Science.gov

Sample records for oil structured lipid

  1. Study of structured lipid-based oil-in-water emulsion prepared with sophorolipid and its oxidative stability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, the stability of oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions prepared with structured lipids (SLs) were evaluated in which the SLs were produced through lipase-catalyzed interesterification between soybean oil and rice bran oil. After interesterification reaction, the major triacylglycerol (TAG) sp...

  2. Lipids, Proteins, and Structure of Seed Oil Bodies from Diverse Species.

    PubMed Central

    Tzen, JTC.; Cao, Yz.; Laurent, P.; Ratnayake, C.; Huang, AHC.

    1993-01-01

    Oil bodies isolated from the mature seeds of rape (Brassica napus L.), mustard (Brassica juncea L.), cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.), flax (Linus usitatis simum), maize (Zea mays L.), peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.), and sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) had average diameters that were different but within a narrow range (0.6-2.0 [mu]m), as measured from electron micrographs of serial sections. Their contents of triacylglycerols (TAG), phospholipids, and proteins (oleosins) were correlated with their sizes. The correlation fits a formula that describes a spherical particle surrounded by a shell of a monolayer of phospholipids embedded with oleosins. Oil bodies from the various species contained substantial amounts of the uncommon negatively charged phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol, as well as small amounts of free fatty acids. These acidic lipids are assumed to interact with the basic amino acid residues of the oleosins on the surface of the phospholipid layer. Isoelectrofocusing revealed that the oil bodies from the various species had an isoelectric point of 5.7 to 6.6 and thus possessed a negatively charged surface at neutral pH. We conclude that seed oil bodies from diverse species are very similar in structure. In rapeseed during maturation, TAG and oleosins accumulated concomitantly. TAG-synthesizing acyltransferase activities appeared at an earlier stage and peaked during the active period of TAG accumulation. The concomitant accumulation of TAG and oleosins is similar to that reported earlier for maize and soybean, and the finding has an implication for the mode of oil body synthesis during seed maturation. PMID:12231682

  3. Synthesis and Characterization of Canola Oil-Stearic Acid-Based Trans-Free Structured Lipids for Possible Margarine Application

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Incorporation of stearic acid into canola oil to produce trans-free structured lipid (SL) as a healthy alternative to partially hydrogenated fats for margarine formulation was investigated. Response surface methodology was used to study the effects of Lipozyme RM IM from Rhizomucor Miehei and Candid...

  4. Synthesis and Characterization of Canola Oil-Stearic Acid-Based Trans-Free Structured Lipids for Possible Margarine Application

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Incorporation of stearic acid into canola oil to produce trans-free structured lipid (SL) as a healthy alternative to partially hydrogenated fats for margarine formulation was investigated. Response surface methodology was used to study the effects of lipozyme RM IM from Rhizomucor miehei and Candi...

  5. A critical study of novel physically structured lipid matrices composed of a homolipid from Capra hircus and theobroma oil.

    PubMed

    Attama, A A; Müller-Goymann, C C

    2006-09-28

    There is increasing interest in drug formulation using lipids. In this study, some physically structured lipid matrices were formulated and characterized for drug delivery applications. Lipid matrices containing a novel homolipid from Capra hircus (goat fat) and theobroma oil, at 25, 50 and 75% (w/w) concentration of the homolipid were formulated by fusion. The lipid matrices were subjected to some characterization procedures such as differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to ascertain their supramolecular properties, small angle X-ray diffraction (SAXD), wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD), polarized light microscopy (PLM) and isothermal heat conduction microcalorimetry (IMC). The internal structures of some selected lipid matrices were also studied by freeze-fracture transmission electron microscopy (FFTEM). DSC results obtained indicated that goat fat has a pre-transition at 15.9 +/- 0.2 degrees C (after 1 week) and melts completely with two detectable melting peaks at 33.0 +/- 0.2 and 49.9 +/- 0.1 degrees C, and total enthalpy of 99.9 +/- 2.5 mJ/mg determined after 6 weeks of preparation. The melting enthalpy of goat fat changed after 3 weeks but remained constant after 6 weeks while the melting enthalpy of the lipid matrix containing 50% (w/w) goat fat changed after 3 and 6 weeks. An increase in lower melting peak was observed in the lipid matrix containing 25% (w/w) goat fat after 6 weeks. WAXD and SAXD of the physically structured lipid matrices showed reflections of the different pure lipids but new interferences were detected in WAXD mostly between 2theta=17.5 degrees and 2theta=27.5 degrees . PLM observation revealed the presence of Maltese crosses for the homolipid at 37 degrees C, which disappeared upon heating at 51.0 degrees C. PLM of the structured lipid matrix containing 25% (w/w) goat fat showed distinct crystal growth after 4 weeks among the admixtures. However, IMC studies did not reveal any change in recrystallization behaviour in this lipid

  6. Composition and oxidative stability of a structured lipid from amaranth oil in a milk-based infant formula.

    PubMed

    Pina-Rodriguez, Ashanty M; Akoh, Casimir C

    2010-03-01

    Amaranth oil can be enzymatically modified to match breast milk fat analog requirements. We have developed a structured lipid (SL) from amaranth oil that, in combination with milk fat, delivers recommended amounts of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) with palmitic acid specifically esterified at the sn-2 position of the triacylglycerol (TAG) backbone. The aim of this study was to study the final fatty acid (FA) contribution and oxidation stability of an infant formula prepared using the structured lipid DCAO (DHA-containing customized amaranth oil). DCAO was included as complementary fat in a "prototype" infant formula, and prepared in parallel with a "control" infant formula under the same processing conditions. The same ingredients but different complementary fat sources were used. A blend of the most commonly used vegetable oils (palm olein, soybean, coconut, and high-oleic sunflower oils) for infant formula was used instead of DCAO in the "control" formula. Additionally, "prototype" and "control" infant formulas were compared to a "commercial" product in terms of FA composition. The oxidative stability index (OSI) of the extracted fats from "prototype,"control," and "commercial" infant formulas were evaluated and compared to the OSI of the substrate fat replacers used. DCAO was the least stable compared to other fat analogs. The use of commercial antioxidants in DCAO containing products should prevent oxidation and therefore increase their stability. PMID:20492217

  7. Potential Use of Avocado Oil on Structured Lipids MLM-Type Production Catalysed by Commercial Immobilised Lipases

    PubMed Central

    Caballero, Eduardo; Soto, Carmen; Olivares, Araceli; Altamirano, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Structured Lipids are generally constituents of functional foods. Growing demands for SL are based on a fuller understanding of nutritional requirements, lipid metabolism, and improved methods to produce them. Specifically, this work was aimed to add value to avocado oil by producing dietary triacylglycerols (TAG) containing medium-chain fatty acids (M) at positions sn-1,3 and long-chain fatty acids (L) at position sn-2. These MLM-type structured lipids (SL) were produced by interesterification of caprylic acid (CA) (C8:0) and avocado oil (content of C18:1). The regiospecific sn-1,3 commercial lipases Lipozyme RM IM and TL IM were used as biocatalysts to probe the potential of avocado oil to produce SL. Reactions were performed at 30–50°C for 24 h in solvent-free media with a substrate molar ratio of 1∶2 (TAG:CA) and 4–10% w/w enzyme content. The lowest incorporation of CA (1.1% mol) resulted from Lipozyme RM IM that was incubated at 50°C. The maximum incorporation of CA into sn-1,3 positions of TAG was 29.2% mol. This result was obtained at 30°C with 10% w/w Lipozyme TL IM, which is the highest values obtained in solvent-free medium until now for structured lipids of low-calories. This strategy opens a new market to added value products based on avocado oil. PMID:25248107

  8. Potential use of avocado oil on structured lipids MLM-type production catalysed by commercial immobilised lipases.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Eduardo; Soto, Carmen; Olivares, Araceli; Altamirano, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Structured Lipids are generally constituents of functional foods. Growing demands for SL are based on a fuller understanding of nutritional requirements, lipid metabolism, and improved methods to produce them. Specifically, this work was aimed to add value to avocado oil by producing dietary triacylglycerols (TAG) containing medium-chain fatty acids (M) at positions sn-1,3 and long-chain fatty acids (L) at position sn-2. These MLM-type structured lipids (SL) were produced by interesterification of caprylic acid (CA) (C8:0) and avocado oil (content of C18:1). The regiospecific sn-1,3 commercial lipases Lipozyme RM IM and TL IM were used as biocatalysts to probe the potential of avocado oil to produce SL. Reactions were performed at 30-50°C for 24 h in solvent-free media with a substrate molar ratio of 1∶2 (TAG:CA) and 4-10% w/w enzyme content. The lowest incorporation of CA (1.1% mol) resulted from Lipozyme RM IM that was incubated at 50°C. The maximum incorporation of CA into sn-1,3 positions of TAG was 29.2% mol. This result was obtained at 30°C with 10% w/w Lipozyme TL IM, which is the highest values obtained in solvent-free medium until now for structured lipids of low-calories. This strategy opens a new market to added value products based on avocado oil. PMID:25248107

  9. Synthesis of structured lipids by lipase-catalyzed interesterification of triacetin with camellia oil methyl esters and preliminary evaluation of their plasma lipid-lowering effect in mice.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yu; Qi, Suijian; Zhang, Yang; Wang, Xiaoning; Yang, Bo; Wang, Yonghua

    2013-01-01

    Structured lipids (SLCTs triacylglycerols with short- and long-chain acyl residues) were synthesized by interesterification of triacetin and fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) from camellia oil, followed by molecular distillation for purification. Different commercial immobilized lipases (Lipozyme RM IM and Novozyme 435), the substrate molar ratios of FAMEs to triacetin, the reaction temperatures and the lipase amounts were studied for their efficiency in producing SLCTs. Results showed that Novozyme 435 was more suitable for this reaction system. Moreover, the optimal reaction conditions for the highest conversion of FAMEs and the highest LLS-TAGs (triacylglycerols with one short- and two long-chain acyl residues) yields were achieved at a molar ratio of FAMEs to triacetin of 3:1, 50 °C of reaction temperature and a lipase amount of 4% (w/v). Scale-up was conducted based on the optimized reaction conditions. Results showed that after 24 h of reaction , the conversion rate of FAMEs was 82.4% and the rate of disubstituted triacetin was 52.4 mol%. The final product yield rate was 94.6%. The effects of the synthesized SLCTs on the plasma lipid level of fasting mice were also studied. The SLCTs could effectively lessen the total triacylglycerol levels in plasma compared to the triacylglycerol group in fasting NIH mice. It suggested that this type of structured lipid might be beneficial for human health, especially for the prevention of obesity. PMID:23529033

  10. Empty nano and micro-structured lipid carriers of virgin coconut oil for skin moisturisation.

    PubMed

    Noor, Norhayati Mohamed; Khan, Abid Ali; Hasham, Rosnani; Talib, Ayesha; Sarmidi, Mohamad Roji; Aziz, Ramlan; Aziz, Azila Abd

    2016-08-01

    Virgin coconut oil (VCO) is the finest grade of coconut oil, rich in phenolic content, antioxidant activity and contains medium chain triglycerides (MCTs). In this work formulation, characterisation and penetration of VCO-solid lipid particles (VCO-SLP) have been studied. VCO-SLP were prepared using ultrasonication of molten stearic acid and VCO in an aqueous solution. The electron microscopy imaging revealed that VCO-SLP were solid and spherical in shape. Ultrasonication was performed at several power intensities which resulted in particle sizes of VCO-SLP ranged from 0.608 ± 0.002 µm to 44.265 ± 1.870 µm. The particle size was directly proportional to the applied power intensity of ultrasonication. The zeta potential values of the particles were from -43.2 ± 0.28 mV to -47.5 ± 0.42 mV showing good stability. The cumulative permeation for the smallest sized VCO-SLP (0.608 µm) was 3.83 ± 0.01 µg/cm(2) whereas for larger carriers it was reduced (3.59 ± 0.02 µg/cm(2)). It is concluded that SLP have the potential to be exploited as a micro/nano scale cosmeceutical carrying vehicle for improved dermal delivery of VCO. PMID:27463789

  11. Achene Structure, Development and Lipid Accumulation in Sunflower Cultivars Differing in Oil Content at Maturity

    PubMed Central

    MANTESE, ANITA I.; MEDAN, DIEGO; HALL, ANTONIO J.

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims Sunflower cultivars exhibit a wide range of oil content in the mature achene, but the relationship between this and the dynamics of oil deposition in the achene during grain filling is not known. Information on the progress, during the whole achene growth period, of the formation of oil bodies in the components of the achene and its relationship with variations in final oil content is also lacking. • Methods The biomass dynamics of achene components (pericarp, embryo, oil) in three cultivars of very different final oil concentration (30–56 % oil) were studied. In parallel, anatomical sections were used to follow the formation of oil and protein bodies in the embryo, and to observe pericarp anatomy. • Key Results In all cultivars, oil bodies were first observed in the embryo 6–7 daa after anthesis (daa). The per-cell number of oil bodies increased rapidly from 10–12 daa until 25–30 daa. Oil bodies were absent from the outer cell layers of young fruit and from mature pericarps. In mature embryos, the proportion of cell cross-sectional area occupied by protein bodies increased with decreasing embryo oil concentration. The sclerenchymatic layer of the mature pericarp decreased in thickness and number of cell layers from the low-oil cultivar to the high-oil cultivar. Different patterns of oil accumulation in the embryo across cultivars were also found, leading to variations in ripe embryo oil concentration. In the high-oil cultivar, the end of oil deposition coincided with cessation of embryo growth, while in the other two cultivars oil ceased to accumulate before the embryo achieved maximum weight. • Conclusions Cultivar differences in mature achene oil concentration reflect variations in pericarp proportion and thickness and mature embryo oil concentration. Cultivar differences in protein body proportion and embryo and oil mass dynamics during achene growth underlie variations in embryo oil concentration. PMID:16675608

  12. Preparation and structure of a water-in-oil cream containing lipid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    de Vringer, T; de Ronde, H A

    1995-04-01

    To obtain a topical dermatological product with a high degree of occlusivity combined with attractive cosmetic properties, a water-in-oil (w/o) cream containing small particles of solid paraffin was developed. Dynamic light scattering, freeze-fracture electron microscopy, polarization microscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry were used to characterize the cream. The preparation method essentially consisted of two steps. First, an aqueous dispersion of solid paraffin particles, with a mean diameter of 200 nm, was prepared with an oil-in-water (o/w) emulsifier. The aqueous dispersion proved to be extremely stable, and the particles had a spherical shape. Second, the aqueous dispersion was incorporated into the water phase of the cream during its production. After production of the cream, 68% of the paraffin was present as particles in the dispersed water phase. The size and shape of these particles did not change by the mechanical treatment during the production of the cream. At least 28% of the paraffin was present in the continuous oily phase, either as solid particles or in the form of a gel structure. At most, 4% of the paraffin was dissolved in this oily phase. The excess o/w emulsifier present in the aqueous phase of the w/o cream did not cause physical instability. PMID:7629738

  13. Production and stability of structured lipids from algal oils and capric acid.

    PubMed

    Hamam, Fayez; Shahidi, Fereidoon

    2004-01-01

    This study aimed to incorporate capric acid (CA) into selected algal oils, namely arachidoinc acid single cell oil (ARASCO), docosahexaenoic acid single cell oil (DHASCO) and the OMEGA-GOLD oil rich in dcosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and dosapentaenoic acid (n-6 DPA). Response surface methodology indicated that under optimum conditions (12.3% enzyme, 45 degrees C, and 29.4 h) CA incorporation was 20.0% into ARASCO; (4.2% enzyme, 43.3 degrees C, and 27.1 h) 22.6% into DHASCO and (2.5% enzyme, 46.6 degrees C and 25.2 h) 20.7% into the OMEGA-GOLD oil. Stereospecific analysis indicated that in all oils examined CA was mainly located at the sn-1 and sn-3 positions of the resultant TAG molecules while the highly unsaturated fatty acids being primarily esterified to the sn-2 positions of the three oils. In all cases, enzymatically modified oils were more susceptible to oxidation than their unmodified counterparts. PMID:15630303

  14. Structure of lipid bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Nagle, John F.; Tristram-Nagle, Stephanie

    2009-01-01

    The quantitative experimental uncertainty in the structure of fully hydrated, biologically relevant, fluid (Lα) phase lipid bilayers has been too large to provide a firm base for applications or for comparison with simulations. Many structural methods are reviewed including modern liquid crystallography of lipid bilayers that deals with the fully developed undulation fluctuations that occur in the Lα phase. These fluctuations degrade the higher order diffraction data in a way that, if unrecognized, leads to erroneous conclusions regarding bilayer structure. Diffraction measurements at high instrumental resolution provide a measure of these fluctuations. In addition to providing better structural determination, this opens a new window on interactions between bilayers, so the experimental determination of interbilayer interaction parameters is reviewed briefly. We introduce a new structural correction based on fluctuations that has not been included in any previous studies. Updated measurements, such as for the area compressibility modulus, are used to provide adjustments to many of the literature values of structural quantities. Since the gel (Lβ′) phase is valuable as a stepping stone for obtaining fluid phase results, a brief review is given of the lower temperature phases. The uncertainty in structural results for lipid bilayers is being reduced and best current values are provided for bilayers of five lipids. PMID:11063882

  15. Levels of bioactive lipids in cooking oils: olive oil is the richest source of oleoyl serine

    PubMed Central

    Leishman, Emma

    2016-01-01

    Background Rates of osteoporosis are significantly lower in regions of the world where olive oil consumption is a dietary cornerstone. Olive oil may represent a source of oleoyl serine (OS), which showed efficacy in animal models of osteoporosis. Here, we tested the hypothesis that OS as well as structurally analogous N-acyl amide and 2-acyl glycerol lipids are present in the following cooking oils: olive, walnut, canola, high heat canola, peanut, safflower, sesame, toasted sesame, grape seed, and smart balance omega. Methods Methanolic lipid extracts from each of the cooking oils were partially purified on C-18 solid-phase extraction columns. Extracts were analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, and 33 lipids were measured in each sample, including OS and bioactive analogs. Results Of the oils screened here, walnut oil had the highest number of lipids detected (22/33). Olive oil had the second highest number of lipids detected (20/33), whereas grape-seed and high-heat canola oil were tied for lowest number of detected lipids (6/33). OS was detected in 8 of the 10 oils tested and the levels were highest in olive oil, suggesting that there is something about the olive plant that enriches this lipid. Conclusions Cooking oils contain varying levels of bioactive lipids from the N-acyl amide and 2-acyl glycerol families. Olive oil is a dietary source of OS, which may contribute to lowered prevalence of osteoporosis in countries with high consumption of this oil. PMID:26565552

  16. Oil-enriched, ultra-small nanostructured lipid carriers (usNLC): a novel delivery system based on flip-flop structure.

    PubMed

    Keck, Cornelia M; Baisaeng, Nuttakorn; Durand, Philippe; Prost, Michel; Meinke, Martina C; Müller, Rainer H

    2014-12-30

    For the development of ultra-small NLC (usNLC) the determination of the required HLB (hydrophilic lipophilic balance) was found to be a suitable method, i.e., usNLC with a size below 50 nm were obtained by this method. Loading with 5% (w/w) coenzyme Q10 (Q10) led to usNLC with a size of about 85 nm. In comparison to classical NLC with a size of 230 nm and a nanoemulsion with similar size, the Q10 loaded usNLC show a higher release, a higher antioxidant capacity, and a better skin penetration for Q10. The reason for this is a flip-flop core-shell structure of the lipid matrix, i.e., the oil with dissolved active is surrounding the solid lipid based core. As the flip-flop structure was probably achieved by admixing high contents of liquid lipid, oil enriched usNLC might represent a novel and promising carrier system for the improved delivery of lipophilic actives. PMID:25455773

  17. Lipase-catalyzed synthesis of structured phenolic lipids in solvent-free system using flaxseed oil and selected phenolic acids as substrates.

    PubMed

    Sorour, Noha; Karboune, Salwa; Saint-Louis, Richard; Kermasha, Selim

    2012-04-15

    Structured phenolic lipids (PLs) were obtained by lipase-catalyzed transesterification of flaxseed oil, in a solvent-free system (SFS), with selected phenolic acids, including hydroxylated and/or methoxylated derivatives of cinnamic, phenyl acetic and benzoic acids. A bioconversion yield of 65% was obtained for the transesterification of flaxseed oil with 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl acetic acid (DHPA). However, the effect of the chemical structure of phenolic acids on the transesterification of flaxseed oil in SFS was of less magnitude as compared to that in organic solvent system (OSS). Using DHPA, the APCI-MS analysis confirmed the synthesis of monolinolenyl, dilinolenyl, linoleyl linolenyl and oleyl linolenyl dihydroxyphenyl acetates as phenolic lipids. A significant increase in the enzymatic activity from 200 to 270 nmol of PLs/g solid enzyme/min was obtained upon the addition of the non-ionic surfactant Span 65. However, upon the addition of the anionic surfactant, sodium bis-2-ethylhexyl sulfosuccinate (AOT), and the cationic one, hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), the enzymatic activity was decreased slightly from 200 to 192 and 190 nmol of PLs/g solid enzyme/min, respectively. The results also showed that the increase in DHPA concentration from 20 to 60 mM resulted in a significant increase in the volumetric productivity (P(V)) from 1.61 to 4.74 mg PLs per mL reaction mixture per day. PMID:22329891

  18. Mid-infrared spectral characteristics of lipid molecular structures in Brassica carinata seeds: relationship to oil content, fatty acid and glucosinolate profiles, polyphenols, and condensed tannins.

    PubMed

    Xin, Hangshu; Khan, Nazir A; Falk, Kevin C; Yu, Peiqiang

    2014-08-13

    The objectives of this study were to quantify lipid-related inherent molecular structures using a Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) technique and determine their relationship to oil content, fatty acid and glucosinolate profile, total polyphenols, and condensed tannins in seeds from newly developed yellow-seeded and brown-seeded Brassica carinata lines. Canola seeds were used as a reference. The lipid-related molecular spectral band intensities were strongly correlated to the contents of oil, fatty acids, glucosinolates, and polyphenols. The regression equations gave relatively high predictive power for the estimation of oil (R² = 0.99); all measured fatty acids (R² > 0.80), except C14:0, C20:3n-3, C22:2n-9, and C22:2n-6; 3-butenyl, 2-OH-3-butenyl, 4-OH-3-CH3-indolyl, and total glucosinolates (R² > 0.686); and total polyphenols (R² = 0.935). However, further study is required to obtain predictive equations based on large numbers of samples from diverse sources to illustrate the general applicability of these regression equations. PMID:25046077

  19. Enzymatic Synthesis of Refined Olive Oil-Based Structured Lipid Containing Omega -3 and -6 Fatty Acids for Potential Application in Infant Formula.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruoyu; Sabir, Jamal S M; Baeshen, Nabih A; Akoh, Casimir C

    2015-11-01

    Structured lipids (SLs) containing palmitic, docosahexaenoic (DHA), and gamma-linolenic (GLA) acids were produced using refined olive oil, tripalmitin, and ethyl esters of DHA single cell oil and GLA ethyl esters. Immobilized Lipozyme TL IM lipase was used as the biocatalyst. The SLs were characterized for fatty acid profile, triacylglycerol (TAG) molecular species, solid fat content, oxidative stability index, and melting and crystallization profiles and compared to physical blend of substrates, extracted fat from commercial infant formula (IFF), and milk fat. 49.28 mol% of palmitic acid was found at the sn-2 position of SL TAG and total DHA and GLA composition were 0.73 and 5.00 mol%, respectively. The total oleic acid content was 36.13 mol% which was very close to the 30.49% present in commercial IFF. Comparable solid fat content profiles were also found between SLs and IFF. The SLs produced have potential for use in infant formulas. PMID:26408984

  20. Performance of structured lipids incorporating selected phenolic and ascorbic acids.

    PubMed

    Gruczynska, Eliza; Przybylski, Roman; Aladedunye, Felix

    2015-04-15

    Conditions applied during frying require antioxidant which is stable at these conditions and provides protection for frying oil and fried food. Novel structured lipids containing nutraceuticals and antioxidants were formed by enzymatic transesterification, exploring canola oil and naturally occurring antioxidants such as ascorbic and selected phenolic acids as substrates. Lipozyme RM IM lipase from Rhizomucor miehei was used as biocatalyst. Frying performance and oxidative stability of the final transesterification products were evaluated. The novel lipids showed significantly improved frying performance compared to canola oil. Oxidative stability assessment of the structured lipids showed significant improvement in resistance to oxidative deterioration compared to original canola oil. Interestingly, the presence of ascorbic acid in an acylglycerol structure protected α-tocopherol against thermal degradation, which was not observed for the phenolic acids. Developed structured lipids containing nutraceuticals and antioxidants may directly affect nutritional properties of lipids also offering nutraceutical ingredients for food formulation. PMID:25466089

  1. Dietary rosemary oil alleviates heat stress-induced structural and functional damage through lipid peroxidation in the testes of growing Japanese quail.

    PubMed

    Türk, Gaffari; Çeribaşı, Ali O; Şimşek, Ülkü G; Çeribaşı, Songül; Güvenç, Mehmet; Özer Kaya, Şeyma; Çiftçi, Mehmet; Sönmez, Mustafa; Yüce, Abdurrauf; Bayrakdar, Ali; Yaman, Mine; Tonbak, Fadime

    2016-01-01

    Supplementation of natural antioxidants to diets of male poultry has been reported to be effective in reducing or completely eliminating heat stress (HS)-induced reproductive failures. In this study, the aim is to investigate whether rosemary oil (RO) has a protective effect on HS-induced damage in spermatozoa production, testicular histologic structures, apoptosis, and androgenic receptor (AR) through lipid peroxidation mechanisms in growing Japanese quail. Male chicks (n=90) at 15-days of age were assigned to two groups. The first group (n=45) was kept in a thermo-neutral (TN) room at 22°C for 24h/d. The second group (n=45) was kept in a room with a greater ambient temperature of 34°C for 8h/d (from 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM) and 22°C for 16h/d. Animals in each of these two groups were randomly assigned to three subgroups (RO groups: 0, 125, 250ppm), consisting of 15 chicks (six treatment groups in 2×3 factorial design). Each of subgroups was replicated three times with each replicate including five chicks. The HS treatment significantly reduced the testicular spermatogenic cell counts, amount of testicular Bcl-2 (anti-apoptotic marker) and amount of AR. In addition, it significantly increased testicular lipid peroxidation, Bax (apoptotic marker) immunopositive staining, and the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio in conjunction with some histopathologic damage. Dietary supplementation of RO to diets of quail where the HS treatment was imposed alleviated HS-induced almost all negative changes such as increased testicular lipid peroxidation, decreased numbers of spermatogenic cells, and decreased amounts of Bcl-2 and AR, increased ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 and some testicular histopathologic lesion. In conclusion, dietary supplementation of RO for growing male Japanese quail reared in HS environmental conditions alleviates the HS-induced structural and functional damage by providing a decrease in lipid peroxidation. PMID:26656503

  2. [Effects of essential oil on lipid peroxidation and lipid metabolism in patients with chronic bronchitis].

    PubMed

    Siurin, S A

    1997-01-01

    Natural concentrations of some essential oils were examined for effects on the system lipid peroxidation-antioxidant defense and lipid metabolism in 150 patients with chronic bronchitis. Lowering of plasm levels of dienic conjugates and ketons, activation of catalase in red cells characteristic of antioxidant effect were observed in exposure to essential oils of rosemary, basil, fir, eucalyptus. Lavender essential oil promotes normalization of the level of total lipids, ratio of total cholesterol to its alpha-fraction. PMID:9490339

  3. [Effect of five kinds of vegetable seed oil on serum lipid and lipid peroxidation in rats].

    PubMed

    Guo, Y; Cai, X; Zhao, X; Shi, R

    2001-01-01

    The effects of vegetable seed oil on hyperlipidemia induced by high lipid diet in rats. Male adult Wistar rats were fed on the test diet containing 94% high lipid diet and 6% lard pinon seed oil, perilla seed oil, blackcurrent seed oil, borage seed oil and evening primrose seed oil respectively for 3 weeks. The results showed that the vale of trilyceride(TG), total cholesterol(TC), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), LDL-C/HDL-C(high density lipoprotein cholesterol) ratio increased and the vale of HDL-C/TC ratio and lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase(LCAT) activity decreased in the groups with vegetable seed oil were less than that of the control group. The results suggested that all the five kinds of vegetable seed oil had the effect of regulating lipid metabolism of hyperlipidemia rats to some extent. Pinon seed oil and borage seed oil may be well suited for the prevention of atherosclerosis. PMID:11255765

  4. Heterogeneous aspects of lipid oxidation in dried microencapsulated oils.

    PubMed

    Velasco, Joaquín; Marmesat, Susana; Dobarganes, Carmen; Márquez-Ruiz, Gloria

    2006-03-01

    This work was aimed at studying lipid oxidation in dried microencapsulated oils (DMOs) during long-term storage. Samples were prepared by freeze-drying of emulsions containing sodium caseinate and lactose as encapsulating components. Evaluation of lipid oxidation was approached by quantitative analysis of nonvolatile lipid oxidation products and tocopherol. Lipid oxidation products were analyzed by separation of polar compounds by adsorption chromatography followed by HPSEC with refraction index detection for quantitation of oxidized triglyceride monomers, dimers, and oligomers. The analytical method applied enabled the detection of different oxidative patterns between the free and encapsulated oil fractions. The free oil fraction of DMOs showed a typical oxidative pattern for oils in continuous phase, which consisted of a clear induction period, in which hydroperoxides (oxidized triglyceride monomers) accumulated, before oxidation accelerated. The end of the induction period was marked by the total loss of tocopherol and the initiation of polymerization. On the contrary, the encapsulated oil showed a pattern characteristic of a mixture of oils with different oxidation status. Thus, high contents of advanced oxidation compounds (polymerization compounds) were detected when the antioxidant (tocopherol) was still present in high amounts. It is concluded that the encapsulated oil was comprised of oil globules with very different oxidation status. The results obtained in this study gave evidence of heterogeneous aspects of lipid oxidation in a dispersed-lipid food system. PMID:16506825

  5. Lipids: From Chemical Structures, Biosynthesis, and Analyses to Industrial Applications.

    PubMed

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Nakamura, Yuki; Harwood, John

    2016-01-01

    Lipids are one of the major subcellular components, and play numerous essential functions. As well as their physiological roles, oils stored in biomass are useful commodities for a variety of biotechnological applications including food, chemical feedstocks, and fuel. Due to their agronomic as well as economic and societal importance, lipids have historically been subjected to intensive studies. Major current efforts are to increase the energy density of cell biomass, and/or create designer oils suitable for specific applications. This chapter covers some basic aspects of what one needs to know about lipids: definition, structure, function, metabolism and focus is also given on the development of modern lipid analytical tools and major current engineering approaches for biotechnological applications. This introductory chapter is intended to serve as a primer for all subsequent chapters in this book outlining current development in specific areas of lipids and their metabolism. PMID:27023229

  6. Effects of flavonoid glycosides obtained from a Ginkgo biloba extract fraction on the physical and oxidative stabilities of oil-in-water emulsions prepared from a stripped structured lipid with a low omega-6 to omega-3 ratio.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dan; Wang, Xiang-Yu; Gan, Lu-Jing; Zhang, Hua; Shin, Jung-Ah; Lee, Ki-Teak; Hong, Soon-Taek

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we have produced a structured lipid with a low ω6/ω3 ratio by lipase-catalysed interesterification with perilla and grape seed oils (1:3, wt/wt). A Ginkgo biloba leaf extract was fractionated in a column packed with HP-20 resin, producing a flavonoid glycoside fraction (FA) and a biflavone fraction (FB). FA exhibited higher antioxidant capacity than FB, showing 58.4 mmol gallic acid equivalent (GAE)/g-of-total-phenol-content, 58.8 mg quercetin equivalent (QUE)/g-of-total-flavonoid-content, 4.5 mmol trolox/g-of-trolox-equivalent antioxidant capacity, 0.14 mg extract/mL-of-free-radical-scavenging-activity (DPPH assay, IC50), and 2.3 mmol Fe2SO4 · 7H2O/g-of-ferric-reducing-antioxidant-power. The oil-in-water emulsion containing the stripped structured lipid as an oil phase with FA exhibited the highest stability and the lowest oil globule diameters (d43 and d32), where the aggregation was unnoticeable by Turbiscan and particle size analyses during 30 days of storage. Furthermore, FA was effective in retarding the oxidation of the emulsions. PMID:25529661

  7. Solid lipid microparticles (SLM) containing juniper oil as anti-acne topical carriers: preliminary studies.

    PubMed

    Gavini, Elisabetta; Sanna, Vanna; Sharma, Reeta; Juliano, Claudia; Usai, Marianna; Marchetti, Mauro; Karlsen, Jan; Giunchedi, Paolo

    2005-01-01

    compounds owing to evaporation from dry particles was found in all preparations. This indicated that the microparticles were able to substantially maintain the oil loaded inside their lipidic structure, reducing its volatility. Some modifications of composition were found in the oil encapsulated in SLM with respect to the juniper oil raw material, but these modifications did not decrease the antibacterial activity of the oil. The SLM here described are promising carriers for the development of anti-acne topical formulations containing Juniper oil. PMID:16370177

  8. Comparative plant sphingolipidomic reveals specific lipids in seeds and oil.

    PubMed

    Tellier, Frédérique; Maia-Grondard, Alessandra; Schmitz-Afonso, Isabelle; Faure, Jean-Denis

    2014-07-01

    Plant sphingolipids are a highly diverse family of structural and signal lipids. Owing to their chemical diversity and complexity, a powerful analytical method was required to identify and quantify a large number of individual molecules with a high degree of structural accuracy. By using ultra-performance liquid chromatography with a single elution system coupled to electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-ESI-MS/MS) in the positive multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode, detailed sphingolipid composition was analyzed in various tissues of two Brassicaceae species Arabidopsis thaliana and Camelina sativa. A total of 300 molecular species were identified defining nine classes of sphingolipids, including Cers, hCers, Glcs and GIPCs. High-resolution mass spectrometry identified sphingolipids including amino- and N-acylated-GIPCs. The comparative analysis of seedling, seed and oil sphingolipids showed tissue specific distribution suggesting metabolic channeling and compartmentalization. PMID:24731258

  9. Further characterization of theobroma oil-beeswax admixtures as lipid matrices for improved drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Attama, A A; Schicke, B C; Müller-Goymann, C C

    2006-11-01

    There is an increasing interest in lipid based drug delivery systems due to factors such as better characterization of lipidic excipients and formulation versatility and the choice of different drug delivery systems. It is important to know the thermal characteristics, crystal habit, texture, and appearance of a new lipid matrix when determining its suitability for use in certain pharmaceutical application. It is line with this that this research was embarked upon to characterize mixtures of beeswax and theobroma oil with a view to applying their admixtures in drug delivery systems such as solid lipid nanoparticles and nanostructured lipid carriers. Admixtures of theobroma oil and beeswax were prepared to contain 25% w/w, 50% w/w, and 75% w/w of theobroma oil. The admixtures were analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), small angle X-ray diffraction (SAXD), wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD), and isothermal heat conduction microcalorimetry (IMC). The melting behavior and microstructures of the lipid admixtures were monitored by polarized light microscopy (PLM). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to study the internal structures of the lipid bases. DSC traces indicated that the higher melting peaks were roughly constant for the different admixtures, but lower melting peaks significantly increased (p < 0.05). The admixture containing 25% w/w of theobroma oil possessed highest crystallinity index of 95.6%. WAXD studies indicated different reflections for the different lipid matrices. However, new interferences were detected for all the lipid matrix admixtures between 2theta = 22.0 degrees and 2theta = 25.0 degrees. The lipid matrices containing 50% w/w and 25% w/w of theobroma oil showed absence of the weak reflection characteristic of pure theobroma oil, while there was disappearance of the strong intensity reflection of beeswax in all the lipid matrix admixtures at all stages of the study. PLM micrographs revealed differences with regard to

  10. Lipid classification, structures and tools☆

    PubMed Central

    Fahy, Eoin; Cotter, Dawn; Sud, Manish; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2012-01-01

    The study of lipids has developed into a research field of increasing importance as their multiple biological roles in cell biology, physiology and pathology are becoming better understood. The Lipid Metabolites and Pathways Strategy (LIPID MAPS) consortium is actively involved in an integrated approach for the detection, quantitation and pathway reconstruction of lipids and related genes and proteins at a systems-biology level. A key component of this approach is a bioinformatics infrastructure involving a clearly defined classification of lipids, a state-of-the-art database system for molecular species and experimental data and a suite of user-friendly tools to assist lipidomics researchers. Herein, we discuss a number of recent developments by the LIPID MAPS bioinformatics core in pursuit of these objectives. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Lipodomics and Imaging Mass Spectrometry. PMID:21704189

  11. Competitive adsorption between beta-casein or beta-lactoglobulin and model milk membrane lipids at oil-water interfaces.

    PubMed

    Waninge, Rianne; Walstra, Pieter; Bastiaans, Jan; Nieuwenhuijse, Hans; Nylander, Tommy; Paulsson, Marie; Bergenståhl, Björn

    2005-02-01

    This study investigated the competitive adsorption between milk proteins and model milk membrane lipids at the oil-water interface and its dependence on the state of the lipid dispersion and the formation of emulsions. Both protein and membrane lipid surface load were determined using a serum depletion technique. The membrane lipid mixture used was a model milk membrane lipid system, containing dioleoylphosphatidylcholine, dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine, milk sphingomyelin, dioleoylphosphatidylserine, and soybean phosphatidylinositol. The model composition mimics the lipid composition of natural milk fat globule membranes. The interactions were studied for two proteins, beta-lactoglobulin and beta-casein. The mixing order was varied to allow for differentiation between equilibrium structures and nonequilibrium structures. The results showed more than monolayer adsorption for most combinations. Proteins dominated at the oil-water interface in the protein-emulsified emulsion even after 48 h of exposure to a vesicular dispersion of membrane lipids. The membrane lipids dominated the oil-water interface in the case of the membrane lipid emulsified emulsion even after equilibration with a protein solution. Protein displacement with time was observed only for emulsions in which both membrane lipids and beta-casein were included during the emulsification. This study shows that kinetics controls the structures rather than the thermodynamic equilibrium, possibly resulting in structures more complex than an adsorbed monolayer. Thus, it can be expected that procedures such as the mixing order during emulsion preparation are of crucial importance to the emulsification performance. PMID:15686425

  12. Comprehensive analysis of lipid composition in crude palm oil using multiple lipidomic approaches.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Wei Fun; Wenk, Markus R; Shui, Guanghou

    2014-05-20

    Palm oil is currently the leading edible oil consumed worldwide. Triacylglycerol (TAG) and diacylglycerol (DAG) are the dominant lipid classes in palm oil. Other lipid classes present in crude palm oil, such as phospholipids and galactolipids, are very low in abundance. These low-abundance lipids constitute key intermediates in lipid biosynthesis. In this study, we applied multiple lipidomic approaches, including high-sensitivity and high-specificity multiple reaction monitoring, to comprehensively quantify individual lipid species in crude palm oil. We also established a new liquid chromatography-coupled mass spectrometry method that allows direct quantification of low-abundance galactolipids in palm oil without the need for sample pretreatment. As crude palm oil contains large amounts of neutral lipids, our direct-detection method circumvents many of the challenges encountered with conventional lipid quantification methods. This approach allows direct measurement of lipids with no hassle during sample preparation and is more accurate and precise compared with other methods. PMID:24894356

  13. The supramolecular chemistry of lipid oxidation and antioxidation in bulk oils

    PubMed Central

    Budilarto, Elizabeth S; Kamal-Eldin, Afaf

    2015-01-01

    The microenvironment formed by surface active compounds is being recognized as the active site of lipid oxidation. Trace amounts of water occupy the core of micro micelles and several amphiphilic minor components (e.g., phospholipids, monoacylglycerols, free fatty acids, etc.) act as surfactants and affect lipid oxidation in a complex fashion dependent on the structure and stability of the microemulsions in a continuous lipid phase such as bulk oil. The structures of the triacylglycerols and other lipid-soluble molecules affect their organization and play important roles during the course of the oxidation reactions. Antioxidant head groups, variably located near the water-oil colloidal interfaces, trap and scavenge radicals according to their location and concentration. According to this scenario, antioxidants inhibit lipid oxidation not only by scavenging radicals via hydrogen donation but also by physically stabilizing the micelles at the microenvironments of the reaction sites. There is a cut-off effect (optimum value) governing the inhibitory effects of antioxidants depending inter alias on their hydrophilic/lipophilic balance and their concentrations. These complex effects, previously considered as paradoxes in antioxidants research, are now better explained by the supramolecular chemistry of lipid oxidation and antioxidants, which is discussed in this review. PMID:26448722

  14. Influence of encapsulated functional lipids on crystal structure and chemical stability in solid lipid nanoparticles: Towards bioactive-based design of delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Hanna; Gömmel, Christina; Leuenberger, Bruno H; Weiss, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the influence of physicochemical properties of encapsulated functional lipids--vitamin A, β-carotene and ω-3 fish oil--on the structural arrangement of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN). The relationship between the crystal structure and chemical stability of the incorporated bioactive lipids was evaluated with different emulsifier compositions of a saponin-rich, food-grade Quillaja extract alone or combined with high-melting or low-melting lecithins. The major factors influencing the structural arrangement and chemical stability of functional lipids in solid lipid dispersions were their solubility in the aqueous phase and their crystallization temperature in relation to that of the carrier lipid. The results showed that the stabilization of the α-subcell crystals in the lattice of the carrier lipid is a key parameter for forming stable solid lipid dispersions. This study contributes to a better understanding of SLN as a function of the bioactive lipid. PMID:26213058

  15. Oil is on the agenda: Lipid turnover in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Amélie A; Feussner, Ivo

    2016-09-01

    Lipases hydrolyze ester bonds within lipids. This process is called lipolysis. They are key players in lipid turnover and involved in numerous metabolic pathways, many of which are shared between organisms like the mobilization of neutral or storage lipids or lipase-mediated membrane lipid homeostasis. Some reactions though are predominantly present in certain organisms, such as the production of signaling molecules (endocannabinoids) by diacylglycerol (DAG) and monoacylglycerol (MAG) lipases in mammals and plants or the jasmonate production in flowering plants. This review aims at giving an overview of the different functional classes of lipases and respective well-known activities, with a focus on the most recent findings in plant biology for selected classes. Here we will put an emphasis on the physiological role and contribution of lipases to the turnover of neutral lipids found in seed oil and other vegetative tissue as candidates for increasing the economical values of crop plants. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Lipid Biology edited by Kent D. Chapman and Ivo Feussner. PMID:27155216

  16. Structured lipids via lipase-catalyzed incorporation of eicosapentaenoic acid into borage (Borago officinalis L.) and evening primrose (Oenothera biennis L.) oils.

    PubMed

    Senanayake, S P J Namal; Shahidi, Fereidoon

    2002-01-30

    Enzymatic acidolysis of borage oil (BO) or evening primrose oil (EPO) with eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3; EPA) was studied. Of the six lipases that were tested in the initial screening, nonspecific lipase PS-30 from Pseudomonas sp. resulted in the highest incorporation of EPA into both oils. This enzyme was further studied for the influence of enzyme load, temperature, time, type of organic solvent, and mole ratio of substrates. The products from the acidolysis reaction were analyzed by gas chromatography (GC). The highest incorporation of EPA in both oils occurred at 45-55 degrees C and at 150-250 enzyme activity units. One unit of lipase activity was defined as nanomoles of fatty acids (oleic acid equivalents) produced per minute per gram of enzyme. Time course studies indicated that EPA incorporation was increased up to 26.8 and 25.2% (after 24 h) in BO and EPO, respectively. Among the solvents examined, n-hexane served best for the acidolysis of EPA with both oils. The effect of the mole ratio of oil to EPA was studied from 1:1 to 1:3. As the mole ratio of EPA increased, the incorporation increased from 25.2-26.8 to 37.4-39.9% (after 24 h). The highest EPA incorporations of 39.9 and 37.4% in BO and EPO, respectively, occurred at the stoichiometric mole ratio of 1:3 for oil to EPA. PMID:11804516

  17. Preparation and characterization of novel lipid carriers containing microalgae oil for food applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia-Li; Dong, Xu-Yan; Wei, Fang; Zhong, Juan; Liu, Bo; Yao, Ming-Hao; Yang, Mei; Zheng, Chang; Quek, Siew-Young; Chen, Hong

    2014-02-01

    This work investigated the suitability of lipid carriers as potential encapsulation method to improve the physical and chemical stability of microalgae oil high in docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Lipid carriers with various oil contents were successfully prepared by a microfluidization method using stearic acid as solid lipid, microalgae oil as liquid lipid, and poloxamer 188 as surfactant. Results show that the mean particle diameter of the lipid carriers was in the range of 300 to 350 nm with the polydispersity index below 0.2. The lipid carriers were found to have spherical shape when examined under the transmission electron microscope. Data from the encapsulation efficiency and loading capacity indicate high distribution of microalgae oil throughout the lipid carriers and good physical stability as reflected by the particle size and size distribution during storage. Furthermore, the lower DPPH scavenging activity of lipid carriers compared with that of free microalgae oil suggests better chemical stability of microalgae oil encapsulated in lipid carriers. The addition of microalgae oil into lipid phase could disturb the crystalline order and form lattice defects to enable encapsulation of DHA as revealed by the results from differential scanning calorimetery. Current results suggest that this type of novel lipid carriers could be an efficient and promising carrier system for delivery of microalgae oil. PMID:24446860

  18. The Effect of Fish Oil-Based Lipid Emulsion and Soybean Oil-Based Lipid Emulsion on Cholestasis Associated with Long-Term Parenteral Nutrition in Premature Infants

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Leilei; Zhang, Jing; Gao, Jiejin; Qian, Yan; Ling, Ya

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To retrospectively study the effect of fish oil-based lipid emulsion and soybean oil-based lipid emulsion on cholestasis associated with long-term parenteral nutrition in premature infants. Methods. Soybean oil-based lipid emulsion and fish oil-based lipid emulsion had been applied in our neonatology department clinically between 2010 and 2014. There were 61 qualified premature infants included in this study and divided into two groups. Soybean oil group was made up of 32 premature infants, while fish oil group was made up of 29 premature infants. Analysis was made on the gender, feeding intolerance, infection history, birth weight, gestational age, duration of parenteral nutrition, total dosage of amino acid, age at which feeding began, usage of lipid emulsions, and incidence of cholestasis between the two groups. Results. There were no statistical differences in terms of gender, feeding intolerance, infection history, birth weight, gestational age, duration of parenteral nutrition, total dosage of amino acid, and age at which feeding began. Besides, total incidence of cholestasis was 21.3%, and the days of life of occurrence of cholestasis were 53 ± 5.0 days. Incidence of cholestasis had no statistical difference in the two groups. Conclusion. This study did not find the different role of fish oil-based lipid emulsions and soybean oil-based lipid emulsions in cholestasis associated with long-term parenteral nutrition in premature infants. PMID:27110237

  19. Fish oil and krill oil supplementations differentially regulate lipid catabolic and synthetic pathways in mice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Marine derived oils are rich in long-chain polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acids, in particular eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), which have long been associated with health promoting effects such as reduced plasma lipid levels and anti-inflammatory effects. Krill oil (KO) is a novel marine oil on the market and is also rich in EPA and DHA, but the fatty acids are incorporated mainly into phospholipids (PLs) rather than triacylglycerols (TAG). This study compares the effects of fish oil (FO) and KO on gene regulation that influences plasma and liver lipids in a high fat diet mouse model. Methods Male C57BL/6J mice were fed either a high-fat diet (HF) containing 24% (wt/wt) fat (21.3% lard and 2.3% soy oil), or the HF diet supplemented with FO (15.7% lard, 2.3% soy oil and 5.8% FO) or KO (15.6% lard, 2.3% soy oil and 5.7% KO) for 6 weeks. Total levels of cholesterol, TAG, PLs, and fatty acid composition were measured in plasma and liver. Gene regulation was investigated using quantitative PCR in liver and intestinal epithelium. Results Plasma cholesterol (esterified and unesterified), TAG and PLs were significantly decreased with FO. Analysis of the plasma lipoprotein particles indicated that the lipid lowering effect by FO is at least in part due to decreased very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) content in plasma with subsequent liver lipid accumulation. KO lowered plasma non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) with a minor effect on fatty acid accumulation in the liver. In spite of a lower omega-3 fatty acid content in the KO supplemented diet, plasma and liver PLs omega-3 levels were similar in the two groups, indicating a higher bioavailability of omega-3 fatty acids from KO. KO more efficiently decreased arachidonic acid and its elongation/desaturation products in plasma and liver. FO mainly increased the expression of several genes involved in fatty acid metabolism, while KO specifically decreased the expression of genes involved in

  20. Preventive effect of cinnamon essential oil on lipid oxidation of vegetable oil

    PubMed Central

    Keshvari, Mahtab; Asgary, Sedigheh; Jafarian-dehkordi, Abbas; Najafi, Somayeh; Ghoreyshi-Yazdi, Seyed Mojtaba

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Lipid oxidation is the main deterioration process that occurs in vegetable oils. This process was effectively prevented by natural antioxidants. Cinnamomum zeylanicum (Cinnamon) is rich with antioxidants. The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of cinnamon on malondialdehyde (MDA) rate production in two high consumption oils in Iranian market. METHODS Chemical composition of cinnamon essential oil was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). 200 µl each oil, 50 µl tween 20, and 2 ml of 40 Mm AAPH solutions were mixed and the prepared solution was divided into four glass vials. Respectively, 50 µl of 500, 1000 and 2000 ppm of cinnamon essential oil were added to three glass vials separately and one of the glass vials was used as the control. All of the glass vials were incubated at 37° C water bath. Rate of MDA production was measured by thiobarbituric acid (TBA) test at the baseline and after the 0.5, 1, 2, 3 and 5 hours. RESULTS Compounds of cinnamon essential oil by GC-MS analysis such as cinnamaldehyde (96.8%), alpha-capaene (0.2%), alpha-murolene (0.11%), para-methoxycinnamaldehyde (0.6%) and delta-cadinen (0.4%) were found to be the major compounds. For both oils, maximum rate of MDA production was achieved in 5th hours of heating. Every three concentrations of cinnamon essential oil significantly decreased MDA production (P < 0.05) in comparison with the control. CONCLUSION Essential oil of cinnamon considerably inhibited MDA production in studied oils and can be used with fresh and heated oils for reduction of lipid peroxidation and adverse free radicals effects on body. PMID:24302936

  1. Development of Extraction Techniques for the Detection of Signature Lipids from Oil

    SciTech Connect

    Borglin, Sharon; Geller, Jil; Chakraborty, Romy; Hazen, Terry; Mason, Olivia

    2010-05-17

    Pure cultures, including Desulfovibrio vulgaris and Methanococcus maripaludus, were combined with model oil samples and oil/diesel mixtures to optimize extraction techniques of signature lipids from oil in support of investigation of microbial communities in oil deposit samples targets for microbial enhanced hydrocarbon recovery. Several techniques were evaluated, including standard phospholipid extraction, ether linked lipid for Archaeal bacterial detection, and high pressure extractiontechniques. Recovery of lipids ranged from 50-80percent as compared to extraction of the pure culture. Extraction efficiency was evaluated by the use of internal standards. Field samples will also be tested for recovery of signature lipids with optimized extraction techniques.

  2. Seed Structure Characteristics to Form Ultrahigh Oil Content in Rapeseed

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liang; Deng, Lin-Bin; Wang, Xin-Fa; Liu, Gui-Hua; Hao, Wan-Jun; Wang, Han-Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Background Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) is an important oil crop in the world, and increasing its oil content is a major breeding goal. The studies on seed structure and characteristics of different oil content rapeseed could help us to understand the biological mechanism of lipid accumulation, and be helpful for rapeseed breeding. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we report on the seed ultrastructure of an ultrahigh oil content rapeseed line YN171, whose oil content is 64.8%, and compared with other high and low oil content rapeseed lines. The results indicated that the cytoplasms of cotyledon, radicle, and aleuronic cells were completely filled with oil and protein bodies, and YN171 had a high oil body organelle to cell area ratio for all cell types. In the cotyledon cells, oil body organelles comprised 81% of the total cell area in YN171, but only 53 to 58% in three high oil content lines and 33 to 38% in three low oil content lines. The high oil body organelle to cotyledon cell area ratio and the cotyledon ratio in seed were the main reasons for the ultrahigh oil content of YN171. The correlation analysis indicated that oil content is significantly negatively correlated with protein content, but is not correlated with fatty acid composition. Conclusions/Significance Our results indicate that the oil content of YN171 could be enhanced by increasing the oil body organelle to cell ratio for some cell types. The oil body organelle to seed ratio significantly highly positively correlates with oil content, and could be used to predict seed oil content. Based on the structural analysis of different oil content rapeseed lines, we estimate the maximum of rapeseed oil content could reach 75%. Our results will help us to screen and identify high oil content lines in rapeseed breeding. PMID:23637973

  3. Removal of lipid soluble process chemicals from biological materials by extraction with naturally occurring oils or synthetic substitutes thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, K.R.; Orme, T.W.

    1988-12-06

    This patent describes a method of removing lipid soluble process chemicals from biological materials comprising blood plasma and fractions thereof containing the lipid soluble process chemicals. The lipid soluble process chemical is a virus attenuating solvent having a high flash point, a detergent, or a mixture thereof. It comprises bringing the biological materials containing the lipid soluble process chemicals into contact with an effective amount of a naturally occurring oil extracted from a plant or an animal or a synthetic compound of similar chemical structure. Also described is a method of removing lymphokine inducing phorbol esters from lympholkine-containing biological material. It comprises bringing the biological materials containing the phorbol esters into contact with an effective amount of a naturally occurring oil extracted from a plant or an animal or a synthetic compound of similar chemical structure so as to remove 80% or more of the phorbol esters.

  4. 2011 Plant Lipids: Structure, Metabolism, & Function Gordon Research Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Benning

    2011-02-04

    This is the second Gordon Research Conference on 'Plant Lipids: Structure, Metabolism & Function'. It covers current topics in lipid structure, metabolism and function in eukaryotic photosynthetic organisms including seed plants, algae, mosses and ferns. Work in photosynthetic bacteria is considered as well as it serves the understanding of specific aspects of lipid metabolism in plants. Breakthroughs are discussed in research on plant lipids as diverse as glycerolipids, sphingolipids, lipids of the cell surface, isoprenoids, fatty acids and their derivatives. The program covers nine concepts at the forefront of research under which afore mentioned plant lipid classes are discussed. The goal is to integrate areas such as lipid signaling, basic lipid metabolism, membrane function, lipid analysis, and lipid engineering to achieve a high level of stimulating interaction among diverse researchers with interests in plant lipids. One Emphasis is on the dynamics and regulation of lipid metabolism during plant cell development and in response to environmental factors.

  5. Self-assembly behavior of lipids at an oil-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pautot, Sophie

    The hydrophilic and hydrophobic properties of lipid molecules enable them to organize into large structures when dissolved in water or in oil. Under certain conditions and with the right they can organize into micellar or into lamellar phases under certain conditions and with the right system composition. The equilibrium phase of lipids have been well studied. In this work we observe the behavior of lipids at an oil-water interface, and we investigate the molecular assembly that can result in the presence of lipids at an oil-water interface. We have established that lipids can be used as a surfactant to stabilize water droplets in oil, and we have developed a new method, a reverse emulsion technique, that allows us to use these emulsions to assemble unilamellar vesicles with a high encapsulation yield. The vesicle bilayer is formed from the assembly of two monolayers formed independently and we have proven that this technique offers the possibility to directly assemble asymmetric bilayer. Because the encapsulated phase remains contained at all time by a surfactant layer the reactivity of the molecules initially encapsulated can be preserved. We have demonstrated using fluorescence measurement that the vesicles formed can be used as micro-reactor where reactive molecules can be encapsulated and their activity remotely triggered. This technique is not limited to lipids and we have demonstrated that the process can also be applied to other amphiphilic molecules such as polymers or synthetic surfactants. In addition, we have used dynamic light scattering to study the size of the inverted emulsion stabilized with lipids as a function of the shear applied to the suspension. We have established that a water drop injected in an alkane solution such as dodecane lead to the spontaneous formation of emulsion droplet. Moreover we have demonstrated that the spontaneous emulsification is due to the swelling of a lyotropic semi-crystalline phase which forms at the dodecane

  6. Protection and viability of fruit seeds oils by nanostructured lipid carrier (NLC) nanosuspensions.

    PubMed

    Krasodomska, Olga; Paolicelli, Patrizia; Cesa, Stefania; Casadei, Maria Antonietta; Jungnickel, Christian

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we focused on the development of nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) for dermal application. The NLC matrix was designed as a protective reservoir of biological active compounds that naturally occur in domestic fruit seed oils. Over the years, emulsions, as a popular physicochemical form of personal care products, were refined in order to obtain the best possible penetration into the skin of any bioactive compound introduced in the formulation, such as polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). In fact, the bioactive components are useful only if they are able to penetrate the skin unchanged. Therefore, an alternate way to deliver naturally occurring PUFAs is needed. NLCs present a novel delivery and protection system for the PUFAs. The cold pressed fruit seed oils obtained from waste material were used in this paper: blackcurrant, blackberry, raspberry, strawberry and plum. Thermodynamic (DSC) and structural techniques ((1)H NMR) were applied in order to characterize the obtained systems in terms of seed oil incorporation into the NLC, and oxidative stability tests were used to confirm the protective quality of the systems. During the formulation optimization process the most stable nanosuspension with the best seed oil incorporation was a mixture of 4% nonionic emulsifiers, 88% water and 6% lipids with a ratio of 6:2, wax:oil. The oxidative stability tests showed that the NLC was an effective method of protection of the PUFAs. PMID:27348480

  7. Effect of essential oil of Hyssopus officinalis on the lipid composition of Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Ghfir, B; Fonvieille, J L; Koulali, Y; Ecalle, R; Dargent, R

    1994-06-01

    Addition of the essential oil of Hyssopus officinalis to the culture medium of Aspergillus fumigatus induced alterations in both growth and lipid composition of this mould. Total lipids and sterols were reduced, whereas total phospholipids were increased. There were alterations in the proportions of fatty acids, neutral lipid and phospholipid fractions. PMID:7935731

  8. Structure of Cholesterol in Lipid Rafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toppozini, Laura; Meinhardt, Sebastian; Armstrong, Clare L.; Yamani, Zahra; Kučerka, Norbert; Schmid, Friederike; Rheinstädter, Maikel C.

    2014-11-01

    Rafts, or functional domains, are transient nano-or mesoscopic structures in the plasma membrane and are thought to be essential for many cellular processes such as signal transduction, adhesion, trafficking, and lipid or protein sorting. Observations of these membrane heterogeneities have proven challenging, as they are thought to be both small and short lived. With a combination of coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations and neutron diffraction using deuterium labeled cholesterol molecules, we observe raftlike structures and determine the ordering of the cholesterol molecules in binary cholesterol-containing lipid membranes. From coarse-grained computer simulations, heterogenous membranes structures were observed and characterized as small, ordered domains. Neutron diffraction was used to study the lateral structure of the cholesterol molecules. We find pairs of strongly bound cholesterol molecules in the liquid-disordered phase, in accordance with the umbrella model. Bragg peaks corresponding to ordering of the cholesterol molecules in the raftlike structures were observed and indexed by two different structures: a monoclinic structure of ordered cholesterol pairs of alternating direction in equilibrium with cholesterol plaques, i.e., triclinic cholesterol bilayers.

  9. Recent Research Trends on the Enzymatic Synthesis of Structured Lipids.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung Hee; Akoh, Casimir C

    2015-08-01

    Structured lipids (SLs) are lipids that have been chemically or enzymatically modified from their natural biosynthetic form. Because SLs are made to possess desired nutritional, physicochemical, or textural properties for various applications in the food industry, many research activities have been aimed at their commercialization. The production of SLs by enzymatic procedures has a great potential in the future market because of the specificity of lipases and phospholipases used as the biocatalysts. The aim of this review is to provide concise information on the recent research trends on the enzymatic synthesis of SLs of commercial interest, such as medium- and long-chain triacylglycerols, human milk fat substitutes, cocoa butter equivalents, trans-free or low-trans plastic fats (such as margarines and shortenings), low-calorie fats/oils, health-beneficial fatty acid-rich fats/oils, mono- or diacylglycerols, and structurally modified phospholipids. This limited review covers 108 research articles published between 2010 and 2014 which were searched in Web of Science. PMID:26189491

  10. Phase behavior of ternary mannosylerythritol lipid/water/oil systems.

    PubMed

    Worakitkanchanakul, Wannasiri; Imura, Tomohiro; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Morita, Tomotake; Sakai, Hideki; Abe, Masahiko; Rujiravanit, Ratana; Chavadej, Sumaeth; Minamikawa, Hiroyuki; Kitamoto, Dai

    2009-02-01

    Mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs) are glycolipid biosurfactants (BS) abundantly produced from renewable resources by yeast strains of the genus Pseudozyma. In this study, the ternary phase behaviors of two types of MELs, i.e. MEL-A and MEL-B, mixed with water and oil were investigated at 25 degrees C based on polarized optical microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). When n-decane was used as an oil phase, diacetylated MEL-A formed single-phase water-in-oil (W/O) microemulsion in a remarkably large region. MEL-A, with a negative spontaneous curvature, also formed sponge (L(3)), reverse bicontinuous cubic (V(2)), and lamellar (L(alpha)) phases. Meanwhile, monoacetylated MEL-B, with the opposite configuration of the erythritol moiety, gave single-phase bicontinuous microemulsion and showed a triangular phase diagram dominated by the L(alpha) phase, suggesting that MEL-B has an almost zero spontaneous curvature. Moreover, we succeeded in preparation of oil-in-liquid crystal (O/LC) emulsion in the biphasic L(alpha)+O region of the MEL-B/water/n-decane system. The obtained gel-like emulsion was stable for at least 1 month. These results clearly demonstrated that the difference in the number of acetyl group on the headgroup and/or the chirality of the erythritol moiety drastically changed the phase behavior of MELs. Accordingly, these MELs would be quite distinctive from conventional BS hitherto reported, and would have great potential for the preparation of microemulsion and LC-based emulsion. PMID:19070997

  11. The structure of percolating lipid monolayers.

    PubMed

    Risović, D; Frka, S; Kozarac, Z

    2012-05-01

    The lattice structure and in plane molecular organization of Langmuir monolayer of amphiphilic material is usually determined from grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD) or neutron reflectivity. Here we present results of a different approach for determination of monolayer lattice structure based on application of fractal analysis and percolation theory in combination with Brewster angle microscopy. The considerations of compressibility modulus and fractal dimension dynamics provide information on percolation threshold and consequently by application of percolation theory on the lattice structure of a monolayer. We have applied this approach to determine the monolayer lattice structures of single chain and double chain lipids. The compressibility moduli were determined from measured π-A isotherms and fractal dimensions from corresponding BAM images. The monolayer lattice structures of stearic acid, 1-hexadecanol, DPPC and DPPA, obtained in this way conform to the corresponding lattice structures determined previously by other authors using GIXD. PMID:22209411

  12. Wrinkled1 Accelerates Flowering and Regulates Lipid Homeostasis between Oil Accumulation and Membrane Lipid Anabolism in Brassica napus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qing; Shao, Jianhua; Tang, Shaohua; Shen, Qingwen; Wang, Tiehu; Chen, Wenling; Hong, Yueyun

    2015-01-01

    Wrinkled1 (WRI1) belongs to the APETALA2 transcription factor family; it is unique to plants and is a central regulator of oil synthesis in Arabidopsis. The effects of WRI1 on comprehensive lipid metabolism and plant development were unknown, especially in crop plants. This study found that BnWRI1 in Brassica napus accelerated flowering and enhanced oil accumulation in both seeds and leaves without leading to a visible growth inhibition. BnWRI1 decreased storage carbohydrates and increased soluble sugars to facilitate the carbon flux to lipid anabolism. BnWRI1 is localized to the nucleus and directly binds to the AW-box at proximal upstream regions of genes involved in fatty acid (FA) synthesis and lipid assembly. The overexpression (OE) of BnWRI1 resulted in the up-regulation of genes involved in glycolysis, FA synthesis, lipid assembly, and flowering. Lipid profiling revealed increased galactolipids monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG), digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG), and phosphatidylcholine (PC) in the leaves of OE plants, whereas it exhibited a reduced level of the galactolipids DGDG and MGDG and increased levels of PC, phosphatidylethanolamide, and oil [triacylglycerol (TAG)] in the siliques of OE plants during the early seed development stage. These results suggest that BnWRI1 is important for homeostasis among TAG, membrane lipids and sugars, and thus facilitates flowering and oil accumulation in B. napus. PMID:26635841

  13. Wrinkled1 Accelerates Flowering and Regulates Lipid Homeostasis between Oil Accumulation and Membrane Lipid Anabolism in Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Shao, Jianhua; Tang, Shaohua; Shen, Qingwen; Wang, Tiehu; Chen, Wenling; Hong, Yueyun

    2015-01-01

    Wrinkled1 (WRI1) belongs to the APETALA2 transcription factor family; it is unique to plants and is a central regulator of oil synthesis in Arabidopsis. The effects of WRI1 on comprehensive lipid metabolism and plant development were unknown, especially in crop plants. This study found that BnWRI1 in Brassica napus accelerated flowering and enhanced oil accumulation in both seeds and leaves without leading to a visible growth inhibition. BnWRI1 decreased storage carbohydrates and increased soluble sugars to facilitate the carbon flux to lipid anabolism. BnWRI1 is localized to the nucleus and directly binds to the AW-box at proximal upstream regions of genes involved in fatty acid (FA) synthesis and lipid assembly. The overexpression (OE) of BnWRI1 resulted in the up-regulation of genes involved in glycolysis, FA synthesis, lipid assembly, and flowering. Lipid profiling revealed increased galactolipids monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG), digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG), and phosphatidylcholine (PC) in the leaves of OE plants, whereas it exhibited a reduced level of the galactolipids DGDG and MGDG and increased levels of PC, phosphatidylethanolamide, and oil [triacylglycerol (TAG)] in the siliques of OE plants during the early seed development stage. These results suggest that BnWRI1 is important for homeostasis among TAG, membrane lipids and sugars, and thus facilitates flowering and oil accumulation in B. napus. PMID:26635841

  14. Lipid self-assembled structures for reactivity control in food.

    PubMed

    Sagalowicz, L; Moccand, C; Davidek, T; Ghanbari, R; Martiel, I; Negrini, R; Mezzenga, R; Leser, M E; Blank, I; Michel, M

    2016-07-28

    Lipid self-assembled structures (SASs) have recently gained considerable interest for their potential applications, especially for sustained nutrient release and protein crystallization. An additional property, which is underexploited, is their ability to control chemical reactions in food products. Here, we concentrate on SASs formed by phospholipids (PLs) and monoglycerides (MGs), those compounds being the most natural surfactants and therefore, the best compatible with food products, in view of providing new functionalities through the formation of SASs. In this work, the phase behaviour of these amphiphiles when mixed with oil and water is described and compared. Subsequently, we address the influence of these structures to the oxidation and Maillard-type reactions. Finally, we show that SASs formed by MGs can strongly increase the yield of key aroma impact compounds generated by Maillard-type reactions when compared with the reaction performed in aqueous precursor solutions. Various SASs are compared. In particular, addition of oil to a reversed bicontinuous structure formed by MG leads to a reversed microemulsion, which, considering its low viscosity, is particularly suitable for food products and act as a very efficient reactor system. The influence of oil and precursors on phase behaviour is discussed and related to the efficiency of the Maillard reactions.This article is part of the themed issue 'Soft interfacial materials: from fundamentals to formulation'. PMID:27298441

  15. Irregular bilayer structure in vesicles prepared from Halobacterium cutirubrum lipids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyi, J. K.

    1974-01-01

    Fluorescent probes were used to study the structure of the cell envelope of Halobacterium cutirubrum, and, in particular, to explore the effect of the heterogeneity of the lipids in this organism on the structure of the bilayers. The fluorescence polarization of perylene was followed in vesicles of unfractionated lipids and polar lipids as a function of temperature in 3.4 M solutions of NaCl, NaNO3, and KSCN, and it was found that vesicles of unfractionated lipids were more perturbed by chaotropic agents than polar lipids. The dependence of the relaxation times of perylene on temperature was studied in cell envelopes and in vesicles prepared from polar lipids, unfractionated lipids, and mixtures of polar and neutral lipids.

  16. Fish oil changes the lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans via lipid peroxidation

    PubMed Central

    Sugawara, Soko; Honma, Taro; Ito, Junya; Kijima, Ryo; Tsuduki, Tsuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we administered fish oil containing eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) to senescence-accelerated mice P8 (SAMP8), in order to investigate the effects on lifespan. Surprisingly, the lifespan of SAMP8 that were fed fish oil was shortened significantly, through a mechanism that likely involved lipid peroxidation. In this study, we investigated this phenomenon in further detail. To examine whether this phenomenon occurs only in SAMP8, we investigated the effect of fish oil on the lifespan of another organism species, Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). C. elegans fed fish oil were cultured and the lifespan monitored. As a consequence of the provision of large amounts of fish oil the lifespan of C. elegans was shortened significantly, whereas an appropriate amount of fish oil extended their lifespan significantly. Lipid peroxide levels in C. elegans that were fed fish oil increased significantly in a dose-dependent manner. However, lipid peroxide levels in C. elegans were inhibited by the addition of fish oil and an antioxidant, α-tocopherol, and completely abrogated the changes in the lifespan. To further confirm whether the oxidation of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid in fish oil would change the lifespan of C. elegans, the effect of oxidized DHA was examined. Large amounts of oxidized DHA were found to shorten their lifespan significantly. Thus, fish oil changes the lifespan of C. elegans through lipid peroxidation. PMID:23526170

  17. Nanoemulsion delivery systems for oil-soluble vitamins: Influence of carrier oil type on lipid digestion and vitamin D3 bioaccessibility.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Bengu; Argin, Sanem; Ozilgen, Mustafa; McClements, David Julian

    2015-11-15

    The influence of carrier oil type on the bioaccessibility of vitamin D3 encapsulated within oil-in-water nanoemulsions prepared using a natural surfactant (quillaja saponin) was studied using a simulated gastrointestinal tract (GIT) model: mouth; stomach; small intestine. The rate of free fatty acid release during lipid digestion decreased in the following order: medium chain triglycerides (MCT) > corn oil ≈ fish oil > orange oil > mineral oil. Conversely, the measured bioaccessibility of vitamin D3 decreased in the following order: corn oil ≈ fish oil > orange oil > mineral oil > MCT. These results show that carrier oil type has a considerable impact on lipid digestion and vitamin bioaccessibility, which was attributed to differences in the release of bioactives from lipid droplets, and their solubilization in mixed micelles. Nanoemulsions prepared using long chain triglycerides (corn or fish oil) were most effective at increasing vitamin bioaccessibility. PMID:25977056

  18. Regulation of inflammatory and lipid metabolism genes by eicosapentaenoic acid-rich oil[S

    PubMed Central

    Gillies, Peter J.; Bhatia, Sujata K.; Belcher, Leigh A; Hannon, Daniel B.; Thompson, Jerry T.; Vanden Heuvel, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Omega-3-PUFAs, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), are associated with prevention of various aspects of metabolic syndrome. In the present studies, the effects of oil rich in EPA on gene expression and activation of nuclear receptors was examined and compared with other ω3-PUFAs. The EPA-rich oil (EO) altered the expression of FA metabolism genes in THP-1 cells, including stearoyl CoA desaturase (SCD) and FA desaturase-1 and -2 (FASDS1 and -2). Other ω3-PUFAs resulted in a similar gene expression response for a subset of genes involved in lipid metabolism and inflammation. In reporter assays, EO activated human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) and PPARβ/γ with minimal effects on PPARγ, liver X receptor, retinoid X receptor, farnesoid X receptor, and retinoid acid receptor γ (RARγ); these effects were similar to that observed for purified EPA. When serum from a 6 week clinical intervention with dietary supplements containing olive oil (control), DHA, or two levels of EPA were applied to THP-1 cells, the expression of SCD and FADS2 decreased in the cells treated with serum from the ω3-PUFA-supplemented individuals. Taken together, these studies indicate regulation of gene expression by EO that is consistent with treating aspects of dyslipidemia and inflammation. PMID:22556214

  19. Preparation and characterization of solid lipid nanoparticles loaded with frankincense and myrrh oil

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Feng; Zhao, Ji-Hui; Liu, Ying; Wang, Zhi; Zhang, Yong-Tai; Feng, Nian-Ping

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to prepare solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) for the oral delivery of frankincense and myrrh essential oils (FMO). Aqueous dispersions of SLNs were successfully prepared by a high-pressure homogenization method using Compritol 888 ATO as the solid lipid and soybean lecithin and Tween 80 as the surfactants. The properties of the SLNs such as particle size, zeta potential (ZP), and drug encapsulation efficiency (EE) were investigated. The morphology of SLNs was observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The crystallinity of the formulation was analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). In addition, drug evaporation release and antitumor activity were also studied. Round SLNs with a mean size of 113.3 ± 3.6 nm, a ZP of −16.8 ± 0.4 mV, and an EE of 80.60% ± 1.11% were obtained. DSC and XRD measurements revealed that less ordered structures were formed in the inner cores of the SLN particles. Evaporation loss of the active components in FMO could be reduced in the SLNs. Furthermore, the SLN formulation increased the antitumor efficacy of FMO in H22-bearing Kunming mice. Hence, the presented SLNs can be used as drug carriers for hydrophobic oil drugs extracted from traditional Chinese medicines. PMID:22619540

  20. Electric polarizability of lipid bilayers: The influence of the structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soussi, J.; Chalopin, Y.

    2015-10-01

    We have calculated the electric polarizability of two types of lipid bilayers, formed by 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) and 1-palmitoyl-2- oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) lipids. We demonstrate that despite the very similar chemical structures, the bilayers exhibit dramatically different terahertz infrared (IR) properties. We demonstrate that the chemical structure of the lipids influences the morphology of the bilayers, which in turn impacts their IR responses: interestingly, both structures exhibit a non-uniform absorption. For the case of DPPC, the infrared absorption is mostly driven by the hydrophilic heads, whereas for the POPC lipids, the absorption occurs predominately at the hydrophobic tails.

  1. Kdo2-lipid A: structural diversity and impact on immunopharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoyuan; Quinn, Peter J; Yan, Aixin

    2015-01-01

    3-deoxy-d-manno-octulosonic acid-lipid A (Kdo2-lipid A) is the essential component of lipopolysaccharide in most Gram-negative bacteria and the minimal structural component to sustain bacterial viability. It serves as the active component of lipopolysaccharide to stimulate potent host immune responses through the complex of Toll-like-receptor 4 (TLR4) and myeloid differentiation protein 2. The entire biosynthetic pathway of Escherichia coli Kdo2-lipid A has been elucidated and the nine enzymes of the pathway are shared by most Gram-negative bacteria, indicating conserved Kdo2-lipid A structure across different species. Yet many bacteria can modify the structure of their Kdo2-lipid A which serves as a strategy to modulate bacterial virulence and adapt to different growth environments as well as to avoid recognition by the mammalian innate immune systems. Key enzymes and receptors involved in Kdo2-lipid A biosynthesis, structural modification and its interaction with the TLR4 pathway represent a clear opportunity for immunopharmacological exploitation. These include the development of novel antibiotics targeting key biosynthetic enzymes and utilization of structurally modified Kdo2-lipid A or correspondingly engineered live bacteria as vaccines and adjuvants. Kdo2-lipid A/TLR4 antagonists can also be applied in anti-inflammatory interventions. This review summarizes recent knowledge on both the fundamental processes of Kdo2-lipid A biosynthesis, structural modification and immune stimulation, and applied research on pharmacological exploitations of these processes for therapeutic development. PMID:24838025

  2. Understanding the control of acyl flux through the lipid metabolic network of plant oil biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Bates, Philip D

    2016-09-01

    Plant oil biosynthesis involves a complex metabolic network with multiple subcellular compartments, parallel pathways, cycles, and pathways that have a dual function to produce essential membrane lipids and triacylglycerol. Modern molecular biology techniques provide tools to alter plant oil compositions through bioengineering, however with few exceptions the final composition of triacylglycerol cannot be predicted. One reason for limited success in oilseed bioengineering is the inadequate understanding of how to control the flux of fatty acids through various fatty acid modification, and triacylglycerol assembly pathways of the lipid metabolic network. This review focuses on the mechanisms of acyl flux through the lipid metabolic network, and highlights where uncertainty resides in our understanding of seed oil biosynthesis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Lipid Biology edited by Kent D. Chapman and Ivo Feussner. PMID:27003249

  3. Structural Proton Diffusion along Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Serowy, Steffen; Saparov, Sapar M.; Antonenko, Yuri N.; Kozlovsky, Wladas; Hagen, Volker; Pohl, Peter

    2003-01-01

    For H+ transport between protein pumps, lateral diffusion along membrane surfaces represents the most efficient pathway. Along lipid bilayers, we measured a diffusion coefficient of 5.8 × 10−5 cm2 s−1. It is too large to be accounted for by vehicle diffusion, considering proton transport by acid carriers. Such a speed of migration is accomplished only by the Grotthuss mechanism involving the chemical exchange of hydrogen nuclei between hydrogen-bonded water molecules on the membrane surface, and the subsequent reorganization of the hydrogen-bonded network. Reconstitution of H+-binding sites on the membrane surface decreased the velocity of H+ diffusion. In the absence of immobile buffers, structural (Grotthuss) diffusion occurred over a distance of 100 μm as shown by microelectrode aided measurements of the spatial proton distribution in the immediate membrane vicinity and spatially resolved fluorescence measurements of interfacial pH. The efficiency of the anomalously fast lateral diffusion decreased gradually with an increase in mobile buffer concentration suggesting that structural diffusion is physiologically important for distances of ∼10 nm. PMID:12547784

  4. Counteracting foaming caused by lipids or proteins in biogas reactors using rapeseed oil or oleic acid as antifoaming agents.

    PubMed

    Kougias, P G; Boe, K; Einarsdottir, E S; Angelidaki, I

    2015-08-01

    Foaming is one of the major operational problems in biogas plants, and dealing with foaming incidents is still based on empirical practices. Various types of antifoams are used arbitrarily to combat foaming in biogas plants, but without any scientific support this action can lead to serious deterioration of the methanogenic process. Many commercial antifoams are derivatives of fatty acids or oils. However, it is well known that lipids can induce foaming in manure based biogas plants. This study aimed to elucidate the effect of rapeseed oil and oleic acid on foam reduction and process performance in biogas reactors fed with protein or lipid rich substrates. The results showed that both antifoams efficiently suppressed foaming. Moreover rapeseed oil resulted in stimulation of the biogas production. Finally, it was reckoned that the chemical structure of lipids, and more specifically their carboxylic ends, is responsible for their foam promoting or foam counteracting behaviour. Thus, it was concluded that the fatty acids and oils could suppress foaming, while salt of fatty acids could generate foam. PMID:25978353

  5. Solid Lipid Nanoparticles and Nanostructured Lipid Carriers: Structure, Preparation and Application

    PubMed Central

    Naseri, Neda; Valizadeh, Hadi; Zakeri-Milani, Parvin

    2015-01-01

    Lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) have attracted special interest during last few decades. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) and nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) are two major types of Lipid-based nanoparticles. SLNs were developed to overcome the limitations of other colloidal carriers, such as emulsions, liposomes and polymeric nanoparticles because they have advantages like good release profile and targeted drug delivery with excellent physical stability. In the next generation of the lipid nanoparticle, NLCs are modified SLNs which improve the stability and capacity loading. Three structural models of NLCs have been proposed. These LNPs have potential applications in drug delivery field, research, cosmetics, clinical medicine, etc. This article focuses on features, structure and innovation of LNPs and presents a wide discussion about preparation methods, advantages, disadvantages and applications of LNPs by focusing on SLNs and NLCs. PMID:26504751

  6. Coconut oil predicts a beneficial lipid profile in pre-menopausal women in the Philippines

    PubMed Central

    Feranil, Alan B.; Duazo, Paulita L.; Kuzawa, Christopher W.; Adair, Linda S.

    2011-01-01

    Coconut oil is a common edible oil in many countries, and there is mixed evidence for its effects on lipid profiles and cardiovascular disease risk. Here we examine the association between coconut oil consumption and lipid profiles in a cohort of 1,839 Filipino women (age 35–69 years) participating in the Cebu Longitudinal Health and Nutrition Survey, a community based study in Metropolitan Cebu City. Coconut oil intake was measured as individual coconut oil intake calculated using two 24-hour dietary recalls (9.54 ± 8.92 grams). Cholesterol profiles were measured in plasma samples collected after an overnight fast. Mean lipid values in this sample were total cholesterol (TC) (186.52 ± 38.86 mg/dL), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) (40.85 ± 10.30 mg/dL), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) (119.42 ± 33.21 mg/dL), triglycerides (130.75 ± 85.29 mg/dL) and the TC/HDL ratio (4.80 ± 1.41). Linear regression models were used to estimate the association between coconut oil intake and each plasma lipid outcome after adjusting for total energy intake, age, body mass index (BMI), number of pregnancies, education, menopausal status, household assets and urban residency. Dietary coconut oil intake was positively associated with HDL-c levels. PMID:21669587

  7. Localized lipid autoxidation initiated by two-photon irradiation within single oil droplets in oil-in-water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Raudsepp, Piret; Brüggemann, Dagmar A; Knudsen, Jes C; Andersen, Mogens L

    2016-05-15

    The initiation of lipid autoxidation within single oil droplets in Tween-20-stabilized oil-in-water emulsion was achieved by highly focused two-photon (2P) irradiation at excitation wavelength (λex) 700 nm. The radical formation was enhanced by inclusion of the photo-cleavable radical initiator di-tert-butyl peroxide (DTBP) into the droplets, and demonstrated with confocal microscopy using radical-sensitive probe BODIPY(665/676). The radical chain reactions progressed up to 60 μm; however, there were no indications of oxidation in neighboring droplets demonstrating that radicals and oxidized probe molecules were not able to migrate between oil droplets. In addition, the spatial propagation of lipid autoxidation increased with the degree of oil unsaturation. PMID:26776033

  8. Oil and lipids biocatalysis: Past, present and future prospects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biocatalysts (enzymes) for both petroleum oil and vegetable oils are quite similar. In the 1960s, scientists were trying to convert the excess petroleum oil into single cell protein. After 1970, scientists focused on converting petroleum products to value-added products such as oxygenated products...

  9. Analysis of Lipoplex Structure and Lipid Phase Changes

    SciTech Connect

    Koynova, Rumiana

    2012-07-18

    Efficient delivery of genetic material to cells is needed for tasks of utmost importance in the laboratory and clinic, such as gene transfection and gene silencing. Synthetic cationic lipids can be used as delivery vehicles for nucleic acids and are now considered the most promising nonviral gene carriers. They form complexes (lipoplexes) with the polyanionic nucleic acids. A critical obstacle for clinical application of the lipid-mediated DNA delivery (lipofection) is its unsatisfactory efficiency for many cell types. Understanding the mechanism of lipid-mediated DNA delivery is essential for their successful application, as well as for a rational design and synthesis of novel cationic lipoid compounds for enhanced gene delivery. A viewpoint now emerging is that the critical factor in lipid-mediated transfection is the structural evolution of lipoplexes within the cell, upon interacting and mixing with cellular lipids. In particular, recent studies showed that the phase evolution of lipoplex lipids upon interaction and mixing with membrane lipids appears to be decisive for transfection success: specifically, lamellar lipoplex formulations, which were readily susceptible to undergoing lamellar-nonlamellar phase transition upon mixing with cellular lipids and were found rather consistently associated with superior transfection potency, presumably as a result of facilitated DNA release. Thus, understanding the lipoplex structure and the phase changes upon interacting with membrane lipids is important for the successful application of the cationic lipids as gene carriers.

  10. Analysis of lipoplex structure and lipid phase changes.

    PubMed

    Koynova, Rumiana

    2010-01-01

    Efficient delivery of genetic material to cells is needed for tasks of utmost importance in the laboratory and clinic, such as gene transfection and gene silencing. Synthetic cationic lipids can be used as delivery vehicles for nucleic acids and are now considered the most promising nonviral gene carriers. They form complexes (lipoplexes) with the polyanionic nucleic acids. A critical obstacle for clinical application of the lipid-mediated DNA delivery (lipofection) is its unsatisfactory efficiency for many cell types. Understanding the mechanism of lipid-mediated DNA delivery is essential for their successful application, as well as for a rational design and synthesis of novel cationic lipoid compounds for enhanced gene delivery. A viewpoint now emerging is that the critical factor in lipid-mediated transfection is the structural evolution of lipoplexes within the cell, upon interacting and mixing with cellular lipids. In particular, recent studies showed that the phase evolution of lipoplex lipids upon interaction and mixing with membrane lipids appears to be decisive for transfection success: specifically, lamellar lipoplex formulations, which were readily susceptible to undergoing lamellar-nonlamellar phase transition upon mixing with cellular lipids and were found rather consistently associated with superior transfection potency, presumably as a result of facilitated DNA release. Thus, understanding the lipoplex structure and the phase changes upon interacting with membrane lipids is important for the successful application of the cationic lipids as gene carriers. PMID:20013412

  11. The Effect of Camellia Seed Oil Intake on Lipid Metabolism in Mice.

    PubMed

    Satou, Tadaaki; Sato, Naoko; Kato, Haruyo; Kawamura, Mana; Watanabe, Sanae; Koike, Kazuo

    2016-04-01

    Camellia seed oil has mainly been applied to the production of cosmetics, and research into its dietary effects is required. Alterations in lipid metabolism by the intake of camellia seed oil were investigated. Health parameters such as diet intake, weight gain, fat mass, and plasma cholesterol and triglyceride levels were measured in mice fed a high fat diet containing camellia seed oil; comparisons were made to a normal diet and a high fat diet containing either soybean oil or olive oil as controls. No significant differences in weight gain and diet intake were observed between the groups. However, the camellia seed oil diet suppressed epididymal fat weight similarly to the olive oil diet. In total cholesterol and HDL (high density lipoprotein) cholesterol levels, the soybean oil, olive oil and camellia seed oil diet groups showed significant increases compared with the normal diet. However, increases in LDL (low density lipoprotein) cholesterol levels were inhibited by the camellia seed oil diet similarly to the olive oil diet. As the high oleic acid content of camellia seed oil is similar to that of olive oil, it is proposed that its presence mitigated fat accumulation and plasma cholesterol levels. PMID:27396207

  12. Protective Effect of Pulp Oil Extracted from Canarium odontophyllum Miq. Fruit on Blood Lipids, Lipid Peroxidation, and Antioxidant Status in Healthy Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Shakirin, Faridah Hanim; Azlan, Azrina; Ismail, Amin; Amom, Zulkhairi; Cheng Yuon, Lau

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to compare the effects of pulp and kernel oils of Canarium odontophyllum Miq. (CO) on lipid profile, lipid peroxidation, and oxidative stress of healthy rabbits. The oils are rich in SFAs and MUFAs (mainly palmitic and oleic acids). The pulp oil is rich in polyphenols. Male New Zealand white (NZW) rabbits were fed for 4 weeks on a normal diet containing pulp (NP) or kernel oil (NK) of CO while corn oil was used as control (NC). Total cholesterol (TC), HDL-C, LDL-c and triglycerides (TG) levels were measured in this paper. Antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidise), thiobarbiturate reactive substances (TBARSs), and plasma total antioxidant status (TAS) were also evaluated. Supplementation of CO pulp oil resulted in favorable changes in blood lipid and lipid peroxidation (increased HDL-C, reduced LDL-C, TG, TBARS levels) with enhancement of SOD, GPx, and plasma TAS levels. Meanwhile, supplementation of kernel oil caused lowering of plasma TC and LDL-C as well as enhancement of SOD and TAS levels. These changes showed that oils of CO could be beneficial in improving lipid profile and antioxidant status as when using part of normal diet. The oils can be used as alternative to present vegetable oil. PMID:22685623

  13. Hypocholesterolemic effects of low calorie structured lipids on rats and rabbits fed on normal and atherogenic diet.

    PubMed

    Kanjilal, Sanjit; Kaki, Shiva Shanker; Rao, Bhamidipati V S K; Sugasini, Dhavamani; Rao, Yalagala Poornachandra; Prasad, Rachapudi B N; Lokesh, Belur R

    2013-01-01

    The hypocholesterolemic effects of two low calorie structured lipids (SL1 and SL2) containing essential fatty acids, prepared by lipase catalysed interesterification of ethyl behenate respectively with sunflower and soybean oils were studied in rats and rabbits. The feeding experiment conducted on rats as well as rabbits, fed on normal and atherogenic diet containing 10% of SL1 and SL2 (experimental) and sunflower oil (control) indicated no adverse effects on growth and food intake. However, the structured lipids beneficially lowered serum and liver lipids, particularly cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides and also maintains the essential fatty acid status in serum and liver. The lipid deposition observed in the arteries of rabbits fed on atherogenic diets was significantly reduced when structured lipids were included in the diet. These observations coincided with reduced levels of serum cholesterol particularly LDL cholesterol observed in experimental groups. Therefore the structured lipids, designed to have low calorific value also beneficially lower serum lipids and lipid deposition in animals fed on atherogenic diets. PMID:23017421

  14. Determination of lipid oxidation products in vegetable oils and marine omega-3 supplements

    PubMed Central

    Halvorsen, Bente Lise; Blomhoff, Rune

    2011-01-01

    Background There is convincing evidence that replacing dietary saturated fats with polyunsaturated fats (PUFA) decreases risk of cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, PUFA rich foods such as vegetable oils, fatty fish, and marine omega-3 supplements are recommended. However, PUFA are easily oxidizable and there is concern about possible negative health effects from intake of oxidized lipids. Little is known about the degree of lipid oxidation in such products. Objective To assess the content of lipid oxidation products in a large selection of vegetable oils and marine omega-3 supplements available in Norway. Both fresh and heated vegetable oils were studied. Design A large selection of commercially available vegetable oils and marine omega-3 supplements was purchased from grocery stores, pharmacies, and health food stores in Norway. The content of lipid oxidation products were measured as peroxide value and alkenal concentration. Twelve different vegetable oils were heated for a temperature (225°C) and time (25 minutes) resembling conditions typically used during cooking. Results The peroxide values were in the range 1.04–10.38 meq/kg for omega-3 supplements and in the range 0.60–5.33 meq/kg for fresh vegetable oils. The concentration range of alkenals was 158.23–932.19 nmol/mL for omega-3 supplements and 33.24–119.04 nmol/mL for vegetable oils. After heating, a 2.9–11.2 fold increase in alkenal concentration was observed for vegetable oils. Conclusions The contents of hydroperoxides and alkenals in omega-3 supplements are higher than in vegetable oils. After heating vegetable oils, a large increase in alkenal concentration was observed. PMID:21691461

  15. Composite S-layer lipid structures.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Bernhard; Sleytr, Uwe B

    2009-10-01

    Designing and utilization of biomimetic membrane systems generated by bottom-up processes is a rapidly growing scientific and engineering field. Elucidation of the supramolecular construction principle of archaeal cell envelopes composed of S-layer stabilized lipid membranes led to new strategies for generating highly stable functional lipid membranes at meso- and macroscopic scale. In this review, we provide a state of the art survey how S-layer proteins, lipids, and polysaccharides may be used as basic building blocks for the assembly of S-layer supported lipid membranes. These biomimetic membrane systems are distinguished by a nanopatterned fluidity, enhanced stability and longevity and thus, provide a dedicated reconstitution matrix for membrane-active peptides and transmembrane proteins. Exciting areas for application of composite S-layer membrane systems concern sensor systems involving specific membrane functions. PMID:19303933

  16. Composite S-layer lipid structures

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Bernhard; Sleytr, Uwe B.

    2010-01-01

    Designing and utilization of biomimetic membrane systems generated by bottom-up processes is a rapidly growing scientific and engineering field. Elucidation of the supramolecular construction principle of archaeal cell envelopes composed of S-layer stabilized lipid membranes led to new strategies for generating highly stable functional lipid membranes at meso- and macroscopic scale. In this review, we provide a state of the art survey how S-layer proteins, lipids, and polysaccharides may be used as basic building blocks for the assembly of S-layer supported lipid membranes. These biomimetic membrane systems are distinguished by a nanopatterned fluidity, enhanced stability and longevity and thus, provide a dedicated reconstitution matrix for membrane-active peptides and transmembrane proteins. Exciting areas for application of composite S-layer membrane systems concern sensor systems involving specific membrane functions. PMID:19303933

  17. The effect of oil type on the aggregation stability of nanostructured lipid carriers.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yihui; Corona, Alessandro; Schubert, Beth; Reeder, Robert; Henson, Michael A

    2014-03-15

    Second generation lipid systems for the delivery of bioactive compounds have been developed by mixing a liquid carrier oil with a solid lipid to form so-called nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs). In this study, we investigated the effect of different liquid carrier oils on the crystallization and aggregation behavior of tristearin NLC dispersions. We found that NLC suspension stability was strongly affected by the type and amount of the carrier oil. As the oil concentration was increased, the crystallization and melting temperatures decreased, the polymorphic transformation rate increased, the particles became more spherical, and suspension stability was enhanced. These results suggest that oil trapped within the growing crystal matrix accelerated polymorphic transformation but retarded the large shape change normally associated with the transformation. We also found that considerably less surfactant was necessary to produce stable NLC suspensions than was required to stabilize solid lipid nanoparticle (SLN) suspensions without a carrier oil. Based on preliminary simulation results, we hypothesized that improved NLC suspension stability was attributable to both reduced particle shape change, which created less new surface area to be covered by surfactant, and increased mobility of surfactant molecules, which resulted in available surfactant being more efficient at covering created surface area. PMID:24461844

  18. Influences of the Structure of Lipids on Thermal Stability of Lipid Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hai, Nan-Nan; Zhou, Xin; Li, Ming

    2015-08-01

    The binding free energy (BFE) of lipid to lipid bilayer is a critical factor to determine the thermal or mechanical stability of the bilayer. Although the molecular structure of lipids has significant impacts on BFE of the lipid, there lacks a systematic study on this issue. In this paper we use coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation to investigate this problem for several typical phospholipids. We find that both the tail length and tail unsaturation can significantly affect the BFE of lipids but in opposite way, namely, BFE decreases linearly with increasing length, but increases linearly with addition of unsaturated bonds. Inspired by the specific structure of cholesterol which is a crucial component of biomembrane, we also find that introduction of carbo-ring-like structures to the lipid tail or to the bilayer may greatly enhance the stability of the bilayer. Our simulation also shows that temperature can influence the bilayer stability and this effect can be significant when the bilayer undergoes phase transition. These results may be helpful to the design of liposome or other self-assembled lipid systems. Support by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 91027046 and 11105218.

  19. Structural heterogeneity regarding local Shwartzman activity of lipid A.

    PubMed

    Mashimo, J; Tanaka, C; Arata, S; Akiyama, Y; Hata, S; Hirayama, T; Egawa, K; Kasai, N

    1988-01-01

    The relation of chemical structure to local Shwartzman activity of lipid A preparations purified by thin-layer chromatography from five bacterial strains was examined. Two lipid A fractions from E. coli F515--Ec-A2 and Ec-A3--exhibited strong activity, similar to that of previous synthetic E. coli-type lipid A (compound 506 or LA-15-PP). The Ec-A3 fraction contained a component that appeared to be structurally identical to compound 506, and the main component of Ec-A2 fraction was structurally similar to compound 506 except that it carried a 3-hydroxytetradecanoyl group at the C-3' position of the backbone in place of a 3-tetradecanoyloxytetradecanoyl group. Free lipid A (12 C) and purified lipid A fractions, Ec-A2 (12 C) and Ec-A3 (12 C), respectively, obtained from bacteria grown at 12 C, exhibited activity comparable to Ec-A2 or Ec-A3. In these preparations, a large part of the 3-dodecanoyloxytetradecanoyl group might be replaced by 3-hexadecenoyloxytetradecanoyl group. Salmonella minnesota R595 free lipid A also contained at least two active lipid A components as seen in E. coli lipid A, but the third component corresponding to the synthetic Salmonella-type lipid A (compound 516 or LA-16-PP) exhibited low activity. A lipid A fraction, Cv-A4 from Chromobacterium violaceum IFO 12614, which was proposed to have two acyloxyacyl groups at the C-2 and C-2' positions with other acyl groups, exhibited weaker activity than the free lipid A or LPS. The purified lipid A fractions from Pseudomonas diminuta JCM 2788 and Pseudomonas vesicularis JCM 1477 contained an unusual backbone with 2,3-diamino-2,3-dideoxy-D-glucose disaccharide phosphomonoester, and these lipid A (Pd-A3 and Pv-A3) exhibited strong activity comparable to the E. coli lipid A. Thus, the present results show that the local Shwartzman reaction can be expressed by partly different lipid A structures in both hydrophilic backbone and fatty acyl residues; when they have the same backbone the potency varies

  20. Saturating Light Induces Sustained Accumulation of Oil in Plastidal Lipid Droplets in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Goold, Hugh Douglas; Cuiné, Stéphan; Légeret, Bertrand; Liang, Yuanxue; Brugière, Sabine; Auroy, Pascaline; Javot, Hélène; Tardif, Marianne; Jones, Brian; Beisson, Fred; Peltier, Gilles; Li-Beisson, Yonghua

    2016-08-01

    Enriching algal biomass in energy density is an important goal in algal biotechnology. Nitrogen (N) starvation is considered the most potent trigger of oil accumulation in microalgae and has been thoroughly investigated. However, N starvation causes the slow down and eventually the arrest of biomass growth. In this study, we show that exposing a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii culture to saturating light (SL) under a nonlimiting CO2 concentration in turbidostatic photobioreactors induces a sustained accumulation of lipid droplets (LDs) without compromising growth, which results in much higher oil productivity than N starvation. We also show that the polar membrane lipid fraction of SL-induced LDs is rich in plastidial lipids (approximately 70%), in contrast to N starvation-induced LDs, which contain approximately 60% lipids of endoplasmic reticulum origin. Proteomic analysis of LDs isolated from SL-exposed cells identified more than 200 proteins, including known proteins of lipid metabolism, as well as 74 proteins uniquely present in SL-induced LDs. LDs induced by SL and N depletion thus differ in protein and lipid contents. Taken together, lipidomic and proteomic data thus show that a large part of the sustained oil accumulation occurring under SL is likely due to the formation of plastidial LDs. We discuss our data in relation to the different metabolic routes used by microalgae to accumulate oil reserves depending on cultivation conditions. Finally, we propose a model in which oil accumulation is governed by an imbalance between photosynthesis and growth, which can be achieved by impairing growth or by boosting photosynthetic carbon fixation, with the latter resulting in higher oil productivity. PMID:27297678

  1. Characterization of mannosylerythritol lipids containing hexadecatetraenoic acid produced from cuttlefish oil by Pseudozyma churashimaensis OK96.

    PubMed

    Morita, Tomotake; Kawamura, Daisuke; Morita, Naoki; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Imura, Tomohiro; Sakai, Hideki; Abe, Masahiko; Kitamoto, Dai

    2013-01-01

    Biosurfactants are surface-active compounds produced by microorganisms. Mannosylerythritol lipids (MEL) are promising biosurfactants produced by Ustilaginomycetes, and their physicochemical and biochemical properties differ depending on the chemical structure of their hydrophilic and/or hydrophobic moieties. To further develop MEL derivatives and expand their potential applications, we focused our attention on the use of cuttlefish oil, which contains polyunsaturated fatty acids (e.g., docosahexaenoic acid, C₂₂:₆, and eicosapentaenoic acid, C₂₀:₅, as the sole carbon source. Among the microorganisms capable of producing MEL, only nine strains were able to produce them from cuttlefish oil. On gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis, we observed that Pseudozyma churashimaensis OK96 was particularly suitable for the production of MEL-A, a MEL containing hexadecatetraenoic acid (C₁₆:₄) (23.6% of the total unsaturated fatty acids and 7.7% of the total fatty acids). The observed critical micelle concentration (CMC) and surface tension at CMC of the new MEL-A were 5.7×10⁻⁶ M and 29.5 mN/m, respectively, while those of MEL-A produced from soybean oil were 2.7×10⁻⁶ M and 27.7 mN/m, respectively. With polarized optical and confocal laser scanning microscopies, the self-assembling properties of MEL-A were found to be different from those of conventional MEL. Furthermore, based on the DPPH radical-scavenging assay, the anti-oxidative activity of MEL-A was found to be 2.1-fold higher than that of MEL-A produced from soybean oil. Thus, the newly identified MEL-A is attractive as a new functional material with excellent surface-active and antioxidative properties. PMID:23648407

  2. Structure of a lipid-bound extended synaptotagmin indicates a role in lipid transfer.

    PubMed

    Schauder, Curtis M; Wu, Xudong; Saheki, Yasunori; Narayanaswamy, Pradeep; Torta, Federico; Wenk, Markus R; De Camilli, Pietro; Reinisch, Karin M

    2014-06-26

    Growing evidence suggests that close appositions between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and other membranes, including appositions with the plasma membrane (PM), mediate exchange of lipids between these bilayers. The mechanisms of such exchange, which allows lipid transfer independently of vesicular transport, remain poorly understood. The presence of a synaptotagmin-like mitochondrial-lipid-binding protein (SMP) domain, a proposed lipid-binding module, in several proteins localized at membrane contact sites has raised the possibility that such domains may be implicated in lipid transport. SMP-containing proteins include components of the ERMES complex, an ER–mitochondrial tether, and the extended synaptotagmins (known as tricalbins in yeast), which are ER–PM tethers. Here we present at 2.44 Å resolution the crystal structure of a fragment of human extended synaptotagmin 2 (E-SYT2), including an SMP domain and two adjacent C2 domains. The SMP domain has a β-barrel structure like protein modules in the tubular-lipid-binding (TULIP) superfamily. It dimerizes to form an approximately 90-Å-long cylinder traversed by a channel lined entirely with hydrophobic residues, with the two C2A–C2B fragments forming arched structures flexibly linked to the SMP domain. Importantly, structural analysis complemented by mass spectrometry revealed the presence of glycerophospholipids in the E-SYT2 SMP channel, indicating a direct role for E-SYTs in lipid transport. These findings provide strong evidence for a role of SMP-domain-containing proteins in the control of lipid transfer at membrane contact sites and have broad implications beyond the field of ER-to-PM appositions. PMID:24847877

  3. Design, characterization, and clinical evaluation of argan oil nanostructured lipid carriers to improve skin hydration.

    PubMed

    Tichota, Deise Michele; Silva, Ana Catarina; Sousa Lobo, José Manuel; Amaral, Maria Helena

    2014-01-01

    Given its advantages in skin application (eg, hydration, antiaging, and protection), argan oil could be used in both dermatological and cosmetic formulations. Therefore, the preparation of nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) using argan oil as a liquid lipid is a promising technique, since the former constitute well-established systems for dermal delivery. The aim of this work was to develop a topical formulation of argan oil NLCs to improve skin hydration. Firstly an NLC dispersion was developed and characterized, and afterward an NLC-based hydrogel was prepared. The in vivo evaluation of the suitability of the prepared formulation for the proposed application was assessed in volunteers, by measuring different skin-surface parameters for 1 month. An argan oil NLC-based hydrogel formulation was successfully prepared and characterized. Moreover, the entrapment of the NLCs in the hydrogel net did not affect their colloidal sizes. Additionally, it was observed that this formulation precipitated an increase in skin hydration of healthy volunteers. Therefore, we concluded that the preparation of NLC systems using argan oil as the liquid lipid is a promising strategy, since a synergistic effect on the skin hydration was obtained (ie, NLC occlusion plus argan oil hydration). PMID:25143733

  4. Design, characterization, and clinical evaluation of argan oil nanostructured lipid carriers to improve skin hydration

    PubMed Central

    Tichota, Deise Michele; Silva, Ana Catarina; Sousa Lobo, José Manuel; Amaral, Maria Helena

    2014-01-01

    Given its advantages in skin application (eg, hydration, antiaging, and protection), argan oil could be used in both dermatological and cosmetic formulations. Therefore, the preparation of nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) using argan oil as a liquid lipid is a promising technique, since the former constitute well-established systems for dermal delivery. The aim of this work was to develop a topical formulation of argan oil NLCs to improve skin hydration. Firstly an NLC dispersion was developed and characterized, and afterward an NLC-based hydrogel was prepared. The in vivo evaluation of the suitability of the prepared formulation for the proposed application was assessed in volunteers, by measuring different skin-surface parameters for 1 month. An argan oil NLC-based hydrogel formulation was successfully prepared and characterized. Moreover, the entrapment of the NLCs in the hydrogel net did not affect their colloidal sizes. Additionally, it was observed that this formulation precipitated an increase in skin hydration of healthy volunteers. Therefore, we concluded that the preparation of NLC systems using argan oil as the liquid lipid is a promising strategy, since a synergistic effect on the skin hydration was obtained (ie, NLC occlusion plus argan oil hydration). PMID:25143733

  5. Why Fish Oil Fails: A Comprehensive 21st Century Lipids-Based Physiologic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Peskin, B. S.

    2014-01-01

    The medical community suffered three significant fish oil failures/setbacks in 2013. Claims that fish oil's EPA/DHA would stop the progression of heart disease were crushed when The Risk and Prevention Study Collaborative Group (Italy) released a conclusive negative finding regarding fish oil for those patients with high risk factors but no previous myocardial infarction. Fish oil failed in all measures of CVD prevention—both primary and secondary. Another major 2013 setback occurred when fish oil's DHA was shown to significantly increase prostate cancer in men, in particular, high-grade prostate cancer, in the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT) analysis by Brasky et al. Another monumental failure occurred in 2013 whereby fish oil's EPA/DHA failed to improve macular degeneration. In 2010, fish oil's EPA/DHA failed to help Alzheimer's victims, even those with low DHA levels. These are by no means isolated failures. The promise of fish oil and its so-called active ingredients EPA / DHA fails time and time again in clinical trials. This lipids-based physiologic review will explain precisely why there should have never been expectation for success. This review will focus on underpublicized lipid science with a focus on physiology. PMID:24551453

  6. Effect of temperature towards lipid oxidation and non-enzymatic browning reactions in krill oil upon storage.

    PubMed

    Lu, F S H; Bruheim, I; Haugsgjerd, B O; Jacobsen, C

    2014-08-15

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the effect of temperature towards lipid oxidation and non-enzymatic browning reactions in krill oil upon storage. Krill oil was incubated at two different temperatures (20 and 40 °C) for 28 or 42 days. The oxidative stability of krill oil was assessed by peroxide value and anisidine value, measurement of lipid derived volatiles, lipid classes and antioxidants. The non-enzymatic browning reactions were assessed through the measurement of pyrroles, free amino acids content and Strecker-derived volatiles. The increase of incubation temperature firstly increased the lipid oxidation in krill oil and subsequently the non-enzymatic browning reactions. The occurrence of these reactions was most likely due to the reaction between α-dicarbonyl or carbonyl compounds with amino acids or ammonia. In addition to tocopherol and astaxanthin esters, the formation of pyrroles might help to protect the krill oil against lipid oxidation. PMID:24679797

  7. Structural studies of lipid-protein interactions on cushioned bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, S. K.; Mukhopadhyay, M. K.; Ma, Y.; Lopez, I.; Bera, S.; Lurio, L. B.; Chakrabarti, A.; Kim, J. E.; Sanyal, M. K.; Sinha, S. K.

    2013-03-01

    Biological membranes are heterogeneous and dynamical organizations of lipids and proteins, which perform functions fundamental to cell survival. Lipid-protein interactions control these functions by influencing folding and stability of integral or peripheral membrane proteins. Further, the incorporation or adsorption of these proteins into the membrane can in turn influence the lipid bilayer properties. In spite of some progress in understanding this process, a detailed structural analysis is lacking. Towards a better understanding of this interaction, we have performed an advanced interface sensitive scattering experiment using synchrotron x-rays. To accurately mimic the biological membranes with their natural thermal fluctuations and in-plane mobility of lipid molecules, polymer cushioned lipid bilayers have been used. This study shows that the adsorption of peripheral membrane proteinspectrindepends on the lipid headgroups, exhibiting different types of binding to phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamie (PE). Further, the interaction of outer membrane protein A (OMP-A), an integral membrane protein is sensitive to the thermodynamic phase of the lipids. A detailed physical modeling of the lipid-protein interactions is under way.

  8. Lipid emulsions containing fish oil protect against PN-induced cholestatic liver disease in preterm piglets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During their first weeks of life preterm infants are dependent on parenteral nutrition (PN). However, PN is associated with the development of cholestasis (PN Associated Liver Disease PNALD). Studies in children showed that fish oil-based lipid emulsions can reverse PNALD; whether they prevent PNALD...

  9. The olive oil-based lipid clinoleic blocks leukocyte recruitment and improves survival during systemic inflammation: a comparative in vivo study of different parenteral lipid emulsions.

    PubMed

    Buschmann, Kirsten; Poeschl, Johannes; Braach, Natascha; Hudalla, Hannes; Kuss, Navina; Frommhold, David

    2015-01-01

    Although fish oil-based and olive oil-based lipid emulsions have been shown to exert anti-inflammatory functions, the immunomodulating properties of lipids are still controversial. Therefore, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effect of three different parenterally administered lipid emulsions in vivo: olive oil-based Clinoleic, fish oil-based Smoflipid, and soybean oil-based Lipofundin. We observed leukocyte recruitment in inflamed murine cremaster muscle using intravital microscopy and survival in a murine model of LPS-induced systemic inflammation and analyzed expression of leukocyte and endothelial adhesion molecules. Olive oil-based Clinoleic and fish oil-based Smoflipid profoundly inhibited leukocyte adhesion compared to Lipofundin during LPS-induced inflammation of the murine cremaster muscle. In the trauma model of cremaster muscle inflammation, Lipofundin was the only lipid emulsion that even augmented leukocyte adhesion. In contrast to Smoflipid and Lipofundin, Clinoleic effectively blocked leukocyte recruitment and increased survival during lethal endotoxemia. Flow chamber experiments and analysis of adhesion molecule expression suggest that both endothelial and leukocyte driven mechanisms might contribute to anti-inflammatory effects of Clinoleic. We conclude that the anti-inflammatory properties of Clinoleic are superior to those of Smoflipid and Lipofundin even during systemic inflammation. Thus, these results should stimulate further studies investigating parenteral lipids as an anti-inflammatory strategy in critically ill patients. PMID:25767334

  10. The Olive Oil-Based Lipid Clinoleic Blocks Leukocyte Recruitment and Improves Survival during Systemic Inflammation: A Comparative In Vivo Study of Different Parenteral Lipid Emulsions

    PubMed Central

    Buschmann, Kirsten; Poeschl, Johannes; Braach, Natascha; Kuss, Navina

    2015-01-01

    Although fish oil-based and olive oil-based lipid emulsions have been shown to exert anti-inflammatory functions, the immunomodulating properties of lipids are still controversial. Therefore, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effect of three different parenterally administered lipid emulsions in vivo: olive oil-based Clinoleic, fish oil-based Smoflipid, and soybean oil-based Lipofundin. We observed leukocyte recruitment in inflamed murine cremaster muscle using intravital microscopy and survival in a murine model of LPS-induced systemic inflammation and analyzed expression of leukocyte and endothelial adhesion molecules. Olive oil-based Clinoleic and fish oil-based Smoflipid profoundly inhibited leukocyte adhesion compared to Lipofundin during LPS-induced inflammation of the murine cremaster muscle. In the trauma model of cremaster muscle inflammation, Lipofundin was the only lipid emulsion that even augmented leukocyte adhesion. In contrast to Smoflipid and Lipofundin, Clinoleic effectively blocked leukocyte recruitment and increased survival during lethal endotoxemia. Flow chamber experiments and analysis of adhesion molecule expression suggest that both endothelial and leukocyte driven mechanisms might contribute to anti-inflammatory effects of Clinoleic. We conclude that the anti-inflammatory properties of Clinoleic are superior to those of Smoflipid and Lipofundin even during systemic inflammation. Thus, these results should stimulate further studies investigating parenteral lipids as an anti-inflammatory strategy in critically ill patients. PMID:25767334

  11. Vegetable oil thermosets reinforced by tannin-lipid formulations.

    PubMed

    Luo, Chunhua; Grigsby, Warren J; Edmonds, Neil R; Al-Hakkak, Jafar

    2013-02-01

    Totally bio-based thermosetting polymers which are comparable to synthetic polyester thermosets have been prepared from copolymerization of condensed tannin-fatty acid esters with vegetable oils. Oxidative copolymerization of tannin linoleate/acetate mixed esters with linseed oil and tung oil produced polymer films ranging from soft rubbers to rigid thermosets. Tannin incorporation into the formulations was essential for the final product to achieve necessary mechanical strength. Films had ambient modulus values between 0.12 and 1.6 GPa, with glass transition temperatures ranging from 32 to 72 °C and calculated crosslink densities of 1020-57,700 mol m⁻³. Film stiffness, T(g) and crosslink density increase with greater tannin linoeate/acetate content due mainly to this tannin component providing rigidity through polyphenolic aromatic rings and unsaturated chains as crosslinking sites. PMID:22975626

  12. Structural Requirements of the Fructan-Lipid Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Vereyken, Ingrid J.; van Kuik, J. Albert; Evers, Toon H.; Rijken, Pieter J.; de Kruijff, Ben

    2003-01-01

    Fructans are a group of fructose-based oligo- and polysaccharides. They are proposed to be involved in membrane protection of plants during dehydration. In accordance with this hypothesis, they show an interaction with hydrated lipid model systems. However, the structural requirements for this interaction are not known both with respect to the fructans as to the lipids. To get insight into this matter, the interaction of several inulins and levan with lipids was investigated using a monomolecular lipid system or the MC 540 probe in a bilayer system. MD was used to get conformational information concerning the polysaccharides. It was found that levan-type fructan interacted comparably with model membranes composed of glyco- or phospholipids but showed a preference for lipids with a small headgroup. Furthermore, it was found that there was an inulin chain-length-dependent interaction with lipids. The results also suggested that inulin-type fructan had a more profound interaction with the membrane than levan-type fructan. MD simulations indicated that the favorable conformation for levan is a helix, whereas inulin tends to form random coil structures. This suggests that flexibility is an important determinant for the fructan-lipid interaction. PMID:12719244

  13. Effects of Cymbopogon citratus L. essential oil on the growth, lipid content and morphogenesis of Aspergillus niger ML2-strain.

    PubMed

    Helal, G A; Sarhan, M M; Abu Shahla, A N K; Abou El-Khair, E K

    2006-01-01

    The mycelial growth of Aspergillus niger van Tieghem was completely inhibited using 1.5 (microl/ml or 2.0 (microl/ml of Cymbopogon citratus essential oil applied by fumigation or contact method in Czapek liquid medium, respectively. This oil was found also to be fungicidal at the same concentrations. The sublethal doses 1.0 and 1.5 (microl/ml inhibited about 70% of fungal growth after five days of incubation and delayed conidiation as compared with the control. Microscopic observations using Light Microscope (LM), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) were carried out to determine the ultra structural modifications of A. niger hyphae after treatment with C. citratus essential oil. The hyphal diameter and hyphal wall appeared markedly thinner. This oil also caused plasma membrane disruption and mitochondrial structure disorganization. Moreover, Ca+2, K+ and Mg+2 leakages increased from the fumigated mycelium and its total lipid content decreased, while the saturated fatty acids decreased and unsaturated fatty acids increased. These findings increase the possibility of exploiting C. citratus essential oil as an effective inhibitor of biodegrading and storage contaminating fungi and in fruit juice preservation. PMID:17139611

  14. Sea buckthorn seed oil protects against the oxidative stress produced by thermally oxidized lipids.

    PubMed

    Zeb, Alam; Ullah, Sana

    2015-11-01

    Thermally oxidized vegetable ghee was fed to the rabbits for 14 days with specific doses of sea buckthorn seed oil (SO). The ghee and SO were characterized for quality parameters and fatty acid composition using GC-MS. Rabbits serum lipid profile, hematology and histology were investigated. Major fatty acids were palmitic acid (44%) and oleic acid (46%) in ghee, while SO contains oleic acid (56.4%) and linoleic acid (18.7%). Results showed that oxidized vegetable ghee increases the serum total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterols, triglycerides and decrease the serum glucose. Oxidized ghee produced toxic effects in the liver and hematological parameters. Sea buckthorn oil supplementation significantly lowered the serum LDL-cholesterols, triglycerides and increased serum glucose and body weight of the animals. Sea buckthorn oil was found to reduce the toxic effects and degenerative changes in the liver and thus provides protection against the thermally oxidized lipids induced oxidative stress. PMID:25976784

  15. Characterization of lipid oxidation in plant oils by micro-calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Dridi, Wafa; Toutain, Jean; Sommier, Alain; Essafi, Wafa; Gargouri, Mohamed; Leal-Calderon, Fernando; Cansell, Maud

    2016-04-15

    A new experimental device was developed, based on the measurement of the heat flux dissipated during chemical reactions. The technique was exploited for real time monitoring of lipid oxidation in plant oils. The thermopiles were used in adiabatic configuration in order to measure the entire heat flux and improve sensitivity. Measurements were operated with a resolution of few μW as required to follow low exothermic reactions like oxidation. The validation of the device was performed by correlating conjugated diene concentrations measured by spectrophotometry and the heat flux dissipated by oxidation reactions. Our experimental approach involved several plant oils analyzed in isothermal conditions. This novel technique provides a versatile, sensitive, solvent-free and yet low-cost method to assess lipid oxidation stability, particularly suitable for the fast screening of plant oils. PMID:26617007

  16. Impact of dietary oils and fats on lipid peroxidation in liver and blood of albino rats

    PubMed Central

    Haggag, Mohammad El-Sayed Yassin El-Sayed; Elsanhoty, Rafaat Mohamed; Ramadan, Mohamed Fawzy

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of different dietary fat and oils (differing in their degree of saturation and unsaturation) on lipid peroxidation in liver and blood of rats. Methods The study was conducted on 50 albino rats that were randomly divided into 5 groups of 10 animals. The groups were fed on dietary butter (Group I), margarine (Group II), olive oil (Group III), sunflower oil (Group IV) and corn oil (Group V) for 7 weeks. After 12 h of diet removal, livers were excised and blood was collected to measure malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in the supernatant of liver homogenate and in blood. Blood superoxide dismutase activity (SOD), glutathione peroxidase activity (GPx), serum vitamin E and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) levels were also measured to determine the effects of fats and oils on lipid peroxidation. Results The results indicated that no significant differences were observed in SOD activity, vitamin E and TAC levels between the five groups. However, there was significant decrease of GPx activity in groups IV and V when compared with other groups. The results indicated that feeding corn oil caused significant increases in liver and blood MDA levels as compared with other oils and fats. There were positive correlations between SOD and GPx, vitamin E and TAC as well as between GPx and TAC (r: 0.743; P<0.001) and between blood MDA and liver MDA (r: 0.897; P<0.001). The results showed also negative correlations between blood MDA on one hand and SOD, GPx, vitamin E and TAC on the other hand. Conclusions The results demonstrated that feeding oils rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) increases lipid peroxidation significantly and may raise the susceptibility of tissues to free radical oxidative damage. PMID:24144131

  17. Lipids for Health and Beauty: Enzymatic Modification of Vegetable Oil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ferulic acid has been extensively investigated for its potential as a cosmetic and pharmaceutical agent. We have prepared lipophilic derivatives of ferulic acid by a simple, enzyme-catalyzed transesterification reaction of ethyl ferulate with vegetable oils. Immobilized Candida antarctica lipase B...

  18. A new cultivation method for microbial oil production: cell pelletization and lipid accumulation by Mucor circinelloides

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The recent energy crisis has triggered significant attention on the microbial synthesis of lipids, which comprise the raw material for biodiesel production. Microbial oil accumulation with filamentous fungi has great potential because filamentous fungi can form pellets during cell growth, and these pellets are much easier to harvest from cell broth. This paper focuses on the cell pelletization process of the oleaginous Mucor circinelloides. We have studied the effect of various cultural conditions on pelletized cell growth and lipid accumulation. This study is the first to report that pH adjustment during cell growth plays a key role in pellet formation of M. circinelloides and describes a handy method by which to induce cell pelletization in submerged fungal cultivation. Our study reveals that cell growth and lipid production are not significantly affected by pelletization and that lipid accumulation is triggered at stressed conditions, such as a high carbon-to-nitrogen ratio and high temperature. PMID:21635739

  19. The embryo and the endosperm contribute equally to argan seed oil yield but confer distinct lipid features to argan oil.

    PubMed

    Errouane, Kheira; Doulbeau, Sylvie; Vaissayre, Virginie; Leblanc, Olivier; Collin, Myriam; Kaid-Harche, Meriem; Dussert, Stéphane

    2015-08-15

    In the perspective of studying lipid biosynthesis in the argan seed, the anatomy, ploidy level and lipid composition of mature seed tissues were investigated using an experimental design including two locations in Algeria and four years of study. Using flow cytometry, we determined that mature argan seeds consist of two well-developed tissues, the embryo and the endosperm. The lipid content of the embryo was higher than that of the endosperm, but the dry weight of the endosperm was higher. Consequently, both tissues contribute equally to seed oil yield. Considerable differences in fatty acid composition were observed between the two tissues. In particular, the endosperm 18:2 percentage was twofold higher than that of the embryo. The tocopherol content of the endosperm was also markedly higher than that of the embryo. In contrast, the endosperm and the embryo had similar sterol and triterpene alcohol contents and compositions. PMID:25794750

  20. Peptide lipidation stabilizes structure to enhance biological function★

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Brian P.; Ottaway, Nickki L.; Perez-Tilve, Diego; Ma, Dejian; Gelfanov, Vasily M.; Tschöp, Matthias H.; DiMarchi, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    Medicines that decrease body weight and restore nutrient tolerance could improve human diabetes and obesity treatment outcomes. We developed lipid–acylated glucagon analogs that are co-agonists for the glucagon and glucagon-like peptide 1 receptors, and stimulate weight loss and plasma glucose lowering in pre-diabetic obese mice. Our studies identified lipid acylation (lipidation) can increase and balance in vitro potencies of select glucagon analogs for the two aforementioned receptors in a lipidation site-dependent manner. A general capacity for lipidation to enhance the secondary structure of glucagon analogs was recognized, and the energetics of this effect quantified. The molecular structure of a lipid–acylated glucagon analog in water was also characterized. These results support that lipidation can modify biological activity through thermodynamically-favorable intramolecular interactions which stabilize structure. This establishes use of lipidation to achieve specific pharmacology and implicates similar endogenous post-translational modifications as physiological tools capable of refining biological action in means previously underappreciated. PMID:24327962

  1. Enzymatic Synthesis of Structured Lipids using a Novel Cold-Active Lipase from Pichia lynferdii NRRL Y-7723

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Structured lipids (SL) were synthesized by the acidolysis of borage oil with caprylic acid using lipases. Six commercial lipases from different sources and a novel lipase from Pichia lynferdii NRRL Y-7723 were screened for their acidolysis activities and Lipozyme RM IM and NRRL Y-7723 lipase were s...

  2. Structure, activity and uptake mechanism of siRNA-lipid nanoparticles with an asymmetric ionizable lipid.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yuta; Ishihara, Hiroshi

    2016-08-20

    Lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) represent the most advanced platform for the systemic delivery of siRNA. We have previously reported the discovery of novel ionizable lipids with asymmetric lipid tails, enabling potent gene-silencing activity in hepatocytes in vivo; however, the structure and delivery mechanism had not been elucidated. Here, we report the structure, activity and uptake mechanism of LNPs with an asymmetric ionizable lipid. Zeta potential and hemolytic activity of LNPs showed that LNPs were neutral at the pH of the blood compartment but become increasingly charged and fusogenic in the acidic endosomal compartment. (31)P NMR experiments indicated that the siRNA was less mobile inside particles, presumably because of an electrostatic interaction with an ionizable lipid. The role of Apolipoprotein E (apoE) was studied using recombinant human apoE both in vitro and in vivo. A comparative study in wild-type and apoE-deficient mice revealed that apoE significantly influenced the in vivo biodistribution of LNPs and enhanced the cellular uptake. Pretreatment of mice with siRNA targeting low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) impaired gene-silencing of the following siRNA treatment, demonstrating that in vivo activity of LNPs is dependent on LDLR. Our studies on the detailed mechanism should lead to the creation of more sophisticated LNP-based RNAi therapeutics. PMID:27374199

  3. Bioactive lipids, radical scavenging potential, and antimicrobial properties of cold pressed clove (Syzygium aromaticum) oil.

    PubMed

    Assiri, Adel Mohamad Ali; Hassanien, Mohamed F R

    2013-11-01

    Health promoting cold pressed oils may improve human health and prevent certain diseases. It is hard to find any research concerning the composition and functional properties of cold pressed clove (Syzygium aromaticum) oil (CO). Cold pressed CO was evaluated for its lipid classes, fatty acid profiles, and tocol contents. In addition, antiradical and antimicrobial properties of CO were evaluated. The amounts of neutral lipids in CO was the highest (∼94.7% of total lipids), followed by glycolipids and phospholipids. The main fatty acids in CO were linoleic and oleic, which comprise together ∼80% of total fatty acids. Stearic and palmitic acids were the main saturated fatty acids. α- and γ-tocopherols and δ-tocotrienol were the main detected tocols. CO had higher antiradical action against DPPH• and galvinoxyl radicals than virgin olive oil. The results of antimicrobial properties revealed that CO inhibited the growth of all tested microorganisms. CO had a drastic effect on the biosynthesis of proteins and lipids in cells of Bacillus subtilis. In consideration of potential utilization, detailed knowledge on the composition and functional properties of CO is of major importance. PMID:24180551

  4. Structural changes in human tear lipocalins associated with lipid binding.

    PubMed

    Gasymov, O K; Abduragimov, A R; Yusifov, T N; Glasgow, B J

    1998-07-28

    Structural and conformational changes in tear lipocalins were detected in association with ligand binding and release. Circular dichroism measurements demonstrated that ligand binding induces beta structure formation, aromatic side chain asymmetry, and a more rigid state in tear lipocalins (TL). The exposure of the tyrosyl component is less in apo-TL than in holo-TL. The sole tryptophan residue, Trp17, is buried in both holo- and apo-TL. The steady state exposure of Trp17 is the same in holo- and apo-TL, but the dynamic exposure is two-fold greater in apo-TL. Maneuvers to unfold the protein with urea or incubation in an acidic environment resulted in increased exposure of aromatic amino acids. Electron paramagnetic resonance studies verified that lipids are liberated from TL in an acidic environment. Acidic pH promotes conformational changes in TL involving aromatic residues, particularly the conserved residue Trp17. These changes are associated with lipid release. The liberation of lipid from the cavity of TL under acidic conditions involves a molten globule state of the protein. We postulate that TL, exposed to the steep surface pH gradient that exists at lipid-aqueous interfaces, would release lipid in association with a molten globule transition. The data suggest a plausible regulatory mechanism for lipid delivery from lipocalins at the tear film surface. PMID:9675263

  5. Structure and Interactions in Polypeptide Cationic Lipid Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, G.; Hjelm, R. P.; Smith, G. S.; Safinya, C. R.

    1998-03-01

    Complexes of polypeptides and cationic lipids have elicited much interest recently because of their potential in developing novel biomolecular materials. We have investigated the solution structure of complexes made from the anionic polypeptide poly-L-glutamic acid (PGA), the cationic lipid DDAB, and the neutral lipid DLPC. X-ray scattering and SANS revealed the structure of the complexes to be multilamellar in nature with the PGA molecules sandwiched in between the lipid bilayers and that the PGA molecules are in the disordered state on the plane of the bilayers. Lipid dilution experiments at charge neutrality indicated that the "d" spacing of the complexes monotonically increases from 39Åupto 60Åat very high dilutions. While lipid chain stretching alone does not account for the increase in "d" spacing, we propose a "pinching" mechanism where the PGA and DDAB molecules are localized to form a tightly packed layer. Away from these "pinches" the system behaves as a pure DLPC membrane with an equilibrium spacing of 60ÅSupported by NSF-DMR-9624091, PRF-31352-AC7, and Los Alamos-STB/UC:96-108.

  6. Lipid oxidation induces structural changes in biomimetic membranes.

    PubMed

    Weber, Georges; Charitat, Thierry; Baptista, Maurício S; Uchoa, Adjaci F; Pavani, Christiane; Junqueira, Helena C; Guo, Yachong; Baulin, Vladimir A; Itri, Rosangela; Marques, Carlos M; Schroder, André P

    2014-06-28

    Oxidation can intimately influence and structurally compromise the levels of biological self-assembly embodied by intracellular and plasma membranes. Lipid peroxidation, a natural metabolic outcome of life with oxygen under light, is also a salient oxidation reaction in photomedicine treatments. However, the effect of peroxidation on the fate of lipid membranes remains elusive. Here we use a new photosensitizer that anchors and disperses in the membrane to achieve spatial control of the oxidizing species. We find, surprisingly, that the integrity of unsaturated unilamellar vesicles is preserved even for fully oxidized membranes. Membrane survival allows for the quantification of the transformations of the peroxidized bilayers, providing key physical and chemical information to understand the effect of lipid oxidation on protein insertion and on other mechanisms of cell function. We anticipate that spatially controlled oxidation will emerge as a new powerful strategy for tuning and evaluating lipid membranes in biomimetic media under oxidative stress. PMID:24871383

  7. Additive effect of linseed oil supplementation on the lipid profiles of older adults

    PubMed Central

    Avelino, Ana Paula A; Oliveira, Gláucia MM; Ferreira, Célia CD; Luiz, Ronir R; Rosa, Glorimar

    2015-01-01

    Background Linseed oil has been investigated as a rich source of n-3 series polyunsaturated fatty acids, which mainly produce a non-atherogenic lipid profile. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of linseed oil supplementation associated with nutritional guidelines on the lipid profiles of older adults, according to the intake of saturated fatty acids (SFA). Methods We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial with 110 older adults randomized in two groups: placebo and linseed oil. The linseed oil group received supplementation with 3 g of linseed oil. Both groups received nutritional guidance and were supplemented for 90 days with monthly blood collection for biochemical analysis. The dietary intake of saturated fat was subdivided into low (<7% SFA/day of the total energy value) and high consumption groups (>7% SFA/day of the total energy value). Results Low SFA (<7% SFA/day of total energy value) consumption was associated with lower total cholesterol concentrations. However, we observed that the linseed oil group, including older adults who consumed >7% SFA/day, had a greater reduction in total cholesterol than the placebo group (P=0.020). The same was observed for low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (P<0.050), suggesting an additive effect of linseed oil and diet. High-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol concentrations were increased significantly in only the linseed group, suggesting that the nutritional intervention alone did not improve HDL cholesterol. Conclusion The results suggest that the nutritional intervention was effective, but linseed oil showed notable effects by increasing the HDL cholesterol concentration. In addition, consumption of <7% SFA/day of the total energy value increased the effect of linseed oil, demonstrating the importance of reducing the consumption of saturated fat. PMID:26543357

  8. Modulatory effects and molecular mechanisms of olive oil and other dietary lipids in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Escrich, Eduard; Solanas, Montserrat; Moral, Raquel; Escrich, Raquel

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women worldwide. In addition to genetic and endocrine factors, the environment, and specifically dietary habits, plays a key role in the aetiology of this malignancy. Epidemiological and, especially, experimental studies have shown a relationship between dietary lipids and breast cancer although there are conflicting results concerning their potential to modify cancer risk in humans. Abundant data have attributed a potential chemopreventive effect to extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO), the main source of fat in the Mediterranean diet, which is associated with low incidence and mortality rates from cardiovascular disease and some cancers, including that of the breast. It is well-established that the healthy effects of EVOO can be attributed both to its particular fatty acid composition (a high content in oleic acid (OA), a suitable quantity of essential polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and a relatively low n-6 PUFA/n-3 PUFA ratio) and its richness in minor bioactive compounds such as squalene and phenolic antioxidants. The specific mechanisms by which EVOO and other dietary lipids may exert their modulatory effects on cancer are not fully understood although abundant research has proposed the following: They influence in the stages of the carcinogenesis process, oxidative stress, alteration of the hormonal status, modification of the structure and function of cell membranes, modulation of cell signalling transduction pathways, regulation of gene expression and influence in the immune system. This article will explore the current knowledge of these mechanisms, including our own results in the context of the international literature. PMID:21443482

  9. Non-lamellar lipid liquid crystalline structures at interfaces.

    PubMed

    Chang, Debby P; Barauskas, Justas; Dabkowska, Aleksandra P; Wadsäter, Maria; Tiberg, Fredrik; Nylander, Tommy

    2015-08-01

    The self-assembly of lipids leads to the formation of a rich variety of nano-structures, not only restricted to lipid bilayers, but also encompassing non-lamellar liquid crystalline structures, such as cubic, hexagonal, and sponge phases. These non-lamellar phases have been increasingly recognized as important for living systems, both in terms of providing compartmentalization and as regulators of biological activity. Consequently, they are of great interest for their potential as delivery systems in pharmaceutical, food and cosmetic applications. The compartmentalizing nature of these phases features mono- or bicontinuous networks of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic domains. To utilize these non-lamellar liquid crystalline structures in biomedical devices for analyses and drug delivery, it is crucial to understand how they interact with and respond to different types of interfaces. Such non-lamellar interfacial layers can be used to entrap functional biomolecules that respond to lipid curvature as well as the confinement. It is also important to understand the structural changes of deposited lipid in relation to the corresponding bulk dispersions. They can be controlled by changing the lipid composition or by introducing components that can alter the curvature or by deposition on nano-structured surface, e.g. vertical nano-wire arrays. Progress in the area of liquid crystalline lipid based nanoparticles opens up new possibilities for the preparation of well-defined surface films with well-defined nano-structures. This review will focus on recent progress in the formation of non-lamellar dispersions and their interfacial properties at the solid/liquid and biologically relevant interfaces. PMID:25435157

  10. Influence of aqueous phase emulsifiers on lipid oxidation in water-in-walnut oil emulsions.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jianhua; Zhu, Zhenbao; McClements, D Julian; Decker, Eric A

    2014-03-01

    Effects of selected aqueous phase emulsifiers on lipid oxidative stability of water-in-walnut oil (W/O) emulsions stabilized by polyglycerol polyricinoleate (PGPR) were evaluated. The formation of primary oxidation products (lipid hydroperoxides) and secondary oxidation products (headspace hexanal) increased with increasing dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) concentration (0.1-0.2 wt % of emulsions). In contrast, the addition of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in the aqueous phase reduced lipid hydroperoxide and hexanal formation. In addition, the presence of Tween 20 in the aqueous phase did not significantly influence lipid oxidation rates in W/O emulsions compared to the control (without Tween 20). Whey protein isolate (WPI) was observed to inhibit lipid oxidation in the W/O emulsions (0.05-0.2 wt % of emulsions). Aqueous phase pH had an important impact on the antioxidant capability of WPI, with higher pH improving its ability to inhibit lipid oxidation. The combination of WPI and DTAB in the aqueous phase suppressed the prooxidant effect of DTAB. The combination of WPI and SDS resulted in improved antioxidant activity, with inhibition being greater at pH 7.0 than at pH 3.0. These results suggest that the oxidative stability of W/O emulsions could be improved by the use of suitable emulsifiers in the aqueous phase. PMID:24446832

  11. Structural elucidation of olive pomace fed sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) polar lipids with cardioprotective activities.

    PubMed

    Nasopoulou, Constantina; Smith, Terry; Detopoulou, Maria; Tsikrika, Constantina; Papaharisis, Leonidas; Barkas, Dimitris; Zabetakis, Ioannis

    2014-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to structurally characterise the polar lipids of sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax), fed with an experimental diet containing olive pomace (OP), that exhibit cardioprotective activities. OP has been added to conventional fish oil (FO) feed at 4% and this was the OP diet, having been supplemented as finishing diet to fish. Sea bass was aquacultured using either FO or OP diet. At the end of the dietary experiment, lipids in both samples of fish muscle were quantified and HPLC fractionated. The in vitro cardioprotective properties of the polar lipid fractions, using washed rabbit's platelets, have been assessed and the two most biologically active fractions were further analysed by mass spectrometry. The gas-chromatrograpy-mass spectrometric data shows that these two fractions contain low levels of myristic (14:0), oleic (18:1 cis ω-9) and linoleic acids (18:2 ω-6), but high levels of palmitic (16:0) and stearic acids (18:0) as well as eicosadienoic acid (20:2 ω-6). The first fraction (MS1) also contained significant levels of arachidonic acid (20:4 ω-6) and the omega-3 fatty acids: eicosapentaenoic acid (22:5) and docosahexaenoic acid (22:6). Electrospray-mass spectrometry elucidated that the lipid composition of the two fractions contained various diacyl-glycerophospholipids species, where the majority of them have either 18:0 or 18:1 fatty acids in the sn-1 position and either 22:6 or 20:2 fatty acids in the sn-2 position for MS1 and MS2, respectively. Our research focuses on the structure/function relationship of fish muscle polar lipids and cardiovascular diseases and structural data are given for polar lipid HPLC fractions with strong cardioprotective properties. PMID:24128590

  12. Lipid structure does not modify incorporation of EPA and DHA into blood lipids in healthy adults: a randomised-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    West, Annette L; Burdge, Graham C; Calder, Philip C

    2016-09-01

    Dietary supplementation is an effective means to improve EPA and DHA status. However, it is unclear whether lipid structure affects EPA+DHA bioavailability. We determined the effect of consuming different EPA and DHA lipid structures on their concentrations in blood during the postprandial period and during dietary supplementation compared with unmodified fish oil TAG (uTAG). In a postprandial cross-over study, healthy men (n 9) consumed in random order test meals containing 1·1 g EPA+0·37 g DHA as either uTAG, re-esterified TAG, free fatty acids (FFA) or ethyl esters (EE). In a parallel design supplementation study, healthy men and women (n 10/sex per supplement) consumed one supplement type for 12 weeks. Fatty acid composition was determined by GC. EPA incorporation over 6 h into TAG or phosphatidylcholine (PC) did not differ between lipid structures. EPA enrichment in NEFA was lower from EE than from uTAG (P=0·01). Plasma TAG, PC or NEFA DHA incorporation did not differ between lipid structures. Lipid structure did not affect TAG or NEFA EPA incorporation and PC or NEFA DHA incorporation following dietary supplementation. Plasma TAG peak DHA incorporation was greater (P=0·02) and time to peak shorter (P=0·02) from FFA than from uTAG in men. In both studies, the order of EPA and DHA incorporation was PC>TAG>NEFA. In conclusion, EPA and DHA lipid structure may not be an important consideration in dietary interventions. PMID:27424661

  13. Investigating the Structure of Multicomponent Gel-Phase Lipid Bilayers.

    PubMed

    Hartkamp, Remco; Moore, Timothy C; Iacovella, Christopher R; Thompson, Michael A; Bulsara, Pallav A; Moore, David J; McCabe, Clare

    2016-08-23

    Single- and multicomponent lipid bilayers of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DSPC), isostearyl isostearate, and heptadecanoyl heptadecanoate in the gel phase are studied via molecular dynamics simulations. It is shown that the structural properties of multicomponent bilayers can deviate strongly from the structures of their single-component counterparts. Specifically, the lipid mixtures are shown to adopt a compact packing by offsetting the positioning depths at which different lipid species are located in the bilayer. This packing mechanism affects the area per lipid, the bilayer height, and the chain tilt angles and has important consequences for other bilayer properties, such as interfacial hydrogen bonding and bilayer permeability. In particular, the simulations suggest that bilayers containing isostearyl isostearate or heptadecanoyl heptadecanoate are less permeable than pure 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine or DSPC bilayers. Furthermore, hydrogen-bond analysis shows that the residence times of lipid-water hydrogen bonds depend strongly on the bilayer composition, with longer residence times for bilayers that have a higher DSPC content. The findings illustrate and explain the fundamental differences between the properties of single- and multicomponent bilayers. PMID:27558724

  14. Comparison of effects of soft margarine, blended, ghee, and unhydrogenated oil with hydrogenated oil on serum lipids: A randomized clinical trail

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadifard, Noushin; Hosseini, Mohsen; Sajjadi, Firoozeh; Maghroun, Maryam; Boshtam, Maryam; Nouri, Fatemeh

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Trans fatty acids (TFAs) are known as the most harmful type of dietary fats. Therefore, this study was done to compare the effects of some different oils including unhydrogenated, blended, ghee, and soft magazine with hydrogenated oil on serum lipid profile of healthy adults. METHODS This study was a randomized clinical trial conducted on 206 healthy participants of 20 to 60 years of age. Subjects were randomly divided into 5 groups and each of them was treated with a diet containing unhydrogenated oil, ghee, blended oil, soft margarine, or hydrogenated oil for 40 days. Fasting serum lipids were measured before and after the study. RESULTS Compared to hydrogenated oil, total cholesterol (TC) and triglyceride (TG) had a significant reduction in all groups, LDL-C declined in unhydrogenated oil and soft margarine groups, and apolipoprotein (Apo) B only in unhydrogenated oil group (all P < 0.05). However, there was a significant enhancement in ApoA of ghee oil (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION Consuming unhydrogenated oil, ghee, soft margarine, and blended oil had some beneficial effects on serum lipids. PMID:24575140

  15. The Use of Fish Oil Lipid Emulsion in the Treatment of Intestinal Failure Associated Liver Disease (IFALD)

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Melissa I.; Puder, Mark; Gura, Kathleen M.

    2012-01-01

    Since 2004, fish oil based lipid emulsions have been used in the treatment of intestinal failure associated liver disease, with a noticeable impact on decreasing the incidence of morbidity and mortality of this often fatal condition. With this new therapy, however, different approaches have emerged as well as concerns about potential risks with using fish oil as a monotherapy. This review will discuss the experience to date with this lipid emulsion along with the rational for its use, controversies and concerns. PMID:23363993

  16. DNA/Fusogenic Lipid Nanocarrier Assembly: Millisecond Structural Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Angelov, Borislav; Angelova, Angelina; Filippov, Sergey K; Narayanan, Theyencheri; Drechsler, Markus; Štěpánek, Petr; Couvreur, Patrick; Lesieur, Sylviane

    2013-06-01

    Structural changes occurring on a millisecond time scale during uptake of DNA by cationic lipid nanocarriers are monitored by time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) coupled to a rapid-mixing stopped-flow technique. Nanoparticles (NPs) of nanochannel organization are formed by PEGylation, hydration, and dispersion of a lipid film of the fusogenic lipid monoolein in a mixture with positively charged (DOMA) and PEGylated (DOPE-PEG2000) amphiphiles and are characterized by the inner cubic structure of very large nanochannels favorable for DNA upload. Ultrafast structural dynamics of complexation and assembly of these cubosome particles with neurotrophic plasmid DNA (pDNA) is revealed thanks to the high brightness of the employed synchrotron X-ray beam. The rate constant of the pDNA/lipid NP complexation is estimated from dynamic roentgenograms recorded at 4 ms time resolution. pDNA upload into the vastly hydrated channels of the cubosome carriers leads to a fast nanoparticle-nanoparticle structural transition and lipoplex formation involving tightly packed pDNA. PMID:26283134

  17. Data supporting beta-amyloid dimer structural transitions and protein-lipid interactions on asymmetric lipid bilayer surfaces using MD simulations on experimentally derived NMR protein structures.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Sara Y; Chou, George; Buie, Creighton; Vaughn, Mark W; Compton, Campbell; Cheng, Kwan H

    2016-06-01

    This data article supports the research article entitled "Maximally Asymmetric Transbilayer Distribution of Anionic Lipids Alters the Structure and interaction with Lipids of an Amyloidogenic Protein Dimer Bound to the Membrane Surface" [1]. We describe supporting data on the binding kinetics, time evolution of secondary structure, and residue-contact maps of a surface-absorbed beta-amyloid dimer protein on different membrane surfaces. We further demonstrate the sorting of annular and non-annular regions of the protein/lipid bilayer simulation systems, and the correlation of lipid-number mismatch and surface area per lipid mismatch of asymmetric lipid membranes. PMID:27054174

  18. Structural studies of aliphatic substituted phthalocyanine-lipid multilayers.

    PubMed

    Zarbakhsh, Ali; Campana, Mario; Mills, David; Webster, John R P

    2010-10-01

    A Langmuir-Blodgett film of aliphatic substituted phthalocyanines on a C18 silane supporting layer coupled onto a silicon substrate has been investigated using neutron reflectometry. This multilayer structure is seen as a possible candidate for phthalocyanine-lipid biosensor devices. The results show the suitability of the C18 ligands as an anchoring layer for the phthalocyanines. The scattering length density profiles demonstrate the effectiveness of a lipid monolayer in partitioning the composition of phthalocyanine layers from that of the bulk liquid. The effectiveness of this barrier is a critical factor in the efficiency of such devices. PMID:20831252

  19. Tethered and Polymer Supported Bilayer Lipid Membranes: Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Jakob; Köper, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Solid supported bilayer lipid membranes are model systems to mimic natural cell membranes in order to understand structural and functional properties of such systems. The use of a model system allows for the use of a wide variety of analytical tools including atomic force microscopy, impedance spectroscopy, neutron reflectometry, and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. Among the large number of different types of model membranes polymer-supported and tethered lipid bilayers have been shown to be versatile and useful systems. Both systems consist of a lipid bilayer, which is de-coupled from an underlying support by a spacer cushion. Both systems will be reviewed, with an emphasis on the effect that the spacer moiety has on the bilayer properties. PMID:27249006

  20. Tethered and Polymer Supported Bilayer Lipid Membranes: Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Jakob; Köper, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Solid supported bilayer lipid membranes are model systems to mimic natural cell membranes in order to understand structural and functional properties of such systems. The use of a model system allows for the use of a wide variety of analytical tools including atomic force microscopy, impedance spectroscopy, neutron reflectometry, and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. Among the large number of different types of model membranes polymer-supported and tethered lipid bilayers have been shown to be versatile and useful systems. Both systems consist of a lipid bilayer, which is de-coupled from an underlying support by a spacer cushion. Both systems will be reviewed, with an emphasis on the effect that the spacer moiety has on the bilayer properties. PMID:27249006

  1. Effect of replacement of fish oil with camelina (Camelina sativa) oil on growth, lipid class and fatty acid composition of farmed juvenile Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua).

    PubMed

    Hixson, Stefanie M; Parrish, Christopher C; Anderson, Derek M

    2013-12-01

    Camelina (Camelina sativa) oil was tested as a replacement for fish oil in diets for farmed Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua). Camelina differs from other plant oilseeds previously used in aquaculture with high lipid (40 %), α-linolenic acid (40 %), antioxidants and low proportions of saturated fats. Dietary treatments were fed to cod (19 g fish⁻¹ initial weight) for 9 weeks and included a fish oil control (FO), 40 % (CO40) and 80 % (CO80) replacement of fish oil with camelina oil. There was no effect of replacing fish oil with camelina oil included at levels up to 80 % on the growth performance. Cod fed CO80 stored more lipid in the liver (p < 0.01), including more neutral lipid (p < 0.05) and triacylglycerol (p < 0.05). Cod fed CO80 decreased in total polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in muscle compared to CO40 and FO (p < 0.05), increased in monounsaturated fatty acids (p < 0.01), decreased in total ω3 fatty acids (FO > CO40 > CO80; p < 0.01) and increased in total ω6 fatty acids (FO < CO40 < CO80; p < 0.01). In the liver, long-chain (LC) PUFA such as 20:4ω6, 20:5ω3, 22:5ω3 and 22:6ω3 decreased when fish oil was removed from the diet (p < 0.05), and increased in 18-carbon fatty acids (p < 0.01). Camelina oil can reduce the amount of fish oil needed to meet lipid requirements, although replacing 80 % of fish oil reduced LC PUFAs in both tissues. A comparison of BF₃ and H₂SO₄ as catalysts to transmethylate cod liver and muscle lipids revealed small but significant differences in some fatty acid proportions. PMID:23584924

  2. Treatment of rheumatoid arthritis with marine and botanical oils: influence on serum lipids.

    PubMed

    Olendzki, Barbara C; Leung, Katherine; Van Buskirk, Susan; Reed, George; Zurier, Robert B

    2011-01-01

    The gap in mortality between patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and the general population (1.5-3.0 fold risk) is increasing. This disparity is attributable mainly to cardiovascular disease (CVD), as the CVD risk is comparable to patients with diabetes mellitus. The purpose of this study is to determine whether borage seed oil rich in gamma-linolenic acid, fish oil rich in eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), or the combination of both oils are useful treatments for dyslipidemia in patients with RA. We randomized patients into a double blind, 18 month trial. Mixed effects models were used to compare trends over time in serum lipids. No significant differences were observed between the three groups: All three treatment groups exhibited similar meaningful improvement in the lipid profile at 9 and 18 months. When all groups were combined, these treatments significantly reduced total and LDL-cholesterol and triglycerides, increased HDL-cholesterol, and improved the atherogenic index. All improvements observed at 9 months persisted at 18 months (P < 0.001 verses baseline). Conclusion. Marine and botanical oils may be useful treatment for rheumatoid arthritis patients who are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease compared to the general population. PMID:22007257

  3. Pyrolysis oil-based lipid production as biodiesel feedstock by Rhodococcus opacus.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhen; Zeng, Guangming; Kosa, Matyas; Huang, Danlian; Ragauskas, Arthur J

    2015-01-01

    Light oil from pyrolysis, which accounts for ∼10 % carbon yield of the starting biomass, is a complex aqueous product that is difficult to utilize and usually discarded. This work presents the feasibility of light oil as a sole carbon source to support the growth of Rhodococcus opacus (R. opacus) that in turn accumulate triacylglycerols as biodiesel feedstock. Two types of bacteria (R. opacus PD630 and DSM 1069) were selected in this study. Research results showed that after short adaption periods both strains can grow well on this complex carbon source, as proved by the consumption of oligomers and monomers in light oil. Lipid content by R. opacus PD630 and DSM 1069 was observed up to 25.8 % and 22.0 % of cell dry weight, respectively. Palmitic and stearic acids were found to be the predominant fatty acids in these bacterial cells. In addition, the light oil-based lipid production can be enhanced by reducing the pH value from 7 to 4, especially in case of DSM 1069. PMID:25377250

  4. The Effects of Polyunsaturated Lipid Components on bilayer Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramudya, Y.; Kiss, A.; Nguyen, Lam T.; Yuan, J.; Hirst, Linda S.

    2007-03-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), such as DHA (Docosahexanoic Acid) and AA (Alphalinoleic Acid) have been the focus of much research attention in recent years, due to their apparent health benefits and effects on cell physiology. They are found in a variety of biological membranes and have been implicated with lipid raft formation and possible function, particularly in the retinal rod cells and the central nervous system. In this work lipid bilayer structure has been investigated in lipid mixtures, incorporating polyunsaturated fatty acid moieties. The structural effects of increasing concentrations of both symmetric and asymmetric PUFA materials on the bilayer structure are investigated via synchrotron x-ray diffraction on solution samples. We observe bilayer spacings to increase with the percentage of unsaturated fatty acid lipid in the membrane, whilst the degree of ordering significantly decreases. In fact above 20% of fatty acid, well defined bilayers are no longer observed to form. Evidence of phase separation can be clearly seen from these x-ray results and in combination with AFM measurements.

  5. [Fish oil containing lipid emulsions in critically ill patients: Critical analysis and future perspectives].

    PubMed

    Manzanares, W; Langlois, P L

    2016-01-01

    Third-generation lipid emulsions (LE) are soybean oil sparing strategies with immunomodulatory and antiinflammatory effects. Current evidence supporting the use of intravenous (i.v) fish oil (FO) LE in critically ill patients requiring parenteral nutrition or receiving enteral nutrition (pharmaconutrient strategy) mainly derives from small phase ii clinical trials in heterogenous intensive care unit patient's population. Over the last three years, there have been published different systematic reviews and meta-analyses evaluating the effects of FO containing LE in the critically ill. Recently, it has been demonstrated that i.v FO based LE may be able to significantly reduce the incidence of infections as well as mechanical ventilation days and hospital length of stay. Nonetheless, more robust evidence is required before giving a definitive recommendation. Finally, we strongly believe that a dosing study is required before new phase iii clinical trials comparing i.v FO containing emulsions versus other soybean oil strategies can be conducted. PMID:26403991

  6. Short-Term Use of Parenteral Nutrition With a Lipid Emulsion Containing a Mixture of Soybean Oil, Olive Oil, Medium-Chain Triglycerides, and Fish Oil

    PubMed Central

    Devlieger, Hugo; Jochum, Frank; Allegaert, Karel

    2012-01-01

    Background: For premature neonates needing parenteral nutrition (PN), a balanced lipid supply is crucial. The authors hypothesized that a lipid emulsion containing medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) and soybean, olive, and fish oils would be as safe and well tolerated as a soybean emulsion while beneficially influencing the fatty acid profile. Methods: Double-blind, controlled study in 53 neonates (<34 weeks’ gestation) randomized to receive at least 7 days of PN containing either an emulsion of MCTs and soybean, olive, and fish oils or a soybean oil emulsion. Target lipid dosage was 1.0 g fat/kg body weight [BW]/d on days 1–3, 2 g/kg BW/d on day 4, 3 g/kg BW/d on day 5, and 3.5 g/kg BW/d on days 6–14. Results: Test emulsion vs control, mean ± SD: baseline triglyceride concentrations were 0.52 ± 0.16 vs 0.54 ± 0.19 mmol/L and increased similarly in both groups to 0.69 ± 0.38 vs 0.67 ± 0.36 on day 8 of treatment (P = .781 for change). A significantly higher decrease in total and direct bilirubin vs baseline was seen in the test group compared with the control group P < .05 between groups). In plasma and red blood cell phospholipids, eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid were higher, and the n-6/n-3 fatty acid ratio was lower in the test group (P < .05 vs control). Conclusions: The lipid emulsion, based on a mixture of MCTs and soybean, olive, and fish oils, was safe and well tolerated by preterm infants while beneficially modulating the fatty acid profile. PMID:22237883

  7. Comparison of palmolein and olive oil: effects on plasma lipids and vitamin E in young adults.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, N; Tan, L; Truswell, A S

    1995-05-01

    Twenty-one healthy normocholesterolemic young adults, men and women, completed a randomized 30-d/30-d crossover comparison of the effect of palmolein and olive oil on plasma lipids. The subjects were free-living volunteers who changed to low-fat diets to which one of the test oils was added (used as a spread, for baking, or for frying) in turn. Complete food records were kept throughout: the test oils were compared at 17% of total dietary energy. Under the conditions of this experiment plasma total and low-density-lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol were almost identical with the two oils, so that when the palmitic acid (16:0) in palm oil replaced oleic acid (18:1) in olive oil the expected increase in LDL cholesterol was not seen. These results indicate that 16:0, though saturated, is not always a plasma cholesterol-raising fatty acid. Palmolein is rich in vitamin E, alpha-tocopherol, and especially tocotrienols, but the latter were barely detectable in plasma. PMID:7733026

  8. Structure and shear response of lipid monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, P.; Ketterson, J.B.

    1990-02-01

    Organic monolayers and multilayers are both scientifically fascinating and technologically promising; they are, however, both complex systems and relatively inaccessible to experimental probes. In this Progress Report, we describe our X-ray diffraction studies, which have given us substantial new information about the structures and phase transitions in monolayers on the surface of water; our use of these monolayers as a unique probe of the dynamics of wetting and spreading; and our studies of monolayer mechanical properties using a simple but effective technique available to anyone using the Wilhelmy method to measure surface tension.

  9. Determination and structural elucidation of triacylglycerols in krill oil by chromatographic techniques.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Pedro; Zhu, Han; Breivik, Joar Fjørtoft; Hjelle, Jan Idar; Zeng, Yingxu

    2014-02-01

    The content of triacylglycerols (TAG) in krill oil is generally omitted from the labels of commercial supplements and unacknowledged in studies aimed at proving its health benefits. The present study demonstrates that TAG compounds, in addition to phospholipids and lysophospholipids, are an important lipid class in pure krill oil. The fatty acid composition of TAG molecules from krill oil and their distribution on the backbone of TAG structures were determined by gas chromatography and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometric, respectively. The content of omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) was similar to those reported in the literature for fish oil. It was estimated that 21 % of n-3 PUFA were at the sn-2 position of TAG structures. To our knowledge, this is the first determination and structural characterization of TAG in pure krill oil supplements. PMID:24190513

  10. Comparison of Formulas Based on Lipid Emulsions of Olive Oil, Soybean Oil, or Several Oils for Parenteral Nutrition: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yu-Jie; Sun, Li-Li; Li, Meng-Ying; Ding, Cui-Ling; Su, Yu-Cheng; Sun, Li-Juan; Xue, Sen-Hai; Yan, Feng; Zhao, Chang-Hai; Wang, Wen

    2016-03-01

    Many studies have reported that olive oil-based lipid emulsion (LE) formulas of soybean oil, medium-chain triglycerides, olive oil, and fish oil (SMOF) may be a viable alternative for parenteral nutrition. However, some randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) have raised concerns regarding the nutritional benefits and safety of SMOFs. We searched principally the MEDLINE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Scopus, EMBASE, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases from inception to March 2014 for the relevant literature and conducted a meta-analysis of 15 selected RCTs that 1) compared either olive oil- or SMOF-based LEs with soybean oil-based LEs and 2) reported plasma concentrations of α-tocopherol, oleic acid, and ω-6 (n-6) and ω-3 (n-3) long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and liver concentrations of total bilirubin and the enzymes alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase, alkaline phosphatase, and γ-glutamyl transferase. The meta-analysis suggested that SMOF-based LEs were associated with higher plasma concentrations of plasma α-tocopherol, oleic acid, and the ω-3 PUFAs eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid. Olive oil- and SMOF-based LEs correlated with lower plasma concentrations of long-chain ω-6 PUFAs and were similar to soybean oil-based LEs with regard to their effects on liver function indicators. In summary, olive oil- and SMOF-based LEs have nutritional advantages over soybean oil-based LEs and are similarly safe. However, their performance in clinical settings requires further investigation. PMID:26980811

  11. Control analysis of lipid biosynthesis in tissue cultures from oil crops shows that flux control is shared between fatty acid synthesis and lipid assembly.

    PubMed Central

    Ramli, Umi S; Baker, Darren S; Quant, Patti A; Harwood, John L

    2002-01-01

    Top-Down (Metabolic) Control Analysis (TDCA) was used to examine, quantitatively, lipid biosynthesis in tissue cultures from two commercially important oil crops, olive (Olea europaea L.) and oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.). A conceptually simplified system was defined comprising two blocks of reactions: fatty acid synthesis (Block A) and lipid assembly (Block B), which produced and consumed, respectively, a common and unique system intermediate, cytosolic acyl-CoA. We manipulated the steady-state levels of the system intermediate by adding exogenous oleic acid and, using two independent assays, measured the effect of the addition on the system fluxes (J(A) and J(B)). These were the rate of incorporation of radioactivity: (i) through Block A from [1-(14)C]acetate into fatty acids and (ii) via Block B from [U-(14)C]glycerol into complex lipids respectively. The data showed that fatty acid formation (Block A) exerted higher control than lipid assembly (Block B) in both tissues with the following group flux control coefficients (C):(i) Oil palm: *C(J(TL))(BlkA)=0.64+/-0.05 and *C(J(TL))(BlkB)=0.36+/-0.05(ii) Olive: *C(J(TL))(BlkA)=0.57+/-0.10 and *C(J(TL))(BlkB)=0.43+/-0.10where *C indicates the group flux control coefficient over the lipid biosynthesis flux (J(TL)) and the subscripts BlkA and BlkB refer to defined blocks of the system, Block A and Block B. Nevertheless, because both parts of the lipid biosynthetic pathway exert significant flux control, we suggest strongly that manipulation of single enzyme steps will not affect product yield appreciably. The present study represents the first use of TDCA to examine the overall lipid biosynthetic pathway in any tissue, and its findings are of immediate academic and economic relevance to the yield and nutritional quality of oil crops. PMID:12023882

  12. Structural interactions of a voltage sensor toxin with lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Mihailescu, Mihaela; Krepkiy, Dmitriy; Milescu, Mirela; Gawrisch, Klaus; Swartz, Kenton J; White, Stephen

    2014-12-16

    Protein toxins from tarantula venom alter the activity of diverse ion channel proteins, including voltage, stretch, and ligand-activated cation channels. Although tarantula toxins have been shown to partition into membranes, and the membrane is thought to play an important role in their activity, the structural interactions between these toxins and lipid membranes are poorly understood. Here, we use solid-state NMR and neutron diffraction to investigate the interactions between a voltage sensor toxin (VSTx1) and lipid membranes, with the goal of localizing the toxin in the membrane and determining its influence on membrane structure. Our results demonstrate that VSTx1 localizes to the headgroup region of lipid membranes and produces a thinning of the bilayer. The toxin orients such that many basic residues are in the aqueous phase, all three Trp residues adopt interfacial positions, and several hydrophobic residues are within the membrane interior. One remarkable feature of this preferred orientation is that the surface of the toxin that mediates binding to voltage sensors is ideally positioned within the lipid bilayer to favor complex formation between the toxin and the voltage sensor. PMID:25453087

  13. Structural interactions of a voltage sensor toxin with lipid membranes

    PubMed Central

    Mihailescu, Mihaela; Krepkiy, Dmitriy; Milescu, Mirela; Gawrisch, Klaus; Swartz, Kenton J.; White, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Protein toxins from tarantula venom alter the activity of diverse ion channel proteins, including voltage, stretch, and ligand-activated cation channels. Although tarantula toxins have been shown to partition into membranes, and the membrane is thought to play an important role in their activity, the structural interactions between these toxins and lipid membranes are poorly understood. Here, we use solid-state NMR and neutron diffraction to investigate the interactions between a voltage sensor toxin (VSTx1) and lipid membranes, with the goal of localizing the toxin in the membrane and determining its influence on membrane structure. Our results demonstrate that VSTx1 localizes to the headgroup region of lipid membranes and produces a thinning of the bilayer. The toxin orients such that many basic residues are in the aqueous phase, all three Trp residues adopt interfacial positions, and several hydrophobic residues are within the membrane interior. One remarkable feature of this preferred orientation is that the surface of the toxin that mediates binding to voltage sensors is ideally positioned within the lipid bilayer to favor complex formation between the toxin and the voltage sensor. PMID:25453087

  14. Fish oil-based lipid emulsions prevent and reverse parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease: the Boston experience.

    PubMed

    de Meijer, Vincent E; Gura, Kathleen M; Le, Hau D; Meisel, Jonathan A; Puder, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD) is the most prevalent and most severe complication of long-term parenteral nutrition. Its underlying pathophysiology, however, largely remains to be elucidated. The currently approved parenteral lipid emulsions in the United States contain safflower or soybean oils, both rich in omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). Mounting evidence indicates that the omega-6 PUFAs originating from plant oils in these lipid emulsions may play a role in the onset of liver injury. Fish oil-based lipid emulsions, in contrast, are primarily composed of omega-3 PUFAs, thus providing a promising alternative. The authors review the literature on the role of lipid emulsions in the onset of PNALD and discuss prevention and treatment strategies using a fish oil-based lipid emulsion. They conclude that a fish oil-based emulsion is hepatoprotective in a murine model of PNALD, and it appears to be safe and efficacious for the treatment of this type of liver disease in children. A prospective randomized trial that is currently under way at the authors' institution will objectively determine the place of fish oil monotherapy in the prevention of PNALD. PMID:19571170

  15. A bicontinuous tetrahedral structure in a liquid-crystalline lipid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longley, William; McIntosh, Thomas J.

    1983-06-01

    The structure of most lipid-water phases can be visualized as an ordered distribution of two liquid media, water and hydrocarbons, separated by a continuous surface covered by the polar groups of the lipid molecules1. In the cubic phases in particular, rod-like elements are linked into three-dimensional networks1,2. Two of these phases (space groups Ia3d and Pn3m) contain two such three-dimensional networks mutually inter-woven and unconnected. Under the constraints of energy minimization3, the interface between the components in certain of these `porous fluids' may well resemble one of the periodic minimal surface structures of the type described mathematically by Schwarz4,5. A structure of this sort has been proposed for the viscous isotropic (cubic) form of glycerol monooleate (GMO) by Larsson et al.6 who suggested that the X-ray diagrams of Lindblom et al.7 indicated a body-centred crystal structure in which lipid bilayers might be arranged as in Schwarz's octahedral surface4. We have now found that at high water contents, a primitive cubic lattice better fits the X-ray evidence with the material in the crystal arranged in a tetrahedral way. The lipid appears to form a single bilayer, continuous in three dimensions, separating two continuous interlinked networks of water. Each of the water networks has the symmetry of the diamond crystal structure and the bilayer lies in the space between them following a surface resembling Schwarz's tetrahedral surface4.

  16. Effect of Variable Solvents on Particle Size of Geranium Oil-Loaded Solid Lipid Nanoparticle (Ge-SLN) For Mosquito Repellent Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asnawi, Syalwati; Aziz, Azila A.; Aziz, Ramlan A.

    2009-06-01

    A new delivery system for insect repellent is proposed by the incorporation of geranium oil into solid lipid nanoparticle (SLN). A variety of solvents which act as co-surfactants, were introduced to increase the particle size of GE-SLN. Ethanol, which has a high boiling point and a long chain alcohol produced larger particle than dichloromethane. The structure of SLN was not stable when methanol and acetone were used as co-solvents. Concentration of solvents can also influence the size of SLN. In vitro release experiments showed that SLN was able to reduce the rapid evaporation of geranium oil.

  17. Differential molecular regulation of bile acid homeostasis by soy lipid induced phytosterolemia and fish oil lipid emulsions in TPN-fed preterm pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prolonged total parenteral nutrition (PN) may lead to cholestasis and liver disease (PNALD). The soybean oil-based lipid emulsion (Intralipid) and its constituent phytosterols have been implicated in PNALD. Phytosterols may induce cholestasis by antagonism of the nuclear bile-acid receptor, FXR, lea...

  18. The binding of Maize DHN1 to Lipid Vesicles. Gain of Structure and Lipid Specificity1

    PubMed Central

    Koag, Myong-Chul; Fenton, Raymond D.; Wilkens, Stephan; Close, Timothy J.

    2003-01-01

    Dehydrins (DHNs; late embryogenesis abundant D-11) are a family of plant proteins induced in response to abiotic stresses such as drought, low temperature, and salinity or during the late stages of embryogenesis. Spectral and thermal properties of these proteins in purified form suggest that they are “intrinsically unstructured.” However, DHNs contain at least one copy of a consensus 15-amino acid sequence, the “K segment,” which resembles a class A2 amphipathic α-helical, lipid-binding domain found in other proteins such as apolipoproteins and α-synuclein. The presence of the K segment raises the question of whether DHNs bind lipids, bilayers, or phospholipid vesicles. Here, we show that maize (Zea mays) DHN DHN1 can bind to lipid vesicles that contain acidic phospholipids. We also observe that DHN1 binds more favorably to vesicles of smaller diameter than to larger vesicles, and that the association of DHN1 with vesicles results in an apparent increase of α-helicity of the protein. Therefore, DHNs, and presumably somewhat similar plant stress proteins in the late embryogenesis abundant and cold-regulated classes may undergo function-related conformational changes at the water/membrane interface, perhaps related to the stabilization of vesicles or other endomembrane structures under stress conditions. PMID:12529538

  19. Assessment of the antioxidant capacity and oxidative stability of esterified phenolic lipids in selected edible oils.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Sarya; Kermasha, Selim

    2014-04-01

    The research work was aimed at the determination of the antioxidant capacity (AOC) and the oxidative stability of phenolic lipids (PLs), obtained by lipase-catalyzed transesterification of phenolic acids (PAs) with selected edible oils (EOs), including flaxseed (FSO), fish liver (FO), and krill (KO) oils. The statistical analyses (Tukey's test at P < 0.05) revealed that the difference in AOC between that of the esterified FSO (EFSO) and the esterified krill oil (EKO) containing PLs and their control trials of EOs was significant (P < 0.05). To evaluate the storage stability, the EOs and their esterified products were subjected to 2 oxidation treatments. The experimental findings showed that the esterified EOs had higher oxidative stability when they were subjected to light, oxygen, and agitation at 50 °C as compared to that of the EOs; however, only the esterified fish oil (EFO) showed a significant difference in its peroxide value, when the esterified EOs were placed in the dark at 25 °C. Overall, the phenolic mono- and diacyglycerols present in the EOs have shown to be potential antioxidants in improving the oxidative stability of the oil and enhancing its AOC. PMID:24611943

  20. Chemical structure and immunobiological activity of Porphyromonas gingivalis lipid A.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Tomohiko; Asai, Yasuyuki; Makimura, Yutaka; Tamai, Riyoko

    2007-01-01

    In 1933, Boivin et al. extracted an endotoxin from Salmonella typhimurium for the first time, after which a variety of chemical and biological studies on endotoxins have been performed. In 1952, the structural and functional properties of endotoxic lipopolysaccharide (LPS), extracted by a hot phenol and water method devised by Westphal et al., were reported, which led to a number of studies of Gram-negative bacteria in regards to the host defense mechanism. Since 1960, the unique chemical structure and biological activity of Bacteroides species LPS have received a great deal of attention, and there is a long history of such studies. In addition, among oral bacterial strains that have received attention as causative periodontopathic bacteria, many have been classified as Bacteroides species. In particular, a number of researchers have investigated whether LPS of Porphyromonas gingivalis (formerly Bacteroides gingivalis), a black-pigmented oral anaerobic rod, is a virulent factor of the bacterium. The active center of the LPS of these Bacteroides species, the lipid A molecule, is known to be an active participant in endotoxic activation, though its other biological activities are weak, due to its unique chemical structure and action as an antagonist of LPS. On the other hand, many reports have noted that the LPS of those species activate cells in C3H/HeJ mice, which generally do not respond to LPS. We were the first to reveal the chemical structure of P. gingivalis lipid A and, together with other researchers, reported that P. gingivalis LPS and its lipid A have activities toward C3H/HeJ mice. Since that time, because of the popularity of Toll-like receptor (TLR) studies, a great deal of evidence has been reported indicating that P. gingivalis LPS and its lipid A are ligands that act on TLR2. In order to solve such problems as heterogeneity and contamination of the biologically active components of P. gingivalis lipid A, we produced a chemical synthesis counterpart

  1. Improving lipids with prescription icosapent ethyl after previous use of fish oil dietary supplements.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Kota J; Chowdhury, Sumita

    2016-05-01

    Managing dyslipidemia can be challenging in patients with statin intolerance. We describe the lipid effects of icosapent ethyl 4 g/day (high-purity prescription omega-3 eicosapentaenoic acid) in two coronary artery disease patients with statin intolerance who were self-treating with fish oil dietary supplements. After initiating icosapent ethyl, improvements were noted in the first and second patients, respectively, in total cholesterol (-12%; -21%), LDL cholesterol (-3%; -24%), triglycerides (-34%; -16%), non-HDL cholesterol (-12%; -22%), the omega-3 index (+42%; +8%) and eicosapentaenoic acid levels (+275%; +138%). Icosapent ethyl was well tolerated with no adverse events reported. These cases demonstrated favorable lipid effects with prescription icosapent ethyl treatment that may help optimize the care of high-risk coronary artery disease patients with statin intolerance. PMID:27070379

  2. The effect of olive oil-based ketogenic diet on serum lipid levels in epileptic children.

    PubMed

    Güzel, Orkide; Yılmaz, Unsal; Uysal, Utku; Arslan, Nur

    2016-03-01

    Ketogenic diet (KD) is one of the most effective therapies for intractable epilepsy. Olive oil is rich in monounsaturated fatty acids and antioxidant molecules and has some beneficial effects on lipid profile, inflammation and oxidant status. The aim of this study was to evaluate the serum lipid levels of children who were receiving olive oil-based KD for intractable seizures at least 1 year. 121 patients (mean age 7.45 ± 4.21 years, 57 girls) were enrolled. At baseline and post-treatment 1, 3, 6, and 12 months body mass index-SDS, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and triglyceride levels were measured. Repeated measure ANOVA with post hoc Bonferroni correction was used for data analysis. The mean duration of KD was 15.4 ± 4.1 months. Mean total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and triglyceride levels were significantly higher at 1st, 3rd, 6th and 12th months of the KD treatment, compared to pre-treatment levels (p = 0.001), but showed no difference among during-treatment measurements. Mean body mass index-SDS and HDL-cholesterol levels were not different among the baseline and follow-up time points (p = 0.113 and p = 0.067, respectively). No child in this study discontinued the KD because of dyslipidemia. Even if rich in olive oil, high-fat KD causes significant increase in LDL-cholesterol and triglyceride levels. More studies are needed to determine the effect of KD on serum lipids in children using different fat sources in the diet. PMID:26700799

  3. Effects of 7-hydroxycalamenene isolated from Croton cajucara essential oil on growth, lipid content and ultrastructural aspects of Rhizopus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Mariana M B; Almeida, Catia A; Chaves, Francisco C M; Campos-Takaki, Galba M; Rozental, Sonia; Bizzo, Humberto R; Alviano, Celuta S; Alviano, Daniela S

    2014-05-01

    The leaves and bark of Croton cajucara, a shrub from the Amazon region, have been used in folk medicine to treat diabetes, malaria, and gastrointestinal and liver disorders. The essential oil from the leaves, rich in linalool, presented antileishmanial and antimicrobial activities. A chemotype of this species was found with an essential oil rich in 7-hydroxycalamenene. During our studies of the C. cajucara essential oil, we isolated 7-hydroxycalamenene at > 98 % purity. The minimum inhibitory concentration of 7-hydroxycalamenene against Absidia cylindrospora, Cunninghamella elegans, Mucor circinelloides, Mucor circinelloides f. circinelloides, Mucor mucedo, Mucor plumbeus, Mucor ramosissimus, Rhizopus microsporus, Rhizopus oryzae, and Syncephalastrum racemosum ranged from 19.53 to 2500 µg/mL. The reference drug used, amphotericin B, presented a minimum inhibitory concentration ranging from 0.085 µg/mL to 43.87 µg/mL. 7-Hydroxycalamenene also altered spore differentiation and total lipid content. Ultrastructural analysis by transmission electron microscopy showed significant alterations in the cellular structure of R. oryzae. PMID:24841967

  4. Chemical Structure of Lipid A Isolated from Flavobacterium meningosepticum Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Hitomi; Haishima, Yuji; Iida, Takatoshi; Tanaka, Akira; Tanamoto, Ken-ichi

    1998-01-01

    The chemical structure of the lipid A of the lipopolysaccharide component isolated from Flavobacterium meningosepticum IFO 12535 was elucidated. Methylation and nuclear magnetic resonance analyses showed that two kinds of hydrophilic backbone exist in the free lipid A: a β (1→6)-linked 2-amino-2-deoxy-d-glucose, which is usually present in enterobacterial lipid A’s, and a 2-amino-6-O-(2,3-diamino-2,3-dideoxy-β-d-glucopyranosyl)-2-deoxy-d-glucose, in a molar ratio of 1.00:0.35. Both backbones were α-glycosidically phosphorylated in position 1, and the hydroxyl groups at positions 4, 4′, and 6′ were unsubstituted. Liquid secondary ion-mass spectrometry revealed a pseudomolecular ion at m/z 1673 [M-H]− as a major monophosphoryl lipid A component carrying five acyl groups. Fatty acid analysis showed that the lipid A contained 1 mol each of amide-linked (R)-3-OH iC17:0, ester-linked (R)-3-OH iC15:0, amide-linked (R)-3-O-(iC15:0)-iC17:0, and both amide- and ester-linked (R)-3-OH C16:0. Fatty acid distribution analyses using several mass spectrometry determinations demonstrated that the former two constituents were distributed on positions 2 and 3 of the reducing terminal unit of the backbones and that the latter two were attached to the 2′ and 3′ positions in the nonreducing terminal residue. PMID:9683486

  5. Argan Oil Exerts an Antiatherogenic Effect by Improving Lipids and Susceptibility of LDL to Oxidation in Type 2 Diabetes Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ould Mohamedou, M. M.; Zouirech, K.; El Messal, M.; El Kebbaj, M. S.; Chraibi, A.; Adlouni, A.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the effect of argan oil consumption on serum lipids, apolipoproteins (AI and B), CRP, and LDL susceptibility to oxidation in type 2 diabetic patients which are known to have a high level of cardiovascular risk due to lipid abnormalities and lipid peroxidation. For that, 86 type 2 diabetic patients with dyslipidemia were randomized to one group consuming 25 mL/day of argan oil during 3 weeks and control group consuming 20 g/day of butter in breakfast. After argan oil intervention, serum triglycerides decreased by 11.84%, (P = 0.001), total chol by 9.13%, (P = 0.01), and LDL-chol by 11.81%, (P = 0.02). However, HDL-chol and Apo AI increased (10.51%, P = 0.01 and 9.40%,  P = 0.045, resp.). Susceptibility of LDL to lipid peroxidation was significantly reduced by increasing of 20.95%, (P = 0.038) in lag phase after argan oil consumption. In conclusion, we show for the first time that consumption of argan oil may have an antiatherogenic effect by improving lipids, and the susceptibility of LDL to oxidation in type 2 diabetes patients with dyslipidemia, and can therefore be recommended in the nutritional management of type 2 diabetes. PMID:22114593

  6. Argan Oil Exerts an Antiatherogenic Effect by Improving Lipids and Susceptibility of LDL to Oxidation in Type 2 Diabetes Patients.

    PubMed

    Ould Mohamedou, M M; Zouirech, K; El Messal, M; El Kebbaj, M S; Chraibi, A; Adlouni, A

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the effect of argan oil consumption on serum lipids, apolipoproteins (AI and B), CRP, and LDL susceptibility to oxidation in type 2 diabetic patients which are known to have a high level of cardiovascular risk due to lipid abnormalities and lipid peroxidation. For that, 86 type 2 diabetic patients with dyslipidemia were randomized to one group consuming 25 mL/day of argan oil during 3 weeks and control group consuming 20 g/day of butter in breakfast. After argan oil intervention, serum triglycerides decreased by 11.84%, (P = 0.001), total chol by 9.13%, (P = 0.01), and LDL-chol by 11.81%, (P = 0.02). However, HDL-chol and Apo AI increased (10.51%, P = 0.01 and 9.40%,  P = 0.045, resp.). Susceptibility of LDL to lipid peroxidation was significantly reduced by increasing of 20.95%, (P = 0.038) in lag phase after argan oil consumption. In conclusion, we show for the first time that consumption of argan oil may have an antiatherogenic effect by improving lipids, and the susceptibility of LDL to oxidation in type 2 diabetes patients with dyslipidemia, and can therefore be recommended in the nutritional management of type 2 diabetes. PMID:22114593

  7. Structural changes of lipoprotein lipids by 1H NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ala-Korpela, M.; Oja, J.; Lounila, J.; Jokisaari, J.; Savolainen, M. J.; Kesäniemi, Y. A.

    1995-08-01

    A new procedure for detecting structural changes of lipoprotein lipids is introduced and applied to study native low (LDL) and high density lipoprotein (HDL) particles. The method involves lineshape fitting analyses of specific resonances in proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra together with numerical derivation of the obtained intensity curves with respect to temperature. In addition to the well-known phase transition of the LDL core cholesterol esters, a novel structural change was revealed in the phospholipid monolayer of both native LDL and HDL particles. The attributes of this phenomenon are discussed.

  8. Structure-Guided Modification of Rhizomucor miehei Lipase for Production of Structured Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun-Hui; Jiang, Yu-Yan; Lin, Ying; Sun, Yu-Fei; Zheng, Sui-Ping; Han, Shuang-Yan

    2013-01-01

    To improve the performance of yeast surface-displayed Rhizomucor miehei lipase (RML) in the production of human milk fat substitute (HMFS), we mutated amino acids in the lipase substrate-binding pocket based on protein hydrophobicity, to improve esterification activity. Five mutants: Asn87Ile, Asn87Ile/Asp91Val, His108Leu/Lys109Ile, Asp256Ile/His257Leu, and His108Leu/Lys109Ile/Asp256Ile/His257Leu were obtained and their hydrolytic and esterification activities were assayed. Using Discovery Studio 3.1 to build models and calculate the binding energy between lipase and substrates, compared to wild-type, the mutant Asp256Ile/His257Leu was found to have significantly lower energy when oleic acid (3.97 KJ/mol decrease) and tripalmitin (7.55 KJ/mol decrease) were substrates. This result was in accordance with the esterification activity of Asp256Ile/His257Leu (2.37-fold of wild-type). The four mutants were also evaluated for the production of HMFS in organic solvent and in a solvent-free system. Asp256Ile/His257Leu had an oleic acid incorporation of 28.27% for catalyzing tripalmitin and oleic acid, and 53.18% for the reaction of palm oil with oleic acid. The efficiency of Asp256Ile/His257Leu was 1.82-fold and 1.65-fold that of the wild-type enzyme for the two reactions. The oleic acid incorporation of Asp256Ile/His257Leu was similar to commercial Lipozyme RM IM for palm oil acidolysis with oleic acid. Yeast surface-displayed RML mutant Asp256Ile/His257Leu is a potential, economically feasible catalyst for the production of structured lipids. PMID:23844120

  9. Fatty Acid Composition and Lipid Profile of Diospyros mespiliformis, Albizia lebbeck, and Caesalpinia pulcherrima Seed Oils from Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Oderinde, Rotimi Ayodele

    2014-01-01

    The screening of lesser-known underutilized seeds as source of food has been a way of finding solution to food insecurity in developing nations. In this regard, oil as a class of food was extracted from the seeds of Diospyros mespiliformis  (4.72 ± 0.2%), Albizia lebbeck  (6.40 ± 0.60%), and Caesalpinia pulcherrima  (7.2 ± 0.30%). The oils were finally analyzed for their fatty acid composition, lipid classes, fatty acid distribution in the lipid fractions, and molecular speciation of the triacylglycerols, glycolipids, and phospholipids. The fatty acid composition of the oils varied with C18:2 fatty acid being the most dominant in the oils. Neutral lipids were the most abundant lipid class found in the oils while molecular species of the triacylglycerol with equivalent carbon chain number C40 was majorly present in the oils of Diospyros mespiliformis and Caesalpinia pulcherrima. The present study presents lesser-known underutilized seeds as possible sources of food. PMID:26904625

  10. Lipid digestibility and energy content of distillers' corn oil in swine and poultry.

    PubMed

    Kerr, B J; Dozier, W A; Shurson, G C

    2016-07-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the DE and ME and apparent total tract digestibility of ether extract of 3 distillers' corn oil (DCO; 4.9, 12.8, or 13.9% free fatty acids [FFA]) samplescompared with a sample of refined corn oil (CO; 0.04% FFA) and an industrially hydrolyzed high-FFA DCO (93.8% FFA) in young pigs and growing broilers. In Exp. 1, 54 barrows (initial age = 28 d) were fed a common diet for 7 d and then fed their allotted dietary treatment (either 100% basal diet or 1 of 5 test diets consisting of 90% basal diet plus 10% test lipid) for the next 7 d in group pens (9 pigs/pen). For the next 10 d, pigs were moved to individual metabolism crates for continued diet and crate adaptation and to a twice-daily feeding regimen. Pigs remained on their respective diets for a 4-d total fecal and urine collection period. For Exp. 2, 567 male broilers were obtained from a commercial hatchery (1 d of age) and reared in grower battery cages that contained 9 chicks per cage. Broilers were fed a common corn-soybean meal starter diet from placement until the beginning of the trial (19 d of age). Birds were then randomly assigned to 1 of 6 dietary treatments (94% basal diet plus 6% dextrose or 94% basal diet plus 6% test lipid substituted for dextrose) on d 19 and were allowed an 8-d dietary acclimation period followed by a 48-h energy balance assay. In Exp. 1, the DCO sample with 12.8% FFA contained the lowest ( < 0.05) DE (8,036 kcal/kg) content compared with the 0.04% refined CO sample and the 4.9 or 93.8% FFA DCO samples (8,814, 8,828, and 8,921 kcal/kg, respectively), with the DCO source containing 13.9% FFA having intermediate DE (8,465 kcal/kg) content. The ME content of these lipid sources also differed among treatments ( < 0.01), following trends similar to their DE values, with no differences noted for ME as a percentage of DE ( > 0.35) content among the lipids evaluated. In Exp. 2, lipids containing 0.04, 4.9, 12.8, and 13.9% FFA had similar nitrogen

  11. Protein-lipid interactions and non-lamellar lipidic structures in membrane pore formation and membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Robert J C

    2016-03-01

    Pore-forming proteins and peptides act on their targeted lipid bilayer membranes to increase permeability. This approach to the modulation of biological function is relevant to a great number of living processes, including; infection, parasitism, immunity, apoptosis, development and neurodegeneration. While some pore-forming proteins/peptides assemble into rings of subunits to generate discrete, well-defined pore-forming structures, an increasing number is recognised to form pores via mechanisms which co-opt membrane lipids themselves. Among these, membrane attack complex-perforin/cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (MACPF/CDC) family proteins, Bax/colicin family proteins and actinoporins are especially prominent and among the mechanisms believed to apply are the formation of non-lamellar (semi-toroidal or toroidal) lipidic structures. In this review I focus on the ways in which lipids contribute to pore formation and contrast this with the ways in which lipids are co-opted also in membrane fusion and fission events. A variety of mechanisms for pore formation that involve lipids exists, but they consistently result in stable hybrid proteolipidic structures. These structures are stabilised by mechanisms in which pore-forming proteins modify the innate capacity of lipid membranes to respond to their environment, changing shape and/or phase and binding individual lipid molecules directly. In contrast, and despite the diversity in fusion protein types, mechanisms for membrane fusion are rather similar to each other, mapping out a pathway from pairs of separated compartments to fully confluent fused membranes. Fusion proteins generate metastable structures along the way which, like long-lived proteolipidic pore-forming complexes, rely on the basic physical properties of lipid bilayers. Membrane fission involves similar intermediates, in the reverse order. I conclude by considering the possibility that at least some pore-forming and fusion proteins are evolutionarily related

  12. Lipid profiles, in vitro digestion and oxidative stability of mutton bird oil.

    PubMed

    Akanbi, Taiwo O; Barrow, Colin J

    2016-02-01

    The lipid profile, in vitro digestion and oxidative stability of mutton bird oil were investigated. Wax ester, triacylglycerol and sterol were the major lipids present as determined using capillary chromatography with flame ionisation detector (Iatroscan). Fatty acid analysis by gas chromatography (GC) showed that wax esters had a higher total omega-3 fatty acids content including EPA, DPA and DHA than TAGs (31 % and 24 %, respectively). In TAGs, (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data showed that EPA was statistically positioned at sn-1,3 and sn-2, while DHA was preferentially at sn-2. In vitro digestion using porcine pancreatic lipase resulted in 75 % of TAG and 10 % wax ester hydrolysis in 120 min. As reflected in the measured conjugated dienes (CD) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) values during accelerated oxidation at 60 °C for 5 days, the oil was relatively stable against oxidation considering its high omega-3 content. PMID:27162403

  13. Camphor Tree Seed Kernel Oil Reduces Body Fat Deposition and Improves Blood Lipids in Rats.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jing; Wang, Baogui; Gong, Deming; Zeng, Cheng; Jiang, Yihao; Zeng, Zheling

    2015-08-01

    The total and positional fatty acid composition in camphor tree (Cinnamomum camphora) seed kernel oil (CKO) were analyzed, and for the first time, the effect of CKO on body fat deposition and blood lipids in rats was studied. The major fatty acids in CKO were determined to be decanoic acid (C10:0, 51.49%) and dodecanoic acid (C12:0, 40.08%), and uniformly distributed at Sn-1, 3, and Sn-2 positions in triglyceride (TG). Rats were randomly divided into control, CKO, lard, and soybean oil groups. At the end of the experiment, levels of blood lipids and the fats of abdomen in the rats were measured. The main organ were weighted and used for the histological examination. The results showed that body weight and fat deposition in CKO group were significantly lower than the lard and soybean groups. Moderate consumption of CKO was found to improve the levels of blood TG and low density lipoprotein cholesterol. PMID:26130050

  14. Oxidative stability of structured lipid-based infant formula emulsion: effect of antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Zou, Long; Akoh, Casimir C

    2015-07-01

    The effect of permitted antioxidants, including α-tocopherol, β-carotene, ascorbyl palmitate, ascorbic acid, citric acid, and their combinations, on the lipid oxidation of structured lipid (SL)-based infant formula (IF) was evaluated. The 3.5% oil-in-water IF emulsion was formulated with a human milk fat analogue enriched with docosahexaenoic acid and stearidonic acid, and the antioxidants were added at 0.005% and 0.02% of the oil. The peroxide value, anisidine value, and hexanal concentration of emulsion samples were measured over a 28-day period. The results showed that whether a compound exhibited antioxidant behavior depended on its mechanism of action, polarity, concentration, and environmental conditions. The most effective antioxidant was ascorbyl palmitate at 0.005%, and a synergistic antioxidant effect was found between α-tocopherol and β-carotene. A high correlation was observed between anisidine value and hexanal content. Our findings have important implications for the successful incorporation of SL into IF products for infant nutrition and health. PMID:25704676

  15. Thermal Oxidation Induces Lipid Peroxidation and Changes in the Physicochemical Properties and β-Carotene Content of Arachis Oil

    PubMed Central

    Falade, Ayodeji Osmund

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to investigate the effect of thermal oxidation on the physicochemical properties, malondialdehyde, and β-carotene content of arachis oil. Pure arachis oil was heated for 20 mins with a corresponding temperature of 220°C. Thereafter, changes in the physicochemical properties (acid, iodine, and peroxide values) of the oil samples were determined. Subsequently, the level of lipid peroxidation was determined using change in malondialdehyde content. Then, the total carotenoid and β-carotene contents were evaluated using spectrophotometric method and high performance liquid chromatography, respectively. The results of the study revealed a significant increase (P < 0.05) in the acid and peroxide values and malondialdehyde concentration of the heated oil when compared with the fresh arachis oil. In contrast, a significant decrease (P < 0.05) was observed in the iodine value, total carotenoid, 13-cis-, 15-cis-, trans-, and 9-cis-β-carotene, and total β-carotene content of the heated oil. Hence, thermal oxidation induced lipid peroxidation and caused changes in the physicochemical properties and carotenoid contents of arachis oil, thereby reducing its nutritive value and health benefit. Therefore, cooking and frying with arachis oil for a long period might not be appropriate as this might lead to a loss of significant amount of the insignificant β-carotene in arachis oil. PMID:26904665

  16. Bead milling for lipid recovery from thraustochytrid cells and selective hydrolysis of Schizochytrium DT3 oil using lipase.

    PubMed

    Byreddy, Avinesh R; Barrow, Colin J; Puri, Munish

    2016-01-01

    Marine microalgae present a renewable alternative source for sustainable production of omega-3 fatty acids, as compared to conventional sources such as krill oil and fish oil. In this study, we optimised a method for lipid extraction from marine thraustochytrids using a bead mill and enzymatic concentration of omega-3 fatty acids from the thraustochytrid oil. The optimised lipid extraction conditions were, bead size 0.4-0.6μm, 4500rpm, 4min of processing time at 5g biomass concentration. The maximum lipid yield (% dry weight basis) achieved at optimum conditions were 40.5% for Schizochytrium sp. S31 (ATCC) and 49.4% for Schizochytrium sp. DT3 (in-house isolate). DT3 oil contained 39.8% docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) as a percentage of lipid, a higher DHA percentage than S31. Partial hydrolysis of DT3 oil using Candida rugosa lipase was performed to enrich omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in the glyceride portion. Total omega-3 fatty acid content was increased to 88.7%. PMID:26519698

  17. Effects of dietary oregano essential oil and vitamin E on the lipid oxidation stability of cooked chicken breast meat.

    PubMed

    Avila-Ramos, F; Pro-Martínez, A; Sosa-Montes, E; Cuca-García, J M; Becerril-Pérez, C M; Figueroa-Velasco, J L; Narciso-Gaytán, C

    2012-02-01

    The antioxidant effect of oregano essential oil and vitamin E was evaluated in cooked chicken breast meat. In total, 480 broilers were randomly assigned to 6 treatments and 4 replications. Broilers were raised with a corn-soybean meal diet including either crude soybean oil or acidulated soybean oil soapstock, each supplemented with vitamin E at 10 or 100 mg or oregano essential oil at 100 mg/kg of feed. At 42 d, broilers were slaughtered and their breast meat was prepared into strips (1.5 × 10 cm) or patties (150 g). Fatty acid composition of the muscle was determined. For lipid oxidation stability, both meat strips and patties were cooked to an internal temperature of 74°C and malonaldehyde contents were assessed during 0, 3, 6, and 9 d of storage at 4°C. Each storage day had 4 replications per treatment. The meat lipid oxidative stability was estimated by content of malonaldehyde values. Results showed that feed consumption, weight gain, and feed conversion were not affected by the dietary oils or antioxidants, except for the mortality in acidulated soybean oil soapstock with the 10-mg vitamin E treatment. The fatty acid composition of the meat was similar between the 2 diets given the same antioxidant supplement. The oxidation stability of meat lipids in both types of meats showed a significant (P < 0.05) interaction between oils, antioxidants, and storage time. In the crude soybean oil oil diet, the malonaldehyde value in the 10-mg vitamin E treatment was the highest, followed by oregano essential oil, and then the 100-mg vitamin E treatment at 9 d of storage, whereas the value of oregano essential oil in the acidulated soybean oil soapstock diet was the highest, followed by the 10-mg vitamin E, and then the 100-mg vitamin E treatment during the 9 d of storage. In conclusion, the dietary oils and antioxidants used can be included in broiler diets without negative effects on their productivity. The antioxidant effect of vitamin E was higher with a higher

  18. Lipid profiles of oil from trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) heads, spines and viscera: trout by-products as a possible source of omega-3 lipids?

    PubMed

    Fiori, L; Solana, M; Tosi, P; Manfrini, M; Strim, C; Guella, G

    2012-09-15

    Lipid profiles of fish oil extracted from trout heads, spines and viscera using supercritical carbon dioxide and Randall extraction with hexane were measured. The amount of unsaturated fatty acids (as a percentage of total fatty acids) was within the range of 72.6-75.3% in all the substrates. A significant presence of the most important omega-3 fatty acids was detected. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) content in oil from spines, heads and viscera resulted to be 8.7% and 7.3%, 7.9% and 6.3%, and 6.4% and 6.0%, respectively. A low (≈3%), but worth noting, presence of lipids with omega-1 polyunsaturated fatty chains was observed in all the oils. Finally, significant differences were noticed in the relative amounts of triacylglycerides (TAG), diacylglycerides (DAG) and free fatty acids (FFA). Whereas oil from heads and spines was essentially composed of TAG (≈98%), in viscera oil the molar distribution ratio became TAG:DAG:FFA=87:8:5. PMID:23107732

  19. Lipid formation and γ-linolenic acid production by Mucor circinelloides and Rhizopus sp., grown on vegetable oil

    PubMed Central

    Tauk-Tornisielo, Sâmia M.; Arasato, Luciana S.; de Almeida, Alex F.; Govone, José S.; Malagutti, Eleni N.

    2009-01-01

    The fungi strains were tested in Bioscreen automated system to select the best nutritional source. Following, shaking submserse cultures were studied in media containing sole carbon or nitrogen source. The growth of these strains improved in media containing vegetable oil, with high concentration of lipids. The high concentration of γ-linolenic acid was obtained with M. circinelloides in culture containing sesame oil. PMID:24031370

  20. Postprandial lipid responses to an alpha-linolenic acid-rich oil, olive oil and butter in women: A randomized crossover trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Postprandial lipaemia varies with gender and the composition of dietary fat due to the partitioning of fatty acids between beta-oxidation and incorporation into triacylglycerols (TAGs). Increasing evidence highlights the importance of postprandial measurements to evaluate atherogenic risk. Postprandial effects of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) in women are poorly characterized. We therefore studied the postprandial lipid response of women to an ALA-rich oil in comparison with olive oil and butter, and characterized the fatty acid composition of total lipids, TAGs, and non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs) in plasma. Methods A randomized crossover design (n = 19) was used to compare the postprandial effects of 3 meals containing 35 g fat. Blood samples were collected at regular intervals for 7 h. Statistical analysis was carried out with ANOVA (significant difference = P < 0.05). Results No significant difference was seen in incremental area under the curve (iAUC) plasma-TAG between the meals. ALA and oleic acid levels were significantly increased in plasma after ALA-rich oil and olive oil meals, respectively. Palmitic acid was significantly increased in plasma-TAG after the butter meal. The ratios of 18:2 n-6 to18:3 n-3 in plasma-TAGs, three and seven hours after the ALA-rich oil meal, were 1.5 and 2.4, respectively. The corresponding values after the olive oil meal were: 13.8 and 16.9; and after the butter meal: 9.0 and 11.6. Conclusions The postprandial p-TAG and NEFA response in healthy pre-menopausal women was not significantly different after the intake of an ALA-rich oil, olive oil and butter. The ALA-rich oil significantly affected different plasma lipid fractions and improved the ratio of n-6 to n-3 fatty acids several hours postprandially. PMID:21711508

  1. Structural basis for the transcriptional regulation of membrane lipid homeostasis

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Darcie J.; Zhang, Yong-Mei; Subramanian, Chitra; Rock, Charles O.; White, Stephen W.

    2010-11-09

    DesT is a transcriptional repressor that regulates the genes that control the unsaturated:saturated fatty acid ratio available for membrane lipid synthesis. DesT bound to unsaturated acyl-CoA has a high affinity for its cognate palindromic DNA-binding site, whereas DesT bound to saturated acyl-CoA does not bind this site. Structural analyses of the DesT-oleoyl-CoA-DNA and DesT-palmitoyl-CoA complexes reveal that acyl chain shape directly influences the packing of hydrophobic core residues within the DesT ligand-binding domain. These changes are propagated to the paired DNA-binding domains via conformational changes to modulate DNA binding. These structural interpretations are supported by the in vitro and in vivo characterization of site-directed mutants. The regulation of DesT by the unsaturated:saturated ratio of acyl chains rather than the concentration of a single ligand is a paradigm for understanding transcriptional regulation of membrane lipid homeostasis.

  2. Structure and dynamics of water and lipid molecules in charged anionic DMPG lipid bilayer membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rønnest, A. K.; Peters, G. H.; Hansen, F. Y.; Taub, H.; Miskowiec, A.

    2016-04-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to investigate the influence of the valency of counter-ions on the structure of freestanding bilayer membranes of the anionic 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (DMPG) lipid at 310 K and 1 atm. At this temperature, the membrane is in the fluid phase with a monovalent counter-ion and in the gel phase with a divalent counter-ion. The diffusion constant of water as a function of its depth in the membrane has been determined from mean-square-displacement calculations. Also, calculated incoherent quasielastic neutron scattering functions have been compared to experimental results and used to determine an average diffusion constant for all water molecules in the system. On extrapolating the diffusion constants inferred experimentally to a temperature of 310 K, reasonable agreement with the simulations is obtained. However, the experiments do not have the sensitivity to confirm the diffusion of a small component of water bound to the lipids as found in the simulations. In addition, the orientation of the dipole moment of the water molecules has been determined as a function of their depth in the membrane. Previous indirect estimates of the electrostatic potential within phospholipid membranes imply an enormous electric field of 108-109 V m-1, which is likely to have great significance in controlling the conformation of translocating membrane proteins and in the transfer of ions and molecules across the membrane. We have calculated the membrane potential for DMPG bilayers and found ˜1 V (˜2 ṡ 108 V m-1) when in the fluid phase with a monovalent counter-ion and ˜1.4 V (˜2.8 ṡ 108 V m-1) when in the gel phase with a divalent counter-ion. The number of water molecules for a fully hydrated DMPG membrane has been estimated to be 9.7 molecules per lipid in the gel phase and 17.5 molecules in the fluid phase, considerably smaller than inferred experimentally for 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholine (DMPC

  3. Comparative study of tissue deposition of omega-3 fatty acids from polar-lipid rich oil of the microalgae Nannochloropsis oculata with krill oil in rats.

    PubMed

    Kagan, Michael L; Levy, Aharon; Leikin-Frenkel, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC n-3 PUFA) exert health benefits which are dependent upon their incorporation into blood, cells and tissues. Plasma and tissue deposition of LC n-3 PUFA from oils extracted from the micro-algae Nannochloropsis oculata and from krill were compared in rats. The algal oil provides eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) partly conjugated (15%) to phospholipids and glycolipids but no docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), whereas krill oil provides both EPA and DHA conjugated in part (40%) to phospholipids. Rats fed a standard diet received either krill oil or polar-lipid rich algal oil by gavage daily for 7 days (5 ml oil per kg body weight each day). Fatty acid concentrations were analyzed in plasma, brain and liver, and two adipose depots since these represent transport, functional and storage pools of fatty acids, respectively. When measuring total LC n-3 PUFA (sum of EPA, docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) and DHA), there was no statistically significant difference between the algal oil and krill oil for plasma, brain, liver and gonadal adipose tissue. Concentrations of LC n-3 PUFA were higher in the retroperitoneal adipose tissue from the algal oil group. Tissue uptake of LC n-3 PUFA from an algal oil containing 15% polar lipids (glycolipids and phospholipids) was found to be equivalent to krill oil containing 40% phospholipids. This may be due to glycolipids forming smaller micelles during ingestive hydrolysis than phospholipids. Ingestion of fatty acids with glycolipids may improve bioavailability, but this needs to be further explored. PMID:25360534

  4. Acute toxicity of dispersed crude oil on the cold-water copepod Calanus finmarchicus: Elusive implications of lipid content.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Bjørn Henrik; Jager, Tjalling; Altin, Dag; Øverjordet, Ida B; Olsen, Anders J; Salaberria, Iurgi; Nordtug, Trond

    2016-01-01

    In this investigation, acute toxicity data were used from two previously reported studies where cold-water copepods were exposed to mechanically dispersed (MD) and chemically (CD) dispersed oil. In one of these studies, concentration-dependent mortality was observed, whereas no apparent relationship between exposure concentration and mortality was found in the other. The only marked difference between the studies is that copepods in the first experiment displayed a lower lipid sac volume (on average) than in the second one. In this study additional biometric data on lipid content were utilized and observed effects and toxicokinetics modeling applied in order to investigate whether differences in sensitivity between copepod cohorts might be explained by differences in lipid content. Results suggest that although a considerable lipid sac might retard toxicokinetics, the observed differences in lipid volume are not sufficient to explain differences in toxicity. Further, there are no apparent indications that acute toxic stress leads to lipid depletion, or that acute increased mortality rate selectively affects lipid-poor individuals. It is conceivable that other potential explanations exist, but the causal relationship between lipid content and increased mortality frequency remains elusive. PMID:27484137

  5. Effects of salts on oxidative stability of lipids in Tween-20 stabilized oil-in-water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Cui, Leqi; Cho, Hyung Taek; McClements, D Julian; Decker, Eric A; Park, Yeonhwa

    2016-04-15

    Lipid oxidation in oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions is an important factor determining the shelf life of food products. Salts are often present in many types of emulsion based food products. However, there is limited information on influence of salts on lipid oxidation in O/W emulsions. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine the effects of sodium and potassium chloride on lipid oxidation in O/W emulsions. Tween 20 stabilized corn O/W emulsions at pH 7.0 were prepared with different concentrations of sodium chloride with or without the metal chelators. NaCl did not cause any changes in emulsion droplet size. NaCl dose-dependently promoted lipid oxidation as measured by the lipid oxidation product, hexanal. Both deferoxamine (DFO) and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) reduced lipid oxidation in emulsions with NaCl, with EDTA being more effective. Potassium chloride showed similar impact on lipid oxidation as sodium chloride. These results suggest that salts are able to promote lipid oxidation in emulsions and this effect can be controlled by metal chelators. PMID:26675849

  6. Modification of the structure and activity of lipid A in Yersinia pestis lipopolysaccharide by growth temperature.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Kazuyoshi; Tsukano, Hiroko; Watanabe, Haruo; Lindner, Buko; Matsuura, Motohiro

    2002-08-01

    Yersinia pestis strain Yreka was grown at 27 or 37 degrees C, and the lipid A structures (lipid A-27 degrees C and lipid A-37 degrees C) of the respective lipopolysaccharides (LPS) were investigated by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. Lipid A-27 degrees C consisted of a mixture of tri-acyl, tetra-acyl, penta-acyl, and hexa-acyl lipid A's, of which tetra-acyl lipid A was most abundant. Lipid A-37 degrees C consisted predominantly of tri- and tetra-acylated molecules, with only small amounts of penta-acyl lipid A; no hexa-acyl lipid A was detected. Furthermore, the amount of 4-amino-arabinose was substantially higher in lipid A-27 degrees C than in lipid A-37 degrees C. By use of mouse and human macrophage cell lines, the biological activities of the LPS and lipid A preparations were measured via their abilities to induce production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). In both cell lines the LPS and the lipid A from bacteria grown at 27 degrees C were stronger inducers of TNF-alpha than those from bacteria grown at 37 degrees C. However, the difference in activity was more prominent in human macrophage cells. These results suggest that in order to reduce the activation of human macrophages, it may be more advantageous for Y. pestis to produce less-acylated lipid A at 37 degrees C. PMID:12117916

  7. Palm oil and cardiovascular disease: a randomized trial of the effects of hybrid palm oil supplementation on human plasma lipid patterns.

    PubMed

    Lucci, P; Borrero, M; Ruiz, A; Pacetti, D; Frega, N G; Diez, O; Ojeda, M; Gagliardi, R; Parra, L; Angel, M

    2016-01-01

    This study examines, for the first time, the effect of hybrid Elaeis oleifera × E. guineensis palm oil supplementation on human plasma lipids related to CVD risk factors. One hundred sixty eligible participants were randomized and assigned to one of the two treatments: 25 mL hybrid palm oil (HPO group) or 25 mL extra virgin olive oil (EVOO group) daily for 3 months. Fasting venous samples were obtained at baseline and after 1, 2 and 3 months for measurement of plasma lipids (TC, LDL-C, HDL-C and TAGs). Changes in body mass index and waist circumference were also assessed. Although there was an overall reduction in TC (7.4%, p < 0.001) and in LDL-C (15.6%, p < 0.001), no significant differences were found between the treatment groups in a repeated measures analysis of variance for TC (p = 0.0525), LDL-C (p = 0.2356), HDL-C (p = 0.8293) or TAGs (p = 0.3749). Furthermore, HPO consumption had similar effects on plasma lipids to EVOO, thus providing additional support for the concept that hybrid Elaeis oleifera × E. guineensis palm oil can be seen as a "tropical equivalent of olive oil". PMID:26488229

  8. Optimized Rapeseed Oils Rich in Endogenous Micronutrients Protect High Fat Diet Fed Rats from Hepatic Lipid Accumulation and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiqu; Liu, Xiaoli; Gao, Hui; Chen, Chang; Deng, Qianchun; Huang, Qingde; Ma, Zhonghua; Huang, Fenghong

    2015-01-01

    Micronutrients in rapeseed exert a potential benefit to hepatoprotection, but most of them are lost during the conventional refining processing. Thus some processing technologies have been optimized to improve micronutrient retention in oil. The aim of this study is to assess whether optimized rapeseed oils (OROs) have positive effects on hepatic lipid accumulation and oxidative stress induced by a high-fat diet. Methods: Rats received experiment diets containing 20% fat and refined rapeseed oil or OROs obtained with various processing technologies as lipid source. After 10 weeks of treatment, liver was assayed for lipid accumulation and oxidative stress. Results: All OROs reduced hepatic triglyceride contents. Microwave pretreatment-cold pressing oil (MPCPO) which had the highest micronutrients contents also reduced hepatic cholesterol level. MPCPO significantly decreased hepatic sterol regulatory element-binding transcription factor 1 (SREBP1) but increased peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α (PPARα) expressions, and as a result, MPCPO significantly suppressed acetyl CoA carboxylase and induced carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1 and acyl CoA oxidase expression. Hepatic catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities as well as reduced glutathione (GSH) contents remarkably increased and lipid peroxidation levels decreased in parallel with the increase of micronutrients. Conclusion: OROs had the ability to reduce excessive hepatic fat accumulation and oxidative stress, which indicated that OROs might contribute to ameliorating nonalcoholic fatty liver induced by high-fat diet. PMID:26473919

  9. Structural Oil Pan With Integrated Oil Filtration And Cooling System

    DOEpatents

    Freese, V, Charles Edwin

    2000-05-09

    An oil pan for an internal combustion engine includes a body defining a reservoir for collecting engine coolant. The reservoir has a bottom and side walls extending upwardly from the bottom to present a flanged lip through which the oil pan may be mounted to the engine. An oil cooler assembly is housed within the body of the oil pan for cooling lubricant received from the engine. The body includes an oil inlet passage formed integrally therewith for receiving lubricant from the engine and delivering lubricant to the oil cooler. In addition, the body also includes an oil pick up passage formed integrally therewith for providing fluid communication between the reservoir and the engine through the flanged lip.

  10. Effects of green tea extract and α-tocopherol on the lipid oxidation rate of omega-3 oils, incorporated into table spreads, prepared using multiple emulsion technology.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, Sandra P O'; O'Beirne, David; Ní Eidhin, Deirdre; O'Kennedy, Brendan T

    2012-12-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of fat and water soluble antioxidants on the oxidative stability of omega (ω)-3 rich table spreads, produced using novel multiple emulsion technology. Table spreads were produced by dispersing an oil-in-water (O/W) emulsion (500 g/kg 85 camelina/15 fish oil blend) in a hardstock/rapeseed oil blend, using sodium caseinate and polyglycerol polyricinoleate as emulsifiers. The O/W and oil-in-water-in-oil (O/W/O) emulsions contained either a water soluble antioxidant (green tea extract [GTE]), an oil soluble antioxidant (α-Tocopherol), or both. Spreads containing α-Tocopherol had the highest lipid hydroperoxide values, whereas spreads containing GTE had the lowest (P < 0.05), during storage at 5°C, while p-Anisidine values did not differ significantly. Particle size was generally unaffected by antioxidant type (P < 0.05). Double emulsion (O/W/O) structures were clearly seen in confocal images of the spreads. By the end of storage, none of the spreads had significantly different G' values. Firmness (Newtons) of all spreads generally increased during storage (P < 0.05). PMID:23171419

  11. Comparison of ruminal lipid metabolism in dairy cows and goats fed diets supplemented with starch, plant oil, or fish oil.

    PubMed

    Toral, P G; Bernard, L; Belenguer, A; Rouel, J; Hervás, G; Chilliard, Y; Frutos, P

    2016-01-01

    Direct comparison of cow and goat performance and milk fatty acid responses to diets known to induce milk fat depression (MFD) in the bovine reveals relevant species-by-diet interactions in ruminal lipid metabolism. Thus, this study was conducted to infer potential mechanisms responsible for differences in the rumen microbial biohydrogenation (BH) due to diet and ruminant species. To meet this objective, 12 cows and 15 goats were fed a basal diet (control), a similar diet supplemented with 2.2% fish oil (FO), or a diet containing 5.3% sunflower oil and additional starch (+38%; SOS) according to a 3 × 3 Latin square design with 25-d experimental periods. On the last day of each period, fatty acid composition (by gas chromatography) and bacterial community (by terminal-RFLP), as well as fermentation characteristics, were measured in rumen fluid samples. Results showed significant differences in the response of cows and goats to dietary treatments, although variations in some fermentation parameters (e.g., decreases in the acetate-to-propionate ratio due to FO or SOS) were similar in both species. Main alterations in ruminal BH pathways potentially responsible for MFD on the SOS diet (i.e., the shift from trans-11 to trans-10 18:1 and related increases in trans-10,cis-12 18:2) tended to be more pronounced in cows, which is consistent with an associated MFD only in this species. However, changes linked to FO-induced MFD (e.g., decreases in 18:0 and increases in total trans-18:1) were stronger in caprine rumen fluid, which may explain their unexpected susceptibility (although less marked than in bovine) to the negative effect of FO on milk fat content. Altogether, these results suggest that distinct ruminal mechanisms lead to each type of diet-induced MFD and confirm a pronounced interaction with species. With regard to microbiota, differences between cows and goats in the composition of the rumen bacterial community might be behind the disparity in the microorganisms

  12. Deciphering tissue-induced Klebsiella pneumoniae lipid A structure.

    PubMed

    Llobet, Enrique; Martínez-Moliner, Verónica; Moranta, David; Dahlström, Käthe M; Regueiro, Verónica; Tomás, Anna; Cano, Victoria; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Camino; Frank, Christian G; Fernández-Carrasco, Helena; Insua, José Luis; Salminen, Tiina A; Garmendia, Junkal; Bengoechea, José A

    2015-11-17

    The outcome of an infection depends on host recognition of the pathogen, hence leading to the activation of signaling pathways controlling defense responses. A long-held belief is that the modification of the lipid A moiety of the lipopolysaccharide could help Gram-negative pathogens to evade innate immunity. However, direct evidence that this happens in vivo is lacking. Here we report the lipid A expressed in the tissues of infected mice by the human pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae. Our findings demonstrate that Klebsiella remodels its lipid A in a tissue-dependent manner. Lipid A species found in the lungs are consistent with a 2-hydroxyacyl-modified lipid A dependent on the PhoPQ-regulated oxygenase LpxO. The in vivo lipid A pattern is lost in minimally passaged bacteria isolated from the tissues. LpxO-dependent modification reduces the activation of inflammatory responses and mediates resistance to antimicrobial peptides. An lpxO mutant is attenuated in vivo thereby highlighting the importance of this lipid A modification in Klebsiella infection biology. Colistin, one of the last options to treat multidrug-resistant Klebsiella infections, triggers the in vivo lipid A pattern. Moreover, colistin-resistant isolates already express the in vivo lipid A pattern. In these isolates, LpxO-dependent lipid A modification mediates resistance to colistin. Deciphering the lipid A expressed in vivo opens the possibility of designing novel therapeutics targeting the enzymes responsible for the in vivo lipid A pattern. PMID:26578797

  13. Deciphering tissue-induced Klebsiella pneumoniae lipid A structure

    PubMed Central

    Llobet, Enrique; Martínez-Moliner, Verónica; Moranta, David; Dahlström, Käthe M.; Regueiro, Verónica; Tomás, Anna; Cano, Victoria; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Camino; Frank, Christian G.; Fernández-Carrasco, Helena; Insua, José Luis; Salminen, Tiina A.; Garmendia, Junkal; Bengoechea, José A.

    2015-01-01

    The outcome of an infection depends on host recognition of the pathogen, hence leading to the activation of signaling pathways controlling defense responses. A long-held belief is that the modification of the lipid A moiety of the lipopolysaccharide could help Gram-negative pathogens to evade innate immunity. However, direct evidence that this happens in vivo is lacking. Here we report the lipid A expressed in the tissues of infected mice by the human pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae. Our findings demonstrate that Klebsiella remodels its lipid A in a tissue-dependent manner. Lipid A species found in the lungs are consistent with a 2-hydroxyacyl-modified lipid A dependent on the PhoPQ-regulated oxygenase LpxO. The in vivo lipid A pattern is lost in minimally passaged bacteria isolated from the tissues. LpxO-dependent modification reduces the activation of inflammatory responses and mediates resistance to antimicrobial peptides. An lpxO mutant is attenuated in vivo thereby highlighting the importance of this lipid A modification in Klebsiella infection biology. Colistin, one of the last options to treat multidrug-resistant Klebsiella infections, triggers the in vivo lipid A pattern. Moreover, colistin-resistant isolates already express the in vivo lipid A pattern. In these isolates, LpxO-dependent lipid A modification mediates resistance to colistin. Deciphering the lipid A expressed in vivo opens the possibility of designing novel therapeutics targeting the enzymes responsible for the in vivo lipid A pattern. PMID:26578797

  14. Effect of fish oil supplementation and exercise on serum lipids and aerobic fitness.

    PubMed

    Brilla, L R; Landerholm, T E

    1990-06-01

    The effects of fish oil supplementation and exercise were investigated in healthy, previously sedentary males, ages 19-34. Thirty-two subjects were assigned to four groups: control (C), fish (F), exercise (E), fish and exercise (FE). The fish groups consumed 4 g.d-1 of omega-3 fatty acids. The exercise groups performed aerobic exercise for one hour three per week. The study was conducted for 10 weeks with pre and post values obtained for cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max), ventilatory anaerobic threshold (VAT), percent body fat, and dietary composition of macronutrients and polyunsaturated to saturated fat (P:S) ratio. No significant differences were noted between groups for any of the blood lipid values, percent body fat or dietary variables. VO2max and VAT did exhibit significant changes among groups. VO2max was greater for the exercise groups (E, FE) as compared to the control group (p less than 0.05). E, but not FE, was significantly greater than F. VAT was significantly greater in F, E, and FE as compared to controls, however the control's VAT decreased slightly. The slight improvement, although statistically non-significant, in VO2max and VAT by the F group requires further study. This data indicates an improvement in aerobic metabolism from aerobic exercise, alone or in combination with fish oil, compared to controls. PMID:2402138

  15. Inhibition of Lipid Oxidation in Oil-in-Water Emulsions by Interface-Adsorbed Myofibrillar Protein.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiayi; Xiong, Youling L

    2015-10-14

    This study investigated the role of interfacial myofibrillar protein (MFP) in the oxidative stabilization of meat emulsions. Emulsions with 10% oil were prepared using either 2% (w/v) Tween 20 or 0.25, 0.5, and 1% (w/v) MFP and then subjected to hydroxyl radical oxidation at 4 °C for 0, 2, and 24 h. MFP was more readily oxidized (intrinsic fluorescence quenching, sulfur losses, and carbonyl formation) than oil [conjugated dienes and 2-thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS)]. However, oxidized MFP in the continuous phase stimulated lipid oxidation after 24 h, sharply contrasting with interface-adsorbed MFP that inhibited TBARS formation nearly 90% (p < 0.05). Interfacial MFP from 2 h oxidized samples exhibited greater losses of fluorescence and more extensive polymerization of myosin (detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis) than MFP present in the continuous phase. Results indicated that, due to the physical localization, interface-adsorbed MFP in general and myosin in particular provided accentuated protection of emulsions against oxidation. PMID:26414649

  16. Intestinal failure-associated liver disease and the use of fish oil-based lipid emulsions.

    PubMed

    Goulet, Olivier J

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal failure (IF) is caused by the critical reduction of functional gut mass below the minimal amount necessary for adequate digestion and absorption to satisfy body nutrient and fluid requirements for maintenance in adults and growth in children. The advent of parenteral nutrition (PN) resulted in a dramatic improvement in life expectancy of patients suffering IF, but it has its own complications, such as catheter related sepsis. In pediatric patients suffering IF, intraluminal intestinal bacterial overgrowth may cause bacterial translocation and subsequent cholestasis and liver fibrosis. With our current understanding of the genesis of intestinal failure associated liver disease (IFALD), it should be prevented or at least early recognized and treated especially in patients experiencing prematurity and/or sepsis. Targeting harmful cytokine responses can be expected to reduce the severity and frequency of IFALD. In that view, prevention of sepsis, appropriate management of enteral feeding, prevention and treatment of intestinal bacterial overgrowth and the effects of fish oil, as providing omega-3 fatty with anti-inflammatory effects, are promising in avoiding or reversing cholestasis. This chapter aims to review both IF and PN related factors of liver disease with special emphasize on inflammation as cause of liver injury and on the use of fish oil based lipid emulsions as a provision of both alpha-tocopherol (200 g/l of 20% emulsion), as anti-oxidant agent and long-chain PUFAs. PMID:25471806

  17. Loss of lipid material during the dehulling of oilseeds with different structural characteristics.

    PubMed

    de Figueiredo, A K; Rodríguez, L M; Fernández, M; Riccobene, I C; Nolasco, S M

    2015-12-01

    The loss of lipid material by migration to the hull during the dehulling of oilseeds with different structural characteristics was evaluated. The samples selected -three sunflower hybrids and a safflower cultivar- were processed under optimal dehulling operating conditions and with two passes through a dehuller. From the SEM micrographs of the samples it was possible to observe structural differences which affect the mechanical properties of the pericarps and, consequently, the dehulling process. The black-hull sunflower hybrid exhibited residual hull percentages lightly above those recommended by the industry after one pass through the dehuller, therefore, this hybrid should not be further processed to avoid oil losses due to migration to the hull. On the other hand, the safflower cultivar and the high stearic high oleic sunflower hybrid and the traditional striped-hull sunflower require two passes through the dehuller, but this resulted in an oil loss due to migration to the hull of over 0.9 % per gram of grains processed. These results suggest the need to reach 'compromise' decisions based on economic impact studies in the face of the variables that originate simultaneously both positive and negative effects. PMID:26604365

  18. Dietary Njavara rice bran oil reduces experimentally induced hypercholesterolaemia by regulating genes involved in lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Chithra, Pushpan K; Sindhu, G; Shalini, V; Parvathy, Rathnam; Jayalekshmy, Ananthasankaran; Helen, Antony

    2015-04-28

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the anti-atherogenic effect of Njavara rice bran oil (NjRBO) on atherosclerosis by modulating enzymes and genes involved in lipid metabolism in rats fed a high-cholesterol diet (HCD). Adult male rats (Sprague-Dawley strain, weighing 100-120 g) were divided into three groups of nine animals each. Group I served as the control, group II were fed a HCD and group III were fed a HCD and NjRBO (100 mg/kg body weight). The study duration was 60 d. Serum and tissue lipid profile, atherogenic index, enzymes of lipid metabolism, plasma C-reactive protein levels, serum paraoxonase and arylesterase activities, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, gene and protein expression of paraoxonase 1 (PON1), PPARα, ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), apoB and apoA1 in the liver were quantified. Total cholesterol, TAG, phospholipid, NEFA, LDL-cholesterol concentrations in the serum and liver, lipogenic enzyme activities, hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase activity and atherogenic index were significantly increased in HCD-fed rats, but they decreased after treatment with NjRBO. HDL-cholesterol level and lecithin cholesterol acyl transferase activity were increased in the NjRBO-treated group, but decreased in the HCD-fed group. The expression levels of ABCA1, apoA1, PON1 and PPARα were found to be significantly increased in NjRBO-treated group compared with the HCD-fed group; however, the expression level of apoB was found to be higher in HCD-fed group and lower in the NjRBO-treated group. These data suggest that NjRBO possesses an anti-atherogenic property by modulating lipid metabolism and up-regulating genes involved in reverse cholesterol transport and antioxidative defence mechanism through the induction of the gene expression PON1. PMID:25823019

  19. Structures of aminoarabinose transferase ArnT suggest a molecular basis for lipid A glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Petrou, Vasileios I; Herrera, Carmen M; Schultz, Kathryn M; Clarke, Oliver B; Vendome, Jérémie; Tomasek, David; Banerjee, Surajit; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R; Belcher Dufrisne, Meagan; Kloss, Brian; Kloppmann, Edda; Rost, Burkhard; Klug, Candice S; Trent, M Stephen; Shapiro, Lawrence; Mancia, Filippo

    2016-02-01

    Polymyxins are antibiotics used in the last line of defense to combat multidrug-resistant infections by Gram-negative bacteria. Polymyxin resistance arises through charge modification of the bacterial outer membrane with the attachment of the cationic sugar 4-amino-4-deoxy-l-arabinose to lipid A, a reaction catalyzed by the integral membrane lipid-to-lipid glycosyltransferase 4-amino-4-deoxy-L-arabinose transferase (ArnT). Here, we report crystal structures of ArnT from Cupriavidus metallidurans, alone and in complex with the lipid carrier undecaprenyl phosphate, at 2.8 and 3.2 angstrom resolution, respectively. The structures show cavities for both lipidic substrates, which converge at the active site. A structural rearrangement occurs on undecaprenyl phosphate binding, which stabilizes the active site and likely allows lipid A binding. Functional mutagenesis experiments based on these structures suggest a mechanistic model for ArnT family enzymes. PMID:26912703

  20. Essential oil from lemon peels inhibit key enzymes linked to neurodegenerative conditions and pro-oxidant induced lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Oboh, Ganiyu; Olasehinde, Tosin A; Ademosun, Ayokunle O

    2014-01-01

    This study sought to investigate the effects of essential oil from lemon (Citrus limoni) peels on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) activities in vitro. The essential oil was extracted by hydrodistillation, dried with anhydrous Na2SO4 and characterized using gas chromatography. Antioxidant properties of the oil and inhibition of pro-oxidant-induced lipid peroxidation in rats brain homogenate were also assessed. The essential oil inhibited AChE and BChE activities in a concentration-dependent manner. GC analysis revealed the presence of sabinene, limonene, α-pinene, β-pinene, neral, geranial, 1,8-cineole, linalool, borneol, α-terpineol, terpinen-4-ol, linalyl acetate and β-caryophyllene. Furthermore, the essential oil exhibited antioxidant activities as typified by ferric reducing property, Fe(2+)-chelation and radicals [DPPH, ABTS, OH, NO] scavenging abilities. The inhibition of AChE and BChE activities, inhibition of pro-oxidant induced lipid peroxidation and antioxidant activities could be possible mechanisms for the use of the essential oil in the management and prevention of oxidative stress-induced neurodegeneration. PMID:24599102

  1. Production of a novel mannosylerythritol lipid containing a hydroxy fatty acid from castor oil by Pseudozyma tsukubaensis.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Shuhei; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Imura, Tomohiro; Morita, Tomotake; Yanagidani, Shusaku; Kitamoto, Dai; Kitagawa, Masaru

    2013-01-01

    Mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs) are glycolipid biosurfactants produced by various yeasts belonging to the genus Pseudozyma, which exhibit excellent surface activities as well as versatile biochemical activities. A study on P. tsukubaensis NBRC1940 as a mono-acetylated MEL (MEL-B) producer revealed that the yeast accumulated a novel glycolipid from castor oil at a yield of 22 g/L. Its main chemical structure was identified as 1-O-β-(2'-O-alka(e)noyl-3'-O-hydroxyalka(e)noyl-6'-O-acetyl-D-mannopyranosyl)-D-erythritol designated as "new MEL-B." The new MEL-B, comprising a hydroxy fatty acid had a reduced surface tension of 28.5 mN/m at a critical micelle concentration (CMC) of 2.2×10⁻⁵ M in water. The observed CMC was 5-fold higher than that of conventional MEL-B. When conventional MEL-B was dispersed in water, it self-assembled to form the lamellar (L(α)) phase at a wide range of concentrations. In contrast, new MEL-B formed spherical oily droplets similar to the sponge (L₃) phase, which is observed in aqueous solutions of di-acetylated MEL (MEL-A). The data suggest that the newly identified MEL-B is likely to have a different structure and interfacial properties compared to the conventional MELs, and could facilitate an increase in the application of glycolipid biosurfactants. PMID:23728329

  2. Comparison of the radical scavenging potential of polar and lipidic fractions of olive oil and other vegetable oils under normal conditions and after thermal treatment.

    PubMed

    Valavanidis, Athanasios; Nisiotou, Christala; Papageorgiou, Yiannis; Kremli, Ioulia; Satravelas, Nikolaos; Zinieris, Nikolaos; Zygalaki, Helen

    2004-04-21

    The antioxidant activity (IC(50)) of extra virgin olive oil (EVOO), commercial olive oil, and other vegetable oils (soybean, sunflower, and corn oil) was determined by UV-vis and by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy of the stable radical 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH). Also, we studied the antioxidant activity of the methanol soluble phase (methanolic, MF) and the nonsoluble phase (lipidic, LF) of oils by the same methods. Similarly, we studied the effect of heating on the antioxidant activity at 160 and 190 degrees C. Also, the MF, containing the polyphenolic substances, was used for measurements of the radical scavenging capacity toward the most important oxygen free radicals, superoxide anion (O(2)(*)(-)) and hydroxyl (HO(*)) radicals. Results showed that soybean oil and EVOO had the highest antioxidant potential and thermal stability. In the case of soybean oil, the antioxidant capacity is the result of its high content of gamma- and delta-tocopherols (with the highest antioxidant capacity and thermostabilities), whereas in EVOO, the antioxidant potential is the result of the combination of specific antioxidant polyphenols, which are acting additionally as effective stabilizers of alpha-tocopherol. The high content of EVOO in tyrosol, hydrotyrosol, and oleuropein and other polyphenolics with radical scavenging abilities toward superoxide anion and hydroxyl radical suggests that olive oil possesses biological properties that could partially account for the observed beneficial health effects of the Mediterranean diet. PMID:15080646

  3. Formation and finite element analysis of tethered bilayer lipid structures.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Kwang Joo; Valincius, Gintaras; Liao, Wei-Ching; Hu, Xin; Wen, Xuejin; Lee, Andrew; Yu, Bo; Vanderah, David J; Lu, Wu; Lee, L James

    2010-12-01

    Rapid solvent exchange of an ethanolic solution of diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPhyPC) in the presence of a mixed self-assembled monolayer (SAM) [thiolipid/β-mercaptoethanol (βME) (3/7 mol/mol) on Au] shows a transition from densely packed tethered bilayer lipid membranes [(dp)tBLMs], to loosely packed tethered bilayer lipid membranes [(lp)tBLMs], and tethered bilayer liposome nanoparticles (tBLNs) with decreasing DPhyPC concentration. The tethered lipidic constructs in the aqueous medium were analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Finite element analysis (FEA) was applied to interpret spectral EIS features without referring to equivalent circuit modeling. Using structural data obtained earlier from neutron reflectometry and dielectric constants of lipid bilayers, we reproduced experimentally observed features of the electrochemical impedance (EI) spectra of complex surface constructs involving small pinhole defects, large membrane-free patches, and bound liposomes. We demonstrated by FEA that highly insulating (dp)tBLMs with low-defect density exhibit EI spectra in the shape of a perfect semicircle with or without low-frequency upward "tails" in the Cole-Cole representation. Such EI spectra were observed at DPhyPC concentrations of >5 × 10(-3) mol L(-1). While AFM was not able to visualize very small lateral defects in such films, EI spectra unambiguously signaled their presence by increased low frequency "tails". Using FEA we demonstrate that films with large diameter visible defects (>25 nm by AFM) produce EI spectral features consisting of two semicircles of comparable size. Such films were typically obtained at DPhyPC concentrations of <5 × 10(-3) mol L(-1). At DPhyPC concentrations of <1.0 × 10(-3) mol L(-1) the planar bilayer structures were replaced by ellipsoidal liposomes with diameters ranging from 50 to 500 nm as observed in AFM images. Despite the distinct surface morphology change, the EI

  4. 2009 Plant Lipids: Structure, Metabolism & Function Gordon Research Conference - February 1- 6 ,2009

    SciTech Connect

    Kent D. Chapman

    2009-02-06

    The Gordon Research Conference on 'Plant Lipids: Structure, Metabolism and Function' has been instituted to accelerate research productivity in the field of plant lipids. This conference will facilitate wide dissemination of research breakthroughs, support recruitment of young scientists to the field of plant lipid metabolism and encourage broad participation of the plant lipid community in guiding future directions for research in plant lipids. This conference will build upon the strengths of the successful, previous biannual meetings of the National Plant Lipid Cooperative (www.plantlipids.org) that began in 1993, but will reflect a broader scope of topics to include the biochemistry, cell biology, metabolic regulation, and signaling functions of plant acyl lipids. Most importantly, this conference also will serve as a physical focal point for the interaction of the plant lipid research community. Applications to attend this conference will be open to all researchers interested in plant lipids and will provide a venue for the presentation of the latest research results, networking opportunities for young scientists, and a forum for the development and exchange of useful lipid resources and new ideas. By bringing together senior- and junior-level scientists involved in plant lipid metabolism, a broad range of insights will be shared and the community of plant lipid researchers will function more as a network of vested partners. This is important for the vitality of the research community and for the perceived value that will encourage conference attendance into the future.

  5. Konjac-based oil bulking system for development of improved-lipid pork patties: technological, microbiological and sensory assessment.

    PubMed

    Salcedo-Sandoval, Lorena; Cofrades, Susana; Ruiz-Capillas, Claudia; Carballo, José; Jiménez-Colmenero, Francisco

    2015-03-01

    Improved-lipid pork patties were manufactured following two different reformulation strategies: fat reduction by replacement of pork backfat with konjac gel (KG), and fat reduction/lipid improvement by replacement of pork backfat with an improved oil combination (olive, linseed and fish oils) bulking system based on konjac gel (O-KG). Technological, microbiological and sensory properties were analyzed as affected by the type of formulation and by chilled storage (9days, 2°C). Fat was reduced by between 30 and 86%. In the cases where O-KG was incorporated, 12 and 41% of total fat in patties came from the oil combination. There was no observable effect on color parameters in samples with O-K. Higher KG levels produced harder cooked patties. Animal fat replacement in patties promoted an increase in lipid oxidation, which was more pronounced in samples with an oil combination. In general, during chilled storage no major changes were observed in the studied properties as a result of the different treatments. PMID:25485511

  6. Regulatory mechanisms underlying oil palm fruit mesocarp maturation, ripening, and functional specialization in lipid and carotenoid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Tranbarger, Timothy J; Dussert, Stéphane; Joët, Thierry; Argout, Xavier; Summo, Marilyne; Champion, Antony; Cros, David; Omore, Alphonse; Nouy, Bruno; Morcillo, Fabienne

    2011-06-01

    Fruit provide essential nutrients and vitamins for the human diet. Not only is the lipid-rich fleshy mesocarp tissue of the oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) fruit the main source of edible oil for the world, but it is also the richest dietary source of provitamin A. This study examines the transcriptional basis of these two outstanding metabolic characters in the oil palm mesocarp. Morphological, cellular, biochemical, and hormonal features defined key phases of mesocarp development. A 454 pyrosequencing-derived transcriptome was then assembled for the developmental phases preceding and during maturation and ripening, when high rates of lipid and carotenoid biosynthesis occur. A total of 2,629 contigs with differential representation revealed coordination of metabolic and regulatory components. Further analysis focused on the fatty acid and triacylglycerol assembly pathways and during carotenogenesis. Notably, a contig similar to the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seed oil transcription factor WRINKLED1 was identified with a transcript profile coordinated with those of several fatty acid biosynthetic genes and the high rates of lipid accumulation, suggesting some common regulatory features between seeds and fruits. We also focused on transcriptional regulatory networks of the fruit, in particular those related to ethylene transcriptional and GLOBOSA/PISTILLATA-like proteins in the mesocarp and a central role for ethylene-coordinated transcriptional regulation of type VII ethylene response factors during ripening. Our results suggest that divergence has occurred in the regulatory components in this monocot fruit compared with those identified in the dicot tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fleshy fruit model. PMID:21487046

  7. Biobased oil structure on amphiphilic and tribological properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biobased oils are those derived from farm-based renewable raw materials. Most are vegetable oils (such as soybean, canola, corn, etc.) or chemical modifications of vegetable oils. They have a number of interesting structural features that impact their amphiphilic and lubrication properties. The basi...

  8. TRPV1 structures in nanodiscs reveal mechanisms of ligand and lipid action.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuan; Cao, Erhu; Julius, David; Cheng, Yifan

    2016-06-16

    When integral membrane proteins are visualized in detergents or other artificial systems, an important layer of information is lost regarding lipid interactions and their effects on protein structure. This is especially relevant to proteins for which lipids have both structural and regulatory roles. Here we demonstrate the power of combining electron cryo-microscopy with lipid nanodisc technology to ascertain the structure of the rat TRPV1 ion channel in a native bilayer environment. Using this approach, we determined the locations of annular and regulatory lipids and showed that specific phospholipid interactions enhance binding of a spider toxin to TRPV1 through formation of a tripartite complex. Furthermore, phosphatidylinositol lipids occupy the binding site for capsaicin and other vanilloid ligands, suggesting a mechanism whereby chemical or thermal stimuli elicit channel activation by promoting the release of bioactive lipids from a critical allosteric regulatory site. PMID:27281200

  9. Wheat germ oil and α-lipoic acid predominantly improve the lipid profile of broiler meat.

    PubMed

    Arshad, Muhammad Sajid; Anjum, Faqir Muhammad; Khan, Muhammad Issa; Shahid, Muhammad

    2013-11-20

    In response to recent assertions that synthetic antioxidants may have the potential to cause toxic effects and to consumers' increased attention to consuming natural products, the poultry industry has been seeking sources of natural antioxidants, alone or in combination with synthetic antioxidants that are currently being used by the industry. The present study was conducted to determine the effect of α-lipoic acid, α-tocopherol, and wheat germ oil on the status of antioxidant enzymes, fatty acid profile, and serum biochemical profile of broiler blood. One-day-old (180) broiler birds were fed six different feeds varying in their antioxidant content: no addition (T1), natural α-tocopherol (wheat germ oil, T2), synthetic α-tocopherol (T3), α-lipoic acid (T4), α-lipoic acid together with natural α-tocopherol (T5), and α-lipoic acid together with synthetic α-tocopherol (T6). The composition of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids in the breast and leg meat was positively influenced by the different dietary supplements. The content of fatty acid was significantly greater in broilers receiving T2 both in breast (23.92%) and in leg (25.82%) meat, whereas lower fatty acid levels was found in broilers receiving diets containing T6 in the breast (19.57%) and leg (21.30%) meat. Serum total cholesterol (113.42 mg/dL) and triglycerides (52.29 mg/dL) were lowest in the group given natural α-tocopherol and α-lipoic acid. Wheat germ oil containing natural α-tocopherol alone or with α-lipoic acid was more effective than synthetic α-tocopherol in raising levels of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione reductase while lowering plasma total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, and triglycerides and raising high-density lipoprotein and plasma protein significantly. It was concluded that the combination of wheat germ oil and α-lipoic acid is helpful in improving the lipid profile of broilers. PMID:24191686

  10. Dendrisomes: vesicular structures derived from a cationic lipidic dendron.

    PubMed

    Al-Jamal, Khuloud T; Sakthivel, Thiagarajan; Florence, Alexander T

    2005-01-01

    The behavior of a novel synthetic lipidic cationic lysine-based dendron (partial dendrimer) in aqueous media and its ability, with and without cholesterol, to self-assemble into higher order structures was studied to gain an understanding of these structures as potential drug carriers. The dendron was prepared by solid-phase peptide synthesis. A reverse-phase evaporation (REV) technique was used to prepare cationic vesicular aggregates of the dendron with different molar ratios of cholesterol. The size and zeta potential of these supramolecular aggregates or "dendrisomes" was determined by photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS). Dendrisome morphology and thermotropic properties were studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Radiolabeled penicillin G was used as a model of a negatively charged water-soluble compound to investigate the encapsulation efficiency of the dendrisomes. In vitro release of the drug was determined using as a comparator a REV liposome formulation. Dendrisomes of all compositions have higher encapsulation efficiencies and slower release rates compared to the comparator. Cholesterol was found both to increase the size of the aggregates from around 310 to 560 nm and to increase shape irregularities, but did not change the positive zeta potential, in the order of +50 mV, of the dendrisomes. Cholesterol decreases penicillin G entrapment efficiency but increases solute leakage at 25 degrees C. PMID:15761934

  11. Membrane Protein Crystallization in Lipidic Mesophases. Hosting Lipid Effects on the Crystallization and Structure of a Transmembrane Peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Hfer, Nicole; Aragao, David; Lyons, Joseph A.; Caffrey, Martin

    2011-09-28

    Gramicidin is an apolar pentadecapeptide antibiotic consisting of alternating d- and l-amino acids. It functions, in part, by creating pores in membranes of susceptible cells rendering them leaky to monovalent cations. The peptide should be able to traverse the host membrane either as a double-stranded, intertwined double helix (DSDH) or as a head-to-head single-stranded helix (HHSH). Current structure models are based on macromolecular X-ray crystallography (MX) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). However, the HHSH form has only been observed by NMR. The shape and size of the different gramicidin conformations differ. We speculated therefore that reconstituting it into a lipidic mesophase with bilayers of different microstructures would preferentially stabilize one form over the other. By using such mesophases for in meso crystallogenesis, the expectation was that at least one would generate crystals of gramicidin in the HHSH form for structure determination by MX. This was tested using commercial and in-house synthesized lipids that support in meso crystallogenesis. Lipid acyl chain lengths were varied from 14 to 18 carbons to provide mesophases with a range of bilayer thicknesses. Unexpectedly, all lipids produced high-quality, structure-grade crystals with gramicidin only in the DSDH conformation.

  12. [Effect of sacha inchi oil (plukenetia volúbilis l) on the lipid profile of patients with hyperlipoproteinemia].

    PubMed

    Garmendia, Fausto; Pando, Rosa; Ronceros, Gerardo

    2011-12-01

    We performed a pilot, experimental, open study in order to know the effect, effective dosage and secondary effects of sacha inchi´s (Plukenetia Huallabamba) [corrected] oil on the lipid profiles of patients with hypercholesterolemia. We included 24 patients of ages 35 to 75, to whom we measured total cholesterol (TC), HDL, triglycerides (Tg), glucose (G), non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) and insulin (I) levels in blood, then we randomized them to receive sacha inchi oil orally 5 ml or 10 ml of a suspension of sacha inchi oil (2gr/5ml) for four months. The oil intake produced a decrease in the mean values of TC, and NEFA, and a rise in HDL in both subgroups. The subgroup receiving 10 ml was associated to an increase in the insulin levels. Sacha inchi oil appears to have beneficial effects on the lipid profile of patients with dyslipidemia, but their efficacy and security should be evaluated in randomized clinical trials. PMID:22241259

  13. The effect of hydroalcoholic extract and essential oil of Heracleum persicum on lipid profile in cholesterol-fed rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Hajhashemi, Valiollah; Dashti, Gholamreza; Saberi, Salabali; Malekjamshidi, Parvin

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study was designed to investigate the effect of hydroalcoholic extract and essential oil of Heracleum persicum (Apiaceae) on lipid profile of male hyperlipidemic rabbits. Materials and Methods: Thirty rabbits were randomly divided into six groups of five each. One group received normal diet and the other groups fed with a high cholesterol (2% W/W) diet for 7 weeks. Vehicle, hydroalcoholic extract (500 and 1000 mg/kg), essential oil (200  l/kg), and lovastatin (5 mg/kg) were administered orally to animals and their effects on lipid profile were evaluated. Results: Essential oil of H. perscum significantly (p<0.05) lowered serum triglyceride level and increased HDL-cholesterol concentration. Moreover, hydroalcoholic extract (1000 mg/kg), essential oil (200  l/kg), and lovastatin significantly (p<0.01) reduced serum concentration of total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol. Conclusion: These findings suggest that essential oil of the plant fruits may have some benefits in reducing cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:25050312

  14. A Thermodynamic and Structural Study of Myelin Basic Protein in Lipid Membrane Models

    PubMed Central

    Rispoli, P.; Carzino, R.; Svaldo-Lanero, T.; Relini, A.; Cavalleri, O.; Fasano, A.; Liuzzi, G. M.; Carlone, G.; Riccio, P.; Gliozzi, A.; Rolandi, R.

    2007-01-01

    Myelin basic protein (MBP) is a major protein of the myelin membrane in the central nervous system. It is believed to play a relevant role in the structure and function of the myelin sheath and is a candidate autoantigen in demyelinating processes such as multiple sclerosis. MBP has many features typical of soluble proteins but is capable of strongly interacting with lipids, probably via a conformation change. Its structure in the lipid membrane as well as the details of its interaction with the lipid membrane are still to be resolved. In this article we study the interaction of MBP with Langmuir films of anionic and neutral phospholipids, used as experimental models of the lipid membrane. By analyzing the equilibrium surface pressure/area isotherms of these films, we measured the protein partition coefficient between the aqueous solution and the lipid membrane, the mixing ratio between protein and lipid, and the area of the protein molecules inserted in the lipid film. The penetration depth of MBP in the lipid monolayer was evaluated by x-ray reflectivity measurements. The mixing ratio and the MBP molecular area decrease as the surface pressure increases, and at high surface pressure the protein is preferentially located at the lipid/water interface for both anionic and neutral lipids. The morphology of MBP adsorbed on lipid films was studied by atomic force microscopy. MBP forms bean-like structures and induces a lateral compaction of the lipid surface. Scattered MBP particles have also been observed. These particles, which are 2.35-nm high, 4.7-nm wide, and 13.3-nm long, could be formed by protein-lipid complexes. On the basis of their size, they could also be either single MBP molecules or pairs of c-shaped interpenetrating molecules. PMID:17513373

  15. Role of charged lipids in membrane structures - Insight given by simulations.

    PubMed

    Pöyry, Sanja; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2016-10-01

    Lipids and proteins are the main components of cell membranes. It is becoming increasingly clear that lipids, in addition to providing an environment for proteins to work in, are in many cases also able to modulate the structure and function of those proteins. Particularly charged lipids such as phosphatidylinositols and phosphatidylserines are involved in several examples of such effects. Molecular dynamics simulations have proved an invaluable tool in exploring these aspects. This so-called computational microscope can provide both complementing explanations for the experimental results and guide experiments to fruitful directions. In this paper, we review studies that have utilized molecular dynamics simulations to unravel the roles of charged lipids in membrane structures. We focus on lipids as active constituents of the membranes, affecting both general membrane properties as well as non-lipid membrane components, mainly proteins. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biosimulations edited by Ilpo Vattulainen and Tomasz Róg. PMID:27003126

  16. Characterization of new types of mannosylerythritol lipids as biosurfactants produced from soybean oil by a basidiomycetous yeast, Pseudozyma shanxiensis.

    PubMed

    Fukuoka, Tokuma; Morita, Tomotake; Konishi, Masaaki; Imura, Tomohiro; Kitamoto, Dai

    2007-01-01

    Mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs) are glycolipid biosurfactants produced by the yeast strains of the genus Pseudozyma. These show not only the excellent surface-active properties but also versatile biochemical actions. In course of MEL production from soybean oil by P. shanxiensis, new extracellular glycolipids (more hydrophilic than the previously reported MELs) were found in the culture medium. As a result of the structural characterization, the glycolipids were identified as a mixture of 4-O-[(2', 4'-di-O-acetyl-3'-O-alka(e)noyl)-beta-D-mannopyranosyl]-D-erythritol and 4-O-[(4'-O-acetyl-3'-O-alka(e)noyl-2'-O-butanoyl)-beta-D-mannopyranosyl]-D-erythritol. Interestingly, the new MELs possessed a much shorter chain (C(2) or C(4)) at the C-2' position of the mannose moiety compared to the MELs hitherto reported, which mainly possess a medium-chain acid (C(10)) at the position. They would thus show higher hydrophilicity and/or water-solubility, and expand the development of the environmentally advanced yeast biosurfactants. PMID:17898510

  17. Effect of alpha-linolenic acid-rich Camelina sativa oil on serum fatty acid composition and serum lipids in hypercholesterolemic subjects.

    PubMed

    Karvonen, Henna M; Aro, Antti; Tapola, Niina S; Salminen, Irma; Uusitupa, Matti I j; Sarkkinen, Essi S

    2002-10-01

    Camelina sativa-derived oil (camelina oil) is a good source of alpha-linolenic acid. The proportion of alpha-linolenic acid in serum fatty acids is associated with the risk of cardiovascular diseases. We studied the effects of camelina oil on serum lipids and on the fatty acid composition of total lipids in comparison to rapeseed and olive oils in a parallel, double-blind setting. Sixty-eight hypercholesterolemic subjects aged 28 to 65 years were randomly assigned after a 2-week pretrial period to 1 of 3 oil groups: camelina oil, olive oil, and rapeseed oil. Subjects consumed daily 30 g (actual intake, approximately 33 mL) of test oils for 6 weeks. In the camelina group, the proportion of alpha-linolenic acid in fatty acids of serum lipids was significantly higher (P <.001) compared to the 2 other oil groups at the end of the study: 2.5 times higher compared to the rapeseed oil group and 4 times higher compared to the olive oil group. Respectively the proportions of 2 metabolites of alpha-linolenic acid (eicosapentaenoic and docosapentaenoic acids) increased and differed significantly in the camelina group from those in other groups. During the intervention, the serum low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol concentration decreased significantly by 12.2% in the camelina oil group, 5.4% in the rapeseed oil group, and 7.7% in the olive oil group. In conclusion, camelina oil significantly elevated the proportions of alpha-linolenic acid and its metabolites in serum of mildly or moderately hypercholesterolemic subjects. Camelina oil's serum cholesterol-lowering effect was comparable to that of rapeseed and olive oils. PMID:12370843

  18. MemProtMD: Automated Insertion of Membrane Protein Structures into Explicit Lipid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Stansfeld, Phillip J.; Goose, Joseph E.; Caffrey, Martin; Carpenter, Elisabeth P.; Parker, Joanne L.; Newstead, Simon; Sansom, Mark S.P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary There has been exponential growth in the number of membrane protein structures determined. Nevertheless, these structures are usually resolved in the absence of their lipid environment. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) simulations enable insertion of membrane proteins into explicit models of lipid bilayers. We have automated the CGMD methodology, enabling membrane protein structures to be identified upon their release into the PDB and embedded into a membrane. The simulations are analyzed for protein-lipid interactions, identifying lipid binding sites, and revealing local bilayer deformations plus molecular access pathways within the membrane. The coarse-grained models of membrane protein/bilayer complexes are transformed to atomistic resolution for further analysis and simulation. Using this automated simulation pipeline, we have analyzed a number of recently determined membrane protein structures to predict their locations within a membrane, their lipid/protein interactions, and the functional implications of an enhanced understanding of the local membrane environment of each protein. PMID:26073602

  19. Preservative system development for argan oil-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers.

    PubMed

    Hommoss, A

    2011-03-01

    Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) are used in many dermal cosmetic formulations. To prevent microbiological spoilage of NLC suspensions preservative systems must be used. Preservatives can impair the physical stability of NLC suspensions. Therefore, a systematic screening of preservative systems should be performed and the compatibility of these preservative systems with each NLC formulation has to be investigated. In this study three Argan oil-loaded NLC formulations were developed. Ethanol, propylene glycol and pentylene glycol were admixed to these formulations as preservative systems. The physical stability of the non-preserved and preserved formulations has been investigated. Upon admixing 20% w/w ethanol to the selected formulations, immediate particle aggregation could be detected using laser diffractometry and after 24 hours gelling occurred. This was accompanied with a lowering of Zeta potential value. Samples preserved with 10% w/w propylene glycol did not show any change in particle size or in Zeta potential, in comparison to the non-preserved formulation, when measured after one day and 120 days. Samples preserved with 5% pentylene glycol proved also to be stable after 120 days and did not show any change in particle size or Zeta potential. PMID:21553648

  20. Dynamical Clustering and a Mechanism for Raft-like Structures in a Model Lipid Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Starr, Francis W.; Hartmann, Benedikt; Douglas, Jack F.

    2014-01-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to examine the dynamical heterogeneity of a model single-component lipid membrane using a coarse-grained representation of lipid molecules. This model qualitatively reproduces the known phase transitions between disordered, ordered, and gel membrane phases, and the phase transitions are accompanied by significant changes in the nature of the lipid dynamics. In particular, lipid diffusion in the liquid-ordered phase is hindered by the transient trapping of molecules by their neighbors, similar to the dynamics of a liquid approaching its glass transition. This transient molecular caging gives rise to two distinct mobility groups within a single-component membrane: lipids that are transiently trapped, and lipids with displacements on the scale of the intermolecular spacing. Most significantly, lipids within these distinct mobility states spatially segregate, creating transient “islands” of enhanced mobility having a size and time scale compatible with lipid “rafts,” dynamical structures thought to be important for cell membrane function. Although the dynamic lipid clusters that we observe do not themselves correspond to rafts (which are more complex, multicomponent structures), we hypothesize that such rafts may develop from the same universal mechanism, explaining why raft-like regions should arise, regardless of lipid structural or compositional details. These clusters are strikingly similar to the dynamical clusters found in glass-forming fluids, and distinct from phase-separation clusters. Further examination shows that mobile lipid clusters can be dissected into smaller clusters of cooperatively rearranging molecules. The geometry of these clusters can be understood in the context of branched equilibrium polymers, related to the statistics percolation theory. We discuss how these dynamical structures relate to a range observations on the dynamics of lipid membranes. PMID:24695573

  1. The Structure of DNA within Cationic Lipid/DNA Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Chad S.; Jas, Gouri S.; Choosakoonkriang, Sirirat; Koe, Gary S.; Smith, Janet G.; Middaugh, C. Russell

    2003-01-01

    The structure of DNA within CLDCs used for gene delivery is controversial. Previous studies using CD have been interpreted to indicate that the DNA is converted from normal B to C form in complexes. This investigation reexamines this interpretation using CD of model complexes, FTIR as well as Raman spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations to address this issue. CD spectra of supercoiled plasmid DNA undergo a significant loss of rotational strength in the signal near 275 nm upon interaction with either the cationic lipid dimethyldioctadecylammonium bromide or 1,2-dioleoyltrimethylammonium propane. This loss of rotational strength is shown, however, by both FTIR and Raman spectroscopy to occur within the parameters of the B-type conformation. Contributions of absorption flattening and differential scattering to the CD spectra of complexes are unable to account for the observed spectra. Model studies of the CD of complexes prepared from synthetic oligonucleotides of varying length suggest that significant reductions in rotational strength can occur within short stretches of DNA. Furthermore, some alteration in the hydrogen bonding of bases within CLDCs is indicated in the FTIR and Raman spectroscopy results. In addition, alterations in base stacking interactions as well as hydrogen bonding are suggested by molecular dynamics simulations. A global interpretation of all of the data suggests the DNA component of CLDCs remains in a variant B form in which base/base interactions are perturbed. PMID:12547792

  2. Investigating structural details of lipid-cholesterol-A β interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Durgesh; Anunciado, Divina; Heller, William; O'Neill, Hugh; Urban, Volker; Qian, Shuo

    2015-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia and is predicted to affect 1 in 85 people around the world by 2050. Amyloid beta (A β) -peptide, a peptide composed of 40- 42 amino acids that is the product of cleavage from the amyloid precursor protein (APP), is regarded to play a major role in the development of AD. In addition, accumulating evidence points to a positive association between cholesterol and AD. Here, we present results from our studies about A β-peptide and cholesterol in bilayer by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) using a combination of dimyristoyl, phosphocholine (DMPC) and partially deuterated cholesterol (cholesterol-d7) with and without A β. We compare the results using grazing incidence and transmission SANS on lipid bilayer films and unilamellar vesicles respectively. The structural details on vesicles and bilayers work in conjunction with the circular dichroism on peptide in solution and oriented circular dichroism in bilayer films. The studies confirm a positive association of A β with the membrane layers. The results from different studies will be compared and contrasted in presentation.

  3. Differential Impacts of Soybean and Fish Oils on Hepatocyte Lipid Droplet Accumulation and Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Primary Rabbit Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xueping; Xiao, Zhihui; Xu, Yumin; Zhao, Xingli; Cheng, Ping; Cui, Ningxun; Cui, Mingling; Li, Jie; Zhu, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD) is a severe ailment associated with long-term parenteral nutrition. Soybean oil-based lipid emulsions (SOLE) are thought to promote PNALD development, whereas fish oil-based lipid emulsions (FOLE) are thought to protect against PNALD. This study aimed to investigate the effects of SOLE and FOLE on primary rabbit hepatocytes. The results reveal that SOLE caused significant endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondrial damage, ultimately resulting in lipid droplets accumulation and ER stress. While these deleterious events induce hepatocyte injury, FOLE at high doses cause only minor ER and mitochondrial damage, which has no effect on hepatic function. SOLE also significantly upregulated glucose-regulated protein 94 mRNA and protein expression. These data indicate that SOLE, but not FOLE, damage the ER and mitochondria, resulting in lipid droplets accumulation and ER stress and, finally, hepatocyte injury. This likely contributes to the differential impacts of SOLE and FOLE on PNALD development and progression. PMID:27057162

  4. The development of flow-through bio-catalyst microreactors from silica micro structured fibers for lipid transformations.

    PubMed

    Anuar, Sabiqah Tuan; Villegas, Carla; Mugo, Samuel M; Curtis, Jonathan M

    2011-06-01

    This study demonstrates the utility of a flow-through enzyme immobilized silica microreactor for lipid transformations. A silica micro structured fiber (MSF) consisting of 168 channels of internal diameter 4-5 μm provided a large surface area for the covalent immobilization of Candida antartica lipase. The specific activity of the immobilized lipase was determined by hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl butyrate and calculated to be 0.81 U/mg. The catalytic performance of the lipase microreactor was demonstrated by the efficient ethanolysis of canola oil. The parameters affecting the performance of the MSF microreactor, including temperature and reaction flow rate, were investigated. Characterization of the lipid products exiting the microreactor was performed by non-aqueous reversed-phased liquid chromatography (NARP-LC) with evaporative light scattering detector (ELSD) and by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC x GC). Under optimized conditions of 1 μL/min flow rate of 5 mg/mL trioleoylglycerol (TO) in ethanol and 50 °C reaction temperature, 2-monooleoylglycerol was the main product at > 90% reaction yield. The regioselectivity of the Candida antartica lipase immobilized MSF microreactor in the presence of ethanol was found to be comparable to that obtained under conventional conditions. The ability of these reusable flow-through microreactors to regioselectively form monoacylglycerides in high yield from triacylglycerides demonstrate their potential use in small-scale lipid transformations or analytical lipids profiling. PMID:21318469

  5. Modification of the Structure and Activity of Lipid A in Yersinia pestis Lipopolysaccharide by Growth Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Kawahara, Kazuyoshi; Tsukano, Hiroko; Watanabe, Haruo; Lindner, Buko; Matsuura, Motohiro

    2002-01-01

    Yersinia pestis strain Yreka was grown at 27 or 37°C, and the lipid A structures (lipid A-27°C and lipid A-37°C) of the respective lipopolysaccharides (LPS) were investigated by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. Lipid A-27°C consisted of a mixture of tri-acyl, tetra-acyl, penta-acyl, and hexa-acyl lipid A's, of which tetra-acyl lipid A was most abundant. Lipid A-37°C consisted predominantly of tri- and tetra-acylated molecules, with only small amounts of penta-acyl lipid A; no hexa-acyl lipid A was detected. Furthermore, the amount of 4-amino-arabinose was substantially higher in lipid A-27°C than in lipid A-37°C. By use of mouse and human macrophage cell lines, the biological activities of the LPS and lipid A preparations were measured via their abilities to induce production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). In both cell lines the LPS and the lipid A from bacteria grown at 27°C were stronger inducers of TNF-α than those from bacteria grown at 37°C. However, the difference in activity was more prominent in human macrophage cells. These results suggest that in order to reduce the activation of human macrophages, it may be more advantageous for Y. pestis to produce less-acylated lipid A at 37°C. PMID:12117916

  6. Ether polar lipids of methanogenic bacteria: structures, comparative aspects, and biosyntheses.

    PubMed Central

    Koga, Y; Nishihara, M; Morii, H; Akagawa-Matsushita, M

    1993-01-01

    Complete structures of nearly 40 ether polar lipids from seven species of methanogens have been elucidated during the past 10 years. Three kinds of variations of core lipids, macrocyclic archaeol and two hydroxyarchaeols, were identified, in addition to the usual archaeol and caldarchaeol (for the nomenclature of archaeal [archaebacterial] ether lipids, see the text). Polar head groups of methanogen phospholipids include ethanolamine, serine, inositol, N-acetylglucosamine, dimethyl- and trimethylaminopentanetetrol, and glucosaminylinositol. Glucose is the sole hexose moiety of glycolipids in most methanogens, and galactose and mannose have been found in a few species. Methanogen lipids are characterized by their diversity in phosphate-containing polar head groups and core lipids, which in turn can be used for chemotaxonomy of methanogens. This was shown by preliminary simplified analyses of lipid component residues. Core lipid analysis by high-pressure liquid chromatography provides a method of determining the methanogenic biomass in natural samples. There has been significant progress in the biosynthetic studies of methanogen lipids in recent years. In vivo incorporation experiments have led to delineation of the outline of the synthetic route of the diphytanylglycerol ether core. The mechanisms of biosynthesis of tetraether lipids and various polar lipids, and cell-free systems of either lipid synthesis, however, remain to be elucidated. The significance and the origin of archaeal ether lipids is discussed in terms of the lipid composition of bacteria living in a wide variety of environments, the oxygen requirement for biosynthesis of hydrocarbon chains, and the physicochemical properties and functions of lipids as membrane constituents. PMID:8464404

  7. Ether polar lipids of methanogenic bacteria: structures, comparative aspects, and biosyntheses.

    PubMed

    Koga, Y; Nishihara, M; Morii, H; Akagawa-Matsushita, M

    1993-03-01

    Complete structures of nearly 40 ether polar lipids from seven species of methanogens have been elucidated during the past 10 years. Three kinds of variations of core lipids, macrocyclic archaeol and two hydroxyarchaeols, were identified, in addition to the usual archaeol and caldarchaeol (for the nomenclature of archaeal [archaebacterial] ether lipids, see the text). Polar head groups of methanogen phospholipids include ethanolamine, serine, inositol, N-acetylglucosamine, dimethyl- and trimethylaminopentanetetrol, and glucosaminylinositol. Glucose is the sole hexose moiety of glycolipids in most methanogens, and galactose and mannose have been found in a few species. Methanogen lipids are characterized by their diversity in phosphate-containing polar head groups and core lipids, which in turn can be used for chemotaxonomy of methanogens. This was shown by preliminary simplified analyses of lipid component residues. Core lipid analysis by high-pressure liquid chromatography provides a method of determining the methanogenic biomass in natural samples. There has been significant progress in the biosynthetic studies of methanogen lipids in recent years. In vivo incorporation experiments have led to delineation of the outline of the synthetic route of the diphytanylglycerol ether core. The mechanisms of biosynthesis of tetraether lipids and various polar lipids, and cell-free systems of either lipid synthesis, however, remain to be elucidated. The significance and the origin of archaeal ether lipids is discussed in terms of the lipid composition of bacteria living in a wide variety of environments, the oxygen requirement for biosynthesis of hydrocarbon chains, and the physicochemical properties and functions of lipids as membrane constituents. PMID:8464404

  8. Membrane proteins bind lipids selectively to modulate their structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Timothy M.; Ulmschneider, Martin B.; Degiacomi, Matteo T.; Baldwin, Andrew J.; Robinson, Carol V.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have established that the folding, structure and function of membrane proteins are influenced by their lipid environments1-7 and that lipids can bind to specific sites, for example in potassium channels8. Fundamental questions remain however regarding the extent of membrane protein selectivity toward lipids. Here we report a mass spectrometry (MS) approach designed to determine the selectivity of lipid binding to membrane protein complexes. We investigate the mechanosensitive channel of large conductance (MscL), aquaporin Z (AqpZ), and the ammonia channel (AmtB) using ion mobility MS (IM-MS), which reports gas-phase collision cross sections. We demonstrate that folded conformations of membrane protein complexes can exist in the gas-phase. By resolving lipid-bound states we then rank bound lipids based on their ability to resist gas phase unfolding and thereby stabilize membrane protein structure. Results show that lipids bind non-selectively and with high avidity to MscL, all imparting comparable stability, the highest-ranking lipid however is phosphatidylinositol phosphate, in line with its proposed functional role in mechanosensation9. AqpZ is also stabilized by many lipids with cardiolipin imparting the most significant resistance to unfolding. Subsequently, through functional assays, we discover that cardiolipin modulates AqpZ function. Analogous experiments identify AmtB as being highly selective for phosphatidylglycerol prompting us to obtain an X-ray structure in this lipid membrane-like environment. The 2.3Å resolution structure, when compared with others obtained without lipid bound, reveals distinct conformational changes that reposition AmtB residues to interact with the lipid bilayer. Overall our results demonstrate that resistance to unfolding correlates with specific lipid-binding events enabling distinction of lipids that merely bind from those that modulate membrane protein structure and/or function. We anticipate that these

  9. Control mechanisms operating for lipid biosynthesis differ in oil-palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) and olive (Olea europaea L.) callus cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Ramli, Umi S; Baker, Darren S; Quant, Patti A; Harwood, John L

    2002-01-01

    As a prelude to detailed flux control analysis of lipid synthesis in plants, we have examined the latter in tissue cultures from two important oil crops, olive (Olea europaea L.) and oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.). Temperature was used to manipulate the overall rate of lipid formation in order to characterize and validate the system to be used for analysis. With [1-14C]acetate as a precursor, an increase in temperature from 20 to 30 degrees C produced nearly a doubling of total lipid labelling. This increase in total lipids did not change the radioactivity in the intermediate acyl-(acyl carrier protein) or acyl-CoA pools, indicating that metabolism of these pools did not exert any significant constraint for overall synthesis. In contrast, there were some differences in the proportional labelling of fatty acids and of lipid classes at the two temperatures. The higher temperature caused a decrease in polyunsaturated fatty acid labelling and an increase in the proportion of triacylglycerol labelling in both calli. The intermediate diacylglycerol was increased in olive, but not in oil palm. Overall the data indicate the suitability of olive and oil-palm cultures for the study of lipid synthesis and indicate that de novo fatty acid synthesis may exert more flux control than complex lipid assembly. In olive, diacylglycerol acyltransferase may exert significant flux control when lipid synthesis is rapid. PMID:12023881

  10. The effects of coconut oil supplementation on the body composition and lipid profile of rats submitted to physical exercise.

    PubMed

    Resende, Nathália M; Félix, Henrique R; Soré, Murillo R; M M, Aníbal; Campos, Kleber E; Volpato, Gustavo T

    2016-05-13

    This study aims to verify the effects of coconut oil supplementation (COS) in the body composition and lipid profile of rats submitted to physical exercise. The animals (n=6 per group) were randomly assigned to: G1=Sedentary and Non-supplemented (Control Group), G2=Sedentary and Supplemented, G3=Exercised and Non-supplemented and G4=Exercised and Supplemented. The COS protocol used was 3 mL/Kg of body mass by gavage for 28 days. The physical exercise was the vertical jumping training for 28 days. It was determined the body mass parameters, Lee Index, blood glucose and lipid profile. The COS did not interfere with body mass, but the lean body mass was lower in G3 compared to G2. The final Lee Index classified G1 and G2 as obese (>30g/cm). The lipid profile showed total cholesterol was decreased in G3, LDL-c concentration was decreased in G2, triglycerides, VLDL-c and HDL-c concentrations were increased in G2 and G4 in relation to G1 and G3. The COS decreased LDL-c/HDL-c ratio. In conclusion, the COS associated or not to physical exercise worsen others lipid parameters, like triglycerides and VLDL-c level, showing the care with the use of lipid supplements. PMID:27192196

  11. The helical structure of surfactant peptide KL4 when bound to POPC: POPG lipid vesicles.

    PubMed

    Mills, Frank D; Antharam, Vijay C; Ganesh, Omjoy K; Elliott, Doug W; McNeill, Seth A; Long, Joanna R

    2008-08-12

    KL 4 is a 21-residue peptide employed as a functional mimic of lung surfactant protein B, which successfully lowers surface tension in the alveoli. A mechanistic understanding of how KL 4 affects lipid properties has proven elusive as the secondary structure of KL 4 in lipid preparations has not been determined at high resolution. The sequence of KL 4 is based on the C-terminus of SP-B, a naturally occurring helical protein that binds to lipid interfaces. The spacing of the lysine residues in KL 4 precludes the formation of a canonical amphipathic alpha-helix; qualitative measurements using Raman, CD, and FTIR spectroscopies have given conflicting results as to the secondary structure of the peptide as well as its orientation in the lipid environment. Here, we present a structural model of KL 4 bound to lipid bilayers based on solid state NMR data. Double-quantum correlation experiments employing (13)C-enriched peptides were used to quantitatively determine the backbone torsion angles in KL 4 at several positions. These measurements, coupled with CD experiments, verify the helical nature of KL 4 when bound to lipids, with (phi, psi) angles that differ substantially from common values for alpha-helices of (-60, -45). The average torsion angles found for KL 4 bound to POPC:POPG lipid vesicles are (-105, -30); this deviation from ideal alpha-helical structure allows KL 4 to form an amphipathic helix at the lipid interface. PMID:18636713

  12. Influence of plasma-treatments on the structure, superstructure, and function of membrane lipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Malte U.; Forbrig, Enrico; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Reuter, Stephan

    2012-10-01

    Every cell, eu- or prokaryotic, has a membrane as an interface to the environment. Every substance that is applied from outside the cell has to interact with it. This includes plasma-generated reactive species in the liquid cell environment created by plasma-treatment. By the Singer and Nicolson model, proteins are embedded in a lipid bilayer. Proteins are the functional elements, lipids are the structural elements. Due to the amphiphilic nature of the lipids, they form (super-) structures in an aqueous environment. The exact superstructure is determined by a structural parameter of the lipid, its shape. Here, we show experiments on lipids by fluorophore-based liposome assays and raman spectroscopy. The results show a membrane-activity of plasma-born reactive species against lipids and lipid structures. Based on this results and literature, we propose a model for a lesion-forming mechanism in membranes of some reactive species created by plasma-treatment. It is based on a hydrophobic-hydrophilic mismatch due to lipid peroxidization induced by reactive species generated in liquids by plasma-treatment.

  13. Association of Borage Oil and Betamethasone Dipropionate in Lipid-Core Nanocapsules: Characterization, Photostability and In Vitro Irritation Test.

    PubMed

    Weber, Julia; Funk, Nadine L; Motta, Mariana H; Guedes, Alessandra M; Visintainer, Ana Paula C; Tedesco, Solange B; Da Silva, Cristiane de B

    2016-02-01

    The association of vegetable products to nanostructured systems has attracted the attention of researchers due to several advantages, such as drug photoprotection, as well as the improvement of the pharmacological and therapeutic activities because of synergistic action, which can provide their topical application. In this work, lipid-core nanocapsules containing borage oil as oil core and betamethasone dipropionate were developed, and nanocapsules without the drug were prepared for comparison. The suspensions were characterized in relation to mean particle size, zeta potential, pH, drug content, and encapsulation efficiency. A photodegradation study was carried out and the in vitro release profile as well as the irritation potential of the drug after nanoencapsulation were also evaluated. In addition, the antiproliferative activity of the free borage oil as well as loaded in nanocapsules was studied. Lipid-core nanocapsules showed nanometric mean size (185-210 nm); polydispersity index below 0.10; negative zeta potential and pH slightly acid (6.0-6.2). Moreover, the drug content was close to theoretical concentration (0.50 +/- 0.03 mg/ml of betamethasone), and the encapsulation efficiency was approximately 100%. The study of the antiproliferative activity of borage oil showed ability to reduce cell growth of Allium cepa. The nanoencapsulation of betamethasone dipropionate provided greater protection against UVC light and decreased the irritation potential of the drug. The release profile of betamethasone dipropionate from nanocapsules followed monoexponential model. PMID:27433586

  14. Structure of phospholipid monolayers containing poly(ethylene glycol) lipids at the air-water interface

    SciTech Connect

    Majewski, J.; Smith, G.S.; Kuhl, T.L.; Israelachvili, J.N.; Gerstenberg, M.C.

    1997-04-17

    The density distribution of a lipid monolayer at the air-water interface mixed with varying amounts of lipid with poly(ethylene glycol)polymer headgroups (polymer-lipid or PEG-lipid) was measured using neutron reflectometry. The structure of the monolayer at the interface was greatly perturbed by the presence of the bulky polymer-lipid headgroups resulting in a large increase in the thickness of the headgroup region normal to the interface and a systematic roughening of the interface with increasing polymer-lipid content. These results show how bulky hydrophilic moieties cause significant deformations and out-of-place protrusions of phospholipid monolayers and presumably bilayers, vesicles and biological membranes. In terms of polymer physics, very short polymer chains tethered to the air-water interface follow scaling behavior with a mushroom to brush transition with increasing polymer grafting density. 34 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  15. A plural role for lipids in motor neuron diseases: energy, signaling and structure

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Florent; Hussain, Ghulam; Dupuis, Luc; Loeffler, Jean-Philippe; Henriques, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    Motor neuron diseases (MNDs) are characterized by selective death of motor neurons and include mainly adult-onset amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Neurodegeneration is not the single pathogenic event occurring during disease progression. There are multiple lines of evidence for the existence of defects in lipid metabolism at peripheral level. For instance, hypermetabolism is well characterized in ALS, and dyslipidemia correlates with better prognosis in patients. Lipid metabolism plays also a role in other MNDs. In SMA, misuse of lipids as energetic nutrients is described in patients and in related animal models. The composition of structural lipids in the central nervous system is modified, with repercussion on membrane fluidity and on cell signaling mediated by bioactive lipids. Here, we review the main epidemiologic and mechanistic findings that link alterations of lipid metabolism and motor neuron degeneration, and we discuss the rationale of targeting these modifications for therapeutic management of MNDs. PMID:24600344

  16. Stoichiometry of lipid interactions with transmembrane proteins--Deduced from the 3D structures.

    PubMed

    Páli, Tibor; Bashtovyy, Denys; Marsh, Derek

    2006-05-01

    The stoichiometry of the first shell of lipids interacting with a transmembrane protein is defined operationally by the population of spin-labeled lipid chains whose motion is restricted directly by the protein. Interaction stoichiometries have been determined experimentally for a wide range of alpha-helical integral membrane proteins by using spin-label ESR spectroscopy. Here, we determine the spatially defined number of first-shell lipids at the hydrophobic perimeter of integral membrane proteins whose 3D structure has been determined by X-ray crystallography and lipid-protein interactions characterized by spin-labeling. Molecular modeling is used to build a single shell of lipids surrounding transmembrane structures derived from the PDB. Constrained energy optimization of the protein-lipid assemblies is performed by molecular mechanics. For relatively small proteins (up to 7-12 transmembrane helices), the geometrical first shell corresponds to that defined experimentally by perturbation of the lipid-chain dynamics. For larger, multi-subunit alpha-helical proteins, the lipids perturbed directly by the protein may either exceed or be less in number than those that can be accommodated at the intramembranous perimeter. In these latter cases, the motionally restricted spin-labeled lipids can be augmented by intercalation, or can correspond to a specific subpopulation at the protein interface, respectively. For monomeric beta-barrel proteins, the geometrical lipid stoichiometry corresponds to that determined from lipid mobility for a 22-stranded barrel, but fewer lipids are motionally restricted than can be accommodated around an eight-stranded barrel. Deviations from the geometrical first shell, in the beta-barrel case, are for the smaller protein with a highly curved barrel. PMID:16641489

  17. Flaxseed oil and alpha-lipoic acid combination ameliorates hepatic oxidative stress and lipid accumulation in comparison to lard

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Intake of high-fat diet is associated with increased non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Hepatic lipid accumulation and oxidative stress are key pathophysiological mechanisms in NAFLD. Both flaxseed oil (FO) and α-lipoic acid (LA) exert potential benefit to NAFLD. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the combination of FO and LA on hepatic lipid accumulation and oxidative stress in rats induced by high-fat diet. Methods LA was dissolved in flaxseed oil to a final concentration of 8 g/kg (FO + LA). The rodent diet contained 20% fat. One-fifth of the fat was soybean oil and the others were lard (control group), or 75% lard and 25% FO + LA (L-FO + LA group), or 50% lard and 50% FO + LA (M-FO + LA group), or FO + LA (H-FO + LA group). Male Sprague–Dawley rats were fed for 10 weeks and then killed for liver collection. Results Intake of high-fat lard caused a significant hepatic steatosis. Replacement with FO + LA was effective in reducing steatosis as well as total triglyceride and total cholesterol contents in liver. The combination of FO and LA also significantly elevated hepatic antioxidant defense capacities, as evaluated by the remarkable increase in the activities of SOD, CAT and GPx as well as the level of GSH, and the significant decline in lipid peroxidation. Conclusion The combination of FO and LA may contribute to prevent fatty livers such as NAFLD by ameliorating hepatic lipid accumulation and oxidative stress. PMID:23634883

  18. Structural analysis of the lipid A isolated from Hafnia alvei 32 and PCM 1192 lipopolysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Lukasiewicz, Jolanta; Jachymek, Wojciech; Niedziela, Tomasz; Kenne, Lennart; Lugowski, Czeslaw

    2010-03-01

    Hafnia alvei, a Gram-negative bacterium, is an opportunistic pathogen associated with mixed hospital infections, bacteremia, septicemia, and respiratory diseases. The majority of clinical symptoms of diseases caused by this bacterium have a lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin)-related origin. The lipid A structure affects the biological activity of endotoxins predominantly. Thus, the structure of H. alvei lipid A was analyzed for the first time. The major form, asymmetrically hexa-acylated lipid A built of beta-D-GlcpN4P-(1-->6)-alpha-D-GlcpN1P substituted with (R)-14:0(3-OH) at N-2 and O-3, 14:0(3-(R)-O-12:0) at N-2', and 14:0(3-(R)-O-14:0) at O-3', was identified by ESI-MS(n) and MALDI-time-of-flight (TOF) MS. Comparative analysis performed by MS suggested that LPSs of H. alvei 32, PCM 1192, PCM 1206, and PCM 1207 share the identified structure of lipid A. LPSs of H. alvei are yet another example of enterobacterial endotoxins having the Escherichia coli-type structure of lipid A. The presence of hepta-acylated forms of H. alvei lipid A resulted from the addition of palmitate (16:0) substituting 14:0(3-OH) at N-2 of the alpha-GlcpN residue. All the studied strains of H. alvei have an ability to modify their lipid A structure by palmitoylation. PMID:19706748

  19. Changes in tissue lipid and fatty acid composition of farmed rainbow trout in response to dietary camelina oil as a replacement of fish oil.

    PubMed

    Hixson, Stefanie M; Parrish, Christopher C; Anderson, Derek M

    2014-01-01

    Camelina oil (CO) replaced 50 and 100 % of fish oil (FO) in diets for farmed rainbow trout (initial weight 44 ± 3 g fish(-1)). The oilseed is particularly unique due to its high lipid content (40 %) and high amount of 18:3n-3 (α-linolenic acid, ALA) (30 %). Replacing 100 % of fish oil with camelina oil did not negatively affect growth of rainbow trout after a 12-week feeding trial (FO = 168 ± 32 g fish(-1); CO = 184 ± 35 g fish(-1)). Lipid and fatty acid profiles of muscle, viscera and skin were significantly affected by the addition of CO after 12 weeks of feeding. However, final 22:6n-3 [docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)] and 20:5n-3 [eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)] amounts (563 mg) in a 75 g fillet (1 serving) were enough to satisfy daily DHA and EPA requirements (250 mg) set by the World Health Organization. Other health benefits include lower SFA and higher MUFA in filets fed CO versus FO. Compound-specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA) confirmed that the δ(13)C isotopic signature of DHA in CO fed trout shifted significantly compared to DHA in FO fed trout. The shift in DHA δ(13)C indicates mixing of a terrestrial isotopic signature compared to the isotopic signature of DHA in fish oil-fed tissue. These results suggest that ~27 % of DHA was synthesized from the terrestrial and isotopically lighter ALA in the CO diet rather than incorporation of DHA from fish meal in the CO diet. This was the first study to use CSIA in a feeding experiment to demonstrate synthesis of DHA in fish. PMID:24264359

  20. Effects of microalgal polyunsaturated fatty acid oil on body weight and lipid accumulation in the liver of C57BL/6 mice fed a high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Go, Ryeo-Eun; Hwang, Kyung-A; Park, Geon-Tae; Lee, Hae-Miru; Lee, Geum-A; Kim, Cho-Won; Jeon, So-Ye; Seo, Jeong-Woo; Hong, Won-Kyung; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2016-05-01

    Dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), which are abundant in marine fish oils, have recently received global attention for their prominent anti-obesogenic effects. Among PUFAs, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n-3), which are n-3 long-chain PUFAs widely referred to as omega-3 oils, were reported to prevent the development of obesity in rodents and humans. In the present study, we evaluated the anti-obesity effects of microalgal oil on high-fat induced obese C57BL/6 mice, compared with commercial omega-3 fish oil and vegetable corn oil. Microalgal oil is an inherent mixture of several PUFAs, including EPA, DHA and other fatty acids produced from a marine microalgal strain of Thraustochytriidae sp. derived mutant. It was found to contain more PUFAs (>80%) and more omega-3 oils than commercial omega-3 fish oil (PUFAs >31%) and corn oil (PUFAs 59%). All three types of oils induced weight loss in high-fat-induced obese mice, with the loss induced by microalgal oil being most significant at 9 weeks (10% reduction). However, the oils tested did not improve blood lipid levels, although microalgal oil showed an apparent inhibitory effect on lipid accumulation in the liver. These findings may be attributed to the higher PUFA content, including omega-3 oils of microalgal oil than other oils. Collectively, these findings suggest that microalgal oil, derived from Thraustochytriidae sp. derived mutant, is a prominent candidate for replacement of omega-3 fish oils based on its apparent anti-obesity effect in vivo. PMID:27533934

  1. Effects of microalgal polyunsaturated fatty acid oil on body weight and lipid accumulation in the liver of C57BL/6 mice fed a high fat diet

    PubMed Central

    Go, Ryeo-Eun; Hwang, Kyung-A; Park, Geon-Tae; Lee, Hae-Miru; Lee, Geum-A; Kim, Cho-Won; Jeon, So-Ye; Seo, Jeong-Woo; Hong, Won-Kyung; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), which are abundant in marine fish oils, have recently received global attention for their prominent anti-obesogenic effects. Among PUFAs, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n-3), which are n-3 long-chain PUFAs widely referred to as omega-3 oils, were reported to prevent the development of obesity in rodents and humans. In the present study, we evaluated the anti-obesity effects of microalgal oil on high-fat induced obese C57BL/6 mice, compared with commercial omega-3 fish oil and vegetable corn oil. Microalgal oil is an inherent mixture of several PUFAs, including EPA, DHA and other fatty acids produced from a marine microalgal strain of Thraustochytriidae sp. derived mutant. It was found to contain more PUFAs (>80%) and more omega-3 oils than commercial omega-3 fish oil (PUFAs >31%) and corn oil (PUFAs 59%). All three types of oils induced weight loss in high-fat-induced obese mice, with the loss induced by microalgal oil being most significant at 9 weeks (10% reduction). However, the oils tested did not improve blood lipid levels, although microalgal oil showed an apparent inhibitory effect on lipid accumulation in the liver. These findings may be attributed to the higher PUFA content, including omega-3 oils of microalgal oil than other oils. Collectively, these findings suggest that microalgal oil, derived from Thraustochytriidae sp. derived mutant, is a prominent candidate for replacement of omega-3 fish oils based on its apparent anti-obesity effect in vivo. PMID:27533934

  2. Linking lipid architecture to bilayer structure and mechanics using self-consistent field modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pera, H.; Kleijn, J. M.; Leermakers, F. A. M.

    2014-02-01

    To understand how lipid architecture determines the lipid bilayer structure and its mechanics, we implement a molecularly detailed model that uses the self-consistent field theory. This numerical model accurately predicts parameters such as Helfrichs mean and Gaussian bending modulus kc and bar{k} and the preferred monolayer curvature J_0^m, and also delivers structural membrane properties like the core thickness, and head group position and orientation. We studied how these mechanical parameters vary with system variations, such as lipid tail length, membrane composition, and those parameters that control the lipid tail and head group solvent quality. For the membrane composition, negatively charged phosphatidylglycerol (PG) or zwitterionic, phosphatidylcholine (PC), and -ethanolamine (PE) lipids were used. In line with experimental findings, we find that the values of kc and the area compression modulus kA are always positive. They respond similarly to parameters that affect the core thickness, but differently to parameters that affect the head group properties. We found that the trends for bar{k} and J_0^m can be rationalised by the concept of Israelachivili's surfactant packing parameter, and that both bar{k} and J_0^m change sign with relevant parameter changes. Although typically bar{k}<0, membranes can form stable cubic phases when the Gaussian bending modulus becomes positive, which occurs with membranes composed of PC lipids with long tails. Similarly, negative monolayer curvatures appear when a small head group such as PE is combined with long lipid tails, which hints towards the stability of inverse hexagonal phases at the cost of the bilayer topology. To prevent the destabilisation of bilayers, PG lipids can be mixed into these PC or PE lipid membranes. Progressive loading of bilayers with PG lipids lead to highly charged membranes, resulting in J_0^m ≫ 0, especially at low ionic strengths. We anticipate that these changes lead to unstable membranes

  3. Composition and structure of asphalthene components of oils from the Krapivinskoye oil field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergun, Valery P.; Cheshkova, Tatiana V.; Sagachenko, Tatiana A.; Min, Raissa S.

    2015-10-01

    Asphaltene substances of oil are characterized via the methods of extraction, adsorption chromatography, chemical degradation, and chromatography-mass spectrometry. The data on the structure of the high- and low molecular weight asphaltenes of methane-naphthene oils and composition of the compounds adsorbed/occluded by their molecules are presented. These investigations are important for the development of efficient petroleum technologies.

  4. Lipid Analysis and Lipidomics by Structurally Selective Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Kliman, Michal; May, Jody C.

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in mass spectrometry approaches to the analysis of lipids include the ability to incorporate both lipid class identification with lipid structural information for increased characterization capabilities. The detailed examination of lipids and their biosynthetic and biochemical pathways made possible by novel instrumental and bioinformatics approaches is advancing research in fundamental cellular and medical studies. Recently, high-throughput structural analysis has been demonstrated through the use of rapid gas-phase separation on the basis of the ion mobility (IM) analytical technique combined with mass spectrometry (IM-MS). While IM-MS has been extensively utilized in biochemical research for peptide, protein and small molecule analysis, the role of IM-MS in lipid research is still an active area of development. In this review of lipid-based IM-MS research, we begin with an overview of three contemporary IM techniques which show great promise in being applied towards the analysis of lipids. Fundamental concepts regarding the integration of IM-MS are reviewed with emphasis on the applications of IM-MS towards simplifying and enhancing complex biological sample analysis. Finally, several recent IM-MS lipid studies are highlighted and the future prospects of IM-MS for integrated omics studies and enhanced spatial profiling through imaging IM-MS are briefly described. PMID:21708282

  5. Localized surface plasmon microscopy of submicron domain structures of mixed lipid bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Koyo; Miyazaki, Ryosuke; Terakado, Goro; Okazaki, Takashi; Morigaki, Kenichi; Kano, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    We propose scanning localized surface plasmon microscopy of mixed lipid bilayers with submicron domain structures. Our observation technique, which employs localized surface plasmons excited on a flat metal surface as a sensing probe, provides non-label and non-contact imaging with the spatial resolution of ∼ 170 nm. We experimentally show that submicron domain structures of mixed lipid bilayers can be observed. A detailed analysis finds that the domains are classified into two groups. PMID:23024897

  6. Supercritical fluid precipitation of ketoprofen in novel structured lipid carriers for enhanced mucosal delivery--a comparison with solid lipid particles.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, V S S; Matias, A A; Rodríguez-Rojo, S; Nogueira, I D; Duarte, C M M

    2015-11-10

    Structured lipid carriers based on mixture of solid lipids with liquid lipids are the second generation of solid lipid particles, offering the advantage of improved drug loading capacity and higher storage stability. In this study, structured lipid carriers were successfully prepared for the first time by precipitation from gas saturated solutions. Glyceryl monooleate (GMO), a liquid glycerolipid, was selected in this work to be incorporated into three solid glycerolipids with hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB) ranging from 1 to 13, namely Gelucire 43/01™, Geleol™ and Gelucire 50/13™. In general, microparticles with a irregular porous morphology and a wide particle size distribution were obtained. The HLB of the individual glycerolipids might be a relevant parameter to take into account during the processing of solid:liquid lipid blends. As expected, the addition of a liquid lipid into a solid lipid matrix led to increased stability of the lipid carriers, with no significant modifications in their melting enthalpy after 6 months of storage. Additionally, Gelucire 43/01™:GMO particles were produced with different mass ratios and loaded with ketoprofen. The drug loading capacity of the structured lipid carriers increased as the GMO content in the particles increased, achieving a maximum encapsulation efficiency of 97% for the 3:1 mass ratio. Moreover, structured lipid carriers presented an immediate release of ketoprofen from its matrix with higher permeation through a mucous-membrane model, while solid lipid particles present a controlled release of the drug with less permeation capacity. PMID:26277371

  7. Automated Lipid A Structure Assignment from Hierarchical Tandem Mass Spectrometry Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Ying S.; Shaffer, Scott A.; Jones, Jace W.; Ng, Wailap V.; Ernst, Robert K.; Goodlett, David R.

    2011-05-01

    Infusion-based electrospray ionization (ESI) coupled to multiple-stage tandem mass spectrometry (MS n ) is a standard methodology for investigating lipid A structural diversity (Shaffer et al. J. Am. Soc. Mass. Spectrom. 18(6), 1080-1092, 2007). Annotation of these MS n spectra, however, has remained a manual, expert-driven process. In order to keep up with the data acquisition rates of modern instruments, we devised a computational method to annotate lipid A MS n spectra rapidly and automatically, which we refer to as hierarchical tandem mass spectrometry (HiTMS) algorithm. As a first-pass tool, HiTMS aids expert interpretation of lipid A MS n data by providing the analyst with a set of candidate structures that may then be confirmed or rejected. HiTMS deciphers the signature ions (e.g., A-, Y-, and Z-type ions) and neutral losses of MS n spectra using a species-specific library based on general prior structural knowledge of the given lipid A species under investigation. Candidates are selected by calculating the correlation between theoretical and acquired MS n spectra. At a false discovery rate of less than 0.01, HiTMS correctly assigned 85% of the structures in a library of 133 manually annotated Francisella tularensis subspecies novicida lipid A structures. Additionally, HiTMS correctly assigned 85% of the structures in a smaller library of lipid A species from Yersinia pestis demonstrating that it may be used across species.

  8. Biophysical investigations of the structure and function of the tear fluid lipid layers and the effect of ectoine. Part B: artificial lipid films.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Mridula; Brinkkötter, Marc; Harishchandra, Rakesh Kumar; Galla, Hans-Joachim

    2014-10-01

    The tear fluid lipid layer is present at the outermost part of the tear film which lines the ocular surface and functions to maintain the corneal surface moist by retarding evaporation. Instability in the structure of the tear fluid lipid layer can cause an increased rate of evaporation and thus dry eye syndrome. Ectoine has been previously shown to fluidize lipid monolayers and alter the phase behavior. In the current study we have investigated the effect of ectoine on the artificial tear fluid lipid layer composed of binary and ternary lipid mixtures of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), cholesteryl esters and tri-acyl-glycerols. The focus of our study was mainly the structural and the biophysical aspects of the artificial tear fluid lipid layer using surface activity studies and topology analysis. The presence of ectoine consistently causes an expansion of the pressure-area isotherm indicating increased intermolecular spacing. The topology studies showed the formation of droplet-like structures due to the addition of ectoine only when tri-acyl-glycerol is present in the mixture of DPPC and chol-palmitate, similar to the natural meibomian lipids. Consequently, the hypothesis of an exclusion of tri/di-acyl-glycerol from the meibomian lipid film in the presence of ectoine in the subphase is confirmed. A model describing the effect of ectoine on meibomian lipid films is further presented which may have an application for the use of ectoines in eye drops as a treatment for the dry eye syndrome. PMID:24853656

  9. Dried flour-oil composites for lipid delivery in low-fat cake mix

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Excess steam jet-cooked wheat flour and canola oil composites containing 30 to 55% oil were drum dried. The composites were used to replace the flour and oil in the low-fat cake mix formulations. The cake batter specific gravity and viscosity were measured. The cakes were analyzed for crumb grain...

  10. Reduction of lipid oxidation by formation of caseinate-oil-oat gum emulsions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The concentration of oat gum, though important for formation of stable emulsion, has no effect on oxidation of Omega 3 oil; this is most prominent in fish-oil based Omega 3 oil. The optimal concentration of oat gum is about 0.2% wt for emulsion stability and visual appearance. We found that concentr...

  11. High-throughput analysis of lipid hydroperoxides in edible oils and fats using the fluorescent reagent diphenyl-1-pyrenylphosphine.

    PubMed

    Santas, Jonathan; Guzmán, Yeimmy J; Guardiola, Francesc; Rafecas, Magdalena; Bou, Ricard

    2014-11-01

    A fluorometric method for the determination of hydroperoxides (HP) in edible oils and fats using the reagent diphenyl-1-pyrenylphosphine (DPPP) was developed and validated. Two solvent media containing 100% butanol or a mixture of chloroform/methanol (2:1, v/v) can be used to solubilise lipid samples. Regardless of the solvent used to solubilise the sample, the DPPP method was precise, accurate, sensitive and easy to perform. The HP content of 43 oil and fat samples was determined and the results were compared with those obtained by means of the AOCS Official Method for the determination of peroxide value (PV) and the ferrous oxidation-xylenol orange (FOX) method. The proposed method not only correlates well with the PV and FOX methods, but also presents some advantages such as requiring low sample and solvent amounts and being suitable for high-throughput sample analysis. PMID:24874381

  12. Heat flow anomalies in oil- and gas-bearing structures

    SciTech Connect

    Sergiyenko, S.I.

    1988-02-01

    The main features of the distribution of heat flow values in oil, gas and gas-condensate fields on the continents have been discussed by Makarenko and Sergiyenko. The method of analysis used made it possible to establish that the presence of hydrocarbons in formations leads to high heat-flow, regardless of the age of folding of the potentially oil- and gas-bearing zones. Only in regions adjacent to marginal Cenozoic folded mountain structures and in zones of Cenozoic volcanism is the world average higher, by 2.5 to 10%, than in the oil- and gas-bearing structures in those regions. The earlier analysis of the distribution of heat flow values in oil and gas structures was based on 403 measurements. The author now has nearly doubled the sample population, enabling him substantially to revise the ideas on the distribution of heat flow values and the development of the thermal regime of local oil and gas structures. He notes that the method previously used, comparing heat flow values on young continental platforms with values in local oil and gas structures, makes it possible to estimate the thermal effect of the presence of oil and gas. This conclusion stems from the fact that the overwhelming majority of heat flow measurements were made on various kinds of positive structural forms, and distortions of the thermal field caused by thermal anisotropy phenomena are equally characteristic of both productive and nonproductive structures. As a result, for the first time a continuous time series of heat flow measurements over oil and gas structures in various tectonic regions, with ages of consolidation ranging from the Precambrian to the Cenozoic, was established. 26 references.

  13. Carbohydrate Conformation and Lipid Condensation in Monolayers Containing Glycosphingolipid Gb3: Influence of Acyl Chain Structure

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Erik B.; Gao, Haifei; Dennison, Andrew J.C.; Chopin, Nathalie; Struth, Bernd; Arnold, Thomas; Florent, Jean-Claude; Johannes, Ludger

    2014-01-01

    Globotriaosylceramide (Gb3), a glycosphingolipid found in the plasma membrane of animal cells, is the endocytic receptor of the bacterial Shiga toxin. Using x-ray reflectivity (XR) and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction (GIXD), lipid monolayers containing Gb3 were investigated at the air-water interface. XR probed Gb3 carbohydrate conformation normal to the interface, whereas GIXD precisely characterized Gb3’s influence on acyl chain in-plane packing and area per molecule (APM). Two phospholipids, 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC) and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DPPE), were used to study Gb3 packing in different lipid environments. Furthermore, the impact on monolayer structure of a naturally extracted Gb3 mixture was compared to synthetic Gb3 species with uniquely defined acyl chain structures. XR results showed that lipid environment and Gb3 acyl chain structure impact carbohydrate conformation with greater solvent accessibility observed for smaller phospholipid headgroups and long Gb3 acyl chains. In general, GIXD showed that Gb3 condensed phospholipid packing resulting in smaller APM than predicted by ideal mixing. Gb3’s capacity to condense APM was larger for DSPC monolayers and exhibited different dependencies on acyl chain structure depending on the lipid environment. The interplay between Gb3-induced changes in lipid packing and the lipid environment’s impact on carbohydrate conformation has broad implications for glycosphingolipid macromolecule recognition and ligand binding. PMID:25185550

  14. Xenon and Other Volatile Anesthetics Change Domain Structure in Model Lipid Raft Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Weinrich, Michael; Worcester, David L.

    2014-01-01

    Inhalation anesthetics have been in clinical use for over 160 years, but the molecular mechanisms of action continue to be investigated. Direct interactions with ion channels received much attention after it was found that anesthetics do not change the structure of homogeneous model membranes. However, it was recently found that halothane, a prototypical anesthetic, changes domain structure of a binary lipid membrane. The noble gas xenon is an excellent anesthetic and provides a pivotal test of the generality of this finding, extended to ternary lipid raft mixtures. We report that xenon and conventional anesthetics change the domain equilibrium in two canonical ternary lipid raft mixtures. These findings demonstrate a membrane-mediated mechanism whereby inhalation anesthetics can affect the lipid environment of trans-membrane proteins. PMID:24299622

  15. Structural studies of the lipid membranes at the Siberia-2 synchrotron radiation source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselev, M. A.; Ermakova, E. V.; Ryabova, N. Yu.; Nayda, O. V.; Zabelin, A. V.; Pogorely, D. K.; Korneev, V. N.; Balagurov, A. M.

    2010-05-01

    Lipid membranes are a subject of contemporary interdisciplinary studies at the junction of biology, biophysics, pharmacology, and bionanotechnology. The results of the structural studies of several types of lipid membranes by the lamellar and lateral diffraction of X-ray synchrotron radiation are presented. The experiments were performed at the Mediana and DICSI stations of the Siberia-2 synchrotron radiation source at the Russian Research Center Kurchatov Institute. The data obtained are compared with the results of studying lipid membranes at the small-angle scattering beamlines D22 and D24 at LURE (France) and at the A2 beamline at DESY (Germany). The parameters of the DICSI station are shown to meet the basic requirements for the structural study of lipid systems, which are of fundamental and applied interest.

  16. Synergistic interactions between doxycycline and terpenic components of essential oils encapsulated within lipid nanocapsules against gram negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Valcourt, C; Saulnier, P; Umerska, A; Zanelli, M P; Montagu, A; Rossines, E; Joly-Guillou, M L

    2016-02-10

    The combination of essential oils (EOs) with antibiotics provides a promising strategy towards combating resistant bacteria. We have selected a mixture of 3 major components extracted from EOs: carvacrol (oregano oil), eugenol (clove oil) and cinnamaldehyde (cinnamon oil). These compounds were successfully encapsulated within lipid nanocapsules (LNCs). The EOs-loaded LNCs were characterised by a noticeably high drug loading of 20% and a very small particle diameter of 114nm. The in vitro interactions between EOs-loaded LNCs and doxycycline were examined via checkerboard titration and time-kill assay against 5 Gram-negative strains: Acinetobacter baumannii SAN, A. baumannii RCH, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. No growth inhibition interactions were found between EOs-loaded LNCs and doxycycline (FIC index between 0.7 and 1.30). However, when bactericidal effects were considered, a synergistic interaction was observed (FBC index equal to 0.5) against all tested strains. A synergistic effect was also observed in time-kill assay (a difference of at least 3 log between the combination and the most active agent alone). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to visualise the changes in the bacterial membrane. The holes in bacterial envelope and leakage of cellular contents were observed in SE micrographs after exposure to the EOs-LNCs and the doxycycline combination. PMID:26631640

  17. The influence of dietary palm olein, fish oil and lard on the egg yolk and plasma lipid composition, and performances of laying hens.

    PubMed

    Hodzic, A; Hamamdzic, M; Gagic, A; Mihaljevic, M; Vegara, M; Krnic, J; Pasic Juhas, E

    2008-01-01

    The influence of dietary palm olein, in comparison to fish oil and lard, on lipid levels in egg yolk and blood plasma, the fatty acid composition of egg yolk, and various production parameters were studied. Brown Lohman laying hens (n=45) were randomly assigned into three groups of 15 birds, and treated with experimental diets with either 3% palm olein (PO), fish oil (FO) or lard (L) for 6 weeks. At the end of the experiment, feed consumption was significantly lower for hens fed the PO diet, except week 6 of the experiment. The concentration of plasma triglycerides was increased by all experimental diets, whereas there were no significant increases of plasma total lipid and total cholesterol concentrations only in the PO group. For yolk lipids a decrease in triglycerides in the FO and L groups was observed, while total cholesterol and total lipid were significantly decreased in the PO group. Feeding with the PO diet resulted in the lowest concentrations of palmitic, stearic and linoleic acid, as well as in the highest concentration of monounsaturated oleic acid in the yolk total lipid. It was concluded that the composition of yolk lipids did not closely match the concentrations of lipids observed in experimental diets or plasma. Based on the current work it seems that the PO diet modulates egg yolk lipid content best. PMID:18540201

  18. Low fish oil intake improves insulin sensitivity, lipid profile and muscle metabolism on insulin resistant MSG-obese rats

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Obesity is commonly associated with diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and cancer. The purpose of this study was to determinate the effect of a lower dose of fish oil supplementation on insulin sensitivity, lipid profile, and muscle metabolism in obese rats. Methods Monosodium glutamate (MSG) (4 mg/g body weight) was injected in neonatal Wistar male rats. Three-month-old rats were divided in normal-weight control group (C), coconut fat-treated normal weight group (CO), fish oil-treated normal weight group (FO), obese control group (Ob), coconut fat-treated obese group (ObCO) and fish oil-treated obese group (ObFO). Obese insulin-resistant rats were supplemented with fish oil or coconut fat (1 g/kg/day) for 4 weeks. Insulin sensitivity, fasting blood biochemicals parameters, and skeletal muscle glucose metabolism were analyzed. Results Obese animals (Ob) presented higher Index Lee and 2.5 fold epididymal and retroperitoneal adipose tissue than C. Insulin sensitivity test (Kitt) showed that fish oil supplementation was able to maintain insulin sensitivity of obese rats (ObFO) similar to C. There were no changes in glucose and HDL-cholesterol levels amongst groups. Yet, ObFO revealed lower levels of total cholesterol (TC; 30%) and triacylglycerol (TG; 33%) compared to Ob. Finally, since exposed to insulin, ObFO skeletal muscle revealed an increase of 10% in lactate production, 38% in glycogen synthesis and 39% in oxidation of glucose compared to Ob. Conclusions Low dose of fish oil supplementation (1 g/kg/day) was able to reduce TC and TG levels, in addition to improved systemic and muscle insulin sensitivity. These results lend credence to the benefits of n-3 fatty acids upon the deleterious effects of insulin resistance mechanisms. PMID:21526994

  19. Structure and orientation study of Ebola fusion peptide inserted in lipid membrane models.

    PubMed

    Agopian, Audrey; Castano, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    The fusion peptide of Ebola virus comprises a highly hydrophobic sequence located downstream from the N-terminus of the glycoprotein GP2 responsible for virus-host membrane fusion. The internal fusion peptide of GP2 inserts into membranes of infected cell to mediate the viral and the host cell membrane fusion. Since the sequence length of Ebola fusion peptide is still not clear, we study in the present work the behavior of two fusion peptides of different lengths which were named EBO17 and EBO24 referring to their amino acid length. The secondary structure and orientation of both peptides in lipid model systems made of DMPC:DMPG:cholesterol:DMPE (6:2:5:3) were investigated using PMIRRAS and polarized ATR spectroscopy coupled with Brewster angle microscopy. The infrared results showed a structural flexibility of both fusion peptides which are able to transit reversibly from an α-helix to antiparallel β-sheets. Ellipsometry results corroborate together with isotherm measurements that EBO peptides interacting with lipid monolayer highly affected the lipid organization. When interacting with a single lipid bilayer, at low peptide content, EBO peptides insert as mostly α-helices mainly perpendicular into the lipid membrane thus tend to organize the lipid acyl chains. Inserted in multilamellar vesicles at higher peptide content, EBO peptides are mostly in β-sheet structures and induce a disorganization of the lipid chain order. In this paper, we show that the secondary structure of the Ebola fusion peptide is reversibly flexible between α-helical and β-sheet conformations, this feature being dependent on its concentration in lipids, eventually inducing membrane fusion. PMID:24055820

  20. Elaiophores in Gomesa bifolia (Sims) M.W. Chase & N.H. Williams (Oncidiinae: Cymbidieae: Orchidaceae): structure and oil secretion

    PubMed Central

    Aliscioni, Sandra S.; Torretta, Juan P.; Bello, Mariano E.; Galati, Beatriz G.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Oils are an unusual floral reward in Orchidaceae, being produced by specialized glands called elaiophores. Such glands have been described in subtribe Oncidiinae for a few species. The aims of the present study were to identify the presence of elaiophores in Gomesa bifolia, to study their structure and to understand how the oil is secreted. Additionally, elaiophores of G. bifolia were compared with those of related taxa within the Oncidiinae. Methods Elaiophores were identified using Sudan III. Their structure was examined by using light, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopy. Key Results Secretion of oils was from the tips of callus protrusions. The secretory cells each had a large, centrally located nucleus, highly dense cytoplasm, abundant plastids containing lipid globules associated with starch grains, numerous mitochondria, an extensive system of rough and smooth endoplasmatic reticulum, and electron-dense dictyosomes. The outer tangential walls were thick, with a loose cellulose matrix and a few, sparsely distributed inconspicuous cavities. Electron-dense structures were observed in the cell wall and formed a lipid layer that covered the cuticle of the epidermal cells. The cuticle as viewed under the scanning electron microscope was irregularly rugose. Conclusions The elaiophores of G. bifolia are of the epithelial type. The general structure of the secretory cells resembles that described for other species of Oncidiinae, but some unique features were encountered for this species. The oil appears to pass through the outer tangential wall and the cuticle, covering the latter without forming cuticular blisters. PMID:19692391

  1. A variety of novel lipid A structures obtained from Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain.

    PubMed

    Beasley, Ashley S; Cotter, Robert J; Vogel, Stefanie N; Inzana, Thomas J; Qureshi, Asaf A; Qureshi, Nilofer

    2012-04-01

    F. tularensis is a Gram-negative coccobacillus that causes tularemia. Its LPS has nominal biological activity. Currently, there is controversy regarding the structure of the lipid A obtained from F. tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS). Therefore, to resolve this controversy, the purification and structural identification of this LPS was crucial. To achieve this, LPS from F. tularensis LVS was acid hydrolyzed to obtain crude lipid A that was methylated and purified by HPLC and the fractions were analyzed by MALDI-TOF MS. The structure of the major lipid A species was composed of a glucosamine disaccharide backbone substituted with four fatty acyl groups and a phosphate (1-position) with a molecular mass of 1505. The major lipid A component contained 18:0[3-O(16:0)] in the distal subunit and two 18:0(3-OH) fatty acyl chains at the 2- or 3-positions of the reducing subunit. Additional variations in the lipid A species include: heterogeneity in fatty acyl groups, a phosphate or a phosphoryl galactosamine at the 1-position, and a hexose at the 4' or 6' position, some of which have not been previously described for F. tularensis LVS. This analysis revealed that lipid A from F. tularensis LVS is far more complex than originally believed. PMID:21709054

  2. Structure determination of a quartet of novel tetraether lipids from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum.

    PubMed

    Nishihara, M; Morii, H; Koga, Y

    1987-04-01

    The structures of three of the major polar lipids (PNL1a, GL1a, and PNGL1) of Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum were elucidated. These lipids are derivatives of dibiphytanyl diglycerol tetraether (C40 tetraether; the proposed name is caldarchaeol). PNL1a is a C40 tetraether analog of phosphatidylethanolamine (proposed name: caldarchaetidylethanolamine). GL1a was identified as beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-6)-beta-D-glucopyranosyl C40 tetraether (diglucosyl caldarchaeol). PNGL1 has the polar head groups of both PNL1a and GL1a; one of the free hydroxyls of this tetraether is esterified with phosphoethanolamine while the other is linked to a glucosylglucose residue with the same structure as that of GL1a (proposed name: diglucosyl caldarchaetidylethanolamine). That is, PNL1a (aminophospholipid), GL1a (glycolipid), and PNGL1 (aminophosphoglycolipid) form structurally a quartet of lipids with the bare caldarchaeol. We propose a new systematic nomenclature of archaebacterial polar lipids in the "DISCUSSION," because the alternative names are too lengthy and laboratory designations of these lipids are not at all systematic. This nomenclature starts with giving the names archaeol and caldarchaeol to dialkyl diether of glycerol or other polyol and tetraether of glycerol or other polyol and alkyl alcohols, respectively, because these lipids are specific to archaebacteria. Phospholipids with a phosphodiester bond were named as derivatives of archaetidic acid or caldarchaetidic acid (phosphomonoesters of archaeol and caldarchaeol) by analogy with phosphatidic acid. PMID:3611039

  3. Effects of Essential Oils and Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids on Canine Skin Equivalents: Skin Lipid Assessment and Morphological Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Cerrato, S.; Ramió-Lluch, L.; Fondevila, D.; Rodes, D.; Brazis, P.; Puigdemont, A.

    2013-01-01

    A canine skin equivalent model has been validated for the assessment of a topical formulation effects. Skin equivalents were developed from freshly isolated cutaneous canine fibroblasts and keratinocytes, after enzymatic digestion of skin samples (n = 8) from different breeds. Fibroblasts were embedded into a collagen type I matrix, and keratinocytes were seeded onto its surface at air-liquid interface. Skin equivalents were supplemented with essential oils and polyunsaturated fatty acid formulation or with vehicle. Skin equivalents were histopathologically and ultrastructurally studied, and the three main lipid groups (free fatty acids, cholesterol, and ceramides) were analyzed. Results showed that the culture method developed resulted in significant improvements in cell retrieval and confluence. Treated samples presented a thicker epidermis with increased number of viable cell layers, a denser and compact stratum corneum, and a more continuous basal membrane. Regarding lipid profile, treated skin equivalents showed a significant increase in ceramide content (51.7 ± 1.3) when compared to untreated (41.6  ±  1.4) samples. Ultrastructural study evidenced a compact and well-organized stratum corneum in both treated and control skin equivalents. In conclusion, cell viability and ceramides increase, after lipid supplementation, are especially relevant for the treatment of skin barrier disruptions occurring in canine atopic dermatitis. PMID:26464904

  4. Phase Behavioral and Structural Properties of an Efficient Solvent-Free Model of Lipid Bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revalee, Joel; Laradji, Mohamed

    2007-03-01

    High-power computers facilitate the study of lipid bilayer membranes. Any computer model used to simulate such membranes must account for their spontaneous self- assembly due to hydrophobic interactions between lipid tails and water. This is usually done by simulating lipid molecules in explicit solvent. In such simulations most of the system is occupied by the solvent. It is therefore computationally desirable for equilibrium studies of lipid membranes to develop a model that leads to self-assembly of lipids without explicit solvent. We designed such a model, and show that its use leads to faster simulations than what can be achieved with current solvent-free models. This model utilizes soft interactions to account for hydrophobic effects (instead of the Lennard-Jones potential). Investigation of the lipids' diffusion coefficient, single-lipid orientational order parameter and internal energy as functions of temperature reveal a structural phase diagram in the membrane from a gel-like hexatic phase to a fluid phase. The characterization of membrane elastic properties from this model will also be presented.

  5. Influence of membrane phospholipid composition and structural organization on spontaneous lipid transfer between membranes.

    PubMed

    Pankov, R; Markovska, T; Antonov, P; Ivanova, L; Momchilova, A

    2006-09-01

    Investigations were carried out on the influence of phospholipid composition of model membranes on the processes of spontaneous lipid transfer between membranes. Acceptor vesicles were prepared from phospholipids extracted from plasma membranes of control and ras-transformed fibroblasts. Acceptor model membranes with manipulated levels of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), sphingomyelin and phosphatidic acid were also used in the studies. Donor vesicles were prepared of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and contained two fluorescent lipid analogues, NBD-PC and N-Rh-PE, at a self-quenching concentration. Lipid transfer rate was assessed by measuring the increase of fluorescence in acceptor membranes due to transfer of fluorescent lipid analogues from quenched donor to unquenched acceptor vesicles. The results showed that spontaneous NBD-PC transfer increased upon fluidization of acceptor vesicles. In addition, elevation of PE concentration in model membranes was also accompanied by an increase of lipid transfer to all series of acceptor vesicles. The results are discussed with respect to the role of lipid composition and structural order of cellular plasma membranes in the processes of spontaneous lipid exchange between membrane bilayers. PMID:17197729

  6. The structure of ions and zwitterionic lipids regulates the charge of dipolar membranes.

    PubMed

    Szekely, Or; Steiner, Ariel; Szekely, Pablo; Amit, Einav; Asor, Roi; Tamburu, Carmen; Raviv, Uri

    2011-06-21

    In pure water, zwitterionic lipids form lamellar phases with an equilibrium water gap on the order of 2 to 3 nm as a result of the dominating van der Waals attraction between dipolar bilayers. Monovalent ions can swell those neutral lamellae by a small amount. Divalent ions can adsorb onto dipolar membranes and charge them. Using solution X-ray scattering, we studied how the structure of ions and zwitterionic lipids regulates the charge of dipolar membranes. We found that unlike monovalent ions that weakly interact with all of the examined dipolar membranes, divalent and trivalent ions adsorb onto membranes containing lipids with saturated tails, with an association constant on the order of ∼10 M(-1). One double bond in the lipid tail is sufficient to prevent divalent ion adsorption. We suggest that this behavior is due to the relatively loose packing of lipids with unsaturated tails that increases the area per lipid headgroup, enabling their free rotation. Divalent ion adsorption links two lipids and limits their free rotation. The ion-dipole interaction gained by the adsorption of the ions onto unsaturated membranes is insufficient to compensate for the loss of headgroup free-rotational entropy. The ion-dipole interaction is stronger for cations with a higher valence. Nevertheless, polyamines behave as monovalent ions near dipolar interfaces in the sense that they interact weakly with the membrane surface, whereas in the bulk their behavior is similar to that of multivalent cations. Advanced data analysis and comparison with theory provide insight into the structure and interactions between ion-induced regulated charged interfaces. This study models biologically relevant interactions between cell membranes and various ions and the manner in which the lipid structure governs those interactions. The ability to monitor these interactions creates a tool for probing systems that are more complex and forms the basis for controlling the interactions between dipolar

  7. Evaluation of diacylphospholipids as boundary lipids for bacteriorhodopsin from structural and functional aspects.

    PubMed

    Kawatake, Satoshi; Umegawa, Yuichi; Matsuoka, Shigeru; Murata, Michio; Sonoyama, Masashi

    2016-09-01

    Reconstituted membranes with diverse diacylphospholipids were prepared by using bacteriorhodopsin (bR) in which the intrinsic lipid content was decreased to 24% of the original while the trimeric structure and photocycle of bR were retained. Four phospholipids with a different headgroup, phosphatidic acid (PA), phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylglycerol (PG), and phosphatidylserine (PS), were adopted for reconstitution. By varying the lipid-protein ratios, the interactions of these phospholipids with bR, as a boundary lipid, were evaluated by solid state (2)H/(31)P NMR, circular dichroism (CD), and laser-flash photolysis. The (31)P NMR results revealed that the headgroup of acidic phosphatidylglycerol (PG) interacts more strongly with bR than that of phosphatidylcholine (PC). CD analysis indicated that the trimetric structure of bR was retained in all the phospholipid-bR preparations at low and medium lipid contents. Acidic lipids PA, PG and PS restored the photocycle activity of bR to an extent comparable to (or slightly lower than) that of the purple membrane while PC caused a marked reduction of the bR photocycle efficiency. Among PGs with different fatty acyl groups, those with mono- and di-unsaturated lipids tended to preserve the photocycle efficiency, whereas the fully saturated lipid did not. These results show that acidic unsaturated phospholipids, particularly dioleoylphosphatidylglycerol (DOPG), have higher affinity for bR and efficiently restore its trimetric structure. The present study suggests that bR reconstituted in DOPG bilayers may possibly be used as a model system for spectroscopic investigations of the lipid-bR interactions with the membrane-integral α-helices, and potentially for a similar type of membrane proteins. PMID:27301269

  8. Impact of solidification on the performance of lipid-based colloidal carriers: oil-based versus self-emulsifying systems.

    PubMed

    Alinaghi, Azadeh; Tan, Angel; Rao, Shasha; Prestidge, Clive A

    2015-01-01

    The study aims to develop and optimise lipid-based colloidal carriers (LBCC) for enhancing solubilisation and reducing fed/fasted variation for the poorly water-soluble danazol (DAN). Oil-based and self-microemulsifying delivery systems (SMEDDS) were developed, and the effect of solidification was investigated. Liquid SMEDDS (L-SMEDDS, Capmul MCM:Tween 80:Transcutol HP 1:2:1, w/w) and emulsion (Capmul MCM:soya lecithin 100:0.6, w/w) were developed. Solid-state formulations were prepared via (i) physical adsorption of L-SMEDDS (P-SMEDDS) or (ii) spray drying of emulsion (silica-lipid hybrid, SLH) and L-SMEDDS (spray-dried SMEDDS, S-SMEDDS) using Aerosil 380 silica nanoparticles as the solid carrier. In vitro lipid digestion and drug solubilisation under simulated intestinal conditions in both fasted and fed states were investigated. Solubilisation of unformulated DAN under both fasted and fed conditions was low, and a large fed/fasted variation was observed, i.e. 6.6-fold difference. All LBCC formulations provided enhanced drug solubilisation and significantly reduced the fed/fasted variation. For self-emulsifying LBCC, the fasted state drug solubilisation was ranked as L-SMEDDS > PSMEDDS > S-SMEDDS, suggesting that solidification reduced the capability of SMEDDS in presenting DAN to the aqueous phase. However, in the case of oil-based LBCC, improved drug solubility was observed with the solid form SLH under both fasted and fed state in comparison to that of the equivalent liquid form. Overall, the SLH, which provided the highest drug solubilisation in the fasted state (i.e. 10-fold higher than the pure DAN) and the smallest fed/fasted variation, was considered an optimised solid LBCC to enhance the solubilisation of DAN and reduce the fed/fasted variation. PMID:25030115

  9. Avian sebokeratocytes and marine mammal lipokeratinocytes: structural, lipid biochemical, and functional considerations.

    PubMed

    Elias, P M; Menon, G K; Grayson, S; Brown, B E; Rehfeld, S J

    1987-10-01

    In terrestrial mammals, stratum corneum lipids derive from two sources: deposition of lamellar body lipids in stratum corneum interstices and excretion of sebaceous lipids onto the skin surface, resulting in a two-compartment ("bricks and mortar") system of lipid-depleted cells surrounded by lipid-enriched intercellular spaces. In contrast, intracellular lipid droplets, normally not present in the epidermis of terrestrial mammals, are prominent in avian and marine mammal epidermis (cetaceans, manatees). We compared the transepidermal water loss, ultrastructure, and lipid biochemistry of the viable epidermis and stratum corneum of pigeon apterium, fledgling (featherless) zebra finches, painted storks, cetaceans, and manatees to those of humans and mice. Marine mammals possess an even more extensive lamellar-body secretory system than do terrestrial mammals; and lamellar-body contents, as in terrestrials, are secreted into the stratum corneum interstices. In cetaceans, however, glycolipids, but not ceramides, persist into the stratum corneum; whereas in manatees, glycolipids are replaced by ceramides, as in terrestrial mammals. Acylglucosylceramides, thought to be critical for lamellar-body deposition and barrier function in terrestrial mammals, are present in manatees but virtually absent in cetaceans, a finding that indicates that they are not obligate constituents of lamellar-body-derived membrane structures. Moreover, cetaceans do not elaborate the very long-chain, saturated N-acyl fatty acids that abound in terrestrial mammalian acylglucosylceramides. Furthermore, cold-water marine mammals generate large, intracellular neutral lipid droplets not found in terrestrial and warm-water marine mammals; these lipid droplets persist into the stratum corneum, suggesting thermogenesis, flotation, and/or cryoprotectant functions. Avians generate distinctive multigranular bodies that may be secreted into the intercellular spaces under xerotic conditions, as in zebra

  10. Feruloylated vegetable oils: synthesis and applications of UV-absorbing/antioxidative lipids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In an effort to produce higher value uses for vegetable oils, we have developed an environmentally “green” process to transesterify soybean oil with the phenylpropanoid, ferulic acid. Ferulic acid is a natural plant component that absorbs light within the UVB and UVA regions (290 to 370 nm) and pos...

  11. Lipid digestibility and energy content of distillers corn oil in swine and poultry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the DE and ME, and apparent total tract digestibility of ether extract of 3 distillers corn oil (DCO; 4.9, 12.8, or 13.9% FFA), compared with a sample of refined corn oil (CO, 0.04% FFA), and an industrially-hydrolyzed high FFA DCO (93.8% FFA) in young pig...

  12. Effect of ionizing radiation on the protein and lipid quality characteristics of mutton kheema treated with rice bran oil and sunflower oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalarama Reddy, K.; Jayathilakan, K.; Pandey, M. C.

    2015-12-01

    Effect of rice bran oil (RBO) and irradiation (0, 1, 2 and 3 kGy) on lipid and protein quality of ready-to-eat mutton kheema were established during refrigerated storage (4±1 °C). Total carbonyls, thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS), non-heme iron and total volatiles in irradiated RBO samples were significantly lower (p<0.05) from the corresponding sunflower oil (SFO) treated samples initially and during storage. Product with RBO and Flaxseed oil (FSO) at the optimized level yielded a designer meat product having an SFA:MUFA:PUFA and n-6/n-3 ratio of 1:1.3:1.3 and 3.6:1 respectively. Degradation in PUFA levels in SFO samples were significantly higher (p<0.05) and an increase of 31% in metmyoglobin after 50 days was noticed in comparison with RBO samples. Non-linear correlation analysis of chemical markers established polynomial fit equations. 2 kGy radiation processing with RBO yielded a product having 50 days of shelf stability in terms of its chemical characteristics.

  13. Evidence Suggesting That Francisella tularensis O-Antigen Capsule Contains a Lipid A-Like Molecule That Is Structurally Distinct from the More Abundant Free Lipid A

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Jason H.; Kaufman, Justin W.; Apicella, Michael A.; Weiss, Jerrold P.

    2016-01-01

    Francisella tularensis, the Gram-negative bacterium that causes tularemia, produces a high molecular weight capsule that is immunologically distinct from Francisella lipopolysaccharide but contains the same O-antigen tetrasaccharide. To pursue the possibility that the capsule of Francisella live vaccine strain (LVS) has a structurally unique lipid anchor, we have metabolically labeled Francisella with [14C]acetate to facilitate highly sensitive compositional analysis of capsule-associated lipids. Capsule was purified by two independent methods and yielded similar results. Autoradiographic and immunologic analysis confirmed that this purified material was largely devoid of low molecular weight LPS and of the copious amounts of free lipid A that the Francisellae accumulate. Chemical hydrolysis yielded [14C]-labeled free fatty acids characteristic of Francisella lipid A but with a different molar ratio of 3-OH C18:0 to 3-OH C16:0 and different composition of non-hydroxylated fatty acids (mainly C14:0 rather than C16:0) than that of free Francisella lipid A. Mild acid hydrolysis to induce selective cleavage of KDO-lipid A linkage yielded a [14C]-labeled product that partitioned during Bligh/Dyer extraction and migrated during thin-layer chromatography like lipid A. These findings suggest that the O-antigen capsule of Francisella contains a covalently linked and structurally distinct lipid A species. The presence of a discrete lipid A-like molecule associated with capsule raises the possibility that Francisella selectively exploits lipid A structural heterogeneity to regulate synthesis, transport, and stable bacterial surface association of the O-antigen capsular layer. PMID:27326857

  14. Effect of incorporation of drugs, vitamins and peptides on the structure and dynamics of lipid assemblies.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, S; Phadke, R S; Govil, G

    The characteristics of vesicles formed from Dipalmitoyl Phosphatidyl Choline (DPPC) are sensitive to the presence of perturbing molecules such as drugs, peptides, hormones and vitamins. We have used ESR spin labeling and NMR techniques for studying interaction of such molecules with lipid bilayers. ESR spin labeling has been used to monitor thermotropic behaviour of model membranes. Different NMR probes such as 1H, 31P, 13C have been used to gather information regarding the mode of interaction. It has been observed that the model membrane systems respond differently depending upon the localization of the perturbing molecules in the lipid bilayer. Small molecules such as neurotransmitters epinephrine and norepinephrine decrease gel to liquid crystalline phase transition temperature significantly even when present in small amounts. Vitamin E acetate having a hydrophobic hydrocarbon tail orients parallel to the lipid molecule and thereby exhibits dynamics similar to palmitate chain. When the acetate group is replaced by hydroxyl group (alpha-tocopherol), the phase transition becomes broad and the lipid molecules loose freedom of lateral diffusion. This can be attributed to formation of hydrogen bond between the hydroxyl group of alpha-tocopherol and phosphate moiety of lipid. The conformation of antidepressants nitroxazepine and imipramine is significantly altered when embedded in lipid bilayer. Anaesthetic etomidate not only modifies thermotropic characteristics but also induces polymorphism. The normal bilayer arrangement of lipids gets transformed into hexagonal packing. Amino acid tryptophan induces cubic phases in the normal bilayer arrangement of DPPC dispersions. Peptide gonadoliberin shows a reduced internal motion due to the lipid peptide interaction. The major consequences of binding of lipids with externally added molecules are changes in the fluidity and permeability properties of membranes. It has been shown that permeability is effected by the presence

  15. Effect of methyl-branched fatty acids on the structure of lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Poger, David; Caron, Bertrand; Mark, Alan E

    2014-12-01

    Methyl-branched fatty acids are widespread in prokaryotic membranes. Although anteiso and iso branching (that is on the antepenultimate and penultimate carbons) and the presence of multiple methyl branches in the phytanoyl chain are known to modify the thermotropic behavior and enhance the fluidity of lipid bilayers, little is known about the effect of methyl branching on the structure of lipid bilayers. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations are used to examine systematically the impact of one or more methyl branches at different positions along the sn-1 palmitoyl chain on the structural properties of a 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) lipid bilayer. It is found that methyl branching reduces lipid condensation, decreases the bilayer thickness, and lowers chain ordering. Branching also results in the formation of kinks at the branching point, thereby enhancing the fluidity of lipid bilayers. Furthermore, this effect varies in a methyl-position-dependent fashion. In the case of polymethylated chains, the simulations suggest that if the gap between the methyl groups is sufficient (two or three carbons), the effects of the methyl branches are additive and equivalent to the combined effect of the corresponding monomethyl-branched lipids. PMID:25380125

  16. Effects of local structural transformation of lipid-like compounds on delivery of messenger RNA

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bin; Luo, Xiao; Deng, Binbin; Giancola, JoLynn B.; McComb, David W.; Schmittgen, Thomas D.; Dong, Yizhou

    2016-01-01

    Lipid-like nanoparticles (LLNs) have shown great potential for RNA delivery. Lipid-like compounds are key components in LLNs. In this study, we investigated the effects of local structural transformation of lipid-like compounds on delivery of messenger RNA. Our results showed that position change of functional groups on lipid-like compounds can dramatically improve delivery efficiency. We then optimized formulation ratios of TNT-b10 LLNs, a lead material, increasing delivery efficiency over 2-fold. More importantly, pegylated TNT-b10 LLNs is stable for over four weeks and is over 10-fold more efficient than that of its counterpart TNT-a10 LLNs. Additionally, the optimal formulation O-TNT-b10 LLNs is capable of delivering mRNA encoding luciferase in vivo. These results provide useful insights into the design of next generation LLNs for mRNA delivery. PMID:26916931

  17. Effects of local structural transformation of lipid-like compounds on delivery of messenger RNA.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Luo, Xiao; Deng, Binbin; Giancola, JoLynn B; McComb, David W; Schmittgen, Thomas D; Dong, Yizhou

    2016-01-01

    Lipid-like nanoparticles (LLNs) have shown great potential for RNA delivery. Lipid-like compounds are key components in LLNs. In this study, we investigated the effects of local structural transformation of lipid-like compounds on delivery of messenger RNA. Our results showed that position change of functional groups on lipid-like compounds can dramatically improve delivery efficiency. We then optimized formulation ratios of TNT-b10 LLNs, a lead material, increasing delivery efficiency over 2-fold. More importantly, pegylated TNT-b10 LLNs is stable for over four weeks and is over 10-fold more efficient than that of its counterpart TNT-a10 LLNs. Additionally, the optimal formulation O-TNT-b10 LLNs is capable of delivering mRNA encoding luciferase in vivo. These results provide useful insights into the design of next generation LLNs for mRNA delivery. PMID:26916931

  18. Effects of local structural transformation of lipid-like compounds on delivery of messenger RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Luo, Xiao; Deng, Binbin; Giancola, Jolynn B.; McComb, David W.; Schmittgen, Thomas D.; Dong, Yizhou

    2016-02-01

    Lipid-like nanoparticles (LLNs) have shown great potential for RNA delivery. Lipid-like compounds are key components in LLNs. In this study, we investigated the effects of local structural transformation of lipid-like compounds on delivery of messenger RNA. Our results showed that position change of functional groups on lipid-like compounds can dramatically improve delivery efficiency. We then optimized formulation ratios of TNT-b10 LLNs, a lead material, increasing delivery efficiency over 2-fold. More importantly, pegylated TNT-b10 LLNs is stable for over four weeks and is over 10-fold more efficient than that of its counterpart TNT-a10 LLNs. Additionally, the optimal formulation O-TNT-b10 LLNs is capable of delivering mRNA encoding luciferase in vivo. These results provide useful insights into the design of next generation LLNs for mRNA delivery.

  19. Effects of dietary oxidized oil on laying performance, lipid metabolism, and apolipoprotein gene expression in laying hens.

    PubMed

    Yue, H Y; Wang, J; Qi, X L; Ji, F; Liu, M F; Wu, S G; Zhang, H J; Qi, G H

    2011-08-01

    We studied the effects of dietary oxidized oils on serum lipid metabolic indices, estradiol level, and the gene expression of apolipoprotein B-100 and apolipoprotein VLDL-II in laying hens. Hy-Line Grey hens (280 ± 10 d old; average egg production, 90.0 ± 2.5%) were allotted to 1 of 4 dietary treatments, which were supplemented with 0 (control group), 1% (low oxidized group), 2% (moderately oxidized group), or 4% (highly oxidized group) thermally oxidized soybean oil. Each treatment contained 6 replicates, with 12 birds each. The feeding trial lasted for 30 d. Laying performance data were recorded weekly. Other indices were measured on d 0, 2, 6, 14, and 30 of the feeding trial. Hens in the moderately and highly oxidized groups had significantly lowered feed conversion ratios (P < 0.05). Those in the highly oxidized group also had decreased concentrations of serum very low density lipoprotein cholesterol on d 30 (P < 0.05) compared with the very low density lipoprotein cholesterol of hens in the moderately oxidized group. Hens in the moderately oxidized group had significantly increased expression of apolipoprotein B-100 (P < 0.05) from d 6 to 30. Consequently, hepatic triglyceride increased in this group on d 30 (P < 0.05). Serum triglyceride decreased in the moderately oxidized group on d 30 (P < 0.05), which may have been caused by the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activating receptor α. Serum estradiol levels were not significantly affected by oxidized oils at any time of measurement, but were significantly different between d 0 and 30 within the moderately oxidized group. This fact indicated that the effect of oxidized oils on apolipoprotein B-100 might partially be a cumulative result of the increasing secretion of estradiol. The results suggested that oxidized oil may affect the performance of laying hens through the regulation of apolipoproteins and estradiol. PMID:21753210

  20. Structure of lipid multilayers via drop casting of aqueous liposome dispersions.

    PubMed

    Sironi, Beatrice; Snow, Tim; Redeker, Christian; Slastanova, Anna; Bikondoa, Oier; Arnold, Thomas; Klein, Jacob; Briscoe, Wuge H

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the structure of solid supported lipid multilayers is crucial to their application as a platform for novel materials. Conventionally, they are prepared from drop casting or spin coating of lipids dissolved in organic solvents, and lipid multilayers prepared from aqueous media and their structural characterisation have not been reported previously, due to their extremely low lipid solubility (i.e.∼10(-9) M) in water. Herein, using X-ray reflectivity (XRR) facilitated by a "bending mica" method, we have studied the structural characteristics of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) multilayers prepared via drop casting aqueous small unilamellar and multilamellar vesicle or liposome (i.e. SUV and MLV) dispersions on different surfaces, including mica, positively charged polyethylenimine (PEI) coated mica, and stearic trimethylammonium iodide (STAI) coated mica which exposes a monolayer of hydrocarbon tails. We suggest that DOPC liposomes served both as a delivery matrix where an appreciable lipid concentration in water (∼25 mg mL(-1) or 14 mM) was feasible, and as a structural precursor where the lamellar structure was readily retained on the rupture of the vesicles at the solid surface upon solvent evaporation to facilitate rapid multilayer formation. We find that multilayers on mica from MLVs exhibited polymorphism, whereas the SUV multilayers were well ordered and showed stronger stability against water. The influence of substrate chemistry (i.e. polymer coating, charge and hydrophobicity) on the multilayer structure is discussed in terms of lipid-substrate molecular interactions determining the bilayer packing proximal to the solid-liquid interface, which then had a templating effect on the structure of the bilayers distal from the interface, resulting in the overall different multilayer structural characteristics on different substrates. Such a fundamental understanding of the correlation between the physical parameters that characterise liposomes

  1. Structural Significance of Lipid Diversity as Studied by Small Angle Neutron and X-ray Scattering.

    PubMed

    Kučerka, Norbert; Heberle, Frederick A; Pan, Jianjun; Katsaras, John

    2015-01-01

    We review recent developments in the rapidly growing field of membrane biophysics, with a focus on the structural properties of single lipid bilayers determined by different scattering techniques, namely neutron and X-ray scattering. The need for accurate lipid structural properties is emphasized by the sometimes conflicting results found in the literature, even in the case of the most studied lipid bilayers. Increasingly, accurate and detailed structural models require more experimental data, such as those from contrast varied neutron scattering and X-ray scattering experiments that are jointly refined with molecular dynamics simulations. This experimental and computational approach produces robust bilayer structural parameters that enable insights, for example, into the interplay between collective membrane properties and its components (e.g., hydrocarbon chain length and unsaturation, and lipid headgroup composition). From model studies such as these, one is better able to appreciate how a real biological membrane can be tuned by balancing the contributions from the lipid's different moieties (e.g., acyl chains, headgroups, backbones, etc.). PMID:26402708

  2. The effect of compatible solute ectoines on the structural organization of lipid monolayer and bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Harishchandra, Rakesh Kumar; Wulff, Stephanie; Lentzen, Georg; Neuhaus, Thorsten; Galla, Hans-Joachim

    2010-08-01

    Compatible solutes are small organic osmolytes responsible for osmotic balance and at the same time compatible with the cellular metabolism. Here, we have investigated the effect of the compatible solutes, ectoine and hydroxyectoine, on the fluid-rigid domain structure of lipid monolayer and bilayer membranes. Mainly saturated dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine membranes exhibiting a clear le/lc phase transition were used. Fluorescence microscopy showed that ectoines added to the aqueous subphase expand and fluidize the lipid monolayers especially at surface pressures below 30mN/m. The domain structure at the le/lc phase transition is sensitively modified leading to smaller but more numerous domains in the presence of ectoines. Hydroxyectoine was more efficient than ectoine. These results are explained by the replacement theory assuming that the ectoines are likely to be expelled from the membrane surface thus favoring the hydration of the lipid membrane. This effect reduces the line tension, which is the interfacial energy at the domain edges leading to reduced domain sizes and increased number of rigid domains. Isotherms of negatively charged phosphatidylglycerol membranes show a similar expansion, while unsaturated lipids are less affected. Mixed phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidylglycerol membranes exhibit the same effect on the line tension increasing the tendency for a phase separation. This could be shown also in bilayer vesicles, where the compatible solutes have only a minor effect on the lipid main phase transition in pure DPPC membranes but reduce the extent of the pretransition. In mixed DPPC/DPPG bilayer membranes ectoines cause a phase separation leading to the enrichment of expanded DPPC domains. In conclusion, our study gives for the first time evidence that ectoines have an effect on lipid membranes increasing the hydration of the surface and thus increasing the mobility of the lipid head groups and fluidizing the lipid layer accordingly. This increased

  3. Edible oil structuring: an overview and recent updates.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ashok R; Dewettinck, Koen

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, research dealing with edible oil structuring has received considerable interest from scientific community working in the area of food formulation. Much of this interest is linked to the possibility of using structured oil in development of newer product formats with improved nutritional profile (trans fat-free, low in saturated fats and high in mono and/or poly unsaturated fatty acids). In addition to the obvious industrial need of finding the alternative formulation approach, the interesting properties of structured systems (particularly, oleogels) also makes them a fascinating subject for fundamental studies. In this paper, we attempt to give a comprehensive and concise overview of the field of oil structuring with special emphasis on the updates from recent years. Specifically, several categories of food-grade oleogelators and their potential food applications are summarized with typical examples along with a discussion on the general principles and unresolved challenges related to this emerging area. PMID:26415120

  4. Crystal structure of truncated human apolipoprotein A-I suggests a lipid-bound conformation

    PubMed Central

    Borhani, David W.; Rogers, Danise P.; Engler, Jeffrey A.; Brouillette, Christie G.

    1997-01-01

    The structure of truncated human apolipoprotein A-I (apo A-I), the major protein component of high density lipoprotein, has been determined at 4-Å resolution. The crystals comprise residues 44–243 (exon 4) of apo A-I, a fragment that binds to lipid similarly to intact apo A-I and that retains the lipid-bound conformation even in the absence of lipid. The molecule consists almost entirely of a pseudo-continuous, amphipathic α-helix that is punctuated by kinks at regularly spaced proline residues; it adopts a shape similar to a horseshoe of dimensions 125 × 80 × 40 Å. Four molecules in the asymmetric unit associate via their hydrophobic faces to form an antiparallel four-helix bundle with an elliptical ring shape. Based on this structure, we propose a model for the structure of apo A-I bound to high density lipoprotein. PMID:9356442

  5. Biotechnology of oil palm: strategies towards manipulation of lipid content and composition.

    PubMed

    Parveez, Ghulam Kadir Ahmad; Rasid, Omar Abdul; Masani, Mat Yunus Abdul; Sambanthamurthi, Ravigadevi

    2015-04-01

    Oil palm is a major economic crop for Malaysia. The major challenges faced by the industry are labor shortage, availability of arable land and unstable commodity price. This has caused the industry to diversify its applications into higher value products besides increasing its yield. While conventional breeding has its limitations, biotechnology was identified as one of the tools for overcoming the above challenges. Research on biotechnology of oil palm began more than two decades ago leveraging a multidisciplinary approach involving biochemical studies, gene and promoter isolation, transformation vector construction and finally genetic transformation to produce the targeted products. The main target of oil palm biotechnology research is to increase oleic acid in the mesocarp. Other targets are stearic acid, palmitoleic acid, ricinoleic acid, lycopene (carotenoid) and biodegradable plastics. Significant achievements were reported for the biochemical studies, isolation of useful oil palm genes and characterization of important promoters. A large number of transformation constructs for various targeted products were successfully produced using the isolated oil palm genes and promoters. Finally transformation of these constructs into oil palm embryogenic calli was carried out while the regeneration of transgenic oil palm harboring the useful genes is in progress. PMID:25480400

  6. Transcriptome Analysis of the Oil-Rich Tea Plant, Camellia oleifera, Reveals Candidate Genes Related to Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hui; Zhang, Li-Ping; Zhang, Hai-Bin; Gao, Li-Zhi

    2014-01-01

    Background Rapidly driven by the need for developing sustainable sources of nutritionally important fatty acids and the rising concerns about environmental impacts after using fossil oil, oil-plants have received increasing awareness nowadays. As an important oil-rich plant in China, Camellia oleifera has played a vital role in providing nutritional applications, biofuel productions and chemical feedstocks. However, the lack of C. oleifera genome sequences and little genetic information have largely hampered the urgent needs for efficient utilization of the abundant germplasms towards modern breeding efforts of this woody oil-plant. Results Here, using the 454 GS-FLX sequencing platform, we generated approximately 600,000 RNA-Seq reads from four tissues of C. oleifera. These reads were trimmed and assembled into 104,842 non-redundant putative transcripts with a total length of ∼38.9 Mb, representing more than 218-fold of all the C. oleifera sequences currently deposited in the GenBank (as of March 2014). Based on the BLAST similarity searches, nearly 42.6% transcripts could be annotated with known genes, conserved domains, or Gene Ontology (GO) terms. Comparisons with the cultivated tea tree, C. sinensis, identified 3,022 pairs of orthologs, of which 211 exhibited the evidence under positive selection. Pathway analysis detected the majority of genes potentially related to lipid metabolism. Evolutionary analysis of omega-6 fatty acid desaturase (FAD2) genes among 20 oil-plants unexpectedly suggests that a parallel evolution may occur between C. oleifera and Olea oleifera. Additionally, more than 2,300 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and 20,200 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were detected in the C. oleifera transcriptome. Conclusions The generated transcriptome represents a considerable increase in the number of sequences deposited in the public databases, providing an unprecedented opportunity to discover all related-genes associated with lipid metabolic

  7. Structural and Formulation Factors Influencing Pyridinium Lipid-based Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lin; Lu, Yan; Miller, Duane D.; Mahato, Ram I.

    2009-01-01

    A series of pyridinium lipids containing a heterocyclic ring and a nitrogen atom were synthesized to determine the structure-activity relationship for gene delivery. Pyrylium chloroaluminate was synthesized by monoacylation of mesityl oxide and converted into pyrylium hexafluorophosphate, which was used as the key intermediate for reaction with different primary amines, to yield hydroxyethylpyridinium hexafluorophosphate and aminoethylpyridinium hexafluorophosphate. Acylation of these pyridinium salts with different types of fatty acid chlorides afforded the final pyridinium lipids, which were mixed with a co-lipid, such as L-alpha-dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) and cholesterol (Chol) to prepare cationic liposomes by sonication. These liposomes were mixed with plasmid DNA encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (pCMS-EGFP) or luciferase (pDNA3-Luc) and transfected into Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells. Several factors including hydrophobic anchor chain length, anchor chain type, configuration of double bond, linker type, co-lipid type, cationic lipid: co-lipid molar ratio, charge ratio (N/P), and cell type had significant influence on transfection efficiency and cytotoxicity. Pyridinium lipids with amide linker showed significantly higher transfection efficiency compared to their ester counterparts. Liposomes prepared at 1:1 molar ratio of pyridinium lipid and co-lipid showed higher transfection efficiency when either DOPE or cholesterol was used as a co-lipid to prepare cationic liposomes for complex formation with plasmid DNA at 3:1(+/−) charge ratio. Pyridinium liposomes based on hydrophobic anchor chain length of 16 showed higher transfection efficiency and lower cytotoxicity. The pyridinium lipid with trans-configuration of the double bond in fatty acid chain showed higher transfection efficiency than its counterpart with cis-configuration at the same fatty acid chain length. In the presence of serum, C16:0 and Lipofectamine significantly

  8. Impact of nitrogen flushing and oil choice on the progression of lipid oxidation in unwashed fried sliced potato crisps.

    PubMed

    Marasca, E; Greetham, D; Herring, S D; Fisk, I D

    2016-05-15

    Unwashed, sliced, batch-fried potato crisps have a unique texture and are growing in popularity in the UK/EU premium snack food market. In this study, the storage stability of unwashed sliced (high surface starch) potatoes (crisps) fried in regular sunflower oil (SO) or in high oleic sunflower oil (HOSO) was compared over accelerated shelf life testing (45°C, 6 weeks); with and without nitrogen gas flushing. Primary oxidation products (lipid hydroperoxides) were measured with a ferrous oxidation-xylenol orange (FOX) assay and volatile secondary oxidation products (hexanal) were quantified by using solid phase micro-extraction gas chromatography mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC/MS). Results revealed that crisps fried in SO were the least stable. Flushing the stored crisps with nitrogen gas proved to be effective in slowing down the oxidation rate after frying with sunflower oil, significantly stabilizing the crisps. However, crisps fried in HOSO were the most stable, with the lowest rate of development of oxidation markers, and this has previously not been shown for crisps with a high free starch content. PMID:26775947

  9. Impact of nitrogen flushing and oil choice on the progression of lipid oxidation in unwashed fried sliced potato crisps

    PubMed Central

    Marasca, E.; Greetham, D.; Herring, S.D.; Fisk, I.D.

    2016-01-01

    Unwashed, sliced, batch-fried potato crisps have a unique texture and are growing in popularity in the UK/EU premium snack food market. In this study, the storage stability of unwashed sliced (high surface starch) potatoes (crisps) fried in regular sunflower oil (SO) or in high oleic sunflower oil (HOSO) was compared over accelerated shelf life testing (45 °C, 6 weeks); with and without nitrogen gas flushing. Primary oxidation products (lipid hydroperoxides) were measured with a ferrous oxidation-xylenol orange (FOX) assay and volatile secondary oxidation products (hexanal) were quantified by using solid phase micro-extraction gas chromatography mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC/MS). Results revealed that crisps fried in SO were the least stable. Flushing the stored crisps with nitrogen gas proved to be effective in slowing down the oxidation rate after frying with sunflower oil, significantly stabilizing the crisps. However, crisps fried in HOSO were the most stable, with the lowest rate of development of oxidation markers, and this has previously not been shown for crisps with a high free starch content. PMID:26775947

  10. Linking lipid architecture to bilayer structure and mechanics using self-consistent field modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Pera, H.; Kleijn, J. M.; Leermakers, F. A. M.

    2014-02-14

    To understand how lipid architecture determines the lipid bilayer structure and its mechanics, we implement a molecularly detailed model that uses the self-consistent field theory. This numerical model accurately predicts parameters such as Helfrichs mean and Gaussian bending modulus k{sub c} and k{sup ¯} and the preferred monolayer curvature J{sub 0}{sup m}, and also delivers structural membrane properties like the core thickness, and head group position and orientation. We studied how these mechanical parameters vary with system variations, such as lipid tail length, membrane composition, and those parameters that control the lipid tail and head group solvent quality. For the membrane composition, negatively charged phosphatidylglycerol (PG) or zwitterionic, phosphatidylcholine (PC), and -ethanolamine (PE) lipids were used. In line with experimental findings, we find that the values of k{sub c} and the area compression modulus k{sub A} are always positive. They respond similarly to parameters that affect the core thickness, but differently to parameters that affect the head group properties. We found that the trends for k{sup ¯} and J{sub 0}{sup m} can be rationalised by the concept of Israelachivili's surfactant packing parameter, and that both k{sup ¯} and J{sub 0}{sup m} change sign with relevant parameter changes. Although typically k{sup ¯}<0, membranes can form stable cubic phases when the Gaussian bending modulus becomes positive, which occurs with membranes composed of PC lipids with long tails. Similarly, negative monolayer curvatures appear when a small head group such as PE is combined with long lipid tails, which hints towards the stability of inverse hexagonal phases at the cost of the bilayer topology. To prevent the destabilisation of bilayers, PG lipids can be mixed into these PC or PE lipid membranes. Progressive loading of bilayers with PG lipids lead to highly charged membranes, resulting in J{sub 0}{sup m}≫0, especially at low ionic

  11. Effects of Dietary Coconut Oil as a Medium-chain Fatty Acid Source on Performance, Carcass Composition and Serum Lipids in Male Broilers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianhong; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Li, Juntao; Chen, Yiqiang; Yang, Wenjun; Zhang, Liying

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary coconut oil as a medium-chain fatty acid (MCFA) source on performance, carcass composition and serum lipids in male broilers. A total of 540, one-day-old, male Arbor Acres broilers were randomly allotted to 1 of 5 treatments with each treatment being applied to 6 replicates of 18 chicks. The basal diet (i.e., R0) was based on corn and soybean meal and was supplemented with 1.5% soybean oil during the starter phase (d 0 to 21) and 3.0% soybean oil during the grower phase (d 22 to 42). Four experimental diets were formulated by replacing 25%, 50%, 75%, or 100% of the soybean oil with coconut oil (i.e., R25, R50, R75, and R100). Soybean oil and coconut oil were used as sources of long-chain fatty acid and MCFA, respectively. The feeding trial showed that dietary coconut oil had no effect on weight gain, feed intake or feed conversion. On d 42, serum levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were linearly decreased as the coconut oil level increased (p<0.01). Lipoprotein lipase, hepatic lipase, and total lipase activities were linearly increased as the coconut oil level increased (p<0.01). Abdominal fat weight/eviscerated weight (p = 0.05), intermuscular fat width (p<0.01) and subcutaneous fat thickness (p<0.01) showed a significant quadratic relationship, with the lowest value at R75. These results indicated that replacement of 75% of the soybean oil in diets with coconut oil is the optimum level to reduce fat deposition and favorably affect lipid profiles without impairing performance in broilers. PMID:25557818

  12. Recombinant production and solution structure of lipid transfer protein from lentil Lens culinaris

    SciTech Connect

    Gizatullina, Albina K.; Finkina, Ekaterina I.; Mineev, Konstantin S.; Melnikova, Daria N.; Bogdanov, Ivan V.; Shenkarev, Zakhar O.; Ovchinnikova, Tatiana V.

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •Lipid transfer protein from lentil seeds (Lc-LTP2) was overexpressed in E. coli. •Antimicrobial activity and spatial structure of the recombinant Lc-LTP2 were examined. •Internal tunnel-like lipid-binding cavity occupies ∼7% of the total Lc-LTP2 volume. •Binding of DMPG lipid induces moderate rearrangements in the Lc-LTP2 structure. •Lc-LTP2/DMPG complex has limited lifetime and dissociates within tens of hours. -- Abstract: Lipid transfer protein, designated as Lc-LTP2, was isolated from seeds of the lentil Lens culinaris. The protein has molecular mass 9282.7 Da, consists of 93 amino acid residues including 8 cysteines forming 4 disulfide bonds. Lc-LTP2 and its stable isotope labeled analogues were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Antimicrobial activity of the recombinant protein was examined, and its spatial structure was studied by NMR spectroscopy. The polypeptide chain of Lc-LTP2 forms four α-helices (Cys4-Leu18, Pro26-Ala37, Thr42-Ala56, Thr64-Lys73) and a long C-terminal tail without regular secondary structure. Side chains of the hydrophobic residues form a relatively large internal tunnel-like lipid-binding cavity (van der Waals volume comes up to ∼600 Å{sup 3}). The side-chains of Arg45, Pro79, and Tyr80 are located near an assumed mouth of the cavity. Titration with dimyristoyl phosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) revealed formation of the Lc-LTP2/lipid non-covalent complex accompanied by rearrangements in the protein spatial structure and expansion of the internal cavity. The resultant Lc-LTP2/DMPG complex demonstrates limited lifetime and dissociates within tens of hours.

  13. LIPID - BINDING SURFACES OF MEMBRANE PROTEINS: EVIDENCE FROM EVOLUTIONARY AND STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS

    PubMed Central

    Adamian, Larisa; Naveed, Hammad; Liang, Jie

    2011-01-01

    Membrane proteins function in the diverse environment of the lipid bilayer. Experimental evidence suggests that some lipid molecules bind tightly to specific sites on the membrane protein surface. These lipid molecules often act as co-factors and play important functional roles. In this study, we have assessed the evolutionary selection pressure experienced at lipid-binding sites in a set of α-helical and β-barrel membrane proteins using posterior probability analysis of the ratio of synonymous vs. nonsynonymous substitutions (ω-ratio). We have also carried out a geometric analysis of the membrane protein structures to identify residues in close contact with co-crystallized lipids. We found that residues forming cholesterol-binding sites in both β2-adrenergic receptor and Na+-K+-ATPase exhibit strong conservation, which can be characterized by an expanded cholesterol consensus motif for GPCRs. Our results suggest the functional importance of aromatic stacking interactions and interhelical hydrogen bonds in facilitating protein-cholesterol interactions, which is now reflected in the expanded motif. We also find that residues forming the cardiolipin-binding site in formate dehydrogenase-N γ-subunit and the phosphatidylglycerol binding site in KcsA are under strong purifying selection pressure. Although the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding site in ferric hydroxamate uptake receptor (FhuA) is only weakly conserved, we show using a statistical mechanical model that LPS binds to the least stable FhuA β-strand and protects it from the bulk lipid. Our results suggest that specific lipid binding may be a general mechanism employed by β-barrel membrane proteins to stabilize weakly stable regions. Overall, we find that the residues forming specific lipid binding sites on the surfaces of membrane proteins often experience strong purifying selection pressure. PMID:21167813

  14. Reversal of Intestinal Failure-Associated Liver Disease by Switching From a Combination Lipid Emulsion Containing Fish Oil to Fish Oil Monotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sanghoon; Park, Hyo Jung; Yoon, Jihye; Hong, Seul Hee; Oh, Chae-Youn; Lee, Suk-Koo; Seo, Jeong-Meen

    2016-03-01

    Intestinal failure-associated liver disease (IFALD) is a serious complication of parenteral nutrition (PN). Studies have shown that the amount and content of intravenous lipid emulsions (LEs) used is closely related to the development of IFALD. We report 2 cases of IFALD reversed by switching from a combination lipid emulsion containing fish oil to fish oil monotherapy (Omegaven; Fresenius Kabi Austria Gmbh, Graz, Austria). Patients initially received PN containing SMOFlipid 20% (SMOF; Fresenius Kabi Austria Gmbh, Graz, Austria), 2.0-3.0 g/kg/d, over 24 hours. When IFALD developed, LE was switched from SMOF to Omegaven starting at 1.0 g/kg/d over 12 hours. Case 1 was an 11-month-old girl with a diagnosis of extensive Hirschsprung disease up to the proximal jejunum. She developed direct bilirubinemia at 3 months, and the patient's LE was switched to Omegaven. A decrease in direct bilirubin was observed after 60 days on Omegaven, and IFALD was completely resolved after 90 days. Case 2 was a 1-month-old boy with a history of gastroschisis diagnosed with megacystis microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome. He could not tolerate any oral feeds and was kept on full PN. He had elevated direct bilirubin and developed IFALD since 5 weeks. Omegaven treatment was initiated at 5 months. Direct bilirubin rose to 8 mg/dL during the first month on Omegaven. Then a gradual decrease in direct bilirubin was observed, and after 5 months on Omegaven, IFALD was completely resolved. In conclusion, 2 infants with advanced IFALD showed reversal of cholestasis by switching from SMOF to Omegaven monotherapy. PMID:25560679

  15. Impact of oil on bacterial community structure in bioturbated sediments.

    PubMed

    Stauffert, Magalie; Cravo-Laureau, Cristiana; Jézéquel, Ronan; Barantal, Sandra; Cuny, Philippe; Gilbert, Franck; Cagnon, Christine; Militon, Cécile; Amouroux, David; Mahdaoui, Fatima; Bouyssiere, Brice; Stora, Georges; Merlin, François-Xavier; Duran, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Oil spills threaten coastlines where biological processes supply essential ecosystem services. Therefore, it is crucial to understand how oil influences the microbial communities in sediments that play key roles in ecosystem functioning. Ecosystems such as sediments are characterized by intensive bioturbation due to burrowing macrofauna that may modify the microbial metabolisms. It is thus essential to consider the bioturbation when determining the impact of oil on microbial communities. In this study, an experimental laboratory device maintaining pristine collected mudflat sediments in microcosms closer to true environmental conditions--with tidal cycles and natural seawater--was used to simulate an oil spill under bioturbation conditions. Different conditions were applied to the microcosms including an addition of: standardized oil (Blend Arabian Light crude oil, 25.6 mg.g⁻¹ wet sediment), the common burrowing organism Hediste (Nereis) diversicolor and both the oil and H. diversicolor. The addition of H. diversicolor and its associated bioturbation did not affect the removal of petroleum hydrocarbons. After 270 days, 60% of hydrocarbons had been removed in all microcosms irrespective of the H. diversicolor addition. However, 16S-rRNA gene and 16S-cDNA T-RFLP and RT-PCR-amplicon libraries analysis showed an effect of the condition on the bacterial community structure, composition, and dynamics, supported by PerMANOVA analysis. The 16S-cDNA libraries from microcosms where H. diversicolor was added (oiled and un-oiled) showed a marked dominance of sequences related to Gammaproteobacteria. However, in the oiled-library sequences associated to Deltaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were also highly represented. The 16S-cDNA libraries from oiled-microcosms (with and without H. diversicolor addition) revealed two distinct microbial communities characterized by different phylotypes associated to known hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria and dominated by Gammaproteobacteria

  16. Response and sensitivity of lipid related molecular structure to wet and dry heating in Canola tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeysekara, Saman; Samadi; Yu, Peiqiang

    2012-05-01

    Heat treatments are used to manipulate nutrient utilization, availability and functional properties. The objective of this study was to characterize any molecular level changes of the functional groups associated with lipid structure in canola (Brassica) seed, as affected during the wet and dry heat treatment processes using molecular spectroscopy. The parameters included lipid CH3 asymmetric (ca. 2970-2946 cm-1), CH2 asymmetric (ca. 2945-2880 cm-1), CH3 symmetric (ca. 2881-2864 cm-1) and CH2 symmetric (ca. 2864-2770 cm-1) functional groups, lipid carbonyl Cdbnd O ester group (ca. 1774-1711 cm-1), lipid unsaturation group (CH attached to C-C) (ca. 3007 cm-1) as well as their ratios. Hierarchical cluster analysis (CLA) and principal components analysis (PCA) were conducted to identify molecular spectral differences. Raw canola seeds were used for the control or autoclaved at 120 °C for 1 h (HT-1: wet heating) or dry roasted at 120 °C for 1 h (HT-2: dry heating). Molecular spectral analysis of lipid functional group ratios were not significantly changed (P > 0.05) in the CH2 asymmetric to CH3 asymmetric stretching band peak intensity ratios for canola seed. Both wet (HT-1) and dry heating method (HT-2) had no significant effect (P > 0.05) on lipid carbonyl Cdbnd O ester group and lipid unsaturation group (CH attached to Cdbnd C). Multivariate molecular spectral analyses, CLA and PCA, were unable to make distinctions between the different treatment original spectra at the CH3 and CH2 asymmetric and symmetric region (ca. 2992-2770 cm-1), unsaturated lipids band region (ca. 3025-2993 cm-1) and lipid carbonyl Cdbnd O ester band region (ca. 1774-1711 cm-1). The results indicated that both dry and wet heating of given intense had no impact to the molecular spectrum in lipid related functional groups of canola seed, and was not strong enough to elicit heat-induced changes in lipid conformation.

  17. Determining Structural and Mechanical Properties from Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Lipid Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Braun, Anthony R; Sachs, Jonathan N

    2014-09-01

    We have developed an algorithm to determine membrane structure, area per lipid, and bending rigidity from molecular dynamics simulations of lipid vesicles. Current methods to extract structure from vesicle simulations define densities relative to the global center of mass of the vesicle. This approach ignores the long-wavelength fluctuations (undulations) that develop across the sphere and broaden the underlying structure. Our method establishes a local reference frame by defining a radially undulating reference surface (URS) and thereby removes the broadening effect of the undulations. Using an arc-length low-pass filter, we render the URS by defining the bilayer midplane on an equi-angular θ, ϕ-grid (colatitude, longitude). This surface is then expanded onto a truncated series of spherical harmonics. The spherical harmonic coefficients characterize the long-wavelength fluctuations that define both the local reference frame-used to determine the bilayer's structure-and the area per lipid (A L) along the undulating surface. Additionally, the resulting power spectrum of spherical harmonic coefficients can be fit to a Helfrich continuum model for membrane bending in spherical geometry to extract bending rigidity (k c). k c values determined for both DMPC and DMPC + cholesterol (30 mol %) vesicles are consistent with values from corresponding flat-patch systems determined using an independent, previously published spectral method. These new tools to accurately extract structure, A L, and k c should prove invaluable in evaluating the construction and equilibration of lipid vesicle simulations. PMID:25221448

  18. Effect of exercise on the content of lipids, cholesterol and on the composition of fatty acids in the adrenals of rats receiving rapeseed oil in diet.

    PubMed

    Kucharczyk, B; Ziemlański, S

    1981-01-01

    The effect of different levels of high-erucic acid rapeseed oil in diet and exposure to graded exercise on the contents of total lipids and total cholesterol, and the composition of fatty acids, in total lipids and cholesterol ester fractions in the adrenals of Wistar rats was investigated. Presence of erucic acid in the diet produced greater changes in the characteristic composition of fatty acids in the fraction of cholesterol esters than in the total lipids in the adrenals. The intensity of changes in the composition of fatty acids was greater with higher amounts of rapeseed oil in the diet and longer administration of the diet. Exercise decreased the changes in fatty acid composition in the fraction of cholesterol esters in rats receiving 50% of calories from rapeseed oil. In the group receiving 30% of calories from rapeseed oil the trained rats accumulated more rapidly cholesterol in the adrenals than the untrained rats. Exercise load had no effect on the total lipid level in the adrenals. PMID:7304197

  19. High rates of resolution of cholestasis in parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease with fish oil-based lipid emulsion monotherapy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our research was conducted to determine factors leading to resolution of cholestasis in patients with parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease treated with fish-oil-based lipid emulsion (FOLE). We used a prospective observational study of 57 infants <6 months of age with parenteral nutrition-as...

  20. Structural insights into nonvesicular lipid transport by the oxysterol binding protein homologue family.

    PubMed

    Tong, Junsen; Manik, Mohammad Kawsar; Yang, Huiseon; Im, Young Jun

    2016-08-01

    Sterols such as cholesterol in mammals and ergosterol in fungi are essential membrane components and play a key role in membrane function and in cell signaling. The intracellular distribution and processing of sterols and other phospholipids are in part carried out by oxysterol binding protein-related proteins (ORPs) in eukaryotes. Seven ORPs (Osh1-Osh7 proteins) in yeast have distinct functions in maintaining distribution, metabolism and signaling of intracellular lipids but they share at least one essential function. Significant progress has been made in understanding the ligand specificity and mechanism of non-vesicular lipid transport by ORPs. The unique structural features of Osh proteins explain the diversity and specificity of functions in PI(4)P-coupled lipid transport optimized in membrane contact sites. This review discusses the current advances in structural biology regarding this protein family and its potential functions, introducing them as the key players in the novel pathways of phosphoinositide-coupled directional transport of various lipids. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The cellular lipid landscape edited by Tim P. Levine and Anant K. Menon. PMID:26784528

  1. Link between lipid metabolism and voluntary food intake in rainbow trout fed coconut oil rich in medium-chain TAG.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo-Silva, A Cláudia; Kaushik, Sadasivam; Terrier, Frédéric; Schrama, Johan W; Médale, Françoise; Geurden, Inge

    2012-06-01

    We examined the long-term effect of feeding coconut oil (CO; rich in lauric acid, C12) on voluntary food intake and nutrient utilisation in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), with particular attention to the metabolic use (storage or oxidation) of ingested medium-chain TAG. Trout were fed for 15 weeks one of the four isoproteic diets containing fish oil (FO) or CO as fat source (FS), incorporated at 5% (low fat, LF) or 15% (high fat, HF). Fat level or FS did not modify food intake (g/kg(0·8) per d), despite higher intestinal cholecystokinin-T mRNA in trout fed the HF-FO diet. The HF diets relative to the LF ones induced higher growth and adiposity, whereas the replacements of FO by CO resulted in similar growth and adiposity. This, together with the substantial retention of C12 (57% of intake), suggests the relatively low oxidation of ingested C12. The down-regulation of carnitine palmitoyl-transferase-1 (CPT-1) confirms the minor dependency of medium-chain fatty acids (MCFA) on CPT-1 to enter the mitochondria. However, MCFA did not up-regulate mitochondrial oxidation evaluated using hepatic hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase as a marker, in line with their high retention in body lipids. At a low lipid level, MCFA increased mRNA levels of fatty acid synthase, elongase and stearoyl-CoA desaturase in liver, showing the hepatic activation of fatty acid synthesis pathways by MCFA, reflected by increased 16 : 0, 18 : 0, 16 : 1, 18 : 1 body levels. The high capacity of trout to incorporate and transform C12, rather than to readily oxidise C12, contrasts with data in mammals and may explain the absence of a satiating effect of CO in rainbow trout. PMID:22018667

  2. Influence of fish oil on skeletal muscle mitochondrial energetics and lipid metabolites during high-fat diet

    PubMed Central

    Blachnio-Zabielska, Agnieszka; Johnson, Matthew L.; Schimke, Jill M.; Jakaitis, Daniel R.; Lebrasseur, Nathan K.; Jensen, Michael D.; Sreekumaran Nair, K.; Zabielski, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) enhance insulin sensitivity and glucose homeostasis in rodent models of insulin resistance. These beneficial effects have been linked with anti-inflammatory properties, but emerging data suggest that the mechanisms may also converge on mitochondria. We evaluated the influence of dietary n-3 PUFAs on mitochondrial physiology and muscle lipid metabolites in the context of high-fat diet (HFD) in mice. Mice were fed control diets (10% fat), HFD (60% fat), or HFD with fish oil (HFD+FO, 3.4% kcal from n-3 PUFAs) for 10 wk. Body mass and fat mass increased similarly in HFD and HFD+FO, but n-3 PUFAs attenuated the glucose intolerance that developed with HFD and increased expression of genes that regulate glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle. Despite similar muscle triglyceride levels in HFD and HFD+FO, long-chain acyl-CoAs and ceramides were lower in the presence of fish oil. Mitochondrial abundance and oxidative capacity were similarly increased in HFD and HFD+FO compared with controls. Hydrogen peroxide production was similarly elevated in HFD and HFD+FO in isolated mitochondria but not in permeabilized muscle fibers, likely due to increased activity and expression of catalase. These results support a hypothesis that n-3 PUFAs protect glucose tolerance, in part by preventing the accumulation of bioactive lipid mediators that interfere with insulin action. Furthermore, the respiratory function of skeletal muscle mitochondria does not appear to be a major factor in sphingolipid accumulation, glucose intolerance, or the protective effects of n-3 PUFAs. PMID:23632634

  3. All-atom simulations and free-energy calculations of coiled-coil peptides with lipid bilayers: binding strength, structural transition, and effect on lipid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Woo, Sun Young; Lee, Hwankyu

    2016-01-01

    Peptides E and K, which are synthetic coiled-coil peptides for membrane fusion, were simulated with lipid bilayers composed of lipids and cholesterols at different ratios using all-atom models. We first calculated free energies of binding from umbrella sampling simulations, showing that both E and K peptides tend to adsorb onto the bilayer surface, which occurs more strongly in the bilayer composed of smaller lipid headgroups. Then, unrestrained simulations show that K peptides more deeply insert into the bilayer with partially retaining the helical structure, while E peptides less insert and predominantly become random coils, indicating the structural transition from helices to random coils, in quantitative agreement with experiments. This is because K peptides electrostatically interact with lipid phosphates, as well as because hydrocarbons of lysines of K peptide are longer than those of glutamic acids of E peptide and thus form stronger hydrophobic interactions with lipid tails. This deeper insertion of K peptide increases the bilayer dynamics and a vacancy below the peptide, leading to the rearrangement of smaller lipids. These findings help explain the experimentally observed or proposed differences in the insertion depth, binding strength, and structural transition of E and K peptides, and support the snorkeling effect. PMID:26926570

  4. All-atom simulations and free-energy calculations of coiled-coil peptides with lipid bilayers: binding strength, structural transition, and effect on lipid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Sun Young; Lee, Hwankyu

    2016-01-01

    Peptides E and K, which are synthetic coiled-coil peptides for membrane fusion, were simulated with lipid bilayers composed of lipids and cholesterols at different ratios using all-atom models. We first calculated free energies of binding from umbrella sampling simulations, showing that both E and K peptides tend to adsorb onto the bilayer surface, which occurs more strongly in the bilayer composed of smaller lipid headgroups. Then, unrestrained simulations show that K peptides more deeply insert into the bilayer with partially retaining the helical structure, while E peptides less insert and predominantly become random coils, indicating the structural transition from helices to random coils, in quantitative agreement with experiments. This is because K peptides electrostatically interact with lipid phosphates, as well as because hydrocarbons of lysines of K peptide are longer than those of glutamic acids of E peptide and thus form stronger hydrophobic interactions with lipid tails. This deeper insertion of K peptide increases the bilayer dynamics and a vacancy below the peptide, leading to the rearrangement of smaller lipids. These findings help explain the experimentally observed or proposed differences in the insertion depth, binding strength, and structural transition of E and K peptides, and support the snorkeling effect. PMID:26926570

  5. All-atom simulations and free-energy calculations of coiled-coil peptides with lipid bilayers: binding strength, structural transition, and effect on lipid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Sun Young; Lee, Hwankyu

    2016-03-01

    Peptides E and K, which are synthetic coiled-coil peptides for membrane fusion, were simulated with lipid bilayers composed of lipids and cholesterols at different ratios using all-atom models. We first calculated free energies of binding from umbrella sampling simulations, showing that both E and K peptides tend to adsorb onto the bilayer surface, which occurs more strongly in the bilayer composed of smaller lipid headgroups. Then, unrestrained simulations show that K peptides more deeply insert into the bilayer with partially retaining the helical structure, while E peptides less insert and predominantly become random coils, indicating the structural transition from helices to random coils, in quantitative agreement with experiments. This is because K peptides electrostatically interact with lipid phosphates, as well as because hydrocarbons of lysines of K peptide are longer than those of glutamic acids of E peptide and thus form stronger hydrophobic interactions with lipid tails. This deeper insertion of K peptide increases the bilayer dynamics and a vacancy below the peptide, leading to the rearrangement of smaller lipids. These findings help explain the experimentally observed or proposed differences in the insertion depth, binding strength, and structural transition of E and K peptides, and support the snorkeling effect.

  6. Structure and function studies of cationic lipid non-viral gene delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slack, Nelle Lynn

    Gene and drug delivery systems incorporating lipids mimic the biological environment and thus offer many advantages. In order to design successful gene or drug delivery vehicles based on lipid molecules an understanding of the affects of biopolymers on lipid membranes is necessary. We have examined the structures and interactions involved in two systems based on model biomembrane/biopolymer mixtures that are relevant for gene and drug delivery research. Liposomes incorporating PEG-lipids have shown great promise as drug carriers since they have proven to increase blood circulation times by evading the immune system. Previously, it was found that the addition of single-end-anchored (SEA)-PEG-surfactants to fluid lamellar membrane systems induces a novel hydrogel. As an extension of this work, we examine the affects of adding double-end-anchored (DEA)-PEG-surfactants to fluid membrane systems. The DEA-PEG-surfactants can adopt either a looping or bridging configuration which could deeply alter the microstructure of lamellar phases. We show that the DEA-PEG-surfactants induce gelation of fluid Lalpha phases in a way similar to that previously reported for SEA-PEG-surfactants. We also show, via x-ray diffraction, two striking differences between the SEA-and DEA-PEG-surfactant systems which demonstrate the existence of a large concentration of bridging polymers in the DEA system. The use of cationic liposomes (formed by mixtures of cationic and neutral lipids) as carriers of DNA for delivery in cells is a promising alternative to viral carriers for gene therapy. Using x-ray diffraction and biological assays, we show key parameters for optimizing gene transfer with these systems that are mediated by properties of the lipid. We have found cationic liposomes complexed with supercoiled plasmid DNA in solution self-assemble into a lamellar or an inverted hexagonal structure depending on lipid composition. Transfection efficiencies, determined by X-Gal and Luciferase assays

  7. Structural elucidation of the interaction between neurodegenerative disease-related tau protein with model lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Emmalee M.

    A protein's sequence of amino acids determines how it folds. That folded structure is linked to protein function, and misfolding to dysfunction. Protein misfolding and aggregation into beta-sheet rich fibrillar aggregates is connected with over 20 neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD is characterized in part by misfolding, aggregation and deposition of the microtubule associated tau protein into neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs). However, two questions remain: What is tau's fibrillization mechanism, and what is tau's cytotoxicity mechanism? Tau is prone to heterogeneous interactions, including with lipid membranes. Lipids have been found in NFTs, anionic lipid vesicles induced aggregation of the microtubule binding domain of tau, and other protein aggregates induced ion permeability in cells. This evidence prompted our investigation of tau's interaction with model lipid membranes to elucidate the structural perturbations those interactions induced in tau protein and in the membrane. We show that although tau is highly charged and soluble, it is highly surface active and preferentially interacts with anionic membranes. To resolve molecular-scale structural details of tau and model membranes, we utilized X-ray and neutron scattering techniques. X-ray reflectivity indicated tau aggregated at air/water and anionic lipid membrane interfaces and penetrated into membranes. More significantly, membrane interfaces induced tau protein to partially adopt a more compact conformation with density similar to folded protein and ordered structure characteristic of beta-sheet formation. This suggests possible membrane-based mechanisms of tau aggregation. Membrane morphological changes were seen using fluorescence microscopy, and X-ray scattering techniques showed tau completely disrupts anionic membranes, suggesting an aggregate-based cytotoxicity mechanism. Further investigation of protein constructs and a "hyperphosphorylation" disease mimic helped

  8. Manifestations of Fasting-Induced Fatty Liver and Rapid Recovery from Steatosis in Voles Fed Lard or Flaxseed Oil Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Mustonen, Anne-Mari; Kärjä, Vesa; Kilpiö, Michael; Tammi, Raija; Tammi, Markku; Rouvinen-Watt, Kirsti; Halonen, Toivo; Nieminen, Petteri

    2013-01-01

    Long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) can have beneficial effects against fat deposition, cardiovascular diseases, and liver steatosis. We investigated how diets based on lard (predominantly saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids) or flaxseed oil (rich in 18:3n-3) affect liver fat-% and fatty acid profiles of tundra voles (Microtus oeconomus). We also studied potential participation of hyaluronan (HA) in the pathology of fatty liver and whether the development and recovery of fasting-induced steatosis are influenced by n-3 PUFA. The dietary fatty acid composition was manifested in the liver fatty acid signatures. Fasting for 18 h induced macrovesicular steatosis and the liver fat-% increased to 22% independent of the preceding diet. Fasting-induced steatosis did not involve inflammation or connective tissue activation indicated by the absence of both leukocyte accumulation and increased HA. Food deprivation modified the liver fatty acid signatures to resemble more closely the diets. Fasting reduced the proportions of long-chain n-3 PUFA in both dietary regimes and n-3/n-6 PUFA ratios in the lard-fed voles. Decreases in long-chain n-3 PUFA may promote lipid accumulation by modulating the expression of lipid-metabolizing genes. Dietary 18:3n-3 did not prevent the development or attenuate the manifestation of steatosis in the fasted voles or promote the recovery. PMID:24152753

  9. Ginger Essential Oil Ameliorates Hepatic Injury and Lipid Accumulation in High Fat Diet-Induced Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yi-Syuan; Lee, Wan-Ching; Lin, Yu-En; Ho, Chi-Tang; Lu, Kuan-Hung; Lin, Shih-Hang; Panyod, Suraphan; Chu, Yung-Lin; Sheen, Lee-Yan

    2016-03-16

    The objective of this study was to investigate the hepatoprotective efficacy and mechanism of action of ginger essential oil (GEO) against the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Mice were maintained on either a control diet or high-fat diet (HFD) supplemented with GEO (12.5, 62.5, and 125 mg/kg) or citral (2.5 and 25 mg/kg) for 12 weeks. We demonstrated that GEO and its major component (citral) lowered HFD-induced obesity in a dose-dependent manner, accompanied by anti-hyperlipidemic effects by reducing serum free fatty acid, triglyceride, and total cholesterol levels. Moreover, liver histological results showed that administration of 62.5 and 125 mg/kg GEO and 25 mg/kg citral significantly reduced hepatic lipid accumulation. Further assessment by Western blotting and investigation of the lipid metabolism revealed that hepatic protein expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c), acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), fatty acid synthase (FAS), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), and cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) were down-regulated by GEO and citral, indicating that GEO and citral suppressed HFD-stimulated lipid biosynthesis and oxidative stress. Furthermore, GEO and citral effectively enhanced the antioxidant capacities and reduced inflammatory response in mouse liver, which exerted protective effects against steatohepatitis. Collectively, GEO and citral exhibited potent hepatoprotective effects against NAFLD induced by HFD in obese mice. Thus, GEO might be an effective dietary supplement to ameliorate NAFLD-related metabolic diseases, and citral could play a vital role in its management. PMID:26900108

  10. Effect of Erythrodiol, A Natural Pentacyclic Triterpene from Olive Oil, on the Lipid Membrane Properties.

    PubMed

    Habib, Lamice; Jraij, Alia; Khreich, Nathalie; Charcosset, Catherine; Greige-Gerges, Hélène

    2015-12-01

    The effect of erythrodiol, a natural pentacyclic triterpene to which humans are exposed through nutrients, on the lipid membranes is studied using liposomes as a membrane model. Empty and erythrodiol-loaded liposomes were prepared by the reverse phase evaporation method followed by the extrusion and by the thin film hydration method. Liposomes were characterized in terms of size and zeta potential and were imaged by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The effect of erythrodiol on thermotropic behavior of DPPC bilayers is also examined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The DSC thermograms suggested that erythrodiol interacted with the polar head groups of phospholipids and may produce a disruption of the ordering of the alkyl chains. The diffraction light scattering analysis showed that erythrodiol-loaded liposomes presented a decrease in the vesicle size when compared to blank liposomes. Images obtained by TEM confirmed the formation of unilamellar and spherical liposomes. AFM images showed spherical vesicles and single lipid bilayers. The latter were more abundant in the preparations containing erythrodiol than in the blank ones. Moreover, erythrodiol-loaded liposomes tended to rupture into single lipid bilayers during scanning. The study may provide a better understanding of pentacyclic triterpenes-membrane interaction. PMID:26141679

  11. Determining Structural and Mechanical Properties from Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Lipid Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We have developed an algorithm to determine membrane structure, area per lipid, and bending rigidity from molecular dynamics simulations of lipid vesicles. Current methods to extract structure from vesicle simulations define densities relative to the global center of mass of the vesicle. This approach ignores the long-wavelength fluctuations (undulations) that develop across the sphere and broaden the underlying structure. Our method establishes a local reference frame by defining a radially undulating reference surface (URS) and thereby removes the broadening effect of the undulations. Using an arc-length low-pass filter, we render the URS by defining the bilayer midplane on an equi-angular θ, ϕ-grid (colatitude, longitude). This surface is then expanded onto a truncated series of spherical harmonics. The spherical harmonic coefficients characterize the long-wavelength fluctuations that define both the local reference frame—used to determine the bilayer’s structure—and the area per lipid (AL) along the undulating surface. Additionally, the resulting power spectrum of spherical harmonic coefficients can be fit to a Helfrich continuum model for membrane bending in spherical geometry to extract bending rigidity (kc). kc values determined for both DMPC and DMPC + cholesterol (30 mol %) vesicles are consistent with values from corresponding flat-patch systems determined using an independent, previously published spectral method. These new tools to accurately extract structure, AL, and kc should prove invaluable in evaluating the construction and equilibration of lipid vesicle simulations. PMID:25221448

  12. Structure to Function Correlations of Cationic Lipid Carriers for Gene Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slack, Nelle L.; Lin, Alison J.; George, Cyril X.; Ahmad, Ayesha; Samuel, Charles E.; Safinya, Cyrus R.

    1998-03-01

    The use of cationic lipids as carriers of genes (stretches of DNA) for delivery in cells is a promising alternative to viral-carriers for gene therapy. However, there exists a lack of knowledge regarding interactions and structures of cationic lipid:DNA (CL:DNA) complexes which is essential for the development of the optimal cationic lipid carrier. We are using x-ray diffraction and biological assays to elucidate the solution structures of CL:DNA complexes and how these structures affect transfection efficiencies. We determine transfection efficiencies by X-Gal assays which measure protein synthesized as a result of reporter gene expression. We have found that cationic liposomes complexed with supercoiled plasmid DNA in solution self-assemble into a lamellar( J. Raedler, I. Koltover, T. Salditt, C. R. Safinya, Science 275, 810 (1997).) or hexagonal phase depending on the composition of the cationic and neutral lipid. We present correlation data between solution structures and transfection efficiencies based on x-ray and X-Gal results. Supported by NSF-DMR-9624091, PRF-31352-AC7, and Los Alamos-STB/UC: 96-108.

  13. Structure elucidation of fungal beauveriolide III, a novel inhibitor of lipid droplet formation in mouse macrophages.

    PubMed

    Namatame, I; Tomoda, H; Tabata, N; Si, S; Omura, S

    1999-01-01

    The structure of fungal beauveriolide III, an inhibitor of lipid droplet formation in mouse macrophages, was elucidated to be cyclo-[(3S,4S)-3-hydroxy-4-methyloctanoyl-L-phenylalanyl-L-alanyl- D-allo-isoleucyl] by spectral analyses and chemical degradation. PMID:10092190

  14. Structural Significance of Lipid Diversity as Studied by Small Angle Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Kučerka, Norbert; Heberle, Frederick A.; Pan, Jianjun; Katsaras, John

    2015-01-01

    We review recent developments in the rapidly growing field of membrane biophysics, with a focus on the structural properties of single lipid bilayers determined by different scattering techniques, namely neutron and X-ray scattering. The need for accurate lipid structural properties is emphasized by the sometimes conflicting results found in the literature, even in the case of the most studied lipid bilayers. Increasingly, accurate and detailed structural models require more experimental data, such as those from contrast varied neutron scattering and X-ray scattering experiments that are jointly refined with molecular dynamics simulations. This experimental and computational approach produces robust bilayer structural parameters that enable insights, for example, into the interplay between collective membrane properties and its components (e.g., hydrocarbon chain length and unsaturation, and lipid headgroup composition). From model studies such as these, one is better able to appreciate how a real biological membrane can be tuned by balancing the contributions from the lipid’s different moieties (e.g., acyl chains, headgroups, backbones, etc.). PMID:26402708

  15. Structural Significance of Lipid Diversity as Studied by Small Angle Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kučerka, Norbert; Heberle, Frederick A.; Pan, Jianjun; Katsaras, John

    2015-09-21

    In this paper, we review recent developments in the rapidly growing field of membrane biophysics, with a focus on the structural properties of single lipid bilayers determined by different scattering techniques, namely neutron and X-ray scattering. The need for accurate lipid structural properties is emphasized by the sometimes conflicting results found in the literature, even in the case of the most studied lipid bilayers. Increasingly, accurate and detailed structural models require more experimental data, such as those from contrast varied neutron scattering and X-ray scattering experiments that are jointly refined with molecular dynamics simulations. This experimental and computational approach producesmore » robust bilayer structural parameters that enable insights, for example, into the interplay between collective membrane properties and its components (e.g., hydrocarbon chain length and unsaturation, and lipid headgroup composition). Finally, from model studies such as these, one is better able to appreciate how a real biological membrane can be tuned by balancing the contributions from the lipid’s different moieties (e.g., acyl chains, headgroups, backbones, etc.).« less

  16. Structural Significance of Lipid Diversity as Studied by Small Angle Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Kučerka, Norbert; Heberle, Frederick A.; Pan, Jianjun; Katsaras, John

    2015-09-21

    In this paper, we review recent developments in the rapidly growing field of membrane biophysics, with a focus on the structural properties of single lipid bilayers determined by different scattering techniques, namely neutron and X-ray scattering. The need for accurate lipid structural properties is emphasized by the sometimes conflicting results found in the literature, even in the case of the most studied lipid bilayers. Increasingly, accurate and detailed structural models require more experimental data, such as those from contrast varied neutron scattering and X-ray scattering experiments that are jointly refined with molecular dynamics simulations. This experimental and computational approach produces robust bilayer structural parameters that enable insights, for example, into the interplay between collective membrane properties and its components (e.g., hydrocarbon chain length and unsaturation, and lipid headgroup composition). Finally, from model studies such as these, one is better able to appreciate how a real biological membrane can be tuned by balancing the contributions from the lipid’s different moieties (e.g., acyl chains, headgroups, backbones, etc.).

  17. Differential effects of natural palm oil, chemically- and enzymatically-modified palm oil on weight gain, blood lipid metabolites and fat deposition in a pediatric pig model

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Increasing prevalence of obesity and overweight in the Western world, continue to be a major health threat and is responsible for increased health care costs. Dietary intervention studies show a strong positive association between saturated fat intake and the development of obesity and cardiovascular disease. This study investigated the effect of positional distribution of palmitic acid (Sn-1, 2 & 3) of palm oil on cardiovascular health and development of obesity, using weaner pigs as a model for young children. Methods Male and female weaner piglets were randomly allocated to 4 dietary treatment groups: 1) pork lard (LRD); 2) natural palm olein (NPO); 3) chemically inter-esterified PO (CPO) and 4) enzymatically inter-esterified PO (EnPO) as the fat source. Diets were formulated with 11% lard or with palm olein in order to provide 31% of digestible energy from fat in the diet and were balanced for cholesterol, protein and energy across treatments. Results From 8 weeks onwards, pigs on EnPO diet gained (P < 0.05) more weight than all other groups. Feed conversion efficiency (feed to gain) over the 12 week experimental period did not vary between treatment groups. Plasma LDL-C content and LDL-C/HDL-C ratio in pigs fed natural PO tended to be lower compared to all other diets. The natural PO lowered (P < 0.02) the plasma triglyceride (TG) content relative to the lard or EnPO diets, but was not different from the CPO diet. The natural PO diet was associated with lower (P < 0.05) saturated fat levels in subcutaneous adipose tissue than the CPO and EnPO diets that had lower saturated fat levels than the lard diet. Female pigs had lower lean and higher fat and fat:lean ratio in the body compared with male pigs. No difference in weight gain or blood lipid parameters was observed between sexes. Conclusions The observations on plasma TG, muscle and adipose tissue saturated fatty acid contents and back fat (subcutaneous) thickness suggest that natural palm oil may

  18. Approaches of Russian oil companies to optimal capital structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishuk, T.; Ulyanova, O.; Savchitz, V.

    2015-11-01

    Oil companies play a vital role in Russian economy. Demand for hydrocarbon products will be increasing for the nearest decades simultaneously with the population growth and social needs. Change of raw-material orientation of Russian economy and the transition to the innovative way of the development do not exclude the development of oil industry in future. Moreover, society believes that this sector must bring the Russian economy on to the road of innovative development due to neo-industrialization. To achieve this, the government power as well as capital management of companies are required. To make their optimal capital structure, it is necessary to minimize the capital cost, decrease definite risks under existing limits, and maximize profitability. The capital structure analysis of Russian and foreign oil companies shows different approaches, reasons, as well as conditions and, consequently, equity capital and debt capital relationship and their cost, which demands the effective capital management strategy.

  19. Structural characteristics of oil-poor dilutable fish oil omega-3 microemulsions for ophthalmic applications.

    PubMed

    Lidich, Nina; Aserin, Abraham; Garti, Nissim

    2016-02-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) promotes synthesis of anti-inflammatory prostaglandins and relief of dry eye symptoms. However, topical ophthalmic application of DHA is difficult because of its lipophilic property. Therefore, it is important to develop aqueous-based formulation with enhanced capabilities. Novel, unique water-dilutable microemulsions (MEs) were constructed to allow loading of naturally occurring rigid long-chain triglyceride of DHA (TG-DHA). The TG-DHA serves as solubilizate and as the oil phase, therefore preparation is poor in oil. The structural transformations of MEs upon water dilution were studied by SAXS, viscosity, electrical conductivity, self-diffusion NMR, DSC, cryo-TEM, and DLS techniques. At low water content a new type of water-in-oil (W/O) structure is formed. The glycerol/water phase hydrates the headgroups of surfactants, and the oil solvates their tails, forming "ill-defined bicontinuous domains". Upon further water dilution more structured bicontinuous domains of high viscosity are formed. After additional dilution, the mesophases invert to oil-in-water (O/W) droplets of ∼8nm. In the structures composed of up to 25wt% water, the TG-DHA spaces and de-entangles the surfactant tails. Once the bicontinuous structures are formed, the surfactants and TG-DHA content decrease and their interfacial layer shrinks, leading to entanglement and buildup of viscous non-Newtonian mesophase. Above 70wt% water TG-DHA is embedded in the core of the O/W droplets, and its effect on the droplets' structure is minimal. This new dilutable ill-defined microemulsion can be a potential delivery vehicle for ophthalmic TG-DHA transport. PMID:26520814

  20. The structural role of cholesterol in cell membranes: from condensed bilayers to lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Krause, Martin R; Regen, Steven L

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Defining the two-dimensional structure of cell membranes represents one of the most daunting challenges currently facing chemists, biochemists, and biophysicists. In particular, the time-averaged lateral organization of the lipids and proteins that make up these natural enclosures has yet to be established. As the classic Singer-Nicolson model of cell membranes has evolved over the past 40 years, special attention has focused on the structural role played by cholesterol, a key component that represents ca. 30% of the total lipids that are present. Despite extensive studies with model membranes, two fundamental issues have remained a mystery: (i) the mechanism by which cholesterol condenses low-melting lipids by uncoiling their acyl chains and (ii) the thermodynamics of the interaction between cholesterol and high- and low-melting lipids. The latter bears directly on one of the most popular notions in modern cell biology, that is, the lipid raft hypothesis, whereby cholesterol is thought to combine with high-melting lipids to form "lipid rafts" that float in a "sea" of low-melting lipids. In this Account, we first describe a chemical approach that we have developed in our laboratories that has allowed us to quantify the interactions between exchangeable mimics of cholesterol and low- and high-melting lipids in model membranes. In essence, this "nearest-neighbor recognition" (NNR) method involves the synthesis of dimeric forms of these lipids that contain a disulfide moiety as a linker. By means of thiolate-disulfide interchange reactions, equilibrium mixtures of dimers are then formed. These exchange reactions are initiated either by adding dithiothreitol to a liposomal dispersion to generate a small amount of thiol monomer or by including a small amount of thiol monomer in the liposomes at pH 5.0 and then raising the pH to 7.4. We then show how such NNR measurements have allowed us to distinguish between two very different mechanisms that have been

  1. Influence of surfactant composition on physical and oxidative stability of Quillaja saponin-stabilized lipid particles with encapsulated ω-3 fish oil.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Hanna; Aulbach, Susanne; Leuenberger, Bruno H; Tedeschi, Concetta; Weiss, Jochen

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of a saponin-rich extract of Quillaja saponaria to replace bile salts in the surfactant formulations for stabilization of nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC). The influence of Quillaja extract and/or high-melting lecithin at different concentrations on physical and oxidative stability was evaluated in (i) NLC containing tristearin and ω-3 fish oil, (ii) ω-3 fish oil-in-water emulsion, and (iii) solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) containing tristearin. Best physical, polymorphic and oxidative stability of NLC were achieved with a surfactant combination of 2.4% (w/w) Quillaja extract and 0.6% (w/w) high-melting lecithin. The results showed that encapsulation of ω-3 fish oil into NLC inhibited the formation of lipid hydroperoxides, propanal and hexanal by 72, 53 and 57%, respectively, compared to the fish oil-in-water emulsion prepared with the same surfactants. This indicated that the low oxidation observed in NLC cannot be due to potential antioxidative effects of the surfactant combination itself. Evidence is accumulating that tristearin is able to form a protective shell around the ω-3 fish oil, when crystallization is induced via high-melting phospholipids in the solidified interfacial layer. PMID:25016544

  2. Effect of dietary oregano essential oil on performance of chickens and on iron-induced lipid oxidation of breast, thigh and abdominal fat tissues.

    PubMed

    Botsoglou, N A; Florou-Paneri, P; Christaki, E; Fletouris, D J; Spais, A B

    2002-05-01

    1. We studied the effect of dietary oregano essential oil (50 and 100 mg/kg of feed) on the performance of broilers, and determined the susceptibility of the resulting broiler meat to iron-induced lipid oxidation. 2. Performance of the birds was unaffected by the experimental diets. Therefore, dietary oregano oil exerted no growth-promoting effect on broilers. 3. Iron-induced lipid oxidation showed that as oregano oil increased in the diet, malondialdehyde values decreased in tissue samples, suggesting that the oil, particularly at 100 mg/kg of feed, exerted an antioxidant effect on chicken tissues. 4. Dietary alpha-tocopheryl acetate supplementation at 200 mg/kg of feed displayed greater antioxidant activity than oregano oil at either supplementation rate. 5. Thigh muscle was more susceptible to oxidation than breast muscle, although the former contained alpha-tocopherol at higher concentration. Muscle alpha-tocopherol is an important factor influencing lipid oxidation, but the influence of polyunsaturated fatty acids and content of pro-oxidants must be taken into consideration too. PMID:12047086

  3. Comparative evaluation of structured oil systems: Shellac oleogel, HPMC oleogel, and HIPE gel

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ashok R; Dewettinck, Koen

    2015-01-01

    In lipid-based food products, fat crystals are used as building blocks for creating a crystalline network that can trap liquid oil into a 3D gel-like structure which in turn is responsible for the desirable mouth feel and texture properties of the food products. However, the recent ban on the use of trans-fat in the US, coupled with the increasing concerns about the negative health effects of saturated fat consumption, has resulted in an increased interest in the area of identifying alternative ways of structuring edible oils using non-fat-based building blocks. In this paper, we give a brief account of three alternative approaches where oil structuring was carried out using wax crystals (shellac), polymer strands (hydrophilic cellulose derivative), and emulsion droplets as structurants. These building blocks resulted in three different types of oleogels that showed distinct rheological properties and temperature functionalities. The three approaches are compared in terms of the preparation process (ease of processing), properties of the formed systems (microstructure, rheological gel strength, temperature response, effect of water incorporation, and thixotropic recovery), functionality, and associated limitations of the structured systems. The comparative evaluation is made such that the new researchers starting their work in the area of oil structuring can use this discussion as a general guideline. Practical applications Various aspects of oil binding for three different building blocks were studied in this work. The practical significance of this study includes (i) information on the preparation process and the concentrations of structuring agents required for efficient gelation and (ii) information on the behavior of oleogels to temperature, applied shear, and presence of water. This information can be very useful for selecting the type of structuring agents keeping the final applications in mind. For detailed information on the actual edible applications

  4. Magnitude and detailed structure of residual oil saturation

    SciTech Connect

    Chatzis, I.; Morrow, N.R.; Lim, H.T.

    1982-01-01

    Experimental results are presented which demonstrate the effect on residual oil, under water-wet conditions, of particle size, particle size distribution, macroscopic and microscopic heterogeneities, microscopic dimensions such as ratio of pore body to pore throat size, and pore-to-pore coordination number. Experiments were performed in random packs of equal spheres, heterogeneous packs of spheres with microscopic and macroscopic heterogeneities, two-dimensional capillary networks having various pore geometries, and Berea sandstone. Detailed information on residual oil structure is presented, including blob size distributions of residual oil. Major conclusions are: (1) residual saturationds are independent of absolute pore size, per se, in systems of similar pore geometry; (2) well-mixed two-component aggregates of spheres gave virtually the same residual saturations as random packings of equal spheres; (3) clusters of large pores accessible through small pores will retain oil; (4) high aspect ratios tend to cause entrapment of oil as a large number of relatively small blobs, each held in single pores; and (5) the role of pore-to-pore coordination unber is generally secondary, hence correlations which have been proposed between residual oil and coordination number are unreliable.

  5. Magnitude and detailed structure of residual oil saturation

    SciTech Connect

    Chatzis, I.; Lim, H.T.; Morrow, N.R.

    1983-04-01

    Experimental results are presented that demonstrate the effect on residual oil, under water-wet conditions, of particle size, particle-size distribution, macroscopic and microscopic heterogeneities, microscopic dimensions such as ratio of pore-body to pore-throat size, and pore-to-pore coordination number. Experiments were performed in random packs of equal spheres, heterogeneous packs of spheres with microscopic and macroscopic heterogeneities, two-dimensional (2D) capillary networks having various pore geometries, and Berea sandstone. Detailed information on residual oil structure is presented, including blob-size distributions of residual oil. Major conclusions are: residual saturations are independent of absolute pore size, per se, in systems of similar pore geometry; well-mixed two-component aggregates of spheres gave virtually the same residual saturations as random packings of equal spheres; clusters of large pores accessible through small pores will retain oil; high aspect ratios tend to cause entrapment of oil as a large number of relatively small blobs, each held in single pores; and the role of pore-to-pore coordination number is generally secondary; hence, correlations that have been proposed between residual oil and coordination number are unreliable.

  6. Magnitude and detailed structure of residual oil saturation

    SciTech Connect

    Chatzis, I.; Lim, H.T.; Morrow, N.R.

    1983-04-01

    Experimental results are presented that demonstrate the effect on residual oil, under water-wet conditions, of particle size, particle-size distribution, macroscopic and microscopic heterogeneities, microscopic dimensions such as ratio of pore-body to pore-throat size, and pore-to-pore coordination number. Experiments were performed in random packs of equal spheres, heterogeneous packs of spheres with microscopic and macroscopic heterogeneities, two-dimensional (2D) capillary networks having various pore geometries, and Berea sandstone. Detailed information on residual oil structure is presented, including blob-size distributions of residual oil. Major conclusions are (1) residual saturations are independent of absolute pore size, per se, in systems of similar pore geometry; (2) well-mixed two-component aggregates of spheres gave virtually the same residual saturations as random packings of equal spheres; (3) clusters of large pores accessible through small pores will retain oil; (4) high aspect ratios tend to cause entrapment of oil as a large number of relatively small blobs, each held in single pores; and (5) the role of pore-to-pore coordination number is generally secondary; hence, correlations that have been proposed between residual oil and coordination number are unreliable.

  7. Crystal Structure of a Lipid G Protein-Coupled Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Michael A; Roth, Christopher B; Jo, Euijung; Griffith, Mark T; Scott, Fiona L; Reinhart, Greg; Desale, Hans; Clemons, Bryan; Cahalan, Stuart M; Schuerer, Stephan C; Sanna, M Germana; Han, Gye Won; Kuhn, Peter; Rosen, Hugh; Stevens, Raymond C

    2012-03-01

    The lyso-phospholipid sphingosine 1-phosphate modulates lymphocyte trafficking, endothelial development and integrity, heart rate, and vascular tone and maturation by activating G protein-coupled sphingosine 1-phosphate receptors. Here, we present the crystal structure of the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 fused to T4-lysozyme (S1P1-T4L) in complex with an antagonist sphingolipid mimic. Extracellular access to the binding pocket is occluded by the amino terminus and extracellular loops of the receptor. Access is gained by ligands entering laterally between helices I and VII within the transmembrane region of the receptor. This structure, along with mutagenesis, agonist structure-activity relationship data, and modeling, provides a detailed view of the molecular recognition and requirement for hydrophobic volume that activates S1P1, resulting in the modulation of immune and stromal cell responses.

  8. Comparison of plasma lipids and vitamin E in young and middle-aged subjects on potato crisps fried in palmolein and highly oleic sunflower oil.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, N; Truswell, A S; McNeil, Y

    1997-01-01

    We previously found no difference in healthy young adults' plasma cholesterols between palmolein and olive oil as the major dietary lipid, although the former is high in palmitic acid (16:0) but the latter in oleic acid (18:1 cis). In the experiment reported here we compared the effects of palmolein against another monounsaturated oil, highly oleic sunflower oil (HOSO), on plasma cholesterol in both young and middle-aged healthy adults. The test oils were provided as frying oil of potato crisps (150 g/day in men; 100 g/day in women) against low-fat background diets in free-living motivated volunteers. The design was a randomised double-blind 4-week/3-week crossover trial. Compliance was monitored with continuous dietary diaries and by measuring (fasting) plasma lipid fatty-acid pattern. Plasma lipids and vitamin-E compounds were measured at the start and twice at the end of each test period. In combined young plus older subjects (n = 42) mean plasma total and low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) values were both 7% (significantly) lower on HOSO than on palmolein, but because high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) was also 5% lower, the LDL-c/HDL-c ratio was only 3% lower on HOSO than on palmolein. The difference between the present results with HOSO and previous results with olive oil both compared against palmolein suggest that olive oil is associated with higher plasma cholesterols than other monounsaturated oils. In both the young and older subgroup, LDL-c was lower on HOSO but because HDL-c moved down too in the young subgroup, the LDL-c/HDL-c ratio was lower on HOSO only in the older subjects. Palmolein has an unusual pattern of E vitamins, with a high content of tocotrienols, notably the gamma-isomer. Unlike alpha-tocopherol however, there was no sign of these tocotrienols in subjects' plasmas. PMID:9286464

  9. Extracellular cellobiose lipid from yeast and their analogues: structures and fungicidal activities.

    PubMed

    Kulakovskaya, Tatyana; Shashkov, Alexander; Kulakovskaya, Ekaterina; Golubev, Wladyslav; Zinin, Alexander; Tsvetkov, Yury; Grachev, Alexey; Nifantiev, Nikolay

    2009-01-01

    Basidiomycetous yeasts Cryptococcus humicola and Pseudozyma fusiformata secrete cellobiose lipids into the culture broth. In the case of Cr. humicola, 16-(tetra-O-acetyl-beta-cellobiosyloxy)-2-hydroxyhexadecanoic acid was defined as major product and 16-(tetra-O-acetyl-beta-cellobiosyloxy)-2,15-dihydrohexadecanoic acid was defined as minor product, while Ps. fusiformata secreted mainly 16-[6-O-acetyl-2'-O-(3-hydroxyhexanoyl)-beta-cellobiosyloxy)-2,15-dihydroxyhexadecanoic acid. These compounds exhibit similar fungicidal activities against different yeasts including pathogenic Cryptococcus and Candida species. The cells of Filobasidiella neoformans causing systemic cryptococcosis completely died after 30-min incubation with 0.02 mg mL(-1) of cellobiose lipids. The same effect on ascomycetous yeast, including pathogenic Candida species, is achieved at 0.1-0.3 mg mL(-1) of cellobiose lipids depending on the test culture used. Cellobiose lipid of Ps. fusiformata inhibits the growth of phytopathogenic fungi Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Phomopsis helianthi more efficiently than cellobiose lipids from Cr. humicola. Fully O-deacylated analogue, namely 16-(beta-cellobiosyloxy)-2-hydroxyhexadecanoic acid, and totally synthetic compound, 16-(beta-cellobiosyloxy)-hexadecanoic acid, do not inhibit the growth of F. neoformans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, while 16-(beta-cellobiosyloxy)-2,15-dihydroxyhexadecanoic acid inhibits the growth of both test cultures but at higher concentrations than cellobiose lipids of Cr. humicola and Ps. fusiformata. The amide of 16-(beta-cellobiosyloxy)-2,15-dihydroxyhexadecanoic acid possessed no fungicide activity. Thus, the structures of both the carbohydrate part and fatty acid aglycon moiety are important for the fungicidal activity of cellobiose lipids. PMID:19202311

  10. Spruce galactoglucomannans inhibit the lipid oxidation in rapeseed oil-in-water emulsions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oil-in-water emulsions are functional and industrially valuable systems, whose large interfacial area makes them prone to deterioration, due in part to as the oxidation and oligomerization of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Spruce galactoglucomannans (GGM), wood biomacromolecules abundantly available f...

  11. Lipid oxidation in algae oil-in-water emulsions stabilized by bovine and caprine caseins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Caseins (alpha S1-, alpha S2-, and beta-casein) are phosphoproteins that are capable of binding transition metals and scavenging free radicals, these properties make them good candidates to be used as natural antioxidants in oil-in-water emulsions. Caprine casein exhibits variability in aS1-casein c...

  12. Lipid profile of in vitro oil produced through cell culture of Jatropha curcas.

    PubMed

    Correa, Sandra M; Atehortúa, Lucía

    2012-01-01

    Recent increases in energy demands as a consequence of population growth and industrialization, and pollution caused during the extraction and combustion of fossil fuel sources have driven the development of new energy sources that do not cause pollution and are inexpensive and renewable. Consequently, it is necessary to develop alternative ways of generating biofuels that put less pressure on agricultural lands and water supplies, and ensure ecosystems conservation. In order to achieve the proposed goals related to energetic coverage and independence, several approaches have been developed, including biodiesel production using vegetal oils as feedstock. The aim of the current research project was to apply a nonconventional bioprocess for in vitro biomass and oil production of Jatropha curcas, for assessing different J. curcas varieties, where seed tissue was isolated and used for callus induction. Once friable callus was obtained, cell suspension cultures were established. The cell viability, fatty acid content, and characteristics were used to select the most promising cell line according to its fatty acid profile and ability to grow and develop under in vitro conditions. Oil produced by cell suspension culture of the Jatropha varieties studied was extracted and characterized by GC/MS. Differences encountered among Jatropha varieties were related to their fatty acid profiles, oil content (% on dry basis), and cell viability measurements (%). PMID:22970586

  13. Heat-induced changes to lipid molecular structure in Vimy flaxseed: Spectral intensity and molecular clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Peiqiang; Damiran, Daalkhaijav

    2011-06-01

    Autoclaving was used to manipulate nutrient utilization and availability. The objectives of this study were to characterize any changes of the functional groups mainly associated with lipid structure in flaxseed ( Linum usitatissimum, cv. Vimy), that occurred on a molecular level during the treatment process using infrared Fourier transform molecular spectroscopy. The parameters included lipid CH 3 asymmetric (ca. 2959 cm -1), CH 2 asymmetric (ca. 2928 cm -1), CH 3 symmetric (ca. 2871 cm -1) and CH 2 symmetric (ca. 2954 cm -1) functional groups, lipid carbonyl C dbnd O ester group (ca. 1745 cm -1), lipid unsaturation group (CH attached to C dbnd C) (ca. 3010 cm -1) as well as their ratios. Hierarchical cluster analysis (CLA) and principal components analysis (PCA) were conducted to identify molecular spectral differences. Flaxseed samples were kept raw for the control or autoclaved in batches at 120 °C for 20, 40 or 60 min for treatments 1, 2 and 3, respectively. Molecular spectral analysis of lipid functional group ratios showed a significant decrease ( P < 0.05) in the CH 2 asymmetric to CH 3 asymmetric stretching band peak intensity ratios for the flaxseed. There were linear and quadratic effects ( P < 0.05) of the treatment time from 0, 20, 40 and 60 min on the ratios of the CH 2 asymmetric to CH 3 asymmetric stretching vibration intensity. Autoclaving had no significant effect ( P > 0.05) on lipid carbonyl C dbnd O ester group and lipid unsaturation group (CH attached to C dbnd C) (with average spectral peak area intensities of 138.3 and 68.8 IR intensity units, respectively). Multivariate molecular spectral analyses, CLA and PCA, were unable to make distinctions between the different treatment original spectra at the CH 3 and CH 2 asymmetric and symmetric region (ca. 2988-2790 cm -1). The results indicated that autoclaving had an impact to the mid-infrared molecular spectrum of flaxseed to identify heat-induced changes in lipid conformation. A future study

  14. Conformational studies of synthetic lipid A analogues and partial structures by infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Brandenburg, K; Kusumoto, S; Seydel, U

    1997-10-01

    Synthetic lipid A analogues and partial structures were analyzed and compared with natural hexaacyl lipid A from E. coli applying Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The investigations comprised (i) the measurement of the beta <=> alpha phase transition of the acyl chains via monitoring of the symmetric stretching vibration of the methylene groups, (ii) an estimation of the supramolecular aggregate structures evaluating vibrations from the interface like ester carbonyl and applying theoretical calculations (iii) a determination of the inter- and intramolecular conformations monitoring functional groups from the interface and the diglucosamine backbone (ester carbonyl, phosphate). The phase transition temperature Tc was found to be nearly a linear function of the number of acyl chains for most bisphosphoryl compounds indicating comparable packing density, whereas the deviating behaviour of some samples indicated a higher packing density. From the determination of the supramolecular aggregate structures (cubic, HII) of natural hexaacyl lipid A by X-ray small-angle diffraction, the existence of the same aggregate structures also for the synthetic hexaacyl lipid A was deduced from the nearly identical thermotropism of the ester carbonyl band. From this, a good approximation of the supramolecular structures of all synthetic samples was possible on the basis of the theory of Israelachvili. The analysis of the main phosphate band, together with that of the Tc data and former colorimetric results, allowed the establishment of a model of the intermolecular conformations of neighbouring lipid A/LPS molecules. The biological relevance of the findings is discussed in terms of the strongly varying biological activity (between high and no activity) of the samples. PMID:9370256

  15. An engineered lipid remodeling system using a galactolipid synthase promoter during phosphate starvation enhances oil accumulation in plants

    PubMed Central

    Shimojima, Mie; Madoka, Yuka; Fujiwara, Ryota; Murakawa, Masato; Yoshitake, Yushi; Ikeda, Keiko; Koizumi, Ryota; Endo, Keiji; Ozaki, Katsuya; Ohta, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Inorganic phosphate (Pi) depletion is a serious problem for plant growth. Membrane lipid remodeling is a defense mechanism that plants use to survive Pi-depleted conditions. During Pi starvation, phospholipids are degraded to supply Pi for other essential biological processes, whereas galactolipid synthesis in plastids is up-regulated via the transcriptional activation of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol synthase 3 (MGD3). Thus, the produced galactolipids are transferred to extraplastidial membranes to substitute for phospholipids. We found that, Pi starvation induced oil accumulation in the vegetative tissues of various seed plants without activating the transcription of enzymes involved in the later steps of triacylglycerol (TAG) biosynthesis. Moreover, the Arabidopsis starchless phosphoglucomutase mutant, pgm-1, accumulated higher TAG levels than did wild-type plants under Pi-depleted conditions. We generated transgenic plants that expressed a key gene involved in TAG synthesis using the Pi deficiency–responsive MGD3 promoter in wild-type and pgm-1 backgrounds. During Pi starvation, the transgenic plants accumulated higher TAG amounts compared with the non-transgenic plants, suggesting that the Pi deficiency–responsive promoter of galactolipid synthase in plastids may be useful for producing transgenic plants that accumulate more oil under Pi-depleted conditions. PMID:26379690

  16. How the multiple antioxidant properties of ascorbic acid affect lipid oxidation in oil-in-water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Uluata, Sibel; McClements, D Julian; Decker, Eric A

    2015-02-18

    Lipid oxidation is a serious problem for oil-containing food products because it negatively affects shelf life and nutritional composition. An antioxidant strategy commonly employed to prevent or delay oxidation in foods is to remove oxygen from the closed food-packaging system. An alternative technique is use of an edible oxygen scavenger to remove oxygen within the food. Ascorbic acid (AA) is a particularly promising antioxidant because of its natural label and multiple antioxidative functions. In this study, AA was tested as an oxygen scavenger in buffer and an oil-in-water (O/W) emulsion. The effects of transition metals on the ability of AA to scavenge oxygen were determined. Headspace oxygen decrease less than 1% in the medium-chain triacylglycerol (MCT) O/W emulsion system (pH 3 and 7). AA was able to almost completely remove dissolved oxygen (DO) in a buffered solution. Transition metals (Fe(2+) and Cu(+)) significantly accelerated the degradation of AA; however, iron and copper only increased DO depletion rates, by 10.6-16.4% from day 1 to 7, compared to the control. AA (2.5-20 mM) decreased DO in a 1% O/W emulsion system 32.0-64.0% and delayed the formation of headspace hexanal in the emulsion from 7 to over 20 days. This research shows that, when AA is used in an O/W emulsion system, oxidation of the emulsion system can be delay by multiple mechanisms. PMID:25650525

  17. Effects of dietary essential oil components on growth performance, digestive enzymes and lipid metabolism in female broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Lee, K W; Everts, H; Kappert, H J; Frehner, M; Losa, R; Beynen, A C

    2003-07-01

    1. The present experiment was conducted to describe the effects of thymol, cinnamaldehyde and a commercial preparation of essential oil components (CRINA Poultry), in female broilers. Feed and water were provided for ad libitum consumption. 2. Feed intake, weight gain and feed:gain ratio were not different among the treatments. Water intake was significantly lowered by cinnamaldehyde. Relative liver weight (g/100 g of body weight) was highest in birds given thymol, but this was seen only at the age of 21 d and not at 40 d. Patterns of digestive enzymes in pancreatic tissue were similar for the 4 treatments. 3. Amylase activity in intestinal digesta was highest in chickens given CRINA Poultry for 21 d, but the effect had disappeared after 40 d. Ileal digestibility coefficients for starch and protein were high and identical for all treatments. 4. Fatty acid composition of diet was reflected in that of adipose tissue. Plasma lipid concentrations were not changed by any dietary treatment. 5. Thus, the present results show no effect of essential oil constituents on growth performance in female broiler chickens, but it cannot be excluded that positive effects would have been observed under less hygienic environmental conditions or when using a less digestible diet. PMID:12964629

  18. Investigation of the structure of multilayer lipid membranes by real-time neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabova, N. Yu.; Kiselev, M. A.; Beskrovnyĭ, A. I.; Balagurov, A. M.

    2010-05-01

    This paper reports on the results of neutron diffraction experiments on the study of structural changes in multilayer lipid membranes as a function of the degree of hydration. The experiments have been performed on a time-of-flight diffractometer at the IBR-2 pulsed reactor (Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia) with a dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) multilayer membrane oriented on a quartz plate. The structural parameters have been determined from the simultaneously measured several (up to five) diffraction orders of reflection, which has made it possible to calculate the profile of the DPPC bilayer structure. A high rate of the measurement of diffraction patterns has allowed one to trace the evolution the lamellar structure of the lipid bilayer in the course of its hydration and dehydration. The minimum time of accumulation of the necessary statistics is 3 min, which has made it possible to determine the characteristic times of transition processes in the membrane with a high accuracy.

  19. Structure formation in binary mixtures of lipids and detergents: Self-assembly and vesicle division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Self-assembly dynamics in binary surfactant mixtures and structure changes of lipid vesicles induced by detergent solution are studied using coarse-grained molecular simulations. Disk-shaped micelles, the bicelles, are stabilized by detergents surrounding the rim of a bilayer disk of lipids. The self-assembled bicelles are considerably smaller than bicelles formed from vesicle rupture, and their size is determined by the concentrations of lipids and detergents and the interactions between the two species. The detergent-adsorption induces spontaneous curvature of the vesicle bilayer and results in vesicle division into two vesicles or vesicle rupture into worm-like micelles. The division occurs mainly via the inverse pathway of the modified stalk model. For large spontaneous curvature of the monolayers of the detergents, a pore is often opened, thereby leading to vesicle division or worm-like micelle formation.

  20. Lipid Transfer Proteins As Components of the Plant Innate Immune System: Structure, Functions, and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Finkina, E. I.; Melnikova, D. N.; Bogdanov, I. V.; Ovchinnikova, T. V.

    2016-01-01

    Among a variety of molecular factors of the plant innate immune system, small proteins that transfer lipids and exhibit a broad spectrum of biological activities are of particular interest. These are lipid transfer proteins (LTPs). LTPs are interesting to researchers for three main features. The first feature is the ability of plant LTPs to bind and transfer lipids, whereby these proteins got their name and were combined into one class. The second feature is that LTPs are defense proteins that are components of plant innate immunity. The third feature is that LTPs constitute one of the most clinically important classes of plant allergens. In this review, we summarize the available data on the plant LTP structure, biological properties, diversity of functions, mechanisms of action, and practical applications, emphasizing their role in plant physiology and their significance in human life. PMID:27437139

  1. Structure formation in binary mixtures of lipids and detergents: self-assembly and vesicle division.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2013-01-14

    Self-assembly dynamics in binary surfactant mixtures and structure changes of lipid vesicles induced by detergent solution are studied using coarse-grained molecular simulations. Disk-shaped micelles, the bicelles, are stabilized by detergents surrounding the rim of a bilayer disk of lipids. The self-assembled bicelles are considerably smaller than bicelles formed from vesicle rupture, and their size is determined by the concentrations of lipids and detergents and the interactions between the two species. The detergent-adsorption induces spontaneous curvature of the vesicle bilayer and results in vesicle division into two vesicles or vesicle rupture into worm-like micelles. The division occurs mainly via the inverse pathway of the modified stalk model. For large spontaneous curvature of the monolayers of the detergents, a pore is often opened, thereby leading to vesicle division or worm-like micelle formation. PMID:23320721

  2. Dietary strawberry seed oil affects metabolite formation in the distal intestine and ameliorates lipid metabolism in rats fed an obesogenic diet

    PubMed Central

    Jurgoński, Adam; Fotschki, Bartosz; Juśkiewicz, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    Objective To answer the question whether dietary strawberry seed oil rich in α-linolenic acid and linoleic acid (29.3 and 47.2% of total fatty acids, respectively) can beneficially affect disorders induced by the consumption of an obesogenic diet. Design Thirty-two male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to four groups of eight animals each and fed with a basal or obesogenic (high in fat and low in fiber) diet that contained either strawberry seed oil or an edible rapeseed oil. A two-way analysis of variance was then applied to assess the effects of diet and oil and the interaction between them. Results After 8 weeks of feeding, the obesogenic diet increased the body weight and the liver mass and fat content, whereas decreased the cecal acetate and butyrate concentration. This diet also altered the plasma lipid profile and decreased the liver sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c (SREBP-1c) content. However, the lowest liver SREBP-1c content was observed in rats fed an obesogenic diet containing strawberry seed oil. Moreover, dietary strawberry seed oil decreased the cecal short-chain fatty acid concentrations (acetate, propionate, and butyrate) regardless of the diet type, whereas the cecal β-glucuronidase activity was considerably increased only in rats fed an obesogenic diet containing strawberry seed oil. Dietary strawberry seed oil also lowered the liver fat content, the plasma triglyceride level and the atherogenic index of plasma. Conclusions Strawberry seed oil has a potent lipid-lowering activity but can unfavorably affect microbial metabolism in the distal intestine. The observed effects are partly due to the synergistic action of the oil and the obesogenic diet. PMID:25636326

  3. Structural Characterization of Lecithin-Stabilized Tetracosane Lipid Nanoparticles. Part I: Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Schmiele, M; Busch, S; Morhenn, H; Schindler, T; Schmutzler, T; Schweins, R; Lindner, P; Boesecke, P; Westermann, M; Steiniger, F; Funari, Sérgio S; Unruh, T

    2016-06-23

    The structure of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC)-stabilized colloidal tetracosane emulsions was investigated by photon correlation spectroscopy and small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering, using emulsions with different neutron scattering contrasts. Special emphasis was placed on the structure of the DMPC stabilizer layer covering the emulsion droplets. A monolayer, structurally similar to a half DMPC bilayer, with a thickness of 16 Å is found. Thereby, the phosphocholine headgroups arrange flat at the oil-water interface. A deep penetration of the tetracosane oil into the stabilizer layer can be ruled out. PMID:27231751

  4. Lipid membrane structure and dynamics in the presence of tamoxifen and antimicrobial peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebenstreit, Samuel; Khadka, Nawal; Pan, Jianjun

    2015-03-01

    Lipids are organic molecules composed of hydrophobic fatty acid tails and hydrophilic head groups that can form a multitude of structures, including lipid vesicles which provides an excellent model representing cell membranes. In this study, we examine the effects of antimicrobial peptides and drugs on lipid vesicles. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements are performed with and without the antimicrobial peptide. A change in absorbance corresponding to the wavenumber regimes associated with the stretching of the carbonyl and phosphate groups is observed. Also, a dye leakage assay is performed with vesicles composed of neutral and charged lipids. Calcein dye is enclosed within these vesicles in solution. Different concentrations of the active and inactive antimicrobial peptides, and tamoxifen are incubated with the vesicles. Concentration dependent dye leakage is determined by measuring fluorescence intensity before and after the addition of the peptides and tamoxifen. Different leakage behavior is observed for the active and inactive peptides, and the lipid composition of the vesicle is found to have a large effect. Supported by an NSF grant.

  5. Solution Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction Reveals Structural Details of Lipid Domains in Ternary Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, J.; Kiss, A; Pramudya, Y; Nguyen, L; Hirst, L

    2009-01-01

    The influence of cholesterol on lipid bilayer structure is significant and the effect of cholesterol on lipid sorting and phase separation in lipid-raft-forming model membrane systems has been well investigated by microscopy methods on giant vesicles. An important consideration however is the influence of fluorescence illumination on the phase state of these lipids and this effect must be carefully minimized. In this paper, we show that synchrotron x-ray scattering on solution lipid mixtures is an effective alternative technique for the identification and characterization of the l o (liquid ordered) and l d (liquid disordered) phases. The high intensity of synchrotron x rays allows the observation of up to 5 orders of diffraction from the l o phase, whereas only two are clearly visible when the l d phase alone is present. This data can be collected in approximately 1 min/sample, allowing rapid generation of phase data. In this paper, we measure the lamellar spacing in both the liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered phases simultaneously, as a function of cholesterol concentration in two different ternary mixtures. We also observe evidence of a third gel-phaselike population at 10-12 mol % cholesterol and determine the thickness of the bilayer for this phase. Importantly we are able to look at phase coexistence in the membrane independent of photoeffects.

  6. Effect of lipid structure on the dipole potential of phosphatidylcholine bilayers.

    PubMed

    Clarke, R J

    1997-07-25

    A fluorescent ratio method utilizing styrylpyridinium dyes has recently been suggested for the measurement of the membrane dipole potential. Up to now only qualititative measurements have been possible. Here the fluorescence excitation ratio of the dye di-8-ANEPPS has been measured in lipid vesicles composed of a range of saturated and unsaturated phosphatidylcholines. It has been found that the fluorescence ratio is inversely proportional to the surface area occupied by the lipid in its fully hydrated state. This finding allows, by extra- and interpolation, the packing density to be estimated of phosphatidylcholines for which X-ray crystallographic data are not yet available. Comparison of the fluorescence data with literature data of the dipole potential from electrical measurements on monolayers and bilayers allows a calibration curve to be constructed, so that a quantitative determination of the dipole potential using di-8-ANEPPS is possible. It has been found that the value of the dipole potential decreases with increasing unsaturation and, in the case of unsaturated lipids, with increasing length of the hydrocarbon chains. This effect can be explained by the effects of chain packing on the spacing between the headgroups. In addition to the effects of lipid structure on membrane fluidity, these measurements demonstrate the possibility of a direct electrical mechanism for lipid regulation of protein function, in particular of ion transport proteins. PMID:9271269

  7. Profiling of phospholipids and related lipid structures using multidimensional ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimpin, Sarah; Tan, Bo; Bohrer, Brian C.; O'Dell, David K.; Merenbloom, Samuel I.; Pazos, Mauricio X.; Clemmer, David E.; Walker, J. Michael

    2009-10-01

    Increasingly comprehensive questions related to the biosynthesis of lipids relevant to understanding new signaling pathways have created daunting tasks for their chemical analysis. Here, ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and mass spectrometry (MS) techniques combined with electrospray ionization have been used to examine mixtures of closely related lipid structures. The drift time distributions of sphingomyelins show baseline separations for ethylene chain length differences ([Delta] ~ 1.2 ms) and partial separations in single unsaturation differences ([Delta] ~ 0.3 ms) revealing that the most compact structures are observed with shorter chains and increasing unsaturation. Drift time distributions of different ionizations frequently fall into families with the same drift times (isodrifts) indicating that the ion attached to the lipid has little structural influence. The present data show that phospholipids, especially phosphatidylinositol, aggregate to form inverted micelles. Phospholipids (phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, sphingomyelin, and phosphatidylinositol) are effectively separated according to their polar head groups. This method also provides information about the mixture composition of the chemically different lipids N-palmitoyl glycine, N-arachidonoyl ethanolamide, and phosphatidylcholine existing over an array of charge states and sizes (inverted micelles) depending on mixture concentration. Multidimensional IMS3-MS introduces an additional dimension to fragmentation analysis by separating the fragmented ions into groups related to size, shape and charge and allows determination of sn-1 and sn-2 substitution as is shown for phosphatidylglycerols. This contribution provides evidence for extending the targeted approach to global lipidomics analysis using the high-efficiency gas-phase separation afforded by multidimensional IMS-MS.

  8. Structural basis for self-assembly of a cytolytic pore lined by protein and lipid.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Koji; Caaveiro, Jose M M; Morante, Koldo; González-Mañas, Juan Manuel; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2015-01-01

    Pore-forming toxins (PFT) are water-soluble proteins that possess the remarkable ability to self-assemble on the membrane of target cells, where they form pores causing cell damage. Here, we elucidate the mechanism of action of the haemolytic protein fragaceatoxin C (FraC), a α-barrel PFT, by determining the crystal structures of FraC at four different stages of the lytic mechanism, namely the water-soluble state, the monomeric lipid-bound form, an assembly intermediate and the fully assembled transmembrane pore. The structure of the transmembrane pore exhibits a unique architecture composed of both protein and lipids, with some of the lipids lining the pore wall, acting as assembly cofactors. The pore also exhibits lateral fenestrations that expose the hydrophobic core of the membrane to the aqueous environment. The incorporation of lipids from the target membrane within the structure of the pore provides a membrane-specific trigger for the activation of a haemolytic toxin. PMID:25716479

  9. Structural basis for self-assembly of a cytolytic pore lined by protein and lipid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Koji; Caaveiro, Jose M. M.; Morante, Koldo; González-Mañas, Juan Manuel; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2015-02-01

    Pore-forming toxins (PFT) are water-soluble proteins that possess the remarkable ability to self-assemble on the membrane of target cells, where they form pores causing cell damage. Here, we elucidate the mechanism of action of the haemolytic protein fragaceatoxin C (FraC), a α-barrel PFT, by determining the crystal structures of FraC at four different stages of the lytic mechanism, namely the water-soluble state, the monomeric lipid-bound form, an assembly intermediate and the fully assembled transmembrane pore. The structure of the transmembrane pore exhibits a unique architecture composed of both protein and lipids, with some of the lipids lining the pore wall, acting as assembly cofactors. The pore also exhibits lateral fenestrations that expose the hydrophobic core of the membrane to the aqueous environment. The incorporation of lipids from the target membrane within the structure of the pore provides a membrane-specific trigger for the activation of a haemolytic toxin.

  10. Structural basis for self-assembly of a cytolytic pore lined by protein and lipid

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Koji; Caaveiro, Jose M.M.; Morante, Koldo; González-Mañas, Juan Manuel; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2015-01-01

    Pore-forming toxins (PFT) are water-soluble proteins that possess the remarkable ability to self-assemble on the membrane of target cells, where they form pores causing cell damage. Here, we elucidate the mechanism of action of the haemolytic protein fragaceatoxin C (FraC), a α-barrel PFT, by determining the crystal structures of FraC at four different stages of the lytic mechanism, namely the water-soluble state, the monomeric lipid-bound form, an assembly intermediate and the fully assembled transmembrane pore. The structure of the transmembrane pore exhibits a unique architecture composed of both protein and lipids, with some of the lipids lining the pore wall, acting as assembly cofactors. The pore also exhibits lateral fenestrations that expose the hydrophobic core of the membrane to the aqueous environment. The incorporation of lipids from the target membrane within the structure of the pore provides a membrane-specific trigger for the activation of a haemolytic toxin. PMID:25716479

  11. Domains of surfactant protein A that affect protein oligomerization, lipid structure and surface tension.

    PubMed

    Palaniyar, N; Ikegami, M; Korfhagen, T; Whitsett, J; McCormack, F X

    2001-05-01

    Surfactant protein A (SP-A) is an abundant protein found in pulmonary surfactant which has been reported to have multiple functions. In this review, we focus on the structural importance of each domain of SP-A in the functions of protein oligomerization, the structural organization of lipids and the surface-active properties of surfactant, with an emphasis on ultrastructural analyses. The N-terminal domain of SP-A is required for disulfide-dependent protein oligomerization, and for binding and aggregation of phospholipids, but there is no evidence that this domain directly interacts with lipid membranes. The collagen-like domain is important for the stability and oligomerization of SP-A. It also contributes shape and dimension to the molecule, and appears to determine membrane spacing in lipid aggregates such as common myelin and tubular myelin. The neck domain of SP-A is primarily involved in protein trimerization, which is critical for many protein functions, but it does not appear to be directly involved in lipid interactions. The globular C-terminal domain of SP-A clearly plays a central role in lipid binding, and in more complex functions such as the formation and/or stabilization of curved membranes. In recent work, we have determined that the maintenance of low surface tension of surfactant in the presence of serum protein inhibitors requires cooperative interactions between the C-terminal and N-terminal domains of the molecule. This effect of SP-A requires a high degree of oligomeric assembly of the protein, and may be mediated by the activity of the protein to alter the form or physical state of surfactant lipid aggregates. PMID:11369537

  12. The structural differences between the embryos of viable and nonviable wheat seeds as studied with the EPR spectroscopy of lipid-soluble spin labels.

    PubMed

    Golovina, E A; Tikhonov, A N

    1994-03-23

    Dried and hydrated embryos of wheat seeds (viable and nonviable, harvested in 1992 and 1976, respectively) were studied by the EPR method with the use of the spin-labeling technique. Spin label Tempone was used for testing the plasmalemma integrity. It has been demonstrated that the loss of seed viability correlates with the loss of external membrane integrity. Spin-labeled derivatives of stearic acids, 5-doxylstearate I(12.3) and 16-doxylstearate I(1.14), were used to monitor the changes in structural characteristics of embryo cell membranes. The EPR spectra of these spin labels represent the superpositions of at least two signals from the molecules located in domains characterized by different fluidity. The comparison of the EPR spectra from I(12.3) in embryo cells and model systems (total fraction of lipids and purified seed oil) indicates that the majority of spin label molecules is located in the lipid surroundings, while the minor portion of I(12.3) is localized in so-called lipid bodies which contain seed oil. The embryo cells of viable and nonviable seeds differ in the sizes of these 'solid' and 'fluid' intracellular domains. The environment of spin label molecules located in cell membranes of nonviable seeds is more rigid, as compared with that in the membranes of the viable cells. The study of dehydration-rehydration effects has demonstrated that the loss of water causes the restriction of spin label mobility in embryo cells from both kinds of seeds. PMID:8142440

  13. A substrate-based approach for the selection of oil-bearing heterotrophs from nitrogen-deficient soil for lipid production.

    PubMed

    Kuttiraja, M; Krishna, Shyam; Dhouha, Ayed; Tyagi, Rajeshwar Dayal

    2015-02-01

    In this study, nine heterotrophic yeast isolates were tested for their ability to assimilate crude glycerol and consecutive conversion to triacylglycerides (TGAs). All the organisms were initially screened on crude glycerol-based selection media, and those producing lipid globules were further evaluated for lipid production. Sudan Black B staining of eight isolates showed lipid globules. These strains were further studied at different C/N ratio. The molecular identification revealed that the isolates belonged to the genera of Yarrowia and Candida. Among these isolates, SKY7 (Yarrowia lipolytica) produced up to 42.04 ± 0.11 % of lipid w/w) with a C/N ratio of 100 and fermentation time of 72 h. The other strains produced 5.82 ± 0.4 to 34.57 ± 0.44 % lipid (w/w). The GC-flame ionization detector (FID) lipid profile showed that the lipid produced by the strains had close resemblance with vegetable oil and could serve as a feedstock for biodiesel production. Biolog test of the isolates revealed a wide spectrum of carbon utilization. PMID:25432337

  14. Membrane attachment and structure models of lipid storage droplet protein 1.

    PubMed

    Lin, Penghui; Chen, Xiao; Moktan, Hem; Arrese, Estela L; Duan, Lian; Wang, Liying; Soulages, Jose L; Zhou, Donghua H

    2014-03-01

    Neutral lipid triglycerides, a main reserve for fat and energy, are stored in organelles called lipid droplets. The storage and release of triglycerides are actively regulated by several proteins specific to the droplet surface, one of which in insects is PLIN1. PLIN1 plays a key role in the activation of triglyceride hydrolysis upon phosphorylation. However, the structure of PLIN1 and its relation to functions remain elusive due to its insolubility and crystallization difficulty. Here we report the first solid-state NMR study on the Drosophila melanogaster PLIN1 in combination with molecular dynamics simulation to show the structural basis for its lipid droplet attachment. NMR spin diffusion experiments were consistent with the predicted membrane attachment motif of PLIN1. The data indicated that PLIN1 has close contact with the terminal methyl groups of the phospholipid acyl chains. Structure models for the membrane attachment motif were generated based on hydrophobicity analysis and NMR membrane insertion depth information. Simulated NMR spectra from a trans-model agreed with experimental spectra. In this model, lipids from the bottom leaflet were very close to the surface in the region enclosed by membrane attachment motif. This may imply that in real lipid droplet, triglyceride molecules might be brought close to the surface by the same mechanism, ready to leave the droplet in the event of lipolysis. Juxtaposition of triglyceride lipase structure to the trans-model suggested a possible interaction of a conserved segment with the lipase by electrostatic interactions, opening the lipase lid to expose the catalytic center. PMID:24333382

  15. Membrane attachment and structure models of lipid storage droplet protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Penghui; Chen, Xiao; Moktan, Hem; Arrese, Estela L.; Duan, Lian; Wang, Liying; Soulages, Jose L.; Zhou, Donghua H.

    2014-01-01

    Neutral lipid triglycerides, a main reserve for fat and energy, are stored in organelles called lipid droplets. The storage and release of triglycerides are actively regulated by several proteins specific to the droplet surface, one of which in insects is PLIN1. PLIN1 plays a key role in the activation of triglyceride hydrolysis upon phosphorylation. However, the structure of PLIN1 and its relation to functions remain elusive due to its insolubility and crystallization difficulty. Here we report the first solid-state NMR study on the Drosophila melanogaster PLIN1 in combination with molecular dynamics simulation to show the structural basis for its lipid droplet attachment. NMR spin diffusion experiments were consistent with the predicted membrane attachment motif of PLIN1. The data indicated that PLIN1 has close contact with the terminal methyl groups of the phospholipid acyl chains. Structure models for the membrane attachment motif were generated based on hydrophobicity analysis and NMR membrane insertion depth information. Simulated NMR spectra from a trans-model agreed with experimental spectra. In this model, lipids from the bottom leaflet were very close to the surface in the region enclosed by membrane attachment motif. This may imply that in real lipid droplet, triglyceride molecules might be brought close to the surface by the same mechanism, ready to leave the droplet in the event of lipolysis. Juxtaposition of triglyceride lipase structure to the trans-model suggested a possible interaction of a conserved segment with the lipase by electrostatic interactions, opening the lipase lid to expose the catalytic center. PMID:24333382

  16. Inhibition of endotoxin-induced interleukin-6 production by synthetic lipid A partial structures in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, M H; Flad, H D; Feist, W; Brade, H; Kusumoto, S; Rietschel, E T; Ulmer, A J

    1991-01-01

    The effect of two synthetic lipid A partial structures, compound 406 (or LA-14-PP, identical in structure to the lipid A precursor, known as Ia or IVa) and compound 401 (lipid X), on the in vitro modulation of endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide)-induced interleukin-6 production by human blood mononuclear cells was investigated. Lipopolysaccharide of Salmonella abortus equi and synthetic Escherichia coli-type lipid A (compound 506, or LA-15-PP) had potent interleukin-6-inducing capacities. The maximum release of interleukin-6 was found after stimulation with 1 to 10 ng of lipopolysaccharide or 10 to 100 ng of synthetic E. coli-type lipid A per ml. Both synthetic lipid A partial structures (compounds 406 and 401) failed to induce interleukin-6 release. However, they inhibited lipopolysaccharide- or lipid A-induced interleukin-6 production in a dose-dependent manner. Inhibition was found not only in mononuclear cells but also in purified monocytes and was not due to a shift in the kinetics of cytokine production. Suppression was manifested in the early stage of interleukin-6 production. Inhibition was also found in the presence of recombinant gamma interferon, indicating that compound 406 and recombinant gamma interferon act in different, independent pathways. Our data, therefore, indicate that the inhibition of interleukin-6 production by lipid A partial structures may help elucidate the mechanism of interaction of the lipid A component of lipopolysaccharide with immune cells in the inflammatory reaction during gram-negative infection. PMID:1937825

  17. Dietary α-linolenic acid-rich flaxseed oil prevents against alcoholic hepatic steatosis via ameliorating lipid homeostasis at adipose tissue-liver axis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meng; Zhang, Xiao-Jing; Feng, Kun; He, Chengwei; Li, Peng; Hu, Yuan-Jia; Su, Huanxing; Wan, Jian-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Low levels of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in serum and liver tissue biopsies are the common characteristics in patients with alcoholic liver disease. The α-linolenic acid (ALA) is a plant-derived n-3 PUFA and is rich in flaxseed oil. However, the impact of ALA on alcoholic fatty liver is largely unknown. In this study, we assessed the potential protective effects of ALA-rich flaxseed oil (FO) on ethanol-induced hepatic steatosis and observed that dietary FO supplementation effectively attenuated the ethanol-induced hepatic lipid accumulation in mice. Ethanol exposure stimulated adipose lipolysis but reduced fatty acid/lipid uptake, which were normalized by FO. Our investigations into the corresponding mechanisms demonstrated that the ameliorating effect of FO might be associated with the lower endoplasmic reticulum stress and normalized lipid metabolism in adipose tissue. In the liver, alcohol exposure stimulated hepatic fatty acid uptake and triglyceride synthesis, which were attenuated by FO. Additionally, dietary FO upregulated plasma adiponectin concentration, hepatic adiponectin receptor 2 expression, and the activation of hepatic adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase. Collectively, dietary FO protects against alcoholic hepatic steatosis by improving lipid homeostasis at the adipose tissue-liver axis, suggesting that dietary ALA-rich flaxseed oil might be a promising approach for prevention of alcoholic fatty liver. PMID:27220557

  18. Impact of N-acetylcysteine and sesame oil on lipid metabolism and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis homeostasis in middle-aged hypercholesterolemic mice

    PubMed Central

    Korou, Laskarina-Maria; Agrogiannis, George; Koros, Christos; Kitraki, Efthimia; Vlachos, Ioannis S.; Tzanetakou, Irene; Karatzas, Theodore; Pergialiotis, Vasilios; Dimitroulis, Dimitrios; Perrea, Despina N.

    2014-01-01

    Hyperlipidemia and stress are important factors affecting cardiovascular health in middle-aged individuals. We investigated the effects of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and sesame oil on the lipidemic status, liver architecture and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis of middle-aged mice fed a cholesterol-enriched diet. We randomized 36 middle-aged C57bl/6 mice into 6 groups: a control group, a cholesterol/cholic acid diet group, a cholesterol/cholic acid diet group with NAC supplementation, a cholesterol/cholic acid diet enriched with 10% sesame oil and two groups receiving a control diet enriched with NAC or sesame oil. NAC administration prevented the onset of the disturbed lipid profile, exhibiting decreased lipid peroxidation and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) levels, restored nitric oxide bioavailability and reduced hepatic damage, compared to non-supplemented groups. High-cholesterol feeding resulted in increased hypothalamic glucocorticoid receptors (GR) levels, while NAC supplementation prevented this effect. NAC supplementation presented significant antioxidant capacity by means of preventing serum lipid status alterations, hepatic damage, and HPA axis disturbance due to high-cholesterol feeding in middle-aged mice. These findings suggest a beneficial preventive action of plant-derived antioxidants, such as NAC, on lipid metabolism and on the HPA axis. PMID:25348324

  19. Atomic Structure of a Voltage-Dependent K+ Channel in a Lipid Membrane-Like Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Long,S.; Tao, X.; Campbell, E.; MacKinnon, R.

    2007-01-01

    Voltage-dependent K+ (Kv) channels repolarize the action potential in neurons and muscle. This type of channel is gated directly by membrane voltage through protein domains known as voltage sensors, which are molecular voltmeters that read the membrane voltage and regulate the pore. Here we describe the structure of a chimaeric voltage-dependent K+ channel, which we call the 'paddle-chimaera channel', in which the voltage-sensor paddle has been transferred from Kv2.1 to Kv1.2. Crystallized in complex with lipids, the complete structure at 2.4 Angstroms resolution reveals the pore and voltage sensors embedded in a membrane-like arrangement of lipid molecules. The detailed structure, which can be compared directly to a large body of functional data, explains charge stabilization within the membrane and suggests a mechanism for voltage-sensor movements and pore gating.

  20. Measuring Ca2+-Induced Structural Changes in Lipid Monolayers: Implications for Synaptic Vesicle Exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sajal Kumar; Castorph, Simon; Konovalov, Oleg; Salditt, Tim; Jahn, Reinhard; Holt, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Synaptic vesicles (SVs) are small, membrane-bound organelles that are found in the synaptic terminal of neurons. Although tremendous progress has been made in understanding the protein machinery that drives fusion of SVs with the presynaptic membrane, little progress has been made in understanding changes in the membrane structure that accompany this process. We used lipid monolayers of defined composition to mimic biological membranes, which were probed by x-ray reflectivity and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction. These techniques allowed us to successfully monitor structural changes in the membranes at molecular level, both in response to injection of SVs in the subphase below the monolayer, as well as to physiological cues involved in neurotransmitter release, such as increases in the concentration of the membrane lipid PIP2, or addition of physiological levels of Ca2+. Such structural changes may well modulate vesicle fusion in vivo. PMID:22455922

  1. Electron tomography reveals the fibril structure and lipid interactions in amyloid deposits.

    PubMed

    Kollmer, Marius; Meinhardt, Katrin; Haupt, Christian; Liberta, Falk; Wulff, Melanie; Linder, Julia; Handl, Lisa; Heinrich, Liesa; Loos, Cornelia; Schmidt, Matthias; Syrovets, Tatiana; Simmet, Thomas; Westermark, Per; Westermark, Gunilla T; Horn, Uwe; Schmidt, Volker; Walther, Paul; Fändrich, Marcus

    2016-05-17

    Electron tomography is an increasingly powerful method to study the detailed architecture of macromolecular complexes or cellular structures. Applied to amyloid deposits formed in a cell culture model of systemic amyloid A amyloidosis, we could determine the structural morphology of the fibrils directly in the deposit. The deposited fibrils are arranged in different networks, and depending on the relative fibril orientation, we can distinguish between fibril meshworks, fibril bundles, and amyloid stars. These networks are frequently infiltrated by vesicular lipid inclusions that may originate from the death of the amyloid-forming cells. Our data support the role of nonfibril components for constructing fibril deposits and provide structural views of different types of lipid-fibril interactions. PMID:27140609

  2. Food web structure in oil sands reclaimed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Kovalenko, K E; Ciborowski, J J H; Daly, C; Dixon, D G; Farwell, A J; Foote, A L; Frederick, K R; Costa, J M Gardner; Kennedy, K; Liber, K; Roy, M C; Slama, C A; Smits, J E G

    2013-07-01

    Boreal wetlands play an important role in global carbon balance. However, their ecosystem function is threatened by direct anthropogenic disturbance and climate change. Oil sands surface mining in the boreal regions of Western Canada denudes tracts of land of organic materials, leaves large areas in need of reclamation, and generates considerable quantities of extraction process-affected materials. Knowledge and validation of reclamation techniques that lead to self-sustaining wetlands has lagged behind development of protocols for reclaiming terrestrial systems. It is important to know whether wetlands reclaimed with oil sands process materials can be restored to levels equivalent to their original ecosystem function. We approached this question by assessing carbon flows and food web structure in naturally formed and oil sands-affected wetlands constructed in 1970-2004 in the postmining landscape. We evaluated whether a prescribed reclamation strategy, involving organic matter amendment, accelerated reclaimed wetland development, leading to wetlands that were more similar to their natural marsh counterparts than wetlands that were not supplemented with organic matter. We measured compartment standing stocks for bacterioplankton, microbial biofilm, macrophytes, detritus, and zoobenthos; concentrations of dissolved organic carbon and residual naphthenic acids; and microbial production, gas fluxes, and aquatic-terrestrial exports (i.e., aquatic insect emergence). The total biomass of several biotic compartments differed significantly between oil sands and reference wetlands. Submerged macrophyte biomass, macroinvertebrate trophic diversity, and predator biomass and richness were lower in oil sands-affected wetlands than in reference wetlands. There was insufficient evidence to conclude that wetland age and wetland amendment with peat-mineral mix mitigate effects of oil sands waste materials on the fully aquatic biota. Although high variability was observed within

  3. Structural characterization of the lipid A from the LPS of the haloalkaliphilic bacterium Halomonas pantelleriensis.

    PubMed

    Carillo, Sara; Pieretti, Giuseppina; Casillo, Angela; Lindner, Buko; Romano, Ida; Nicolaus, Barbara; Parrilli, Michelangelo; Giuliano, Mariateresa; Cammarota, Marcella; Lanzetta, Rosa; Corsaro, Maria Michela

    2016-09-01

    Halomonas pantelleriensis DSM9661(Τ) is a Gram-negative haloalkaliphilic bacterium isolated from the sand of the volcanic Venus mirror lake, closed to seashore in the Pantelleria Island in the south of Italy. It is able to optimally grow in media containing 3-15 % (w/v) total salt and at pH between 9 and 10. To survive in these harsh conditions, the bacterium has developed several strategies that probably concern the bacteria outer membrane, a barrier regulating the exchange with the environment. In such a context, the lipopolysaccharides (LPSs), which are among the major constituent of the Gram-negative outer membrane, are thought to contribute to the restrictive membrane permeability properties. The structure of the lipid A family derived from the LPS of Halomonas pantelleriensis DSM 9661(T) is reported herein. The lipid A was obtained from the purified LPS by mild acid hydrolysis. The lipid A, which contains different numbers of fatty acids residues, and its partially deacylated derivatives were completely characterized by means of ESI FT-ICR mass spectrometry and chemical analysis. Preliminary immunological assays were performed, and a comparison with the lipid A structure of the phylogenetic proximal Halomonas magadiensis is also reported. PMID:27329160

  4. Application of Small-Angle Neutron and X-ray Scattering in Determining Lipid Bilayer Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Jianjun; Heberle, Frederick A.; Kucerka, Norbert; Tristram-Nagle, Stephanie; Szymanski, Michelle; Koepfinger, Mary; Katsaras, John

    2012-02-01

    Accurately determining lipid structure in biologically relevant fluid bilayers is not straightforward. We have recently developed a hybrid experimental/computational technique (i.e., the scattering density profile, or SDP model), which exploits the fact that neutron and X-ray scattering are sensitive to different bilayer thicknesses - the large difference in neutron scattering length density (SLD) between proteated lipid and deuterated water defines the overall bilayer thickness, while X-ray scattering resolves the headgroup-headgroup distance due to the large scattering contrast between the electron-rich phosphate groups and the hydrocarbon/aqueous medium. A key step in the SDP analysis is the use of MD simulations to parse the lipid molecule into fragments whose volume probability distributions follow simple analytical functional forms. Given the appropriate atomic scattering lengths, these volume probabilities can simultaneously predict both the neutron and X-ray SLD profiles, and hence the scattering form factors. Structural results for commonly used phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol lipids will be given.

  5. Regulatory Mechanisms Underlying Oil Palm Fruit Mesocarp Maturation, Ripening, and Functional Specialization in Lipid and Carotenoid Metabolism1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Tranbarger, Timothy J.; Dussert, Stéphane; Joët, Thierry; Argout, Xavier; Summo, Marilyne; Champion, Antony; Cros, David; Omore, Alphonse; Nouy, Bruno; Morcillo, Fabienne

    2011-01-01

    Fruit provide essential nutrients and vitamins for the human diet. Not only is the lipid-rich fleshy mesocarp tissue of the oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) fruit the main source of edible oil for the world, but it is also the richest dietary source of provitamin A. This study examines the transcriptional basis of these two outstanding metabolic characters in the oil palm mesocarp. Morphological, cellular, biochemical, and hormonal features defined key phases of mesocarp development. A 454 pyrosequencing-derived transcriptome was then assembled for the developmental phases preceding and during maturation and ripening, when high rates of lipid and carotenoid biosynthesis occur. A total of 2,629 contigs with differential representation revealed coordination of metabolic and regulatory components. Further analysis focused on the fatty acid and triacylglycerol assembly pathways and during carotenogenesis. Notably, a contig similar to the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seed oil transcription factor WRINKLED1 was identified with a transcript profile coordinated with those of several fatty acid biosynthetic genes and the high rates of lipid accumulation, suggesting some common regulatory features between seeds and fruits. We also focused on transcriptional regulatory networks of the fruit, in particular those related to ethylene transcriptional and GLOBOSA/PISTILLATA-like proteins in the mesocarp and a central role for ethylene-coordinated transcriptional regulation of type VII ethylene response factors during ripening. Our results suggest that divergence has occurred in the regulatory components in this monocot fruit compared with those identified in the dicot tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fleshy fruit model. PMID:21487046

  6. Structure of the DMPC lipid bilayer ripple phase†

    PubMed Central

    Akabori, Kiyotaka; Nagle, John F.

    2014-01-01

    High resolution structure is presented for the ripple (Pβ′) phase of the phospholipid dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine. Low angle X-ray scattering from oriented samples yielded 57 orders, more than twice as many as recorded previously. The determined electron density map has a sawtooth profile similar to the result from lower resolution data, but the features are sharper allowing better estimates for the modulated bilayer profile and the distribution of headgroups along the aqueous interface. Analysis of high resolution wide angle X-ray data shows that the hydrocarbon chains in the longer, major side of the asymmetric sawtooth are packed similarly to the LβF gel phase, with chains in both monolayers coupled and tilted by 18° in the same direction. The absence of Bragg rods that could be associated with the minor side is consistent with disordered chains, as often suggested in the literature. However, the new high resolution bilayer profile strongly suggests that the chains in the two monolayers in the minor side and the curved region are not in registry. This staggered monolayer modulated melting suggests a direction for improving theories of the ripple phase. PMID:25503248

  7. Structure and mechanism of calmodulin binding to a signaling sphingolipid reveal new aspects of lipid-protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kovacs, Erika; Harmat, Veronika; Tóth, Judit; Vértessy, Beáta G.; Módos, Károly; Kardos, József; Liliom, Károly

    2010-01-01

    Lipid-protein interactions are rarely characterized at a structural molecular level due to technical difficulties; however, the biological significance of understanding the mechanism of these interactions is outstanding. In this report, we provide mechanistic insight into the inhibitory complex formation of the lipid mediator sphingosylphosphorylcholine with calmodulin, the most central and ubiquitous regulator protein in calcium signaling. We applied crystallographic, thermodynamic, kinetic, and spectroscopic approaches using purified bovine calmodulin and bovine cerebral microsomal fraction to arrive at our conclusions. Here we present 1) a 1.6-Å resolution crystal structure of their complex, in which the sphingolipid occupies the conventional hydrophobic binding site on calmodulin; 2) a peculiar stoichiometry-dependent binding process: at low or high protein-to-lipid ratio calmodulin binds lipid micelles or a few lipid molecules in a compact globular conformation, respectively, and 3) evidence that the sphingolipid displaces calmodulin from its targets on cerebral microsomes. We have ascertained the specificity of the interaction using structurally related lipids as controls. Our observations reveal the structural basis of selective calmodulin inhibition by the sphingolipid. On the basis of the crystallographic and biophysical characterization of the calmodulin–sphingosylphosphorylcholine interaction, we propose a novel lipid-protein binding model, which might be applicable to other interactions as well.—Kovacs, E., Harmat, V., Tóth, J., Vértessy, B. G., Módos, K., Kardos, J., Liliom, K. Structure and mechanism of calmodulin binding to a signaling sphingolipid reveal new aspects of lipid-protein interactions. PMID:20522785

  8. Characterization of oilseed lipids from "DHA-producing Camelina sativa": a new transformed land plant containing long-chain omega-3 oils.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Maged P; Shrestha, Pushkar; Belide, Srinivas; Petrie, James R; Nichols, Peter D; Singh, Surinder P

    2014-01-01

    New and sustainable sources of long-chain (LC, ≥C₂₀) omega-3 oils containing DHA (docosahexaenoic acid, 22:6ω3) are required to meet increasing demands. The lipid content of the oilseed of a novel transgenic, DHA-producing land plant, Camelina sativa, containing microalgal genes able to produce LC omega-3 oils, contained 36% lipid by weight with triacylglycerols (TAG) as the major lipid class in hexane extracts (96% of total lipid). Subsequent chloroform-methanol (CM) extraction recovered further lipid (~50% polar lipid, comprising glycolipids and phospholipids) and residual TAG. The main phospholipid species were phosphatidyl choline and phosphatidyl ethanolamine. The % DHA was: 6.8% (of total fatty acids) in the TAG-rich hexane extract and 4.2% in the polar lipid-rich CM extract. The relative level of ALA (α-linolenic acid, 18:3ω3) in DHA-camelina seed was higher than the control. Major sterols in both DHA- and control camelina seeds were: sitosterol, campesterol, cholesterol, brassicasterol and isofucosterol. C₁₆-C₂₂ fatty alcohols, including iso-branched and odd-chain alcohols were present, including high levels of iso-17:0, 17:0 and 19:0. Other alcohols present were: 16:0, iso-18:0, 18:0 and 18:1 and the proportions varied between the hexane and CM extracts. These iso-branched odd-chain fatty alcohols, to our knowledge, have not been previously reported. These components may be derived from wax esters, or free fatty alcohols. PMID:24566436

  9. Characterization of Oilseed Lipids from “DHA-Producing Camelina sativa”: A New Transformed Land Plant Containing Long-Chain Omega-3 Oils

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Maged P.; Shrestha, Pushkar; Belide, Srinivas; Petrie, James R.; Nichols, Peter D.; Singh, Surinder P.

    2014-01-01

    New and sustainable sources of long-chain (LC, ≥C20) omega-3 oils containing DHA (docosahexaenoic acid, 22:6ω3) are required to meet increasing demands. The lipid content of the oilseed of a novel transgenic, DHA-producing land plant, Camelina sativa, containing microalgal genes able to produce LC omega-3 oils, contained 36% lipid by weight with triacylglycerols (TAG) as the major lipid class in hexane extracts (96% of total lipid). Subsequent chloroform-methanol (CM) extraction recovered further lipid (~50% polar lipid, comprising glycolipids and phospholipids) and residual TAG. The main phospholipid species were phosphatidyl choline and phosphatidyl ethanolamine. The % DHA was: 6.8% (of total fatty acids) in the TAG-rich hexane extract and 4.2% in the polar lipid-rich CM extract. The relative level of ALA (α-linolenic acid, 18:3ω3) in DHA-camelina seed was higher than the control. Major sterols in both DHA- and control camelina seeds were: sitosterol, campesterol, cholesterol, brassicasterol and isofucosterol. C16–C22 fatty alcohols, including iso-branched and odd-chain alcohols were present, including high levels of iso-17:0, 17:0 and 19:0. Other alcohols present were: 16:0, iso-18:0, 18:0 and 18:1 and the proportions varied between the hexane and CM extracts. These iso-branched odd-chain fatty alcohols, to our knowledge, have not been previously reported. These components may be derived from wax esters, or free fatty alcohols. PMID:24566436

  10. Hippocampus lipid peroxidation induced by residual oil fly ash intranasal instillation versus habituation to the open field.

    PubMed

    Zanchi, Ana Claudia; Saiki, Mitiko; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento; Barros, Helena Maria Tannhauser; Rhoden, Claudia Ramos

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated the adverse effects of particulate matter (PM) inhalation on the respiratory and cardiovascular systems. It has been reported that air pollution may affect the central nervous system and decrease cognitive function. In rats, residual oil fly ash (ROFA) instillation causes decreased motor activity and increased lipid peroxidation in the striatum and the cerebellum. Our objective was to determine whether chronic instillation of particles induces changes in learning and memory in rats and whether oxidants in the hippocampus may contribute to these adverse effects. Forty-five-day-old male Wistar rats were exposed to ROFA by intranasal instillation and were treated with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) at 150 mg/kg i.p. for 30 days. Control groups were exposed to ROFA, NAC, or neither. On days 1, 8, and 30 of the protocol, rats were submitted to the open field test to evaluate habituation. After the last open field session, the rats were killed by decapitation. The hippocampus was used to determine lipid peroxidation (LP) by the thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances test. ROFA instillation induced an increase in LP in the hippocampus compared to all treatment groups (p = .012). NAC treatment blocked these changes. All of the treatment groups presented a decrease in the frequency of peripheral walking (p = .001), rearing (p = .001), and exploration (p = .001) over time. Our study demonstrates that exposure to particles for 30 days and/or NAC treatment do not modify habituation to an open field, a simple form of learning and memory in rats, and that oxidative damage induced by ROFA does not modulate these processes. PMID:20017596

  11. Garlic essential oil protects against obesity-triggered nonalcoholic fatty liver disease through modulation of lipid metabolism and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yi-Syuan; Chen, Wei-Cheng; Ho, Chi-Tang; Lu, Kuan-Hung; Lin, Shih-Hang; Tseng, Hui-Chun; Lin, Shuw-Yuan; Sheen, Lee-Yan

    2014-06-25

    This study investigated the protective properties of garlic essential oil (GEO) and its major organosulfur component (diallyl disulfide, DADS) against the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). C57BL/6J mice were fed a normal or high-fat diet (HFD) with/without GEO (25, 50, and 100 mg/kg) or DADS (10 and 20 mg/kg) for 12 weeks. GEO and DADS dose-dependently exerted antiobesity and antihyperlipidemic effects by reducing HFD-induced body weight gain, adipose tissue weight, and serum biochemical parameters. Administration of 50 and 100 mg/kg GEO and 20 mg/kg DADS significantly decreased the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines in liver, accompanied by elevated antioxidant capacity via inhibition of cytochrome P450 2E1 expression during NAFLD development. The anti-NAFLD effects of GEO and DADS were mediated through down-regulation of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c, acetyl-CoA carboxylase, fatty acid synthase, and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, as well as stimulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1. These results demonstrate that GEO and DADS dose-dependently protected obese mice with long-term HFD-induced NAFLD from lipid accumulation, inflammation, and oxidative damage by ameliorating lipid metabolic disorders and oxidative stress. The dose of 20 mg/kg DADS was equally as effective in preventing NAFLD as 50 mg/kg GEO containing the same amount of DADS, which demonstrates that DADS may be the main bioactive component in GEO. PMID:24857364

  12. Structural Studies of a Lipid-Binding Peptide from Tunicate Hemocytes with Anti-Biofilm Activity

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Osmar N.; Alves, Eliane S. F.; de la Fuente-Núñez, César; Ribeiro, Suzana M.; Mandal, Santi M.; Gaspar, Diana; Veiga, Ana S.; Castanho, Miguel A. R. B.; Andrade, Cesar A. S.; Nascimento, Jessica M.; Fensterseifer, Isabel C. M.; Porto, William F.; Correa, Jose R.; Hancock, Robert. E. W.; Korpole, Suresh; Oliveira, Aline L.; Liao, Luciano M.; Franco, Octavio L.

    2016-01-01

    Clavanins is a class of peptides (23aa) histidine-rich, free of post-translational modifications. Clavanins have been studied largely for their ability to disrupt bacterial membranes. In the present study, the interaction of clavanin A with membranes was assessed by dynamic light scattering, zeta potential and permeabilization assays. We observed through those assays that clavanin A lysis bacterial cells at concentrations corresponding to its MIC. Further, the structure and function of clavanin A was investigated. To better understand how clavanin interacted with bacteria, its NMR structure was elucidated. The solution state NMR structure of clavanin A in the presence of TFE-d3 indicated an α-helical conformation. Secondary structures, based on circular dichroism measurements in anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and TFE (2,2,2-trifluorethanol), in silico lipid-peptide docking and molecular simulations with lipids DPPC and DOPC revealed that clavanin A can adopt a variety of folds, possibly influencing its different functions. Microcalorimetry assays revealed that clavanin A was capable of discriminating between different lipids. Finally, clavanin A was found to eradicate bacterial biofilms representing a previously unrecognized function. PMID:27292548

  13. Structural Studies of a Lipid-Binding Peptide from Tunicate Hemocytes with Anti-Biofilm Activity.

    PubMed

    Silva, Osmar N; Alves, Eliane S F; de la Fuente-Núñez, César; Ribeiro, Suzana M; Mandal, Santi M; Gaspar, Diana; Veiga, Ana S; Castanho, Miguel A R B; Andrade, Cesar A S; Nascimento, Jessica M; Fensterseifer, Isabel C M; Porto, William F; Correa, Jose R; Hancock, Robert E W; Korpole, Suresh; Oliveira, Aline L; Liao, Luciano M; Franco, Octavio L

    2016-01-01

    Clavanins is a class of peptides (23aa) histidine-rich, free of post-translational modifications. Clavanins have been studied largely for their ability to disrupt bacterial membranes. In the present study, the interaction of clavanin A with membranes was assessed by dynamic light scattering, zeta potential and permeabilization assays. We observed through those assays that clavanin A lysis bacterial cells at concentrations corresponding to its MIC. Further, the structure and function of clavanin A was investigated. To better understand how clavanin interacted with bacteria, its NMR structure was elucidated. The solution state NMR structure of clavanin A in the presence of TFE-d3 indicated an α-helical conformation. Secondary structures, based on circular dichroism measurements in anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and TFE (2,2,2-trifluorethanol), in silico lipid-peptide docking and molecular simulations with lipids DPPC and DOPC revealed that clavanin A can adopt a variety of folds, possibly influencing its different functions. Microcalorimetry assays revealed that clavanin A was capable of discriminating between different lipids. Finally, clavanin A was found to eradicate bacterial biofilms representing a previously unrecognized function. PMID:27292548

  14. Effect of monolayer lipid charges on the structure and orientation of protein VAMP1 at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Yassine, Wissam; Milochau, Alexandra; Buchoux, Sebastien; Lang, Jochen; Desbat, Bernard; Oda, Reiko

    2010-05-01

    SNARE proteins are implicated in membrane fusion during neurotransmission and peptide hormone secretion. Relatively little is known about the molecular interactions of their trans- and juxtamembrane domains with lipid membranes. Here, we report the structure and the assembling behavior of one of the SNARE proteins, VAMP1/synaptobrevin1 incorporated in a lipid monolayer at an air-water interface which mimics the membrane environment. Our results show that the protein is extremely sensitive to surface pressure as well as the lipid composition. Monolayers of proteins alone or in the presence of the neutral phospholipid DMPC underwent structural transition from alpha-helix to beta-sheet upon surface compression. In contrast, the anionic phospholipid DMPG inhibited this transition in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, the orientation of the proteins was highly sensitive to the charge density of the lipid layers. Thus, the structure of VAMP1 is clearly controlled by protein-lipid interactions. PMID:20085749

  15. Safety assessment of EPA-rich polar lipid oil produced from the microalgae Nannochloropsis oculata.

    PubMed

    Kagan, Michael L; Sullivan, Dexter W; Gad, Shayne C; Ballou, Corey M

    2014-01-01

    Almega PL is an eicosapentaenoic acid-rich ω-3 oil that is isolated from Nannochloropsis oculata algae and developed as a dietary supplement. The safety of the algal oil was evaluated in 14- and 90-day studies in Sprague-Dawley rats by oral gavage at dose levels of 0, 250, 500, and 2500 mg/kg/d and 0, 200, 400, and 2000 mg/kg/d, respectively. No mortalities occurred and no signs of toxicity were observed during the studies. No treatment-related effects were seen for body weight, food consumption, ophthalmology, neurological effects, urinalysis, clinical pathology, gross pathology, organ weights, or histopathology. Although statistically significant effects were noted for some end points, none were considered to be of toxicological significance. The no observed adverse effect level for Almega PL was 2000 mg/kg/d. Additionally, Almega PL was not mutagenic in Salmonella typhimurium or Escherichia coli, did not induce chromosome aberrations in Chinese hamster ovary cells, and did not induce genotoxic effects in vivo in rat bone marrow erythrocytes. PMID:25305242

  16. Structural characterization of the pulmonary innate immune protein SPLUNC1 and identification of lipid ligands

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Fangkun; Wang, Chao; Berry, Karin Zemski; Kandasamy, Pitchaimani; Liu, Haolin; Murphy, Robert C.; Voelker, Dennis R.; Nho, Chu Won; Pan, Choel-Ho; Dai, Shaodong; Niu, Liwen; Chu, Hong-Wei; Zhang, Gongyi

    2014-01-01

    The short palate, lung and nasal epithelial clone 1 (SPLUNC1) protein is a member of the palate, lung, and nasal epithelium clone (PLUNC) family, also known as bactericidal/permeability-increasing (BPI) fold-containing protein, family A, member 1 (BPIFA1). SPLUNC1 is an abundant protein in human airways, but its function remains poorly understood. The lipid ligands of SPLUNC1 as well as other PLUNC family members are largely unknown, although some reports provide evidence that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) could be a lipid ligand. Unlike previous hypotheses, we found significant structural differences between SPLUNC1 and BPI. Recombinant SPLUNC1 produced in HEK 293 cells harbored several molecular species of sphingomyelin and phosphatidylcholine as its ligands. Significantly, in vitro lipid-binding studies failed to demonstrate interactions between SPLUNC1 and LPS, lipoteichoic acid, or polymyxin B. Instead, one of the major and most important pulmonary surfactant phospholipids, dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), bound to SPLUNC1 with high affinity and specificity. We found that SPLUNC1 could be the first protein receptor for DPPC. These discoveries provide insight into the specific determinants governing the interaction between SPLUNC1 and lipids and also shed light on novel functions that SPLUNC1 and other PLUNC family members perform in host defense.—Ning, F., Wang, C., Berry, K. Z., Kandasamy, P., Liu, H., Murphy, R. C., Voelker, D. R., Nho, C. W., Pan, C.-H., Dai, S., Niu, L., Chu, H.-W., Zhang, G. Structural characterization of the pulmonary innate immune protein SPLUNC1 and identification of lipid ligands. PMID:25223608

  17. Controllable occurrence of free-standing lipid membranes on nanograting structured supports.

    PubMed

    Peng, Po-Yu; Chiang, Po-Chieh; Chao, Ling

    2014-08-13

    Supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) have been widely used to study protein-lipid membrane interactions because their planar geometry is suitable for many surface analysis tools. However, the friction coupling between the support and the membrane can influence the properties of biomolecules in the membrane. Many studies have attempted to span SLBs over nanostructured supports to create free-standing regions in SLBs for biosensor applications. However, membranes following the support surface contour are more frequently observed than are free-standing membranes on structured supports, indicating that the parameter range suitable for formation of free-standing SLBs might be narrow and more information is necessary to understand the required conditions. The objective of this study was to estimate the system energies of free-standing and contour-following membrane states and determine which state is the most energetically favorable under various conditions. For a lipid membrane preferring to stay close to the support, an energy reward occurs when they are in close proximity; however, increasing the contact area on a structured surface can result in an energy penalty because of the bending of the lipid bilayer. Whether the energy reward or the energy penalty dominates could determine the membrane state. We used the extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory and the Helfrich bending theory to relate the energy sizes to experimentally controllable parameters. We experimentally examined whether the membrane state followed the model prediction when we used various buffer ionic strengths, various lipid types, and nanograting supports with three different geometries. Because it is difficult to observe the experimental membrane state directly at the nanoscale, we developed a method to use the fluorescence recovery shape change after photobleaching to distinguish experimental membrane states at the micrometer scale. Our experimental results closely matched the

  18. Structures of the EphA2 Receptor at the Membrane: Role of Lipid Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Chavent, Matthieu; Seiradake, Elena; Jones, E. Yvonne; Sansom, Mark S.P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Ephs are transmembrane receptors that mediate cell-cell signaling. The N-terminal ectodomain binds ligands and enables receptor clustering, which activates the intracellular kinase. Relatively little is known about the function of the membrane-proximal fibronectin domain 2 (FN2) of the ectodomain. Multiscale molecular dynamics simulations reveal that FN2 interacts with lipid bilayers via a site comprising K441, R443, R465, Q462, S464, S491, W467, F490, and P459–461. FN2 preferentially binds anionic lipids, a preference that is reduced in the mutant K441E + R443E. We confirm these results by measuring the binding of wild-type and mutant FN2 domains to lipid vesicles. In simulations of the complete EphA2 ectodomain plus the transmembrane region, we show that FN2 anchors the otherwise flexible ectodomain at the surface of the bilayer. Altogether, our data suggest that FN2 serves a dual function of interacting with anionic lipids and constraining the structure of the EphA2 ectodomain to adopt membrane-proximal configurations. PMID:26724997

  19. Function and structure of lipid storage droplet protein 1 studied in lipoprotein complexes.

    PubMed

    Arrese, Estela L; Rivera, Laticia; Hamada, Masakazu; Mirza, Saima; Hartson, Steve D; Weintraub, Susan; Soulages, Jose L

    2008-05-01

    Triglycerides (TG) stored in lipid droplets (LDs) are the main energy reserve in all animals. The mechanism by which animals mobilize TG is complex and not fully understood. Several proteins surrounding the LDs have been implicated in TG homeostasis such as mammalian perilipin A and insect lipid storage proteins (Lsd). Most of the knowledge on LD-associated proteins comes from studies using cells or LDs leaving biochemical properties of these proteins uncharacterized. Here we describe the purification of recombinant Lsd1 and its reconstitution with lipids to form lipoprotein complexes suitable for functional and structural studies. Lsd1 in the lipid bound state is a predominately alpha-helical protein. Using lipoprotein complexes containing triolein it is shown that PKA mediated phosphorylation of Lsd1 promoted a 1.7-fold activation of the main fat body lipase demonstrating the direct link between Lsd1 phosphorylation and activation of lipolysis. Serine 20 was identified as the Lsd1-phosphorylation site triggering this effect. PMID:18342616

  20. Crystallization modifiers in lipid systems.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Ana Paula Badan; Masuchi, Monise Helen; Miyasaki, Eriksen Koji; Domingues, Maria Aliciane Fontenele; Stroppa, Valter Luís Zuliani; de Oliveira, Glazieli Marangoni; Kieckbusch, Theo Guenter

    2015-07-01

    Crystallization of fats is a determinant physical event affecting the structure and properties of fat-based products. The stability of these processed foods is regulated by changes in the physical state of fats and alterations in their crystallization behavior. Problems like polymorphic transitions, oil migration, fat bloom development, slow crystallization and formation of crystalline aggregates stand out. The change of the crystallization behavior of lipid systems has been a strategic issue for the processing of foods, aiming at taylor made products, reducing costs, improving quality, and increasing the applicability and stability of different industrial fats. In this connection, advances in understanding the complex mechanisms that govern fat crystallization led to the development of strategies in order to modulate the conventional processes of fat structuration, based on the use of crystallization modifiers. Different components have been evaluated, such as specific triacyglycerols, partial glycerides (monoacylglycerols and diacylglycerols), free fatty acids, phospholipids and emulsifiers. The knowledge and expertise on the influence of these specific additives or minor lipids on the crystallization behavior of fat systems represents a focus of current interest for the industrial processing of oils and fats. This article presents a comprehensive review on the use of crystallization modifiers in lipid systems, especially for palm oil, cocoa butter and general purpose fats, highlighting: i) the removal, addition or fractionation of minor lipids in fat bases; ii) the use of nucleating agents to modify the crystallization process; iii) control of crystallization in lipid bases by using emulsifiers. The addition of these components into lipid systems is discussed in relation to the phenomena of nucleation, crystal growth, morphology, thermal behavior and polymorphism, with the intention of providing the reader with a complete panorama of the associated mechanisms

  1. Constraining Microbial Community Response During Oil Sands Reclamation via Lipid and Isotope Biosignatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradford, L. M.; Ziolkowski, L. A.; Ngonadi, N.; Warren, L. A.; Slater, G. F.

    2013-12-01

    A pilot scale reclamation project in the Athabasca oil sands region (Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada) has created an artificial freshwater fen typical of the boreal forest region in which the oil sands occur. At this site, composite tailings (CT) residue was overlain with a thick sand cap and a freshwater fen constructed on top. This project began in 2009, with most wetland development occurring over the summer of 2012. It is recognized that the response of microbial communities to reclamation activities has the potential to play a significant role in the outcome of reclamation. Microbial biodegradation of petroleum residues may improve reclamation outcomes, while production of by-products, particularly hydrogen sulphide gas (H2S) via bacterial sulphate reduction, must be assessed to manage any potential negative impacts. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) concentration and isotopic analysis were used to characterize the response of in situ microbial communities within the reclamation fen system. Increases in PLFA concentrations were observed in sediment taken from the sand layer at sample sites within the fen from during its establishment. Initial values equivalent to circa 106 cells/gram in July 2011 increased to values equivalent to 107cells/gram in August 2012 and then to 108 cells/gram in November 2012. Analysis of the radiocarbon (Δ14C) content of total organic carbon shows an increase in Δ14C from highly depleted values (-983×2‰) in July 2011, consistent with petroleum hydrocarbons dominating the total organic carbon, to more 14C enriched values as fen development progressed (-423×2.1‰ in August 2012 and -417×1.4‰ in November 2012). This indicates inputs of more modern organic matter potentially associated with the peat used to construct the fen and/or inputs from recent photosynthesis. The correlation between the observed PLFA increases and this increase in modern carbon inputs suggests that reclamation activities have stimulated the increase in the

  2. Effect of incremental levels of sunflower-seed oil in the diet on ruminal lipid metabolism in lactating cows.

    PubMed

    Shingfield, K J; Ahvenjärvi, S; Toivonen, V; Vanhatalo, A; Huhtanen, P; Griinari, J M

    2008-05-01

    Based on the potential benefits of cis-9, trans-11-conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) for human health there is interest in developing sustainable nutritional strategies for enhancing the concentration of this fatty acid in ruminant-derived foods. Most evidence to date suggests that endogenous synthesis is the major source of cis-9, trans-11 in milk fat and ruminal outflow is limited and largely independent of dietary 18 : 2n-6 supply. Four lactating cows fitted with a rumen cannula were used in a 4 x 4 Latin square with 14 d experimental periods to examine the effects of sunflower-seed oil (SFO) as a source of 18 : 2n-6 on ruminal lipid metabolism. Cows were offered grass silage-based diets supplemented with 0, 250, 500 or 750 g SFO/d. Supplements of SFO had no effect on DM intake, milk fat or protein secretion, but increased linearly (P < 0.01) milk yield and milk lactose output and shifted (P < 0.001) rumen fermentation towards propionate at the expense of acetate. SFO supplements increased linearly (P < 0.05) the flow of 18 : 0, 18 : 1, 18 : 2n-6 and total CLA at the omasum and enhanced ruminal cis-9-18 : 1, 18 : 2n-6 and 18 : 3n-3 metabolism. Flows of all-trans- (Delta4-16) and cis- (Delta9-16) 18 : 1 isomers were elevated, while increases in ruminal CLA outflow were confined to trans-8, trans-10 and geometric 9,11 and 10,12 isomers. It is concluded that supplementing grass silage-based diets with plant oils rich in 18 : 2n-6 enhances ruminal outflow of trans-11-18 : 1 and cis-9, trans-11-CLA in lactating cows. PMID:18005482

  3. Development of Iron-Chelating Poly(ethylene terephthalate) Packaging for Inhibiting Lipid Oxidation in Oil-in-Water Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Johnson, David R; Tian, Fang; Roman, Maxine J; Decker, Eric A; Goddard, Julie M

    2015-05-27

    Foods such as bulk oils, salad dressings, and nutritionally fortified beverages that are susceptible to oxidative degradation are often packaged in poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) bottles with metal chelators added to the food to maintain product quality. In the present work, a metal-chelating active packaging material is designed and characterized, in which poly(hydroxamic acid) (PHA) metal-chelating moieties were grafted from the surface of PET. Biomimetic PHA groups were grafted in a two-step UV-initiated process without the use of a photoinitiator. Surface characterization of the films by attenuated total reflective Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) suggested successful grafting and conversion of poly(hydroxyethyl acrylate) (PHEA) to PHA chelating moieties from the surface of PET. Colorimetric (ferrozine) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) assays demonstrated the ability of PET-g-PHA to chelate iron in a low-pH (3.0) environment containing a competitive metal chelator (citric acid). Lipid oxidation studies demonstrated the antioxidant activity of PET-g-PHA films in inhibiting iron-promoted oxidation in an acidified oil-in-water (O/W) emulsion model system (pH 3.0). Particle size and ζ-potential analysis indicated that the addition of PET-g-PHA films did not affect the physical stability of the emulsion system. This work suggests that biomimetic chelating moieties can be grafted from PET and effectively inhibit iron-promoted degradation reactions, enabling removal of metal-chelating additives from product formulations. PMID:25985711

  4. Structures, dynamics, and water permeation free energy across bilayers of Lipid A and its analog studied with molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Tao; Huang, Tiefan; Qiao, Baofu; Zhang, Mo; Ma, Heng; Zhang, Lin

    2014-11-20

    Fundamental studies of the supramolecular layer structures, dynamics and water permeation free energy of hexa-acyl-chain Lipid A and its analogue of tetra-acyl chains would be useful for polymer membranes design for endotoxin removal in water treatment, drug delivery and other biotechnologies. In this work, we studied their supramolecular bilayer by using molecular dynamics simulations and efficient free energy computations. Our simulation accuracy was verified by the agreement between the bilayer structural properties (structure factor, bilayer thickness, and the area per lipid) and lateral diffusion coefficient in our simulation and experimental measurements. More importantly, our simulation for the first time illustrated hexagonal compact packing of the hydrocarbon acyl chains within a leaflet of Lipid A membrane (at 298 K and water content of 40 wt %), which is consistent with experiments. In contrast, Lipid A analogue is found with less ordered ripple structures at the same condition. Our study also demonstrated slower dynamics and larger and broader free energy barrier (∼23 kJ/mol) for water permeation for Lipid A, compared with that of Lipid A analogue. Moreover, the analysis of dynamics showed that highly hydrated hydrophilic diglucosamine backbone is structurally stable, whereas the interdigitated hydrophobic acyl chain tails inside the membrane with faster dynamics screen the aqueous environment from the lipid interior and also reinforce the membrane's structural stability. PMID:25310797

  5. Crystal structure of soluble MD-1 and its interaction with lipid IVa

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Sung-il; Hong, Minsun; Han, Gye Won; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-07-22

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Gram-negative bacteria is a common pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) that induces potent innate immune responses. The host immune response against LPS is triggered by myeloid differentiation factor 2 (MD-2) in association with Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) on the cell surface. The MD-2/TLR4-mediated LPS response is regulated by the evolutionarily related complex of MD-1 and Toll-like receptor homolog RP105. Here, we report crystallographic and biophysical data that demonstrate a previously unidentified direct interaction of MD-1 with LPS. The crystal structure of chicken MD-1 (cMD-1) at 2.0 {angstrom} resolution exhibits a {beta}-cup-like fold, similar to MD-2, that encloses a hydrophobic cavity between the two {beta}-sheets. A lipid-like moiety was observed inside the cavity, suggesting the possibility of a direct MD-1/LPS interaction. LPS was subsequently identified as an MD-1 ligand by native gel electrophoresis and gel filtration analyses. The crystal structure of cMD-1 with lipid IVa, an LPS precursor, at 2.4 {angstrom} resolution revealed that the lipid inserts into the deep hydrophobic cavity of the {beta}-cup-like structure, but with some important differences compared with MD-2. These findings suggest that soluble MD-1 alone, in addition to its complex with RP105, can regulate host LPS sensitivity.

  6. Maximally asymmetric transbilayer distribution of anionic lipids alters the structure and interaction with lipids of an amyloidogenic protein dimer bound to the membrane surface.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Sara Y; Chou, George; Buie, Creighton; Vaughn, Mark W; Compton, Campbell; Cheng, Kwan H

    2016-03-01

    We used molecular dynamics simulations to explore the effects of asymmetric transbilayer distribution of anionic phosphatidylserine (PS) lipids on the structure of a protein on the membrane surface and subsequent protein-lipid interactions. Our simulation systems consisted of an amyloidogenic, beta-sheet rich dimeric protein (D42) absorbed to the phosphatidylcholine (PC) leaflet, or protein-contact PC leaflet, of two membrane systems: a single-component PC bilayer and double PC/PS bilayers. The latter comprised of a stable but asymmetric transbilayer distribution of PS in the presence of counterions, with a 1-component PC leaflet coupled to a 1-component PS leaflet in each bilayer. The maximally asymmetric PC/PS bilayer had a non-zero transmembrane potential (TMP) difference and higher lipid order packing, whereas the symmetric PC bilayer had a zero TMP difference and lower lipid order packing under physiologically relevant conditions. Analysis of the adsorbed protein structures revealed weaker protein binding, more folding in the N-terminal domain, more aggregation of the N- and C-terminal domains and larger tilt angle of D42 on the PC leaflet surface of the PC/PS bilayer versus the PC bilayer. Also, analysis of protein-induced membrane structural disruption revealed more localized bilayer thinning in the PC/PS versus PC bilayer. Although the electric field profile in the non-protein-contact PS leaflet of the PC/PS bilayer differed significantly from that in the non-protein-contact PC leaflet of the PC bilayer, no significant difference in the electric field profile in the protein-contact PC leaflet of either bilayer was evident. We speculate that lipid packing has a larger effect on the surface adsorbed protein structure than the electric field for a maximally asymmetric PC/PS bilayer. Our results support the mechanism that the higher lipid packing in a lipid leaflet promotes stronger protein-protein but weaker protein-lipid interactions for a dimeric protein on

  7. Valorization of agroindustrial wastes: Identification by LC-MS and NMR of benzylglucosinolate from papaya (Carica papaya L.) seeds, a protective agent against lipid oxidation in edible oils.

    PubMed

    Castro-Vargas, Henry I; Baumann, Wolfram; Parada-Alfonso, Fabián

    2016-07-01

    In the present study we report the characterization of benzylglucosinolate (BG) isolated from papaya (Carica papaya L.) seeds. A methanolic extract was fractionated and further purified by solid phase extraction (SPE). It was analyzed by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS), and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1) H and (13) C-NMR) as well, and the target compound BG was identified by these two techniques. The effect of BG on lipid oxidation in edible vegetable oil (EO) was shown by observing some lipid oxidation products (linoleic acid hydroperoxides, LHP; hexanal, HEX; nonanal, NON; thiobarbituric acid reactives species, TBARS). BG reduced lipid oxidation production in EO by over 80%, as compared to a control sample and in this way has proved to be a useful antioxidant, even more effective than some antioxidants used by food industry. PMID:26756135

  8. Extra virgin olive oil phenolic extracts counteract the pro-oxidant effect of dietary oxidized lipids in human intestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Incani, Alessandra; Serra, Gessica; Atzeri, Angela; Melis, Maria Paola; Serreli, Gabriele; Bandino, Giovanni; Sedda, Piergiorgio; Campus, Marco; Tuberoso, Carlo I G; Deiana, Monica

    2016-04-01

    The phenolic fraction of extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) concentrates before absorption in the intestinal lumen, where it may contribute to the modulation of enterocytes response to oxidative and inflammatory stimuli. We evaluated the ability of two monovarietal EVOOs phenolic extracts, Bosana and Nera di Gonnos/Tonda di Cagliari, typical and widespread varieties in Sardinia (Italy), to counteract in enterocytes like Caco-2 cells the pro-oxidant action of oxidized lipids, tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBH) or a mixture of oxysterols of dietary origin. We confirmed that TBH treatment causes a significant increase of ROS production, GSH depletion, increase of MDA, fatty acids hydroperoxides and 7-ketocholesterol, and showed first evidence of oxidative imbalance and cell damage due to oxysterols exposure. Preincubation of cells with the phenolic extracts significantly attenuated oxidative modifications. Bosana extract showed the highest concentration of total phenols, mainly hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol, and was the most active in presence of TBH, where the free radical scavenging activity of these simple phenols seems to be a determining factor. The two extracts were equally effective, in spite of the different composition, in presence of oxysterols, where ROS production probably occurs according to different and more complex mechanisms. PMID:26911552

  9. Thermal, dynamic and structural properties of drug AT1 antagonist olmesartan in lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Ntountaniotis, Dimitrios; Mali, Gregor; Grdadolnik, Simona Golic; Halabalaki, Maria; Maria, Halabalaki; Skaltsounis, Alexios-Leandros; Potamitis, Constantinos; Siapi, Eleni; Chatzigeorgiou, Petros; Rappolt, Michael; Mavromoustakos, Thomas

    2011-12-01

    It is proposed that AT1 antagonists (ARBs) exert their biological action by inserting into the lipid membrane and then diffuse to the active site of AT1 receptor. Thus, lipid bilayers are expected to be actively involved and play a critical role in drug action. For this reason, the thermal, dynamic and structural effects of olmesartan alone and together with cholesterol were studied using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), 13C magic-angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), cross-polarization (CP) MAS NMR, and Raman spectroscopy as well as small- and wide angle X-ray scattering (SAXS and WAXS) on dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) multilamellar vesicles. 13C CP/MAS spectra provided direct evidence for the incorporation of olmesartan and cholesterol in lipid bilayers. Raman and X-ray data revealed how both molecules modify the bilayer's properties. Olmesartan locates itself at the head-group region and upper segment of the lipid bilayers as 13C CP/MAS spectra show that its presence causes significant chemical shift changes mainly in the A ring of the steroidal part of cholesterol. The influence of olmesartan on DPPC/cholesterol bilayers is less pronounced. Although, olmesartan and cholesterol are residing at the same region of the lipid bilayers, due to their different sizes, display distinct impacts on the bilayer's properties. Cholesterol broadens significantly the main transition, abolishes the pre-transition, and decreases the membrane fluidity above the main transition. Olmesartan is the only so far studied ARB that increases the gauche:trans ratio in the liquid crystalline phase. These significant differences of olmesartan may in part explain its distinct pharmacological profile. PMID:21843501

  10. Quil A-lipid powder formulations releasing ISCOMs and related colloidal structures upon hydration.

    PubMed

    Demana, Patrick H; Davies, Nigel M; Hook, Sarah; Rades, Thomas

    2005-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to prepare solid Quil A-cholesterol-phospholipid formulations (as powder mixtures or compressed to pellets) by physical mixing or by freeze-drying of aqueous dispersions of these components in ratios that allow spontaneous formation of ISCOMs and other colloidal structures upon hydration. The effect of addition of excess cholesterol to the lipid mixtures on the release of a model antigen (PE-FITC-OVA) from the pellets was also investigated. Physical properties were evaluated by X-ray powder diffractometry (XPRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and polarized light microscopy (PLM). Characterization of aqueous colloidal dispersions was performed by negative staining transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Physically mixed powders (with or without PE-FITC-OVA) and pellets prepared from the same powders did not spontaneously form ISCOM matrices and related colloidal structures such as worm-like micelles, ring-like micelles, lipidic/layered structures and lamellae (hexagonal array of ring-like micelles) upon hydration as expected from the pseudo-ternary diagram for aqueous mixtures of Quil A, cholesterol and phospholipid. In contrast, spontaneous formation of the expected colloids was demonstrated for the freeze-dried lipid mixtures. Pellets prepared by compression of freeze-dried powders released PE-FITC-OVA slower than those prepared from physically mixed powders. TEM investigations revealed that the antigen was released in the form of colloidal particles (ISCOMs) from pellets prepared by compression of freeze-dried powders. The addition of excess cholesterol slowed down the release of antigen. The findings obtained in this study are important for the formulation of solid Quil A-containing lipid articles as controlled particulate adjuvant containing antigen delivery systems. PMID:15710499

  11. Structural analysis of the lipid A isolated from Hafnia alvei 32 and PCM 1192 lipopolysaccharides[S

    PubMed Central

    Lukasiewicz, Jolanta; Jachymek, Wojciech; Niedziela, Tomasz; Kenne, Lennart; Lugowski, Czeslaw

    2010-01-01

    Hafnia alvei, a Gram-negative bacterium, is an opportunistic pathogen associated with mixed hospital infections, bacteremia, septicemia, and respiratory diseases. The majority of clinical symptoms of diseases caused by this bacterium have a lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin)-related origin. The lipid A structure affects the biological activity of endotoxins predominantly. Thus, the structure of H. alvei lipid A was analyzed for the first time. The major form, asymmetrically hexa-acylated lipid A built of β-d-GlcpN4P-(1→6)-α-d-GlcpN1P substituted with (R)-14:0(3-OH) at N-2 and O-3, 14:0(3-(R)-O-12:0) at N-2′, and 14:0(3-(R)-O-14:0) at O-3′, was identified by ESI-MSn and MALDI-time-of-flight (TOF) MS. Comparative analysis performed by MS suggested that LPSs of H. alvei 32, PCM 1192, PCM 1206, and PCM 1207 share the identified structure of lipid A. LPSs of H. alvei are yet another example of enterobacterial endotoxins having the Escherichia coli-type structure of lipid A. The presence of hepta-acylated forms of H. alvei lipid A resulted from the addition of palmitate (16:0) substituting 14:0(3-OH) at N-2 of the α-GlcpN residue. All the studied strains of H. alvei have an ability to modify their lipid A structure by palmitoylation. PMID:19706748

  12. Structure of Carbon Nanotube Porins in Lipid Bilayers: An in Situ Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) Study.

    PubMed

    Tran, Ich C; Tunuguntla, Ramya H; Kim, Kyunghoon; Lee, Jonathan R I; Willey, Trevor M; Weiss, Thomas M; Noy, Aleksandr; van Buuren, Tony

    2016-07-13

    Carbon nanotube porins (CNTPs), small segments of carbon nanotubes capable of forming defined pores in lipid membranes, are important future components for bionanoelectronic devices as they could provide a robust analog of biological membrane channels. In order to control the incorporation of these CNT channels into lipid bilayers, it is important to understand the structure of the CNTPs before and after insertion into the lipid bilayer as well as the impact of such insertion on the bilayer structure. Here we employed a noninvasive in situ probe, small-angle X-ray scattering, to study the integration of CNT porins into dioleoylphosphatidylcholine bilayers. Our results show that CNTPs in solution are stabilized by a monolayer of lipid molecules wrapped around their outer surface. We also demonstrate that insertion of CNTPs into the lipid bilayer results in decreased bilayer thickness with the magnitude of this effect increasing with the concentration of CNTPs. PMID:27322135

  13. Anti-rancidity effect of essential oils, application in the lipid stability of cooked turkey meat patties and potential implications for health.

    PubMed

    Loizzo, Monica R; Tundis, Rosa; Menichini, Francesco; Duthie, Garry

    2015-02-01

    Twenty-three commercial essential oils were tested for their anti-rancidity effect and potential implications to prolong the induction time of corn oil and extend the shelf life of cooked turkey patties. Moreover, the potential health benefit was investigated through DPPH, ABTS, β-carotene bleaching, FRAP, and α-amylase inhibitory assays. Essential oils' composition was investigated by GC-MS. Cumin, thyme, clove, and cinnamon oils improved oxidative stability and increased the induction time of the corn oil 1.5-3 fold. Clove and cinnamon oils were particularly effective in delaying lipid oxidation of cooked turkey patties (time of induction 11.04 and 9.43 h) compared with the plain burger (5.04 h). Both oils are also characterized by a potent radical scavenging activity in ABTS test (IC(50) values of 1.43 and 2.05 μg/ml for cinnamon and clove, respectively). In the α-amylase inhibitory assay, cumin and grape fruits were the most potent with IC(50) values of 21.88 and 23.95 μg/ml, respectively. PMID:25265207

  14. Lipid classes and fatty acid regiodistribution in triacylglycerols of seed oils of two Sambucus species (S. nigra L. and S. ebulus L.).

    PubMed

    Dulf, Francisc Vasile; Oroian, Ioan; Vodnar, Dan Cristian; Socaciu, Carmen; Pintea, Adela

    2013-01-01

    The oil content and fatty acid composition of total lipids (TLs) and main lipid classes (NLs- neutral and PLs- polar lipids) in seeds of two wild Sambucus species (S. nigra and S. ebulus) from Transylvania (Romania) were determined by capillary gas chromatography (GC-MS). In addition, the positional distribution of fatty acids in seed triacylglycerols (TAGs) was determined by hydrolysis with pancreatic lipase. The seeds were found to be rich in fat (22.40-24.90 g/100g) with high amounts of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) ranging from 68.96% (S. ebulus) to 75.15% (S. nigra). High ratios of PUFAs/SFAs (saturated fatty acids), ranging from 7.06 (S. nigra) to 7.64 (S. ebulus), and low ratios of n-6/n-3, ranging from 0.84 (S. nigra) to 1.51 (S. ebulus), were determined in both oils. The lipid classes/subclasses analyzed (PLs, MAGs--monoacylglycerols, DAGs--diacylglycerols, FFAs--free fatty acids, TAGs and SEs--sterol esters) were separated and identified using thin-layer chromatography. The fatty acid compositions of the TAG fractions were practically identical to the profiles of TLs, with the same dominating fatty acids in both analyzed species. SEs and FFAs, were characterized by high proportions of SFAs. The sn-2 position of TAGs was esterified predominantly with linoleic acid (43.56% for S. nigra and 50.41% for S. ebulus). PMID:24071984

  15. Atomistic resolution structure and dynamics of lipid bilayers in simulations and experiments.

    PubMed

    Ollila, O H Samuli; Pabst, Georg

    2016-10-01

    Accurate details on the sampled atomistic resolution structures of lipid bilayers can be experimentally obtained by measuring C-H bond order parameters, spin relaxation rates and scattering form factors. These parameters can be also directly calculated from the classical atomistic resolution molecular dynamics simulations (MD) and compared to the experimentally achieved results. This comparison measures the simulation model quality with respect to 'reality'. If agreement is sufficient, the simulation model gives an atomistic structural interpretation of the acquired experimental data. Significant advance of MD models is made by jointly interpreting different experiments using the same structural model. Here we focus on phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers, which out of all model membranes have been studied mostly by experiments and simulations, leading to the largest available dataset. From the applied comparisons we conclude that the acyl chain region structure and rotational dynamics are generally well described in simulation models. Also changes with temperature, dehydration and cholesterol concentration are qualitatively correctly reproduced. However, the quality of the underlying atomistic resolution structural changes is uncertain. Even worse, when focusing on the lipid bilayer properties at the interfacial region, e.g. glycerol backbone and choline structures, and cation binding, many simulation models produce an inaccurate description of experimental data. Thus extreme care must be applied when simulations are applied to understand phenomena where the interfacial region plays a significant role. This work is done by the NMRlipids Open Collaboration project running at https://nmrlipids.blogspot.fi and https://github.com/NMRLipids. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biosimulations edited by Ilpo Vattulainen and Tomasz Róg. PMID:26809025

  16. Structural Origins of Cholesterol Accelerated Lipid Flip-Flop Studied by Sum-Frequency Vibrational Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Allhusen, John S; Kimball, Dylan R; Conboy, John C

    2016-03-31

    The unique structure of cholesterol and its role in modulating lipid translocation (flip-flop) were examined using sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy (SFVS). Two structural analogues of cholesterol--cholestanol and cholestene--were examined to explore the influence of ring rigidity and amphiphilicity on controlling distearoylphosphocholine (DSPC) flip-flop. Kinetic rates for DSPC flip-flop were determined as a function of sterol concentration and temperature. All three sterols increased the rate of DSPC flip-flop in a concentration-dependent manner following the order cholestene > cholestanol > cholesterol. Rates of DSPC flip-flop were used to calculate the thermodynamic activation free energy barrier (ΔG(‡)) in the presence of cholesterol, cholestanol, and cholestene. The acyl chain gauche content of DSPC, mean lipid area, and membrane compressibility were correlated to observed trends in ΔG(‡). ΔG(‡) for DSPC flip-flop showed a strong positive correlation with the molar compression modulus (K*) of the membrane, influenced by the type and concentration of the sterol added. Interestingly, cholesterol is distinctive in maintaining invariant membrane compressibility over the range of 2-10 mol %. The results in this study demonstrate that the compression modulus of a membrane plays a significant role in moderating ΔG(‡) and the kinetics of native, protein-free, lipid translocation in membranes. PMID:26978577

  17. Structure and Stability of Carbohydrate-Lipid Interactions. Methylmannose Polysaccharide-Fatty Acid Complexes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lan; Siuda, Iwona; Richards, Michele R; Renaud, Justin; Kitova, Elena N; Mayer, Paul M; Tieleman, D Peter; Lowary, Todd L; Klassen, John S

    2016-08-17

    We report a detailed study of the structure and stability of carbohydrate-lipid interactions. Complexes of a methylmannose polysaccharide (MMP) derivative and fatty acids (FAs) served as model systems. The dependence of solution affinities and gas-phase dissociation activation energies (Ea ) on FA length indicates a dominant role of carbohydrate-lipid interactions in stabilizing (MMP+FA) complexes. Solution (1) H NMR results reveal weak interactions between MMP methyl groups and FA acyl chain; MD simulations suggest the complexes are disordered. The contribution of FA methylene groups to the Ea is similar to that of heats of transfer of n-alkanes from the gas phase to polar solvents, thus suggesting that MMP binds lipids through dipole-induced dipole interactions. The MD results point to hydrophobic interactions and H-bonds with the FA carboxyl group. Comparison of collision cross sections of deprotonated (MMP+FA) ions with MD structures suggests that the gaseous complexes are disordered. PMID:27253157

  18. Dimeric Structure of the Transmembrane Domain of Glycophorin A in Lipidic and Detergent Environments

    PubMed Central

    Mineev, K.S.; Bocharov, E.V.; Volynsky, P.E.; Goncharuk, M.V.; Tkach, E.N.; Ermolyuk, Ya.S.; Schulga, A.A.; Chupin, V.V.; Maslennikov, I.V.; Efremov, R.G.; Arseniev, A.S.

    2011-01-01

    Specific interactions between transmembrane α-helices, to a large extent, determine the biological function of integral membrane proteins upon normal development and in pathological states of an organism. Various membrane-like media, partially those mimicking the conditions of multicomponent biological membranes, are used to study the structural and thermodynamic features that define the character of oligomerization of transmembrane helical segments. The choice of the composition of the membrane-mimicking medium is conducted in an effort to obtain a biologically relevant conformation of the protein complex and a sample that would be stable enough to allow to perform a series of long-term experiments with its use. In the present work, heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations were used to demonstrate that the two most widely used media (detergent DPC micelles and lipid DMPC/DHPC bicelles) enable to perform structural studies of the specific interactions between transmembrane α-helices by the example of dimerizing the transmembrane domain of the bitopic protein glycophorin A. However, a number of peculiarities place lipid bicelles closer to natural lipid bilayers in terms of their physical properties. PMID:22649687

  19. Biopolymer-Lipid Bilayer Interaction Modulates the Physical Properties of Liposomes: Mechanism and Structure.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chen; Zhang, Yating; Abbas, Shabbar; Feng, Biao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Xia, Wenshui; Xia, Shuqin

    2015-08-19

    This study was conducted to elucidate the conformational dependence of the modulating ability of chitosan, a positively charged biopolymer, on a new type of liposome composed of mixed lipids including egg yolk phosphatidylcholine (EYPC) and nonionic surfactant (Tween 80). Analysis of the dynamic and structure of bilayer membrane upon interaction with chitosan by fluorescence and electron paramagnetic resonance techniques demonstrated that, in addition to providing a physical barrier for the membrane surface, the adsorption of chitosan extended and crimped chains rigidified the lipid membrane. However, the decrease in relative microviscosity and order parameter suggested that the presence of chitosan coils disturbed the membrane organization. It was also noted that the increase of fluidity in the lipid bilayer center was not pronounced, indicating the shallow penetration of coils into the hydrophobic interior of bilayer. Microscopic observations revealed that chitosan adsorption not only affected the morphology of liposomes but also modulated the particle aggregation and fusion. Especially, a number of very heterogeneous particles were visualized, which tended to confirm the role of chitosan coils as a "polymeric surfactant". In addition to particle deformation, the membrane permeability was also tuned. These findings may provide a new perspective to understand the physiological functionality of biopolymer and design biopolymer-liposome composite structures as delivery systems for bioactive components. PMID:26173584

  20. Structure and mechanism of calmodulin binding to a signaling sphingolipid reveal new aspects of lipid-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Erika; Harmat, Veronika; Tóth, Judit; Vértessy, Beáta G; Módos, Károly; Kardos, József; Liliom, Károly

    2010-10-01

    Lipid-protein interactions are rarely characterized at a structural molecular level due to technical difficulties; however, the biological significance of understanding the mechanism of these interactions is outstanding. In this report, we provide mechanistic insight into the inhibitory complex formation of the lipid mediator sphingosylphosphorylcholine with calmodulin, the most central and ubiquitous regulator protein in calcium signaling. We applied crystallographic, thermodynamic, kinetic, and spectroscopic approaches using purified bovine calmodulin and bovine cerebral microsomal fraction to arrive at our conclusions. Here we present 1) a 1.6-Å resolution crystal structure of their complex, in which the sphingolipid occupies the conventional hydrophobic binding site on calmodulin; 2) a peculiar stoichiometry-dependent binding process: at low or high protein-to-lipid ratio calmodulin binds lipid micelles or a few lipid molecules in a compact globular conformation, respectively, and 3) evidence that the sphingolipid displaces calmodulin from its targets on cerebral microsomes. We have ascertained the specificity of the interaction using structurally related lipids as controls. Our observations reveal the structural basis of selective calmodulin inhibition by the sphingolipid. On the basis of the crystallographic and biophysical characterization of the calmodulin-sphingosylphosphorylcholine interaction, we propose a novel lipid-protein binding model, which might be applicable to other interactions as well. PMID:20522785

  1. From microalgae oil to produce novel structured triacylglycerols enriched with unsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Wang, Xu-Dong; Zhao, Xing-Yu; Liu, Xi; Dong, Tao; Wu, Fu-An

    2015-05-01

    Novel structured triacylglycerols (STAGs) enriched with unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) and low palmitic acid (PA) content were firstly synthesized from Schizochytrium sp. oil and oleic acid (OA) via solvent-free acidolysis catalyzed by Lipozyme RM IM. The results indicated that, the PA content decreased from 24.49% to 6.95%, while the UFAs content increased from 70.20% to 90.9% at the sn-1,3 positions in the STAGs under the optimal condition (i.e., lipase load of 7%, molar ratio of microalgae oil TAGs to OA of 1:3, and temperature of 65 °C). The lipase Lipozyme RM IM could be reused 16 times without significant loss of activity. The improved plastic and storage ranges of STAGs are useful for infant formula formulations, by which a possible method is blending of this product and 1,3-dioleoyl-2-palmitoylglycerol enriched fats and minor lipids based on the corresponding chemical compositions of human milk fat. PMID:25451776

  2. Effect of Lipid Partitioning on Predictions of Acute Toxicity of Oil Sands Process Affected Water to Embryos of Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas).

    PubMed

    Morandi, Garrett D; Zhang, Kun; Wiseman, Steve B; Pereira, Alberto Dos Santos; Martin, Jonathan W; Giesy, John P

    2016-08-16

    Dissolved organic compounds in oil sands process affected water (OSPW) are known to be responsible for most of its toxicity to aquatic organisms, but the complexity of this mixture prevents use of traditional bottom-up approaches for predicting toxicities of mixtures. Therefore, a top-down approach to predict toxicity of the dissolved organic fraction of OSPW was developed and tested. Accurate masses (i.e., m/z) determined by ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry in negative and positive ionization modes were used to assign empirical chemical formulas to each chemical species in the mixture. For each chemical species, a predictive measure of lipid accumulation was estimated by stir-bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) to poly(dimethyl)siloxane, or by partitioning to solid-supported lipid membranes (SSLM). A narcosis mode of action was assumed and the target-lipid model was used to estimate potencies of mixtures by assuming strict additivity. A model developed using a combination of the SBSE and SSLM lipid partitioning estimates, whereby the accumulation of chemicals to neutral and polar lipids was explicitly considered, was best for predicting empirical values of LC50 in 96-h acute toxicity tests with embryos of fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). Model predictions were within 4-fold of observed toxicity for 75% of OSPW samples, and within 8.5-fold for all samples tested, which is comparable to the range of interlaboratory variability for in vivo toxicity testing. PMID:27420640

  3. Structural organization of lipid phase and protein-lipid interface in apolipoprotein-phospholipid recombinants: influence of cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Dergunov, A D; Taveirne, J; Vanloo, B; Caster, H; Rosseneu, M

    1997-06-01

    The complexes of individual human plasma apolipoproteins (apo) A-I, E and A-II with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) in the absence or in the presence of cholesterol (Chol) were prepared with initial DPPC/Chol/protein weight ratio as 3:0.15:1. ApoA-I/DPPC/Chol complexes with different protein content (initial DPPC/apoA-I weight ratios were changed from 10.5:1 to 2.6:1) but with a fixed initial DPPC/Chol weight ratio of 20:1 were also prepared. The complexes were isolated by gel-filtration and characterized by size and composition. ApoA-I- and apoA-II-complexes had the same size (80-84 A) and the complexes became more heterogeneous upon Chol inclusion; apoE-complexes were larger (97-100 A) and more homogeneous and Chol addition had no effect on their hydrodynamic properties. Chol seems to be excluded partially in the following manner for isolated complexes with different apo's: A-II > E > A-I. The possible existence of two lipid regions in the complexes differing in lipid dynamics - the lipid shell in the vicinity of apolipoprotein (boundary lipid) opposite to the remaining part of the lipid bilayer - has been studied by absorbance and fluorescence spectroscopy with cis-parinaric acid (cis-PA) and trans-parinaric acid (trans-PA) embedded into the complexes. Their application is based on a strong preference of trans-PA for solid lipid while cis-PA distributes more equally between co-existing fluid and solid lipid regions (Sklar et al. (1979) Biochemistry 18, 1707-1716). (1) For apoA-I-complexes, the partition of cis-PA between water and lipid phase at temperatures below and above the transition temperature of DPPC (T(t)) was insensitive to Chol and temperature, while partition of trans-PA into the lipid phase of Chol-containing complex was increased at high temperature and decreased at low temperature. These results seem to be related to trans-PA redistribution between Chol-rich and protein-rich lipid domains, the latter being more disordered at T < T(t) and

  4. A rice bran oil diet improves lipid abnormalities and suppress hyperinsulinemic responses in rats with streptozotocin/nicotinamide-induced type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Chou, Tsui-Wei; Ma, Chien-Ya; Cheng, Hsing-Hsien; Chen, Ya-Yen; Lai, Ming-Hoang

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of rice bran oil (RBO) on lipid metabolism and insulin resistance in rats with streptozotocin/nicotinamide-induced type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Rats were divided into two groups: the control group (15% soybean oil, contains 0 g gamma-oryzanol and 0 g gamma-tocotrienol/150 g oil for 5 weeks) and the RBO group (15% RBO, contains 5.25 g gamma-oryzanol and 0.9 g gamma-tocotrienol/150 g oil for 5 weeks). Compared with the control group, the RBO group had a lower plasma nonesterified fatty acid concentration, ratio of total to high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol, hepatic cholesterol concentration, and area under the curve for insulin. The RBO group had a higher high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol concentration and greater excretion of fecal neutral sterols and bile acid than did the control group. RBO may improve lipid abnormalities, reduce the atherogenic index, and suppress the hyperinsulinemic response in rats with streptozotocin/nicotinamide-induced T2DM. In addition, RBO can lead to increased fecal neutral sterol and bile acid excretion. PMID:19590704

  5. Supplementation with pumpkin seed oil improves plasma lipid profile and cardiovascular outcomes of female non-ovariectomized and ovariectomized Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Gossell-Williams, M; Lyttle, K; Clarke, T; Gardner, M; Simon, O

    2008-07-01

    Pumpkin (Cucurbita species) seed oil (PSO) is a rich source of phytoestrogens and the aim of this study was to examine the effect of PSO supplementation on the total cholesterol (TC), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), triglycerides, high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), systolic and diastolic blood pressure in non-ovariectomized and ovariectomized Sprague-Dawley rats. Female rats weighing 220-300 g were divided into non-ovariectomized rats for supplementation with corn oil (control CO; n = 6) or PSO (control PSO; n = 5) and ovariectomized rats for supplementation with corn oil (OVX/CO; n = 6) or PSO (OVX/PSO; n = 5) for 5 days per week for 12 weeks (corn oil 40 mg/kg or PSO 40 mg/kg given orally). Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were measured weekly. Blood was collected at the end of the period for plasma lipid assays. Control PSO had lower TC, LDL-C, triglycerides and higher HDL-C than the control CO. The OVX/CO had higher TC, LDL-C, triglycerides and lower HDL-C than the control CO and these changes were prevented in the OVX/PSO rats. PSO supplementation also resulted in lower systolic and diastolic blood pressures in both non-ovariectomized and ovariectomized rats. It is concluded that PSO supplementation can prevent changes in plasma lipids and blood pressure associated with inadequate oestrogen availability. PMID:18567058

  6. A Rice Bran Oil Diet Improves Lipid Abnormalities and Suppress Hyperinsulinemic Responses in Rats with Streptozotocin/Nicotinamide-Induced Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Tsui-Wei; Ma, Chien-Ya; Cheng, Hsing-Hsien; Chen, Ya-Yen; Lai, Ming-Hoang

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of rice bran oil (RBO) on lipid metabolism and insulin resistance in rats with streptozotocin/nicotinamide-induced type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Rats were divided into two groups: the control group (15% soybean oil, contains 0 g γ-oryzanol and 0 g γ-tocotrienol/150 g oil for 5 weeks) and the RBO group (15% RBO, contains 5.25 g γ-oryzanol and 0.9 g γ-tocotrienol/150 g oil for 5 weeks). Compared with the control group, the RBO group had a lower plasma nonesterified fatty acid concentration, ratio of total to high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol, hepatic cholesterol concentration, and area under the curve for insulin. The RBO group had a higher high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol concentration and greater excretion of fecal neutral sterols and bile acid than did the control group. RBO may improve lipid abnormalities, reduce the atherogenic index, and suppress the hyperinsulinemic response in rats with streptozotocin/nicotinamide-induced T2DM. In addition, RBO can lead to increased fecal neutral sterol and bile acid excretion. PMID:19590704

  7. Chains, Sheets and Droplets: Assemblies of Hydrophobic Gold Nanocrystals with Saturated Phosphatidylcholine Lipid and Squalene

    PubMed Central

    Rasch, Michael R.; Bosoy, Christian; Yu, Yixuan; Korgel, Brian A.

    2012-01-01

    Assemblies of saturated 1,2-diacyl-phosphatidylcholine lipid and hydrophobic dodecanethiol-capped 1.8 nm diameter gold nanocrystals were studied as a function of lipid chain length and the addition of the naturally-occurring oil, squalene. The gold nanocrystals formed various lipid-stabilized agglomerates, sometimes fusing with lipid vesicle bilayers. The nanocrystal assembly structure depended on the hydrocarbon chain length of the lipid fatty acids. Lipid with the shortest fatty acid length studied, dilauroyl-phosphatidylcholine, created extended chains of gold nanocrystals. Lipid with slightly longer fatty acid chains created planar sheets of nanocrystals. Further increases of the fatty acid chain length led to spherical agglomerates. The inclusion of squalene led to lipid- and nanocrystal-coated oil droplets. PMID:23033891

  8. Shape Transitions and Lattice Structuring of Ceramide-Enriched Domains Generated by Sphingomyelinase in Lipid Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Härtel, Steffen; Fanani, María Laura; Maggio, Bruno

    2005-01-01

    Sphingomyelinases (SMases) hydrolyze the membrane constituent sphingomyelin (SM) to phosphocholine and ceramide (Cer). Growing evidence supports that SMase-induced SM→Cer conversion leads to the formation of lateral Cer-enriched domains which drive structural reorganization in lipid membranes. We previously provided visual evidence in real-time for the formation of Cer-enriched domains in SM monolayers through the action of the neutral Bacillus cereus SMase. In this work, we disclose a succession of discrete morphologic transitions and lateral organization of Cer-enriched domains that underlay the SMase-generated surface topography. We further reveal how these structural parameters couple to the generation of two-dimensional electrostatic fields, based upon the specific orientation of the lipid dipole moments in the Cer-enriched domains. Advanced image processing routines in combination with time-resolved epifluorescence microscopy on Langmuir monolayers revealed: 1), spontaneous nucleation and circular growth of Cer-enriched domains after injection of SMase into the subphase of the SM monolayer; 2), domain-intrinsic discrete transitions from circular to periodically undulating shapes followed by a second transition toward increasingly branched morphologies; 3), lateral superstructure organization into predominantly hexagonal domain lattices; 4), formation of super-superstructures by the hexagonal lattices; and 5), rotationally and laterally coupled domain movement before domain border contact. All patterns proved to be specific for the SMase-driven system since they could not be observed with Cer-enriched domains generated by defined mixtures of SM/Cer in enzyme-free monolayers at the same surface pressure (Π = 10 mN/m). Following the theories of lateral shape transitions, dipolar electrostatic interactions of lipid domains, and direct determinations of the monolayer dipole potential, our data show that SMase induces a domain-specific packing and orientation of

  9. Asymmetrical long-run dependence between oil price and US dollar exchange rate-Based on structural oil shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jiaqi; Gu, Rongbao

    2016-08-01

    The multifractal behavior in cross-correlation between oil prices and exchange rates is examined in this paper. We use the multifractal detrended cross-correlation analysis to investigate the general cross-correlations, and further show that these cross-correlations are asymmetric by multifractal asymmetric cross-correlation analysis. We recover the structural oil shocks and then use these indicators to characterize the asymmetries along with oil price trend itself. Our empirical results show that their asymmetric degrees vary significantly. The sign of oil supply shock leads to the most significant asymmetry among them.

  10. Ca(2+)-mediated anionic lipid-plasmid DNA lipoplexes. Electrochemical, structural, and biochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Barrán-Berdón, Ana L; Yélamos, Belén; Malfois, Marc; Aicart, Emilio; Junquera, Elena

    2014-10-01

    Several experimental methods, such as zeta potential, gel electrophoresis, small-angle X-ray scattering, gene transfection, fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry, and cell viability/cytotoxicity assays, have been used to analyze the potential of anionic lipids (AL) as effective nontoxic and nonviral DNA vectors, assisted by divalent cations. The lipoplexes studied are those comprised of the green fluorescent protein-encoding plasmid DNA pEGFP-C3, an anionic lipid as 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-(1'-rac-glycerol) (DOPG) or 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-L-serine (DOPS), and a zwitterionic lipid, the 1,2-dioleoyl-sn -glycero-3-phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE, not charged at physiological pH). The studies have been carried on at different liposome and lipoplex compositions and in the presence of a variety of [Ca2+]. Electrochemical experiments reveal that DOPG/DOPE and DOPS/DOPE anionic liposomes may compact more effectively pDNA at low molar fractions (with an excess of DOPE) and at AL/pDNA ratios ≈20. Calcium concentrations around 15-20 mM are needed to yield lipoplexes neutral or slightly positive. From a structural standpoint, DOPG/DOPE-Ca2+-pDNA lipoplexes are self-assembled into a HIIc phase (inverted cylindrical micelles in hexagonal ordering with plasmid supercoils inside the cylinders), while DOPS/DOPE-Ca2+-pDNA lipoplexes show two phases in coexistence: one classical HIIc phase which contains pDNA supercoils and one Lα phase without pDNA among the lamellae, i.e., a lamellar stack of lipidic bilayers held together by Ca2+ bridges. Transfection and cell viability studies were done with HEK293T and HeLa cells in the presence of serum. Lipoplexes herein studied show moderate-to-low transfection levels combined with moderate-to-high cell viability, comparable to those yield by Lipofectamine2000*, which is a cationic lipid (CL) standard formulation, but none of them improve the output of typical CL gen vectors, mostly if they are gemini or dendritic

  11. Fish Oil Contaminated with Persistent Organic Pollutants Reduces Antioxidant Capacity and Induces Oxidative Stress without Affecting Its Capacity to Lower Lipid Concentrations and Systemic Inflammation in Rats123

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Mee Young; Lumibao, Jan; Mistry, Prashila; Saleh, Rhonda; Hoh, Eunha

    2015-01-01

    Background: Numerous studies have investigated the benefits of fish, fish oil, and ω-3 (n–3) polyunsaturated fatty acids against cardiovascular diseases. However, concern surrounding contamination with persistent organic pollutants (POPs) prompts caution in the recommendation to consume fish and fish oil. Objective: The present study compared the effects of fish oil contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides (OCs) on serum lipid profiles, inflammation, and oxidative stress. Methods: Twenty eight-day-old male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 30) consumed diets of unmodified fish oil (FO) consisting of 15% fat by weight, persistent organic pollutant–contaminated fish oil (POP FO) (PCBs at 2.40 μg/g; OCs at 3.80 μg/g FO), or corn oil (control; CO) for 9 wk. Lipid profiles and C-reactive protein concentrations were assessed. Hepatic gene expression related to lipid metabolism was determined by real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis. Results: After 9 wk of feeding, accumulation of PCBs and OCs in the fat tissue of the POP FO group compared with the other 2 groups was confirmed (P < 0.01). Both fish oil groups showed greater HDL cholesterol (FO 53 ± 5.3 and POP FO 55 ± 7.7 vs. CO 34 ± 2.3 mg/dL), but lower triglycerides (24 ± 2.8 and 22 ± 3.0 vs. 43 ± 5.6 mg/dL), LDL cholesterol (38 ± 14 and 34 ± 9.2 vs. 67 ± 4.4 mg/dL), and C-reactive protein (113 ± 20 and 120 ± 26 vs. 189 ± 22 μg/dL) compared with the CO group (P < 0.05). Gene expression of fatty acid synthase in both fish oil groups was also less than in the CO group (P < 0.05). However, the POP FO group showed greater lipid peroxidation (5.1 ± 0.7 vs. 2.9 ± 0.9 and 2.6 ± 0.6 μM) and less antioxidant capacity (0.08 ± 0.06 vs. 0.5 ± 0.1 and 0.4 ± 0.1 mM) than the CO and FO groups (P < 0.05). Conclusions: These findings indicate that, despite exhibiting benefits on serum lipid concentrations and inflammation, contamination with PCBs and OCs

  12. Temperature-Dependence of Lipid A Acyl Structure in Psychrobacter cryohalolentis and Arctic Isolates of Colwellia hornerae and Colwellia piezophila.

    PubMed

    Sweet, Charles R; Watson, Rebecca E; Landis, Corinne A; Smith, Joseph P

    2015-08-01

    Lipid A is a fundamental Gram-negative outer membrane component and the essential element of lipopolysaccharide (endotoxin), a potent immunostimulatory molecule. This work describes the metabolic adaptation of the lipid A acyl structure by Psychrobacter cryohalolentis at various temperatures in its facultative psychrophilic growth range, as characterized by MALDI-TOF MS and FAME GC-MS. It also presents the first elucidation of lipid A structure from the Colwellia genus, describing lipid A from strains of Colwellia hornerae and Colwellia piezophila, which were isolated as primary cultures from Arctic fast sea ice and identified by 16S rDNA sequencing. The Colwellia strains are obligate psychrophiles, with a growth range restricted to 15 °C or less. As such, these organisms have less need for fluidity adaptation in the acyl moiety of the outer membrane, and they do not display alterations in lipid A based on growth temperature. Both Psychrobacter and Colwellia make use of extensive single-methylene variation in the size of their lipid A molecules. Such single-carbon variations in acyl size were thought to be restricted to psychrotolerant (facultative) species, but its presence in these Colwellia species shows that odd-chain acyl units and a single-carbon variation in lipid A structure are present in obligate psychrophiles, as well. PMID:26264000

  13. Temperature-Dependence of Lipid A Acyl Structure in Psychrobacter cryohalolentis and Arctic Isolates of Colwellia hornerae and Colwellia piezophila

    PubMed Central

    Sweet, Charles R.; Watson, Rebecca E.; Landis, Corinne A.; Smith, Joseph P.

    2015-01-01

    Lipid A is a fundamental Gram-negative outer membrane component and the essential element of lipopolysaccharide (endotoxin), a potent immunostimulatory molecule. This work describes the metabolic adaptation of the lipid A acyl structure by Psychrobacter cryohalolentis at various temperatures in its facultative psychrophilic growth range, as characterized by MALDI-TOF MS and FAME GC-MS. It also presents the first elucidation of lipid A structure from the Colwellia genus, describing lipid A from strains of Colwellia hornerae and Colwellia piezophila, which were isolated as primary cultures from Arctic fast sea ice and identified by 16S rDNA sequencing. The Colwellia strains are obligate psychrophiles, with a growth range restricted to 15 °C or less. As such, these organisms have less need for fluidity adaptation in the acyl moiety of the outer membrane, and they do not display alterations in lipid A based on growth temperature. Both Psychrobacter and Colwellia make use of extensive single-methylene variation in the size of their lipid A molecules. Such single-carbon variations in acyl size were thought to be restricted to psychrotolerant (facultative) species, but its presence in these Colwellia species shows that odd-chain acyl units and a single-carbon variation in lipid A structure are present in obligate psychrophiles, as well. PMID:26264000

  14. Influence of the type of vegetable oil on the drug release profile from lipid-core nanocapsules and in vivo genotoxicity study.

    PubMed

    Rigo, Lucas Almeida; Frescura, Viviane; Fiel, Luana; Coradini, Karine; Ourique, Aline Ferreira; Emanuelli, Tatiana; Quatrin, Andréia; Tedesco, Solange; Silva, Cristiane B da; Guterres, Silvia Staniçuaski; Pohlmann, Adriana Raffin; Beck, Ruy Carlos Ruver

    2014-11-01

    The use of rice bran (RB), soybean (SB) or sunflower seed (SF) oils to prepare lipid-core nanocapsules (LNCs) as controlled drug delivery systems was investigated. LNCs were prepared by interfacial deposition using the preformed polymer method. All formulations showed negative zeta potential and adequate nanotechnological characteristics (particle size 220-230  nm, polydispersity index < 0.20). The environmental safety was evaluated through an in vivo protocol (Allium cepa test) and LNCs containing RB, SB or SF oils did not present genotoxic potential. Clobetasol propionate (CP) was selected as a model drug to evaluate the influence of the type of vegetable oil on the control of the drug release from LNCs. Biphasic drug release profiles were observed for all formulations. After 168  h, the concentration of drug released from the formulation containing SF oil was lower (0.36  mg/mL) than from formulations containing SB (0.40  mg/mL) or RB oil (0.45  mg/mL). Good correlations between the consistency indices for the LNC cores and the burst and sustained drug release rate constants were obtained. Therefore, the type of the vegetal oil was shown as an important factor governing the control of drug release from LNCs. PMID:23978050

  15. The influence of amphotericin B on the molecular organization and structural properties of DPPC lipid membranes modified by sterols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiński, Daniel M.; Pociecha, Damian; Górecka, Ewa; Gagoś, Mariusz

    2015-02-01

    In this work, we studied the influence of the polyene antibiotic amphotericin B (AmB) on dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) multibilayers modified by cholesterol and ergosterol investigated by means of X-ray diffraction. The periodic structures related to AmB-DPPC-sterol complexes in multibilayers are completely created in temperatures above the main lipid phase transition. The differences between all observed multilayer structures are related to the thickness. Multibilayers composed of lipid and sterols have similar thickness of 51 Å. Addition of amphotericin B leads to creation of new periodic structures. Multibilayers composed of lipid-ergosterol-AmB have thickness of 44 Å which does not change with temperature. Multibilayers composed of lipid-cholesterol-AmB at 20 °C are 43 Å and gets thicker at 50 °C. Most probably this is caused by weaker van der Vaals cholesterol-amphotericin B interactions.

  16. Structural Basis of Lipid Targeting and Destruction by the Type V Secretion System of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    da Mata Madeira, Paulo Vinicius; Zouhir, Samira; Basso, Pauline; Neves, David; Laubier, Aurélie; Salacha, Richard; Bleves, Sophie; Faudry, Eric; Contreras-Martel, Carlos; Dessen, Andréa

    2016-05-01

    The type V secretion system is a macromolecular machine employed by a number of bacteria to secrete virulence factors into the environment. The human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa employs the newly described type Vd secretion system to secrete a soluble variant of PlpD, a lipase of the patatin-like family synthesized as a single macromolecule that also carries a polypeptide transport-associated domain and a 16-stranded β-barrel. Here we report the crystal structure of the secreted form of PlpD in its biologically active state. PlpD displays a classical lipase α/β hydrolase fold with a catalytic site located within a highly hydrophobic channel that entraps a lipidic molecule. The active site is covered by a flexible lid, as in other lipases, indicating that this region in PlpD must modify its conformation in order for catalysis at the water-lipid interface to occur. PlpD displays phospholipase A1 activity and is able to recognize a number of phosphatidylinositols and other phosphatidyl analogs. PlpD is the first example of an active phospholipase secreted through the type V secretion system, for which there are more than 200 homologs, revealing details of the lipid destruction arsenal expressed by P. aeruginosa in order to establish infection. PMID:27012424

  17. Structural and functional insights into lipid-bound nerve growth factors.

    PubMed

    Tong, Qiong; Wang, Feng; Zhou, Hong-Zhe; Sun, Han-Li; Song, Hui; Shu, Yu-Yan; Gong, Yong; Zhang, Wen-Ting; Cai, Tan-Xi; Yang, Fu-Quan; Tang, Jie; Jiang, Tao

    2012-09-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is a dimeric molecule that modulates the survival, proliferation, and differentiation of nervous cells and is also known to act on cells of the immune system and endocrine system. NGFs extracted from mouse submaxillary gland and cobra venom have different immunological behaviors, yet the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here we report the crystal structure of the NGF purified from Chinese cobra Naja naja atra (cNGF), which unexpectedly reveals a 2-tailed lipid molecule that is embedded between the two protomers of the NGF homodimer. In addition, crystallographic analysis indicated that the purified mouse NGF(mNGF) is free from lipid but can bind lysophosphatidylserine (lyso-PS) in the same pocket as cNGF. Bioassays indicated that the binding of lipid molecules to cNGF and mNGF are essential for their mast cell activation activity and abates their p75(NTR) binding capacity. Taken together, these results suggest a new mechanism for the regulation of the function of NGF. PMID:22649032

  18. Construction of Escherichia coli Mutant with Decreased Endotoxic Activity by Modifying Lipid A Structure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiong; Li, Yanyan; Zhao, Xinxin; Yang, Xue; Liu, Qing; Kong, Qingke

    2015-06-01

    Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) and its derivatives are widely used for the production of recombinant proteins, but these purified proteins are always contaminated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS is recognized by the toll-like receptor 4 and myeloid differentiation factor 2 complex of mammalian immune cells and leads to release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. It is a vital step to remove LPS from the proteins before use for therapeutic purpose. In this study, we constructed BL21 (DE3) ∆msbB28 ∆pagP38 mutant, which produces a penta-acylated LPS with reduced endotoxicity. The plasmids harboring pagL and/or lpxE were then introduced into this mutant to further modify the LPS. The new strain (S004) carrying plasmid pQK004 (pagL and lpxE) produced mono-phosphoryated tetra-acylated lipid A, which induces markedly less production of tumor necrosis factor-α in the RAW264.7 and IL-12 in the THP1, but still retains ability to produce recombinant proteins. This study provides a strategy to decrease endotoxic activity of recombinant proteins purified from E. coli BL21 backgrounds and a feasible approach to modify lipid A structure for alternative purposes such as mono-phosphoryl lipid A (MPL) as vaccine adjuvants. PMID:26023843

  19. Construction of Escherichia coli Mutant with Decreased Endotoxic Activity by Modifying Lipid A Structure

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qiong; Li, Yanyan; Zhao, Xinxin; Yang, Xue; Liu, Qing; Kong, Qingke

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) and its derivatives are widely used for the production of recombinant proteins, but these purified proteins are always contaminated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS is recognized by the toll-like receptor 4 and myeloid differentiation factor 2 complex of mammalian immune cells and leads to release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. It is a vital step to remove LPS from the proteins before use for therapeutic purpose. In this study, we constructed BL21 (DE3) ∆msbB28 ∆pagP38 mutant, which produces a penta-acylated LPS with reduced endotoxicity. The plasmids harboring pagL and/or lpxE were then introduced into this mutant to further modify the LPS. The new strain (S004) carrying plasmid pQK004 (pagL and lpxE) produced mono-phosphoryated tetra-acylated lipid A, which induces markedly less production of tumor necrosis factor-α in the RAW264.7 and IL-12 in the THP1, but still retains ability to produce recombinant proteins. This study provides a strategy to decrease endotoxic activity of recombinant proteins purified from E. coli BL21 backgrounds and a feasible approach to modify lipid A structure for alternative purposes such as mono-phosphoryl lipid A (MPL) as vaccine adjuvants. PMID:26023843

  20. Effects of Ether vs. Ester Linkage on Lipid Bilayer Structure and Water Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Guler, S. Deren; Ghosh, D. Dipon; Pan, Jianjun; Matthai, John C.; Zeidel, Mark L.; Nagle, John F.; Tristram-Nagle, Stephanie

    2009-01-01

    The structure and water permeability of bilayers composed of the ether linked lipid, dihexadecylphosphatidylcholine (DHPC), were studied and compared with the ester linked lipid, dipalmitoylphosphaditdylcholine (DPPC). Wide angle x-ray scattering on oriented bilayers in the fluid phase indicate that the area per lipid A is slightly larger for DHPC than for DPPC. Low angle x-ray scattering yields A=65.1Å2 for DHPC at 48°C. LAXS data provide the bending modulus, KC=4.2×10−13erg, and the Hamaker parameter H=7.2×10−14erg for the van der Waals attractive interaction between neighboring bilayers. For the low temperature phases with ordered hydrocarbon chains, we confirm the transition from a tilted Lß’ gel phase to an untilted, interdigitated LßI phase as the sample hydrates at 20°C. Our measurement of water permeability, Pf=0.022 cm/s at 48 °C for fluid phase DHPC is slightly smaller than that of DPPC, (Pf=0.027 cm/s) at 50 °C, consistent with our triple slab theory of permeability. PMID:19416724

  1. Lipid-lowering and anti-inflammatory effects of omega 3 ethyl esters and krill oil: a randomized, cross-over, clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Rosticci, Martina; Morbini, Martino; Cagnati, Marcella; Grandi, Elisa; Parini, Angelo; Borghi, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) derived from different sources could have different lipid-lowering effects in humans. The main aim of our study was to compare the short-term triglyceride-lowering efficacy of krill oil and purified omega 3 ethyl ester PUFAs in mildly overweight hypertriglyceridemic subjects. Material and methods This double-blind, randomized clinical trial was carried out in 25 moderately hypertriglyceridemic subjects (TG = 150–500 mg/dl). After a 4-week run-in, participants were allocated to treatment with similar pills containing omega 3 ethyl ester PUFAs 1000 mg twice a day vs. krill oil 500 mg twice a day. After 4 weeks of treatment, participants were asked to observe a 4-week wash-out period, and they were then assigned to the alternative treatment for a further period of 4 weeks. Results Although both PUFA sources were able to improve TG plasma levels, esterified omega 3 PUFAs were more efficacious than krill oil (p < 0.05). Nonetheless, only krill oil treatment was able to significantly improve high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and apolipoprotein AI levels, compared to both baseline (p < 0.05) and end of treatment with esterified omega 3 PUFAs (p < 0.05) values. Both treatments were able to significantly reduce high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels from the baseline (p < 0.05), but krill oil improved it more efficaciously than esterified omega 3 PUFAs (p < 0.05). Conclusions Krill oil has lipid-lowering effects comparable with those obtained through a 4-fold higher dose of purified omega 3 ethyl ester PUFAs in mildly overweight hypertriglyceridemic subjects, while more efficaciously reducing hs-CRP. PMID:27279841

  2. A Simple Evaporation Method for Large-Scale Production of Liquid Crystalline Lipid Nanoparticles with Various Internal Structures.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do-Hoon; Lim, Sora; Shim, Jongwon; Song, Ji Eun; Chang, Jong Soo; Jin, Kyeong Sik; Cho, Eun Chul

    2015-09-16

    We present a simple and industrially accessible method of producing liquid crystalline lipid nanoparticles with various internal structures based on phytantriol, Pluronic F127, and vitamin E acetate. Bilayer vesicles were produced when an ethanolic solution dissolving the lipid components was mixed with deionized water. After the evaporation of ethanol from the aqueous mixture, vesicles were transformed into lipid-filled liquid crystalline nanoparticles with well-defined internal structures such as hexagonal lattices (mostly inverted cubic Pn3m), lined or coiled pattern (inverted hexagonal H2), and disordered structure (inverse microemulsion, L2), depending on the compositions. Further studies suggested that their internal structures were also affected by temperature. The internal structures were characterized from cryo-TEM and small-angle X-ray scattering results. Microcalorimetry studies were performed to investigate the degree of molecular ordering/crystallinity of lipid components within the nanostructures. From the comparative studies, we demonstrated the present method could produce the lipid nanoparticles with similar characteristics to those made from a conventional method. More importantly, the production only requires simple tools for mixing and ethanol evaporation and it is possible to produce 10 kg or so per batch of aqueous lipid nanoparticles dispersions, enabling the large-scale production of the liquid crystalline nanoparticles for various biomedical applications. PMID:26305487

  3. Enhanced lipid accumulation and biodiesel production by oleaginous Chlorella protothecoides under a structured heterotrophic-iron (II) induction strategy.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuqin; Mu, Jinxiu; Chen, Di; Xu, Hua; Han, Fangxin

    2015-05-01

    A structured heterotrophic-iron (II) induction (HII) strategy was proposed to enhance lipid accumulation in oleaginous Chlorella protothecoides. C. protothecoides subjected to heterotrophic-iron (II) induction achieved a favorable lipid accumulation up to 62 % and a maximum lipid productivity of 820.17 mg/day, representing 2.78-fold and 3.64-fold increase respectively over heterotrophic cultivation alone. HII-induced cells produced significantly elevated levels of 16:0, 18:1(Δ9), and 18:2(Δ9,12) fatty acids (over 90 %). The lipid contents and plant lipid-like fatty acid compositions exhibit the potential of HII-induced C. protothecoides as biodiesel feedstock. Furthermore, 31 altered proteins in HII-induced algal cells were successfully identified. These differentially expressed proteins were assigned into nine molecular function categories, including carbohydrate metabolism, lipid biosynthesis, Calvin cycle, cellular respiration, photosynthesis, energy and transport, protein biosynthesis, regulate and defense, and unclassified. Analysis using the Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes and gene ontology annotation showed that malic enzyme, acyltransferase, and ACP were key metabolic checkpoints found to modulate lipid accumulation in C. protothecoides. The results provided possible applications of HII cultivation strategy in other microalgal species and new possibilities in developing genetic and metabolic engineering microalgae for desirable lipid productivity. PMID:25724298

  4. Fish oil prevents colon cancer by modulation of structure and function of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Agnihotri, Navneet; Sharma, Gayatri; Rani, Isha; Renuka; Bhatnagar, Archana

    2016-08-01

    Cancer cells are more susceptible to metabolic perturbations due to impaired electron transport chain (ETC) that promote uncontrolled proliferation. Mitochondria play a pivotal role in bioenergetics and apoptosis, hence are considered as a promising target in tumor cell eradication. Therefore, the present study is designed to elucidate chemopreventive action of fish oil (FO) in combination with corn oil (CO) on mitochondria in colorectal cancer (CRC). Male Wistar rats were divided into groups depending on dietary regimen-Control group, FO+CO(1:1) and FO+CO(2.5:1). These groups were further subdivided depending on whether these received a weekly intraperitoneal injection of ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA) or N,N-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH) for a period of 4 weeks. The animals sacrificed 48h and 16 weeks after EDTA/DMH treatment constituted initiation and post-initiation phase respectively. The structural and functional alterations in mitochondria were evaluated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and by assaying electron transport chain (ETC) enzymes. Mitochondrial lipid composition and cholesterol levels were also assessed. DMH treatment led to mitochondrial degeneration, disrupted cristae and a significant decrease in ETC complexes suggestive of metabolic reprogramming. Moreover, an increase in cholesterol and cardiolipin (CL) levels in post-initiation phase led to evasion of apoptosis. FO in both the ratios resulted in stabilization and increase in number of mitochondria, however, FO+CO(2.5:1)+DMH group also exhibited mitophagy and crystolysis alongwith altered dynamics in ETC which facilitated apoptosis. It also decreased cholesterol and CL levels to increase apoptosis. Fish oil targets mitochondria in a dose dependent manner that augments apoptosis and hence attenuates carcinogenesis. PMID:27470343

  5. Small GTPase Rab40c associates with lipid droplets and modulates the biogenesis of lipid droplets.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ran; Wang, Weijie; Wang, Shicong; Wang, Zhen; Sun, Lixiang; He, Wei; Fan, Rong; Zhou, Yunhe; Xu, Xiaohui; Hong, Wanjin; Wang, Tuanlao

    2013-01-01

    The subcellular location and cell biological function of small GTPase Rab40c in mammalian cells have not been investigated in detail. In this study, we demonstrated that the exogenously expressed GFP-Rab40c associates with lipid droplets marked by neutral lipid specific dye Oil red or Nile red, but not with the Golgi or endosomal markers. Further examination demonstrated that Rab40c is also associated with ERGIC-53 containing structures, especially under the serum starvation condition. Rab40c is increasingly recruited to the surface of lipid droplets during lipid droplets formation and maturation in HepG2 cells. Rab40c knockdown moderately decreases the size of lipid droplets, suggesting that Rab40c is involved in the biogenesis of lipid droplets. Stimulation for adipocyte differentiation increases the expression of Rab40c in 3T3-L1 cells. Rab40c interacts with TIP47, and is appositionally associated with TIP47-labeled lipid droplets. In addition, over-expression of Rab40c causes the clustering of lipid droplets independent of its GTPase activity, but completely dependent of the intact SOCS box domain of Rab40c. In addition, Rab40c displayed self-interaction as well as interaction with TIP47 and the SOCS box is essential for its ability to induce clustering of lipid droplets. Our results suggest that Rab40c is a novel Rab protein associated with lipid droplets, and is likely involved in modulating the biogenesis of lipid droplets. PMID:23638186

  6. Oxidation of Membrane Curvature-Regulating Phosphatidylethanolamine Lipid Results in Formation of Bilayer and Cubic Structures.

    PubMed

    Sankhagowit, Shalene; Lee, Ernest Y; Wong, Gerard C L; Malmstadt, Noah

    2016-03-15

    Oxidation is associated with conditions related to chronic inflammations and aging. Cubic structures have been observed in the smooth endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial membranes of cells under oxidative stress (e.g., tumor cells and virus-infected cells). It has been previously suspected that oxidation can result in the rearrangement of lipids from a fluid lamellar phase to a cubic structure in organelles containing membranes enriched with amphiphiles that have nonzero intrinsic curvature, such as phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and cardiolipin. This study focuses on the oxidation of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE), a lipid that natively forms an inverted hexagonal phase at physiological conditions. The oxidized samples contain an approximately 3:2 molar ratio of nonoxidized to oxidized DOPE. Optical microscopy images collected during the hydration of this mixture from a dried film suggest that the system evolves into a coexistence of a stable fluid lamellar phase and transient square lattice structures with unit cell sizes of 500-600 nm. Small-angle X-ray scattering of the same lipid mixture yielded a body-centered Im3m cubic phase with the lattice parameter of 14.04 nm. On average, the effective packing parameter of the oxidized DOPE species was estimated to be 0.657 ± 0.069 (standard deviation). This suggests that the oxidation of PE leads to a group of species with inverted molecular intrinsic curvature. Oxidation can create amphiphilic subpopulations that potently impact the integrity of the membrane, since negative Gaussian curvature intrinsic to cubic phases can enable membrane destabilization processes. PMID:26866900

  7. Interaction of polyphemusin I and structural analogs with bacterial membranes, lipopolysaccharide, and lipid monolayers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Scott, M G; Yan, H; Mayer, L D; Hancock, R E

    2000-11-28

    Three structural variants (PV5, PV7, and PV8) of the horseshoe crab cationic antimicrobial peptide polyphemusin I were designed with improved amphipathic profiles. Circular dichroism spectroscopy analysis indicated that in phosphate buffer polyphemusin I, PV7, and PV8 displayed the spectrum of a type II beta-turn-rich structure, but, like polyphemusin I, all three variants adopted a typical beta-sheet structure in an anionic lipid environment. Both polyphemusin I and variants were potent broad spectrum antimicrobials that were clearly bactericidal at their minimal inhibitory concentrations. The variants were moderately less active in vitro but more effective in animal models. Moreover, these variants exhibited delayed bacterial killing, whereas polyphemusin I killed Escherichia coli UB1005 within 5 min at 2.5 microg/mL. All the peptides showed similar abilities to bind to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and permeabilize bacterial outer membranes. Consistent with this was the observation that all peptides significantly inhibited cytokine production by LPS-stimulated macrophages and penetrated polyanionic LPS monolayers to similar extents. None of the peptides had affinity for neutral lipids as evident from both tryptophan fluorescence spectroscopy and Langmuir monolayer analysis. As compared to polyphemusin I, all variants showed reduced ability to interact with anionic lipids, and the hemolytic activity of the variants was decreased by 2-4-fold. In contrast, polyphemusin I efficiently depolarized the cytoplasmic membrane of E. coli, as assessed using a membrane potential sensitive fluorescent dye 3,3-dipropylthiacarbocyanine (diSC(3)5) assay, but the variants showed a substantially delayed and decreased depolarizing ability. The coincident assessment of cell viability indicated that depolarization of the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane potential by polyphemusin I occurred prior to lethal damage to cells. Our data suggest that increase of amphipathicity of beta

  8. Substitution of fish oil with camelina oil and inclusion of camelina meal in diets fed to Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) and their effects on growth, tissue lipid classes, and fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Hixson, S M; Parrish, C C

    2014-03-01

    Developing a commercially relevant Atlantic cod aquaculture industry will require improvements in feed sustainability. Camelina oil and meal are potential replacements of fish oil and fish meal in aquaculture feeds. Camelina oil is high in 18:3ω3 (30%), with an ω3/ω6 ratio > 1. Camelina meal has a considerable crude protein level (38%), which includes significant amounts of methionine and phenylalanine. Four diets were tested; each diet was fed to triplicate tanks (3 tanks per diet) of Atlantic cod (14.4 g/fish; 70 fish per tank) for 13 wk. The diets included a fish oil/fish meal control (FO) and three diets which replaced 100% of fish oil with camelina oil: one diet contained fish meal (100CO), another solvent extracted fish meal (100COSEFM), and another had fish meal partially reduced by 15% inclusion of camelina meal (100CO15CM). Growth was measured (length and weight) and tissue samples were collected for lipid analysis (muscle, liver, brain, gut, spleen, skin, and carcass) at wk 0 (before feeding the experimental diet) and at wk 13. Cod fed camelina oil had a lower (P < 0.001) final weight than cod fed the FO diet (50.8 ± 10.3 g/fish). Cod fed 100CO15CM had a lower (P < 0.001) final weight (35.0 ± 8.0 g) than those fed 100CO (43.6 ± 8.9 g) and 100COSEFM (46.7 ± 10.7 g). Cod tissues in the 100COSEFM treatment were most impacted by dietary fatty acid profile. Multivariate statistics revealed that FO and 100COSEFM tissue fatty acid profiles were 21 to 31% different, depending on tissue type. The full replacement of fish oil with camelina oil, plus solvent extracted fish meal had an overarching effect on the entire fatty acid profile of the whole animal. Fatty acid mass balance calculations indicated that cod fed 100COSEFM elongated 13% of 18:3ω3 to 20:3ω3 and oxidized the remaining 87%, whereas cod fed fish oil showed a much lower (P < 0.001) elongation of 18:3ω3 of 1.6%. These results suggest that excess 18:3ω3 from camelina oil caused some fatty acid

  9. Structural properties of archaeal lipid bilayers: small-angle X-ray scattering and molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Polak, Andraž; Tarek, Mounir; Tomšič, Matija; Valant, Janez; Ulrih, Nataša Poklar; Jamnik, Andrej; Kramar, Peter; Miklavčič, Damijan

    2014-07-22

    Aeropyrum pernix is an aerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon that grows in harsh environmental conditions and as such possesses unique structural and metabolic features. Its membrane interfaces with the extreme environment and is the first line of defense from external factors. Therefore, lipids composing this membrane have special moieties that increase its stability. The membrane of A. pernix is composed predominantly of two polar lipids 2,3-di-O-sesterterpanyl-sn-glicerol-1-phospho-1'(2'-O-α-D-glucosyl)-myo-inositol (AGI) and 2,3-di-O-sesterterpanyl-sn-glicerol-1-phospho-myo-inositol (AI). Both have methyl branches in their lipid tails and ether linkages and carbohydrates in their headgroup. These moieties significantly affect the structure and dynamics of the bilayer. To provide a molecular level insight into these characteristics, we used here Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of lipid bilayers of composition similar to those of the archaeal membranes. First, we show that the electron density profiles along the normal to the bilayers derived from the simulations are in good agreement with the profiles obtained by the small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) technique, which provides confidence in the force fields used. Analyses of the simulation data show that the archaeal lipid bilayers are less hydrated than conventional phosphatidylcholine (PC) lipids and that their structure is not affected by the salt present in the surrounding solution. Furthermore, the lateral pressure in their hydrophobic core, due to the presence of the branched tails, is much higher than that at PC-based lipid bilayers. Both the methyl branched tails and the special headgroup moieties contribute to slow drastically the lateral diffusion of the lipids. Furthermore, we found that the lipid head groups associate via hydrogen bonding, which affects their reorientational dynamics. All together, our data provide links between the microscopic properties of these membranes and their overall

  10. Structure of CrgA, a cell division structural and regulatory protein from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, in lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Das, Nabanita; Dai, Jian; Hung, Ivan; Rajagopalan, Malini R; Rajagopalan, Malini R; Zhou, Huan-Xiang; Cross, Timothy A

    2015-01-13

    The 93-residue transmembrane protein CrgA in Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a central component of the divisome, a large macromolecular machine responsible for cell division. Through interactions with multiple other components including FtsZ, FtsQ, FtsI (PBPB), PBPA, and CwsA, CrgA facilitates the recruitment of the proteins essential for peptidoglycan synthesis to the divisome and stabilizes the divisome. CrgA is predicted to have two transmembrane helices. Here, the structure of CrgA was determined in a liquid-crystalline lipid bilayer environment by solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Oriented-sample data yielded orientational restraints, whereas magic-angle spinning data yielded interhelical distance restraints. These data define a complete structure for the transmembrane domain and provide rich information on the conformational ensembles of the partially disordered N-terminal region and interhelical loop. The structure of the transmembrane domain was refined using restrained molecular dynamics simulations in an all-atom representation of the same lipid bilayer environment as in the NMR samples. The two transmembrane helices form a left-handed packing arrangement with a crossing angle of 24° at the conserved Gly39 residue. This helix pair exposes other conserved glycine and alanine residues to the fatty acyl environment, which are potential sites for binding CrgA's partners such as CwsA and FtsQ. This approach combining oriented-sample and magic-angle spinning NMR spectroscopy in native-like lipid bilayers with restrained molecular dynamics simulations represents a powerful tool for structural characterization of not only isolated membrane proteins, but their complexes, such as those that form macromolecular machines. PMID:25548160

  11. Structure of CrgA, a cell division structural and regulatory protein from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, in lipid bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Das, Nabanita; Dai, Jian; Hung, Ivan; Rajagopalan, Malini; Zhou, Huan-Xiang; Cross, Timothy A.

    2015-01-01

    The 93-residue transmembrane protein CrgA in Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a central component of the divisome, a large macromolecular machine responsible for cell division. Through interactions with multiple other components including FtsZ, FtsQ, FtsI (PBPB), PBPA, and CwsA, CrgA facilitates the recruitment of the proteins essential for peptidoglycan synthesis to the divisome and stabilizes the divisome. CrgA is predicted to have two transmembrane helices. Here, the structure of CrgA was determined in a liquid–crystalline lipid bilayer environment by solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Oriented-sample data yielded orientational restraints, whereas magic-angle spinning data yielded interhelical distance restraints. These data define a complete structure for the transmembrane domain and provide rich information on the conformational ensembles of the partially disordered N-terminal region and interhelical loop. The structure of the transmembrane domain was refined using restrained molecular dynamics simulations in an all-atom representation of the same lipid bilayer environment as in the NMR samples. The two transmembrane helices form a left-handed packing arrangement with a crossing angle of 24° at the conserved Gly39 residue. This helix pair exposes other conserved glycine and alanine residues to the fatty acyl environment, which are potential sites for binding CrgA’s partners such as CwsA and FtsQ. This approach combining oriented-sample and magic-angle spinning NMR spectroscopy in native-like lipid bilayers with restrained molecular dynamics simulations represents a powerful tool for structural characterization of not only isolated membrane proteins, but their complexes, such as those that form macromolecular machines. PMID:25548160

  12. Rafts, little caves and large potholes: how lipid structure interacts with membrane proteins to create functionally diverse membrane environments.

    PubMed

    Morris, Roger; Cox, Helen; Mombelli, Enrico; Quinn, Peter J

    2004-01-01

    This chapter reviews how diverse lipid microdomains form in the membrane and partition proteins into different functional units that regulate cell trafficking, signalling and movement. We will concentrate upon five major issues: 1. the diversity of lipid structure that produces diverse microenvironments into which different subsets of proteins partition; 2. why ordered lipid domains exclude proteins, and the conditions required for select subsets of proteins to enter these domains; 3. the coupling of the inner and outer leaflets within ordered microdomains; 4. the effect of ordered lipid domains upon membrane properties including curvature and hydrophobicity that affect membrane fission, fusion and extension of filopodia; 5. the biological effects of these structural constraints; in particular how the properties of these domains combine to provide a very different signalling, trafficking and membrane fusion environment to that found in disordered (fluid mosaic) membrane. In addressing these problems, the review draws upon studies ranging from molecular dynamic modelling of lipid interactions, through physical studies of model membrane systems to structural and biological studies of whole cells, examining in the process problems inherent in visualising and purifying these microdomains. While the diversity of structure and function of ordered lipid microdomains is emphasised, some general roles emerge. In particular, the basis for having quite different, non-interacting ordered lipid domains on the same membrane is evident in the diversity of lipid structure and plays a key role in sorting signalling systems. The exclusion of ordered membrane from coated pits, and hence rapid endocytosis, is suggested to underlie the ability of highly ordered domains to establish stable secondary signalling systems required, for instance, in T cell receptor, insulin and neurotrophin signalling. PMID:15376618

  13. Structural organisation and phase behaviour of a stratum corneum lipid analogue: ceramide 3A.

    PubMed

    Garidel, Patrick

    2006-05-21

    The thermotropic phase behaviour and structural organisation of ceramide N-linoeoyl-phytosphingosine (ceramide 3A) is investigated by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Its polymorphism and structural properties are compared with two ceramides of the type III class with various hydrocarbon chain saturation degrees. After hydration the main phase transition temperature of ceramide 3A is found at 76 degrees C with a phase transition enthalpy of +29 kJ mol(-1). Analysing the frequency of methylene stretching vibrations (by infrared spectroscopy) reveals that the fluidity (amount of trans-gauche isomers) is strongly increased for ceramide 3A compared to its stearoyl ceramide type III analogue. After lipid hydration, the acyl chains of all investigated phytosphingosine ceramides of type III adopt a hexagonal-like chain packing. The amide I and amide II vibrations are quite sensitive to the phase transition of the ceramide. The corresponding band analysis reveals strong inter- and intramolecular hydrogen bonds between the amide and hydroxyl groups in the ceramide head groups. The H-bonding network and conformation of the head group of ceramide 3A is only slightly influenced by hydration. The water penetration capacity of ceramide 3A is, however, considerably larger compared to other phytosphingosine derivatives. The structural and organisational properties of ceramides of type III class are discussed with respect to their physiological relevancies for the stratum corneum lipid barrier property of the skin. PMID:16688309

  14. Novel aliphatic lipid-based diesters for use in lubricant formulations: Structure property investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghunanan, Latchmi Cindy

    Structure-property relationships are increasingly valued for the identification of specifically engineered materials with properties optimized for targeted application(s). In this work, linear and branched diesters for use in lubricant formulations are prepared from lipid-based oleochemicals and their structure-property relationships reported. It is shown that the branched diesters possess exceptional physical property profiles, including suppression of crystallization, and are superior alternatives for use in lubricant formulations. For the linear aliphatic diesters, both high and low temperature properties were predictable functions of total chain length, and both were differently influenced by the fatty acid versus diol chain length. Symmetry did not influence either, although thermal stability decreased and thermal transition temperatures increased with increasing saturation. All of the linear diesters demonstrated Newtonian flow behaviour. Viscosity was also predictable as a function of total chain length; any microstructural features due to structural effects were superseded by mass effects.

  15. Influence of cholesterol and ceramide VI on the structure of multilamellar lipid membranes at water exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Ryabova, N. Yu. Kiselev, M. A.; Balagurov, A. M.

    2010-05-15

    The structural changes in the multilamellar lipid membranes of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC)/cholesterol and DPPC/ceramide VI binary systems during hydration and dehydration have been studied by neutron diffraction. The effect of cholesterol and ceramide on the kinetics of water exchange in DPPC membranes is characterized. Compared to pure DPPC, membranes of binary systems swell faster during hydration (with a characteristic time of {approx}30 min). Both compounds, ceramide VI and cholesterol, similarly affect the hydration of DPPC membranes, increasing the repeat distance due to the bilayer growth. However, in contrast to cholesterol, ceramide significantly reduces the thickness of the membrane water layer. The introduction of cholesterol into a DPPC membrane slows down the change in the parameters of the bilayer internal structure during dehydration. In the DPPC/ceramide VI/cholesterol ternary system (with a molar cholesterol concentration of 40%), cholesterol is partially released from the lamellar membrane structure into the crystalline phase.

  16. The crystal structure of ORF-9b, a lipid binding protein from the SARS coronavirus.

    PubMed

    Meier, Christoph; Aricescu, A Radu; Assenberg, Rene; Aplin, Robin T; Gilbert, Robert J C; Grimes, Jonathan M; Stuart, David I

    2006-07-01

    To achieve the greatest output from their limited genomes, viruses frequently make use of alternative open reading frames, in which translation is initiated from a start codon within an existing gene and, being out of frame, gives rise to a distinct protein product. These alternative protein products are, as yet, poorly characterized structurally. Here we report the crystal structure of ORF-9b, an alternative open reading frame within the nucleocapsid (N) gene from the SARS coronavirus. The protein has a novel fold, a dimeric tent-like beta structure with an amphipathic surface, and a central hydrophobic cavity that binds lipid molecules. This cavity is likely to be involved in membrane attachment and, in mammalian cells, ORF-9b associates with intracellular vesicles, consistent with a role in the assembly of the virion. Analysis of ORF-9b and other overlapping genes suggests that they provide snapshots of the early evolution of novel protein folds. PMID:16843897

  17. Visualization and Analysis of Hepatitis C Virus Structural Proteins at Lipid Droplets by Super-Resolution Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Reimer, Rudolph; Herker, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Cytosolic lipid droplets are central organelles in the Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) life cycle. The viral capsid protein core localizes to lipid droplets and initiates the production of viral particles at lipid droplet–associated ER membranes. Core is thought to encapsidate newly synthesized viral RNA and, through interaction with the two envelope proteins E1 and E2, bud into the ER lumen. Here, we visualized the spatial distribution of HCV structural proteins core and E2 in vicinity of small lipid droplets by three-color 3D super-resolution microscopy. We observed and analyzed small areas of colocalization between the two structural proteins in HCV-infected cells with a diameter of approximately 100 nm that might represent putative viral assembly sites. PMID:25019511

  18. Independent and interactive effects of plant sterols and fish oil n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids on the plasma lipid profile of mildly hyperlipidaemic Indian adults.

    PubMed

    Khandelwal, Shweta; Demonty, Isabelle; Jeemon, Panniyammakal; Lakshmy, Ramakrishnan; Mukherjee, Rajat; Gupta, Ruby; Snehi, Uma; Niveditha, Devasenapathy; Singh, Yogendra; van der Knaap, Henk C M; Passi, Santosh J; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Reddy, K Srinath

    2009-09-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the independent and interactive effects of a once-a-day yoghurt drink providing 2 g plant sterols/d and capsules providing 2 g fish oil n-3 long-chain (LC) PUFA/d on plasma lipids, apolipoproteins and LDL particle size. Following a 2-week run-in period, 200 mildly hypercholesterolaemic Indian adults aged 35-55 years were randomised into one of four groups of a 2 x 2 factorial, double-blind controlled trial. The 4-week treatments consisted of (1) control yoghurt drink and control capsules, (2) control yoghurt drink and fish oil capsules, (3) plant sterol-enriched yoghurt drink and control capsules, or (4) plant sterol-enriched yoghurt drink and fish oil capsules. Blood was drawn before and after the 4-week intervention. Changes in health status, lifestyle and dietary habits, and daily compliance were recorded. The main effects of plant sterols were a 4.5 % reduction in LDL-cholesterol and a 15 % reduction in TAG without a significant change in HDL-cholesterol. Overall, fish oil n-3 LC-PUFA did not significantly affect cholesterol concentrations but reduced TAG by 15 % and increased HDL-cholesterol by 5.4 %. The combination significantly lowered TAG by 15 % v. control. No significant interaction between plant sterols and n-3 LC-PUFA was observed on plasma cholesterol concentrations. In conclusion, once-a-day intake of 2 g plant sterols/d in a yoghurt drink, 2 g fish oil n-3 LC-PUFA/d in capsules, and their combination had beneficial effects on the lipid profile of mildly hypercholesterolaemic Indian adults. The potent hypotriacylglycerolaemic effect of plant sterols observed in the present study and this population warrants additional investigation. PMID:19296875

  19. The pecan nut (Carya illinoinensis) and its oil and polyphenolic fractions differentially modulate lipid metabolism and the antioxidant enzyme activities in rats fed high-fat diets.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Avila, Jesús A; Alvarez-Parrilla, Emilio; López-Díaz, José A; Maldonado-Mendoza, Ignacio E; Gómez-García, María Del Consuelo; de la Rosa, Laura A

    2015-02-01

    Tree nuts such as pecans (Carya illinoinensis) contain mostly oil but are also a source of polyphenols. Nut consumption has been linked to a reduction in serum lipid levels and oxidative stress. These effects have been attributed to the oil while overlooking the potential contribution of the polyphenols. Because the evidence regarding each fraction's bioactivity is scarce, we administered high-fat (HF) diets to male Wistar rats, supplementing them with pecan oil (HF+PO), pecan polyphenols (HF+PP) or whole pecans (HF+WP), and analysed the effects of each fraction. The HF diet increased the serum leptin and total cholesterol (TC) with respect to the control levels. The HF+WP diet prevented hyperleptinemia and decreased the TC compared with the control. The HF+WP diet upregulated the hepatic expression of apolipoprotein B and LDL receptor mRNAs with respect to the HF levels. The HF+PO diet reduced the level of triacylglycerols compared with the control. The HF+PP diet stimulated the hepatic expression of liver X receptor alpha mRNA. The HF+WP diet increased the activities of hepatic catalase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione S transferase compared with the control, and decreased the degree of lipid peroxidation compared with the HF diet. The most bioactive diet was the WP diet. PMID:25172744

  20. Fish oil-based lipid emulsion: current updates on a promising novel therapy for the management of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Bharadwaj, Shishira; Gohel, Tushar; Deen, Omer J.; DeChicco, Robert; Shatnawei, Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal failure is characterized by loss of enteral function to absorb necessary nutrients and water to sustain life. Parenteral nutrition (PN) is a lifesaving therapeutic modality for patients with intestinal failure. Lifelong PN is also needed for patients who have short bowel syndrome due to extensive resection or a dysmotility disorder with malabsorption. However, prolonged PN is associated with short-term and long-term complications. Parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD) is one of the long-term complications associated with the use of an intravenous lipid emulsion to prevent essential fatty acid deficiency in these patients. PNALD affects 30–60% of the adult population on long-term PN. Further, PNALD is one of the indications for isolated liver or combined liver and intestinal transplantation. There is no consensus on how to manage PNALD, but fish oil-based lipid emulsion (FOBLE) has been suggested to play an important role both in its prevention and reversal. There is significant improvement in liver function in those who received FOBLE as lipid supplement compared with those who received soy-based lipid emulsion. Studies have also demonstrated that FOBLE reverses hepatic steatosis and reduces markers of inflammation in patients on long-term PN. Future prospective studies with larger sample sizes are needed to further strengthen the positive role of FOBLE in PNALD. PMID:25858884

  1. Modifications to surfactant protein B structure and lipid interactions under respiratory distress conditions: consequences of tryptophan oxidation.

    PubMed

    Sarker, Muzaddid; Rose, Jarratt; McDonald, Mark; Morrow, Michael R; Booth, Valerie

    2011-01-11

    These studies detail the altered structure-function relationships caused by oxidation of surfactant protein B (SP-B), a mode of damage thought to be important in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), a common and frequently fatal condition. An 18-residue fragment comprising the N-terminal helix of SP-B was investigated in oxidized and unmodified forms by solution and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), circular dichroism (CD), and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Taken together, the results indicate that tryptophan oxidation causes substantial disruptions in helical structure and lipid interactions. The structural modifications induced by tryptophan oxidation were severe, with a reduction in helical extent from approximately three helical turns to, at most, one turn, and were observed in a variety of solvent environments, including sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelles, dodecyl phosphocholine (DPC) micelles, and a 40% hexafluoro-2-propanol (HFIP) aqueous solution. The unmodified peptide takes on an orientation within lipid bilayers that is tilted approximately 30° away from an in-plane position. Tryptophan oxidation causes significant modifications to the peptide-lipid interactions, and the peptide likely shifts to a more in-plane orientation within the lipids. Interestingly, the character of the disruptions to peptide-lipid interactions caused by tryptophan oxidation was highly dependent on the charge of the lipid headgroup. PMID:21128671

  2. Wheat germ oil enrichment in broiler feed with α-lipoic acid to enhance the antioxidant potential and lipid stability of meat

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Lipid peroxidation is the cause of declining the meat quality. Natural antioxidants plays a vital role in enhancing the stability and quality of meat. The supplementation of natural antioxidants in feed decreases lipid peroxidation and improves the stability of meat. Methods The present research was conducted to determine the effect of α-lipoic acid, α-tocopherol and wheat germ oil on the status of antioxidants, quality and lipid stability of broiler meat. One day old male broilers were fed with different feeds containing antioxidants i.e. natural (wheat germ oil) and synthetic α-tocopherol and α-lipoic acid during the two experimental years. Results The feed treatments have significant variation on the body weight and feed conversion ratio (FCR) while having no influence on the feed intake. The broilers fed on wheat germ oil (natural α-tocopherol) gained maximum body weight (2451.97 g & 2466.07 g) in the experimental years 2010–11 & 2011–12, respectively. The higher total phenolic contents were found in the broilers fed on wheat germ oil plus α-lipoic acid in breast (162.73±4.8 mg Gallic acid equivalent/100 g & 162.18±4.5 mg Gallic acid equivalent/100 g) and leg (149.67±3.3 mg Gallic acid equivalent/100 g & 146.07±3.2 mg Gallic acid equivalent/100 g) meat during both experimental years. Similar trend was observed for the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and ferric reducing antioxidant power assay (FRAP). The production of malondialdehydes in the breast and leg meat increased with progressive increase in the time period. The deposition of α-tocopherol (AT) and α-lipoic acid (ALA) contents were found to be higher in the broilers fed on wheat germ oil plus α-lipoic acid in breast and leg meat during the both experimental years. Conclusion In conclusion, the combination of wheat germ oil and α-lipoic acid has more beneficial for stability and the quality of the broiler meat and more work should be needed in future for the bio

  3. Effect of feeding crude red palm oil (Elaeis guineensis) and grain amaranth (Amaranthus paniculatus) to hens on total lipids, cholesterol, PUFA levels and acceptability of eggs.

    PubMed

    Punita, A; Chaturvedi, A

    2000-01-01

    Eggs, though a very nutritious food, also have high amounts of cholesterol and hence are not recommended to be consumed regularly by persons having hypercholesterolemia and associated cardiovascular diseases (CVD). In this context, an attempt was made in this study to reduce the cholesterol content of eggs by diet manipulation, using two naturally available and already proved hypocholesteromic agents [red palm oil (RPO) and grain amaranth]. Thirteen experimental rations using raw and popped grain Amaranth and RPO were fed to 24 weeks old hens for a period of 6 weeks, singularly and in combinations. Total lipids, cholesterol and PUFA contents were analyzed in the experimental and control eggs. The results showed that RPO and RPO + popped amaranth feeding resulted in a maximum reduction in total lipids and cholesterol contents. Significant increase was observed in linoleic acid content in RPO + popped amaranth; raw amaranth and RPO fed groups. Acceptability studies showed that the products made from lower cholesterol eggs were well accepted. PMID:10898484

  4. Effects of dietary fish oil replacement on fillet lipids in North American Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) families

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Consumers want fish that contain high amount of long-chain omega-3 fatty acids for the health benefits. Fish producers desire to supply fish with these fatty acids while reducing the amount of fish oil included in the diet and replacing the fish oil with alternative oils. Two studies were conducte...

  5. Structuring from nanoparticles in oil-based ferrofluids.

    PubMed

    Rozynek, Z; Józefczak, A; Knudsen, K D; Skumiel, A; Hornowski, T; Fossum, J O; Timko, M; Kopčanský, P; Koneracká, M

    2011-03-01

    The effect of magnetic field on the structure formation in an oil-based magnetic fluid with various concentrations of magnetite particles was studied. The evaluation of the experimental data obtained from small-angle X-ray scattering and ultrasonic attenuation indicates the formation of chain-like aggregates composed of magnetite particles. The experimental data obtained from ultrasonic spectroscopy fit well with the recent theoretical model by Shliomis, Mond and Morozov but only for a diluted magnetic fluid. In this model it is assumed that a dimer is the main building block of a B -field-induced chain-like structure, thus the estimation of the nematic order parameter does not depend on the actual length of the structure. The scattering method used reveals information about the aggregated structure size and relative changes in the degree of anisotropy in qualitative terms. The coupling constant [Formula: see text] , concentrations [Formula: see text] , average particle size d and its polydispersity [Formula: see text] were initially obtained using the vibrating sample magnetometry and these results were further confirmed by rheometry and scattering methods. Both the particles' orientational distribution and the nematic order parameter S were inferred from the ultrasonic measurements. The investigation of SAXS patterns reveals the orientation and sizes of aggregated structures under application of different magnetic-field strengths. In addition, the magnetic-field-dependent yield stress was measured, and a relationship between the yield stress and magnetic-field strength up to 0.5 T was established. PMID:21416265

  6. Argan oil prevents prothrombotic complications by lowering lipid levels and platelet aggregation, enhancing oxidative status in dyslipidemic patients from the area of Rabat (Morocco)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background It is now established that patients with hyperlipidemia have a high risk of atherosclerosis and thrombotic complications, which are two important events responsible for the onset and progression of cardiovascular disease. In the context of managing dyslipidemia by means of dietary advice based on the consumption of argan oil, we wanted to investigate the effect of virgin argan oil on plasma lipids, and for the first time, on the platelet hyperactivation and oxidative status associated with dyslipidemia. This study concerns patients recruited in the area of Rabat in Morocco. Methods 39 dyslipidemic (79% women) patients were recruited for our study in the area of Rabat in Morocco. They were randomly assigned to the two following groups: the argan group, in which the subjects consumed 25 mL/day of argan oil at breakfast for 3 weeks, and the control group in which argan oil was replaced by butter. Results After a 3-week consumption period, blood total cholesterol was significantly lower in the argan oil group, as was LDL cholesterol (23.8% and 25.6% lower, respectively). However, the HDL cholesterol level had increased by 26% at the end of the intervention period compared to baseline. Interestingly, in the argan oil group thrombin-induced platelet aggregation was lower, and oxidative status was enhanced as a result of lower platelet MDA and higher GPx activity, respectively. Conclusions In conclusion, our results, even if it is not representative of the Moroccan population, show that argan oil can prevent the prothrombotic complications associated with dyslipidemia, which are a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. PMID:23870174

  7. Evidence for Lipid Packaging in the Crystal Structure of the GM2-Activator Complex with Platelet Activating Factor

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Christine S.; Mi, Li-Zhi; Rastinejad, Fraydoon

    2010-11-16

    GM2-activator protein (GM2-AP) is a lipid transfer protein that has the ability to stimulate the enzymatic processing of gangliosides as well as T-cell activation through lipid presentation. Our previous X-ray crystallographic studies of GM2-AP have revealed a large lipid binding pocket as the central overall feature of the structure with non-protein electron density within this pocket suggesting bound lipid. To extend these studies, we present here the 2 {angstrom} crystal structure of GM2-AP complexed with platelet activating factor (PAF). PAF is a potent phosphoacylglycerol whose toxic patho-physiological effects can be inhibited by GM2-AP. The structure shows an ordered arrangement of two bound lipids and a fatty acid molecule. One PAF molecule binds in an extended conformation within the hydrophobic channel that has an open and closed conformation, and was seen to contain bound phospholipid in the low pH apo structure. The second molecule is submerged inside the pocket in a U-shaped conformation with its head group near the single polar residue S141. It was refined as lyso-PAF as it lacks electron density for the sn-2 acetate group. The alkyl chains of PAF interact through van der Waals contacts, while the head groups bind in different environments with their phosphocholine moieties in contact with aromatic rings (Y137, F80). The structure has revealed further insights into the lipid binding properties of GM2-AP, suggesting an unexpected unique mode of lipid packaging that may explain the efficiency of GM2-AP in inhibiting the detrimental biological effects of PAF.

  8. Structural insights into lipid-dependent reversible dimerization of human GLTP

    SciTech Connect

    Samygina, Valeria R.; Ochoa-Lizarralde, Borja; Popov, Alexander N.; Cabo-Bilbao, Aintzane; Goni-de-Cerio, Felipe; Molotkovsky, Julian G.; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Brown, Rhoderick E.; Malinina, Lucy

    2013-04-01

    It is shown that dimerization is promoted by glycolipid binding to human GLTP. The importance of dimer flexibility in wild-type protein is manifested by point mutation that ‘locks’ the dimer while diversifying ligand/protein adaptations. Human glycolipid transfer protein (hsGLTP) forms the prototypical GLTP fold and is characterized by a broad transfer selectivity for glycosphingolipids (GSLs). The GLTP mutation D48V near the ‘portal entrance’ of the glycolipid binding site has recently been shown to enhance selectivity for sulfatides (SFs) containing a long acyl chain. Here, nine novel crystal structures of hsGLTP and the SF-selective mutant complexed with short-acyl-chain monoSF and diSF in different crystal forms are reported in order to elucidate the potential functional roles of lipid-mediated homodimerization. In all crystal forms, the hsGLTP–SF complexes displayed homodimeric structures supported by similarly organized intermolecular interactions. The dimerization interface always involved the lipid sphingosine chain, the protein C-terminus (C-end) and α-helices 6 and 2, but the D48V mutant displayed a ‘locked’ dimer conformation compared with the hinge-like flexibility of wild-type dimers. Differences in contact angles, areas and residues at the dimer interfaces in the ‘flexible’ and ‘locked’ dimers revealed a potentially important role of the dimeric structure in the C-end conformation of hsGLTP and in the precise positioning of the key residue of the glycolipid recognition centre, His140. ΔY207 and ΔC-end deletion mutants, in which the C-end is shifted or truncated, showed an almost complete loss of transfer activity. The new structural insights suggest that ligand-dependent reversible dimerization plays a role in the function of human GLTP.

  9. Structure and Dynamics of Cholesterol-Containing Polyunsaturated Lipid Membranes Studied by Neutron Diffraction and NMR

    PubMed Central

    Mihailescu, Mihaela; Soubias, Olivier; Worcester, David; White, Stephen H.

    2010-01-01

    A direct and quantitative analysis of the internal structure and dynamics of a polyunsaturated lipid bilayer composed of 1-stearoyl-2-docosahexaenoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (18:0-22:6n3-PC) containing 29 mol% cholesterol was carried out by neutron diffraction, 2H-NMR and 13C-MAS NMR. Scattering length distribution functions of cholesterol segments as well as of the sn-1 and sn-2 hydrocarbon chains of 18:0-22:6n3-PC were obtained by conducting experiments with specifically deuterated cholesterol and lipids. Cholesterol orients parallel to the phospholipids, with the A-ring near the lipid glycerol and the terminal methyl groups 3 Å away from the bilayer center. Previously, we reported that the density of polyunsaturated docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n3) chains was higher near the lipid–water interface. Addition of cholesterol partially redistributes DHA density from near the lipid–water interface to the center of the hydrocarbon region. Cholesterol raises chain-order parameters of both stearic acid and DHA chains. The fractional order increase for stearic acid methylene carbons C8–C18 is larger, reflecting the redistribution of DHA chain density toward the bilayer center. The correlation times of DHA chain isomerization are short and mostly unperturbed by the presence of cholesterol. The uneven distribution of saturated and polyunsaturated chain densities and the cholesterol-induced balancing of chain distributions may have important implications for the function and integrity of membrane receptors, such as rhodopsin. PMID:21161517

  10. Effects of distillers' dried grains with solubles and soybean oil on dietary lipid, fiber, and amino acid digestibility in corn-based diets fed to growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, N A; Serão, N V L; Patience, J F

    2016-04-01

    The use of corn coproducts increases the concentration of fiber and, often, the use of supplemental lipids in swine diets, which may affect energy and nutrient digestibility. An experiment was conducted to determine the effects of reduced-oil distillers' dried grains with solubles (DDGS) and soybean oil (SBO) on dietary AA, acid hydrolyzed ether extract (AEE), and NDF digestibility in corn-based diets fed to growing pigs. Eighteen growing pigs (33.8 ± 2.2 kg BW) were surgically fitted with a T-cannula in the distal ileum and allocated to 1 of 6 dietary treatment groups in a 3-period incomplete Latin square design, with 9 observations per treatment. Six dietary treatments were obtained by adding 0, 20, and 40% DDGS to corn-casein diets formulated with 2 and 6% SBO. Ileal digesta and fecal samples were collected and the apparent ileal digestibility (AID) and apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD) of AEE and NDF and the AID of AA were determined. Apparent values were corrected for endogenous losses of lipids, and true ileal (TID) and true total tract digestibility (TTTD) values of lipids were calculated. Results showed that the AID of Lys decreased ( < 0.001) with the inclusion of DDGS but was not affected ( = 0.63) by the inclusion of SBO. An interaction between DDGS and SBO on the AID ( = 0.002) and ATTD ( = 0.009) of NDF was observed, where the AID and ATTD of NDF decreased with DDGS at 6% SBO but no effect was observed at 2% SBO. The AID of NDF increased with SBO at 0% DDGS, but no effect was observed at 20 or 40% DDGS. An interaction between DDGS and SBO on the AID ( = 0.011) and ATTD ( = 0.008) of AEE was observed, where the AID and ATTD of AEE increased with SBO. The AID and ATTD of AEE increased with DDGS at 2% SBO, but no effect was observed at 6% SBO. Correction by ileal and fecal endogenous loss of AEE (9.5 and 13.6 g/kg of DMI, respectively) showed that increasing dietary AEE had no effect on the TID and TTD of AEE ( > 0.05). In conclusion, the AID of

  11. Lipid-sorting by ceramide structure from plasma membrane to ER for the cholera toxin receptor ganglioside GM1

    PubMed Central

    Chinnapen, Daniel J.-F.; Hsieh, Wan-Ting; te Welscher, Yvonne M.; Saslowsky, David E.; Kaoutzani, Lydia; Brandsma, Eelke; D’Auria, Ludovic; Park, Hyejung; Wagner, Jessica S.; Drake, Kimberly R.; Kang, Minchul; Benjamin, Thomas; Ullman, M. David; Costello, Catherine E.; Kenworthy, Anne K.; Baumgart, Tobias; Massol, Ramiro H.; Lencer, Wayne I.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The glycosphingolipid GM1 binds cholera toxin (CT) on host cells and carries it retrograde from the plasma membrane (PM) through endosomes, the trans-Golgi (TGN), and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to induce toxicity. To elucidate how a membrane lipid can specify trafficking in these pathways, we synthesized GM1 isoforms with alternate ceramide domains and imaged their trafficking in live cells. Only GM1 with unsaturated acyl chains sorted efficiently from PM to TGN and ER. Toxin binding, which effectively crosslinks GM1 lipids, was dispensable, but membrane cholesterol and the lipid raft-associated proteins actin and flotillin were required. The results implicate a protein-dependent mechanism of lipid-sorting by ceramide structure and provide a molecular explanation for the diversity and specificity of retrograde trafficking by CT in host cells. PMID:22975326

  12. X-Ray Structure Determination of Fully Hydrated L_alpha Phase DPPC Lipid Bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagle, John F.

    1996-03-01

    Accurate and reliable structural information is more difficult to obtain for lipid bilayers in the biologically relevant fully hydrated L_α thermodynamic phase than for bilayers at lower hydration or for phases that occur at lower temperature because there are fewer x-ray or neutron reflections. There have been many studies of the benchmark lipid DPPC, but these have yielded unacceptably large discrepancies ranging from 58 to 71 Åfor interfacial area A^F per lipid molecule. We have resolved this uncertainty using X-ray scattering with high instrumental resolution at CHESS for multilamellar vesicles of L_α phase lipid bilayers of DPPC at 50^circC under varying osmotic pressure.(This work was performed by the authors of ref. 3 and Horia Petrache. This research is supported by NIH grant GM-44976.) Artifacts in the magnitudes of the form factors due to liquid crystalline fluctuations have been eliminated by using modified Caillé theory (R. Zhang, R. M. Suter and J. F. Nagle, Phys. Rev. E50, 5047 (1994)), which we have shown to provide an excellent fit to the data (R. Zhang, S. Tristram-Nagle, W. Sun, R. Headrick, T. Irving, R. Suter and J. Nagle, Biophys. J., in press for 1/96). The Caillé fluctuation parameter η1 increases systematically with increasing D spacing and this explains why some higher order peaks are unobservable for the larger D spacings. The corrected form factors fall on one smooth continuous transform F(q); this shows that the bilayer does not change shape as D decreases from 67.2 Åfully hydrated) to 53.9 Åthereby validating the biological relevance of older neutron diffraction data taken on less than fully hydrated samples. We obtain the distance between headgroup peaks from Fourier reconstruction of electron density profiles for samples with four orders of diffraction and also from electron density models that use 38 independent form factors. By combining these results with our previous gel phase results, we obtain the area A^F = 62.9±1.3

  13. QCM-D and reflectometry instrument: applications to supported lipid structures and their biomolecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Edvardsson, Malin; Svedhem, Sofia; Wang, Guoliang; Richter, Ralf; Rodahl, Michael; Kasemo, Bengt

    2009-01-01

    A novel setup was recently developed, combining quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) and optical reflectometry for measurements on one and the same surface of, for example, biomolecular adlayers and interactions ( Rev. Sci. Instr. 2008 , 79 075107 ). This combination was chosen on the basis of prior experience of using QCM-D and optical techniques in separate instruments, which showed both the advantage of employing multiple techniques and the disadvantage of not working with the same surface and (flow) cell. The new instrument provides, for example, information about associated water and structural changes of the adlayers that would often pass unnoticed or be hard to interpret or quantify, using either technique alone. The triple response instrument (QCM-D frequency and dissipation and reflectometry) is here applied to four model systems: (A) formation of supported lipid bilayers (SLBs), (B) lipid exchange between a SLB and transiently adsorbed vesicles, (C) binding of a hydrated peptide on a functionalized SLB, and (D) streptavidin coupling to a biotinylated SLB, followed by attachment of biotinylated vesicles. The results demonstrate three major advantages of the combination instrument: (i) much faster data collection because the experiments are done on one surface for all signals, (ii) a common time axis and the same relative importance of surface kinetics and mass transport because the same liquid sample and the same transport conditions apply, and (iii) new features are discovered about the studied system that would be difficult to unravel in separate instruments. PMID:19035651

  14. Structure of Cholesterol/Ceramide Monolayer Mixtures: Implications to the Molecular Organization of Lipid Rafts

    PubMed Central

    Scheffer, Luana; Solomonov, Inna; Weygand, Markus Jan; Kjaer, Kristian; Leiserowitz, Leslie; Addadi, Lia

    2005-01-01

    The structure of monolayers of cholesterol/ceramide mixtures was investigated using grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, immunofluorescence, and atomic force microscopy techniques. Grazing incidence x-ray diffraction measurements showed the existence of a crystalline mixed phase of the two components within a range of compositions of cholesterol/ceramide between 100:0 and 67:33. The mixed phase coexists with the ceramide crystalline phase in the range of compositions between 50:50 and 30:70; between 30:70 and 0:100 only the highly crystalline phase of ceramide was detected. The latter was determined and modeled. Immunolabeling was performed with an antibody specific to the cholesterol monohydrate crystalline arrangement. The antibody recognizes crystalline cholesterol monolayers, but does not interact with crystalline ceramide. Immunofluorescence and atomic force microscopy data show that in uncompressed ceramide monolayers, the highly crystalline phase coexists with a disordered loosely packed phase. In contrast, no disordered phase coexists with the new crystalline mixed phase. We conclude that the new mixed phase represents a stable homogeneous arrangement of cholesterol with ceramide. As ceramide incorporates the lipid backbone common to all sphingolipids, this arrangement may be relevant to the understanding of the molecular organization of lipid rafts. PMID:15722431

  15. Reconstitution of a Kv Channel into Lipid Membranes for Structural and Functional Studies

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Liang; Jiang, Qiu-Xing

    2013-01-01

    To study the lipid-protein interaction in a reductionistic fashion, it is necessary to incorporate the membrane proteins into membranes of well-defined lipid composition. We are studying the lipid-dependent gating effects in a prototype voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channel, and have worked out detailed procedures to reconstitute the channels into different membrane systems. Our reconstitution procedures take consideration of both detergent-induced fusion of vesicles and the fusion of protein/detergent micelles with the lipid/detergent mixed micelles as well as the importance of reaching an equilibrium distribution of lipids among the protein/detergent/lipid and the detergent/lipid mixed micelles. Our data suggested that the insertion of the channels in the lipid vesicles is relatively random in orientations, and the reconstitution efficiency is so high that no detectable protein aggregates were seen in fractionation experiments. We have utilized the reconstituted channels to determine the conformational states of the channels in different lipids, record electrical activities of a small number of channels incorporated in planar lipid bilayers, screen for conformation-specific ligands from a phage-displayed peptide library, and support the growth of 2D crystals of the channels in membranes. The reconstitution procedures described here may be adapted for studying other membrane proteins in lipid bilayers, especially for the investigation of the lipid effects on the eukaryotic voltage-gated ion channels. PMID:23892292

  16. Effects of dietary cold-pressed turnip rapeseed oil and butter on serum lipids, oxidized LDL and arterial elasticity in men with metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Rapeseed oil is the principal dietary source of monounsaturated and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in the Northern Europe. However, the effect of rapeseed oil on the markers of subclinical atherosclerosis is not known. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of dietary intake of cold-pressed turnip rapeseed oil (CPTRO) and butter on serum lipids, oxidized LDL and arterial elasticity in men with metabolic syndrome. Methods Thirty-seven men with metabolic syndrome completed an open and balanced crossover study. Treatment periods lasted for 6 to 8 weeks and they were separated from each other with an eight-week washout period. Subjects maintained their normal dietary habits and physical activity without major variations. The daily fat adjunct consisted either of 37.5 grams of butter or 35 mL of VirginoR CPTRO. Participants were asked to spread butter on bread on the butter period and to drink CPTRO on the oil period. The fat adjunct was used as such without heating or frying. Results Compared to butter, administration of CPTRO was followed by a reduction of total cholesterol by 8% (p < 0.001) and LDL cholesterol by 11% (p < 0.001). The level of oxidized LDL was 16% lower after oil period (p = 0.024). Minimal differences in arterial elasticity were not statistically significant. Conclusion Cold-pressed turnip rapeseed oil had favourable effects on circulating LDL cholesterol and oxidized LDL, which may be important in the management of patients at high cardiovascular risk. Trial registration ClinicalTrial.gov NCT01119690 PMID:21122147

  17. HPLC, HPLC-MS and Lipidomics methods for the analysis of functional lipids in vegetable oils, nutraceuticals, and functional foods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Functional lipids include triacylglycerols (some contain health-promoting omega-3 fatty acids), phytosterols, tocopherols, tocotrienols, carotenoids, and related natural products. Until recently, thin layer chromatography was commonly used for their qualitative separation and gas chromatography (GC...

  18. Evaluation of Collision Cross Section Calibrants for Structural Analysis of Lipids by Traveling Wave Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hines, Kelly M; May, Jody C; McLean, John A; Xu, Libin

    2016-07-19

    Collision cross section (CCS) measurement of lipids using traveling wave ion mobility-mass spectrometry (TWIM-MS) is of high interest to the lipidomics field. However, currently available calibrants for CCS measurement using TWIM are predominantly peptides that display quite different physical properties and gas-phase conformations from lipids, which could lead to large CCS calibration errors for lipids. Here we report the direct CCS measurement of a series of phosphatidylcholines (PCs) and phosphatidylethanolamines (PEs) in nitrogen using a drift tube ion mobility (DTIM) instrument and an evaluation of the accuracy and reproducibility of PCs and PEs as CCS calibrants for phospholipids against different classes of calibrants, including polyalanine (PolyAla), tetraalkylammonium salts (TAA), and hexakis(fluoroalkoxy)phosphazines (HFAP), in both positive and negative modes in TWIM-MS analysis. We demonstrate that structurally mismatched calibrants lead to larger errors in calibrated CCS values while the structurally matched calibrants, PCs and PEs, gave highly accurate and reproducible CCS values at different traveling wave parameters. Using the lipid calibrants, the majority of the CCS values of several classes of phospholipids measured by TWIM are within 2% error of the CCS values measured by DTIM. The development of phospholipid CCS calibrants will enable high-accuracy structural studies of lipids and add an additional level of validation in the assignment of identifications in untargeted lipidomics experiments. PMID:27321977

  19. Structural organization of DMPC lipid layers on chemically micropatterned self-assembled monolayers as biomimetic systems.

    PubMed

    Brechling, A; Pohl, M; Kleineberg, U; Heinzmann, U

    2004-08-26

    The growth structure of DMPC lipid layers on hydrophobic and hydrophilic alkylsilane-based self-assembled monolayers adsorbed on silicon has been investigated by means of X-ray reflectometry and atomic force microscopy. Hydrophilic modification of hydrophobically terminated ODS-SAMs has been achieved by dose-controlled irradiation with DUV light. While island formation of small DMPC bilayer islands is observed on hydrophobic SAM surfaces, closed layers of DMPC monolayers are formed on hydrophilic SAM surfaces. Furthermore, DMPC adsorption on chemically micropatterned substrates with alternating hydrophobic/hydrophilic surface properties has been studied by imaging ellipsometry and photoemission microscopy. Indication for at least partial bridging of hydrophobic areas by an adsorbed DMPC monolayer has been found. PMID:15288947

  20. Dynamics of Stable and Metastable Structures of Liquid Crystal and Lipid Systems at Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honaker, Lawrence; Popov, Piotr; Mann, Elizabeth; Kooijman, Edgar; Jakli, Antal

    2015-03-01

    Due to the amphiphilic structure and character of liquid crystal molecules, they tend to align in a planar fashion at a boundary with water and homeotropically at a boundary with air. However, the introduction of heteromolecules with long aliphatic tails, such as phospholipids, into the system promotes homeotropic alignment, a conformational change which is easily visually observable. It can be expected that the presence of these lipids induces a uniformly homeotropic texture in the liquid crystalline system, but experimental observations show otherwise. Studies of the textures and features that arise in such systems are presented here with an emphasis on the study of the metastable hybrid textures that develop, their stability, the characteristics of their alignment, and factors that influence their presence.

  1. Purification and structural characterisation of lipid transfer protein from red wine and grapes.

    PubMed

    Jaeckels, Nadine; Tenzer, Stefan; Rosfa, Susanne; Schild, Hansjoerg; Decker, Heinz; Wigand, Petra

    2013-05-01

    Lipid transfer proteins (LTP) play a major role in plant defence and are of particular interest due to their known ability to cause allergic reactions. These proteins are expressed in grapes and also remain detectable after vinification, especially in red wine. However, it remains unknown whether the protein undergoes any changes during the vinification process. Here, we present a purification method for LTPs from Dornfelder grapes and wine. By liquid-chromatography-mass spectroscopy (LC-MS/MS) we identified LTPs from two different species (Vitis vinifera and Vitis aestivalis). Additionally, the purified LTPs were characterised using spectrometric methods, confirming their high purity and structural stability during vinification. We conclude that LTPs are resistant to the alcohol content (13.5 vol%), acidic milieu of wine and other ingredients present during the vinification process, indicating that the allergenic potential of grape LTP is not diminished by the vinification process. PMID:23265486

  2. Structural and Functional Characterization of Recombinant Isoforms of the Lentil Lipid Transfer Protein.

    PubMed

    Bogdanov, I V; Finkina, E I; Balandin, S V; Melnikova, D N; Stukacheva, E A; Ovchinnikova, T V

    2015-01-01

    The recombinant isoforms Lc-LTP1 and Lc-LTP3 of the lentil lipid transfer protein were overexpressed in E. coli cells. It was confirmed that both proteins are stabilized by four disulfide bonds and characterized by a high proportion of the α-helical structure. It was found that Lc-LTP1 and Lc-LTP3 possess antimicrobial activity and can bind fatty acids. Both isoforms have the ability to bind specific IgE from sera of patients with food allergies, which recognize similar epitopes of the major peach allergen Pru p 3. Both isoforms were shown to have immunological properties similar to those of other plant allergenic LTPs, but Lc-LTP3 displayed a less pronounced immunoreactivity. PMID:26483961

  3. Structural and Functional Characterization of Recombinant Isoforms of the Lentil Lipid Transfer Protein

    PubMed Central

    Bogdanov, I. V.; Finkina, E. I.; Balandin, S. V.; Melnikova, D. N.; Stukacheva, E. A.; Ovchinnikova, T. V.

    2015-01-01

    The recombinant isoforms Lc-LTP1 and Lc-LTP3 of the lentil lipid transfer protein were overexpressed in E. coli cells. It was confirmed that both proteins are stabilized by four disulfide bonds and characterized by a high proportion of the α-helical structure. It was found that Lc-LTP1 and Lc-LTP3 possess antimicrobial activity and can bind fatty acids. Both isoforms have the ability to bind specific IgE from sera of patients with food allergies, which recognize similar epitopes of the major peach allergen Pru p 3. Both isoforms were shown to have immunological properties similar to those of other plant allergenic LTPs, but Lc-LTP3 displayed a less pronounced immunoreactivity. PMID:26483961

  4. Effect of dietary fish oil on the expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism in liver and skeletal muscle of lactating sows.

    PubMed

    Gessner, D K; Gröne, B; Rosenbaum, S; Most, E; Hillen, S; Becker, S; Erhardt, G; Reiner, G; Eder, K

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the hypothesis that dietary supplementation of fish oil as a source of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) influences the expression of target genes of sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBP)-1 and (SREBP)-2 involved in triacylglycerol (TAG) synthesis and fatty acid and cholesterol metabolism in the liver, and moreover activates the expression of target genes of peroxisome proliferation-activated receptor (PPAR)-α involved in TAG and fatty acid catabolism in liver and skeletal muscle. Twenty lactating sows were fed a control diet or a fish oil diet with either 50 g of a mixture of palm oil and soya bean oil (4:1, w/w) or fish oil per kg. The diet of the fish oil group contained 19.1 g of n-3 PUFA (mainly 20:5 n-3 and 22:6 n-3) per 100 g of total fatty acids, while the diet of the control group contained 2.4 g of n-3 PUFA (mainly 18:3 n-3) per 100 g of total fatty acids. The fish oil group had reduced relative mRNA concentrations of various target genes of SREBP-1 involved in fatty acid and TAG synthesis in comparison with the control group (p < 0.05). Relative mRNA concentrations of target genes of PPARα involved in fatty acid catabolism in both liver and muscle, and mRNA concentrations of target genes of SREBP-2 involved in cholesterol synthesis and uptake were not influenced by fish oil supplementation. Concentrations of cholesterol and TAG in plasma, fat content of milk and weight gains of litters during the suckling period were not different between the two groups of sows. In conclusion, this study suggests that fish oil has only minor effects on hepatic lipid metabolism, which are non-critical with respect to milk production in sows. PMID:25865806

  5. Oceanographic conditions structure forage fishes into lipid-rich and lipid-poor communities in lower Cook Inlet, Alaska, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abookire, A.A.; Piatt, J.F.

    2005-01-01

    community dominated by Pacific sand lance (colder, more saline). Axis 3 reflected the negative spatial association of capelin Mallotus villosus and Pacific cod Gadus macrocephalus. Correlations of year with Axes 1 and 3 indicate that from 1996 to 1999 the forage fish community significantly decreased in lipid-poor gadids (walleye pollock and Pacific cod), and significantly increased in lipid-rich species such as Pacific sand lance, Pacific herring, and capelin.

  6. Oceanographic conditions structure forage fishes into lipid-rich and lipid-poor communities in lower Cook Inlet, Alaska, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abookire, A.A.; Piatt, J.F.

    2005-01-01

    community dominated by Pacific sand lance (colder, more saline). Axis 3 reflected the negative spatial association of capelin Mallotus villosus and Pacific cod Gadus macrocephalus. Correlations of year with Axes 1 and 3 indicate that from 1996 to 1999 the forage fish community significantly decreased in lipid-poor gadids (walleye pollock and Pacific cod), and significantly increased in lipid-rich species such as Pacific sand lance, Pacific herring, and capelin. ?? Inter-Research 2005.

  7. Optimization of fluorimetric lipid membrane biosensor sensitivity through manipulation of membrane structure and nitrobenzoxadiazole dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrive, Jason D. A.; Krull, Ulrich J.

    1995-01-01

    In the work reported here, surface concentrations of 0.027 and 0.073 molecules nm-2 of the fluorescent membrane probe molecule nitrobenzoxadiazole dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine (NBD-PE) were shown to yield optimum sensitivity for fluorimetric transduction of membrane structural perturbations for lipid membrane-based biosensor development. These optima were obtained through correlation of experimental data with theoretical predictions of optimum surface concentrations based on a model for NBD-PE self quenching previously published by our group. It was also determined that membrane structural heterogeneity improves the sensitivity of NBD-PE labeled membrane transducers. Together with fluorescence microscopy, observations of surface potential change upon compression or expansion of phosphatidylcholine (PC)/phosphatidic acid (PA) monolayers were used to qualitatively indicate the degree of structural heterogeneity in these membranes. It was determined that sub-microscopic domains must exist in microscopically homogeneous egg PC/egg PA membranes in order to facilitate the observed NBD-PE self-quenching responses upon alteration of bulk pH and therefore, membrane surface electrostatics and structure.

  8. The Effect of Dietary Fish Oil in addition to Lifestyle Counselling on Lipid Oxidation and Body Composition in Slightly Overweight Teenage Boys

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Maiken Højgaard; Mølgaard, Christian; Hellgren, Lars Ingvar; Matthiessen, Jeppe; Holst, Jens Juul; Lauritzen, Lotte

    2011-01-01

    Objective. n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs) have shown potential to increase lipid oxidation and prevent obesity. Subjects. Seventy-eight boys aged 13–15 y with whole-body fat% of 30 ± 9% were randomly assigned to consume bread with fish oil (FO) (1.5 g n-3 LCPUFA/d) or vegetable oil for 16 weeks. All boys were counselled to improve diet and exercise habits. Results. Lifestyle counselling resulted in decreased sugar intake but did not change the physical activity level. Whole-body fat% decreased 0.7 ± 2.5% and 0.6 ± 2.2%, resting metabolic rate after the intervention was 7150 ± 1134 kJ/d versus 7150 ± 1042 kJ/d, and the respiratory quotient was 0.89 ± 0.05 versus 0.88 ± 0.05, in the FO and control group, respectively. No group differences were significant. Conclusion. FO-supplementation to slightly overweight teenage boys did not result in beneficial effects on RMR, lipid oxidation, or body composition. PMID:21773017

  9. Cinnamomum camphora Seed Kernel Oil Improves Lipid Metabolism and Enhances β3-Adrenergic Receptor Expression in Diet-Induced Obese Rats.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jing; Zeng, Cheng; Zeng, Zheling; Wang, Baogui; Wen, Xuefang; Yu, Ping; Gong, Deming

    2016-06-01

    The effects of dietary Cinnamomum camphora seed kernel oil (CCSKO) containing medium-chain triacylglycerols on lipid metabolism and mRNA and protein expression of β-3 adrenergic receptor in adipose tissue were studied in diet-induced obese rats. High fat food-induced obese rats were randomly divided into CCSKO group, Lard group, Soybean oil (SOY) group and naturally restoring group (n = 10). Rats fed with low fat food were used as a normal control group. Significant decreases in body mass and abdominal fat mass/body mass after 12 weeks were found in CCSKO group as compared with Lard and SOY groups (p < 0.05). Levels of blood total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride, free fatty acid, fasting insulin and insulin resistance in the CCSKO group were decreased significantly, and noradrenaline level and insulin sensitivity index in the CCSKO group were significantly higher than other groups. Meanwhile liver TC and triglyceride levels in the CCSKO group were also decreased markedly. Expression levels of β3-adrenergic receptor mRNA and protein were higher in CCSKO group than in Lard and SOY groups. These results suggest that CCSKO may contribute to reduction of the body fat mass, promote lipid metabolism and up-regulate β3-adrenergic receptor expression in high fat diet-induced obese rats. PMID:27068065

  10. Computational identification and phylogenetic analysis of the oil-body structural proteins, oleosin and caleosin, in castor bean and flax.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Tae Kyung; Kumar, Dhinesh; Cho, Young-Yeol; Hyun, Hae-Nam; Kim, Ju-Sung

    2013-02-25

    Oil bodies (OBs) are the intracellular particles derived from oilseeds. These OBs store lipids as a carbon resource, and have been exploited for a variety of industrial applications including biofuels. Oleosin and caleosin are the common OB structural proteins which are enabling biotechnological enhancement of oil content and OB-based pharmaceutical formations via stabilizing OBs. Although the draft whole genome sequence information for Ricinus communis L. (castor bean) and Linum usitatissimum L. (flax), important oil seed plants, is available in public database, OB-structural proteins in these plants are poorly indentified. Therefore, in this study, we performed a comprehensive bioinformatic analysis including analysis of the genome sequence, conserved domains and phylogenetic relationships to identify OB structural proteins in castor bean and flax genomes. Using comprehensive analysis, we have identified 6 and 15 OB-structural proteins from castor bean and flax, respectively. A complete overview of this gene family in castor bean and flax is presented, including the gene structures, phylogeny and conserved motifs, resulting in the presence of central hydrophobic regions with proline knot motif, providing an evolutionary proof that this central hydrophobic region had evolved from duplications in the primitive eukaryotes. In addition, expression analysis of L-oleosin and caleosin genes using quantitative real-time PCR demonstrated that seed contained their maximum expression, except that RcCLO-1 expressed maximum in cotyledon. Thus, our comparative genomics analysis of oleosin and caleosin genes and their putatively encoded proteins in two non-model plant species provides insights into the prospective usage of gene resources for improving OB-stability. PMID:23232356

  11. Low n-6/n-3 PUFA Ratio Improves Lipid Metabolism, Inflammation, Oxidative Stress and Endothelial Function in Rats Using Plant Oils as n-3 Fatty Acid Source.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li Gang; Song, Zhi Xiu; Yin, Hong; Wang, Yan Yan; Shu, Guo Fang; Lu, Hui Xia; Wang, Shao Kang; Sun, Gui Ju

    2016-01-01

    Lipid metabolism, inflammation, oxidative stress and endothelial function play important roles in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease (CVD), which may be affected by an imbalance in the n-6/n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) ratio. This study aimed to investigate the effects of the n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio on these cardiovascular risk factors in rats fed a high-fat diet using plant oils as the main n-3 PUFA source. The 1:1 and 5:1 ratio groups had significantly decreased serum levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and proinflammatory cytokines compared with the 20:1 group (p < 0.05). Additionally, the 20:1 group had significantly increased serum levels of E-Selectin, von Willebrand factor (vWF), and numerous markers of oxidative stress compared with the other groups (p < 0.05). The 1:1 group had a significantly decreased lipid peroxide level compared with the other groups (p < 0.05). Serum levels of malondialdehyde, reactive oxygen species and vWF tended to increase with n-6/n-3 PUFA ratios increasing from 5:1 to 20:1. We demonstrated that low n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio (1:1 and 5:1) had a beneficial effect on cardiovascular risk factors by enhancing favorable lipid profiles, having anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative stress effects, and improving endothelial function. A high n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio (20:1) had adverse effects. Our results indicated that low n-6/n-3 PUFA ratios exerted beneficial cardiovascular effects, suggesting that plant oils could be used as a source of n-3 fatty acids to prevent CVD. They also suggested that we should be aware of possible adverse effects from excessive n-3 PUFA. PMID:26526061

  12. Adsorption kinetics dictate monolayer self-assembly for both lipid-in and lipid-out approaches to droplet interface bilayer formation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Venkatesan, Guru A.; Lee, Joonho; Farimani, Amir Barati; Heiranian, Mohammad; Collier, C. Patrick; Narayana, Aluru; Sarles, Stephen A.

    2015-11-10

    The droplet interface bilayer (DIB) is a method to assemble planar lipid bilayer membranes between lipid-coated aqueous droplets and has gained popularity among researchers in many fields. Well-packed lipid monolayer on aqueous droplet–oil interfaces is a prerequisite for successfully assembling DIBs. Such monolayers can be achieved by two different techniques: “lipid-in”, in which phospholipids in the form of liposomes are placed in water, and “lipid-out”, in which phospholipids are placed in oil as inverse micelles. While both approaches are capable of monolayer assembly needed for bilayer formation, droplet pairs assembled with these two techniques require significantly different incubation periods andmore » exhibit different success rates for bilayer formation. In our study, we combine experimental interfacial tension measurements with molecular dynamics simulations of phospholipids (DPhPC and DOPC) assembled from water and oil origins to understand the differences in kinetics of monolayer formation. With the results from simulations and by using a simplified model to analyze dynamic interfacial tensions, we conclude that, at high lipid concentrations common to DIBs, monolayer formation is simple adsorption controlled for lipid-in technique, whereas it is predominantly adsorption-barrier controlled for the lipid-out technique due to the interaction of interface-bound lipids with lipid structures in the subsurface. The adsorption barrier established in lipid-out technique leads to a prolonged incubation time and lower bilayer formation success rate, proving a good correlation between interfacial tension measurements and bilayer formation. Also, we clarify that advective flow expedites monolayer formation and improves bilayer formation success rate by disrupting lipid structures, rather than enhancing diffusion, in the subsurface and at the interface for lipid-out technique. Additionally, electrical properties of DIBs formed with varying lipid

  13. Adsorption kinetics dictate monolayer self-assembly for both lipid-in and lipid-out approaches to droplet interface bilayer formation

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatesan, Guru A.; Lee, Joonho; Farimani, Amir Barati; Heiranian, Mohammad; Collier, C. Patrick; Narayana, Aluru; Sarles, Stephen A.

    2015-11-10

    The droplet interface bilayer (DIB) is a method to assemble planar lipid bilayer membranes between lipid-coated aqueous droplets and has gained popularity among researchers in many fields. Well-packed lipid monolayer on aqueous droplet–oil interfaces is a prerequisite for successfully assembling DIBs. Such monolayers can be achieved by two different techniques: “lipid-in”, in which phospholipids in the form of liposomes are placed in water, and “lipid-out”, in which phospholipids are placed in oil as inverse micelles. While both approaches are capable of monolayer assembly needed for bilayer formation, droplet pairs assembled with these two techniques require significantly different incubation periods and exhibit different success rates for bilayer formation. In our study, we combine experimental interfacial tension measurements with molecular dynamics simulations of phospholipids (DPhPC and DOPC) assembled from water and oil origins to understand the differences in kinetics of monolayer formation. With the results from simulations and by using a simplified model to analyze dynamic interfacial tensions, we conclude that, at high lipid concentrations common to DIBs, monolayer formation is simple adsorption controlled for lipid-in technique, whereas it is predominantly adsorption-barrier controlled for the lipid-out technique due to the interaction of interface-bound lipids with lipid structures in the subsurface. The adsorption barrier established in lipid-out technique leads to a prolonged incubation time and lower bilayer formation success rate, proving a good correlation between interfacial tension measurements and bilayer formation. Also, we clarify that advective flow expedites monolayer formation and improves bilayer formation success rate by disrupting lipid structures, rather than enhancing diffusion, in the subsurface and at the interface for lipid-out technique. Additionally, electrical properties of DIBs formed with varying lipid placement and

  14. Research advancements in palm oil nutrition*

    PubMed Central

    May, Choo Yuen; Nesaretnam, Kalanithi

    2014-01-01

    Palm oil is the major oil produced, with annual world production in excess of 50 million tonnes. About 85% of global palm oil produced is used in food applications. Over the past three decades, research on nutritional benefits of palm oil have demonstrated the nutritional adequacy of palm oil and its products, and have resulted in transitions in the understanding these attributes. Numerous studies have demonstrated that palm oil was similar to unsaturated oils with regards to effects on blood lipids. Palm oil provides a healthy alternative to trans-fatty acid containing hydrogenated fats that have been demonstrated to have serious deleterious effects on health. The similar effects of palm oil on blood lipids, comparable to other vegetable oils could very well be due to the structure of the major triglycerides in palm oil, which has an unsaturated fatty acid in the stereospecific numbers (sn)-2 position of the glycerol backbone. In addition, palm oil is well endowed with a bouquet of phytonutrients beneficial to health, such as tocotrienols, carotenoids, and phytosterols. This review will provide an overview of studies that have established palm oil as a balanced and nutritious oil. PMID:25821404

  15. Structural Insight into Substrate Selection and Catalysis of Lipid Phosphate Phosphatase PgpB in the Cell Membrane.

    PubMed

    Tong, Shuilong; Lin, Yibin; Lu, Shuo; Wang, Meitian; Bogdanov, Mikhail; Zheng, Lei

    2016-08-26

    PgpB belongs to the lipid phosphate phosphatase protein family and is one of three bacterial integral membrane phosphatases catalyzing dephosphorylation of phosphatidylglycerol phosphate (PGP) to generate phosphatidylglycerol. Although the structure of its apo form became recently available, the mechanisms of PgpB substrate binding and catalysis are still unclear. We found that PgpB was inhibited by phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) in a competitive mode in vitro Here we report the crystal structure of the lipid-bound form of PgpB. The structure shows that a PE molecule is stabilized in a membrane-embedded tunnel formed by TM3 and the "PSGH" fingerprint peptide near the catalytic site, providing structural insight into PgpB substrate binding mechanism. Noteworthy, in silico docking of varied lipid phosphates exhibited similar substrate binding modes to that of PE, and the residues in the lipid tunnel appear to be important for PgpB catalysis. The catalytic triad in the active site is essential for dephosphorylating substrates lysophosphatidic acid, phosphatidic acid, or sphingosine-1-phosphate but surprisingly not for the native substrate PGP. Remarkably, residue His-207 alone is sufficient to hydrolyze PGP, indicating a specific catalytic mechanism for PgpB in PG biosynthesis. We also identified two novel sensor residues, Lys-93 and Lys-97, on TM3. Our data show that Lys-97 is essential for the recognition of lyso-form substrates. Modification at the Lys-93 position may alter substrate specificity of lipid phosphate phosphatase proteins in prokaryotes versus eukaryotes. These studies reveal new mechanisms of lipid substrate selection and catalysis by PgpB and suggest that the enzyme rests in a PE-stabilized state in the bilayer. PMID:27405756

  16. Integrated femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering and two-photon fluorescence imaging of subcellular lipid and vesicular structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuesong; Lam, Wen Jiun; Cao, Zhe; Hao, Yan; Sun, Qiqi; He, Sicong; Mak, Ho Yi; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2015-11-01

    The primary goal of this study is to demonstrate that stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) as a new imaging modality can be integrated into a femtosecond (fs) nonlinear optical (NLO) microscope system. The fs sources of high pulse peak power are routinely used in multimodal nonlinear microscopy to enable efficient excitation of multiple NLO signals. However, with fs excitations, the SRS imaging of subcellular lipid and vesicular structures encounters significant interference from proteins due to poor spectral resolution and a lack of chemical specificity, respectively. We developed a unique NLO microscope of fs excitation that enables rapid acquisition of SRS and multiple two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) signals. In the in vivo imaging of transgenic C. elegans animals, we discovered that by cross-filtering false positive lipid signals based on the TPEF signals from tryptophan-bearing endogenous proteins and lysosome-related organelles, the imaging system produced highly accurate assignment of SRS signals to lipid. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the multimodal NLO microscope system could sequentially image lipid structure/content and organelles, such as mitochondria, lysosomes, and the endoplasmic reticulum, which are intricately linked to lipid metabolism.

  17. Structure-related aspects on water diffusivity in fatty acid-soap and skin lipid model systems.

    PubMed

    Norlén, L; Engblom, J

    2000-01-01

    Simplified skin barrier models are necessary to get a first hand understanding of the very complex morphology and physical properties of the human skin barrier. In addition, it is of great importance to construct relevant models