuseppina; D’Autilia, Francesca; Contri, Renata V; Bonferoni, Maria Cristina; Caramella, Carla; Frank, Alejandro G; Pohlmann, Adriana R; Guterres, Silvia S

    2014-01-01

    The vaginal route of administration is an alternative for several treatments for either local or systemic pharmacological effects. However, the permanence of a drug in this route represents a challenge for formulation development that can be overcome by using nanoencapsulation and chitosan gel. Thus, this work aimed to evaluate the performance of chitosan hydrogels containing cationic and anionic acrylic-based nanocapsules (Eudragit® RS 100 and Eudragit® S 100, respectively) with Nile red as a model of lipophilic substance in the vaginal route of administration, as measured by increases in the residence time and the penetration of these formulations. Several formulations were prepared with increasing chitosan concentrations, and were analyzed in terms of pH and rheological behavior so that the most suitable formulation could be selected. The enhancement of the adhesion (tensile stress test and washability profile) and penetration (confocal laser scanning microscopy and extraction followed by quantification) properties of the formulations, when applied to porcine vaginal mucosa, were evaluated. The nanocapsule suspensions produced presented adequate properties: size of approximately 200 nm (polydispersity index of ≤v0.2); zeta potential around +10 mV for the cationic formulation and -10 mV for the anionic formulation; and pH values of 6.1±0.1 (Eudragit RS 100), 5.3±0.2 (Eudragit S 100), 6.2±0.1 (Nile red loaded Eudragit RS 100), and 5.1±0.1 (Nile red loaded Eudragit S 100). The chitosan formulation presented suitable viscosity for vaginal application and acidic pH (approximately 4.5). The tensile stress test showed that both formulations containing polymeric nanocapsules presented higher mucoadhesion when compared with the formulation without nanocapsules. In the washability experiment, no significant differences were found between formulations. Confocal microscopy and fluorescence quantification after extraction from the mucosa showed higher penetration of

  14. In vivo toxicological evaluation of polymeric nanocapsules after intradermal administration.

    PubMed

    Bulcão, Rachel P; de Freitas, Fernando A; Dallegrave, Eliane; Venturini, Cristina G; Baierle, Marília; Durgante, Juliano; Sauer, Elisa; Cassini, Carina; Cerski, Carlos T; Zielinsky, Paulo; Salvador, Mirian; Pohlmann, Adriana R; Guterres, Sílvia S; Garcia, Solange C

    2014-02-01

    Polymeric nanocarriers have shown great promise as delivery systems. An alternative strategy has been to explore new delivery routes, such as intradermal (i.d.), that can be used for vaccines and patch-based drug delivery. Despite their many advantages, there are few toxicity studies, especially in vivo. We report a safety assessment of biodegradable poly(ɛ-caprolactone) lipid-core nanocapsules (LNC) with a mean size of 245±10nm following single and repeated intradermal injections to Wistar rats. Suspensions were prepared by interfacial deposition of polymer. The animals (n=6/group) received a single-dose of saline solution (1.2ml/kg) or LNC (7.2×10(12)LNC/kg), or repeated-doses of two controls, saline solution or Tween 80 (0.9ml/kg), or three different concentrations of LNC (1.8, 3.6, and 5.4×10(12)LNC/kg) for 28 consecutive days. Clinical and physiological signs and mortality were observed. Samples of urine, blood, and tissue were used to perform toxicological evaluation. There were no clinical signs of toxicity or mortality, but there was a slight decrease in the relative body weights in the Tween 80-treated group (p<0.01) after repeated administration. No histopathological alterations were observed in tissues or significant changes in blood and urinary biomarkers for tissue damage. Mild alterations in white blood cells count with increases in granulocytes in the Tween-80 group (p<0.05) were found. Genotoxicity was evaluated through the comet assay, and no statistical difference was observed among the groups. Therefore, we conclude that, under the conditions of these experiments, biodegradable LNC did not present appreciable toxicity after 28 consecutive days of intradermal administration and is promising for its future application in vaccines and patch-based devices for enhancing the delivery of drugs. PMID:23643792

  15. 7 CFR 58.327 - Frozen cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Frozen cream. 58.327 Section 58.327 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.327 Frozen cream. To produce frozen cream eligible for official certification, the quality...

  16. 7 CFR 58.327 - Frozen cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Frozen cream. 58.327 Section 58.327 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.327 Frozen cream. To produce frozen cream eligible for official certification, the quality...

  17. 7 CFR 58.327 - Frozen cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Frozen cream. 58.327 Section 58.327 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.327 Frozen cream. To produce frozen cream eligible for official certification, the quality...

  18. 7 CFR 58.327 - Frozen cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Frozen cream. 58.327 Section 58.327 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.327 Frozen cream. To produce frozen cream eligible for official certification, the quality...

  19. 7 CFR 58.327 - Frozen cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Frozen cream. 58.327 Section 58.327 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.327 Frozen cream. To produce frozen cream eligible for official certification, the quality...

  20. Enhanced cellular uptake and intracellular drug controlled release of VESylated gemcitabine prodrug nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yanfen; Du, Fang; Xu, Yanyun; Meng, Haijing; Huang, Jin; Zhang, Xiongwen; Lu, Wei; Liu, Shiyuan; Yu, Jiahui

    2015-04-01

    Gemcitabine, 2',2'-difluoro-2'-deoxycytidine (dFdC), is the first-line antitumor agent in the treatment of pancreatic tumors. However, it possesses certain drawbacks, such as poor biological half-life resulted from rapid metabolism and the induction of resistance, leading to its restricted therapeutic potential. With the purpose of overcoming the above drawbacks, we developed a novel VESylated gemcitabine (VES-dFdC) prodrug by coupling the N4-amino group of the pyrimidine ring of dFdC to the carboxylic group of vitamin E succinate (VES). The resulting amphiphilic compound could protect the N4-amino group of the pyrimidine ring of dFdC from being degraded by cytidine deaminase. What is more, the prodrug was able to form nanocapsules in aqueous media (similar to the structure of cytomembrane), confirmed by transmission electron microscope (TEM). Their average particle size is about 107 nm with zeta potential of -33.4 mV measured by dynamic light scattering (DLS). VES-dFdC nanocapsules showed accelerated accumulative drug release profile in simulated lysosome environment (sodium acetate buffer pH 5+cathepsin B, an enzyme in lysosome), due to the easily hydrolyzed property of amide bond by cathepsin B, while rather stable in PBS (pH 7.4) or sodium acetate buffer (pH 5.0) without cathepsin B, indicating their enhanced intracellular drug controlled release manner. Besides, VES-dFdC prodrug nanocapsules showed enhanced cellular uptake ability, and the amount of cellular uptake of the nanocapsules by the pancreatic cancer cell line BxPC-3 is seventy times higher than that of native gemcitabine in the first 1.5 h. Compared with free gemcitabine, VES-dFdC nanocapsules showed essentially increased growth inhibition activity against BxPC-3 cells, indicating its great potential as prodrug for pancreatic tumor therapy with improved antitumor activity. PMID:25746328

  1. Logical enzyme triggered (LET) layer-by-layer nanocapsules for drug delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Marie-Michelle

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of morbidity and mortality among women in the United States. Early detection and treatment methods have resulted in 100% 5-year survival rates for stage 0-I breast cancer. Unfortunately, the 5-year survival rate of metastatic breast cancer (stage IV) is reduced fivefold. The most challenging issues of metastatic breast cancer treatment are the ability to selectively target the adenoma and adenocarcinoma cells both in their location of origin and as they metastasize following initial treatment. Multilayer/Layer-by-Layer (LbL) nanocapsules have garnered vast interest as anticancer drug delivery systems due to their ability to be easily modified, their capacity to encapsulate a wide range of chemicals and proteins, and their improved pharmacokinetics. Multilayer nanocapsule formation requires the layering of opposing charged polyelectrolytic polymers over a removable core nanoparticle. Our goal is to have a programmable nanocapsules degrade only after receiving and validating specific breast cancer biomarkers. The overall objective is to fabricate a novel programmable LbL nanocapsule with a specific logical system that will enhance functions pertinent to drug delivery systems. Our central hypothesis is that LbL technology coupled with extracellular matrix (ECM) protein substrates will result in a logical enzyme triggered LbL nanocapsule drug delivery system. This platform represents a novel approach toward a logically regulated nano-encapsulated cancer therapy that can selectively follow and deliver chemotherapeutics to cancer cells. The rationale for this project is to overcome a crucial limitation of existing drug delivery systems where chemotherapeutic can be erroneously delivered to non-carcinogenic cells.

  2. Molecular architecture of nanocapsules, bilayer-enclosed solid particles of Cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Chupin, Vladimir; de Kroon, Anton I P M; de Kruijff, Ben

    2004-10-27

    Cisplatin nanocapsules represent a lipid formulation of the anticancer drug cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (cisplatin) characterized by an unprecedented cisplatin-to-lipid ratio and exhibiting strongly improved cytotoxicity against tumor cells in vitro as compared to the free drug (Burger, K. N. J., et al. Nat. Med. 2002, 8, 81-84). Cisplatin nanocapsules are prepared by the repeated freezing and thawing of an equimolar dispersion of phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidylcholine (PC) in a concentrated aqueous solution of cisplatin. Here, the molecular architecture of these novel nanostructures was elucidated by solid-state NMR techniques. 15N NMR and 2H NMR spectra of nanocapsules containing 15N- and 2H-labeled cisplatin, respectively, demonstrated that the core of the nanocapsules consists of solid cisplatin devoid of free water. Magic-angle spinning 15N NMR showed that approximately 90% of the cisplatin in the core is present as the dichloro species. The remaining 10% was accounted for by a newly discovered dinuclear Pt compound that was identified as the positively charged chloride-bridged dimer of cisplatin. NMR techniques sensitive to lipid organization, 31P NMR and 2H NMR, revealed that the cisplatin core is coated by phospholipids in a bilayer configuration and that the interaction between solid core and bilayer coat exerts a strong ordering effect on the phospholipid molecules. Compared to phospholipids in liposomal membranes, the motion of the phospholipid headgroups is restricted and the ordering of the acyl chains is increased, particularly in PS. The implications of these findings for the structural organization, the mechanism of formation, and the mode of action of cisplatin nanocapsules are discussed. PMID:15493941

  3. Entrance effects at nanopores of nanocapsules functionalized with poly(ethylene glycol) and their flow through nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Popa, Raluca; Vrânceanu, M; Nikolaus, S; Nirschl, H; Leneweit, G

    2008-11-18

    We studied the effect of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) on the extrusion of large, multilamellar nanocapsules (also called liposomes or vesicles) through nanochannels with a length of 6 microm. For the generation of the nanocapsules, we used a lipid mixture with lecithin consisting of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids (dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC)), cholesterol, and 2-8 mol % PEG linked to a lipid anchor (distearoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DSPE)) or the plain lipid anchor without PEG. An increase in PEG leads to a decrease of the critical tension for nanocapsule rupture (lysis tension) between 20-30%, whereas the pure lipid anchor does not produce any differences. We interpret these findings to be produced by a partial intrusion of the polymeric chain into the phospholipid bilayer of the nanocapsule which weakens its tensile strength. We evaluate statistically the discrepancies of lysis tensions found for different channels widths (50-100 nm) and two or four channels in series. Comparing our results on the flow resistance of either nanocapsules or pure water with lubrication theory, we find that the calculated viscous forces are not sufficient to account for the measured friction of nanocapsules. This shows that the nanocapsules are decelerated in the nanochannels by van der Waals interactions between channel and capsule walls and the intermediate water layer. The strength of these forces is 24 times higher for PEG and 94 times higher for the pure lipid anchor than the respective calculated viscous forces alone, showing that nanocapsule flow in nanochannels cannot be considered under the classical continuum assumption of the intermediate water layer. PMID:18950201

  4. 21 CFR 101.95 - “Fresh,” “freshly frozen,” “fresh frozen,” “frozen fresh.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false âFresh,â âfreshly frozen,â âfresh frozen,â âfrozen... frozen,” “fresh frozen,” “frozen fresh.” The terms defined in this section may be used on the label or in... state and has not been frozen or subjected to any form of thermal processing or any other form...

  5. 21 CFR 101.95 - “Fresh,” “freshly frozen,” “fresh frozen,” “frozen fresh.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false âFresh,â âfreshly frozen,â âfresh frozen,â âfrozen... frozen,” “fresh frozen,” “frozen fresh.” The terms defined in this section may be used on the label or in... state and has not been frozen or subjected to any form of thermal processing or any other form...

  6. 21 CFR 101.95 - “Fresh,” “freshly frozen,” “fresh frozen,” “frozen fresh.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false âFresh,â âfreshly frozen,â âfresh frozen,â âfrozen... frozen,” “fresh frozen,” “frozen fresh.” The terms defined in this section may be used on the label or in... state and has not been frozen or subjected to any form of thermal processing or any other form...

  7. 21 CFR 101.95 - “Fresh,” “freshly frozen,” “fresh frozen,” “frozen fresh.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false âFresh,â âfreshly frozen,â âfresh frozen,â âfrozen... frozen,” “fresh frozen,” “frozen fresh.” The terms defined in this section may be used on the label or in... state and has not been frozen or subjected to any form of thermal processing or any other form...

  8. Hydrogels containing redispersible spray-dried melatonin-loaded nanocapsules: a formulation for transdermal-controlled delivery

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop a transdermal system for controlled delivery of melatonin combining three strategies: nanoencapsulation of melatonin, drying of melatonin-loaded nanocapsules, and incorporation of nanocapsules in a hydrophilic gel. Nanocapsules were prepared by interfacial deposition of the polymer and were spray-dried using water-soluble excipients. In vitro drug release profiles were evaluated by the dialysis bag method, and skin permeation studies were carried out using Franz cells with porcine skin as the membrane. The use of 10% (w/v) water-soluble excipients (lactose or maltodextrin) as spray-drying adjuvants furnished redispersible powders (redispersibility index approximately 1.0) suitable for incorporation into hydrogels. All formulations showed a better controlled in vitro release of melatonin compared with the melatonin solution. The best controlled release results were achieved with hydrogels prepared with dried nanocapsules (hydrogels > redispersed dried nanocapsules > nanocapsule suspension > melatonin solution). The skin permeation studies demonstrated a significant modulation of the transdermal melatonin permeation for hydrogels prepared with redispersible nanocapsules. In this way, the additive effect of the different approaches used in this study (nanoencapsulation, spray-drying, and preparation of semisolid dosage forms) allows not only the control of melatonin release, but also transdermal permeation. PMID:22587614

  9. The JLab Frozen Spin Target

    SciTech Connect

    Keith, C. D.

    2009-08-04

    A polarized, frozen spin target has been designed and constructed at Jefferson Lab for use inside the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Protons in TEMPO-doped butanol are polarized via dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to approximately 90% using microwaves and an external, 5 T solenoid magnet. The target sample is then cooled to approximately 30 mK while an internal 0.56 T superconducting magnet is used to maintain the polarization. Relaxation times in excess of 3500 hours have been observed.

  10. Acidity of frozen electrolyte solutions.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Carmen; Boxe, C S; Guzman, M I; Colussi, A J; Hoffmann, M R

    2006-04-20

    Ice is selectively intolerant to impurities. A preponderance of implanted anions or cations generates electrical imbalances in ice grown from electrolyte solutions. Since the excess charges are ultimately neutralized via interfacial (H(+)/HO(-)) transport, the acidity of the unfrozen portion can change significantly and permanently. This insufficiently recognized phenomenon should critically affect rates and equilibria in frozen media. Here we report the effective (19)F NMR chemical shift of 3-fluorobenzoic acid as in situ probe of the acidity of extensively frozen electrolyte solutions. The sign and magnitude of the acidity changes associated with freezing are largely determined by specific ion combinations, but depend also on solute concentration and/or the extent of supercooling. NaCl solutions become more basic, those of (NH(4))(2)SO(4) or Na(2)SO(4) become more acidic, while solutions of the 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid zwitterion barely change their acidity upon freezing. We discuss how acidity scales based on solid-state NMR measurements could be used to assess the degree of ionization of weak acids and bases in frozen media. PMID:16610849

  11. Heat Diffusion with Frozen Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florescu, Laura; Ganguly, Shirshendu; Peres, Yuval; Spencer, Joel

    2015-11-01

    Consider "frozen random walk" on Z: n particles start at the origin. At any discrete time, the leftmost and rightmost lfloor {n/4}rfloor particles are "frozen" and do not move. The rest of the particles in the "bulk" independently jump to the left and right uniformly. The goal of this note is to understand the limit of this process under scaling of mass and time. To this end we study the following deterministic mass splitting process: start with mass 1 at the origin. At each step the extreme quarter mass on each side is "frozen". The remaining "free" mass in the center evolves according to the discrete heat equation. We establish diffusive behavior of this mass evolution and identify the scaling limit under the assumption of its existence. It is natural to expect the limit to be a truncated Gaussian. A naive guess for the truncation point might be the 1 / 4 quantile points on either side of the origin. We show that this is not the case and it is in fact determined by the evolution of the second moment of the mass distribution.

  12. Rattle-type hollow CaWO4:Tb(3+)@SiO2 nanocapsules as carriers for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Xuefeng; Yu, Min; Cheng, Ziyong; Hou, Zhiyao; Ma, Ping'an; Yang, Dongmei; Kang, Xiaojiao; Dai, Yunlu; Wang, Dong; Lin, Jun

    2011-12-28

    Rattle-type hollow nanocapsules are among of the most promising candidates as drug carriers owing to their huge inner space and multifunctional material combination. In this paper, rattle-type hollow CaWO(4):Tb(3+)@SiO(2) nanocapsules with a diameter of 100-110 nm and a wall thickness around 10 nm were fabricated. The hollow silica nanospheres were used as nano-reactors and the luminescent core of CaWO(4):Tb(3+) was post-filled into the nano-reactors by a vacuum nano-casting route combined with a Pechini-type sol-gel method. Subsequently, doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX), a model of an anti-cancer drug, is loaded into the CaWO(4):Tb(3+)@SiO(2) nanocapsules and their cell cytotoxicity, cancer cell uptake and drug release behavior are investigated in vitro. The prepared multifunctional inorganic nanocapsules show a loading capacity for DOX as high as 124 mg g(-1) and sustained-release properties. The release profile of the drug from DOX-loaded nanocapsules can last over five days. Besides, the blank CaWO(4):Tb(3+)@SiO(2) shows very low cytotoxicity against cancer cell lines (HeLa cell) while the DOX-loaded nanocapsules exhibit relatively high efficiency for killing of HeLa cells. The rapid cancer cell uptake process is observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The results indicate that a rattle-type hollow CaWO(4):Tb(3+)@SiO(2) nanocapsule has the potential to be used as drug carrier in therapy. Moreover, it is possible to extend the synthetic strategy in this study to other rattle-type multifunctional composites to meet various demands. PMID:21879092

  13. Artificial oxygen carriers based on perfluorodecalin-filled poly(n-butyl-cyanoacrylate) nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Claudia; Schlawne, Carolin; Grass, Stefan; Waack, Indra N; Ferenz, Katja B; Bachmann, Michael; Barnert, Sabine; Schubert, Rolf; Bastmeyer, Martin; de Groot, Herbert; Mayer, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Poly(n-butyl-cyanoacrylate)-nanocapsules filled by perfluorodecalin (PFD) are proposed as potential oxygen carriers for blood substitute. The capsule dispersion is prepared via interfacial polymerisation from a PFD emulsion in water which in turn is generated by spontaneous phase separation. The resulting dispersion is capable of carrying approximately 10% of its own volume of gaseous oxygen, which is approximately half of the capacity of human blood. The volumes of the organic solvents and water are varied within a wide range, connected to a change of the capsule radius between 200 and 400 nm. The principal suitability of the capsule dispersion for intravenous application is proven in first physiological experiments. A total amount of 10 ml/kg body weight has been infused into rats, with the dispersion supernatant and a normal saline solution as controls. After the infusion of nanocapsules, the blood pressure as well as the heart rate remains constant on a normal level. PMID:24124886

  14. Surface Functionalization of Titanium Alloy with miR-29b Nanocapsules To Enhance Bone Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yubin; Li, Xue; Li, Zhaoyang; Liu, Chaoyong; Zhao, Jin; Wang, Jianwei; Liu, Yunde; Yuan, Xubo; Cui, Zhenduo; Yang, Xianjin

    2016-03-01

    Titanium and its alloys have been widely used over the past 3 decades as implants for healing bone defects. Nevertheless, the bioinert property of titanium alloy limits its clinical application and surface modification method is frequently performed to improve the biological and chemical properties. Recently, the delivery of microRNA with osteogenesis capability has been recognized as a promising tool to enhance bone regeneration of implants. Here, we developed a biodegradable coating to modify the titanium surface in order to enhance osteogenic bioactivity. The previous developed nanocapsules were used as the building blocks, and then a bioactive titanium coating was designed to entrap the miR-29b nanocapsules. This coating was not only favorable for cell adhesion and growth but also provided sufficient microRNA transfection efficacy and osteoinductive potential, resulting in a significant enhancement of bone regeneration on the surface of bioinert titanium alloy. PMID:26887789

  15. Synthesis of triplet-triplet annihilation upconversion nanocapsules under protective conditions.

    PubMed

    Katta, Kartheek; Busko, Dmitry; Avlasevich, Yuri; Muñoz-Espí, Rafael; Baluschev, Stanislav; Landfester, Katharina

    2015-06-01

    Triplet-triplet annihilation upconversion (TTA-UC) nanocapsules are synthesized under oxygen-protective conditions (i.e., complete darkness and argon atmosphere) by free-radical miniemulsion polymerization. These conditions help to exclude the oxidation of the emitter molecules caused by singlet oxygen, generated during the synthesis at daylight conditions and oxygen-rich environment. Subsequently, keeping all the other experimental conditions the same, samples synthesized at protective conditions demonstrate substantially increased UC efficiency. These experimental facts strongly support the hypothesis that posterior removing of oxygen from TTA-UC nanocapsules is not sufficient to obtain reproducible and sustainable UC results. The schematic representation shows the influence of sunlight on the formation of singlet oxygen and its effect on the triplet-triplet annihilation upconversion process. PMID:25630569

  16. Innovative hybrid vs polymeric nanocapsules: The influence of the cationic lipid coating on the "4S".

    PubMed

    Carbone, C; Manno, D; Serra, A; Musumeci, T; Pepe, V; Tisserand, C; Puglisi, G

    2016-05-01

    Polymeric and hybrid aqueous-core nanocapsules were prepared using a low energy organic-solvent free procedure as innovative nanodevices for the ophthalmic delivery of melatonin. In order to evaluate how different cationic lipids could affect the main properties of the nanodevices, we focused our attention on mean particles size, surface charge, shape and stability (the "4S"). The results of our study confirmed the hypothesis that the coating material differently affects the overall nanoparticles properties, above all in terms of morphology: in particular, the cationic lipid dimethyldioctadecylammonium bromide allows the formation of very stable well-defined nanocapsules with non-spherical shape with sustained and prolonged drug release, thus representing a great advantage in ophthalmic application. PMID:26895507

  17. Cell-Demanded VEGF Release via Nanocapsules Elicits Different Receptor Activation Dynamics and Enhanced Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Suwei; Segura, Tatiana

    2016-06-01

    Although the delivery of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) with extended release profiles has consistently shown beneficial therapeutic effects compared with bolus delivery, [Martino, M. M., F. Tortelli, M. Mochizuki, S. Traub, D. Ben-David, G. A. Kuhn, R. Muller, E. Livne, S. A. Eming, and J. A. Hubbell. Sci. Transl. Med. 3(100):100ra189, 2011; Martino, M. M., P. S. Briquez, A. Ranga, M. P. Lutolf, and J. A. Hubbell. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 110(12):4563-4568, 2013; Amiram, M., K. M. Luginbuhl, X. Li, M. N. Feinglos, and A. Chilkoti. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 110(8):2792-2797, 2013] it remains unclear if the reason is solely due to the physical availability and the reduced degradation of the protein. Here we studied the activation of VEGF receptor 2 (VR-2) by sustained released VEGF compared with bolus delivered VEGF to unveil that sustained delivery system alters the dynamics of receptor activation and affects the actions of cells between sprouting and proliferation. We utilized a protein nanocapsule delivery strategy that releases VEGF as mediated by extracellular proteases. These protein nanocapsules were synthesized through an aqueous assembly of a nanogel-peptide shell around the protein, leading to one to two proteins encapsulated per nanocapsule. Receptor activation studies revealed differential dynamics of receptor activation for slowly released VEGF compared with bolus delivered VEGF. As expected sustained released VEGF via nanocapsules resulted in enhanced vascular sprouting in vitro and in vivo. These studies demonstrate the physical presentation of VEGF, in this case of a slow release with time, can affect its molecular mechanism of actions and cause alterations in cellular responses and therapeutic outcomes. PMID:26940611

  18. The atomic configuration of graphene/vanadium carbide interfaces in vanadium carbide-encapsulating carbon nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Yazaki, Gaku; Matsuura, Daisuke; Kizuka, Tokushi

    2014-03-01

    Carbon nanocapsules (CNCs) encapsulating vanadium carbide (VC) nanocrystals with a NaCI structure were synthesized by a gas-evaporation method using arc-discharge heating. The CNCs were observed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The VC nanocrystals within the nanospaces of CNCs were truncated by low-index facets and were coated with several graphene layers, forming graphene/VC interfaces. The atomic configuration and interlayer spacings at the interfaces were found. PMID:24745251

  19. Lung inflammation does not affect the clearance kinetics of lipid nanocapsules following pulmonary administration.

    PubMed

    Patel, Aateka; Woods, A; Riffo-Vasquez, Yanira; Babin-Morgan, Anna; Jones, Marie-Christine; Jones, Stuart; Sunassee, Kavitha; Clark, Stephen; T M de Rosales, Rafael; Page, Clive; Spina, Domenico; Forbes, Ben; Dailey, Lea Ann

    2016-08-10

    Lipid nanocapsules (LNCs) are semi-rigid spherical capsules with a triglyceride core that present a promising formulation option for the pulmonary delivery of drugs with poor aqueous solubility. Whilst the biodistribution of LNCs of different size has been studied following intravenous administration, the fate of LNCs following pulmonary delivery has not been reported. We investigated quantitatively whether lung inflammation affects the clearance of 50nm lipid nanocapsules, or is exacerbated by their pulmonary administration. Studies were conducted in mice with lipopolysaccharide-induced lung inflammation compared to healthy controls. Particle deposition and nanocapsule clearance kinetics were measured by single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) imaging over 48 h. A significantly lower lung dose of (111)In-LNC50 was achieved in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated animals compared with healthy controls (p<0.001). When normalised to the delivered lung dose, the clearance kinetics of (111)In-LNC50 from the lungs fit a first order model with an elimination half-life of 10.5±0.9h (R(2)=0.995) and 10.6±0.3h (R(2)=1.000) for healthy and inflamed lungs respectively (n=3). In contrast, (111)In-diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA), a small hydrophilic molecule, was cleared rapidly from the lungs with the majority of the dose absorbed within 20min of administration. Biodistribution to lungs, stomach-intestine, liver, trachea-throat and blood at the end of the imaging period was unaltered by lung inflammation. This study demonstrated that lung clearance and whole body distribution of lipid nanocapsules were unaffected by the presence of acute lung inflammation. PMID:27180635

  20. Grading of cervical dysplasias by frozen section.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, S; Smart, G E; Livingstone, J R

    1985-09-14

    Grading of cervical dysplasias at colposcopy by means of rapid frozen section avoids the delay inevitable with paraffin sections. The immediacy of the diagnosis benefits the patient, who can be treated at her first visit. A comparison of grading by frozen sections with paraffin sections has confirmed the safety of the frozen method. Additional advantages are opportunities for optimum orientation and "rescue" of specimens, improved colposcopic training, and the facilitation of special investigations on fresh cervical tissue. PMID:2863606

  1. Biodegradable Poly (Lactic-co-Glycolic Acid)-Polyethylene Glycol Nanocapsules: An Efficient Carrier for Improved Solubility, Bioavailability, and Anticancer Property of Lutein.

    PubMed

    Arunkumar, Ranganathan; Prashanth, Keelara Veerappa Harish; Manabe, Yuki; Hirata, Takashi; Sugawara, Tatsuya; Dharmesh, Shylaja Mallaiah; Baskaran, Vallikannan

    2015-06-01

    Lutein bioavailability is limited because of its poor aqueous solubility. In this study, lutein-poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)-polyethylene glycol (PEG) nanocapsules were prepared to improve the solubility, bioavailability, and anticancer property of lutein. The scanning electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering examination revealed that the nanocapsules are smooth and spherical with size ranging from 80 to 500 nm (mean = 200 nm). In vitro lutein release profile from nanocapsules showed controlled sustainable release (66%) up to 72 h. Aqueous solubility of lutein nanocapsules was much higher by 735-fold than the lutein. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analyses showed no chemical interaction among PLGA, PEG, and lutein, indicating possible weak intermolecular forces like hydrogen bonds. X-ray diffraction revealed lutein is distributed in a disordered amorphous state in nanocapsules. Postprandial plasma kinetics (area under the curve) of an oral dose of lutein from nanocapsules was higher by 5.4-fold compared with that of micellar lutein (control). The antiproliferative effect of lutein from nanocapsules (IC50 value, 10.9 μM) was higher (43.6%) than the lutein (IC50 value, 25 μM). Results suggest that PLGA-PEG nanocapsule is an efficient carrier for enhancing hydrophilicity, bioavailability, and anticancer property of lipophilic molecules such as lutein. PMID:25824524

  2. Modulating the Morphology of Gold Graphitic Nanocapsules for Plasmon Resonance-Enhanced Multimodal Imaging.

    PubMed

    Lai, Xiao-Fang; Zou, Yu-Xiu; Wang, Shan-Shan; Zheng, Meng-Jie; Hu, Xiao-Xiao; Liang, Hao; Xu, Yi-Ting; Wang, Xue-Wei; Ding, Ding; Chen, Long; Chen, Zhuo; Tan, Weihong

    2016-05-17

    With their unique optical properties and distinct Raman signatures, graphitic nanomaterials can serve as substrates for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) or provide signal amplification for bioanalysis and detection. However, a relatively weak Raman signal has limited further biomedical applications. This has been addressed by encapsulating gold nanorods (AuNRs) in a thin graphitic shell to form gold graphitic nanocapsules. This step improves plasmon resonance, which enhances Raman intensity, and has the potential for integrating two-photon luminescence (TPL) imaging capability. However, changing the morphology of gold graphitic nanocapsules such that high quality and stability are achieved remains a challenge. To address this task, we herein report a confinement chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method to prepare the construction of AuNR-encapsulated graphitic nanocapsules with these properties. Specifically, through morphological modulation, we (1) achieved higher plasmon resonance with near-IR incident light, thus achieving greater Raman intensity, and (2) successfully integrated two-photon luminescence dual-modal (Raman/TPL) bioimaging capabilities. Cancer-cell-specific aptamers were further modified on the AuNR@G graphitic surface through simple, but strong, π-π interactions to achieve imaging selectivity through differential cancer cell recognition. PMID:27089383

  3. Activatable thermo-sensitive ICG encapsulated pluronic nanocapsules for temperature sensitive fluorescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwong, Tiffany C.; Nouizi, Farouk; Sampathkumaran, Uma; Zhu, Yue; Alam, Maksudul M.; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2015-03-01

    Fluorescent tomography has been hindered by poor tissue penetration and weak signal which results in poor spatial resolution and quantification accuracy. Recently, it has been reported that activatable temperature responsive fluorescent probes which respond to focused ultrasound heating can improve the resolution and quantification of fluorescent tomography in deep tissue. This has lead to a new imaging modality, "Temperature-modulated fluorescent tomography." This technique relies on activatable thermo-sensitive fluorescent nanocapsules for whose fluorescence quantum efficiency is temperature dependent. Within a 4-5° C temperature range, the fluorescent signal increase more than 10-fold. In this molecular probe, Indocyanine Green (ICG) is encapsulated inside the core of a thermo-reversible pluronic micelle. Here we show the fluorescence response and temperature range of the nanocapsules which have been optimized for a higher temperature range to be used for in vivo animal imaging. We report on the feasibility of these temperature-sensitive reversible nanocapsules for in vivo applications by studying the pharmacokinetics in a subcutaneous mouse tumor model in vivo.

  4. Polyelectrolyte coated multilayered liposomes (nanocapsules) for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Jain, Parul; Jain, Sanyog; Prasad, K N; Jain, S K; Vyas, Suresh P

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the major causes of gastric cancers. A number of systems have already been reported, but 100% eradication has never been achieved. The present invention designs a gastro-retentive drug delivery system incorporated with amoxicillin and metronidazole, specifically suited for the eradication of Helicobacter pylori infections due to its mucoadhesiveness in the presence of polyelectrolyte polymers. The system possesses the advantages of both vesicular and particulate carriers, and it was prepared by alternative coating of polyanion (poly(acrylic acid), PAA) and polycation (poly(allylamine hydrochloride), PAH) using liposomes as the core. Compared with the conventional liposomes, the polyelectrolyte based multilayered system (nanocapsules) gave prolonged drug release in simulated gastric fluid, which is well suited for drug delivery against H. pylori infection in the stomach. In vitro growth inhibition study, agglutination assay, and in situ adherence assay in cultured H. pylori suggested the successful in vitro activity and binding propensity of the system. In vivo bacterial clearance study carried out in a H. pylori infected mouse model finally confirmed the success of the developed novel nanocapsule system. Thus, the newly developed composite nanocapsules along with the use of combination therapy proved to have commendable potential in Helicobacter pylori eradication as compared to already existing conventional and novel drug delivery systems. PMID:19718807

  5. The effect of functionalizing lipid nanocapsules with NFL-TBS.40-63 peptide on their uptake by glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Balzeau, Julien; Pinier, Maud; Berges, Raphael; Saulnier, Patrick; Benoit, Jean-Pierre; Eyer, Joel

    2013-04-01

    We previously described a neurofilament derived cell-penetrating peptide, NFL-TBS.40-63, that specifically enters in glioblastoma cells where it disturbs the microtubule network both in vitro and in vivo. The aim of this study is to test whether this peptide can increase the targeted uptake by glioblastoma cells of lipid nanocapsules filled with Paclitaxel, and thus can increase their anti-proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Here, using the drop tensiometry we show that approximately 60 NFL-TBS.40-63 peptides can bind to one 50 nm lipid nanocapsule. When nanocapsules are filled with a far-red fluorochrome (DiD) and Paclitaxel, the presence of the NFL-TBS.40-63 peptide increases their uptake by glioblastoma cells in culture as evaluated by FACS analysis, and thus reduces their proliferation. Finally, when such nanocapsules were injected in mice bearing a glioma tumour, they are preferentially targeted to the tumour and reduce its progression. These results show that nanocapsules functionalized with the NFL-TBS.40-63 peptide represent a powerful drug-carrier system for glioma targeted treatment. PMID:23391494

  6. 7 CFR 58.349 - Frozen cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Frozen cream. 58.349 Section 58.349 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Products Bearing Usda Official Identification § 58.349 Frozen cream. The flavor shall be sweet,...

  7. 7 CFR 58.349 - Frozen cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Frozen cream. 58.349 Section 58.349 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Products Bearing Usda Official Identification § 58.349 Frozen cream. The flavor shall be sweet,...

  8. 7 CFR 58.349 - Frozen cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Frozen cream. 58.349 Section 58.349 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Products Bearing Usda Official Identification § 58.349 Frozen cream. The flavor shall be sweet,...

  9. 7 CFR 58.349 - Frozen cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Frozen cream. 58.349 Section 58.349 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Products Bearing Usda Official Identification § 58.349 Frozen cream. The flavor shall be sweet,...

  10. 7 CFR 58.349 - Frozen cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Frozen cream. 58.349 Section 58.349 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Products Bearing Usda Official Identification § 58.349 Frozen cream. The flavor shall be sweet,...

  11. 5 CFR 1650.3 - Frozen accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... child support legal process, and child abuse enforcement orders (found in 5 CFR part 1653). (b) A... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Frozen accounts. 1650.3 Section 1650.3... SAVINGS PLAN General § 1650.3 Frozen accounts. (a) All withdrawals from the TSP are subject to the...

  12. Testing the frozen flow approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucchin, Francesco; Matarrese, Sabino; Melott, Adrian L.; Moscardini, Lauro

    1993-01-01

    We investigate the accuracy of the frozen-flow approximation (FFA), recently proposed by Matarrese, et al. (1992), for following the nonlinear evolution of cosmological density fluctuations under gravitational instability. We compare a number of statistics between results of the FFA and n-body simulations, including those used by Melott, Pellman & Shandarin (1993) to test the Zel'dovich approximation. The FFA performs reasonably well in a statistical sense, e.g. in reproducing the counts-in-cell distribution, at small scales, but it does poorly in the crosscorrelation with n-body which means it is generally not moving mass to the right place, especially in models with high small-scale power.

  13. DFT investigation of endohedral boron oxide nanocapsules: Encapsulation of He, Ne, Ar, H, N, and Cl atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabbagh, Hossein A.; Zamani, Mehdi; Farrokhpour, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    The electronic structure and stabilization energy of spherical and pyramidal shapes of boron oxide nanocapsules (X@B 20O 30, X = He, Ne, Ar, H, N, Cl) were investigated by long-range and dispersion corrected density functional theory (DFT + Disp) including CAM-B3LYP, B3LYP-D3, ωB97X-D and B2PLYP-D methods. Based on these calculations, the formation of nanocapsules is an exothermic process (except for Cl@B 20O 30). The spherical boron oxide nanocapsules are mainly stabilized by dispersion, while the stability of pyramidal complexes is mainly due to monomer relaxation energy. The theoretical results obtained in this work show that the boron oxide capsule is a good potential candidate for gas storage.

  14. Metal-Organic-Framework-Templated Polyelectrolyte Nanocapsules for the Encapsulation and Delivery of Small-Molecule-Polymer Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuo; Chen, Jianbin; Bao, Xiaojia; Li, Tao; Ling, Yunyang; Li, Chunxiang; Wu, Chuanliu; Zhao, Yibing

    2016-06-21

    Herein, we report a strategy for exploiting nanoscale metal-organic frameworks (nano-MOFs) as templates for the layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly of polyelectrolytes. Because small-molecule drugs or imaging agents cannot be efficiently encapsulated by polyelectrolyte nanocapsules, we investigated two promising and biocompatible polymers (comb-shaped polyethylene glycol (PEG) and hyperbranched polyglycerol-based PEG) for the conjugation of model drugs and imaging agents, which were then encapsulated inside the nano-MOF-templated nanocapsules. Furthermore, we also systemically explored the release kinetics of the encapsulated conjugates, and examined how the encapsulation and/or release processes could be controlled by varying the composition and architecture of the polymers. We envision that our nano-MOFs-templated nanocapsules, through combining with small-molecule-polymer conjugates, will represent a new type of delivery system that could open up new opportunities for biomedical applications. PMID:27123998

  15. Clozapine-Loaded Polysorbate-Coated Polymeric Nanocapsules: Physico-Chemical Characterization and Toxicity Evaluation in Caenorhabditis elegans Model.

    PubMed

    Moraes, BarbraKatyúscya Sanches; Vieira, Simone Machado; Salgueiro, Willian Goulart; Michels, Luana Roberta; Colomé, Letícia Marques; Avila, Daiana Silva; Haas, Sandra Elisa

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this work was to develop and characterize clozapine loaded polysorbate-coated polymeric nanocapsules and assess their toxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans, an invertebrate animal model. Formulations were prepared by nanoprecipitation method and characterized by particle size, zeta potential, pH, drug loading, entrapment efficiency and in vitro drug release. All nanocapsules prepared presented diameter around 140 nm, pH slightly acid and negative zeta potential. In vitro studies showed biphasic drug release from nanocapsules with decreasing of the release rate on nanoencapsulation. The t(1/2)beta of clozapine was 7.23 +/- 0.73 and 2.23 +/- 0.97 h for nanoencapsulated and free drug, respectively (p < 0.05), in pH 1.2 medium. Similar results were obtained in pH 6.8 buffer. Regarding toxicity evaluation, worms exposed to clozapine-loaded nanocapsules did not show the same mortality rate compared to others formulations, as the survival was significantly higher than the free drug treated-group. In addition, we observed that free clozapine decreased egg laying at the first reproductive day, whereas nanoencapsulated clozapine did not depict significant change of this parameter. Longevity assay showed no significant difference, demonstrating that the toxicological effects of clozapine observed in C. elegans are acute. In addition, we proved that free and nanoencapsulated clozapine were orally uptake by the worms, as determined by fluorescein-labeled nanocapsules. Then, the use of nanocapsules delayed the drug release and minimized the toxic effects of clozapine in worms, which can be used as a new animal model to evaluate the nanotoxicity of drug delivery systems. PMID:27433575

  16. Dithranol-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules improve the photostability and reduce the in vitro irritation potential of this drug.

    PubMed

    Savian, Ana L; Rodrigues, Daiane; Weber, Julia; Ribeiro, Roseane F; Motta, Mariana H; Schaffazick, Scheila R; Adams, Andréa I H; de Andrade, Diego F; Beck, Ruy C R; da Silva, Cristiane B

    2015-01-01

    Dithranol is a very effective drug for the topical treatment of psoriasis. However, it has some adverse effects such as irritation and stain in the skin that make its application and patient adherence to treatment difficult. The aims of this work were to prepare and characterize dithranol-loaded nanocapsules as well as to evaluate the photostability and the irritation potential of these nanocarriers. Lipid-core nanocapsules containing dithranol (0.5 mg/mL) were prepared by interfacial deposition of preformed polymer. EDTA (0.05%) or ascorbic acid (0.02%) was used as antioxidants. After preparation, dithranol-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules showed satisfactory characteristics: drug content close to the theoretical concentration, encapsulation efficiency of about 100%, nanometric mean size (230-250 nm), polydispersity index below 0.25, negative zeta potential, and pH values from 4.3 to 5.6. In the photodegradation study against UVA light, we observed a higher stability of the dithranol-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules comparing to the solution containing the free drug (half-life times around 4 and 1h for the dithranol-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules and free drug solution containing EDTA, respectively; half-life times around 17 and 7h for the dithranol-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules and free drug solution containing ascorbic acid, respectively). Irritation test by HET-CAM method was conducted to evaluate the safety of the formulations. From the results it was found that the nanoencapsulation of the drug decreased its toxicity compared to the effects observed for the free drug. PMID:25491961

  17. Poly(D,L-lactide) nanocapsules prepared by a solvent displacement process: influence of the composition on physicochemical and structural properties.

    PubMed

    Mosqueira, V C; Legrand, P; Pinto-Alphandary, H; Puisieux, F; Barratt, G

    2000-05-01

    Nanocapsules (NC) were prepared by interfacial deposition of preformed biodegradable polymer (PLA(50)) after a solvent displacement process. The influence of the composition used for the preparation of NC was evaluated in terms of particle size, polydispersity, zeta potential, homogeneity, and structural characteristics of the systems. The nature of the oil phase, polymer molecular weight, type and concentration of different surfactants were investigated to optimize the formulation to obtain NC suitable for intravenous administration. The influence of the physicochemical properties of the different oils used in NC preparation on the NC size was evaluated. The interfacial tension between the oil and water phases seems to have a greater effect on NC size than the oil viscosity. Miglyol 810 and ethyl oleate lead to the formation of smaller NC, probably because of the reduced interfacial tension. The polymer molecular weight plays only a small role in NC surface charge in the presence of lecithin, whereas NC surface charge, size, polydispersity, and short-term stability were highly influenced by lecithin purity. It appears that the absence of poloxamer 188 leads to smaller polydispersity, less contamination with nanospheres, and reduced formation of structures other than NC. Furthermore, electron microscopy and density gradient density techniques were used to examine the structure of the particles formed and their homogeneity. NC formation was evidenced by the bands with intermediate density between nanoemulsion and nanospheres; however, other bands of low intensity were observed. The presence of liposomes and multilayers in NC preparation was confirmed by electron microscopy. The percentage of carboxyfluorescein entrapped in different NC formulations allowed us to estimate the contamination by liposomes. It has been show that, under our experimental conditions, an excess of lecithin is an essential prerequisite for a stable preparation of PLA NC. PMID:10756327

  18. Crystallization and melting transitions of hexadecane droplets in polystyrene nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Fette, Emily V; Pham, Anthony; Adalsteinsson, Thorsteinn

    2008-05-01

    Shifts to lower transition temperatures are observed for the freezing and melting of submicron-sized hexadecane droplets encapsulated within thin polystyrene shells. Supercooling of approximately 14 K is observed in the first-time cooling scans for the oil. We attribute this lowering predominantly to nucleation of the phase change originating from the oil/polymer/water interface. We obtain a rough estimate of the interfacial tension between the hexadecane oil droplet and the polystyrene of 14 mN/m assuming the Gibbs-Thomson relationship. Melting points for the hexadecane are 1-2 K below the bulk transition temperatures. This effect is connected with the surface/volume ratio of the capsules. Both the supercooling and the melting point depression approach the bulk-phase transition temperature when the sample is taken through multiple cool/heat cycles. The heating and cooling rates affects the number of cycles required before bulk-like behavior is observed. The thickness of the capsule wall is also observed to be critical to how many cooling cycles are required. Two hypotheses to explain this behavior are presented. PMID:18393480

  19. Preparation and evaluation of folate-modified lipid nanocapsules for quercetin delivery.

    PubMed

    Ding, Buyun; Chen, Ping; Kong, Yan; Zhai, Yingjie; Pang, Xin; Dou, Jinfeng; Zhai, Guangxi

    2014-01-01

    Folate-modified lipid nanocapsule encapsulated quercetin (QT-FALNC) was prepared with phase inversion method. The formulation was optimized by simplex lattice design with encapsulation efficiency and drug loading as index. The encapsulation efficiency and drug loading of the optimal formulation were 96.01% and 2.98%, respectively. The drug concentration in QT-FALNC suspension was 4.29 mg/mL. Under transmission electron microscopy, the QT-FALNC showed spherical shape with a narrow size distribution. The particle size and zeta potential of QT-FALNC were 36.2 nm and -4.76 mV, respectively. The pharmacokinetics study in rats showed that the mean retention time (MRT0-∞) of the non-targeting lipid nanocapsules (LNC) loading quercetin (QT-LNC) and the targeting QT-FALNC was 12.981 h and 15.086 h, respectively, indicating that LNC could prolong the effect of QT in vivo. The in vitro anti-proliferative activity and cellar uptake of QT-FALNC were studied on Hela and MCF-7/MDR cells. The results showed that both QT-LNC and QT-FALNC displayed a stronger cell-killing effect than free QT. The in vivo anti-tumor study indicated that both QT-LNC and QT-FALNC showed the significant inhibition effect on tumor growth in H22 tumor-bearing mice compared with the control. It can be concluded that lipid nanocapsule is a potential carrier for improving solubility and biological activity of QT. PMID:24099639

  20. Efficacy of Lychnopholide Polymeric Nanocapsules after Oral and Intravenous Administration in Murine Experimental Chagas Disease.

    PubMed

    de Mello, Carlos Geraldo Campos; Branquinho, Renata Tupinambá; Oliveira, Maykon Tavares; Milagre, Matheus Marques; Saúde-Guimarães, Dênia Antunes; Mosqueira, Vanessa Carla Furtado; Lana, Marta de

    2016-09-01

    The etiological treatment of Chagas disease remains neglected. The compounds available show several limitations, mainly during the chronic phase. Lychnopholide encapsulated in polymeric nanocapsules (LYC-NC) was efficacious in mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi and treated by intravenous administration during the acute phase (AP). As the oral route is preferred for treatment of chronic infections, such as Chagas disease, this study evaluated the use of oral LYC-NC in the AP and also compared it with LYC-NC administered to mice by the oral and intravenous routes during the chronic phase (CP). The therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by fresh blood examination, hemoculture, PCR, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The cure rates in the AP and CP were 62.5% and 55.6%, respectively, upon oral administration of LYC-poly(d,l-lactide)-polyethylene glycol nanocapsules (LYC-PLA-PEG-NC) and 57.0% and 30.0%, respectively, with LYC-poly-ε-caprolactone nanocapsules (LYC-PCL-NC). These cure rates were significantly higher than that of free LYC, which did not cure any animals. LYC-NC formulations administered orally during the AP showed cure rates similar to that of benznidazole, but only LYC-NC cured mice in the CP. Similar results were achieved with intravenous treatment during the CP. The higher cure rates obtained with LYC loaded in PLA-PEG-NC may be due to the smaller particle size of these NC and the presence of PEG, which influence tissue diffusion and the controlled release of LYC. Furthermore, PLA-PEG-NC may improve the stability of the drug in the gastrointestinal tract. This work is the first report of cure of experimental Chagas disease via oral administration during the CP. These findings represent a new and important perspective for oral treatment of Chagas disease. PMID:27324760

  1. Self-Assembly of Uranyl-Peroxide Nanocapsules in Basic Peroxidic Environments.

    PubMed

    Miró, Pere; Vlaisavljevich, Bess; Gil, Adria; Burns, Peter C; Nyman, May; Bo, Carles

    2016-06-13

    A wide range of uranyl-peroxide nanocapsules have been synthesized using very simple reactants in basic media; however, little is known about the process to form these species. We have performed a density functional theory study of the speciation of the uranyl ions under different experimental conditions and explored the formation of dimeric species via a ligand exchange mechanism. We shed some light onto the importance of the excess of peroxide and alkali counterions as a thermodynamic driving force towards the formation of larger uranyl-peroxide species. PMID:27165671

  2. Utilization of a protein "shuttle" to load vault nanocapsules with gold probes and proteins.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, Lisa E; Pupols, Melody; Kickhoefer, Valerie A; Rome, Leonard H; Monbouquette, Harold G

    2009-10-27

    Vaults are large protein nanocapsules that may be useful as drug delivery vehicles due to their normal presence in humans, their large interior volume, their simple structural composition consisting of multiple copies of one protein, and a recombinant production system that also provides a means to tailor their structure. However, for vaults to be effective in such applications, efficient means to load the interiors of the capsules must be demonstrated. Here we describe the use of a domain derived from a vault lumen-associated protein as a carrier to target both gold nanoclusters and heterologous His-tagged proteins to specific binding sites on the vault interior wall. PMID:19775119

  3. Material effects in photoconductive frozen wave generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oconnell, Robert M.; Thaxter, J. B.; Bell, Richard E.

    1991-04-01

    Linear photoconductive gallium arsenide (GaAs) fast closing switches for microwave applications, such as frozen wave pulse generation, are analyzed and compared to experimental measurements. Material effects in photo-conductive frozen wave generators fabricated in semiconductor-based microstrip transmission line are studied from three perspectives; frozen wave propagation in the line; the spacing between the switches in a frozen wave generator and their maximum number; and the switching behavior of the gap-switch itself, which is modeled as a lumped-element, modified Ebers-Moll equivalent circuit. The experimental transient behavior of hybrid gap-switches fabricated on semi-insulating GaAs with ohmic and non-ohmic contacts is compared with predicted performance. Picosecond laser pulses, doubled to 527 micron wavelength are used to excite linear photoconductivity in 75 micron gap switches mounted in a test fixture of 50 ohm microstrip lines on alumina.

  4. Foods - fresh vs. frozen or canned

    MedlinePlus

    ... canned vegetables. Try to buy those without added salt and don't overcook any vegetable, whether fresh, frozen, or canned. Instead of boiling them in water for longer periods of time, they should be ...

  5. Group for frozen soil and rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The American Society for Testing and Materials wants participants for D18.19, its new subcommittee on frozen soil and rock. The group will write standards for engineering practices in northern Canada, Alaska, and other areas where soil and rock are commonly in the frozen or recently thawed state. Three standards are currently under development: axial compressive load tests o n piles in frozen soils, laboratory rate of frost-heave tests, and laboratory creep testing of frozen soil.The next D18.19 meeting is June 26 in St. Louis, Mo. Scientists who want to work on the subcommittee should contact Bill Lovell, School of Civil Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47904, tel. 317-494- 5034; or Wendy Dyer, ASTM, 1916 Race Street, Philadelphia, PA 19103, tel. 215-299-5526.

  6. Chemical Effects during Storage of Frozen Foods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powrie, W. D.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses (1) characteristics, interrelationships, and distribution of food constituents (including water) in unfrozen food systems; (2) the freezing process; and (3) chemical changes in food during frozen storage. Protein alterations and lipid oxidation are emphasized. (JN)

  7. Frozen shoulder--an algoneurodystrophic process?

    PubMed

    Müller, L P; Rittmeister, M; John, J; Happ, J; Kerschbaumer, F

    1998-12-01

    The frozen shoulder syndrome and the Sudeck syndrome are clinically in many aspects similar. Radioisotope bone scan shows an increased uptake in the affected areas in both diseases, while standard radiographs show a progressive demineralization. With measurement of bone-mineral density by quantitative digital radiography these local decalcification processes were diagnosed in an early stage of the frozen shoulder syndrome: of 12 patients with primary frozen shoulder 10 had a bone-mineral density decrease of more than 21% in the humeral head of the affected shoulder compared to the unaffected side. In the control groups (n = 32) the difference between affected and unaffected side (left and right humerus of the healthy probands) was in only one case each above 21%. There are several indications in the literature assuming the frozen shoulder to be an algoneurodystrophic process. Our observation supports this hypothesis, and may possibly lead to earlier diagnosis and improved therapeutic management. PMID:9922549

  8. Frozen singularities in M and F theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachikawa, Yuji

    2016-06-01

    We revisit the duality between ALE singularities in M-theory and 7-branes on a circle in F-theory. We see that a frozen M-theory singularity maps to a circle compactification involving a rotation of the plane transverse to the 7-brane, showing an interesting correspondence between commuting triples in simply-laced groups and Kodaira's classification of singular elliptic fibrations. Our analysis strongly suggests that the O7+ plane is the only completely frozen F-theory singularity.

  9. Artificial insemination of cranes with frozen semen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gee, G.F.; Sexton, T.J.

    1979-01-01

    For the first time (1978) artificial insemination (AI) with frozen greater sandhill crane (Grus canadensis tabida) semen resulted in fertile eggs and chicks. During the 2 year (1977-78) study, 6 of 27 eggs produced were fertile. Three chicks hatched. Semen samples used for insemination were frozen and stored in liquid nitrogen for two months or less. Recent improvements in the laboratory indicated that a more effective sample can be prepared and greater fertility rates should be expected.

  10. Shoulder pain in primary care: frozen shoulder.

    PubMed

    Cadogan, Angela; Mohammed, Khalid D

    2016-03-01

    BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT Frozen shoulder is a painful condition that follows a protracted clinical course. We aim to review the management of patients with a diagnosis of frozen shoulder who are referred for specialist orthopaedic evaluation against existing guidelines in primary care. ASSESSMENT OF PROBLEM Referrals and clinical records were reviewed for all patients referred for orthopaedic specialist assessment who received a specialist diagnosis of frozen shoulder. Diagnostic, investigation and management practices from a regional primary health care setting in New Zealand were compared with guideline-recommended management. RESULTS Eighty patients with frozen shoulder were referred for orthopaedic evaluation in the 13 month study period, mostly from general practice. Fifteen patients (19%) were identified as having a frozen shoulder in their medical referral. Most (99%) had received previous imaging. Seven patients (12%) had received guideline recommended treatment. STRATEGIES FOR IMPROVEMENT Education of all clinicians involved in patient management is important to ensure an understanding of the long natural history of frozen shoulder and provide reassurance that outcomes are generally excellent. HealthPathways now include more information regarding diagnosis, imaging and evidence-based management for frozen shoulder. LESSONS Frozen shoulder may be under-diagnosed among patients referred for orthopaedic review. Ultrasound imaging is commonly used and may identify occult and unrelated pathology in this age-group. When managed according to clinical guidelines, patients report significant clinical and functional improvement with most reporting 80% function compared with normal after 1 year. KEYWORDS Adhesive capsulitis; bursitis; injections; practice guideline; primary health care; ultrasound. PMID:27477374

  11. Adhesive capsulitis of the ankle (frozen ankle).

    PubMed

    van Moppes, F I; van den Hoogenband, C R; Greep, J M

    1979-09-01

    Adhesive capsulitis or "frozen ankle" is a syndrome resulting from repeated ankle sprains, or perhaps following immobilization after trauma. Ankle arthrography is a useful and safe diagnostic procedure in this syndrome. Typical arthrographic features are described together with case histories of two patients with frozen ankle. We suggest that early mobilization of the patient following trauma is particularly important in preventing the development of a forzen ankle syndrome. PMID:508071

  12. PEGylated nanocapsules of perfluorooctyl bromide: Mechanism of formation, influence of polymer concentration on morphology and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Diou, Odile; Brûlet, Annie; Pehau-Arnaudet, Gérard; Morvan, Estelle; Berti, Romain; Astafyeva, Ksenia; Taulier, Nicolas; Fattal, Elias; Tsapis, Nicolas

    2016-10-01

    PEGylated nanocapsules containing a liquid core of perfluorooctyl bromide (PFOB) were formulated by an emulsion-evaporation process to be further used as ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs). In an attempt to modulate their acoustic response, related to their shell thickness-to-radius ratio, the initial concentration of polymer was varied in the formulation. Indeed, thinner shells may lead to higher echogenicity. PEGylated nanocapsules morphology was studied by electron microscopy, Small Angle Neutron Scattering and (19)F NMR spectroscopy and related to their mechanical properties to allow a better understanding of their mechanism of formation. We show that the variation of polymer concentration in the formulation impacts the formation mechanism of nanocapsules, and consequently their morphology and mechanical properties. Using low concentration of Poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(dl-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA-b-PEG), it is impossible to reduce the shell thickness of the UCA, most probably due to dewetting of the polymer layer at the PFOB/water interface. This leads to the coexistence of thick shells along with free PFOB droplets. On the other hand, for high polymer concentration, PEGylated nanocapsules with thick shells were produced with high encapsulation efficiency. PMID:27451363

  13. Incorporation in polymeric nanocapsules improves the antioxidant effect of melatonin against lipid peroxidation in mice brain and liver.

    PubMed

    Schaffazick, Scheila R; Siqueira, Ionara R; Badejo, Alessandra S; Jornada, Denise S; Pohlmann, Adriana R; Netto, Carlos Alexandre; Guterres, Sílvia S

    2008-05-01

    It has been recently shown that the association of melatonin with polymeric nanoparticles causes a significant increase of the in vitro effect against lipid peroxidation. Hence, the aim of the present study was to compare the in vivo acute antioxidant effect of intraperitoneal administration of melatonin-loaded polysorbate 80-coated nanocapsules with that of melatonin aqueous solution in mice brain (frontal cortex and hippocampus) and liver. The lipid peroxidation through thiobarbituric acid reactive substance levels, the total antioxidant reactivity (luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence) and the free radical levels (formed dichlorofluorescein) has been carried out. Our results show that a single melatonin aqueous solution injection exerted no antioxidant activity in the evaluated range, while the administration of the melatonin-loaded polysorbate 80-coated nanocapsules caused a marked reduction on lipid peroxidation levels in all studied tissues. No differences on free radical content were found in the tissues. The melatonin-loaded nanocapsules also increased the total antioxidant reactivity in the hippocampus. These in vivo results are in accordance with our previous in vitro findings and confirm the hypothesis that polymeric nanocapsules improve the antioxidant effect of melatonin against lipid peroxidation. PMID:18182281

  14. Mucoadhesive Amphiphilic Methacrylic Copolymer-Functionalized Poly(ε-caprolactone) Nanocapsules for Nose-to-Brain Delivery of Olanzapine.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Francisco N; Betti, Andresa H; Carvalho, Flávia C; Gremião, Maria P D; Dimer, Frantiescoli A; Guterres, Sílvia S; Tebaldi, Marli L; Rates, Stela M K; Pohlmann, Adriana R

    2015-08-01

    Nose-to-brain drug delivery has been proposed to overcome the low absorption of drugs in central nervous system due to the absence of brain-blood barrier in the olfactory nerve pathway. However, the presence of a mucus layer and quick clearance limit the use of this route. Herein, amphiphilic methacrylic copolymer-functionalized poly(ε-caprolactone) nanocapsules were proposed as a mucoadhesive system to deliver olanzapine after intranasal administration. In vitro evaluations showed that these nanocapsules were able to interact with mucin (up to 17% of increment in particle size and 30% of reduction of particle concentration) and nasal mucosa (2-fold higher force for detaching), as well as to increase the retention of olanzapine (about 40%) on the nasal mucosa after continuous wash. The olanzapine-loaded amphiphilic methacrylic copolymer-functionalized PCL nanocapsules enhanced the amount of drug in the brain of rats (1.5-fold higher compared to the drug solution). In accordance with this finding, this formulation improved the prepulse inhibition impairment induced by apomorphine, which is considered as an operational measure of pre-attentive sensorimotor gating impairment present in schizophrenia. Besides, nanoencapsulated olanzapine did not affect the nasal mucosa integrity after repeated doses. These data evidenced that the designed nanocapsules are a promising mucoadhesive system for nose-to-brain delivery of drugs. PMID:26295147

  15. Enhanced in vivo therapeutic efficacy of plitidepsin-loaded nanocapsules decorated with a new poly-aminoacid-PEG derivative.

    PubMed

    Lollo, Giovanna; Hervella, Pablo; Calvo, Pilar; Avilés, Pablo; Guillén, Maria Jose; Garcia-Fuentes, Marcos; Alonso, Maria José; Torres, Dolores

    2015-04-10

    The focus of this study is to disclose a new delivery carrier intended to improve the pharmacokinetic characteristics of the anticancer drug plitidepsin and to favor its accumulation within the tumor. These nanocarriers named as nanocapsules, consist of an oily core surrounded by a highly PEGylated polyglutamic acid (PGA-PEG) shell loaded with plitidepsin. They showed a size of around 190 nm, a zeta potential of -24 mV and were able to encapsulate a high percentage (85%) of plitidepsin. In vivo studies, following intravenous injection in healthy mice, indicated that the encapsulation of the drug within PGA-PEG nanocapsules led to an important increase in its area under the curve (AUC) which is related to the important decrease of the clearance, as compared to the values observed for the drug dissolved in a Cremophor(®) EL solution. This improvement of the pharmacokinetic profile of the encapsulated plitidepsin was accompanied by a high increase (2.5-fold) of the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) in comparison to that of plitidepsin Cremophor(®) EL solution. The efficacy study performed in a xenograft tumor mice model evidenced the capacity of PGA-PEG nanocapsules to significantly reduce tumor growth. These promising results highlight the potential of PGA-PEG nanocapsules as an effective drug delivery system for cancer therapy. PMID:25681727

  16. 21 CFR 152.126 - Frozen cherry pie.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Frozen cherry pie. 152.126 Section 152.126 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION FRUIT PIES Requirements for Specific Standardized Fruit Pies § 152.126 Frozen cherry pie. (a) Identity. (1) Frozen cherry pie (excluding baked and then frozen) is the food prepared...

  17. 21 CFR 152.126 - Frozen cherry pie.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Frozen cherry pie. 152.126 Section 152.126 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION FRUIT PIES Requirements for Specific Standardized Fruit Pies § 152.126 Frozen cherry pie. (a) Identity. (1) Frozen cherry pie (excluding baked and then frozen) is the food prepared...

  18. 21 CFR 146.126 - Frozen concentrate for colored lemonade.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Frozen concentrate for colored lemonade. 146.126... Fruit Juices and Beverages § 146.126 Frozen concentrate for colored lemonade. (a) Frozen concentrate for colored lemonade conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for frozen concentrate...

  19. 21 CFR 146.126 - Frozen concentrate for colored lemonade.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Frozen concentrate for colored lemonade. 146.126... Fruit Juices and Beverages § 146.126 Frozen concentrate for colored lemonade. (a) Frozen concentrate for colored lemonade conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for frozen concentrate...

  20. 21 CFR 146.126 - Frozen concentrate for colored lemonade.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Frozen concentrate for colored lemonade. 146.126... Fruit Juices and Beverages § 146.126 Frozen concentrate for colored lemonade. (a) Frozen concentrate for colored lemonade conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for frozen concentrate...

  1. 21 CFR 152.126 - Frozen cherry pie.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Frozen cherry pie. 152.126 Section 152.126 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION FRUIT PIES Requirements for Specific Standardized Fruit Pies § 152.126 Frozen cherry pie. (a) Identity. (1) Frozen cherry pie (excluding baked and then frozen) is the food prepared...

  2. 21 CFR 152.126 - Frozen cherry pie.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Frozen cherry pie. 152.126 Section 152.126 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION FRUIT PIES Requirements for Specific Standardized Fruit Pies § 152.126 Frozen cherry pie. (a) Identity. (1) Frozen cherry pie (excluding baked and then frozen) is the food prepared...

  3. 21 CFR 146.126 - Frozen concentrate for colored lemonade.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Frozen concentrate for colored lemonade. 146.126... Fruit Juices and Beverages § 146.126 Frozen concentrate for colored lemonade. (a) Frozen concentrate for colored lemonade conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for frozen concentrate...

  4. 21 CFR 152.126 - Frozen cherry pie.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Frozen cherry pie. 152.126 Section 152.126 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION FRUIT PIES Requirements for Specific Standardized Fruit Pies § 152.126 Frozen cherry pie. (a) Identity. (1) Frozen cherry pie (excluding baked and then frozen) is the food prepared...

  5. 21 CFR 146.126 - Frozen concentrate for colored lemonade.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Frozen concentrate for colored lemonade. 146.126... Fruit Juices and Beverages § 146.126 Frozen concentrate for colored lemonade. (a) Frozen concentrate for colored lemonade conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for frozen concentrate...

  6. 21 CFR 160.190 - Frozen egg yolks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Frozen egg yolks. 160.190 Section 160.190 Food and... CONSUMPTION EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Eggs and Egg Products § 160.190 Frozen egg yolks. (a) Frozen egg yolks, frozen yolks is the food prepared by freezing egg yolks...

  7. 21 CFR 160.150 - Frozen egg whites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Frozen egg whites. 160.150 Section 160.150 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Eggs and Egg Products § 160.150 Frozen egg whites. (a) Frozen egg whites, frozen egg albumen is the food prepared by...

  8. 21 CFR 160.150 - Frozen egg whites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Frozen egg whites. 160.150 Section 160.150 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Eggs and Egg Products § 160.150 Frozen egg whites. (a) Frozen egg whites, frozen egg albumen is the food prepared by...

  9. 21 CFR 160.190 - Frozen egg yolks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Frozen egg yolks. 160.190 Section 160.190 Food and... CONSUMPTION EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Eggs and Egg Products § 160.190 Frozen egg yolks. (a) Frozen egg yolks, frozen yolks is the food prepared by freezing egg yolks...

  10. 21 CFR 160.190 - Frozen egg yolks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Frozen egg yolks. 160.190 Section 160.190 Food and... CONSUMPTION EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Eggs and Egg Products § 160.190 Frozen egg yolks. (a) Frozen egg yolks, frozen yolks is the food prepared by freezing egg yolks...

  11. 21 CFR 160.150 - Frozen egg whites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Frozen egg whites. 160.150 Section 160.150 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Eggs and Egg Products § 160.150 Frozen egg whites. (a) Frozen egg whites, frozen egg albumen is the food prepared by...

  12. 21 CFR 160.150 - Frozen egg whites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Frozen egg whites. 160.150 Section 160.150 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Eggs and Egg Products § 160.150 Frozen egg whites. (a) Frozen egg whites, frozen egg albumen is the food prepared by...

  13. 21 CFR 160.190 - Frozen egg yolks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Frozen egg yolks. 160.190 Section 160.190 Food and... CONSUMPTION EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Eggs and Egg Products § 160.190 Frozen egg yolks. (a) Frozen egg yolks, frozen yolks is the food prepared by freezing egg yolks...

  14. 21 CFR 160.190 - Frozen egg yolks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Frozen egg yolks. 160.190 Section 160.190 Food and... CONSUMPTION EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Eggs and Egg Products § 160.190 Frozen egg yolks. (a) Frozen egg yolks, frozen yolks is the food prepared by freezing egg yolks...

  15. 21 CFR 160.150 - Frozen egg whites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Frozen egg whites. 160.150 Section 160.150 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Eggs and Egg Products § 160.150 Frozen egg whites. (a) Frozen egg whites, frozen egg albumen is the food prepared by...

  16. Triple-Modal Imaging of Magnetically-Targeted Nanocapsules in Solid Tumours In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Jie; Wang, Julie T.-W.; Rubio, Noelia; Protti, Andrea; Heidari, Hamed; Elgogary, Riham; Southern, Paul; Al-Jamal, Wafa' T.; Sosabowski, Jane; Shah, Ajay M.; Bals, Sara; Pankhurst, Quentin A.; Al-Jamal, Khuloud T.

    2016-01-01

    Triple-modal imaging magnetic nanocapsules, encapsulating hydrophobic superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, are formulated and used to magnetically target solid tumours after intravenous administration in tumour-bearing mice. The engineered magnetic polymeric nanocapsules m-NCs are ~200 nm in size with negative Zeta potential and shown to be spherical in shape. The loading efficiency of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in the m-NC was ~100%. Up to ~3- and ~2.2-fold increase in tumour uptake at 1 and 24 h was achieved, when a static magnetic field was applied to the tumour for 1 hour. m-NCs, with multiple imaging probes (e.g. indocyanine green, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and indium-111), were capable of triple-modal imaging (fluorescence/magnetic resonance/nuclear imaging) in vivo. Using triple-modal imaging is to overcome the intrinsic limitations of single modality imaging and provides complementary information on the spatial distribution of the nanocarrier within the tumour. The significant findings of this study could open up new research perspectives in using novel magnetically-responsive nanomaterials in magnetic-drug targeting combined with multi-modal imaging. PMID:26909110

  17. Polymeric nanocapsules with up-converting nanocrystals cargo make ideal fluorescent bioprobes

    PubMed Central

    Bazylińska, U.; Wawrzyńczyk, D.; Kulbacka, J.; Frąckowiak, R.; Cichy, B.; Bednarkiewicz, A.; Samoć, M.; Wilk, K. A.

    2016-01-01

    An innovative approach for up-converting nanoparticles adaptation for bio-related and theranostic applications is presented. We have successfully encapsulated multiple, ~8 nm in size NaYF4 nanoparticles inside the polymeric nanocarriers with average size of ~150 nm. The initial coating of nanoparticles surfaces was preserved due to the hydrophobic environment inside the nanocapsules, and thus no single nanoparticle surface functionalization was necessary. The selection of biodegradable and sugar-based polyelectrolyte shells ensured biocompatibility of the nanostructures, while the choice of Tm3+ and Yb3+ NaYF4 nanoparticles co-doping allowed for near-infrared to near-infrared bioimaging of healthy and cancerous cell lines. The protective role of organic shell resulted in not only preserved high up-converted emission intensity and long luminescence lifetimes, without quenching from water environment, but also ensured low cytotoxicity and high cellular uptake of the engineered nanocapsules. The multifunctionality of the proposed nanocarriers is a consequence of both the organic exterior part that is accessible for conjugation with biologically important molecules, and the hydrophobic interior, which in future application may be used as a container for co-encapsulation of inorganic nanoparticles and anticancer drug cargo. PMID:27406954

  18. Triple-Modal Imaging of Magnetically-Targeted Nanocapsules in Solid Tumours In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Bai, Jie; Wang, Julie T-W; Rubio, Noelia; Protti, Andrea; Heidari, Hamed; Elgogary, Riham; Southern, Paul; Al-Jamal, Wafa' T; Sosabowski, Jane; Shah, Ajay M; Bals, Sara; Pankhurst, Quentin A; Al-Jamal, Khuloud T

    2016-01-01

    Triple-modal imaging magnetic nanocapsules, encapsulating hydrophobic superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, are formulated and used to magnetically target solid tumours after intravenous administration in tumour-bearing mice. The engineered magnetic polymeric nanocapsules m-NCs are ~200 nm in size with negative Zeta potential and shown to be spherical in shape. The loading efficiency of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in the m-NC was ~100%. Up to ~3- and ~2.2-fold increase in tumour uptake at 1 and 24 h was achieved, when a static magnetic field was applied to the tumour for 1 hour. m-NCs, with multiple imaging probes (e.g. indocyanine green, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and indium-111), were capable of triple-modal imaging (fluorescence/magnetic resonance/nuclear imaging) in vivo. Using triple-modal imaging is to overcome the intrinsic limitations of single modality imaging and provides complementary information on the spatial distribution of the nanocarrier within the tumour. The significant findings of this study could open up new research perspectives in using novel magnetically-responsive nanomaterials in magnetic-drug targeting combined with multi-modal imaging. PMID:26909110

  19. Ultrastable Liquid-Liquid Interface as Viable Route for Controlled Deposition of Biodegradable Polymer Nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Vecchione, Raffaele; Iaccarino, Giulia; Bianchini, Paolo; Marotta, Roberto; D'autilia, Francesca; Quagliariello, Vincenzo; Diaspro, Alberto; Netti, Paolo A

    2016-06-01

    Liquid-liquid interfaces are highly dynamic and characterized by an elevated interfacial tension as compared to solid-liquid interfaces. Therefore, they are gaining an increasing interest as viable templates for ordered assembly of molecules and nanoparticles. However, liquid-liquid interfaces are more difficult to handle compared to solid-liquid interfaces; their intrinsic instability may affect the assembly process, especially in the case of multiple deposition. Indeed, some attempts have been made in the deposition of polymer multilayers at liquid-liquid interfaces, but with limited control over size and stability. This study reports on the preparation of an ultrastable liquid-liquid interface based on an O/W secondary miniemulsion and its possible use as a template for the self-assembly of polymeric multilayer nanocapsules. Such polymer nanocapsules are made of entirely biodegradable materials, with highly controlled size-well under 200 nm-and multi-compartment and multifunctional features enriching their field of application in drug delivery, as well as in other bionanotechnology fields. PMID:27060934

  20. Polymeric nanocapsules with up-converting nanocrystals cargo make ideal fluorescent bioprobes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazylińska, U.; Wawrzyńczyk, D.; Kulbacka, J.; Frąckowiak, R.; Cichy, B.; Bednarkiewicz, A.; Samoć, M.; Wilk, K. A.

    2016-07-01

    An innovative approach for up-converting nanoparticles adaptation for bio-related and theranostic applications is presented. We have successfully encapsulated multiple, ~8 nm in size NaYF4 nanoparticles inside the polymeric nanocarriers with average size of ~150 nm. The initial coating of nanoparticles surfaces was preserved due to the hydrophobic environment inside the nanocapsules, and thus no single nanoparticle surface functionalization was necessary. The selection of biodegradable and sugar-based polyelectrolyte shells ensured biocompatibility of the nanostructures, while the choice of Tm3+ and Yb3+ NaYF4 nanoparticles co-doping allowed for near-infrared to near-infrared bioimaging of healthy and cancerous cell lines. The protective role of organic shell resulted in not only preserved high up-converted emission intensity and long luminescence lifetimes, without quenching from water environment, but also ensured low cytotoxicity and high cellular uptake of the engineered nanocapsules. The multifunctionality of the proposed nanocarriers is a consequence of both the organic exterior part that is accessible for conjugation with biologically important molecules, and the hydrophobic interior, which in future application may be used as a container for co-encapsulation of inorganic nanoparticles and anticancer drug cargo.

  1. Facile Directed Assembly of Hollow Polymer Nanocapsules within Spontaneously Formed Catanionic Surfactant Vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Mariya D.; Dergunov, Sergey; Richter, Andrew; Durbin, Jeffrey; Shmakov, Sergey; Jia, Ying; Kenbeilova, Saltanat; Orazbekuly, Yerbolat; Kengpeiil, Aigerim; Lindner, Erno; Pingali, Sai Venkatesh; Urban, Volker S; Weigand, Steven; Pinkhassik, Eugene

    2014-01-01

    Surfactant vesicles containing monomers in the interior of the bilayer were used to template hollow polymer nanocapsules. This study investigated the formation of surfactant/monomer assemblies by two loading methods, concurrent loading and diffusion loading. The assembly process and the resulting aggregates were investigated with dynamic light scattering, small angle neutron scattering, and small-angle X-ray scattering. Acrylic monomers formed vesicles with a mixture of cationic and anionic surfactants in a broad range of surfactant ratios. Regions with predominant formation of vesicles were broader for compositions containing acrylic monomers compared with blank surfactants. This observation supports the stabilization of the vesicular structure by acrylic monomers. Diffusion loading produced monomer-loaded vesicles unless vesicles were composed from surfactants at the ratios close to the boundary of a vesicular phase region on a phase diagram. Both concurrent-loaded and diffusion-loaded surfactant/monomer vesicles produced hollow polymer nanocapsules upon the polymerization of monomers in the bilayer followed by removal of surfactant scaffolds.

  2. Iron-Loaded Magnetic Nanocapsules for pH-Triggered Drug Release and MRI Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic nanocapsules were synthesized for controlled drug release, magnetically assisted delivery, and MRI imaging. These magnetic nanocapsules, consisting of a stable iron nanocore and a mesoporous silica shell, were synthesized by controlled encapsulation of ellipsoidal hematite in silica, partial etching of the hematite core in acid, and reduction of the core by hydrogen. The iron core provided a high saturation magnetization and was stable against oxidation for at least 6 months in air and 1 month in aqueous solution. The hollow space between the iron core and mesoporous silica shell was used to load anticancer drug and a T1-weighted MRI contrast agent (Gd-DTPA). These multifunctional monodispersed magnetic “nanoeyes” were coated by multiple polyelectrolyte layers of biocompatible poly-l-lysine and sodium alginate to control the drug release as a function of pH. We studied pH-controlled release, magnetic hysteresis curves, and T1/T2 MRI contrast of the magnetic nanoeyes. They also served as MRI contrast agents with relaxivities of 8.6 mM–1 s–1 (r1) and 285 mM–1 s–1 (r2). PMID:24748722

  3. Specific Elimination of Latently HIV-1 Infected Cells Using HIV-1 Protease-Sensitive Toxin Nanocapsules

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jing; Yan, Ming; Liu, Yang; Li, Jie; Xie, Yiming; Lu, Yunfeng; Kamata, Masakazu; Chen, Irvin S. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-retroviral drugs suppress HIV-1 plasma viremia to undetectable levels; however, latent HIV-1 persists in reservoirs within HIV-1-infected patients. The silent provirus can be activated through the use of drugs, including protein kinase C activators and histone deacetylase inhibitors. This “shock” approach is then followed by “kill” of the producing cells either through direct HIV-1-induced cell death or natural immune mechanisms. However, these mechanisms are relatively slow and effectiveness is unclear. Here, we develop an approach to specifically target and kill cells that are activated early in the process of virus production. We utilize a novel nanocapsule technology whereby the ricin A chain is encapsulated in an inactive form within a polymer shell. Specificity for release of the ricin A toxin is conferred by peptide crosslinkers that are sensitive to cleavage by HIV-1 protease. By using well-established latent infection models, J-Lat and U1 cells, we demonstrate that only within an HIV-1-producing cell expressing functional HIV-1 protease will the nanocapsule release its ricin A cargo, shutting down viral and cellular protein synthesis, and ultimately leading to rapid death of the producer cell. Thus, we provide proof of principle for a novel technology to kill HIV-1-producing cells without effects on non-target cells. PMID:27049645

  4. Efficacy of capsicum oleoresin nanocapsules formulation by the modified emulsion-diffusion method.

    PubMed

    Surassmo, Suvimol; Min, Sang-Gi; Bejrapha, Piyawan; Choi, Mi-Jung

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of high pressure homogenizer on the physico-chemical properties of capsicum oleoresin loaded nanoemulsion (NE) or nanocapsules (NCs) based on the emulsion-diffusion method. According to the application stage of high pressure process at principle emulsion-diffusion method, NCs was prepared by conventional-emulsion-diffusion method (CED), modified-emulsion-microfluidization-diffusion method (MEMD) and modified-emulsion-diffusion-microfluidization method (MEDM). The nanocapsules of MEMD showed homogeneous and the smallest particle size as compared with CED. In addition, MEMD presented the surface tension at the value 36.5 mN/m. The encapsulated capsicum oleoresin was generated the bright color and suppressed the dark red color. Furthermore, MEMD gave the high encapsulation efficiency of capsicum oleoresin around 95% and showed the slow release rate. On the other hand, MEDM presented the non-homogeneous and agglomerate of the particle, low percentage of encapsulation efficiency and the high initial release rate when compared with CED and MEMD methods. According these results, it was supposed that the microfluidization was interesting technique to ameliorate the physical properties and efficiency of NCs. However, it was depending on the appropriate combination of microfluidization based on the emulsion-diffusion method. PMID:21446515

  5. Oral fondaparinux: use of lipid nanocapsules as nanocarriers and in vivo pharmacokinetic study

    PubMed Central

    Ramadan, Alyaa; Lagarce, Frederic; Tessier-Marteau, Anne; Thomas, Olivier; Legras, Pierre; Macchi, Laurent; Saulnier, Patrick; Benoit, Jean Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Oral anticoagulant therapy could be advanced using lipid-based nanoparticulate systems. This study examined lipid nanocapsules for their oral absorption potential as the first step in developing oral fondaparinux (Fp) novel carriers. Using phase inversion method and cationic surfactants such as hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) or stearylamine (SA), cationic lipid nanocapsules (cLNCs), loaded with Fp on their surface, were prepared and characterized (zeta potential, size and Fp association efficiency and content). In vivo studies were conducted after single oral increasing doses of Fp-loaded cLNCs (0.5 to 5 mg/kg of Fp) in rats and the concentration of Fp in the plasma was measured by anti-factor Xa activity assay. The monodisperse, (~50 nm), positively charged Fp-cLNCs with high drug loadings demonstrated linear pharmacokinetic profiles of the drug with an increased oral absolute bioavailability (up to ~21%) compatible with therapeutic anticoagulant effect (>0.2 μg/mL). PMID:22162653

  6. Lipid nanocapsules as a new delivery system in copepods: Toxicity studies and optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Stancheva, Stefka; Souissi, Anissa; Ibrahim, Ali; Barras, Alexandre; Spriet, Corentin; Souissi, Sami; Boukherroub, Rabah

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we investigated the potential of lipid nanocapsules (LNCs) as a delivery system of small hydrophobic molecules, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) - pyrene, fluoranthene, phenanthrene, in the copepod Acartia tonsa. The LNCs were produced by a phase inversion process with a nominal size of 50 nm. These nanocapsules were obtained without organic solvent and with pharmaceutically acceptable excipients. The PAHs-LNCs displayed a stable monodisperse size distribution and a good stability in sea water for 7 days. By using fluorescent LNCs, it was possible to evidence LNCs ingestion by the copepods using confocal laser scanning microscopy. While blank LNCs are not toxic to copepods at tested concentrations, PAH-loaded LNCs were found to be very toxic on A. tonsa with a high mortality rate reaching 95% after 72 h exposure to 200 nM pyrene-loaded LNCs. On the other hand, when acetone is used to dissolve an equivalent concentration of PAHs in sea water, the copepod mortality is 10 times lower than using LNCs as nano-delivery system. This confirms the efficiency of using LNCs to deliver molecules directly in the gut or copepod carapace. The small size and non toxicity of these delivery nano-systems make them suitable for drug delivery to copepods. PMID:26280818

  7. Lipid-Core Nanocapsules Improved Antiedematogenic Activity of Tacrolimus in Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis Model.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Rossana B; Coradini, Karine; Fonseca, Francisco N; Guterres, Silvia S; Beck, Ruy C R; Pohlmann, Adriana R

    2016-02-01

    Despite significant technological advances, rheumatoid arthritis remains an incurable disease with great impact on the life quality of patients. We studied the encapsulation of tacrolimus in lipidcore nanocapsules (TAC-LNC) as a strategy to enhance its systemic anti-arthritic properties. TAC-LNC presented unimodal distribution of particles with z-average diameter of 212 +/- 11, drug content close to the theoretical value (0.80 mg mL(-1)), and 99.43% of encapsulation efficiency. An in vitro sustained release was determined for TAC-LNC with anomalous transport mechanism (n = 0.61). In vivo studies using an arthritis model induced by Complete Freund's Adjuvant demonstrated that the animals treated with TAC-LNC presented a significantly greater inhibition of paw oedema after intraperitoneal administration. Furthermore, the encapsulation of TAC in lipid-core nanocapsules was potentially able to prevent hyperglycemia in the animals. In conclusion, TAC-LNC was prepared with 100% yield of nanoscopic particles having satisfactory characteristics for systemic use. This formulation represents a promising strategy to the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in the near future. PMID:27433576

  8. Specific Elimination of Latently HIV-1 Infected Cells Using HIV-1 Protease-Sensitive Toxin Nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jing; Yan, Ming; Liu, Yang; Li, Jie; Xie, Yiming; Lu, Yunfeng; Kamata, Masakazu; Chen, Irvin S Y

    2016-01-01

    Anti-retroviral drugs suppress HIV-1 plasma viremia to undetectable levels; however, latent HIV-1 persists in reservoirs within HIV-1-infected patients. The silent provirus can be activated through the use of drugs, including protein kinase C activators and histone deacetylase inhibitors. This "shock" approach is then followed by "kill" of the producing cells either through direct HIV-1-induced cell death or natural immune mechanisms. However, these mechanisms are relatively slow and effectiveness is unclear. Here, we develop an approach to specifically target and kill cells that are activated early in the process of virus production. We utilize a novel nanocapsule technology whereby the ricin A chain is encapsulated in an inactive form within a polymer shell. Specificity for release of the ricin A toxin is conferred by peptide crosslinkers that are sensitive to cleavage by HIV-1 protease. By using well-established latent infection models, J-Lat and U1 cells, we demonstrate that only within an HIV-1-producing cell expressing functional HIV-1 protease will the nanocapsule release its ricin A cargo, shutting down viral and cellular protein synthesis, and ultimately leading to rapid death of the producer cell. Thus, we provide proof of principle for a novel technology to kill HIV-1-producing cells without effects on non-target cells. PMID:27049645

  9. 21 CFR 146.137 - Frozen orange juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Frozen orange juice. 146.137 Section 146.137 Food... Beverages § 146.137 Frozen orange juice. (a) Frozen orange juice is orange juice as defined in § 146.135, except that it is frozen. (b) The name of the food is “Frozen orange juice”. Such name may be preceded...

  10. 21 CFR 146.137 - Frozen orange juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Frozen orange juice. 146.137 Section 146.137 Food... Beverages § 146.137 Frozen orange juice. (a) Frozen orange juice is orange juice as defined in § 146.135, except that it is frozen. (b) The name of the food is “Frozen orange juice”. Such name may be preceded...