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1

Advancements Toward Oil-Free Rotorcraft Propulsion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA and the Army have been working for over a decade to advance the state-of-the-art (SOA) in Oil-Free Turbomachinery with an eye toward reduced emissions and maintenance, and increased performance and efficiency among other benefits. Oil-Free Turbomachinery is enabled by oil-free gas foil bearing technology and relatively new high-temperature tribological coatings. Rotorcraft propulsion is a likely candidate to apply oil-free bearing technology because the engine size class matches current SOA for foil bearings and because foil bearings offer the opportunity for higher speeds and temperatures and lower weight, all critical issues for rotorcraft engines. This paper describes an effort to demonstrate gas foil journal bearing use in the hot section of a full-scale helicopter engine core. A production engine hot-core location is selected as the candidate foil bearing application. Rotordynamic feasibility, bearing sizing, and load capability are assessed. The results of the program will help guide future analysis and design in this area by documenting the steps required and the process utilized for successful application of oil-free technology to a full-scale engine.

Howard, Samuel A.; Bruckner, Robert J.; Radil, Kevin C.

2010-01-01

2

Preliminary Analysis for an Optimized Oil-Free Rotorcraft Engine Concept  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Recent developments in gas foil bearing technology have led to numerous advanced high-speed rotating system concepts, many of which have become either commercial products or experimental test articles. Examples include Oil-Free microturbines, motors, generators and turbochargers. The driving forces for integrating gas foil bearings into these high-speed systems are the benefits promised by removing the oil lubrication system. Elimination of the oil system leads to reduced emissions, increased reliability, and decreased maintenance costs. Another benefit is reduced power plant weight. For rotorcraft applications, this would be a major advantage, as every pound removed from the propulsion system results in a payload benefit. Implementing foil gas bearings throughout a rotorcraft gas turbine engine is an important long-term goal that requires overcoming numerous technological hurdles. Adequate thrust bearing load capacity and potentially large gearbox applied radial loads are among them. However, by replacing the turbine end, or hot section, rolling element bearing with a gas foil bearing many of the above benefits can be realized. To this end, engine manufacturers are beginning to explore the possibilities of hot section gas foil bearings in propulsion engines. This paper presents a logical follow-on activity by analyzing a conceptual rotorcraft engine to determine the feasibility of a foil bearing supported core. Using a combination of rotordynamic analyses and a load capacity model, it is shown to be reasonable to consider a gas foil bearing core section.

Howard, Samuel A.; Bruckner, Robert J.; DellaCorte, Christopher; Radil, Kevin C.

2008-01-01

3

Technical Seminar: Oil-Free Turbomachinery for Rotorcraft  

NASA Video Gallery

Rotorcraft engines are among the most demanding applications for conventional oil-lubricated bearings because they must operate with extreme reliability and the highest possible power density. Rece...

4

System Analysis and Performance Benefits of an Optimized Rotorcraft Propulsion System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The propulsion system of rotorcraft vehicles is the most critical system to the vehicle in terms of safety and performance. The propulsion system must provide both vertical lift and forward flight propulsion during the entire mission. Whereas propulsion is a critical element for all flight vehicles, it is particularly critical for rotorcraft due to their limited safe, un-powered landing capability. This unparalleled reliability requirement has led rotorcraft power plants down a certain evolutionary path in which the system looks and performs quite similarly to those of the 1960 s. By and large the advancements in rotorcraft propulsion have come in terms of safety and reliability and not in terms of performance. The concept of the optimized propulsion system is a means by which both reliability and performance can be improved for rotorcraft vehicles. The optimized rotorcraft propulsion system which couples an oil-free turboshaft engine to a highly loaded gearbox that provides axial load support for the power turbine can be designed with current laboratory proven technology. Such a system can provide up to 60% weight reduction of the propulsion system of rotorcraft vehicles. Several technical challenges are apparent at the conceptual design level and should be addressed with current research.

Bruckner, Robert J.

2007-01-01

5

Oil-Free Rotor Support Technologies for an Optimized Helicopter Propulsion System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An optimized rotorcraft propulsion system incorporating a foil air bearing supported Oil-Free engine coupled to a high power density gearbox using high viscosity gear oil is explored. Foil air bearings have adequate load capacity and temperature capability for the highspeed gas generator shaft of a rotorcraft engine. Managing the axial loads of the power turbine shaft (low speed spool) will likely require thrust load support from the gearbox through a suitable coupling or other design. Employing specially formulated, high viscosity gear oil for the transmission can yield significant improvements (approx. 2X) in allowable gear loading. Though a completely new propulsion system design is needed to implement such a system, improved performance is possible.

DellaCorte, Christopher; Bruckner, Robert J.

2007-01-01

6

Progress in NASA Rotorcraft Propulsion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This presentation reviews recent progress made under NASA s Subsonic Rotary Wing (SRW) propulsion research activities. Advances in engines, drive systems and optimized propulsion systems are discussed. Progress in wide operability compressors, modeling of variable geometry turbine performance, foil gas bearings and multi-speed transmissions are presented.

DellaCorte, Christopher; Johnson, Susan M.

2008-01-01

7

Development of a rotorcraft. Propulsion dynamics interface analysis, volume 2  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A study was conducted to establish a coupled rotor/propulsion analysis that would be applicable to a wide range of rotorcraft systems. The effort included the following tasks: (1) development of a model structure suitable for simulating a wide range of rotorcraft configurations; (2) defined a methodology for parameterizing the model structure to represent a particular rotorcraft; (3) constructing a nonlinear coupled rotor/propulsion model as a test case to use in analyzing coupled system dynamics; and (4) an attempt to develop a mostly linear coupled model derived from the complete nonlinear simulations. Documentation of the computer models developed is presented.

Hull, R.

1982-01-01

8

Rotorcraft flight-propulsion control integration: An eclectic design concept  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA Ames and Lewis Research Centers, in conjunction with the Army Research and Technology Laboratories, have initiated and partially completed a joint research program focused on improving the performance, maneuverability, and operating characteristics of rotorcraft by integrating the flight and propulsion controls. The background of the program, its supporting programs, its goals and objectives, and an approach to accomplish them are discussed. Results of the modern control governor design of the General Electric T700 engine and the Rotorcraft Integrated Flight-Propulsion Control Study, which were key elements of the program, are also presented.

Mihaloew, James R.; Ballin, Mark G.; Ruttledge, D. C. G.

1988-01-01

9

Rotorcraft propulsion for year 2000 plus  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objective of this study was to identify high-payoff technologies for year 2000 small gas turbine engines for rotorcraft application. A current state-of-the-art technology Allison gas turbine engine was used as a baseline and three advanced concepts were studied: the simple cycle engine, a waste heat recovery cycle, and a wave rotor engine cycle. For the simple cycle engine, two general arrangements were considered: the traditional concentric spool arrangement and a nonconcentric spool arrangement. Both a regenerative and a recuperative cycle were studied for the waste heat recovery cycle. An extensive cycle optimization procedure was performed for each configuration under study using relative direct operating cost (DOC) as the figure of merit. A high pressure ratio nonconcentric engine provided the greatest reduction in DOC with a 16.5 percent improvement.

Larkin, T. R.; Staton, D. V.; Mongia, H. C.

1986-01-01

10

Assessment of High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) electric motors for rotorcraft propulsion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The successful development of high temperature superconductors (HTS) could have a major impact on future aeronautical propulsion and aeronautical flight vehicle systems. Applications of high temperature superconductors have been envisioned for several classes of aeronautical systems, including subsonic and supersonic transports, hypersonic aircraft, V/STOL aircraft, rotorcraft and solar powered aircraft. The potential of HTS electric motors and generators for providing primary shaft power for rotorcraft propulsion is examined. Three different sized production helicopters were investigated; namely, the Bell Jet Ranger, the Sikorsky Black Hawk and the Sikorsky Super Stallion. These rotorcraft have nominal horsepower ratings of 500, 3600, and 13400 respectively. Preliminary results indicated that an all-electric HTS drive system produces an improvement in rotorcraft Takeoff Gross Weight (TOGW) for those rotorcraft with power ratings above 2000 horsepower. The predicted TOGW improvements are up to 9 percent for the medium-sized Sikorsky Black Hawk and up to 20 percent for the large-sized Sikorsky Super Stallion. The small-sized Bell Jet Ranger, however, experienced a penalty in TOGW with the all-electric HTS drive system.

Doernbach, Jay

1990-01-01

11

A Survey of Current Rotorcraft Propulsion Health Monitoring Technologies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A brief review is presented on the state-of-the-art in rotorcraft engine health monitoring technologies including summaries on current practices in the area of sensors, data acquisition, monitoring and analysis. Also, presented are guidelines for verification and validation of Health Usage Monitoring System (HUMS) and specifically for maintenance credits to extend part life. Finally, a number of new efforts in HUMS are summarized as well as lessons learned and future challenges. In particular, gaps are identified to supporting maintenance credits to extend rotorcraft engine part life. A number of data sources were consulted and include results from a survey from the HUMS community, Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) documents, American Helicopter Society (AHS) papers, as well as references from Defence Science & Technology Organization (DSTO), Civil Aviation Authority (CAA), and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

Delgado, Irebert R.; Dempsey, Paula J.; Simon, Donald L.

2012-01-01

12

A rotorcraft flight/propulsion control integration study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An eclectic approach was taken to a study of the integration of digital flight and propulsion controls for helicopters. The basis of the evaluation was the current Gen Hel simulation of the UH-60A Black Hawk helicopter with a model of the GE T700 engine. A list of flight maneuver segments to be used in evaluating the effectiveness of such an integrated control system was composed, based on past experience and an extensive survey of the U.S. Army Air-to-Air Combat Test data. A number of possible features of an integrated system were examined and screened. Those that survived the screening were combined into a design that replaced the T700 fuel control and part of the control system in the UH-60A Gen Hel simulation. This design included portions of an existing pragmatic adaptive fuel control designed by the Chandler-Evans Company and an linear quadratic regulator (LQR) based N(p) governor designed by the GE company, combined with changes in the basic Sikorsky Aircraft designed control system. The integrated system exhibited improved total performance in many areas of the flight envelope.

Ruttledge, D. G. C.

1986-01-01

13

NASA/Army Rotorcraft Technology. Volume 2: Materials and Structures, Propulsion and Drive Systems, Flight Dynamics and Control, and Acoustics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Conference Proceedings is a compilation of over 30 technical papers presented which report on the advances in rotorcraft technical knowledge resulting from NASA, Army, and industry research programs over the last 5 to 10 years. Topics addressed in this volume include: materials and structures; propulsion and drive systems; flight dynamics and control; and acoustics.

1988-01-01

14

Rotorcraft convertible engine study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objective of the Rotorcraft Convertible Engine Study was to define future research and technology effort required for commercial development by 1988 of convertible fan/shaft gas turbine engines for unconventional rotorcraft transports. Two rotorcraft and their respective missions were defined: a Fold Tilt Rotor aircraft and an Advancing Blade Concept (ABC) rotorcraft. Sensitivity studies were conducted with these rotorcraft to determine parametrically the influence of propulsion characteristics on aircraft size, mission fuel requirements, and direct operating costs (DOC). The two rotorcraft were flown with conventional propulsion systems (separate lift/cruise engines) and with convertible propulsion systems to determine the benefits to be derived from convertible engines. Trade-off studies were conducted to determine the optimum engine cycle and staging arrangement for a convertible engine. Advanced technology options applicable to convertible engines were studied. Research and technology programs were identified which would ensure technology readiness for commercial development of convertible engines by 1988.

Gill, J. C.; Earle, R. V.; Mar, H. M.

1982-01-01

15

Comprehensive Modeling and Analysis of Rotorcraft Variable Speed Propulsion System With Coupled Engine/Transmission/Rotor Dynamics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This project develops comprehensive modeling and simulation tools for analysis of variable rotor speed helicopter propulsion system dynamics. The Comprehensive Variable-Speed Rotorcraft Propulsion Modeling (CVSRPM) tool developed in this research is used to investigate coupled rotor/engine/fuel control/gearbox/shaft/clutch/flight control system dynamic interactions for several variable rotor speed mission scenarios. In this investigation, a prototypical two-speed Dual-Clutch Transmission (DCT) is proposed and designed to achieve 50 percent rotor speed variation. The comprehensive modeling tool developed in this study is utilized to analyze the two-speed shift response of both a conventional single rotor helicopter and a tiltrotor drive system. In the tiltrotor system, both a Parallel Shift Control (PSC) strategy and a Sequential Shift Control (SSC) strategy for constant and variable forward speed mission profiles are analyzed. Under the PSC strategy, selecting clutch shift-rate results in a design tradeoff between transient engine surge margins and clutch frictional power dissipation. In the case of SSC, clutch power dissipation is drastically reduced in exchange for the necessity to disengage one engine at a time which requires a multi-DCT drive system topology. In addition to comprehensive simulations, several sections are dedicated to detailed analysis of driveline subsystem components under variable speed operation. In particular an aeroelastic simulation of a stiff in-plane rotor using nonlinear quasi-steady blade element theory was conducted to investigate variable speed rotor dynamics. It was found that 2/rev and 4/rev flap and lag vibrations were significant during resonance crossings with 4/rev lagwise loads being directly transferred into drive-system torque disturbances. To capture the clutch engagement dynamics, a nonlinear stick-slip clutch torque model is developed. Also, a transient gas-turbine engine model based on first principles mean-line compressor and turbine approximations is developed. Finally an analysis of high frequency gear dynamics including the effect of tooth mesh stiffness variation under variable speed operation is conducted including experimental validation. Through exploring the interactions between the various subsystems, this investigation provides important insights into the continuing development of variable-speed rotorcraft propulsion systems.

DeSmidt, Hans A.; Smith, Edward C.; Bill, Robert C.; Wang, Kon-Well

2013-01-01

16

Assessment of High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) Electric Motors for Rotorcraft Propulsion.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The successful development of high temperature superconductors (HTS) could have a major impact on future aeronautical propulsion and aeronautical flight vehicle systems. Applications of high temperature superconductors have been envisioned for several cla...

J. Doernbach

1990-01-01

17

Test stand performance of a convertible engine for advanced V/STOL and rotorcraft propulsion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A variable inlet guide vane (VIGV) convertible engine that could be used to power future high-speed V/STOL and rotorcraft was tested on an outdoor stand. The engine ran stably and smoothly in the turbofan, turboshaft, and dual (combined fan and shaft) power modes. In the turbofan mode with the VIGV open, fuel consumption was comparable to that of a conventional turbofan engine. In the turboshaft mode with the VIGV closed, fuel consumption was higher than that of present turboshaft engines because power was wasted in churning fan-tip air flow. In dynamic performance tests with a specially built digital engine control and using a waterbrake dynamometer for shaft load, the engine responded effectively to large steps in thrust command and shaft torque.

Mcardle, Jack G.

1987-01-01

18

Test stand performance of a convertible engine for advanced V/STOL and rotorcraft propulsion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A variable inlet guide vane (VIGV) convertible engine that could be used to power future high-speed V/STOL and rotorcraft was tested on an outdoor stand. The engine ran stably and smoothly in the turbofan, turboshaft, and dual (combined fan and shaft) power modes. In the turbofan mode with the VIGV open, fuel consumption was comparable to that of a conventional turbofan engine. In the turboshaft mode with the VIGV closed, fuel consumption was higher than that of present turboshaft engines because power was wasted in churning fan-tip air flow. In dynamic performance tests with a specially built digital engine control and using a waterbrake dynamometer for shaft load, the engine responded effectively to large steps in thrust command and shaft torque.

Mcardle, Jack G.

1988-01-01

19

Rotorcraft Health Management Issues and Challenges.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This paper presents an overview of health management issues and challenges that are specific to rotorcraft. Rotorcraft form a unique subset of air vehicles in that their propulsion system is used not only for propulsion, but also serves as the primary sou...

E. M. Huff J. J. Zakrajske M. Augustin P. J. Dempsey R. Safa-Bakhsh

2006-01-01

20

Rotorcraft Health Management Issues and Challenges  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents an overview of health management issues and challenges that are specific to rotorcraft. Rotorcraft form a unique subset of air vehicles in that their propulsion system is used not only for propulsion, but also serves as the primary source of lift and maneuvering of the vehicle. No other air vehicle relies on the propulsion system to provide these functions through a transmission system with single critical load paths without duplication or redundancy. As such, health management of the power train is a critical and unique part of any rotorcraft health management system. This paper focuses specifically on the issues and challenges related to the dynamic mechanical components in the main power train. This includes the transmission and main rotor mechanisms. This paper will review standard practices used for rotorcraft health management, lessons learned from fielded trials, and future challenges.

Zakrajsek, James J.; Dempsey, Paula J.; Huff, Edward M.; Augustin, Michael; Safa-Bakhsh, Robab; Ephraim, Piet; Grabil, Paul; Decker, Harry J.

2006-01-01

21

Rotorcraft Diagnostics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Health management (HM) in any engineering systems requires adequate understanding about the system s functioning; a sufficient amount of monitored data; the capability to extract, analyze, and collate information; and the capability to combine understanding and information for HM-related estimation and decision-making. Rotorcraft systems are, in general, highly complex. Obtaining adequate understanding about functioning of such systems is quite difficult, because of the proprietary (restricted access) nature of their designs and dynamic models. Development of an EIM (exact inverse map) solution for rotorcraft requires a process that can overcome the abovementioned difficulties and maximally utilize monitored information for HM facilitation via employing advanced analytic techniques. The goal was to develop a versatile HM solution for rotorcraft for facilitation of the Condition Based Maintenance Plus (CBM+) capabilities. The effort was geared towards developing analytic and reasoning techniques, and proving the ability to embed the required capabilities on a rotorcraft platform, paving the way for implementing the solution on an aircraft-level system for consolidation and reporting. The solution for rotorcraft can he used offboard or embedded directly onto a rotorcraft system. The envisioned solution utilizes available monitored and archived data for real-time fault detection and identification, failure precursor identification, and offline fault detection and diagnostics, health condition forecasting, optimal guided troubleshooting, and maintenance decision support. A variant of the onboard version is a self-contained hardware and software (HW+SW) package that can be embedded on rotorcraft systems. The HM solution comprises components that gather/ingest data and information, perform information/feature extraction, analyze information in conjunction with the dependency/diagnostic model of the target system, facilitate optimal guided troubleshooting, and offer decision support for optimal maintenance.

Haste, Deepak; Azam, Mohammad; Ghoshal, Sudipto; Monte, James

2012-01-01

22

Rotorcrafts for Mars Exploration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Rotorcraft mobility provides a number of useful capabilities to potential Mars missions. We present some recent results relating to the design and test of Mars rotorcraft mobility elements, and aspects of rotorcraft system and mission design.

Balaram, J.; Tokumaru, P. T.

2014-06-01

23

Design Study of Propulsion and Drive Systems for the Large Civil TiltRotor (LCTR2) Rotorcraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Boeing, Rolls Royce, and NASA have worked together to complete a parametric sizing study for NASA's Large Civil Tilt Rotor (LCTR2) concept 2nd iteration. Vehicle gross weight and fuel usage were evaluated as propulsion and drive system characteristics were varied to maximize the benefit of reduced rotor tip speed during cruise conditions. The study examined different combinations of engine and gearbox variability to achieve rotor cruise tip speed reductions down to 54% of the hover tip speed. Previous NASA studies identified that a 54% rotor speed reduction in cruise minimizes vehicle gross weight and fuel burn. The LCTR2 was the study baseline for initial sizing. This study included rotor tip speed ratios (cruise to hover) of 100%, 77% and 54% at different combinations of engine RPM and gearbox speed reductions, which were analyzed to achieve the lightest overall vehicle gross weight (GW) at the chosen rotor tip speed ratio. Different engine and gearbox technology levels are applied ranging from commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) engines and gearbox technology to entry-in-service (EIS) dates of 2025 and 2035 to assess the benefits of advanced technology on vehicle gross weight and fuel burn. Interim results were previously reported1. This technical paper extends that work and summarizes the final study results including additional engine and drive system study accomplishments. New vehicle sizing data is presented for engine performance at a single operating speed with a multispeed drive system. Modeling details for LCTR2 vehicle sizing and subject engine and drive sub-systems are presented as well. This study was conducted in support of NASA's Fundamental Aeronautics Program, Subsonic Rotary Wing Project.

Robuck, Mark; Wilkerson, Joseph; Zhang, Yiyi; Snyder, Christopher A.; Vonderwell, Daniel

2013-01-01

24

Conceptual Design and Feasibility of Foil Bearings for Rotorcraft Engines: Hot Core Bearings  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Recent developments in gas foil bearing technology have led to numerous advanced high-speed rotating system concepts, many of which have become either commercial products or experimental test articles. Examples include oil-free microturbines, motors, generators and turbochargers. The driving forces for integrating gas foil bearings into these high-speed systems are the benefits promised by removing the oil lubrication system. Elimination of the oil system leads to reduced emissions, increased reliability, and decreased maintenance costs. Another benefit is reduced power plant weight. For rotorcraft applications, this would be a major advantage, as every pound removed from the propulsion system results in a payload benefit.. Implementing foil gas bearings throughout a rotorcraft gas turbine engine is an important long-term goal that requires overcoming numerous technological hurdles. Adequate thrust bearing load capacity and potentially large gearbox applied radial loads are among them. However, by replacing the turbine end, or hot section, rolling element bearing with a gas foil bearing many of the above benefits can be realized. To this end, engine manufacturers are beginning to explore the possibilities of hot section gas foil bearings in propulsion engines. This overview presents a logical follow-on activity by analyzing a conceptual rotorcraft engine to determine the feasibility of a foil bearing supported core. Using a combination of rotordynamic analyses and a load capacity model, it is shown to be reasonable to consider a gas foil bearing core section. In addition, system level foil bearing testing capabilities at NASA Glenn Research Center are presented along with analysis work being conducted under NRA Cooperative Agreements.

Howard, Samuel A.

2007-01-01

25

Propulsion  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An introductory discussion of aircraft propulsion is included along with diagrams and pictures of piston, turbojet, turboprop, turbofan, and jet engines. Also, a table on chemical propulsion is included. (MDR)

Air and Space, 1978

1978-01-01

26

Variable/Multispeed Rotorcraft Drive System Concepts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Several recent studies for advanced rotorcraft have identified the need for variable, or multispeed-capable rotors. A speed change of up to 50 percent has been proposed for future rotorcraft to improve vehicle performance. Varying rotor speed during flight not only requires a rotor capable of performing effectively over the extended operation speed and load range, but also requires an advanced propulsion system to provide the required speed changes. A study has been completed, which investigated possible drive system arrangements to accommodate up to the 50 percent speed change. These concepts are presented. The most promising configurations are identified and will be developed for future validation testing.

Stevens, Mark A.; Handschuh, Robert F.; Lewicki, David G.

2009-01-01

27

Advanced rotorcraft technology: Task force report  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The technological needs and opportunities related to future civil and military rotorcraft were determined and a program plan for NASA research which was responsive to the needs and opportunities was prepared. In general, the program plan places the primary emphasis on design methodology where the development and verification of analytical methods is built upon a sound data base. The four advanced rotorcraft technology elements identified are aerodynamics and structures, flight control and avionic systems, propulsion, and vehicle configurations. Estimates of the total funding levels that would be required to support the proposed program plan are included.

1978-01-01

28

Heat Treatment Used to Strengthen Enabling Coating Technology for Oil-Free Turbomachinery  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The PS304 high-temperature solid lubricant coating is a key enabling technology for Oil- Free turbomachinery propulsion and power systems. Breakthroughs in the performance of advanced foil air bearings and improvements in computer-based finite element modeling techniques are the key technologies enabling the development of Oil-Free aircraft engines being pursued by the Oil-Free Turbomachinery team at the NASA Glenn Research Center. PS304 is a plasma spray coating applied to the surface of shafts operating against foil air bearings or in any other component requiring solid lubrication at high temperatures, where conventional materials such as graphite cannot function.

Edmonds, Brian J.; DellaCorte, Christopher

2002-01-01

29

Rotorcraft as Mars Scouts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A new approach for the robotic exploration of Mars is detailed in this paper: the use of small, ultralightweight, autonomous rotary-wing aerial platforms. Missions based on robotic rotorcraft could make excellent candidates for NASA Mars Scout program. The paper details the work to date and future planning required for the development of such 'Mars rotorcraft.'

Young, L. A.; Aiken, E. W.; Gulick, V.; Mancinelli, R.; Briggs, G. A.; Rutkowski, Michael (Technical Monitor)

2002-01-01

30

Oil-Free Turbomachinery Team Passed Milestone on Path to the First Oil-Free Turbine Aircraft Engine  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Oil-Free Turbine Engine Technology Project team successfully demonstrated a foil-air bearing designed for the core rotor shaft of a turbine engine. The bearings were subjected to test conditions representative of the engine core environment through a combination of high speeds, sustained loads, and elevated temperatures. The operational test envelope was defined during conceptual design studies completed earlier this year by bearing manufacturer Mohawk Innovative Technologies and the turbine engine company Williams International. The prototype journal foil-air bearings were tested at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Glenn is working with Williams and Mohawk to create a revolution in turbomachinery by developing the world's first Oil-Free turbine aircraft engine. NASA's General Aviation Propulsion project and Williams International recently developed the FJX-2 turbofan engine that is being commercialized as the EJ-22. This core bearing milestone is a first step toward a future version of the EJ-22 that will take advantage of recent advances in foil-air bearings by eliminating the need for oil lubrication systems and rolling element bearings. Oil-Free technology can reduce engine weight by 15 percent and let engines operate at very high speeds, yielding power density improvements of 20 percent, and reducing engine maintenance costs. In addition, with NASA coating technology, engines can operate at temperatures up to 1200 F. Although the project is still a couple of years from a full engine test of the bearings, this milestone shows that the bearing design exceeds the expected environment, thus providing confidence that an Oil-Free turbine aircraft engine will be attained. The Oil-Free Turbomachinery Project is supported through the Aeropropulsion Base Research Program.

Bream, Bruce L.

2002-01-01

31

NDARC NASA Design and Analysis of Rotorcraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA Design and Analysis of Rotorcraft (NDARC) software is an aircraft system analysis tool intended to support both conceptual design efforts and technology impact assessments. The principal tasks are to design (or size) a rotorcraft to meet specified requirements, including vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) operation, and then analyze the performance of the aircraft for a set of conditions. For broad and lasting utility, it is important that the code have the capability to model general rotorcraft configurations, and estimate the performance and weights of advanced rotor concepts. The architecture of the NDARC code accommodates configuration flexibility; a hierarchy of models; and ultimately multidisciplinary design, analysis, and optimization. Initially the software is implemented with lowfidelity models, typically appropriate for the conceptual design environment. An NDARC job consists of one or more cases, each case optionally performing design and analysis tasks. The design task involves sizing the rotorcraft to satisfy specified design conditions and missions. The analysis tasks can include off-design mission performance calculation, flight performance calculation for point operating conditions, and generation of subsystem or component performance maps. For analysis tasks, the aircraft description can come from the sizing task, from a previous case or a previous NDARC job, or be independently generated (typically the description of an existing aircraft). The aircraft consists of a set of components, including fuselage, rotors, wings, tails, and propulsion. For each component, attributes such as performance, drag, and weight can be calculated; and the aircraft attributes are obtained from the sum of the component attributes. Description and analysis of conventional rotorcraft configurations is facilitated, while retaining the capability to model novel and advanced concepts. Specific rotorcraft configurations considered are single main-rotor and tailrotor helicopter; tandem helicopter; coaxial helicopter; and tiltrotors. The architecture of the code accommodates addition of new or higher-fidelity attribute models for a component, as well as addition of new components.

Johnson, Wayne R.

2009-01-01

32

Rotorcraft Conceptual Design Environment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Requirements for a rotorcraft conceptual design environment are discussed, from the perspective of a government laboratory. Rotorcraft design work in a government laboratory must support research, by producing technology impact assessments and defining the context for research and development; and must support the acquisition process, including capability assessments and quantitative evaluation of designs, concepts, and alternatives. An information manager that will enable increased fidelity of analysis early in the design effort is described. This manager will be a framework to organize information that describes the aircraft, and enable movement of that information to and from analyses. Finally, a recently developed rotorcraft system analysis tool is described.

Johnson, Wayne; Sinsay, Jeffrey

2009-01-01

33

Rotorcraft Conceptual Design Environment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Requirements for a rotorcraft conceptual design environment are discussed, from the perspective of a government laboratory. Rotorcraft design work in a government laboratory must support research, by producing technology impact assessments and defining the context for research and development; and must support the acquisition process, including capability assessments and quantitative evaluation of designs, concepts, and alternatives. An information manager that will enable increased fidelity of analysis early in the design effort is described. This manager will be a framework to organize information that describes the aircraft, and enable movement of that information to and from analyses. Finally, a recently developed rotorcraft system analysis tool is described.

Johnson, Wayne; Sinsay, Jeffrey D.

2010-01-01

34

Rotorcraft simulation at Ames  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Attention is given to rotorcraft simulation experience at NASA's Ames research facility, which has involved complex mathematical modeling, high computational capability requirements, and strong influences from pilot motion and visual cues. A development history and performance assessment is presented for the rotorcraft simulation hardware, together with projections of near term development improvements of capabilities. Greater demand is anticipated for the simulation of all-digital helicopter flight control systems.

Alderete, T. S.

1984-01-01

35

Oil-Free Turbomachinery Research Enhanced by Thrust Bearing Test Capability  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA Glenn Research Center s Oil-Free Turbomachinery research team is developing aircraft turbine engines that will not require an oil lubrication system. Oil systems are required today to lubricate rolling-element bearings used by the turbine and fan shafts. For the Oil-Free Turbomachinery concept, researchers combined the most advanced foil (air) bearings from industry with NASA-developed high-temperature solid lubricant technology. In 1999, the world s first Oil-Free turbocharger was demonstrated using these technologies. Now we are working with industry to demonstrate Oil-Free turbomachinery technology in a small business jet engine, the EJ-22 produced by Williams International and developed during Glenn s recently concluded General Aviation Propulsion (GAP) program. Eliminating the oil system in this engine will make it simpler, lighter (approximately 15 percent), more reliable, and less costly to purchase and maintain. Propulsion gas turbines will place high demands on foil air bearings, especially the thrust bearings. Up until now, the Oil-Free Turbomachinery research team only had the capability to test radial, journal bearings. This research has resulted in major improvements in the bearings performance, but journal bearings are cylindrical, and can only support radial shaft loads. To counteract axial thrust loads, thrust foil bearings, which are disk shaped, are required. Since relatively little research has been conducted on thrust foil air bearings, their performance lags behind that of journal bearings.

Bauman, Steven W.

2003-01-01

36

Study and Sub-System Optimization of Propulsion and Drive Systems for the Large Civil TiltRotor (LCTR2) Rotorcraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In a series of study tasks conducted as a part of NASA's Fundamental Aeronautics Program, Rotary Wing Project, Boeing and Rolls-Royce explored propulsion, drive, and rotor system options for the NASA Large Civil Tilt Rotor (LCTR2) concept vehicle. The original objective of this study was to identify engine and drive system configurations to reduce rotor tip speed during cruise conditions and quantify the associated benefits. Previous NASA studies concluded that reducing rotor speed (from 650 fps hover tip speed) during cruise would reduce vehicle gross weight and fuel burn. Initially, rotor cruise speed ratios of 54% of the hover tip speed were of most interest during operation at cruise air speed of 310 ktas. Interim results were previously reported1 for cruise tip speed ratios of 100%, 77%, and 54% of the hover tip speed using engine and/or gearbox features to achieve the reduction. Technology levels from commercial off-the-shelf (COTS), through entry-in-service (EIS) dates of 2025 and 2035 were considered to assess the benefits of advanced technology on vehicle gross weight and fuel burn. This technical paper presents the final study results in terms of vehicle sizing and fuel burn as well as Operational and Support (O&S) costs. New vehicle sizing at rotor tip speed reduced to 65% of hover is presented for engine performance with an EIS 2035 fixed geometry variable speed power turbine. LCTR2 is also evaluated for missions range cases of 400, 600, 800, 1000, and 1200 nautical miles and cruise air speeds of 310, 350 and 375 ktas.

Robuck, Mark; Wilkerson, Joseph; Snyder, Christopher A.; Zhang, Yiyi; Maciolek, Bob

2013-01-01

37

Maneuvering rotorcraft noise prediction  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents the unique aspects of the development of an entirely new maneuver noise prediction code called PSU-WOPWOP. The main focus of this work is development of a noise prediction methodology, which will enable the study of the aeroacoustic aspects a rotorcraft in maneuvering flight. It is assumed that the aeromechanical data (namely aircraft and blade motion, blade airloads)

G. A. Brès; K. S. Brentner; G. Perez; H. E. Jones

2004-01-01

38

Future Issues and Approaches to Health Monitoring and Failure Prevention for Oil-Free Gas Turbines  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Recent technology advances in foil air bearings, high temperature solid lubricants and computer based modeling has enabled the development of small Oil-Free gas turbines. These turbomachines are currently commercialized as small (<100 kW) microturbine generators and larger machines are being developed. Based upon these successes and the high potential payoffs offered by Oil-Free systems, NASA, industry, and other government entities are anticipating Oil-Free gas turbine propulsion systems to proliferate future markets. Since an Oil-Free engine has no oil system, traditional approaches to health monitoring and diagnostics, such as chip detection, oil analysis, and possibly vibration signature analyses (e.g., ball pass frequency) will be unavailable. As such, new approaches will need to be considered. These could include shaft orbit analyses, foil bearing temperature measurements, embedded wear sensors and start-up/coast down speed analysis. In addition, novel, as yet undeveloped techniques may emerge based upon concurrent developments in MEMS technology. This paper introduces Oil-Free technology, reviews the current state of the art and potential for future turbomachinery applications and discusses possible approaches to health monitoring, diagnostics and failure prevention.

DellaCorte, Christopher

2004-01-01

39

NASA PS304 Lubricant Tested in World's First Commercial Oil-Free Gas Turbine  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In a marriage of research and commercial technology, a 30-kW Oil-Free Capstone microturbine electrical generator unit has been installed and is serving as a test bed for long-term life-cycle testing of NASA-developed PS304 shaft coatings. The coatings are used to reduce friction and wear of the turbine engine s foil air bearings during startup and shut down when sliding occurs, prior to the formation of a lubricating air film. This testing supports NASA Glenn Research Center s effort to develop Oil-Free gas turbine aircraft propulsion systems, which will employ advanced foil air bearings and NASA s PS304 high temperature solid lubricant to replace the ball bearings and lubricating oil found in conventional engines. Glenn s Oil-Free Turbomachinery team s current project is the demonstration of an Oil-Free business jet engine. In anticipation of future flight certification of Oil-Free aircraft engines, long-term endurance and durability tests are being conducted in a relevant gas turbine environment using the Capstone microturbine engine. By operating the engine now, valuable performance data for PS304 shaft coatings and for industry s foil air bearings are being accumulated.

Weaver, Harold F.

2003-01-01

40

Advanced Rotorcraft Transmission Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The U.S. Army/NASA Advanced Rotorcraft Transmission (ART) program is charged with developing and demonstrating a light, quiet, and durable drivetrain for next-generation rotorcraft in two classes: a 10,000-20,000 Future Attack Air Vehicle capable of both tactical ground support and air-to-air missions, and a 60,000-80,000 lb Advanced Cargo Aircraft, for heavy-lift field-support operations. Specific ART objectives encompass a 25-percent reduction in drivetrain weight, a 10-dB noise level reduction at the transmission source, and the achievement of a 5000-hr MTBF. Four candidate drivetrain systems have been carried to a conceptual design stage, together with projections of their mission performance and life-cycle costs.

Bill, Robert C.

1990-01-01

41

Rotorcraft noise prediction  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The purpose of this presentation is to give a general strategy for rotorcraft noise prediction. This strategy is expressed through a modular software system design rather than theoretical analysis of the aerocoustic phenomena. The crucial design choices in a software system design are the module interface definitions. An interface is the data that are passed from one module to another. A module takes data from one (input) interface and transforms it, through a prediction method, to another (output) interface. In system design, the method is less important than the interface. The two types of methods available may be braodly classified as empirical or analytical, although no method is purely one or the other. These two general approaches will be compared as they apply to rotorcraft noise prediction.

Zorumski, W. E.

1982-01-01

42

Maneuvering rotorcraft noise prediction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents the unique aspects of the development of an entirely new maneuver noise prediction code called PSU-WOPWOP. The main focus of this work is development of a noise prediction methodology, which will enable the study of the aeroacoustic aspects a rotorcraft in maneuvering flight. It is assumed that the aeromechanical data (namely aircraft and blade motion, blade airloads) are provided as input data. This new noise prediction capability was developed for rotors in steady and transient maneuvering flight. Featuring an object-oriented design, the PSU-WOPWOP code allows great flexibility for complex rotor configuration and motion (including multiple rotors and full aircraft motion). The relative locations and number of hinges, flexures, and body motions can be arbitrarily specified to match any specific rotorcraft. An analysis of algorithm efficiency was performed for maneuver noise prediction along with a description of the tradeoffs made specifically for the maneuvering noise problem. Noise predictions for the mainrotor of a rotorcraft in steady descent, transient (arrested) descent, hover and a "pop-up" maneuver are demonstrated.

Brès, G. A.; Brentner, K. S.; Perez, G.; Jones, H. E.

2004-08-01

43

Analysis of Advanced Rotorcraft Configurations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Advanced rotorcraft configurations are being investigated with the objectives of identifying vehicles that are larger, quieter, and faster than current-generation rotorcraft. A large rotorcraft, carrying perhaps 150 passengers, could do much to alleviate airport capacity limitations, and a quiet rotorcraft is essential for community acceptance of the benefits of VTOL operations. A fast, long-range, long-endurance rotorcraft, notably the tilt-rotor configuration, will improve rotorcraft economics through productivity increases. A major part of the investigation of advanced rotorcraft configurations consists of conducting comprehensive analyses of vehicle behavior for the purpose of assessing vehicle potential and feasibility, as well as to establish the analytical models required to support the vehicle development. The analytical work of FY99 included applications to tilt-rotor aircraft. Tilt Rotor Aeroacoustic Model (TRAM) wind tunnel measurements are being compared with calculations performed by using the comprehensive analysis tool (Comprehensive Analytical Model of Rotorcraft Aerodynamics and Dynamics (CAMRAD 11)). The objective is to establish the wing and wake aerodynamic models that are required for tilt-rotor analysis and design. The TRAM test in the German-Dutch Wind Tunnel (DNW) produced extensive measurements. This is the first test to encompass air loads, performance, and structural load measurements on tilt rotors, as well as acoustic and flow visualization data. The correlation of measurements and calculations includes helicopter-mode operation (performance, air loads, and blade structural loads), hover (performance and air loads), and airplane-mode operation (performance).

Johnson, Wayne

2000-01-01

44

Solid Lubricants for Oil-Free Turbomachinery  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Recent breakthroughs in gas foil bearing solid lubricants and computer based modeling has enabled the development of revolulionary Oil-Free turbomachinery systems. These innovative new and solid lubricants at low speeds (start-up and shut down). Foil bearings are hydrodynamic, self acting fluid film bearings made from thin, flexible sheet metal foils. These thin foils trap a hydrodynamic lubricating air film between their surfaces and moving shaft surface. For low temperature applications, like ainrafl air cycle machines (ACM's), polymer coatings provide important solid lubrication during start-up and shut down prior to the development of the lubricating fluid film. The successful development of Oil-Free gas turbine engines requires bearings which can operate at much higher temperatures (greater than 300 C). To address this extreme solid lubrication need, NASA has invented a new family of compostie solid lubricant coatings, NASA PS300.

DellaCorte, Christopher

2005-01-01

45

Advanced rotorcraft transmission program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Advanced Rotorcraft Transmission (ART) program is an Army-funded, joint Army/NASA program to develop and demonstrate lightweight, quiet, durable drivetrain systems for next generation rotorcraft. ART addresses the drivetrain requirements of two distinct next generation aircraft classes: Future Air Attack Vehicle, a 10,000 to 20,000 lb. aircraft capable of undertaking tactical support and air-to-air missions; and Advanced Cargo Aircraft, a 60,000 to 80,000 lb. aircraft capable of heavy life field support operations. Both tiltrotor and more conventional helicopter configurations are included in the ART program. Specific objectives of ART include reduction of drivetrain weight by 25 percent compared to baseline state-of-the-art drive systems configured and sized for the next generation aircraft, reduction of noise level at the transmission source by 10 dB relative to a suitably sized and configured baseline, and attainment of at least a 5000 hr mean-time-between-removal. The technical approach for achieving the ART goals includes application of the latest available component, material, and lubrication technology to advanced concept drivetrains that utilize new ideas in gear configuration, transmission layout, and airframe/drivetrain integration. To date, candidate drivetrain systems were carried to a conceptual design stage, and tradeoff studies were conducted resulting in selection of an ART transmission configuration for each of the four contractors. The final selection was based on comparative weight, noise, and reliability studies. A description of each of the selected ART designs is included. Preliminary design of each of the four selected ART transmission was completed, as have mission impact studies wherein comparisons of aircraft mission performance and life cycle costs are undertaken for the next generation aircraft with ART and with the baseline transmission.

Bill, Robert C.

1990-01-01

46

Concepts for Variable/Multi-Speed Rotorcraft Drive System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In several recent studies and on-going developments for advanced rotorcraft, the need for variable or multi-speed capable rotors has been raised. A speed change of up to 50 percent has been proposed for future rotorcraft to improve overall vehicle performance. Accomplishing rotor speed changes during operation requires both a rotor that can perform effectively over the operation speed/load range, and a propulsion system that can enable these speed changes. A study has been completed to investigate possible drive system arrangements that can accommodate up to the 50 percent speed change. Several concepts will be presented and evaluated. The most promising configurations will be identified and developed for future testing in a sub-scaled test facility to validate operational capability.

Stevens, Mark A.; Handschuh, Robert F.; Lewicki, David G.

2008-01-01

47

Community rotorcraft air transporation: Opportunities and benefits  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Opportunities and benefits of rotorcraft transportation are examined in light of the flight capabilities of rotorcraft. Promising helicopter scenarios include public service, public transportation, energy exploration, construction, cargo, agriculture/forestry, and other business/commercial uses.

Freund, D. J.

1983-01-01

48

Model for Rotorcraft Flying Qualities Studies.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This paper outlines the development of a mathematical model that is expected to be useful for rotorcraft flying qualities research. A computer model is presented that can be applied to a range of different rotorcraft configurations. The algorithm computes...

M. Mittal M. F. Costello

1993-01-01

49

NASA/Army Rotorcraft Technology. Volume 1: Aerodynamics, and Dynamics and Aeroelasticity  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Conference Proceedings is a compilation of over 30 technical papers presented at this milestone event which reported on the advances in rotorcraft technical knowledge resulting from NASA, Army, and industry rotorcraft research programs over the last 5 to 10 years. The Conference brought together over 230 government, industry, and allied nation conferees to exchange technical information and hear invited technical papers by prominent NASA, Army, and industry researchers covering technology topics which included: aerodynamics, dynamics and elasticity, propulsion and drive systems, flight dynamics and control, acoustics, systems integration, and research aircraft.

1988-01-01

50

NDARC-NASA Design and Analysis of Rotorcraft Theoretical Basis and Architecture  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The theoretical basis and architecture of the conceptual design tool NDARC (NASA Design and Analysis of Rotorcraft) are described. The principal tasks of NDARC are to design (or size) a rotorcraft to satisfy specified design conditions and missions, and then analyze the performance of the aircraft for a set of off-design missions and point operating conditions. The aircraft consists of a set of components, including fuselage, rotors, wings, tails, and propulsion. For each component, attributes such as performance, drag, and weight can be calculated. The aircraft attributes are obtained from the sum of the component attributes. NDARC provides a capability to model general rotorcraft configurations, and estimate the performance and attributes of advanced rotor concepts. The software has been implemented with low-fidelity models, typical of the conceptual design environment. Incorporation of higher-fidelity models will be possible, as the architecture of the code accommodates configuration flexibility, a hierarchy of models, and ultimately multidisciplinary design, analysis and optimization.

Johnson, Wayne

2010-01-01

51

Rotorcraft and Enabling Robotic Rescue  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper examines some of the issues underlying potential robotic rescue devices (RRD) in the context where autonomous or manned rotorcraft deployment of such robotic systems is a crucial attribute for their success in supporting future disaster relief and emergency response (DRER) missions. As a part of this discussion, work related to proof-of-concept prototyping of two notional RRD systems is summarized.

Young, Larry A.

2010-01-01

52

Ambient Pressure Test Rig Developed for Testing Oil-Free Bearings in Alternate Gases and Variable Pressures  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Oil-Free Turbomachinery research team at the NASA Glenn Research Center is conducting research to develop turbomachinery systems that utilize high-speed, high temperature foil (air) bearings that do not require an oil lubrication system. Such systems combine the most advanced foil bearings from industry with NASA-developed hightemperature solid-lubricant technology. New applications are being pursued, such as Oil- Free turbochargers, auxiliary power units, and turbine propulsion systems for aircraft. An Oil-Free business jet engine, for example, would be simpler, lighter, more reliable, and less costly to purchase and maintain than current engines. Another application is NASA's Prometheus mission, where gas bearings will be required for the closed-cycle turbine based power-conversion system of a nuclear power generator for deep space. To support these applications, Glenn's Oil-Free Turbomachinery research team developed the Ambient Pressure Test Rig. Using this facility, researchers can load and heat a bearing and evaluate its performance with reduced air pressure to simulate high altitude conditions. For the nuclear application, the test chamber can be purged with gases such as helium to study foil gas bearing operation in working fluids other than air.

Bauman, Steven W.

1990-01-01

53

Noise Prediction for Maneuvering Rotorcraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents the initial work toward first-principles noise prediction for maneuvering rotors. Both the aeromechanical and acoustics aspects of the maneuver noise problem are discussed. The comprehensive analysis code, CAMRAD 2. was utilized to predict the time-dependent aircraft position and attitude, along - with the rotor blade airloads and motion. The major focus of this effort was the enhancement of the acoustic code WOPWOP necessary to compute the noise from a maneuvering rotorcraft. Full aircraft motion, including arbitrary transient motion, is modeled together with arbitrary rotor blade motions. Noise from a rotorcraft in turning and descending flight is compared to level flight. A substantial increase in the rotor noise is found both for turning flight and during a transient maneuver. Additional enhancements to take advantage of parallel computers and clusters of workstations, in addition to a new compact-chordwise loading formulation, are also described.

Brentner, Kenneth S.; Jones, Henry E.

2000-01-01

54

NASA's rotorcraft icing research program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objective of the NASA aircraft icing research program is to develop and make available icing technology to support the needs and requirements of industry for all weather aircraft designs. While a majority of the technology being developed is viewed to be generic (i.e., appropriate to all vehicle classes), vehicle specific emphasis is being placed on the helicopter due to its unique icing problems. In particular, some of the considerations for rotorcraft icing are indicated. The NASA icing research program emphasizes technology development in two key areas: ice protection concepts and icing simulation (analytical and experimental). The NASA research efforts related to rotorcraft icing in these two technology areas will be reviewed.

Shaw, Robert J.; Reinmann, John J.; Miller, Thomas L.

1988-01-01

55

Development of large rotorcraft transmissions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The U.S. Army Heavy Lift Helicopter (HLH) represents a large rotorcraft which was developed by an American aerospace company. In the early 1970's with the HLH Advanced Technology Components (ATC) program, the development of large rotorcraft transmission and drive systems was started. Failures in the spiral bevel gearing were experienced in tests because the employed method of analysis had not considered the effect of rim bending. Consequently, new gears with strengthened rims were designed and fabricated. For a more accurate prediction of the load capacity of the gears, an extensive Finite Element Method (FEM) system was developed. The U.S. Army's XCH-62 HLH aft rotor transmission was finally successfully tested at full design torque and speed. A description of the test program is provided, and the analytical program is discussed. The analytical phase includes the development of a preprocessing program which aids in the review of calculated FEM stresses.

Samanich, N. E.; Drago, R. J.; Mack, J. C.

1984-01-01

56

Advanced Rotorcraft Transmission program summary  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The current status of the Advanced Rotorcraft Transmission (ART) program is reviewed. The discussion includes a general configuration and face gear description, weight analysis, stress analysis, reliability analysis, acoustic analysis, face gear testing, and planned torque split testing. Design descriptions include the face gear webs sized for equal stiffness, a positive engagement clutch, the lubrication system, and a high contact ratio planetary. Test results for five gear materials and three housing materials are presented.

Bossler, Robert B., Jr.; Heath, Gregory F.

1992-01-01

57

Shipboard\\/rotorcraft simulation and analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research has simulated the rotorcraft on-deck dynamic interface for defining safe operational conditions and for the first time, compared the results of studies with measured performance stability data. A comprehensive interface simulation and analysis of rotorcraft shipboard on-deck operational envelopes were developed in FLIGHTLAB (a software tool for rapid prototyping and interactive evaluation of simulation models). The helicopter was

Ted A. Akinyanju

2007-01-01

58

Remaining Technical Challenges and Future Plans for Oil-Free Turbomachinery  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The application of Oil-Free technologies (foil gas bearings, solid lubricants and advanced analysis and predictive modeling tools) to advanced turbomachinery has been underway for several decades. During that time, full commercialization has occurred in aircraft air cycle machines, turbocompressors and cryocoolers and ever-larger microturbines. Emerging products in the automotive sector (turbochargers and superchargers) indicate that high volume serial production of foil bearings is imminent. Demonstration of foil bearings in APU s and select locations in propulsion gas turbines illustrates that such technology also has a place in these future systems. Foil bearing designs, predictive tools and advanced solid lubricants have been reported that can satisfy anticipated requirements but a major question remains regarding the scalability of foil bearings to ever larger sizes to support heavier rotors. In this paper, the technological history, primary physics, engineering practicalities and existing experimental and experiential database for scaling foil bearings are reviewed and the major remaining technical challenges are identified.

DellaCorte, Christopher; Bruckner, Robert J.

2010-01-01

59

Wireless Sensors Pinpoint Rotorcraft Troubles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Helicopters present many advantages over fixed-wing aircraft: they can take off from and land in tight spots, they can move in any direction with relative ease, and they can hover in one area for extended periods of time. But that maneuverability comes with costs. For example, one persistent issue in helicopter maintenance and operation is that their components are subject to high amounts of wear compared to fixed-wing aircraft. In particular, the rotor drive system that makes flight possible undergoes heavy vibration during routine performance, slowly degrading components in a way that can cause failures if left unmonitored. The level of attention required to ensure flight safety makes helicopters very expensive to maintain. As a part of NASA s Fundamental Aeronautics Program, the Subsonic Rotary Wing Project seeks to advance knowledge about and improve prediction capabilities for rotorcraft, with the aim of developing technology that will meet future civilian requirements like higher efficiency and lower noise flights. One of the program s goals is to improve technology to detect and assess the health of critical components in rotorcraft drive systems.

2013-01-01

60

NASA Heavy Lift Rotorcraft Systems Investigation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA Heavy Lift Rotorcraft Systems Investigation examined in depth several rotorcraft configurations for large civil transport, designed to meet the technology goals of the NASA Vehicle Systems Program. The investigation identified the Large Civil Tiltrotor as the configuration with the best potential to meet the technology goals. The design presented was economically competitive, with the potential for substantial impact on the air transportation system. The keys to achieving a competitive aircraft were low drag airframe and low disk loading rotors; structural weight reduction, for both airframe and rotors; drive system weight reduction; improved engine efficiency; low maintenance design; and manufacturing cost comparable to fixed-wing aircraft. Risk reduction plans were developed to provide the strategic direction to support a heavy-lift rotorcraft development. The following high risk areas were identified for heavy lift rotorcraft: high torque, light weight drive system; high performance, structurally efficient rotor/wing system; low noise aircraft; and super-integrated vehicle management system.

Johnson, Wayne; Yamauchi, Gloria K.; Watts, Michael E.

2005-01-01

61

Safe Test Flights for Small Rotorcrafts  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we present an experimental test bed for the development and evaluation of unmanned helicopters control. Main\\u000a component of the suggested test bed is a flying stand which permits all possible movements but, also, prevents helicopters’\\u000a damage because of crashing. A variety of sensors mounted on the stand, monitor and feedback rotorcraft’s attitude and operational\\u000a states. Based on

Nikos Vitzilaios; Nikos Tsourveloudis

62

Public acceptance of urban rotorcraft operations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Even though tiltrotor operations from city center to city center could greatly shorten travel times over moderate ranges, public opposition to intense urban rotorcraft activity has kept this possibility from being realized. One significant factor in this opposition is rotorcraft noise. Over the last 25 years, NASA has explored the subjective response to rotorcraft noise and developed low noise design concepts and noise abatement flight procedures. While low noise designs can be applied for future rotorcraft, this is not an effective near-term means of reducing rotorcraft noise, because of the costs associated with replacement of helicopter rotor blades. Recent noise abatement research, which has been focusing on the development of tools and techniques to facilitate the design of quieter flight procedures for existing vehicles, has much more immediate application. While very little subjective response work has occurred recently, prior work at NASA in this area from the 1970s and 1980s is discussed. Lastly, thoughts on future research areas that might help improve the public acceptance of rotorcraft will be described.

Marcolini, Michael A.; Powell, Clemans A.; Posey, Joe W.

2001-05-01

63

A review of NASA's propulsion programs for aviation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A review of five NASA engine-oriented propulsion programs of major importance to civil aviation are presented and discussed. Included are programs directed at exploring propulsion system concepts for (1) energy conservation subsonic aircraft (improved current turbofans, advanced turbofans, and advanced turboprops); (2) supersonic cruise aircraft (variable cycle engines); (3) general aviation aircraft (improved reciprocating engines and small gas turbines); (4) powered lift aircraft (advanced turbofans); and (5) advanced rotorcraft.

Stewart, W. L.; Johnson, H. W.; Weber, R. J.

1978-01-01

64

Aeropropulsion 1987. Session 5: Subsonic Propulsion Technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA is conducting aeropropulsion research over a broad range of Mach numbers. In addition to the high-speed propulsion research described, major progress was recorded in research aimed at the subsonic flight regimes of interest to many commercial and military users. Recent progress and future directions in such areas as small engine technology, rotorcraft transmissions, icing, Hot Section Technology (HOST) and the Advanced Turboprop Program (ATP) are covered.

1987-01-01

65

REXOR 2 Rotorcraft Simulation Model. Volume 1: Engineering Documentation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A rotorcraft nonlinear simulation called REXOR II, divided into three volumes, is described. The first volume is a development of rotorcraft mechanics and aerodynamics. The second is a development and explanation of the computer code required to implement...

J. S. Reaser, P. H. Kretsinger

1978-01-01

66

Techniques for designing rotorcraft control systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report summarizes the work that was done on the project from 1 Apr. 1992 to 31 Mar. 1993. The main goal of this research is to develop a practical tool for rotorcraft control system design based on interactive optimization tools (CONSOL-OPTCAD) and classical rotorcraft design considerations (ADOCS). This approach enables the designer to combine engineering intuition and experience with parametric optimization. The combination should make it possible to produce a better design faster than would be possible using either pure optimization or pure intuition and experience. We emphasize that the goal of this project is not to develop an algorithm. It is to develop a tool. We want to keep the human designer in the design process to take advantage of his or her experience and creativity. The role of the computer is to perform the calculation necessary to improve and to display the performance of the nominal design. Briefly, during the first year we have connected CONSOL-OPTCAD, an existing software package for optimizing parameters with respect to multiple performance criteria, to a simplified nonlinear simulation of the UH-60 rotorcraft. We have also created mathematical approximations to the Mil-specs for rotorcraft handling qualities and input them into CONSOL-OPTCAD. Finally, we have developed the additional software necessary to use CONSOL-OPTCAD for the design of rotorcraft controllers.

Levine, William S.; Barlow, Jewel

1993-01-01

67

Advanced Rotorcraft Transmission (ART) Program summary  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Advanced Rotorcraft Transmission (ART) Program was initiated to advance the state of the art for rotorcraft transmissions. The goal of the ART Program was to develop and demonstrate the technologies needed to reduce transmission weight by 25 pct and reduce noise by 10 dB while obtaining a 5000 hr 'mean time between failure'. The research done under the ART Program is summarized. A split path design was selected as best able to meet the program goals. Key part technologies needed for this design were identified, studied, and developed. Two of these technologies are discussed in detail: the load sharing of split path designs including the use of a compliant elastomeric torque splitter and the application of a high ratio, low pitch line velocity gear mesh. Development of an angular contact spherical roller bearing, transmission error analysis, and fretting fatigue testing are discussed. The technologies for a light weight, quiet, and reliable rotorcraft transmission were demonstrated.

Krantz, T. L.; Kish, J. G.

1992-01-01

68

Influence of Lift Offset on Rotorcraft Performance  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The influence of lift offset on the performance of several rotorcraft configurations is explored. A lift-offset rotor, or advancing blade concept, is a hingeless rotor that can attain good efficiency at high speed by operating with more lift on the advancing side than on the retreating side of the rotor disk. The calculated performance capability of modern-technology coaxial rotors utilizing a lift offset is examined, including rotor performance optimized for hover and high-speed cruise. The ideal induced power loss of coaxial rotors in hover and twin rotors in forward flight is presented. The aerodynamic modeling requirements for performance calculations are evaluated, including wake and drag models for the high-speed flight condition. The influence of configuration on the performance of rotorcraft with lift-offset rotors is explored, considering tandem and side-by-side rotorcraft as well as wing-rotor lift share.

Johnson, Wayne

2009-01-01

69

Planning for rotorcraft and commuter air transportationn  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Community planning needs, criteria, and other considerations such as intermodal coordination and regulatory requirements, for rotorcraft and fixed wing commuter air transportation were identified. A broad range of community planning guidelines, issues, and information which can be used to: (1) direct anticipated aircraft technological improvements; (2) assist planners in identifying and evaluating the opportunities and tradeoffs presented by rotorcraft and commuter aircraft options relative to other modes; and (3) increase communication between aircraft technologists and planners for the purpose of on going support in capitalizing on rotorcraft and commuter air opportunities are provided. The primary tool for identifying and analyzing planning requirements was a detailed questionnaire administered to a selected sample of 55 community planners and other involved in planning for helicopters and commuter aviation.

Stockwell, W. L.; Stowers, J.

1981-01-01

70

Influence of Lift Offset on Rotorcraft Performance  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The influence of lift offset on the performance of several rotorcraft configurations is explored. A lift-offset rotor, or advancing blade concept, is a hingeless rotor that can attain good efficiency at high speed, by operating with more lift on the advancing side than on the retreating side of the rotor disk. The calculated performance capability of modern-technology coaxial rotors utilizing a lift offset is examined, including rotor performance optimized for hover and high-speed cruise. The ideal induced power loss of coaxial rotors in hover and twin rotors in forward flight is presented. The aerodynamic modeling requirements for performance calculations are evaluated, including wake and drag models for the high speed flight condition. The influence of configuration on the performance of rotorcraft with lift-offset rotors is explored, considering tandem and side-by-side rotorcraft as well as wing-rotor lift share.

Johnson, Wayne

2008-01-01

71

Advanced Rotorcraft Transmission (ART) program summary  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Advanced Rotorcraft Transmission (ART) Program was initiated to advance the state of the art for rotorcraft transmissions. The goal of the ART Program was to develop and demonstrate the technologies needed to reduce transmission weight by 25 pct. and reduce noise by 10 dB while obtaining a 5000 hr 'mean time between failure'. The research done under the ART Program is summarized. A split path design was selected as best able to meet the program goals. Key part technologies needed for this design were identified, studied, and developed. Two of these technologies are discussed in detail: the load sharing of split path designs including the use of a compliant elastomeric torque splitter and the application of a high ratio, low pitch line velocity gear mesh. Development of an angular contact spherical roller bearing, transmission error analysis, and fretting fatigue testing are discussed. The technologies for a light weight, quiet, and reliable rotorcraft transmission were demonstrated.

Krantz, T. L.; Kish, J. G.

1992-01-01

72

A teleoperated unmanned rotorcraft flight test technique  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA and the U.S. Army are jointly developing a teleoperated unmanned rotorcraft research platform at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center. This effort is intended to provide the rotorcraft research community an intermediate step between wind tunnel rotorcraft studies and full scale flight testing. The research vehicle is scaled such that it can be operated in the NASA Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel or be flown freely at an outside test range. This paper briefly describes the system's requirements and the techniques used to marry the various technologies present in the system to meet these requirements. The paper also discusses the status of the development effort.

Walker, Gregory W.; Phelps, Arthur E., III; Hodges, W. Todd

1993-01-01

73

The selection of convertible engines with current gas generator technology for high speed rotorcraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA-Lewis has sponsored two studies to determine the most promising convertible engine concepts for high speed rotorcraft. These studies projected year 2000 convertible technology limited to present gas generator technology. Propulsion systems for utilization on aircraft needing thrust only during cruise and those aircraft needing both power and thrust at cruise were investigated. Mission calculations for the two contractors involved were based upon the fold tilt rotor concept. Analysis and comparison of the General Electric concepts (geared UDF, clutched fan, and VIGV fan), and the Allison Gas Turbine concepts (clutched fan, VIGV fan, variable pitch fan, single rotation tractor propfan, and counter rotation tractor propfan) are presented.

Eisenberg, Joseph D.

1990-01-01

74

A practical approach to rotorcraft systems identification  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A standard for rotorcraft system identification is proposed to facilitate the exchange of data and technology within the industry. This integrated approach utilizes simulations to validate methodology and flight data to validate simulations. A new technique allowing results obtained from separate maneuvers to be systematically combined is also presented and shown to be a fundamental tool in providing a practical approach to rotorcraft identification. The proposed methodology is evaluated using data generated by nonlinear blade-element simulation of the Rotor Systems Research Aircraft.

Du Val, R. W.; Wang, J. C.; Demiroz, M. Y.

1984-01-01

75

Rotorcraft Technology for HALE Aeroelastic Analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Much of technology needed for analysis of HALE nonlinear aeroelastic problems is available from rotorcraft methodologies. Consequence of similarities in operating environment and aerodynamic surface configuration. Technology available - theory developed, validated by comparison with test data, incorporated into rotorcraft codes. High subsonic to transonic rotor speed, low to moderate Reynolds number. Structural and aerodynamic models for high aspect-ratio wings and propeller blades. Dynamic and aerodynamic interaction of wing/airframe and propellers. Large deflections, arbitrary planform. Steady state flight, maneuvers and response to turbulence. Linearized state space models. This technology has not been extensively applied to HALE configurations. Correlation with measured HALE performance and behavior required before can rely on tools.

Young, Larry; Johnson, Wayne

2008-01-01

76

Rotorcraft technology at Boeing Vertol: Recent advances  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An overview is presented of key accomplishments in the rotorcraft development at Boeing Vertol. Projects of particular significance: high speed rotor development and the Model 360 Advanced Technology Helicopter. Areas addressed in the overview are: advanced rotors with reduced noise and vibration, 3-D aerodynamic modeling, flight control and avionics, active control, automated diagnostics and prognostics, composite structures, and drive systems.

Shaw, John; Dadone, Leo; Wiesner, Robert

1988-01-01

77

Rotorcraft Blade-Vortex Interaction Controller  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Blade-vortex interaction noises, sometimes referred to as 'blade slap', are avoided by increasing the absolute value of inflow to the rotor system of a rotorcraft. This is accomplished by creating a drag force which causes the angle of the tip-path plane of the rotor system to become more negative or more positive.

Schmitz, Fredric H. (Inventor)

1995-01-01

78

Rotorcraft research in India: recent developments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to discuss published research in rotorcraft which has taken place in India during the last ten years. The helicopter research is divided into the following parts: health monitoring, smart rotor, design optimization, control, helicopter rotor dynamics, active control of structural response (ACSR) and helicopter design and development. Aspects of health monitoring and

Ranjan Ganguli

2010-01-01

79

Obstacle detection algorithms for rotorcraft navigation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wires can be hardly visible and thus present a serious hazard to rotorcrafts flying at low altitudes. Vision systems capable of detecting wires in time to avoid collisions must be able to find in the input images curves less than one or two pixels wide. This paper describes a study on the performance of wire detection using a sub-pixel edge

Nitin Pande; Ying Huang; Anand Narasimhamurthy; Octavia I. Camps; Rangachar Kasturi

2002-01-01

80

Oil-Free shaft support system rotordynamics: Past, present and future challenges and opportunities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recent breakthroughs in Oil-Free technologies have enabled new high-speed rotor systems and turbomachinery. Such technologies can include compliant-surface gas bearings, magnetic bearings and advanced solid lubricants and tribo-materials. This presentation briefly reviews critical technology developments and the current state-of-the-art, emerging Oil-Free rotor systems and discusses obstacles preventing more widespread use. Key examples of "best practices" for deploying Oil-Free technologies will be presented and remaining major technical questions surrounding Oil-Free technologies will be brought forward.

DellaCorte, Christopher

2012-05-01

81

14 CFR 29.519 - Hull type rotorcraft: Water-based and amphibian.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2014-01-01 false Hull type rotorcraft: Water-based and amphibian. 29.519 Section...CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Water Loads § 29.519 Hull type rotorcraft: Water-based and amphibian. (a)...

2014-01-01

82

14 CFR 27.573 - Damage Tolerance and Fatigue Evaluation of Composite Rotorcraft Structures.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Tolerance and Fatigue Evaluation of Composite Rotorcraft Structures. ...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS...Tolerance and Fatigue Evaluation of Composite Rotorcraft Structures. ...applicant must evaluate the composite rotorcraft...

2014-01-01

83

14 CFR 29.573 - Damage Tolerance and Fatigue Evaluation of Composite Rotorcraft Structures.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Tolerance and Fatigue Evaluation of Composite Rotorcraft Structures. ...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS...Tolerance and Fatigue Evaluation of Composite Rotorcraft Structures. ...applicant must evaluate the composite rotorcraft...

2014-01-01

84

Rotorcraft noise: Status and recent developments  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper briefly reviews rotorcraft noise mechanisms and their approximate importance for different types of rotorcraft in different flight regimes. Discrete noise is due to periodic flow disturbances and includes impulsive noise produced by phenomena which occur during a limited segment of a blade's rotation. Broadband noise results when rotors interact with random disturbances, such as turbulence, which can originate in a variety of sources. The status of analysis techniques for these mechanisms are reviewed. Also, some recent progress is presented on the understanding and analysis of tilt rotor aircraft noise due to: (1) recirculation and blockage effects of the rotor flow in hover; and (2) blade-vortex interactions in forward and descending flight.

George, Albert R.; Sim, Ben WEL-C.; Polak, David R.

1993-01-01

85

A model for rotorcraft flying qualities studies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper outlines the development of a mathematical model that is expected to be useful for rotorcraft flying qualities research. A computer model is presented that can be applied to a range of different rotorcraft configurations. The algorithm computes vehicle trim and a linear state-space model of the aircraft. The trim algorithm uses non linear optimization theory to solve the nonlinear algebraic trim equations. The linear aircraft equations consist of an airframe model and a flight control system dynamic model. The airframe model includes coupled rotor and fuselage rigid body dynamics and aerodynamics. The aerodynamic model for the rotors utilizes blade element theory and a three state dynamic inflow model. Aerodynamics of the fuselage and fuselage empennages are included. The linear state-space description for the flight control system is developed using standard block diagram data.

Mittal, Manoj; Costello, Mark F.

1993-01-01

86

Mathematical biodynamic feedthrough model applied to rotorcraft.  

PubMed

Biodynamic feedthrough (BDFT) occurs when vehicle accelerations feed through the human body and cause involuntary control inputs. This paper proposes a model to quantitatively predict this effect in rotorcraft. This mathematical BDFT model aims to fill the gap between the currently existing black box BDFT models and physical BDFT models. The model structure was systematically constructed using asymptote modeling, a procedure described in detail in this paper. The resulting model can easily be implemented in many typical rotorcraft BDFT studies, using the provided model parameters. The model's performance was validated in both the frequency and time domain. Furthermore, it was compared with several recent BDFT models. The results show that the proposed mathematical model performs better than typical black box models and is easier to parameterize and implement than a recent physical model. PMID:24013832

Venrooij, Joost; Mulder, Mark; Abbink, David A; van Paassen, Marinus M; Mulder, Max; van der Helm, Frans C T; Bulthoff, Heinrich H

2014-07-01

87

Rotorcraft Noise Abatement Flight Path Modeling  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report addresses development of a rotor state/trim modeling capability for noise modeling of decelerating rotorcraft approaches. The resulting technique employs discretization of the descent trajectory as multiple steady state segments for input to CAMRAD.Mod 1 to predict rotor states for acoustic analysis. Deceleration is included by modifying the CAMRAD.Mod 1 free flight trim options to allow trim to the specified acceleration/deceleration components.

Murty, Hema; Berezin, Charles R.

2000-01-01

88

Optimization-based controller design for rotorcraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An optimization-based methodology for linear control system design is outlined by considering the design of a controller for a UH-60 rotorcraft in hover. A wide range of design specifications is taken into account: internal stability, decoupling between longitudinal and lateral motions, handling qualities, and rejection of windgusts. These specifications are investigated while taking into account physical limitations in the swashplate displacements and rates of displacement. The methodology crucially relies on user-machine interaction for tradeoff exploration.

Tsing, N.-K.; Fan, M. K. H.; Barlow, J.; Tits, A. L.; Tischler, M. B.

1993-01-01

89

Robust Crossfeed Design for Hovering Rotorcraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Control law design for rotorcraft fly-by-wire systems normally attempts to decouple angular responses using fixed-gain crossfeeds. This approach can lead to poor decoupling over the frequency range of pilot inputs and increase the load on the feedback loops. In order to improve the decoupling performance, dynamic crossfeeds may be adopted. Moreover, because of the large changes that occur in rotorcraft dynamics due to small changes about the nominal design condition, especially for near-hovering flight, the crossfeed design must be 'robust'. A new low-order matching method is presented here to design robust crossfeed compensators for multi-input, multi-output (MIMO) systems. The technique identifies degrees-of-freedom that can be decoupled using crossfeeds, given an anticipated set of parameter variations for the range of flight conditions of concern. Cross-coupling is then reduced for degrees-of-freedom that can use crossfeed compensation by minimizing off-axis response magnitude average and variance. Results are presented for the analysis of pitch, roll, yaw and heave coupling of the UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter in near-hovering flight. Robust crossfeeds are designed that show significant improvement in decoupling performance and robustness over nominal, single design point, compensators. The design method and results are presented in an easily used graphical format that lends significant physical insight to the design procedure. This plant pre-compensation technique is an appropriate preliminary step to the design of robust feedback control laws for rotorcraft.

Catapang, David R.

1993-01-01

90

Flight formation of multiple mini rotorcraft via coordination control  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, the coordination and trajectory tracking control design of multiple mini rotorcraft systems are discussed. The dynamic model of a mini rotorcraft is presented using the Newton-Euler formalism. Our approach is based on a leader\\/follower structure of multiple robot systems. The centroid of the coordinated control subsystem is used for trajectory tracking purposes. A nonlinear coordinated control design

Jose Alfredo Guerrero Mata; Isabelle Fantoni; Sergio Salazar; Rogelio Lozano

2010-01-01

91

REXOR 2 rotorcraft simulation model. Volume 1: Engineering documentation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A rotorcraft nonlinear simulation called REXOR II, divided into three volumes, is described. The first volume is a development of rotorcraft mechanics and aerodynamics. The second is a development and explanation of the computer code required to implement the equations of motion. The third volume is a user's manual, and contains a description of code input/output as well as operating instructions.

Reaser, J. S.; Kretsinger, P. H.

1978-01-01

92

NASA/HAA Advanced Rotorcraft Technology and Tilt Rotor Workshops. Volume 3: Aerodynamics and Structures Session  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Advanced rotorcraft technology and tilt rotor aircraft were discussed. Rotorcraft performance, acoustics, and vibrations were discussed, as was the use of composite materials in rotorcraft structures. Rotorcraft aerodynamics, specifically the aerodynamic phenomena of a rotating and the aerodynamics of fuselages, was discussed.

1980-01-01

93

Fatigue Crack Growth Threshold Testing of Metallic Rotorcraft Materials  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Results are presented for a program to determine the near-threshold fatigue crack growth behavior appropriate for metallic rotorcraft alloys. Four alloys, all commonly used in the manufacture of rotorcraft, were selected for study: Aluminum alloy 7050, 4340 steel, AZ91E Magnesium, and Titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V (beta-STOA). The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) sponsored this research to advance efforts to incorporate damage tolerance design and analysis as requirements for rotorcraft certification. Rotorcraft components are subjected to high cycle fatigue and are typically subjected to higher stresses and more stress cycles per flight hour than fixed-wing aircraft components. Fatigue lives of rotorcraft components are generally spent initiating small fatigue cracks that propagate slowly under near-threshold cracktip loading conditions. For these components, the fatigue life is very sensitive to the near-threshold characteristics of the material.

Newman, John A.; James, Mark A.; Johnson, William M.; Le, Dy D.

2008-01-01

94

The NASA/Army Autonomous Rotorcraft Project  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An overview of the NASA Ames Research Center Autonomous Rotorcraft Project (ARP) is presented. The project brings together several technologies to address NASA and US Army autonomous vehicle needs, including a reactive planner for mission planning and execution, control system design incorporating a detailed understanding of the platform dynamics, and health monitoring and diagnostics. A candidate reconnaissance and surveillance mission is described. The autonomous agent architecture and its application to the candidate mission are presented. Details of the vehicle hardware and software development are provided.

Whalley, M.; Freed, M.; Takahashi, M.; Christian, D.; Patterson-Hine, A.; Schulein, G.; Harris, R.

2002-01-01

95

Perception and control of rotorcraft flight  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Three topics which can be applied to rotorcraft flight are examined: (1) the nature of visual information; (2) what visual information is informative about; and (3) the control of visual information. The anchorage of visual perception is defined as the distribution of structure in the surrounding optical array or the distribution of optical structure over the retinal surface. A debate was provoked about whether the referent of visual event perception, and in turn control, is optical motion, kinetics, or dynamics. The interface of control theory and visual perception is also considered. The relationships among these problems is the basis of this article.

Owen, Dean H.

1991-01-01

96

Remaining Technical Challenges and Future Plans for Oil-Free Turbomachinery.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The application of Oil-Free technologies (foil gas bearings, solid lubricants and advanced analysis and predictive modeling tools) to advanced turbomachinery has been underway for several decades. During that time, full commercialization has occurred in a...

C. DellaCorte R. J. Bruckner

2010-01-01

97

Future Issues and Approaches to Health Monitoring and Failure Prevention for Oil-Free Gas Turbines.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Recent technology advances in foil air bearings, high temperature solid lubricants and computer based modeling has enabled the development of small Oil-Free gas turbines. These turbomachines are currently commercialized as small (<100 kW) microturbine ...

C. DellaCorte

2004-01-01

98

Smart structures for rotorcraft control (SSRC) II  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Smart Structures for Rotor Control (SSRC) is a consortium under the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Smart Structures program. Phase I of the program was administered by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, with Boeing Seattle as the consortium administrator, and MIT, PSU and Boeing Helicopters as the other principal consortium members. Phase II, renamed Smart Materials and Structures Demonstration Consortium (SMSDC), is a combination of the proposed Phase II efforts of SSRC and the Boeing MESA Smart Materials Actuated Rotor Technology (SMART) program. This paper summarizes the SSRC efforts, introduces the SMSDC program, and provides a framework for the relationships between specific SSRC technical papers in this conference. The SSRC objectives were to research smart structure methods to achieve reduced rotorcraft vibration, reduce acoustic noise, and increased performance. The SSRC program includes dynamic piezoelectric actuation of flaps on the rotor blades, distributed dynamic piezo actuation of the rotor twist, and quasi-steady rotor twist control using shape memory alloys. The objective of Phase II is then to fly a rotorcraft to demonstrate such a system.

Jacot, A. Dean; Dadone, Leo

1998-06-01

99

Obstacle Detection Algorithms for Rotorcraft Navigation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In this research we addressed the problem of obstacle detection for low altitude rotorcraft flight. In particular, the problem of detecting thin wires in the presence of image clutter and noise was studied. Wires present a serious hazard to rotorcrafts. Since they are very thin, their detection early enough so that the pilot has enough time to take evasive action is difficult, as their images can be less than one or two pixels wide. After reviewing the line detection literature, an algorithm for sub-pixel edge detection proposed by Steger was identified as having good potential to solve the considered task. The algorithm was tested using a set of images synthetically generated by combining real outdoor images with computer generated wire images. The performance of the algorithm was evaluated both, at the pixel and the wire levels. It was observed that the algorithm performs well, provided that the wires are not too thin (or distant) and that some post processing is performed to remove false alarms due to clutter.

Kasturi, Rangachar; Camps, Octavia I.; Huang, Ying; Narasimhamurthy, Anand; Pande, Nitin; Ahumada, Albert (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

100

Rotorcraft digital advanced avionics system (RODAAS) functional description  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A functional design of a rotorcraft digital advanced avionics system (RODAAS) to transfer the technology developed for general aviation in the Demonstration Advanced Avionics System (DAAS) program to rotorcraft operation was undertaken. The objective was to develop an integrated avionics system design that enhances rotorcraft single pilot IFR operations without increasing the required pilot training/experience by exploiting advanced technology in computers, busing, displays and integrated systems design. A key element of the avionics system is the functionally distributed architecture that has the potential for high reliability with low weight, power and cost. A functional description of the RODAAS hardware and software functions is presented.

Peterson, E. M.; Bailey, J.; Mcmanus, T. J.

1985-01-01

101

Rotorcraft low-speed download drag definition and its reduction  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Download drag for rotorcraft in hover and low-speed flight is a burden which significantly affects useful load, fuel, and payload. Reduction of the burden will enhance these aspects of rotorcraft and complement the forthcoming improvements in isolated rotor performance. Analyses and experimental data are available, though fragmentary, regarding gross drag, thrust recovery, and other characteristics which can be utilized to define interim rotorcraft design changes to reduce the burden. Eventually the experimental data and a comprehensive combination of rotor, rotor-wake, and potential-flow analyses can evolve to reduce the burden to an absolute minimum.

Wilson, J. C.

1975-01-01

102

Performance of Advanced Heavy-Lift, High-Speed Rotorcraft Configurations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The aerodynamic performance of rotorcraft designed for heavy-lift and high-speed cruise is examined. Configurations considered include the tiltrotor, the compound helicopter, and the lift-offset rotor. Design conditions are hover and 250-350 knot cruise, at 5k/ISA+20oC (civil) or 4k/95oF (military); with cruise conditions at 4000 or 30,000 ft. The performance was calculated using the comprehensive analysis CAMRAD II, emphasizing rotor optimization and performance, including wing-rotor interference. Aircraft performance was calculated using estimates of the aircraft drag and auxiliary propulsion efficiency. The performance metric is total power, in terms of equivalent aircraft lift-to-drag ratio L/D = WV/P for cruise, and figure of merit for hover.

Johnson, Wayne; Yeo, Hyeonsoo; Acree, C. W., Jr.

2007-01-01

103

Nasa's Role in Aeronautics: A Workshop. Volume 5: Rotorcraft.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The potential roles for NASA relating to rotorcraft are reviewed. The agency's participation is delineated for each role, a rationale is provided, the current level of activity is summarized, and suggestions are given for the kinds of research still neede...

1981-01-01

104

Rotorcraft Linear Simulation Model. Volume 1: Engineering Documentation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A rotorcraft small perturbation linear model is described. Rotor flap, inplane and feathering degrees of freedom, as well as control and augmentation systems are defined in addition to the classical vehicle six degrees of freedom. The primary application ...

J. S. Reaser

1978-01-01

105

Innovative Energy Absorbing Mounting Systems for High Mass Rotorcraft Payloads.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This paper presents recent developments on two innovative types of crashworthy cargo restraints for high mass rotorcraft payloads: textile-based devices and flexible matrix composite devices. Each type of device employs energy dissipation mechanisms to ar...

C. Tiwari C. E. Bakis E. C. Smith M. J. Hagon W. Kong

2008-01-01

106

Challenges in Rotorcraft Acoustic Flight Prediction and Validation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Challenges associated with rotorcraft acoustic flight prediction and validation are examined. First, an outline of a state-of-the-art rotorcraft aeroacoustic prediction methodology is presented. Components including rotorcraft aeromechanics, high resolution reconstruction, and rotorcraft acoustic prediction arc discussed. Next, to illustrate challenges and issues involved, a case study is presented in which an analysis of flight data from a specific XV-15 tiltrotor acoustic flight test is discussed in detail. Issues related to validation of methodologies using flight test data are discussed. Primary flight parameters such as velocity, altitude, and attitude are discussed and compared for repeated flight conditions. Other measured steady state flight conditions are examined for consistency and steadiness. A representative example prediction is presented and suggestions are made for future research.

Boyd, D. Douglas, Jr.

2003-01-01

107

Designs and Technology Requirements for Civil Heavy Lift Rotorcraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA Heavy Lift Rotorcraft Systems Investigation examined in depth several rotorcraft configurations for large civil transport, designed to meet the technology goals of the NASA Vehicle Systems Program. The investigation identified the Large Civil Tiltrotor as the configuration with the best potential to meet the technology goals. The design presented was economically competitive, with the potential for substantial impact on the air transportation system. The keys to achieving a competitive aircraft were low drag airframe and low disk loading rotors; structural weight reduction, for both airframe and rotors; drive system weight reduction; improved engine efficiency; low maintenance design; and manufacturing cost comparable to fixed-wing aircraft. Risk reduction plans were developed to provide the strategic direction to support a heavy-lift rotorcraft development. The following high risk areas were identified for heavy lift rotorcraft: high torque, light weight drive system; high performance, structurally efficient rotor/wing system; low noise aircraft; and super-integrated vehicle management system.

Johnson, Wayne; Yamauchi, Gloria K.; Watts, Michael E.

2006-01-01

108

NASA's Role in Aeronautics: A Workshop. Volume 5: Rotorcraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The potential roles for NASA relating to rotorcraft are reviewed. The agency's participation is delineated for each role, a rationale is provided, the current level of activity is summarized, and suggestions are given for the kinds of research still needed. In examining opportunities for the most beneficial deployment of its resources, NASA should consider societal benefits as well as the military and civil markets in formulating the role it can play to support the development of a stronger rotorcraft technology base.

1981-01-01

109

A system for obstacle detection during rotorcraft low altitude flight  

Microsoft Academic Search

An airborne vehicle such as a rotorcraft must avoid obstacles like antennas, towers, poles, fences, tree branches, and wires strung across the flight path. Automatic detection of the obstacles and generation of appropriate guidance and control actions for the vehicle to avoid these obstacles would facilitate autonomous navigation. The requirements of an obstacle detection system for rotorcraft in low-altitude Nap-of-the-Earth

BIR BHANU; S. Das; B. Roberts; D. Duncan

1996-01-01

110

Flight formation of multiple mini rotorcraft based on nested saturations  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper addresses the coordination and trajectory tracking control design for a multiple mini rotorcraft system. The dynamic model of the mini rotorcraft is presented using the Newton-Euler formalism. Our approach is based on a leader\\/follower structure of multiple robot systems. A nonlinear controller based on nested saturations and a multi-agent consensus control are combined to obtain a flight formation

J. A. Guerrero; R. Lozano

2010-01-01

111

Mini Rotorcraft Flight Formation Control Using Bounded Inputs  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, the flight formation control and trajectory tracking control design of multiple mini rotorcraft systems are\\u000a discussed. The dynamic model of a mini rotorcraft is presented using the Newton-Euler formalism. Our approach is based on\\u000a a leader\\/follower structure of multiple robot systems. The centroid of the coordinated control subsystem is used for trajectory\\u000a tracking purposes. A nonlinear controller

Jose Alfredo Guerrero; Pedro Castillo; Sergio Salazar; Rogelio Lozano

112

U.S. Civil Rotorcraft Accidents, 1963 Through 1997  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Narrative summary data produced by the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) has been obtained and analyzed for all 8,436 U.S. civil registered rotorcraft accidents which occurred from mid-1963 through 1997. This analysis was based on the NTSB's assignment of each mishap into one of 21 "first event" categories. The number of U.S. civil registered rotorcraft as recorded by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) for the same period has also been obtained. Taken together, these data indicate the civil rotorcraft accident rate (on a per 1,000 registered rotorcraft basis) has decreased by almost a factor of 10 (i.e., from 130 accidents per 1,000 rotorcraft in 1964 to 13.4 per 1,000 in 1997). Analysis of the mishap data indicates over 70% of the rotorcraft accidents were associated with one of the following four NTSB "first event" categories: 2408 Loss of engine power (28.5%); 1,322 In-flight collisions with objects (15.7%); 1,114 Loss of control (13.2%); 1,083 Airframe/component/system failure or malfunction (12.8%).

Harris, Franklin D.; Kasper, Eugene F.; Iseler, Laura E.

2000-01-01

113

Technology needs for high-speed rotorcraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A study to determine the technology development required for high-speed rotorcraft development was conducted. The study begins with an initial assessment of six concepts capable of flight at, or greater than 450 knots with helicopter-like hover efficiency (disk loading less than 50 pfs). These concepts were sized and evaluated based on measures of effectiveness and operational considerations. Additionally, an initial assessment of the impact of technology advances on the vehicles attributes was made. From these initial concepts a tilt wing and rotor/wing concepts were selected for further evaluation. A more detailed examination of conversion and technology trade studies were conducted on these two vehicles, each sized for a different mission.

Rutherford, John; Orourke, Matthew; Martin, Christopher; Lovenguth, Marc; Mitchell, Clark

1991-01-01

114

Advanced Rotorcraft Transmission (ART) program status  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Reported herein is work done on the Advanced Rotorcraft Transmission by McDonnell Douglas Helicopter Company under Army/NASA contract. The novel concept pursued includes the use of face gears for power transmission and a torque splitting arrangement. The design reduces the size and weight of the corner-turning hardware and the next reduction stage. New methods of analyzing face gears have increased confidence in their usefulness. Test gears have been designed and manufactured for power transmission testing on the NASA-Lewis spiral bevel test rig. Transmission design effort has included finite element modeling of the split torque paths to assure equal deflection under load. A finite element model of the Apache main transmission has been completed to substantiate noise prediction methods. A positive engagement overrunning clutch design is described. Test spur gears have been made by near-net-shape forging from five different materials. Three housing materials have been procured for evaluation testing.

Bossler, Robert; Heath, Gregory

1991-01-01

115

Toward Right-Fidelity Rotorcraft Conceptual Design  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The aviation Advanced Design Office (ADO) of the US Army Aeroflightdynamics Directorate (AMRDEC) performs conceptual design of advanced Vertical Takeoff and Landing (VTOL) concepts in support of the Army's development and acquisition of new aviation systems. In particular, ADO engages in system synthesis to assess the impact of new technologies and their application to satisfy emerging warfighter needs and requirements. Fundamental to ADO being successful in accomplishing its role; is the ability to evaluate a wide array of proposed air vehicle concepts, and independently synthesize new concepts to inform Army and DoD decision makers about the tradespace in which decisions will be made (Figure 1). ADO utilizes a conceptual design (CD) process in the execution of its role. Benefiting from colocation with NASA rotorcraft researchers at the Ames Research Center, ADO and NASA have engaged in a survey of the current rotorcraft PD practices and begun the process of improving those capabilities to enable effective design and development of the next generation of VTOL systems. A unique aspect of CD in ADO is the fact that actual designs developed in-house are not intended to move forward in the development process. Rather, they are used as reference points in discussions about requirements development and technology impact. The ultimate products of ADO CD efforts are technology impact assessments and specifications which guide industry design activity. The fact that both the requirement and design are variables in the tradespace adds to the complexity of the CD process. A frequent need is ability to assess the relative "cost" of variations in requirement for a diverse set of VTOL configurations. Each of these configurations may have fundamentally different response characteristics to this requirement variation, and such insight into how different requirements drive different designs is a critical insight ADO attempts to provide decision makers. The processes and tools utilized are driven by the timeline in which questions must be answered. This can range from quick "back-of-the-envelope" assessments of a configuration made in an afternoon, to more detailed tradespace explorations that can take upwards of a year to complete. A variety of spreadsheet based tools and conceptual design codes are currently in use. The in-house developed conceptual sizing code RC (Rotorcraft) has been the preferred tool of choice for CD activity for a number of years. Figure 2 illustrates the long standing coupling between RC and solid modeling tools for layout, as well as a number of ad-hoc interfaces with external analyses. RC contains a sizing routine that is built around the use of momentum theory for rotors, classic finite wing theory, a referred parameter engine model, and semi-emperical weight estimation techniques. These methods lend themselves to rapid solutions, measured in seconds and minutes. The successful use of RC, however requires careful consideration of model input parameters and judicious comparison with existing aircraft to avoid unjustified extrapolation of results. RC is in fact a legacy of a series of codes whose development started in the early 1970s, and is best suited to the study of conventional helicopters and XV-15 style tiltrotors. Other concepts have been analyzed with RC, but typically it became necessary to modify the source code and methods for each unique configuration. Recent activity has lead to the development of a new code, NASA Design and Analysis of Rotorcraft (NDARC). NDARC uses a similar level of analytical fidelity as RC, but is built on a new framework intended to improve modularity and ability to rapidly model a wider array of concepts. Critical to achieving this capability is the decomposition of the aircraft system into a series of fundamental components which can then be assembled to form a wide-array of configurations. The paper will provide an overview of NDARC and its capabilities.

Sinsay, Jeffrey D.; Johnson, Wayne

2010-01-01

116

Fundamental Rotorcraft Acoustic Modeling From Experiments (FRAME)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A new methodology is developed for the construction of helicopter source noise models for use in mission planning tools from experimental measurements of helicopter external noise radiation. The models are constructed by employing a parameter identification method to an assumed analytical model of the rotor harmonic noise sources. This new method allows for the identification of individual rotor harmonic noise sources and allows them to be characterized in terms of their individual non-dimensional governing parameters. The method is applied to both wind tunnel measurements and ground noise measurements of two-bladed rotors. The method is shown to match the parametric trends of main rotor harmonic noise, allowing accurate estimates of the dominant rotorcraft noise sources to be made for operating conditions based on a small number of measurements taken at different operating conditions. The ability of this method to estimate changes in noise radiation due to changes in ambient conditions is also demonstrated.

Greenwood, Eric

2011-01-01

117

Focused technology: Nuclear propulsion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Five viewgraphs are presented that outline the objectives and elements of the Nuclear Propulsion Program, mission considerations, propulsion technologies, and the logic flow path for nuclear propulsion development.

Miller, Thomas J.

1993-01-01

118

Focused Technology: Nuclear Propulsion.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Five viewgraphs are presented that outline the objectives and elements of the Nuclear Propulsion Program, mission considerations, propulsion technologies, and the logic flow path for nuclear propulsion development.

T. J. Miller

1993-01-01

119

Development of Ditching and Water Impact Design Limit Curves for Civil Rotorcraft.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report describes the further development of Design Limit Envelopes (DLE) for rotorcraft. A Bell Helicopter (BH) 205 was used as a prototype rotorcraft configuration upon which KRASH models were developed and analyses were performed. Included in the K...

G. Wittlin M. Gamon

2007-01-01

120

Stiffness and Damping Coefficient Estimation of Compliant Surface Gas Bearings for Oil-Free Turbomachinery  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Foil gas bearings are a key technology in many commercial and emerging Oil-Free turbomachinery systems. These bearings are non-linear and have been difficult to analytically model in terms of performance characteristics such as load capacity, power loss, stiffness and damping. Previous investigations led to an empirically derived method, a rule-of-thumb, to estimate load capacity. This method has been a valuable tool in system development. The current paper extends this tool concept to include rules for stiffness and damping coefficient estimation. It is expected that these rules will further accelerate the development and deployment of advanced Oil-Free machines operating on foil gas bearings

DellaCorte, Christopher

2010-01-01

121

NASA/HAA Advanced Rotorcraft Technology and Tilt Rotor Workshops. Volume 1: Executive Summary  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This presentation provides an overview of the NASA Rotorcraft Program as an introduction to the technical sessions of the Advanced Rotorcraft Technology Workshop. It deals with the basis for NASA's increasing emphasis on rotorcraft technology, NASA's research capabilities, recent program planning efforts, highlights of its 10-year plan and future directions and opportunities.

1980-01-01

122

NASA PS304 Lubricant Tested in World's First Commercial Oil-Free Gas Turbine.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In a marriage of research and commercial technology, a 30-kW Oil-Free Capstone microturbine electrical generator unit has been installed and is serving as a test bed for long-term life-cycle testing of NASA-developed PS304 shaft coatings. The coatings are...

H. F. Weaver

2003-01-01

123

Cost Analysis for Large Civil Transport Rotorcraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents cost analysis of purchase price and DOC+I (direct operating cost plus interest) that supports NASA s study of three advanced rotorcraft concepts that could enter commercial transport service within 10 to 15 years. The components of DOC+I are maintenance, flight crew, fuel, depreciation, insurance, and finance. The cost analysis aims at VTOL (vertical takeoff and landing) and CTOL (conventional takeoff and landing) aircraft suitable for regional transport service. The resulting spreadsheet-implemented cost models are semi-empirical and based on Department of Transportation and Army data from actual operations of such aircraft. This paper describes a rationale for selecting cost tech factors without which VTOL is more costly than CTOL by a factor of 10 for maintenance cost and a factor of two for purchase price. The three VTOL designs selected for cost comparisons meet the mission requirement to fly 1,200 nautical miles at 350 knots and 30,000 ft carrying 120 passengers. The lowest cost VTOL design is a large civil tilt rotor (LCTR) aircraft. With cost tech factors applied, the LCTR is reasonably competitive with the Boeing 737-700 when operated in economy regional service following the business model of the selected baseline operation, that of Southwest Airlines.

Coy, John J.

2006-01-01

124

Large rotorcraft transmission technology development program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Testing of a U.S. Army XCH-62 HLH aft rotor transmission under NASA Contract NAS 3-22143 was successfully completed. This test establishes the feasibility of large, high power rotorcraft transmissions as well as demonstrating the resolution of deficiencies identified during the HLH advanced technology programs and reported by USAAMRDLTR-77-38. Over 100 hours of testing was conducted. At the 100% design power rating of 10,620 horsepower, the power transferred through a single spiral bevel gear mesh is more than twice that of current helicopter bevel gearing. In the original design of these gears, industry-wide design methods were employed and failures were experienced which identified problem areas unique to gear size. To remedy this technology shortfall, a program was developed to predict gear stresses using finite element analysis for complete and accurate representation of the gear tooth and supporting structure. To validate the finite element methodology gear strain data from the existing U.S. Army HLH aft transmission was acquired, and existing data from smaller gears were made available.

Mack, J. C.

1983-01-01

125

Airfoil Dynamic Stall and Rotorcraft Maneuverability  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The loading of an airfoil during dynamic stall is examined in terms of the augmented lift and the associated penalties in pitching moment and drag. It is shown that once stall occurs and a leading-edge vortex is shed from the airfoil there is a unique relationship between the augmented lift, the negative pitching moment, and the increase in drag. This relationship, referred to here as the dynamic stall function, shows limited sensitivity to effects such as the airfoil section profile and Mach number, and appears to be independent of such parameters as Reynolds number, reduced frequency, and blade sweep. For single-element airfoils there is little that can be done to improve rotorcraft maneuverability except to provide good static C(l(max)) characteristics and the chord or blade number that is required to provide the necessary rotor thrust. However, multi-element airfoils or airfoils with variable geometry features can provide augmented lift in some cases that exceeds that available from a single-element airfoil. The dynamic stall function is shown to be a useful tool for the evaluation of both measured and calculated dynamic stall characteristics of single element, multi-element, and variable geometry airfoils.

Bousman, William G.

2000-01-01

126

Evaluation of Scaling Methods for Rotorcraft Icing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper reports result of an experimental study in the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) to evaluate how well the current recommended scaling methods developed for fixed-wing unprotected surface icing applications might apply to representative rotor blades at finite angle of attack. Unlike the fixed-wing case, there is no single scaling method that has been systematically developed and evaluated for rotorcraft icing applications. In the present study, scaling was based on the modified Ruff method with scale velocity determined by maintaining constant Weber number. Models were unswept NACA 0012 wing sections. The reference model had a chord of 91.4 cm and scale model had a chord of 35.6 cm. Reference tests were conducted with velocities of 76 and 100 kt (39 and 52 m/s), droplet MVDs of 150 and 195 fun, and with stagnation-point freezing fractions of 0.3 and 0.5 at angle of attack of 0deg and 5deg. It was shown that good ice shape scaling was achieved for NACA 0012 airfoils with angle of attack lip to 5deg.

Tsao, Jen-Ching; Kreeger, Richard E.

2010-01-01

127

Space Station propulsion system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Viewgraphs on space station propulsion systems are presented. Topics covered include: space station propulsion system requirements; space station propulsion system design; space station propulsion system drivers; hydrazine technology development; waste fluid disposal system; space station propulsion system evolution; propellant selection trade study; technology needs to water electrolysis/oxygen-hydrogen propulsion system; and technology needs for bipropellant systems.

Henderson, J.

128

Accomplishments at NASA Langley Research Center in rotorcraft aerodynamics technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In recent years, the development of aerodynamic technology for rotorcraft has continued successfully at NASA LaRC. Though the NASA Langley Research Center is not the lead NASA center in this area, the activity was continued due to facilities and individual capabilities which are recognized as contributing to helicopter research needs of industry and government. Noteworthy accomplishments which contribute to advancing the state of rotorcraft technology in the areas of rotor design, airfoil research, rotor aerodynamics, and rotor/fuselage interaction aerodynamics are described. Rotor designs were defined for current helicopters and evaluated in wind tunnel testing. These designs have incorporated advanced airfoils defined analytically and also proven in wind tunnel tests. A laser velocimetry system has become a productive tool for experimental definition of rotor inflow/wake and is providing data for rotorcraft aerodynamic code validation.

Wilson, John C.

1988-01-01

129

Aircraft System Analysis of Technology Benefits to Civil Transport Rotorcraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An aircraft systems analysis was conducted to evaluate the net benefits of advanced technologies on two conceptual civil transport rotorcraft, to quantify the potential of future civil rotorcraft to become operationally viable and economically competitive, with the ultimate goal of alleviating congestion in our airways, runways and terminals. These questions are three of many that must be resolved for the successful introduction of civil transport rotorcraft: 1) Can civil transport rotorcraft actually relieve current airport congestion and improve overall air traffic and passenger throughput at busy hub airports? What is that operational scenario? 2) Can advanced technology make future civil rotorcraft economically competitive in scheduled passenger transport? What are those enabling technologies? 3) What level of investment is necessary to mature the key enabling technologies? This study addresses the first two questions, and several others, by applying a systems analysis approach to a broad spectrum of potential advanced technologies at a conceptual level of design. The method was to identify those advanced technologies that showed the most promise and to quantify their benefits to the design, development, production, and operation of future civil rotorcraft. Adjustments are made to sizing data by subject matter experts to reflect the introduction of new technologies that offer improved performance, reduced weight, reduced maintenance, or reduced cost. This study used projected benefits from new, advanced technologies, generally based on research results, analysis, or small-scale test data. The technologies are identified, categorized and quantified in the report. The net benefit of selected advanced technologies is quantified for two civil transport rotorcraft concepts, a Single Main Rotor Compound (SMRC) helicopter designed for 250 ktas cruise airspeed and a Civil Tilt Rotor (CTR) designed for 350 ktas cruise airspeed. A baseline design of each concept was sized for a representative civil passenger transport mission, using current technology. Individual advanced technologies are quantified and applied to resize the aircraft, thereby quantifying the net benefit of that technology to the rotorcraft. Estimates of development cost, production cost and operating and support costs are made with a commercial cost estimating program, calibrated to Boeing products with adjustments for future civil production processes. A cost metric of cash direct operating cost per available seat-mile (DOC ASM) is used to compare the cost benefit of the technologies. The same metric is used to compare results with turboprop operating costs. Reduced engine SFC was the most advantageous advanced technology for both rotorcraft concepts. Structural weight reduction was the second most beneficial technology, followed by advanced drive systems and then by technology for rotorcraft performance. Most of the technologies evaluated in this report should apply similarly to conventional helicopters. The implicit assumption is that resources will become available to mature the technologies for fullscale production aircraft. That assumption is certainly the weak link in any forecast of future possibilities. The analysis serves the purpose of identifying which technologies offer the most potential benefit, and thus the ones that should receive the highest priority for continued development. This study directly addressed the following NASA Subsonic Rotary Wing (SRW) subtopics: SR W.4.8.I.J Establish capability for rotorcraft system analysis and SRW. 4.8.I.4 Conduct limited technology benefit assessment on baseline rotorcraft configurations.

Wilkerson, Joseph B.; Smith, Roger L.

2008-01-01

130

Summary highlights of the Advanced Rotorcraft Transmission (ART) program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA/U.S. Army Advanced Rotorcraft Transmission (ART) program is charged with the development and demonstration of lightweight, durable drivetrains for next-generation rotorcraft: (1) a Future Air Attack Vehicle for tactical ground-support and air-to-air missions, and (2) an Advanced Cargo Aircraft for heavy-lift field-support operations. Both tilt-rotor and more conventional helicopter configurations have been studied by the ART program. ART performance goals are sought through the use of advanced component materials and lubrication systems, transmission and geartrain configurations, and airframe/drivetrain integrations.

Bill, Robert C.

1992-01-01

131

Rotorcraft aviation icing research requirements: Research review and recommendations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The status of rotorcraft icing evaluation techniques and ice protection technology was assessed. Recommendations are made for near and long term icing programs that describe the needs of industry. These recommended programs are based on a consensus of the major U.S. helicopter companies. Specific activities currently planned or underway by NASA, FAA and DOD are reviewed to determine relevance to the overall research requirements. New programs, taking advantage of current activities, are recommended to meet the long term needs for rotorcraft icing certification.

Peterson, A. A.; Dadone, L.; Bevan, A.

1981-01-01

132

Some recent applications of Navier-Stokes codes to rotorcraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Many operational limitations of helicopters and other rotary-wing aircraft are due to nonlinear aerodynamic phenomena incuding unsteady, three-dimensional transonic and separated flow near the surfaces and highly vortical flow in the wakes of rotating blades. Modern computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technology offers new tools to study and simulate these complex flows. However, existing Euler and Navier-Stokes codes have to be modified significantly for rotorcraft applications, and the enormous computational requirements presently limit their use in routine design applications. Nevertheless, the Euler/Navier-Stokes technology is progressing in anticipation of future supercomputers that will enable meaningful calculations to be made for complete rotorcraft configurations.

Mccroskey, W. J.

1992-01-01

133

Technology needs for high-speed rotorcraft, volume 1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

High-speed rotorcraft concepts and the technology needed to extend rotorcraft cruise speeds up to 450 knots (while retaining the helicopter attributes of low downwash velocities) were identified. Task I identified 20 concepts with high-speed potential. These concepts were qualitatively evaluated to determine the five most promising ones. These five concepts were designed with optimum wing loading and disk loading to a common NASA-defined military transport mission. The optimum designs were quantitatively compared against 11 key criteria and ranked accordingly. The two highest ranking concepts were selected for the further study.

Wilkerson, J. B.; Schneider, J. J.; Bartie, K. M.

1991-01-01

134

Low-Altitude Operation of Unmanned Rotorcraft  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Currently deployed unmanned rotorcraft rely on preplanned missions or teleoperation and do not actively incorporate information about obstacles, landing sites, wind, position uncertainty, and other aerial vehicles during online motion planning. Prior work has successfully addressed some tasks such as obstacle avoidance at slow speeds, or landing at known to be good locations. However, to enable autonomous missions in cluttered environments, the vehicle has to react quickly to previously unknown obstacles, respond to changing environmental conditions, and find unknown landing sites. We consider the problem of enabling autonomous operation at low-altitude with contributions to four problems. First we address the problem of fast obstacle avoidance for a small aerial vehicle and present results from over a 1000 rims at speeds up to 10 m/s. Fast response is achieved through a reactive algorithm whose response is learned based on observing a pilot. Second, we show an algorithm to update the obstacle cost expansion for path planning quickly and demonstrate it on a micro aerial vehicle, and an autonomous helicopter avoiding obstacles. Next, we examine the mission of finding a place to land near a ground goal. Good landing sites need to be detected and found and the final touch down goal is unknown. To detect the landing sites we convey a model based algorithm for landing sites that incorporates many helicopter relevant constraints such as landing sites, approach, abort, and ground paths in 3D range data. The landing site evaluation algorithm uses a patch-based coarse evaluation for slope and roughness, and a fine evaluation that fits a 3D model of the helicopter and landing gear to calculate a goodness measure. The data are evaluated in real-time to enable the helicopter to decide on a place to land. We show results from urban, vegetated, and desert environments, and demonstrate the first autonomous helicopter that selects its own landing sites. We present a generalized planning framework that enables reaching a goal point, searching for unknown landing sites, and approaching a landing zone. In the framework, sub-objective functions, constraints, and a state machine define the mission and behavior of an UAV. As the vehicle gathers information by moving through the environment, the objective functions account for this new information. The operator in this framework can directly specify his intent as an objective function that defines the mission rather than giving a sequence of pre-specified goal points. This allows the robot to react to new information received and adjust its path accordingly. The objective is used in a combined coarse planning and trajectory optimization algorithm to determine the best patch the robot should take. We show simulated results for several different missions and in particular focus on active landing zone search. We presented several effective approaches for perception and action for low-altitude flight and demonstrated their effectiveness in field experiments on three autonomous aerial vehicles: a 1m quadrocopter, a 36m helicopter, and a hill-size helicopter. These techniques permit rotorcraft to operate where they have their greatest advantage: In unstructured, unknown environments at low-altitude.

Scherer, Sebastian

135

Space systems propulsion technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The following topics are presented in viewgraph form: (1) space systems propulsion technology vision; (2) orbit transfer and maneuvering propulsion; (3) modular/storable orbit transfer/maneuvering propulsion; (4) cryogenic orbital transfer vehicle (OTV) propulsion; (5) advanced propulsion; (6) high energy density matter; (7) nuclear propulsion; (8) space launch propulsion; (9) advanced launch development program technologies at the Astronautics Laboratory (AL); and (10) AL support to the National Aerospace Plane (NASP).

Hite, Dale

1991-01-01

136

Topological optimization of rotorcraft subfloor structures for crashworthiness considerations  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present paper discusses significant design issues in the sizing of rotorcraft structures for requirements of enhanced crash performance. The focus of the study is on topological design of the subfloor structure, defined as a crush zone under a more rigid floor structure. The topological design problem includes both an appropriate selection of an energy absorbing material (tailored load-deflection curve),

P. Hajela; E. Lee

1997-01-01

137

INDES User's guide multistep input design with nonlinear rotorcraft modeling  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The INDES computer program, a multistep input design program used as part of a data processing technique for rotorcraft systems identification, is described. Flight test inputs base on INDES improve the accuracy of parameter estimates. The input design algorithm, program input, and program output are presented.

1979-01-01

138

ROTORCRAFT AERODYNAMIC AND AEROACOUSTIC MODELLING USING VORTEX PARTICLE METHODS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The initial development of a combined active aeroelastic aeroacoustic rotorcraft code is discussed. The GENeral Unsteady Vortex Particle code (GENUVP) is used as the aerodynamic component of the combined code. A brief discussion of the theory behind GENUVP's use of an unsteady panel method with a vortex particle wake is presented. Modifications to GENUVP to increase its computational efficiency are

Daniel G. Opoku; Dimitris G. Triantos; Fred Nitzsche; Spyros G. Voutsinas

2002-01-01

139

Oil-Free Turbomachinery Technologies for Long-Life, Maintenance-Free Power Generation Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Turbines have long been used to convert thermal energy to shaft work for power generation. Conventional turbines rely upon oil-lubricated rotor supports (bearings, seals, etc.) to achieve low wear, high efficiency and reliability. Emerging Oil-Free technologies such as gas foil bearings and magnetic bearings offer a path for reduced weight and complexity and truly maintenance free systems. Oil-Free gas turbines, using gaseous and liquid fuels are commercially available in power outputs to at least 250kWe and are gaining acceptance for remote power generation where maintenance is a challenge. Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) turbines are an approach to power generation that is well suited for long life space missions. In these systems, a recirculating gas is heated by nuclear, solar or other heat energy source then fed into a high-speed turbine that drives an electrical generator. For closed cycle systems such as these, the working fluid also passes through the bearing compartments thus serving as a lubricant and bearing coolant. Compliant surface foil gas bearings are well suited for the rotor support systems of these advanced turbines. Foil bearings develop a thin hydrodynamic gas film that separates the rotating shaft from the bearing preventing wear. During start-up and shut down when speeds are low, rubbing occurs. Solid lubricants are used to reduce starting torque and minimize wear. Other emerging technologies such as magnetic bearings can also contribute to robust and reliable Oil-Free turbomachinery. In this presentation, Oil-Free technologies for advanced rotor support systems will be reviewed as will the integration and development processes recommended for implementation.

Dellacorte, Christopher

2013-01-01

140

Stiffness and Damping Coefficient Estimation of Compliant Surface Gas Bearings for Oil-Free Turbomachinery  

Microsoft Academic Search

Foil gas bearings are a key technology in many commercial and emerging Oil-Free turbomachinery systems. These bearings are non-linear and have been difficult to analytically model in terms of performance characteristics such as load capacity, power loss, stiffness, and damping. Previous investigations led to an empirically derived method, a rule-of-thumb, to estimate load capacity. This method has been a valuable

Christopher DellaCorte

2011-01-01

141

Load Capacity Estimation of Foil Air Journal Bearings for Oil-Free Turbomachinery Applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper introduces a simple “Rule of Thumb” (ROT) method to estimate the load capacity of foil air journal bearings, which are self-acting compliant-surface hydrodynamic bearings being considered for Oil-Free turbomachinery applications such as gas turbine engines. The ROT is based on first principles and data available in the literature and it relates bearing load capacity to the bearing size

C. Dellacorte; M. J. Valco

2000-01-01

142

Future of space propulsion  

Microsoft Academic Search

A development status-and-prospects evaluation is presented for the range of spacecraft propulsion alternatives under consideration by the USAF's Phillips Laboratory, encompassing technologies broadly characterizable as 'conventional' (solid, storable liquid, cryogenic) and 'nonconventional'. Nonconventional spacecraft propulsion system types include arcjets, magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters, solar thermal propulsion, and nuclear propulsion. The prospects for high energy density materials' application to more coventional propulsion concepts

R. R. Weiss; D. S. Mackay

1992-01-01

143

General Rotorcraft Aeromechanical Stability Program (GRASP): Theory manual  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The general rotorcraft aeromechanical stability program (GRASP) was developed to calculate aeroelastic stability for rotorcraft in hovering flight, vertical flight, and ground contact conditions. GRASP is described in terms of its capabilities and its philosophy of modeling. The equations of motion that govern the physical system are described, as well as the analytical approximations used to derive them. The equations include the kinematical equation, the element equations, and the constraint equations. In addition, the solution procedures used by GRASP are described. GRASP is capable of treating the nonlinear static and linearized dynamic behavior of structures represented by arbitrary collections of rigid-body and beam elements. These elements may be connected in an arbitrary fashion, and are permitted to have large relative motions. The main limitation of this analysis is that periodic coefficient effects are not treated, restricting rotorcraft flight conditions to hover, axial flight, and ground contact. Instead of following the methods employed in other rotorcraft programs. GRASP is designed to be a hybrid of the finite-element method and the multibody methods used in spacecraft analysis. GRASP differs from traditional finite-element programs by allowing multiple levels of substructure in which the substructures can move and/or rotate relative to others with no small-angle approximations. This capability facilitates the modeling of rotorcraft structures, including the rotating/nonrotating interface and the details of the blade/root kinematics for various types. GRASP differs from traditional multibody programs by considering aeroelastic effects, including inflow dynamics (simple unsteady aerodynamics) and nonlinear aerodynamic coefficients.

Hodges, Dewey H.; Hopkins, A. Stewart; Kunz, Donald L.; Hinnant, Howard E.

1990-01-01

144

Laser propulsion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The use of an earth-based high-power laser beam to provide energy for earth-launched rocket vehicle is investigated. The laser beam energy is absorbed in an opaque propellant gas and is converted to high-specific-impulse thrust by expanding the heated propellant to space by means of a nozzle. This laser propulsion scheme can produce specific impulses of several thousand seconds. Payload to gross-weight fractions about an order of magnitude higher than those for conventional chemical earth-launched vehicles appear possible. There is a potential for a significant reduction in cost per payload mass in earth orbit.

Rom, F. E.; Putre, H. A.

1972-01-01

145

Propulsion Systems Panel deliberations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Propulsion Systems Panel was established because of the specialized nature of many of the materials and structures technology issues related to propulsion systems. This panel was co-chaired by Carmelo Bianca, MSFC, and Bob Miner, LeRC. Because of the diverse range of missions anticipated for the Space Transportation program, three distinct propulsion system types were identified in the workshop planning process: liquid propulsion systems, solid propulsion systems and nuclear electric/nuclear thermal propulsion systems.

Bianca, Carmelo J.; Miner, Robert; Johnston, Lawrence M.; Bruce, R.; Dennies, Daniel P.; Dickenson, W.; Dreshfield, Robert; Karakulko, Walt; Mcgaw, Mike; Munafo, Paul M.

1993-01-01

146

New Concepts and Perspectives on Micro-Rotorcraft and Small Autonomous Rotary-Wing Vehicles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A key part of the strategic vision for rotorcraft research as identified by senior technologists within the Army/NASA Rotorcraft Division at NASA Ames Research Center is the development and use of small autonomous rotorcraft. Small autonomous rotorcraft are defined for the purposes of this paper to be a class of vehicles that range in size from rotary-wing micro air vehicles (MAVs) to larger, more conventionally sized, rotorcraft uninhabited aerial vehicles (UAVs) - i.e. vehicle gross weights ranging from hundreds of grams to thousands of kilograms. The development of small autonomous rotorcraft represents both a technology challenge and a potential new vehicle class that will have substantial societal impact for: national security, personal transport, planetary science, and public service.

Young, Larry A.; Aiken, E. W.; Johnson, J. L.; Demblewski, R.; Andrews, J.; Aiken, Irwin W. (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

147

Electric vehicle propulsion alternatives  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Propulsion technology development for electric vehicles is summarized. Analytical studies, technology evaluation, and the development of technology for motors, controllers, transmissions, and complete propulsion systems are included.

Secunde, R. R.; Schuh, R. M.; Beach, R. F.

1983-01-01

148

Analysis of image-based navigation system for rotorcraft low-altitude flight  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Some of the issues in the location of objects using a sequence of images from a passive sensor are examined. Image-object differential equations for a rotorcraft executing an arbitrary maneuver are developed. Assuming an onboard inertial navigation system for rotorcraft, state estimation, this study considers how object location is affected by the choice of Kalman filter estimation technique, the rotorcraft, and the object. Simulation results are presented.

Sridhar, Banavar; Phatak, Anil V.

1992-01-01

149

Mars Rotorcraft: Possibilities, Limitations, and Implications For Human/Robotic Exploration  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Several research investigations have examined the challenges and opportunities in the use of small robotic rotorcraft for the exploration of Mars. To date, only vehicles smaller than 150 kg have been studied. This paper proposes to examine the question of maximum Mars rotorcraft size, range, and payload/cargo capacity. Implications for the issue of whether or not (from an extreme design standpoint) a manned Mars rotorcraft is viable are also discussed.

Young, Larry A.; Aiken, Edwin; Lee, Pascal; Briggs, Geoffrey

2005-01-01

150

An Analysis of U.S. Civil Rotorcraft Accidents by Cost and Injury (1990-1996)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A study of rotorcraft accidents was conducted to identify safety issues and research areas that might lead to a reduction in rotorcraft accidents and fatalities. The primary source of data was summaries of National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) accident reports. From 1990 to 1996, the NTSB documented 1396 civil rotorcraft accidents in the United States in which 491 people were killed. The rotorcraft data were compared to airline and general aviation data to determine the relative safety of rotorcraft compared to other segments of the aviation industry. In depth analysis of the rotorcraft data addressed demographics, mission, and operational factors. Rotorcraft were found to have an accident rate about ten times that of commercial airliners and about the same as that of general aviation. The likelihood that an accident would be fatal was about equal for all three classes of operation. The most dramatic division in rotorcraft accidents is between flights flown by private pilots versus professional pilots. Private pilots, flying low cost aircraft in benign environments, have accidents that are due, in large part, to their own errors. Professional pilots, in contrast, are more likely to have accidents that are a result of exacting missions or use of specialized equipment. For both groups judgement error is more likely to lead to a fatal accident than are other types of causes. Several approaches to improving the rotorcraft accident rate are recommended. These mostly address improvement in the training of new pilots and improving the safety awareness of private pilots.

Iseler, Laura; DeMaio, Joe; Rutkowski, Michael (Technical Monitor)

2002-01-01

151

Flight dynamics of rotorcraft in steep high-g turns  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An analyticl procedure developed to permit a systematic examination of rotorcraft flight dynamics in steep high-g turns is presented. The procedure is used in a numerical investigation of a tilt-rotor aircraft and three single-rotor helicopters that have different types of main rotor systems. The results indicate (1) that strong coupling in longitudinal and lateral-directional motions exists for these rotorcraft in high-g turns; (2) that for single-rotor helicopters, the direction of turn has a significant influence on flight dynamics; and (3) that a stability and control augmentation system that is designed on the basis of standard small-disturbance equations of motion from steady straight and level flight and that otherwise performs satisfactorily in operations near 1 g, becomes significantly degraded in steep turning flight.

Chen, R. T. N.

1982-01-01

152

Impact of pilots' biodynamic feedthrough on rotorcraft by robust stability  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The coupling of rotorcraft dynamics with the dynamics of one of the main systems devoted to its control, the pilot, may lead to several peculiar phenomena, known as Rotorcraft-Pilot Couplings (RPCs), all characterized by an abnormal behavior that may jeopardize flight safety. Among these phenomena, there is a special class of couplings which is dominated by the biodynamic behavior of the pilot's limbs that close the loop between the vibrations and the control inceptors in the cockpit. Leveraging robust stability analysis, the inherently uncertain pilot biodynamics can be treated as the uncertain portion of a feedback system, making analytical, numerical or graphical determination of proneness to RPC possible by comparing robust stability margins of helicopter models with experimental Biodynamic Feedthrough (BDFT) data. The application of the proposed approach to collective bounce is exemplified using simple analytical helicopter and pilot models. The approach is also applied to detailed helicopter models and experimental BDFT measurement data.

Quaranta, Giuseppe; Masarati, Pierangelo; Venrooij, Joost

2013-09-01

153

Structures technology for a new generation of rotorcraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents an overview of structures research at the U. S. Army Aerostructures Directorate. The objectives of this research are to investigate, explore, and demonstrate emerging technologies that will provide lighter, safer, more survivable, and more cost-effective structures for rotorcraft in the 1990s and beyond. The emphasis of today's R&D is to contribute proven structures technology to the U. S. rotorcraft industry and Army aviation that directly impacts tomorrow's fleet readiness and mission capabilities. The primary contributor toward meeting these challenges is the development of high-strength and durable composites to minimize structural weight while maximizing cost effectiveness. Special aviation issues such as delamination of dynamic components, impact damage to thin skins, crashworthiness, and affordable manufacturing need to be resolved before the full potential of composites technology can be realized. To that end, this paper highlights research into composites structural integrity, crashworthiness, and materials applications which addresses these issues.

Bartlett, Felton D., Jr.

1989-01-01

154

Image-based ranging and guidance for rotorcraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report documents the research carried out under NASA Cooperative Agreement No. NCC2-575 during the period Oct. 1988 - Dec. 1991. Primary emphasis of this effort was on the development of vision based navigation methods for rotorcraft nap-of-the-earth flight regime. A family of field-based ranging algorithms were developed during this research period. These ranging schemes are capable of handling both stereo and motion image sequences, and permits both translational and rotational camera motion. The algorithms require minimal computational effort and appear to be implementable in real time. A series of papers were presented on these ranging schemes, some of which are included in this report. A small part of the research effort was expended on synthesizing a rotorcraft guidance law that directly uses the vision-based ranging data. This work is discussed in the last section.

Menon, P. K. A.

1991-01-01

155

Rotorcraft derivative identification from analytical models and flight test data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A general procedure is presented for systematic development of rotorcraft models for use in systems identification, which includes fuselage and rotor degrees of freedom (DOF). Formulations for rigid blade flap and lag as well as the normal mode representation of an elastic blade are developed for hingeless and articulated rotor systems. The method of multiblade coordinates is used to obtain linear constant coefficient state variable models of various levels of approximation. Two of the approximate models, a 6 DOF, are identified from a nonlinear articulated helicopter computer simulation. The results demonstrate the accuracy attainable for each model. Advanced results outline the status of rotorcraft modeling and systems identification and indicate areas that require further investigation.

Molusis, J. A.

1975-01-01

156

Measurement of Rotorcraft Blade Deformation using Projection Moire Interferometry  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Projection Moire Interferometry (PMI) has been used to obtain near instantaneous, quantitative blade deformation measurements of a generic rotorcraft model at several test conditions. These laser-based measurements provide quantitative, whole field, dynamic blade deformation profiles conditionally sampled as a function of rotor azimuth. The instantaneous nature of the measurements permits computation of the mean and unsteady blade deformation, blade bending, and twist. The PMI method is presented, and the image processing steps required to obtain quantitative deformation profiles from PMI interferograms are described. Experimental results are provided which show blade bending, twist, and unsteady motion. This initial proof-of-concept test has demonstrated the capability of PMI to acquire accurate, full field rotorcraft blade deformation data.

Fleming, Gary A.; Gorton, Susan Althoff

1998-01-01

157

Application of Climate Impact Metrics to Rotorcraft Design  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Multiple metrics are applied to the design of large civil rotorcraft, integrating minimum cost and minimum environmental impact. The design mission is passenger transport with similar range and capacity to a regional jet. Separate aircraft designs are generated for minimum empty weight, fuel burn, and environmental impact. A metric specifically developed for the design of aircraft is employed to evaluate emissions. The designs are generated using the NDARC rotorcraft sizing code, and rotor analysis is performed with the CAMRAD II aeromechanics code. Design and mission parameters such as wing loading, disk loading, and cruise altitude are varied to minimize both cost and environmental impact metrics. This paper presents the results of these parametric sweeps as well as the final aircraft designs.

Russell, Carl; Johnson, Wayne

2013-01-01

158

Advanced Rotorcraft Transmission (ART) program-Boeing helicopters status report  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Advanced Rotorcraft Transmission (ART) program is structured to incorporate key emerging material and component technologies into an advanced rotorcraft transmission with the intention of making significant improvements in the state of the art (SOA). Specific objectives of ART are: (1) Reduce transmission weight by 25 pct.; (2) Reduce transmission noise by 10 dB; and (3) Improve transmission life and reliability, while extending Mean Time Between Removal to 5000 hr. Boeing selected a transmission sized for the Tactical Tilt Rotor (TTR) aircraft which meets the Future Air Attack Vehicle (FAVV) requirements. Component development testing will be conducted to evaluate the high risk concepts prior to finalizing the advanced transmission configuration. The results of tradeoff studies and development test which were completed are summarized.

Lenski, Joseph W., Jr.; Valco, Mark J.

1991-01-01

159

Rotorcraft linear simulation model. Volume 1: Engineering documentation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A rotorcraft small perturbation linear model is described. Rotor flap, inplane and feathering degrees of freedom, as well as control and augmentation systems are defined in addition to the classical vehicle six degrees of freedom. The primary application was intended to be an analytic tool to assess the handling qualities of a dynamically combined main rotor and body. The modeling method retained the higher frequency response properties which aided in evaluating control and stability augmentation systems.

Reaser, J. S.

1978-01-01

160

Envelope protection systems for piloted and unmanned rotorcraft  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Performance and agility of rotorcraft can be improved using envelope protection systems (or carefree maneuvering systems), which allow the aircraft to use the full flight envelope without risk of exceeding structural or controllability limits. Implementation of such a system can be divided into two necessary parts: "Limit Prediction" which detects the impending violation of the limit parameter, and "Limit Avoidance" where a preventive action is taken in the form of pilot cueing or autonomous limiting. Depending upon the underlying flight control system, implementation of the envelope limiting system was categorized into two different structures: "Inceptor Constraint Architecture" and "Command Limiting Architecture". The Inceptor Constraint Architecture is applicable to existing rotorcraft with conventional flight control system where control input proportionally affects control surfaces. The relationship between control input and limit parameter is complex which requires advanced algorithms for predicting impending limit violations. This research focuses on limits that exceed in transient response. A new algorithm was developed for predicting transient response using non-linear functions of measured aircraft states. The functions were generated off-line using simulation data from a non-real-time simulation, model to demonstrate the procedure for extracting them from flight test data. Modern rotorcraft flight control systems are designed to accurately track certain aircraft states like roll and pitch attitudes which are either specified as command inputs in unmanned rotorcraft or mapped to control stick in piloted aircrafts. In the Command Limiting Architecture applicable to these systems, performance constraints were generated on the command input corresponding to the envelope limit. To simulate this flight control system, an adaptive model inversion controller was applied to a non-linear, blade element simulation model of a helicopter. The controller generated fully-coupled lateral, longitudinal, vertical and yaw axis control inputs using a single design point linear model. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

Sahani, Nilesh A.

161

The Repair of Magnesium Rotorcraft Components by Cold Spray  

Microsoft Academic Search

The U.S. Army and Navy have experienced significant corrosion problems with magnesium alloys that are used to fabricate aircraft\\u000a components. The most severe of these are associated with large and expensive transmission and gearbox housings for rotorcraft,\\u000a which have to be removed prematurely because of corrosion, adversely affecting fleet readiness and safety. Many of the parts\\u000a cannot be reclaimed because

Victor K. Champagne

2008-01-01

162

Smart Rotorcraft Field Assistants for Terrestrial and Planetary Science  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Field science in extreme terrestrial environments is often difficult and sometimes dangerous. Field seasons are also often short in duration. Robotic field assistants, particularly small highly mobile rotary-wing platforms, have the potential to significantly augment a field season's scientific return on investment for geology and astrobiology researchers by providing an entirely new suite of sophisticated field tools. Robotic rotorcraft and other vertical lift planetary aerial vehicle also hold promise for supporting planetary science missions.

Young, Larry A.; Aiken, Edwin W.; Briggs, Geoffrey A.

2004-01-01

163

Active and Passive Damping of Vibration for Rotorcraft Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Advanced helicopter rotor systems, such as those proposed for military rotorcraft in the near future, are mechanically less complex than traditional rotor systems. This simplification may lead to problems with both air and ground resonance. Damping can be a major stabilizing influence for these conditions, and a method of introducing damping in the flexbeam would allow for greater aeromechanical stability. Distributed and point damping strategies are currently being investigated to this end.

Wereley, Norman M.; Kamath, G. M.; Smith, C.

1996-01-01

164

14 CFR 129.22 - Communication and navigation equipment for rotorcraft operations under VFR over routes navigated...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... false Communication and navigation equipment for rotorcraft...OPERATORS OF U.S.-REGISTERED AIRCRAFT ENGAGED IN COMMON CARRIAGE...129.22 Communication and navigation equipment for rotorcraft...this section; and (2) Navigation equipment suitable for...

2014-01-01

165

Electric propulsion, circa 2000  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper discusses the future of electric propulsion, circa 2000. Starting with the first generation Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) technology as the first step toward the next century's advanced propulsion systems, the current status and future trends of other systems such as the magnetoplasmadynamic accelerator, the mass driver, the laser propulsion system, and the rail gun are described.

Hudson, W. R.; Finke, R. C.

1980-01-01

166

Structural Dynamics Verification of Rotorcraft Comprehensive Analysis System (RCAS)  

SciTech Connect

The Rotorcraft Comprehensive Analysis System (RCAS) was acquired and evaluated as part of an ongoing effort by the U.S Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to provide state-of-the-art wind turbine modeling and analysis technology for Government and industry. RCAS is an interdisciplinary tool offering aeroelastic modeling and analysis options not supported by current codes. RCAS was developed during a 4-year joint effort among the U.S. Army's Aeroflightdynamics Directorate, Advanced Rotorcraft Technology Inc., and the helicopter industry. The code draws heavily from its predecessor 2GCHAS (Second Generation Comprehensive Helicopter Analysis System), which required an additional 14 years to develop. Though developed for the rotorcraft industry, its general-purpose features allow it to model or analyze a general dynamic system. Its key feature is a specialized finite element that can model spinning flexible parts. The code, therefore, appears particularly suited for wind turbines whose dynamics is dominated by massive flexible spinning rotors. In addition to the simulation capability of the existing codes, RCAS [1-3] offers a range of unique capabilities, including aeroelastic stability analysis, trim, state-space modeling, operating modes, modal reduction, multi-blade coordinate transformation, periodic-system-specific analysis, choice of aerodynamic models, and a controls design/implementation graphical interface.

Bir, G. S.

2005-02-01

167

Rotorcraft fatigue life-prediction: Past, present, and future  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In this paper the methods used for calculating the fatigue life of metallic dynamic components in rotorcraft is reviewed. In the past, rotorcraft fatigue design has combined constant amplitude tests of full-scale parts with flight loads and usage data in a conservative manner to provide 'safe life' component replacement times. This is in contrast to other industries, such as the automobile industry, where spectrum loading in fatigue testing is a part of the design procedure. Traditionally, the linear cumulative damage rule has been used in a deterministic manner using a conservative value for fatigue strength based on a one in a thousand probability of failure. Conservatism on load and usage are also often employed. This procedure will be discussed along with the current U.S. Army fatigue life specification for new rotorcraft which is the so-called 'six nines' reliability requirement. In order to achieve the six nines reliability requirement the exploration and adoption of new approaches in design and fleet management may also be necessary if this requirement is to be met with a minimum impact on structural weight. To this end a fracture mechanics approach to fatigue life design may be required in order to provide a more accurate estimate of damage progression. Also reviewed in this paper is a fracture mechanics approach for calculating total fatigue life which is based on a crack-closure small crack considerations.

Everett, Richard A., Jr.; Elber, W.

1994-01-01

168

Robust crossfeed design for hovering rotorcraft. M.S. Thesis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Control law design for rotorcraft fly-by-wire systems normally attempts to decouple angular responses using fixed-gain crossfeeds. This approach can lead to poor decoupling over the frequency range of pilot inputs and increase the load on the feedback loops. In order to improve the decoupling performance, dynamic crossfeeds may be adopted. Moreover, because of the large changes that occur in rotorcraft dynamics due to small changes about the nominal design condition, especially for near-hovering flight, the crossfeed design must be 'robust.' A new low-order matching method is presented here to design robost crossfeed compensators for multi-input, multi-output (MIMO) systems. The technique identifies degrees-of-freedom that can be decoupled using crossfeeds, given an anticipated set of parameter variations for the range of flight conditions of concern. Cross-coupling is then reduced for degrees-of-freedom that can use crossfeed compensation by minimizing off-axis response magnitude average and variance. Results are presented for the analysis of pitch, roll, yaw, and heave coupling of the UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter in near-hovering flight. Robust crossfeeds are designed that show significant improvement in decoupling performance and robustness over nominal, single design point, compensators. The design method and results are presented in an easily-used graphical format that lends significant physical insight to the design procedure. This plant pre-compensation technique is an appropriate preliminary step to the design of robust feedback control laws for rotorcraft.

Catapang, David R.

1993-01-01

169

Airworthiness Qualification Criteria for Rotorcraft with External Sling Loads  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report presents the results of a study to develop airworthiness requirements for rotorcraft with external sling loads. The report starts with a review of the various phenomena that limit external sling load operations. Specifically discussed are the rotorcraft-load aeroservoelastic stability, load-on handling qualities, effects of automatic flight control system failure, load suspension system failure, and load stability at speed. Based on past experience and treatment of these phenomena, criteria are proposed to form a package for airworthiness qualification. The desired end objective is a set of operational flight envelopes for the rotorcraft with intended loads that can be provided to the user to guide operations in the field. The specific criteria proposed are parts of ADS-33E-PRF; MIL-F-9490D, and MIL-STD-913A all applied in the context of external sling loads. The study was performed for the Directorate of Engineering, U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command (AMCOM), as part of the contract monitored by the Aerothermodynamics Directorate, U.S. Army AMCOM.

Key, David L.

2002-01-01

170

Automated Design of Noise-Minimal, Safe Rotorcraft Trajectories  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA and the international community are investing in the development of a commercial transportation infrastructure that includes the increased use of rotorcraft, specifically helicopters and aircraft such as a 40-passenger civil tilt rotors. Rotorcraft have a number of advantages over fixed wing aircraft, primarily in not requiring direct access to the primary fixed wing runways. As such they can operate at an airport without directly interfering with major air carrier and commuter aircraft operations. However, there is significant concern over the impact of noise on the communities surrounding the transportation facilities. In this paper we propose to address the rotorcraft noise problem by exploiting powerful search techniques coming from artificial intelligence, coupled with simulation and field tests, to design trajectories that are expected to improve on the amount of ground noise generated. This paper investigates the use of simulation based on predictive physical models to facilitate the search for low-noise trajectories using a class of automated search algorithms called local search. A novel feature of this approach is the ability to incorporate constraints into the problem formulation that addresses passenger safety and comfort.

Morris, Robert A.; Venable, K. Brent; Lindsay, James

2012-01-01

171

MEMS for measuring deflection, acceleration, and ice sensing on rotorcraft  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Smart MEMS (MicroElectroMechanical Systems) in the form of integrated sensors and actuators offer significant potential for many rotorcraft applications. Sensing of flex beam deflection and acceleration, ice formation and deicing are major candidate areas where smart conformal MEMS based sensors can be exploited by the rotorcraft community. The major technical barrier of the present day smart structures technology is the need for wired communication between sensors and actuators in the rotating system and controllers, data storage units, and cockpit avionics. Many proposed sensors and actuators are commonly distributed either along the blade length or, in the active flap devices, out near the 75% blade radial station. Also they are not conformal to the airfoil shape of the rotor blades. The communication between rotating and fixed systems is typically accomplished using complex slip ring assemblies transferring electronic information down through the rotor shaft. Although advances have been made in wired communication, these complex assemblies are essentially similar to test hardware and present numerous reliability and maintainability limitations when implemented on a production scale. Considering these limitations, development of a wireless means of communication through a new generation of conformal sensors with built-in antenna, akin to telemetry, could have a dramatic beneficial payoff for rotorcraft applications. In this paper, an integration of IDT (inter digital transducer) microsensors and MEMS sensors is presented.

Varadan, Vijay K.; Varadan, Vasundara V.

1998-04-01

172

IDT sensors for detection of ice on rotorcraft  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

IDT (Interdigital Transducers) offer significant potential for detecting ice formation on rotorcraft applications. Sensing of flex beam deflection and acceleration, ice formation and deicing are major candidate areas where smart conformal IDT and MEMS based sensors can be exploited by the rotorcraft community. The major technical barrier of the present day smart structures technology is the need for wired communication between sensors and actuators in the rotating system and controllers, data storage units, and cockpit avionics. Many proposed sensors and actuators are commonly distributed either along the blade length or, in the active flap devices, out near the 75% blade radial station. Also they are not conformal to the airfoil shape of the rotor blades. The communication between rotating and fixed systems is typically accomplished using complex slip ring assemblies transferring electronic information down through the rotor shaft. Although advances have been made in wired communication, these complex assemblies are essentially similar to test hardware and present numerous reliability and maintainability limitations when implemented on a production scale. Considering these limitations, development of a wireless means of communication through a new generation of conformal sensors with built-in antenna, akin to telemetry, could have a dramatic beneficial payoff for rotorcraft applications. In this paper, an integration of IDT microsensors and MEMS sensors is presented.

Varadan, Vasundara V.; Varadan, Vijay K.; Bao, Xiao-Qi

1998-07-01

173

Technology needs for high speed rotorcraft (3)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The spectrum of vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) type aircraft is examined to determine which aircraft are most likely to achieve high subsonic cruise speeds and have hover qualities similar to a helicopter. Two civil mission profiles are considered: a 600-n.mi. mission for a 15- and a 30-passenger payload. Applying current technology, only the 15- and 30-passenger tiltfold aircraft are capable of attaining the 450-knot design goal. The two tiltfold aircraft at 450 knots and a 30-passenger tiltrotor at 375 knots were further developed for the Task II technology analysis. A program called High-Speed Total Envelope Proprotor (HI-STEP) is recommended to meet several of these issues based on the tiltrotor concept. A program called Tiltfold System (TFS) is recommended based on the tiltrotor concept. A task is identified to resolve the best design speed from productivity and demand considerations based on the technology that emerges from the recommended programs. HI-STEP's goals are to investigate propulsive efficiency, maneuver loads, and aeroelastic stability. Programs currently in progress that may meet the other technology needs include the Integrated High Performance Turbine Engine Technology (IHPTET) (NASA Lewis) and the Advanced Structural Concepts Program funded through NASA Langley.

Detore, Jack; Conway, Scott

1991-01-01

174

Future of space propulsion  

SciTech Connect

A development status-and-prospects evaluation is presented for the range of spacecraft propulsion alternatives under consideration by the USAF's Phillips Laboratory, encompassing technologies broadly characterizable as 'conventional' (solid, storable liquid, cryogenic) and 'nonconventional'. Nonconventional spacecraft propulsion system types include arcjets, magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters, solar thermal propulsion, and nuclear propulsion. The prospects for high energy density materials' application to more coventional propulsion concepts are noted.

Weiss, R.R.; Mackay, D.S. (USAF, Phillips Laboratory, Edwards AFB, CA (United States))

1992-03-01

175

Load Capacity Estimation of Foil Air Journal Bearings for Oil-Free Turbomachinery Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper introduces a simple "Rule of Thumb" (ROT) method to estimate the load capacity of foil air journal bearings, which are self-acting compliant-surface hydrodynamic bearings being considered for Oil-Free turbo-machinery applications such as gas turbine engines. The ROT is based on first principles and data available in the literature and it relates bearing load capacity to the bearing size and speed through an empirically based load capacity coefficient, D. It is shown that load capacity is a linear function of bearing surface velocity and bearing projected area. Furthermore, it was found that the load capacity coefficient, D, is related to the design features of the bearing compliant members and operating conditions (speed and ambient temperature). Early bearing designs with basic or "first generation" compliant support elements have relatively low load capacity. More advanced bearings, in which the compliance of the support structure is tailored, have load capacities up to five times those of simpler designs. The ROT enables simplified load capacity estimation for foil air journal bearings and can guide development of new Oil-Free turbomachinery systems.

DellaCorte, Christopher; Valco, Mark J.

2000-01-01

176

An Oil-Free Thrust Foil Bearing Facility Design, Calibration, and Operation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

New testing capabilities are needed in order to foster thrust foil air bearing technology development and aid its transition into future Oil-Free gas turbines. This paper describes a new test apparatus capable of testing thrust foil air bearings up to 100 mm in diameter at speeds to 80,000 rpm and temperatures to 650 C (1200 F). Measured parameters include bearing torque, load capacity, and bearing temperatures. This data will be used for design performance evaluations and for validation of foil bearing models. Preliminary test results demonstrate that the rig is capable of testing thrust foil air bearings under a wide range of conditions which are anticipated in future Oil-Free gas turbines. Torque as a function of speed and temperature corroborates results expected from rudimentary performance models. A number of bearings were intentionally failed with no resultant damage whatsoever to the test rig. Several test conditions (specific speeds and loads) revealed undesirable axial shaft vibrations which have been attributed to the magnetic bearing control system and are under study. Based upon these preliminary results, this test rig will be a valuable tool for thrust foil bearing research, parametric studies and technology development.

Bauman, Steve

2005-01-01

177

Rotorcraft Ditchings and Water-Related Impacts that Occurred from 1982 - 1989. Phase 2.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report documents Phase II of a two-phase effort to examine rotorcraft ditchings and water-related impacts for rotorcraft, that occurred between the years 1982 through 1989. The main tasks performed for this phase of the investigation were assessment ...

M. Muller L. W. Bark

1993-01-01

178

Interfacing comprehensive rotorcraft analysis with advanced aeromechanics and vortex wake models  

Microsoft Academic Search

This dissertation describes three aspects of the comprehensive rotorcraft analysis. First, a physics-based methodology for the modeling of hydraulic devices within multibody-based comprehensive models of rotorcraft systems is developed. This newly proposed approach can predict the fully nonlinear behavior of hydraulic devices, and pressure levels in the hydraulic chambers are coupled with the dynamic response of the system. The proposed

Haiying Liu

2008-01-01

179

Detecting delamination damage in composite rotorcraft flexbeams using the local wave response  

Microsoft Academic Search

The appearance of delaminations caused by excessive vibratory and fatigue loads in composite rotorcraft flexbeams can lead to degradation in flapwise and lagwise performance of the rotor blade. In addition, delaminations in composite rotorcraft flexbeams under cyclic loading can result in rapid fatigue failure of these elements leading to catastrophic results. A novel detection strategy is evaluated which attempts to

Ashish Purekar; Kodanate A. Lakshmanan; Darryll J. Pines

1998-01-01

180

14 CFR 29.519 - Hull type rotorcraft: Water-based and amphibian.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 false Hull type rotorcraft: Water-based and amphibian. 29.519 Section 29.519 Aeronautics and Space ...Loads § 29.519 Hull type rotorcraft: Water-based and amphibian. (a) General. For hull type...

2010-01-01

181

14 CFR 29.519 - Hull type rotorcraft: Water-based and amphibian.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-01-01 false Hull type rotorcraft: Water-based and amphibian. 29.519 Section 29.519 Aeronautics and Space ...Loads § 29.519 Hull type rotorcraft: Water-based and amphibian. (a) General. For hull type...

2009-01-01

182

A New High-Speed Oil-Free Turbine Engine Rotordynamic Simulator Test Rig  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A new test rig has been developed for simulating high-speed turbomachinery rotor systems using Oil-Free foil air bearing technology. Foil air bearings have been used in turbomachinery, primarily air cycle machines, for the past four decades to eliminate the need for oil lubrication. The goal of applying this bearing technology to other classes of turbomachinery has prompted the fabrication of this test rig. The facility gives bearing designers the capability to test potential bearing designs with shafts that simulate the rotating components of a target machine without the high cost of building "make-and-break" hardware. The data collected from this rig can be used to make design changes to the shaft and bearings in subsequent design iterations. This paper describes the new test rig and demonstrates its capabilities through the initial run with a simulated shaft system.

Howard, Samuel A.

2007-01-01

183

Hybrid rocket propulsion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Topics addressed are: (1) comparison of the theoretical impulses; (2) comparison of the density-specific impulses; (3) general propulsion system features comparison; (4) hybrid systems, booster applications; and (5) hybrid systems, upper stage propulsion applications.

Holzman, Allen L.

1993-01-01

184

Expendable Launch Vehicle Propulsion.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The current status is reviewed of the U.S. Expendable Launch Vehicle (ELV) fleet, the international competition, and the propulsion technology of both domestic and foreign ELVs. The ELV propulsion technology areas where research, development, and demonstr...

P. N. Fuller

1991-01-01

185

OTV Propulsion Issues  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The statistical technology needs of aero-assist maneuvering, propulsion, and usage of cryogenic fluids were presented. Industry panels discussed the servicing of reusable space based vehicles and propulsion-vehicle interation.

1984-01-01

186

NASA Electric Propulsion Program.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Nearly all space missions require on-board propulsion systems and these systems typically have a major impact on spacecraft mass and cost. Electric propulsion systems offer major performance advantages over conventional chemical systems for many mission f...

L. W. Callahan F. M. Curran

1996-01-01

187

Electrical Propulsion Machinery Study.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report covers the design analysis of electrical propulsion machinery suitable for naval propulsion applications. The primary objectives of this study were to identify the technical problem areas in the machines analyzed, and to develop methods of solv...

C. J. Mole

1973-01-01

188

Electrodynamic Tether Propulsion System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This picture is an artist's concept of an orbiting vehicle using the Electrodynamic Tethers Propulsion System. Relatively short electrodynamic tethers can use solar power to push against a planetary magnetic field to achieve propulsion without the expenditure of propellant.

2004-01-01

189

Methodology development for evaluation of selective-fidelity rotorcraft simulation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper addressed the initial step toward the goal of establishing performance and handling qualities acceptance criteria for realtime rotorcraft simulators through a planned research effort to quantify the system capabilities of 'selective fidelity' simulators. Within this framework the simulator is then classified based on the required task. The simulator is evaluated by separating the various subsystems (visual, motion, etc.) and applying corresponding fidelity constants based on the specific task. This methodology not only provides an assessment technique, but also provides a technique to determine the required levels of subsystem fidelity for a specific task.

Lewis, William D.; Schrage, D. P.; Prasad, J. V. R.; Wolfe, Daniel

1992-01-01

190

Overview of Lightweight Structures for Rotorcraft Engines and Drivetrains  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This is an overview presentation of research being performed in the Advanced Materials Task within the NASA Subsonic Rotary Wing Project. This research is focused on technology areas that address both national goals and project goals for advanced rotorcraft. Specific technology areas discussed are: (1) high temperature materials for advanced turbines in turboshaft engines; (2) polymer matrix composites for lightweight drive system components; (3) lightweight structure approaches for noise and vibration control; and (4) an advanced metal alloy for lighter weight bearings and more reliable mechanical components. An overview of the technology in each area is discussed, and recent accomplishments are presented.

Roberts, Gary D.

2011-01-01

191

European auxiliary propulsion, 1972  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The chemical and electric auxiliary propulsion technology of the United Kingdom, France, and West Germany is discussed in detail, and the propulsion technology achievements of Italy, India, Japan, and Russia are reviewed. A comparison is presented of Shell 405 catalyst and a European spontaneous hydrazine catalyst called CNESRO I. Finally, conclusions are drawn regarding future trends in European auxiliary propulsion technology development.

Holcomb, L. B.

1972-01-01

192

Advanced space propulsion  

Microsoft Academic Search

An evaluation is made of the conceptual development status and prospective performance gains anticipated from fully developed spacecraft propulsion systems of radically innovative character. Candidate systems encompass such widely different technologies as solar sails, tethers, laser-sustained ablative propellant evaporation, nuclear propulsion, solar-thermal propulsion, and such ultrahigh energy exotic fuels as metallic hydrogen, which has been calculated to be capable of

1990-01-01

193

Propulsion aspects of transportation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Propulsion factors have a major influence on the characteristics of transportation systems and their economics, and advances in transportation have been keyed to advances in propulsion technology. Propulsion concepts conceived in the past 30 years have completely revolutionized air, land, and sea transportation,The turbojet engine, the diesel-electric locomotive, and the nuclear submarine are each uniquely suited to their applications and

HERBERT R. HAZARD

1968-01-01

194

Acoustic Predictions of Manned and Unmanned Rotorcraft Using the Comprehensive Analytical Rotorcraft Model for Acoustics (CARMA) Code System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Comprehensive Analytical Rotorcraft Model for Acoustics (CARMA) is being developed under the Quiet Aircraft Technology Project within the NASA Vehicle Systems Program. The purpose of CARMA is to provide analysis tools for the design and evaluation of efficient low-noise rotorcraft, as well as support the development of safe, low-noise flight operations. The baseline prediction system of CARMA is presented and current capabilities are illustrated for a model rotor in a wind tunnel, a rotorcraft in flight and for a notional coaxial rotor configuration; however, a complete validation of the CARMA system capabilities with respect to a variety of measured databases is beyond the scope of this work. For the model rotor illustration, predicted rotor airloads and acoustics for a BO-105 model rotor are compared to test data from HART-II. For the flight illustration, acoustic data from an MD-520N helicopter flight test, which was conducted at Eglin Air Force Base in September 2003, are compared with CARMA full vehicle flight predictions. Predicted acoustic metrics at three microphone locations are compared for limited level flight and descent conditions. Initial acoustic predictions using CARMA for a notional coaxial rotor system are made. The effect of increasing the vertical separation between the rotors on the predicted airloads and acoustic results are shown for both aerodynamically non-interacting and aerodynamically interacting rotors. The sensitivity of including the aerodynamic interaction effects of each rotor on the other, especially when the rotors are in close proximity to one another is initially examined. The predicted coaxial rotor noise is compared to that of a conventional single rotor system of equal thrust, where both are of reasonable size for an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV).

Boyd, D. Douglas, Jr.; Burley, Casey L.; Conner, David A.

2005-01-01

195

A Higher Harmonic Optimal Controller to Optimise Rotorcraft Aeromechanical Behaviour  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Three methods to optimize rotorcraft aeromechanical behavior for those cases where the rotorcraft plant can be adequately represented by a linear model system matrix were identified and implemented in a stand-alone code. These methods determine the optimal control vector which minimizes the vibration metric subject to constraints at discrete time points, and differ from the commonly used non-optimal constraint penalty methods such as those employed by conventional controllers in that the constraints are handled as actual constraints to an optimization problem rather than as just additional terms in the performance index. The first method is to use a Non-linear Programming algorithm to solve the problem directly. The second method is to solve the full set of non-linear equations which define the necessary conditions for optimality. The third method is to solve each of the possible reduced sets of equations defining the necessary conditions for optimality when the constraints are pre-selected to be either active or inactive, and then to simply select the best solution. The effects of maneuvers and aeroelasticity on the systems matrix are modelled by using a pseudo-random pseudo-row-dependency scheme to define the systems matrix. Cases run to date indicate that the first method of solution is reliable, robust, and easiest to use, and that it was superior to the conventional controllers which were considered.

Leyland, Jane Anne

1996-01-01

196

A comparison of fatigue life prediction methodologies for rotorcraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Because of the current U.S. Army requirement that all new rotorcraft be designed to a 'six nines' reliability on fatigue life, this study was undertaken to assess the accuracy of the current safe life philosophy using the nominal stress Palmgrem-Miner linear cumulative damage rule to predict the fatigue life of rotorcraft dynamic components. It has been shown that this methodology can predict fatigue lives that differ from test lives by more than two orders of magnitude. A further objective of this work was to compare the accuracy of this methodology to another safe life method called the local strain approach as well as to a method which predicts fatigue life based solely on crack growth data. Spectrum fatigue tests were run on notched (k(sub t) = 3.2) specimens made of 4340 steel using the Felix/28 tests fairly well, being slightly on the unconservative side of the test data. The crack growth method, which is based on 'small crack' crack growth data and a crack-closure model, also predicted the fatigue lives very well with the predicted lives being slightly longer that the mean test lives but within the experimental scatter band. The crack growth model was also able to predict the change in test lives produced by the rainflow reconstructed spectra.

Everett, R. A., Jr.

1990-01-01

197

Foil Bearing Starting Considerations and Requirements for Rotorcraft Engine Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Foil gas bearings under development for rotorcraft-sized, hot core engine applications have been susceptible to damage from the slow acceleration and rates typically encountered during the pre-ignition stage in conventional engines. Recent laboratory failures have been assumed to be directly linked to operating foil bearings below their lift-off speed while following conventional startup procedures for the engines. In each instance, the continuous sliding contact between the foils and shaft was believed to thermally overload the bearing and cause the engines to fail. These failures highlight the need to characterize required acceleration rates and minimum operating speeds for these applications. In this report, startup experiments were conducted with a large, rotorcraft engine sized foil bearing under moderate load and acceleration rates to identify the proper start procedures needed to avoid bearing failure. The results showed that a bearing under a 39.4 kPa static load can withstand a modest acceleration rate of 500 rpm/s and excessive loitering below the bearing lift-off speed provided an adequate solid lubricant is present.

Radil, Kevin C.; DellaCorte, Christopher

2009-01-01

198

Impact of Airfoils on Aerodynamic Optimization of Heavy Lift Rotorcraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Rotor airfoils were developed for two large tiltrotor designs, the Large Civil Tilt Rotor (LCTR) and the Military Heavy Tilt Rotor (MHTR). The LCTR was the most promising of several rotorcraft concepts produced by the NASA Heavy Lift Rotorcraft Systems Investigation. It was designed to carry 120 passengers for 1200 nm, with performance of 350 knots cruise at 30,000 ft altitude. A parallel design, the MHTR, had a notional mission of 40,000 Ib payload, 500 nm range, and 300 knots cruise at 4000 ft, 95 F. Both aircraft were sized by the RC code developed by the U. S. Army Aeroflightdynamics Directorate (AFDD). The rotors were then optimized using the CAMRAD II comprehensive analysis code. Rotor airfoils were designed for each aircraft, and their effects on performance analyzed by CAMRAD II. Airfoil design criteria are discussed for each rotor. Twist and taper optimization are presented in detail for each rotor, with discussions of performance improvements provided by the new airfoils, compared to current technology airfoils. Effects of stall delay and blade flexibility on performance are also included.

Acree, Cecil W., Jr.; Martin Preston B.; Romander, Ethan A.

2006-01-01

199

Free Flight Rotorcraft Flight Test Vehicle Technology Development  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A rotary wing, unmanned air vehicle (UAV) is being developed as a research tool at the NASA Langley Research Center by the U.S. Army and NASA. This development program is intended to provide the rotorcraft research community an intermediate step between rotorcraft wind tunnel testing and full scale manned flight testing. The technologies under development for this vehicle are: adaptive electronic flight control systems incorporating artificial intelligence (AI) techniques, small-light weight sophisticated sensors, advanced telepresence-telerobotics systems and rotary wing UAV operational procedures. This paper briefly describes the system's requirements and the techniques used to integrate the various technologies to meet these requirements. The paper also discusses the status of the development effort. In addition to the original aeromechanics research mission, the technology development effort has generated a great deal of interest in the UAV community for related spin-off applications, as briefly described at the end of the paper. In some cases the technologies under development in the free flight program are critical to the ability to perform some applications.

Hodges, W. Todd; Walker, Gregory W.

1994-01-01

200

Current Research Activities in Drive System Technology in Support of the NASA Rotorcraft Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Drive system technology is a key area for improving rotorcraft performance, noise/vibration reduction, and reducing operational and manufacturing costs. An overview of current research areas that support the NASA Rotorcraft Program will be provided. Work in drive system technology is mainly focused within three research areas: advanced components, thermal behavior/emergency lubrication system operation, and diagnostics/prognostics (also known as Health and Usage Monitoring Systems (HUMS)). Current research activities in each of these activities will be presented. Also, an overview of the conceptual drive system requirements and possible arrangements for the Heavy Lift Rotorcraft program will be reviewed.

Handschuh, Robert F.; Zakrajsek, James J.

2006-01-01

201

System concept for a rotorcraft vision system to improve cargo-handling operations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The shift in defense strategy towards more rapid power projection and deployment drives a need for improved transport rotorcraft mission effectiveness. More efficient cargo handling during sling load operations will decrease time in hover, thereby reducing overall mission timelines. Furthermore, less fuel expenditure in hover will increase the effective mission range. In addition, expected improvements in pilot situational awareness will increase safety during these precise rotorcraft handling operations. This is particularly applicable for naval operations during adverse sea states. This paper outlines a concept for a vision system to improve rotorcraft external cargo handling operations. It presents the operational concept, sensor characteristics, image processing approach, pilot display format, and demonstration strategy.

Dubois, Thomas A.; Dipietro, Charles A.; Stevenson, Gary

1996-05-01

202

Rotorcraft Blade Mode Damping Identification from Random Responses Using a Recursive Maximum Likelihood Algorithm.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

An on line technique is presented for the identification of rotor blade modal damping and frequency from rotorcraft random response test data. The identification technique is based upon a recursive maximum likelihood (RML) algorithm, which is demonstrated...

J. A. Molusis

1982-01-01

203

Rotorcraft Blade Mode Damping Identification from Random Responses Using a Recursive Maximum Likelihood Algorithm.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

An on-line technique is presented for the identification of rotor blade modal damping and frequency from rotorcraft random response test data. The identification technique is based upon a recursive maximum likelihood (RML) algorithm, which is demonstrated...

J. A. Molusis

1982-01-01

204

14 CFR 119.25 - Rotorcraft operations: Direct air carriers and commercial operators.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... false Rotorcraft operations: Direct air carriers and commercial operators. 119...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS AND OPERATORS FOR COMPENSATION...CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS CERTIFICATION: AIR CARRIERS AND COMMERCIAL OPERATORS...

2014-01-01

205

NASA/HAA Advanced Rotorcraft Technology and Tilt Rotor Workshop. Volume 6: Vehicle Configuration Session  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Five high speed rotorcraft configurations are considered: the high speed helicopter, compound helicopter, ABC, tilt rotor and the X wing. The technology requirements and the recommended actions are discussed.

1980-01-01

206

Proceedings of the Monterey Conference on Planning for Rotorcraft and Commuter Air Transportation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Planning and technological issues involved in rotorcraft and commuter fixed-wing air transportation are discussed. Subject areas include the future community environment, aircraft technology, community transportation planning, and regulatory perspectives.

Stockwell, W. L.

1983-01-01

207

Oil-Free Rotor Support Technologies for Long Life, Closed Cycle Brayton Turbines  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The goal of this study is to provide technological support to ensure successful life and operation of a 50-300 kW dynamic power conversion system specifically with response to the rotor support system. By utilizing technical expertise in tribology, bearings, rotordynamic, solid lubricant coatings and extensive test facilities, valuable input for mission success is provided. A discussion of the history of closed cycle Brayton turboalternators (TA) will be included. This includes the 2 kW Mini-Brayton Rotating Unit (Mini-BRU), the 10kW Brayton Rotating Unit (BRU) and the 125 kW turboalternator-compressor (TAC) designed in mid 1970's. Also included is the development of air-cycle machines and terrestrial oil-free gas turbine power systems in the form of microturbines, specifically Capstone microturbines. A short discussion of the self-acting compliant surface hydrodynamic fluid film bearings, or foil bearings, will follow, including a short history of the load capacity advances, the NASA coatings advancements as well as design model advances. Successes in terrestrial based machines will be noted and NASA tribology and bearing research test facilities will be described. Finally, implementation of a four step integration process will be included in the discussion.

Lucero, John M.; DellaCorte, Christopher

2004-01-01

208

Performance and Durability of High Temperature Foil Air Bearing for Oil-Free Turbomachinery  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The performance and durability of advanced, high temperature foil air bearings are evaluated under a wide range (10-50 kPa) of loads at temperatures from 25 to 650 C. The bearings are made from uncoated nickel based superalloy foils. The foil surface experiences sliding contact with the shaft during initial start/stop operation. To reduce friction and wear, the solid lubricant coating, PS304, is applied to the shaft by plasma spraying. PS304, is a NiCr based Cr2O3 coating with silver and barium fluoride/calcium fluoride solid lubricant additions. The results show that the bearings provide lives well in excess of 30,000 cycles under all of the conditions tested. Several bearings exhibited lives in excess of 100,000 cycles. Wear is a linear function of the bearing load. The excellent performance measured in this study suggests that these bearings and the PS304 coating are well suited for advanced high temperature, oil-free turbomachinery applications.

DellaCorte, C.; Valco, M. J.; Radil, K. C.; Heshmat, H.

1999-01-01

209

Performance and Durability of High Temperature Foil Air Bearings for Oil-Free Turbomachinery  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The performance and durability of advanced, high temperature foil air bearings are evaluated under a wide range (10-50 kPa) of loads at temperatures from 25 to 650 C. The bearings are made from uncoated nickel based superalloy foils. The foil surface experiences sliding contact with the shaft during initial start/stop operation. To reduce friction and wear, the solid lubricant coating, PS304, is applied to the shaft by plasma spraying. PS304 is a NiCr based Cr2O3 coating with silver and barium fluoride/calcium fluoride solid lubricant additions. The results show that the bearings provide lives well in excess of 30,000 cycles under all of the conditions tested. Several bearings exhibited lives in excess of 100,000 cycles. Wear is a linear function of the bearing load. The excellent performance measured in this study suggests that these bearings and the PS304 coating are well suited for advanced high temperature, oil-free turbomachinery applications.

DellaCorte, C.; Lukaszewicz, V.; Valco, M. J.; Radil, K. C.; Heshmat, H.

2000-01-01

210

Functional evaluation and characterization of a newly developed silicone oil-free prefillable syringe system.  

PubMed

The functionality of a newly developed silicone oil-free (SOF) syringe system, of which the plunger stopper is coated by a novel coating technology (i-coating™), was assessed. By scanning electron microscopy observations and other analysis, it was confirmed that the plunger stopper surface was uniformly covered with the designed chemical composition. A microflow imaging analysis showed that the SOF system drastically reduced both silicone oil (SO) doplets and oil-induced aggregations in a model protein formulation, whereas a large number of subvisible particles and protein aggregations were formed when a SO system was used. Satisfactory container closure integrity (CCI) was confirmed by means of dye and microorganism penetration studies. Furthermore, no significant difference between the break loose and gliding forces was observed in the former, and stability studies revealed that the SOF system could perfectly show the aging independence in break loose force observed in the SO system. The results suggest that the introduced novel SOF system has a great potential and represents an alternative that can achieve very low subvisible particles, secure CCI, and the absence of a break loose force. In particular, no risk of SO-induced aggregation can bring additional value in the highly sensitive biotech drug market. PMID:24643749

Yoshino, Keisuke; Nakamura, Koji; Yamashita, Arisa; Abe, Yoshihiko; Iwasaki, Kazuhiro; Kanazawa, Yukie; Funatsu, Kaori; Yoshimoto, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Shigeru

2014-05-01

211

Performance of G-M Cryocooler with Oil-Free Linear Compressor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A completely oil-free compressor for use with GM cryocoolers has been designed, built, and tested. The compressor uses two, fully-balanced, STAR linear motors together with friction-free reed valves. This arrangement eliminates all possibility of oil contamination in the helium working fluid, and therefore also eliminates the regular servicing that is required by conventional GM compressors. The compressor delivers high-pressure flows comparable to those delivered by well-developed conventional compressors, and is designed to match the operating point pressures and flow for a Sumitomo model 408 cold head. The design of the compressor is briefly reviewed. The measured performance of the compressor when integrated with a Sumitomo model 408 GM cold head is presented. The performance is mapped as a function of the refrigeration load and temperature at both the first and second stage heat exchangers and is compared with the both the manufacturer specified performance and separate baseline tests for the same cold head integrated with a conventional oil-flooded GM compressor.

Maddocks, J. R.; Kashani, A.; Helvensteijn, B. P. M.; Hoch, D. W.; Nellis, G. F.; Corey, J. A.; James, E. L.; Rhoads, G. L.

2006-04-01

212

Oil-free generation of small polymeric particles using a coaxial microfluidic channel.  

PubMed

In this study, a microfluidic method to generate small polymeric particles ( approximately 10 mum in diameter) via the control of interfacial tension without using oil and in situ photopolymerization immediately after drop generation was introduced. For the reduction in size, the selection of proper sample and sheath liquid to minimize the interfacial tension is extremely important, and 4-HBA (4-hydroxybutyl acrylate) and PVA (poly(vinyl acrylate)) were employed as core and sheath fluid pair because of much smaller surface tension than the case using oil. In addition, PVA is easily washable by aqueous solution, which is a strong advantage when the particle is applied in biomedical fields. The viscosity effect of sheath flow was also examined for further size reduction. The loading and release properties of proteins were evaluated using fluorescently labeled bovine serum albumin for the potential application as drug carrier. The protein was uniformly loaded into particles, and the protein release rate was dependent on the particle size. For utility in the biomedical area, the cyto-compatibility test of 4-HBA was performed by culturing glioma cells on the 4-HBA sheet, and the cells were alive well after 4 days culture. Conclusively, this oil-free particle generation methods facilitates the generation of uniform and small particles in a simple way without an oil-washing process. PMID:19821631

Shin, SuJung; Hong, Joung Sook; Lee, Kwang-Ho; Lee, Sang-Hoon

2009-10-20

213

Development of autonomous magnetometer rotorcraft for wide area assessment  

SciTech Connect

Large areas across the United States are potentially contaminated with UXO, with some ranges encompassing tens to hundreds of thousands of acres. Technologies are needed which will allow for cost effective wide area scanning with 1) near 100 % coverage and 2) near 100 % detection of subsurface ordnance or features indicative of subsurface ordnance. The current approach to wide area assessment is a multi-level one, in which medium - altitude fixed wing optical imaging is used for an initial site assessment. This assessment is followed with low altitude manned helicopter based magnetometry. Subsequent to this wide area assessment targeted surface investigations are performed using either towed geophysical sensor arrays or man portable sensors. In order to be an effective tool for small UXO detection, the sensing altitude for magnetic site investigations needs to be on the order of 1 – 3 meters. These altitude requirements mean that manned helicopter surveys will generally only be feasible in large, open and relatively flat terrains. While such surveys are effective in mapping large areas relatively fast there are substantial mobilization/demobilization, staffing and equipment costs associated with these surveys (resulting in costs of approximately $100-$150/acre). In addition, due to the low altitude there are substantial risks to pilots and equipment. Surface towed arrays provide high resolution maps but have other limitations, e.g. in their ability to navigate rough terrain effectively. There is thus a need for other systems which can be used for effective data collection. An UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) magnetometer platform is an obvious alternative. The motivation behind such a system is that it reduces risk to operators, is lower in initial and Operational and Maintenance (O&M) costs (and can thus potentially be applied to smaller sites) and has the potential of being more effective in terms of detection and possibly characterization (through the use of dynamic acquisition, i.e. survey mission inflight reprioritization). We describe and report on a one year effort with as primary goal to provide a recommendation to SERDP for a path forward in the implementation of one or more autonomous unmanned magnetometer rotorcraft platforms. This recommendation (which is provided in chapter 6) is based on the following three elements a) An assessment on the applicability of autonomous rotorcraft magnetometer systems to the current DoD site inventory, and an initial assessment of which type(s) of autonomous unmanned magnetometer rotorcraft platforms (in terms of performance characteristics such as payload, altitude, obstacle avoidance, production rate and flight time) would be most relevant to this inventory (chapter 3); b) An evaluation of the feasibility of assembling such platforms from commercial components (unmanned rotorcraft, control systems and sensors – both magnetometer sensors and supporting sensors). This evaluation included several highly successful field tests (chapter 4 and 5); c) A recommendation of the path forward, which includes a detailed outline of the efforts required in the design, assembly and testing of different modular platforms (chapter 6)

Roelof Versteeg; Matt Anderson; Les Beard; Eric Corban; Darryl Curley; Jeff Gamey; Ross Johnson; Dwight Junkin; Mark McKay; Jared Salzmann; Mikhail Tchernychev; Suraj Unnikrishnan; Scott Vinson

2010-04-01

214

Passive range estimation for rotorcraft low-altitude flight  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The automation of rotorcraft low-altitude flight presents challenging problems in control, computer vision and image understanding. A critical element in this problem is the ability to detect and locate obstacles, using on-board sensors, and modify the nominal trajectory. This requirement is also necessary for the safe landing of an autonomous lander on Mars. This paper examines some of the issues in the location of objects using a sequence of images from a passive sensor, and describes a Kalman filter approach to estimate the range to obstacles. The Kalman filter is also used to track features in the images leading to a significant reduction of search effort in the feature extraction step of the algorithm. The method can compute range for both straight line and curvilinear motion of the sensor. A laboratory experiment was designed to acquire a sequence of images along with sensor motion parameters under conditions similar to helicopter flight. Range estimation results using this imagery are presented.

Sridhar, B.; Suorsa, R.; Hussien, B.

1991-01-01

215

Design of Quiet Rotorcraft Approach Trajectories: Verification Phase  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Flight testing that is planned for October 2010 will provide an opportunity to evaluate rotorcraft trajectory optimization techniques. The flight test will involve a fully instrumented MD-902 helicopter, which will be flown over an array of microphones. In this work, the helicopter approach trajectory is optimized via a multiobjective genetic algorithm to improve community noise, passenger comfort, and pilot acceptance. Previously developed optimization strategies are modified to accommodate new helicopter data and to increase pilot acceptance. This paper describes the MD-902 trajectory optimization plus general optimization strategies and modifications that are needed to reduce the uncertainty in noise predictions. The constraints that are imposed by the flight test conditions and characteristics of the MD-902 helicopter limit the testing possibilities. However, the insights that will be gained through this research will prove highly valuable.

Padula, Sharon L.

2010-01-01

216

Separation Control on Generic ROBIN Rotorcraft Fuselage Using Plasma Actuators  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Active flow control, in the form of dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuators, is applied to a NASA ROBIN mod7 generic rotorcraft fuselage model. The control objective is reduce the massive 3-D flow separation occurring over the aft ramp section of the fuselage, thereby improving the vehicle flight characteristics. The plasma actuation methods investigated include: plasma streamwise vortex generators (PSVGs), as well as steady and unsteady spanwise actuation, combined with passive geometric modifications to the ramp section. Experiments were conducted at freestream Mach and Reynolds numbers of M?= 0.12 and ReL= 2.65 x10^6, respectively. Aerodynamic loads from each technique were quantified by means of 3-component force balance measurements (drag, lift, and pitching moment), a 128 count static pressure array, and time-resolved PIV wake surveys. Results are compared with previous studies that utilized active flow control in the form of pulsed jets and combustion actuators.

Coleman, Dustin

2011-11-01

217

Electric propulsion system technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

The work performed in fiscal year (FY) 1991 under the Propulsion Technology Program RTOP (Research and Technology Objectives and Plans) No. (55) 506-42-31 for Low-Thrust Primary and Auxiliary Propulsion technology development is described. The objectives of this work fall under two broad categories. The first of these deals with the development of ion engines for primary propulsion in support of

John R. Brophy; Charles E. Garner; Keith D. Goodfellow; Thomas J. Pivirotto; James E. Polk

1992-01-01

218

Evaluation of Gear Condition Indicator Performance on Rotorcraft Fleet  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The U.S. Army is currently expanding its fleet of Health Usage Monitoring Systems (HUMS) equipped aircraft at significant rates, to now include over 1,000 rotorcraft. Two different on-board HUMS, the Honeywell Modern Signal Processing Unit (MSPU) and the Goodrich Integrated Vehicle Health Management System (IVHMS), are collecting vibration health data on aircraft that include the Apache, Blackhawk, Chinook, and Kiowa Warrior. The objective of this paper is to recommend the most effective gear condition indicators for fleet use based on both a theoretical foundation and field data. Gear diagnostics with better performance will be recommended based on both a theoretical foundation and results of in-fleet use. In order to evaluate the gear condition indicator performance on rotorcraft fleets, results of more than five years of health monitoring for gear faults in the entire HUMS equipped Army helicopter fleet will be presented. More than ten examples of gear faults indicated by the gear CI have been compiled and each reviewed for accuracy. False alarms indications will also be discussed. Performance data from test rigs and seeded fault tests will also be presented. The results of the fleet analysis will be discussed, and a performance metric assigned to each of the competing algorithms. Gear fault diagnostic algorithms that are compliant with ADS-79A will be recommended for future use and development. The performance of gear algorithms used in the commercial units and the effectiveness of the gear CI as a fault identifier will be assessed using the criteria outlined in the standards in ADS-79A-HDBK, an Army handbook that outlines the conversion from Reliability Centered Maintenance to the On-Condition status of Condition Based Maintenance.

Antolick, Lance J.; Branning, Jeremy S.; Wade, Daniel R.; Dempsey, Paula J.

2010-01-01

219

Field resonance propulsion concept  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A propulsion concept was developed based on a proposed resonance between coherent, pulsed electromagnetic wave forms, and gravitational wave forms (or space-time metrics). Using this concept a spacecraft propulsion system potentially capable of galactic and intergalactic travel without prohibitive travel times was designed. The propulsion system utilizes recent research associated with magnetic field line merging, hydromagnetic wave effects, free-electron lasers, laser generation of megagauss fields, and special structural and containment metals. The research required to determine potential, field resonance characteristics and to evaluate various aspects of the spacecraft propulsion design is described.

Holt, A. C.

1979-01-01

220

Advanced Propulsion Concepts at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Current interest in advanced propulsion within NASA and research activities in advanced propulsion concepts at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory are reviewed. The concepts, which include high power plasma thrusters such as lithuim-fueled Lorentz-Force-Accelerators, MEMS-scale propulsion systems, in-situ propellant utilization techniques, fusion propulsion systems and methods of using antimatter, offer the potential for either significantly enhancing space transportation capability as compared with that of traditional chemical propulsion, or enabling ambitious new missions.

Brophy, J. R.

1997-01-01

221

Physics and Process Modeling (PPM) and Other Propulsion R and T. Volume 1; Materials Processing, Characterization, and Modeling; Lifting Models  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This CP contains the extended abstracts and presentation figures of 36 papers presented at the PPM and Other Propulsion R&T Conference. The focus of the research described in these presentations is on materials and structures technologies that are parts of the various projects within the NASA Aeronautics Propulsion Systems Research and Technology Base Program. These projects include Physics and Process Modeling; Smart, Green Engine; Fast, Quiet Engine; High Temperature Engine Materials Program; and Hybrid Hyperspeed Propulsion. Also presented were research results from the Rotorcraft Systems Program and work supported by the NASA Lewis Director's Discretionary Fund. Authors from NASA Lewis Research Center, industry, and universities conducted research in the following areas: material processing, material characterization, modeling, life, applied life models, design techniques, vibration control, mechanical components, and tribology. Key issues, research accomplishments, and future directions are summarized in this publication.

1997-01-01

222

Embedded Wing Propulsion Conceptual Study.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

As a part of distributed propulsion work under NASA's Revolutionary Aeropropulsion Concepts or RAC project, a new propulsion-airframe integrated vehicle concept called Embedded Wing Propulsion (EWP) is developed and examined through system and computation...

H. D. Kim J. D. Saunders

2003-01-01

223

Research Capabilities for Oil-Free Turbomachinery Expanded by New Rotordynamic Simulator Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A new test rig has been developed for simulating high-speed turbomachinery shafting using Oil-Free foil air bearing technology. Foil air journal bearings are self-acting hydrodynamic bearings with a flexible inner sleeve surface using air as the lubricant. These bearings have been used in turbomachinery, primarily air cycle machines, for the past four decades to eliminate the need for oil lubrication. More recently, interest has been growing in applying foil bearings to aircraft gas turbine engines. They offer potential improvements in efficiency and power density, decreased maintenance costs, and other secondary benefits. The goal of applying foil air bearings to aircraft gas turbine engines prompted the fabrication of this test rig. The facility enables bearing designers to test potential bearing designs with shafts that simulate the rotating components of a target engine without the high cost of building actual flight hardware. The data collected from this rig can be used to make changes to the shaft and bearings in subsequent design iterations. The rest of this article describes the new test rig and demonstrates some of its capabilities with an initial simulated shaft system. The test rig has two support structures, each housing a foil air journal bearing. The structures are designed to accept any size foil journal bearing smaller than 63 mm (2.5 in.) in diameter. The bearing support structures are mounted to a 91- by 152-cm (3- by 5-ft) table and can be separated by as much as 122 cm (4 ft) and as little as 20 cm (8 in.) to accommodate a wide range of shaft sizes. In the initial configuration, a 9.5-cm (3.75-in.) impulse air turbine drives the test shaft. The impulse turbine, as well as virtually any number of "dummy" compressor and turbine disks, can be mounted on the shaft inboard or outboard of the bearings. This flexibility allows researchers to simulate various engine shaft configurations. The bearing support structures include a unique bearing mounting fixture that rotates to accommodate a laserbased alignment system. This can measure the misalignment of the bearing centers in each of 2 translational degrees of freedom and 2 rotational degrees of freedom. In the initial configuration, with roughly a 30.5-cm- (12-in.-) long shaft, two simulated aerocomponent disks, and two 50.8-cm (2-in.) foil journal bearings, the rig can operate at 65,000 rpm at room temperature. The test facility can measure shaft displacements in both the vertical and horizontal directions at each bearing location. Horizontal and vertical structural vibrations are monitored using accelerometers mounted on the bearing support structures. This information is used to determine system rotordynamic response, including critical speeds, mode shapes, orbit size and shape, and potentially the onset of instabilities. Bearing torque can be monitored as well to predict the power loss in the foil bearings. All of this information is fed back and forth between NASA and the foil bearing designers in an iterative fashion to converge on a final bearing and shaft design for a given engine application. In addition to its application development capabilities, the test rig offers several unique capabilities for basic bearing research. Using the laser alignment system mentioned earlier, the facility will be used to map foil air journal bearing performance. A known misalignment of increasing severity will be induced to determine the sensitivity of foil bearings to misalignment. Other future plans include oil-free integral starter generator testing and development, and dynamic load testing of foil journal bearings.

Howard, Samuel A.

2004-01-01

224

Pulsed Fission Propulsion Concept  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the 1960's U.S. Government laboratories, under Project Orion, investigated a pulsed nuclear fission propulsion system. Small nuclear pulse units would be sequentially discharged from the aft end of the vehicle. A blast shield and shock absorber system would protect the crew and convert the shock loads into a continuous propulsive force.

1999-01-01

225

Micro electric propulsion feasibility  

Microsoft Academic Search

Miniature, 50 kg class, strategic satellites intended for extended deployment in space require an on-board propulsion capability to perform needed attitude control adjustments and drag compensation maneuvers. Even on such very small spacecraft, these orbit maintenance functions can be significant and result in a substantial propellant mass requirement. Development of advanced propulsion technology could reduce this propellant mass significantly, and

Graeme Aston; Martha Aston

1992-01-01

226

Rarefaction Wave Gun Propulsion.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

RArefaction waVE guN (RAVEN) propulsion constitutes a novel means to dramatically reduce the recoil momentum and heat imparted to future cannons during firing. The method may be considered a hybrid propulsion technology with features common to both closed...

E. Kathe R. Dillon S. Sopok M. Witherell S. Dunn

2001-01-01

227

Rarefaction Wave Gun Propulsion.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A new species of gun propulsion that dramatically reduces recoil momentum imparted to the gun is presented. First conceived by the author on 18 March 1999, the propulsion concept is explained, a methodology for the design of a reasonable apparatus for exp...

E. L. Kathe

2002-01-01

228

Advanced Chemical Propulsion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Advanced Chemical Propulsion (ACP) provides near-term incremental improvements in propulsion system performance and/or cost. It is an evolutionary approach to technology development that produces useful products along the way to meet increasingly more demanding mission requirements while focusing on improving payload mass fraction to yield greater science capability. Current activities are focused on two areas: chemical propulsion component, subsystem, and manufacturing technologies that offer measurable system level benefits; and the evaluation of high-energy storable propellants with enhanced performance for in-space application. To prioritize candidate propulsion technology alternatives, a variety of propulsion/mission analyses and trades have been conducted for SMD missions to yield sufficient data for investment planning. They include: the Advanced Chemical Propulsion Assessment; an Advanced Chemical Propulsion System Model; a LOx-LH2 small pumps conceptual design; a space storables propellant study; a spacecraft cryogenic propulsion study; an advanced pressurization and mixture ratio control study; and a pump-fed vs. pressure-fed study.

Alexander, Leslie, Jr.

2006-01-01

229

Magnetohydrodynamic propulsion of ships.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) propulsion of ships has been studied by scientists and technicians since the early 1960's. The major reason for the interest is the potential for a high energy efficiency and low noise propulsion. The report gives a brief introdu...

B. Wolff

1990-01-01

230

Nuclear Pulse Propulsion  

Microsoft Academic Search

A general technical description and programmatic review of nuclear pulse propulsion activities over the last decade is presented. Major problem areas are reviewed together with the status of current research efforts. Sufficient technical information is now available to predict achievable propulsion systems performance with a rather high degree of confidence based on current materials and nuclear technology. Expected performance is

J. C. Nance

1965-01-01

231

ATOMIC PROPULSION OF SHIPS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The history of the development of the U. S. Navy's nuclear submarine ; propulsion program is briefly reviewed. The factors which influence nuclear ; shipdesign are discussed and compared with more conventional propulsion design ; factors. Of special interest are the influences of nuclear radiation and the ; exceptional endurance which are characteristic of nuclear ships. The ; construction materials

1959-01-01

232

Trends in propulsion technology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The development history of aircraft and rocket propulsion technologies is reviewed, and future trends are discussed. Particular attention is given to technology developments in ISRO; launch vehicle programs developed in the Soviet Union, Japan, U.S.A., Great Britain, Germany, and France; and propulsion system concepts and options.

Muthunayagam, A. E.

1991-08-01

233

Nuclear thermal propulsion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This document is presented in viewgraph form, and the topics covered include the following: (1) the direct fission-thermal propulsion process; (2) mission applications of direct fission-thermal propulsion; (3) nuclear engines for rocket vehicles; (4) manned mars landers; and (5) particle bed reactor design.

Bennett, Gary L.

1991-01-01

234

Electric propulsion cost estimation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A parametric cost model for mercury ion propulsion modules is presented. A detailed work breakdown structure is included. Cost estimating relationships were developed for the individual subsystems and the nonhardware items (systems engineering, software, etc.). Solar array and power processor unit (PPU) costs are the significant cost drivers. Simplification of both of these subsystems through applications of advanced technology (lightweight solar arrays and high-efficiency, self-radiating PPUs) can reduce costs. Comparison of the performance and cost of several chemical propulsion systems with the Hg ion module are also presented. For outer-planet missions, advanced solar electric propulsion (ASEP) trip times and O2/H2 propulsion trip times are comparable. A three-year trip time savings over the baselined NTO/MMH propulsion system is possible with ASEP.

Palaszewski, B. A.

1985-01-01

235

Small satellite propulsion options  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Advanced chemical and low power electric propulsion offer attractive options for small satellite propulsion. Applications include orbit raising, orbit maintenance, attitude control, repositioning, and deorbit of both Earth-space and planetary spacecraft. Potential propulsion technologies for these functions include high pressure Ir/Re bipropellant engines, very low power arcjets, Hall thrusters, and pulsed plasma thrusters, all of which have been shown to operate in manners consistent with currently planned small satellites. Mission analyses show that insertion of advanced propulsion technologies enables and/or greatly enhances many planned small satellite missions. Examples of commercial, DoD, and NASA missions are provided to illustrate the potential benefits of using advanced propulsion options on small satellites.

Myers, Roger M.; Oleson, Steven R.; Curran, Francis M.; Schneider, Steven J.

1994-01-01

236

Propulsion Research and Technology: Overview  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Propulsion is unique in being the main delimiter on how far and how fast one can travel in space. It is the lack of truly economical high-performance propulsion systems that continues to limit and restrict the extent of human endeavors in space. Therefore the goal of propulsion research is to conceive and investigate new, revolutionary propulsion concepts. This presentation reviews the development of new propulsion concepts. Some of these concepts are: (1) Rocket-based Combined Cycle (RBCC) propulsion, (2) Alternative combined Cycle engines suc2 as the methanol ramjet , and the liquid air cycle engines, (3) Laser propulsion, (4) Maglifter, (5) pulse detonation engines, (6) solar thermal propulsion, (7) multipurpose hydrogen test bed (MHTB) and other low-G cryogenic fluids, (8) Electric propulsion, (9) nuclear propulsion, (10) Fusion Propulsion, and (11) Antimatter technology. The efforts of the NASA centers in this research is also spotlighted.

Cole, John; Schmidt, George

1999-01-01

237

Bionic Propulsion on Water and Measurement of Propulsion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Traditional propulsion fashion on water are propeller propulsion and jet propulsion, but the efficiency relatively low. Used by biological propulsion, after the last million years of evolution, the maximum utilization of its power. Bionic propulsion system designed in this paper consists of two large travel umbrella wing plate in reciprocating linear travel agencies, led by the reciprocating motion along the vertical, in the water under the influence of backward movement of the wing disk automatically open, resulting in the pull forward, the forward movement of the wing disk automatically shut down to reduce water resistance. This paper designs a bionic propulsion and drag model for the static test and measurement test propulsion.

Yun, Liu; Si-yuan, Zhao; Shan-chao, Tu; Tian-yu, Zhu; Rong-xiang, Li

238

Advanced Propulsion Research Interest in Materials for Propulsion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This viewgraph presentation provides an overview of material science and technology in the area of propulsion energetics. The authors note that conventional propulsion systems are near peak performance and further refinements in manufacturing, engineering design and materials will only provide incremental increases in performance. Energetic propulsion technologies could potential solve the problems of energy storage density and energy-to-thrust conversion efficiency. Topics considered include: the limits of thermal propulsion systems, the need for energetic propulsion research, emerging energetic propulsion technologies, materials research needed for advanced propulsion, and potential research opportunities.

Cole, John

2003-01-01

239

Distributed Propulsion Vehicles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Since the introduction of large jet-powered transport aircraft, the majority of these vehicles have been designed by placing thrust-generating engines either under the wings or on the fuselage to minimize aerodynamic interactions on the vehicle operation. However, advances in computational and experimental tools along with new technologies in materials, structures, and aircraft controls, etc. are enabling a high degree of integration of the airframe and propulsion system in aircraft design. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been investigating a number of revolutionary distributed propulsion vehicle concepts to increase aircraft performance. The concept of distributed propulsion is to fully integrate a propulsion system within an airframe such that the aircraft takes full synergistic benefits of coupling of airframe aerodynamics and the propulsion thrust stream by distributing thrust using many propulsors on the airframe. Some of the concepts are based on the use of distributed jet flaps, distributed small multiple engines, gas-driven multi-fans, mechanically driven multifans, cross-flow fans, and electric fans driven by turboelectric generators. This paper describes some early concepts of the distributed propulsion vehicles and the current turboelectric distributed propulsion (TeDP) vehicle concepts being studied under the NASA s Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project to drastically reduce aircraft-related fuel burn, emissions, and noise by the year 2030 to 2035.

Kim, Hyun Dae

2010-01-01

240

Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The fundamental capability of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) is game changing for space exploration. A first generation Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) based on NTP could provide high thrust at a specific impulse above 900 s, roughly double that of state of the art chemical engines. Characteristics of fission and NTP indicate that useful first generation systems will provide a foundation for future systems with extremely high performance. The role of the NCPS in the development of advanced nuclear propulsion systems could be analogous to the role of the DC-3 in the development of advanced aviation. Progress made under the NCPS project could help enable both advanced NTP and advanced NEP.

Houts, Michael G.; Borowski, S. K.; George, J. A.; Kim, T.; Emrich, W. J.; Hickman, R. R.; Broadway, J. W.; Gerrish, H. P.; Adams, R. B.

2012-01-01

241

Advanced Space Propulsion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This presentation describes a number of advanced space propulsion technologies with the potential for meeting the need for dramatic reductions in the cost of access to space, and the need for new propulsion capabilities to enable bold new space exploration (and, ultimately, space exploitation) missions of the 21st century. For example, current Earth-to-orbit (e.g., low Earth orbit, LEO) launch costs are extremely high (ca. $10,000/kg); a factor 25 reduction (to ca. $400/kg) will be needed to produce the dramatic increases in space activities in both the civilian and government sectors identified in the Commercial Space Transportation Study (CSTS). Similarly, in the area of space exploration, all of the relatively 'easy' missions (e.g., robotic flybys, inner solar system orbiters and landers; and piloted short-duration Lunar missions) have been done. Ambitious missions of the next century (e.g., robotic outer-planet orbiters/probes, landers, rovers, sample returns; and piloted long-duration Lunar and Mars missions) will require major improvements in propulsion capability. In some cases, advanced propulsion can enable a mission by making it faster or more affordable, and in some cases, by directly enabling the mission (e.g., interstellar missions). As a general rule, advanced propulsion systems are attractive because of their low operating costs (e.g., higher specific impulse, ISD) and typically show the most benefit for relatively 'big' missions (i.e., missions with large payloads or AV, or a large overall mission model). In part, this is due to the intrinsic size of the advanced systems as compared to state-of-the-art (SOTA) chemical propulsion systems. Also, advanced systems often have a large 'infrastructure' cost, either in the form of initial R&D costs or in facilities hardware costs (e.g., laser or microwave transmission ground stations for beamed energy propulsion). These costs must then be amortized over a large mission to be cost-competitive with a SOTA system with a low initial development and infrastructure cost and a high operating cost. Note however that this has resulted in a 'Catch 22' standoff between the need for large initial investment that is amortized over many launches to reduce costs, and the limited number of launches possible at today's launch costs. Some examples of missions enabled (either in cost or capability) by advanced propulsion include long-life station-keeping or micro-spacecraft applications using electric propulsion or BMDO-derived micro-thrusters, low-cost orbit raising (LEO to GEO or Lunar orbit) using electric propulsion, robotic planetary missions using aerobraking or electric propulsion, piloted Mars missions using aerobraking and/or propellant production from Martian resources, very fast (100-day round-trip) piloted Mars missions using fission or fusion propulsion, and, finally, interstellar missions using fusion, antimatter, or beamed energy. The NASA Advanced Propulsion Technology program at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is aimed at assessing the feasibility of a range of near-term to far term advanced propulsion technologies that have the potential to reduce costs and/or enable future space activities. The program includes cooperative modeling and research activities between JPL and various universities and industry; and directly supported independent research at universities and industry. The cooperative program consists of mission studies, research and development of ion engine technology using C60 (Buckminsterfullerene) propellant, and research and development of lithium-propellant Lorentz-force accelerator (LFA) engine technology. The university/industry-supported research includes modeling and proof-of-concept experiments in advanced, high-lsp, long-life electric propulsion, and in fusion propulsion.

Frisbee, Robert H.

1996-01-01

242

Progress in Conceptual Design and Analysis of Advanced Rotorcraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This presentation will give information on Multi-Disciplinary Analysis and Technology Development, including it's objectives and how they will be met. In addition, it will also present recent highlights including the Lift-Offset Civil Design and it's study conclusions, as well as, the LCTR2 Propulsion Concept's study conclusions. Recent publications and future publications will also be discussed.

Yamauchi, Gloria K.

2012-01-01

243

Design sensitivity analysis of rotorcraft airframe structures for vibration reduction  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Optimization of rotorcraft structures for vibration reduction was studied. The objective of this study is to develop practical computational procedures for structural optimization of airframes subject to steady-state vibration response constraints. One of the key elements of any such computational procedure is design sensitivity analysis. A method for design sensitivity analysis of airframes under vibration response constraints is presented. The mathematical formulation of the method and its implementation as a new solution sequence in MSC/NASTRAN are described. The results of the application of the method to a simple finite element stick model of the AH-1G helicopter airframe are presented and discussed. Selection of design variables that are most likely to bring about changes in the response at specified locations in the airframe is based on consideration of forced response strain energy. Sensitivity coefficients are determined for the selected design variable set. Constraints on the natural frequencies are also included in addition to the constraints on the steady-state response. Sensitivity coefficients for these constraints are determined. Results of the analysis and insights gained in applying the method to the airframe model are discussed. The general nature of future work to be conducted is described.

Murthy, T. Sreekanta

1987-01-01

244

The role of computerized symbolic manipulation in rotorcraft dynamics analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The potential role of symbolic manipulation programs in development and solution of the governing equations for rotorcraft dynamics problems is discussed and illustrated. Nonlinear equations of motion for a helicopter rotor blade represented by a rotating beam are developed making use of the computerized symbolic manipulation program MACSYMA. The use of computerized symbolic manipulation allows the analyst to concentrate on more meaningful tasks, such as establishment of physical assumptions, without being sidetracked by the tedious and trivial details of the algebraic manipulations. Furthermore, the resulting equations can be produced, if necessary, in a format suitable for numerical solution. A perturbation-type solution for the resulting dynamical equations is shown to be possible with a combination of symbolic manipulation and standard numerical techniques. This should ultimately lead to a greater physical understanding of the behavior of the solution than is possible with purely numerical techniques. The perturbation analysis of the flapping motion of a rigid rotor blade in forward flight is presented, for illustrative purposes, via computerized symbolic manipulation with a method that bypasses Floquet theory.

Crespo Da Silva, Marcelo R. M.; Hodges, Dewey H.

1986-01-01

245

Model for Vortex Ring State Influence on Rotorcraft Flight Dynamics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The influence of vortex ring state (VRS) on rotorcraft flight dynamics is investigated, specifically the vertical velocity drop of helicopters and the roll-off of tiltrotors encountering VRS. The available wind tunnel and flight test data for rotors in vortex ring state are reviewed. Test data for axial flow, non-axial flow, two rotors, unsteadiness, and vortex ring state boundaries are described and discussed. Based on the available measured data, a VRS model is developed. The VRS model is a parametric extension of momentum theory for calculation of the mean inflow of a rotor, hence suitable for simple calculations and real-time simulations. This inflow model is primarily defined in terms of the stability boundary of the aircraft motion. Calculations of helicopter response during VRS encounter were performed, and good correlation is shown with the vertical velocity drop measured in flight tests. Calculations of tiltrotor response during VRS encounter were performed, showing the roll-off behavior characteristic of tiltrotors. Hence it is possible, using a model of the mean inflow of an isolated rotor, to explain the basic behavior of both helicopters and tiltrotors in vortex ring state.

Johnson, Wayne

2005-01-01

246

Hypersonic Propulsion Research.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The development of technology for the modular airframe integrated scramjet has been the focus of hypersonic propulsion research for several years. An part of this research, a variety of inlet concepts have been explored and characterized. The emphasis of ...

G. B. Northam

1990-01-01

247

Flagellar propulsion near walls  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Confinement and wall effects are known to affect the kinematics and propulsive characteristics of swimming microorganisms. When a solid body is dragged through a viscous fluid at constant velocity, the presence of a wall increases fluid drag, and thus the net force required to maintain speed has to increase. In contrast, recent optical trapping experiments have revealed that the propulsive force generated by human spermatozoa is decreased by the presence of boundaries. Here we use simple models to analytically elucidate the propulsive effects of a solid boundary on passively actuated filaments and model eukaryotic flagella. We show that in some cases, the increase in fluid friction induced by the wall can lead to a change in the waveform expressed by the flagella which results in a decrease of their propulsive force near a no-slip wall.

Evans, Arthur; Lauga, Eric

2010-11-01

248

CFD for Hypersonic Propulsion.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

An overview is given of research activity on the application of computational fluid dynamics (CDF) for hypersonic propulsion systems. After the initial consideration of the highly integrated nature of air-breathing hypersonic engines and airframe, attenti...

L. A. Povinelli

1990-01-01

249

CFD Applications in Propulsion.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

An overview of various applications of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) algorithms to propulsion problems is given. Topics of interest include incompressible, low speed compressible, transonic, and supersonic problems. A common family of algorithms is u...

C. L. Merkle

1991-01-01

250

Propulsion technology discipline  

Microsoft Academic Search

Viewgraphs on propulsion technology discipline for Space Station Freedom are presented. Topics covered include: water electrolysis O2\\/H2 system; hydrazine system advancements; common technology; fluids disposal; and storable bipropellant system.

Lee W. Jones

1990-01-01

251

Combustion and Propulsion.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A brief review of combustion and propulsion research currently underway at the Institute for Aerospace Studies is provided. Afterburning rocket exhaust plume properties are being investigated both experimentally and by mathematical analysis. The objective...

J. P. Sislian Y. Sheng L. Jiang R. A. Cusworth J. T. C. Hu

1989-01-01

252

Contributions of the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel to Rotorcraft Technology and Development  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A historical account of the contributions of the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) to rotorcraft technology and development tunnel's inception in 1960 is presented. The paper begins with a summary of the major characteristics of the TDT and a description of the unique capability offered by the TDT for testing aeroelastic models by virtue of its heavy gas test medium. This is followed by some remarks on the role played by scale models in the design and development of rotorcraft vehicles and review of the basic scaling relationships important for designing and building dynamic aeroelastic models of rotorcraft vehicles for testing in the TDT. Chronological accounts of helicopter and tiltrotor research conducted in the TDT are then described in separate sections. The discussions include a description of the various models employed, the specific objectives of the tests, and illustrative results.

Yeager, William T., Jr.; Kvaternik, Raymond G.

2000-01-01

253

A Historical Overview of Aeroelasticity Branch and Transonic Dynamics Tunnel Contributions to Rotorcraft Technology and Development  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A historical account of the contributions of the Aeroelasticity Branch (AB) and the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) to rotorcraft technology and development since the tunnel's inception in 1960 is presented. The paper begins with a summary of the major characteristics of the TDT and a description of the unique capability offered by the TDT for testing aeroelastic models by virtue of its heavy gas test medium. This is followed by some remarks on the role played by scale models in the design and development of rotorcraft vehicles and a review of the basic scaling relationships important for designing and building dynamic aeroelastic models of rotorcraft vehicles for testing in the TDT. Chronological accounts of helicopter and tiltrotor research conducted in AB/TDT are then described in separate sections. Both experimental and analytical studies are reported and include a description of the various physical and mathematical models employed, the specific objectives of the investigations, and illustrative experimental and analytical results.

Yeager, William T., Jr.; Kvaternik, Raymond G.

2001-01-01

254

Zero/zero rotorcraft certification issues. Volume 2: Plenary session presentations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report analyzes the Zero/Zero Rotorcraft Certification Issues from the perspectives of manufacturers, operators, researchers and the FAA. The basic premise behind this analysis is that zero/zero, or at least extremely low visibility, rotorcraft operations are feasible today from both a technological and an operational standpoint. The questions and issues that need to be resolved are: What certification requirements do we need to ensure safety. Can we develop procedures which capitalize on the performance and maneuvering capabilities unique to rotorcraft. Will extremely low visibility operations be economically feasible. This is Volume 2 of three. It presents the operator perspectives (system needs), applicable technology and zero/zero concepts developed in the first 12 months of research of this project.

Adams, Richard J.

1988-01-01

255

Directions in propulsion control  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The research needs in the area of propulsion control as driven by trends in advanced aircraft are considered. Ongoing propulsion control research at NASA Lewis is discussed. Special emphasis is made on research to improve control system reliability through the use of analytical redundancy to accommodate failed control sensors. In conclusion, a discussion of new research thrusts in the area of supersonic STOVL integrated control and intelligent system control is presented.

Lorenzo, Carl F.

1987-01-01

256

Advanced propulsion concepts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A variety of Advanced Propulsion Concepts (APC) is discussed. The focus is on those concepts that are sufficiently near-term that they could be developed for the Space Exploration Initiative. High-power (multi-megawatt) electric propulsion, solar sails, tethers, and extraterrestrial resource utilization concepts are discussed. A summary of these concepts and some general conclusions on their technology development needs are presented.

Frisbee, Robert H.

1991-01-01

257

Solar Thermal Propulsion Test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Researchers at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) have designed, fabricated, and tested the first solar thermal engine, a non-chemical rocket engine that produces lower thrust but has better thrust efficiency than a chemical combustion engine. MSFC turned to solar thermal propulsion in the early 1990s due to its simplicity, safety, low cost, and commonality with other propulsion systems. Solar thermal propulsion works by acquiring and redirecting solar energy to heat a propellant. The 20- by 24-ft heliostat mirror (not shown in this photograph) has a dual-axis control that keeps a reflection of the sunlight on the 18-ft diameter concentrator mirror, which then focuses the sunlight to a 4-in focal point inside the vacuum chamber. The focal point has 10 kilowatts of intense solar power. This image, taken during the test, depicts the light being concentrated into the focal point inside the vacuum chamber. As part of MSFC's Space Transportation Directorate, the Propulsion Research Center serves as a national resource for research of advanced, revolutionary propulsion technologies. The mission is to move the Nation's capabilities beyond the confines of conventional chemical propulsion into an era of aircraft-like access to Earth orbit, rapid travel throughout the solar system, and exploration of interstellar space.

1999-01-01

258

An adaptive altitude information fusion method for autonomous landing processes of small unmanned aerial rotorcraft.  

PubMed

This paper presents an adaptive information fusion method to improve the accuracy and reliability of the altitude measurement information for small unmanned aerial rotorcraft during the landing process. Focusing on the low measurement performance of sensors mounted on small unmanned aerial rotorcraft, a wavelet filter is applied as a pre-filter to attenuate the high frequency noises in the sensor output. Furthermore, to improve altitude information, an adaptive extended Kalman filter based on a maximum a posteriori criterion is proposed to estimate measurement noise covariance matrix in real time. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed method is proved by static tests, hovering flight and autonomous landing flight tests. PMID:23201993

Lei, Xusheng; Li, Jingjing

2012-01-01

259

A comprehensive analytical model of rotorcraft aerodynamics and dynamics. Part 3: Program manual  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The computer program for a comprehensive analytical model of rotorcraft aerodynamics and dynamics is described. This analysis is designed to calculate rotor performance, loads, and noise; the helicopter vibration and gust response; the flight dynamics and handling qualities; and the system aeroelastic stability. The analysis is a combination of structural, inertial, and aerodynamic models that is applicable to a wide range of problems and a wide class of vehicles. The analysis is intended for use in the design, testing, and evaluation of rotors and rotorcraft and to be a basis for further development of rotary wing theories.

Johnson, W.

1980-01-01

260

Application of special-purpose digital computers to rotorcraft real-time simulation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The use of an array processor as a computational element in rotorcraft real-time simulation is studied. A multilooping scheme was considered in which the rotor would loop over its calculations a number of time while the remainder of the model cycled once on a host computer. To prove that such a method would realistically simulate rotorcraft, a FORTRAN program was constructed to emulate a typical host-array processor computing configuration. The multilooping of an expanded rotor model, which included appropriate kinematic equations, resulted in an accurate and stable simulation.

Mackie, D. B.; Michelson, S.

1978-01-01

261

An Adaptive Altitude Information Fusion Method for Autonomous Landing Processes of Small Unmanned Aerial Rotorcraft  

PubMed Central

This paper presents an adaptive information fusion method to improve the accuracy and reliability of the altitude measurement information for small unmanned aerial rotorcraft during the landing process. Focusing on the low measurement performance of sensors mounted on small unmanned aerial rotorcraft, a wavelet filter is applied as a pre-filter to attenuate the high frequency noises in the sensor output. Furthermore, to improve altitude information, an adaptive extended Kalman filter based on a maximum a posteriori criterion is proposed to estimate measurement noise covariance matrix in real time. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed method is proved by static tests, hovering flight and autonomous landing flight tests.

Lei, Xusheng; Li, Jingjing

2012-01-01

262

Fusion for Space Propulsion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The need for fusion propulsion for interplanetary flights is discussed. For a propulsion system, there are three important system attributes: (1) The absolute amount of energy available, (2) the propellant exhaust velocity, and (3) the jet power per unit mass of the propulsion system (specific power). For efficient and affordable human exploration of the solar system, propellant exhaust velocity in excess of 100 km/s and specific power in excess of 10 kW/kg are required. Chemical combustion obviously cannot meet the requirement in propellant exhaust velocity. Nuclear fission processes typically result in producing energy in the form of heat that needs to be manipulated at temperatures limited by materials to about 2,800 K. Using the fission energy to heat a low atomic weight propellant produces propellant velocity of the order of 10 kinds. Alternatively the fission energy can be converted into electricity that is used to accelerate particles to high exhaust velocity. However, the necessary power conversion and conditioning equipment greatly increases the mass of the propulsion system. Fundamental considerations in waste heat rejection and power conditioning in a fission electric propulsion system place a limit on its jet specific power to the order of about 0.2 kW/kg. If fusion can be developed for propulsion, it appears to have the best of all worlds - it can provide the largest absolute amount of energy, the propellant exhaust velocity (> 100 km/s), and the high specific jet power (> 10 kW/kg). An intermediate step towards fusion propulsion might be a bimodal system in which a fission reactor is used to provide some of the energy to drive a fusion propulsion unit. There are similarities as well as differences between applying fusion to propulsion and to terrestrial electrical power generation. The similarities are the underlying plasma and fusion physics, the enabling component technologies, the computational and the diagnostics capabilities. These physics and engineering capabilities have been demonstrated for a fusion reactor gain (Q) of the order of unity (TFTR: 0.25, JET: 0.65, JT-60: Q(sub eq) approx. 1.25). These technological advances made it compelling for considering fusion for propulsion.

Thio, Y. C. Francis; Schmidt, George R.; Santarius, John F.; Turchi, Peter J.; Siemon, Richard E.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

2002-01-01

263

High-Temperature Solid Lubricants Developed by NASA Lewis Offer Virtually "Unlimited Life" for Oil-Free Turbomachinery  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA Lewis Research Center is capitalizing on breakthroughs in foil air bearing performance, tribological coatings, and computer analyses to formulate the Oil-free Turbomachinery Program. The program s long-term goal is to develop an innovative, yet practical, oil-free aeropropulsion gas turbine engine that floats on advanced air bearings. This type of engine would operate at higher speeds and temperatures with lower weight and friction than conventional oil-lubricated engines. During startup and shutdown, solid lubricant coatings are required to prevent wear in such engines before the self-generating air-lubrication film develops. NASA s Tribology Branch has created PS304, a chrome-oxide-based plasma spray coating specifically tailored for shafts run against foil bearings. PS304 contains silver and barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic (BaF2/CaF2) lubricant additives that, together, provide lubrication from cold start temperatures to over 650 C, the maximum use temperature for foil bearings. Recent lab tests show that bearings lubricated with PS304 survive over 100 000 start-stop cycles without experiencing any degradation in performance due to wear. The accompanying photograph shows a test bearing after it was run at 650 C. The rubbing process created a "polished" surface that enhances bearing load capacity.

DellaCorte, Christopher; Valco, Mark J.

1999-01-01

264

Laser Propulsion Standardization Issues  

SciTech Connect

It is a relevant issue in the research on laser propulsion that experimental results are treated seriously and that meaningful scientific comparison is possible between groups using different equipment and measurement techniques. However, critical aspects of experimental measurements are sparsely addressed in the literature. In addition, few studies so far have the benefit of independent confirmation by other laser propulsion groups. In this paper, we recommend several approaches towards standardization of published laser propulsion experiments. Such standards are particularly important for the measurement of laser ablation pulse energy, laser spot area, imparted impulse or thrust, and mass removal during ablation. Related examples are presented from experiences of an actual scientific cooperation between NU and DLR. On the basis of a given standardization, researchers may better understand and contribute their findings more clearly in the future, and compare those findings confidently with those already published in the laser propulsion literature. Relevant ISO standards are analyzed, and revised formats are recommended for application to laser propulsion studies.

Scharring, Stefan; Eckel, Hans-Albert [Institute of Technical Physics, German Aerospace Center (DLR), D-70569 Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 38-40 (Germany); Roeser, Hans-Peter [Institute of Space Systems, University of Stuttgart, D-70569 Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 31 (Germany); Sinko, John E. [Micro-Nano Global Center of Excellence, Nagoya University (Niue), Nagoya, Aichi, 464-8603 (Japan); Sasoh, Akihiro [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi, 464-8603 (Japan)

2010-10-08

265

A liquid propulsion panorama  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Liquid-propellant rocket engines are widely used all over the world, thanks to their high performances, in particular high thrust-to-weight ratio. The present paper presents a general panorama of liquid propulsion as a contribution of the IAF Advanced Propulsion Prospective Group. After a brief history of its past development in the different parts of the world, the current status of liquid propulsion, the currently observed trends, the possible areas of future improvement and a summarized road map of future developments are presented. The road map includes a summary of the liquid propulsion status presented in the "Year in review 2007" of Aerospace America. Although liquid propulsion is often seen as a mature technology with few areas of potential improvement, the requirements of an active commercial market and a renewed interest for space exploration has led to the development of a family of new engines, with more design margins, simpler to use and to produce associated with a wide variety of thrust and life requirements.

Caisso, Philippe; Souchier, Alain; Rothmund, Christophe; Alliot, Patrick; Bonhomme, Christophe; Zinner, Walter; Parsley, Randy; Neill, Todd; Forde, Scott; Starke, Robert; Wang, William; Takahashi, Mamoru; Atsumi, Masahiro; Valentian, Dominique

2009-12-01

266

Nanosatellite Propulsion Development Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Earth-orbiting nanosatellite constellations are a unique and exciting means toward fulfilling part of the mission of the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). These constellations, which may consist of several hundred 10-kg spacecraft, present unique challenges in the area of propulsion. Many mission concepts require significant delta-v and attitude control capability to reside in the nanosatellites. In response to requirements from mission feasibility studies, such as the Magnetospheric Constellation study, the GSFC has initiated industry and government partnerships to develop enabling propulsion technologies. The largest challenge has been to meet the power constraints of nanosatellites. These power issues, combined with the high thrust required by many of the missions studied, have led the GSFC to concentrate its efforts on chemical propulsion technology. Electric propulsion technologies capable of performing efficiently at very low power are also of interest to the GSFC as potential candidates for nanosatellite formation flying missions. This paper provides the status of specific industrial or government partnerships undertaken by the GSFC to develop nano/micro propulsion components. Three specific technologies are described in detail: 1) Nanosatellite Solid Rocket Motor Prototype 2) Ultra-Low-Power Cold Gas Thruster for Spin-Axis Precession 3) Micro-Machined Solid-Propellant Gas Generators.

Gagosian, J. S.; Rhee, M. S.; Zakrzwski, C. M.

1999-01-01

267

Propulsion IVHM Technology Experiment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Propulsion IVHM Technology Experiment (PITEX) successfully demonstrated real-time fault detection and isolation of a virtual reusable launch vehicle (RLV) main propulsion system (MPS). Specifically, the PITEX research project developed and applied a model-based diagnostic system for the MPS of the X-34 RLV, a space-launch technology demonstrator. The demonstration was simulation-based using detailed models of the propulsion subsystem to generate nominal and failure scenarios during captive carry, which is the most safety-critical portion of the X-34 flight. Since no system-level testing of the X-34 Main Propulsion System (MPS) was performed, these simulated data were used to verify and validate the software system. Advanced diagnostic and signal processing algorithms were developed and tested in real time on flight-like hardware. In an attempt to expose potential performance problems, the PITEX diagnostic system was subjected to numerous realistic effects in the simulated data including noise, sensor resolution, command/valve talkback information, and nominal build variations. In all cases, the PITEX system performed as required. The research demonstrated potential benefits of model-based diagnostics, defined performance metrics required to evaluate the diagnostic system, and studied the impact of real-world challenges encountered when monitoring propulsion subsystems.

Chicatelli, Amy K.; Maul, William A.; Fulton, Christopher E.

2006-01-01

268

Nuclear concepts/propulsion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Nuclear thermal and nuclear electric propulsion systems will enable and/or enhance important space exploration missions to the moon and Mars. Current efforts are addressing certain research areas, although NASA and DOE still have much work yet to do. Relative to chemical systems, nuclear thermal propulsion offers the potential of reduced vehicle weight, wider launch windows. and shorter transit times, even without aerobrakes. This would improve crew safety by reducing their exposure to cosmic radiation. Advanced materials and structures will be an important resource in responding to the challenges posed by safety and test facility requirements, environmental concerns, high temperature fuels and the high radiation, hot hydrogen environment within nuclear thermal propulsion systems. Nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) has its own distinct set of advantages relative to chemical systems. These include low resupply mass, the availability of large amounts of onboard electric power for other uses besides propulsion, improved launch windows, and the ability to share technology with surface power systems. Development efforts for NEP reactors will emphasize long life operation of compact designs. This will require designs that provide high fuel burnup and high temperature operation along with personnel and environmental safety.

Miller, Thomas J.

1993-01-01

269

Propulsion by laser power  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Laser power can be transformed into propulsive power to set into motion various kinds of vehicles and other objects on the surface, in the air and in space. The transformation process can occur indirectly, for instance by producing electricity via photovoltaic cells or thermal power. Another possibility is the generation of impulses by the ablation of matter from a solid body, or by the initiation of a high-pressure plasma breakdown wave in a fluid medium. Applications range from driving remotely powered roving vehicles to various kinds of thrusters for space propulsion. The direct thrust of the laser photon flux can be used for the propulsion of laser sailcrafts. Applications in space range from micropropulsion for satellite attitude control in the near-term to futuristic interstellar travel driven by photon propulsion. Other propulsive applications in space concern the change of orbits of objects like man-made orbital debris as well as of large objects (asteroids, comets) for protection of Earth against disastrous impacts.

Schall, Wolfgang O.

2005-03-01

270

Electric Propulsion Applications and Impacts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Most space missions require on-board propulsion systems and these systems are often dominant spacecraft mass drivers. Presently, on-board systems account for more than half the injected mass for commercial communications systems and even greater mass fractions for ambitious planetary missions. Anticipated trends toward the use of both smaller spacecraft and launch vehicles will likely increase pressure on the performance of on-board propulsion systems. The acceptance of arcjet thrusters for operational use on commercial communications satellites ushered in a new era in on-board propulsion and exponential growth of electric propulsion across a broad spectrum of missions is anticipated. NASA recognizes the benefits of advanced propulsion and NASA's Office of Space Access and Technology supports an aggressive On-Board Propulsion program, including a strong electric propulsion element, to assure the availability of high performance propulsion systems to meet the goals of the ambitious missions envisioned in the next two decades. The program scope ranges from fundamental research for future generation systems through specific insertion efforts aimed at near term technology transfer. The On-Board propulsion program is committed to carrying technologies to levels required for customer acceptance and emphasizes direct interactions with the user community and the development of commercial sources. This paper provides a discussion of anticipated missions, propulsion functions, and electric propulsion impacts followed by an overview of the electric propulsion element of the NASA On-Board Propulsion program.

Curran, Frank M.; Wickenheiser, Timothy J.

1996-01-01

271

Free radical propulsion concept  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A free radical propulsion concept utilizing the recombination energy of dissociated low molecular weight gases to produce thrust was examined. The concept offered promise of a propulsion system operating at a theoretical impulse, with hydrogen, as high as 2200 seconds at high thrust to power ratio, thus filling the gas existing between chemical and electrostatic propulsion capabilities. Microwave energy used to dissociate a continuously flowing gas was transferred to the propellant via three body recombination for conversion to propellant kinetic energy. Power absorption by the microwave plasma discharge was in excess of 90 percent over a broad range of pressures. Gas temperatures inferred from gas dynamic equations showed much higher temperatures from microwave heating than from electrothermal heating. Spectroscopic analysis appeared to corroborate the inferred temperatures of one of the gases tested.

Hawkins, C. E.; Nakanishi, S.

1981-01-01

272

Space station propulsion technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The progress on the Space Station Propulsion Technology Program is described. The objectives are to provide a demonstration of hydrogen/oxygen propulsion technology readiness for the Initial Operating Capability (IOC) space station application, specifically gaseous hydrogen/oxygen and warm hydrogen thruster concepts, and to establish a means for evolving from the IOC space station propulsion to that required to support and interface with advanced station functions. The evaluation of concepts was completed. The accumulator module of the test bed was completed and, with the microprocessor controller, delivered to NASA-MSFC. An oxygen/hydrogen thruster was modified for use with the test bed and successfully tested at mixture ratios from 4:1 to 8:1.

Briley, G. L.

1986-01-01

273

Fusion for Space Propulsion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

There is little doubt that humans will attempt to explore and develop the solar system in this century. A large amount of energy will be required for accomplishing this. The need for fusion propulsion is discussed. For a propulsion system, there are three important thermodynamical attributes: (1) The absolute amount of energy available, (2) the propellant exhaust velocity, and (3) the jet power per unit mass of the propulsion system (specific power). For human exploration and development of the solar system, propellant exhaust velocity in excess of 100 km/s and specific power in excess of 10 kW/kg are required. Chemical combustion can produce exhaust velocity up to about 5 km/s. Nuclear fission processes typically result in producing energy in the form of heat that needs to be manipulated at temperatures limited by materials to about 2,800 K. Using the energy to heat a hydrogen propellant increases the exhaust velocity by only a factor of about two. Alternatively the energy can be converted into electricity which is then used to accelerate particles to high exhaust velocity. The necessary power conversion and conditioning equipment, however, increases the mass of the propulsion system for the same jet power by more than two orders of magnitude over chemical system, thus greatly limits the thrust-to-weight ratio attainable. The principal advantage of the fission process is that its development is relatively mature and is available right now. If fusion can be developed, fusion appears to have the best of all worlds in terms of propulsion - it can provide the absolute amount, the propellant exhaust velocity, and the high specific jet power. An intermediate step towards pure fusion propulsion is a bimodal system in which a fission reactor is used to provide some of the energy to drive a fusion propulsion unit. The technical issues related to fusion for space propulsion are discussed. The technical priorities for developing and applying fusion for propulsion are somewhat different from those for terrestrial electrical power generation. Thus fusion schemes that are initially attractive for electrical power generation might not necessarily be attractive also for propulsion and vice versa, though the underlying fusion science and engineering enjoy much overlap. Parallel efforts to develop these qualitatively differently fusion schemes for the two applications could benefit greatly from each other due to the synergy in the underlying physics and engineering. Pulsed approaches to fusion have not been explored to the same degree as steady-state or long-pulse approaches to fusion in the fusion power research program. The concerns early on were several. One was that the pulsed power components might not have the service lifetimes meeting the requirements of a practical power generating plant. Another was that, for many pulsed fusion schemes, it was not clear whether the destruction of hardware per pulse could be minimized or eliminated or recycled to such an extent as to make economical electrical power generation feasible, Significant development of the underlying pulsed power component technologies have occurred in the last two decades because of defense and other energy requirements. The state of development of the pulsed power technologies are sufficiently advanced now to make it compelling to visit or re-visit pulsed fusion approaches for application to propulsion where the cost of energy is not so demanding a factor as in the case of terrestrial power application. For propulsion application, the overall mass of the fusion system is the critical factor. Producing fusion reactions require extreme states of matter. Conceptually, these extreme states of matter are more readily realizable in the pulsed states, at least within appropriate bounds, than in the steady states. Significant saving in system mass may result in such systems. Magnetic fields are effective in confining plasma energy, whereas inertial compression is an effective way of heating and containing the plasma. Intensive research in developing magnetic energy containme

Thio, Y. C. Francis; Schafer, Charles (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

274

Advanced rocket propulsion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Existing NASA research contracts are supporting development of advanced reinforced polymer and metal matrix composites for use in liquid rocket engines of the future. Advanced rocket propulsion concepts, such as modular platelet engines, dual-fuel dual-expander engines, and variable mixture ratio engines, require advanced materials and structures to reduce overall vehicle weight as well as address specific propulsion system problems related to elevated operating temperatures, new engine components, and unique operating processes. High performance propulsion systems with improved manufacturability and maintainability are needed for single stage to orbit vehicles and other high performance mission applications. One way to satisfy these needs is to develop a small engine which can be clustered in modules to provide required levels of total thrust. This approach should reduce development schedule and cost requirements by lowering hardware lead times and permitting the use of existing test facilities. Modular engines should also reduce operational costs associated with maintenance and parts inventories.

Obrien, Charles J.

1993-02-01

275

Nuclear electric propulsion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The feasibility is investigated of using nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) for slow freighter ships traveling from a 500 km low Earth orbit (LEO) to the Moon's orbit about the Earth, and on to Mars. NEP is also shown to be feasible for transporting people to Mars on long conjunction-class missions lasting about nine months one way, and on short sprint missions lasting four months one way. Generally, it was not attempted to optimize ion exhaust velocities, but rather suitable parameters to demonstrate NEP feasibility were chosen. Various combinations of missions are compared with chemical and nuclear thermal propulsion (NTR) systems. Typically, NEP and NTR can accomplish the same lifting task with similar mass in LEO. When compared to chemical propulsion, NEP was found to accomplish the same missions with 40% less mass in LEO. These findings are sufficiently encouraging as to merit further studies with optimum systems.

Keaton, Paul W.; Tubb, David J.

1986-01-01

276

Advanced Chemical Propulsion Study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A study was performed of advanced chemical propulsion technology application to space science (Code S) missions. The purpose was to begin the process of selecting chemical propulsion technology advancement activities that would provide greatest benefits to Code S missions. Several missions were selected from Code S planning data, and a range of advanced chemical propulsion options was analyzed to assess capabilities and benefits re these missions. Selected beneficial applications were found for higher-performing bipropellants, gelled propellants, and cryogenic propellants. Technology advancement recommendations included cryocoolers and small turbopump engines for cryogenic propellants; space storable propellants such as LOX-hydrazine; and advanced monopropellants. It was noted that fluorine-bearing oxidizers offer performance gains over more benign oxidizers. Potential benefits were observed for gelled propellants that could be allowed to freeze, then thawed for use.

Woodcock, Gordon; Byers, Dave; Alexander, Leslie A.; Krebsbach, Al

2004-01-01

277

Nuclear electric propulsion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The feasibility is investigated of using nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) for slow freighter ships traveling from a 500 km low Earth orbit (LEO) to the Moon's orbit about the Earth, and on to Mars. NEP is also shown to be feasible for transporting people to Mars on long conjunction-class missions lasting about nine months one way, and on short sprint missions lasting four months one way. Generally, it was not attempted to optimize ion exhaust velocities, but rather suitable parameters to demonstrate NEP feasibility were chosen. Various combinations of missions are compared with chemical and nuclear thermal propulsion (NTR) systems. Typically, NEP and NTR can accomplish the same lifting task with similar mass in LEO. When compared to chemical propulsion, NEP was found to accomplish the same missions with 40% less mass in LEO. These findings are sufficiently encouraging as to merit further studies with optimum systems.

Keaton, Paul W.; Tubb, David J.

1986-05-01

278

Performance Evaluation of Vision-Based Navigation and Landing on a Rotorcraft Unmanned Aerial Vehicle  

Microsoft Academic Search

A rotorcraft UAV provides an ideal experimental platform for vision-based navigation. This paper describes the flight tests of the US Army PALACE project, which implements Moravec's pseudo-normalized correlation tracking algorithm. The tracker uses the movement of the landing site in the camera, a laser range, and the aircraft attitude from an IMU to estimate the relative motion of the UAV.

David Hubbard; Bryan Morse; Colin Theodore; Mark Tischler; Timothy W. Mclain

2007-01-01

279

Doppler-based motion compensation algorithm for focusing the signature of a rotorcraft.  

PubMed

A computationally efficient algorithm was developed and tested to compensate for the effects of motion on the acoustic signature of a rotorcraft. For target signatures with large spectral peaks that vary slowly in amplitude and have near constant frequency, the time-varying Doppler shift can be tracked and then removed from the data. The algorithm can be used to preprocess data for classification, tracking, and nulling algorithms. The algorithm was tested on rotorcraft data. The average instantaneous frequency of the first harmonic of a rotorcraft was tracked with a fixed-lag smoother. Then, state space estimates of the frequency were used to calculate a time warping that removed the effect of a time-varying Doppler shift from the data. The algorithm was evaluated by analyzing the increase in the amplitude of the harmonics in the spectrum of a rotorcraft. The results depended upon the frequency of the harmonics and the processing interval duration. Under good conditions, the results for the fundamental frequency of the target (~11 Hz) almost achieved an estimated upper bound. The results for higher frequency harmonics had larger increases in the amplitude of the peaks, but significantly lower than the estimated upper bounds. PMID:23363088

Goldman, Geoffrey H

2013-02-01

280

The effect of rotor motion on the induced velocity in predicting the response of rotorcraft  

Microsoft Academic Search

The prediction of the dynamic response is a fundamental objective in rotorcraft flight mechanics, having relevance to flight simulation, handling qualities assessment and control system design. Unlike conventional fixed-wing aircraft, helicopter flight dynamics models must account for the coupling between the fuselage, rotor, and inflow degrees of freedom, resulting in highly complex systems whose predictive capability is limited by aerodynamic

Jeffrey David Keller

1998-01-01

281

Robust Low Altitude Behavior Control of a Quadrotor Rotorcraft Through Sliding Modes  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper gives the full dynamical model of a commercially available quadrotor rotorcraft and presents its behavior control at low altitudes through sliding mode control. The control law is very well known for its robustness against disturbances and invariance during the sliding regime. The plant, on the other hand, is a nonlinear one with state variables are tightly coupled. The

Onder Efe

282

Robust low altitude behavior control of a quadrotor rotorcraft through sliding modes  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper gives the full dynamical model of a commercially available quadrotor rotorcraft and presents its behavior control at low altitudes through sliding mode control. The control law is very well known for its robustness against disturbances and invariance during the sliding regime. The plant, on the other hand, is a nonlinear one with state variables are tightly coupled. The

M. O. Efe

2007-01-01

283

A closed loop experiment of collective bounce aeroelastic Rotorcraft-Pilot Coupling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This work presents an experimental study that investigated the possibility of destabilising a rotorcraft by coupling the biomechanical behaviour of human subjects with the dynamics of the vehicle. The results of a study focused on the behaviour of pilots holding the collective control inceptor in a flight simulator are discussed. The motion of the flight simulation model was restricted to the heave axis, and augmented to include an elastic mode of vibration in addition to the rigid heave degree of freedom. Four different pilots flew several alternative model configurations with different elastic mode frequency and different collective pitch gearing ratios. This resulted in several observable unstable pilot-vehicle interactions at frequencies that cannot be traced back to the rotorcraft dynamics. Unstable oscillatory events evolving into limit cycle oscillations occurred most often at frequencies related to the biomechanics of the flight simulator occupant. They appeared to be task dependent and, in some cases, the trigger could be attributed to specific events. Additionally, it was found that the presence of collective friction alleviates but does not completely eliminate the unstable interactions between the pilot and the rotorcraft. Although not statistically meaningful because of the small set of human subjects available for the study, the results confirmed that the biomechanics transfer function of the pilot is the most influential aspect of the pilot-vehicle system that gives rise to the adverse vertical bounce phenomenon. Additionally, this study gave useful insight into the vehicle parameters that can adversely influence the involuntary interaction of pilots with rotorcraft.

Masarati, Pierangelo; Quaranta, Giuseppe; Lu, Linghai; Jump, Michael

2014-01-01

284

Rotordynamic Feasibility of a Conceptual Variable-Speed Power Turbine Propulsion System for Large Civil Tilt-Rotor Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A variable-speed power turbine concept is analyzed for rotordynamic feasibility in a Large Civil Tilt-Rotor (LCTR) class engine. Implementation of a variable-speed power turbine in a rotorcraft engine would enable high efficiency propulsion at the high forward velocities anticipated of large tilt-rotor vehicles. Therefore, rotordynamics is a critical issue for this engine concept. A preliminary feasibility study is presented herein to address this concern and identify if variable-speed is possible in a conceptual engine sized for the LCTR. The analysis considers critical speed placement in the operating speed envelope, stability analysis up to the maximum anticipated operating speed, and potential unbalance response amplitudes to determine that a variable-speed power turbine is likely to be challenging, but not impossible to achieve in a tilt-rotor propulsion engine.

Howard, Samuel

2012-01-01

285

Z-Pinch Fusion Propulsion.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Fusion-based nuclear propulsion has the potential to enable fast interplanetary transportation. Shorter trips are better for humans in the harmful radiation environment of deep space. Nuclear propulsion and power plants can enable high Ispand payload mass...

J. Miernik

2011-01-01

286

Enhanced Passive Thermal Propulsion System.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The long term goal is to advance our understanding of thermal energy extraction from the ocean thermocline using an enhanced passive thermal propulsion system. Integration of this new propulsion technology in a low drag hydrodynamic shape is expected to y...

D. Warner E. Warner

2008-01-01

287

Nuclear thermal propulsion program overview  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Nuclear thermal propulsion program is described. The following subject areas are covered: lunar and Mars missions; national space policy; international cooperation in space exploration; propulsion technology; nuclear rocket program; and budgeting.

Bennett, Gary L.

1991-01-01

288

Satellite/spacecraft propulsion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Propulsion system performance has high leverage for many future missions because of large propellant mass requirements. Relatively small performance improvements can translate into large increases in payload and science return. Contamination control becomes more important as science instruments become more sensitive. This places more emphasis on exhaust plume contamination control. The need for reliable operation and long life places increased importance on health monitoring and control of spacecraft propulsion systems. The need for accurate spacecraft pointing and control increases the need for small impulse-bit thrusters. This presentation is represented by viewgraphs.

Dowdy, Mack W.

1991-01-01

289

Propulsion controlled aircraft computer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A low-cost, easily retrofit Propulsion Controlled Aircraft (PCA) system for use on a wide range of commercial and military aircraft consists of an propulsion controlled aircraft computer that reads in aircraft data including aircraft state, pilot commands and other related data, calculates aircraft throttle position for a given maneuver commanded by the pilot, and then displays both current and calculated throttle position on a cockpit display to show the pilot where to move throttles to achieve the commanded maneuver, or is automatically sent digitally to command the engines directly.

Cogan, Bruce R. (Inventor)

2010-01-01

290

Focused technology: Nuclear propulsion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The topics presented are covered in viewgraph form and include: nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP), which challenges (1) high temperature fuel and materials, (2) hot hydrogen environment, (3) test facilities, (4) safety, (5) environmental impact compliance, and (6) concept development, and nuclear electric propulsion (NEP), which challenges (1) long operational lifetime, (2) high temperature reactors, turbines, and radiators, (3) high fuel burn-up reactor fuels, and designs, (4) efficient, high temperature power conditioning, (5) high efficiency, and long life thrusters, (6) safety, (7) environmental impact compliance, and (8) concept development.

Miller, Thomas J.

1991-01-01

291

CFD applications - propulsion perspective  

SciTech Connect

The current status of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) as applied to propulsion devices is discussed. The traditional code development cycle is described, and it is argued that this cycle needs to be improved if the explosive growth in CFD codes is to be harnessed profitably. It is also argued that the government funding agencies have to take a leading role in the modification of this cycle. The technical issues relating to internal flows in propulsion systems are discussed, and it is suggested that mesh generation, mesh adaptation, and turbulence model development require major emphasis in the future. 16 references.

Syed, S.A.; Pickett, G.F.

1989-01-01

292

Electric propulsion: Experimental research  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes experimental electric propulsion research which was carried out at the University of Tennessee Space Institute with support from the Center for Space Transportation and Applied Research. Specifically, a multiplexed laser induced fluorescence (LIF) technique for obtaining vector velocities, Doppler temperatures, and relative number densities in the exhaust plumes from electric propulsion devices is described, and results are presented that were obtained on a low power argon arcjet. Also, preliminary Langmuir probe measurements on an ion source are described, and an update on the vacuum facility is presented.

Ruyten, W. M.; Friedly, V. J.; Keefer, D.

1992-01-01

293

The NASA Electric Propulsion Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA OAST Propulsion, Power, and Energy Division supports an electric propulsion program aimed at providing benefits to a broad class of missions. Concepts which have the potential to enable or significantly benefit space exploration and exploitation are identified and advanced toward application in the near and far term. This paper summarizes recent program progress in mission/system analysis; in electrothermal, electrostatic, and electromagnetic propulsion technologies; and in propulsion/spacecraft integration.

Stone, James R.; Byers, David C.; King, David Q.

1988-01-01

294

BREAKTHROUGH PROPULSION PHYSICS RESEARCH PROGRAM  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1996, a team of government, university and industry researchers proposed a program to seek the ultimate breakthroughs in space transportation: propulsion that requires no propellant mass, propulsion that can approach and, if possible, circumvent light speed, and breakthrough methods of energy production to power such devices. This Breakthrough Propulsion Physics program, managed by Lewis Research Center, is one part

Marc G. Millis

1996-01-01

295

NASA breakthrough propulsion physics program  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1996, NASA established the Breakthrough Propulsion Physics program to seek the ultimate breakthroughs in space transportation: propulsion that requires no propellant mass, propulsion that attains the maximum transit speeds physically possible, and breakthrough methods of energy production to power such devices. Topics of interest include experiments and theories regarding the coupling of gravity and electromagnetism, vacuum fluctuation energy, warp

Marc G. Millis

1999-01-01

296

Neural dynamic programming applied to rotorcraft flight control and reconfiguration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This dissertation introduces a new rotorcraft flight control methodology based on a relatively new form of neural control, neural dynamic programming (NDP). NDP is an on-line learning control scheme that is in its infancy and has only been applied to simple systems, such as those possessing a single control and a handful of states. This dissertation builds on the existing NDP concept to provide a comprehensive control system framework that can perform well as a learning controller for more realistic and practical systems of higher dimension such as helicopters. To accommodate such complex systems, the dissertation introduces the concept of a trim network that is seamlessly integrated into the NDP control structure and is also trained using this structure. This is the first time that neural networks have been applied to the helicopter control problem as a direct form of control without using other controller methodologies to augment the neural controller and without using order reducing simplifications such as axes decoupling. The dissertation focuses on providing a viable alternative helicopter control system design approach rather than providing extensive comparisons among various available controllers. As such, results showing the system's ability to stabilize the helicopter and to perform command tracking, without explicit comparison to other methods, are presented. In this research, design robustness was addressed by performing simulations under various disturbance conditions. All designs were tested using FLYRT, a sophisticated, industrial-scale, nonlinear, validated model of the Apache helicopter. Though illustrated for helicopters, the NDP control system framework should be applicable to general purpose multi-input multi-output (MIMO) control. In addition, this dissertation tackles the helicopter reconfigurable flight control problem, finding control solutions when the aircraft, and in particular its control actuators, are damaged. Such solutions have significant implications as actuator failures are presently deemed catastrophic, resulting in a complete loss of the aircraft. This dissertation develops pioneering reconfigurable flight control methods that are easily integrated into the NDP controller framework. Results show the reconfiguration control strategy to be successful, a first for helicopter flight control.

Enns, Russell James

297

SPE propulsion electrolyzer for NASA's integrated propulsion test article  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Hamilton Standard has delivered a 3000 PSI SPE Propulsion Electrolyzer Stack and Special Test Fixture to the NASA Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) Integrated Propulsion Test Article (IPTA) program in June 1990, per contract NAS9-18030. This prototype unit demonstrates the feasibility of SPE-high pressure water electrolysis for future space applications such as Space Station propulsion and Lunar/Mars energy storage. The SPE-Propulsion Electrolyzer has met or exceeded all IPTA program goals. It continues to function as the primary hydrogen and oxygen source for the IPTA test bed at the NASA/JSC Propulsion and Power Division Thermochemical Test Branch.

1991-01-01

298

Alternate Propulsion Energy Sources.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report contains a summary of the non-proprietary technical results of the referenced contract. The objective of the contract was to survey the entire field of advanced propulsion to uncover and carry out a technical assessment of any concept that sho...

R. L. Forward

1983-01-01

299

Pulsed Fission Propulsion Concept  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the 1960's U.S. Government laboratories, under Project Orion, investigated a pulsed nuclear fission propulsion system. Small nuclear pulse units would be sequentially discharged from the aft end of the vehicle. A blast shield and shock absorber system would protect the crew and convert the shock loads into a continuous propusive force.

1999-01-01

300

Internal combustion propulsion engine  

Microsoft Academic Search

An internal combustion propulsion engine is described which includes: a spherical engine body having an internal combustion chamber, the engine body being provided with a radially projecting nozzle which has an outwardly divergent conical exhaust opening centrally disposed therein, the nozzle being an extension in the wall of the engine body; a plurality of spaced support struts attached to and

Sing

1988-01-01

301

Electromechanical propulsion system  

Microsoft Academic Search

An Electro-Mechanical Propulsion System for vehicles, wherein the prime mover, such as an internal combustion engine, drives an alternating voltage generator through a first shaft at a constant RPM controlled by a speed governor; and wherein the alternating voltage generator serves as a source of energy for an electrical energy conversion unit comprising a controlled rectifier, a polyphase signal generator,

C. F. Stewart; J. K. Stewart

1984-01-01

302

General Aviation Propulsion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Programs exploring and demonstrating new technologies in general aviation propulsion are considered. These programs are the quiet, clean, general aviation turbofan (QCGAT) program; the general aviation turbine engine (GATE) study program; the general aviation propeller technology program; and the advanced rotary, diesel, and reciprocating engine programs.

1980-01-01

303

CFD applications - Propulsion perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current status of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) as applied to propulsion devices is discussed. The traditional code development cycle is described, and it is argued that this cycle needs to be improved if the explosive growth in CFD codes is to be harnessed profitably. It is also argued that the government funding agencies have to take a leading role

Saadat A. Syed; Gordon F. Pickett

1989-01-01

304

CFD for hypersonic propulsion  

Microsoft Academic Search

An overview is given of research activity on the application of computational fluid dynamics (CDF) for hypersonic propulsion systems. After the initial consideration of the highly integrated nature of air-breathing hypersonic engines and airframe, attention is directed toward computations carried out for the components of the engine. A generic inlet configuration is considered in order to demonstrate the highly three

Louis A. Povinelli

1990-01-01

305

ATOMIC PROPULSION OF SHIPS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The advantages and disadvantages of the nuclear propulsion of ships are ; considered both for naval and maritime purposes. The increased range of nuclear ; ships justifies their use in both submarine and surface naval vessels. However, ; the economic problems are of importance for merchant ships. The conditions to be ; realized before the application of nuclear energy to

Ricard

1962-01-01

306

Nuclear Merchant Ship Propulsion.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The operation of about 300 nuclear naval vessels has proven the feasibility of nuclear ship propulsion. Until now six non military ships have been built or are under construction. In the Soviet Union two nuclear icebreakers are in operation, and a third o...

E. Schroeder W. Jager H. G. Schafstall

1977-01-01

307

Ion Propulsion Systems.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The principles and performances of ion propulsion systems are reviewed. Engines developed for the U.S.S.R. space program, NASA, and ESA are described. A cluster of RIT-35 engines is proposed for the ESA comet nucleus sample return mission.

H. W. Loeb

1986-01-01

308

White Light Used to Enable Enhanced Surface Topography, Geometry, and Wear Characterization of Oil-Free Bearings  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A new optically based measuring capability that characterizes surface topography, geometry, and wear has been employed by NASA Glenn Research Center s Tribology and Surface Science Branch. To characterize complex parts in more detail, we are using a three-dimensional, surface structure analyzer-the NewView5000 manufactured by Zygo Corporation (Middlefield, CT). This system provides graphical images and high-resolution numerical analyses to accurately characterize surfaces. Because of the inherent complexity of the various analyzed assemblies, the machine has been pushed to its limits. For example, special hardware fixtures and measuring techniques were developed to characterize Oil- Free thrust bearings specifically. We performed a more detailed wear analysis using scanning white light interferometry to image and measure the bearing structure and topography, enabling a further understanding of bearing failure causes.

Lucero, John M.

2003-01-01

309

Advanced Chemical Propulsion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Improving the performance and reliability characteristics of chemical propulsion systems requires research and testing of higher-performance propellants, higher efficiency thrusters, cryogenics technology, lightweight components and advancements in propulsion system design and assessment. Propellants are being investigated to identify practical combinations with higher efficiencies and better thermal properties to reduce thermal control requirements. This includes combinations with modest increases, such as LOX-hydrazine, as well as a new evaluation of major improvements available from fluorine-bearing oxidizers. Practical ways of implementing cryogenic propulsion to further increase efficiency are also being studied. Some potential advances include small pump-fed engines, and improvements in cryocooler technology and tank pressure control. Gelled propellants will be tested to determine the practicality of letting propellants freeze at low environmental temperatures and thawing them only when required for use. The propellant tank is typically the single highest non-expendable mass in a chemical propulsion system. Lightweight tank designs, materials and methods of fabrication are being investigated. These are projected to offer a 45-50 percent decrease in tank mass, representing the potential inert system mass savings. Mission and systems analyses are being conducted to guide the technology research and set priorities for technology investment, based on estimated gains in payload and mission capabilities. This includes development of advanced assessment tools and analyses of specific missions selected from Science Missions' Directorate. The goal is to mature a suite of reliable advanced propulsion technologies that will promote more cost efficient missions through the reduction of interplanetary trip time, increased scientific payload mass fraction and longer on-station operations. This talk will review the Advanced Chemical technology development roadmap, current funded technology development work, future funding opportunities and results from on-going mission studies.

Alexander, L.

2004-11-01

310

Micro electric propulsion feasibility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Miniature, 50 kg class, strategic satellites intended for extended deployment in space require an on-board propulsion capability to perform needed attitude control adjustments and drag compensation maneuvers. Even on such very small spacecraft, these orbit maintenance functions can be significant and result in a substantial propellant mass requirement. Development of advanced propulsion technology could reduce this propellant mass significantly, and thereby maximize the payload capability of these spacecraft. In addition, spacecraft maneuverability could be enhanced and/or multi-year mission lifetimes realized. These benefits cut spacecraft replacement costs, and reduce services needed to maintain the launch vehicles. For SDIO brilliant pebble spacecraft, a miniaturized hydrazine propulsion system provides both boost and divert thrust control. This type of propulsion system is highly integrated and is capable of delivering large thrust levels for short time periods. However, orbit maintenance functions such as drag make-up require only very small velocity corrections. Using the boost and/or divert thrusters for these small corrections exposes this highly integrated propulsion system to continuous on/off cycling and thereby increases the risk of system failure. Furthermore, since drag compensation velocity corrections would be orders of magnitude less than these thrusters were designed to deliver, their effective specific impulse would be expected to be lower when operated at very short pulse lengths. The net result of these effects would be a significant depletion of the on-board hydrazine propellant supply throughout the mission, and a reduced propulsion system reliability, both of which would degrade the interceptors usefulness. In addition to SDIO brilliant pebble spacecraft, comparably small spacecraft can be anticipated for other future strategic defense applications such as surveillance and communication. For such spacecraft, high capability and reliability, minimal detectability and low cost are requirements. All these miniature spacecraft share a common characteristic: because of their on-board electronic equipment they have, by design, solar order 50-100 W. In a relative sense, such spacecraft are power rich when compared to other larger spacecraft. This power rich situation is offset by very tight mass budgets, which make reductions in propellant mass requirements a key issue in meeting overall spacecraft minimum mass goals. In principle, power rich and propellant poor brilliant pebbles class spacecraft can benefit from using high specific impulse electric propulsion to reduce chemical propellant mass requirements. However, at power levels of order 50 W, arcjets cannot be made to function, ion thrusters are too complex and heavy and resistojets have too low a specific impulse. Recognizing these capability limitations in existing electric propulsion technology, the SDIO/IST sponsored the Phase I SBIR Micro Electric Propulsion (MEP) thruster study described in this report.

Aston, Graeme; Aston, Martha

1992-11-01

311

Micro electric propulsion feasibility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Miniature, 50 kg class, strategic satellites intended for extended deployment in space require an on-board propulsion capability to perform needed attitude control adjustments and drag compensation maneuvers. Even on such very small spacecraft, these orbit maintenance functions can be significant and result in a substantial propellant mass requirement. Development of advanced propulsion technology could reduce this propellant mass significantly, and thereby maximize the payload capability of these spacecraft. In addition, spacecraft maneuverability could be enhanced and/or multi-year mission lifetimes realized. These benefits cut spacecraft replacement costs, and reduce services needed to maintain the launch vehicles. For SDIO brilliant pebble spacecraft, a miniaturized hydrazine propulsion system provides both boost and divert thrust control. This type of propulsion system is highly integrated and is capable of delivering large thrust levels for short time periods. However, orbit maintenance functions such as drag make-up require only very small velocity corrections. Using the boost and/or divert thrusters for these small corrections exposes this highly integrated propulsion system to continuous on/off cycling and thereby increases the risk of system failure. Furthermore, since drag compensation velocity corrections would be orders of magnitude less than these thrusters were designed to deliver, their effective specific impulse would be expected to be lower when operated at very short pulse lengths. The net result of these effects would be a significant depletion of the on-board hydrazine propellant supply throughout the mission, and a reduced propulsion system reliability, both of which would degrade the interceptors usefulness. In addition to SDIO brilliant pebble spacecraft, comparably small spacecraft can be anticipated for other future strategic defense applications such as surveillance and communication. For such spacecraft, high capability and reliability, minimal detectability and low cost are requirements. All these miniature spacecraft share a common characteristic: because of their on-board electronic equipment they have, by design, solar order 50-100 W. In a relative sense, such spacecraft are power rich when compared to other larger spacecraft. This power rich situation is offset by very tight mass budgets, which make reductions in propellant mass requirements a key issue in meeting overall spacecraft minimum mass goals. In principle, power rich and propellant poor brilliant pebbles class spacecraft can benefit from using high specific impulse electric propulsion to reduce chemical propellant mass requirements. However, at power levels of order 50 W, arcjets cannot be made to function, ion thrusters are too complex and heavy and resistojets have too low a specific impulse. Recognizing these capability limitations in existing electric propulsion technology, the SDIO/IST sponsored the Phase I SBIR Micro Electric Propulsion (MEP) thruster study described in this report. The objective of this study was to examine the feasibility of developing a very simple, low mass and small volume, electric thruster for operation on hydrazine at less than 100 W of input power. The feasibility of developing such a MEP thruster was successfully demonstrated by EPL by the discovery of a novel plasma acceleration process. The sections in this report summarize the approach, test results and major accomplishments of this proof-of-concept program.

Aston, Graeme; Aston, Martha

1992-01-01

312

Pressure-Sensitive Paints Advance Rotorcraft Design Testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The rotors of certain helicopters can spin at speeds as high as 500 revolutions per minute. As the blades slice through the air, they flex, moving into the wind and back out, experiencing pressure changes on the order of thousands of times a second and even higher. All of this makes acquiring a true understanding of rotorcraft aerodynamics a difficult task. A traditional means of acquiring aerodynamic data is to conduct wind tunnel tests using a vehicle model outfitted with pressure taps and other sensors. These sensors add significant costs to wind tunnel testing while only providing measurements at discrete locations on the model's surface. In addition, standard sensor solutions do not work for pulling data from a rotor in motion. "Typical static pressure instrumentation can't handle that," explains Neal Watkins, electronics engineer in Langley Research Center s Advanced Sensing and Optical Measurement Branch. "There are dynamic pressure taps, but your costs go up by a factor of five to ten if you use those. In addition, recovery of the pressure tap readings is accomplished through slip rings, which allow only a limited amount of sensors and can require significant maintenance throughout a typical rotor test." One alternative to sensor-based wind tunnel testing is pressure sensitive paint (PSP). A coating of a specialized paint containing luminescent material is applied to the model. When exposed to an LED or laser light source, the material glows. The glowing material tends to be reactive to oxygen, explains Watkins, which causes the glow to diminish. The more oxygen that is present (or the more air present, since oxygen exists in a fixed proportion in air), the less the painted surface glows. Imaged with a camera, the areas experiencing greater air pressure show up darker than areas of less pressure. "The paint allows for a global pressure map as opposed to specific points," says Watkins. With PSP, each pixel recorded by the camera becomes an optical pressure tap. "Instead of having 100 or 200 pressure taps, you can have in theory several million, up to whatever the resolution of your camera is." Watkins explains that typical wind tunnel testing requires two models: one with very little instrumentation, and a pressure model with a significant amount of sensors applied. "If you can make all of your measurements on one model with PSP, you've decreased your model costs by at least a factor of two and preferably your testing costs by about that much," he says. PSP technology has been around for almost 20 years, but a PSP solution for gathering instantaneous dynamic pressure data from surfaces moving at high speeds, such as rotor blades, was not available until a NASA partnership led to a game-changing innovation.

2013-01-01

313

Electromagnetic propulsion for spacecraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Three electromagnetic propulsion technologies, solid propellant pulsed plasma thrusters (PPT), magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters, and pulsed inductive thrusters (PIT) have been developed for application to auxiliary and primary spacecraft propulsion. Both the PPT and MPD thrusters have been flown in space, though only PPTs have been used on operational satellites. The performance of operational PPTs is quite poor, providing only about 8 percent efficiency at about 1000 sec specific impulse. Laboratory PPTs yielding 34 percent efficiency at 5170 sec specific impulse have been demonstrated. Laboratory MPD thrusters have been demonstrated with up to 70 percent efficiency and 7000 sec specific impulse. Recent PIT performance measurements using ammonia and hydrazine propellants are extremely encouraging, reaching 50 percent efficiency for specific impulses between 4000 and 8000 sec.

Myers, Roger M.

1993-01-01

314

Deuterium microbomb rocket propulsion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Large scale manned space flight within the solar system is still confronted with the solution of two problems: (1) A propulsion system to transport large payloads with short transit times between different planetary orbits. (2) A cost effective lifting of large payloads into earth orbit. For the solution of the first problem a deuterium fusion bomb propulsion system is proposed where a thermonuclear detonation wave is ignited in a small cylindrical assembly of deuterium with a gigavolt-multimegaampere proton beam, drawn from the magnetically insulated spacecraft acting in the ultrahigh vacuum of space as a gigavolt capacitor. For the solution of the second problem, the ignition is done by argon ion lasers driven by high explosives, with the lasers destroyed in the fusion explosion and becoming part of the exhaust.

Winterberg, F.

2010-01-01

315

Cryogenic Propulsion Stage  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The CPS is an in-space cryogenic propulsive stage based largely on state of the practice design for launch vehicle upper stages. However, unlike conventional propulsive stages, it also contains power generation and thermal control systems to limit the loss of liquid hydrogen and oxygen due to boil-off during extended in-space storage. The CPS provides the necessary (Delta)V for rapid transfer of in-space elements to their destinations or staging points (i.e., E-M L1). The CPS is designed around a block upgrade strategy to provide maximum mission/architecture flexibility. Block 1 CPS: Short duration flight times (hours), passive cryo fluid management. Block 2 CPS: Long duration flight times (days/weeks/months), active and passive cryo fluid management.

Jones, David

2011-01-01

316

Hybrid propulsion technology program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Technology was identified which will enable application of hybrid propulsion to manned and unmanned space launch vehicles. Two design concepts are proposed. The first is a hybrid propulsion system using the classical method of regression (classical hybrid) resulting from the flow of oxidizer across a fuel grain surface. The second system uses a self-sustaining gas generator (gas generator hybrid) to produce a fuel rich exhaust that was mixed with oxidizer in a separate combustor. Both systems offer cost and reliability improvement over the existing solid rocket booster and proposed liquid boosters. The designs were evaluated using life cycle cost and reliability. The program consisted of: (1) identification and evaluation of candidate oxidizers and fuels; (2) preliminary evaluation of booster design concepts; (3) preparation of a detailed point design including life cycle costs and reliability analyses; (4) identification of those hybrid specific technologies needing improvement; and (5) preperation of a technology acquisition plan and large scale demonstration plan.

1990-01-01

317

STOL propulsion systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The selection and the characteristics of quiet, clean propulsion systems for STOL aircraft are discussed. Engines are evaluated for augmentor wing and externally blown flap STOL aircraft with the engines located both under and over the wings. Some supporting test data are presented. Optimum engines are selected based on achieving the performance, economic, acoustic, and pollution goals presently being considered for future STOL aircraft. The data and results presented were obtained from a number of contracted studies and some supporting NASA inhouse programs, most of which began in early 1972. The contracts include: (1) two aircraft and mission studies, (2) two propulsion system studies, (3) the experimental and analytic work on the augmentor wing, and (4) the experimental programs on Q-Fan. Engines are selected and discussed based on aircraft economics using the direct operating cost as the primary criterion. This cost includes the cost of the crew, fuel, aircraft, and engine maintenance and depreciation.

Denington, R. J.; Koenig, R. W.; Vanco, M. R.; Sagerser, D. A.

1972-01-01

318

Emerging Propulsion Technologies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Emerging Propulsion Technologies (EPT) investment area is the newest area within the In-Space Propulsion Technology (ISPT) Project and strives to bridge technologies in the lower Technology Readiness Level (TRL) range (2 to 3) to the mid TRL range (4 to 6). A prioritization process, the Integrated In-Space Transportation Planning (IISTP), was developed and applied in FY01 to establish initial program priorities. The EPT investment area emerged for technologies that scored well in the IISTP but had a low technical maturity level. One particular technology, the Momentum-eXchange Electrodynamic-Reboost (MXER) tether, scored extraordinarily high and had broad applicability in the IISTP. However, its technical maturity was too low for ranking alongside technologies like the ion engine or aerocapture. Thus MXER tethers assumed top priority at EPT startup in FY03 with an aggressive schedule and adequate budget. It was originally envisioned that future technologies would enter the ISP portfolio through EPT, and EPT developed an EPT/ISP Entrance Process for future candidate ISP technologies. EPT has funded the following secondary, candidate ISP technologies at a low level: ultra-lightweight solar sails, general space/near-earth tether development, electrodynamic tether development, advanced electric propulsion, and in-space mechanism development. However, the scope of the ISPT program has focused over time to more closely match SMD needs and technology advancement successes. As a result, the funding for MXER and other EPT technologies is not currently available. Consequently, the MXER tether tasks and other EPT tasks were expected to phased out by November 2006. Presentation slides are presented which provide activity overviews for the aerocapture technology and emerging propulsion technology projects.

Keys, Andrew S.

2006-01-01

319

Interstellar Propulsion Concepts Assessment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA is investigating the feasibility of conducting extra-solar and interstellar missions over the next 10 to 50 years. An assessment of technologies supporting these near and far term objectives is required. To help meet these objectives the Principal Investigator assessed the feasibility of candidate propulsion systems for the proposed 'Interstellar Probe', a mission to send a spacecraft to the Heliopause at 250 AU and beyond.

Forward, Robert L.

2000-01-01

320

Why Density Dependent Propulsion?  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In 2004 Khoury and Weltman produced a density dependent cosmology theory they call the Chameleon, as at its nature, it is hidden within known physics. The Chameleon theory has implications to dark matter/energy with universe acceleration properties, which implies a new force mechanism with ties to the far and local density environment. In this paper, the Chameleon Density Model is discussed in terms of propulsion toward new propellant-less engineering methods.

Robertson, Glen A.

2011-01-01

321

Nuclear propulsion systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

The main results of the work done at the Research and Design Institute of Electrical Technology on the development of designs\\u000a and the creation of nuclear steam-producing systems (SPS) for propulsion are presented: the SPS VM-A for the first Soviet\\u000a nuclear powered submarine, the SPS V-5 for the most powerful and fastest submarine with design 661 in the world team,

A. N. Achkasov; G. I. Grechko; V. A. Shishkin

2007-01-01

322

The MAP Propulsion Subsystem  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes the requirements, design, integration, test, performance, and lessons learned of NASA's Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) propulsion subsystem. MAP was launched on a Delta-II launch vehicle from NASA's Kennedy Space Center on June 30, 2001. Due to instrument thermal stability requirements, the Earth-Sun L2 Lagrange point was selected for the mission orbit. The L2 trajectory incorporated phasing loops and a lunar gravity assist. The propulsion subsystem's requirements are to manage momentum, perform maneuvers during the phasing loops to set up the lunar swingby, and perform stationkeeping at L2 for 2 years. MAP's propulsion subsystem uses 8 thrusters which are located and oriented to provide attitude control and momentum management about all axes, and delta-V in any direction without exposing the instrument to the sun. The propellant tank holds 72 kg of hydrazine, which is expelled by unregulated blowdown pressurization. Thermal management is complex because no heater cycling is allowed at L2. Several technical challenges presented themselves during I and T, such as in-situ weld repairs and in-situ bending of thruster tubes to accommodate late changes in the observatory CG. On-orbit performance has been nominal, and all phasing loop, mid-course correction, and stationkeeping maneuvers have been successfully performed to date.

Davis, Gary T.; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

2002-01-01

323

In-Space Propulsion Solar Electric Propulsion Technology Overview  

Microsoft Academic Search

NASA's In-space Propulsion Technology Project is developing new propulsion technologies that can enable or enhance near and mid-term NASA science missions. The solar electric propulsion technology area has been investing in NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT), the High Voltage Hall Accelerator (HiVHAC), lightweight reliable feed systems, wear testing and thruster modeling. These investments are specifically targeted to increase planetary science

John W. Dankanich

2006-01-01

324

AHS National Specialists' Meeting on Rotorcraft Dynamics, Arlington, TX, Nov. 13, 14, 1989, Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

Various papers on rotorcraft dynamics are presented. Individual topics addressed include: aeromechanical stability of helicopters, evolution and test history of the V-22 Aeroelastic Model Series, helicopter individual blade control through optimal output feedback, dynamic characteristics of composite beam structures, dynamic testing of thin-walled composite box beams in a vacuum chamber, fundamental dynamics issues for comprehensive rotorcraft analyses, and development of the second generation Comprehensive Helicopter Analysis System. Also considered are: experiences in NASTRAN airframe vibration predictions, application of CRFD program to total helicopter dynamics, vibration reduction on servoflap controlled rotor using HHC, V-22 MSC/NASTRAN airframe vibration analysis and correlation, responses of helicopter rotors to vibratory airloads, helicopter rotor load calculations, prediction and alleviation of V-22 rotor dynamic loads, free wake analysis of rotor configurations for reduced vibratory airloads.

Not Available

1989-01-01

325

Effects of side-stick controllers on rotorcraft handling qualities for terrain flight  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Pertinent fixed and rotary-wing feasibility studies and handling-qualities research programs are reviewed and the effects of certain controller characteristics on handling qualities for specific rotorcraft flight tasks are summarized. The effects of the controller force-deflection relationship and the number of controlled axes that are integrated in a single controller are examined. Simulation studies were conducted which provide a significant part of the available handling qualities data. The studies demonstrate the feasibility of using a single, properly designed, limited-displacement, multiaxis controller for certain relatively routine flight tasks in a two-crew rotorcraft with nominal levels of stability and control augmentation with a high degree of reliability are incorporated, separated three or two-axis controller configurations are required for acceptable handling qualities.

Aiken, E. W.

1985-01-01

326

Development of advanced techniques for rotorcraft state estimation and parameter identification  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An integrated methodology for rotorcraft system identification consists of rotorcraft mathematical modeling, three distinct data processing steps, and a technique for designing inputs to improve the identifiability of the data. These elements are as follows: (1) a Kalman filter smoother algorithm which estimates states and sensor errors from error corrupted data. Gust time histories and statistics may also be estimated; (2) a model structure estimation algorithm for isolating a model which adequately explains the data; (3) a maximum likelihood algorithm for estimating the parameters and estimates for the variance of these estimates; and (4) an input design algorithm, based on a maximum likelihood approach, which provides inputs to improve the accuracy of parameter estimates. Each step is discussed with examples to both flight and simulated data cases.

Hall, W. E., Jr.; Bohn, J. G.; Vincent, J. H.

1980-01-01

327

A robust rotorcraft flight control system design methodology utilizing quantitative feedback theory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Rotorcraft flight control systems present design challenges which often exceed those associated with fixed-wing aircraft. First, large variations in the response characteristics of the rotorcraft result from the wide range of airspeeds of typical operation (hover to over 100 kts). Second, the assumption of vehicle rigidity often employed in the design of fixed-wing flight control systems is rarely justified in rotorcraft where rotor degrees of freedom can have a significant impact on the system performance and stability. This research was intended to develop a methodology for the design of robust rotorcraft flight control systems. Quantitative Feedback Theory (QFT) was chosen as the basis for the investigation. Quantitative Feedback Theory is a technique which accounts for variability in the dynamic response of the controlled element in the design robust control systems. It was developed to address a Multiple-Input Single-Output (MISO) design problem, and utilizes two degrees of freedom to satisfy the design criteria. Two techniques were examined for extending the QFT MISO technique to the design of a Multiple-Input-Multiple-Output (MIMO) flight control system (FCS) for a UH-60 Black Hawk Helicopter. In the first, a set of MISO systems, mathematically equivalent to the MIMO system, was determined. QFT was applied to each member of the set simultaneously. In the second, the same set of equivalent MISO systems were analyzed sequentially, with closed loop response information from each loop utilized in subsequent MISO designs. The results of each technique were compared, and the advantages of the second, termed Sequential Loop Closure, were clearly evident.

Gorder, Peter James

1993-01-01

328

An Investigation of the Use of Bandwidth Criteria for Rotorcraft Handling-Qualities Specifications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objective of this study was to investigate bandwidth concepts for deriving rotorcraft handling-qualities criteria from data obtained in two simulator experiments conducted at the Aeromechanics Laboratory. The first experiment was an investigation of the effects of helicopter vertical-thrust-response characteristics on handling qualities; the second experiment investigated the effects of helicopter yaw-control-response characteristics. In both experiments, emphasis was on low-speed Nap-of-the-Earth (NOE) tasks.

Blanken, C. L.; Bivens, C. C.; Whalley, M. S.

1985-01-01

329

Application of a two-point exponential approximation method in optimizing rotorcraft airframe structures  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Fadel (1990) two-point exponential approximation technique for rotorcraft airframe structural optimization is presently examined by comparing its results with the well established linear and hybrid first-order methods. Attention is given to both the elastic-line and FEM models of an AH-1G airframe. The Direct Matrix Abstraction Programming Language is used to compute sensitivity derivatives and motivate the CONMIN optimizer to produce the design change.

Sareen, Ashish K.; Fadel, Georges M.; Schrage, Daniel P.

1991-01-01

330

1995 JANNAF Propulsion Meeting. Volume 1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This volume is a collection of 36 unclassified/unlimited distribution papers which were presented at the 1995 Joint Army-Navy-NASA-Air Force (JANNAF) propulsion meeting. Specific subjects discussed include the integrated High Payoff Rocket Propulsion Technology initiative, hybrid propulsion, electric propulsion, the Minuteman 2/3 missile system, slag, aluminum in propellant compositions, electric propulsion, rocket nozzle design, and tactical missiles.

Eggleston, Debra S. (Editor)

1995-01-01

331

NASA breakthrough propulsion physics program  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In 1996, NASA established the Breakthrough Propulsion Physics program to seek the ultimate breakthroughs in space transportation: propulsion that requires no propellant mass, propulsion that attains the maximum transit speeds physically possible, and breakthrough methods of energy production to power such devices. Topics of interest include experiments and theories regarding the coupling of gravity and electromagnetism, vacuum fluctuation energy, warp drives and wormholes, and superluminal quantum effects. Because these propulsion goals are presumably far from fruition, a special emphasis is to identify affordable, near-term, and credible research that could make measurable progress toward these propulsion goals. The methods of the program and the results of the 1997 workshop are presented. This Breakthrough Propulsion Physics program, managed by Lewis Research Center, is one part of a comprehensive, long range Advanced Space Transportation Plan managed by Marshall Space Flight Center.

Millis, Marc G.

1999-05-01

332

Embedded Wing Propulsion Conceptual Study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As a part of distributed propulsion work under NASA's Revolutionary Aeropropulsion Concepts or RAC project, a new propulsion-airframe integrated vehicle concept called Embedded Wing Propulsion (EWP) is developed and examined through system and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies. The idea behind the concept is to fully integrate a propulsion system within a wing structure so that the aircraft takes full benefits of coupling of wing aerodynamics and the propulsion thrust stream. The objective of this study is to assess the feasibility of the EWP concept applied to large transport aircraft such as the Blended-Wing-Body aircraft. In this paper, some of early analysis and current status of the study are presented. In addition, other current activities of distributed propulsion under the RAC project are briefly discussed.

Kim, Hyun D.; Saunders, John D.

2003-01-01

333

NASA Breakthrough Propulsion Physics Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In 1996, NASA established the Breakthrough Propulsion Physics program to seek the ultimate breakthroughs in space transportation: propulsion that requires no propellant mass, propulsion that attains the maximum transit speeds physically possible, and breakthrough methods of energy production to power such devices. Topics of interest include experiments and theories regarding the coupling of gravity and electromagnetism, vacuum fluctuation energy, warp drives and worm-holes, and superluminal quantum effects. Because these propulsion goals are presumably far from fruition, a special emphasis is to identify affordable, near-term, and credible research that could make measurable progress toward these propulsion goals. The methods of the program and the results of the 1997 workshop are presented. This Breakthrough Propulsion Physics program, managed by Lewis Research Center, is one part of a comprehensive, long range Advanced Space Transportation Plan managed by Marshall Space Flight Center.

Millis, Marc G.

1998-01-01

334

Overview of the NASA Subsonic Rotary Wing Aeronautics Research Program in Rotorcraft Crashworthiness  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper provides an overview of rotorcraft crashworthiness research being conducted at NASA Langley Research Center under sponsorship of the Subsonic Rotary Wing (SRW) Aeronautics Program. The research is focused in two areas: development of an externally deployable energy attenuating concept and improved prediction of rotorcraft crashworthiness. The deployable energy absorber (DEA) is a composite honeycomb structure, with a unique flexible hinge design that allows the honeycomb to be packaged and remain flat until needed for deployment. The capabilities of the DEA have been demonstrated through component crush tests and vertical drop tests of a retrofitted fuselage section onto different surfaces or terrain. The research on improved prediction of rotorcraft crashworthiness is focused in several areas including simulating occupant responses and injury risk assessment, predicting multi-terrain impact, and utilizing probabilistic analysis methods. A final task is to perform a system-integrated simulation of a full-scale helicopter crash test onto a rigid surface. A brief description of each research task is provided along with a summary of recent accomplishments.

Jackson, Karen E.; Fuchs, Yvonne T.; Kellas, Sotiris

2008-01-01

335

Overview of the NASA Subsonic Rotary Wing Aeronautics Research Program in Rotorcraft Crashworthiness  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper provides an overview of rotorcraft crashworthiness research being conducted at NASA Langley Research Center under sponsorship of the Subsonic Rotary Wing (SRW) Aeronautics Program. The research is focused in two areas: development of an externally deployable energy attenuating concept and improved prediction of rotorcraft crashworthiness. The deployable energy absorber (DEA) is a composite honeycomb structure, with a unique flexible hinge design that allows the honeycomb to be packaged and remain flat until needed for deployment. The capabilities of the DEA have been demonstrated through component crush tests and vertical drop tests of a retrofitted fuselage section onto different surfaces or terrain. The research on improved prediction of rotorcraft crashworthiness is focused in several areas including simulating occupant responses and injury risk assessment, predicting multi-terrain impact, and utilizing probabilistic analysis methods. A final task is to perform a system-integrated simulation of a full-scale helicopter crash test onto a rigid surface. A brief description of each research task is provided along with a summary of recent accomplishments.

Jackson, Karen E.; Kellas, Sotiris; Fuchs, Yvonne T.

2009-01-01

336

Controls design with crossfeeds for hovering rotorcraft using quantitative feedback theory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A multi-input, multi-output controls design with dynamic crossfeed pre-compensation is presented for rotorcraft in near-hovering flight using Quantitative Feedback Theory (QFT). The resulting closed-loop control system bandwidth allows the rotorcraft to be considered for use as an inflight simulator. The use of dynamic, robust crossfeeds prior to the QFT design reduces the magnitude of required feedback gain and results in performance that meets most handling qualities specifications relative to the decoupling of off-axis responses. Handling qualities are Level 1 for both low-gain tasks and high-gain tasks in the roll, pitch, and yaw axes except for the 10 deg/sec moderate-amplitude yaw command where the rotorcraft exhibits Level 2 handling qualities in the yaw axis caused by phase lag. The combined effect of the QFT feedback design following the implementation of low-order, dynamic crossfeed compensators successfully decouples ten of twelve off-axis channels. For the other two channels it was not possible to find a single, low-order crossfeed that was effective. This is an area to be investigated in future research.

Tischler, Mark B.; Biezad, Daniel J.; Cheng, Rendy

1996-01-01

337

A summary of rotorcraft handling qualities research at NASA Ames Research Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objectives of the rotorcraft handling qualities research program at Ames Research Center are twofold: (1) to develop basic handling qualities design criteria to permit cost effective design decisions to be made for helicopters, and (2) to obtain basic handling qualities data for certification of new rotorcraft configurations. The research on the helicopter handling qualities criteria has focused primarily on military nap-of-the-earth (NOE) terrain flying missions, which are flown in day visual meteorological conditions (VMC) and instrument meteorological conditions (IMC), or at night. The Army has recently placed a great deal of emphasis on terrain flying tactics in order to survive and effectively complete the missions in modern and future combat environments. Unfortunately, the existing Military Specification MIL-H 8501A which is a 1961 update of a 1951 document, does not address the handling qualities requirements for terrain flying. The research effort is therefore aimed at filling the void and is being conducted jointly with the Army Aeromechanics Laboratory at Ames. The research on rotorcraft airworthiness standards with respect to flying qualities requirements was conducted to collaboration with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

Chen, R. T.

1984-01-01

338

Gas Wave Bearings: A Stable Alternative to Journal Bearings for High-Speed Oil-Free Machines  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

To run both smoothly and efficiently, high-speed machines need stable, low-friction bearings to support their rotors. In addition, an oil-free bearing system is a common requirement in today's designs. Therefore, self-acting gas film bearings are becoming the bearing of choice in high-performance rotating machinery, including that used in the machine tool industry. Although plain journal bearings carry more load and have superior lift and land characteristics, they suffer from instability problems. Since 1992, a new type of fluid film bearing, the wave bearing, has been under development at the NASA Lewis Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio, by Dr. Florin Dimofte, a Senior Research Associate of the University of Toledo. One unique characteristic of the waved journal bearing that gives it improved capabilities over conventional journal bearings is the low-amplitude waves of its inner diameter surface. The radial clearance is on the order of one thousandth of the shaft radius, and the wave amplitude is nominally up to one-half the clearance. This bearing concept offers a load capacity which is very close to that of a plain journal bearing, but it runs more stably at nominal speeds.

Dimofte, Florin

2005-01-01

339

Modeling small-scale unmanned rotorcraft for advanced flight control design  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Rotorcraft can take off and land vertically, and can perform flight ranging from hovering to airplane-like cruising with agility and maneuverability. These qualities have made them indispensable vehicles for a variety of applications. Today, there is a growing interest in using small-scale rotorcraft as platforms for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). Current RUAVs, however, fail to exploit the vehicles' full potential because of deficient flight control systems. The design of high performance control systems for a vehicle with complex dynamics requires a mathematical model that accurately describes the vehicle's dynamics. Linear, low order models are preferred, setting difficult constraints on the modeling task. This thesis describes the development of a dynamic model for a small-scale Yamaha R-50 helicopter using rotorcraft system identification techniques. Based on experimental data collected from the vehicle, a parameterized model of its dynamics was identified. The parameterized model accounts for the presence of a stabilizer bar and an active yaw damping system; which are typical stability augmentation system on small-scale helicopters. Because rotorcraft dynamics change with operating conditions, both a hover and cruise flight condition were identified. The resulting models were validated against flight-test data and were shown to be highly accurate in predicting the vehicle responses, and the identified parameters were shown to be close to the theoretical values. The model helped us understand typical characteristics of small-scale rotorcraft. We used dynamic scaling rules to determine the effect of scale on the dynamic characteristics of helicopters, and at the same time, we used these rules to compare between the characteristics of the R-50 and those of a full-scale Bell UH-1H helicopter. By explicitly accounting for the stabilizer bar, we were able to use our model to determine and simulate the effect that system has on the vehicle dynamics. Finally, by using the model to analyze and optimize the RUAV's attitude control system we demonstrated that the model lends itself to advanced control design.

Mettler, Bernard F.

340

46 CFR 130.120 - Propulsion control.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Propulsion control. 130.120 Section 130...SYSTEMS Vessel Control § 130.120 Propulsion control. (a) Each vessel must haveâ (1) A propulsion-control system operable from the...

2010-10-01

341

46 CFR 130.120 - Propulsion control.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-10-01 2009-10-01 false Propulsion control. 130.120 Section 130...SYSTEMS Vessel Control § 130.120 Propulsion control. (a) Each vessel must haveâ (1) A propulsion-control system operable from the...

2009-10-01

342

Hybrid Propulsion Systems for Space Exploration Missions.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Combinations of nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP), nuclear electric propulsion (NEP), and chemical propulsion are discussed. Technical details are given in viewgraph form. The characteristics of each configuration are discussed, particularly thrust charact...

D. K. Darooka

1991-01-01

343

Powersail High Power Propulsion System Design Study.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In order to support the development of high power, thin film photovoltaic solar arrays by the Air Force Research Laboratory Space Vehicles Directorate, the Propulsion Directorate's Spacecraft Propulsion Branch carried out an in-house propulsion trade stud...

F. S. Gulczinski, J. H. Schilling, C. D. Hall, J. R. Woodward

2001-01-01

344

Airbreathing propulsion system trends.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Among trends in airbreathing propulsion, the priority is shown to belong to the goal of quieting engines to a level no greater than the natural background noise level of the environment in which they operate. For military engines, not so severely noise-constrained, the possibility of stoichiometric gas-turbine engines is shown to be within reach. Very high bypass ratio propfans are especially suitable for V/STOL aircraft. Evolution of reliable variable-geometry inlets and exhaust nozzles characterizes trends in the supersonic regime.

Dugan, J. F., Jr.

1971-01-01

345

Advanced propulsion concepts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The topics presented are covered in viewgraph form. The programmatic objective is to establish the feasibility of propulsion technologies for vastly expanded space activity. The technical objective is a revolutionary performance sought, such as: (1) about 1 kg/kW specific mass; (2) specific impulse tailored to mission requirements; (3) ability to use in-situ resources; (4) round-trips to Mars in months; (5) round-trips to outer planets in 1 to 2 years; and (6) the capability for robotic mission beyond the solar system.

Sercel, Joel C.

1991-01-01

346

Rotorcraft acoustic radiation prediction based on a refined blade-vortex interaction model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The analysis of rotorcraft aerodynamics and acoustics is a challenging problem, primarily due to the fact that a rotorcraft continually flies through its own wake. The generation mechanism for a rotorcraft wake, which is dominated by strong, concentrated blade-tip trailing vortices, is similar to that in fixed wing aerodynamics. However, following blades encounter shed vortices from previous blades before they are swept downstream, resulting in sharp, impulsive loading on the blades. The blade/wake encounter, known as Blade-Vortex Interaction, or BVI, is responsible for a significant amount of vibratory loading and the characteristic rotorcraft acoustic signature in certain flight regimes. The present work addressed three different aspects of this interaction at a fundamental level. First, an analytical model for the prediction of trailing vortex structure is discussed. The model as presented is the culmination of a lengthy research effort to isolate the key physical mechanisms which govern vortex sheet rollup. Based on the Betz model, properties of the flow such as mass flux, axial momentum flux, and axial flux of angular momentum are conserved on either a differential or integral basis during the rollup process. The formation of a viscous central core was facilitated by the assumption of a turbulent mixing process with final vortex velocity profiles chosen to be consistent with a rotational flow mixing model and experimental observation. A general derivation of the method is outlined, followed by a comparison of model predictions with experimental vortex measurements, and finally a viscous blade drag model to account for additional effects of aerodynamic drag on vortex structure. The second phase of this program involved the development of a new formulation of lifting surface theory with the ultimate goal of an accurate, reduced order hybrid analytical/numerical model for fast rotorcraft load calculations. Currently, accurate rotorcraft airload analyses are limited by the massive computational power required to capture the small time scale events associated with BVI. This problem has two primary facets: accurate knowledge of the wake geometry, and accurate resolution of the impulsive loading imposed by a tip vortex on a blade. The present work addressed the second facet, providing a mathematical framework for solving the impulsive loading problem analytically, then asymptotically matching this solution to a low-resolution numerical calculation. A method was developed which uses continuous sheets of integrated boundary elements to model the lifting surface and wake. Special elements were developed to capture local behavior in high-gradient regions of the flow, thereby reducing the burden placed on the surrounding numerical method. Unsteady calculations for several classical cases were made in both frequency and time domain to demonstrate the performance of the method. Finally, a new unsteady, compressible boundary element method was applied to the problem of BVI acoustic radiation prediction. This numerical method, combined with the viscous core trailing vortex model, was used to duplicate the geometry and flight configuration of a detailed experimental BVI study carried out at NASA Ames Research Center. Blade surface pressure and near- and far-field acoustic radiation calculations were made. All calculations were shown to compare favorably with experimentally measured values. The linear boundary element method with non-linear corrections proved sufficient over most of the rotor azimuth, and particular in the region of the blade vortex interaction, suggesting that full non-linear CFD schemes are not necessary for rotorcraft noise prediction.

Rule, John Allen

1997-08-01

347

PROPULSION SYSTEMS FOR HYPERSONIC FLIGHT  

Microsoft Academic Search

During last twenty years, a large effort has been undertaken in Europe, and particularly in France, to improve knowledge on hypersonic airbreathing propulsion, to acquire a first know-how for components design and to develop needed technologies. On this scientific and technology basis, two families of possible application can be imagined for high- speed airbreathing propulsion : reusable space launcher and

François Falempin

348

Modern Pulsed Fission Propulsion Concept  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the 1960's U.S. Government laboratories, under Project Orion, investigated a pulsed nuclear fission propulsion system. Based on Project Orion, an interplanetary vehicle using pulsed fission propulsion would incorporate modern technologies for momentum transfer, thermal management, and habitation design.

1999-01-01

349

Induction-drive magnetohydrodynamic propulsion  

Microsoft Academic Search

The use of magnetohydrodynamic propulsion for marine applications is reviewed with emphasis on induction-drive systems such as the “ripple” motor. Comparisons are made with direct-drive MHD propulsion systems. Application to pumps for hazardous fluids and liquid-metal coolants are also discussed.

D. L. Mitchell; D. U. Gubser

1993-01-01

350

Analyses Of Underwater Magnetohydrodynamic Propulsion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sea water magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) propulsion for marine vehicles offers many unique features. There is no need for propellers, and therefore no noise associated that. Gear reduction system for the shafts is thus no longer needed. It offers maneuverbility by directional thrusts along with quietness. The theories of MHD pump jet propulsion are discussed in detail in this paper. A so-called

J. B. Gilbertt; T. F. Lint

1990-01-01

351

Nuclear electric propulsion systems overview  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: nuclear propulsion background; schedule for the nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) project; NEP for the Space Exploration Initiative; NEP on-going systems tasks; 20KWe mission/system study; and agenda.

Doherty, Michael P.

1993-01-01

352

Advanced technologies for nuclear propulsion  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Mission Requirements and Resources Allocation Model is presently used to examine nuclear propulsion alternatives on the basis of projected performance levels. All calculations are based on a complete vehicle design, including habitat subsystem masses, external services, propulsion system component performance, power subsystems, tankage factors, and the allocations for both propellant boiloff volumes and the accumulation of unusable residuals. Attention

Benton Clark; Scott Geels; Brian Sutter; Rohan Zaveri; Robert Zubrin

1992-01-01

353

Turbulence program for propulsion systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Program goals at the Center for Modeling of Turbulence and Transition (CMOTT), NASA Lewis Research Center, are (1) to develop reliable turbulence (including bypass transition) and combustion models for complex flows in propulsion systems and (2) to integrate developed models into deliverable CFD tools for propulsion systems in collaboration with industry. This viewgraph presentation covers the following topics: development of

Tsan-Hsing Shih

1995-01-01

354

The NASA Electric Propulsion Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA OAST Propulsion, Power and Energy Division supports electric propulsion for a broad class of missions. Concepts with potential to significantly benefit or enable space exploration and exploitation are identified and advanced toward applications in the near to far term. Recent program progress in mission/system analyses and in electrothermal, ion, and electromagnetic technologies are summarized.

Byers, David C.; Wasel, Robert A.

1987-01-01

355

Problems in propulsion system integration  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Jet engine components are considered that influence propulsion system integration on the airframe and related aircraft drag areas. Emphasis is placed on high Mach number inlet geometries, boattailed nozzle configurations, propulsive wing installation, wing surface blowing lift, fuselage mounted nacelles, and thrust reversal.

Henderson, W. P.; Runckel, J. F.

1975-01-01

356

Exotic power and propulsion concepts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The status of some exotic physical phenomena and unconventional spacecraft concepts that might produce breakthroughs in power and propulsion in the 21st Century are reviewed. The subjects covered include: electric, nuclear fission, nuclear fusion, antimatter, high energy density materials, metallic hydrogen, laser thermal, solar thermal, solar sail, magnetic sail, and tether propulsion.

Forward, Robert L.

1990-01-01

357

Integrated airframe propulsion control  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Perturbation equations which describe flight dynamics and engine operation about a given operating point are combined to form an integrated aircraft/propulsion system model. Included in the model are the dependence of aerodynamic coefficients upon atmospheric variables along with the dependence of engine variables upon flight condition and inlet performance. An off-design engine performance model is used to identify interaction parameters in the model. Inclusion of subsystem interaction effects introduces coupling between flight and propulsion variables. To analyze interaction effects on control, consideration is first given to control requirements for separate flight and engine models. For the separate airframe model, feedback control provides substantial improvement in short period damping. For the integrated system, feedback control compensates for the coupling present in the model and provides good overall system stability. However, this feedback control law involves many non-zero gains. Analysis of suboptimal control strategies indicates that performance of the closed loop integrated system can be maintained with a feedback matrix in which the number of non-zero gains is small relative to the number of components in the feedback matrix.

Fennell, R. E.; Black, S. B.

1982-01-01

358

Assessing Potential Propulsion Breakthroughs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The term, propulsion breakthrough, refers to concepts like propellantless space drives and faster-than-light travel, the kind of breakthroughs that would make interstellar exploration practical. Although no such breakthroughs appear imminent, a variety of investigations into these goals have begun. From 1996 to 2002, NASA supported the Breakthrough Propulsion Physics Project to examine physics in the context of breakthrough spaceflight. Three facets of these assessments are now reported: (1) predicting benefits, (2) selecting research, and (3) recent technical progress. Predicting benefits is challenging since the breakthroughs are still only notional concepts, but kinetic energy can serve as a basis for comparison. In terms of kinetic energy, a hypothetical space drive could require many orders of magnitude less energy than a rocket for journeys to our nearest neighboring star. Assessing research options is challenging when the goals are beyond known physics and when the implications of success are profound. To mitigate the challenges, a selection process is described where: (a) research tasks are constrained to only address the immediate unknowns, curious effects or critical issues, (b) reliability of assertions is more important than their implications, and (c) reviewers judge credibility rather than feasibility. The recent findings of a number of tasks, some selected using this process, are discussed. Of the 14 tasks included, six reached null conclusions, four remain unresolved, and four have opportunities for sequels. A dominant theme with the sequels is research about the properties of space, inertial frames, and the quantum vacuum.

Millis, Marc G.

2005-01-01

359

Electromagnetic propulsion for spacecraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Three electromagnetic propulsion technologies, solid propellant pulsed plasma thrusters (PPT), magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters, and pulsed inductive thrusters (PIT), were developed for application to auxiliary and primary spacecraft propulsion. Both the PPT and MPD thrusters were flown in space, though only PPT's were used on operational satellites. The performance of operational PPT's is quite poor, providing only approximately 8 percent efficiency at approximately 1000 s specific impulse. However, laboratory PPT's yielding 34 percent efficiency at 2000 s specific impulse were extensively tested, and peak performance levels of 53 percent efficiency at 5170 s specific impulse were demonstrated. MPD thrusters were flown as experiments on the Japanese MS-T4 spacecraft and the Space Shuttle and were qualified for a flight in 1994. The flight MPD thrusters were pulsed, with a peak performance of 22 percent efficiency at 2500 s specific impulse using ammonia propellant. Laboratory MPD thrusters were demonstrated with up to 70 percent efficiency and 700 s specific impulse using lithium propellant. While the PIT thruster has never been flown, recent performance measurements using ammonia and hydrazine propellants are extremely encouraging, reaching 50 percent efficiency for specific impulses between 4000 to 8000 s. The fundamental operating principles, performance measurements, and system level design for the three types of electromagnetic thrusters are reviewed, and available data on flight tests are discussed for the PPT and MPD thrusters.

Myers, Roger M.

1993-01-01

360

Jet propulsion without inertia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A body immersed in a highly viscous fluid can locomote by drawing in and expelling fluid through pores at its surface. We consider this mechanism of jet propulsion without inertia in the case of spheroidal bodies and derive both the swimming velocity and the hydrodynamic efficiency. Elementary examples are presented and exact axisymmetric solutions for spherical, prolate spheroidal, and oblate spheroidal body shapes are provided. In each case, entirely and partially porous (i.e., jetting) surfaces are considered and the optimal jetting flow profiles at the surface for maximizing the hydrodynamic efficiency are determined computationally. The maximal efficiency which may be achieved by a sphere using such jet propulsion is 12.5%, a significant improvement upon traditional flagella-based means of locomotion at zero Reynolds number, which corresponds to the potential flow created by a source dipole at the sphere center. Unlike other swimming mechanisms which rely on the presentation of a small cross section in the direction of motion, the efficiency of a jetting body at low Reynolds number increases as the body becomes more oblate and limits to approximately 162% in the case of a flat plate swimming along its axis of symmetry. Our results are discussed in the light of slime extrusion mechanisms occurring in many cyanobacteria.

Spagnolie, Saverio E.; Lauga, Eric

2010-08-01

361

Overview on hybrid propulsion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Aside of research works, this historical survey shows propulsion units used by students for small satellites and for gas generation, or those for the Space Ship One, even if LOx/HTPB was studied and tested in large motors for its potential very low cost; however, this combination highlights a series of technical problems without any performance advantage over the existing LOx/Kerosene family and never been operational for ETO applications. The particularity of hybrid propulsion is to use the state-of-the-art of both liquids and solids; the only show stopper is the propellant itself. The past work focused on LOx/HTPB (selected for its low cost) appears to be a dead-end (combustion problems and global low performances resulting from a high level of residuals). The solution that appears through the past experience is the addition of hydrides to a binder (HTPB or other) or to a binder and a homogeneous fuel or a mixture of both, with or without others additives; within these solutions some will not present any manufacturing problem and some may have a low cost. Nevertheless, the studies of the following phases have to demonstrate the compatibility of the potential regression rate range with a high-performance global design of a hybrid Motor and the manufacturing at a reasonable cost of a hydride giving a high level of performances.

Calabro, M.

2011-10-01

362

Laser Propulsion-Quo Vadis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

First, an introductory overview of the different types of laser propulsion techniques will be given and illustrated by some historical examples. Second, laser devices available for basic experiments will be reviewed ranging from low power lasers sources to inertial confinement laser facilities. Subsequently, a status of work will show the impasse in which the laser propulsion community is currently engaged. Revisiting the basic relations leads to new avenues in ablative and direct laser propulsion for ground based and space based applications. Hereby, special attention will be devoted to the impact of emerging ultra-short pulse lasers on the coupling coefficient and specific impulse. In particular, laser sources and laser propulsion techniques will be tested in microgravity environment. A novel approach to debris removal will be discussed with respect to the Satellite Laser Ranging (SRL) facilities. Finally, some non technical issues will be raised aimed at the future prospects of laser propulsion in the international community.

Bohn, Willy L.

2008-04-01

363

The NASA Electric Propulsion Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Nearly all space missions require on-board propulsion systems and these systems typically have a major impact on spacecraft mass and cost. Electric propulsion systems offer major performance advantages over conventional chemical systems for many mission functions and the NASA Office of Space Access and Technology (OSAT) supports an extensive effort to develop the technology for high-performance, on-board electric propulsion system options to enhance and enable near- and far-term US space missions. This program includes research and development efforts on electrothermal, electrostatic, and electromagnetic propulsion system technologies to cover a wide range of potential applications. To maximize expectations of technology transfer, the program emphasizes strong interaction with the user community through a variety of cooperative and contracted approaches. This paper provides an overview of the OSAT electric propulsion program with an emphasis on recent progress and future directions.

Callahan, Lisa Wood; Curran, Francis M.

1996-01-01

364

Advanced transportation system studies. Alternate propulsion subsystem concepts: Propulsion database  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Advanced Transportation System Studies alternate propulsion subsystem concepts propulsion database interim report is presented. The objective of the database development task is to produce a propulsion database which is easy to use and modify while also being comprehensive in the level of detail available. The database is to be available on the Macintosh computer system. The task is to extend across all three years of the contract. Consequently, a significant fraction of the effort in this first year of the task was devoted to the development of the database structure to ensure a robust base for the following years' efforts. Nonetheless, significant point design propulsion system descriptions and parametric models were also produced. Each of the two propulsion databases, parametric propulsion database and propulsion system database, are described. The descriptions include a user's guide to each code, write-ups for models used, and sample output. The parametric database has models for LOX/H2 and LOX/RP liquid engines, solid rocket boosters using three different propellants, a hybrid rocket booster, and a NERVA derived nuclear thermal rocket engine.

Levack, Daniel

1993-04-01

365

Characterization of oil-free and oil-loaded liquid-crystalline particles stabilized by negatively charged stabilizer citrem.  

PubMed

The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of the negatively charged food-grade emulsifier citrem on the internal nanostructures of oil-free and oil-loaded aqueous dispersions of phytantriol (PHYT) and glyceryl monooleate (GMO). To our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature on the utilization of this charged stabilizing agent in the formation of aqueous dispersions consisting of well-ordered interiors (either inverted-type hexagonal (H(2)) phases or inverted-type microemulsion systems). Synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) were used to characterize the dispersed and the corresponding nondispersed phases of inverted-type nonlamellar liquid-crystalline phases and microemulsions. The results suggest a transition between different internal nanostructures of the aqueous dispersions after the addition of the stabilizer. In addition to the main function of citrem as a stabilizer that adheres to the surface of the dispersed particles, it has a significant impact on the internal nanostructures, which is governed by the following factors: (1) its penetration between the hydrophobic tails of the lipid molecules and (2) its degree of incorporation into the lipid-water interfacial area. In the presence of citrem, the formation of aqueous dispersions with functionalized hydrophilic domains by the enlargement of the hydrophilic nanochannels of the internal H(2) phase in hexosomes and the hydrophilic core of the L(2) phase in emulsified microemulsions (EMEs) could be particularly attractive for solubilizing and controlling the release of positively charged drugs. PMID:22831645

Nilsson, Christa; Edwards, Katarina; Eriksson, Jonny; Larsen, Susan Weng; Østergaard, Jesper; Larsen, Claus; Urtti, Arto; Yaghmur, Anan

2012-08-14

366

Propulsion system assembly  

SciTech Connect

A propulsion system assembly for a vehicle is described having an engine and a nacelle disposed about the engine which has an exterior which comprises: a shroud disposed circumferentially about the nacelle which is spaced radially from the nacelle leaving an opening there between for cooling air from the exterior of the nacelle; structure which extends radially upstream of the opening to block flow from entering the opening, the structure extending between the shroud and nacelle and having at least one under cut portion forming a passage which diverges in the axial direction and which begins upstream of the opening and is bounded by an axially extending wall on the structure; wherein the passage provides a flow path to duct air from the exterior of the nacelle to a location downstream of the blocked portion of the opening on the interior of the shroud.

Zysmaan, S.H.

1993-06-08

367

Pulsed hydrojet propulsion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The pulsed hydrojet is a device in which the water ingested from the free stream is accelerated out of the exhaust pipe to produce thrust. In this report a way of accelerating the stream of water with pockets of high pressure steam and gas generated inside the stream by an exothermal reaction of suitable propellant injected and dispersed in the water is described and analyzed. The velocity increment that must be imparted to the water to produce a substantial thrust need not be very large because the density of the water is comparable to the average density of the accelerated body. Results of the numerical modeling of the proposed jet acceleration mechanism indicate that the hydrojet propulsion device is potentially capable of propelling underwater projectiles at speeds three to five times greater than those currently attainable. Several promising applications of the hydrojet thruster are discussed and evaluated.

Bohachevsky, I. O.; Torrey, M. D.

368

Pulsed plasmoid electric propulsion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A method of electric propulsion is explored where plasmoids such as spheromaks and field reversed configurations (FRC) are formed and then allowed to expand down a diverging conducting shell. The plasmoids contain a toroidal electric current that provides both heating and a confining magnetic field. They are free to translate because there are no externally supplied magnetic fields that would restrict motion. Image currents in the diverging conducting shell keep the plasmoids from contacting the wall. Because these currents translate relative to the wall, losses due to magnetic flux diffusion into the wall are minimized. During the expansion of the plasma in the diverging cone, both the inductive and thermal plasma energy are converted to directed kinetic energy producing thrust. Specific impulses can be in the 4000 to 20000 sec range with thrusts from 0.1 to 1000 Newtons, depending on available power.

Bourque, Robert F.; Parks, Paul B.; Tamano, Teruo

1990-01-01

369

Pulsed hydrojet propulsion  

SciTech Connect

The pulsed hydrojet is a device in which the water ingested from the free stream is accelerated out of the exhaust pipe to produce thrust. In this report we describe and analyze a way of accelerating the stream of water with pockets of high pressure steam and gas generated inside the stream by an exothermal reaction of suitable propellant injected and dispersed in the water. The velocity increment that must be imparted to the water to produce a substantial thrust need not be very large because the density of the water is comparable to the average density of the accelerated body. Results of the numerical modeling of the proposed jet acceleration mechanism indicate that the hydrojet propulsion device is potentially capable of propelling underwater projectiles at speeds three to five times greater than those currently attainable. Several promising applications of the hydrojet thruster are discussed and evaluated.

Bohachevsky, I.O.; Torrey, M.D.

1985-01-01

370

Electric propulsion system technology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The work performed in fiscal year (FY) 1991 under the Propulsion Technology Program RTOP (Research and Technology Objectives and Plans) No. (55) 506-42-31 for Low-Thrust Primary and Auxiliary Propulsion technology development is described. The objectives of this work fall under two broad categories. The first of these deals with the development of ion engines for primary propulsion in support of solar system exploration. The second with the advancement of steady-state magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster technology at 100 kW to multimegawatt input power levels. The major technology issues for ion propulsion are demonstration of adequate engine life at the 5 to 10 kW power level and scaling ion engines to power levels of tens to hundreds of kilowatts. Tests of a new technique in which the decelerator grid of a three-grid ion accelerator system is biased negative of neutralizer common potential in order to collect facility induced charge-exchange ions are described. These tests indicate that this SAND (Screen, Accelerator, Negative Decelerator) configuration may enable long duration ion engine endurance tests to be performed at vacuum chamber pressures an order of magnitude higher than previously possible. The corresponding reduction in pumping speed requirements enables endurance tests of 10 kW class ion engines to be performed within the resources of existing technology programs. The results of a successful 5,000-hr endurance of a xenon hollow cathode operating at an emission current of 25 A are described, as well as the initial tests of hollow cathodes operating on a mixture of argon and 3 percent nitrogen. Work performed on the development of carbon/carbon grids, a multi-orifice hollow cathode, and discharge chamber erosion reduction through the addition of nitrogen are also described. Critical applied-field MPD thruster technical issues remain to be resolved, including demonstration of reliable steady-state operation at input powers of hundreds to thousands of kilowatts, achievement of thruster efficiency and specific impulse levels required for missions of interest, and demonstration of adequate engine life at these input power, efficiency, and specific impulse levels. To address these issues we have designed, built, and tested a 100 kW class, radiation-cooled applied-field MPD thruster and a unique dual-beam thrust stand that enables separate measurements of the applied- and self-field thrust components. We have also initiated the development of cathode thermal and plasma sheath models that will eventually be used to guide the experimental program. In conjunction with the cathode modeling, a new cathode test facility is being constructed. This facility will support the study of cathode thermal behavior and erosion mechanisms, the diagnosis of the near-cathode plasma and the development and endurance testing of new, high-current cathode designs. To facilitate understanding of electrode surface phenomenon, we have implemented a telephoto technique to obtain photographs of the electrodes during engine operation. In order to reduce the background vacuum tank pressure during steady-state engine operation in order to obtain high fidelity anode thermal data, we have developed and are evaluating a gas-dynamic diffuser. A review of experience with alkali metal propellants for MPD thrusters led to the conclusion that alkali metals, particularly lithium, offer the potential for significant engine performance and lifetime improvements.

Brophy, John R.; Garner, Charles E.; Goodfellow, Keith D.; Pivirotto, Thomas J.; Polk, James E.

1992-11-01

371

Reactionless propulsion using tethers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An orbiting tethered satellite can propel itself by reaction against the gravitational gradient, with expenditure of energy but with no use of on-board reaction mass. Energy can be added to the orbit by pumping the tether length in the same way as pumping a swing. Examples of tether propulsion in orbit without use of reaction mass are discussed, including: (1) using tether extension to reposition a satellite in orbit without fuel expenditure by extending a mass on the end of a tether; (2) using a tether for eccentricity pumping to add energy to the orbit for boosting an orbital transfer; and (3) length modulation of a spinning tether to transfer angular momentum between the orbit and tether spin, thus allowing changes in orbital angular momentum.

Landis, Geoffrey A.

1990-01-01

372

Magnetohydrodynamic Augmented Propulsion Experiment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Over the past several years, efforts have been under way to design and develop an operationally flexible research facility for investigating the use of cross-field MHD accelerators as a potential thrust augmentation device for thermal propulsion systems. The baseline configuration for this high-power experimental facility utilizes a 1.5-MWe multi-gas arc-heater as a thermal driver for a 2-MWe MHD accelerator, which resides in a large-bore 2-tesla electromagnet. A preliminary design study using NaK seeded nitrogen as the working fluid led to an externally diagonalized segmented MHD channel configuration based on an expendable heat-sink design concept. The current status report includes a review of engineering/design work and performance optimization analyses and summarizes component hardware fabrication and development efforts, preliminary testing results, and recent progress toward full-up assembly and testing

Litchford, Ron J.

2008-01-01

373

Oil-Free Compressor  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Compressor pistons moved by eccentric shaft need no lubricants. Compressor has shaft, middle section is eccentric in relation to end sections. Driven by brushless dc motor, shaft turns inner races of set of four cam bearings. Outer cam-bearing races in turn actuate four pistons spaced equally apart, around and along shaft. Each outer bearing race held in position by pressure exerted on it by piston. Because no frictional motion between piston and outer bearing race, lubricant between them unnecessary. Cam bearings themselves contain potted internal lubricant. Originally proposed for use in space, new compressor for refrigerators or freezers does not depend on pool of oil for lubricating its pistons. Operated in any orientation.

Fitzjerrell, D. G.; Belver, T. L.; Moore, H. E.

1986-01-01

374

Solar Thermal Propulsion Test Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Researchers at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) have designed, fabricated and tested the first solar thermal engine, a non-chemical rocket engine that produces lower thrust but has better thrust efficiency than a chemical combustion engine. MSFC turned to solar thermal propulsion in the early 1990s due to its simplicity, safety, low cost, and commonality with other propulsion systems. Solar thermal propulsion works by acquiring and redirecting solar energy to heat a propellant. This photograph, taken at MSFC's Solar Thermal Propulsion Test Facility, shows a concentrator mirror, a combination of 144 mirrors forming this 18-ft diameter concentrator, and a vacuum chamber that houses the focal point. The 20- by 24-ft heliostat mirror (not shown in this photograph) has a dual-axis control that keeps a reflection of the sunlight on the 18-foot diameter concentrator mirror, which then focuses the sunlight to a 4-in focal point inside the vacuum chamber. The focal point has 10 kilowatts of intense solar power. As part of MSFC's Space Transportation Directorate, the Propulsion Research Center serves as a national resource for research of advanced, revolutionary propulsion technologies. The mission is to move the Nation's capabilities beyond the confines of conventional chemical propulsion into an era of aircraft-like access to Earth-orbit, rapid travel throughout the solar system, and exploration of interstellar space.

1999-01-01

375

Lightweight spacecraft propulsion system selection  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Various methods of significantly reducing the mass of planetary spacecraft propulsion systems were addressed. Because of the Space Shuttle Challenger accident, the availability of the Space Transportation System for planetary missions may be limited. Mounting a future planetary mission with lower-energy launch vehicles will require a significant reduction in the spacecraft mass. Smaller launch vehicles for planetary missions were considered. In this study, the assumed payload capability for the planetary missions were considered. In this study, the assumed payload capability for the planetary missions was restricted to the Delta and the Atlas-Centaur launch vehicles. Several propulsion and propulsion-related technologies for spacecraft mass reduction were investigated; ion, arcjet, resistojet, and Magneto-Plasma-Dynamic propulsion and earth-storable high-energy propulsion system thrusters were candidates. The propulsion-related technologies included a start-basket Propellant Management Device, a nitrogen tetroxide diaphragm, and a solid-cryogen cooler. Xenon-ion propulsion allowed the greatest mass reduction.

Palaszewski, B.; Engelbrecht, C.

1987-01-01

376

Using tightly-coupled CFD/CSD simulation for rotorcraft stability analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Dynamic stall deeply affects the response of helicopter rotor blades, making its modeling accuracy very important. Two commonly used dynamic stall models were implemented in a comprehensive code, validated, and contrasted to provide improved analysis accuracy and versatility. Next, computational fluid dynamics and computational structural dynamics loose coupling methodologies are reviewed, and a general tight coupling approach was implemented and tested. The tightly coupled computational fluid dynamics and computational structural dynamics methodology is then used to assess the stability characteristics of complex rotorcraft problems. An aeroelastic analysis of rotors must include an assessment of potential instabilities and the determination of damping ratios for all modes of interest. If the governing equations of motion of a system can be formulated as linear, ordinary differential equations with constant coefficients, classical stability evaluation methodologies based on the characteristic exponents of the system can rapidly and accurately provide the system's stability characteristics. For systems described by linear, ordinary differential equations with periodic coefficients, Floquet's theory is the preferred approach. While these methods provide excellent results for simplified linear models with a moderate number of degrees of freedom, they become quickly unwieldy as the number of degrees of freedom increases. Therefore, to accurately analyze rotorcraft aeroelastic periodic systems, a fully nonlinear, coupled simulation tool is used to determine the response of the system to perturbations about an equilibrium configuration and determine the presence of instabilities and damping ratios. The stability analysis is undertaken using an algorithm based on a Partial Floquet approach that has been successfully applied with computational structural dynamics tools on rotors and wind turbines. The stability analysis approach is computationally inexpensive and consists of post processing aeroelastic data, which can be used with any aeroelastic rotorcraft code or with experimental data.

Zaki, Afifa Adel

377

One Engine Inoperative (OEI) and Autorotation For Heavy Lift Rotorcraft Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Federal Aviation Administration will certainly require the Heavy Lift Rotorcraft to be operated under Category A performance and operations requirements. Because of the weight, no operation will be allowed except Category A according to FAA Part 29.1(c). This means that any where along the flight path, the aircraft must be able to land safely following an engine failure or continue flight. A repeatable flight profile must be developed and executed to ensure that the aircraft can be safely landed or flown away depending on its location on the flight profile. This means that there will be no Height-Velocity testing required as is currently required for Part 29 Category B. Since all the configurations shown to date are different than existing rotorcraft, each type would have to develop their individual requirements under existing special conditions FAA Part 21.17(b). This means the FAA will take the opportunity to negotiate additional requirements or change requirements to ensure safety. For example, since the tiltrotor did not fit normal rotorcraft category, new rules were negotiated between the applicant and the FAA. As a result of this negotiation, performance requirements for Category A were increased. The rules were written in terms of guaranteed performance instead of Category A requirements. Detailed discussion will follow later. The proposed tiltrotor would likely follow along with the current tiltrotor rules with the possibility of increase Category A performance requirements. Compounding with addition of wing and auxiliary thrust to both the tandem and coaxial rotor would result in new special condition aircraft. To my knowledge, no compound tandem or compound coaxial rotor has ever been certified by FAA.

Wood, Tom

2012-01-01

378

Electric propulsion and interstellar flight  

SciTech Connect

Two general classes of interstellar space-flights are defined: endothermic and exothermic. Endothermic methods utilize power sources external to the vehicle and associated technology. Faster exothermic methods utilize on-board propulsive power sources or energy-beam technology. Various proposed endothermic electric propulsion methods are described. These include solar electric rockets, mass drivers, and ramjets. A review of previously suggested exothermic electric propulsion methods is presented. Following this review is a detailed discussion of possible near future application of the beamed-laser ramjet, mainly for ultimate relativistic travel. Electric/magnetic techniques offer an excellent possibility for decelerating an interstellar vehicle, regardless of the acceleration technique. 20 references.

Matloff, G.L.

1987-01-01

379

Combined microwave science and propulsion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The combined use of high-power active science instruments and high-power electric propulsion is investigated with a view to new science opportunities and measurements on future planetary missions. An example of a comet rendezvous mission that could benefit from this combination is discussed. It was found that, with electric propulsion, the launch mass of the comet spacecraft could be reduced by 61-68 percent over the chemical propulsion baseline mission. This high-power spacecraft is also capable of delivering a significant high-power radar science payload to the comet.

Palaszewski, Bryan

1989-01-01

380

MSFC Nuclear Propulsion Materials Development  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Nuclear propulsion systems for spacecraft applications present numerous technical challenges for propulsion systems. They have been the focus of a recent NRA. Challenges inclue: a nuclear reactor subsystem to produce thermal energy; a power conversion subsystem to convert the thermal energy into electrical energy; a propulsion subsystem that utilizes Hall effect thrusters; thruster technologies and high temperature materials to support subsystems. The MSFC Electrostatic Levitation (ESL) Facility provides an ideal platform for the study of high temperature and reactive materials. An overview of the facility and its capabilities will be presented.

Rogers, J. R.; Cook, B.

2004-01-01

381

The Dawn Ion Propulsion System  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Dawn’s ion propulsion system (IPS) is the most advanced propulsion system ever built for a deep-space mission. Aside from the Mars gravity assist it provides all of the post-launch ? V required for the mission including the heliocentric transfer to Vesta, orbit capture at Vesta, transfer to various Vesta science orbits, escape from Vesta, the heliocentric transfer to Ceres, orbit capture at Ceres, and transfer to the different Ceres science orbits. The ion propulsion system provides a total ? V of nearly 11 km/s, comparable to the ?V provided by the 3-stage launch vehicle, and a total impulse of 1.2×107 N s.

Brophy, John

2011-12-01

382

Nuclear thermal propulsion engine cost trade studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

The NASA transportation strategy for the Mars Exploration architecture includes the use of nuclear thermal propulsion as the primary propulsion system for Mars transits. It is anticipated that the outgrowth of the NERVA\\/ROVER programs will be a nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) system capable of providing the propulsion for missions to Mars. The specific impulse (Isp) for such a system is

Robert K. Paschall; Rocketdyne Division

1993-01-01

383

A comprehensive analytical model of rotorcraft aerodynamics and dynamics. Part 1: Analysis development  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Structural, inertia, and aerodynamic models were combined to form a comprehensive model of rotor aerodynamics and dynamics that is applicable to a wide range of problems and a wide class of vehicles. A digital computer program is used to calculate rotor performance, loads, and noise; helicopter vibration and gust response; flight dynamics and handling qualities; and system aeroelastic stability. The analysis is intended for use in the design, testing, and evaluation of rotors and rotorcraft, and to be a basis for further development of rotary wing theories.

Johnson, W.

1980-01-01

384

Development of a Pressure Sensitive Paint System for Measuring Global Surface Pressures on Rotorcraft Blades  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper will describe the results from a proof of concept test to examine the feasibility of using Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) to measure global surface pressures on rotorcraft blades in hover. The test was performed using the U.S. Army 2-meter Rotor Test Stand (2MRTS) and 15% scale swept rotor blades. Data were collected from five blades using both the intensity- and lifetime-based approaches. This paper will also outline several modifications and improvements that are underway to develop a system capable of measuring pressure distributions on up to four blades simultaneously at hover and forward flight conditions.

Watkins, A. Neal; Leighty, Bradley D.; Lipford, William E.; Wong, Oliver D.; Oglesby, Donald M.; Ingram, JoAnne L.

2007-01-01

385

Semi-active magnetorheological seat suspensions for enhanced crashworthiness and vibration isolation of rotorcraft seats  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This research focuses on the use of magnetorheological (MR) dampers for enhanced occupant protection during harsh vertical landings as well as isolation of the occupant from cockpit vibrations. The capabilities of the current state-of-the-art in helicopter crew seat energy absorption systems are highly limited because they cannot be optimally adapted to each individual crash scenario (i.e. variations in both occupant weight and crash load level). They also present an unnecessarily high risk of injury by not minimizing the load transmitted to the occupant during a crash. Additionally, current rotorcraft seats provide no means of isolating the occupant from harmful cockpit vibrations. The objective of this research was to investigate and demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of an MR-based suspension for rotorcraft seats. As such, this research began with an in-depth investigation into design feasibility. Three MR seat suspension design cases are investigated: (1) for only vibration isolation, (2) for adaptive occupant protection, and (3) for combined adaptive occupant protection and vibration isolation. It is shown that MR-based suspensions are feasible for each of these cases and the performance benefits and tradeoffs are discussed for each case. Next, to further illustrate the occupant protection benefits gained with an MR-based suspension, three control strategies were developed and performance metrics were compared. It was shown that MR dampers can be controlled such that they will automatically adapt to the crash load level as well as occupant weight. By using feedback of sensor signals, MR dampers were adjusted to utilize the full stroke capability of the seat suspension regardless crash level and occupant weight. The peak load transmitted to the occupant and the risk of spinal injury, therefore, was always minimized. Because this control significantly reduced or eliminated injury risk during less severe landings, it is a significant advance over the current state-of-the-art rotorcraft seat suspensions which can provide no better than 20% risk of occupant injury. Finally, an MR-based seat suspension designed solely for the purposes of vibration isolation was designed, analyzed, and experimentally demonstrated. MR dampers were integrated into the current crashworthy SH-60 crew seat with minimal weight impact such that the original crashworthy capabilities were maintained. Then, utilizing semi-active control, experimental vibration testing demonstrated that the system reduced vertical cockpit vibrations transmitted to the occupant by 76%. This is a significant advance over current state-of-the-art rotorcraft seats which provide no attenuation of cockpit vibrations.

Hiemenz, Gregory J.

386

Interfacing comprehensive rotorcraft analysis with advanced aeromechanics and vortex wake models  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This dissertation describes three aspects of the comprehensive rotorcraft analysis. First, a physics-based methodology for the modeling of hydraulic devices within multibody-based comprehensive models of rotorcraft systems is developed. This newly proposed approach can predict the fully nonlinear behavior of hydraulic devices, and pressure levels in the hydraulic chambers are coupled with the dynamic response of the system. The proposed hydraulic device models are implemented in a multibody code and calibrated by comparing their predictions with test bench measurements for the UH-60 helicopter lead-lag damper. Predicted peak damping forces were found to be in good agreement with measurements, while the model did not predict the entire time history of damper force to the same level of accuracy. The proposed model evaluates relevant hydraulic quantities such as chamber pressures, orifice flow rates, and pressure relief valve displacements. This model could be used to design lead-lag dampers with desirable force and damping characteristics. The second part of this research is in the area of computational aeroelasticity, in which an interface between computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and computational structural dynamics (CSD) is established. This interface enables data exchange between CFD and CSD with the goal of achieving accurate airloads predictions. In this work, a loose coupling approach based on the delta-airloads method is developed in a finite-element method based multibody dynamics formulation, DYMORE. To validate this aerodynamic interface, a CFD code, OVERFLOW-2, is loosely coupled with a CSD program, DYMORE, to compute the airloads of different flight conditions for Sikorsky UH-60 aircraft. This loose coupling approach has good convergence characteristics. The predicted airloads are found to be in good agreement with the experimental data, although not for all flight conditions. In addition, the tight coupling interface between the CFD program, OVERFLOW-2, and the CSD program, DYMORE, is also established. The ability to accurately capture the wake structure around a helicopter rotor is crucial for rotorcraft performance analysis. In the third part of this thesis, a new representation of the wake vortex structure based on Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline (NURBS) curves and surfaces is proposed to develop an efficient model for prescribed and free wakes. NURBS curves and surfaces are able to represent complex shapes with remarkably little data. The proposed formulation has the potential to reduce the computational cost associated with the use of Helmholtz's law and the Biot-Savart law when calculating the induced flow field around the rotor. An efficient free-wake analysis will considerably decrease the computational cost of comprehensive rotorcraft analysis, making the approach more attractive to routine use in industrial settings.

Liu, Haiying

387

Automatic Tip Vortex Core Profiling for Numerical Flow Simulations of Rotorcraft in Hover  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An automated approach is presented that extracts visual and quantitative data from vortex cores produced by Navier-Stokes simulations of rotorcraft in hover mode. This approach extracts contiguous rotor tip vortex-core trajectories, cross-flow velocity profiles, and vortex-core diameter variation with wake age (azimuth angle). This automated approach is faster and more accurate than a conventional manual approach. Moreover, this new approach allows for an efficient way to quantitatively compare vortex-core profiles from different flow simulations, e.g., grid resolution studies, and validate computed results with experimental data

Kao, David L.; Chaderjian, Neal M.

2010-01-01

388

Integration of Environment Sensing and Control Functions for Robust Rotorcraft UAV (RUAV) Guidance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs) have started supplanting manned aircraft in a broad range of tasks. Vehicles such as miniature rotorcrafts with broad maneuvering range and small size can enter remote locations that are hard to reach using other air and ground vehicles. Developing a guidance system which enables a Rotorcraft UAV (RUAV) to perform such tasks involves combing key elements from robotics motion planning, control system design, trajectory optimization as well as dynamics modeling. The focus of this thesis is to integrate a guidance system for a small-scale rotorcraft to enable a high level of performance and situational awareness. We cover large aspects of the system integration including modeling, control system design, environment sensing as well as motion planning in the presence of uncertainty. The system integration in this thesis is performed around a Blade-CX2 miniature coaxial helicopter. The first part of the thesis focuses on the development of the parameterized model for the Blade-CX2 helicopter with an emphasis on the coaxial rotor configuration. The model explicitly accounts for the dynamics of lower rotor and uses an implicit lumped parameter model for the upper rotor and stabilizer-bar. The parameterized model was identified using frequency domain system identification. In the second part of the thesis, we use the identified model to design a control law for the Blade-CX2 helicopter. The control augmentation for the Blade-CX2 helicopter was based on a nested attitude-velocity loop control architecture and was designed following classical loop-shaping and dynamic inversion techniques. A path following layer wrapped around the velocity control system enables the rotorcraft to follow reference trajectories specified by a sequence of waypoints and velocity vectors. Such reference paths are common in autonomous guidance systems. Finally, the third part of the thesis addresses the problem of autonomous navigation through a partially known or unknown 3D cluttered environment. The proposed multi-layer hierarchical guidance framework is based on optimal control principles and relies on the interaction of several subsystems such as environment sensing and mapping, Cost-to-Go (CTG) function update, reactive planning and Receding Horizon (RH) optimization. It is also tightly integrated with the path following controller.

Dadkhah Tehrani, Navid

389

Civil applications of high-speed rotorcraft and powered-lift aircraft configurations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Advanced subsonic vertical and short takeoff and landing (V/STOL) aircraft configurations offer new transportation options for civil applications. Described is a range of vehicles from low-disk to high-disk loading aircraft, including high-speed rotorcraft, V/STOL aircraft, and short takeoff and landing (STOL) aircraft. The status and advantages of the various configurations are described. Some of these show promise for relieving congestion in high population-density regions and providing transportation opportunities for low population-density regions.

Albers, James A.; Zuk, John

1987-01-01

390

Engineering science research issues in high power density transmission dynamics for aerospace applications. [rotorcraft geared rotors  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper discusses analytical and experimental approaches that will be needed to understand dynamic, vibro-acoustic and design characteristics of high power density rotorcraft transmissions. Complexities associated with mathematical modeling of such systems will be discussed. An overview of research work planned during the next several years will be presented, with emphasis on engineering science issues such as gear contact mechanics, multi-mesh drive dynamics, parameter uncertainties, vibration transmission through bearings, and vibro-acoustic characteristics of geared rotor systems and housing-mount structures. A few examples of work in progress are cited.

Singh, Rajendra; Houser, Donald R.

1993-01-01

391

Trajectory correction propulsion for TOPS  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A blowdown-pressurized hydrazine propulsion system was selected to provide trajectory correction impulse for outer planet flyby spacecraft as the result of cost/mass/reliability tradeoff analyses. Present hydrazine component and system technology and component designs were evaluated for application to the Thermoelectric Outer Planet Spacecraft (TOPS); while general hydrazine technology was adequate, component design changes were deemed necessary for TOPS-type missions. A prototype hydrazine propulsion system was fabricated and fired nine times for a total of 1600 s to demonstrate the operation and performance of the TOPS propulsion configuration. A flight-weight trajectory correction propulsion subsystem (TCPS) was designed for the TOPS based on actual and estimated advanced components.

Long, H. R.; Bjorklund, R. A.

1972-01-01

392

Laser Space Propulsion Overview (Postprint).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In this paper, we review the history of laser space propulsion from its earliest theoretical conceptions to modern practical applications. Applications begin with the 'Lightcraft' flights of Myrabo and include practical thrusters for satellites now comple...

C. Phipps J. Luke W. Helgeson

2006-01-01

393

Power Processing for Electric Propulsion.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The inclusion of electric thruster systems in spacecraft design is considered. The propulsion requirements of such spacecraft dictate a wide range of thruster power levels and operational lifetimes, which must be matched by lightweight, efficient, and rel...

R. C. Finke B. G. Herron G. D. Gant

1975-01-01

394

Rotational propulsion enabled by inertia.  

PubMed

The fluid mechanics of small-scale locomotion has recently attracted considerable attention, due to its importance in cell motility and the design of artificial micro-swimmers for biomedical applications. Most studies on the topic consider the ideal limit of zero Reynolds number. In this paper, we investigate a simple propulsion mechanism --an up-down asymmetric dumbbell rotating about its axis of symmetry-- unable to propel in the absence of inertia in a Newtonian fluid. Inertial forces lead to continuous propulsion for all finite values of the Reynolds number. We study computationally its propulsive characteristics as well as analytically in the small-Reynolds-number limit. We also derive the optimal dumbbell geometry. The direction of propulsion enabled by inertia is opposite to that induced by viscoelasticity. PMID:25034393

Nadal, François; Pak, On Shun; Zhu, LaiLai; Brandt, Luca; Lauga, Eric

2014-07-01

395

Nuclear thermal propulsion technology overview  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Viewgraphs on nuclear thermal propulsion technology overview are presented. Topics covered include non-nuclear material; instrumentation, controls, and health monitoring; turbopumps; nozzle and extension; and exhaust plume characteristics.

Stone, James R.

1993-01-01

396

Water Electrolysis Satellite Propulsion System.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A water electrolysis satellite propulsion system capable of providing 100,000 pound-seconds of impulse during a seven year life was fabricated and tested in three modes of operation -- simple blowdown, helium repressurization and repressurization by oxyge...

J. G. Campbell R. C. Stechman

1973-01-01

397

Electric propulsion system technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The work performed on the Ion Propulsion System Technology Task in FY90 is described. The objectives of this work fall under two broad categories. The first of these deals with issues associated with the application of xenon ion thrusters for primary propulsion of planetary spacecraft, and the second with the investigation of technologies which will facilitate the development of larger, higher power ion thrusters to support more advanced mission applications. Most of the effort was devoted to investigation of the critical issues associated with the use of ion thrusters for planetary spacecraft. These issues may be succinctly referred to as life time, system integration, and throttling. Chief among these is the engine life time. If the engines do not have sufficient life to perform the missions of interest, then the other issues become unimportant. Ion engine life time was investigated through two experimental programs: an investigation into the reduction of ion engine internal sputter erosion through the addition of small quantities of nitrogen, and a long duration cathode life test. In addition, a literature review and analysis of accelerator grid erosion were performed. The nitrogen addition tests indicated that the addition of between 0.5 and 1.0 percent of nitrogen by mass to the xenon propellant results in a reduction in the sputter erosion of discharge chamber components by a factor of between 20 and 50, with negligible reduction in thruster performance. The long duration test of a 6.35-mm dia. xenon hollow cathode is still in progress, and has accumulated more than 4,000 hours of operation at an emission current of 25 A at the time of this writing. One of the major system integration issues concerns possible interactions of the ion thruster produced charge exchange plasma with the spacecraft. A computer model originally developed to describe the behavior of mercury ion thruster charge exchange plasmas was resurrected and modified for xenon propellant. This model enables one to calculate the flow direction and local density of the charge exchange plasma, and indicates the degree to which this plasma can flow upstream of the thruster exhaust plane. A continuing effort to investigate the most desirable throttling technique for noble gas ion thrusters concentrated this year on experimentally determining the fixed flow rate throttling range of a 30-cm dia. thruster with a two-grid accelerator system. These experiments demonstrated a throttling capability which covers a 2.8 to 1 variation in input power. This throttling range is 55 percent greater than expected, and is due to better accelerator system performance at low net-to-total voltage ratios than indicated in the literature. To facilitate the development of large, higher power ion thrusters several brief studies were performed. These include the development of a technique which simulates ion thruster operation without beam extraction, the development of an optical technique to measure ion thruster grid distortion due to thermal expansion, tests of a capacitance measurement technique to quantify the accelerator system grid separation, and the development of a segmented thruster geometry which enables near term development of ion thrusters at power levels greater than 100 kW. Finally, a paper detailing the benefits of electric propulsion for the Space Exploration Initiative was written.

Brophy, John R.; Garner, Charles E.; Goodfellow, Keith D.

1991-01-01

398

Selecting hydrocarbon rocket propulsion technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Past studies have shown that the dry weight of future earth-to-orbit vehicles can be reduced by the combined use of hydrogen and hydrocarbon propulsion compared to all-hydrogen propulsion. This paper shows that the use of certain hydrocarbon engines with hydrogen engines produces the lowest vehicle dry mass. These hydrocarbon engines use propane or RP-1 fuel, hydrogen cooling, and hydrogen-rich gas generators. Integration of the hydrogen and hydrocarbon nozzles is also beneficial.

Martin, J. A.

1986-01-01

399

Hydromagnetics and future propulsion systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Futuristic hydromagnetic propulsion systems for spacecraft are examined with emphasis on systems that use regular coherent patterns of magnetic and electric fields of very high strength to interact with the structure of space-time to effect a quick translation from one space-time point to another. A particular type of this system is discussed: namely, the field resonance propulsion concept which will utilize superconducting magnets and a configuration of tunable free-electron lasers.

Holt, A. C.

1980-01-01

400

Nuclear Propulsion in Space (1968)  

ScienceCinema

Project NERVA was an acronym for Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application, a joint program of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission and NASA managed by the Space Nuclear Propulsion Office (SNPO) at the Nuclear Rocket Development Station in Jackass Flats, Nevada U.S.A. Between 1959 and 1972, the Space Nuclear Propulsion Office oversaw 23 reactor tests, both the program and the office ended at the end of 1972.

None

2014-06-17

401

Theory for Plasma Rocket Propulsion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Electrical propulsion of rockets is developing potentially into the use of 3 different thrusters for future long-distance space missions that primarily involve plasma dynamics. These are the Magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) Thruster, the Plasma Induction Thruster (PID), and the VASIMIR Thruster. The history of the development of electrical propulsion into these prospects and the current research of particularly the VASIMIR Thruster are reviewed. Theoretical questions that need to be addressed in that development are explored.

Grabbe, Crockett

2009-11-01

402

Nuclear Propulsion in Space (1968)  

SciTech Connect

Project NERVA was an acronym for Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application, a joint program of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission and NASA managed by the Space Nuclear Propulsion Office (SNPO) at the Nuclear Rocket Development Station in Jackass Flats, Nevada U.S.A. Between 1959 and 1972, the Space Nuclear Propulsion Office oversaw 23 reactor tests, both the program and the office ended at the end of 1972.

None

2012-06-23

403

Space and transatmospheric propulsion technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report focuses primarily on Japan's programs in liquid rocket propulsion and propulsion for spaceplane and related transatmospheric areas. It refers briefly to Japan's solid rocket programs and to new supersonic air-breathing propulsion efforts. The panel observed that the Japanese had a carefully thought-out plan, a broad-based program, and an ambitious but achievable schedule for propulsion activity. Japan's overall propulsion program is behind that of the United States at the time of this study, but the Japanese are gaining rapidly. The Japanese are at the forefront in such key areas as advanced materials, enjoying a high level of project continuity and funding. Japan's space program has been evolutionary in nature, while the U.S. program has emphasized revolutionary advances. Projects have typically been smaller in Japan than in the United States, focusing on incremental advances in technology, with an excellent record of applying proven technology to new projects. This evolutionary approach, coupled with an ability to take technology off the shelf from other countries, has resulted in relatively low development costs, rapid progress, and enhanced reliability. Clearly Japan is positioned to be a world leader in space and transatmospheric propulsion technology by the year 2000.

Merkle, Charles; Stangeland, Maynard L.; Brown, James R.; Mccarty, John P.; Povinelli, Louis A.; Northam, G. Burton; Zukoski, Edward E.

1994-01-01

404

Solar Thermal Propulsion Test Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Researchers at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) have designed, fabricated, and tested the first solar thermal engine, a non-chemical rocket engine that produces lower thrust but has better thrust efficiency than a chemical combustion engine. MSFC turned to solar thermal propulsion in the early 1990s due to its simplicity, safety, low cost, and commonality with other propulsion systems. Solar thermal propulsion works by acquiring and redirecting solar energy to heat a propellant. This photograph shows a fully assembled solar thermal engine placed inside the vacuum chamber at the test facility prior to testing. The 20- by 24-ft heliostat mirror (not shown in this photograph) has a dual-axis control that keeps a reflection of the sunlight on the 18-ft diameter concentrator mirror, which then focuses the sunlight to a 4-in focal point inside the vacuum chamber. The focal point has 10 kilowatts of intense solar power. As part of MSFC's Space Transportation Directorate, the Propulsion Research Center serves as a national resource for research of advanced, revolutionary propulsion technologies. The mission is to move theNation's capabilities beyond the confines of conventional chemical propulsion into an era of aircraft-like access to Earth orbit, rapid travel throughout the solar system, and exploration of interstellar space.

1999-01-01

405

Applications of flight control system methods to an advanced combat rotorcraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Advanced flight control system design, analysis, and testing methodologies developed at the Ames Research Center are applied in an analytical and flight test evaluation of the Advanced Digital Optical Control System (ADOCS) demonstrator. The primary objectives are to describe the knowledge gained about the implications of digital flight control system design for rotorcraft, and to illustrate the analysis of the resulting handling-qualities in the context of the proposed new handling-qualities specification for rotorcraft. Topics covered in-depth are digital flight control design and analysis methods, flight testing techniques, ADOCS handling-qualities evaluation results, and correlation of flight test results with analytical models and the proposed handling-qualities specification. The evaluation of the ADOCS demonstrator indicates desirable response characteristics based on equivalent damping and frequency, but undersirably large effective time-delays (exceeding 240 m sec in all axes). Piloted handling-qualities are found to be desirable or adequate for all low, medium, and high pilot gain tasks; but handling-qualities are inadequate for ultra-high gain tasks such as slope and running landings.

Tischler, Mark B.; Fletcher, Jay W.; Morris, Patrick M.; Tucker, George T.

1989-01-01

406

Deriving Function-Failure Similarity Information for Failure-Free Rotorcraft Component Design  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Performance and safety are the top concerns of high-risk aerospace applications at NASA. Eliminating or reducing performance and safety problems can be achieved with a thorough understanding of potential failure modes in the design that lead to these problems. The majority of techniques use prior knowledge and experience as well as Failure Modes and Effects as methods to determine potential failure modes of aircraft. The aircraft design needs to be passed through a general technique to ensure that every potential failure mode is considered, while avoiding spending time on improbable failure modes. In this work, this is accomplished by mapping failure modes to certain components, which are described by their functionality. In turn, the failure modes are then linked to the basic functions that are carried within the components of the aircraft. Using the technique proposed in this paper, designers can examine the basic functions, and select appropriate analyses to eliminate or design out the potential failure modes. This method was previously applied to a simple rotating machine test rig with basic functions that are common to a rotorcraft. In this paper, this technique is applied to the engine and power train of a rotorcraft, using failures and functions obtained from accident reports and engineering drawings.

Roberts, Rory A.; Stone, Robert B.; Tumer, Irem Y.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

2002-01-01

407

Aeroelastic Analysis for Rotorcraft in Flight or in a Wind Tunnel  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An analytical model is developed for the aeroelastic behavior of a rotorcraft in flight or in a wind tunnel. A unified development is presented for a wide class of rotors, helicopters, and operating conditions. The equations of motion for the rotor are derived using an integral Newtonian method, which gives considerable physical insight into the blade inertial and aerodynamic forces. The rotor model includes coupled flap-lag bending and blade torsion degrees of freedom, and is applicable to articulated, hingeless, gimballed, and teetering rotors with an arbitrary number of blades. The aerodynamic model is valid for both high and low inflow, and for axial and nonaxial flight. The rotor rotational speed dynamics, including engine inertia and damping, and the perturbation inflow dynamics are included. For a rotor on a wind-tunnel support, a normal mode representation of the test module, strut, and balance system is used. The aeroelastic analysis for the rotorcraft in flight is applicable to a general two-rotor aircraft, including single main-rotor and tandem helicopter configurations, and side-by-side or tilting proprotor aircraft configurations.

Johnson, W.

1977-01-01

408

Projection Moire Interferometry for Rotorcraft Applications: Deformation Measurements of Active Twist Rotor Blades  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Projection Moire Interferometry (PMI) has been used during wind tunnel tests to obtain azimuthally dependent blade bending and twist measurements for a 4-bladed Active Twist Rotor (ATR) system in simulated forward flight. The ATR concept offers a means to reduce rotor vibratory loads and noise by using piezoelectric active fiber composite actuators embedded in the blade structure to twist each blade as they rotate throughout the rotor azimuth. The twist imparted on the blades for blade control causes significant changes in blade loading, resulting in complex blade deformation consisting of coupled bending and twist. Measurement of this blade deformation is critical in understanding the overall behavior of the ATR system and the physical mechanisms causing the reduction in rotor loads and noise. PMI is a non-contacting, video-based optical measurement technique capable of obtaining spatially continuous structural deformation measurements over the entire object surface within the PMI system field-of-view. When applied to rotorcraft testing, PMI can be used to measure the azimuth-dependent blade bending and twist along the full span of the rotor blade. This paper presents the PMI technique as applied to rotorcraft testing, and provides results obtained during the ATR tests demonstrating the PMI system performance. PMI measurements acquired at select blade actuation conditions generating minimum and maximum rotor loads are provided to explore the interrelationship between rotor loads, blade bending, and twist.

Fleming, Gary A.; Soto, Hector L.; South, Bruce W.

2002-01-01

409

Flight-Test Validation and Flying Qualities Evaluation of a Rotorcraft UAV Flight Control System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents a process of design and flight-test validation and flying qualities evaluation of a flight control system for a rotorcraft-based unmanned aerial vehicle (RUAV). The keystone of this process is an accurate flight-dynamic model of the aircraft, derived by using system identification modeling. The model captures the most relevant dynamic features of our unmanned rotorcraft, and explicitly accounts for the presence of a stabilizer bar. Using the identified model we were able to determine the performance margins of our original control system and identify limiting factors. The performance limitations were addressed and the attitude control system was 0ptimize.d for different three performance levels: slow, medium, fast. The optimized control laws will be implemented in our RUAV. We will first determine the validity of our control design approach by flight test validating our optimized controllers. Subsequently, we will fly a series of maneuvers with the three optimized controllers to determine the level of flying qualities that can be attained. The outcome enable us to draw important conclusions on the flying qualities requirements for small-scale RUAVs.

Mettler, Bernard; Tuschler, Mark B.; Kanade, Takeo

2000-01-01

410

Application of Function-Failure Similarity Method to Rotorcraft Component Design  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Performance and safety are the top concerns of high-risk aerospace applications at NASA. Eliminating or reducing performance and safety problems can be achieved with a thorough understanding of potential failure modes in the designs that lead to these problems. The majority of techniques use prior knowledge and experience as well as Failure Modes and Effects as methods to determine potential failure modes of aircraft. During the design of aircraft, a general technique is needed to ensure that every potential failure mode is considered, while avoiding spending time on improbable failure modes. In this work, this is accomplished by mapping failure modes to specific components, which are described by their functionality. The failure modes are then linked to the basic functions that are carried within the components of the aircraft. Using this technique, designers can examine the basic functions, and select appropriate analyses to eliminate or design out the potential failure modes. The fundamentals of this method were previously introduced for a simple rotating machine test rig with basic functions that are common to a rotorcraft. In this paper, this technique is applied to the engine and power train of a rotorcraft, using failures and functions obtained from accident reports and engineering drawings.

Roberts, Rory A.; Stone, Robert E.; Tumer, Irem Y.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

2002-01-01

411

Preliminary design features of the RASCAL: A NASA /Army rotorcraft in-flight simulator  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Salient design features of a new NASA/Army research rotorcraft - the Rotorcraft-Aircrew Systems Concepts Airborne Laboratory (RASCAL) - are described. Using a UH-60A Black Hawk helicopter as a baseline vehicle, the RASCAL will be a flying laboratory capable of supporting the research requirements of major NASA and Army guidance, control, and display research programs. The paper describes the research facility requirements of these programs together with other critical constraints on the design of the research system, including safety-of-flight. Research program schedules demand a phased development approach, wherein specific research capability milestones are met and flight research projects are flown throughout the complete development cycle of the RASCAL. This development approach is summarized, and selected features of the research system are described. The research system includes a full-authority, programmable, fault-tolerant/fail-safe, fly-by-wire flight control system and a real-time obstacle detection and avoidance system which will generate low-altitude guidance commands to the pilot on a wide field-of-view, color helmet-mounted display.

Aiken, Edwin W.; Jacobsen, Robert A.; Eshow, Michelle M.; Hindson, William S.; Doane, Douglas H.

1993-01-01

412

Internal combustion propulsion engine  

SciTech Connect

An internal combustion propulsion engine is described which includes: a spherical engine body having an internal combustion chamber, the engine body being provided with a radially projecting nozzle which has an outwardly divergent conical exhaust opening centrally disposed therein, the nozzle being an extension in the wall of the engine body; a plurality of spaced support struts attached to and outwardly projecting from the spherical engine body parallel to the central axis of the exhaust opening in the nozzle; a planar annular ring carried by the plurality of support struts, the annular ring being fixedly spaced from the projecting nozzle and being positioned so that its plane is orthogonal to the central axis of the conical exhaust opening; a plurality of cross-rib members attached to, extending radially inwardly from, and coplanar with, the annular ring, the cross-rib members being joined at the center of the annular ring; a piston cylinder fixedly mounted centrally on the plurality of cross-rib members coaxially with and facing the exhaust opening in spaced relation thereto.

Sing, P.

1988-07-05

413

Mars Rocket Propulsion System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A report discusses the methane and carbon monoxide/LOX (McLOx) rocket for ascent from Mars as well as other critical space propulsion tasks. The system offers a specific impulse over 370 s roughly 50 s higher than existing space-storable bio-propellants. Current Mars in-situ propellant production (ISPP) technologies produce impure methane and carbon monoxide in various combinations. While separation and purification of methane fuel is possible, it adds complexity to the propellant production process and discards an otherwise useful fuel product. The McLOx makes such complex and wasteful processes unnecessary by burning the methane/CO mixtures produced by the Mars ISPP systems without the need for further refinement. Despite the decrease in rocket-specific impulse caused by the CO admixture, the improvement offered by concomitant increased propellant density can provide a net improvement in stage performance. One advantage is the increase of the total amount of propellant produced, but with a decrease in mass and complexity of the required ISPP plant. Methane/CO fuel mixtures also may be produced by reprocessing the organic wastes of a Moon base or a space station, making McLOx engines key for a human Lunar initiative or the International Space Station (ISS) program. Because McLOx propellant components store at a common temperature, very lightweight and compact common bulkhead tanks can be employed, improving overall stage performance further.

Zubrin, Robert; Harber, Dan; Nabors, Sammy

2008-01-01

414

A Closed-Loop Optimal Neural-Network Controller to Optimize Rotorcraft Aeromechanical Behaviour. Volume 1; Theory and Methodology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Given the predicted growth in air transportation, the potential exists for significant market niches for rotary wing subsonic vehicles. Technological advances which optimise rotorcraft aeromechanical behaviour can contribute significantly to both their commercial and military development, acceptance, and sales. Examples of the optimisation of rotorcraft aeromechanical behaviour which are of interest include the minimisation of vibration and/or loads. The reduction of rotorcraft vibration and loads is an important means to extend the useful life of the vehicle and to improve its ride quality. Although vibration reduction can be accomplished by using passive dampers and/or tuned masses, active closed-loop control has the potential to reduce vibration and loads throughout a.wider flight regime whilst requiring less additional weight to the aircraft man that obtained by using passive methads. It is ernphasised that the analysis described herein is applicable to all those rotorcraft aeromechanical behaviour optimisation problems for which the relationship between the harmonic control vector and the measurement vector can be adequately described by a neural-network model.

Leyland, Jane Anne

2001-01-01

415

Propulsion Technology Needs for Exploration  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objectives of currently planned exploration efforts, as well as those further in the future, require significant advancements in propulsion technologies. The current Lunar exploration architecture has set goals and mission objectives that necessitate the use of new systems and the extension of existing technologies beyond present applications. In the near term, the majority of these technologies are the result of a need to apply high performing cryogenic propulsion systems to long duration in-space applications. Advancement of cryogenic propulsion to these applications is crucial to provide higher performing propulsion systems that reduce the vehicle masses; enhance the safety of vehicle systems and ground operations; and provide a path for In-situ Resource Utilization (ISRU).Use of a LOX/LH2 main propulsion system for Lunar Lander Descent is a top priority because more conventional storable propellants are far from meeting the performance needs of the current architecture. While LOX/LH2 pump feed engines have been used in flight applications for many years, these engines have limited throttle capabilities. Engines that are capable of much greater throttling while still meeting high performance goals are a necessity to achieving exploration goals. Applications of LOX/CH4 propulsion to Lander ascent propulsion systems and reaction control systems are also if interest because of desirable performance and operations improvements over conventional storable systems while being more suitable for use of in-situ produced propellants. Within the current lunar architecture, use of cryogenic propulsion for the Earth Departure Stage and Lunar Lander elements also necessitate the need for advanced Cryogenic Fluid Management technologies. These technologies include long duration propellant storage/distribution, low-gravity propellant management, cryogenic couplings and disconnects, light weight composite tanks and support structure, and subsystem integration. In addition to the propulsive and fluid management system technologies described, many component level technologies are also required to enable to the success if the integrated systems. The components include, but are not limited to, variable/throttling valves, variable position actuators, leak detectors, light weight cryogenic fluid pumps, sensor technology and others. NASA, partnering with the Aerospace Industry must endeavor to develop these, and other promising propulsion technologies, to enable the implements of the country's goals in exploration of the Moon, Mars and beyond.

Brown, Thomas

2007-01-01

416

Magnetohydrodynamic sea water propulsion  

SciTech Connect

An experimental and theoretical investigation of a large scale MHD propulsor has been undertaken whose objectives are to (1) investigate the transient and steady state performance of the thruster over operating parameter ranges that are compatible with achievement of high efficiency, (2) to quantify the principal loss mechanisms within the thruster and (3) to obtain preliminary hydroacoustic data. The performance of the thruster was first investigated theoretically with a 3-D code to quantify the loss mechanisms and identify experimental parameter ranges of interest. The loss mechanisms of interest are ohmic losses within the channel and those resulting from electrical currents at the entrance and exit of the thruster, and enhanced frictional losses. The analysis indicated that the relative importance of the loss mechanisms was a function of the thruster design and operating parameters. The experimental investigation of the large scale propulsor is being conducted on a sea water test facility that was designed to match the capabilities of a large 6-T superconducting magnet. The facility design was such that {approximately}90{degrees} of all losses occurred within the propulsion test train (inlet nozzle, propulsor and diffuser) thus facilitating isolation of the loss mechanisms. The test thruster itself is heavily instrumented to provide local measurements of velocity, pressure, and electric fields. The predicted overall thruster performance and value of the loss mechanisms will be compared with measured values. Comparisons will also be presented of the voltage gradients between electrodes, overall thruster efficiency, axial pressure gradients across the propulsor, change in velocity profiles, axial and vertical current distributions and exit distribution of the electrolytic gases.

Petrick, M.; Thomas, A.; Genens, L.; Libera, J.; Nietert, R.; Bouillard, J.; Pierson, E.; Hill, D.; Picologlou, B.; Ohlsson, O.; Kasprzyk, T.; Berry, G.

1991-12-31

417

Magnetohydrodynamic sea water propulsion  

SciTech Connect

An experimental and theoretical investigation of a large scale MHD propulsor has been undertaken whose objectives are to (1) investigate the transient and steady state performance of the thruster over operating parameter ranges that are compatible with achievement of high efficiency, (2) to quantify the principal loss mechanisms within the thruster and (3) to obtain preliminary hydroacoustic data. The performance of the thruster was first investigated theoretically with a 3-D code to quantify the loss mechanisms and identify experimental parameter ranges of interest. The loss mechanisms of interest are ohmic losses within the channel and those resulting from electrical currents at the entrance and exit of the thruster, and enhanced frictional losses. The analysis indicated that the relative importance of the loss mechanisms was a function of the thruster design and operating parameters. The experimental investigation of the large scale propulsor is being conducted on a sea water test facility that was designed to match the capabilities of a large 6-T superconducting magnet. The facility design was such that {approximately}90{degrees} of all losses occurred within the propulsion test train (inlet nozzle, propulsor and diffuser) thus facilitating isolation of the loss mechanisms. The test thruster itself is heavily instrumented to provide local measurements of velocity, pressure, and electric fields. The predicted overall thruster performance and value of the loss mechanisms will be compared with measured values. Comparisons will also be presented of the voltage gradients between electrodes, overall thruster efficiency, axial pressure gradients across the propulsor, change in velocity profiles, axial and vertical current distributions and exit distribution of the electrolytic gases.

Petrick, M.; Thomas, A.; Genens, L.; Libera, J.; Nietert, R.; Bouillard, J.; Pierson, E.; Hill, D.; Picologlou, B.; Ohlsson, O.; Kasprzyk, T.; Berry, G.

1991-01-01

418

Basic research for future electric propulsion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

It is pointed out that the evolution of electric propulsion over the past two and a half decades has been constrained by the interaction of three broad factors, including the physics and dynamics of the propellants, the dynamical and logistical requirements of the mission, and the technological realities of materials, power sources, and thermal management. A projection of the future of electric propulsion requires, therefore, a simultaneous reassessment of all three factors. Aspects of mission specification and power systems are discussed, and basic research needed for future electric propulsion applications is considered. Attention is given to electrostatic propulsion, electrothermal propulsion, electromagnetic propulsion, electrothermal/electromagnetic hybrids, novel concepts, and ancillary concerns.

Jahn, R. G.

1985-01-01

419

Main Propulsion Test Article (MPTA)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Scope: The Main Propulsion Test Article integrated the main propulsion subsystem with the clustered Space Shuttle Main Engines, the External Tank and associated GSE. The test program consisted of cryogenic tanking tests and short- and long duration static firings including gimbaling and throttling. The test program was conducted on the S1-C test stand (Position B-2) at the National Space Technology Laboratories (NSTL)/Stennis Space Center. 3 tanking tests and 20 hot fire tests conducted between December 21 1 1977 and December 17, 1980 Configuration: The main propulsion test article consisted of the three space shuttle main engines, flightweight external tank, flightweight aft fuselage, interface section and a boilerplate mid/fwd fuselage truss structure.

Snoddy, Cynthia

2010-01-01

420

Automated Rocket Propulsion Test Management  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Rocket Propulsion Test-Automated Management System provides a central location for managing activities associated with Rocket Propulsion Test Management Board, National Rocket Propulsion Test Alliance, and the Senior Steering Group business management activities. A set of authorized users, both on-site and off-site with regard to Stennis Space Center (SSC), can access the system through a Web interface. Web-based forms are used for user input with generation and electronic distribution of reports easily accessible. Major functions managed by this software include meeting agenda management, meeting minutes, action requests, action items, directives, and recommendations. Additional functions include electronic review, approval, and signatures. A repository/library of documents is available for users, and all items are tracked in the system by unique identification numbers and status (open, closed, percent complete, etc.). The system also provides queries and version control for input of all items.

Walters, Ian; Nelson, Cheryl; Jones, Helene

2007-01-01

421

Space Station Freedom propulsion activities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The technical highlights and accomplishments made at NASA LeRC in the development of the Space Station Freedom (SSF) propulsion system are discussed. The objectives are as follows: develop and characterize resistojet-thruster components and assemblies; develop and characterize hydrogen-oxygen thruster components; and conduct system trade studies. The research projects primarily characterize propulsion performance and life. Other tests include environmental impacts, such as exhaust gas profiles and electromagnetic interference. The technical activities that are highlighted are being conducted at LeRC within the Aerospace Technology and Space Station Freedom directorates. These activities include the following: derivation of design analysis models; trade studies of design options; propulsion system impact studies; and component testing for characterization and design verification.

Spera, David A. (editor)

1990-01-01

422

On-Board Chemical Propulsion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA Lewis Research Center's On-Board Propulsion program (OBP) is developing low-thrust chemical propulsion technologies for both satellite and vehicle reaction control applications. There is a vigorous international competition to develop new, highperformance bipropellant engines. High-leverage bipropellant systems are critical to both commercial competitiveness in the international communications market and to cost-effective mission design in government sectors. To significantly improve bipropellant engine performance, we must increase the thermal margin of the chamber materials. Iridium-coated rhenium (Ir/Re) engines, developed and demonstrated under OBP programs, can operate at temperatures well above the constraints of state-of-practice systems, providing a sufficient margin to maximize performance with the hypergolic propellants used in most satellite propulsion systems.

Schneider, Steven J.

1997-01-01

423

The Need for Fusion Propulsion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Fusion propulsion is inevitable if the human race remains dedicated to exploration of the solar system. There are fundamental reasons why fusion surpasses more traditional approaches to routine crewed missions to Mars, crewed missions to the outer planets, and deep space high speed robotic missions, assuming that reduced trip times, increased payloads, and higher available power are desired. A recent series of informal discussions were held among members from government, academia, and industry concerning fusion propulsion. We compiled a sufficient set of arguments for utilizing fusion in space. If the U.S. is to lead the effort and produce a working system in a reasonable amount of time, NASA must take the initiative, relying on, but not waiting for, DOE guidance. In this talk those arguments for fusion propulsion are presented, along with fusion enabled mission examples, fusion technology trade space, and a proposed outline for future efforts.

Cassibry, Jason

2005-01-01

424

Nuclear thermal propulsion workshop overview  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA is planning an Exploration Technology Program as part of the Space Exploration Initiative to return U.S. astronauts to the moon, conduct intensive robotic exploration of the moon and Mars, and to conduct a piloted mission to Mars by 2019. Nuclear Propulsion is one of the key technology thrust for the human mission to Mars. The workshop addresses NTP (Nuclear Thermal Rocket) technologies with purpose to: assess the state-of-the-art of nuclear propulsion concepts; assess the potential benefits of the concepts for the mission to Mars; identify critical, enabling technologies; lay-out (first order) technology development plans including facility requirements; and estimate the cost of developing these technologies to flight-ready status. The output from the workshop will serve as a data base for nuclear propulsion project planning.

Clark, John S.

1991-01-01

425

Propulsion on a superhydrophobic ratchet  

PubMed Central

Liquids in the Leidenfrost state were shown by Linke to self-propel if placed on ratchets. The vapour flow below the liquid rectified by the asymmetric teeth entrains levitating drops by viscosity. This effect is observed above the Leidenfrost temperature of the substrate, typically 200°C for water. Here we show that coating ratchets with super-hydrophobic microtextures extends quick self-propulsion down to a substrate temperature of 100°C, which exploits the persistence of Leidenfrost state with such coatings. Surprisingly, propulsion is even observed below 100°C, implying that levitation is not necessary to induce the motion. Finally, we model the drop velocity in this novel “cold regime” of self-propulsion.

Dupeux, Guillaume; Bourrianne, Philippe; Magdelaine, Quentin; Clanet, Christophe; Quere, David

2014-01-01

426

Propulsion on a superhydrophobic ratchet.  

PubMed

Liquids in the Leidenfrost state were shown by Linke to self-propel if placed on ratchets. The vapour flow below the liquid rectified by the asymmetric teeth entrains levitating drops by viscosity. This effect is observed above the Leidenfrost temperature of the substrate, typically 200°C for water. Here we show that coating ratchets with super-hydrophobic microtextures extends quick self-propulsion down to a substrate temperature of 100°C, which exploits the persistence of Leidenfrost state with such coatings. Surprisingly, propulsion is even observed below 100°C, implying that levitation is not necessary to induce the motion. Finally, we model the drop velocity in this novel "cold regime" of self-propulsion. PMID:24923358

Dupeux, Guillaume; Bourrianne, Philippe; Magdelaine, Quentin; Clanet, Christophe; Quéré, David

2014-01-01

427

Breakthrough Propulsion Physics Research Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In 1996, a team of government, university and industry researchers proposed a program to seek the ultimate breakthroughs in space transportation: propulsion that requires no propellant mass, propulsion that can approach and, if possible, circumvent light speed, and breakthrough methods of energy production to power such devices. This Breakthrough Propulsion Physics program, managed by Lewis Research Center, is one part of a comprehensive, long range Advanced Space Transportation Plan managed by Marshall Space Flight Center. Because the breakthrough goals are beyond existing science, a main emphasis of this program is to establish metrics and ground rules to produce near-term credible progress toward these incredible possibilities. An introduction to the emerging scientific possibilities from which such solutions can be sought is also presented.

Millis, Marc G.

1996-01-01

428

Twenty-First Century Space Propulsion Study.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The contract objective was to monitor the research at the forefront of physics and engineering to discover new space propulsion concepts. The major topics covered were antiproton annihilation propulsion, solar sails, space tethers, microspacecraft, and un...

R. L. Forward

1990-01-01

429

Vertical Takeoff and Landing (VTOL) propulsion technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Propulsion problems and advanced technology requirements of VTOL aircraft are discussed. Specific topics covered include inlets with high angle of attack capability, rapid thrust modulation fans, and propulsion-system/aircraft-control integration.

Ciepluch, C. C.; Abbott, J. M.; Moore, R. D.; Sellers, J. F.

1979-01-01

430

Small-Scale Propulsion for Jump Augmentation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This program was an examination of the feasibility of providing small-scale propulsion systems to provide power and propulsion assistance for soldiers, especially to offer a capability for extended vertical leap with heavy combat weights. The concept unde...

M. J. Lewis D. Beksinski P. White

2001-01-01

431

Nuclear propulsion technology advanced fuels technology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Viewgraphs on advanced fuels technology are presented. Topics covered include: nuclear thermal propulsion reactor and fuel requirements; propulsion efficiency and temperature; uranium fuel compounds; melting point experiments; fabrication techniques; and sintered microspheres.

Stark, Walter A., Jr.

432

Shielding Requirements for Particle Bed Propulsion Systems.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Nuclear Thermal Propulsion systems present unique challenges in reliability and safety. Due to the radiation incident upon all components of the propulsion system, shielding must be used to keep nuclear heating in the materials within limits; in addition,...

S. J. Gruneisen

1991-01-01

433

A New Propulsion System for Ships.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Contents: Executive Summary; Introduction -- Limitation of Existing Propulsion Systems, Trends in Ship Power Requirements, Propeller Configuration, Supercavitating Propellers, Water Jet Propulsion, Integrate Ship and Propeller Into a Single System; The Ne...

H. E. Sheets T. Kowalski A. P. Davis

1980-01-01

434

Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) Tests.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Viewgraphs on the space nuclear thermal propulsion (SNTP) program are presented. The objective of the research is to develop advanced nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) technology based on the particle bed reactor concept. A strong philosophical commitment ...

G. C. Allen

1993-01-01

435

Overview of Doe Space Nuclear Propulsion Programs.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

An overview of Department of Energy space nuclear propulsion programs is presented in outline and graphic form. DOE's role in the development and safety assurance of space nuclear propulsion is addressed. Testing issues and facilities are discussed along ...

A. R. Newhouse

1993-01-01

436

Nuclear propulsion technology advanced fuels technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Viewgraphs on advanced fuels technology are presented. Topics covered include: nuclear thermal propulsion reactor and fuel requirements; propulsion efficiency and temperature; uranium fuel compounds; melting point experiments; fabrication techniques; and sintered microspheres.

Stark, Walter A., Jr.

1993-01-01

437

Current technology in ion and electrothermal propulsion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

High performance propulsion devices, such as electrostatic ion engines and electrothermal thrusters, are achieving wide user acceptance. The current technology and projected development trends in the areas of ion and electrothermal propulsion systems and components are surveyed.

Finke, R. C.; Murch, C. K.

1973-01-01

438

Types of Electric Propulsion Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As presented by Gerhard Heller of Marshall Space Flight Center's Research Projects Division in 1961, this chart illustrates three basic types of electric propulsion systems then under consideration by NASA. The ion engine (top) utilized cesium atoms ionized by hot tungsten and accelerated by an electrostatic field to produce thrust. The arc engine (middle) achieved propulsion by heating a propellant with an electric arc and then producing an expansion of the hot gas or plasma in a convergent-divergent duct. The electromagnetic, or MFD engine (bottom) manipulated strong magnetic fields to interact with a plasma and produce acceleration.

1961-01-01

439

Z-Pinch Fusion Propulsion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Fusion-based nuclear propulsion has the potential to enable fast interplanetary transportation. Shorter trips are better for humans in the harmful radiation environment of deep space. Nuclear propulsion and power plants can enable high Ispand payload mass fractions because they require less fuel mass. Fusion energy research has characterized the Z-Pinch dense plasma focus method. (1) Lightning is form of pinched plasma electrical discharge phenomena. (2) Wire array Z-Pinch experiments are commonly studied and nuclear power plant configurations have been proposed. (3) Used in the field of Nuclear Weapons Effects (NWE) testing in the defense industry, nuclear weapon x-rays are simulated through Z-Pinch phenomena.

Miernik, Janie

2011-01-01

440

Propulsion Risk Reduction Activities for Non-Toxic Cryogenic Propulsion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Propulsion and Cryogenics Advanced Development (PCAD) Project s primary objective is to develop propulsion system technologies for non-toxic or "green" propellants. The PCAD project focuses on the development of non-toxic propulsion technologies needed to provide necessary data and relevant experience to support informed decisions on implementation of non-toxic propellants for space missions. Implementation of non-toxic propellants in high performance propulsion systems offers NASA an opportunity to consider other options than current hypergolic propellants. The PCAD Project is emphasizing technology efforts in reaction control system (RCS) thruster designs, ascent main engines (AME), and descent main engines (DME). PCAD has a series of tasks and contracts to conduct risk reduction and/or retirement activities to demonstrate that non-toxic cryogenic propellants can be a feasible option for space missions. Work has focused on 1) reducing the risk of liquid oxygen/liquid methane ignition, demonstrating the key enabling technologies, and validating performance levels for reaction control engines for use on descent and ascent stages; 2) demonstrating the key enabling technologies and validating performance levels for liquid oxygen/liquid methane ascent engines; and 3) demonstrating the key enabling technologies and validating performance levels for deep throttling liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen descent engines. The progress of these risk reduction and/or retirement activities will be presented.

Smith, Timothy D.; Klem, Mark D.; Fisher, Kenneth

2010-01-01

441

Propulsion Risk Reduction Activities for Nontoxic Cryogenic Propulsion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Propulsion and Cryogenics Advanced Development (PCAD) Project s primary objective is to develop propulsion system technologies for nontoxic or "green" propellants. The PCAD project focuses on the development of nontoxic propulsion technologies needed to provide necessary data and relevant experience to support informed decisions on implementation of nontoxic propellants for space missions. Implementation of nontoxic propellants in high performance propulsion systems offers NASA an opportunity to consider other options than current hypergolic propellants. The PCAD Project is emphasizing technology efforts in reaction control system (RCS) thruster designs, ascent main engines (AME), and descent main engines (DME). PCAD has a series of tasks and contracts to conduct risk reduction and/or retirement activities to demonstrate that nontoxic cryogenic propellants can be a feasible option for space missions. Work has focused on 1) reducing the risk of liquid oxygen/liquid methane ignition, demonstrating the key enabling technologies, and validating performance levels for reaction control engines for use on descent and ascent stages; 2) demonstrating the key enabling technologies and validating performance levels for liquid oxygen/liquid methane ascent engines; and 3) demonstrating the key enabling technologies and validating performance levels for deep throttling liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen descent engines. The progress of these risk reduction and/or retirement activities will be presented.

Smith, Timothy D.; Klem, Mark D.; Fisher, Kenneth L.

2010-01-01

442

Electrolysis Propulsion Provides High-Performance, Inexpensive, Clean Spacecraft Propulsion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An electrolysis propulsion system consumes electrical energy to decompose water into hydrogen and oxygen. These gases are stored in separate tanks and used when needed in gaseous bipropellant thrusters for spacecraft propulsion. The propellant and combustion products are clean and nontoxic. As a result, costs associated with testing, handling, and launching can be an order of magnitude lower than for conventional propulsion systems, making electrolysis a cost-effective alternative to state-of-the-art systems. The electrical conversion efficiency is high (>85 percent), and maximum thrust-to-power ratios of 0.2 newtons per kilowatt (N/kW), a 370-sec specific impulse, can be obtained. A further advantage of the water rocket is its dual-mode potential. For relatively high thrust applications, the system can be used as a bipropellant engine. For low thrust levels and/or small impulse bit requirements, cold gas oxygen can be used alone. An added innovation is that the same hardware, with modest modifications, can be converted into an energy-storage and power-generation fuel cell, reducing the spacecraft power and propulsion system weight by an order