These are representative sample records from Science.gov related to your search topic.
For comprehensive and current results, perform a real-time search at Science.gov.
1

Oklahoma City, Canadian River, OK, USA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This view of Oklahoma City, OK (35.5N, 97.5W) surrounded by the grasslands of the central plains, is detailed enough to use as a map of the major highways and throughfares within the city and surrounding area. Tinker Air Force Base and Will Rogers International Airport as well as Lakes Hefner, Stanley Draper and nearby recreation areas. The smaller community of Norman, on the banks of the Canadian River to the south, is home to the University of Oklahoma.

1991-01-01

2

A Study of Public Higher Education in the Oklahoma City Area with Special Focus on Community College Services. Report on the Delivery of Comprehensive Community College Services in Metropolitan Oklahoma City.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In response to a legislative mandate, a study was conducted to identify and address the basic factors which should be considered in the expansion of postsecondary educational opportunities in metropolitan Oklahoma City, with specific focus on the steps to be taken by Oklahoma City Community College (OCCC). Study findings, based on demographic…

Priest, Bill J.; And Others

3

Service Networks and Patterns of Utilization: Mental Health Programs, Indian Health Service (IHS). Volume 7: Oklahoma City Area, 1969-1973.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The seventh volume in a 10-volume report on the historical development (1966-1973) of the 8 administrative Area Offices of the Indian Health Service (IHS) Mental Health Programs, this report presents information on the Oklahoma City Area Office. Included in this document are: (1) General Description: Geography and Demography (population;…

Attneave, Carolyn L.; Beiser, Morton

4

78 FR 32007 - Environmental Impact Statement for Tulsa-Oklahoma City Passenger Rail Corridor, Oklahoma, Lincoln...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Statement for Tulsa--Oklahoma City Passenger Rail Corridor, Oklahoma, Lincoln, Creek...Oklahoma Department of Transportation (ODOT) Rail Division intend to prepare an EIS pursuant...for the State of Oklahoma High-Speed Rail Initiative: Tulsa--Oklahoma City...

2013-05-28

5

Did Divorces Decline after the Oklahoma City Bombing?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Oklahoma City bombing in April 1995 was an act of terrorism that had many potential influences on the city and state, including influences on families. We analyzed divorce data from 1985 to 2000 for all 77 counties in Oklahoma to assess the divorce response to the Oklahoma City bombing. Our prediction was that divorce rates in Oklahoma would…

Nakonezny, Paul A.; Reddick, Rebecca; Rodgers, Joseph Lee

2004-01-01

6

The early planning and development of Oklahoma City  

E-print Network

An analysis of the planning, development, and implementation of Oklahoma City's Grand Boulevard. In the early days of 1909, a plan emerged to build an expansive parks and boulevard system to encircle Oklahoma City. Such ...

Humphreys, Blair D. (Blair David)

2009-01-01

7

Summary of Sonic Boom Rise Times Observed During FAA Community Response Studies over a 6-Month Period in the Oklahoma City Area  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The sonic boom signature data acquired from about 1225 supersonic flights, over a 6-month period in 1964 in the Oklahoma City area, was enhanced with the addition of data relating to rise times and total signature duration. These later parameters, not available at the time of publication of the original report on the Oklahoma City sonic boom exposures, are listed in tabular form along with overpressure, positive impulse, positive duration, and waveform category. Airplane operating information along with the surface weather observations are also included. Sonic boom rise times include readings to the 1/2, 3/4, and maximum overpressure values. Rise time relative probabilities for various lateral locations from the ground track of 0, 5, and 10 miles are presented along with the variation of rise times with flight altitude. The tabulated signature data, along with corresponding airplane operating conditions and surface and upper level atmospheric information, are also available on electronic files to provide it in the format for more efficient and effective utilization.

Maglieri, Domenic J.; Sothcott, Victor E.

1990-01-01

8

How a School Coped with the Oklahoma City Bombing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Following the Oklahoma City bombing, fifth graders at a nearby elementary school coped with ensuing uncertainty, pain, and loss. They wrote appreciative letters to fire and rescue workers; shared personal stories with classmates; compiled an anthology of poems, prayers, and stories; attended an assembly to honor parents participating in rescue…

Aspy, David N.; Aspy, Cheryl B.

1996-01-01

9

Personal Touches Warm up Oklahoma City U.'s Campus  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Oklahoma City University prides itself on treating its faculty and staff members like family. It is the kind of place where new employees are welcomed in the president's house, staff members kick in to raise money when a colleague faces hard times, and promising young workers are offered flexible work schedules and free tuition to help them…

Mangan, Katherine

2009-01-01

10

Emergency Department Impact of the Oklahoma City Terrorist Bombing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Study objective: To collect descriptive epidemiologic injury data on patients who suffered acute injuries after the April 19, 1995, Oklahoma City bombing and to describe the effect on metropolitan emergency departments. Methods: A retrospective review of the medical records of victims seen for injury or illness related to the bombing at 1 of the 13 study hospitals from 9:02 AM

David E Hogan; Joseph F Waeckerle; Daniel J Dire; Scott R Lillibridge

1999-01-01

11

Twister! Employment responses to the 3 May 1999 Oklahoma City tornado  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research examined the impact of the 3 May 1999 tornado on the Oklahoma City labour market. We estimated time series models that allow for time-varying variance in employment growth. The models include intervention variables designed to capture the tornado's effect at initial impact as well as over the post-tornado period. In terms of total employment growth, the Oklahoma City

Bradley T. Ewing; Jamie B. Kruse; Mark A. Thompson

2009-01-01

12

Estimated flood peak discharges on Twin, Brock, and Lightning creeks, Southwest Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, May 8, 1993  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The flash flood in southwestern Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, May 8, 1993, was the result of an intense 3-hour rainfall on saturated ground or impervious surfaces. The total precipitation of 5.28 inches was close to the 3-hour, 100-year frequency and produced extensive flooding. The most serious flooding was on Twin, Brock, and Lightning Creeks. Four people died in this flood. Over 1,900 structures were damaged along the 3 creeks. There were about $3 million in damages to Oklahoma City public facilities, the majority of which were in the three basins. A study was conducted to determine the magnitude of the May 8, 1993, flood peak discharge in these three creeks in southwestern Oklahoma City and compare these peaks with published flood estimates. Flood peak-discharge estimates for these creeks were determined at 11 study sites using a step-backwater analysis to match the flood water-surface profiles defined by high-water marks. The unit discharges during peak runoff ranged from 881 cubic feet per second per square mile for Lightning Creek at SW 44th Street to 3,570 cubic feet per second per square mile for Brock Creek at SW 59th Street. The ratios of the 1993 flood peak discharges to the Federal Emergency Management Agency 100-year flood peak discharges ranged from 1.25 to 3.29. The water-surface elevations ranged from 0.2 foot to 5.9 feet above the Federal Emergency Management Agency 500-year flood water-surface elevations. The very large flood peaks in these 3 small urban basins were the result of very intense rainfall in a short period of time, close to 100 percent runoff due to ground surfaces being essentially impervious, and the city streets acting as efficient conveyances to the main channels. The unit discharges compare in magnitude to other extraordinary Oklahoma urban floods.

Tortorelli, R.L.

1996-01-01

13

Hydrogeology of the Chickasaw National Recreation Area, Murray County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Travertine District (Park) of the Chickasaw National Recreation Area, operated and maintained by the National Park Service, is near the City of Sulphur in south-central Oklahoma. The Park was established in 1902 because of its unique hydrologic setting, which includes Rock Creek, Travertine Creek, numerous mineralized and freshwater springs, and a dense cover of riparian vegetation. Since the turn of the century several flowing artesian wells have been drilled within and adjacent to the Park. Discharge from many of these springs and the numbers of flowing wells have declined substantially during the past 86 years. To determine the cause of these declines, a better understanding of the hydrologic system must be obtained. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the National Park Service, has appraised hydrologic information obtained for the Park from several studies conducted during 1902-87. The principal geologic units referred to in this report are the Arbuckle Group and the overlying Simpson Group. These rocks are of Upper Cambrian to Middle Ordovician age and are composed of dolomitic limestone, with some sandstones and shales in the Simpson Group. Surface geologic maps give a general understanding of the regional subsurface geology, but information about the subsurface geology within the Park is poor. The Simpson and Arbuckle aquifers are the principal aquifers in the study area. The two aquifers are not differentiated readily in some parts of the study area because of the similarity of the Simpson and Arbuckle rocks; thus, both water-bearing units are referred to frequently as the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer. The aquifers are confined under the Park, but are unconfined east and south of the Park. Precipitation on the outcrop area of the Arbuckle aquifer northeast and east of the Park recharges the freshwater springs (Antelope and Buffalo Springs) near the east boundary of the Park. The source of water from mineralized springs located in the central part of the Park, and flowing wells within and north of the Park, is believed to be a mix of waters from rocks of the Arbuckle and Simpson Groups. The source of water from two highly mineralized springs, Bromide and Medicine, that ceased to flow in the early 1970?s is believed to be from the Simpson Group. Water-quality characteristics reflect the sources of ground water in the study area. The highly mineralized springs near the western end of the Park are a sodium chloride type with dissolved solids greater than 4,500 mg/L. The freshwater springs near the eastern end of the Park are a calcium bicarbonate type with total dissolved solids of less than 400 mg/L. Flow from the artesian wells has declined substantially during the past 86 years and the wells are estimated to currently discharge only about 10 percent of the total flow reported in 1939. The depletion is believed to be caused by a gradual lowering of the hydraulic head within the aquifer. The influence on the hydrologic system of local municipal and industrial pumping from the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer is difficult to discern because the system is much more sensitive to precipitation than to pumpage. Ground-water levels and spring flows in this region respond rapidly to precipitation. The effects of withdrawals from the City of Sulphur and Oklahoma Gas and Electric Company power-plant water-well fields are not discernible at wells and springs. The hydrologic system may be influenced by pumping, particularly during extended dry periods of several years, but the impact of pumping on the system cannot be determined without further investigation.

Hanson, Ronald L.; Cates, Steven W.

1994-01-01

14

Oklahoma  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

A report on the research activities at the USDA-ARS, Plant Science Research Laboratory in Stillwater, Oklahoma, were compiled for WERA-066 Meeting that was held in Ft. Collins, Colorado, February 13, 2008. Research presentations included barley breeding research, sorghum breeding research, wheat br...

15

Oklahoma City FILM Even Start Family Literacy Program Evaluation, 2000-2001.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report presents findings from the evaluation of the Oklahoma City Public Schools Even Start Program, also called the Family Intergenerational Literacy Model (FILM), now in its twelfth full year of operation. The evaluation focuses on the total population of adult students, preschoolers, adult graduates, and preschool graduates. The…

Richardson, Donna Castle; Shove, Joanie; Brickman, Sharon; Terrell, Sherry; Shields, Jane

16

Geology Fieldnotes: Chickasaw National Recreation Area, Oklahoma  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site provides information about the Chickasaw National Recreation Area including geology, park maps, visitor information, photographs, and links for more details. The human attraction to the water found there(streams, lakes, and springs), human history, the old mountains (300 million years old - Carboniferous) formed by the Arbuckle uplift, and sedimentary rock deposits are highlighted.

17

Did fertility go up after the oklahoma city bombing? An analysis of births in metropolitan counties in Oklahoma, 1990–1999  

Microsoft Academic Search

Political and sociocultural events (e.g., Brown v. Board of Education in 1954 and the German reunification in 1989) and natural disasters (e.g., Hurricane Hugo in 1989) can affect fertility.\\u000a In our research, we addressed the question of whether the Oklahoma City bombing in April 1995, a man-made disaster, influenced\\u000a fertility patterns in Oklahoma. We defined three theoretical orientations—replacement theory, community

Joseph Lee Rodgers; Craig A. St. John; Ronnie Coleman

2005-01-01

18

Florida Cities and Metro Areas  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In addition to the raw data files that you analyzed in Module One, the US Census makes a great deal of information about cities (and everything else) available through its various publications. Our learning objective in Module Two is to familiarize students with these data resources and their contents by retrieving information on various Florida cities and metropolitan areas.

Jim Wright, University of Central Florida

19

Promoting Student Engagement and Creativity by Infusing Art across the Curriculum: The Arts Integration Initiative at Oklahoma City University  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Christopher E. Garrett describes a faculty learning community program at Oklahoma City University that focused on improving teaching and learning through integrating the arts in a variety of disciplines, some of which may surprise you. (Contains 9 notes.)

Garrett, Christopher E.

2013-01-01

20

Statistical analysis of stream water-quality data and sampling network design near Oklahoma City, central Oklahoma, 1977-1999  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water-quality data collected from 1993-99 at five sites on Bluff, Deer, and Chisholm Creeks and from 1988-99 at five sites in the North Canadian River indicated that there were significant differences in constituent values among sites for water properties, major ions, trace elements, nutrients, turbidity, pesticides, and bacteria. Concentrations of dissolved solids and sulfate generally decreased as streams flowed through the Oklahoma City urban area. Concentrations of organic carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus compounds, lindane, and 2,4-D, and frequencies of detection of pesticides increased in the North Canadian River as it flowed through the urban area. Volatile organic compounds were not detected in samples collected quarterly from 1988-90 at sites on the North Canadian River. Concentrations of some compounds, including dissolved oxygen, sulfate, chloride, ammonia, manganese, diazinon, dieldrin, and fecal coliform bacteria periodically exceeded Federal or state water-quality standards at some sites. Regression analyses were used to identify trends in constituent concentrations related to streamflow, season, and time. Trends for some constituents were indicated at all sites, but most trends were site-specific. Seasonal trends were evident for several constituents: suspended solids, organic nitrogen, and biochemical oxygen demand were greatest during summer. Dissolved oxygen, ammonia, and nitrite plus nitrate-nitrogen were greatest during winter. Concentrations of dissolved oxygen, fluoride, sulfate, total suspended solids, iron, and manganese generally increased with time. Concentrations of chloride, nitrite plus nitrate-nitrogen, dissolved phosphorus, dissolved orthophosphate, biochemical oxygen demand, dieldrin, and lindane decreased with time. There was relatively little change in land use from the late 1970s to the mid-1990s due to relatively modest rates of population growth in the study area during that period. Most changes in water quality in these streams and rivers may be due to changes in chemical use and wastewater treatment practices. The sampling network was evaluated with respect to areal coverage, sampling frequency, and analytical schedules. Areal coverage could be expanded to include one additional watershed that is not part of the current network. A new sampling site on the North Canadian River might be useful because of expanding urbanization west of the city, but sampling at some other sites could be discontinued or reduced based on comparisons of data between the sites. Additional real-time or periodic monitoring for dissolved oxygen may be useful to prevent anoxic conditions in pools behind new low-water dams. The sampling schedules, both monthly and quarterly, are adequate to evaluate trends, but additional sampling during flow extremes may be needed to quantify loads and evaluate water quality during flow extremes. Emerging water-quality issues may require sampling for volatile organic compounds, sulfide, total phosphorus, chlorophyll-a, Escherichia coli, and enterococci, as well as use of more sensitive laboratory analytical methods for determination of cadmium, mercury, lead, and silver.

Brigham, Mark E.; Payne, Gregory A.; Andrews, William J.; Abbott, Marvin M.

2002-01-01

21

Ground-water records for the area surrounding the Chickasaw National Recreation Area, Murray County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report is a compilation of ground-water records, water levels, and water-quality field determinations, for wells in a 132 square-mile (342 square kilometer) area surrounding the Chickasaw National Recreational Area in south-central Oklahoma. This information was collected in cooperation with the National Park Service. The location of the study area is shown on figure 1; the well locations are shown on figure 2. Data from 101 wells are summarized in this report.

Goemaat, Robert L.; Willard, Cass C.

1983-01-01

22

The University of Oklahoma Designation of Beneficiary Form Select Campus Location: Norman Oklahoma City Tulsa  

E-print Network

) 660-3200 1 Employee Information Last First: Middle: Home Address: City: State: Zip: Employee SSN: EMPL Name Beneficiary SSN Beneficiary Date of Birth Relationship Primary or Contingent ? Percentage (Please Print) Add Drop Beneficiary Name Beneficiary SSN Beneficiary Date of Birth Relationship Primary

Oklahoma, University of

23

The University of Oklahoma Designation of Beneficiary Form Select Campus Location: Norman Oklahoma City Tulsa  

E-print Network

First: Middle: Home Address: City: State: Zip: Employee SSN: EMPL ID: Work Phone # Email Address: 2 Life. Street, Suite 1C114 - Tulsa, OK, 74135 - (918) 660-3190, FAX (918) 660-3200. 1 Employee Information Last - Beneficiary Information (Please Print) Add Drop Beneficiary Name Beneficiary SSN Beneficiary Date of Birth

Oklahoma, University of

24

Final Report for the Joint Urban 2003 Atmospheric Dispersion Study in Oklahoma City: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory participation  

SciTech Connect

The Joint Urban 2003 (JU2003) field study was designed to collect meteorological and tracer data resolving atmospheric dispersion at scales-of-motion ranging from flows in and around a single city block, in and around several blocks in the downtown Central Business District (CBD), and into the suburban Oklahoma City area a few km from the CBD. Indoor tracer and flow measurements within four downtown study buildings were also made in conjunction with detailed outdoor measurements investigating the outdoor-indoor exchange rates and mechanisms. The movement of tracer within the study buildings was also studied. The data from the field experiment is being used to evaluate models that are being developed for predicting dispersion of contaminants in urban areas. These models may be fast-response models based on semi-empirical algorithms that are used in real-time emergencies, or highly sophisticated computational fluid dynamics models that resolve individual building faces and crevices. The data from the field experiment, together with the models, can then be used to develop other advanced tools that are especially valuable in the efforts to thwart terrorists. These include tools for finding location and characteristics of a contaminant source; tools that can be used for real-time response or for forensic investigation. The tools will make use of monitoring networks for biological agents that are being established in several sensitive cities throughout the nation. This major urban study was conducted beginning June 28 and ending July 31, 2003. It included several integrated scientific components necessary to describe and understand the physical processes governing dispersion within and surrounding an urban area and into and within building environments. The components included characterizing: (1) the urban boundary layer and the development of the urban boundary layer within the atmospheric boundary layer, (2) the flows within and downwind of the tall-building core, (3) the flows within a street canyon including the effects of traffic on turbulence, (4) the surface energy balance within an urban area, (5) the dispersion of tracer into, out of and within buildings, and (6) the dispersion of tracer throughout the tall-building core and out to four km downwind from the release. The scientific elements of the study were accomplished using state-of-the-art meteorological and tracer instruments including lidars, sodars, radars, sonic anemometers, airplane-based meteorological sensors, fast-response tracer analyzers and helicopter-based remote tracer detectors. Winds and other meteorological quantities were measured continuously at nearly 200 locations in and around downtown Oklahoma City. Ten intensive operation periods (IOPs) of 8-hours each were completed during the 34-day study period where detailed meteorological, turbulence and tracer measurements were made. Sulfur hexafluoride tracer was released in downtown Oklahoma City and sampled in and around downtown and as far as four km downwind. During four of the ten IOPs the infiltration of tracer into four downtown buildings was studied with detailed measurements of tracer and flows within and surrounding some buildings. Tracer was sampled using over 200 integrated samplers and 25 fast response analyzers. Vertical measurements of tracer were made by placing samplers on the tops of nearly 20 buildings and by sampling tracer at 7 levels on a 90 m crane. The tracer and meteorological data collected in Oklahoma City is being used to evaluate and improve existing indoor and outdoor dispersion models, including fine-scale computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models, mesoscale numerical weather prediction models with sub-grid scale urban parameterizations and fast-response dispersion models that typically rely on empirical or semi-empirical relationships describing the atmospheric processes. The data will lead to improved algorithms and parameterizations within these models. Samplers to collect tracer data were located at various distances from the release locations for collecting data for

Leach, M J

2005-10-12

25

Groundwater quality and water-well characteristics in the Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma Jurisdictional Area, central Oklahoma, 1948--2011  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 2012, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma, compiled historical groundwater-quality data collected from 1948 to 2011 and water-well completion information in parts of Lincoln, Oklahoma, and Pottawatomie Counties in central Oklahoma to support the development of a comprehensive water-management plan for the Tribe’s jurisdictional area. In this study, water-quality data from 155 water wells, collected from 1948 to 2011, were retrieved from the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Information System database; these data include measurements of pH, specific conductance, and hardness and concentrations of the major ions, trace elements, and radionuclides that have Maximum Contaminant Levels or Secondary Maximum Contaminant Levels in public drinking-water supplies. Information about well characteristics includes ranges of well yield and well depth of private water wells in the study area and was compiled from the Oklahoma Water Resources Board Multi-Purpose Well Completion Report database. This report also shows depth to water from land surface by using shaded 30-foot contours that were created by using a geographic information system and spatial layers of a 2009 potentiometric surface (groundwater elevation) and land-surface elevation. Wells in the study area produce water from the North Canadian River alluvial and terrace aquifers, the underlying Garber Sandstone and Wellington Formation that compose the Garber–Wellington aquifer, and the Chase, Council Grove, and Admire Groups. Water quality varies substantially between the alluvial and terrace aquifers and bedrock aquifers in the study area. Water from the alluvial aquifer has relatively high concentrations of dissolved solids and generally is used for livestock only, whereas water from the terrace aquifer has low concentrations of dissolved solids and is used extensively by households in the study area. Water from the bedrock aquifer also is used extensively by households but may have high concentrations of trace elements, including uranium, in some areas where groundwater pH is above 8.0. Well yields vary and are dependent on aquifer characteristics and well-completion practices. Well yields in the unconsolidated alluvial and terrace aquifers generally are higher than yields from bedrock aquifers but are limited by the thickness and extent of these river deposits. Well yields in the alluvium and terrace aquifers commonly range from 50 to 150 gallons per minute and may exceed 300 gallons per minute, whereas well yields in the bedrock aquifers commonly range from 25 to 50 gallons per minute in the western one-third of study area (Oklahoma County) and generally less than 25 gallons per minute in the eastern two-thirds of the study area (Lincoln and Pottawatomie Counties).

Becker, Carol J.

2013-01-01

26

Nocturnal Low-Level-Jet-Dominated Atmospheric Boundary Layer Observed by a Doppler Lidar Over Oklahoma City during JU2003  

SciTech Connect

Boundary layer wind data observed by a Doppler lidar and sonic anemometers during the mornings of three intensive observational periods (IOP2, IOP3, and IOP7) of the Joint Urban 2003 (JU2003) field experiment are analyzed to extract the mean and turbulent characteristics of airflow over Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. A strong nocturnal low-level jet (LLJ) dominated the flow in the boundary layer over the measurement domain from midnight to the morning hours. Lidar scans through the LLJ taken after sunrise indicate that the LLJ elevation shows a gradual increase of 25-100 m over the urban area relative to that over the upstream suburban area. The mean wind speed beneath the jet over the urban area is about 10%-15% slower than that over the suburban area. Sonic anemometer observations combined with Doppler lidar observations in the urban and suburban areas are also analyzed to investigate the boundary layer turbulence production in the LLJ-dominated atmospheric boundary layer. The turbulence kinetic energy was higher over the urban domain mainly because of the shear production of building surfaces and building wakes. Direct transport of turbulent momentum flux from the LLJ to the urban street level was very small because of the relatively high elevation of the jet. However, since the LLJ dominated the mean wind in the boundary layer, the turbulence kinetic energy in the urban domain is correlated directly with the LLJ maximum speed and inversely with its height. The results indicate that the jet Richardson number is a reasonably good indicator for turbulent kinetic energy over the urban domain in the LLJ-dominated atmospheric boundary layer.

Wang, Yansen; Klipp, Cheryl L.; Garvey, Dennis M.; Ligon, David; Williamson, Chatt C.; Chang, Sam S.; Newsom, Rob K.; Calhoun, Ron

2007-12-01

27

Geographic Information Systems Methods for Determining Drainage-Basin Areas, Stream-Buffered Areas, Stream Length, and Land Uses for the Neosho and Spring Rivers in Northeastern Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Geographic Information Systems have many uses, one of which includes the reproducible computation of environmental characteristics that can be used to categorize hydrologic features. The Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation and the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality are investigating Geographic Information Systems techniques to determine partial drainage-basin areas, stream-buffer areas, stream length, and land uses (drainage basin and stream characteristics) in northeastern Oklahoma. The U.S Geological Survey, in cooperation with Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation and the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality, documented the methods used to determine drainage-basin and stream characteristics for the Neosho and Spring Rivers above Grand Lake Of the Cherokees in northeastern Oklahoma and calculated the characteristics. The drainage basin and stream characteristics can be used by the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation and the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality to aid in natural-resource assessments.

Masoner, Jason R.; March, Ferrella

2006-01-01

28

THE OKLAHOMA MESONET  

EPA Science Inventory

The Oklahoma Mesonet, operated and maintained by the Oklahoma Climatological Survey, is Oklahoma's premier climatological data collection system. For the area covered, which includes the entire state, no other system within the United States or internationally has the degree of ...

29

Insurance Enrollment Form -2014 Plan Year -New Enrollees Select one: Norman Campus Oklahoma City Campus Tulsa Campus  

E-print Network

Insurance Enrollment Form - 2014 Plan Year - New Enrollees Select one: Norman Campus Oklahoma City Insurance: BlueOptions PPO BlueEdge HCA BlueLincs HMO I Waive Medical Coverage (Proof of coverage required applicants only): Child(ren) PCP # (For HMO applicants only): 3 Dental Insurance: University provides paid

Oklahoma, University of

30

Baseline ambient gaseous ammonia concentrations in the Four Corners area and eastern Oklahoma, USA.  

PubMed

Ambient ammonia monitoring using Ogawa passive samplers was conducted in the Four Corners area and eastern Oklahoma, USA during 2007. The resulting data will be useful in the multipollutant management of ozone, nitrogen oxides, and visibility (atmospheric regional haze) in the Four Corners area, an area with growing oil/gas production and increasing coal-based power plant construction. The passive monitoring data also add new ambient ammonia concentration information for the U.S. and will be useful to scientists involved in present and future visibility modeling exercises. Three week integrated passive ammonia samples were taken at five sites in the Four Corners area and two sites in eastern Oklahoma from December, 2006 through December, 2007 (January, 2008 for two sites). Results show significantly higher regional background ammonia concentrations in eastern Oklahoma (1.8 parts per billion (ppb) arithmetic mean) compared to the Four Corners area (0.2 ppb arithmetic mean). Annual mean ammonia concentrations for all Four Corners area sites for the 2007 study ranged from 0.2 ppb to 1.5 ppb. Peak ambient ammonia concentrations occurred in the spring and summer in both areas. The passive samplers deployed at the Stilwell, Oklahoma site compared favorably with other passive samplers and a continuous ammonia monitoring instrument. PMID:18974901

Sather, Mark E; Mathew, Johnson; Nguyen, Nghia; Lay, John; Golod, George; Vet, Robert; Cotie, Joseph; Hertel, Terry; Aaboe, Erik; Callison, Ryan; Adam, Jacque; Keese, Danielle; Freise, Jeremy; Hathcoat, April; Sakizzie, Brenda; King, Michael; Lee, Chris; Oliva, Sylvia; San Miguel, George; Crow, Leon; Geasland, Frank

2008-11-01

31

Gravity investigations of the Chickasaw National Recreation Area, south-central Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The geological configuration of the Arbuckle Uplift in the vicinity of Chickasaw National Recreation Area in south-central Oklahoma plays a governing role in the distribution of fresh and mineral springs within the park and in the existence of artesian wells in and around the park. A confining layer of well-cemented conglomerate lies immediately below the surface of the recreation area, and groundwater migrates from an area of meteoric recharge where rocks of the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer crop out as close as two kilometers to the east of the park. Prominent, Pennsylvanian-aged faults are exposed in the aquifer outcrop, and two of the fault traces project beneath the conglomerate cover toward two groups of springs within the northern section of the park. We conducted gravity fieldwork and analysis to investigate the subsurface extensions of these major faults beneath Chickasaw National Recreation Area. By defining gravity signatures of the faults where they are exposed, we infer that the Sulphur and Mill Creek Faults bend to the south-west where they are buried. The South Sulphur Fault may project westward linearly if it juxtaposes rocks that have a density contrast opposite that of that fault's density configuration in the Sulphur Syncline area. The Sulphur Syncline, whose eastern extent is exposed in the outcrop area of the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer, does not appear to extend beneath Chickasaw National Recreation Area nor the adjacent City of Sulphur. The South Sulphur Fault dips steeply northward, and its normal sense of offset suggests that the Sulphur Syncline is part of a graben. The Mill Creek Fault dips vertically, and the Reagan Fault dips southward, consistent with its being mapped as a thrust fault. The Sulphur and Mill Creek Synclines may have formed as pull-apart basins in a left-lateral, left-stepping strike-slip environment. The character of the gravity field of Chickasaw National Recreation Area is different from the lineated gravity field in the area of Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer outcrop. This change in character is not due to the presence of the overlying conglomerate layer, which is quite thin (<100 m) in the area of the park with the springs. The presence of relatively high-density Precambrian basement rocks in a broader region suggests that significant gravity anomalies may arise from variations in basement topography. Understanding of the geological configuration of Chickasaw National Recreation Area can be improved by expanding the study area and by investigating complementary geophysical and borehole constraints of the subsurface.

Scheirer, Daniel S.; Scheirer, Allegra Hosford

2006-01-01

32

Predictors of post-traumatic stress symptoms in oklahoma city: Exposure, social support, peri-traumatic responses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eighty-five adults seeking mental health assistance six months after the Oklahoma City bombing were assessed to determine which of three groups of variables (exposure, peri-traumatic responses, and social support) predicted development of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. Variables most highly associated with subsequent PTSD symptoms included having been injured (among exposure variables), feeling nervous or afraid (peri-traumatic responses), and responding

Phebe Tucker; Betty Pfefferbaum; Sara Jo Nixon; Warren Dickson

2000-01-01

33

Autonomic reactivity and hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis dysregulation in spouses of Oklahoma City bombing survivors 7 years after the attack  

PubMed Central

Objective The objective of this exploratory pilot study was to examine autonomic reactivity and hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis dysregulation in spouses of highly exposed survivors of the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing. Methods This study compared psychiatric diagnoses and biological stress markers (physiological reactivity and cortisol measures) in spouses of bombing survivors and matched community participants. Spouses were recruited through bombing survivors who participated in prior studies. Individuals with medical illnesses and those taking psychotropic medications that would confound biological stress measures were excluded. The final sample included 15 spouses and 15 community participants. The primary outcome measures were psychiatric diagnoses assessed with the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for DSM-IV (DIS-IV). Biological stress markers were physiological reactivity and recovery in heart rate and blood pressure responses to a trauma interview and cortisol (morning, afternoon, and diurnal variation). Results Compared to the community participants, spouses evidenced greater reactivity in heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and diastolic blood pressure; delayed recovery in systolic blood pressure; and higher afternoon salivary cortisol. Conclusions The results support the need for further research in this area to clarify post-disaster effects on biological stress measures in the spouses of survivors and the potential significance of these effects and to address the needs of this important population which may be overlooked in recovery efforts. PMID:22520087

Pfefferbaum, Betty; Tucker, Phebe; North, Carol S.; Jeon-Slaughter, Haekyung

2012-01-01

34

Earthquake activity in Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oklahoma is one of the most seismically active areas in the southern Mid-Continent. From 1897 to 1988, over 700 earthquakes are known to have occurred in Oklahoma. The earliest documented Oklahoma earthquake took place on December 2, 1897, near Jefferson, in Grant County. The largest known Oklahoma earthquake happened near El Reno on April 9, 1952. This magnitude 5.5 (mb)

K. V. Luza; J. E. Jr. Lawson

1989-01-01

35

PSYCHOSOCIAL ADJUSTMENT OF DIRECTLY EXPOSED SURVIVORS SEVEN YEARS AFTER THE OKLAHOMA CITY BOMBING  

PubMed Central

Objective To prospectively examine the long-term course of psychiatric disorders, symptoms, and functioning among 113 directly exposed survivors of the Oklahoma City bombing systematically assessed at six months and again nearly seven years post-bombing. Methods The Diagnostic Interview Schedule/Disaster Supplement was used to assess predisaster and postdisaster psychiatric disorders and symptoms and other variables of relevance to disaster exposure and outcomes. Results Total prevalence of PTSD was 41%. Seven years post-bombing, 26% of the sample still had active PTSD. Delayed-onset PTSD and new postdisaster alcohol use disorders were not observed. PTSD non-remission was predicted by the occurrence of negative life events after the bombing. Posttraumatic symptoms among survivors without PTSD decayed more rapidly than for those with PTSD, and symptoms remained at seven years even for many who did not develop PTSD. Those with PTSD reported more functioning problems at index than those without PTSD, but functioning improved dramatically over seven years, regardless of remission from PTSD. No survivors had long-term employment disability based on psychiatric problems alone. Conclusions These findings have potentially important implications for anticipation of long-term emotional and functional recovery from disaster trauma. PMID:21220059

North, Carol S.; Pfefferbaum, Betty; Kawasaki, Aya; Lee, Sungkyu; Spitznagel, Edward L.

2010-01-01

36

Growth of Cities and Loss of Streams: Land Cover Change Impacts on Stream Channel Loss in Central Oklahoma from 1874 to 2010  

EPA Science Inventory

Central Oklahoma has undergone substantial land cover changes since the 1800’s. Accordingly, regional watersheds have been covered by impervious surfaces, peripheral agricultural areas have been subdivided or intensified, and large reservoirs have been constructed. Here, we...

37

24 CFR 81.13 - Central Cities, Rural Areas, and Other Underserved Areas Housing Goal.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Central Cities, Rural Areas, and Other Underserved... Housing Goals § 81.13 Central Cities, Rural Areas, and Other Underserved...mortgages on housing located in central cities, rural areas, and other...

2011-04-01

38

24 CFR 81.13 - Central Cities, Rural Areas, and Other Underserved Areas Housing Goal.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Central Cities, Rural Areas, and Other Underserved... Housing Goals § 81.13 Central Cities, Rural Areas, and Other Underserved...mortgages on housing located in central cities, rural areas, and other...

2010-04-01

39

Analysis and Prediction of 8 May 2003 Oklahoma City Tornadic Thunderstorm and Embedded Tornado using ARPS with Assimilation of WSR-88D Radar Data  

E-print Network

; Hu and Xue 2007) to initial tornado thunderstorms for the ARPS model. For the 8 May 2003 case1 Analysis and Prediction of 8 May 2003 Oklahoma City Tornadic Thunderstorm and Embedded Tornado researchers in the past three decays to study the tornado and tornadogenesis. Trough 2-dimensional

Xue, Ming

40

Tornado-Related Deaths and Injuries in Oklahoma due to the 3 May 1999 Tornadoes  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the evening hours of 3 May 1999, 58 tornadoes occurred in Oklahoma. One tornado reached F5 intensity and left a widespread path of death, injury, and destruction in and around the Oklahoma City metropolitan area. Other communities across the state were also affected. Data on persons who died or were injured were collected from medical examiner reports, hospital medical

Sheryll Brown; Pam Archer; Elizabeth Kruger; Sue Mallonee

2002-01-01

41

Gaseous Oxidized Mercury Dry Deposition Measurements in the FourCorners Area and Eastern Oklahoma, U.S.A.  

EPA Science Inventory

Gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) dry deposition measurements using surrogate surface passive samplers were collected in the Four Corners area and eastern Oklahoma from August, 2009?August, 2011. Using data from a six site area network, a characterization of the magnitude and spatia...

42

Reductive Dechlorination of Chlorinated Ethenes Under Oxidation-Reduction Conditions and Potentiometric Surfaces in Two Trichloroethene-Contaminated Zones at the Double Eagle and Fourth Street Superfund Sites in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Double Eagle Refining Superfund site and the Fourth Street Abandoned Refinery Superfund site are in northeast Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, adjacent to one another. The Double Eagle facility became a Superfund site on the basis of contamination from lead and volatile organic compounds; the Fourth Street facility on the basis of volatile organic compounds, pesticides, and acid-base neutral compounds. The study documented in this report was done to investigate whether reductive dechlorination of chlorinated ethenes under oxidation-reduction conditions is occurring in two zones of the Garber-Wellington aquifer (shallow zone 30?60 to 75 feet below land surface, deep zone 75 to 160 feet below land surface) at the sites; and to construct potentiometric surfaces of the two water-yielding zones to determine the directions of ground-water flow at the sites. The presence in some wells of intermediate products of reductive dechlorination, dichloroethene and vinyl chloride, is an indication that reductive dechlorination of trichloroethene is occurring. Dissolved oxygen concentrations (less than 0.5 milligram per liter) indicate that consumption of dissolved oxygen likely had occurred in the oxygen-reducing microbial process associated with reductive dechlorination. Concentrations of nitrate and nitrite nitrogen (generally less than 2.0 and 0.06 milligrams per liter, respectively) indicate that nitrate reduction probably is not a key process in either aquifer zone. Concentrations of ferrous iron greater than 1.00 milligram per liter in the majority of wells sampled indicate that iron reduction is probable. Concentrations of sulfide less than 0.05 milligram per liter in all wells indicate that sulfate reduction probably is not a key process in either zone. The presence of methane in ground water is an indication of strongly reducing conditions that facilitate reductive dechlorination. Methane was detected in all but one well. In the shallow zone in the eastern part of the study area, ground water flowing from the northwest and south coalesces in a potentiometric trough, then moves westward and ultimately northwestward. In the western part of the study area, ground water in the shallow zone flows northwest. In the deep zone in the eastern part of the study area, ground water generally flows northwestward; and in the western part of the study area, ground water in the deep zone generally flows northward.

Braun, Christopher L.

2004-01-01

43

Assessment of Local Recharge Area Characteristics of Four Caves in Northern Arkansas and Northeastern Oklahoma, 2004-07  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A study was conducted from 2004 to 2007 by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to assess the characteristics of the local recharge areas of four caves in northern Arkansas and northeastern Oklahoma that provide habitat for a number of unique organisms. Characterization of the local recharge areas are important because the caves occur in a predominately karst system and because land use proximal to the caves, including areas suspected to lie within the local recharge areas, may include activities with potentially deleterious effects to cave water quality. An integrated approach was used to determine the hydrogeologic characteristics and the extent of the local recharge areas of Civil War Cave, January-Stansbury Cave, Nesbitt Spring Cave, and Wasson's Mud Cave. This approach incorporated methods of hydrology, structural geology, geomorphology, and geochemistry. Continuous water-level and water-temperature data were collected at each cave for various periods to determine recharge characteristics. Field investigations were conducted to determine surficial controls affecting the groundwater flow and connections of the groundwater system to land-surface processes in each study area. Qualitative groundwater tracing also was conducted at each cave to help define the local recharge areas. These independent methods of investigation provided multiple lines of evidence for effectively describing the behavior of these complex hydrologic systems. Civil War Cave is located near the city of Bentonville in Benton County, Arkansas, and provides habitat for the Ozark cavefish. Civil War Cave is developed entirely within the epikarst of the upper Boone Formation, and recharge to Civil War Cave occurs from the Boone Formation (Springfield Plateau aquifer). The daily mean discharge for the period of study was 0.59 cubic feet per second and ranged from 0.19 to 2.8 cubic feet per second. The mean water temperature for Civil War Cave was 14.0 degrees Celsius. The calculated recharge area for Civil War Cave ranged from 0.13 to 2.5 square miles using the water-balance equation to 3.80 square miles using a normalized base-flow method. Tracer tests indicated a portion of the water within Civil War Cave was from across a major topographic divide located to the southwest. January-Stansbury Cave is located in Delaware County in northeastern Oklahoma, and provides habitat for the Oklahoma cave crayfish and the Ozark cavefish. January-Stansbury Cave is developed in the St. Joe Limestone member of the Boone Formation. The daily mean discharge for the period of study was 1.0 cubic foot per second and ranged from 0.35 to 8.7 cubic feet per second. The mean water temperature for January-Stansbury Cave was 14.3 degrees. The calculated recharge area for January-Stansbury Cave using the water-balance equation ranged from approximately 0.04 to 0.83 square miles. Tracer tests generally showed water discharging from January-Stansbury Cave during high flow originates from within the topographic drainage area and from an area outside the topographic drainage area to the southwest. Nesbitt Spring Cave is located near the city of Mountain View in north-central Arkansas and provides habitat for the Hell Creek cave crayfish. Nesbitt Spring Cave is developed in the Plattin Limestone (Ozark aquifer) and is recharged through the Boone Formation (Springfield Plateau aquifer). The mean daily discharge for the period of study was 4.5 cubic feet per second and ranged from 0.39 to 70.7 cubic feet per second. The mean water temperature for Nesbitt Spring Cave was 14.2 degrees Celsius. The calculated recharge area for Nesbitt Spring Cave using the water-balance equation ranged from 0.49 square mile to 4.0 square miles. Tracer tests generally showed a portion of water discharging from Nesbitt Spring during high flow originates from outside the topographic drainage area. Wasson's Mud Cave is located near the city of Springtown

Gillip, Jonathan A.; Galloway, Joel M.; Hart, Rheannon M.

2009-01-01

44

Oklahoma Forestry Services  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The mission of the Oklahoma Forestry Services (OFS) is "to conserve, enhance and protect the forest resources of Oklahoma for present and future generations." As part of this mission the OFS website contains information about fire reports, tree and forest health, and water quality. First-time visitors should start their journey through the site by clicking on the "Oklahoma's Forests" section. Here they will find information about Oklahoma's major forest types, the ecoregions of Oklahoma, and several Trees of Oklahoma fact sheets. Back on the homepage, visitors can learn about upcoming workshops and events, read a list of forestry bulletins, and find out about the Forest Heritage Center Museum. Residents of Oklahoma may also wish to look through the "Home and Community Trees" area to learn more about planning their own trees and Arbor Day related activities.

45

Hydrology of an abandoned coal-mining area near McCurtain, Haskell County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water quality was investigated from October 1980 to May 1983 in an area of abandoned coal mines in Haskell county, Oklahoma. Bedrock in the area is shale, siltstone, sandstone, and the McAlester (Stigler) and Hartshorne coals of the McAlester Formation and Hartshorne Sandstone of Pennsylvanian age. The two coal beds, upper and lower Hartshorne, associated with the Hartshorne Sandstone converge or are separated by a few feet or less of bony coal or shale in the McCurtain area. Many small faults cut the Hartshorne coal in all the McCurtain-area mines. The main avenues of water entry to and movement through the bedrock are the exposed bedding-plane openings between layers of sandstone, partings between laminae of shale, fractures and joints developed during folding and faulting laminae of shale, fractures and joints developed during folding and faulting of the brittle rocks, and openings caused by surface mining--the overburden being shattered and broken to form spoil. Water-table conditions exist in bedrock and spoil in the area. Mine pond water is in direct hydraulic connections with water in the spoil piles and the underlying Hartshorne Sandstone. Sulfate is the best indicator of the presence of coal-mine drainage in both surface and ground water in the Oklahoma coal field. Median sulfate concentrations for four sites on Mule Creek ranged from 26 to 260 milligrams per liter. Median sulfate concentrations increased with increased drainage from unreclaimed mined areas. The median sulfate concentration in Mule Creek where it drains the reclaimed area is less than one-third of that at the next site downstream where the stream begins to drain abandoned (unreclaimed) mine lands. Water from Mule Creek predominantly is a sodium sulfate type. Maximum and median values for specific conductance and concentrations of calcium, magnesium, sodium, sulfate, chloride, dissolved solids, and alkalinity increase as Mule Creek flows downstream and drains increasing areas of abandoned (unreclaimed) mining lands. Constituent concentrations in Mule Creek, except those for dissolved solids, iron, manganese, and sulfate, generally do not exceed drinking-water limits. Reclamation likely would result in decreased concentrations of dissolved solids, calcium, magnesium, sodium, sulfate, and alkalinity in Mule Creek in the vicinity of the reclaimed area. Ground water in the area is moderately hard to very hard alkaline water with a median pH of 7.2 to 7.6. It predominately is a sodium sulfate type and, except for dissolved solids, iron manganese, and sulfate, constituent concentrations generally do not exceed drinking-water limits. Ground-water quality would likely be unchanged by reclamation. The quality of water in the two mine ponds is quite similar to that of the shallow ground water in the area. Constituents in water from both ponds generally do not exceed drinking-water limits and the water quality is unlikely to be changed by reclamation in the area.

Slack, L.J.

1983-01-01

46

12 CFR 1282.13 - Central Cities, Rural Areas, and Other Underserved Areas Housing Goal.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01... false Central Cities, Rural Areas, and Other Underserved...13 Section 1282.13 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING...1282.13 Central Cities, Rural Areas, and Other...

2010-01-01

47

1980 Census of Population: American Indians, Eskimos, and Aleuts on Identified Reservations and in the Historic Areas of Oklahoma (Excluding Urbanized Areas). Subject Reports, Volume 2. Sections 1 and 2.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This two-part report provides data from the 1980 Census Supplementary Questionnaire for American Indians, Eskimos, and Aleuts for the United States, census regions, standard federal administrative regions, divisions, selected states, American Indian reservations, historic areas of Oklahoma, and tribal governments and selected tribes in Oklahoma

Crook, Karen A.; And Others

48

CITY/TOWN AREAS FOR ID, OR, AND WA  

EPA Science Inventory

Census place codes were dissolved & combined into state city or census Designated Place (CDP) areas. The total 1990 population was also calculated & attached to the Census place. Each state file may have multiple polygons and/or doughnut holes in an area for a city/CDP. A loca...

49

Devitrification of the Carlton Rhyolite in the Blue Creek Canyon area, Wichita Mountains, southwestern Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The Cambrian Carlton Rhyolite is a sequence of lava flows and ignimbrites extruded in association with rifting in the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen. Rhyolite exposed in the Blue Creek Canyon area consists of a single, originally glassy, porphyritic lava flow > 300 m thick. Abundant flow banding is deformed by variably oriented flow folds present on both outcrop and thin-section scales. A variety of complex texture record the cooling, degassing, and devitrification history of the flow. Acicular Fe, Ti-oxide crystallites aligned in the flow banding document nucleation and limited crystal growth during flow. Spherical microvesicles and larger lithophysal cavities up to 10 cm long crosscut flow banding, showing that degassing continued after flow had ceased. Pseudomorphs of quartz after cristobalite and tridymite are present on cavity walls and are products of high-T vapor-phase crystallization. Devitrification textures overprint the flow banding and developed in two stages. Primary devitrification occurred during initial cooling and formed spherulitic intergrowths in distinct areas bound by sharp devitrification fronts. Spherulites nucleated on phenocrysts, vesicles, and flow bands and show evidence of multiple episodes of growth. Rhyolite outside of the devitrification fronts initially remained glassy but underwent later, low-T hydration to form perlitic texture, which was followed by prolonged secondary devitrification to form extremely fine-grained, equigranular quartzofeldspathic mosaics. Snowflake texture (micropoikilitic quartz surrounding randomly oriented alkali feldspar) developed during both primary and secondary devitrification. Spherical bodies up to 30 cm across are present in discrete horizons within the flow and weather out preferentially from the host rhyolite.

Bigger, S.E. (Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). Dept. of Geology); Hanson, R.E. (Texas Christian Univ., Fort Worth, TX (United States). Dept. of Geology)

1993-02-01

50

Restoration of One-Room School Facilities in Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Within the last 4 years, four one-room school houses have been restored for use as educational museum facilities. These include the Pleasant Valley School in Stillwater, Oklahoma; the Rose Hill School at Perry, Oklahoma; the old school located on the grounds of the Harn Homestead Museum in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; and the Old Roll School, located…

McKinley, Kenneth H.

51

New York City Metropolitan Area Retail Motor Gasoline Supply Report  

EIA Publications

Final report of the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) emergency survey, which was started on Friday, November 2, 2012, to monitor the vehicle fuel supply conditions in the New York City metropolitan area on a temporary basis after Hurricane Sandy.

2012-01-01

52

Name: H. EUGENE STANLEY Born: 28 Mar 41, Oklahoma City, USA. Email: hes@bu.edu Postal Address: Physics Dept., Boston Univ., Boston, MA 02215 USA Tel: 617.353.2617  

E-print Network

Name: H. EUGENE STANLEY Born: 28 Mar 41, Oklahoma City, USA. Email: hes@bu.edu Postal Address: Physics Dept., Boston Univ., Boston, MA 02215 USA Tel: 617.353.2617 Fax: 617.353.9393 EDUCATION: -- B, AWARDS, NAMED LECTURES, and LEADERSHIP: (1a) Doctorate Honoris Causa: Universidade Federal de Cear

53

Geothermal resource assessment of Canon City, Colorado Area  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1979 a program was initiated to fully define the geothermal conditions of an area east of Canon City, bounded by the mountains on the north and west, the Arkansas River on the south and Colorado Highway 115 on the east. Within this area are a number of thermal springs and wells in two distinct groups. The eastern group consists

Ted G. Zacharakis; Richard Howard Pearl

1982-01-01

54

View of the Salt Lake City, Utah area  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An oblique view of the Salt Lake City, Utah area as photographed from Earth orbit by one of the six lenses of the Itek-furnished S190-A Multispectral Photographic Facility Experiment aboard the Skylab space station. Approximately two-thirds of the Great Salt Lake is in view. The smaller body of water south of Salt Lake City is Utah Lake. The Wasatch Range is on the east side of the Great Salt Lake.

1973-01-01

55

Salt Lake City, Utah Area Flyover during Summer (NASM2002)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Landsat 7 imagery is combined here with terrain elevation data to create a view of the Salt Lake City area. This image was taken in the Summer of 2001 and can be compared to identical animations using images taken at other times of the year. This visualization was created for the NASM2002 presentation and is based on a earlier visualizations created for the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City.

Greg Shirah

2002-09-24

56

Salt Lake City, Utah Area Flyover during Spring (NASM2002)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Landsat 7 imagery is combined here with terrain elevation data to create a view of the Salt Lake City area. This image was taken in the Spring of 2001 and can be compared to identical animations using images taken at other times of the year. This visualization was created for the NASM2002 presentation and is based on a earlier visualizations created for the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City.

Greg Shirah

2002-09-24

57

Salt Lake City, Utah Area Flyover during Fall (NASM2002)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Landsat 7 imagery is combined here with terrain elevation data to create a view of the Salt Lake City area. This image was taken in the Fall of 2001 and can be compared to identical animations using images taken at other times of the year. This visualization was created for the NASM2002 presentation and is based on a earlier visualizations created for the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City.

Greg Shirah

2002-09-24

58

33 CFR 334.763 - Naval Support Activity Panama City; Gulf of Mexico; restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... false Naval Support Activity Panama City; Gulf of Mexico; restricted area. ...334.763 Naval Support Activity Panama City; Gulf of Mexico; restricted area. ...Officer, Naval Support Activity, Panama City Florida, and such agencies as...

2011-07-01

59

40 CFR 81.337 - Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section...otherwise noted. Oklahoma—Ozone (1-Hour Standard)2 Designated...noted. 2 The 1-hour ozone standard is revoked effective... Oklahoma—1997 8-Hour Ozone NAAQS (Primary and...

2013-07-01

60

40 CFR 81.337 - Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section...otherwise noted. Oklahoma—Ozone (1-Hour Standard)2 Designated...noted. 2 The 1-hour ozone standard is revoked effective...otherwise noted. Oklahoma—Ozone (8-Hour Standard)...

2012-07-01

61

Earthquake activity in Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Oklahoma is one of the most seismically active areas in the southern Mid-Continent. From 1897 to 1988, over 700 earthquakes are known to have occurred in Oklahoma. The earliest documented Oklahoma earthquake took place on December 2, 1897, near Jefferson, in Grant County. The largest known Oklahoma earthquake happened near El Reno on April 9, 1952. This magnitude 5.5 (mb) earthquake was felt from Austin, Texas, to Des Moines, Iowa, and covered a felt area of approximately 362,000 km{sup 2}. Prior to 1962, all earthquakes in Oklahoma (59) were either known from historical accounts or from seismograph stations outside the state. Over half of these events were located in Canadian County. In late 1961, the first seismographs were installed in Oklahoma. From 1962 through 1976, 70 additional earthquakes were added to the earthquake database. In 1977, a statewide network of seven semipermanent and three radio-telemetry seismograph stations were installed. The additional stations have improved earthquake detection and location in the state of Oklahoma. From 1977 to 1988, over 570 additional earthquakes were located in Oklahoma, mostly of magnitudes less than 2.5. Most of these events occurred on the eastern margin of the Anadarko basin along a zone 135 km long by 40 km wide that extends from Canadian County to the southern edge of Garvin County. Another general area of earthquake activity lies along and north of the Ouachita Mountains in the Arkoma basin. A few earthquakes have occurred in the shelves that border the Arkoma and Anadarko basins.

Luza, K.V.; Lawson, J.E. Jr. (Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman (USA))

1989-08-01

62

No evidence of suicide increase following terrorist attacks in the United States: an interrupted time-series analysis of September 11 and Oklahoma City.  

PubMed

There is substantial evidence of detrimental psychological sequelae following disasters, including terrorist attacks. The effect of these events on extreme responses such as suicide, however, is unclear. We tested competing hypotheses about such effects by employing autoregressive integrated moving average techniques to model the impact of September 11 and the Oklahoma City bombing on monthly suicide counts at the local, state, and national level. Unlike prior studies that provided conflicting evidence, rigorous time series techniques revealed no support for an increase or decrease in suicides following these events. We conclude that while terrorist attacks produce subsequent psychological morbidity and may affect self and collective efficacy well beyond their immediate impact, these effects are not strong enough to influence levels of suicide mortality. PMID:20121329

Pridemore, William Alex; Trahan, Adam; Chamlin, Mitchell B

2009-12-01

63

Oklahoma NASA EPSCoR  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The mission of Oklahoma EPSCoR is to make Oklahoma researchers more successful in competing for research funding. Specific goals, objectives, and strategies were developed for each federal EPSCoR program, based on federal and state needs. A theme of stimulating collaboration among campuses and building on common research strengths is a strong component of the Oklahoma EPSCoR strategic plan. It extends also to our relationships with the federal agencies, and wherever possible, Oklahoma EPSCoR projects are developed collaboratively with federal research laboratories and program offices. Overall, Oklahoma EPSCoR seeks to capitalize on unique research capabilities and opportunities. The NASA EPSCoR Program in Oklahoma was developed through this grant as a joint effort between Oklahoma EPSCoR and the NASA Oklahoma Space Grant Consortium (OSGC). The major goal of the Oklahoma NASA EPSCoR Plan established in 1996 is to develop an academic research enterprise directed towards a long-term, self-sustaining, nationally competitive capability in areas of mutual self-interest to NASA and Oklahoma. Our final technical summary pie chart demonstrates the strong successes we have achieved during this period as a result of the award.

Snowden, Victoria Duca

2002-01-01

64

Chemical analyses of stream sediment in the Tar Creek basin of the Picher mining area, northeast Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Chemical analyses are presented for 47 sediment samples from the Tar Creek drainage in the Picher mining area of northeast Oklahoma. The samples were taken in December 1983, June 1984, and June 1985. All of the samples were taken downstream from mine-water discharge points of abandoned lead and zinc mines. The 34 samples taken in December 1983 and June 1984 were analyzed semiquantitatively by emission spectrography for 64 elements and quantitatively for cadmium, copper, iron, manganese, nickel, lead, sulfur, zinc, and organic carbon. The 13 samples taken in June 1985 were analyzed quantitatively for aluminum, cadmium, cobalt, chromium, copper, iron, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, phosphorus, lead, sulfur, silicon, titanium, vanadium, zinc, and organic carbon.

Parkhurst, David L.; Doughten, Michael; Hearn, Paul P.

1988-01-01

65

Gaseous oxidized mercury dry deposition measurements in the southwestern USA: a comparison between Texas, eastern Oklahoma, and the Four Corners area.  

PubMed

Gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) dry deposition measurements using aerodynamic surrogate surface passive samplers were collected in central and eastern Texas and eastern Oklahoma, from September 2011 to September 2012. The purpose of this study was to provide an initial characterization of the magnitude and spatial extent of ambient GOM dry deposition in central and eastern Texas for a 12-month period which contained statistically average annual results for precipitation totals, temperature, and wind speed. The research objective was to investigate GOM dry deposition in areas of Texas impacted by emissions from coal-fired utility boilers and compare it with GOM dry deposition measurements previously observed in eastern Oklahoma and the Four Corners area. Annual GOM dry deposition rate estimates were relatively low in Texas, ranging from 0.1 to 0.3 ng/m(2)h at the four Texas monitoring sites, similar to the 0.2 ng/m(2)h annual GOM dry deposition rate estimate recorded at the eastern Oklahoma monitoring site. The Texas and eastern Oklahoma annual GOM dry deposition rate estimates were at least four times lower than the highest annual GOM dry deposition rate estimate previously measured in the more arid bordering western states of New Mexico and Colorado in the Four Corners area. PMID:24955412

Sather, Mark E; Mukerjee, Shaibal; Allen, Kara L; Smith, Luther; Mathew, Johnson; Jackson, Clarence; Callison, Ryan; Scrapper, Larry; Hathcoat, April; Adam, Jacque; Keese, Danielle; Ketcher, Philip; Brunette, Robert; Karlstrom, Jason; Van der Jagt, Gerard

2014-01-01

66

Gaseous Oxidized Mercury Dry Deposition Measurements in the Southwestern USA: A Comparison between Texas, Eastern Oklahoma, and the Four Corners Area  

PubMed Central

Gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) dry deposition measurements using aerodynamic surrogate surface passive samplers were collected in central and eastern Texas and eastern Oklahoma, from September 2011 to September 2012. The purpose of this study was to provide an initial characterization of the magnitude and spatial extent of ambient GOM dry deposition in central and eastern Texas for a 12-month period which contained statistically average annual results for precipitation totals, temperature, and wind speed. The research objective was to investigate GOM dry deposition in areas of Texas impacted by emissions from coal-fired utility boilers and compare it with GOM dry deposition measurements previously observed in eastern Oklahoma and the Four Corners area. Annual GOM dry deposition rate estimates were relatively low in Texas, ranging from 0.1 to 0.3?ng/m2h at the four Texas monitoring sites, similar to the 0.2?ng/m2h annual GOM dry deposition rate estimate recorded at the eastern Oklahoma monitoring site. The Texas and eastern Oklahoma annual GOM dry deposition rate estimates were at least four times lower than the highest annual GOM dry deposition rate estimate previously measured in the more arid bordering western states of New Mexico and Colorado in the Four Corners area. PMID:24955412

Sather, Mark E.; Allen, Kara L.; Smith, Luther; Mathew, Johnson; Jackson, Clarence; Callison, Ryan; Scrapper, Larry; Hathcoat, April; Adam, Jacque; Keese, Danielle; Brunette, Robert; Karlstrom, Jason; Van der Jagt, Gerard

2014-01-01

67

Playing the City: Public Participation in a Contested Suburban Area  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents one case study of public participation in urban planning: the "Face Your World" project that took place in 2005 in the suburban area of Slotervaart, close to the Dutch city of Amsterdam. "Face Your World" was a participation project that aimed at engaging both younger and immigrant inhabitants of Slotervaart in the urban…

Lauwaert, Maaike

2009-01-01

68

Oklahoma Today  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Published since the 1950s, Oklahoma Today is a production of several state agencies, and it is designed to showcase various cultural, historical, and social aspects of Oklahoma. Over the past several years, Oklahoma State University has digitized back issues of the magazine, and visitors can now read all the way back to the first issue from 1956. Visitors can browse back issues by decade, and they can also perform key-word searches. First-time visitors should start by reading through the spring 1960 issue, which contains pieces on rattlesnakes, Oklahoma wildflowers, and the Washington Irving Trail. While the name Washington Irving may not be commonly associated with Oklahoma, the author spent part of 1832 wandering through the state with a Native American guide. More recent issues feature profiles of singer Vince Gill and Route 66.

69

Riparian Area. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Management Handbook  

E-print Network

Riparian Area. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Management Handbook E-952 Oklahoma Cooperative;.............................................................................................. 99 Riparian Area. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-952 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service ..........................................................................................................viii Benefits and Functions of Riparian Areas

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

70

CensusScope: Racial Segregation Statistics for Cities and Metropolitan Areas  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Equipped with charts, data, and rankings, CensusScope's Racial Segregation Statistics for Cities and Metropolitan Areas covers dissimilarity and exposure indices for 1,246 individual US cities with populations above 25,000 and 318 US metropolitan areas.

71

Gaseous Oxidized Mercury Dry Deposition Measurements in Southwestern USA: Comparison between texas, Eastern Oklahoma, and the Four Corners Area  

EPA Science Inventory

Gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) dry deposition measurements using aerodynamic surrogate surface passive samplers were collected in central and eastern Texas and eastern Oklahoma, from September 2011 to September 2012.The purpose of this study was to provide an initial characteriza...

72

Geothermal resource assessment in Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

In September 1980, the Oklahoma Geological Survey began a program to assess the geothermal potential of the state. The program, thus far, consists of: the preparation of a detailed geothermal-gradient map of Oklahoma at a scale of 1:500,000; and site-specific investigations of gradient and subsurface conditions in areas that appear to have geothermal potential. Two areas where recent mapping showed

M. L. Prater; P. K. Cheung; K. V. Luza; W. E. Harrison

1981-01-01

73

33 CFR 334.763 - Naval Support Activity Panama City; Gulf of Mexico; restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Naval Support Activity Panama City; Gulf of Mexico; restricted area. 334.763 Section 334.763 Navigation... § 334.763 Naval Support Activity Panama City; Gulf of Mexico; restricted area. (a) The area. The area is bounded by a line directly...

2010-07-01

74

Convective weather hazards in the Twin Cities Metropolitan Area, MN  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This dissertation investigates the frequency and intensity of severe convective storms, and their associated hazards, in the Twin Cities Metropolitan Area (TCMA), Minnesota. Using public severe weather reports databases and high spatial density rain gauge data, annual frequencies and return-periods are calculated for tornadoes, damaging winds, large hail, and flood-inducing rainfall. The hypothesis that severe thunderstorms and tornadoes are less likely in the central TCMA than in surrounding areas also is examined, and techniques for estimating 100-year rainfall amounts are developed and discussed. This research finds that: (i) storms capable of significant damage somewhere within the TCMA recur annually (sometimes multiple times per year), while storms virtually certain to cause such damage recur every 2-3 years; (ii) though severe weather reports data are not amenable to classical comparative statistical testing, careful treatment of them suggests all types and intensity categories of severe convective weather have been and should continue to be approximately as common in the central TCMA as in surrounding areas; and (iii) applications of Generalized Extreme Value (GEV) statistics and areal analyses of rainfall data lead to significantly larger (25-50%) estimates of 100-year rainfall amounts in the TCMA and parts of Minnesota than those currently published and used for precipitation design. The growth of the TCMA, the popular sentiment that downtown areas somehow deter severe storms and tornadoes, and the prior underestimation of extreme rainfall thresholds for precipitation design, all act to enhance local susceptibility to hazards from severe convective storms.

Blumenfeld, Kenneth A.

75

33 CFR 334.762 - Naval Support Activity Panama City; North Bay and West Bay; restricted areas.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... false Naval Support Activity Panama City; North Bay and West Bay; restricted areas...334.762 Naval Support Activity Panama City; North Bay and West Bay; restricted areas...Officer, Naval Support Activity, Panama City Florida, and such agencies as...

2011-07-01

76

33 CFR 334.762 - Naval Support Activity Panama City; North Bay and West Bay; restricted areas.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... false Naval Support Activity Panama City; North Bay and West Bay; restricted areas...334.762 Naval Support Activity Panama City; North Bay and West Bay; restricted areas...Officer, Naval Support Activity, Panama City Florida, and such agencies as...

2010-07-01

77

33 CFR 165.556 - Regulated Navigation Area; Chesapeake and Delaware Canal, Chesapeake City Anchorage Basin, MD.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Navigation Area; Chesapeake and Delaware Canal, Chesapeake City Anchorage Basin, MD...Navigation Area; Chesapeake and Delaware Canal, Chesapeake City Anchorage Basin, MD...of the Chesapeake and Delaware (C & D) Canal within the anchorage basin at Chesapeake City,...

2011-07-01

78

33 CFR 165.556 - Regulated Navigation Area; Chesapeake and Delaware Canal, Chesapeake City Anchorage Basin, MD.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Navigation Area; Chesapeake and Delaware Canal, Chesapeake City Anchorage Basin, MD...Navigation Area; Chesapeake and Delaware Canal, Chesapeake City Anchorage Basin, MD...of the Chesapeake and Delaware (C & D) Canal within the anchorage basin at Chesapeake City,...

2013-07-01

79

33 CFR 165.556 - Regulated Navigation Area; Chesapeake and Delaware Canal, Chesapeake City Anchorage Basin, MD.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Navigation Area; Chesapeake and Delaware Canal, Chesapeake City Anchorage Basin, MD...Navigation Area; Chesapeake and Delaware Canal, Chesapeake City Anchorage Basin, MD...of the Chesapeake and Delaware (C & D) Canal within the anchorage basin at Chesapeake City,...

2014-07-01

80

33 CFR 165.556 - Regulated Navigation Area; Chesapeake and Delaware Canal, Chesapeake City Anchorage Basin, MD.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Navigation Area; Chesapeake and Delaware Canal, Chesapeake City Anchorage Basin, MD...Navigation Area; Chesapeake and Delaware Canal, Chesapeake City Anchorage Basin, MD...of the Chesapeake and Delaware (C & D) Canal within the anchorage basin at Chesapeake City,...

2012-07-01

81

33 CFR 165.556 - Regulated Navigation Area; Chesapeake and Delaware Canal, Chesapeake City Anchorage Basin, MD.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Navigation Area; Chesapeake and Delaware Canal, Chesapeake City Anchorage Basin, MD...Navigation Area; Chesapeake and Delaware Canal, Chesapeake City Anchorage Basin, MD...of the Chesapeake and Delaware (C & D) Canal within the anchorage basin at Chesapeake City,...

2010-07-01

82

Urban Groundwater Mapping - Bucharest City Area Case Study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Urban Groundwater Mapping (UGM) is a generic term for a collection of procedures and techniques used to create targeted cartographic representation of the groundwater related aspects in urban areas. The urban environment alters the physical and chemical characteristics of the underneath aquifers. The scale of the pressure is controlled by the urban development in time and space. To have a clear image on the spatial and temporal distribution of different groundwater- urban structures interaction we need a set of thematic maps is needed. In the present study it is described the methodological approach used to obtain a reliable cartographic product for Bucharest City area. The first step in the current study was to identify the groundwater related problems and aspects (changes in the groundwater table, infiltration and seepage from and to the city sewer network, contamination spread to all three aquifers systems located in quaternary sedimentary formations, dewatering impact for large underground structures, management and political drawbacks). The second step was data collection and validation. In urban areas there is a big spectrum of data providers related to groundwater. Due to the fact that data is produced and distributed by different types of organizations (national agencies, private companies, municipal water regulator, etc) the validation and cross check process is mandatory. The data is stored and managed by a geospatial database. The design of the database follows an object-orientated paradigm and is easily extensible. The third step consists of a set of procedures based on a multi criteria assessment that creates the specific setup for the thematic maps. The assessment is based on the following criteria: (1) scale effect area - how the groundwater is interacting with urban structures >, (2) time , (3) vertical distribution and (4) type of the groundwater related problem. The final step is the cartographic representation. In this final step the urban groundwater maps are created. All the methodological steps are doubled by programmed procedures developed in a groundwater management platform for urban areas. The core of the procedures is represented by a set of well defined hydrogeological set of geospatial queries. The cartographic products (urban groundwater maps) can be used by different types of users: civil engineers, urban planners, scientist as well as decision and policies makers.

Gaitanaru, Dragos; Radu Gogu, Constantin; Bica, Ioan; Anghel, Leonard; Amine Boukhemacha, Mohamed; Ionita, Angela

2013-04-01

83

Analysis of environmental setting, surface-water and groundwater data, and data gaps for the Citizen Potawatomi Nation Tribal Jurisdictional Area, Oklahoma, through 2011  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Citizen Potawatomi Nation Tribal Jurisdictional Area, consisting of approximately 960 square miles in parts of three counties in central Oklahoma, has an abundance of water resources, being underlain by three principal aquifers (alluvial/terrace, Central Oklahoma, and Vamoosa-Ada), bordered by two major rivers (North Canadian and Canadian), and has several smaller drainages. The Central Oklahoma aquifer (also referred to as the Garber-Wellington aquifer) underlies approximately 3,000 square miles in central Oklahoma in parts of Cleveland, Logan, Lincoln, Oklahoma, and Pottawatomie Counties and much of the tribal jurisdictional area. Water from these aquifers is used for municipal, industrial, commercial, agricultural, and domestic supplies. The approximately 115,000 people living in this area used an estimated 4.41 million gallons of fresh groundwater, 12.12 million gallons of fresh surface water, and 8.15 million gallons of saline groundwater per day in 2005. Approximately 8.48, 2.65, 2.24, 1.55, 0.83, and 0.81 million gallons per day of that water were used for domestic, livestock, commercial, industrial, crop irrigation, and thermoelectric purposes, respectively. Approximately one-third of the water used in 2005 was saline water produced during petroleum production. Future changes in use of freshwater in this area will be affected primarily by changes in population and agricultural practices. Future changes in saline water use will be affected substantially by changes in petroleum production. Parts of the area periodically are subject to flooding and severe droughts that can limit available water resources, particularly during summers, when water use increases and streamflows substantially decrease. Most of the area is characterized by rural types of land cover such as grassland, pasture/hay fields, and deciduous forest, which may limit negative effects on water quality by human activities because of lesser emissions of man-made chemicals on such areas than in more urbanized areas. Much of the water in the area is of good quality, though some parts of this area have water quality impaired by very hard surface water and groundwater; large chloride concentrations in some smaller streams; relatively large concentrations of nutrients and counts of fecal-indicator bacteria in the North Canadian River; and chloride, iron, manganese, and uranium concentrations that exceed primary or secondary drinking-water standards in water samples collected from small numbers of wells. Substantial amounts of hydrologic and water-quality data have been collected in much of this area, but there are gaps in those data caused by relatively few streamflow-gaging stations, uneven distribution of surface-water quality sampling sites, lack of surface-water quality sampling at high-flow and low-flow conditions, and lack of a regularly measured and sampled groundwater network. This report summarizes existing water-use, climatic, geographic, hydrologic, and water-quality data and describes several means of filling gaps in hydrologic data for this area.

Andrews, William J.; Harich, Christopher R.; Smith, S. Jerrod; Lewis, Jason M.; Shivers, Molly J.; Seger, Christian H.; Becker, Carol J.

2013-01-01

84

Hydrology and Water Quality near Bromide Pavilion in Chickasaw National Recreation Area, Murray County, Oklahoma, 2000  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Bromide Pavilion in Chickasaw National Recreation Area drew many thousands of people annually to drink the mineral-rich waters piped from nearby Bromide and Medicine Springs. Periodic detection of fecal coliform bacteria in water piped to the pavilion from the springs, low yields of the springs, or flooding by adjacent Rock Creek prompted National Park Service officials to discontinue piping of the springs to the pavilion in the 1970s. Park officials would like to resume piping mineralized spring water to the pavilion to restore it as a visitor attraction, but they are concerned about the ability of the springs to provide sufficient quantities of potable water. Pumping and sampling of Bromide and Medicine Springs and Rock Creek six times during 2000 indicate that these springs may not provide sufficient water for Bromide Pavilion to supply large numbers of visitors. A potential problem with piping water from Medicine Spring is the presence of an undercut, overhanging cliff composed of conglomerate, which may collapse. Evidence of intermittent inundation of the springs by Rock Creek and seepage of surface water into the spring vaults from the adjoining creek pose a threat of contamination of the springs. Escherichia coli, fecal coliform, and fecal streptococcal bacteria were detected in some samples from the springs, indicating possible fecal contamination. Cysts of Giardia lamblia and oocysts of Cryptosporidium parvum protozoa were not detected in the creek or the springs. Total culturable enteric viruses were detected in only one water sample taken from Rock Creek.

Andrews, William J.; Burrough, Steven P.

2002-01-01

85

Sin City? Why is the Divorce Rate Higher in Urban Areas? &ast  

Microsoft Academic Search

AbstractDivorce rates are higher in cities. Based on Danish register data, this paper shows that of the marriages formed in the city, those couples who remain in the city have a 23% higher divorce rate than those who move out. In this paper, we test whether this observation is due to sorting of more stable marriages into rural areas or

Pieter A. Gautier; Michael Svarer; Coen N. Teulings

2009-01-01

86

Dynamics in urban water quality: monitoring the Amsterdam city area  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Urban water quality is influenced by a large number of heterogeneous sources. We aimed to identify solute pathways from different sources in the urban area of Amsterdam, The Netherlands. The city is situated in the Dutch delta, and largely below mean sea level. The water system of the centre of the city is connected to the large fresh water lake Ijsselmeer, but suburbs are mainly located within reclaimed lake and polder areas where water is pumped out in order to maintain the water levels, which are generally 1 tot 4 m. below sea level. Sources of water include: urban storm runoff, inlet water from the Ijsselmeer and surrounding areas, groundwater seepage and possibly also leaking sewage systems. The temporal dynamics and spatial patterns related to these flow routes and sources were largely unknown to date. Water quality is measured at those pumping stations systematically each month. We analysed the pumping discharge data and the concentration data to calculate daily water balances and annual load estimates for HCO3,Ca, Cl, Na, SO4, Ptot, Ntot ,NH4, NH3 and NO3. Chloride appears to be a good tracer to identify inlet water and bicarbonate and DIC were effective to estimate the groundwater contribution to the surface water outflow to the regional system. We were able to improve the solute balances by calibrating the measured temporal patterns of chloride and DIC using known concentrations from the individual sources. Subsequently the water balances where used to identify periods where one of the sources was dominant and by doing so we improved our understanding of the dynamics of N, P and S fluxes and the relations with dry and wet meteorological conditions. It appeared that N and P were largely related to groundwater outflow , whereas S was mainly related to dry periods and shallow flow routes influenced by sewage, urban storm runoff and shallow groundwater flow . The results are used to optimize urban water management which benefits from the improved insight in dominant processes and solute pathways.

van der Vlugt, Corné; Yu, Liang; Rozemeijer, Joachim; van Breukelen, Boris; Ouboter, Maarten; Stuurman, Roelof; Broers, Hans Peter

2014-05-01

87

Salt intrusion in Coastal and Lowland areas of Semarang City  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Over a long term, Semarang Coastal and Lowland areas have experienced salt water intrusion. This condition is accelerated due to land subsidence, sea level rise and groundwater exploitation. The purposes of this research paper were to highlight the salt water intrusion from 1995 until 2108 based on well log measurement and MODFOW numerical modeling in Coastal and Lowland of Semarang City. Sea level rise projection also was considered for salt intrusion projection in the future. MODFLOW was used to compute the groundwater flow field, MT3D for the salt transport, and ArcGIS Environments for coherent geographic visualization. A calibration of the model was conducted based on observation best match. The results obtained illustrate the development of a forward onshore sea salt water intrusion since 1995. It also showed the 2008 recorded sea water intrusion and provide groundwater sea water contamination projection for the years 2018 until 2108. Moreover, fresh water distribution near the coast in previous years developed into brackish water then into saline groundwater. Result showed the movement of saline groundwater from coastline to landward years by years from 2018, 2028, 2048, 2068, 2088 and 2108 following high hydraulic conductivity area. Salt intrusion was also driven by future sea level rise which result to the increase of the fresh water front forward move.

Rahmawati, Novi; Vuillaume, Jean-François; Purnama, Ignasius Loyola Setyawan

2013-06-01

88

Cancer mortality inequalities in urban areas: a Bayesian small area analysis in Spanish cities  

PubMed Central

Background Intra-urban inequalities in mortality have been infrequently analysed in European contexts. The aim of the present study was to analyse patterns of cancer mortality and their relationship with socioeconomic deprivation in small areas in 11 Spanish cities. Methods It is a cross-sectional ecological design using mortality data (years 1996-2003). Units of analysis were the census tracts. A deprivation index was calculated for each census tract. In order to control the variability in estimating the risk of dying we used Bayesian models. We present the RR of the census tract with the highest deprivation vs. the census tract with the lowest deprivation. Results In the case of men, socioeconomic inequalities are observed in total cancer mortality in all cities, except in Castellon, Cordoba and Vigo, while Barcelona (RR = 1.53 95%CI 1.42-1.67), Madrid (RR = 1.57 95%CI 1.49-1.65) and Seville (RR = 1.53 95%CI 1.36-1.74) present the greatest inequalities. In general Barcelona and Madrid, present inequalities for most types of cancer. Among women for total cancer mortality, inequalities have only been found in Barcelona and Zaragoza. The excess number of cancer deaths due to socioeconomic deprivation was 16,413 for men and 1,142 for women. Conclusion This study has analysed inequalities in cancer mortality in small areas of cities in Spain, not only relating this mortality with socioeconomic deprivation, but also calculating the excess mortality which may be attributed to such deprivation. This knowledge is particularly useful to determine which geographical areas in each city need intersectorial policies in order to promote a healthy environment. PMID:21232096

2011-01-01

89

Onion transplant production system for Oklahoma  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Onions are a valuable specialty crop. Unfortunately, commercially available transplants in Oklahoma are often produced in a different area of the country and shipped into Oklahoma, resulting in a limited cultivar selection, non-adapted cultivars, poor crop stands, high bolting incidence, and low pro...

90

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering  

E-print Network

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Assistant Professor The School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Oklahoma State University is pleased to invite applications for six areas of mechanical and aerospace engineering are encouraged to apply. Applicants with a research

91

The City of Saskatoon's Local Area Planning Program: A Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The City of Saskatoon's Local Area Planning (LAP) Program is a community-based approach to developing comprehensive neighbourhood plans. In order to achieve sustainable and implementable Local Area Plans (LAPs), the City of Saskatoon has been using innovative methods of collaborative decision-making to engage citizens. The program has been…

Kellett, Livia; Peter, Lyla; Moore, Kelley

2008-01-01

92

Oklahoma Healthy Homes Initiative  

PubMed Central

Compelling scientific evidence suggests that a strong association exists between housing-related hazards and the health and safety of their residents. Health, safety, and environmental hazards (such as asthma and allergy triggers), unintentional injury hazards, lead-based paint hazards, and poor indoor air quality are interrelated with substandard housing conditions. This article describes a Healthy Homes initiative to address these hazards in a coordinated fashion in the home, rather than taking a categorical approach, even in the presence of multiple hazards. It also provides an overview of Oklahoma's Healthy Homes initiative and its pilot project, the Tulsa Safe and Healthy Housing Project, which is currently administered in Tulsa in collaboration with Children First, Oklahoma's Nurse-Family Partnership program. This pilot project seeks to open new areas of research that can lead to a greater understanding of environmental health issues related to substandard housing in the United States, which will eventually make homes safer and healthier. PMID:21563709

Khan, Fahad

2011-01-01

93

Oklahoma Agriculture Agriculture  

E-print Network

's Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources promotes sustainable land use and embraces the landOklahoma Agriculture Agriculture #12;Oklahoma Agriculture 2011Oklahoma Agriculture 2011 Oklahoma agriculture affects each of us every day, young and old, whether we live in largely rural regions or the state

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

94

Regional land subsidence simulation in Su-Xi-Chang area and Shanghai City, China  

Microsoft Academic Search

Su-Xi-Chang area and Shanghai City, located in the south of Yangtze Delta, China, has subsided due to groundwater overpumping. Because of the regional scale of the groundwater exploitation, cone of depression and land subsidence at present, Su-Xi-Chang area and Shanghai City are treated as a single area for land subsidence study to avoid the uncertainty of boundary condition due to

Xiaoqing Shi; Jichun Wu; Shujun Ye; Yun Zhang; Yuqun Xue; Zixin Wei; Qinfen Li; Jun Yu

2008-01-01

95

Fraction of natural area as main predictor of net CO2 emissions from cities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Cities account for most anthropogenic greenhouse-gas emissions, CO2 being most important. We evaluate the net urban contribution to CO2 emissions by performing a meta-analysis of all available 14 annual CO2 budget studies. The studies are based on direct flux measurements using the eddy-covariance technique which excludes all strong point sources. We show that the fraction of natural area is the strongest predictor of urban CO2 budgets, and this fraction can be used as a robust proxy for net urban CO2 emissions. Up-scaling, based on that proxy and satellite mapping of the fraction of natural area, identifies urban hotspots of CO2 emissions; and extraction of 56 individual cities corroborates their inventory-based estimates. Furthermore, cities are estimated as carbon-neutral when the natural fraction is about 80%. This fresh view on the importance of cities in climate change treats cities as urban ecosystems: incorporating natural areas like vegetation.

Nordbo, Annika; Järvi, Leena; Haapanala, Sami; Wood, Curtis R.; Vesala, Timo

2012-10-01

96

Groundwater quality and the relation between pH values and occurrence of trace elements and radionuclides in water samples collected from private wells in part of the Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma Jurisdictional Area, central Oklahoma, 2011  

USGS Publications Warehouse

From 1999 to 2007, the Indian Health Service reported that gross alpha-particle activities and concentrations of uranium exceeded the Maximum Contaminant Levels for public drinking-water supplies in water samples from six private wells and two test wells in a rural residential neighborhood in the Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma Jurisdictional Area, in central Oklahoma. Residents in this rural area use groundwater from Quaternary-aged terrace deposits and the Permian-aged Garber-Wellington aquifer for domestic purposes. Uranium and other trace elements, specifically arsenic, chromium, and selenium, occur naturally in rocks composing the Garber-Wellington aquifer and in low concentrations in groundwater throughout its extent. Previous studies have shown that pH values above 8.0 from cation-exchange processes in the aquifer cause selected metals such as arsenic, chromium, selenium, and uranium to desorb (if present) from mineral surfaces and become mobile in water. On the basis of this information, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma, conducted a study in 2011 to describe the occurrence of selected trace elements and radionuclides in groundwater and to determine if pH could be used as a surrogate for laboratory analysis to quickly and inexpensively identify wells that might contain high concentrations of uranium and other trace elements. The pH and specific conductance of groundwater from 59 private wells were measured in the field in an area of about 18 square miles in Lincoln and Pottawatomie Counties. Twenty of the 59 wells also were sampled for dissolved concentrations of major ions, trace elements, gross alpha-particle and gross beta-particle activities, uranium, radium-226, radium-228, and radon-222 gas. Arsenic concentrations exceeded the Maximum Contaminant Level of 10 micrograms per liter in one sample having a concentration of 24.7 micrograms per liter. Selenium concentrations exceeded the Maximum Contaminant Level of 50 micrograms per liter in one sample having a concentration of 147 micrograms per liter. Both samples had alkaline pH values, 8.0 and 8.4, respectively. Uranium concentrations ranged from 0.02 to 383 micrograms per liter with 5 of 20 samples exceeding the Maximum Contaminant Level of 30 micrograms per liter; the five wells with uranium concentrations exceeding 30 micrograms per liter had pH values ranging from 8.0 to 8.5. Concentrations of uranium and radon-222 and gross alpha-particle activity showed a positive relation to pH, with the highest concentrations and activity in samples having pH values of 8.0 or above. The groundwater samples contained dissolved oxygen and high concentrations of bicarbonate; these characteristics are also factors in increasing uranium solubility. Concentrations of radium-226 and radium-228 (combined) ranged from 0.03 to 1.7 picocuries per liter, with a median concentration of 0.45 picocuries per liter for all samples. Radon-222 concentrations ranged from 95 to 3,600 picocuries per liter with a median concentration of 261 picocuries per liter. Eight samples having pH values ranging from 8.0 to 8.7 exceeded the proposed Maximum Contaminant Level of 300 picocuries per liter for radon-222. Eight samples exceeded the 15 picocuries per liter Maximum Contaminant Level for gross alpha-particle activity at 72 hours (after sample collection) and at 30 days (after the initial count); those samples had pH values ranging from 8.0 to 8.5. Gross beta-particle activity increased in 15 of 21 samples during the interval from 72 hours to 30 days. The increase in gross beta-particle activity over time probably was caused by the ingrowth and decay of uranium daughter products that emit beta particles. Water-quality data collected for this study indicate that pH values above 8.0 are associated with potentially high concentrations of uranium and radon-222 and high gross alpha-particle activity in the study area. High pH values also are associated with potentially high concentrations of arsenic, chromium, and selenium in groundwater when these elements oc

Becker, Carol J.

2013-01-01

97

Impact of primary formaldehyde on air pollution in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area  

E-print Network

Formaldehyde (HCHO) is a radical source that plays an important role in urban atmospheric chemistry and ozone formation. The Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) is characterized by high anthropogenic emissions of HCHO ...

Lei, Wenfang

98

Biodiversity in tropical areas, from molecules to ecosystems Place: Do Son, Hai Phong city, VIETNAM.  

E-print Network

Biodiversity in tropical areas, from molecules to ecosystems Place: Do Son, Hai Phong city, VIETNAM 7. Health ecology 8. Bio-cultural Interactions in tropical ecosystems 9. Biodiversity) Organizational unit : Institute of Ecology and Biological Resources (IEBR) Tropical biodiversity: ecological

van Tiggelen, Bart

99

Hamburg, Germany's second largest city, is home to two of the most important urban development areas in Europe: HafenCity  

E-print Network

areas in Europe: HafenCity and the International Building Exhibition (IBA). Both projects embrace and character. HafenCity, Europe's largest inner-city development project, is setting new standards. The International Building Exhibition (IBA) is applying experimental design and urban planning to a neglected inner

District of Columbia, University of the

100

The food retail environment and area deprivation in Glasgow City, UK. — Measures of the Food Environment  

Cancer.gov

It has previously been suggested that deprived neighbourhoods within modern cities have poor access to general amenities, for example, fewer food retail outlets. Here we examine the distribution of food retailers by deprivation in the City of Glasgow, UK.We obtained a list of 934 food retailers in Glasgow, UK, in 2007, and mapped these at address level. We categorised small areas (data zones) into quintiles of area deprivation using the 2006 Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation Income sub-domain score.

101

Texas-Oklahoma  

Atmospheric Science Data Center

article title:  Texas-Oklahoma Border     View ... SpectroRadiometer (MISR) images of Oklahoma and north Texas were acquired on March 12, 2000 during Terra orbit 1243. The three images ... The south bank of the Red River marks the boundary between Texas and Oklahoma. Traversing brush-covered and grassy plains, rolling hills, ...

2014-05-15

102

Electromagnetic Radiation from Severe Storms in Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The results of observing the radiation from lightning discharge processes indicated that major radio frequency electrical activity was associated with the tornado-producing severe storms that struck Oklahoma City during this period. Rates of occurrence of atmospherics at frequencies from 10 kHz to above 3 MHz were observed by using short time constant circuits to preserve the burst nature of the

WILLIAM L. TAYLOR

1973-01-01

103

Social differences in avoidable mortality between small areas of 15 European cities: an ecological study  

PubMed Central

Background Health and inequalities in health among inhabitants of European cities are of major importance for European public health and there is great interest in how different health care systems in Europe perform in the reduction of health inequalities. However, evidence on the spatial distribution of cause-specific mortality across neighbourhoods of European cities is scarce. This study presents maps of avoidable mortality in European cities and analyses differences in avoidable mortality between neighbourhoods with different levels of deprivation. Methods We determined the level of mortality from 14 avoidable causes of death for each neighbourhood of 15 large cities in different European regions. To address the problems associated with Standardised Mortality Ratios for small areas we smooth them using the Bayesian model proposed by Besag, York and Mollié. Ecological regression analysis was used to assess the association between social deprivation and mortality. Results Mortality from avoidable causes of death is higher in deprived neighbourhoods and mortality rate ratios between areas with different levels of deprivation differ between gender and cities. In most cases rate ratios are lower among women. While Eastern and Southern European cities show higher levels of avoidable mortality, the association of mortality with social deprivation tends to be higher in Northern and lower in Southern Europe. Conclusions There are marked differences in the level of avoidable mortality between neighbourhoods of European cities and the level of avoidable mortality is associated with social deprivation. There is no systematic difference in the magnitude of this association between European cities or regions. Spatial patterns of avoidable mortality across small city areas can point to possible local problems and specific strategies to reduce health inequality which is important for the development of urban areas and the well-being of their inhabitants. PMID:24618273

2014-01-01

104

75 FR 12731 - Foreign-Trade Zone 204-Tri-Cities Area, Tennessee/Virginia; Application for Expansion  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Foreign-Trade Zone 204--Tri-Cities Area, Tennessee/Virginia; Application for Expansion An application...expand its zone to include a site in Bristol, Tennessee in the Tri-Cities Area, Tennessee/Virginia, adjacent to the Tri-Cities...

2010-03-17

105

75 FR 73983 - Proposed Modification of the Salt Lake City, UT, Class B Airspace Area; Public Meetings  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...71 Proposed Modification of the Salt Lake City, UT, Class B Airspace Area...revise the Class B airspace area at Salt Lake City, UT. The purpose of these meetings...Terminal, 397 North 2370 West, Salt Lake City, UT 84116. (3) The...

2010-11-30

106

77 FR 13074 - Opportunity for Designation in the Pocatello, ID; Evansville, IN; and Salt Lake City, UT Areas...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Designation in the Pocatello, ID; Evansville, IN; and Salt Lake City, UT Areas; Request for Comments on the Official Agencies...QACD, QADB, 10383 North Ambassador Drive, Kansas City, MO 64153. Fax: Eric J. Jabs,...

2012-03-05

107

Boston: City and Cities. A Study of Bunker Hill Community College's Primary Service Area.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Drawing from 1970 census data and other sources of information, this report provides a socio-economic profile of the service area of Bunker Hill Community College (BHCC). Following an introduction, Part I analyzes the total service area in terms of population growth and density; racial composition; ethnicity; age and sex distribution;…

Leipzig, Gloria

108

Trends in socioeconomic inequalities in amenable mortality in urban areas of Spanish cities, 1996–2007  

PubMed Central

Background While research continues into indicators such as preventable and amenable mortality in order to evaluate quality, access, and equity in the healthcare, it is also necessary to continue identifying the areas of greatest risk owing to these causes of death in urban areas of large cities, where a large part of the population is concentrated, in order to carry out specific actions and reduce inequalities in mortality. This study describes inequalities in amenable mortality in relation to socioeconomic status in small urban areas, and analyses their evolution over the course of the periods 1996–99, 2000–2003 and 2004–2007 in three major cities in the Spanish Mediterranean coast (Alicante, Castellón, and Valencia). Methods All deaths attributed to amenable causes were analysed among non-institutionalised residents in the three cities studied over the course of the study periods. Census tracts for the cities were grouped into 3 socioeconomic status levels, from higher to lower levels of deprivation, using 5 indicators obtained from the 2001 Spanish Population Census. For each city, the relative risks of death were estimated between socioeconomic status levels using Poisson’s Regression models, adjusted for age and study period, and distinguishing between genders. Results Amenable mortality contributes significantly to general mortality (around 10%, higher among men), having decreased over time in the three cities studied for men and women. In the three cities studied, with a high degree of consistency, it has been seen that the risks of mortality are greater in areas of higher deprivation, and that these excesses have not significantly modified over time. Conclusions Although amenable mortality decreases over the time period studied, the socioeconomic inequalities observed are maintained in the three cities. Areas have been identified that display excesses in amenable mortality, potentially attributable to differences in the healthcare system, associated with areas of greater deprivation. Action must be taken in these areas of greater inequality in order to reduce the health inequalities detected. The causes behind socioeconomic inequalities in amenable mortality must be studied in depth. PMID:24690471

2014-01-01

109

A Development Program for Metropolitan Junior College, Kansas City. Volume Three: The Economy, Population, and Manpower Requirements of the Kansas City Metropolitan Area.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The economy, population, and manpower requirements of the Kansas City metropolitan area are examined in this volume of a report for the planning and development of Metropolitan Junior College (MJC). Part I looks at the Kansas City economy, first from a historical perspective and then in terms of recent trends in economic growth; the comparative…

Little (Arthur D.), Inc., San Francisco, CA.

110

Evaluation of a Three-Dimensional Chemical Transport Model (PMCAMx) in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area  

Microsoft Academic Search

Atmospheric aerosols have adverse effects on human health, contribute to the visibility reduction and influence the energy balance of the planet. A three-dimensional chemical transport model (PMCAMx) (Gaydos et al., 2007) is used to simulate the particular matter (PM) mass composition distribution in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA). PMCAMx uses the framework of CAMx (ENVIRON, 2002) modelling the processes

A. P. Tsimpidi; V. A. Karydis; M. Zavala; W. Lei; L. T. Molina; S. N. Pandis

2007-01-01

111

Photochemical air pollution: transport from the New York City area into Connecticut and Massachusetts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Photochemical air pollution resulting from primary emissions in the New York City metropolitan area is transported by prevailing winds on a 300-kilometer northeast trajectory through Connecticut and as far as northeastern Massachusetts. As a result, southwestern Connecticut has the highest ozone concentrations in the region and there is a substantial increase in ozone concentrations in Massachusetts. The ozone concentrations of

W. S. Cleveland; B. Kleiner; J. E. McRae; J. L. Warner

1976-01-01

112

SITE CHARACTERIZATION OF A CHROMIUM SOURCE AREA AT THE USCG SUPPORT CENTER, ELIZABETH CITY, NC: SYMPOSIUM  

EPA Science Inventory

NRMRL-ADA-02113 Paul*, C.J., Khan*, F.A., and Puls*, R.W. Site Characterization of a Chromium Source Area at the USCG Support Center, Elizabeth City, NC. 2002 Intl. Ground Water Symposium, IAHR, & IAHS, ASCE, and AGU., Berkeley, CA, 03/01/2002. 2002, 364-367. 12/16/2001 The...

113

SITE CHARACTERIZATION OF A CHROMIUM SOURCE AREA AT THE USCG SUPPORT CENTER, ELIZABETH CITY, NC  

EPA Science Inventory

The chrome source area is located beneath an old electroplating shop at the United States Coast Guard Support Center near Elizabeth City, NC . This electroplating shop was in use for approximately 30 years until 1984 and was the source of discharges of chromic and sulfuric...

114

Perceptions of Neighbourhood Disorder and Reputation: Qualitative Findings from Two Contrasting Areas of an Australian City  

Microsoft Academic Search

Within Australian cities, social and economic inequalities manifest themselves spatially. Perceived neighbourhood disorder and neighbourhood reputation are relevant to considering the ways in which social and economic inequalities translate into place-based inequalities. This article explores the ways in which residents of two socio-economically contrasting urban areas describe and explain neighbourhood disorder and neighbourhood reputation. It draws upon qualitative data from

Katy Osborne; Anna Ziersch; Fran Baum

2011-01-01

115

Business Use of Small Computers in the Salt Lake City, Utah Area.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In July 1981, Utah Technical College (UTC) conducted a survey of businesses in the Salt Lake City area to gather information for the development of a curriculum integrating computer applications with business course instruction. The survey sought to determine the status and usage of current micro/mini computer equipment, future data processing…

Homer, Michael M.

116

Organic geochemical parameters for estimation of petrogenic inputs in the coastal area of Kavala City, Greece  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background, aims, and scope  Sediments and soils in coastal areas are frequently polluted by anthropogenic contaminants as the result of both riverine\\u000a or terrestrial discharge and autochthonic marine emissions. In order to determine petrogenic contamination in the coastal\\u000a industrial area of Kavala City in northern Greece, a combination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and organic geochemical\\u000a petroleum biomarker analyses has been

Anna Grigoriadou; Jan Schwarzbauer; Andreas Georgakopoulos

2008-01-01

117

Plant Selection Factors The City of  

E-print Network

Plant Selection Factors The City of OKLAHOMA CITY UTILITIES DEPARTMENT Oklahoma Cooperative-433 #12;Plan Before you Plant Plants add value to the home, provide shade, define space, and make us happy. Consider the following five plant selection factors when choosing plants for your landscape. Keep

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

118

Hydrogeologic information on the Glorieta Sandstone and the Ogallala Formation in the Oklahoma Panhandle and adjoining areas as related to underground waste disposal  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Oklahoma Panhandle and adjacent areas in Texas, Kansas, Colorado, and New Mexico have prospered because of the development of supplies of fresh water and of oil and gas. The Ogallala and, in places, Cretaceous rocks produce fresh water for irrigation, public supply, and domestic and stock use through approximately 9,000 irrigation and public supply wells and a large but undetermined number of other wells. Disposal of oil-field brine and other wastes into the Glorieta Sandstone is of concern to many local residents because of the possibility of pollution of the overlying fresh-water aquifers, particularly the Ogallala Formation. Permits for 147 disposal wells into the Glorieta have been issued in this area. This report summarizes the data on geology, hydrology, and water development currently available to the U.S. Geological Survey. Geologic information indicates that, in the report area, the Glorieta Sandstone lies at depths ranging from about 500 to 1,600 feet below the base of the Ogallala Fox, nation. The rocks between those two formations are of relatively impermeable types, but solution and removal of salt has resulted in collapse of the rocks in some places. Collapse and fracturing of the rocks could result in increased vertical permeability. This might result in movement of brine under hydrostatic head from the Glorieta Sandstone into overlying fresh-water aquifers, in places where an upward hydraulic gradient exists or is created by an increase in pressure within the Glorieta. Abandoned or inadequately sealed boreholes also are possible conduits for such fluids. The mixing of water in the fresh-water aquifers with brines injected into the Glorieta is not known to have occurred anywhere in the report area, but the information available is not adequate to show positively whether or not this may have occurred locally. Much additional information on the stratigraphy and hydrology--particularly, data on the potentiometric surface of water in the Glorieta--needs to be collected and analyzed before conclusions can be drawn regarding the possibility of vertical movement of oil-field brines from the Glorieta to fresh-water aquifers above.

Irwin, James Haskell; Morton, Robert B.

1969-01-01

119

78 FR 36556 - Oklahoma; Major Disaster and Related Determinations  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...amounts as you find necessary for Federal disaster assistance and administrative expenses...Individual Assistance and assistance for debris removal and emergency protective measures...Coordinating Officer for this major disaster. The following areas of the State...as adversely affected by this major disaster: Cleveland, Lincoln, McClain, Oklahoma...Oklahoma, and......

2013-06-18

120

Preliminary Study on Spatial Recognition of Key Area of Flood Discharge in Mountainous City: A Case in Panxi River Basin in Chongqing City  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, the sinks, the steep slope areas, and locally flat areas, and junction sites of reach are extracted using spatial analysis in Geographical Information System (GIS) and hydrology analysis, based on study area Panxi river basin in Chongqing main city. The junction sites of reaches are directly determined as key sites of flood discharges. Overlaying other factors, three

Han Guifeng; Yan Wentao; Chenshu Yilang; He Qiang

2010-01-01

121

MIXED HERONRIES OF OKLAHOMA  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objectives of this 3-year study were to locate mixed heronries in Oklahoma, census breeding pairs of each species, and indentify site characteristics that may be important to heron ecology. During the study, 17 mixed heronries, containing a total of six ardeid species, were found in Oklahoma. The majority of heronries (82%) were located within the oak-woodland fauna region. Other

G. William Sallee

1982-01-01

122

Oklahoma Tribes: A History  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Oklahoma is a microcosm of American Indian country. Water rights, tribal government impotence, jurisdiction, tribal membership, treaty rights, taxation, sovereignty, racism, and poor housing, education, and health are all vital issues facing the Indian tribes of Oklahoma. In order to understand the complexity of these issues, a review of the…

Gover, Kevin

1977-01-01

123

Pride in Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet is intended to be used as background material by social studies and history classroom teachers as they develop and implement educational programs on Oklahoma's heritage. It includes background information on the land and people of Oklahoma (geology, climate, topography, vegetation, animals, prehistoric peoples, French explorers,…

Moore, Gordon; Blackburn, Bob L.

124

[Problems resulting from the absorption of small towns into urban areas in major Third World cities].  

PubMed

The tendency toward hypertrophy of large metropolitan areas in the Third World has been a subject of concern to economists and other social scientists for some time. Inability to absorb vast waves of migrants into the organized labor force or to provide adequate infrastructure and services are serious problems in many growing cities of Asia, Africa, and Latin America. A different phenomenon created by perpetual urban expansion has been relatively neglected: the problems caused when preexisting urban areas are absorbed into the metropolis. The tendency of squatter settlements to constrict normal urban growth and expansion and to impede rational provision of services has been recognized, but the absorption of small cities does not necessarily produce identical problems. Small cities absorbed into a metropolis lose their identity in the successive waves of suburban proliferation. Los Angeles in the US may be considered the prototype of the phenomenon in which multiple preexisting urban zones are absorbed into the same metropolis without formation of any visible center of gravity. In some cases, small cities may be completely engulfed by the encroaching metropolis, if transit routes or availability of land makes them interesting to developers. The livelihood of residents may be threatened if they are no longer able to cultivate gardens or raise small animals. Local services may deteriorate. The youngest and most able residents are likely to abandon such places for the greater opportunities of the city, leaving the aged and less qualified to fend for themselves. Jobs may disappear and traditional commercial relations may be destroyed without being replaced. The future wellbeing of residents depends on their ability to maneuver in the new metropolitan environment, but many will be unable to adjust for lack of training, the weight of immovable property, or diverse personal considerations. Planning could help to reduce the problems that occasional survival of some small entities may pose for rational expansion of transportation and services at the metropolitan level, but many Third World cities lack such planning capacity altogether. PMID:12267620

Mckee, D L

1985-01-01

125

Damage costs produced by electric power plants: an externality valuation in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area.  

PubMed

This paper presents an estimate of the externalities produced in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) through the impacts on health caused by secondary pollutants attributed to seven electric power plants located outside this area. An original method was developed to make possible a simplified application of the impact pathway approach to estimate the damage costs in the specified area. Our estimate shows that the annual costs attributed to secondary pollutants total 71 million USD (min/max 20/258 million USD). Finally, this paper discusses basic ideas on the implications for energy policy arising from this exercise in externality valuation. PMID:20656328

Macías, P; Islas, J

2010-09-15

126

Preliminary evaluation of ecological risk for the city area from the Pearl River Estuary.  

PubMed

It is essential to evaluate the ecological risk for the estuary cities area for the environmental restoration of the estuary. The ecological risk of six city areas from the Pearl River Estuary were evaluated by using the relative risk model. The relative risk assessment method was developed by considering the river network density in the sub-region. The results indicated that Dongguan had the largest ecological risk pressure with total risk scores as high as 10,846.3, and Hong Kong had the lowest ecological risk pressure with total risk scores up to 4,104.6. The greatest source was domestic sewage with total risk scores as high as 1,798.6, followed by urbanization and industry. Oxygen-consuming organic pollutants, organic toxic pollutants and nutrients were the major stressors of the water environment. In terms of habitats, the water environment was enduring the greatest pressure. For the endpoints, water deterioration faced the largest risk pressure. PMID:25429453

Chen, Qiuying; Ho, KinChung; Liu, Jingling

2014-01-01

127

Ecosystem service value assessment of coastal area in Lianyungang City using LANDSAT images  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study aims at discovering changes of ecosystem service value based on spatial-temporal variety of land use features on the coastal area in Lianyungang City from 1978 to 2000. Three LANDSAT images (1978 MSS, 1987 TM and 2000 ETM) were used to estimate changes in the size of six land-use categories (forest, cropland, urban, wetland, lakes\\/rivers and coastal water). Coefficients

Qixiang Wang; Anqing Ma; Shang Chen; Xuexi Tang

2006-01-01

128

Composition of extractable organic matter in aerosols from urban areas of Rio de Janeiro city, Brazil  

Microsoft Academic Search

The hydrocarbon compositions of atmospheric particulate matter from urban areas of Rio de Janeiro city have been studied to assess the different pollution levels. Samples were acquired using a standard high-volume air sampler (Hi-Vol), extracts were prepared and fractionated into aliphatic and aromatic compounds. High-resolution gas chromatography and GC coupled to mass spectrometry (GC–MS) were used for the analysis of

Débora de Almeida Azevedo; Larissa Silveira Moreira; Denilson Soares de Siqueira

1999-01-01

129

Petrogenesis of granitic rocks of the Jabal Sabir area, South Taiz City, Yemen Republic  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Tertiary granitic intrusive body (?21 Ma) of the Jabal Sabir area was emplaced during the early stages of the Red Sea\\u000a opening. This intrusive body occupies the southern sector of Taiz City. It is triangular in shape, affected by two major faults,\\u000a one of which is in parallel to the Gulf of Aden, and the other is in parallel

Rasmy I. El-Gharbawy

2011-01-01

130

Evaluation of groundwater and surface-water interactions in the Caddo Nation Tribal Jurisdictional Area, Caddo County, Oklahoma, 2010-13  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Streamflows, springs, and wetlands are important natural and cultural resources to the Caddo Nation. Consequently, the Caddo Nation is concerned about the vulnerability of the Rush Springs aquifer to overdrafting and whether the aquifer will continue to be a viable source of water to tribal members and other local residents in the future. Interest in the long-term viability of local water resources has resulted in ongoing development of a comprehensive water plan by the Caddo Nation. As part of a multiyear project with the Caddo Nation to provide information and tools to better manage and protect water resources, the U.S. Geological Survey studied the hydraulic connection between the Rush Springs aquifer and springs and streams overlying the aquifer. The Caddo Nation Tribal Jurisdictional Area is located in southwestern Oklahoma, primarily in Caddo County. Underlying the Caddo Nation Tribal Jurisdictional Area is the Permian-age Rush Springs aquifer. Water from the Rush Springs aquifer is used for irrigation, public, livestock and aquaculture, and other supply purposes. Groundwater from the Rush Springs aquifer also is withdrawn by domestic (self-supplied) wells, although domestic use was not included in the water-use summary in this report. Perennial streamflow in many streams and creeks overlying the Rush Springs aquifer, such as Cobb Creek, Lake Creek, and Willow Creek, originates from springs and seeps discharging from the aquifer. This report provides information on the evaluation of groundwater and surface-water resources in the Caddo Nation Jurisdictional Area, and in particular, information that describes the hydraulic connection between the Rush Springs aquifer and springs and streams overlying the aquifer. This report also includes data and analyses of base flow, evidence for groundwater and surface-water interactions, locations of springs and wetland areas, groundwater flows interpreted from potentiometric-surface maps, and hydrographs of water levels monitored in the Caddo Nation Tribal Jurisdictional Area from 2010 to 2013. Flow in streams overlying the Rush Springs aquifer, on average, were composed of 50 percent base flow in most years. Monthly mean base flow appeared to maintain streamflows throughout each year, but periods of zero flow were documented in daily hydrographs at each measured site, typically in the summer months. A pneumatic slug-test technique was used at 15 sites to determine the horizontal hydraulic conductivity of streambed sediments in streams overlying the Rush Springs aquifer. Converting horizontal hydraulic conductivities (Kh) from the slug-test analyses to vertical hydraulic conductivities (Kv) by using a ratio of Kv/Kh = 0.1 resulted in estimates of vertical streambed hydraulic conductivity ranging from 0.1 to 8.6 feet per day. Data obtained from a hydraulic potentiomanometer in streambed sediments and streams in August 2012 indicate that water flow was from the streambed sediments to the stream (gaining) at 6 of 15 sites, and that water flow was from the stream to the streambed sediments (losing) at 9 of 15 sites. The groundwater and surface-water interaction data collected at the Cobb Creek near Eakly, Okla., streamflow gaging station (07325800), indicate that the bedrock groundwater, alluvial groundwater, and surface-water resources are closely connected. Because of this hydrologic connection, large perennial streams in the study area may change from gaining to losing streams in the summer. The timing and severity of this change from a gaining to a losing condition probably is affected by the local or regional withdrawal of groundwater for irrigation in the summer growing season. Wells placed closer to streams have a greater and more immediate effect on alluvial groundwater levels and stream stages than wells placed farther from streams. Large-capacity irrigation wells, even those completed hundreds of feet below land surface in the bedrock aquifer, can induce surface-water flow from nearby streams by lowering alluvial groundwater levels below the stream altitude. Twenty-five ne

Mashburn, Shana L.; Smith, S. Jerrod

2014-01-01

131

State summaries: Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 2005, Oklahoma mines produced both industrial minerals and coal. No metals were mined in the state. Based on value, leading industrial minerals include crushed stone followed by cement, construction sand and gravel, industrial sand and gravel, iodine and gypsum. The Oklahoma Department of Mines (ODOM) reported that more than 343 mine operators produced nonfuel minerals from 405 mines in the state. However, 530 mining permitted sites were on file. The Oklahoma Miner Training Institute (OMTI) held 239 classes for 33,768 classroom hours of instruction, in which 84 coal miners and 4,587 metal/nonmetal miners were trained.

Krukowski, S.T.

2006-01-01

132

Deterioration of marble. A retrospective analysis of tombstone measurements in the New York City area  

SciTech Connect

A data base of tombstone thickness and depth of emblem inscription at Veterans Administration cemeteries has been compiled by New York University. A subset of measurements for two cemeteries in the vicinity of New York City was selected for analysis in this study. For comparable meteorological conditions, different weathering rates of fine grain marble tombstones were observed for the two cemeteries. Tombstones in the Cypress Hills cemetery, which is located within an industrial area, were observed to have higher rates than similar stones in the semi-rural area of the Long Island cemetery. By using a retrospective air-quality model, which is described in another publication, to predict SO/sub 2/ concentrations in New York City from 1880 to 1980, concentration trends of SO/sub 2/ were estimated for both cemeteries. A linear relationship was found to exist between the weathering rates and estimated SO/sub 2/ concentrations. A value of 10 mm per century per ppm of SO/sub 2/ was derived as the best estimate for the weathering coefficient of fine grain marble for the New York City area.

Husar, R.B.; Patterson, D.E.; Baer, N.S.

1985-03-01

133

Class 1 overview of cultural resources for the Western Area Power Administration Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects electric power marketing environmental impact statement  

Microsoft Academic Search

Argonne National Laboratory conducted an inventory of known archaeological and historic sites in areas that could be affected by the hydropower operation alternatives under analysis in the power marketing environmental impact statement for the Western Area Power Administration`s Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects. The study areas included portions of the Green River (Flaming Gorge Dam to Cub Creek) in

K. L. Moeller; L. M. Malinowski; J. F. Hoffecker; D. A. Walitschek; L. Shogren; J. E. Mathews; B. T. Verhaaren

1993-01-01

134

Roles of surface water areas for water and solute cycle in Hanoi city, Viet Nam  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hanoi city, the capital of Viet Nam, has developed beside the Red river. Recent rapid urbanization of this city has reduced a large number of natural water areas such as lakes, ponds and canals not only in the central area but the suburban area. Contrary, the urbanization has increased artificial water areas such as pond for fish cultivation and landscaping. On the other hand, the urbanization has induced the inflow of waste water from households and various kinds of factories to these water areas because of delay of sewerage system development. Inflow of the waste water has induced eutrophication and pollution of these water areas. Also, there is a possibility of groundwater pollution by infiltration of polluted surface water. However, the role of these water areas for water cycle and solute transport is not clarified. Therefore, this study focuses on the interaction between surface water areas and groundwater in Hanoi city to evaluate appropriate land development and groundwater resource management. We are carrying out three approaches: a) understanding of geochemical characteristics of surface water and groundwater, b) monitoring of water levels of pond and groundwater, c) sampling of soil and pond sediment. Correlation between d18O and dD of precipitation (after GNIP), the Red River (after GNIR) and the water samples of this study showed that the groundwater is composed of precipitation, the Red River and surface water that has evaporation process. Contribution of the surface water with evaporation process was widely found in the study area. As for groundwater monitoring, the Holocene aquifers at two sites were in unconfined condition in dry season and the groundwater levels in the aquifer continued to increase through rainy season. The results of isotopic analysis and groundwater level monitoring showed that the surface water areas are one of the major groundwater sources. On the other hand, concentrations of dissolved Arsenic (filtered by 0.45um) in the pore water of the pond sediments were much higher than the pond water and closed to that of groundwater. Also, other metal elements showed the same trend. This result suggested that Arsenic and other metal elements recharged to these ponds is probably adsorbed and removed by sediments (including organic matters). That is, pond sediment plays an important role for solute transport as a filter of Arsenic and metal elements. The results of this study strongly suggest that the natural and artificial surface water areas have important roles for water cycle and solute transport in Hanoi city. Although the number of the natural water areas is decreasing, dredging of artificial water areas increases the infiltration from the surface to aquifers. Therefore, qualitative and quantitative preservation of the surface water areas is important for conservation of groundwater environment and contribute to sustainable groundwater management in Hanoi city.

Hayashi, Takeshi; Kuroda, Keisuke; Do Thuan, An; Tran Thi Viet, Nga; Takizawa, Satoshi

2013-04-01

135

Storm surge modeling of Superstorm Sandy in the New York City Metropolitan area  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Even though the New York/New Jersey area does not lie within the typical 'hurricane belt', recent events and the historical record indicate that large infrequent tropical storms have had direct hits on the region, with impacts being amplified due to the nearly right angle bend in the coastline. The recent plan unveiled by New York City's Mayor Bloomberg lays out mitigation strategies to protect the region's communities, infrastructure, and assets from future storms, and numerical simulation of storm surge and wave hazards driven by potential hurricanes plays a central role in developing and evaluating these strategies. To assist in local planning, recovery, and decision-making, we have used the tide, storm surge, and wind wave model ADCIRC+SWAN to simulate storm surge in one of the most populated areas of the United States: the New York City (NYC) metropolitan area. We have generated a new high-resolution triangular finite-element model grid for the region from recent USGS data as well as recent city topographic maps at 2-foot (0.6m) contour intervals, nautical charts, and details of shipping channels. Our hindcast simulations are compared against Superstorm Sandy. We used the City University of New York High Performance Computing Center's Cray XE6tm at the College of Staten Island for these simulations. Hindcasting and analysis of the Superstorm Sandy storm surge and waves indicates that our simulations produce a reasonable representation of actual events. The grid will be used in an ADCIRC-based forecasting system implementation for the region.

Benimoff, A. I.; Blanton, B. O.; Dzedzits, E.; Fritz, W. J.; Kress, M.; Muzio, P.; Sela, L.

2013-12-01

136

Contribution of natural and anthropogenic emissions to acid precipitation formation in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area  

SciTech Connect

The emissions of precursor compounds that contribute significantly the formation of acid precipitation in urban areas are associated with the burning of fossils fuels from mobile, area and point sources. In Mexico City, these include services, institutions and residences aggregated as area sources, as well as industrial point sources, including smelting, refinement of petroleum and power generation. In addition, dusts from soil erosion and lack of vegetation in the urban landscape contribute to modification of natural rain water. It is common knowledge that acid precipitation characterizes a large variety of compounds, as much related to precursor emissions as to prevailing environmental factors. This study attempts to establish the contribution of natural and anthropogenic emissions and meteorological conditions during the rainy season by analysis of spatial and temporal distributions, as of different ions in solution with rain water, as well as the modeling of wind patterns, as represented by using the arc/info software. This study`s results also show the geographic areas impacted by the acid rain phenomenon and the acidification rates in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area during the past 3 years.

Garcia, L.; Barrera, G.; Castellanos, L.; Moreno, D. [Direccion de la Red Automatica de Monitoreo Atmosferico, Centro Historico (Mexico)

1996-12-31

137

Martin Van Buren Elementary School, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the title building, including educational context and design goals. Includes a general description; information on the architect, construction team, and manufacturers and suppliers; and a case study of costs and specifications. (EV)

Design Cost Data, 2003

2003-01-01

138

78 FR 78318 - Television Broadcasting Services; Oklahoma City, Oklahoma  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...the Commission instituted a freeze on the acceptance of full power television rulemaking petitions requesting channel...December 16, 2013, and released December 16, 2013. The full text of this document is available for public inspection...

2013-12-26

139

47 CFR 24.102 - Service areas.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Paso-Albuquerque, Houston, Kansas City, Little Rock, Memphis-Jackson, New Orleans-Baton Rouge, Oklahoma City, San Antonio, St. Louis, Tulsa...Angeles-San Diego, Phoenix, Portland, Salt Lake City, San...

2010-10-01

140

A Summary of Convective-Core Vertical Velocity Properties Using ARM UHF Wind Profilers in Oklahoma  

E-print Network

, Colorado ** University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (Manuscript received 16 July 2012, in final form 8 May, Oklahoma @ Bureau of Meteorology, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia & Cooperative Institute for Research

Ohta, Shigemi

141

A New York City Validity Study for the NTE Specialty Area Test in Early Childhood Education. OREA Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Evidence of the validity of the National Teacher Examinations' (NTEs') Early Childhood Education Test (ECET) as it is used in the New York City School System is presented. The NTE Core Battery and Specialty Area Tests are used as part of the alternative process for teacher licensure in New York City. The ECET measures knowledge and skills required…

Kippel, Gary M.; Shivakumar, K. R.

142

Development of sustainable urban green areas in Egyptian new cities: The case of El-Sadat City  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sustainable urban development is essential to enhance the quality of life of the citizens and to decrease the impact of cities upon resources outside the urban context. Redeveloping and planning green spaces and urban structure become the fundamentals of the sustainable urban planning of a city. An effective urban planning using recent technology is required to contribute to the physical

Ayman Hassaan Ahmed Mahmoud; Marwa Adel El-Sayed

2011-01-01

143

Platinum in PM2.5 of the metropolitan area of Mexico City.  

PubMed

The increase in platinum (Pt) in the airborne particulate matter with size ?2.5 µm (PM2.5) in urban environments may be interpreted as result of the abrasion and deterioration of automobile catalyst. Nowadays, about four million vehicles in Mexico City use catalytic converters, which means that their impact should be considered. In order to evaluate the contribution of Pt to environmental pollution of the metropolitan area of Mexico City (MAMC), airborne PM2.5 was collected at five different sites in the urban area (NW, NE, C, SW, SE) in 2011 during April (dry-warm season), August (rainy season) and December (dry-cold season). Analytical determinations were carried out using a ICP-MS with a collision cell and kinetic energy discrimination. The analytical and instrument performance was evaluated with standard road dust reference material (BCR-723). Median Pt concentration in the analyzed particulate was is 38.4 pg m(-3) (minimal value 1 pg m(-3) maximal value 79 pg m(-3)). Obtained Pt concentrations are higher than those reported for other urban areas. Spatial variation shows that SW had Pt concentration significantly higher than NW and C only. Seasonal variation shows that Pt median was higher in rainy season than in both dry seasons. A comparison of these results with previously reported data of PM10 from 1991 and 2003 in the same studied area shows a worrying increase in the concentration of Pt in the air environment of MAMC. PMID:24729077

Morton-Bermea, Ofelia; Amador-Muñoz, Omar; Martínez-Trejo, Lida; Hernández-Álvarez, Elizabeth; Beramendi-Orosco, Laura; García-Arreola, María Elena

2014-10-01

144

An Aerial Radiological Survey of Selected Areas of the City of North Las Vegas  

SciTech Connect

As part of the proficiency training for the Radiological Mapping mission of the Aerial Measuring System (AMS), a survey team from the Remote Sensing Laboratory-Nellis (RSL-Nellis) conducted an aerial radiological survey of selected areas of the city of North Las Vegas for the purpose of mapping natural radiation background and locating any man-made radioactive sources. Survey areas were selected in collaboration with the City Manager's office and included four separate areas: (1) Las Vegas Motor Speedway (10.6 square miles); (2) North Las Vegas Downtown Area (9.2 square miles); (3) I-15 Industrial Corridor (7.4 square miles); and (4) Future site of University of Nevada Las Vegas campus (17.4 square miles). The survey was conducted in three phases: Phase 1 on December 11-12, 2007 (Areas 1 and 2), Phase 2 on February 28, 2008 (Area 3), and Phase 3 on March 19, 2008 (Area 4). The total completed survey covered a total of 44.6 square miles. The flight lines (without the turns) over the surveyed areas are presented in Figures 1, 2, 3, and 4. A total of eight 2.5-hour-long flights were performed at an altitude of 150 ft above ground level (AGL) with 300 feet of flight-line spacing. Water line and test line flights were conducted over the Lake Mead and Government Wash areas to ensure quality control of the data. The data were collected by the AMS data acquisition system (REDAR V) using an array of twelve 2-inch x 4-inch x 16-inch sodium iodide (NaI) detectors flown on-board a twin-engine Bell 412 helicopter. Data, in the form of gamma energy spectra, were collected continually (every second) over the course of the survey and were geo-referenced using a differential Global Positioning System. Collection of spectral data allows the system to distinguish between ordinary fluctuations in natural background radiation levels and the signature produced by man-made radioisotopes. Spectral data can also be used to identify specific radioactive isotopes. As a courtesy service, with the approval of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office, RSL-Nellis is providing this summary to the office of the Mayor of the City of North Las Vegas along with the gross-count-based exposure rate and man-made count contour maps and GIS shape files in electronic format on a compact disk.

Piotr Wasiolek

2008-06-01

145

State Teacher Policy Yearbook, 2009. Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Oklahoma edition of the National Council on Teacher Quality's (NCTQ's) 2009 "State Teacher Policy Yearbook" is the third annual look at state policies impacting the teaching profession. It is hoped that this report will help focus attention on areas where state policymakers can make changes that will have a positive impact on teacher quality…

National Council on Teacher Quality, 2009

2009-01-01

146

75 FR 15450 - Oklahoma; Major Disaster and Related Determinations  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...disaster. The following areas of the State of Oklahoma have been designated as adversely affected by this major disaster: Alfalfa, Caddo, Cleveland, Comanche, Cotton, Delaware, Dewey, Ellis, Grady, Greer, Harmon, Haskell, Hughes,...

2010-03-29

147

In situ measurements of speciated atmospheric mercury and the identification of source regions in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area  

E-print Network

In order to expand the currently limited understanding of atmospheric mercury source-receptor relationships in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area, real time measurements of atmospheric mercury were made at a downtown urban ...

Rutter, A. P.

148

75 FR 38979 - Expansion/Reorganization of Foreign-Trade Zone 204, Tri-Cities Area, TN/VA  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board [Order No. 1691] Expansion/Reorganization of Foreign-Trade Zone 204, Tri-Cities Area...Pursuant to its authority under the Foreign-Trade Zones Act of June 18,...

2010-07-07

149

[Vertical distribution and source analysis of organochlorine pesticides in sewage irrigation area, Taiyuan city].  

PubMed

Nine profile soil samples were collected from Xiaodian sewage irrigation area in Taiyuan city, and the concentrations of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) were determined by gas chromatography coupled with electron capture detector (GC-ECD) to analyze the vertical distribution. The results showed that the OCPs were mainly accumulated in the surface soil layer (0-30 cm) with the maximum concentration of 98.56 ng x g(-1), and HCHs, DDTs, endosulfans and methoxychlor were the predominant contaminants compared with other pesticides in the surface soil, which accounted for 85.1% in total OCPs. The concentrations of OCPs were clearly decreased with the increasing of the depth to the top layer in the most profile soils. Beta-HCH and DDE (sum of o,p'-DDE and p,p'-DDE) were the main contaminants in HCH pesticides and DDT pesticides, respectively. Composition analysis indicated that new DDT sources might be introduced into the groundwater irrigation and swamp area recently, and the main source of HCHs and DDTs was the residual of history use in other areas. Most profile soils were defined silt loam in study area. The correlations between the concentration of sigma OCPs and the total organic carbon (TOC) were positively significant in sewage irrigation area and groundwater irrigation area, but they were not significantly correlated in swamp area and background area. PMID:23379151

Liao, Xiao-Ping; Zhang, Cai-Xiang; Zhao, Xu; Xiang, Qing-Qing; Li, Jia-Le

2012-12-01

150

Oklahoma Industrial Energy Management Program  

E-print Network

OKLAHCJ1A INDUSTRIAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM* Wayne C. Turner Richard E. Webb James M. Phillips Trevor A. Viljoen School of Industrial Engineering and Management Oklahoma Department of Energy Oklahoma State University Stillwater...

Turner, W. C.; Webb, R. E.; Phillips, J. M.; Viljoen, T. A.

1979-01-01

151

Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects Electric Power Marketing. Draft environmental impact statement: Volume 1, Summary  

SciTech Connect

The Salt Lake City Area Office of the Western Area Power Administration (Western) markets electricity produced at hydroelectric facilities operated by the Bureau of Reclamation. The facilities are known collectively as the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP) and include dams equipped for power generation on the Green, Gunnison, Rio Grande, and Colorado rivers and on Deer and Plateau creeks in the states of Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. Of these facilities, only the Glen Canyon Unit, the Flaming Gorge Unit, and the Aspinall Unit (which includes Blue Mesa, Morrow Point, and Crystal dams) are influenced by Western`s power scheduling and transmission decisions. The EIS alternatives, called commitment-level alternatives, reflect combinations of capacity and energy that would feasibly and reasonably fulfill Western`s firm power marketing responsibilities, needs, and statutory obligations. The viability of these alternatives relates directly to the combination of generation capability of the SLCA/IP with energy purchases and interchange. The economic and natural resource assessments in this environmental impact statement (EIS) include an analysis of commitment-level alternatives. Impacts of the no-action altemative are also assessed. Supply options, which include combinations of electrical power purchases and hydropower operational scenarios reflecting different operations of the dams, are also assessed. The EIS evaluates the impacts of these scenarios relative to socioeconomics, air resources, water resources, ecological resources, cultural resources, land use, recreation, and visual resources.

Not Available

1994-02-01

152

Ground-water-use trends in the Twin Cities metropolitan area, Minnesota, 1880-1980  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Detailed ground-water-use information from 1880 to 1980 has been collected and analyzed for the Twin Cities metropolitan area. Interpretation of historic water-use data was required to help water-resource planners and managers assess future trends in water use. Methods were developed to collect, evaluate, store, and retrieve information from all local, State, and Federal agencies ' records and publications. A computerized water-use data base was constructed to facilitate generation of statistics on water-use trends and to store and retrieve data. Ground-water use was analyzed by use category and aquifer and several trends were observed. Eighty percent of ground water currently withdrawn is from wells in the Prairie due Chien-Jordan aquifer. Ground-water use increased from 1880 until the early 1970 's and then declined slightly in the late 1970's. Industrial use in particular declined during the 1970 's as a result of conservation that was prompted by increased sewage-treatment and energy costs. The intensity of pumping had decreased within the St. Paul and Minneapolis city limits and increased outside the city limits. The seasonal variability of ground-water use became more pronounced as the percentage of water used for irrigation and air conditioning increased. (USGS)

Horn, M.A.

1983-01-01

153

Interaction between surface water areas and groundwater in Hanoi city, Viet Nam  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hanoi is the capital of Viet Nam and the second largest city in this country (population: 6.45 million in 2009). Hanoi city has developed along the Red River and has many lakes, ponds and canals. However, recent rapid urbanization of this city has reduced number of natural water areas such as ponds and lakes by reclamation not only in the central area but the suburban area. Canals also have been reclaimed or cut into pieces. Contrary, number of artificial water areas such as fish cultivation pond has rapidly increased. On the other hand, various kind of waste water flows into these natural and artificial water areas and induces pollution and eutrophication. These waste waters also have possibility of pollution of groundwater that is one of major water resources in this city. In addition, groundwater in this area has high concentrations of Arsenic, Fe and NH4. Thus, groundwater use may causes re-circulation of Arsenic. However, studies on the interaction between surface water areas and groundwater and on the role of surface water areas for solute transport with water cycle are a few. Therefore, we focused on these points and took water samples of river, pond and groundwater from four communities in suburban areas: two communities are located near the Red River and other two are far from the River. Also, columnar sediment samples of these ponds were taken and pore water was abstracted. Major dissolved ions, metals and stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen of water samples were analyzed. As for water cycle, from the correlation between ?18O and ?D, the Red River water (after GNIR) were distributed along the LMWL (?D=8.2?18O+14.1, calculated from precipitation (after GNIP)). On the other hand, although the pond waters in rainy season were distributed along the LMWL, that in dry season were distributed along the local evaporation line (LEL, slope=5.6). The LEL crossed with the LMWL at around the point of weighted mean values of precipitation in rainy season and of the Red river. Groundwater samples were also distributed along the LEL and there was no seasonal change. Thus, groundwater in these communities was mainly recharged by mixing of precipitation/the Red River and evaporated water bodies. Considering the land use in these communities, evaporated water bodies were considered to be not only ponds but also paddy fields. As for solute transport, concentration of dissolved Arsenic (filtered by 0.45?m) of the pond water (3 - 10 ?g/L) was slightly higher than the Red River (~ 3 ?g/L) and was much lower than that of groundwater (~ 60 ?g/L). On the other hand, concentration of dissolved Arsenic in the pore water of sediments (10 - 85 ?g/L) was close to groundwater. Also, other metal elements showed the same trend. Therefore, Arsenic and other metal elements recharged to these ponds were considered to be adsorbed by sediments (including organic matters). That is, pond sediments played an important role as a filter of metal elements. The results of this study strongly suggested that the surface water areas such as ponds and paddy fields are one of main groundwater sources. Also, ponds play important role for solute transport of metal elements. Therefore, management of these surface water areas is important to conserve groundwater environment.

Hayashi, T.; Kuroda, K.; Do Thuan, A.; Tran Thi Viet, N.; Takizawa, S.

2012-12-01

154

78 FR 57838 - Foreign-Trade Zone 15-Kansas City, Missouri, Area; Site Renumbering Notice  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Center Business Park, located at Interstate 29 and 112th Street, Kansas City; Site 15 (161 acres)--city-owned Harley Davidson site, 11401 North Congress Avenue, Kansas City; Site 16 (155 acres)--Congress Corporate Center...

2013-09-20

155

78 FR 67333 - Foreign-Trade Zone 15-Kansas City, Missouri, Area; Application for Reorganization Under...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Center Business Park, located at Interstate 29 and 112th Street, Kansas City; Site 15 (161 acres)--city-owned Harley Davidson site, 11401 North Congress Avenue, Kansas City; Site 16 (155 acres)--Congress Corporate Center...

2013-11-12

156

State Documents Collection in Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A questionnaire was distributed to a selected group of Oklahoma academic, public, and special libraries to survey their patterns of acquisition, organization, and reference use of Oklahoma state documents collections. Findings revealed serious deficiencies in the provision of current, comprehensive, and well organized collections of Oklahoma

Tomberlin, Irma R.

157

DISTRIBUTION OF DERMATOPHYTES FROM SOILS OF URBAN AND RURAL AREAS OF CITIES OF PARAIBA STATE, BRAZIL  

PubMed Central

SUMMARY The dermatophytes, keratinophilic fungi, represent important microorganisms of the soil microbiota, where there are cosmopolitan species and others with restricted geographic distribution. The aim of this study was to broaden the knowledge about the presence of dermatophytes in soils of urban (empty lots, schools, slums, squares, beaches and homes) and rural areas and about the evolution of their prevalence in soils of varying pH in cities of the four mesoregions of Paraiba State, Brazil. Soil samples were collected from 31 cities of Paraiba State. Of 212 samples, 62% showed fungal growth, particularly those from the Mata Paraibana mesoregion (43.5%), which has a tropical climate, hot and humid. Soil pH varied from 4.65 to 9.06, with 71% of the growth of dermatophytes occurring at alkaline pH (7.02 - 9.06) (? = 0.000). Of 131 strains isolated, 57.3% were geophilic species, particularly Trichophyton terrestre (31.3%) and Mycrosporum gypseum (21.4%). M. nanum and T. ajelloi were isolated for the first time in Paraiba State. The zoophilic species identified were T. mentagrophytes var. mentagrophytes (31.3 %) and T. verrucosum (7.6 %), and T. tonsurans was isolated as an anthropophilic species. The soils of urban areas including empty lots, schools, slums and squares of cities in the mesoregions of Paraiba State were found to be the most suitable reservoirs for almost all dermatophytes; their growth may have been influenced by environmental factors, soils with residues of human and/or animal keratin and alkaline pH. PMID:24213189

Pontes, Zélia Braz Vieira da Silva; de Oliveira, Aurylene Carlos; Guerra, Felipe Queiroga Sarmento; Pontes, Luiz Renato de Araújo; dos Santos, Jozemar Pereira

2013-01-01

158

Mapping the Sea Floor of the Historic Area Remediation Site (HARS) Offshore of New York City  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The area offshore of New York City has been used for the disposal of dredged material for over a century. The area has also been used for the disposal of other materials such as acid waste, industrial waste, municipal sewage sludge, cellar dirt, and wood. Between 1976 and 1995, the New York Bight Dredged Material Disposal Site, also known as the Mud Dump Site (MDS), received on average about 6 million cubic yards of dredged material annually. In September 1997 the MDS was closed as a disposal site, and it and the surrounding area were designated as the Historic Area Remediation Site (HARS). The sea floor of the HARS, approximately 9 square nautical miles in area, currently is being remediated by placing a minimum 1-m-thick cap of clean dredged material on top of the surficial sediments that are contaminated from previous disposal of dredged and other materials. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is working cooperatively with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to map the sea floor geology of the HARS and changes in the characteristics of the surficial sediments over time.

Butman, Bradford

2002-01-01

159

Cadmium, copper and nickel levels in vegetables from industrial and residential areas of Lagos City, Nigeria.  

PubMed

The levels of cadmium, copper and nickel in five different edible vegetables, Talinum triangulare, Celosia trigyna, Corchorus olitorus, Venomia amygydalina and Telfaria accidentalis, and the soils in which they were grown, from three industrial and three residential areas of Lagos City, Nigeria, were determined using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The results obtained for these three heavy metals from the industrial areas were higher than those of the residential areas as a result of pollution. Industrial area results for vegetables ranged between 1.13 and 1.67 microg/g for cadmium; 25.08 and 56.84 microg/g for copper and 1.33 and 2.06 microg/g for nickel. There were statistically significant differences (P<0.05) between the levels of copper and nickel in all the vegetables studied from industrial and residential areas, while there was no statistically significant difference for cadmium. The results also show that Corchorus olitorus (bush okra) has the ability to accumulate more copper and nickel than the other vegetable studied but has the least ability to accumulate cadmium. PMID:12504169

Yusuf, A A; Arowolo, T A; Bamgbose, O

2003-03-01

160

Monitoring the carbon storage change in Tonghua City of Changbai mountain area  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Estimation of carbon storage in terrestrial ecosystems is vital for research on atmospheric greenhouse gases and global carbon cycle. Based on Landsat TM/ETM+ images, land use / cover changes in Tonghua City of Changbai Mountain area, China during 1986-2008 was analyzed in this study. The carbon storage in terrestrial ecosystems of the study area was quantitatively estimated using InVEST model. CA-Marcov model was used to forecast land use / cover and carbon storage in the year of 2016. The results show that total carbon storage in terrestrial ecosystems of Tonghua in 1986 was about 7932.64×104tons. From 1986 to 1996, carbon storage reduced by 0.6%. However, it increased by 0.1% in 2000 and 4% in 2008, respectively. The forecasted carbon storage in 2016 would be 8296.56×104tons, increased by 4.6%. The total area of forest in Tonghua was 8.0×103km2 in 1986, taking up 54% of the land. In 1996, the percentage of forestland dropped to 53%, while it rose to 54% in 2000 and 59% in 2008. The predicted area of woodland in 2016 increased to 10338.7km2, which might be influenced by the implementation of returning farmland to forest project since 1998. With the area of forestland increased in Tonghua, the carbon storage tended to rise.

Yan, Lishuang; Huang, Fang

2014-12-01

161

[Pollution characteristics of antimony, arsenic and mercury in human hair at Xikuangshan antimony mining area and Guiyang City, China].  

PubMed

The concentration levels of antimony, arsenic and mercury in human hair collected from Xikuangshan antimony mining area and Guiyang City were determined by hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry after having been digested by nitric acid and perchloric acid. The contents of Sb, As and Hg are 15.9, 4.21, 1.79 microg/g in the samples from Xikuangshan antimony mining area and 0.532, 0.280, 0.338 microg/g in the samples from Guiyang City respectively. The contents of Sb, As and Hg in human hair of Xikuangshan antimony area are much higher than those of Guiyang City. The independent-samples t-test shows that there are no marked differences in the contents of Sb and As between male and female hair samples from both Xikuangshan antimony mining area and Guiyang City (p > 0.05), while Hg contents in male hair are apparently higher than those in female hair from Guiyang City (p < or = 0.05). There is positive correlation observed between As and Sb, as well as between As and Hg, while Sb is weakly correlated with Hg (p < or = 0.01). These results show that the heavy metals (Sb, As and Hg) in antimony mining area may significantly affect human health than in the un-mining areas. PMID:19432349

Liu, Bi-Jun; Wu, Feng-Chang; Deng, Qiu-Jing; Mo, Chang-Li; Zhu, Jing; Zeng, Li; Fu, Zhi-You; Li, Wen

2009-03-15

162

The Economic Impact of Johnson County Community College on the Kansas City Metropolitan Area, 1988-89.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In an effort to estimate the economic impact of Johnson County Community College (JCCC) on the Kansas City Metropolitan Area for 1988-89, the Ryan-New Jersey model was used to examine both direct and indirect economic influences of the college. Direct economic impact was assessed by examining institutional expenditures in the metropolitan area;…

Seybert, Jef

163

Contribution of the Gasoline Distribution Cycle to Volatile Organic Compound Emissions in the Metropolitan Area of Mexico City  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gasoline distribution in the metropolitan area of Mexico City (MAMC) represents an area of opportunity for the abatement of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions. The gasoline distribution in this huge urban center encompasses several operations: (1) storage in bulk and distribution plants, (2) transportation to gasoline service stations, (3) unloading at service stations’ underground tanks, and (4) gasoline dispensing. In

I. Schifter; M. Magdaleno; L. Díaz; B. Krüger; J. León; M. E. Palmerín; R. Casas; A. Melgarejo; E. López-Salinas

2002-01-01

164

Strengthening Oklahoma Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Established by the state legislature in 1980, the Oklahoma Citizens' Commission on Education (OCCE) aimed to evaluate the state's schools and prescribe goals for its future educational system. This report presents OCCE's recommendations and background materials. The first section comprises OCCE's 42 recommendations and statements, with supporting…

Oklahoma Citizens' Commission on Education, Oklahoma City.

165

Geologic provinces of Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The geologic provinces of Oklahoma are mainly the product of tectonics and attendant sedimentation of Pennsylvanian age. Most boundaries are structural; thus, the provinces map is a generalized tectonic map. Permian and post-Paleozoic strata tend to mask those structures, but most of those strata have been removed by erosion, except in the Anadarko Basin and the Wichita Uplift provinces. The

R. A. Northcutt; J. A. Campbell

1995-01-01

166

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets  

E-print Network

soils tend to collapse and prairie dogs avoid The black-tailed prairie dog is a keystone species species of prairie dogs and the only species that occurs in Oklahoma. They are highly social burrowing by grasses, while the center is made up of forbs and dwarf shrubs. Many wildlife species utilize these areas

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

167

Annual ground-water use in the Twin Cities metropolitan area, Minnesota, 1970-79  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Annual groundwater use in the Twin Cities Metropolitan Area from 1970-79 is presented by aquifer and type of use. Most groundwater is withdrawn from wells in the Prairie du Chien-Jordan aquifer and major uses of the water are for self-supplied industry and public supplies. Annual groundwater-use data are presented by county for each of the five major aquifers; Prairie du Chien-Jordan, Mount Simon-Hinckley, Ironton-Galesville, St. Peter, and drift. The data also are presented by county for each major use type including public supply, self-supplied industry, commercial air-conditioning, irrigation, lake-level maintenance, and dewatering. The data were collected initially by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources and were supplemented by data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey. (USGS)

Horn, M.A.

1984-01-01

168

Local housing price index analysis in wind-disaster-prone areas  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines the effect of severe wind events on the mean and variance of housing price indices of six metropolitan\\u000a statistical areas (MSA) that are vulnerable to hurricanes and\\/or tornadoes. The research focuses on three areas that experienced\\u000a significant tornado activity (Fort Worth-Arlington, Nashville, and Oklahoma City) and three hurricane-prone areas (Corpus\\u000a Christi, Miami, and Wilmington, NC). An econometric

Bradley T. Ewing; Jamie B. Kruse; Yongsheng Wang

2007-01-01

169

Measurement and evaluation of the environmental noise levels in the urban areas of the city of Nis (Serbia).  

PubMed

The environmental noise level represents one of the key factors of life quality in urban areas of modern cities. A continuous monitoring of the noise levels and the analysis of results have become a necessity when we discuss a possible recovery of those areas with high levels of noise pollution, and particularly, those zones which were designed for specific activities, e.g., areas around hospitals and schools. The city of Nis, Serbia, owing to the permanent long-term noise monitoring, possesses a database containing figures related to the noise levels at relevant locations in the city, which can serve as a basis for an analysis of the change of conditions, their tendencies in the future, and recognizing factors which influence the danger of noise pollution. The paper involves an analysis of the environmental noise level collected during the previous years. PMID:24197556

Prascevic, Momir R; Mihajlov, Darko I; Cvetkovic, Dragan S

2014-02-01

170

Vehicle Traffic as a Source of Particulate Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Exposure in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area  

PubMed Central

Surface properties of aerosols in the Mexico City metropolitan area have been measured in a variety of exposure scenarios related to vehicle emissions in 2002, using continuous, real-time instruments. The objective of these experiments is to describe ambient and occupational particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentrations associated with vehicular traffic and facilities using diesel vehicles. Median total particulate PAH concentrations along Mexico City’s roadways range from 60 to 910 ng m?3, averaged over a minimum of 1 h. These levels are approximately 5 times higher than concentrations measured in the United States and among the highest measured ambient values reported in the literature. The ratio of particulate PAH concentration to aerosol active surface area is much higher along roadways and in other areas of fresh vehicle emissions, compared to ratios measured at sites influenced more by aged emissions or noncombustion sources. For particles freshly emitted by vehicles, PAH and elemental carbon (EC) concentrations are correlated because they both originate during the combustion process. Comparison of PAH versus EC and active surface area concentrations at different locations suggests that surface PAH concentrations may diminish with particle aging. These results indicate that exposure to vehicle-related PAH emissions on Mexico City’s roadways may present an important public health risk. PMID:15180054

MARR, LINSEY C.; GROGAN, LISA A.; WÖHRNSCHIMMEL, HENRY; MOLINA, LUISAT.; MOLINA, MARIO J.; SMITH, THOMAS J.; GARSHICK, ERIC

2005-01-01

171

Availability and quality of water from the bedrock aquifers in the Rapid City area, South Dakota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An evaluation made in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation of the availability and quality of water from the bedrock aquifers in the Rapid City area, South Dakota, concluded that Madison aquifer has the greatest potential for additional development of the three major aquifers investigated (the Inyan Kara, the Minnelusa, and the Madison). Ground-water availability and quality were evaluated on the basis of unit thickness and depth, potentiometric-surface altitudes and gradients, estimated recharge and discharge rates, estimated aquifer transmissivities and storage coefficients, reported yields of existing wells, and concentrations of ions in the water that may affect its use as a community supply. The Inyan Kara aquifer has the least potential for additional development because of reported small well yields , the proximity of the outcrop, and concentration of radium-226 exceeding 5 picocuries per liter. The Minnelusa aquifer is unsuitable for development in the eastern two-thirds of the study area because the concentrations of dissolved solids and sulfate commonly exceed the recommended maximum level for community water supplies. The Madison aquifer has the greatest potential for additional development because it has the greatest recharge rate, has areas with significant fracture permeability, yields as much as 500 gallons per minute to wells, and has satisifactory water quality, though it is hard (hardness 120 to 180 milligrams per liter) to very hard (hardness greater than 180 milligrams per liter). (USGS)

Peter, K.D.

1985-01-01

172

Nonfatal injuries 1 week after hurricane sandy--New York city metropolitan area, October 2012.  

PubMed

On October 29, 2012, Hurricane Sandy (Sandy) made landfall in densely populated areas of New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut. Flooding affected 51 square miles (132 square kilometers) of New York City (NYC) and resulted in 43 deaths, many caused by drowning in the home, along with numerous storm-related injuries. Thousands of those affected were survivors of the World Trade Center (WTC) disaster of September 11, 2001 (9/11) who had previously enrolled in the WTC Health Registry (Registry) cohort study. To assess Sandy-related injuries and associated risk factors among those who lived in Hurricane Sandy-flooded areas and elsewhere, the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene surveyed 8,870 WTC survivors, who had provided physical and mental health updates 8 to 16 months before Sandy. Approximately 10% of the respondents in flooded areas reported injuries in the first week after Sandy; nearly 75% of those had more than one injury. Injuries occurred during evacuation and clean-up/repair of damaged or destroyed homes. Hurricane preparation and precautionary messages emphasizing potential for injury hazards during both evacuation and clean-up or repair of damaged residences might help mitigate the occurrence and severity of injury after a hurricane. PMID:25340912

Brackbill, Robert M; Caramanica, Kimberly; Maliniak, Maret; Stellman, Steven D; Fairclough, Monique A; Farfel, Mark R; Turner, Lennon; Maslow, Carey B; Moy, Amanda J; Wu, David; Yu, Shengchao; Welch, Alice E; Cone, James E; Walker, Deborah J

2014-10-24

173

Quality of runoff from small watersheds in the Twin Cities metropolitan area, Minnesota; a project plan  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A program for water-quality sampling to define the relationships between land use, watershed characteristics, and the quantity, quality, and timing of runoff has been started for the Twin Cities metropolitan area of Minnesota. Ten major watersheds were chosen as representative of conditions in the metropolitan area. Each will be sampled at one location near the outlet. Six of the watersheds are agricultural, and range in size from 14.3 to 82.9 square miles. The four remaining watersheds are urbanized and range in size from 1.22 to 31.7 square miles. In addition, seven urban subwatersheds, which range in size from 0.12 to 0.47 square mile and reflect a dominant land-use type, will be sampled. Data collection is designed around the hydrologic conditions expected for each site. Sixteen of 17 sites are instrumented to define stream discharge and 12 sites have automatic water samplers and recording rain gages. In addition, six sites will have automatic wetfall/dryfall precipitation collectors. Samples for analysis of 32 chemical, physical, and biological constituents will be collected at varying frequencies , with emphasis on storm sampling for suspended solids and nutrients. A data-management system being designed for the U.S. Geological Survey Urban Hydrology Studies Program will facilitate data processing. Data interpretation will be aimed at defining the quantity and quality characteristics of runoff from study watersheds. These findings will be extrapolated to unsampled watersheds in the metropolitan area. (USGS)

Ayers, M.A.; Payne, G.A.; Oberts, Gary L.

1980-01-01

174

Preliminary evaluation of the ground-water-flow system in the Twin Cities Metropolitan area, Minnesota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A preliminary quasi-three-dimensional finite-difference ground-water-flow model of the seven-county Twin Cities Metropolitan area was constructed and used to evaluate parameter sensitivity and adequacy of available data. Fourteen geologic units that underlie the study area were grouped into nine hydrogeologic units and were incorporated into a five-layer model. The layers in the simulation model include the Mount Simon-Hinckley, Ironton-Galesville, Prairie du Chien-Jordan, and St. Peter aquifers and the drift. Sensitivity analyses were made for 19 parameter and boundary-condition specifications. Model results are most sensitive to recharge and withdrawal rates and hydrogeologic variations related to drift-filled bedrock valleys. Analyses of available data and results of steady-state simulations indicate that critical data needs for improving the simulation model include (1) spatial and temporal variations in ground-water withdrawals and potentiometric levels, and (2) hydraulic properties of the drift that fills or partly fills bedrock valleys. Areal distribution of calcium, sodium, sulfate, and chloride concentrations were analyzed to provide information on the hydrologic and geochemical relationships between aquifers. Ground water is generally of the calcium magnesium bicarbonate type. Concentration of dissolved solids in the Jordan Sandstone and Mount Simon-Hinckley aquifer generally decreases from southwest to northeast across the study area. This decrease probably reflects differences in the quality of recharge water and geochemical processes within the aquifers such as ion-exchange. (USGS)

Guswa, John H.; Siegel, Donald I.; Gillies, Daniel C.

1982-01-01

175

Anthropological Approaches to the Study of Housing Areas: Lessons from Oaxaca City, Mexico.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The anthropological study of the city's role in the evolution of human systems requires the use of both macro and micro levels of analysis. From the macro perspective, the city is viewed as part of a wider complex society, while from the micro point of view, the city provides the context for understanding specific human institutions or processes…

Murphy, Arthur D.

176

Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History & Culture  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The 46th state, Oklahoma, presents its unusual history with the online version of The Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture. The Encyclopedia was prepared by over 500 "university-based scholars and independent historians and scholars," and was a joint effort by The Oklahoma Historical Society and Oklahoma State University Library Electronic Publishing Center. Visitors can click on the "Table of Contents" link near the bottom of the homepage to "Browse Entries Alphabetically", "Browse Entries Chronologically", or "Browse Entries by Subject". Browsing via chronology introduces visitors to Oklahoma starting with the "Precontact Era", through the "Westward Expansion" and on to "Twentieth Century to Present". Subject categories include "African Americans", "Farming", "Military", and "Petroleum". When searching, visitors will be taken to the Electronic Publishing Center Search Page, so they will need to choose the specific collection, Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture, from the drop down box, to confine the search to the Encyclopedia.

177

Naturally Occurring Arsenic in Ground Water, Norman, Oklahoma, 2004, and Remediation Options for Produced Water  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 2000, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) reviewed the arsenic drinking water standard for public water supplies. Considering the available research and statistics on the health effects of arsenic ingestion, the EPA reduced the Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for public drinking water from 50 micrograms per liter (?g/L) to 10 ?g/L (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2001a). As a result of the more stringent standard, the EPA estimates that about 3,000 public water providers across the United States must take action to meet the new standard before it becomes effective on January 23, 2006 (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2001b). The City of Norman (City) is one of several Oklahoma municipalities affected by the new arsenic standard. About 20 percent of Norman?s water is supplied by wells completed in the Central Oklahoma (Garber-Wellington) aquifer; the rest is supplied by Lake Thunderbird (fig. 1) or purchased from Oklahoma City. The Norman well field is composed of 24 active wells, and water produced from about half of the wells will not be in compliance with the new MCL (figs. 2 and 3). Chemical treatment of water with elevated arsenic is possible, but it is generally cost prohibitive. Another costly solution is simply to abandon the high-arsenic wells and replace them with new wells in low-arsenic areas. In the next phase of well construction beginning in 2005, the City plans to construct as many as 30 new wells in northeast Norman (Bryan Mitchell, City of Norman, oral commun., 2005). The new wells will replace production lost to the new arsenic standard and add new production to keep pace with rapidly growing consumer demand. Well modification to exclude arsenic-bearing water from existing wells is a more cost-effective solution, but it requires a great deal of knowledge about local aquifer properties and individual well dynamics to decide which wells are good candidates for modification. With the goal of determining if well modification can be used to bring some of Norman?s high-arsenic wells into compliance with the new arsenic standard, the EPA Office of Research and Development (ORD) initiated a three-year research project in 2003 with participation from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Oklahoma State University, and the City of Norman. The primary objectives of the project are to: (1) determine where naturally occurring arsenic is entering wells by collecting water samples at different depths, (2) investigate the utility of new methods for collecting water-quality data in a pumping well, (3) better understand the stratigraphy and composition of aquifer rocks, (4) assess 10 wells for the possibility of arsenic remediation by well modification, and (5) evaluate the effectiveness of well modification in bringing marginal wells into compliance with the new arsenic MCL. The purpose of this report is to describe the occurrence of arsenic in ground water near Norman, Oklahoma, and available options for reducing arsenic concentrations in produced ground water.

Smith, S. Jerrod; Christenson, Scott

2005-01-01

178

Selected demographic, social and work characteristics of the Australian general medical practitioner workforce: comparing capital cities with regional areas.  

PubMed

The aim of the present study was to compare selected characteristics of the Australian general medical practitioner workforce in capital cities and regional areas. Data were derived from the 1996 Census of Population and Housing. Characteristics included age, sex, full- or part-time work, place of birth and change in residential address. Analyses were performed for each state and territory in Australia, the statistical division containing each capital city and all other statistical divisions in each state and territory. Of the 26,359 general medical practitioners identified, 68% were male. More female than male general medical practitioners were aged < 45 years (74 vs 52%, respectively; P < 0.0001). The proportion of general medical practitioners aged < 35 years was higher in capital cities (30%) than regional areas (24%; P < 0.0001). Overall, 32% of the general medical practitioner workforce was female and almost 50% of those aged < 35 years were female. The proportion of female general medical practitioners was higher in capital cities than regional areas, by up to 30%. While 13% of male general medical practitioners reported part-time work, 42% of females also reported part-time work and these figures were similar in capital cities and regional areas. Approximately 40% of the Australian general medical practitioner workforce was born outside Australia and while fewer migrants have entered in recent years they were more likely to be living in regional areas than the capitals. The census provides useful medical workforce data. The regional workforce tends to be made up of more males and is older than in capital cities. Monitoring trends in these characteristics could help to evaluate initiatives aimed at addressing regional workforce issues. PMID:11894793

Wilkinson, D

2000-12-01

179

Climate services for an urban area (Baia Mare City, Romania) with a focus on climate extremes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Baia Mare Urban System is located in the north-western part of Romania, with around 200,000 inhabitants and represents one of the most important former mining areas in the country, whose socioeconomic profile and environmental conditions have greatly changed over the last 20 years during the transition and post-transition period. Currently the mining is closed in the area, but the historical legacy of this activity has implications in terms of economic growth, social and cultural developments and environmental quality. Baia Mare city lies in an extended depression, particularly sheltered by the mountain and hilly regions located in the north and respectively, in the south-south-eastern part of it, which explains the high frequency of calm conditions and low airstream channeling occurrences. This urban system has a typically moderate temperate-continental climate, subject to frequent westerly airflows (moist), which moderate the thermal regime (without depicting severe extremes, both positive and negative) and enhance the precipitation one (entailing a greater frequency of wet extremes). During the reference period (1971-2000), the climate change signal in the area is rather weak and not statistically significant. However, since the mid 1980s, the warming signal became more evident from the observational data (Baia Mare station), showing a higher frequency of dry spells and positive extremes. The modelling experiments covering the 2021-2050 time horizon using regional (RM5.1/HadRM3Q0/RCA3) and global (ARPEGE/HadCM3Q0/BCM/ECHAM5) circulation models carried out within the ECLISE FP7 project suggest an ongoing temperature rise, associated to an intensification of temperature and precipitation extremes. In this context, the aim of this study was to evaluate how the local authorities consider and include climate change in their activity, as well as in the development plans (e.g. territorial, economic and social development plans). Individual interviews have been undertaken with key institutions focusing on environmental, health and urban development issues. The survey was conducted in order to identify the local authorities' perception and needs on climate change information and the importance of climate services for the city and institution's activity. Generally, the results suggest that the selected institutions are poorly aware of the potential impacts of climate change and associated extremes in the area, but they showed a real interest for future climate estimations necessary to undertake reliable adaptation measures. At institutional level, do not exist specialized departments (job positions) to tackle or manage climate information and climate-related aspects, this not being a pressing or priority issue for the city. The climate services aspects are seen with interest mainly in supplying climate scenarios and models for a relatively short term (next 10 or 15 years), the climate information being in this way included in the local planning strategies.

Sima, Mihaela; Micu, Dana; Dragota, Carmen-Sofia; Mihalache, Sorin

2013-04-01

180

Passive electrical measurements from three Oklahoma tornados  

Microsoft Academic Search

Passive electrical measurement of three tornados in the Oklahoma area have been made and are being reported upon. The measurements made include point discharge current, 18.5-kc\\/s sferics, along with 10-, 50-, 100-, and 175-kc\\/s, and 30-Mc\\/s sferics. The preceding measurements of tornados are compared with a typical local thunderstorm. In this comparison, it is shown that the electrical discharges within

P. A. Silberg

1965-01-01

181

N3280RDCOTTONWOODRD PayneOklahoma 11  

E-print Network

51 2 54 11 51 49 4 11 2 11 10 72 51 96 26 47 51 2651 26 76 76 26 4 32 11 26 3 11 26 10 72 51 31 26 51 11 2626 72 11 49 10 11 26 11 26 96 76 26 41 11 76 51 1011 74 31 51 11 SOIL SURVEY OF PAYNE COUNTY Soil Survey Area: Payne County, Oklahoma Spatial Version of Data: 2 Soil Map Compilation Scale: 1

Ghajar, Afshin J.

182

Heavy metals in seawater, sediments, and biota from the coastal area of Yancheng City, China.  

PubMed

A systematic investigation was carried out to analyze the concentration levels of heavy metals in sample seawater, sediments, and biota collected from the coastal area of Yancheng City in Jiangsu Province, China. The authors assessed the impact of these heavy metals in different environmental samples in terms of potential risks to ecology and also to the human population exposed to this area. In addition, a further investigation was carried out to test the toxicity to early-life-stage zebrafish (Danio rerio) of selected samples that were considered to pose higher levels of potential risks to ecology or human health. Chemical analysis showed relatively higher concentrations of heavy metals in the seawater and biota samples collected from Xiangshui County and Binhai County, China. The heavy metal concentrations in different samples collected from the close vicinity of Dafeng Port, China, were also considerable. In all seawater and sediment samples, heavy metals showed a relatively moderate level of risk to ecological species; for consumption of marine organisms, heavy metals had adverse impacts on human health. Toxicity assessment indicated that the selected environmental samples or their extracts had significant toxicity to zebrafish early-life stages, including lethality, teratogenicity, and hatching delay (or advance). Thus the present study provides highly useful and important information on heavy metal pollution in Jiangsu Province. PMID:24619970

Fu, Jie; Wang, Hui; Billah, Shah M Reduwan; Yu, Hongxia; Zhang, Xiaowei

2014-08-01

183

Runoff and chemical loading in small watersheds in the Twin Cities Metropolitan Area, Minnesota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Flow, rainfall, and water-quality data were collected during 1980 for 15 to 30 rainfall and snowmelt events on 6 rural and 11 urban watersheds in the Twin Cities Metropolitan Area. Event or daily flow and load models (for seven constituents) were developed and used with runoff and rainfall data for 1963-80 to compute 2-year frequency annual and seasonal flows and loads for each watershed. In models of storm-sewered watersheds, total storm rainfall proved to be the most significant factor controlling runoff and loads. Depending on the watershed type, antecedent soil-moisture indices and rainfall intensity also were important factors in estimating runoff. Annual runoff from storm-sewered watersheds averaged about 27 percent of annual precipitation, ranging from 13 to 57 percent. Runoff in urban main-stem streams ranged from 13 to 20 percent and was related to the percent of urbanization in the watershed. Annual runoff in rural watersheds ranged from 6 to 20 percent of annual precipitation. Runoff responses were highest in the snowmelt season for all watersheds and declined through the rest of the year. Rural watersheds showed a considerable decrease in runoff response during late summer and fall. Urban-watershed response from season to season was more consistent than rural watersheds because of the impervious area and storm sewers in urban watersheds. (USGS)

Ayers, M.A.; Oberts, G.L.; Brown, R.G.

1985-01-01

184

Oklahoma seismic network. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has established rigorous guidelines that must be adhered to before a permit to construct a nuclear-power plant is granted to an applicant. Local as well as regional seismicity and structural relationships play an integral role in the final design criteria for nuclear power plants. The existing historical record of seismicity is inadequate in a number of areas of the Midcontinent region because of the lack of instrumentation and (or) the sensitivity of the instruments deployed to monitor earthquake events. The Nemaha Uplift/Midcontinent Geophysical Anomaly is one of five principal areas east of the Rocky Mountain front that has a moderately high seismic-risk classification. The Nemaha uplift, which is common to the states of Oklahoma, Kansas, and Nebraska, is approximately 415 miles long and 12-14 miles wide. The Midcontinent Geophysical Anomaly extends southward from Minnesota across Iowa and the southeastern corner of Nebraska and probably terminates in central Kansas. A number of moderate-sized earthquakes--magnitude 5 or greater--have occurred along or west of the Nemaha uplift. The Oklahoma Geological Survey, in cooperation with the geological surveys of Kansas, Nebraska, and Iowa, conducted a 5-year investigation of the seismicity and tectonic relationships of the Nemaha uplift and associated geologic features in the Midcontinent. This investigation was intended to provide data to be used to design nuclear-power plants. However, the information is also being used to design better large-scale structures, such as dams and high-use buildings, and to provide the necessary data to evaluate earthquake-insurance rates in the Midcontinent.

Luza, K.V.; Lawson, J.E. Jr. [Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States)]|[Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). Energy Center

1993-07-01

185

Oklahoma Digital Maps  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A team of talented librarians at the Oklahoma State University Library have created this collection of 3,600 maps, a true find for those with an interest in Sooner history, geography, culture, and more. The cartographic resources are divided into four collections, including the WPA Collection and the USGS Collection. This first collection consists of almost 2,400 detailed county maps produced in the 1930s by the Works Progress Administration and the Oklahoma Tax Commission to determine real estate values. Moving on, the USGS Collection is made up of 300 detailed maps generated from 1892 to the 1950s documenting topographical conditions throughout the state. Interested parties can view all of the maps here via a nice digital image tool and are also welcome to search across the entire collection by keyword.

186

OklahomaState  

Cancer.gov

DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY, OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY is inviting applications for two full-time, Assistant Professor, tenure track positions in Quantitative Psychology and Clinical Health Psychology or Behavior Medicine beginning August, 2015. Candidates are expected to have a strong background in and dedication to scholarly activity, and to interact well with colleagues and students. They must also demonstrate the capacity to maintain a high quality research program leading to scholarly productivity in the form of professional publications, presentations, and grantsmanship.

187

Cities Guide  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

From The Economist, their Cities Guide offers practical information ranging from accommodations to insider tips on getting around various US and world cities. A very nice touch are areas like the City Briefing section (top news stories, history pieces, and other tidbits) and the Being There area (subtopics include how to kill an hour and gifts to take home). City Guide also contains sections on cultural events, shopping, history, facts, and much more. [REB].

188

Techniques for estimating flood discharges for Oklahoma streams; techniques for calculating magnitude and frequency of floods in Oklahoma from rural and urban areas under 2500 square miles, with compilations of flood data through 1975  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Statewide regression equations are defined for estimating peak discharges of floods having recurrence intervals ranging from 2 to 500 years. Contributing drainage area, main-channel slope and mean annual precipitation are the independent variables required for estimating flood discharges for rural streams. For urban streams the percentage of the basin that is impervious and served by storm sewers also is required. The regression equations are applicable for watersheds draining less than 2,500 square miles (6,500 square kilometers) that are not significantly affected by regulation. For the rural streams, the regression equations are presented in graphical form for easy application. Calibration of the U.S. Geological Survey rainfall-runoff model and synthesis of long-term annual peak data for 60 small watersheds is discussed. Synthetic frequency curves, generated using six long-term rainfall stations, are combined into one frequency curve and weighted with the observed frequency curve at each site. Use of the rainfall-runoff model parameters to estimate flood discharges reduces the standard error for selected frequencies by 9-12 percent. However, collection of the necessary rainfall-runoff data to determine the model parameters is time consuming and expensive. Annual peak data, basin and climatic characteristics, log-Pearson Type III statistics, and the flood-frequency relations are presented for 188 gaging stations. (PHOTOSTATIC COPIES ONLY ARE AVAILABLE OF THIS REPORT)

Thomas, W.O.; Corley, R.K.

1977-01-01

189

Health effect of human wastes use in agriculture in El Azzouzia (the wastewater spreading area of Marrakesh city, Morocco)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The use of wastewater and excreta in agriculture constitutes an important source of spread Salmonella strains and protozoan infections into the environment. This practice has been used in El Azzouzia (the wastewater-spreading area of Marrakesh city, Morocco) for several years. The available circumstantial evidence gained from epidemiological and microbiological investigations suggests that the use of untreated wastewater causes an excess

Ait Melloul; O. Amahmid; L. Hassani; K. Bouhoum

2002-01-01

190

Occurrence and toxicity of sediment-associated contaminants in Guangzhou College City and its adjacent areas: the relationship to urbanization.  

PubMed

Guangzhou College City in the southeast of Guangzhou, China, became a home to 10 universities in 2003 after a largely agricultural past. The city has since experienced rapid urbanization with limited development of adjacent areas. Twenty-one sediment samples were collected in the city and its adjacent areas to evaluate the influence of urbanization in different functional zones on sediment quality in local waterways. Sediment toxicity was assessed by 10-day toxicity tests using two benthic invertebrates, Chironomus dilutus and Hyalella azteca. In addition, various organic contaminants-including current-use pesticides (pyrethroids and organophosphate insecticides) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons-were analyzed, and a toxic unit (TU) approach was applied to identify possible toxicity contributors. In general, 38 and 4.8% of the sediments exhibited acute toxicity to C. dilutus and H. azteca, respectively, with 9.5% of the samples resulting in 100% mortality to C. dilutus. Distribution analysis showed that the rural industrial area, which is south of the city, had the greatest contaminant concentrations and greatest toxicity to both organisms compared with the other areas. Pyrethroids, especially cypermethrin, appeared to contribute the most to the observed toxicity, yet the lack of relationship between the toxicity and TU of pyrethroids may reflect toxicity associated with other contaminants. PMID:25362564

Sun, Bao-Quan; Wang, Fei; Li, Hui-Zhen; You, Jing

2015-01-01

191

Potential hazard characteristics of Tilia, Betula, and Acer trees removed in the Helsinki City Area during 2001-2003  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to study decay, and to improve the management and protection of old urban trees, a total of 256 felled urban trees were examined during 2001-2003: 95 Tilia spp., 74 Betula spp., and 87 Acer spp. Most of the trees (73%) were located in the main parks and along the main streets in the downtown area of Helsinki City.

Minna Terho

192

Potential hazard characteristics of Tilia, Betula, and Acer trees removed in the Helsinki City Area during 2001–2003  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to study decay, and to improve the management and protection of old urban trees, a total of 256 felled urban trees were examined during 2001–2003: 95 Tilia spp., 74 Betula spp., and 87 Acer spp. Most of the trees (73%) were located in the main parks and along the main streets in the downtown area of Helsinki City,

Minna Terho; Anna-Maija Hallaksela

2005-01-01

193

Large Scale Groundwater Flow Model for Ho Chi Minh City and its Catchment Area, Southern Vietnam  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC) has become a fast growing city in recent decades and is still growing at a high pace. The water demand for more than 7 million people has increased tremendously, too. Beside surface water, groundwater is used in big amounts to satisfy the need of water. By now, more than 200,000 wells have been developed with very little control. To investigate the sustainability of the water abstraction, a model had been built for the HCMC area and its surrounding. On the catchment scale (around 24,000km2); however, many questions have remained unsolved. In this study, we first gathered and complied geological and hydrogeological information as well as data on groundwater quality to get an idea on regional groundwater flow pattern and problems related to the temporal change of the groundwater situation. Two problems have been depicted by this study. One is the construction of a water reservoir upstream of the Saigon River. This construction has probably changed the water table of the unconfined aquifer, and hence, has significantly changed the properties of soils in some areas. The other problem is the distribution of salty groundwater. Despite the distance of more than 40km from the seashore, groundwater from some wells in and around HCMC shows high concentrations of chloride. Several wells started to produce non-potable water. The chloride concentrations show a complicated and patchy distribution below HCMC, suggesting the possibility of the remnant saltwater at the time of sediment deposition. On the other hand, seawater invades along the streams far beyond HCMC during the dry season and this might be one of the possible sources of salty groundwater by vertical infiltration. A large-scale geological model was constructed and transformed into a hydrogeological model to better understand and quantify the groundwater flow system and the origin of saltwater. Based on the constructed model and numerical calculation, we discuss the influence of reservoir construction on the groundwater situation at the upstream Saigon River, and possible factors for the existence of salty groundwater underneath HCMC.

Sigrist, M.; Tokunaga, T.; Takizawa, S.

2005-12-01

194

Geodetic, Geologic and Seismic Interdisciplinary Research of Tectonically Caused Movements in the Wider Area of the City of Zagreb  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Since the last great earthquake in 1880 which shook the Zagreb area with IX° MCS, tectonic movements and models of numerous Zagreb faults have been the focal point of Croatian geologists, seismologists and in the last 15 years also geodetic scientists, who all have been working in the scope of their scientific branches on bringing the light to the tectonic mechanisms in the wider Zagreb area. Since it is tectonically very active area and being the Capitol city of the Croatia with very high population density it is of utmost importance to understand those mechanisms and to according to them find the best possible measures for protecting people and valuables. Best results are certainly going to be achieved through the interdisciplinary approach. That is why this paper presents first interdisciplinary results from geodetic, geologic and seismic researches and their contribution to the collective knowledge about tectonic movements in the wider area of the City of Zagreb.

Dapo, A.; Pribicevic, B.; Herak, M.; Prelogovic, E.

2012-04-01

195

Design of anti-slide piles for slope stabilization in Wanzhou city, Three Gorges Area, China  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study is related to the design of anti-slide piles for several landslides in Wanzhou city located in the Three Gorges area. Due to the construction of the Three Gorges Reservoir the hydro-geological conditions in this area have deteriorated significantly, leading to larger instability problems. China has invested a lot of money in slope stabilization measures for the treatment of landslides in the Three Gorges area. One of the methods for the stabilization of large landslides is the design of anti-sliding piles. This paper focuses on extensive slope stability analysis and modeling of the mechanical behavior of the landslide masses, and the parameters required for designing the number, size and dimensions of reinforced concrete stabilization piles. The study focuses on determining the rock parameters, anchor depth, and the pile and soil interaction coefficient. The study aims to provide guidelines for anti-slide pile stabilization works for landslides in the Wanzhou area. The research work contains a number of aspects. First a study is carried out on the distribution of pressures expected on the piles, using two different methods that take into account the expected pore water pressure and seismic acceleration. For the Ercengyan landslide , the Limit Equilibrium Method and Strength Reduction Method of FEM are compared through the results of the landslide pressure distributions on the piles and stress fields in the piles. The second component is the study of the required anchor depth of antislide piles, which is carried out using a statistical analysis with data from 20 landslides that have been controlled with anti-sliding piles. The rock characteristics of the anchor locations were obtained using laboratory tests, and a classification of rock mass quality is made for the anchors of antislide piles. The relationship between the critical anchor height and the angle of the landslide slip surface is determined. Two different methods are presented for the length calculation of the anchor section in case of intensely weathered bedrock. The next component is a study on the subgrade retaining coefficient of anti-slide piles, which includes the definition and experimental methods used. The factors that have influence on the coefficient are discussed and the results of stress calculations in the anti-slide piles for different distributions of subgrade retaining coefficients are presented. Finally the differences between rigid piles and elastic pile are discussed and the elastic piles are considered to be more suitable for the landslide stabilization in the Wan Zhou area. The most important aspects for optimal design is the detailed knowledge of the features of soil and rock around the anchor part, which includes ground coefficients, uniaxial compressive strength, rock mass structure, fractures of bedrock, and weathering degree.

Zhou, Chunmei; van Westen, Cees

2013-04-01

196

Hydrocarbon Research Program of the University of Oklahoma Energy Center: Final report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this research program was to develop, edit, maintain, utilize and make publicly available a computerized Natural Resources Information System (NRIS) for the State of Oklahoma. Task 13 funded the collecting and computerizing of oil and gas completion report data available for the southeastern corner of Oklahoma (the Ouachita Mountain and Arkoma Basin areas), as well as supplemental

Mankin

1988-01-01

197

UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA GRADUATE COLLEGE  

E-print Network

ON NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF SUPERCELLS AND TORNADOES OF THE 3 MAY 1999 OKLAHOMA TORNADO OUTBREAK A DISSERTATION ON NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF SUPERCELLS AND TORNADOES OF THE 3 MAY 1999 OKLAHOMA TORNADO OUTBREAK A DISSERTATION. Alan Shapiro provided many helpful comments on various aspects of my work, and we've had many

Xue, Ming

198

UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA GRADUATE COLLEGE  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA GRADUATE COLLEGE 3DVAR AND CLOUD ANALYSIS WITH WSR-88D Level-II DATA of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy By Ming Hu Norman, Oklahoma 2005 #12;2 3DVAR AND CLOUD, but not least, I could not have fulfilled my dream here without the support and sacrifice of my family. My

Xue, Ming

199

GIS mapping of regional probabilistic groundwater potential in the area of Pohang City, Korea  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

SummaryThis study analyzed the relationships between groundwater specific capacity (SPC) and its related hydrological factors to assess the sensitivity of each factor and map the regional groundwater potential for the area of Pohang City, Korea, using a geographic information system (GIS) and a probability model. All related factors including topography, geology, lineament, and soil data were collected and entered into a spatial database. SPC data were collected from well locations, and SPC values of ?6.25 m 3/d/m, corresponding to a yield of 500 m 3/d, were input to a spatial database. SPC data were then randomly selected in a 66/34 ratio to train and validate the model. A frequency-ratio model and sensitivity analysis were used to determine the relationships between SPC and its related factors and the importance of SPC-related factors. Sensitivity analysis allows for comparison of the combined effects of all factors except for one. The validation of the groundwater potential map overlain by all factors showed 77.78% accuracy. In the sensitivity analysis, the best accuracy was obtained by omitting ground elevation data (78.64%), and the worst accuracy resulted when soil texture was not included (76.64%). The results show that soil texture had the greatest effect on the groundwater potential and ground elevation had the least effect. Such information and the maps generated from it can be applied to groundwater management and groundwater resource exploration.

Oh, Hyun-Joo; Kim, Yong-Sung; Choi, Jong-Kuk; Park, Eungyu; Lee, Saro

2011-03-01

200

Flash floods along the Italian coastal areas: examples from Pozzuoli city, Campania, Italy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Italian western coastal areas are the most exposed in the country to low-pressure systems coming from the central-western Mediterranean Sea and Atlantic Ocean. In the last years, many Italian coastal villages were struck by floods and flow processes triggered by high-intensity and short-duration rainfall, typical of flash flood events. In the Campania region (SW Italy) a series of events has caused several fatalities and heavy damages in the last decades, i.e. the flash floods of Casamicciola - Ischia Island (10/11/2009 - 1 fatality) and Atrani (9/9/2010 - 1 fatality). In this work we describe the rainfall properties and the ground effects of the 2009, 2010 and 2011 flash floods which involved the city of Pozzuoli, along the Campi Flegrei coast, where a catastrophic flood event (13 fatalities) is reported in 1918 in the AVI Project database. Rainfall data were measured at a sampling rate of 10 minutes by a regional Civil Protection rain gauge located in the city of Pozzuoli near the areas struck by the flash flood effects. In order to analyze the extreme features of the rainstorms and compare them, we have considered the 1-hour maximum rainfall amount and the 10-min peak storm intensity value for each event. The first rainstorm occurred on 14 September 2009; it was characterized by a 1-hour maximum rainfall amount of 34.4 mm and a 10-min peak storm intensity of 57.6 mm/h. The second rainstorm occurred on 30 July 2010; it was characterized by a 1-hour maximum rainfall amount of 40.6 mm and a 10-min peak storm intensity of 126 mm/h. The third rainstorm occurred on 06 November 2011; it was characterized by a 1-hour maximum rainfall amount of 44.2 mm and a 10-min peak storm intensity of 67.2 mm/h. The three described rainstorms all triggered erosional processes and shallow landslides in the upper part of the Pozzuoli drainage basin that supplied sheet flows and hyperconcentrated flows downstream, with severe damage to the human structures built near or inside the main drainage channels. In this area, in fact, one of the most serious problems for the Civil Protection authorities is the intense urbanization that dramatically increases not only the volcanic and seismic risks but also the level of geo-hydrological risk. The high degree of damage within the basin was also caused by incautious man-made modification of sectors of the drainage network and the use of culverts and even concrete-walled channel segments that in some cases were used as paved roads for local transportation. In all the three cases no warnings were issued to citizens because of the lack of early-warning systems but, fortunately, no fatalities or injuries were reported after the events. The analysis of these flash flood episodes showed an interesting case of interaction between hydrological processes and the geologic setting of a highly urbanized area such as the Campi Flegrei district, where the occurrence of heavy rain coupled with abundance of loose pyroclastic material on the steep volcanic hillslopes is likely to produce high levels of geo-hydrological hazard and risk.

Esposito, Giuseppe; Grimaldi, Giuseppe; Matano, Fabio; Mazzola, Salvatore; Sacchi, Marco

2014-05-01

201

ECOLOGICAL ASPECTS ON AVIFAUNA OF THE COPOU AREA FROM THE CITY OF IASI  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper presents comparatively the avifauna from two city parks: Copou and Expozitiei. They are the most important parks in the city of Iasi, according to the information provided by the Municipality. The ornithological research were conducted since November 2003, based on transect and fixed point observation methods. The structure of avifauna in the two parks is explained by the

Maria-Magdalena BUTNARU; Oana SARACUTU; Mariana POPOVICI; Claudiu NICULAES

202

Redeveloping derelict and underused historic city areas: evidence from a survey of real estate developers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Are economic incentives and regulatory relief useful tools for encouraging reuse of abandoned or under-utilised urban sites with historic buildings? Answering this question is of key importance for many European cities and for older US cities, and has important implications in terms of urban sustainability and “smart growth” initiatives. This study uses conjoint choice experiments to explore the relative importance

Paolo Rosato; Anna Alberini; Valentina Zanatta; Margaretha Breil

2010-01-01

203

Small-Area Estimation of the Probability of Toxocariasis in New York City Based on Sociodemographic Neighborhood Composition  

PubMed Central

Toxocariasis is increasingly recognized as an important neglected infection of poverty (NIP) in developed countries, and may constitute the most important NIP in the United States (US) given its association with chronic sequelae such as asthma and poor cognitive development. Its potential public health burden notwithstanding, toxocariasis surveillance is minimal throughout the US and so the true burden of disease remains uncertain in many areas. The Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey conducted a representative serologic survey of toxocariasis to estimate the prevalence of infection in diverse US subpopulations across different regions of the country. Using the NHANES III surveillance data, the current study applied the predicted probabilities of toxocariasis to the sociodemographic composition of New York census tracts to estimate the local probability of infection across the city. The predicted probability of toxocariasis ranged from 6% among US-born Latino women with a university education to 57% among immigrant men with less than a high school education. The predicted probability of toxocariasis exhibited marked spatial variation across the city, with particularly high infection probabilities in large sections of Queens, and smaller, more concentrated areas of Brooklyn and northern Manhattan. This investigation is the first attempt at small-area estimation of the probability surface of toxocariasis in a major US city. While this study does not define toxocariasis risk directly, it does provide a much needed tool to aid the development of toxocariasis surveillance in New York City. PMID:24918785

Walsh, Michael G.; Haseeb, M. A.

2014-01-01

204

Longitudinal study of microbial diversity and seasonality in the Mexico City metropolitan area water supply system.  

PubMed

In the Mexico City metropolitan area (MCMA), 70% of the water for 18 million inhabitants is derived from the Basin of Mexico regional aquifer. To provide an overview of the quality of the groundwater, a longitudinal study was conducted, in which 30 sites were randomly selected from 1,575 registered extraction wells. Samples were taken before and after chlorine disinfection during both the rainy and dry seasons (2000-2001). Microbiological parameters (total coliforms, fecal coliforms, streptococci, and Vibrio spp.), the presence of Helicobacter pylori, and physicochemical parameters, including the amount of trihalomethanes (THMs), were determined. Although microorganisms and inorganic and organic compounds were evident, they did not exceed current permissible limits. Chlorine levels were low, and the bacterial counts were not affected by chlorine disinfection. Eighty-four bacterial species from nine genera normally associated with fecal contamination were identified in water samples. H. pylori was detected in at least 10% of the studied samples. About 40% of the samples surpassed the THM concentration allowed by Mexican and U.S. regulations, with levels of chloroform being high. The quality of the water distributed to the MCMA varied between the rainy and dry seasons, with higher levels of pH, nitrates, chloroform, bromodichloromethane, total organic carbon, and fecal streptococci during the dry season. This study showed that the groundwater distribution system is susceptible to contamination and that there is a need for a strict, year-round disinfection strategy to ensure adequate drinking-water quality. This situation in one of the world's megacities may reflect what is happening in large urban centers in developing countries which rely on a groundwater supply. PMID:16151096

Mazari-Hiriart, Marisa; López-Vidal, Yolanda; Ponce-de-León, Sergio; Calva, Juan José; Rojo-Callejas, Francisco; Castillo-Rojas, Gonzalo

2005-09-01

205

Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

This Technical Quarterly Report is for the reporting period July 1, 2000 to September 30, 2000. The report provides details of the work done on the project entitled ''Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma''. The project is divided into nine separate tasks. Since this is the first Quarterly report, much of the work done is of a preliminary nature. Several of the tasks are being worked on simultaneously, while other tasks are dependent on earlier tasks being completed. The selection of the pilot test area has been completed. The drilling of the test well is waiting on rig availability. Phillips has begun sonic core testing of offset cores, waiting on the core from the well to be drilled. Design work is progressing for the tool, which will be built to fit the test well. Installation of monitoring equipment and the downhole vibration tool will occur after the well is drilled. Technical transfer efforts have begun with the submission of an abstract for a technical paper for the Oklahoma City Society of Petroleum Engineers meeting in March 2001.

J. Ford Brett; Robert V. Westermark

2000-09-30

206

[Studies on background radioactivity in the Niigata City area--identification of natural nuclides present in underground (well) water samples].  

PubMed

Background radioactivity levels in Niigata city area were studied through the years of 1981-1984. As the results, it was found that the gross beta-radioactivity in underground (well) water samples were comparatively higher than those of other ground water samples. Ion chromatographic and gamma-ray spectroscopic determination revealed that this higher radioactivities were contributed by 40K rather than radium or thorium series nuclides or fallout originated 90Sr. PMID:6515051

Murakami, N; Konishi, T; Tanaka, H; Horikawa, T; Shiiya, H; Ikeda, S

1984-09-01

207

Assessment of road safety in areas around primary and secondary schools in Shkodra, north city of Albania  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundRoad traffic accidents have increased significantly in Albania since the early 1990s, when the transition to the market economy took place. Schoolchildren are continuously exposed to an extremely high risk of road traffic accidents.AimThe aim of the study was to perform a baseline assessment of road safety in areas around primary and secondary schools in Shkodra, a north city of

M Bozo; G Qirjako; E Toi; D Canaku; E Hysa; E Amursi

2010-01-01

208

Factors influencing the uptake of nutrients in streams within the New York City water-supply source areas  

Microsoft Academic Search

The uptake of nutrients was measured in each of ten streams within the water supply source areas for New York City, once each year between 2000 and 2002. Uptake lengths were estimated from the conservative-tracer-corrected downstream attenuation of short-term (1-2 h) nutrient releases. Uptake lengths correlated with stream size and were converted to uptake velocities (Vf) for further analysis. Vf

D. Newbold; L. Kaplan; T. Bott; J. Jackson; A. Aufdenkampe; C. Dow

2005-01-01

209

Assessment of Impacts Produced by Anthropogenic Sources in a Little City near an Important Industrial Area (Modugno, Southern Italy)  

PubMed Central

An annual monitoring campaign of VOCs, consisting of twelve sampling periods, was carried out from June 2008 to June 2009 in Modugno, a city located in the Apulia region (Southern Italy), in order to assess the urban air quality, identify the main emission sources, and quantify the cancer and no-cancer risk attributable to inhalation exposures. Monitoring, carried out by using the Radiello diffusive samplers, was conducted in eleven sampling sites throughout the city taking into account the traffic density and the architecture of the city. From the study of the data, it was found that, among all considered VOCs, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) are the pollutants at higher concentration. The analysis of VOC concentrations, the study of the topography of the city, and the use of different diagnostic ratios between the BTEX species showed that the vehicular traffic emissions were the predominant source of VOCs in the urban area of Modugno. Despite that the annual concentration of benzene is lower than the regulatory limit, the estimation of cancer risk showed that the global lifetime cancer risk attributed to the investigated VOC exposure was not negligible and therefore should be taken into account in future regulatory approaches. PMID:23476120

de Gennaro, Gianluigi; Marzocca, Annalisa; Trizio, Livia; Tutino, Maria

2013-01-01

210

Drought impacts in the New York City metropolitan area: A comparison of impacts between 1995 and other recent droughts  

SciTech Connect

This study is intended to provide information on drought impact on the major cities in the northeastern US. The effects of the 1995 drought on water resources, electric utilities, agriculture, forestry, recreation, and retail sales are analyzed for New York City and surrounding counties. Water resource related impacts associated with the most recent drought are also compared with those that occurred during the prolonged mid-1960s drought and shorter drought periods in the early and mid-1980s. The assessment of drought impacts from the 1995 drought in the New York metropolitan area showed the influence of this drought on water resources to be relatively minor with the exception of some show ground water problems and reduced flow on the Hudson River. There were also negative impacts on non-irrigated agriculture and fire prevention/control operations. In general, these impacts were relatively minor in comparison with prior droughts. Based on the Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) and precipitation deficit, a temporal comparison of droughts in New York City with respect to water supply indicates a general delay in the occurrence of drought impacts and responses. This may be a result of improved efforts to promote water conservation within the city or a reflection of increased reservoir capacity coupled with a declining urban population. 6 refs., 4 figs.

DeGaetano, A.T. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

1997-11-01

211

Industrial extension, the Oklahoma way  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Oklahoma has established a customer-driven industrial extension system. A publicly-chartered, private non-profit corporation, the Oklahoma Alliance for Manufacturing Excellence, Inc. (`the Alliance') coordinates the system. The system incorporates principles that Oklahoma manufacturers value: (1) decentralization and local accessibility; (2) coordinated existing resources; (3) comprehensive help; (4) interfirm cooperation; (5) pro-active outreach; (6) self- help and commitment from firms; (7) customer governance; and (8) performance accountability. The Oklahoma system consists of: (1) a network of locally-based broker/agents who work directly with manufacturers to diagnose problems and find appropriate assistance; (2) a group of industry sector specialists who collect and disseminate sector specific technological and market intelligence to the broker/agents and their clients; (3) all the specialized public and private sector resources coordinated by the system; and (4) a customer- driven coordination and evaluation mechanism, the Alliance.

Farrell, Edmund J.

1994-03-01

212

Oklahoma and American Indian Imagery  

E-print Network

In the late 1980s and early 1990s marketing firms conducted an in-depth examination of the general public's image of Oklahoma as part of their efforts to make the state a profitable tourist destination. This study found ...

Anderson, William Brett

2011-12-31

213

Bathymetric surveys and area/capacity tables of water-supply reservoirs for the city of Cameron, Missouri, July 2013  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Years of sediment accumulation and dry conditions in recent years have led to the decline of water levels and capacities for many water-supply reservoirs in Missouri, and have caused renewed interest in modernizing outdated area/capacity tables for these reservoirs. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Missouri Department of Natural Resources, surveyed the bathymetry of the four water-supply reservoirs used by the city of Cameron, Missouri, in July 2013. The data were used to provide water managers with area/capacity tables and bathymetric maps of the reservoirs at the time of the surveys.

Huizinga, Richard J.

2014-01-01

214

Walkable area within which destinations matter: differences between Australian and Japanese cities.  

PubMed

Adults' walking for transport is important for health benefits and can be associated with availability of destinations such as shops and services within a walking distance of 10 to 15 minutes from home. However, relevant evidence is mostly from Western countries. This study examined associations of destinations with walking for transport in Australian and Japanese cities. Data were collected from Adelaide, Australia (n = 2508), and 4 Japanese cities (n = 1285). Logistic regressions examined associations of self-reported walking for transport with the number of destination types within walk-distance categories. Walking was significantly associated with the number of destination types within a 10-minute walk from home for Australia and with the number of destination types within a 6- to 20-minute walk for Japan. Further research is needed on why walking by residents of Japanese cities can be influenced by more distant local destinations than in Australia to inform physical activity-related environmental and policy initiatives. PMID:23188878

Sugiyama, Takemi; Inoue, Shigeru; Cerin, Ester; Shimomitsu, Teruichi; Owen, Neville

2015-03-01

215

Oklahoma Center for High Energy Physics (OCHEP)  

SciTech Connect

The DOE EPSCoR implementation grant, with the support from the State of Oklahoma and from the three universities, Oklahoma State University, University of Oklahoma and Langston University, resulted in establishing of the Oklahoma Center for High Energy Physics (OCHEP) in 2004. Currently, OCHEP continues to flourish as a vibrant hub for research in experimental and theoretical particle physics and an educational center in the State of Oklahoma. All goals of the original proposal were successfully accomplished. These include foun- dation of a new experimental particle physics group at OSU, the establishment of a Tier 2 computing facility for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and Tevatron data analysis at OU and organization of a vital particle physics research center in Oklahoma based on resources of the three universities. OSU has hired two tenure-track faculty members with initial support from the grant funds. Now both positions are supported through OSU budget. This new HEP Experimental Group at OSU has established itself as a full member of the Fermilab D0 Collaboration and LHC ATLAS Experiment and has secured external funds from the DOE and the NSF. These funds currently support 2 graduate students, 1 postdoctoral fellow, and 1 part-time engineer. The grant initiated creation of a Tier 2 computing facility at OU as part of the Southwest Tier 2 facility, and a permanent Research Scientist was hired at OU to maintain and run the facility. Permanent support for this position has now been provided through the OU university budget. OCHEP represents a successful model of cooperation of several universities, providing the establishment of critical mass of manpower, computing and hardware resources. This led to increasing Oklahoma�¢����s impact in all areas of HEP, theory, experiment, and computation. The Center personnel are involved in cutting edge research in experimental, theoretical, and computational aspects of High Energy Physics with the research areas ranging from the search for new phenomena at the Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider to theoretical modeling, computer simulation, detector development and testing, and physics analysis. OCHEP faculty members participating on the D0 collaboration at the Fermilab Tevatron and on the ATLAS collaboration at the CERN LHC have made major impact on the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson search, top quark studies, B physics studies, and measurements of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) phenomena. The OCHEP Grid computing facility consists of a large computer cluster which is playing a major role in data analysis and Monte Carlo productions for both the D0 and ATLAS experiments. Theoretical efforts are devoted to new ideas in Higgs bosons physics, extra dimensions, neutrino masses and oscillations, Grand Unified Theories, supersymmetric models, dark matter, and nonperturbative quantum field theory. Theory members are making major contributions to the understanding of phenomena being explored at the Tevatron and the LHC. They have proposed new models for Higgs bosons, and have suggested new signals for extra dimensions, and for the search of supersymmetric particles. During the seven year period when OCHEP was partially funded through the DOE EPSCoR implementation grant, OCHEP members published over 500 refereed journal articles and made over 200 invited presentations at major conferences. The Center is also involved in education and outreach activities by offering summer research programs for high school teachers and college students, and organizing summer workshops for high school teachers, sometimes coordinating with the Quarknet programs at OSU and OU. The details of the Center can be found in http://ochep.phy.okstate.edu.

S. Nandi; M.J. Strauss; J. Snow; F. Rizatdinova; B. Abbott; K. Babu; P. Gutierrez; C. Kao; A. Khanov; K.A. Milton; H. Neaman; H. Severini, P. Skubic

2012-02-29

216

Implementing GLOBE in the New York City Metropolitan Area: Trials, Errors, and Successes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Queens College GLOBE NY Metro Partnership was created to introduce GLOBE to more than 1.5 million students in southern NY State and provide continuing support for their teachers. In our first 18 months, we have trained 185 teachers from 82 schools and will triple these numbers this year. Teachers and administrators are attracted to GLOBE by its scientific rigor, the authentic research it offers students, and its fit with NYS standards. They are also eager to interact with our science faculty. Early difficulties included problems with the "standard" 5-day GLOBE training format and misconceptions that protocols are not suitable for urban settings and that preparing for the NYS Regents exams leaves no room for GLOBE. We held information meetings for school districts and for Queens high schools before our first workshop. These identified the most committed schools, energetic teachers, and potential implementation problems. Creative participants at these meetings countered the misconceptions and suggested solutions to the problems better than any outsider could, and generated an atmosphere leading to nearly 100% recruitment. The following stratagems have worked well: a close working relationship with the NYC Dept of Education, BOCES, and other environmental educators; affiliations with government agencies and community environmental groups; two bribes (giving a GLOBE instrument kit and GPS unit to each school that we train and awarding graduate or professional development credits for GLOBE training); a user-friendly training format (an initial 3-day workshop followed by two optional days for hydrology and land use); lending seldom-used items (e.g. soil auger) when needed; building a sense of GLOBE community with a graduation "ceremony", local website (www.qc.edu/qcglobe) and newsletter, phone and email helplines, and annual pedagogy and student research conferences. We also urge that three teachers be trained from each school in order to build local GLOBE support systems. To stimulate data entry, one half-day during the 3-day workshop is devoted to exploring the GLOBE website, and another to generating student research problems using the site's advanced capabilities. Three "carrots" have also improved data submission: (1)a vendor gives a probe and software to the first school in each workshop that submits 250 data items, (2)individual competitiveness (the record is 22 hours from end of training to first submission of data), and (3)congratulatory emails to teachers when they submit their first data. The "stick": a threat to repossess the instruments if no data are submitted within 6 months. We also offer training in GLOBE-related skills, such as acquiring free satellite images and digital elevation data, and workshops on the geological and environmental settings of the NYC area. Suggestions from our teachers for the future include: urbanize protocols to better welcome inner city schools to GLOBE; add protocols involving flora and fauna to fit GLOBE better into Biology classes; develop more links with researchers so GLOBE participants feel they are making a real contribution; create a NYC area listserve so teachers can discuss common issues and concerns; and develop correlations between GLOBE protocols and NYS Curricula in Earth Science, Living Environment, Chemistry, and Physics. The last would vastly improve integration of GLOBE into these Regents-level courses. Our teacher trainees are vehement in their appreciation of GLOBE for its high standards and scientific rigor.

Ludman, A.; Schmidt, P.; Borman, G.

2003-12-01

217

41 CFR 102-83.120 - What happens if an agency has a need to be in a specific urban area that is not a central city in...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

41 Public Contracts and Property...that is not a central city in a metropolitan area...Section 102-83.120 Public Contracts and Property...PROPERTY 83-LOCATION OF SPACE Location of Space...that is not a central city in a metropolitan...

2013-07-01

218

41 CFR 102-83.120 - What happens if an agency has a need to be in a specific urban area that is not a central city in...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

41 Public Contracts and Property...that is not a central city in a metropolitan area...Section 102-83.120 Public Contracts and Property...PROPERTY 83-LOCATION OF SPACE Location of Space...that is not a central city in a metropolitan...

2010-07-01

219

41 CFR 102-83.120 - What happens if an agency has a need to be in a specific urban area that is not a central city in...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

41 Public Contracts and Property...that is not a central city in a metropolitan area...Section 102-83.120 Public Contracts and Property...PROPERTY 83-LOCATION OF SPACE Location of Space...that is not a central city in a metropolitan...

2011-01-01

220

41 CFR 102-83.120 - What happens if an agency has a need to be in a specific urban area that is not a central city in...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

41 Public Contracts and Property...that is not a central city in a metropolitan area...Section 102-83.120 Public Contracts and Property...PROPERTY 83-LOCATION OF SPACE Location of Space...that is not a central city in a metropolitan...

2014-01-01

221

41 CFR 102-83.120 - What happens if an agency has a need to be in a specific urban area that is not a central city in...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

41 Public Contracts and Property...that is not a central city in a metropolitan area...Section 102-83.120 Public Contracts and Property...PROPERTY 83-LOCATION OF SPACE Location of Space...that is not a central city in a metropolitan...

2012-01-01

222

SITE CHARACTERIZATION OF A CHROMIUM SOURCE AREA AT THE USGS SUPPORT CENTER, ELIZABETH CITY, NC  

EPA Science Inventory

Chromic and sulfuric acid wastes had discharged through a hole in the concrete floor of a chrome-plating shop located within a hangar at the U.S. Coast Guard Support Center near Elizabeth City, North Carolina and infiltrated the soils and groundwater beneath the shop. Following i...

223

Inter-City Competition for Foreign Investment: Static and Dynamic Effects of China's Incentive Areas  

Microsoft Academic Search

China's “Open Door” policy has created a natural experiment for studying agglomeration externalities and the role of incentives designed to attract foreign direct investment. We build a model which predicts that foreign firms will prefer cities where other foreign firms are located. We estimate the model using data on 931 foreign ventures. We then use simulations to explore the effect

Keith Head; John Ries

1996-01-01

224

Impacts of sea level rise in the New York City metropolitan area  

Microsoft Academic Search

The greater New York City region, with over 2400 km of shoreline, will be vulnerable to accelerated sea level rise (SLR) due to anticipated climate warming. Accelerated SLR would exacerbate historic trends of beach erosion and attrition of highly productive coastal salt marshes. Coastal populations in the region have swelled by around 17% (av.) and over 100% in some localities

Vivien Gornitz; Stephen Couch; Ellen K. Hartig

2002-01-01

225

DETERIORATION OF MARBLE. A RETROSPECTIVE ANALYSIS OF TOMBSTONE MEASUREMENTS IN THE NEW YORK CITY AREA  

EPA Science Inventory

A data base of tombstone thickness and depth of emblem inscription at Veterans Administration cemeteries has been compiled by New York University. A subset of measurements for two cemeteries in the vicinity of New York City was selected for analysis in this study. For comparable ...

226

PARTICULATE ORGANIC SOURCE MARKERS IN THE NEW YORK CITY METROPOLITAN AREA  

EPA Science Inventory

A sampling network of four sites was established for the Speciation of Organics for Apportionment of PM2.5 (SOAP) project during 2002-2003 to investigate composition, seasonal and spatial variability, and source contributions to particulate organic matter in the New York City met...

227

Energy and macronutrient intakes in preschool children in urban areas of Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: An increasing prevalence of overweight and obesity has been documented in preschool children in Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC), Vietnam. However, little is known about what preschool children in HCMC eat or how well their nutrient intake meets nutrient recommendations. This study aims to describe the energy and macronutrient intake and compare these nutrient intakes with the recommendations for

Dieu TT Huynh; Michael J Dibley; David W Sibbritt; Hanh TM Tran

2008-01-01

228

University of Oklahoma: History of Science Collections  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The University of Oklahoma Libraries have done a wonderful job with their history of science collections. Visitors to the site will find seven collections here to keep their minds busy. Their number includes "Copernicus's De revolutionibus" and "Scientific Instruments and Historical Artifacts." Of course this first volume is nothing less than a classic, presenting Copernicus's evidence and arguments in support of heliocentric theory. This volume also contains extensive marginalia from a circle of astronomers located in Paris in the decade following the book's publication in 1543. Moving on, the "Scientific Instruments and Historical Artifacts" area contains 16 wonderful items, including an ancient Mesopotamian cuneiform tablet and videos of historically significant refractometers.

2012-09-21

229

Annual Report, 1979-80: Oklahoma Cultural Understanding Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This final report describes a project in Oklahoma which tried to increase students' and the general public's awareness, understanding, and appreciation of the cultures of the world. In the project's first phase, 38 school districts and higher education institutions located throughout the state were surveyed to determine the need in the areas of…

Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City.

230

University of Oklahoma: Chemical, Biological, and Materials Engineering  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The School of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Oklahoma offers information on research in the areas of bioengineering, polymers science and engineering, environmental engineering, and energy studies. Examples include the Engineering Virtual Library and the Chemical Engineering Virtual Library, related government research labs, discipline-specific groupings of Chemical Engineering online resources, and selected corporate Web pages.

231

40 CFR 81.123 - Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... false Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.123 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.123...

2012-07-01

232

40 CFR 81.124 - North Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false North Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.124 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.124 North...

2013-07-01

233

40 CFR 81.47 - Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-07-01 false Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.47 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.47 Central...

2014-07-01

234

40 CFR 81.79 - Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... false Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.79 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.79...

2013-07-01

235

40 CFR 81.79 - Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... false Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.79 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.79...

2012-07-01

236

40 CFR 81.47 - Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.47 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.47 Central...

2011-07-01

237

40 CFR 81.47 - Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.47 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.47 Central...

2013-07-01

238

40 CFR 81.79 - Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

... false Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.79 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.79...

2014-07-01

239

40 CFR 81.125 - Southwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... false Southwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.125 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.125...

2012-07-01

240

40 CFR 81.123 - Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... false Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.123 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.123...

2010-07-01

241

40 CFR 81.47 - Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.47 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.47 Central...

2012-07-01

242

40 CFR 81.125 - Southwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... false Southwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.125 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.125...

2013-07-01

243

40 CFR 81.123 - Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... false Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.123 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.123...

2013-07-01

244

40 CFR 81.79 - Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... false Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.79 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.79...

2011-07-01

245

40 CFR 81.123 - Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... false Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.123 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.123...

2011-07-01

246

40 CFR 81.126 - Northwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...geographically located within the outermost boundaries of the area so delimited): In the State of Oklahoma: Alfalfa County, Beaver County, Blaine County, Cimarron County, Custer County, Dewey County, Ellis County, Harper County, Major County,...

2014-07-01

247

40 CFR 81.126 - Northwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...geographically located within the outermost boundaries of the area so delimited): In the State of Oklahoma: Alfalfa County, Beaver County, Blaine County, Cimarron County, Custer County, Dewey County, Ellis County, Harper County, Major County,...

2012-07-01

248

40 CFR 81.126 - Northwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...geographically located within the outermost boundaries of the area so delimited): In the State of Oklahoma: Alfalfa County, Beaver County, Blaine County, Cimarron County, Custer County, Dewey County, Ellis County, Harper County, Major County,...

2011-07-01

249

40 CFR 81.126 - Northwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...geographically located within the outermost boundaries of the area so delimited): In the State of Oklahoma: Alfalfa County, Beaver County, Blaine County, Cimarron County, Custer County, Dewey County, Ellis County, Harper County, Major County,...

2013-07-01

250

40 CFR 81.47 - Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.47 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.47 Central...

2010-07-01

251

40 CFR 81.79 - Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... false Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.79 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.79...

2010-07-01

252

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets  

E-print Network

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources · Oklahoma State University NREM-9017 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets are also available on our website at: http://osufacts.okstate.edu Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Tommy Puffinbarger Extension Educator, Alfalfa County Oklahoma State

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

253

Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibrations Stimulation in Osage County, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

This Technical Quarterly Report is for the reporting period July 1, 2001 to September 30, 2001. The report provides details of the work done on the project entitled ''Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma''. The project is divided into nine separate tasks. Several of the tasks are being worked on simultaneously, while other tasks are dependent on earlier tasks being completed. The vibration stimulation well is permitted as Well 111-W-27, section 8 T26N R6E Osage County Oklahoma. It was spud July 28, 2001 with Goober Drilling Rig No. 3. The well was drilled to 3090-feet cored, logged, cased and cemented. The Rig No.3 moved off August 6, 2001. Phillips Petroleum Co. has begun analyzing the cores recovered from the test well. Standard porosity, permeability and saturation measurements will be conducted. They will then begin the sonic stimulation core tests Calumet Oil Company, the operator of the NBU, has begun to collect both production and injection wells information to establish a baseline for the project in the pilot field test area. Green Country Submersible Pump Company, a subsidiary of Calumet Oil Company, will provide both the surface equipment and downhole tools to allow the Downhole Vibration Tool to be operated by a surface rod rotating system. The 7-inch Downhole Vibration Tool (DHVT) has been built and is ready for initial shallow testing. The shallow testing will be done in a temporarily abandoned well operated by Calumet Oil Co. in the Wynona waterflood unit. The data acquisition doghouse and rod rotating equipment have been placed on location in anticipation of the shallow test in Well No.20-12 Wynona Waterflood Unit. A notice of invention disclosure was submitted to the DOE Chicago Operations Office. DOE Case No.S-98,124 has been assigned to follow the documentation following the invention disclosure. A paper covering the material presented to the Oklahoma Geologic Survey (OGS)/DOE Annual Workshop in Oklahoma City May 8,9 2001 has been submitted for publication to the OGS. A technical paper draft has been submitted for the ASME/ETCE conference (Feb 2002) Production Technology Symposium. A one-day SPE sponsored short course which is planned to cover seismic stimulation efforts around the world, will be offered at the SPE/DOE Thirteenth Symposium on Improved Oil Recovery in Tulsa, OK, April 13-17, 2002. Dan Maloney, Phillips and Bob Westermark, OGCI will be the instructors. In addition, a proposed technical paper has been submitted for this meeting.

J. Ford Brett; Robert V. Westermark

2001-09-30

254

Cumulative influences of a small city and former mining activities on the sediment quality of a subtropical estuarine protected area.  

PubMed

This study aimed to evaluate the sediment quality in the estuarine protected area known as Cananéia-Iguape-Peruíbe (CIP-PA), located on the southeastern coast of Brazil. The study was designed considering possible negative effects induced by the city of Cananéia on the sediment quality of surrounding areas. This evaluation was performed using chemical and ecotoxicological analyses. Sediments were predominantly sandy, with low CaCO3 contents. Amounts of organic matter varied, but higher contents occurred closer to the city, as well as did Fe and Total Recoverable Oils and Greases (TROGs) concentrations. Contamination by Cd and Cu was revealed in some samples, while concentrations of Zn were considered low. Chronic toxicity was detected in all tested sediments and acute toxicity occurred only in sediments collected near the city. The principal component analysis (PCA) revealed an association among Cd, Cu, Fe, TROG, fines, organic matter, CaCO3, and chronic toxicity, whereas acute toxicity was found to be associated with Zn and mud. However, because Zn levels were low, acute toxicity was likely due to a contaminant that was not measured. Results show that there is a broad area within the CIP-PA that is under the influence of mining activities (chronic toxicity, moderate contamination by metals), whereas poorer conditions occur closer to Cananéia (acute toxicity); thus, the urban area seems to constitute a relevant source of contaminants for the estuarine complex. These results show that contamination is already capable of producing risks for the local aquatic biota, which suggests that the CIP-PA effectiveness in protecting estuarine biota may be threatened. PMID:25037965

Cruz, Ana Carolina Feitosa; Davanso, Marcela Bergo; Araujo, Giuliana Seraphim; Buruaem, Lucas M; Santaella, Sandra Tédde; de Morais, Rodofley Davino; Abessa, Denis M S

2014-11-01

255

Relationships between Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing program and hydropower operations at Salt Lake City area integrated projects  

SciTech Connect

This technical memorandum provides background information on the Western Area Power Administration (Western) and the physical characteristics of the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP) hydropower plants, which include the Colorado River Storage Project, the Rio Grande Project, and the Collbran Project. In addition, the history, electrical capacity, storage capacity, and flow restrictions at each dam are presented. An overview of Western`s current programs and services, including a review of statutory authorities, agency discretion, and obligations, is also provided. The variability of SLCA/IP hourly generation under various alternative marketing strategies and purchasing programs is discussed. The effects of Western`s services, such as area load control, outage assistance, and transmission, on SLCA/IP power plant operations are analyzed.

Veselka, T.D.; Folga, S.; Poch, L.A. [and others

1995-03-01

256

Class 1 overview of cultural resources for the Western Area Power Administration Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects electric power marketing environmental impact statement  

SciTech Connect

Argonne National Laboratory conducted an inventory of known archaeological and historic sites in areas that could be affected by the hydropower operation alternatives under analysis in the power marketing environmental impact statement for the Western Area Power Administration`s Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects. The study areas included portions of the Green River (Flaming Gorge Dam to Cub Creek) in Utah and Colorado and the Gunnison River (Blue Mesa Reservoir to Crystal Dam) in Colorado. All previous archaeological surveys and previously recorded prehistoric and historic sites, structures, and features were inventoried and plotted on maps (only survey area maps are included in this report). The surveys were classified by their level of intensity, and the sites were classified according to their age, type, and contents. These data (presented here in tabular form) permit a general assessment of the character and distribution of archaeological remains in the study areas, as well as an indication of the sampling basis for such an assessment. To provide an adequate context for the descriptions of the archaeological and historic sites, this report also presents overviews of the environmental setting and the regional prehistory, history, and ethnography for each study area.

Moeller, K.L.; Malinowski, L.M.; Hoffecker, J.F.; Walitschek, D.A.; Shogren, L.; Mathews, J.E.; Verhaaren, B.T.

1993-11-01

257

Dengue Outbreaks in High-Income Area, Kaohsiung City, Taiwan, 2003–2009  

PubMed Central

Kaohsiung City, a modern metropolis of 1.5 million persons, has been the focus of dengue virus activity in Taiwan for several decades. The aim of this study was to provide a temporal and spatial description of dengue virus epidemiology in Kaohsiung City by using data for all laboratory-confirmed dengue cases during 2003–2009. We investigated age- and sex-dependent incidence rates and the spatiotemporal patterns of all cases confirmed through passive or active surveillance. Elderly persons were at particularly high risk for dengue virus–related sickness and death. Of all confirmed cases, ?75% were detected through passive surveillance activities; case-patients detected through active surveillance included immediate family members, neighbors, and colleagues of confirmed case-patients. Changing patterns of case clustering could be due to the effect of unmeasured environmental and demographic factors. PMID:23017369

Schiøler, Karin L.; Jepsen, Martin R.; Ho, Chi-Kung; Li, Shu-Hua; Konradsen, Flemming

2012-01-01

258

Sources, distribution and variability of airborne trace metals in La Plata City area, Argentina  

Microsoft Academic Search

Airborne particulate trace metals have been measured bimonthly during day and night hours in four permanent stations located in residential, industrial and commercial sectors of La Plata City region, to characterize the sources and variability of atmospheric inputs. Airborne trace metal regional averages (Pb 64±62, Cu 30±27, Mn 26±20, Zn 273±227, Fe 1183±838, Ca 5343±3614, Mg 1472±967, Cr 4.3±2.4, Ni

C Bilos; J. C Colombo; C. N Skorupka; M. J Rodriguez Presa

2001-01-01

259

Potential Leaf Area Index Analyses for the City of Toronto’s Urban Forest  

Microsoft Academic Search

One commonly used measure of urban forest structure is canopy cover, or simply the proportion of the city that is covered\\u000a by tree canopies as visualized from above. This measure is intuitive and relatively easy and inexpensive to measure. However,\\u000a canopy cover only represents the urban forest in two dimensions and fails to recognize differences in species and tree condition.

W. A. Kenney

260

Using a Regional Chemical Transport Model for the Analysis of Gaseous and Particulate Air Pollutants in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area  

E-print Network

&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2010 Major Subject: Civil Engineering Using a Regional Chemical Transport Model for the Analysis of Gaseous... and Particulate Air Pollutants in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area Copyright 2010 Sajjad Ghulam Ali USING A REGIONAL CHEMICAL TRANSPORT MODEL FOR THE ANALYSIS OF GASESOUS AND PARTICULATE AIR POLLUTANTS IN THE MEXICO CITY METROPOLITAN AREA A Thesis...

Ali, Sajjad Ghulam

2012-02-14

261

City Mayors  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Drawing on the expertise of a team of editors who reside in Britain, Germany, Spain, Mexico, France, and a number of other countries, the City Mayors organization is an "international network of professionals working to promote strong cities and good local government." Their website takes on all of the important urban issues of the day, including governance, affordable housing, sustainable development, transportation, and a number of other pressing issues. On their homepage, visitors will find links to recent news stories from cities around the world and direct links to thematic sections such as business, finance, environment, and development. One section that should not be missed is the "City Rankings" area, which includes helpful lists of the largest cities in the world by land area, population and density, along with a list of the most expensive cities in the world.

262

Aerosol Composition and Source Apportionment in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area with PIXE/PESA/STIM and Multivariate Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Aerosols play an important role in the atmosphere but are poorly characterized, particularly in urban areas like the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA). The chemical composition of urban particles must be known to assess their effects on the environment, and specific particulate emissions sources should be identified to establish ef- 5 fective pollution control standards. For these reasons, samples of particulate matter _2.5 µm (PM2.5) were collected during the MCMA-2003 Field Campaign for elemental and multivariate analyses. Proton-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE), Proton-Elastic Scattering Analysis (PESA) and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIM) techniques were done to determine concentrations of 19 elements from Na to Pb, hydrogen, and 10 total mass, respectively. The most abundant elements from PIXE analysis were S, Si, K, Fe, Ca, and Al, while the major emissions sources associated with these elements were industry, wind-blown soil, and biomass burning. Wind trajectories suggest that metals associated with industrial emissions came from northern areas of the city whereas soil aerosols came from the southwest and increased in concentration during 15 dry conditions. Elemental markers for fuel oil combustion V and Ni correlated with a large SO2 plume to suggest an anthropogenic, rather than volcanic, emissions source. By subtracting major components of soil and sulfates determined by PIXE analysis from STIM total mass measurements, we estimate that approximately 50% of PM2.5 consisted of carbonaceous material.

Johnson, Kirsten S.; de Foy, B.; Zuberi, Bilal M.; Molina, Luisa; Molina, Mario J.; Xie, YuLong; Laskin, Alexander; Shutthanandan, V.

2006-10-12

263

Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects Electric Power Marketing. Draft environmental impact statement: Volume 2, Sections 1-16  

SciTech Connect

The Salt Lake City Area Office of the Western Area Power Administration (Western) markets electricity produced at hydroelectric facilities operated by the Bureau of Reclamation. The facilities are known collectively as the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP) and include dams equipped for power generation on the Green, Gunnison, Rio Grande, and Colorado rivers and on Deer and Plateau creeks in the states of Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. Of these facilities, only the Glen Canyon Unit, the Flaming Gorge Unit, and the Aspinall Unit (which includes Blue Mesa, Morrow Point, and Crystal dams;) are influenced by Western power scheduling and transmission decisions. The EIS alternatives, called commitment-level alternatives, reflect combinations of capacity and energy that would feasibly and reasonably fulfill Westerns firm power marketing responsibilities, needs, and statutory obligations. The viability of these alternatives relates directly to the combination of generation capability of the SLCA/IP with energy purchases and interchange. The economic and natural resource assessments in this environmental impact statement (EIS) include an analysis of commitment-level alternatives. Impacts of the no-action alternative are also assessed. Supply options, which include combinations of electrical power purchases and hydropower operational scenarios reflecting different operations of the dams, are also assessed. The EIS evaluates the impacts of these scenarios relative to socioeconomics, air resources, water resources, ecological resources, cultural resources, land use, recreation, and visual resources.

Not Available

1994-02-01

264

Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects Electric Power Marketing. Draft environmental impact statement: Volume 4, Appendixes B-D  

SciTech Connect

The Salt Lake City Area Office of the Western Area Power Administration (Western) markets electricity produced at hydroelectric facilities operated by the Bureau of Reclamation. The facilities are known collectively as the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP) and include dams equipped for power generation on the Green, Gunnison, Rio Grande, and Colorado rivers and on Deer and Plateau creeks in the states of Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. Of these facilities, only the Glen Canyon Unit, the Flaming Gorge Unit, and the Aspinall Unit (which includes Blue Mesa, Morrow Point, and Crystal dams;) are influenced by Western power scheduling and transmission decisions. The EIS alternatives, called commitment-level alternatives, reflect combinations of capacity and energy that would feasibly and reasonably fulfill Westerns firm power marketing responsibilities, needs, and statutory obligations. The viability of these alternatives relates directly to the combination of generation capability of the SLCA/IP with energy purchases and interchange. The economic and natural resource assessments in this environmental impact statement (EIS) include an analysis of commitment-level alternatives. Impacts of the no-action alternative are also assessed. Supply options, which include combinations of electrical power purchases and hydropower operational scenarios reflecting different operations of the dams, are also assessed. The EIS evaluates the impacts of these scenarios relative to socioeconomics, air resources, water resources, ecological resources, cultural resources, land use, recreation, and visual resources.

Not Available

1994-02-01

265

Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects Electric Power Marketing. Draft environmental impact statement: Volume 3, Appendix A  

SciTech Connect

The Salt Lake City Area Office of the Western Area Power Administration (Western) markets electricity produced at hydroelectric facilities operated by the Bureau of Reclamation. The facilities are known collectively as the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP) and include dams equipped for power generation on the Green, Gunnison, Rio Grande, and Colorado rivers and on Deer and Plateau creeks in the states of Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. Of these facilities, only the Glen Canyon Unit, the Flaming Gorge Unit, and the Aspinall Unit (which includes Blue Mesa, Morrow Point, and Crystal dams;) are influenced by Western power scheduling and transmission decisions. The EIS alternatives, called commitment-level alternatives, reflect combinations of capacity and energy that would feasibly and reasonably fulfill Westerns firm power marketing responsibilities, needs, and statutory obligations. The viability of these alternatives relates directly to the combination of generation capability of the SLCA/IP with energy purchases and interchange. The economic and natural resource assessments in this environmental impact statement (EIS) include an analysis of commitment-level alternatives. Impacts of the no-action alternative are also assessed. Supply options, which include combinations of electrical power purchases and hydropower operational scenarios reflecting different operations of the dams, are also assessed. The EIS evaluates the impacts of these scenarios relative to socioeconomics, air resources, water resources, ecological resources, cultural resources, land use, recreation, and visual resources.

Not Available

1994-02-01

266

Chickasaw Plum for Wildlife in Oklahoma  

E-print Network

of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University #12;Chickasaw Plum for Wildlife in Oklahoma Authors from the Department of Natural Resource Ecology and Management, Oklahoma State University in at least 27 states, ranging from Nebraska to New Jersey on the north and from New Mexico to Florida

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

267

the university of oklahoma Annual Report  

E-print Network

the university of oklahoma ADVENTURE A Year Of Annual Report July 2005 ­ June 2006 #12;Board S S I O N Statement The Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History at the University of Oklahoma Conducting and disseminating research to increase knowledge Teaching university students to develop critical

Oklahoma, University of

268

Oklahoma Higher Education: Challenging the Conventional Wisdom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A major headline in recent years has been that cash-strapped state governments are cutting back support for many services, including public higher education. Oklahoma is no different. Indeed, in the most recent state budget crafted by Oklahoma policymakers, Oklahoma's public colleges and universities received a 5.8 percent cut in state…

Denhart, Matthew; Matgouranis, Christopher

2011-01-01

269

Issues of scale, location and geologic terrain related to Salt Lake City and Baltimore-Washington metropolitan areas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Planning and development of expanding metropolitan regions require consideration of earth science issues related to issues involving scale, space (location), geologic terrain and physiographic units, and information transfer. This paper explores these matters with examples from the Salt Lake City, Utah area and Mid-Atlantic region of Baltimore-Washington that include water supply and natural hazards (earthquakes, landslides, and sinkholes.) Information transfer methods using physiographic units at national, regional, local and site scales serve to communicate relevant geologic constraint and natural resource information.

Cleaves, E.T.; Godfrey, A.E.

2004-01-01

270

Building the Future: From Stone Age to Space Age in Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Fourth-graders in Oklahoma City used the Internet to find an expert to identify a 75-pound Pleistocene-Era mammoth femur they found in a nearby river. A superintendent explains how his technologically backward district wired its schools for Internet learning and facilitated genuine instructional improvement. (MLH)

Kitchens, Joe

2000-01-01

271

Assessment on the value of ecosystem service of important protected area for water supply of city  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective assessment on the value of ecosystem service of protected area for water supply is very important to eco- environmental protection of protected area for water supply, comprehensive management of water resources and eco- compensation. The article structured a assessment system based on the classify of ecosystem service of protected area for water supply, which consisted of five values of

Yang Liu; Dan Shen

2011-01-01

272

Prevalence of Tobacco Use in Urban, Semi Urban and Rural Areas in and around Chennai City, India  

PubMed Central

Background Tobacco use leads to many health complications and is a risk factor for the occurrence of cardio vascular diseases, lung and oral cancers, chronic bronchitis etc. Almost 6 million people die from tobacco-related causes every year. This study was conducted to measure the prevalence of tobacco use in three different areas around Chennai city, south India. Methods A survey of 7510 individuals aged >?=?15 years was undertaken covering Chennai city (urban), Ambattur (semi-urban) and Sriperumbudur (rural) taluk. Details on tobacco use were collected using a questionnaire adapted from both Global Youth Tobacco Survey and Global Adults Tobacco Survey. Results The overall prevalence of tobacco use was significantly higher in the rural (23.7%) compared to semi-urban (20.9%) and urban (19.4%) areas (P value <0.001) Tobacco smoking prevalence was 14.3%, 13.9% and 12.4% in rural, semi-urban and urban areas respectively. The corresponding values for smokeless tobacco use were 9.5%, 7.0% and 7.0% respectively. Logistic regression analysis showed that the odds of using tobacco (with smoke or smokeless forms) was significantly higher among males, older individuals, alcoholics, in rural areas and slum localities. Behavioural pattern analysis of current tobacco users led to three groups (1) those who were not reached by family or friends to advice on harmful effects (2) those who were well aware of harmful effects of tobacco and even want to quit and (3) those are exposed to second hand/passive smoking at home and outside. Conclusions Tobacco use prevalence was significantly higher in rural areas, slum dwellers, males and older age groups in this region of south India. Women used mainly smokeless tobacco. Tobacco control programmes need to develop strategies to address the different subgroups among tobacco users. Public health facilities need to expand smoking cessation counseling services as well as provide pharmacotherapy where necessary. PMID:24098418

Chockalingam, Kolappan; Vedhachalam, Chandrasekaran; Rangasamy, Subramani; Sekar, Gomathi; Adinarayanan, Srividya; Swaminathan, Soumya; Menon, Pradeep Aravindan

2013-01-01

273

Monitoring of Heavy Metals Content in Soil Collected from City Centre and Industrial Areas of Misurata, Libya  

PubMed Central

The present paper deals with the assessment of heavy metals in soil and roadside dust around Misurata City Centre and industrial areas/roads in the period of October 2011–May 2012. The levels of Pb, Fe, Zn, Ni, Cd, Cr, and Cu in settled dust samples collected near small streets, playgrounds, gas stations and main streets in the Misurata Area have been determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). Also, the levels of same heavy metals in industrial areas have been determined. Metal concentration trend variation was also discussed in relation with traffic density and other sources of fugitive emission around different sites on each road/area. The overall mean concentration for main streets was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than for other small streets, where Misurata has been the centre of fierce fighting and is located in a frontline battle zone in the Libyan war; therefore most of metal concentrations in surface soil in the fighting area Tripoli Street and Benghazi Street were higher than those from the other sites (outside fighting area). PMID:23762061

Elbagermi, M. A.; Edwards, H. G. M.; Alajtal, A. I.

2013-01-01

274

Facies architecture of the Bluejacket Sandstone in the Eufaula Lake area, Oklahoma: Implications for the reservoir characterization of the Bartlesville Sandstone  

SciTech Connect

Outcrop studies of the Bluejacket Sandstone (Middle Pennsylvanian) provide significant insights to reservoir architecture of the subsurface equivalent Bartlesville Sandstone. Quarry walls and road cuts in the Lake Eufaula area offer excellent exposures for detailed facies architectural investigations using high-precision surveying, photo mosaics. Directional minipermeameter measurements are being conducted. Subsurface studies include conventional logs, borehole image log, and core data. Reservoir architectures are reconstructed in four hierarchical levels: multi-storey sandstone, i.e. discrete genetic intervals; individual discrete genetic interval; facies within a discrete genetic interval; and lateral accretion bar deposits. In both outcrop and subsurface, the Bluejacket (Bartlesville) Sandstone comprises two distinctive architectures: a lower braided fluvial and an upper meandering fluvial. Braided fluvial deposits are typically 30 to 80 ft thick, and are laterally persistent filling an incised valley wider than the largest producing fields. The lower contact is irregular with local relief of 50 ft. The braided-fluvial deposits consist of 100-400-ft wide, 5-15-ft thick channel-fill elements. Each channel-fill interval is limited laterally by an erosional contact or overbank deposits, and is separated vertically by discontinuous mudstones or highly concentrated mudstone interclast lag conglomerates. Low-angle parallel-stratified or trough cross-stratified medium- to coarse-grained sandstones volumetrically dominate. This section has a blocky well log profile. Meandering fluvial deposits are typically 100 to 150 ft thick and comprise multiple discrete genetic intervals.

Ye, Liangmiao; Yang, Kexian [Univ. of Tulsa, OK (United States)

1997-08-01

275

Neighborhood Segregation in Single-Race and Multirace America: A Census 2000 Study of Cities and Metropolitan Areas  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

For the first time, the Census 2000 questionnaire allowed persons to identify with more than one racial group. As a result, demographers had the opportunity to examine segregation indices between mixed raced groups and persons who identify with a single race. Written by William H. Frey of the University of Michigan and Dowell Myers of the University of Southern California, "Neighborhood Segregation in Single-Race and Multirace America: A Census 2000 Study of Cities and Metropolitan Areas" analyzes and compares residential segregation of persons who identify with two or more racial groups versus persons identifying with a single racial group. Available in Adobe Acrobat (.pdf) format, this 45-page report includes all individual cities with Census 2000 populations exceeding 25,000, as well as all US metropolitan areas. One of the findings of the report reveals that persons of mixed race are more likely to live in integrated neighborhoods rather than persons identifying with one race alone. This report, provided by the FannieMae Foundation, is accompanied by racial segregation indices designed by CensusScope (last mentioned in the May 24, 2002 Scout Report).

Frey, William H.

2002-01-01

276

Final report for "Characterization of Fine Particulate Matter (PM) and secondary PM Precursor Gases in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area"  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this funded project were (a) to further analyze the data collected by our group and collaborators in Mexico City during the MCMA-2003 field campaign, with the goal of further our understanding of aerosol sources and processes; and (b) to deploy several advanced instruments, including the newly developed high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and thermal-denuder (TD), during the MILAGRO/MAX-Mex/MCMA-2006 field campaign, and to analyze those data (together with the 2003 data) to provide additional insights on the formation and transformation of aerosols in the Mexico City area. These goals were addressed in collaboration with our project partners, MIT/Molina Center, and Aerodyne Research. Overall this project was very successful, resulting on 22+ journal papers including six “highly cited papers” and three papers that are the most cited in their respective journals (out of several thousand papers) since the year in which they were published. Multiple discoveries, such as the the underestimation of SOA in urban areas even for short photochemical ages, the demonstration that urban POA is of similar or higher volatility than urban SOA, and the first analysis of organic aerosol elemental composition in real-time have been recently published. Several dozen presentations at major US and international conferences and seminars also acknowledged this grant.

Prof. Jose-Luis Jimenez

2009-05-18

277

Gender Pay Gap Lower in Large Cities than in Rural Areas  

Microsoft Academic Search

For years, the difference between the gross hourly earnings of women and of men has remained constant for German white-collar employees at about 30 percent. It is obvious that regional factors play an important role in explaining this difference. In rural areas, the gender pay gap is especially pronounced (2006: 33 percent) while in metropolitan areas it is considerably lower

Anne Busch; Elke Holst

2008-01-01

278

Environmental Characteristics and Geographic Information System Applications for the Development of Nutrient Thresholds in Oklahoma Streams  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S.Environmental Protection Agency has developed nutrient criteria using ecoregions to manage and protect rivers and streams in the United States. Individual states and tribes are encouraged by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to modify or improve upon the ecoregion approach. The Oklahoma Water Resources Board uses a dichotomous process that stratifies streams using environmental characteristics such as stream order and stream slope. This process is called the Use Support Assessment Protocols, subchapter15. The Use Support Assessment Protocols can be used to identify streams threatened by excessive amounts of nutrients, dependant upon a beneficial use designation for each stream. The Use Support Assessment Protocols, subchapter 15 uses nutrient and environmental characteristic thresholds developed from a study conducted in the Netherlands, but the Oklahoma Water Resources Board wants to modify the thresholds to reflect hydrologic and ecological conditions relevant to Oklahoma streams and rivers. Environmental characteristics thought to affect impairment from nutrient concentrations in Oklahoma streams and rivers were determined for 798 water-quality sites in Oklahoma. Nutrient, chlorophyll, water-properties, and location data were retrieved from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency STORET database including data from the U.S. Geological Survey, Oklahoma Conservation Commission, and Oklahoma Water Resources Board. Drainage-basin area, stream order, stream slope, and land-use proportions were determined for each site using a Geographic Information System. The methods, procedures, and data sets used to determine the environmental characteristics are described.

Masoner, Jason R.; Haggard, Brian E.; Rea, Alan

2002-01-01

279

STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES CODE -1 THE UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA  

E-print Network

of the University of Oklahoma is charged in the Constitution of the State of Oklahoma with governing the University of the United States and the State of Oklahoma and the University of Oklahoma Student Association. Those. Student Rights Students of the University of Oklahoma are guaranteed certain rights by the Constitutions

Oklahoma, University of

280

A landslide risk rating system for the Baguio City, Philippines area  

E-print Network

This research formulates a LANDSLIDE RISK RATING SYSTEM for the Greater Baguio area in the Philippines. It is hoped that the tool will be made a part of the physical/urban planning process when used by engineers and planners ...

Saldivar-Sali, Artessa Niccola D., 1980-

2004-01-01

281

77 FR 56608 - Designation for the Pocatello, ID; Evansville, IN; and Salt Lake City, UT Areas  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration Designation...UT Areas AGENCY: Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration, USDA...Mitchell, Administrator, Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration. [FR...

2012-09-13

282

Area-based initiatives and urban dynamics. The case of the Porto city centre  

Microsoft Academic Search

In face of the systemic character of urban problems and the uncertainty surrounding planning methodologies, the need to intervene in urban space requires a holistic and spatial-based approach, rather than simply attempting to regulate urban expansion. Such an approach has increasingly been used in restricted areas to deal with complex urban dynamics and conflicting interests. This area-based and multi-problem approach

José A. Rio Fernandes

2011-01-01

283

Oklahoma Kids Count Factbook, 1999.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Kids Count Factbook details county and statewide trends in the well-being of Oklahoma's children. The statistical portrait is based on eight indicators of child well-being: (1) low birth weight infants; (2) infant mortality; (3) births to young teens; (4) child abuse and neglect; (5) child and teen death; (6) child poverty; (7) high school…

Ingraham, Sandy

284

Oklahoma Kids Count Factbook, 2002.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Kids Count Factbook details county and statewide trends in the well-being of children in Oklahoma. The statistical portrait is based on seven indicators or benchmarks of child well-being: (1) low birthweight infants; (2) infant mortality; (3) births to young teens; (4) child abuse and neglect; (5) child and teen death; (6) high school…

Ingraham, Sandy

285

Oklahoma Kids Count Factbook '98.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Kids Count report details county and statewide trends in the well-being of Oklahoma's children. The statistical portrait is based on eight indicators of child well-being: (1) low birthweight infants; (2) infant mortality; (3) births to teens; (4) child abuse and neglect; (5) child death; (6) child poverty; (7) high school dropouts; and (8)…

Oklahoma Inst. for Child Advocacy, Inc., Oklahoma City. Oklahoma Kids Count.

286

University of Oklahoma Norman Campus  

E-print Network

University of Oklahoma Norman Campus TORNADO Safety Information GENERAL INFORMATION OU is very concerned about the safety and well-being of everyone associated with the Norman Campus. During tornado season, we work to provide timely severe weather safety information that we hope will be carefully

Oklahoma, University of

287

Aerobiology of Juniperus Pollen in Oklahoma, Texas, and New Mexico  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Pollen from members of the Cupressaceae are major aeroallergens in many parts of the world. In the south central and southwest United States, Juniperus pollen is the most important member of this family with J. ashei (JA) responsible for severe winter allergy symptoms in Texas and Oklahoma. In New Mexico, pollen from J. monosperma (JM) and other Juniperus species are important contributors to spring allergies, while J. pinchotii (JP) pollinates in the fall affecting sensitive individuals in west Texas, southwest Oklahoma and eastern New Mexico. Throughout this region, JA, JM, and JP occur in dense woodland populations. Generally monitoring for airborne allergens is conducted in urban areas, although the source for tree pollen may be forested areas distant from the sampling sites. Improved pollen forecasts require a better understanding of pollen production at the source. The current study was undertaken to examine the aerobiology of several Juniperus species at their source areas for the development of new pollen forecasting initiatives.

Levetin, Estelle; Bunderson, Landon; VandeWater, Pete; Luvall, Jeff

2014-01-01

288

Hydraulic properties of the Madison aquifer system in the western Rapid City area, South Dakota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Available information on hydrogeology, data from borehole geophysical logs, and aquifer tests were used to determine the hydraulic properties of the Madison aquifer. From aquifer-test analysis, transmissivity and storage coefficient were determined for the Minnelusa and Madison aquifers, and vertical hydraulic conductivity (Kv') along with specific storage (Ss') for the Minnelusa confining bed. Borehole geophysical well logs were used to determine the thickness and location of the Minnelusa aquifer, the lower Minnelusa confining bed, and the Madison aquifer within the Madison Limestone. Porosity values determined from quantitative analysis of borehole geophysical well logs were used in analyzing the aquifer-test data. The average porosity at the two aquifer-test sites is about 10 percent in the Minnelusa aquifer, 5 percent in the lower Minnelusa confining bed, and 35 percent in the Madison aquifer. The first aquifer test, which was conducted at Rapid City production well #6, produced measured drawdown in the Minnelusa and Madison aquifers. Neuman and Witherspoon's method of determining the hydraulic properties of leaky two-aquifer systems was used to evaluate the aquifer-test data by assuming the fracture and solution-opening network is equivalent to a porous media. Analysis of the aquifer test for the Minnelusa aquifer yielded a transmissivity value of 12,000 feet squared per day and a storage coefficient of 3 x 10-3. The specific storage of the Minnelusa confining bed was 2 x 10-7 per foot, and its vertical hydraulic conductivity was 0.3 foot per day. The transmissivity of the Madison aquifer at this site was 17,000 feet squared per day, and the storage coefficient was 2 x 10-3. The second aquifer test, which was conducted at Rapid City production well #5 (RC-5) produced measured drawdown only in the Madison aquifer. Hantush and Jacob's method of determining the hydraulic properties of leaky confined aquifers with no storage in the confining bed was used to evaluate the aquifer-test data by assuming the fracture and solution-opening network is equivalent to a porous media. The analysis of data from the RC-5 aquifer test showed that transmissivity was not equal in all directions. Hantush's method was used to determine the direction of radial anisotropy and magnitude of the major and minor axes of transmissivity. The major axis of transmissivity is at an angle of 42? east of north, and the transmissivity along this axis is about 56,000 feet squared per day. The minor axis of transmissivity is at an angle of 48? west of north, and the transmissivity along this axis is about 1,300 feet squared per day. The major axis of transmissivity intersects Cleghorn Springs, a large resurgent spring on the west edge of Rapid City. The shape of the potentiometric contours of the Madison aquifer near RC-5 agree with the orientation of the transmissivity ellipse. The average value of the storage coefficient from the isotropic analysis of the aquifer-test data was 3.5 x 10-4, and the average vertical hydraulic conductivity of the lower Minnelusa confining bed was 9.6 x 10-3 foot per day.

Greene, Earl A.

1993-01-01

289

300 Area process sewer piping upgrade and 300 Area treated effluent disposal facility discharge to the City of Richland Sewage System, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to upgrade the existing 300 Area Process Sewer System by constructing and operating a new process sewer collection system that would discharge to the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility. The DOE is also considering the construction of a tie-line from the TEDF to the 300 Area Sanitary Sewer for discharging the process wastewater to the City of Richland Sewage System. The proposed action is needed because the integrity of the old piping in the existing 300 Area Process Sewer System is questionable and effluents might be entering the soil column from leaking pipes. In addition, the DOE has identified a need to reduce anticipated operating costs at the new TEDF. The 300 Area Process Sewer Piping Upgrade (Project L-070) is estimated to cost approximately $9.9 million. The proposed work would involve the construction and operation of a new process sewer collection system. The new system would discharge the effluents to a collection sump and lift station for the TEDF. The TEDF is designed to treat and discharge the process effluent to the Columbia River. The process waste liquid effluent is currently well below the DOE requirements for radiological secondary containment and is not considered a RCRA hazardous waste or a State of Washington Hazardous Waste Management Act dangerous waste. A National Pollutant Discharge Elimination, System (NPDES) permit has been obtained from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for discharge to the Columbia River. The proposed action would upgrade the existing 300 Area Process Sewer System by the construction and operation of a new combined gravity, vacuum, and pressurized process sewer collection system consisting of vacuum collection sumps, pressure pump stations, and buried polyvinyl chloride or similar pipe. Two buildings would also be built to house a main collection station and a satellite collection station.

NONE

1995-05-01

290

Regional debris flow susceptibility assessment using HRDEM: Example of the city area of Messina (Sicily, Italy).  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Shallow landslide and debris flows are among the most dangerous natural hazards triggered by extreme meteorological events. These phenomena have recently caused catastrophic scenarios in Italy (e.g. in Sarno-Quindici and Giampilieri) and, according to expected changes in the climate pattern, an increasing frequency of these phenomena is expected. The aim of this research is to assess the debris flow susceptibility in the Giampilieri area (Sicily) using a spatially-distributed debris flow runout model based on topographic information. The application of the model starts with the identification of the source areas from which debris flows are propagated on the basis of frictional laws and flow direction algorithms. The area selected for this study is located in the Ionian sector of the Peloritanian area in Sicily, in the South part of Messina (Sicily) and includes the villages of Giampilieri, Briga Itala and Scaletta Zanclea. There, the 1stOctober 2009 thousands of debris and mud flows were activated by a cumulative rainfall of about 160 mm in 6 hours, which followed two previous rainfalls events occurred on16th September (76 mm in six hours) and 23rd - 24th September (190 mm in 10 hours). Among the catchments hit by the 2009 event, the Giampilieri basin (10 km2) has been chosen as sub area in order to set the algorithms for the spreading assessment and the friction parameters of the model. In this catchment, a complete inventory of the source areas and accumulation zone was created by photointerpretation of post event images. Moreover, volume and velocity estimations of the mobilized material have been carried out. The susceptibility was evaluated using the source areas of the 2009 event and its accuracy was estimated by the comparison of the results with the accumulation areas and the velocity and volume estimated. In a second step we performed the analysis at the medium scale on the whole area hit by the 2009 event using the parameters calibrated on the Giampilieri basin. The presented approach of debris ?ow susceptibility analysis demonstrates that a simple assessment of the debris ?ow spreading calculated using defined source areas and calibrated on past events, provided good results for consequent hazard and risk studies.

Cama, Mariaelena; Malet, Jean-Philippe; Mathieu, Alexandre; Remaître, Alexandre; Rotigliano, Edoardo

2014-05-01

291

Analysis of Visible/SWIR surface reflectance ratios for aerosol retrievals from satellite in Mexico City urban area  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The surface reflectance ratio between the visible (VIS) and shortwave infrared (SWIR) radiation is an important quantity for the retrieval of the aerosol optical depth (?a) from the MODIS sensor data. Based on empirically determined VIS/SWIR ratios, MODIS ?a retrieval uses the surface reflectance in the SWIR band (2.1 µm), where the interaction between solar radiation and the aerosol layer is small, to predict the visible reflectances in the blue (0.47 µm) and red (0.66 µm) bands. Therefore, accurate knowledge of the VIS/SWIR ratio is essential for achieving accurate retrieval of aerosol optical depth from MODIS. We analyzed the surface reflectance over some distinct surface covers in and around the Mexico City metropolitan area (MCMA) using MODIS radiances at 0.66 µm and 2.1 µm. The analysis was performed at 1.5 km×1.5 km spatial resolution. Also, ground-based AERONET sun-photometer data acquired in Mexico City from 2002 to 2005 were analyzed for aerosol depth and other aerosol optical properties. In addition, a network of hand-held sun-photometers deployed in Mexico City, as part of the MCMA-2006 Study during the MILAGRO Campaign, provided an unprecedented measurement of ?a in 5 different sites well distributed in the city. We found that the average RED/SWIR ratio representative of the urbanized sites analyzed is 0.73±0.06 for scattering angles <140° and goes up to 0.77±0.06 for higher ones. The average ratio for non-urban sites was significantly lower (approximately 0.55). In fact, this ratio strongly depends on differences in urbanization levels (i.e. relative urban to vegetation proportions and types of surface materials). The aerosol optical depth retrieved from MODIS radiances at a spatial resolution of 1.5 km×1.5 km and averaged within 10×10 km boxes were compared with collocated 1-h ?a averaged from sun-photometer measurements. The use of the new RED/SWIR ratio of 0.73 in the MODIS retrieval over Mexico City led to a significant improvement in the agreement between the MODIS and sun-photometer AOD results; with the slope, offset, and the correlation coefficient of the linear regression changing from (?aMODIS=0.91?a sun-photometer+0.33, R2=0.66) to (?aMODIS=0.96 ?a sun-photometer-0.006, R2=0.87). Indeed, an underestimation of this ratio in urban areas lead to a significant overestimation of the AOD retrieved from satellite. Therefore, we strongly encourage similar analyses in other urban areas to enhance the development of a parameterization of the surface ratios accounting for urban heterogeneities.

de Almeida Castanho, A. D.; Prinn, R.; Martins, V.; Herold, M.; Ichoku, C.; Molina, L. T.

2007-10-01

292

Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources  

E-print Network

E-1014 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University E-1014 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Division of Agricultural.S. Department of Agriculture, the Director of Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service, Oklahoma State University

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

293

The psychosocial needs of young offenders and adolescents from an inner city area.  

PubMed

To date, assessments of the prevalence of mental health problems in young offenders have largely focused on incarcerated samples. This paper describes a quantitative study of a sample of 47 male young offenders under the supervision of an inner city Youth Offending Team. A semi-structured interview, modified from previous studies, was used to investigate the type and frequency of psychosocial and health problems they experienced. The results were compared with data from a random community sample of 38 male adolescents interviewed in a comparable way. Young offenders reported more psychosocial problems at a statistically significant level (including depression/misery, excessive worry and problematic substance use), as well as higher life-time rates of head injury, than adolescents in the community sample. Levels of problematic substance use and exposure to head injury continued to differentiate the groups when offenders in custody were removed from the analyses. The findings are discussed in relation to previous research and implications for service delivery. PMID:15288751

Carswell, Kenneth; Maughan, Barbara; Davis, Hilton; Davenport, Franscesca; Goddard, Nick

2004-08-01

294

Dam-breach analysis and flood-inundation mapping for Lakes Ellsworth and Lawtonka near Lawton, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Dams provide beneficial functions such as flood control, recreation, and reliable water supplies, but they also entail risk: dam breaches and resultant floods can cause substantial property damage and loss of life. The State of Oklahoma requires each owner of a high-hazard dam, which the Federal Emergency Management Agency defines as dams for which failure or misoperation probably will cause loss of human life, to develop an emergency action plan specific to that dam. Components of an emergency action plan are to simulate a flood resulting from a possible dam breach and map the resulting downstream flood-inundation areas. The resulting flood-inundation maps can provide valuable information to city officials, emergency managers, and local residents for planning the emergency response if a dam breach occurs. Accurate topographic data are vital for developing flood-inundation maps. This report presents results of a cooperative study by the city of Lawton, Oklahoma, and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to model dam-breach scenarios at Lakes Ellsworth and Lawtonka near Lawton and to map the potential flood-inundation areas of such dam breaches. To assist the city of Lawton with completion of the emergency action plans for Lakes Ellsworth and Lawtonka Dams, the USGS collected light detection and ranging (lidar) data that were used to develop a high-resolution digital elevation model and a 1-foot contour elevation map for the flood plains downstream from Lakes Ellsworth and Lawtonka. This digital elevation model and field measurements, streamflow-gaging station data (USGS streamflow-gaging station 07311000, East Cache Creek near Walters, Okla.), and hydraulic values were used as inputs for the dynamic (unsteady-flow) model, Hydrologic Engineering Center's River Analysis System (HEC-RAS). The modeled flood elevations were exported to a geographic information system to produce flood-inundation maps. Water-surface profiles were developed for a 75-percent probable maximum flood scenario and a sunny-day dam-breach scenario, as well as for maximum flood-inundation elevations and flood-wave arrival times for selected bridge crossings. Some areas of concern near the city of Lawton, if a dam breach occurs at Lakes Ellsworth or Lawtonka, include water treatment plants, wastewater treatment plants, recreational areas, and community-services offices.

Rendon, Samuel H.; Ashworth, Chad E.; Smith, S. Jerrod

2012-01-01

295

Some microbial characteristics of mussels ( Mytilus galloprovincialis ) in coastal city area  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  The aim of this work was to determine some microbial characteristics of Mytilus galloprovincialis harvested from four stations, located in Izmir coastal area (Eastern Aegean Sea, Turkey). The area along the Izmir coast\\u000a is densely populated, and it includes extensive agricultural lands, industrial and domestic discharge. Shellfish contamination\\u000a from sewage-polluted waters is very important for public health.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Materials and methods  Mussel

Asli Kacar

296

Sustainable sanitation systems for low income urban areas - A case of the city of Bulawayo, Zimbabwe  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Lack of basic sanitation systems threaten environmental and human health in low income urban communities. In 2005, the Government of Zimbabwe carried out a cleanup exercise in urban areas involving the destruction of illegal structures which left many people homeless. As a solution to this problem, the government embarked on an extensive housing construction exercise on unserviced land; the ‘Garikai/Hlalani Kuhle’ development programme. The objective of this paper was to investigate the sanitation status in one such area (Cowdray Park Extension, Bulawayo) and determine a sustainable sanitation system for the improved collection of wastewater from the unserviced low income urban area. The study was carried out between October 2010 and February 2011. The sanitation status as well as the residents’ preferences for improved sanitation and the economic set up of the community for the study area was determined through use of questionnaires to the residents. The local authority was then consulted to recommend sanitation facilities and system for the area that met regulatory requirements. A literature study identified sanitation options that were applicable to low income and high density urban areas. The baseline survey found that 61% of the people in the study area lacked sanitation facilities and practiced open defecation. The majority of the residents (70%) preferred ‘flush and discharge’ system sanitation facilities, which was in line with the local council’s requirements. On-site sanitation options were found not to be feasible as per the council regulations and the findings of the literature study, for areas with a high density of houses. Therefore a sewerage system was designed using the conventional sewerage design approach as well as the simplified sewerage design approach in order to determine the collection system that would best meet the needs of the community. In conclusion, the community was in dire need of a sanitation system and a waterborne offsite sanitation system was found to be a feasible option. The simplified sewerage system was found to deliver the same hydraulic benefits for collecting wastewater as the conventional but was 33% cheaper to construct and hence more affordable for the community. It was recommended that stringent environmental monitoring of the sanitation system be put in place to minimise any potential environmental impacts.

Chinyama, A.; Chipato, P. T.; Mangore, E.

297

On-road measurements of volatile organic compounds in the Mexico City metropolitan area using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) was redesigned and deployed to monitor selected hydrocarbon emissions from in-use vehicles as part of the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) 2003 field campaign. This modified PTR-MS instrument provides the necessary time response (<2 s total cycle time) and sensitivity to monitor the rapidly changing hydrocarbon concentrations, within intercepted dilute exhaust emission plumes. Selected hydrocarbons including methanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), benzene and toluene were among the vehicle exhaust emission components monitored. A comparison with samples collected in canisters and analyzed by gas chromatography provides validation to the interpretation of the ion assignments and the concentrations derived using the PTR-MS. The simultaneous detection of multiple hydrocarbons in dilute vehicle exhaust plumes provides a valuable tool to study the impact of driving behavior on the exhaust gas emissions.

Rogers, T. M.; Grimsrud, E. P.; Herndon, S. C.; Jayne, J. T.; Kolb, C. Ee; Allwine, E.; Westberg, H.; Lamb, B. K.; Zavala, M.; Molina, L. T.; Molina, M. J.; Knighton, W. B.

2006-05-01

298

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets  

E-print Network

/Wildlife and Fisheries Consultant Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation Shannon I. Ferrell Extension Agricultural Economics Specialist Department of Agricultural Economics Oklahoma State University Dwayne Elmore Extension Wildlife net income is often greater than traditional agricultural uses alone. Oklahoma Cooperative Extension

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

299

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets  

E-print Network

county OCES agricultural educator or Joe Armstrong, OSU Extension Weeds Specialist, at (405) 744Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources · Oklahoma State University PSS-2779 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets are also available on our website at: http

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

300

Area 6 Piedmont Workforce Network Quick Reference Guide City of Charlottesville.  

E-print Network

-296-2441 Refugee/Immigration Services Call 211 Sign Language Interpreters 800-552-7917 Telamon ­ Farmworkers 434 Charlottesville 434-817-5222 Youth Employment Services WIA Youth Program Charlottesville 434-963-2960 Teensight Reference Guide to Area Services http://www.elevatevirginia.org/career-seekers/employment-guides/ Some

Acton, Scott

301

Towards an Area-Based Curriculum? Creating Space for the City in Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper uses Fraser's (1999) concept of social justice as comprising both redistribution and recognition as a frame to interrogate two "Area-Based Curriculum" projects running since 2008 in Manchester and Peterborough schools. It argues that historic concerns about working with "the local" in cross-curricular activities has originated in a…

Facer, Keri; Thomas, Louise

2012-01-01

302

The food retail environment and area deprivation in Glasgow City, UK. — Measures of the Food Environment  

Cancer.gov

Skip to Main Content at the National Institutes of Health | www.cancer.gov Print Page E-mail Page Search: Please wait while this form is being loaded.... Home Browse by Resource Type Browse by Area of Research Research Networks Funding Information About

303

CHARACTERIZATION OF EXHAUST EMISSIONS FROM LIGHT-DUTY GAS VEHICLES IN THE KANSAS CITY METROPOLITAN AREA  

EPA Science Inventory

This research program on light duty vehicle emissions is being performed under an interagency agreement. It will provide current information on particulate matter emissions and distributions from light-duty vehicles, an area where more and better data are necessary to meet the n...

304

Smart Café Cities: Testing human capital externalities in the Boston metropolitan area  

Microsoft Academic Search

Existing studies have explored only one or, in some cases, two mechanisms by which human capital externalities percolate at the macrogeographic levels. This study, however, uses the 1990 Massachusetts census data to test four mechanisms at the microgeographic levels, in the Boston metropolitan area labor market. We propose that individual workers can learn from their occupational and industrial peers in

Shihe Fu

2007-01-01

305

Smart Café Cities: Testing Human Capital Externalities in the Boston Metropolitan Area  

Microsoft Academic Search

Existing studies have explored either only one or two of the mechanisms that human capital externalities percolate at only macrogeographic levels. This paper, by using the 1990 Massachusetts census data, tests four mechanisms at the microgeographic levels in the Boston metropolitan area labor market. We propose that individual workers can learn from their occupational and industrial peers in the same

Shihe Fu

2005-01-01

306

20 CFR 645.525 - What special consideration will be given to rural areas and cities with large concentrations of...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...and cities with large concentrations of poverty? 645.525 Section 645.525 Employees...and cities with large concentrations of poverty? (a) Competitive grant awards...concentrations of residents living in poverty. (b) Grant application...

2010-04-01

307

Atmospheric aerosol and gaseous pollutant concentrations in Bucharest area using first datasets from the city AQ monitoring network  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

City of Bucharest is the largest and most populated (about 2.8 million inhabitants) city in the Romanian Plain and encounters environmental problems and meteorology typical for several cities in southeastern Europe. City environment includes intense emissions arising from traffic (about 1 million cars per day), five thermo-electrical power-generation stations, that use both natural gas and oil derivatives for power generation and domestic heating, and from industrial sources (more than 800 small and medium plants). In the present work we performed an extensive analysis of the air pollution state for the Bucharest area (inside and outside the city) using filter measurement aerosol data PM10 and PM2.5. Data spanning over first year of continuous sampling (2005) were taken from the city Air Quality Monitoring Network, which consists of eight sampling stations: three industrial and two traffic, one EPA urban background, one suburban and one regional station located outside of Bucharest. The objective was to assess the PM10 recorded levels and their degree of compliance with the EU-legislated air quality standards and to provide a statistical investigation of the factors controlling seasonal and spatial variations of PM levels. PM10 relationships with other measured air pollutants (SO2, CO, NOx) and meteorological parameters (temperature, relative humidity, atmospheric pressure, wind velocity and direction) were investigated by statistical analysis. Back trajectory modeling and wind direction frequency distributions were used to identify the origin of the polluted air masses. Contribution of combustion (slopes) and non-combustion (intercepts) sources to PM10 recorded levels was quantified by linear analysis, for two seasonal periods: cold (15 October-14 April) and warm (15 April-14 October). PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations were compared with corresponding values in other European urban areas. Main conclusions are as follows: Traffic and industrial sites contribute to the PM10 urban background with about 86%; relative contribution of urban background to regional background is about 37%; Relatively low inter-sites correlation coefficients and no significant geographic differences between sites, more or less uniform traffic pattern suggests local sources may play an important role; PM10average and median values systematically exceed the limit value of 50 ?g/m3 at traffic and industrial sites; at background sites the PM10 are below 50?g/m3 but are higher that values at similar sites in Europe; CO and SO2 do not put serious problems relative to their limits values as NOx does; NOx shows a temporal variation with higher values during the cold season; All gaseous pollutants contribute to the PM10 levels but a significant inter-annual variation of this contribution seems not to be observed; Pollution level in Bucharest seems to be higher than in other European cities for traffic, industrial and suburban background sites; regional background in the larger area of Bucharest seems to be similar with the suburban background sites in other European sites. Seven pollution episodes were identified, from which only one in the cold season has been attributed to the long-range transport. During this episode PM10 levels varied between 161-205 ?g/m3 for all sites, the dominant wind direction was NE (10.2%), with an average wind speed of 1.6 m/s. This shows that local pollution sources seem to have more impact on AQ than the long-range transport. Data presented here give an overview of the range of air pollution concentrations to expect under typical meteorological and seasonal conditions in the larger area of Bucharest. Acknowledgements: Dr. Ing. Danut Cociorva, Leader of the Air Quality Control Group-NIRD-ICIM Bucharest, is gratefully acknowledged for his permission to analyse the data. The air mass back trajectories were calculated using HYSPLIT transport and dispersion model: www.arl.noaa.gov/ ready.html. Financial support from ÖAD Austria, Programm WTZ, Project No: RO 02/2009 and from ANCS Romania, Programm PN II, Contract No: 304/27.04.2009

Balaceanu, Cristina; Iorga, Gabriela

2010-05-01

308

Effects of wetlands on quality of runoff entering lakes in the Twin Cities Metropolitan Area, Minnesota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Four wetlands were compared with respect to their effectiveness in decreasing suspended solids and nutrient concentrations in runoff to lakes immediately downstream from the wetlands. An artificial impoundment in one of the wetlands increased settling of suspended solids. A decrease of nutrients in this wetland was probably the result of high assimilation rates associated with a dense stand of cattails. Two of the other three wetlands consist of open water and land areas, both of which contain abundant vegetation. Drainage from land areas within the wetlands may have lowered the overall effectiveness of the wetlands in decreasing sediment and nutrient concentrations. The third wetland was a constructed wetland that was ineffective in decreasing sediment or nutrient concentrations because its storage capacity was too small to prevent frequent flushing of accumulated sediment. Sediment concentrations in discharge from this wetland were as much as 22 times greater than the already high sediment concentrations in the inflow. (Author 's abstract)

Brown, R.G.

1985-01-01

309

Loess–paleosol stratigraphy of Dukso area, Namyangju City, Korea (South)  

Microsoft Academic Search

As Korea lies between China, with a drier climate, and the wetter Japanese Islands, the Korean loess–paleosol stratigraphy constitutes an important record of variations in the East Asian monsoon climate. The loess–paleosol sequence consists of three loess layers (L1LL1, L1LL2, and L2) and three paleosols (L1SS1, S1, and S2) in the study area. L1LL1 accumulated near the surface, and is

Kang-Min Yu; Jae-Bong Shin; Toshiro Naruse

2008-01-01

310

Chemical characteristics of organic aerosols in Algiers city area: influence of a fat manufacture plant  

Microsoft Academic Search

Total concentrations and homologue distributions of organic fraction constituents have been determined in particulate matter emitted from different units of a fat manufacturer (i.e. oils refining and conditioning plants, and production and conditioning units of a soap industry) located in Algiers area, as well as in atmospheric aerosols. In particular n-alkanes, n-alkanoic and n-alkenoic acids, n-alkan-2-ones and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

Noureddine Yassaa; Brahim Youcef Meklati; Angelo Cecinato

2001-01-01

311

Measuring the Pattern of High Temperature Areas in Urban Greenery of Nanjing City, China  

PubMed Central

Most studies are concerned with the cooling effect of urban greenery, but some have also revealed that some patches changed from normal temperature areas (NTAs) into high temperature areas (HTAs). Landsat TM images and ArcGIS software are used to analyze the HTA patterns in Nanjing, China. The HTAs’ lower limit temperature was defined as the 30.26 °C and the percentage of the HTAs in all greenery was 24.87%. The disturbance on the cooling effect existed but not evidently. The average impervious ratio (IR) and surface temperature (ST) of HTAs, respectively, were 3.76 times and higher 2.86 °C than those of NTAs. The structure of NTAs’ IR levels was extremely uneven but the HTAs’ were relatively even. However, the co-coefficient between the IR and ST in the whole greenery was small. Sampling analysis with the same ST and IR revealed that the complex environment in green buffer affected temperature differences; The adjacent HTAs, with its 89.78% in the study area, largely along the green patch, were far more than independent HTAs and presented a ring shape. Thus, the significantly heterogeneous urban environment inevitably resulted in diverse factors forming HTAs. PMID:23066406

Su, Weizhong; Yang, Guishan; Chen, Shuang; Yang, Yinbao

2012-01-01

312

What are people thinking about floods? A study in two Mediterranean areas: Costa Brava, Spain and Talcahuano City, Chile  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mediterranean areas are not immune to flood problems. The Spanish Mediterranean coast is a reflection of this, where flooding continues to be the greatest natural hazard with negative effects on the territory. The urbanization of coastal watersheds, very pronounced in the last 15 years, has led to the creation of authentic urban continuums in the seafront and the appearance of residential developments therein. The municipalities of Costa Brava, in the province of Girona, are an example of this dynamic of the increasing risk, exposure, and impact of floods. In Chile, floods are considered one of the main natural hazards, especially in the province of Concepcion. One of the most important cities of this area is Talcahuano, which has suffered continual flood episodes during recent years. Flood episodes could yet increase in the future due to the high frequency of extraordinary atmospheric events and a higher exposure to flood risk created by the development of intensive urbanization processes. However, after the February 27th 8.8 degrees earthquake (Richter scale) that affected the center-south of Chile and originated the tsunami which flooded a large percentage of the residential area and military base of the city of Talcahuano, the risk, vulnerability, resilience and copy capacity concepts changed. This research looks at the social perception and social knowledge of Mediterranean residents affected and unaffected by floods, emphasizing which is their risk, vulnerability, resilience and copy capacity concept and what kind of measures they proposed to reduce their flood vulnerability. The end objective of this research is to become a framework for future local flood policies and a tool that could be reviewed by specialists in other regions that might be affected by this hazard. This social assessment has been carried out through surveys of residents in Costa Brava and Talcahuano whose endogenous and exogenous characteristics have been significant in explaining their perceptions. The main results show that: a) the flood experience is a determinant in social perception of flood risk; b) fear has a strong role in the livelihood of Talcahuano residents; c) Insurance is the main solution for Spanish residents; d) the residents surveyed feel that the government and disaster managers ignore the local community for design measures to improve local vulnerability against floods and; e) both areas give strong support to implementing structural measures.

Lara, A.; Ribas, A.; Cifuentes, L. A.

2013-05-01

313

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets  

E-print Network

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources · Oklahoma State University PSS-2161 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets are also available on our website at: http://osufacts.okstate.edu Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Jason Warren Soil Conservation Extension Specialist Kevin Meeks

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

314

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets  

E-print Network

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources · Oklahoma State University BAE-1109 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets are also available on our website at: http://osufacts.okstate.edu Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Carol Jones Stored Products Engineering Specialist Edmond Bonjour

Jones, Carol

315

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets  

E-print Network

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources · Oklahoma State University NREM-9016 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets are also available on our website at: http://osufacts.okstate.edu Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Dwayne Elmore Extension Wildlife Specialist, OSU Terry Bidwell

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

316

9th Annual Oklahoma Native American Youth Language Fair Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History  

E-print Network

9th Annual Oklahoma Native American Youth Language Fair Sam Noble Oklahoma from the Oklahoma Native American Youth Language Fair! We are pleasedK ­ 12th) · Song in Native American Language (PreK ­ 12th) NEW for 2011

Oklahoma, University of

317

University of Oklahoma [INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY POLICY] The University of Oklahoma |IP Policy 1  

E-print Network

University of Oklahoma [INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY POLICY] The University of Oklahoma |IP Policy 1 INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY POLICY 3.27.1 PREAMBLE (A) The people of the State of Oklahoma may reasonably expect and Nation. Such new industry creates greater employment opportunities for citizens of the State

Oklahoma, University of

318

A comparison of the speech patterns and dialect attitudes of Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The lexical dialect usage of Oklahoma has been well-studied in the past by the Survey of Oklahoma Dialects, but the acoustic speech production of the state has received little attention. Apart from two people from Tulsa and two people from Oklahoma City that were interviewed for the Atlas of North American English, no other acoustic work has been performed within the state. This dissertation begins to fill in these gaps by presenting twelve respondents interviewed by the Research on Dialects of English in Oklahoma (RODEO) project. For each speaker, a brief biography is given, including some of their regional and speech attitudes of Oklahoma. Then acoustic data from a wordlist and reading task are presented and compared. Analysis will consider plots of each speaker's vowel system as a whole, and will also examine many environments in isolation. These environments were chosen for their likely presence in Oklahoma, and include such dialect features as the Southern Shift, the pin/pen merger, the caught/cot merger, monophthongization of the PRICE vowel, and neutralization of tense vowels before /l./ After considering each respondent separately, some of their results will be pooled together to give a preliminary sense of the state of dialect within Oklahoma. Demographic variables such as age, gender, and urban/rural upbringing will be related to speakers' attitudes and acoustic production. This will serve two goals - first, to compare modern-day production to the findings of previous scholars, and second, to suggest a dialect trajectory for the state that could be studied further in additional research.

Bakos, Jon

319

Indoor dust fall and its composition in two public areas of a city in India  

SciTech Connect

The paper reports the estimates of dust fall and its chemical composition in certain indoor areas of Hyderabad - Secunderabad Railway Station and a big domestic mess. The quantity of dust fall; percentage of living matter in aerosols; and the pH, SO{sub 4}, Cl, Fe, Co, Zn, Mn, and Cu contents of dust were analyzed. The deposition of airborne dust particles was 102 to 180 mg/m{sup 2} {times} d in the railway station, while in the mess it was 52 to 97 mg/m{sup 2} {times} d.

Raza, S.H.; Nirmala, B.; Murthy, M.S.R. (Osmania Univ., Hyderabad (India))

1990-01-01

320

Chromium speciation in groundwater of a tannery polluted area of Chennai City, India  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chromium speciation in groundwater of a tannery polluted area was investigated for the distribution of chromium species and\\u000a the influence of redox couples such as Fe(III)\\/Fe(II) and Mn(IV)\\/Mn(II). Speciation analysis was carried out by ammonium pyrolidinedithiocarbamate\\u000a (APDC)–methylisobutylketone (MIBK) procedure. The groundwater samples were analyzed for Cr(III), Cr(VI), and Cr(III)-organic\\u000a complexes. The APDC could not extract the Cr(III)-organic complexes, but HNO3

A. Ramesh Kumar; P. Riyazuddin

2010-01-01

321

Oklahoma Water Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Imaging, Digital Mapping and Immersion Visualization of Evaporite Karst in Western Oklahoma investigates a novel and innovative procedure that combines electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), digital mapping

322

Oklahoma Water Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Tomographic Imaging, Digital Mapping and Immersion Visualization of Evaporite Karst in Western Oklahoma mapping and immersion visualization hardware and software to provide a digital image of subsurface conduit

323

78 FR 45266 - Notice of Intent To Prepare a Resource Management Plan for the Oklahoma, Kansas, and Texas...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Prepare a Resource Management Plan for the Oklahoma...Kansas, and Texas Planning Area and an Associated...Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION...where applicable, management decisions brought...from existing planning documents....

2013-07-26

324

Landslide prediction using combined deterministic and probabilistic methods in hilly area of Mt. Medvednica in Zagreb City, Croatia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The hilly slopes of Mt. Medvednica are stretched in the northwestern part of Zagreb City, Croatia, and extend to approximately 180km2. In this area, landslides, e.g. Kostanjek landslide and ?rešnjevec landslide, have brought damage to many houses, roads, farmlands, grassland and etc. Therefore, it is necessary to predict the potential landslides and to enhance landslide inventory for hazard mitigation and security management of local society in this area. We combined deterministic method and probabilistic method to assess potential landslides including their locations, size and sliding surfaces. Firstly, this study area is divided into several slope units that have similar topographic and geological characteristics using the hydrology analysis tool in ArcGIS. Then, a GIS-based modified three-dimensional Hovland's method for slope stability analysis system is developed to identify the sliding surface and corresponding three-dimensional safety factor for each slope unit. Each sliding surface is assumed to be the lower part of each ellipsoid. The direction of inclination of the ellipsoid is considered to be the same as the main dip direction of the slope unit. The center point of the ellipsoid is randomly set to the center point of a grid cell in the slope unit. The minimum three-dimensional safety factor and corresponding critical sliding surface are also obtained for each slope unit. Thirdly, since a single value of safety factor is insufficient to evaluate the slope stability of a slope unit, the ratio of the number of calculation cases in which the three-dimensional safety factor values less than 1.0 to the total number of trial calculation is defined as the failure probability of the slope unit. If the failure probability is more than 80%, the slope unit is distinguished as 'unstable' from other slope units and the landslide hazard can be mapped for the whole study area.

Wang, Chunxiang; Watanabe, Naoki; Marui, Hideaki

2013-04-01

325

A test of the Garreau model for edge city development using GIS-based shift-share analysis: a case study for the Clear Lake-NASA Area, Texas  

E-print Network

This study examined the development of Clear Lake-NASA Area, Texas into an edge city and challenged the Garreau edge city model by addressing the question, Do all edge cities follow the Garreau model of development? Objectives of the study focused...

Crate, Frances Margaret

1997-01-01

326

The human health impact of Nyiragongo and Nyamulagira eruptions on Goma city and its surrounding area  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Located in the east of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Nyiragongo and Nyamulagira are two of the most active volcanoes in Africa. Nyiragongo last erupted in January 2002 and Nyamulagira in November 2011. Even if only a small number of victims resulted directly from these eruptions (notably because they both happened in the day-time), the town of Goma (approx. 700 000 inhabitants) is directly threatened by the fluid lava flows, of which the speed can reach several tens of km/h. But this is not the only menace. Indeed, Nyiragongo hosts a permanent lava lake that produces a plume of gases rich in sulphur (SO2), carbon (CO2), and halogen compounds (HCl, HF). As for Nyamulagira, it makes a major contribution to these emissions during its frequent and regular periods of eruptive activity (approx. every two years). Although the region under study is densely populated (up to 250 inh/km2), and basic volcanic hazard mapping exists, an updated and long-term evaluation of the specific impact of Nyiragongo and Nyamulagira semi-permanent volcanic plumes on the population health has not been done to date. It is the objective of this study. Michigan Technological University (MTU, USA) provides satellite data retrievals of volcanogenic SO2 gas columns. These remote sensing data provide insights about the spatial distribution of Nyiragongo and Nyamulagira plumes, which are used to select the sampling areas for studying the human health impact of volcanic emissions. Based on the Congolese Health Information System (HIS) data provided by the CEMUBAC, our study is focused on the 1999-2010 time period. Scientific studies carried out on other active volcanoes suggest that certain pathologies could be linked to a high concentration of SO2 in the atmosphere. These include Acute Respiratory Infections (ARI), conjunctivitis, skin diseases, and ear-nose-throat infections. Using Poisson regression analysis, we determine a Relative Risk Index (IRR) that allows us to identify the years of higher health risk for the population living under the plume. Additionally, time series analysis helps us to disregard any seasonal effect of certain pathologies and to derive a 12-year risk trend. For 2004-2010, our results are compared to SO2 gas emission rates and plume location data measured by using Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopic (DOAS) sensors located around Nyiragongo volcano. Finally, the areas identified as more hazardous are highlighted through a geographical approach (using GIS tools), to generate maps and other relevant information that can be of direct use for risk assessment authorities. Our preliminary analysis suggests that the impact of SO2 emissions doesn't seem to be severe, being its most important effect an increase of ARI in the area surrounding the volcanoes (up to 50km). Our on-going study will help us to better determine the magnitude and geographical extent of the impact of volcanic plumes on the health of the population, as well as locate the areas that are most affected. This will contribute to provide the appropriate sanitation recommendations (water treatment, early warning system, etc.) and lead to a more effective volcanic impact reduction on human health.

Michellier, C.; Dramaix, M.; Arellano, S. R.; Kervyn, F.; Kahindo, J. B.

2012-04-01

327

Fluoride enrichment in groundwater of semi-arid urban area: Khan Younis City, southern Gaza Strip (Palestine)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The aim of this study is to determine fluoride enhancement in the groundwater of semi-arid urban area of Khan Younis City, southern Gaza Strip. Physicochemical data for a total of 200 groundwater samples were analyzed. The fluoride concentrations were varied from 0.3 to 6.45 mg/L with average value of 2.87 mg/L. Correlations between fluorides with other measured ions were relatively observed, negative correlation with calcium and the positive correlation with pH, bicarbonate and sodium increase the dissolution/solubility of fluoride bearing minerals, leading to fluoride leaching into the groundwater. Fluoride enrichment in the groundwater of the area is due to water hydrochemistry, mineral-water interaction (mainly calcite and fluorite), fluorite resulted from fluorapatite dissolution. The saturation indexes evaluation indicated that 42% of the samples are over saturated with respect to calcite and 35.5% under saturated with respect to fluorite, while 40.5% approached equilibrium with respect to both calcite and fluorite. At fluoride concentrations of less than 2.2 mg/L fluorite saturation indexes show under-saturation condition for fluorite and at higher fluoride concentrations show near saturation condition.

Abu Jabal, Mohamed Shaban; Abustan, Ismail; Rozaimy, Mohd Remy; Al-Najar, Hussam

2014-12-01

328

Evaluation of groundwater pollution potential of sewage-irrigated vegetable growing areas of the eastern fringe of Calcutta city.  

PubMed

In recent years recycling in agriculture is a common method of disposal or utilisation of waste. However, recycling of wastes may cause contamination of groundwater by toxic elements like heavy metals, cationic and anionic contaminants and pathogens. Groundwater of shallow and deep tubewells was collected during 1991 to 1997 from raw sewage effluent irrigated garbage farming areas on the eastern fringe of Calcutta city. In general raw sewage effluents, sludges and sewage-irrigated soils contain very high amounts of cations, anions, organics and heavy metals. It is found that most of the groundwater contained undesirable pH, total dissolved solids, total hardness, calcium, magnesium, phenolic compounds, iron and manganese and the observed values or concentrations were much above the maximum desirable limits specified by World Health Organisation (WHO) and Bureau of Indian Standards (BIS) for use as drinking water. Groundwater of that area may be used for irrigation. Dispersion by leaching of the metals, cationic and anionic contaminants from irrigated soil and from settled bottom sludge in unlined sewage channels are the principal causes of groundwater contamination. Some management plans have been suggested to control further deterioration of groundwater quality. PMID:10842824

Mitra, A; Gupta, S K

2000-01-01

329

Atmospheric deposition of selected chemicals and their effect on nonpoint-source pollution in the Twin Cities Metropolitan Area, Minnesota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Atmospheric inputs and runoff concentrations of total Kjeldahl nitrogen, dissolved nitrite-plus-nitrate nitrogen, total phosphorus, total sulfate (only for atmospheric input), total chloride, and total lead were studied from April 1 to October 31 , 1980, in one rural and three urban watersheds in the Twin Cities metropolitan area, Minnesota. Seasonal patterns of wetfall and dryfall generally were similar for all constituents except chloride in both rural and urban watersheds. Similarity between constituents and between rural and urban watersheds suggested that regional air masses transported from the Gulf of Mexico by frontal storm movements influence seasonal patterns of atmospheric input in the metropolitan area. Local influences such as industrial, agricultural, and vehicular air pollutants were found to influence the magnitude or rate of atmospheric input rather than the seasonal pattern. Chloride was primarily influenced by northwest frontal storms laden with coastal chloride. Local influences such as dust from road de-icing salt are thought to have caused an increase in atmospheric chloride during June. The atmospheric contribution to nonpoint-source-runoff pollution of nitrogen, in the form of nitrite-plus-nitrate, and lead was extremely high, constituting as much as 84 percent of the runoff load. In contrast, phosphorus and chloride inputs were low, averaging 6 percent of the total runoff load. (USGS)

Brown, R.G.

1984-01-01

330

Construction-employment opportunities of four oil-replacing space-heating alternatives for core areas of thirteen major northeastern and midwestern cities  

SciTech Connect

Construction employment opportunities are compared for four oil-replacing technologies providing equivalent space-heating services to the core areas of 13 major northeastern and midwestern cities. The four technologies are: cogeneration district heating, coal gasification, coal liquefaction and electrification (coal-fired power plant). It is observed that the district-heating option places a higher percentage of its capital stock within the center city. It also requires lower occupational skills for its construction than the other three alternatives. In view of the lower average educational level of minorities and their concentration in urban areas, substantially more minority employment should occur if district heating is implemented. This alternative also will provide employment opportunities for unemployed nonminority construction laborers and contribute indirectly to the improvement of inner-city neighborhoods where many unemployed construction laborers live.

Santini, D.J.; Wernette, D.R.

1980-07-01

331

Chemical characteristics of organic aerosols in Algiers city area: influence of a fat manufacture plant  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Total concentrations and homologue distributions of organic fraction constituents have been determined in particulate matter emitted from different units of a fat manufacturer (i.e. oils refining and conditioning plants, and production and conditioning units of a soap industry) located in Algiers area, as well as in atmospheric aerosols. In particular n-alkanes, n-alkanoic and n-alkenoic acids, n-alkan-2-ones and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were investigated. Organic aerosol contents varied broadly among the plant units, depending upon nature of the manufactured products. The percent composition of all classes of compounds investigated in ambient atmosphere was similar to those observed indoor at industrial plant units. Organic acids, n-alkanoic as well as n-alkenoic, appeared by far the most abundant organic constituents of aerosols, both indoor and outdoor, ranging from 7.7 to 19.8 and from 12.7 to 17.1 ?g m -3, respectively. The huge occurrence of acids and n-alkanes in ambient aerosols was consistent with their high levels present in oil and fat materials. Among minor components of aerosols, n-alkan-2-ones and PAH, seemed to be related to thermally induced ageing and direct combustion of raw organic material used for oil and soap production.

Yassaa, Noureddine; Meklati, Brahim Youcef; Cecinato, Angelo

332

Oklahoma blast forces unsettling design questions  

SciTech Connect

The bomb that brought down a government building in Oklahoma City killed hundreds of people after it was detonated near the building`s key supports. The blast has reopened a long-simmering debate on safety by design. Structurally, it`s not practical to designing bomb-proof buildings. But it is possible to engineer a structure to deform rather than go through immediate progressive collapse. Delaying collapse gives occupants extra time to evacuate. And that could mean the difference between life and death. The construction material of choice really {open_quotes}depends on the height of the building and the lateral load resisting system,{close_quotes} says Charles H. Thornton of Thornton-Tomasetti/Engineers, New York City. But whether in steel or reinforced concrete, moment-resisting frames, which are inherently redundant, give horizontal components the ability to take reversals of stress common in explosions, he says. Simple frames do not. {open_quotes}They go down like a house of cards,{close_quotes} says Thornton. In reinforced concrete moment frames, beam reinforcing steel is continuous. In simple reinforced concrete frames, beam rebar only penetrates the column for a determined number of inches based on the length of the span. And it is absent from the mid-span of the beam. In a blast from below, the beam, its top usually in compression and bottom in tension, deflects up, throwing the beam top into tension. With no rebar, it loses structural integrity, and falls apart. With rebar, it has a chance of surviving. If a building is not designed for blasts, a steel frame might be better under a reasonably small bomb because steel has equal capacity in tension and compression, and concrete has capacity only in compression, says Thornton.

NONE

1995-05-01

333

Assessing cardiovascular risk in regional areas: the Healthy Hearts – Beyond City Limits program  

PubMed Central

Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is more prevalent in regional and remote Australia compared to metropolitan areas. The aim of Healthy Hearts was to determine age and sex specific CVD risk factor levels and the potential value of national risk clinics. Methods Healthy Hearts was an observational research study conducted in four purposefully selected higher risk communities in regional Victoria, Australia. The main outcome measures were the proportion of participants with CVD risk factors with group comparisons to determine the adjusted likelihood of elevated risk factor levels. Trained personnel used a standardized protocol over four weeks per community to measure CVD risk factor levels, estimate absolute CVD risk and provide feedback and advice. Results A total of 2125 self-selected participants were assessed (mean age 58?±?15 years, 57% women). Overall, CVD risk factors were highly prevalent. More men than women had???2 modifiable CVD risk factors (76% vs. 68%, p?

2012-01-01

334

Community Effects on Teacher Involvement in School Development Activity: A Study of Teachers in Cities, Smaller Towns and Rural Areas in Norway.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined the effects of community type on teacher involvement in school development activity (SDA). Data on urban, small town, and rural teachers indicated that teachers in smaller towns were more involved in SDA than those in rural areas, while the differences between cities and smaller towns were not statistically significant. The impact of…

Midthassel, Unni Vere; Manger, Terje; Torsheim, Torbjorn

2002-01-01

335

Prediction of optimal safe ground water yield and land subsidence in the Los Banos-Kettleman City area, California, using a calibrated numerical simulation model  

Microsoft Academic Search

Land subsidence caused by the excessive use of ground water resources has traditionally caused serious and costly damage to the Los Banos-Kettleman City area of California's San Joaquin Valley. Although the arrival of surface water from the Central Valley Project has reduced subsidence in recent decades, the growing instability of surface water supplies has refocused attention on the future of

K. J Larson; H Ba?a?ao?lu; M. A Mariño

2001-01-01

336

Observed and simulated sensitivities of summertime urban surface air temperatures to anthropogenic heat in downtown areas of two Japanese Major Cities, Tokyo and Osaka  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this study, the sensitivities of surface air temperatures to anthropogenic heat (AH) were investigated in downtowns of the two Japanese major cities, Tokyo and Osaka. First, meteorological measurements were made with the simultaneous monitoring of electricity demand in a contrastive couple of a downtown commercial area (C-area) and a residential area (R-area) within each city in summer 2007. From the measurements, the areal-mean surface air temperatures were obtained as and for each of the C-area and R-area, respectively. Using the actual electricity demand and the estimated motor fuels consumption, their areal total was evaluated as the energy-consumption-basis AH. The estimated C-areas' AH indicated greater values up to 220 W/m2 on weekdays and remarkable decrease about by half on weekends, whereas that in the R-areas showed less values of 10-20 W/m2 stably. Then, on calm and fine days were found to be systematically decreased from weekdays to weekends in both cities roughly indicating a proportional relationship with the reductions in the C-areas' AH on weekends. The result suggested a common afternoon sensitivity for both C-areas of around 1.0°C/100 W/m2, which indicated an intensity of the AH impact on surface air temperature there. Next, to simulate the observed AH impact, the authors' CM-BEM (a multilayer urban canopy model coupled with a building energy model) was newly implemented in the mesoscale Weather Research and Forecasting (WMF) model. This new system, WRF-CM-BEM, was applied to Tokyo and almost reasonably validated from the aspects of the reproducibility of urban surface air temperature and electricity demand in the observation areas. The simulations also suggested that WRF-CM-BEM underestimated the observed air temperature sensitivity to AH in the Tokyo C-area roughly by half but still in the same order of magnitude.

Kikegawa, Yukihiro; Tanaka, Ai; Ohashi, Yukitaka; Ihara, Tomohiko; Shigeta, Yoshinori

2014-07-01

337

Reabilitation of degraded area by erosion, using soil bioengineering techniques in Bacanga river basin, Sao Luis City - Maranhao State, Brazil.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The aim of this paper is to assess the stages of rehabilitation of a degraded site by erosion, in Salina/Sacavém district, São Luís City, considering geomorphologic characteristics and soil bioengineering techniques. This technique has been applied in different situations to rehabilitate degraded areas, with positive results from the use of biodegradable materials (e.g. vegetal fibres, wooden stakes and re-vegetation). These techniques stabilize the soil at low cost and improve the environment. Bioengineering involves the planned and strategic application of selected materials, involving biodegradable materials, often in combination with 'hard engineering' structures constructed from stone, concrete and steel. The settlement of São Luís was established in 1612 and has evolved in distinct phases. Rapid urban growth was associated with industrialization in the second half of the 18th Century. Rapid population and urban growth has intensified problems, compounded by poor planning and improper soil use. São Luís, like many other Brazilian cities, has experienced rapid population growth in recent decades, which has created a series of socio-economic and environmental problems, including accelerated soil erosion. Sacavém is one of these communities where natural and human factors contribute to the severe gully erosion. The local lithology is mainly Tertiary sandstones and, to a lesser extent, shales, argillites and siltstones, all of which belong to the Barreiras Formation. Weathering on these rocks produces erodible soils, including lithosols, latosols, concretionary red/yellow clay soils and concretionary plinthosols. Thus, erodible soils and regolith are subject to high erosion rates, especially on steeper slopes subject to additional human interventions. Furthermore, although regional slopes are quite gentle, there is localized high relative relief. Sacavém vegetation, in the gullied area, consists of brushwood. Secondary mixed forest and brushwood are the dominant vegetal cover adjacent to the urban gullies. The local climate is humid tropical, with average annual temperatures of 26°C, reaching higher values in October to December and lower from April to June. Rainfall distribution throughout the year is irregular, marked by two very distinct seasons (rainy and dry). The highly seasonal erosive rains incise a complex series of soil erosion landforms, mainly gullies in this area. The following procedures have been carried out: fieldwork with monitoring of gully head erosion; Environmental Education Program; handcraft workshop regarding the prodution of geotextiles from Buriti fiber. The rehabilitation of this degraded site, follows these stages: 1. Acquisition of equipment and materials; 2. Contracting workers; 3. Reshaping selected gully walls; 4. Adding organic palm materials to the topsoil and ~30 kg of grass seeds; 5. Application of geotextile anchored on the ground by using wooden stakes; 6. Maintenance work with photographic records; 7. Photo comparison to measure the vegetal cover percentage, with the aid of geoprocessing software. Some of the gully walls presented steep slopes, around 90 degrees, and therefore, it was necessary to reshape them for the application of soil bioengineering techniques. It was selected a sample area of 2.000 m2 to be rehabilitated. The knowledge of soil and geomorphological characteristics was essential to understand surface runoff, considering the direction of water flows. Due to the difficulties in diverting the flows, which would require more extensive engineering works, the channel was maintained, and the base of the slopes was strengthened to support the flows. In the upper part of this area, which had ~8° slope angle, contour lines were surveyed and barriers of wooden stakes were used to retard runoff velocity from adjacent vegetated slopes. Some slopes in this part had a 45° slope angle, due to the local topography. However, this angle is considered too steep for the application of palm-mats. In some parts of gully, work was completed to reshape the gullies and constru

Teixeira Guerra, A. J.; Rodrigues Bezerra, J. F.; da Mota Lima, L. D.; Silva Mendonça, J. K.; Vieira Souza, U. D.; Teixeira Guerra, T.

2009-04-01

338

Analyzing sustainable development model of Wuhan“1+8” city cluster area from some complex scientific management views  

Microsoft Academic Search

Development strategies in the central China has brought unprecedented opportunities and challenges for Wuhan city circle of development. In order to investigate the sustainable development modal of Wuhan \\

Hong Xu; Yi Wen

2011-01-01

339

MISR Scans the Texas-Oklahoma Border  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

These MISR images of Oklahoma and north Texas were acquired on March 12, 2000 during Terra orbit 1243. The three images on the left, from top to bottom, are from the 70-degree forward viewing camera, the vertical-viewing (nadir) camera, and the 70-degree aftward viewing camera. The higher brightness, bluer tinge, and reduced contrast of the oblique views result primarily from scattering of sunlight in the Earth's atmosphere, though some color and brightness variations are also due to differences in surface reflection at the different angles. The longer slant path through the atmosphere at the oblique angles also accentuates the appearance of thin, high-altitude cirrus clouds.

On the right, two areas from the nadir camera image are shown in more detail, along with notations highlighting major geographic features. The south bank of the Red River marks the boundary between Texas and Oklahoma. Traversing brush-covered and grassy plains, rolling hills, and prairies, the Red River and the Canadian River are important resources for farming, ranching, public drinking water, hydroelectric power, and recreation. Both originate in New Mexico and flow eastward, their waters eventually discharging into the Mississippi River.

A smoke plume to the north of the Ouachita Mountains and east of Lake Eufaula is visible in the detailed nadir imagery. The plume is also very obvious at the 70-degree forward view angle, to the right of center and about one-fourth of the way down from the top of the image.

MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

2000-01-01

340

Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Oklahoma, 2010  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper profiles the student subgroup achievement and gap trends in Oklahoma for 2010. Oklahoma made progress in narrowing achievement gaps for most major subgroups on the End-of-Instruction (EOI) test in Algebra I. Trends in achievement gaps could not be determined for other grades in math, or for any grades in reading, because the state…

Center on Education Policy, 2010

2010-01-01

341

PDC Bits Find Applications in Oklahoma Drilling  

Microsoft Academic Search

Drilling in Oklahoma is difficult by any standards. Polycrystalline diamond cutter (PDC) bits, with proven success drilling soft, homogenous formations common in the North Sea and U.S. Gulf Coast regions, have found some significant ''spot'' applications in Oklahoma. Applications qualified by bit design and application development over the past two (2) years include slim hole drilling in the deep Anadarko

L. A. Offenbacher; J. D. McDermaid; C. R. Patterson

1983-01-01

342

75 FR 18048 - Oklahoma Regulatory Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Oklahoma Department of Mines (ODM, Oklahoma, or...other changes to permit design or plans, but such revision...necessary approval of designs or plans but such permit...regulation under the Mine Safety and Health Act...12866--Regulatory Planning and Review This...

2010-04-09

343

Selenium in Oklahoma ground water and soil  

SciTech Connect

Selenium with a consumption of 2 liters per day (5). The objectives of this study are: (1) to determine the concentrations of Se in Oklahoma ground water and soil samples. (2) to map the geographical distribution of Se species in Oklahoma. (3) to relate groundwater depth, pH and geology with concentration of Se.

Atalay, A.; Vir Maggon, D.

1991-03-30

344

76 FR 59766 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00056  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Oklahoma dated 09/21/2011. Incident: Oklahoma County Wildfire. Incident Period: 08/30/2011 through 09/01/2011. Effective Date: 09/21/2011. Physical Loan Application...

2011-09-27

345

Adult Education in the State of Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The development of adult education in Oklahoma has followed the general American pattern. After World War II, several Oklahoma public schools began adult education programs and later took advantage of Federally supported vocational and literacy programs. However, differing attitudes toward educational purpose and financing between eastern and…

Harrison, Arthur Reading

346

Microlevel determinants of blood pressure among women of two ethnic groups in a periurban area of Kolkata city, India.  

PubMed

Blood pressure (BP) trends vary cross-culturally, and studies on the risk factors associated with hypertension are limited in periurban regions of India. This study was conducted to examine the effect of socioeconomic factors (income, expenditure, activity time) and anthropometric measurements (skinfolds of biceps, triceps, subscapular, supra iliac, and body mass index) on 102 Munda (tribe) and 135 Pod (caste) women of childbearing age in a periurban area of Kolkata city. Results indicate that Munda women had significantly higher diastolic BP in the 30+ age group. However, no difference in the systolic and diastolic BP was observed between the two groups, when the socioanthropometric factors were controlled as covariates. Also, according to the JNC (JNC, 2004, The JNC 7 Report NIH Publication No. 04-5230) classification of hypertension, no significant difference in hypertension was noted between the women of the two social groups. But the risk factors associated with hypertension varied between the two ethnic groups. Expenditure on alcohol and activity time was associated with hypertension among the Munda, while body mass index was significantly associated with hypertension among the Pod women. Alcohol consumption is a rare phenomenon among Indian women. Yet, Munda women in this transitional periurban environment, in spite of high poverty were more inclined to spent their earnings in alcohol consumption (due to their cultural preferences), increasing the risk of hypertension in their childbearing age. PMID:17420997

Ghosh, Rohini

2007-01-01

347

Quality of runoff from small watersheds in the Twin Cities metropolitan area, Minnesota; hydrologic data for 1980  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An investigation of nonpoint-source runoff from small watersheds in the Twin Cities metropolitan area was conducted to define relationships between land use, watershed characteristics, and the quantity, quality, and timing of runoff. Six rural and four urban watersheds ranging in size from 1.22 to 82.9 square miles were studied. Discharge and water-quality data were collected at 19 sites during 1980. Recording instruments and automatic samplers provided continuous discharge records at 17 sites, continuous rainfall records and automatic collection of samples at 12 sites, and wetfall/dryfall precipitation samples at six sites. Sampling was intensified during periods of increased runoff resulting from snowmelt and rainstorms. Primary emphasis was placed on analysis of samples for suspended solids, nutrients, and chemical oxygen demand. Samples were also analyzed for chloride, metals, bacteria, and pesticides. The data are documented in tables containing basin characteristics and land use, daily and unit values for discharge and rainfall, rainfall characteristics, water-quality data for runoff and precipitation, results of laboratory settling test, results of quality assurance tests, daily loads, and storm loads. (USGS)

Payne, G.A.; Ayers, M.A.; Brown, R.G.

1982-01-01

348

Preliminary United States-Mexico border watershed analysis, twin cities area of Nogales, Arizona and Nogales, Sonora  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The United States - Mexico border area faces the challenge of integrating aspects of its binational physical boundaries to form a unified or, at least, compatible natural resource management plan. Specified geospatial components such as stream drainages, mineral occurrences, vegetation, wildlife, and land-use can be analyzed in terms of their overlapping impacts upon one another. Watersheds have been utilized as a basic unit in resource analysis because they contain components that are interrelated and can be viewed as a single interactive ecological system. In developing and analyzing critical regional natural resource databases, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and other federal and non-governmental agencies have adopted a ?watershed by watershed? approach to dealing with such complicated issues as ecosystem health, natural resource use, urban growth, and pollutant transport within hydrologic systems. These watersheds can facilitate the delineation of both large scale and locally important hydrologic systems and urban management parameters necessary for sustainable, diversified land-use. The twin border cities area of Nogales, Sonora and Nogales, Arizona, provide the ideal setting to demonstrate the utility and application of a complete, cross-border, geographic information systems (GIS) based, watershed analysis in the characterization of a wide range of natural resource as well as urban features and their interactions. In addition to the delineation of a unified, cross-border watershed, the database contains sewer/water line locations and status, well locations, geology, hydrology, topography, soils, geomorphology, and vegetation data, as well as remotely sensed imagery. This report is preliminary and part of an ongoing project to develop a GIS database that will be widely accessible to the general public, researchers, and the local land management community with a broad range of application and utility.

Brady, Laura Margaret; Gray, Floyd; Castaneda, Mario; Bultman, Mark; Bolm, Karen Sue

2002-01-01

349

Quantification of NO2 and SO2 emissions from the Houston Ship Channel and Texas City industrial areas during the 2006 Texas Air Quality Study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In August-September 2006, as part of the Second Texas Air Quality Study, NO2 and SO2 emissions from the Houston Ship Channel and Texas City industrial areas were quantified using mobile mini-differential optical absorption spectroscopy instruments. The measured NO2 emissions from the Houston Ship Channel and Texas City industrial areas were 2542 and 452 kg h-1, respectively, yielding NOx emissions 70% and 43%, respectively, above the reported inventory values. Quantified SO2 emissions from the Houston Ship Channel area were 1749 kg h-1 and were found to be 34% above the values reported in the inventory. Short-term variability of NO2 and SO2 emissions was found at the Houston Ship Channel. On 31 August 2006, a plume was detected at the HSC during three consecutive measurements, yielding a HCHO flux of 481 kg h-1. This event has been mainly attributed to photochemical production.

Rivera, Claudia; Mellqvist, Johan; Samuelsson, Jerker; Lefer, Barry; Alvarez, Sergio; Patel, Monica R.

2010-04-01

350

The separation of the Hartland Formation and Ravenswood Granodiorite from the Fordham Gneiss at Cameron's Line in the New York City area  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Recent study of the rocks in City Water Tunnel Number 3 between Roosevelt Island and beneath 34th Street and the 63rd Street subway-rail tunnels at 41st Avenue in Long Island City, as well as study of drill core from other sites in western Queens, establishes that this area of New York City is underlain by the Ravenswood Granodiorite and the Hartland Formation. The Fordham Gneiss does not appear east of the East River at these sites. Cameron's Line can be traced down the east side of the East River, as learned from observations in the tunnels, separating the Middle Proterozoic Fordham Gneiss to the west from the Cambrian and Ordovician Hartland Formation and related Ravenswood Granodiorite to the east. The older, adequately defined, Ravenswood Granodiorite, Hartland Formation, and the Fordham Gneiss, are the rock units that make up the poorly defined Brooklyn gneiss or Brooklyn Injection Gneiss and thus appropriately should supercede these later classifications. -from Authors

Baskerville, C.A.; Mose, D.G.

1989-01-01

351

A Reconnaissance of selected organic compounds in streams in tribal lands in Central Oklahoma, January-February 2009  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey worked in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma on two separate reconnaissance projects carried out concurrently. Both projects entailed the use of passive samplers as a sampling methodology to investigate the detection of selected organic compounds at stream sites in jurisdictional areas of several tribes in central Oklahoma during January-February 2009. The focus of the project with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency was the detection of pesticides and pesticide metabolites using Semipermeable Membrane Devices at five stream sites in jurisdictional areas of several tribes. The project with the Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma focused on the detection of pesticides, pesticide metabolites, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyl compounds, and synthetic organic compounds using Semipermeable Membrane Devices and Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Samplers at two stream sites adjacent to the Kickapoo tribal lands. The seven stream sites were located in central Oklahoma on the Cimarron River, Little River, North Canadian River, Deep Fork, and Washita River. Extracts from SPMDs submerged at five stream sites, in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, were analyzed for 46 pesticides and 6 pesticide metabolites. Dacthal, a pre-emergent herbicide, was detected at all five sites. Pendimethalin, also a pre-emergent, was detected at one site. The insecticides chlorpyrifos and dieldrin were detected at three sites and p,p'-DDE, a metabolite of the insecticide DDT, also was detected at three sites. SPMDs and POCIS were submerged at the upstream edge and downstream edge of the Kickapoo tribal boundaries. Both sites are downstream from the Oklahoma City metropolitan area and multiple municipal wastewater treatment plants. Extracts from the passive samplers were analyzed for 62 pesticides, 10 pesticide metabolites, 3 polychlorinated biphenyl compounds, 35 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and 49 synthetic organic compounds. Ten pesticides and four pesticide metabolites were detected at the upstream site and seven pesticides and four pesticide metabolites were detected at the downstream site. Pesticides detected at both sites were atrazine, chlorpyrifos, dacthal, dieldrin, metolachlor, pendimethalin, and trans-nonachlor. Additionally at the upstream site, heptachlor, pentachlorophenol, and prometon were detected. The pesticide metabolites p,p'-DDE, cis-chlordane, and trans-chlordane also were detected at both sites. Polychlorinated biphenyl compounds aroclor-1016/1242, aroclor-1254, and aroclor-1260 were detected at both sites. The upstream site had 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon detections and the downstream site had 8 detections. Because of chromatographic interference during analysis, a positive identification of 17 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons could not be made. Consequently, there may have been a greater number of these compounds detected at both sites. A total of 36 synthetic organic compounds were detected at the two sites adjacent to the Kickapoo tribal lands. The upstream site had 21 synthetic organic compound detections: three detergent metabolites, two fecal indicators, three flame retardants, seven industrial compounds, five compounds related to personal care products, and beta-sitosterol, a plant sterol. Fifteen synthetic organic compounds were detected at the downstream site and included: one fecal indicator, three flame retardants, six industrial compounds, and five compounds related to personal care products.

Becker, Carol J.

2010-01-01

352

Characterization of the NOx-Ox relationship in a mountain gap rural area of interchange of air masses southeast of the Metropolitan Area of Mexico City  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Varying levels of oxidants (Ox = O3 + NO2) with respect to NOx were registered at three sites in a mountain southeast of the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) in February and March 2011. The Ox-NOx ratio was used to gain a better understanding of the photochemical and transport processes happening over this mountain pass. Relatively high concentrations of O3 (moving average concentrations of 8 hours) exceeded maximum levels of the World Health Organization, and the European Union. The cumulative exceedances above background level of O3 in the one month-long campaign also exceeded the three months accumulative UN-ECE AOT40 critical level for crop protection. It was observed that the level of Ox in the mountain gap sites consisted of two contributions: One, independent of NOx emissions, extremely dominant and considered equivalent to the regional background O3 concentration; the second and much smaller was dependent of NOx local concentrations. Evidence was found that the oxidation of NO provided the major contribution of NO2 to Ox, rather than direct NO2 emissions. The contribution of regional Ox dominated from midmorning to noon when the boundary layer height began to increase due to sunlight heating of the surface leading to the mixing of higher concentrations of O3 above the nighttime thermal inversion. After noon, when the ozone vertical distribution was uniform, the Ox and O3 concentrations reached their maximum; they were very similar with very low levels of NO2. The analysis of wind data collected at the monitoring sites showed that from mid-morning to early afternoon, a northerly weak flow was common. Afterwards stronger southerly winds became dominant bringing in O3 rich air parcels into the atmospheric basin where MCMA is located. The high regional ozone concentrations add evidence for the need of coordinated air quality management policies for the complete central part of Mexico. Keywords: mountain gap, oxidant, ground level ozone, Central Mexico

Ruiz Suarez, L.; Garcia-Yee, J.; Torres-JArdon, R.; Barrera Huertas, H.; Torres-Jaramillo, A.; Ortinez, A.

2013-05-01

353

Variable seismic response to fluid injection in central Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Seismicity in Oklahoma since 2009 has been concentrated in the central portion of the state, in the areas of Jones, Prague, and Luther. These three regions account for ~75% of earthquakes in the 2009-2013 Oklahoma Geological Survey catalog. A swarm in the Jones region began in late 2008, with a maximum magnitude of 4.0, and activity continuing to the present. After relocation, the initially diffuse earthquakes in the Jones swarm delineate multiple subparallel faults. The Wilzetta fault zone ruptured in the Prague region in 2010 and again in 2011, with magnitudes up to Mw5.7, and the Luther region experienced two earthquakes of M4.4 and M4.2, with related aftershocks, in 2013. The earthquakes near Prague have previously been linked to wastewater disposal; here we show that the earthquakes near Jones and Luther may also be induced by deep disposal based on the upsurge in seismicity in central Oklahoma coupled with local relationships to pumping and reservoir structure. The timing of each sequence with respect to injection and the distribution of seismic activity differs, highlighting the variability in seismic response to fluid injection related to local permeability structure.

Keranen, K. M.; Hogan, C.; Savage, H. M.; Abers, G. A.; van der Elst, N.

2013-12-01

354

Ames Hole Oklahoma: Impact-formed petroleum reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

Ames Hole is a 16 km wide circular subsurface structure centered at 361{degrees}5{prime}north, 098{degrees}12{prime}west in Major County, northern Oklahoma. An impact origin is confirmed by the presence of shock metamorphosed mineral grains and impact melt rocks recovered from drill cores and by a negative Bouger gravity anomaly over its center. Buried about three km deep, the structure is composed of shattered, central zone of uplifted Precambrian granite and Cambrian-Ordovician Arbuckle dolomite surrounded by two concentric rims of fractured and brecciated Arbuckle dolomite. The crater is filled with, and covered by, marine sediments of the middle Ordovician Oil Creek shale. The crater was formed during Ordovician time in a shallow sea on the northern shelf of the Anadarko Basin. Restricted water circulation and anoxic conditions within the deep crater promoted precipitation of plankton-rich sediments. This Oil Creek shale became both the source and the sealing rocks for hydrocarbons which migrated into underlying porous target rocks fractured during the impact event. About one hundred wells within the area underlain by the Ames Hole astroblem presently produce nearly half of Oklahoma`s oil and gas.

Mchone, J.F. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

1996-12-31

355

Field trip guide to selected outcrops, Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The Arbuckle Mountains, named for Brigadier General Matthew Arbuckle, are located in south-central Oklahoma. The formations that comprise the Arbuckle Mountains have been extensively studied for hydrocarbon source rock and reservoir rock characteristics that can be applied to the subsurface in the adjacent Anadarko and Ardmore basins. Numerous reports and guidebooks have been written concerning the Arbuckle Mountains. A few important general publications are provided in the list of selected references. The purpose of this handout is to provide general information on the geology of the Arbuckle Mountains and specific information on the four field trip stops, adapted from the literature. The four stops were at: (1) Sooner Rock and Sand Quarry; (2) Woodford Shale; (3) Hunton Anticline and Hunton Quarry; and (4) Tar Sands of Sulfur Area. As part of this report, two papers are included for more detail: Paleomagnetic dating of basinal fluid migration, base-metal mineralization, and hydrocarbon maturation in the Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma and Laminated black shale-bedded chert cyclicity in the Woodford Formation, southern Oklahoma.

NONE

1991-11-17

356

Climate Change Impacts on the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer in South-Central Oklahoma due to Projected Precipitation Variations  

E-print Network

Precipitation Variations on the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer in South-Central Oklahoma due to Projected Climate Change Impacts Cesalea N. Osborne Environmental Science Haskell Indian Nations University This project was sponsored by Kiksapa Consulting... through NASA CAN NNX10AU65A The Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer spans five counties in south-central Oklahoma: Carter, Coal, Johnston, Murray, and Pontotoc Base Data • Aquifer study area, roads, rural/non-rural communities, state/county boundaries Methodology...

Osborne, Cesalea

2014-11-19

357

Testing a Mahalanobis distance model of black bear habitat use in the Ouachita Mountains of Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Regional wildlife-habitat models are commonly developed but rarely tested with truly independent data. We tested a published habitat model for black bears {Ursus americanus) with new data collected in a different site in the same ecological region (i.e., Ouachita Mountains of Arkansas and Oklahoma, USA). We used a Mahalanobis distance model developed from relocations of black bears in Arkansas to produce a map layer of Mahalanobis distances on a study area in neighboring Oklahoma. We tested this modeled map layer with relocations of black bears on the Oklahoma area. The distributions of relocations of female black bears were consistent with model predictions. We conclude that this modeling approach can be used to predict regional suitability for a species of interest.

Hellgren, E.C.; Bales, S.L.; Gregory, M.S.; Leslie, D.M., Jr.; Clark, J.D.

2007-01-01

358

Subsurface temperature anomalies as a key to petroleum-producing areas in the Cherokee and Forest City Basins, eastern Kansas?  

SciTech Connect

The relation of subsurface temperature to `plain-type fold` structure in the Midcontinent (USA) as an exploration tool has been speculated on for a long time. Structural highs, termed `plains-type folds,` are partly the result of differential compaction of sediments over rigid crystalline fault blocks in the Precambrian basement. In the Midcontinent, bottom-hole temperature (BHT) data, temperatures measured in drillstem tests (DSTs), and structural data are abundant. In the Cherokee and Forest City Basins, we analyzed BHT data by depth and stratigraphic unit (Cambro-Ordovician Arbuckle carbonates; Mississippian carbonates; and Perm-Pennsylvanian clastics). By relating the BHTs to DSTs, it was noted that the thermal disturbance inherent in BHT by drilling is minor and comparable within a formation. Also, the signal-noise ratio of BHTs could be improved utilizing the large data set. Although the resulting BHT formation gradients show unexpected values from the thermal conductivity in the carbonates and from the evaluated temperature disturbance by the drilling process, analysis of the BHT spatial pattern shows a coincidence of structural highs and temperature anomalies both in the clastics and in the carbonates. These BHT anomalies are outlined by values higher than the regional temperature trend. We attribute the anomalies partly to the insulation effect of petroleum (which may include the self-generation of heat) and partly to the movement of fluids vertically through the fracture and fault system created in the sedimentary veneer. Numerous examples from the oil- and gas-producing areas in eastern Kansas show that the nature of origin of fluids contained in a porous medium can alter local geothermal conditions.

Merriam, D.F. [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States); Foerster, A. [GeoForschungsZentrum Posdam (Germany)

1995-09-01

359

Mutagenic activity of airborne particulate matter (PM10) in a sugarcane farming area (Araraquara city, southeast Brazil).  

PubMed

Brazil contains 25% of the total land planted with sugarcane in the world and is thus one of the major producers. The annual burning of sugarcane fields prior to harvesting emits huge amounts of pyrogenic particles. Biomass burning is an important primary and secondary source of aerosol particles. The presence of carbonaceous particles in the inhalable size range makes it important to study this fraction in view of the possible effects on human health and the climate. In this study, the mutagenic activity associated with inhalable airborne particulate matter (PM(10)) collected on air filters in a sugarcane-growing area near the city of Araraquara (SE Brazil) was determined. The extracts were dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide and tested for mutagenicity by the Ames plate incorporation test with Salmonella typhimurium YG1024 in the presence and absence of the S9 mixture. To assess the association between mutagenicity and PM(10), samples were collected in sugarcane harvesting and non-harvesting periods of the year. Significant mutagenicity was detected in organic solvent extracts of all samples, with differences between the two periods. The highest values of mutagenic potency (13.45 and 5.72 revertants/m(3) of air in the absence and presence of the S9 mixture, respectively) were observed during the harvest. In this period, a Teflon™-coated glass-fiber air filter trapped 67.0 ?g of particulate matter per m(3) of air. In the non-harvest period, on the same type of filter, only 20.9 ?g of particulate matter was found per m(3). The mutagenic potencies at this time were 1.30 and 1.04 revertants/m(3) of air, in the absence and presence of the S9 mixture, respectively. Period, concentration of PM(10) and mutagenicity were associated with each other. For routine monitoring of mutagenicity in the atmosphere, the use of YG1024 tester strain without metabolic activation (S9) is recommended. PMID:21481367

de Andrade, Sandro José; Varella, Soraya Duarte; Pereira, Gener Tadeu; Zocolo, Guilherme Julião; de Marchi, Mary Rosa Rodrigues; Varanda, Eliana Aparecida

2011-05-01

360

Emissions of black carbon and co-pollutants emitted from diesel vehicles in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Black carbon emitted from freight, public transport, and heavy duty trucks sources is linked with adverse effects on human health. In addition, the control of emissions of black carbon, an important short-lived climate forcing agent (SLCF), has recently been considered as one of the key strategies for mitigating regional near-term climate change. Despite the availability of new emissions control technologies for reducing emissions from diesel-powered mobile sources, their introduction is still not widespread in many urban areas and there is a need to characterize real-world emission rates of black carbon from this key source. The emissions of black carbon, organic carbon, and other gaseous and particle pollutants from diesel-powered mobile sources in Mexico were characterized by deploying a mobile laboratory equipped with real-time instrumentation in Mexico City as part of the SLCFs-Mexico 2013 project. From February 25-28 of 2013 the emissions from selected diesel-powered vehicles were measured in both controlled experiments and real-world on-road driving conditions. Sampled vehicles had several emissions levels technologies, including: EPA98, EPA03, EPA04, EURO3-5, and Hybrid. All vehicles were sampled using diesel fuel and several vehicles were measured using both diesel and biodiesel fuels. Additional measurements included the use of a remote sensing unit for the co-sampling of all tested vehicles, and the installation and operation of a Portable Emissions Measurements System (PEMS) for the measurement of emissions from a test vehicle. We will present inter-comparisons of the emission factors obtained among the various vehicle technologies that were sampled during the experiment as well as the inter-comparison of results from the various sampling platforms. The results can be used to

Zavala, Miguel; Molina, Luisa T.; Fortner, Edward; Knighton, Berk; Herndon, Scott; Yacovitch, Tara; Floerchinger, Cody; Roscioli, Joseph; Kolb, Charles; Mejia, Jose Antonio; Sarmiento, Jorge; Paramo, Victor Hugo; Zirath, Sergio; Jazcilevich, Aron

2014-05-01

361

Barriers to use of modern contraceptives among women in an inner city area of Osogbo metropolis, Osun state, Nigeria  

PubMed Central

Objectives To determine the knowledge and attitudes on modern contraceptive use of women living in an inner city area of Osogbo. Materials and methods Three hundred and fifty nine women of childbearing age were studied utilizing a community-based, descriptive, cross-sectional study design. A multistage random sampling technique was used in recruiting respondents to the study. A four-part questionnaire was applied dually, by interviewers and by respondents’ self administration, and the data was analyzed using the SPSS software version 17.0. Results The mean age of respondents was 28.6 ± 6.65 years. The majority (90.3%) of respondents were aware of modern methods of family planning (FP), 76.0% claimed awareness of where to obtain FP services, and 74.9% knew of at least five methods. However, only 30.6% had ever used contraceptives, while only 13.1% were current users. The most frequently used method was the male condom. The commonly perceived barriers accounting for low use of FP methods were fear of perceived side effects (44.0%), ignorance (32.6%), misinformation (25.1%), superstition (22.0%), and culture (20.3%). Some reasons were proffered for respondents’ nonuse of modern contraception. Predictors of use of modern contraceptives include the awareness of a place of FP service provision, respondents’ approval of the use of contraceptives, higher education status, and being married. Conclusion Most of the barriers reported appeared preventable and removable and may be responsible for the reported low point prevalence of use of contraceptives. It is recommended that community-based behavioral-change communication programs be instituted, aimed at improving the perceptions of women with respect to bridging knowledge gaps about contraceptive methods and to changing deep-seated negative beliefs related to contraceptive use in Nigeria. PMID:24143124

Asekun-Olarinmoye, EO; Adebimpe, WO; Bamidele, JO; Odu, OO; Asekun-Olarinmoye, IO; Ojofeitimi, EO

2013-01-01

362

Measurements of volatile organic compounds emitted from plants in the metropolitan area of São Paulo City , Brazil.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The presence of the biogenic hydrocarbons in an NO_x-containing atmosphere can enhance ozone generation and the impact of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from vegetation on atmospheric chemistry has been investigated. No study of VOC emission rates from plant species has been carried out in São Paulo City, Brazil, prior to this work. This study is part of a three-years project on biogenic volatile organic compounds emissions from species of plants found in the vegetation of the São Paulo metropolitan area. Typical plants (Alchornea sidifolia, Cupania oblongifolia, Cecropia pachystachia, Casearia sylvestris, Machaerium villosum, Croton floribundus, Myrcia rostrata, Solanum erianthum and Ficus insípida) were selected and identical species were studied in urban, sub-urban and forest regions. Biogenic hydrocarbons were determined placing branches of plants in enclosures and measuring the accumulation of emitted compounds in an all-Teflon chamber, the cuvette system. Measuring ambient VOC concentration adsorptive preconcentration, followed by GC-MS after thermal desorption of the sample, was employed to determine components heavier than C_5. Collection of carbonyl compounds on 2, 4-dinitrophenylhydrazine coated particles followed by HPLC-UV was used to analyze low molecular weight carbonyl compounds. Emissions rates of isoprene, a-pinene, camphene and limonene ranged from 0.01 to 2.16 ?g C/h.g and emissions rates of aldehydes (C_1 - C_6), acrolein, methacrolein, 2-butanone and acetone ranged from 0.04 to 4.20 ?g C/h.g. Ambient and chamber temperatures, relative humidity, light intensity, O_3 and NO_x were monitored during experiments.

Carvalho, L.; Pisani, S.; Pool, C.; Vasconcellos, P.

2003-04-01

363

Feasibility and acceptability study of rainwater use to the acute water shortage areas in Dhaka City, Bangladesh  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study explored the feasibility and acceptability of harvested rainwater in rural communities of Bangladesh as well as\\u000a densely populated City like Dhaka, using simple and low-cost technology. As a part of this study, a field survey was conducted\\u000a in the water-scarce Dhaka City. Four slums were selected for conducting questionnaire survey. A questionnaire was furnished\\u000a to know some information

M. M. Islam; F. N.-F. Chou; M. R. Kabir

2011-01-01

364

Ground-water hydrology of the Dade City area, Pasco County, Florida : with emphasis on the hydrologic effects of pumping from the Floridan aquifer  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Dade City area, northeast Pasco County, Florida, is an area of about 260 square miles. Of the approximately 32 million gallons per day pumped from the Floridan aquifer in the area in 1975, about 16 million gallons per day were pumped from an area of about 0.25 square miles by a citrus processing plant. There are essentially two producing zones in the Floridan aquifer in the Dade City area. The upper zone is from about 10 feet above to about 150 feet below National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929 , and the lower zone from about 300 to about 500 feet below NGVD of 1929. There is evidence of hydraulic interconnection of the upper and lower zones of the Floridan aquifer. This appears to be highly significant in terms of the geohydrology of the Floridan aquifer in the area, particularly with regard to its ground-water flow pattern, water quality, and aquifer hydraulic characteristics. In the immediate vicinity of the citrus processing plant, aquifer transmissivity may range from 200,000 to as much as 400,000 feet squared per day. It is probable the Floridan is only semiconfined in the immediate vicinity of the citrus processing plant. High aquifer transmissivity in the area is the reason why there are only a few feet of drawdown of the Floridan 's potentiometric level even near the center of the well field. (USGS)

Tibbals, C.H.; Anderson, Warren; Laughlin, Charles P.

1980-01-01

365

[Concentrations of mercury in ambient air in wastewater irrigated area of Tianjin City and its accumulation in leafy vegetables].  

PubMed

Gaseous Hg can evaporate and enter the plants through the stomata of plat leaves, which will cause a serious threat to local food safety and human health. For the risk assessment, this study aimed to characterize atmospheric mercury (Hg) as well as its accumulation in 5 leafy vegetables (spinach, edible amaranth, rape, lettuce, allium tuberosum) from sewage-irrigated area of Tianjin City. Bio-monitoring sites were located in paddy (wastewater irrigation for 30 a), vegetables (wastewater irrigation for 15 a) and grass (control) fields. Results showed that after long-term wastewater irrigation, the mean values of mercury content in paddy and vegetation fields were significantly higher than the local background value and the national soil environment quality standard value for mercury in grade I, but were still lower than grade II. Soil mercury contents in the studied control grass field were between the local background value and the national soil environment quality standard grade I . Besides, the atmospheric environment of paddy and vegetation fields was subjected to serious mercury pollution. The mean values of mercury content in the atmosphere of paddy and vegetation fields were 71.3 ng x m(-3) and 39.2 ng x m(-3), respectively, which were markedly higher than the reference gaseous mercury value on the north sphere of the earth (1.5-2.0 ng x m(-3)). The mean value of ambient mercury in the control grass fields was 9.4 ng x m(-3). In addition, it was found that the mercury content in leafy vegetables had a good linear correlation with the ambient total gaseous mercury (the data was transformed into logarithms as the dataset did not show a normal distribution). The comparison among 5 vegetables showed that the accumulations of mercury in vegetables followed this order: spinach > edible amaranth > allium tuberosum > rape > lettuce. Median and mean values of mercury contents in spinach and edible amaranth were greater than the hygienic standard for the allowable limit of mercury in food. Spinach appeared to accumulate more mercury than the other four vegetables, in which the median and mean mercury content were both higher than 20 ?g x kg(-1). The mercury concentrations in rape, lettuce and allium tuberosum were lower than the standard. Moreover, test results indicated that the Hg content in leafy vegetables was mainly the gaseous mercury through leaf adsorption but not the Hg particulates. This study clearly manifested that there should be a great concern on the pollution risk of both air-and soil borne mercury when cultivating leafy vegetables in long-term wastewater-irrigated area. PMID:25639114

Zheng, Shun-An; Han, Yun-Lei; Zheng, Xiang-Qun

2014-11-01

366

REGISTRATION PACKET 9th Annual Oklahoma Native American Youth Language Fair  

E-print Network

REGISTRATION PACKET 9th Annual Oklahoma Native American Youth Language Fair, Lists, and Entry Forms to: Oklahoma Native American Youth Language Fair Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum Oklahoma Native American Youth Language Fair For questions about the ONAYLF, forms

Oklahoma, University of

367

Characterization of Fine Particulate Matter (PM) and Secondary PM Precursor Gases in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area  

SciTech Connect

This project was one of three collaborating grants funded by DOE/ASP to characterize the fine particulate matter (PM) and secondary PM precursors in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) during the MILAGRO Campaign. The overall effort of MCMA-2006, one of the four components, focused on i) examination of the primary emissions of fine particles and precursor gases leading to photochemical production of atmospheric oxidants and secondary aerosol particles; ii) measurement and analysis of secondary oxidants and secondary fine PM production, with particular emphasis on secondary organic aerosol (SOA), and iii) evaluation of the photochemical and meteorological processes characteristic of the Mexico City Basin. The collaborative teams pursued the goals through three main tasks: i) analyses of fine PM and secondary PM precursor gaseous species data taken during the MCMA-2002/2003 campaigns and preparation of publications; ii) planning of the MILAGRO Campaign and deployment of the instrument around the MCMA; and iii) analysis of MCMA-2006 data and publication preparation. The measurement phase of the MILAGRO Campaign was successfully completed in March 2006 with excellent participation from the international scientific community and outstanding cooperation from the Mexican government agencies and institutions. The project reported here was led by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology/Molina Center for Energy and the Environment (MIT/MCE2) team and coordinated with DOE/ASP-funded collaborators at Aerodyne Research Inc., University of Colorado at Boulder and Montana State University. Currently 24 papers documenting the findings from this project have been published. The results from the project have improved significantly our understanding of the meteorological and photochemical processes contributing to the formation of ozone, secondary aerosols and other pollutants. Key findings from the MCMA-2003 include a vastly improved speciated emissions inventory from on-road vehicles: the MCMA motor vehicles produce abundant amounts of primary PM, elemental carbon, particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide and a wide range of air toxics; the feasibility of using eddy covariance techniques to measure fluxes of volatile organic compounds in an urban core and a valuable tool for validating local emissions inventory; a much better understanding of the sources and atmospheric loadings of volatile organic compounds; the first spectroscopic detection of glyoxal in the atmosphere; a unique analysis of the high fraction of ambient formaldehyde from primary emission sources; characterization of ozone formation and its sensitivity to VOCs and NOx; a much more extensive knowledge of the composition, size distribution and atmospheric mass loadings of both primary and secondary fine PM, including the fact that the rate of MCMA SOA production greatly exceeded that predicted by current atmospheric models; evaluations of significant errors that can arise from standard air quality monitors for O3 and NO2; and the implementation of an innovative Markov Chain Monte Carlo method for inorganic aerosol modeling as a powerful tool to analyze aerosol data and predict gas phase concentrations where these are unavailable. During the MILAGRO Campaign the collaborative team utilized a combination of central fixed sites and a mobile laboratory deployed throughout the MCMA to representative urban and boundary sites to measure trace gases and fine particles. Analysis of the extensive 2006 data sets has confirmed the key findings from MCMA-2002/2003; additionally MCMA-2006 provided more detailed gas and aerosol chemistry and wider regional scale coverage. Key results include an updated 2006 emissions inventory; extension of the flux system to measure fluxes of fine particles; better understanding of the sources and apportionment of aerosols, including contribution from biomass burning and industrial sources; a comprehensive evaluation of metal containing particles in a complex urban environment; identification of a close correlation between

Luisa T. Molina, Rainer Volkamer, Benjamin de Foy, Wenfang Lei, Miguel Zavala, Erik Velasco; Mario J. Molina

2008-10-31

368

A Total Lightning Perspective of the 20 May 2013 Moore, Oklahoma Supercell  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the early afternoon of 20 May 2013, a storm initiated to the west-southwest of Newcastle, Oklahoma. This storm would rapidly intensify into the parent supercell of the tornado that struck the city of Moore, Oklahoma. This article describes what contributions total lightning observations from the Oklahoma Lightning Mapping Array could provide to operational forecasters had these observations been available in real-time. This effort includes a focus on the GOES-R pseudo-geostationary lightning mapper demonstration product as well as the NASA SPoRT / Meteorological Development Laboratory's total lightning tracking tool. These observations and tools identified several contributions. Two distinct lightning jumps at 1908 and 1928 UTC provided a lead time of 19 minutes ahead of severe hail and 26 minutes ahead of the Moore, Oklahoma tornado's touchdown. These observations provide strong situational awareness to forecasters, as the lightning jumps are related to the rapid strengthening of the storm's updraft and mesocyclone and serve as a precursor to the stretching of the storm vortex ahead severe weather.

Stano, Geoffrey T.; Schultz, Christopher J.; Carey, Lawrence D.; MacGorman, Don R.; Calhoun, Kristin M.

2014-01-01

369

77 FR 26598 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00059  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Oklahoma. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes and Hail. DATES: Effective April 26, 2012. Incident Period: April 13, 2012 through April 15, 2012. Physical Loan...

2012-05-04

370

PDC bits find applications in Oklahoma drilling  

SciTech Connect

Drilling in Oklahoma is difficult by any standards. Polycrystalline diamond cutter (PDC) bits, with proven success drilling soft, homogenous formations common in the North Sea and U.S. Gulf Coast regions, have found some significant ''spot'' applications in Oklahoma. Applications qualified by bit design and application development over the past two (2) years include slim hole drilling in the deep Anadarko Basin, deviation control in Southern Oklahoma, drilling on mud motors, drilling in oil base mud, drilling cement, sidetracking, coring and some rotary drilling in larger hole sizes. PDC bits are formation sensitive, and care must be taken in selecting where to run them in Oklahoma. Most of the successful runs have been in water base mud drilling hard shales and soft, unconsolidated sands and lime, although bit life is often extended in oil-base muds.

Offenbacher, L.A.; McDermaid, J.D.; Patterson, C.R.

1983-02-01

371

76 FR 23522 - Oklahoma Regulatory Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...limitations affecting post-mine contours; adding a subsidence...Oklahoma Department of Mines, 2915 N. Classen...minimum criteria and design certification. Their...relation to the underground mine workings. The full...12866--Regulatory Planning and Review This...

2011-04-27

372

76 FR 77578 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00057  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Oklahoma dated 12/07/2011. Incident: Earthquakes. Incident Period: 11/05/2011 and continuing. Effective Date: 12/07/2011. Physical Loan Application...

2011-12-13

373

77 FR 61651 - Oklahoma Disaster # OK-00067  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of OKLAHOMA dated 10/01/2012. Incident: Multiple Wildfires. Incident Period: 07/30/2012 Through 08/12/2012. Effective Date: 10/01/2012. Physical Loan...

2012-10-10

374

Digital geologic map of Beaver County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This data set consists of digital data and accompanying documentation for the surficial geology of Beaver County, Oklahoma. The original data are from the Hydrogeologic Map, sheet 1 of 3, included in the U.S. Geological Survey publication, Reconnaissance of the Water Resources of Beaver County, Oklahoma, Hydrologic Investigations Atlas HA-450, Morton and Goemaat, 1973. The geology was compiled by S.L. Schoff, 1953.

Cederstrand, J.R.

1997-01-01

375

Influence of psychiatric morbidity and sociodemographic determinants on use of service in a catchment area in the city of São Paulo, Brazil  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Recent population-based studies in Latin American and the Caribbean (LAC) countries brought evidence of the growing burden\\u000a of mental illness in this region. The objective of this study is to examine determinants of health service utilization by\\u000a individuals with psychiatric disorders in a defined area in the city of São Paulo, Brazil.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Method  Data were derived from São Paulo Catchment Area

Laura Helena Andrade; Maria Carmen Viana; Luis Fernando Farah Tófoli; Yuan-Pang Wang

2008-01-01

376

Oklahoma Space Industry Development Authority  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The purpose of this grant was to increase the awareness of students of space sciences and commerce through experimentation. This objective was carried out through the award and administration, by OSIDA, the Oklahoma Space Industry Development Authority, of eleven smaller grants to fund thirteen projects at schools determined by competitive application. Applications were graded on potential outreach, experimentation objectives and impact on students' awareness of space sciences. We chose projects from elementary, middle and high schools as well as colleges that would encourage students through research and experimentation to consider education and careers in related disciplines. Each organization did not receive an equal share of the grant; instead, OSIDA distributed the money to each project based on the organization's need. A copy of the dispersement record is enclosed with this final grant report. The projects covered topics such as: space colonization, space stations, constellations, model rocketry, and space commerce.

2002-01-01

377

Microbial and geochemical quality of shallow well water in high-density areas in Mzuzu City in Malawi  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In Malawi, shallow wells constitute the most important water sources for domestic purposes. However, increasing human population coupled with poor sanitation and infrastructure is undermining the quality of shallow well water. An assessment of microbial and geochemical quality of shallow well water in high-density areas of Zolozolo, Ching’ambo and Chiputula in Mzuzu City, Northern Malawi, has been carried out. The study aimed at characterising domestic water sources, identifying possible sources of water contamination and determining levels of microbial and chemical contamination. Arc-view GIS was used to map the water sources. A questionnaire survey was carried out to elicit information on characteristics of drinking water sources. Water samples were collected from quasi-randomly selected shallow wells and analysed for microbial and chemical parameters using standard methods. HCA, performed using R-programme, was used to group sampled sites according to their bio-physicochemical characteristics. Compliance of the water with MBS/WHO water quality guidelines was determined. The WQI was computed to turn multifaceted data obtained from laboratory analyses into simple information that is comprehensible and useable by the public to assess overall quality of water at a specific water points. The GW-chart was used to show hydrogeochemical water types from each sampled site. Microbial analysis revealed that water from 96.3% of shallow wells recorded faecal coliforms ranging from 129 to 920 cfu per 100 ml which were significantly higher than the Malawi Standards and WHO thresholds. In general, shallow well water is of low mineralisation (EC range 80-500 ?S cm-1), with hydrogeochemical facies dominated by Ca-HCO3, which evolves to Ca-Cl water type. The shallow well water registered a WQI range of 50.16-66.04%, with a medium WQ rating. This suggested that the water obtained from the shallow wells is unsuitable for direct human consumption. It was observed that 100% of the shallow wells were at risk of pollution from onsite sanitation because of their proximity to sanitary facilities. It was strongly recommended that onsite treatment interventions have to be mobilised and initiated to protect the households from further possible consequences of using the water.

Msilimba, Golden; Wanda, Elijah M. M.

378

Low-flow characteristics of the Mississippi River upstream from the Twin Cities Metropolitan Area, Minnesota, 1932-2007  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Metropolitan Council, conducted a study to characterize regional low flows during 1932?2007 in the Mississippi River upstream from the Twin Cities metropolitan area in Minnesota and to describe the low-flow profile of the Mississippi River between the confluence of the Crow River and St. Anthony Falls. Probabilities of extremely low flow were estimated for the streamflow-gaging station (Mississippi River near Anoka) and the coincidence of low-flow periods, defined as the extended periods (at least 7 days) when all the daily flows were less than the 10th percentile of daily mean flows for the entire period of record, at four selected streamflow-gaging stations located upstream. The likelihood of extremely low flows was estimated by a superposition method for the Mississippi River near Anoka that created 5,776 synthetic hydrographs resulting in a minimum synthetic low flow of 398 cubic feet per second at a probability of occurrence of 0.0002 per year. Low-flow conditions at the Mississippi River above Anoka were associated with low-flow conditions at two or fewer of four upstream streamflow-gaging stations 42 percent of the time, indicating that sufficient water is available within the basin for many low flows and the occurrence of extremely low-flows is small. However, summer low-flow conditions at the Mississippi River above Anoka were almost always associated with low-stage elevations in three or more of the six upper basin reservoirs. A low-flow profile of the Mississippi River between the confluence of the Crow River and St. Anthony Falls was completed using a real-time kinematic global positioning system, and the water-surface profile was mapped during October 8?9, 2008, and annotated with local landmarks. This was done so that water-use planners could relate free-board elevations of selected water utility structures to the lowest flow conditions during 2008.

Kessler, Erich; Lorenz, David L.

2010-01-01

379

High School to College-Going Rates for Oklahoma High School Graduates to Oklahoma Colleges: Linear College-Going Rate, Combined College-Going Rate. Oklahoma High School Educational Indicators Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Four tables report on college-going rates for high school graduates in Oklahoma from 1989 to 1993. The report cites the Oklahoma State Department of Education and the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education as data sources. The tables report on "Linear College-Going Rates" of those who go directly from Oklahoma high schools to Oklahoma

Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education, Oklahoma City.

380

Measuring visual exposure to smoking behaviours: a viewshed analysis of smoking at outdoor bars and cafés across a capital city’s downtown area  

PubMed Central

Background The influence of visual exposure to health-related behaviours, such as smoking, is increasingly acknowledged in the public health literature. Social contagion or normalisation is thought to operate through the visibility of those behaviours. There has been a lack of systematic and comprehensive approaches to quantifying visual exposure to these behaviours over a relatively large geographic area. We describe the novel application of a geographic tool, viewshed analysis, to estimate visual exposure to smoking outside bars/cafés across a downtown area. Methods Smoking was observed for different times and days of the week at 14 outdoor areas of bars/cafés throughout downtown Wellington, New Zealand. We used these data to extrapolate to other bars/cafés with outdoor seating. We then conducted viewshed analyses to estimate visual exposure to smoking at bars/cafés for all public outdoor spaces. Results We observed a smoking point prevalence of 16%. Visibility analyses indicated that estimated visible smoking was highest in the evenings (7-8 pm), where the average values across Wednesday and Friday ranged from zero up to 92 visible smokers (mean = 1.44). Estimated visible smoking at midday ranged from zero to 13 (mean = 0.27). Values were also higher at the end of the week compared with midweek in the evening. Maps indicate that streets with high levels of retail shops and hospitality areas had high values of estimated visible smokers, particularly in the evening where numbers were consistently above 50. Conclusions This paper highlights a useful method for measuring the extent of visual exposure to smoking behaviours across relatively large areas using a geospatial approach. Applying this method in other locations would require consideration of place-specific characteristics which impact on visibility and could be improved through more sophisticated extrapolation of observational data across the study area. The findings of this and similar research could ultimately support the expansion of smokefree public spaces. PMID:24708883

2014-01-01

381

City Lore  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Based in New York, the City Lore organization is a nonprofit organization devoted to promoting the cultural heritage of the city through a variety of programs and events. Two online exhibits dealing with the Puerto Rican Day parade and the making of lace highlight some of their more recent work. A resources link on the site leads to several helpful articles that highlight the study of urban culture and folklore, along with a list of related links. One of the best parts of the site is an area dealing with New York Favorites, which is essentially a list of places and sights that local New Yorkers have submitted to the site. Finally, the site contains City Lore's online People's Hall of Fame, which recognizes the life-long contributions of persons who have dedicated themselves to the maintenance and practice of a number of folkways and traditions.

382

The Significance of Stratigraphy and Lithology in Landform Development in Washington County, Oklahoma  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This winning entry in the museum's Young Naturalist Awards 1999 by Katie, a 15 year old student from Oklahoma, takes a look at the development of Washington County, Oklahoma. Katie's essay has a field-journal focus and explains stratigraphy and lithology, two of the main factors controlling the shape of the land in her county. She provides an overview of the six different formations in the Skiatook Group and the five different formations that outcrop in the Bartlesville area. There are descriptions of the many rock samples she took for this study.

383

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets  

E-print Network

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources · Oklahoma State University NREM-2874 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets are also available on our website at: http and Management Terrence G. Bidwell Professor and Extension Specialist Rangeland Ecology and Management Case R

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

384

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets  

E-print Network

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources · Oklahoma State University HLA-6435 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets are also available on our website at: http://osufacts.okstate.edu Landscaping and Gardening for Birds David Hillock Assistant Extension Specialist, Consumer Horticulturist Mike

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

385

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets  

E-print Network

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources · Oklahoma State University EPP-7461 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets are also available on our website at: http://osufacts.okstate.edu Brad Kard Extension Pesticide Coordinator Kevin Shelton Extension Coordinator Charles Luper Extension

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

386

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets  

E-print Network

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources · Oklahoma State University HLA-6430 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets are also available on our website at: http://osufacts.okstate.edu Stephanie A. Smith Entomology and Wildlife Extension Program Assistant Ron Masters Extension Wildlife

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

387

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets  

E-print Network

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources · Oklahoma State University NREM-9201 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets are also available on our website at: http,theproductionofaquaticanimalsandplants under controlled conditions, is the fastest growing form of alternative agriculture in the United States

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

388

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets  

E-print Network

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources · Oklahoma State University EPP-7602 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets are also available on our website at: http://osufacts.okstate.edu Eric Rebek Associate Professor/State Extension Specialist Horticultural Entomology Jennifer Olson

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

389

Automation of Oklahoma School Library Media Centers: Directory of Computer Applications.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This directory is designed to allow media specialists in regional areas of Oklahoma to share their experiences in computer applications for libraries. The first of two sections lists schools using computers for circulation, computerized catalogs, library management, CD-ROM, laser disk programs, and online information systems. Schools are listed…

Estes-Rickner, Bettie, Ed.

390

State Teacher Policy Yearbook: What States Can Do to Retain Effective New Teachers, 2008. Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents the Oklahoma edition of the National Council on Teacher Quality's 2008 "State Teacher Policy Yearbook". The 2008 "Yearbook" focuses on how state policies impact the retention of effective new teachers. This policy evaluation is broken down into three areas that encompass 15 goals. Broadly, these goals examine the impact of…

National Council on Teacher Quality, 2008

2008-01-01

391

Mapping geological at risk areas in the city of São Paulo: issues and results from the largest risk survey in Brazil  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the City of São Paulo, the first reports of accidents resulting from landslides are directly related to urban expansion that has been recorded since the 30s. Areas of major environmental fragility, such as slopes and stream-banks, have also ended up being occupied without proper planning. The increased number of deaths due to landslides in the 80s already indicated the need for intervention at these sites by the public authorities. It was important to act to prevent these disasters, not only emergency assistance to victimized families. Therefore, in 1989 the first systematic and official survey on the City's at-risk areas was made. At the time, the at-risk sites had been still unknown, except for the occurrence records and press reports. While some areas were evaluated by experts, others appeared or expanded without any control. The surveys pace could not definitely follow the growth and the density of favelas, and some communities started to trigger the first records of accidents in areas hitherto stable. Considering the universe to be studied and the detail level of the work, it was necessary to use specific methodology to enable evaluation of the entire City in a relatively short period of time. For that purpose,mapping activities were carried out in five phases and involved about 80 professionals in the fields of geology, engineering, architecture, geography, civil defense, and housing, who participated directly or indirectly in all stages of work. Thus, the mapping that has recently been completed by the Municipality of São Paulo and by the Institute for Technological Research of São Paulo State is today the largest geological-risk database in the country. Besides technical information, the survey also shows the types of intervention to be implemented according to the degree of risk and the type of verified occupation, vital data to prioritizing the public-authorities actions. Currently, among the 1,602 favelas and informal settlements in the city, 407 (25%) occupy areas with some occurrence probability of mass-movement processes (landslides, erosion, and fall of stone blocks). Together, the assessed areas cover about 13.5 km², which corresponds to about 1% of the City's territory, although they all are located in the outskirts regions. 105,816 homes were analyzed and, currently, 8% of this total is located in the most critical areas, classified as very high risk, which require immediate actions in order to stabilize them; 19% were classified as high risk and the rest - 73% - show more stable situation. Currently, about 115,000 people live in landslide-risk areas in the capital. The results, now complete and current, have been making possible reassessment and adjustment of the low-income intervention projects by the government, prioritizing housing, social-educational infrastructure, and basic-sanitation actions in areas of greatest susceptibility. The program of slum upgrading, the relocation of 5.000 families to safe places and actions participatory monitoring with communities deserves mention and were only possible after the correct diagnosis of risk situations in the city that, despite the large population, has no record deaths from landslides for more than two years.

Pascarelli, Luciana; Macedo, Eduardo

2013-04-01

392

Formation of Land Use Order in Hamamatsu City under the Original Criteria of the Farm Land Exclusion from the Agricultural Promotion Area  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

While zoning has been practiced to prevent sprawling development and to preserve collective farmland under the Agriculture Promotion Act, The Agricultural Promotion Area (APA) has been reduced in area by the action of the Farm Land Exclusion from the APA (EAPA) aiming at urban-uses. Since the EAPA has a great impact on the regional land use, appropriate criteria application techniques ought to be formulated at the transaction level. However, most local governments seem to have no strategic measure so far. Hamamatsu city, meanwhile, has introduced a unique standard upon which approval of the EAPA aptitude is based in 2003. Since the number of EAPA registration was relatively large in Hamamatsu city owing to the zone bordering on the line of land which a building has erected the officials' willingness to establish an objective standard was high. In this research, we verified the effect of the criteria application over the land use ordering, and made proposals for improvement of the present state through the examination of the EAPA criterion application of Hamamatsu city.

Arita, Hiroyuki; Miyazawa, Shingo

393

Responding to Terrorism Victims: Oklahoma City and Beyond.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report identifies the special measures needed to protect the rights and meet the needs of victims of a large-scale terrorist attack involving mass casualties. In particular, it demonstrates efforts required to ensure an effective response to victims' rights and their short- and long-term emotional and psychological needs as an integral part…

Dinsmore, Janet

394

The spatial impact of EU Pan-European transport axes: City clusters formation in the Balkan area and developmental perspectives  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article explores the spatial and development implications of the Pan-European Transport Axes in the Balkans. For that purpose, the potential Development Poles and Axes are determined, on the basis of size, the location of cities, their interconnection and their role as hubs of the Pan-European axes. This is achieved by means of the formation and implementation of a methodology

Athanasios Papadaskalopoulos; Anastasios Karaganis; Manolis Christofakis

2005-01-01

395

Variation of urban momentum roughness length with land use in the upwind source area, as observed in two UK cities.  

E-print Network

. Printed in the United Kingdom. new_z0_report.tex; 9/09/2003; 16:34; p.1 #12;List of Tables I anemometer roughness lengths against cover fraction of different cover types, Salford 22 c 2003 British Crown. Printed in building wakes to its blended final state at some height above the urban canopy, for a real city, tests

Reading, University of

396

Concentrations of benzene and toluene in the atmosphere of the southwestern area at the Mexico City Metropolitan Zone  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Mexico City Metropolitan Zone (MCMZ) presents important emissions of hazardous air pollutants. It is well documented that the MCMZ suffers a critical air pollution problem due to high ozone and particulate matter concentrations. However, toxic air pollutants such as benzene and toluene have not been considered. Benzene has accumulated sufficient evidence as a human carcinogen, and the ratio benzene\\/toluene

Humberto Bravo; Rodolfo Sosa; Pablo Sánchez; Emma Bueno; Laura González

2002-01-01

397

Hydrogeology and water quality of the North Canadian River alluvium, Concho Reserve, Canadian County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A growing user population within the Concho Reserve in Canadian County, Oklahoma, has increased the need for drinking water. The North Canadian River alluvium is a reliable source of ground water for agriculture, industry, and cities in Canadian County and is the only ground-water source capable of meeting large demands. This study was undertaken to collect and analyze data to describe the hydrogeology and ground-water quality of the North Canadian River alluvium within the Concho Reserve. The alluvium forms a band about 2 miles long and 0.5 mile wide along the southern edge of the Concho Reserve. Thickness of the alluvium ranges from 19 to 75 feet thick and averages about 45 feet in the study area. Well cuttings and natural gamma-ray logs indicate the alluvium consists of interfingering lenses of clay, silt, and sand. The increase of coarse-grained sand and the decrease of clay and silt with depth suggests that the water-bearing properties of the aquifer within the study area improve with depth. A clay layer in the upper part of the aquifer may be partially responsible for surface water ponding in low areas after above normal precipitation and may delay the infiltration of potentially contaminated water from land surface. Specific conductance measurements indicate the ground-water quality improves in a northern direction towards the terrace. Water-quality properties, bacteria counts, major ion and nutrient concentrations, trace-element and radionuclide concentrations, and organic compound concentrations were measured in one ground-water sample at the southern edge of the Concho Reserve and comply with the primary drinking-water standards. Measured concentrations of iron, manganese, sulfate, and total dissolved solids exceed the secondary maximum contaminant levels set for drinking water. The ground water is a calcium sulfate bicarbonate type and is considered very hard, with a hardness of 570 milligrams per liter as calcium carbonate.

Becker, C.J.

1998-01-01

398

Service Assessment Mother's Day Weekend Tornado in Oklahoma and  

E-print Network

impact was in northeast Oklahoma and southwest Missouri. A tornado, rated EF4 on the Enhanced Fujita scale, moved southeast from the town of Picher, Oklahoma, into southwest Missouri. The tornado caused 21

399

Oklahoma 4-H Enrollment Form Today's Date: ___________________  

E-print Network

__________________________________________ Allergies/Health Concerns: __________________________________________________________________ (Include food allergies.) Address: _______________________________________________________ City

Ghajar, Afshin J.

400

SCUSA: integrated approaches and strategies to address the sanitation crisis in unsewered slum areas in African mega-cities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Africa, though reported to be the least urbanized continent, is recognized as one where the rate of urbanization is highest.\\u000a The development and expansion of informal settlements in the suburbs of the cities is widespread, while they harbor the majority\\u000a of the urban population. Slums are characterized by, among other things, poorly constructed houses, poor water supply and\\u000a sanitary conditions,

Jan Willem Foppen; Frank Kansiime

2009-01-01

401

Observational study of influence of aerosol hygroscopic growth on scattering coefficient over rural area near Beijing mega-city  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigated aerosol hygroscopic growth property and its influence on scattering coefficient using M9003 nephelometers in coupling with humidity controlled inlet system at a rural site near Beijing mega-city from 24 April to 15 May 2006. Inlet relative humidity was controlled in an increasing range of 40%-90% while aerosol hygroscopic growth factor of scattering coefficient, f(RH=80%) as ratio of scattering

X. L. Pan; P. Yan; J. Tang; J. Z. Ma; Z. F. Wang; A. Gbaguidi; Y. L. Sun

2009-01-01

402

Paleomagnetism of the Zn-rich Pennsylvanian Stark black shale, Kansas City area, U.S.A  

Microsoft Academic Search

Paleomagnetic results are reported from the metalliferous Stark black shale (Heebner-type) in the Upper Pennsylvanian Kansas City Group. Paleomagnetic analysis of 400 specimens from 28 sites gives a characteristic remanent magnetization (ChRM) in 17 sites that yields a Late Mississippian to Middle Pennsylvanian paleopole at 32.2 ° N 128.5 ° E (dp = 4.7° and dm = 8.8°). The fact

K. Kawasaki; D. T. Symons; R. M. Coveney

2007-01-01

403

25 CFR 169.24 - Railroads in Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Railroads in Oklahoma. 169.24 Section 169...RIGHTS-OF-WAY OVER INDIAN LANDS § 169.24 Railroads in Oklahoma. (a) The Act...otherwise determined by the Secretary, railroad rights-of-way in Oklahoma...

2010-04-01

404

Social and Economic Consequences of Indian Gaming in Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The balancing framework of Indian gaming as it operates in Oklahoma constrains Oklahoma Indian nations from operating facilities according to the dictates of the marketplace on a large-scale Class III basis. Indian gaming actually brings substantial net economic benefits to the state, contrary to claims that Oklahoma Indian gaming benefits come at…

Grant, Kenneth W., II; Spilde, Katherine A.; Taylor, Jonathan B.

2004-01-01

405

Why Norman?: Meteorology Comes to University of Oklahoma  

E-print Network

Why Norman?: Meteorology Comes to University of Oklahoma by John M. Lewis A presentation at the 50th Anniversary University of Oklahoma's School of Meteorology October 8, 2010 #12;2 Extended Abstract A review of the University of Oklahoma's (OU's) meteorology program/department over its first 15 years

Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

406

Drought and grazing effects on Oklahoma phlox (Polemoniaceae, Phlox oklahomensis)  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Oklahoma phlox (Phlox oklahomensis Wherry) is endemic to Butler, Chautauqua, Comanche, Cowley, and Elk Counties of Kansas and Woods and Woodward Counties of Oklahoma. The species comprises populations of a few scattered individuals to several hundred in mixed-grass prairie sites in Oklahoma where co...

407

STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES CODE -1 THE UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA  

E-print Network

of the University of Oklahoma is charged in the Constitution of the State of Oklahoma with governing the University of the United States and the State of Oklahomaand the University of Oklahoma StudentAssociation. Those documents Rights Students of the University of Oklahomaare guaranteed certain rights by the Constitutions

Oklahoma, University of

408

77 FR 74689 - Land Acquisitions; Tonkawa Tribe of Oklahoma  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Indian Affairs Land Acquisitions; Tonkawa Tribe of Oklahoma AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs...acres of land in trust for the Tonkawa Tribe of Oklahoma on December 6, 2012. FOR...acres of land into trust for the Tonkawa Tribe of Oklahoma under the authority of...

2012-12-17

409

Remote Sensing Application to Land Use Classification in a Rapidly Changing Agricultural/Urban Area: City of Virginia Beach, Virginia. Ph.D. Thesis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Remote sensing data on computer-compatible tapes of LANDSAT 1 multispectral scanner imager were analyzed to generate a land use map of the City of Virginia Beach. All four bands were used in both the supervised and unsupervised approaches with the LAYSYS software system. Color IR imagery of a U-2 flight of the same area was also digitized and two sample areas were analyzed via the unsupervised approach. The relationships between the mapped land use and the soils of the area were investigated. A land use land cover map at a scale of 1:24,000 was obtained from the supervised analysis of LANDSAT 1 data. It was concluded that machine analysis of remote sensing data to produce land use maps was feasible; that the LAYSYS software system was usable for this purpose; and that the machine analysis was capable of extracting detailed information from the relatively small scale LANDSAT data in a much shorter time without compromising accuracy.

Odenyo, V. A. O.

1975-01-01

410

Extraction of multilayer vegetation coverage using airborne LiDAR discrete points with intensity information in urban areas: A case study in Nanjing City, China  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Urban vegetation is of a strategic importance for the life quality in the increasing urbanized societies. However, it is still difficult to extract accurately urban vegetation vertical distribution with remote sensing images. This paper presented an effective method to extract multilayer vegetation coverage in urban areas using airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) discrete points with intensity information. It was applied in Nanjing City, one of the ecological cities in China. Firstly, a median filtering algorithm based on discrete points was used to restrain high-frequency noise. The airborne LiDAR data intensities of different urban objects were analyzed and obtained three rules, which can distinguish between vegetation and non-vegetation in urban areas, after removing the influence of topography. According to the footprint size and principles of distribution of the point cloud, multilayer vegetation coverage, including trees, shrubs and grass, was achieved by the inverse distance weighting (IDW) interpolation method. The results show that the overall accuracy of the vegetation point classification is 94.57%, which is much accurate than that of the methods in TerraSolid software, through comparing with the investigation in the field and Digital Orthophoto Maps (DOM). This method proposed in our work can be applied to in the extraction of multilayer vegetation coverage in urban area.

Han, Wenquan; Zhao, Shuhe; Feng, Xuezhi; Chen, Lei

2014-08-01

411

Thermal conditions in the Anadarko basin, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Heat flow, bottom-hole temperature (BHT), and thermal conductivity data are used to evaluate the present thermal conditions in the Anadarko basin. Heat flow values decrease from 54-62 mWm{sup {minus}2} in the northern part of the basin to 39-53 mWm{sup {minus}2} in the southern portion of the basin. The variation in the regional conductive heat flow is controlled by basin geometry and by the distribution of radiogenic elements in the basement. The heat flow, thermal conductivity, and lithologic information were combined to construct a 3-D model of the temperature structure of the Anadarko basin. The highest temperatures sedimentary rocks older than Pennsylvanian are offset 35 km north-northwest of the deepest part of the basin. This offset is related to the regional increase in heat flow to the north and to the presence of high thermal conductivity granite wash adjacent to the Wichita Mountains. A plot of the temperature difference between the equilibrium temperatures estimated from the model and the measured BHTs as a function of depth is remarkably similar to the published correction curve for BHTs for wells in Oklahoma. Vitrinite reflectance and apatite fission-track (FT) data are used to estimate the paleogeothermal conditions in the basin. Published vitrinite reflectance values are consistent with a past geographic temperature distribution comparable to the observed distribution with the maximum values offset from the basin axis. FT analysis of sandstones from wells in the southeastern portion of the basin indicates that subsurface temperatures were at least 30C higher than at present, suggest the possibility of substantial erosion in this area.

Kelley, S.A.; Gallardo, J.D.; Carter, L.C.; Blackwell, D.D. (Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States))

1991-03-01

412

Integration of data from censuses and remote sensing to measure the socio-economic and environmental evolution in urban areas: case of the city of Sherbrooke (1981-2006)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The urban environment is complex, heterogeneous and temporally changeable. Man is the main actor in the transformation of urban areas where he interacts with intensity. Spatial differentiation is a result of human occupation in the urban environment. This occupation may vary according to land use, population density, social and economic characteristics and environment. This leads us to say that the socio-economic and environmental indicators change according to the various locations in the urban area and through time. Our goal is to measure the socio-economic and environmental changes in the urban area of the city of Sherbrooke using remote sensing data synchronized with the censuses and that we will then integrate into the geographic information system (GIS). We have used data from the 1981 and 2006 censuses, 1983 aerial photos, 2007 orthophotos and 1983 MSS and 2006 Ikons satellite images to measure the socio-economic and environmental changes in the city of Sherbrooke. We have used spatial analysis tools to integrate image data with census data. The methods uses such as global indices, principal component analysis combined with the variation between the two dates have yielded interesting results. The first factor in principal component analysis with orthogonal rotation (Varimax) justified a substantial percentage of the variance in global indices. The use of dissemination areas resulted in detailed information on the change in the city. From the perspective of spatial distribution, we noted a major difference between the central areas and the peripheral areas in 1981 and 2006. From the perspective of evolution between 1981 and 2006, we observed that are positive and negative changes at various levels took place. We also observed the evolution of ethnicity in the Sherbrooke city and Lennoxville municipality. The study showed that the French population is prevalent in the old city of Sherbrooke as the English population is prevalent in Lennoxville. The European population is spread over the two cities. The aboriginal population is well distributed over the city of Sherbrooke. The population from Asian and Oceanic backgrounds are concentrated (sometimes on an exclusive basis) in the north and west-centre area of Jardins-Fleuris, in the eastern area of l'Assomption, the northeastern area of Sainte-Famille and the center area of Marie-Reine. We also find concentrations of immigrant populations from all backgrounds in areas such as in the southern part of the Immaculee-Conception and Saint-Joseph and in the south-eastern part of Sainte-Jeanne-d'Arc. This indicates that ethnic neighborhoods are taking roots in the city of Sherbrooke. Keywords : socio-economic and environmental, urban, remote sensing, multiple factor analysis, dissemination areas, the city of Sherbrooke, Lennoxville municipality.

Dari, Ouassini

413

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets  

E-print Network

to be found in canola grown in Oklahoma are the army cutworm and the diamondback moth. Army cutworm (Euxoa auxiliaris) Description and Life History: Army cutworm moths (Figure 1) have a wingspan of 1 to 1½ inches

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

414

Molecular indicators for pollution source identification in marine and terrestrial water of the industrial area of Kavala city, North Greece.  

PubMed

Eight terrestrial and four marine water samples were collected from the industrial section of the city of Kavala in northern Greece to determine the occurrence and distribution of organic contaminants, as well as to identify the molecular markers of different emission sources. The samples were analyzed by means of non-target screening analyses. The analytical procedure included a sequential extraction of the samples, GC-FID, GC/MS analyses, and additional quantitative analyses of selected pollutants. The results show a wide variety of compounds including halogenated compounds, technical additives and metabolites, phosphates, phthalates, benzothiazoles, etc. A close relationship between many of the contaminants and their emission sources was determined based on their molecular structures and information on technical applications. PMID:17490793

Grigoriadou, A; Schwarzbauer, J; Georgakopoulos, A

2008-01-01

415

Eliminating Barriers to Dual Enrollment in Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Policy, financial, and transportation barriers have limited participation in dual enrollment for marginalized (low-socioeconomic, first-generation, and ethnic minority) students in Oklahoma. This chapter presents a collaborative effort by education and community leaders that has successfully eliminated these barriers and increased the number of…

Roach, Rick; Gamez Vargas, Juanita; David, Kevin M.

2015-01-01

416

Oklahoma Curriculum Guide for Teaching Safety Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Developed by classroom teachers, university professors, and personnel from the Oklahoma State Department of Education, this guide is an effort to assist teachers in locating and utilizing safety materials as well as to assist them in developing well-balanced safety programs for the children and young people in the state. The preschool and…

Oklahoma Curriculum Improvement Commission, Oklahoma City.

417

REGENTS' POLICY MANUAL THE UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA  

E-print Network

.7.6 College of Law Library 2.8 Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History Collections Management Policy 2.4.2 Advertising and Promotion 3.4.3 Endorsement Prohibited 3.4.4 Purchasing Advertising 3.4.5 University Name

Oklahoma, University of

418

House Damage from 2011 Oklahoma Earthquake  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

House damage in central Oklahoma from the magnitude 5.6 earthquake on Nov. 6, 2011. Research conducted by USGS geophysicist Elizabeth Cochran and her university-based colleagues suggests that this earthquake was induced by injection into deep disposal wells in the Wilzetta North field....

419

SIMULATION OF PEANUT GROWTH IN OKLAHOMA.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Two peanut growth models of varying complexity were calibrated for Oklahoma varieties and growing conditions. Both models predicted pod growth quite well. The models were then used to simulate the effects of various soil moisture levels on peanut growth. The more complex model has potential as a management tool.

Grosz, Gerald D.; Elliott, Ronald L.; Young, James H.

1986-01-01

420

The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center  

E-print Network

to give the Certification of Birth/Care of a Newborn form to your health care provider for completionThe University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center HUMAN RESOURCES Dear On we were notified that you (FMLA). The purpose of this letter is to provide you with the form your health care provider needs

Oklahoma, University of

421

The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center  

E-print Network

The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center HUMAN RESOURCES Dear On we were notified that you). The purpose of this letter is to provide you with the form your health care provider to complete and return. Your leave is not approved as FMLA until we have received the Certification of Birth/Care of a Newborn

Oklahoma, University of

422

Public Library Service to Children in Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Because of the low density of its population and subsequent low property tax support, library service in Oklahoma is based on the multicounty library operating as a single unit. With the help of federal funds, such units now cover one-third of the state and 60 percent of its population utilizing branch libraries and bookmobile service. Service to…

Wentroth, Mary Ann

423

University of Oklahoma School of Meteorology  

E-print Network

University of Oklahoma School of Meteorology Rapid-response Graduate Degree Application Form This application form is used by the School of Meteorology to provide a rapid, no-cost response to the applicant on prospects to be admitted to the School of Meteorology for pursuit of a graduate degree. The applicant should

Oklahoma, University of

424

Women of Oklahoma, 1890-1920.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book examines the lives of representative White, Black, and American Indian women on the Oklahoma frontier after the abrupt opening of Indian Territory to non-Indian settlement in 1889. Drawing on primary sources, particularly diaries and letters, it focuses on the intersection of race, gender, class, and culture in the relationships among…

Reese, Linda Williams

425

State Education Finance and Governance Profile: Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents the state education finance and governance profile of Oklahoma. The state uses a State Aid Formula to determine the appropriation of funds to various districts. Along with the aid formula, the state collects revenue from the following sources: compensatory programs, special education, vocational programs, transportation…

Slosburg, Tucker

2010-01-01

426

77 FR 53247 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00063  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...declaration of a major disaster for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-4078-DR), dated 08/22/2012. Incident: Freedom Wildfire. Incident Period: 08/03/2012 through 08/14/2012. Effective Date: 08/22/2012. Physical Loan Application...

2012-08-31

427

76 FR 60959 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00055  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Oklahoma dated 09/21/2011. Incident: Pawnee County Wildfire. Incident Period: 08/07/2011 through 08/14/2011. Effective Date: 09/21/2011. Physical Loan Application...

2011-09-30

428

77 FR 61652 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00066  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of OKLAHOMA dated 10/01/2012. Incident: Luther Wildfire. Incident Period: 08/03/2012 Through 08/10/2012. Effective Date: 10/01/2012. Physical Loan Application...

2012-10-10

429

Oklahoma Water Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

. The vast number of landfill sites and ubiquitous nature of alluvial deposits make the results of this study stability of the Canadian River adjacent to the Norman, Oklahoma landfill. The USGS provided access to the extensive data already collected at the site as well as assistance with obtaining cores for the project

430

Oklahoma BEEF Incorporated (OBI) Bull Delivery Sheet Central bull testing at Oklahoma BEEF, Incorporated, is managed and supervised with the emphasis on the performance, health, and safety of the bulls; however, Oklahoma  

E-print Network

for Oklahoma Cattle *Out of state cattle must comply with Oklahoma Animal Health requirements Date TestedOklahoma BEEF Incorporated (OBI) Bull Delivery Sheet Central bull testing at Oklahoma BEEF, injury, sickness, death, or any other cause while the bulls are at the central test station. Delivery

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

431

77 FR 17408 - Foreign-Trade Zone 204-Tri-Cities Area, TN/VA; Application for Reorganization Under Alternative...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Business and Technology Park, 4509 West Stone Drive, Kingsport, Hawkins County, TN; Site 9 (134 acres, expires 6/30/15...service area under the ASF would be the Counties of Sullivan, Hawkins, Greene, Washington, Unicoi, Carter, Hamblen, and...

2012-03-26

432

77 FR 13073 - Designation for the Jamestown, ND; Lincoln, NE; Memphis, TN; and Sioux City, IA Areas  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration Designation...IA Areas AGENCY: Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration, USDA...Acting Administrator, Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration. [FR...

2012-03-05

433

New results about the study of the lightning activity and characteristics over the large urban area of the city of São Paulo  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The urban effect on lightning activity has been studied in many places around the world. The Metropolitan Region of São Paulo (MRSP) in the Southeast region of Brazil is one of the greatest and more populous urban areas of the world with a density of about 3000 inhabitants/km2. Similar to observations in other large urban areas, there is a significant enhancement in the number of negative cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning and a decrease in the percentage of positive CG flashes over the city of São Paulo. This work investigates the role of air polluted on lightning in MRSP. The CG lightning data set used was provided by Brazilian lightning detection network (BrasilDAT) for a period of 10 years (1999 - 2008). In this period, only days with CG flashes during the spring and summer seasons (from October to March) were considered and, for these days, only lightning data from 14 h to 20 h LT, were considered since this period corresponds to the time of the day with maximum lightning activity. The air polluted data set used in this work, was provided by the São Paulo environmental agencies (CETESB). The main results are: there is a tendency of increase in the ratio between lightning activity in the center area and surrounding area of the MRSP during the ten years in agreement with the same tendency observed for the number of automotive vehicles circulating on the center area of the city; there is a statistical significant increase in the CG lightning activity during the week days over MRSP related to the PM10 concentration. Apparently the increase in the lightning activity is related to an increase in the lifetime of the storms and, in consequence, the number of flashes per storm, and not to the mean flash rate of the storms. However, the increase also suggest that the effect of the pollution in the enhancement of the CG lightning activity is probably less significant compared to the effect of the urban heat island. A similar study is being done for other lightning spot not related to a large urban area in the southeast Brazil that occur in the south of Rio de Janeiro State (SRJS) and the preliminary results should be presented. Finally, simulations with the mesoscale numerical model WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting Model) are running in order to evaluate the behavior of the dynamic, thermodynamic and instability of the atmosphere in response to pollution.

Farias, W. R.; Pinto, O.; Pinto, I. R.

2009-12-01

434

Mark Svoboda, Climatologist Monitoring Program Area Leader  

E-print Network

basin webinars: UCRB (Upper Colorado River Basin) ACF (Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint) Southern Plains MORB (Missouri River Basin) Drought Task Forces: North Carolina, Hawaii, Oklahoma, Texas, New MexicoMark Svoboda, Climatologist Monitoring Program Area Leader National Drought Mitigation Center

Tate, Kenneth

435

40 CFR 81.124 - North Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false North Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control...Control Regions § 81.124 North Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The North Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air...

2010-07-01

436

78 FR 16036 - Service Level Environmental Impact Statement for the Texas Oklahoma Passenger Rail Study Corridor...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Statement for the Texas Oklahoma Passenger Rail Study Corridor, South Texas to Oklahoma...improved high- speed intercity passenger rail service along an 850-mile corridor...Level EIS, the Texas Oklahoma Passenger Rail Study (Study) also includes...

2013-03-13

437

Oklahoma Industrial Energy Management Program  

E-print Network

has taken top billing over the ongoing energy crisis. But the problem remains, as the ever increasing costs for electri city and natural gas continue to remind us. For tunately, things can be done to reduce energy consumption and to minimize... by as much as 70%. In recognition of these potentials, in 1975 and 1976 Congress passed Public Law 94-163, Energy Policy and Conservation Act and Public Law 94-385, Energy Conservation and Production Act providing monies for the development and execution...

Turner, W. C.; Estes, C. B.

1982-01-01

438

Species- and tissue-specific bioaccumulation of arsenicals in various aquatic organisms from a highly industrialized area in the Pohang City, Korea.  

PubMed

Contamination of water and sediment with arsenic (As) in a highly industrialized area of Pohang City, Korea was investigated, with emphasis on in situ bioaccumulation of arsenicals by various aquatic organisms. Species- and tissue-specific concentrations of arsenicals were determined by use of HPLC-ICP/MS and ?-X-ray absorption near-edge structure (?-XANES). Concentrations of arsenic in aquatic organisms were strongly associated with corresponding water concentrations, which indicates point sources associated with land use and activities. Arsenobetaine was the most dominant form of arsenic found in fishes, bivalves, crabs, and shrimps, while As(III) was predominant in freshwater snails. The ?-XANES analysis provided additional information about the unidentified arsenicals such as As-thiol. Arsenicals were mainly localized in intestine of mullet and marsh clam. Distribution and bioaccumulation of arsenic were strongly correlated with salinity, which indicates that natural processes controlling biogeochemistry of arsenic would be important in estuarine lotic system. PMID:24880533

Hong, Seongjin; Khim, Jong Seong; Park, Jinsoon; Son, Hee-Sik; Choi, Sung-Deuk; Choi, Kyungho; Ryu, Jongseong; Kim, Chang-Yong; Chang, Gap Soo; Giesy, John P

2014-09-01

439

Trifluoromethyl sulfur pentafluoride and its relationship to sulfur hexafluoride and chlorofluorocarbon-12 in the atmosphere near the New York City metropolitan area  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Trifluoromethyl sulfur pentafluoride (SF5CF3), sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and dichlorodifluoromethane (CCl2F2) (also referred to as CFC-12) were measured simultaneously in the atmosphere at a site 25 km north of New York City over a period of 6 months with continuous measurements every 25 min for 4 months. The SF5CF3 record showed little variability and its concentration appeared close to the remote atmospheric concentration. The concentrations of SF6 and CFC-12 had numerous spikes well in excess of their remote atmospheric concentrations indicating the presence of local sources. The lack of SF5CF3 spikes reveals that the usage of SF6 in the New York metropolitan area does not result in significant production of SF5CF3, and also that there is no significant production by industrial and manufacturing processes in the region.

Erboy, Yasemin; Smethie, William M.

2012-08-01

440

77 FR 65646 - Determination of Attainment for the Yuba City-Marysville Nonattainment Area for the 2006 Fine...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...NAAQS for fine particles (generally referring to particles less than or equal...EPA's Air Quality System (AQS) for 2012...designations for most areas in the United...EPA Air Quality System, Monitor Description...monitoring data for the most recent complete...24-Hour Fine Particle (PM 2.5...

2012-10-30

441

Paleomagnetism of the Zn-rich Pennsylvanian Stark black shale, Kansas City area, U.S.A.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Paleomagnetic results are reported from the metalliferous Stark black shale (Heebner-type) in the Upper Pennsylvanian Kansas City Group. Paleomagnetic analysis of 400 specimens from 28 sites gives a characteristic remanent magnetization (ChRM) in 17 sites that yields a Late Mississippian to Middle Pennsylvanian paleopole at 32.2 ° N 128.5 ° E (dp = 4.7° and dm = 8.8°). The fact that the observed age is slightly older than the host rock age indicates that the shale's mineralization has a syngenetic origin. The main remanence carrier in the Stark Shale is single or psudosingle domain magnetite or titanomagnetite. Trace hematite, which was generated during modern weathering, likely causes the slightly older age by steepening the primary ChRM by ~2°. The large oval of 95 % confidence is interpreted to be caused by the formation of clay-magnetite aggregates during sediment transport that are easily biased by the gentle paleocurrent at each site acting on their large flat surface. Therefore, the scattered distribution of the site mean remanence declinations found for the Stark Shale is evidence of a detrital remanent magnetization that is formed by primary sedimentary processes and not of remagnetization by secondary hydrothermal processes. The finding that the primary ChRM directions of Heebner-type black shales are so easily scattered by sedimentary processes implies that a highly clustered ChRM direction in a mineralized black shale, such as in Zn-Pb rich SEDEX deposits, is evidence of coeval or post-depositional hydrothermal fluids.

Kawasaki, K.; Symons, D. T.; Coveney, R. M.

2007-05-01

442

Potentiometric Surfaces and Changes in Groundwater Levels in Selected Bedrock Aquifers in the Twin Cities Metropolitan Area, March-August 2008 and 1988-2008  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report depicts potentiometric surfaces and groundwater- level changes in three aquifers that underlie the seven-county Twin Cities Metropolitan Area. Approximately 350 groundwater levels were measured in wells from the three aquifers-the Prairie du Chien-Jordan, the Franconia-Ironton-Galesville, and the Mount Simon-Hinckley aquifers-in March and August of 2008. The report presents maps, associated data tables, and 22 geographic information system datasets. The maps presented in this report show the potentiometric surfaces in March and August of 2008 for all three aquifers, groundwater-level changes from March to August 2008 for each aquifer, and revised potentiometric-surface contours for the winter of 1988-89 for the Prairie du Chien-Jordan and the Mount Simon-Hinckley aquifers, and the estimated long-term (winter of 1988-89 to March 2008) groundwater-level changes for the Prairie du Chien-Jordan and Mount Simon-Hinckley aquifers. This report documents the methods used to construct the maps and provides a context for the period of the measurements. Although withdrawal demand is increasing in the Twin Cities Metropolitan area, particularly in the Prairie du Chien-Jordan aquifer, year-to-year changes in withdrawals can be substantial, and the relation between potentiometric surfaces in the major aquifers and year-to-year withdrawals is not well established. The estimated long-term (19-year) groundwater-level changes for the Prairie du Chien-Jordan and Mount Simon-Hinckley aquifers have not been large based on data and maps produced during this study, despite the large seasonal fluctuations shown by the March and August 2008 synoptic measurements.

Sanocki, Christopher A.; Langer, Susan K.; Menard, Jason C.

2008-01-01

443

Dietary intake and food habits of pregnant women residing in urban and rural areas of Deyang City, Sichuan Province, China.  

PubMed

Micronutrient deficiencies and imbalanced dietary intake tend to occur during the reproductive period among women in China. In accordance with traditional Chinese culture, pregnant women are commonly advised to follow a specific set of dietary precautions. The purpose of this study was to assess dietary intake data and identify risk factors for nutritional inadequacy in pregnant women from urban and rural areas of Deyang region, Sichuan province of China. Cross-sectional sampling was applied in two urban hospitals and five rural clinics (randomly selected) in Deyang region. Between July and October 2010, a total of 203 pregnant women in the third trimester, aged 19-42 years, were recruited on the basis of informed consent during antenatal clinic sessions. Semi-structured interviews on background information and 24-h dietary recalls were conducted. On the basis of self-reported height and pre-pregnancy weight, 68.7% of the women had a pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) within the normal range (18.5 ? BMI < 25), 26.3% were found to be underweight with a BMI <18.5 (20.8% in urban vs. 35.6% in rural areas), while only 5.1% were overweight with a BMI ?30. In view of acceptable macronutrient distribution ranges (AMDRs) the women's overall dietary energy originated excessively from fat (39%), was low in carbohydrates (49.6%), and reached the lower limits for protein (12.1%). Compared to rural areas, women living in urban areas had significantly higher reference nutrient intake (RNI) fulfillment levels for energy (106.1% vs. 93.4%), fat (146.6% vs. 119.7%), protein (86.9% vs. 71.6%), vitamin A (94.3% vs. 65.2%), Zn (70.9% vs. 61.8%), Fe (56.3% vs. 48%), Ca (55.1% vs. 41%) and riboflavin (74.7% vs. 60%). The likelihood of pregnant women following traditional food recommendations, such as avoiding rabbit meat, beef and lamb, was higher in rural (80%) than in urban (65.1%) areas. In conclusion, culturally sensitive nutrition education sessions are necessary for both urban and rural women. The prevalence of underweight before conception and an insufficient supply of important micronutrients were more pronounced in rural areas. Therefore, attention must be given to the nutritional status, especially of rural women before, or at the latest, during pregnancy. PMID:23912325

Gao, Haoyue; Stiller, Caroline K; Scherbaum, Veronika; Biesalski, Hans Konrad; Wang, Qi; Hormann, Elizabeth; Bellows, Anne C

2013-08-01

444

Dietary Intake and Food Habits of Pregnant Women Residing in Urban and Rural Areas of Deyang City, Sichuan Province, China  

PubMed Central

Micronutrient deficiencies and imbalanced dietary intake tend to occur during the reproductive period among women in China. In accordance with traditional Chinese culture, pregnant women are commonly advised to follow a specific set of dietary precautions. The purpose of this study was to assess dietary intake data and identify risk factors for nutritional inadequacy in pregnant women from urban and rural areas of Deyang region, Sichuan province of China. Cross-sectional sampling was applied in two urban hospitals and five rural clinics (randomly selected) in Deyang region. Between July and October 2010, a total of 203 pregnant women in the third trimester, aged 19–42 years, were recruited on the basis of informed consent during antenatal clinic sessions. Semi-structured interviews on background information and 24-h dietary recalls were conducted. On the basis of self-reported height and pre-pregnancy weight, 68.7% of the women had a pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) within the normal range (18.5 ? BMI < 25), 26.3% were found to be underweight with a BMI <18.5 (20.8% in urban vs. 35.6% in rural areas), while only 5.1% were overweight with a BMI ?30. In view of acceptable macronutrient distribution ranges (AMDRs) the women’s overall dietary energy originated excessively from fat (39%), was low in carbohydrates (49.6%), and reached the lower limits for protein (12.1%). Compared to rural areas, women living in urban areas had significantly higher reference nutrient intake (RNI) fulfillment levels for energy (106.1% vs. 93.4%), fat (146.6% vs. 119.7%), protein (86.9% vs. 71.6%), vitamin A (94.3% vs. 65.2%), Zn (70.9% vs. 61.8%), Fe (56.3% vs. 48%), Ca (55.1% vs. 41%) and riboflavin (74.7% vs. 60%). The likelihood of pregnant women following traditional food recommendations, such as avoiding rabbit meat, beef and lamb, was higher in rural (80%) than in urban (65.1%) areas. In conclusion, culturally sensitive nutrition education sessions are necessary for both urban and rural women. The prevalence of underweight before conception and an insufficient supply of important micronutrients were more pronounced in rural areas. Therefore, attention must be given to the nutritional status, especially of rural women before, or at the latest, during pregnancy. PMID:23912325

Gao, Haoyue; Stiller, Caroline K.; Scherbaum, Veronika; Biesalski, Hans Konrad; Wang, Qi; Hormann, Elizabeth; Bellows, Anne C.

2013-01-01

445

Altitude and configuration of the 1980 water table in the High Plains regional aquifer, northwestern Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During 1978, the U.S. Geological Survey began a 5-year study of the High Plains regional aquifer system to provide hydrologic information for evaluation of the effects of long-term development of the aquifer and to develop computer models for prediction of aquifer response to alternative changes in ground-water management (Weeks, 1978). This report is one of a series presenting hydrologic information of the High Plains aquifer in Oklahoma. The altitude and configuration of the water table are shown for the eastern area, consisting of Harper, Ellis, Woodward, Dewey, and Roger Mills Counties (sheet 1), and for the Panhandle area, consisting of Cimarron, Texas, and Beaver Counties (sheet 2). Water levels were measured in January, February, and March 1980 by the Oklahoma Water Resources Board.

Havens, John S.

1982-01-01

446

High School to College-Going Rates for Oklahoma High School Graduates to Oklahoma Colleges. Oklahoma High School Indicators Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The counts from the current annual report and reports of the previous two years have been combined to provide a three-year average Oklahoma college-going rate. This report includes single-year reports that are provided for each of the three years used to construct the average college-going rates: the college-going rate for 1995-96, 1996-97, and…

Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education, Oklahoma City.

447

A digital geologic map database for the state of Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This dataset is a composite of part or all of the 12 1:250,000 scale quadrangles that make up Oklahoma. The result looks like a geologic map of the State of Oklahoma. But it is only an Oklahoma shaped map clipped from the 1:250,000 geologic maps. This is not a new geologic map. No new mapping took place. The geologic information from each quadrangle is available within the composite dataset.

Heran, William D.; Green, Gregory N.; Stoeser, Douglas B.

2003-01-01

448

Land use pattern, socio-economic development, and assessment of their impacts on ecosystem service value: study on natural wetlands distribution area (NWDA) in Fuzhou city, southeastern China.  

PubMed

This paper quantifies the allocation of ecosystem services value (ESV) associated with land use pattern and qualitatively examined impacts of land use changes and socio-economic factors on spatiotemporal variation of ESV in the Natural Wetland Distribution Area (NWDA), Fuzhou city, China. The results showed that total ESV of the study area decreased from 4,332.16 × 10(6) RMB Yuan in 1989 to 3,697.42 × 10(6) RMB Yuan in 2009, mainly due to the remarkable decreases in cropland (decreased by 55.3 %) and wetland (decreased by 74.2 %). Forest, water, and wetland played major roles in providing ecosystem services, accounting for over 90 % of the total ESV. Based on time series Landsat TM/ETM+ imagery, geographic information system, and historical data, analysis of the spatiotemporal variation of ESV from 1989 to 2009 was performed. It indicated that rapid expansion of urban areas along the Minjiang River resulted in significant changes in land use types, leading to a dramatic decline in ecosystem services. Meanwhile, because of land scarcity and unique ecosystem functions, the emergency of wetland and cropland protection in built-up area has become an urgent task of local authorities to the local government. Furthermore, there was still a significant negative correlation between ESV of cropland and wetland and the GDP. The results suggest that future planning of land use pattern should control encroachment of urban areas into cropland and wetland in addition to scientific and rational policies towards minimizing the adverse effects of urbanization. PMID:23054291

Cai, Yuan-Bin; Zhang, Hao; Pan, Wen-Bin; Chen, Yan-Hong; Wang, Xiang-Rong

2013-06-01

449

78 FR 28877 - Changes in Flood Hazard Determinations  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...350001 areas of Maggie Hart 2400 Broadway...400466 areas of Oklahoma Vaughn...Oklahoma City, OK 73102. Texas: Bexar...City of San Antonio The Honorable Municipal...480035 areas of Bexar Nelson W....

2013-05-16

450

Ecoregions and stream morphology in eastern Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Broad-scale variables (i.e., geology, topography, climate, land use, vegetation, and soils) influence channel morphology. How and to what extent the longitudinal pattern of channel morphology is influenced by broad-scale variables is important to fluvial geomorphologists and stream ecologists. In the last couple of decades, there has been an increase in the amount of interdisciplinary research between fluvial geomorphologists and stream ecologists. In a historical context, fluvial geomorphologists are more apt to use physiographic regions to distinguish broad-scale variables, while stream ecologists are more apt to use the concept of an ecosystem to address the broad-scale variables that influence stream habitat. For this reason, we designed a study using ecoregions, which uses physical and biological variables to understand how landscapes influence channel processes. Ecoregions are delineated by similarities in geology, climate, soils, land use, and potential natural vegetation. In the fluvial system, stream form and function are dictated by processes observed throughout the fluvial hierarchy. Recognizing that stream form and function should differ by ecoregion, a study was designed to evaluate how the characteristics of stream channels differed longitudinally among three ecoregions in eastern Oklahoma, USA: Boston Mountains, Ozark Highlands, and Ouachita Mountains. Channel morphology of 149 stream reaches was surveyed in 1st- through 4th-order streams, and effects of drainage area and ecoregion on channel morphology was evaluated using multiple regressions. Differences existed (? ? 0.05) among ecoregions for particle size, bankfull width, and width/depth ratio. No differences existed among ecoregions for gradient or sinuosity. Particle size was smallest in the Ozark Highlands and largest in the Ouachita Mountains. Bankfull width was larger in the Ozark Highlands than in the Boston Mountains and Ouachita Mountains in larger streams. Width/depth ratios of the Boston Mountains and Ozark Highlands were not statistically different. Significant differences existed, however, between the Boston Mountains and Ozark Highlands when compared individually to the Ouachita Mountains. We found that ecoregions afforded a good spatial structure that can help in understanding longitudinal trends in stream reach morphology surveyed at the reach scale. The hierarchy of the fluvial system begins within a broad, relatively homogenous setting that imparts control on processes that affect stream function. Ecoregions provide an adequate regional division to begin a large-scale geomorphic study of processes in stream channels.

Splinter, Dale K.; Dauwalter, Daniel C.; Marston, Richard A.; Fisher, William L.

2010-10-01

451

University of Oklahoma - High Energy Physics  

SciTech Connect

The High Energy Physics program at the University of Oklahoma, Pat Skubic, Principal Investigator, is attempting to understand nature at the deepest level using the most advanced experimental and theoretical tools. The four experimental faculty, Brad Abbott, Phil Gutierrez, Pat Skubic, and Mike Strauss, together with post-doctoral associates and graduate students, are finishing their work as part of the D0 collaboration at Fermilab, and increasingly focusing their investigations at the Large Hadron Collidor (LHC) as part of the ATLAS Collaboration. Work at the LHC has become even more exciting with the recent discovery by ATLAS and the other collaboration, CMS, of the long-sought Higgs boson, which plays a key role in generating masses for the elementary constituents of matter. Work of the OUHEP group has been in the three areas of hardware, software, and analysis. Now that the Higgs boson has been discovered, completing the Standard Model of fundamental physics, new efforts will focus on finding hints of physics beyond the standard model, such as supersymmetry. The OUHEP theory group (Kim Milton, PI) also consists of four faculty members, Howie Baer, Chung Kao, Kim Milton, and Yun Wang, and associated students and postdocs. They are involved in understanding fundamental issues in formulating theories of the microworld, and in proposing models that carry us past the Standard Model, which is an incomplete description of nature. They therefore work in close concert with their experimental colleagues. One also can study fundamental physics by looking at the large scale structure of the universe; in particular the ``dark energy'' that seems to be causing the universe to expand at an accelerating rate, effectively makes up about 3/4 of the energy in the universe, and yet is totally unidentified. Dark energy and dark matter, which together account for nearly all of the energy in the universe, are an important probe of fundamental physics at the very shortest distances, or at the very highest energies. The outcomes of the group's combined experimental and theoretical research will be an improved understanding of nature, at the highest energies reachable, from which applications to technological innovation will surely result, as they always have from such studies in the past.

Skubic, Patrick L. [University of Oklahoma] [University of Oklahoma

2013-07-31

452

Ecoregions and stream morphology in eastern Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Broad-scale variables (i.e., geology, topography, climate, land use, vegetation, and soils) influence channel morphology. How and to what extent the longitudinal pattern of channel morphology is influenced by broad-scale variables is important to fluvial geomorphologists and stream ecologists. In the last couple of decades, there has been an increase in the amount of interdisciplinary research between fluvial geomorphologists and stream ecologists. In a historical context, fluvial geomorphologists are more apt to use physiographic regions to distinguish broad-scale variables, while stream ecologists are more apt to use the concept of an ecosystem to address the broad-scale variables that influence stream habitat. For this reason, we designed a study using ecoregions, which uses physical and biological variables to understand how landscapes influence channel processes. Ecoregions are delineated by similarities in geology, climate, soils, land use, and potential natural vegetation. In the fluvial system, stream form and function are dictated by processes observed throughout the fluvial hierarchy. Recognizing that stream form and function should differ by ecoregion, a study was designed to evaluate how the characteristics of stream channels differed longitudinally among three ecoregions in eastern Oklahoma, USA: Boston Mountains, Ozark Highlands, and Ouachita Mountains. Channel morphology of 149 stream reaches was surveyed in 1st- through 4th-order streams, and effects of drainage area and ecoregion on channel morphology was evaluated using multiple regressions. Differences existed (?????0.05) among ecoregions for particle size, bankfull width, and width/depth ratio. No differences existed among ecoregions for gradient or sinuosity. Particle size was smallest in the Ozark Highlands and largest in the Ouachita Mountains. Bankfull width was larger in the Ozark Highlands than in the Boston Mountains and Ouachita Mountains in larger streams. Width/depth ratios of the Boston Mountains and Ozark Highlands were not statistically different. Significant differences existed, however, between the Boston Mountains and Ozark Highlands when compared individually to the Ouachita Mountains. We found that ecoregions afforded a good spatial structure that can help in understanding longitudinal trends in stream reach morphology surveyed at the reach scale. The hierarchy of the fluvial system begins within a broad, relatively homogenous setting that imparts control on processes that affect stream function. Ecoregions provide an adequate regional division to begin a large-scale geomorphic study of processes in stream channels. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

Splinter, D.K.; Dauwalter, D.C.; Marston, R.A.; Fisher, W.L.

2010-01-01

453

Comparing reactions to two severe tornadoes in one Oklahoma community.  

PubMed

The authors compared the effect of the 3 May 1999 F5 and 8 May 2003 F3 tornadoes on the community of Moore, Oklahoma, by canvassing damaged areas after both tornadoes and surveying residents. Significantly more 1999 than 2003 residents reported property damage and injuries. Television and tornado sirens were the most common warnings each year, however, more 1999 residents received and responded to television warnings. Importantly, storm shelters were used more frequently in 2003. Fifty-one per cent of residents who experienced both tornadoes took the same amount of protective action in 2003 as they had in 1999; 22% took less; and 27% took more. Residents who took less action said that the reason for doing so was inadequate warning and shelter. First-hand experience of tornadoes prompts people to heed warnings when adequate notification is received and to take effective protective action when adequate shelter is available. PMID:16108992

Comstock, R Dawn; Mallonee, Sue

2005-09-01

454

Contributing recharge areas, groundwater travel time, and groundwater water quality of the Missouri River alluvial aquifer near the City of Independence, Missouri, well field, 1997-2008  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The City of Independence, Missouri, operates a well field in the Missouri River alluvial aquifer. Contributing recharge areas (CRA) were last determined for the well field in 1996. Since that time, eight supply wells have been installed in the area north of the Missouri River and well pumpage has changed for the older supply wells. The change in pumping has altered groundwater flow and substantially changed the character of the CRA and groundwater travel times to the supply wells. The U.S Geological Survey, in a cooperative study with the City of Independence, Missouri, simulated steady-state groundwater flow for 2007 well pumpage, average annual river stage, and average annual recharge. Particle-tracking analysis was used to determine the CRA for supply wells and monitoring wells, and the travel time from recharge areas to supply wells, recharge areas to monitoring wells, and monitoring wells to supply wells. The simulated CRA for the well field is elongated in the upstream direction and extends to both sides of the Missouri River. Groundwater flow paths and recharge areas estimated for monitoring wells indicate the origin of water to each monitoring well, the travel time of that water from the recharge area, the flow path from the vicinity of each monitoring well to a supply well, and the travel time from the monitoring well to the supply well. Monitoring wells 14a and 14b have the shortest groundwater travel time from their contributing recharge area of 0.30 years and monitoring well 29a has the longest maximum groundwater travel time from its contributing recharge area of 1,701 years. Monitoring well 22a has the shortest groundwater travel time of 0.5 day to supply well 44 and monitoring well 3b has the longest maximum travel time of 31.91 years to supply well 10. Water-quality samples from the Independence groundwater monitoring well network were collected from 1997 to 2008 by USGS personnel during ongoing annual sampling within the 10-year contributing recharge area (CRA) of the Independence well field. Statistical summaries and the spatial and temporal variability of water quality in the Missouri River alluvial aquifer near the Independence well field were characterized from analyses of 598 water samples. Water-quality constituent groups include dissolved oxygen and physical properties, nutrients, major ions and trace elements, wastewater indicator compounds, fuel compounds, and total benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX), alachlor, and atrazine. The Missouri Secondary Maximum Contaminant Level (SMCL) for iron was exceeded in almost all monitoring wells. The Missouri Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for arsenic was exceeded 32 times in samples from monitoring wells. The MCL for barium was exceeded five times in samples from one monitoring well. The SMCL for manganese was exceeded 160 times in samples from all monitoring wells and the combined well-field sample. The most frequently detected wastewater indicator compounds were N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide (DEET), phenol, caffeine, and metolachlor. The most frequently detected fuel compounds were toluene and benzene. Alachlor was detected in 22 samples and atrazine was detected in 37 samples and the combined well-field sample. The MCL for atrazine was exceeded in one sample from one monitoring well. Samples from monitoring wells with median concentrations of total inorganic nitrogen larger than 1 milligram per liter (mg/L) are located near agricultural land and may indicate that agricultural land practices are the source of nitrogen to groundwater. Largest median values of specific conductance; total inorganic nitrogen; dissolved calcium, magnesium, sodium, iron, arsenic, manganese, bicarbonate, and sulfate and detections of wastewater indicator compounds generally were in water samples from monitoring wells with CRAs that intersect the south bank of the Missouri River. Zones of higher specific conductance were located just upstream from the Independen

Kelly, Brian P.

2011-01-01

455