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1

National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Oklahoma City Quadrangle, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reconnaissance and detailed geologic and radiometric investigations were conducted throughout the Oklahoma City Quadrangle, Oklahoma, to evaluate the uranium favorability using National Uranium Resource Evaluation criteria. Surface and subsurface studies were augmented by data from aerial radiometric surveys, hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance studies, basement-rock computer modeling studies, and Track Etch surveys. The results indicate that there are no environments favorable

J. R. Derby; L. P. Upshaw; E. O. Carter; L. F. Roach; D. G. Roach

1982-01-01

2

78 FR 32007 - Environmental Impact Statement for Tulsa-Oklahoma City Passenger Rail Corridor, Oklahoma, Lincoln...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Statement for Tulsa--Oklahoma City Passenger Rail Corridor, Oklahoma, Lincoln, Creek...Oklahoma Department of Transportation (ODOT) Rail Division intend to prepare an EIS pursuant...for the State of Oklahoma High-Speed Rail Initiative: Tulsa--Oklahoma City...

2013-05-28

3

Retirement Guide Norman -Oklahoma City -Tulsa  

E-print Network

Employee Contributions Employer Contributions Termination Prior To Retirement Retirement Benefits TaxRetirement Guide Norman - Oklahoma City - Tulsa IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Board of Regents and policy booklet available through the benefits office. Retirement Guide updated 2007. #12; 2

Oklahoma, University of

4

The early planning and development of Oklahoma City  

E-print Network

An analysis of the planning, development, and implementation of Oklahoma City's Grand Boulevard. In the early days of 1909, a plan emerged to build an expansive parks and boulevard system to encircle Oklahoma City. Such ...

Humphreys, Blair D. (Blair David)

2009-01-01

5

75 FR 5015 - Television Broadcasting Services; Oklahoma City, OK  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...substitution of channel 39 for channel 9 at Oklahoma City...ADDRESSES: Federal Communications Commission, Office...is amended by adding channel 39 and removing channel 9 at Oklahoma City. Federal Communications Commission. Clay...

2010-02-01

6

75 FR 13236 - Television Broadcasting Services; Oklahoma City, OK  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...OK AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION...licensee of KWTV-DT, channel 9, Oklahoma City...is amended by adding channel 39 and removing channel 9 at Oklahoma City. Federal Communications Commission. Clay...

2010-03-19

7

OKLAHOMA CITY UNIVERSITY VOLUME 32 SPRING 2007  

E-print Network

.H. 2003). 87 #12;88 Oklahoma City University Law Review [Vol. 32 such as states banning assisted suicide or gay marriages;3 (4) proprietary intrusions, such as a publisher using a family's group portrait, 521 U.S. 702, 705-06 (1997) (assisted suicide) and Lewis v. Harris, 908 A.2d 196,200 (N.J. 2006) (gay

Sharp, Kim

8

Did the Oklahoma City Bombers Succeed?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The worst case of domestic terrorism in our country's history, the bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, led to the enactment of a landmark antiterrorism statute. Not surprisingly, several of the statute's provisions strengthen federal power in extraordinary and unprecedented ways to counter the threat of terrorism. But other provisions radically restrict the ability of

Jordan Steiker

2001-01-01

9

Case finding and mental health services for children in the aftermath of the Oklahoma City bombing  

Microsoft Academic Search

The 1995 Oklahoma City bombing killed 168 people, including 19 children, and injured hundreds more. Children were a major focus of concern in the mental health response. Most services for them were delivered in the Oklahoma City Public Schools where approximately 40,000 students were enrolled at the time of the explosion. Middle and high school students in the Oklahoma City

Betty Pfefferbaum; Guy M. Sconzo; Brian W. Flynn; Lauri J. Kearns; Debby E. Doughty; Robin H. Gurwitch; Sara Jo Nixon; Shajitha Nawaz

2003-01-01

10

76 FR 15290 - Foreign-Trade Zone 106-Oklahoma City, OK Application for Reorganization/Expansion Under...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...northeast of Will Rogers World Airport, Oklahoma City; Site 12 (26 acres, sunset...Lincoln, Logan, McClain, Noble, Oklahoma, Payne, Pontotoc, Pottawatomie, Seminole and Stephens Counties, Oklahoma. If approved, the grantee...

2011-03-21

11

Turbulence Kinetic Energy in the Oklahoma City Urban Environment  

SciTech Connect

The Joint URBAN 2003 field experiment took place in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, during July 2003 to explore the effect of an urban canopy on the transport and diffusion of a passive tracer released in an urban area. Over one hundred three-dimensional sonic anemometers were deployed in and around the urban area to monitor wind speed, direction, and turbulence during releases of SF6. Deployment locations include a profile of eight sonic anemometers mounted on a crane located 1 km north (typically downwind) of the central business district, and several surface meteorological towers within an urban canyon.

Lundquist, J K; Leach, M; Gouveia, F

2004-03-30

12

Emergency Department Impact of the Oklahoma City Terrorist Bombing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Study objective: To collect descriptive epidemiologic injury data on patients who suffered acute injuries after the April 19, 1995, Oklahoma City bombing and to describe the effect on metropolitan emergency departments. Methods: A retrospective review of the medical records of victims seen for injury or illness related to the bombing at 1 of the 13 study hospitals from 9:02 AM

David E Hogan; Joseph F Waeckerle; Daniel J Dire; Scott R Lillibridge

1999-01-01

13

Diurnal cycle of the Oklahoma City urban heat island  

Microsoft Academic Search

Between the dates of 28 June and 31 July 2003, the Joint Urban 2003 (JU2003) field project was conducted in Oklahoma City and was the largest urban dispersion experiment ever in North America. Because the focus of JU2003 was on atmospheric processes within the urban environment, an extremely dense network of instrumentation was deployed in and around the central business

Jeffrey B. Basara; Peter K. Hall; Amanda J. Schroeder; Bradley G. Illston; Kodi L. Nemunaitis

2008-01-01

14

Oklahoma City Community College Institutional Research Monographs, FY 1988.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Ten institutional research reports from Oklahoma City Community College (OCCC) are presented in this collection. Three of the reports examine the educational objectives of students enrolled in fall 1987, spring 1988, and summer 1988. Two reports compare fall 1987 and spring 1988 students with those from previous semesters in terms of gender, age,…

Shirazi, Annmarie

15

Building a Learning City: Developing School and Community Coalitions in Oklahoma City  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This qualitative case study focuses on a district and community relations plan developed in Oklahoma City Public Schools. This article provides a description of the proposal regarding MAPS for KIDS (Metropolitan Area Projects for Keep Improving District Schools) in Oklahoma City from 1998 through November 2001, and it explores the coalitions that…

Garn, Gregg

2005-01-01

16

Proceedings: Oklahoma School Plant Manager's Workshop (4th, Oklahoma City, OK, April 20-21, 1982).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Nineteen addresses given at the 1982 Oklahoma School Plant Manager's Workshop are presented in this document. Following a welcoming speech, an overview of the issues currently facing school plant managers in Oklahoma, and a general address by a representative of the Arkansas Department of Education, the speakers focused on a number of specific…

Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City.

17

Diurnal cycle of the Oklahoma City urban heat island  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Between the dates of 28 June and 31 July 2003, the Joint Urban 2003 (JU2003) field project was conducted in Oklahoma City and was the largest urban dispersion experiment ever in North America. Because the focus of JU2003 was on atmospheric processes within the urban environment, an extremely dense network of instrumentation was deployed in and around the central business district (CBD) both prior to and during the field experiment. Among the variables collected were high-resolution observations of air temperature from various instrument sources. Additional observations of air temperature were also collected at Oklahoma Mesonet stations in the rural areas surrounding Oklahoma City. Using an index value, the diurnal cycle of the urban heat island (UHI) for Oklahoma City, with respect to the surrounding rural terrain, was quantified. The results revealed a consistent mean nocturnal UHI greater than 1.5°C at both 2 and 9 m. However, observations at 2 m during JU2003 revealed a significant urban "cool" island during the convective portion of the day. The mean variability of temperature within the urban core of Oklahoma City increased significantly after sunrise, increased to a maximum near solar noon, and decreased following sunset. These results were inconsistent with the rural observations wherein the variability among sites was maximized during the nocturnal period. Finally, the vertical temperature gradient between 2 and 9 m demonstrated a clear and strong diurnal trend at the rural locations, whereas observations from the urban environment were nearly isothermal and consistent with near-neutral conditions throughout JU2003.

Basara, Jeffrey B.; Hall, Peter K.; Schroeder, Amanda J.; Illston, Bradley G.; Nemunaitis, Kodi L.

2008-10-01

18

Oklahoma and American Indian Imagery  

E-print Network

: The Grapes of Wrath and the Oklahoma Dust Bowl 120 Chapter 6: American Indian Imagery Since Statehood 168 Chapter 7: Summary 191 Bibliography 199 vii List of Figures 2.1 Map of the Unassigned Lands... 19 2.2 “Ejecting an Oklahoma Boomer” 20 2.3 “The Fertile Fields of Oklahoma” 37 2.4 “Oklahoma City as it was in 1889” and “Oklahoma City as it is To - Day” 39 3.1. Map of Indian Territory, 1889 - 1907 45...

Anderson, William Brett

2011-12-31

19

Oklahoma Today  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Published since the 1950s, Oklahoma Today is a production of several state agencies, and it is designed to showcase various cultural, historical, and social aspects of Oklahoma. Over the past several years, Oklahoma State University has digitized back issues of the magazine, and visitors can now read all the way back to the first issue from 1956. Visitors can browse back issues by decade, and they can also perform key-word searches. First-time visitors should start by reading through the spring 1960 issue, which contains pieces on rattlesnakes, Oklahoma wildflowers, and the Washington Irving Trail. While the name Washington Irving may not be commonly associated with Oklahoma, the author spent part of 1832 wandering through the state with a Native American guide. More recent issues feature profiles of singer Vince Gill and Route 66.

20

A study of the Oklahoma City urban heat island using ground measurements and remote sensing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Measurements of temperature and position were collected during the night from an instrumented van on routes through Oklahoma City and the rural outskirts. The measurements were taken as part of the Joint URBAN 2003 Tracer Field Experiment conducted in Oklahoma City from June 29, 2003 to July 30, 2003 (Allwine et al., 2004). The instrumented van was driven over four

Michael J. Brown; Austin Ivey; Timothy N. McPherson; David Boswell; Eric R. Pardyjak

2004-01-01

21

Estimated flood peak discharges on Twin, Brock, and Lightning creeks, Southwest Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, May 8, 1993  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The flash flood in southwestern Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, May 8, 1993, was the result of an intense 3-hour rainfall on saturated ground or impervious surfaces. The total precipitation of 5.28 inches was close to the 3-hour, 100-year frequency and produced extensive flooding. The most serious flooding was on Twin, Brock, and Lightning Creeks. Four people died in this flood. Over 1,900 structures were damaged along the 3 creeks. There were about $3 million in damages to Oklahoma City public facilities, the majority of which were in the three basins. A study was conducted to determine the magnitude of the May 8, 1993, flood peak discharge in these three creeks in southwestern Oklahoma City and compare these peaks with published flood estimates. Flood peak-discharge estimates for these creeks were determined at 11 study sites using a step-backwater analysis to match the flood water-surface profiles defined by high-water marks. The unit discharges during peak runoff ranged from 881 cubic feet per second per square mile for Lightning Creek at SW 44th Street to 3,570 cubic feet per second per square mile for Brock Creek at SW 59th Street. The ratios of the 1993 flood peak discharges to the Federal Emergency Management Agency 100-year flood peak discharges ranged from 1.25 to 3.29. The water-surface elevations ranged from 0.2 foot to 5.9 feet above the Federal Emergency Management Agency 500-year flood water-surface elevations. The very large flood peaks in these 3 small urban basins were the result of very intense rainfall in a short period of time, close to 100 percent runoff due to ground surfaces being essentially impervious, and the city streets acting as efficient conveyances to the main channels. The unit discharges compare in magnitude to other extraordinary Oklahoma urban floods.

Tortorelli, R. L.

1996-01-01

22

Vocational Education Needs Assessment for the Oklahoma City and Tulsa Public School Systems.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The vocational education needs assessment for Oklahoma City and Tulsa school systems reported here was conducted by the Research Unit at Oklahoma State University and the Center for Vocational Education at Ohio State University. Objectives listed are to determine (1) the vocational education needs of the people in the districts and the extent to…

Oklahoma State Advisory Council for Vocational-Technical Education, Oklahoma City.

23

Impact of Configurations of Rapid Intermittent Assimilation of WSR-88D Radar Data for the 8 May 2003 Oklahoma City Tornadic Thunderstorm Case  

E-print Network

2003 Oklahoma City Tornadic Thunderstorm Case MING HU AND MING XUE Center for Analysis and Prediction for the analysis and prediction of a tornadic thunderstorm that occurred on 8 May 2003 near Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Several tornadoes were produced by this thunderstorm, causing extensive damages in the south Oklahoma City

Xue, Ming

24

Oklahoma Agriculture Agriculture  

E-print Network

Oklahoma Agriculture Agriculture #12;Oklahoma Agriculture 2011Oklahoma Agriculture 2011 Oklahoma agriculture affects each of us every day, young and old, whether we live in largely rural regions or the state's Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources promotes sustainable land use and embraces the land

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

25

Turbulent Kinetic Energy in the Oklahoma City Urban Environment  

SciTech Connect

A major field experiment, Joint URBAN 2003 (JU2003), was conducted in Oklahoma City in July 2003 to collect meteorological and tracer data sets for evaluating dispersion models in urban areas. The Department of Homeland Security and the Defense Threat Reduction Agency were the primary sponsors of JU2003. Investigators from five Department of Energy national laboratories, several other government agencies, universities, private companies, and international agencies conducted the experiment. Observations to characterize the meteorology in and around the urban area complemented the observation of the dispersion of SF6, an inert tracer gas. Over one hundred threedimensional sonic anemometers were deployed in and around the urban area to monitor wind speed, direction, and turbulence fluxes during releases of SF6. Sonic deployment locations included a profile of eight sonic anemometers mounted on a crane less than 1 km north of the central business district (CBD). Using data from these and other sonic anemometers deployed in the urban area, we can quantify the effect of the urban area on atmospheric turbulence and compare results seen in OKC to those in other urban areas to assess the parameters typically used in parameterizations of urban turbulence.

Lundquist, J; Leach, M; Gouveia, F

2004-06-24

26

Did fertility go up after the oklahoma city bombing? An analysis of births in metropolitan counties in Oklahoma, 1990–1999  

Microsoft Academic Search

Political and sociocultural events (e.g., Brown v. Board of Education in 1954 and the German reunification in 1989) and natural disasters (e.g., Hurricane Hugo in 1989) can affect fertility.\\u000a In our research, we addressed the question of whether the Oklahoma City bombing in April 1995, a man-made disaster, influenced\\u000a fertility patterns in Oklahoma. We defined three theoretical orientations—replacement theory, community

Joseph Lee Rodgers; Craig A. St. John; Ronnie Coleman

2005-01-01

27

A Study of Public Higher Education in the Oklahoma City Area with Special Focus on Community College Services. Report on the Delivery of Comprehensive Community College Services in Metropolitan Oklahoma City.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In response to a legislative mandate, a study was conducted to identify and address the basic factors which should be considered in the expansion of postsecondary educational opportunities in metropolitan Oklahoma City, with specific focus on the steps to be taken by Oklahoma City Community College (OCCC). Study findings, based on demographic…

Priest, Bill J.; And Others

28

Impact of Low-Level Jets on the Nocturnal Urban Heat Island Intensity in Oklahoma City  

E-print Network

the radiation and surface energy balance. As a result, cities are known to affect weather and climateImpact of Low-Level Jets on the Nocturnal Urban Heat Island Intensity in Oklahoma City XIAO-MING HU/Renewable and Sustainable Energy Institute, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado FUQING ZHANG Department of Meteorology

Xue, Ming

29

Oklahoma Forestry Services  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The mission of the Oklahoma Forestry Services (OFS) is "to conserve, enhance and protect the forest resources of Oklahoma for present and future generations." As part of this mission the OFS website contains information about fire reports, tree and forest health, and water quality. First-time visitors should start their journey through the site by clicking on the "Oklahoma's Forests" section. Here they will find information about Oklahoma's major forest types, the ecoregions of Oklahoma, and several Trees of Oklahoma fact sheets. Back on the homepage, visitors can learn about upcoming workshops and events, read a list of forestry bulletins, and find out about the Forest Heritage Center Museum. Residents of Oklahoma may also wish to look through the "Home and Community Trees" area to learn more about planning their own trees and Arbor Day related activities.

30

Teachers' psychological reactions 7 weeks after the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing.  

PubMed

This study assessed teachers' reactions to the Oklahoma City bombing. Peritraumatic reactions, the interaction of media exposure with stress from media coverage, feelings toward the perpetrators, and worry about safety predicted posttraumatic stress. Twenty percent reported difficulty handling demands; 5% sought counseling. Outreach efforts should assess and assist teachers. PMID:15291703

Pfefferbaum, Betty; Pfefferbaum, Rose L; Gurwitch, Robin H; Doughty, Debby E; Pynoos, Robert S; Foy, David W; Brandt, Edward N; Reddy, Chandrashekar

2004-07-01

31

Evaluation of the 1982-83 Oklahoma City Public Schools Indiana Education Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Oklahoma City Public School 1982-83 Indian Education Program served students in two major areas: academic assistance and supplemental guidance and counseling. Specific program objectives included the following: under academic assistance (1) students receiving tutoring will show achievement gains in reading and mathematics; (2) the Title IV-A…

Crawford, John

1983-01-01

32

Information from 1982 Oklahoma City Community College Graduates. Research Monograph I.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In May 1983, questionnaires were sent to all students who graduated from Oklahoma City Community College (OCCC) between December 1981 and July 1982. A total of 404 questionnaires were mailed, soliciting information on educational objectives, current educational/employment status, college major, ratings of college services, transfer experiences,…

Shirazi, Annmarie

33

Information from 1983 Oklahoma City Community College Graduates. Research Monograph I.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In May 1984, questionnaires were sent to all students who graduated from Oklahoma City Community College (OCCC) between December 1982 and July 1983. A total of 387 questionnaires were mailed, soliciting information on educational objectives, current educational/employment status, college major, ratings of college services, transfer experiences,…

Shirazi, Annmarie

34

Promoting Student Engagement and Creativity by Infusing Art across the Curriculum: The Arts Integration Initiative at Oklahoma City University  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Christopher E. Garrett describes a faculty learning community program at Oklahoma City University that focused on improving teaching and learning through integrating the arts in a variety of disciplines, some of which may surprise you. (Contains 9 notes.)

Garrett, Christopher E.

2013-01-01

35

MIXED HERONRIES OF OKLAHOMA  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objectives of this 3-year study were to locate mixed heronries in Oklahoma, census breeding pairs of each species, and indentify site characteristics that may be important to heron ecology. During the study, 17 mixed heronries, containing a total of six ardeid species, were found in Oklahoma. The majority of heronries (82%) were located within the oak-woodland fauna region. Other

G. William Sallee

1982-01-01

36

Pride in Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet is intended to be used as background material by social studies and history classroom teachers as they develop and implement educational programs on Oklahoma's heritage. It includes background information on the land and people of Oklahoma (geology, climate, topography, vegetation, animals, prehistoric peoples, French explorers,…

Moore, Gordon; Blackburn, Bob L.

37

Oklahoma Tribes: A History  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Oklahoma is a microcosm of American Indian country. Water rights, tribal government impotence, jurisdiction, tribal membership, treaty rights, taxation, sovereignty, racism, and poor housing, education, and health are all vital issues facing the Indian tribes of Oklahoma. In order to understand the complexity of these issues, a review of the…

Gover, Kevin

1977-01-01

38

Observed winds, turbulence, and dispersion in built-up downtown areas of Oklahoma City and Manhattan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wind and tracer data from the Oklahoma City Joint Urban 2003 (JU2003) and the Manhattan Madison Square Garden 2005 (MSG05)\\u000a urban field experiments are being analyzed to aid in understanding air flow and dispersion near street-level in built-up downtown\\u000a areas. The mean winds are separately calculated for groups of anemometers having similar exposures such as “near street level”\\u000a and “on

Steven Hanna; John White; Ying Zhou

2007-01-01

39

Oklahoma Historical Society  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The mission of the Oklahoma Historical Society is "to preserve and perpetuate the history of Oklahoma and its people by collecting, interpreting and disseminating knowledge of Oklahoma and the Southwest." The Society maintains over 20 museums and historic sites, and they are also responsible for maintaining this website. On the homepage, visitors can learn about the sites they maintain, including the Pawnee Bill Ranch and the Pioneer Woman Museum. In the "Publications" area, visitors can read back issues of "The Chronicles of Oklahoma" dating from 1921 to 1962, and they can also find the "Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture". The Society's "Found in Collections" blog is a great way to learn about their current archival work, and visitors can read about textile preservation techniques and the Civil War. Also, the site includes podcasts created to profile various aspects of the state's history. Finally, visitors can sign up to receive email updates on new additions, programs, and exhibits.

40

76 FR 77578 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00057  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...disaster for the State of Oklahoma dated 12/07/2011...the disaster: Primary Counties: Lincoln. Contiguous Counties: Oklahoma: Creek, Logan, Okfuskee, Oklahoma, Payne, Pottawatomie. The Interest Rates...

2011-12-13

41

PayneOklahoma SOIL SURVEY OF PAYNE COUNTY, OKLAHOMA  

E-print Network

Map Units Cities Detailed Counties Detailed States Interstate Highways Roads Rails Water Hydrography SURVEY OF PAYNE COUNTY, OKLAHOMA OSURR Headquarters Source of Map: Natural Resources Conservation Service Miscellaneous Water Rock Outcrop Saline Spot Sandy Spot Slide or Slip Sinkhole Sodic Spot Spoil Area Stony Spot

Ghajar, Afshin J.

42

Statistical analysis of stream water-quality data and sampling network design near Oklahoma City, central Oklahoma, 1977-1999  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water-quality data collected from 1993-99 at five sites on Bluff, Deer, and Chisholm Creeks and from 1988-99 at five sites in the North Canadian River indicated that there were significant differences in constituent values among sites for water properties, major ions, trace elements, nutrients, turbidity, pesticides, and bacteria. Concentrations of dissolved solids and sulfate generally decreased as streams flowed through the Oklahoma City urban area. Concentrations of organic carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus compounds, lindane, and 2,4-D, and frequencies of detection of pesticides increased in the North Canadian River as it flowed through the urban area. Volatile organic compounds were not detected in samples collected quarterly from 1988-90 at sites on the North Canadian River. Concentrations of some compounds, including dissolved oxygen, sulfate, chloride, ammonia, manganese, diazinon, dieldrin, and fecal coliform bacteria periodically exceeded Federal or state water-quality standards at some sites. Regression analyses were used to identify trends in constituent concentrations related to streamflow, season, and time. Trends for some constituents were indicated at all sites, but most trends were site-specific. Seasonal trends were evident for several constituents: suspended solids, organic nitrogen, and biochemical oxygen demand were greatest during summer. Dissolved oxygen, ammonia, and nitrite plus nitrate-nitrogen were greatest during winter. Concentrations of dissolved oxygen, fluoride, sulfate, total suspended solids, iron, and manganese generally increased with time. Concentrations of chloride, nitrite plus nitrate-nitrogen, dissolved phosphorus, dissolved orthophosphate, biochemical oxygen demand, dieldrin, and lindane decreased with time. There was relatively little change in land use from the late 1970s to the mid-1990s due to relatively modest rates of population growth in the study area during that period. Most changes in water quality in these streams and rivers may be due to changes in chemical use and wastewater treatment practices. The sampling network was evaluated with respect to areal coverage, sampling frequency, and analytical schedules. Areal coverage could be expanded to include one additional watershed that is not part of the current network. A new sampling site on the North Canadian River might be useful because of expanding urbanization west of the city, but sampling at some other sites could be discontinued or reduced based on comparisons of data between the sites. Additional real-time or periodic monitoring for dissolved oxygen may be useful to prevent anoxic conditions in pools behind new low-water dams. The sampling schedules, both monthly and quarterly, are adequate to evaluate trends, but additional sampling during flow extremes may be needed to quantify loads and evaluate water quality during flow extremes. Emerging water-quality issues may require sampling for volatile organic compounds, sulfide, total phosphorus, chlorophyll-a, Escherichia coli, and enterococci, as well as use of more sensitive laboratory analytical methods for determination of cadmium, mercury, lead, and silver.

Brigham, Mark E.; Payne, Gregory A.; Andrews, William J.; Abbott, Marvin M.

2002-01-01

43

Using Prescribed Fire in Oklahoma  

E-print Network

Prescribed Fire in Oklahoma Terrence G. Bidwell Professor and Extension Specialist Rangeland Ecology Tall Timbers Research Station Tallahassee, Florida Samuel D. Fuhlendorf Associate Professor RangelandE-927 Using Prescribed Fire in Oklahoma Using Prescribed Fire in Oklahoma Using Prescribed Fire

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

44

Educational Reform in Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Oklahoma's answer to the cry for reform and involvement in education emerged as House Bill 1017, a comprehensive $223 million school reform and tax act. This article reviews the HR 1017 story, focusing on its legislative enactment history and offering a content analysis of mandated changes in finance, personnel, governance, student assessment,…

Butorac, Marylin M.; First, Patricia F.

1994-01-01

45

Oklahoma and SREB  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) is a nonprofit organization that works collaboratively with Oklahoma and 15 other member states to improve education at every level--from pre-K to postdoctoral study--through many effective programs and initiatives. SREB's "Challenge to Lead" Goals for Education, which call for the region to lead the…

Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2009

2009-01-01

46

Oklahoma NASA EPSCoR  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The mission of Oklahoma EPSCoR is to make Oklahoma researchers more successful in competing for research funding. Specific goals, objectives, and strategies were developed for each federal EPSCoR program, based on federal and state needs. A theme of stimulating collaboration among campuses and building on common research strengths is a strong component of the Oklahoma EPSCoR strategic plan. It extends also to our relationships with the federal agencies, and wherever possible, Oklahoma EPSCoR projects are developed collaboratively with federal research laboratories and program offices. Overall, Oklahoma EPSCoR seeks to capitalize on unique research capabilities and opportunities. The NASA EPSCoR Program in Oklahoma was developed through this grant as a joint effort between Oklahoma EPSCoR and the NASA Oklahoma Space Grant Consortium (OSGC). The major goal of the Oklahoma NASA EPSCoR Plan established in 1996 is to develop an academic research enterprise directed towards a long-term, self-sustaining, nationally competitive capability in areas of mutual self-interest to NASA and Oklahoma. Our final technical summary pie chart demonstrates the strong successes we have achieved during this period as a result of the award.

Snowden, Victoria Duca

2002-01-01

47

78 FR 42147 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00073  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...13647 and 13648] Oklahoma Disaster OK-00073...for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA- 4117-DR...disaster: Primary Counties: Atoka, Canadian...Nowata, Okfuskee, Oklahoma, Okmulgee, Pittsburg, Pottawatomie, Pushmataha,...

2013-07-15

48

40 CFR 81.337 - Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Lincoln County Logan County McClain County Oklahoma County Pottawatomie County AQCR 185 North Central Oklahoma...County Logan County McClain County Pottawatomie County AQCR 185North Central Oklahoma Intrastate...

2010-07-01

49

Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History & Culture  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The 46th state, Oklahoma, presents its unusual history with the online version of The Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture. The Encyclopedia was prepared by over 500 "university-based scholars and independent historians and scholars," and was a joint effort by The Oklahoma Historical Society and Oklahoma State University Library Electronic Publishing Center. Visitors can click on the "Table of Contents" link near the bottom of the homepage to "Browse Entries Alphabetically", "Browse Entries Chronologically", or "Browse Entries by Subject". Browsing via chronology introduces visitors to Oklahoma starting with the "Precontact Era", through the "Westward Expansion" and on to "Twentieth Century to Present". Subject categories include "African Americans", "Farming", "Military", and "Petroleum". When searching, visitors will be taken to the Electronic Publishing Center Search Page, so they will need to choose the specific collection, Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture, from the drop down box, to confine the search to the Encyclopedia.

50

Energy resources of Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The past, present, and near future production of energy sources in Oklahoma is briefly surveyed. In 1977, the production was noted to be 186 million barrels while the reserve of liquid hydrocarbons was estimated to be about 1.4 billion barrels. This gives a reserves-to-production ratio of slightly less than 7:1 (down from 1976). About the same figures are noted for

Mankin

1978-01-01

51

75 FR 30871 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00038  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...affected by the disaster: Primary Counties (Physical Damage and Economic...Cleveland, McIntosh, Okfuskee, Oklahoma, Pottawatomie, Seminole. Contiguous Counties (Economic Injury Loans Only): Oklahoma: Canadian, Creek,...

2010-06-02

52

77 FR 15357 - Reorganization/Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 106 under Alternative Site Framework, Oklahoma...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Whereas, the Port Authority of Greater Oklahoma City, grantee of Foreign-Trade...Lincoln, Logan, McClain, Noble, Oklahoma, Payne, Pontotoc, Pottawatomie, Seminole and Stephens Counties, Oklahoma, within and adjacent to the...

2012-03-15

53

Predictors of post-traumatic stress symptoms in oklahoma city: Exposure, social support, peri-traumatic responses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eighty-five adults seeking mental health assistance six months after the Oklahoma City bombing were assessed to determine which of three groups of variables (exposure, peri-traumatic responses, and social support) predicted development of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. Variables most highly associated with subsequent PTSD symptoms included having been injured (among exposure variables), feeling nervous or afraid (peri-traumatic responses), and responding

Phebe Tucker; Betty Pfefferbaum; Sara Jo Nixon; Warren Dickson

2000-01-01

54

University of Oklahoma Police Department  

E-print Network

University of Oklahoma Police Department Case Log Media Apr 09, 2014 Jun 09, 2014From to Date incidents occurred off-campus and have been reported to the local police. Disposition: Date Reported)Disposition: 1Page No.11:00:0806/10/2014Print Date and Time at #12;University of Oklahoma Police Department Case

Oklahoma, University of

55

Oklahoma Indians and the Cultural Deprivation of an Oklahoma Cherokee Family.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper summarizes the history of Oklahoma Indians, highlights the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma, and relates the story of the family of one Oklahoma Cherokee woman, Lou Jane Morgan Jernigan. Oklahoma is the state with the largest population of Indians, largely due to federal policy in the 19th century, which forced Indians into Oklahoma (or…

Shaver, Lynda Dixon

56

Incident-related television viewing and psychiatric disorders in Oklahoma City bombing survivors.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to examine terrorism media coverage and psychiatric outcomes in directly-exposed terrorism survivors. The study used (1) self-report questionnaires to retrospectively assess event-related media behaviors and reactions in a cross sectional design and (2) longitudinal structured diagnostic interviews to assess psychopathologic outcomes. The participants were 99 directly-exposed Oklahoma City bombing survivors who were initially studied six months after the 1995 incident. Though a fear reaction to bombing-related television coverage and fear-driven discontinuation of bombing-related media contact were associated with diagnostic outcomes, the number of hours viewing bombing-related television coverage in the first week after the event was not associated with the prevalence of bombing-related posttraumatic stress disorder or post-bombing major depressive disorder during the seven years post event. The results raise doubt about the effects of quantified incident-related television viewing on clinically-significant emotional outcomes in directly-exposed terrorism survivors. PMID:23980489

Pfefferbaum, Betty; North, Carol S; Pfefferbaum, Rose L; Jeon-Slaughter, Haekyung; Houston, J Brian; Regens, James L

2012-01-01

57

Computational Fluid Dynamic Simulations of Plume Dispersion in Urban Oklahoma City  

SciTech Connect

A 3D computational fluid dynamics study using Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes modeling was conducted and validated with field data from the Joint Urban 2003 dispersion study in Oklahoma City. The modeled flow field indicated that the many short buildings in this domain had a relatively small effect on the flow field, while the few tall buildings drove the transport and dispersion of tracer gas through the domain. Modeled concentrations and wind speeds were compared to observations along a vertical profile located about 500 meters downwind of the source. The isothermal base case using the k-epsilon closure model was within 50% of the field measurements, while a convective case with ground and building surfaces 10 degrees C hotter than ambient temperatures improved the modeled profile to within 30% of observations. Varying wind direction and source location had a significant effect on the plume dispersion due to the irregularity of the urban landscape. The location of the tallest obstacle in this domain with respect to the source position defined the size and shape of tracer plumes in this study. Model results based upon a Reynolds stress closure scheme were also compared to the vertical concentration profiles. For this location, the isothermal case underestimated concentrations; however, the case with thermal buoyancy resulted in concentrations within 25% of the observations.

Flaherty, Julia E.; Stock, David E.; Lamb, Brian K.

2007-12-01

58

UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA SCHOOL OF MUSIC  

E-print Network

1 20110708 UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA SCHOOL OF MUSIC APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION TO GRADUATE DEGREE MAILING ADDRESS (INCLUDE CITY, STATE, PROVINCE, COUNTRY, ZIP OR POSTAL CODE) CURRENT PHONE NUMBER (INCLUDE AREA CODE OR COUNTRY AND CITY CODES IF APPLICABLE) E-MAIL ADDRESS I AM APPLYING FOR ADMISSION

Oklahoma, University of

59

9th Annual Oklahoma Native American Youth Language Fair Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History  

E-print Network

categories of performance each divided by age. · Spoken Language (Pre9th Annual Oklahoma Native American Youth Language Fair Sam Noble Oklahoma from the Oklahoma Native American Youth Language Fair! We are pleased

Oklahoma, University of

60

Industrial extension, the Oklahoma way  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Oklahoma has established a customer-driven industrial extension system. A publicly-chartered, private non-profit corporation, the Oklahoma Alliance for Manufacturing Excellence, Inc. (`the Alliance') coordinates the system. The system incorporates principles that Oklahoma manufacturers value: (1) decentralization and local accessibility; (2) coordinated existing resources; (3) comprehensive help; (4) interfirm cooperation; (5) pro-active outreach; (6) self- help and commitment from firms; (7) customer governance; and (8) performance accountability. The Oklahoma system consists of: (1) a network of locally-based broker/agents who work directly with manufacturers to diagnose problems and find appropriate assistance; (2) a group of industry sector specialists who collect and disseminate sector specific technological and market intelligence to the broker/agents and their clients; (3) all the specialized public and private sector resources coordinated by the system; and (4) a customer- driven coordination and evaluation mechanism, the Alliance.

Farrell, Edmund J.

1994-03-01

61

Promoting School Readiness in Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The results of the research, conducted on Oklahoma's universal Pre-kindergarten (Pre-k) program, on children of Tulsa Public Schools (TPS), the largest school district in the state to increase the school readiness are presented.

Gormley, William T., Jr.; Gayer, Ted

2005-01-01

62

UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA GRADUATE COLLEGE  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA GRADUATE COLLEGE THE IMPACT OF SINGLE- AND MULTI-MOMENT MICROPHYSICS an immense debt of gratitude. Dr. Kelvin Droegemeier was one of the first professors I met when I first came

Xue, Ming

63

Oklahoma Industrial Energy Management Program  

E-print Network

, closed circuit television short courses on selected energy management topics, energy auditing, industrial energy audits (through the Oklahoma Energy Analysis and Diagnostic Center) , energy and water management research, and two courses currently being...

Turner, W. C.; Estes, C. B.

1982-01-01

64

Heat flow in Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Oklahoma is one area in which terrestrial heat flow data are sparse. The thermal state of the southern mid-continent, however, is a key to understanding several important geologic problems. These include thermal anomalies associated with Paleozoic fluid migrations and the formation of Mississippi Valley-type lead-zinc deposits, the thermal evolution of the Arkoma and Anadarko sedimentary basins, and the history of hydrocarbon generation and overpressuring in the Anadarko Basin. In the late 1920s, the American Petroleum Institute made a set of equilibrium temperature logs in idle oil wells. These temperature data are generally regarded as being high quality, accurate estimates of rock temperature and they cover the entire central part of Oklahoma. Average thermal gradients in the API survey range from 14 to 43 [sup 0]C/km (average 31.2 [sup 0]C/km) over depth intervals that extend from the surface to a an average depth of 961 m. Geothermal gradients decrease from NNE to SSW. The observed change in thermal gradients could be due to a number of factors. The change in thermal gradients could simply reflect changes in lithology and thermal conductivity. Alternatively, the variation in thermal gradients could be indicative of a change in heat flow related perhaps to variations in the concentration of radioactive heat-producing elements in the crust or heat transport by one or more regional groundwater flow systems. We are proceeding to reduce ambiguity in interpretation by estimating heat flow from thermal conductivity measurements on drill cuttings and heat production from available gamma-ray logs which penetrate basement rocks.

Cranganu, C.; Deming, D. (Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States))

1996-01-01

65

Heat flow in Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Oklahoma is one area in which terrestrial heat flow data are sparse. The thermal state of the southern mid-continent, however, is a key to understanding several important geologic problems. These include thermal anomalies associated with Paleozoic fluid migrations and the formation of Mississippi Valley-type lead-zinc deposits, the thermal evolution of the Arkoma and Anadarko sedimentary basins, and the history of hydrocarbon generation and overpressuring in the Anadarko Basin. In the late 1920s, the American Petroleum Institute made a set of equilibrium temperature logs in idle oil wells. These temperature data are generally regarded as being high quality, accurate estimates of rock temperature and they cover the entire central part of Oklahoma. Average thermal gradients in the API survey range from 14 to 43 {sup 0}C/km (average 31.2 {sup 0}C/km) over depth intervals that extend from the surface to a an average depth of 961 m. Geothermal gradients decrease from NNE to SSW. The observed change in thermal gradients could be due to a number of factors. The change in thermal gradients could simply reflect changes in lithology and thermal conductivity. Alternatively, the variation in thermal gradients could be indicative of a change in heat flow related perhaps to variations in the concentration of radioactive heat-producing elements in the crust or heat transport by one or more regional groundwater flow systems. We are proceeding to reduce ambiguity in interpretation by estimating heat flow from thermal conductivity measurements on drill cuttings and heat production from available gamma-ray logs which penetrate basement rocks.

Cranganu, C.; Deming, D. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

1996-12-31

66

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets  

E-print Network

://osufacts.okstate.edu Lease Hunting Opportunities for Oklahoma Landowners Michael D. Porter Regional Manager/Wildlife, and manage wildlife resources. Lease hunting has occurred in Oklahoma as far back as the 1940s. Many Oklahoma of wildlife hunted on Oklahoma hunting leases is native wildlife. Private land managers control wildlife

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

67

76 FR 30224 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00047  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Declaration 12592 and 12593] Oklahoma Disaster OK-00047 AGENCY...Assistance Only for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-- 1985--DR...by the disaster: Primary Counties: Craig, Creek, Jefferson...Osage, Ottawa, Pawnee, Pottawatomie, Rogers, Stephens,...

2011-05-24

68

75 FR 11949 - Oklahoma Disaster # OK-00035  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Declaration 12070 and 12071] Oklahoma Disaster OK-00035 AGENCY...Assistance Only for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA- 1883-DR), dated...by the disaster: Primary Counties: Alfalfa, Caddo, Cleveland...Muskogee, Okmulgee, Pontotoc, Pottawatomie, Roger Mills,...

2010-03-12

69

75 FR 35103 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00040  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Declaration 12206 and 12207] Oklahoma Disaster OK-00040 AGENCY...Assistance Only for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA- 1917-DR), dated...by the disaster: Primary Counties: Alfalfa, Cleveland, Grant...Noble, Okfuskee, Osage, Pottawatomie, Seminole. The...

2010-06-21

70

76 FR 34799 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00050  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-1989-DR...disaster: Primary Counties (Physical Damage...Mcclain, Contiguous Counties (Economic Injury Loans Only): Oklahoma: Adair, Blaine...Payne, Pontotoc, Pottawatomie, Stephens....

2011-06-14

71

78 FR 31998 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00071  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...affected by the disaster: Primary Counties (Physical Damage and Economic Injury...Cleveland, Lincoln, McClain, Oklahoma, Pottawatomie. Contiguous Counties (Economic Injury Loans Only): Oklahoma: Canadian, Creek, Garvin,...

2013-05-28

72

75 FR 10330 - Oklahoma Disaster # OK-00034  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Declaration 12051 and 12052] Oklahoma Disaster OK-00034 AGENCY...Assistance Only for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA- 1876-DR), dated...by the disaster: Primary Counties: Canadian, Cleveland, Comanche...Ottawa, Payne, Pontotoc, Pottawatomie, Rogers, Sequoyah,...

2010-03-05

73

Chickasaw Plum for Wildlife in Oklahoma  

E-print Network

Chickasaw Plum for Wildlife in Oklahoma E-1026 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University #12;Chickasaw Plum for Wildlife is eaten by a variety of animals, including humans (Figure 2). Native American tribes, including the Pawnee

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

74

Mass traumatic terror in Oklahoma City and the phases of adaptational coping, part I: Possible effects of intentional injury\\/harm on victims' post-traumatic responses  

Microsoft Academic Search

The bombing in Oklahoma City shook the entire nation from sea to shining sea. This tremendous collective sensation was made even worse when available evidence revealed that this act of terrorism had not been committed by some terrorist from the Middle East but one from Middle America. The blast stunned the nation's sense of collective safety, while it raised serious

Erwin Randolph Parson

1995-01-01

75

Analysis and Prediction of 8 May 2003 Oklahoma City Tornadic Thunderstorm and Embedded Tornado using ARPS with Assimilation of WSR-88D Radar Data  

E-print Network

1 Analysis and Prediction of 8 May 2003 Oklahoma City Tornadic Thunderstorm and Embedded Tornado of tornadic thunderstorms at horizontal resolutions of 3 km (Xue et al. 2003; Hu and Xue 2006; Hu et al. 2006; Hu and Xue 2007) to initial tornado thunderstorms for the ARPS model. For the 8 May 2003 case

Xue, Ming

76

Numerical Prediction of 8 May 2003 Oklahoma City Tornadic Supercell and Embedded Tornado using ARPS with the Assimilation of WSR-88D Radar  

E-print Network

Numerical Prediction of 8 May 2003 Oklahoma City Tornadic Supercell and Embedded Tornado using ARPS cover the entire period of observed tornado outbreak, and successfully capture the development of tornadic vortices. A tornado on the 50-m grid reaches high-end F-3 intensity while the corresponding

Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

77

Numerical Prediction of 8 May 2003 Oklahoma City Tornadic Supercell and6 Embedded Tornado using ARPS with the Assimilation of WSR-88D Radar7  

E-print Network

1 2 3 4 5 Numerical Prediction of 8 May 2003 Oklahoma City Tornadic Supercell and6 Embedded Tornado on the 100-m grid. The forecasts on48 both grids cover the entire period of observed tornado outbreak, and they successfully capture49 the development of tornadic vortices. A tornado on the 50-m grid reaches high-end F-3

Xue, Ming

78

Numerical Prediction of the 8 May 2003 Oklahoma City Tornadic Supercell and Embedded Tornado Using ARPS with the Assimilation of WSR-88D Data  

E-print Network

Numerical Prediction of the 8 May 2003 Oklahoma City Tornadic Supercell and Embedded Tornado Using of the observed tornado outbreak and successfully capture the development of tornadic vortices. The intensity of a tornado on the 50-m grid reaches the high end of category 3 on the Fujita scale (F3), while

Xue, Ming

79

Final Report for the Joint Urban 2003 Atmospheric Dispersion Study in Oklahoma City: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory participation  

SciTech Connect

The Joint Urban 2003 (JU2003) field study was designed to collect meteorological and tracer data resolving atmospheric dispersion at scales-of-motion ranging from flows in and around a single city block, in and around several blocks in the downtown Central Business District (CBD), and into the suburban Oklahoma City area a few km from the CBD. Indoor tracer and flow measurements within four downtown study buildings were also made in conjunction with detailed outdoor measurements investigating the outdoor-indoor exchange rates and mechanisms. The movement of tracer within the study buildings was also studied. The data from the field experiment is being used to evaluate models that are being developed for predicting dispersion of contaminants in urban areas. These models may be fast-response models based on semi-empirical algorithms that are used in real-time emergencies, or highly sophisticated computational fluid dynamics models that resolve individual building faces and crevices. The data from the field experiment, together with the models, can then be used to develop other advanced tools that are especially valuable in the efforts to thwart terrorists. These include tools for finding location and characteristics of a contaminant source; tools that can be used for real-time response or for forensic investigation. The tools will make use of monitoring networks for biological agents that are being established in several sensitive cities throughout the nation. This major urban study was conducted beginning June 28 and ending July 31, 2003. It included several integrated scientific components necessary to describe and understand the physical processes governing dispersion within and surrounding an urban area and into and within building environments. The components included characterizing: (1) the urban boundary layer and the development of the urban boundary layer within the atmospheric boundary layer, (2) the flows within and downwind of the tall-building core, (3) the flows within a street canyon including the effects of traffic on turbulence, (4) the surface energy balance within an urban area, (5) the dispersion of tracer into, out of and within buildings, and (6) the dispersion of tracer throughout the tall-building core and out to four km downwind from the release. The scientific elements of the study were accomplished using state-of-the-art meteorological and tracer instruments including lidars, sodars, radars, sonic anemometers, airplane-based meteorological sensors, fast-response tracer analyzers and helicopter-based remote tracer detectors. Winds and other meteorological quantities were measured continuously at nearly 200 locations in and around downtown Oklahoma City. Ten intensive operation periods (IOPs) of 8-hours each were completed during the 34-day study period where detailed meteorological, turbulence and tracer measurements were made. Sulfur hexafluoride tracer was released in downtown Oklahoma City and sampled in and around downtown and as far as four km downwind. During four of the ten IOPs the infiltration of tracer into four downtown buildings was studied with detailed measurements of tracer and flows within and surrounding some buildings. Tracer was sampled using over 200 integrated samplers and 25 fast response analyzers. Vertical measurements of tracer were made by placing samplers on the tops of nearly 20 buildings and by sampling tracer at 7 levels on a 90 m crane. The tracer and meteorological data collected in Oklahoma City is being used to evaluate and improve existing indoor and outdoor dispersion models, including fine-scale computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models, mesoscale numerical weather prediction models with sub-grid scale urban parameterizations and fast-response dispersion models that typically rely on empirical or semi-empirical relationships describing the atmospheric processes. The data will lead to improved algorithms and parameterizations within these models. Samplers to collect tracer data were located at various distances from the release locations for collecting data for

Leach, M J

2005-10-12

80

Fighting for Scholarships in Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Fearing a federal court in Oklahoma might end a state-financed merit-scholarship program targeted by a discrimination lawsuit, black legislators passed a bill making the program race and gender neutral. State regents are criticized for failing to develop effective policy to remedy past discrimination. (MSE)

Roach, Ronald

1999-01-01

81

UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA GRADUATE COLLEGE  

E-print Network

during the times when I felt like I was not getting anywhere. Additionally, I think that being able of the requirements for the Degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY By ALEXANDER DANIEL SCHENKMAN Norman, Oklahoma 2012 #12 would like to thank my advisor, Dr. Ming Xue, for his help, advice, and encouragement over the last four

Xue, Ming

82

Oklahoma Kids Count Factbook, 1995.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Kids Count report details county and statewide trends in the well-being of Oklahoma's children. The statistical report is based on eight indicators of child well being: (1) percent low birthweight infants; (2) infant mortality rate; (3) births to unmarried teens; (4) child abuse and neglect rates; (5) child death rate; (6) children living in…

Oklahoma Inst. for Child Advocacy, Inc., Oklahoma City. Oklahoma Kids Count.

83

UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA RETIREMENT POLICY  

E-print Network

or degenerative nature. #12;F. "Disability Benefits" means benefits provided under the Health Plan of all benefits under the University of Oklahoma Retirement Policy. Any conflict between the terms of the Institution are entitled to certain benefits following the completion of a designated number of years

Oklahoma, University of

84

Oklahoma Kids Count Factbook '98.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Kids Count report details county and statewide trends in the well-being of Oklahoma's children. The statistical portrait is based on eight indicators of child well-being: (1) low birthweight infants; (2) infant mortality; (3) births to teens; (4) child abuse and neglect; (5) child death; (6) child poverty; (7) high school dropouts; and (8)…

Oklahoma Inst. for Child Advocacy, Inc., Oklahoma City. Oklahoma Kids Count.

85

Oklahoma Kids Count Factbook, 2002.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Kids Count Factbook details county and statewide trends in the well-being of children in Oklahoma. The statistical portrait is based on seven indicators or benchmarks of child well-being: (1) low birthweight infants; (2) infant mortality; (3) births to young teens; (4) child abuse and neglect; (5) child and teen death; (6) high school…

Ingraham, Sandy

86

Oklahoma Kids Count Factbook, 2001.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Kids Count Factbook details county and statewide trends in the well-being of Oklahoma's children. The statistical portrait is based on seven indicators or benchmarks of child well-being: (1) low birth weight infants; (2) infant mortality; (3) births to young teens; (4) child abuse and neglect; (5) child and teen death; (6) high school…

Ingraham, Sandy

87

Oklahoma Kids Count Factbook '97.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Kids Count report details county and statewide trends in the well-being of Oklahoma's children. The statistical report is based on eight indicators of child well being: (1) economic distress; (2) percent low birthweight infants; (3) infant mortality rate; (4) births to teens; (5) child abuse and neglect rates; (6) child and teen death rate;…

Oklahoma Inst. for Child Advocacy, Inc., Oklahoma City. Oklahoma Kids Count.

88

Oklahoma Kids Count Factbook, 1999.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Kids Count Factbook details county and statewide trends in the well-being of Oklahoma's children. The statistical portrait is based on eight indicators of child well-being: (1) low birth weight infants; (2) infant mortality; (3) births to young teens; (4) child abuse and neglect; (5) child and teen death; (6) child poverty; (7) high school…

Ingraham, Sandy

89

Oklahoma Kids Count Factbook '96.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This data book presents findings of the Kids Count Project on current conditions faced by Oklahoma children age birth through 18. This second annual factbook organizes state and county data over a period of time to enable conditions for children in each county to be compared and ranked. The benchmark indicators studied include low birthweight…

Ingraham, Sandy

90

Water supplies of East Central and Southeastern Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

To plan effectively for future growth in East Central and Southeastern Oklahoma, sound information on public water systems is imperative. This report evaluates the 229 public water systems in 24 counties in East Central and Southeastern Oklahoma. Areas included are: the Central Oklahoma Economic Development District, the Kiamichi Economic Development District of Oklahoma, and the Southern Oklahoma Development Authority. Quantity,

J. W. Ferrell; J. B. Perry; W. F. Harris

1984-01-01

91

77 FR 61466 - Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00063  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...for the State of Oklahoma, dated 08/22...disaster: Primary Counties: (Physical Damage...Cleveland. Contiguous Counties: (Economic Injury Loans Only): Oklahoma: Canadian, Mcclain, Oklahoma, Pottawatomie. All other...

2012-10-09

92

75 FR 32491 - Oklahoma; Major Disaster and Related Determinations  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...following areas of the State of Oklahoma have been designated as adversely...Cleveland, McIntosh, Okfuskee, Oklahoma, Pottawatomie, and Seminole Counties for Individual Assistance...counties within the State of Oklahoma are eligible to apply...

2010-06-08

93

Nocturnal Low-Level-Jet-Dominated Atmospheric Boundary Layer Observed by a Doppler Lidar Over Oklahoma City during JU2003  

SciTech Connect

Boundary layer wind data observed by a Doppler lidar and sonic anemometers during the mornings of three intensive observational periods (IOP2, IOP3, and IOP7) of the Joint Urban 2003 (JU2003) field experiment are analyzed to extract the mean and turbulent characteristics of airflow over Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. A strong nocturnal low-level jet (LLJ) dominated the flow in the boundary layer over the measurement domain from midnight to the morning hours. Lidar scans through the LLJ taken after sunrise indicate that the LLJ elevation shows a gradual increase of 25-100 m over the urban area relative to that over the upstream suburban area. The mean wind speed beneath the jet over the urban area is about 10%-15% slower than that over the suburban area. Sonic anemometer observations combined with Doppler lidar observations in the urban and suburban areas are also analyzed to investigate the boundary layer turbulence production in the LLJ-dominated atmospheric boundary layer. The turbulence kinetic energy was higher over the urban domain mainly because of the shear production of building surfaces and building wakes. Direct transport of turbulent momentum flux from the LLJ to the urban street level was very small because of the relatively high elevation of the jet. However, since the LLJ dominated the mean wind in the boundary layer, the turbulence kinetic energy in the urban domain is correlated directly with the LLJ maximum speed and inversely with its height. The results indicate that the jet Richardson number is a reasonably good indicator for turbulent kinetic energy over the urban domain in the LLJ-dominated atmospheric boundary layer.

Wang, Yansen; Klipp, Cheryl L.; Garvey, Dennis M.; Ligon, David; Williamson, Chatt C.; Chang, Sam S.; Newsom, Rob K.; Calhoun, Ron

2007-12-01

94

Hydrogeology and simulation of groundwater flow in the Central Oklahoma (Garber-Wellington) Aquifer, Oklahoma, 1987 to 2009, and simulation of available water in storage, 2010-2059  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Central Oklahoma (Garber-Wellington) aquifer underlies about 3,000 square miles of central Oklahoma. The study area for this investigation was the extent of the Central Oklahoma aquifer. Water from the Central Oklahoma aquifer is used for public, industrial, commercial, agricultural, and domestic supply. With the exception of Oklahoma City, all of the major communities in central Oklahoma rely either solely or partly on groundwater from this aquifer. The Oklahoma City metropolitan area, incorporating parts of Canadian, Cleveland, Grady, Lincoln, Logan, McClain, and Oklahoma Counties, has a population of approximately 1.2 million people. As areas are developed for groundwater supply, increased groundwater withdrawals may result in decreases in long-term aquifer storage. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Oklahoma Water Resources Board, investigated the hydrogeology and simulated groundwater flow in the aquifer using a numerical groundwater-flow model. The purpose of this report is to describe an investigation of the Central Oklahoma aquifer that included analyses of the hydrogeology, hydrogeologic framework of the aquifer, and construction of a numerical groundwater-flow model. The groundwater-flow model was used to simulate groundwater levels and for water-budget analysis. A calibrated transient model was used to evaluate changes in groundwater storage associated with increased future water demands.

Mashburn, Shana L.; Ryter, Derek; Neel, Christopher R.; Smith, S. Jerrod; Magers, Jessica S.

2014-01-01

95

78 FR 36556 - Oklahoma; Major Disaster and Related Determinations  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...disaster: Cleveland, Lincoln, McClain, Oklahoma, and Pottawatomie Counties for Individual Assistance. Cleveland, Lincoln, McClain, Oklahoma, and Pottawatomie Counties for debris removal and emergency...

2013-06-18

96

We have only listed Oklahoma Hatcheries as they appear in the National Poultry Improvement Plan. For a listing of hatcheries in your state, contact your state USDA  

E-print Network

by the Department of Animal Science, Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources or Oklahoma State University. If you are an Oklahoma Resident you can obtain a copy by contacting: Mr. Ralph Duncan Animal Industry Division Oklahoma State Department of Ag 2800 North Lincoln Blvd. Oklahoma City, OK 73105 Phone

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

97

Autonomic reactivity and hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis dysregulation in spouses of Oklahoma City bombing survivors 7 years after the attack  

PubMed Central

Objective The objective of this exploratory pilot study was to examine autonomic reactivity and hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis dysregulation in spouses of highly exposed survivors of the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing. Methods This study compared psychiatric diagnoses and biological stress markers (physiological reactivity and cortisol measures) in spouses of bombing survivors and matched community participants. Spouses were recruited through bombing survivors who participated in prior studies. Individuals with medical illnesses and those taking psychotropic medications that would confound biological stress measures were excluded. The final sample included 15 spouses and 15 community participants. The primary outcome measures were psychiatric diagnoses assessed with the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for DSM-IV (DIS-IV). Biological stress markers were physiological reactivity and recovery in heart rate and blood pressure responses to a trauma interview and cortisol (morning, afternoon, and diurnal variation). Results Compared to the community participants, spouses evidenced greater reactivity in heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and diastolic blood pressure; delayed recovery in systolic blood pressure; and higher afternoon salivary cortisol. Conclusions The results support the need for further research in this area to clarify post-disaster effects on biological stress measures in the spouses of survivors and the potential significance of these effects and to address the needs of this important population which may be overlooked in recovery efforts. PMID:22520087

Pfefferbaum, Betty; Tucker, Phebe; North, Carol S.; Jeon-Slaughter, Haekyung

2012-01-01

98

50 CFR 32.55 - Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM HUNTING AND FISHING Refuge-Specific Regulations for Hunting and Fishing § 32.55 Oklahoma. The following refuge units have been opened for hunting and/or fishing, and are listed in...

2012-10-01

99

50 CFR 32.55 - Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM HUNTING AND FISHING Refuge-Specific Regulations for Hunting and Fishing § 32.55 Oklahoma. The following refuge units have been opened for hunting and/or fishing, and are listed in...

2013-10-01

100

50 CFR 32.55 - Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM HUNTING AND FISHING Refuge-Specific Regulations for Hunting and Fishing § 32.55 Oklahoma. The following refuge units have been opened for hunting and/or fishing, and are listed in...

2011-10-01

101

50 CFR 32.55 - Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM HUNTING AND FISHING Refuge-Specific Regulations for Hunting and Fishing § 32.55 Oklahoma. The following refuge units have been opened for hunting and/or fishing, and are listed in...

2010-10-01

102

REGISTRATION PACKET 9th Annual Oklahoma Native American Youth Language Fair  

E-print Network

REGISTRATION PACKET 9th Annual Oklahoma Native American Youth Language Fair, Lists, and Entry Forms to: Oklahoma Native American Youth Language Fair Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum Oklahoma Native American Youth Language Fair For questions about the ONAYLF, forms

Oklahoma, University of

103

Digital geologic map of Beaver County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This data set consists of digital data and accompanying documentation for the surficial geology of Beaver County, Oklahoma. The original data are from the Hydrogeologic Map, sheet 1 of 3, included in the U.S. Geological Survey publication, Reconnaissance of the Water Resources of Beaver County, Oklahoma, Hydrologic Investigations Atlas HA-450, Morton and Goemaat, 1973. The geology was compiled by S.L. Schoff, 1953.

Cederstrand, J.R.

1997-01-01

104

TWO ADDITIONS TO THE FLORA OF OKLAHOMA AND NOTES ON XYRIS JUPICAI (XYRIDACEAE) IN OKLAHOMA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eleocharis flavescens and Rhynchospora scirpoides are reported as new to Oklahoma. Xyris jupicai, which has been mentioned as occurring in Oklahoma, is documented in the state by citation of voucher specimens. The overall distribution of these species in the West Gulf Coastal Plain is discussed.

Jason R. Singhurst; Edwin L. Bridges; Walter C. Holmes

105

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets  

E-print Network

-green or purple with a The Ring-necked Pheasant in Oklahoma bright white collar. It is this collar that gives northwest counties. The ring-neck has a high resistance to disease and parasites, is adaptable, a strong Rangeland Specialist Oklahoma State University Jason Sykes Farm Bill Wildlife Biologist Pheasants Forever

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

106

SOIL SURVEY OF PAYNE COUNTY, OKLAHOMA OSURR Section 5  

E-print Network

Units Cities Detailed Counties Detailed States Interstate Highways Roads Rails Water Hydrography Oceans OF PAYNE COUNTY, OKLAHOMA OSURR Section 5 Source of Map: Natural Resources Conservation Service Web Soil, closed Eroded Spot Gravel Pit Gravelly Spot Gulley Lava Flow Landfill Marsh or Swamp Miscellaneous Water

Ghajar, Afshin J.

107

Four Possible Steps to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Ada, Oklahoma  

EPA Science Inventory

An overview of federal, state, and city initiatives on climate change are presented. Specific steps for the City of Ada, Oklahoma, are presented. This is an abstract of a proposed presentation and does not necessarily reflect EPA policy....

108

Reductive Dechlorination of Chlorinated Ethenes Under Oxidation-Reduction Conditions and Potentiometric Surfaces in Two Trichloroethene-Contaminated Zones at the Double Eagle and Fourth Street Superfund Sites in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Double Eagle Refining Superfund site and the Fourth Street Abandoned Refinery Superfund site are in northeast Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, adjacent to one another. The Double Eagle facility became a Superfund site on the basis of contamination from lead and volatile organic compounds; the Fourth Street facility on the basis of volatile organic compounds, pesticides, and acid-base neutral compounds. The study documented in this report was done to investigate whether reductive dechlorination of chlorinated ethenes under oxidation-reduction conditions is occurring in two zones of the Garber-Wellington aquifer (shallow zone 30?60 to 75 feet below land surface, deep zone 75 to 160 feet below land surface) at the sites; and to construct potentiometric surfaces of the two water-yielding zones to determine the directions of ground-water flow at the sites. The presence in some wells of intermediate products of reductive dechlorination, dichloroethene and vinyl chloride, is an indication that reductive dechlorination of trichloroethene is occurring. Dissolved oxygen concentrations (less than 0.5 milligram per liter) indicate that consumption of dissolved oxygen likely had occurred in the oxygen-reducing microbial process associated with reductive dechlorination. Concentrations of nitrate and nitrite nitrogen (generally less than 2.0 and 0.06 milligrams per liter, respectively) indicate that nitrate reduction probably is not a key process in either aquifer zone. Concentrations of ferrous iron greater than 1.00 milligram per liter in the majority of wells sampled indicate that iron reduction is probable. Concentrations of sulfide less than 0.05 milligram per liter in all wells indicate that sulfate reduction probably is not a key process in either zone. The presence of methane in ground water is an indication of strongly reducing conditions that facilitate reductive dechlorination. Methane was detected in all but one well. In the shallow zone in the eastern part of the study area, ground water flowing from the northwest and south coalesces in a potentiometric trough, then moves westward and ultimately northwestward. In the western part of the study area, ground water in the shallow zone flows northwest. In the deep zone in the eastern part of the study area, ground water generally flows northwestward; and in the western part of the study area, ground water in the deep zone generally flows northward.

Braun, Christopher L.

2004-01-01

109

76 FR 36559 - Oklahoma; Major Disaster and Related Determinations  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of the State of Oklahoma, have been designated...Ottawa, Pawnee, Pottawatomie, Rogers, Stephens...and Washington Counties for Public Assistance...Ottawa, Pawnee, Pottawatomie, Stephens, Wagoner...within the State of Oklahoma are eligible...

2011-06-22

110

Muriel Wright: Telling the Story of Oklahoma Indian Nations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Wright family, descended from the patriarch Allen Wright, who arrived in the new Choctaw Nation after surviving the "Trail of Tears," played an important role in Oklahoma politics and society. Following removal to Oklahoma, Allen went on to become Principal Chief of the Choctaw Nation and gave the name, Oklahoma, to the southwest territory. He…

Cesar, Dana; Smith, Joan K.; Noley, Grayson

2004-01-01

111

Social and Economic Consequences of Indian Gaming in Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The balancing framework of Indian gaming as it operates in Oklahoma constrains Oklahoma Indian nations from operating facilities according to the dictates of the marketplace on a large-scale Class III basis. Indian gaming actually brings substantial net economic benefits to the state, contrary to claims that Oklahoma Indian gaming benefits come at…

Grant, Kenneth W., II; Spilde, Katherine A.; Taylor, Jonathan B.

2004-01-01

112

75 FR 11904 - Oklahoma; Major Disaster and Related Determinations  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...exists in the State of Oklahoma. In order to provide...areas of the State of Oklahoma have been designated...Payne, Pontotoc, Pottawatomie, Rogers, Sequoyah...Tillman, and Tulsa Counties for Public Assistance...within the State of Oklahoma are eligible to...

2010-03-12

113

75 FR 15450 - Oklahoma; Major Disaster and Related Determinations  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...exists in the State of Oklahoma. In order to provide...areas of the State of Oklahoma have been designated...Okmulgee, Pontotoc, Pottawatomie, Roger Mills, Seminole...Stephens, and Washita Counties for Public Assistance...within the State of Oklahoma are eligible to...

2010-03-29

114

Nonmarital births in Oklahoma 1975-1995.  

PubMed

This report uses data from the Oklahoma State Department of Health to describe past trends and current patterns of nonmarital births in Oklahoma. Between 1975 and 1995, the percentage of unmarried women delivering a live birth in Oklahoma increased from 12% to 31%. Adult nonmarital births increased faster than teen nonmarital births, but teens had a higher percentage of nonmarital births. White rates increased faster than African-American and Native American rates, but African-Americans had a higher percentage of nonmarital births. Unmarried women who give birth were more likely to be poor and lack education; additionally, they were less likely to receive early prenatal care, more likely to have had low weight births, and more likely to have had an unintended pregnancy. Birth outcomes are poorer among unmarried women, but this may be due to poverty and education rather than marital status alone. PMID:9583321

Campbell, J E; DePersio, S R; Lorenz, R

1998-01-01

115

A Legal Analysis of Litigation against Oklahoma Educators and School Districts under the Oklahoma Governmental Tort Claims Act  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This dissertation analyzed public court decisions in cases against Oklahoma school districts and their employees involving sovereign immunity claims filed under Oklahoma's Governmental Tort Claims Act. The questions addressed were: (1) How have the Oklahoma courts interpreted the Governmental Tort Claims Act, (Okla. Stat. tit. 51 Section 151 et…

Lacefield, Kevin Lee

2010-01-01

116

Oklahoma – Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Law and Documentation of Discrimination  

E-print Network

and polices involving employment discrimination based onof Discrimination Administrative Complaints Municipal PolicePolice Department and the City of Oklahoma, her employer of more than ten (10) years, for gender discrimination,

Sears, Brad

2009-01-01

117

Ethnicity and Identity in Northeastern Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The origins of the Oklahoma Delaware reflect a complex history of migration, forced relocation, and punitive concentration. Though 36 tribal identities survive today, they are not of equal cultural coherence. Among the Delaware, there is no simple relation between socioeconomic status, level of acculturation, and factional membership. Rather, the…

Roark, Sue N.

118

University of Oklahoma Human Resources Healthy Sooners  

E-print Network

University of Oklahoma Human Resources ­ Healthy Sooners For distribution To: All OU Employees://healthysooners.ouhsc.edu. As provided by university policy, Human Resources has approved the distribution of this mass email. Approval we're concerned about keeping a job, saving for retirement, or meeting the cost of day-to-day living

Oklahoma, University of

119

Oklahoma Sheriffs' Association Ok ahoma Sheriff  

E-print Network

Education and Training (CLEET) and the National Center for Biomedical Research and Training (NCBRT), Academy-based and instructor-led training, which includes mobile and residential training. Each of the courses offered of education and experience. The state of Oklahoma is preparing a multi-year training schedule to meet

Harms, Kyle E.

120

Characteristics of successful aviation leaders of Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Scope and method of study. The purpose of the study was to examine the personal traits, skills, practices, behaviors, background, academic, and career success patterns of selected aviation leaders in Oklahoma. A purposive sample of 18 leaders who had achieved a top-ranked position of aviation leadership in an organization or a position of influence in the community was selected for

Mary N. Hill Kutz

1998-01-01

121

State Teacher Policy Yearbook, 2009. Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Oklahoma edition of the National Council on Teacher Quality's (NCTQ's) 2009 "State Teacher Policy Yearbook" is the third annual look at state policies impacting the teaching profession. It is hoped that this report will help focus attention on areas where state policymakers can make changes that will have a positive impact on teacher quality…

National Council on Teacher Quality, 2009

2009-01-01

122

Public Library Service to Children in Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Because of the low density of its population and subsequent low property tax support, library service in Oklahoma is based on the multicounty library operating as a single unit. With the help of federal funds, such units now cover one-third of the state and 60 percent of its population utilizing branch libraries and bookmobile service. Service to…

Wentroth, Mary Ann

123

Oklahoma: A View of the Center  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents a dialogue on twentieth-century Oklahoma artists and writers given at a conference titled "Working from Community: American Indian Art and Literature in a Historical and Cultural Context" and held in the summer of 2003 at Evergreen State College in Olympia, Washington. Twenty-five educators converged for six weeks of…

Jones, Ruthe Blalock; Depriest, Maria; Fowler, Cynthia

2007-01-01

124

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY Financial Guarantee 2014  

E-print Network

Only $19,150 I understand the expenses listed above are average cost estimates for 9 months. The actual's prospective educational and living expenses while in the U.S. Therefore, Oklahoma State University requires their educational costs. The amounts listed below are estimates that are determined by using the cost figures

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

125

Women of Oklahoma, 1890-1920.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book examines the lives of representative White, Black, and American Indian women on the Oklahoma frontier after the abrupt opening of Indian Territory to non-Indian settlement in 1889. Drawing on primary sources, particularly diaries and letters, it focuses on the intersection of race, gender, class, and culture in the relationships among…

Reese, Linda Williams

126

Nutritional Risk among Oklahoma Congregate Meal Participants  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To determine if there were differences by demographic variables in response rates to Nutrition Screening Initiative (NSI) Checklist statements reported by over 50% of Oklahoma Older Americans Act Nutrition Program (OAANP) congregate meal participants categorized at high nutritional risk based on cumulative NSI Checklist scores. Design:…

Quigley, Kimberly K.; Hermann, Janice R.; Warde, William D.

2008-01-01

127

Oklahoma Curriculum Guide for Teaching Safety Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Developed by classroom teachers, university professors, and personnel from the Oklahoma State Department of Education, this guide is an effort to assist teachers in locating and utilizing safety materials as well as to assist them in developing well-balanced safety programs for the children and young people in the state. The preschool and…

Oklahoma Curriculum Improvement Commission, Oklahoma City.

128

An economic assessment of the application of superconductor technology to magnetic-levitation trains in Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Specific objectives were to: (1) develop and refine a methodology that can be used to evaluate the feasibility of MAG-LEV trains; (2) apply this methodology to the state of Oklahoma. The methodology is based on an aggregate econometric demand model and mathematical programming. A city-pair network is constructed to evaluate alternative MAG-LEV routes between Oklahoma City and nine other cites

Sabbagh Kermani

1991-01-01

129

Water conservation as a long-range strategy in municipal water supply planning: the case of Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study is concerned with Oklahoma water managers' attitudes toward the adoption or rejection of long-term water conservation options in small and medium sized cities under 50,000 in population. In focusing upon Oklahoma water managers' attitudes, the following questions are addressed: (1) What factors influence Oklahoma water managers' attitudes toward the adoption or rejection of long-term water conservation measures. (2)

1985-01-01

130

Potentiometric surface in the Central Oklahoma (Garber-Wellington) aquifer, Oklahoma, 2009  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A study of the hydrogeology of the Central Oklahoma aquifer was started in 2008 to provide the Oklahoma Water Resources Board (OWRB) hydrogeologic data and a groundwater flow model that can be used as a tool to help manage the aquifer. The 1973 Oklahoma water law requires the OWRB to do hydrologic investigations of Oklahoma's aquifers (termed 'groundwater basins') and to determine amounts of water that may be withdrawn by permitted water users. 'Maximum annual yield' is a term used by OWRB to describe the total amount of water that can be withdrawn from a specific aquifer in any year while allowing a minimum 20-year life of the basin (Oklahoma Water Resources Board, 2010). Currently (2010), the maximum annual yield has not been determined for the Central Oklahoma aquifer. Until the maximum annual yield determination is made, water users are issued a temporary permit by the OWRB for 2 acre-feet/acre per year. The objective of the study, in cooperation with the Oklahoma Water Resources Board, was to study the hydrogeology of the Central Oklahoma aquifer to provide information that will enable the OWRB to determine the maximum annual yield of the aquifer based on different proposed management plans. Groundwater flow models are typically used by the OWRB as a tool to help determine the maximum annual yield. This report presents the potentiometric surface of the Central Oklahoma aquifer based on water-level data collected in 2009 as part of the current (2010) hydrologic study. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Hydrologic Investigations Atlas HA-724 by Christenson and others (1992) presents the 1986-87 potentiometric-surface map. This 1986-87 potentiometric-surface map was made as part of the USGS National Water-Quality Assessment pilot project for the Central Oklahoma aquifer that examined the geochemical and hydrogeological processes operating in the aquifer. An attempt was made to obtain water-level measurements for the 2009 potentiometric-surface map from the wells used for the 1986-87 potentiometric-surface map. Well symbols with circles on the 2009 potentiometric-surface map (fig. 1) indicate wells that were used for the 1986-87 potentiometric-surface map.

Mashburn, Shana L.; Magers, Jessica

2011-01-01

131

78 FR 41074 - Oklahoma; Amendment No. 6 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FEMA-2013-0001] Oklahoma; Amendment No. 6 to...declaration for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-4117-DR...declaration for the State of Oklahoma is hereby amended to...Okfuskee, Okmulgee, and LeFlore Counties for Individual...

2013-07-09

132

40 CFR 81.124 - North Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false North Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality...Quality Control Regions § 81.124 North Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The North Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air...

2010-07-01

133

78 FR 16036 - Service Level Environmental Impact Statement for the Texas Oklahoma Passenger Rail Study Corridor...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Statement for the Texas Oklahoma Passenger Rail Study Corridor, South Texas to Oklahoma...improved high- speed intercity passenger rail service along an 850-mile corridor...Level EIS, the Texas Oklahoma Passenger Rail Study (Study) also includes...

2013-03-13

134

Middle Pennsylvanian (Atokan) crinoids from Oklahoma and Missouri  

E-print Network

as from the Bostwick Conglomerate in Carter County, Oklahoma. Some of the material consists of spinose first primi- brachs of the arms, which have distinctive con- figuration and surface ornamentation. Generic assignment of the axillary primibrachs was at... is in some question because the pos- terior side of the cup is unknown. The monotype of the species is from the Bostwick Conglomerate (Atokan) of Love County, Oklahoma. A large specimen from the Atoka Formation of Coal County, Oklahoma, which is also lacking...

Strimple, H. L.

1975-05-28

135

A digital geologic map database for the state of Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This dataset is a composite of part or all of the 12 1:250,000 scale quadrangles that make up Oklahoma. The result looks like a geologic map of the State of Oklahoma. But it is only an Oklahoma shaped map clipped from the 1:250,000 geologic maps. This is not a new geologic map. No new mapping took place. The geologic information from each quadrangle is available within the composite dataset.

Heran, William D.; Green, Gregory N.; Stoeser, Douglas B.

2003-01-01

136

Helminth fauna of waterfowl in central Oklahoma.  

PubMed

Free-ranging waterfowl wintering in and migrating through central Oklahoma were collected and examined for intestinal helminths. Seventy-one ducks, including mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), American widgeons (Anas americana), blue-winged teal (Anas discors), and green-winged teal (Anas crecca) were examined; 64 (90.1%) harbored one or more species of metazoa. Six cestodes, 6 trematodes, 6 nematodes, and 1 acanthocephalan were identified, An experimental, non-flying population of ducks was established and monitored to determine the extent of helminth transmission in central Oklahoma. Seven species of helminths were acquired by the sentinel birds during the study. The significance of the parasites recovered and variations in prevalence and species composition of the infections are discussed as they relate to the life cycles of the parasites and the ecology of the hosts. PMID:7373725

Shaw, M G; Kocan, A A

1980-01-01

137

Largest Dinosaur Ever Discovered Found in Oklahoma  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Originally discovered in a remote corner of Oklahoma in 1994, the fossil of what may have been the largest creature to ever walk the earth has been excavated by a research team from the University of Oklahoma. Dubbed Sauroposeidon proteles, or "thunder lizard," the dinosaur was almost 100 feet long, with a 39 foot neck and weighing over 50 tons, so big that it would have created minor seismic activity just by walking, according to scientists. The new find is about 110 million years old and consists of neck vertebrae, some almost five feet in length, together with neck ribs nearly twelve feet long. The find is also significant because it may shed light on the last of the North American sauropods, who died out about 100 million years ago. A paper on this new find is scheduled to appear in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. The sites listed provide information and background material about this momentous discovery.

De Nie, Michael W.

138

N3280RDCOTTONWOODRD PayneOklahoma 11  

E-print Network

51 2 54 11 51 49 4 11 2 11 10 72 51 96 26 47 51 2651 26 76 76 26 4 32 11 26 3 11 26 10 72 51 31 26 51 11 2626 72 11 49 10 11 26 11 26 96 76 26 41 11 76 51 1011 74 31 51 11 SOIL SURVEY OF PAYNE COUNTY Soil Survey Area: Payne County, Oklahoma Spatial Version of Data: 2 Soil Map Compilation Scale: 1

Ghajar, Afshin J.

139

Oklahoma Center for High Energy Physics (OCHEP)  

SciTech Connect

The DOE EPSCoR implementation grant, with the support from the State of Oklahoma and from the three universities, Oklahoma State University, University of Oklahoma and Langston University, resulted in establishing of the Oklahoma Center for High Energy Physics (OCHEP) in 2004. Currently, OCHEP continues to flourish as a vibrant hub for research in experimental and theoretical particle physics and an educational center in the State of Oklahoma. All goals of the original proposal were successfully accomplished. These include foun- dation of a new experimental particle physics group at OSU, the establishment of a Tier 2 computing facility for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and Tevatron data analysis at OU and organization of a vital particle physics research center in Oklahoma based on resources of the three universities. OSU has hired two tenure-track faculty members with initial support from the grant funds. Now both positions are supported through OSU budget. This new HEP Experimental Group at OSU has established itself as a full member of the Fermilab D0 Collaboration and LHC ATLAS Experiment and has secured external funds from the DOE and the NSF. These funds currently support 2 graduate students, 1 postdoctoral fellow, and 1 part-time engineer. The grant initiated creation of a Tier 2 computing facility at OU as part of the Southwest Tier 2 facility, and a permanent Research Scientist was hired at OU to maintain and run the facility. Permanent support for this position has now been provided through the OU university budget. OCHEP represents a successful model of cooperation of several universities, providing the establishment of critical mass of manpower, computing and hardware resources. This led to increasing Oklahoma�¢����s impact in all areas of HEP, theory, experiment, and computation. The Center personnel are involved in cutting edge research in experimental, theoretical, and computational aspects of High Energy Physics with the research areas ranging from the search for new phenomena at the Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider to theoretical modeling, computer simulation, detector development and testing, and physics analysis. OCHEP faculty members participating on the D0 collaboration at the Fermilab Tevatron and on the ATLAS collaboration at the CERN LHC have made major impact on the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson search, top quark studies, B physics studies, and measurements of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) phenomena. The OCHEP Grid computing facility consists of a large computer cluster which is playing a major role in data analysis and Monte Carlo productions for both the D0 and ATLAS experiments. Theoretical efforts are devoted to new ideas in Higgs bosons physics, extra dimensions, neutrino masses and oscillations, Grand Unified Theories, supersymmetric models, dark matter, and nonperturbative quantum field theory. Theory members are making major contributions to the understanding of phenomena being explored at the Tevatron and the LHC. They have proposed new models for Higgs bosons, and have suggested new signals for extra dimensions, and for the search of supersymmetric particles. During the seven year period when OCHEP was partially funded through the DOE EPSCoR implementation grant, OCHEP members published over 500 refereed journal articles and made over 200 invited presentations at major conferences. The Center is also involved in education and outreach activities by offering summer research programs for high school teachers and college students, and organizing summer workshops for high school teachers, sometimes coordinating with the Quarknet programs at OSU and OU. The details of the Center can be found in http://ochep.phy.okstate.edu.

S. Nandi; M.J. Strauss; J. Snow; F. Rizatdinova; B. Abbott; K. Babu; P. Gutierrez; C. Kao; A. Khanov; K.A. Milton; H. Neaman; H. Severini, P. Skubic

2012-02-29

140

Oklahoma GSHP Ini0a0ve Jim Bullington  

E-print Network

Oklahoma GSHP Ini0a0ve Jim Bullington Trade & Industrial Education Oklahoma Department including Skills Centers) · 395 comprehensive school districts with C/T · 550 Comprehensive High Schools with C/T · All 77 coun0es served by CareerTech · 72 coun0es

141

ELECTION AGREEMENT FOR Oklahoma Teachers' Retirement System (OTRS)  

E-print Network

ELECTION AGREEMENT FOR Oklahoma Teachers' Retirement System (OTRS) For Hourly­Paid Employee Contributory Retirement Plan on your behalf. Name (First and Last): Employee ID: Email: Contact Phone #: Last By completing this form you are choosing to participate in the Oklahoma Teachers' Retirement System (OTRS

Oklahoma, University of

142

The Oklahoma PN/ADN Articulation Project Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In response to a critical nursing shortage in the state of Oklahoma, the Oklahoma Practical Nursing (PN)/Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) Articulation Project Coordinating Committee was formed in spring 1990 to develop a proposal for program articulation. A curriculum matrix was designed and adopted for use by five regional subcommittees which…

Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education, Oklahoma City.

143

Service Assessment Mother's Day Weekend Tornado in Oklahoma and  

E-print Network

Service Assessment Mother's Day Weekend Tornado in Oklahoma and Missouri, May 10, 2008 U, Maryland #12;Cover Photograph: Survivors of Picher tornado. (Photo courtesy of Tulsa World News.) ii #12;Service Assessment Mother's Day Weekend Tornado in Oklahoma and Missouri, May 10, 2008 October 2009

144

Wrongful Death: Oklahoma Supreme Court Replaces Viability Standard with \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

On December 7, 1999, a divided Oklahoma Supreme Court held in Nealis v. Baird that a claim may be brought under Oklahoma's wrongful death statute on behalf of a nonviable fetus born alive. The decision represents a departure from the traditional notion that \\

Fatma E. Marouf

2000-01-01

145

75 FR 23280 - Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma Alcohol Control Ordinance  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Indian Affairs Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma Alcohol Control Ordinance AGENCY: Bureau of Indian...publishes the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma's Alcohol Control Ordinance, which was adopted...CB-64-2010 enacted on March 13, 2010. The Alcohol Control Ordinance regulates and...

2010-05-03

146

Color Variation Among Northern Flickers Collected in Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The eastern (yellow-shafted) race of the northern flicker (Colaptes auratus auratus) is resident in Oklahoma. Except at the western end of the panhandle where it breeds, the western (red-shafted) race (C. a. cafer) occupies the state only during migration and winter. The two races interbreed widely. A total of 179 northern flicker (Colaptes auratus) specimens from Oklahoma were examined for

Vickie A. Ivey; Jack D. Tyler

147

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets  

E-print Network

://osufacts.okstate.edu Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Joe Armstrong Extension Weed Science Specialist Why should I weeds are of greatest concern? Pigweed species, Italian ryegrass, cheat, marestail, gi- ant ragweed Science Diagnostic Services Attn: Joe Armstrong Dept. of Plant and Soil Sciences 368 Ag Hall Stillwater

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

148

DISABILITIES IN OKLAHOMA--ESTIMATES AND PROJECTIONS, REPORT OF THE OKLAHOMA SURVEY OF DISABILITIES.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THE PURPOSE OF THE STUDY WAS TO PROVIDE REASONABLY ACCURATE ESTIMATES OF THE NUMBER AND TYPES OF DISABLED PERSONS AND THEIR NEEDS AS A BASIS FOR BOTH PRESENT AND FUTURE PLANNING. PERSONAL INTERVIEWS WERE CONDUCTED WITH ADULT RESPONDENTS IN 3,000 HOUSEHOLDS IN OKLAHOMA, A RANDOM SAMPLE STATIFIED ON THE RURAL-URBAN DIMENSION. DATA FROM 2,058…

BOHLEBER, MICHAEL E.

149

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets  

E-print Network

increased disposable income to be spent in the community. What the Entrepreneur Must Do With the economic a 1994 survey found that 125,000 Oklahoma home-based businesses generated over $3 billion in income. What successful business. The owner, through the sale of products and services, generates income from which

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

150

Oklahoma Aerospace Intellectual Capital/Educational Recommendations: An Inquiry of Oklahoma Aerospace Executives  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Scope and Method of Study: The purpose of this qualitative study was to conduct detailed personal interviews with aerospace industry executives/managers from both the private and military sectors from across Oklahoma to determine their perceptions of intellectual capital needs of the industry. Interviews with industry executives regarding…

Nelson, Erin M.

2010-01-01

151

Oklahoma Industrial Energy Management Program  

E-print Network

[J]('.AL 'UJLOIIf~SuJ1[ 670 lUll I.V. SUI STun POSTAl( "" 'us 'AID CNDfA~. IU. W.S. SINi IUSllLU N1MJIISllA1tl)N' . fFf'ICIAI. IUSt_SS II...." fat "IIATE U$(. S3Dl). NAME, _ COOANY ---:-__ MAILING ADORESSc-__--.,. _ CITY STATE, ZIP__ PHONE, _ CITY YOU...[J]('.AL 'UJLOIIf~SuJ1[ 670 lUll I.V. SUI STun POSTAl( "" 'us 'AID CNDfA~. IU. W.S. SINi IUSllLU N1MJIISllA1tl)N' . fFf'ICIAI. IUSt_SS II...." fat "IIATE U$(. S3Dl). NAME, _ COOANY ---:-__ MAILING ADORESSc-__--.,. _ CITY STATE, ZIP__ PHONE, _ CITY YOU...

Estes, C. B.; Turner, W. C.

1980-01-01

152

Development and Application to Oklahoma City of a New Mass, Energy, Vorticity, and Potential Enstrophy Conserving Scheme for 3D Nonhydrostatic Atmospheric Flows with Complex Boundaries  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a generalization of a mass, energy, vorticity, and potential enstrophy conserving numerical scheme for the 2D shallow water equations (SWEs) in domains with rigid boundaries (e.g. islands) to the governing equations for 3D nonhydrostatic atmospheric flows expressed in the altitude coordinate (as opposed to a terrain-following vertical coordinate). The scheme for the 2D SWEs consists of the scheme of Arakawa and Lamb (1981) (AL81) away from boundaries and the boundary scheme of Ketefian and Jacobson (2009) (KJ09) at boundaries. We generalize the combined AL81/KJ09 scheme to 3D atmospheric flows with rigid boundaries (e.g. hills and buildings) in such a way that, like the continuous equations governing these flows, the generalized 3D scheme conserves mass, energy, vorticity, and potential enstrophy in the special case of 2D barotropic flow. We perform 2D numerical simulations in a vertical plane to demonstrate the scheme's conservation properties. We also perform 3D simulations of flows in a domain with building-scale topography from Oklahoma City, and we use the velocity fields from these simulations to model the transport of an inert tracer around this topography. The generalized 3D scheme is useful because it conserves several important domain-summed quantities in atmospheric models that use the altitude coordinate, thereby avoiding the large errors in pressure-gradient calculations often found in models that use a terrain-following vertical coordinate.

Ketefian, G. S.; Jacobson, M. Z.

2010-12-01

153

University of Oklahoma: History of Science Collections  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The University of Oklahoma Libraries have done a wonderful job with their history of science collections. Visitors to the site will find seven collections here to keep their minds busy. Their number includes "Copernicus's De revolutionibus" and "Scientific Instruments and Historical Artifacts." Of course this first volume is nothing less than a classic, presenting Copernicus's evidence and arguments in support of heliocentric theory. This volume also contains extensive marginalia from a circle of astronomers located in Paris in the decade following the book's publication in 1543. Moving on, the "Scientific Instruments and Historical Artifacts" area contains 16 wonderful items, including an ancient Mesopotamian cuneiform tablet and videos of historically significant refractometers.

2012-09-21

154

Naturally occurring hepatozoonosis in coyotes from Oklahoma.  

PubMed

Nine of 16 free-ranging coyotes (Canis latrans) from central Oklahoma (USA) had naturally acquired infections of Hepatozoon americanum. Infections were confirmed by recognition of tissue stages closely resembling H. americanum in skeletal and cardiac muscle. At the time coyotes were collected they were infested with a variety of ticks, including adult Gulf Coast ticks (Amblyomma maculatum). We propose that the high prevalence of H. americanum in this small sample of free-ranging coyotes and the ability of these same animals to harbor adult populations of A. maculatum is an important component of the epizootiology of canine hepatozoonosis in North America. PMID:10073352

Kocan, A A; Breshears, M; Cummings, C; Panciera, R J; Ewing, S A; Barker, R W

1999-01-01

155

The Native American Studies Program at the University of Oklahoma  

E-print Network

language and initiated classes in that lan guage on the campus. By the fall of 1995 the four languages currently offered were in place. Initially the language courses were offered through the College of Con tinuing Education on tuition driven funding..., the Indian Education Office of the Oklahoma City Public Schools, and Jacobson House Native Art Center. As of the Spring of 2000, the Native American Studies program had gradu ated 56 majors. A number have gone on to graduate programs in law, public...

Kidwell, Clara Sue

2001-03-01

156

Water conservation as a long-range strategy in municipal water supply planning: the case of Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

This study is concerned with Oklahoma water managers' attitudes toward the adoption or rejection of long-term water conservation options in small and medium sized cities under 50,000 in population. In focusing upon Oklahoma water managers' attitudes, the following questions are addressed: (1) What factors influence Oklahoma water managers' attitudes toward the adoption or rejection of long-term water conservation measures. (2) What are the major incentives or disincentives that may encourage or discourage the adoption and implementing of long-term water conservation alternatives at the municipal level in Oklahoma. (3) What are the distinct geographical variations in attitudes toward adopting water conservation policies. To address these and related questions, a questionnaire was mailed to each of the water managers in the selected Oklahoma towns and cities. Results of the study indicated that local water managers considered local governments as the most appropriate body to deal with water management issues. Local water managers in Oklahoma also place heavy reliance upon traditional structural solutions. If these solutions prove to be inadequate, long-term water conservation alternatives become more appealing. However, Oklahoma water managers in the selected cities and towns expressed their profound concerns about the potential revenue loss if long-term water conservation measures were to be adopted and implemented.

Abdallah, A.L.

1985-01-01

157

SFC to cease operations at Gore, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

On February 16, Sequoyah Fuels Corporation (SFC) formally notified the Nuclear Regulatory Commission it intends to terminate operations and commence decommissioning at its uranium conversion facility at Gore, Oklahoma. SFC officially requested that its NRC operating license be terminated July 31, 1993. SFC, a wholly-owned subsidiary of General Atomics Corporation (GA), will be responsible for the estimated $21.2-million decommissioning plan. GA has contended that it is not financially liable for the cleanup but stated it would be available to offer financial assistance if needed. Over the proposed 10-year cleanup schedule, GA said SFC can finance the decommissioning by drawing on SFC's estimated $70-million in revenue from a fee-for-contract agreement in its recently formed joint-venture with AlliedSignal Inc., called ConverDyn.

Not Available

1993-03-01

158

Soil moisture determination study. [Guymon, Oklahoma  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Soil moisture data collected in conjunction with aircraft sensor and SEASAT SAR data taken near Guymon, Oklahoma are summarized. In order to minimize the effects of vegetation and roughness three bare and uniformly smooth fields were sampled 6 times at three day intervals on the flight days from August 2 through 17. Two fields remained unirrigated and dry. A similar pair of fields was irrigated at different times during the sample period. In addition, eighteen other fields were sampled on the nonflight days with no field being sampled more than 24 hours from a flight time. The aircraft sensors used included either black and white or color infrared photography, L and C band passive microwave radiometers, the 13.3, 4.75, 1.6 and .4 GHz scatterometers, the 11 channel modular microwave scanner, and the PRT5.

Blanchard, B. J.

1979-01-01

159

US hydropower resource assessment for Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the hydropower development potential in this country. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose, The HES measures the potential hydropower resources available in the United States, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a dBASE menu-driven software application that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report details the resource assessment results for the state of Oklahoma.

Francfort, J.E.

1993-12-01

160

OKLAHOMA NATIVE AMERICAN YOUTH LANGUAGE FAIR Spoken Language Performance  

E-print Network

OKLAHOMA NATIVE AMERICAN YOUTH LANGUAGE FAIR Spoken Language Performance Category Description Students are invited to present spoken language performances in Native American languages. Traditional are welcome. Please remember the point of the ONAYLF is to demonstrate Native American language use

Oklahoma, University of

161

AN OKLAHOMA WEATHER MODIFICATION PROGRAM STATUS REPORT AND PROJECT REVIEW  

Microsoft Academic Search

The recent history of the Oklahoma Weather Modification Program (OWMP) is presented, the 2001 field program summarized, and the current status of the statewide rainfall stimulation and hail suppression program reported. Some suggestions for program improvement are also enumerated.

Timothy E. Sedlock; Nathan R. Kuhnert; Rebecca L. Resler; Michael E. Mathis; Bruce A. Boe; Brian Vance

162

MISR Scans the Texas-Oklahoma Border  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

These MISR images of Oklahoma and north Texas were acquired on March 12, 2000 during Terra orbit 1243. The three images on the left, from top to bottom, are from the 70-degree forward viewing camera, the vertical-viewing (nadir) camera, and the 70-degree aftward viewing camera. The higher brightness, bluer tinge, and reduced contrast of the oblique views result primarily from scattering of sunlight in the Earth's atmosphere, though some color and brightness variations are also due to differences in surface reflection at the different angles. The longer slant path through the atmosphere at the oblique angles also accentuates the appearance of thin, high-altitude cirrus clouds.

On the right, two areas from the nadir camera image are shown in more detail, along with notations highlighting major geographic features. The south bank of the Red River marks the boundary between Texas and Oklahoma. Traversing brush-covered and grassy plains, rolling hills, and prairies, the Red River and the Canadian River are important resources for farming, ranching, public drinking water, hydroelectric power, and recreation. Both originate in New Mexico and flow eastward, their waters eventually discharging into the Mississippi River.

A smoke plume to the north of the Ouachita Mountains and east of Lake Eufaula is visible in the detailed nadir imagery. The plume is also very obvious at the 70-degree forward view angle, to the right of center and about one-fourth of the way down from the top of the image.

MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

2000-01-01

163

A comparison of the speech patterns and dialect attitudes of Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The lexical dialect usage of Oklahoma has been well-studied in the past by the Survey of Oklahoma Dialects, but the acoustic speech production of the state has received little attention. Apart from two people from Tulsa and two people from Oklahoma City that were interviewed for the Atlas of North American English, no other acoustic work has been performed within the state. This dissertation begins to fill in these gaps by presenting twelve respondents interviewed by the Research on Dialects of English in Oklahoma (RODEO) project. For each speaker, a brief biography is given, including some of their regional and speech attitudes of Oklahoma. Then acoustic data from a wordlist and reading task are presented and compared. Analysis will consider plots of each speaker's vowel system as a whole, and will also examine many environments in isolation. These environments were chosen for their likely presence in Oklahoma, and include such dialect features as the Southern Shift, the pin/pen merger, the caught/cot merger, monophthongization of the PRICE vowel, and neutralization of tense vowels before /l./ After considering each respondent separately, some of their results will be pooled together to give a preliminary sense of the state of dialect within Oklahoma. Demographic variables such as age, gender, and urban/rural upbringing will be related to speakers' attitudes and acoustic production. This will serve two goals - first, to compare modern-day production to the findings of previous scholars, and second, to suggest a dialect trajectory for the state that could be studied further in additional research.

Bakos, Jon

164

ELECTION AGREEMENT FOR UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA OPTIONAL RETIREMENT PLAN FOR AN ELIGIBLE EMPLOYEE THIS Agreement is entered into this ____ day of _____________, 20___, between the University of Oklahoma (the "University") and  

E-print Network

ELECTION AGREEMENT FOR UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA OPTIONAL RETIREMENT PLAN FOR AN ELIGIBLE EMPLOYEE "University") and you, ________________________________, as an Eligible Employee of the University to enable of Oklahoma Optional Retirement Plan (the "Optional Plan") or the Oklahoma Teachers' Retirement System ("OTRS

Oklahoma, University of

165

Multiscale Structure and Evolution of an Oklahoma Winter Precipitation Event  

Microsoft Academic Search

A significant winter precipitation event occurred on 8-9 March 1994 in Oklahoma. Snow accumulations greater than 30 cm (12 in.) were measured within a narrow corridor in northern Oklahoma. On the synoptic scale and mesoscale, a correspondence between large snow accumulations and 600-hPa frontogenesis was re- vealed; the precipitation was formed above the cold frontal surface, owing to midtropospheric ascent

R. Jeffrey Trapp; David M. Schultz; Alexander V. Ryzhkov; Ronald L. Holle

2001-01-01

166

Lower Pennsylvanian (Morrowan) crinoids from Arkansas, Oklahoma, and Texas  

E-print Network

the mid- dle Wapanucka of southern Oklahoma. N. Gary Lane (1964) in a study New Pennsylvanian crinoids from Clark County, Nevada described two spe- cies from Morrowan strata of the Callville Formation as Polusocrinus pachyplax Lane and Polusocrinus calycu... the mid- dle Wapanucka of southern Oklahoma. N. Gary Lane (1964) in a study New Pennsylvanian crinoids from Clark County, Nevada described two spe- cies from Morrowan strata of the Callville Formation as Polusocrinus pachyplax Lane and Polusocrinus calycu...

Moore, R. C.; Strimple, H. L.

1973-06-22

167

77 FR 50762 - Arkansas-Oklahoma Railroad, Inc.-Lease and Operation Exemption-Line of Union Pacific Railroad...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FD 35655] Arkansas-Oklahoma Railroad, Inc...Railroad Company Arkansas-Oklahoma Railroad, Inc. (AOK...at Brangus Road, in Pottawatomie County, Okla. AOK states...Counsel, Arkansas-Oklahoma Railroad, Inc.,...

2012-08-22

168

Nitrogen and Phosphorus Loads in an Agricultural Watershed Affected by Poultry Litter Application and Wastewater Effluent, Northeastern Oklahoma and Northwestern Arkansas, 2002-2009  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Eucha-Spavinaw Basin in Northeastern Oklahoma and Northwestern Arkansas is the source of water for Lake Eucha and Spavinaw Lake, which are part of the water supply for the city of Tulsa, Oklahoma. Lake Eucha and Spavinaw Lakes have experienced deteriorating water quality largely due to growth of algae, notably cyanobacteria, from the excess input of nutrients. As a result,

R. Esralew; R. L. Tortorelli

2010-01-01

169

76 FR 23639 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00046 Declaration of Economic Injury  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Oklahoma: Adair, Caddo, Cherokee, Cotton, Craig, Grady, Kiowa, Lincoln, Nowata...Stephens, Tillman, Wagoner, Washington. Arkansas: Benton. Missouri: McDonald. The Interest...received an EIDL Declaration are Oklahoma, Arkansas, Missouri. (Catalog of Federal...

2011-04-27

170

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Peggy McMahan  

E-print Network

McMahan Administrative Assistant and Student Ron Dahlgren Senior Radio/Television Producer Stan activities, the Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service (OCES) at Oklahoma State University (OSU Dahlgren, OSU Agricultural Communicaitons Services Senior Radio/Television Producer, traveled the state

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

171

77 FR 34975 - Seminole Nation of Oklahoma-Alcohol Control and Enforcement Ordinance  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Affairs Seminole Nation of Oklahoma--Alcohol Control and Enforcement Ordinance AGENCY...publishes the Seminole Nation of Oklahoma--Alcohol Control and Enforcement Ordinance. The...the Seminole Nation Code of Laws and the Alcohol Control and Enforcement Ordinance...

2012-06-12

172

Steamflood hikes Oklahoma heavy oil flow  

SciTech Connect

Conoco Inc.'s fracture assisted steamflood technology (fast) has boosted recovery of heavy oil from shallow zones in Loco Field in Stephens County, Oklahoma to 25 to 50% from approxmately 3%. The company plans to use the fast process to increase recovery from Loco's deeper zones to 40% from 7%. In addition, Conoco expects to license the process for use in heavy oil deposits in Texas, Utah, and Wyoming and the Athabasca tar sands in Alberta. Since the Loco Pilot Project went on stream in 1974, Conoco has run 20 fast injection well patterns which boosted recovery by 25 to 50% from pay at 50 to 350 ft. The first fast test at Loco yielded 43,000 bbl of oil in 6 months, or 60% of the trial zones oil in place. Conoco pegs Loco Fields's shallow oil in place at approximately 70 million bbl with a gravity of approximately 23 to 24. Plans call for the fast process to be used to recover an additional 40%, or approximately 30 million bbl of 26 g oil, from Loco's deeper zones at 1000 to 1200 ft. Tests showed fast recovery feasible at 1500 ft and shallower depths.

Not Available

1981-02-16

173

76 FR 38195 - Oklahoma; Amendment No. 2 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FEMA-2011-0001] Oklahoma; Amendment No. 2 to...declaration for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-1989-DR...declaration for the State of Oklahoma is hereby amended to...Logan, and McClain Counties for Public Assistance...Caddo, Jefferson, LeFlore, Major, and...

2011-06-29

174

75 FR 34753 - Oklahoma; Amendment No. 2 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FEMA-2010-0002] Oklahoma; Amendment No. 2 to...declaration for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-1917-DR...declaration for the State of Oklahoma is hereby amended to...Noble, and Osage Counties for Public Assistance...McIntosh, Okfuskee, Pottawatomie, and Seminole...

2010-06-18

175

Economic impact of climate on water management in Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Topics and authors are listed below: The Oklahoma Water Plan, Jim Schuelin; The Garber-Wellington Research Project, Odell Morgan; The Tulsa Urban Study, Howard Chalker; Some Civil Defense/Flood Warning Problems, Ron Hill; The Impact of Climate on Rural Water Management, Ellen Cooter; Economic Models for Water Resource and Climate Impact Applications, William S. Cooter; Flood Forecasting, Jack Bowman; Small Basin Rainfall Characteristics via Factor Analysis, John M. Harlin; Radar Clouds Over Oklahoma, Bernard N. Meisner; The Oklahoma Climatological Survey Data Bank, Amos Eddy; Derived Variables: Climatic and Hydrologic Data from Weather Station Records, Jayne M. Salisbury; Precipitation Estimates Using Radar, Ken Wilk and David Zittel; and A Water Control Data System, Joe Z. Durham.

Eddy, A.

1981-08-01

176

Thermal conditions in the Anadarko basin, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Heat flow, bottom-hole temperature (BHT), and thermal conductivity data are used to evaluate the present thermal conditions in the Anadarko basin. Heat flow values decrease from 54-62 mWm{sup {minus}2} in the northern part of the basin to 39-53 mWm{sup {minus}2} in the southern portion of the basin. The variation in the regional conductive heat flow is controlled by basin geometry and by the distribution of radiogenic elements in the basement. The heat flow, thermal conductivity, and lithologic information were combined to construct a 3-D model of the temperature structure of the Anadarko basin. The highest temperatures sedimentary rocks older than Pennsylvanian are offset 35 km north-northwest of the deepest part of the basin. This offset is related to the regional increase in heat flow to the north and to the presence of high thermal conductivity granite wash adjacent to the Wichita Mountains. A plot of the temperature difference between the equilibrium temperatures estimated from the model and the measured BHTs as a function of depth is remarkably similar to the published correction curve for BHTs for wells in Oklahoma. Vitrinite reflectance and apatite fission-track (FT) data are used to estimate the paleogeothermal conditions in the basin. Published vitrinite reflectance values are consistent with a past geographic temperature distribution comparable to the observed distribution with the maximum values offset from the basin axis. FT analysis of sandstones from wells in the southeastern portion of the basin indicates that subsurface temperatures were at least 30C higher than at present, suggest the possibility of substantial erosion in this area.

Kelley, S.A.; Gallardo, J.D.; Carter, L.C.; Blackwell, D.D. (Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States))

1991-03-01

177

Characteristics of successful aviation leaders of Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Scope and method of study. The purpose of the study was to examine the personal traits, skills, practices, behaviors, background, academic, and career success patterns of selected aviation leaders in Oklahoma. A purposive sample of 18 leaders who had achieved a top-ranked position of aviation leadership in an organization or a position of influence in the community was selected for interview. The leaders chosen for interview came from a variety of aviation organizations including government, academia, military, corporate aviation, and air carrier leadership as well as community leadership (specifically those aviation personnel who were engaged in a political or civic leadership role). Findings and conclusions. This study identified no common career choices, educational, family, or other background factors exclusively responsible for leadership success of all of the participants. Some of the more significant findings were that a high percentage of the leaders held undergraduate and advanced degrees; however, success had been achieved by some who had little or no college education. Aviation technical experience was not a prerequisite for aviation leadership success in that a significant number of the participants held no airman rating and some had entered positions of aviation leadership from non-aviation related careers. All had received some positive learning experience from their family background even those backgrounds which were less than desirable. All of the participants had been involved in volunteer civic or humanitarian leadership roles, and all had received numerous honors. The most frequently identified value expressed by the leaders was honesty; the predominant management style was participative with a strong backup style for directing, the most important skills were communication and listening skills, and the most frequently mentioned characteristics of success were honesty, credibility, vision, high standards, love for aviation and fiscal responsibility. The most frequently identified curriculum need across all aviation disciplines was that of communication skills.

Kutz, Mary N. Hill

178

A Total Lightning Perspective of the 20 May 2013 Moore, Oklahoma Supercell  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the early afternoon of 20 May 2013, a storm initiated to the west-southwest of Newcastle, Oklahoma. This storm would rapidly intensify into the parent supercell of the tornado that struck the city of Moore, Oklahoma. This article describes what contributions total lightning observations from the Oklahoma Lightning Mapping Array could provide to operational forecasters had these observations been available in real-time. This effort includes a focus on the GOES-R pseudo-geostationary lightning mapper demonstration product as well as the NASA SPoRT / Meteorological Development Laboratory's total lightning tracking tool. These observations and tools identified several contributions. Two distinct lightning jumps at 1908 and 1928 UTC provided a lead time of 19 minutes ahead of severe hail and 26 minutes ahead of the Moore, Oklahoma tornado's touchdown. These observations provide strong situational awareness to forecasters, as the lightning jumps are related to the rapid strengthening of the storm's updraft and mesocyclone and serve as a precursor to the stretching of the storm vortex ahead severe weather.

Stano, Geoffrey T.; Schultz, Christopher J.; Carey, Lawrence D.; MacGorman, Don R.; Calhoun, Kristin M.

2014-01-01

179

University of Oklahoma - High Energy Physics  

SciTech Connect

The High Energy Physics program at the University of Oklahoma, Pat Skubic, Principal Investigator, is attempting to understand nature at the deepest level using the most advanced experimental and theoretical tools. The four experimental faculty, Brad Abbott, Phil Gutierrez, Pat Skubic, and Mike Strauss, together with post-doctoral associates and graduate students, are finishing their work as part of the D0 collaboration at Fermilab, and increasingly focusing their investigations at the Large Hadron Collidor (LHC) as part of the ATLAS Collaboration. Work at the LHC has become even more exciting with the recent discovery by ATLAS and the other collaboration, CMS, of the long-sought Higgs boson, which plays a key role in generating masses for the elementary constituents of matter. Work of the OUHEP group has been in the three areas of hardware, software, and analysis. Now that the Higgs boson has been discovered, completing the Standard Model of fundamental physics, new efforts will focus on finding hints of physics beyond the standard model, such as supersymmetry. The OUHEP theory group (Kim Milton, PI) also consists of four faculty members, Howie Baer, Chung Kao, Kim Milton, and Yun Wang, and associated students and postdocs. They are involved in understanding fundamental issues in formulating theories of the microworld, and in proposing models that carry us past the Standard Model, which is an incomplete description of nature. They therefore work in close concert with their experimental colleagues. One also can study fundamental physics by looking at the large scale structure of the universe; in particular the ``dark energy'' that seems to be causing the universe to expand at an accelerating rate, effectively makes up about 3/4 of the energy in the universe, and yet is totally unidentified. Dark energy and dark matter, which together account for nearly all of the energy in the universe, are an important probe of fundamental physics at the very shortest distances, or at the very highest energies. The outcomes of the group's combined experimental and theoretical research will be an improved understanding of nature, at the highest energies reachable, from which applications to technological innovation will surely result, as they always have from such studies in the past.

Skubic, Patrick L. [University of Oklahoma] [University of Oklahoma

2013-07-31

180

STATUS OF RARE AND ENDANGERED FRESHWATER MUSSELS IN SOUTHEASTERN OKLAHOMA  

E-print Network

leptodon, winged mapleleaf, Quadrula fragosa, and rabbitsfoot, Quadrula cylindrica cylindrica Oklahoma. Encontramos poblaciones existentes de Arkansia wheeleri, Leptodea leptodon, Quadrula fragosa y Quadrula cylindrica cylindrica. Reportamos por primera vez a Q. fragosa en el ri´o Little. Cuando los

Vaughn, Caryn

181

Status of Rare and Endangered Freshwater Mussels in Southeastern Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

We reviewed the conservation status of rare and endangered species of mussels in southeastern Oklahoma by completing surveys of 10 long-term monitoring sites on the Kiamichi River and five sites in the Little River. We found extant populations of the Ouachita rock pocketbook, Arkansia wheeleri, scaleshell, Leptodea leptodon, winged mapleleaf, Quadrula fragosa, and rabbitsfoot, Quadrula cylindrica cylindrica. This is the

Heather S. Galbraith; Daniel E. Spooner; Caryn C. Vaughn

2008-01-01

182

National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Wichita Falls Quadrangle, Texas and Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The uranium favorability of the Wichita Falls Quadrangle, Texas and Oklahoma, was determined by using National Uranium Resource Evaluation criteria; by subsurface studies of structure, facies distribution, and gamma-ray anomalies in well logs to a depth of 1500 m; and by surface studies involving extensive field sampling and radiometric surveying. These were supplemented by both aerial radiometric and hydrogeochemical and

M. B. Edwards; R. L. Andersen

1982-01-01

183

OKLAHOMA NATIVE AMERICAN YOUTH LANGUAGE FAIR Native American Language Book  

E-print Network

OKLAHOMA NATIVE AMERICAN YOUTH LANGUAGE FAIR Native American Language Book Category Description Students are invited to enter books in a Native American language. Please remember the point of the ONAYLF is to demonstrate Native American language use. Keep this in mind when creating your book or instructing students

Oklahoma, University of

184

OKLAHOMA NATIVE AMERICAN YOUTH LANGUAGE FAIR Masters Spoken Language Performance  

E-print Network

OKLAHOMA NATIVE AMERICAN YOUTH LANGUAGE FAIR Masters Spoken Language Performance Category Description Students who have grown up speaking a Native American language in a Native American home. Students should use this opportunity to display their creativity and skill in using Native American

Oklahoma, University of

185

Relationship between College Readiness, Oklahoma State Testing Program, and EXPLORE  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Scope and Method of Study: The study investigated the relationship between performance on the Oklahoma State Testing Program (OSTP) for grades 3-7 and the EXPLORE in math and reading for 586 students. The EXPLORE test, a part of the ACT, is given in the eighth grade and provides college readiness benchmarks and a national percentile ranking (NPR)…

Martin, Rick

2010-01-01

186

Infant Toddler Services through Community Collaboration: Oklahoma's Early Childhood Initiatives  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Comprehensive, integrated services for infants, toddlers, and families are essential for optimal child development, and collaboration across systems is increasingly important to maximize limited resources. The authors describe three successful initiatives in Oklahoma that use a collaborative systems approach to providing direct services to young…

Goble, Carla B.; Horm, Diane M.

2009-01-01

187

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY School of Applied Health and Educational Psychology  

E-print Network

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY School of Applied Health and Educational Psychology M. S. ~ Educational Psychology Option in Development and Instructional Psychology or Gifted and Talented Education Program Description Educational Psychology is concerned with all aspects of psychology that are relevant to education

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

188

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY School of Applied Health and Educational Psychology  

E-print Network

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY School of Applied Health and Educational Psychology Ph.D. Program of the School of Applied Health and Educational Psychology is to foster the development, integration Health and Educational Psychology (SAHEP). The application file must contain official transcripts for all

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

189

CNP Project: University of Oklahoma Community Networks Project (OUCNP)  

Cancer.gov

The burden of cancer in Oklahoma is significant, especially among Native Americans and African Americans. In general, these two groups have disproportionately higher incidence and mortality rates for many cancers, and they experience higher risks for cancer because of lifestyle choices and barriers to appropriate cancer interventions.

190

Oklahoma American Indian Higher Education, 1989. A Position Paper.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Statistics suggest that American Indian higher education in Oklahoma has made significant progress over the past quarter century. However, a new era of higher education is beginning in which higher admission standards, higher tuition costs, and decreased financial aid will take their toll on American Indian enrollment. An estimated 25-40% of…

Bread, Jerry C.

191

ELECTION AGREEMENT FOR Oklahoma Teachers' Retirement System (OTRS)  

E-print Network

ELECTION AGREEMENT FOR Oklahoma Teachers' Retirement System (OTRS) For Hourly­Paid Employee also sponsors the OU Contributory Retirement Plan. If you are an hourly-paid employee age 28 years contributions to the OU Contributory Retirement Plan on your behalf. Name (First and Last): Employee ID: Email

Oklahoma, University of

192

Students' Perceptions of Bullying in Oklahoma Public Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We studied perceptions of Oklahoma public school students (n = 7,848) regarding bullying. Specifically, we asked for their thoughts about the seriousness of bullying, the hurtfulness of bullying, their involvement in bullying (as victim or perpetrator), their responses to being bullied or seeing someone else being bullied, and what they wanted…

Hughes, Patricia Paulsen; Middleton, Katherine M.; Marshall, David D.

2009-01-01

193

OKLAHOMA NATIVE AMERICAN YOUTH LANGUAGE FAIR Category Description  

E-print Network

Language Used, 2) Creativity 3) Effort 4) Age appropriate ability to control the media 4. Awards 1st , 2ndOKLAHOMA NATIVE AMERICAN YOUTH LANGUAGE FAIR Film/Video Category Description Students are invited to send in original film or video creations that are in a Native American language or about Native

Oklahoma, University of

194

OKLAHOMA NATIVE AMERICAN YOUTH LANGUAGE FAIR Language Advocacy Essay  

E-print Network

category only. AGE DIVISIONS 9th ­ 12th Grades 1. Language Advocacy Essay Guidelines Essays MUST be lessOKLAHOMA NATIVE AMERICAN YOUTH LANGUAGE FAIR Language Advocacy Essay Category Description Students are invited to prepare an essay on the importance of Native American languages. Many entries contain

Oklahoma, University of

195

National Environmental/Energy Workforce Assessment for Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report presents existing workforce levels, training programs and career potentials and develops staffing level projections (1976-1982) based on available information for the State of Oklahoma. The study concerns itself with the environmental pollution control areas of air, noise, potable water, pesticides, radiation, solid waste, wastewater,…

National Field Research Center Inc., Iowa City, IA.

196

Anderson Productions Cruisin' Oklahoma US 66 video archive Transcripts  

E-print Network

. Paye, Randy Weaver, 2 maps, Unity race, Miami bridge. · Phillips Petroleum Company video services. #12Anderson Productions ­ Cruisin' Oklahoma US 66 video archive Transcripts Handwritten note reads: 1 are Hi8 video, ¾", or BetaSP. 1 TC 000000 ­ 00:31:00 from Hi8 #1. See ¾" #A. 2 TC 00:31:21:15 ­ 1

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

197

The Texas- Oklahoma Cattle Feeding Industry: Structure and Operational Characteristics.  

E-print Network

December 1968 I The Texas-Oklahoma 1 Cattle Feeding Industry Structure I and Operational 1 Characteristics TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY Texas Agricultural Experiment Station H. 0. Kunkel, Acting Director, College Station, Texas In Cooperation... and Shifts in Cattle Feeding 6 Organizational Characteristics of the ........... Texas-0 klahoma Cattle Feeding Industry ,., 7 ................................ Longevity of Present Feedlots 7 .................................... Legal Form of Ownership 8...

Dietrich, Raymond A.

1968-01-01

198

Student Data Report. Oklahoma Higher Education, 1995-96.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This annual report of student data for the Oklahoma State System of Higher Education covers the period 1995-96 and includes data for 30 institutions and branch campuses. Text and 95 supporting data tables and figures are grouped in 11 sections: (1) a summary of private and public higher education enrollment as a percentage of state population; (2)…

Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education, Oklahoma City.

199

Oklahoma National Distinguished Principals: A Case Study of Leadership Practices  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose, scope, and method of study: The purpose of this study was to examine the daily leadership practices of Oklahoma National Distinguished Principals to better understand how leadership performance is used to create and sustain productive change within schools. This qualitative study relied on a multiple case design utilizing participants…

Jones, Toni Rae

2010-01-01

200

The University of Oklahoma Office of Human Resources  

E-print Network

) Divorce or legal separation from the employee; or 4) The employee becomes entitled to Medicare. Dependent's hours of employment with the university; 3) The employee's divorce or legal separation; 4) The employee the responsibility to inform The University of Oklahoma Office of Human Resources in writing of a divorce, legal

Oklahoma, University of

201

Economic impact of climate on water management in Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Topics and authors are listed below: The Oklahoma Water Plan, Jim Schuelin; The Garber-Wellington Research Project, Odell Morgan; The Tulsa Urban Study, Howard Chalker; Some Civil Defense\\/Flood Warning Problems, Ron Hill; The Impact of Climate on Rural Water Management, Ellen Cooter; Economic Models for Water Resource and Climate Impact Applications, William S. Cooter; Flood Forecasting, Jack Bowman; Small Basin Rainfall

Eddy

1981-01-01

202

STUDENT ALCOHOL POLICY -1 The University of Oklahoma  

E-print Network

STUDENT ALCOHOL POLICY - 1 The University of Oklahoma STUDENT ALCOHOL POLICY Revised and Responsibilities Code, and the Student Alcohol Policy. (1) All fraternities, sororities, and residence halls shall be dry. Alcoholic beverages will not be allowed inside fraternity houses, sorority houses and OU

Oklahoma, University of

203

Oklahoma State University GENDER DISCRIMINATION/SEXUAL HARASSMENT IS PROHIBITED  

E-print Network

Oklahoma State University GENDER DISCRIMINATION/SEXUAL HARASSMENT IS PROHIBITED THE LAW Gender discrimination/sexual harassment is prohibited by Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 as amended, Title IX that gender discrimination and sexual harassment of students, staff, and faculty is prohibited. OSU subscribes

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

204

Oklahoma Public Health Environmental Tracking System (OK-PHETS)  

E-print Network

--2002)2002) #12;DataData OSDH data Birth Defect Registry, 1994-2002 Vital Statistics, 1994-2002 DEQ data Toxic Oklahoma Birth Defects Registry (OBDR) database and various Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ;Things Should be DoneThings Should be Done Water quality and other environmental data should be used

205

Oklahoma BEEF Incorporated (OBI) Bull Delivery Sheet Central bull testing at Oklahoma BEEF, Incorporated, is managed and supervised with the emphasis on the performance, health, and safety of the bulls; however, Oklahoma  

E-print Network

for Oklahoma Cattle *Out of state cattle must comply with Oklahoma Animal Health requirements Date Tested/dd/yy Have the following vaccinations been given at home? (Please check the appropriate boxes) YES NO DATE Leptospira bacterin Pasteurella vaccines (PresponseTM, One ShotTM, or Pulmo-guardTM) Do not use old style

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

206

Comparative analysis of wind energy production in Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Scope and method of study. In the last decades humanity has realized the necessity of developing alternative energy sources for its efficient economic development and simple survival in the future. During the last 30 years major improvements were made in renewable energy technologies and they started to become competitive with traditional energy sources (fossil fuels), especially with consideration of external costs. Among the renewable energy sources, wind energy is one of the cheapest and fastest growing nowadays. Oklahoma is a very promising site for wind energy development considering its excellent wind resources. Developing wind energy can allow not only electricity production for in-state consumption, but also exporting to other states. The development of wind energy could encourage economic growth with very few adverse impacts on the environment. However, traditional energy sources are still the cheapest and, thus, the introduction of the wind energy in Oklahoma should be critically analyzed from economic, ecological and social points of view. The goal of this study is to conduct analysis of wind energy electricity production in Oklahoma on the four main stages: (1) Investment Analysis from Private Perspective: Calculate present value net benefits for wind energy and traditional energy (natural gas), make sure that both of them are positive. (2) Investment Analysis from Social Perspective: Evaluate present value net private benefits (PVNPB) and present value net social benefit from both projects (PVNSB). (3) Government Subsidy Analysis: recognize the necessity of the subsidies and evaluate the amount of subsidies if any. (4) Investment Analysis from a Geographic Perspective: determine economic feasibility of wind power generation for 77 Oklahoma counties. Findings and conclusions. The final output of the study is the recommendations concerning wind energy development in Oklahoma with consideration of economic efficiency, ecological and social impacts. Study not only analyze possibilities for wind energy development in the state, but make recommendations on the county by county basis with consideration of wind power density, land cost, property tax and infrastructure development in each county.

Ermilova, Ekaterina Alexeevna

207

Ground-water-quality assessment of the central Oklahoma aquifer, Oklahoma - Analysis of available water-quality data through 1987  

Microsoft Academic Search

The water quality of the Central Oklahoma aquifer was assessed using the information available through 1987. The following conclusions were drawn from the available data and the contingency-table statistics. The word common is used to describe situations where approximately 10% or more of the data exceeded a water quality standard: (1) groundwater concentrations of nitrate and selenium commonly exceed the

D. L. Parkhurst; S. C. Christenson; J. L. Schlottmann

1989-01-01

208

Dear University of Oklahoma Graduate Assistant: Effective September 1, 2012, Delta Dental of Oklahoma (DDOK) will provide a fully-insured, voluntary dental program for  

E-print Network

Dear University of Oklahoma Graduate Assistant: Effective September 1, 2012, Delta Dental of Oklahoma (DDOK) will provide a fully-insured, voluntary dental program for graduate assistants. The Delta Dental PPO­Point of Service program affords you access to two Delta Dental networks--Delta Dental

Oklahoma, University of

209

Dear University of Oklahoma Graduate Assistant: Effective September 1, 2011, Delta Dental of Oklahoma (DDOK) will provide a fully-insured, voluntary dental  

E-print Network

Dear University of Oklahoma Graduate Assistant: Effective September 1, 2011, Delta Dental of Oklahoma (DDOK) will provide a fully-insured, voluntary dental program for graduate assistants. The Delta Dental PPO­Point of Service program affords you access to two Delta Dental networks--Delta Dental

Oklahoma, University of

210

Dear University of Oklahoma Graduate Assistant: Effective September 1, 201 , Delta Dental of Oklahoma (DDOK) will provide a fully-insured, voluntary dental program for  

E-print Network

Dear University of Oklahoma Graduate Assistant: Effective September 1, 201 , Delta Dental of Oklahoma (DDOK) will provide a fully-insured, voluntary dental program for graduate assistants. The Delta Dental PPO­Point of Service program affords you access to two Delta Dental networks--Delta Dental

Oklahoma, University of

211

Employment Advertising Request -University of Oklahoma (Norman Campus) To place a University of Oklahoma employment advertisement with an external publication, complete and return  

E-print Network

Employment Advertising Request - University of Oklahoma (Norman Campus) To place a University of Oklahoma employment advertisement with an external publication, complete and return this form to the Office, call Employment & Compensation Services at (405) 325-1826. Deadline for receipt of advertising requests

Oklahoma, University of

212

An economic assessment of the application of superconductor technology to magnetic-levitation trains in Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Specific objectives were to: (1) develop and refine a methodology that can be used to evaluate the feasibility of MAG-LEV trains; (2) apply this methodology to the state of Oklahoma. The methodology is based on an aggregate econometric demand model and mathematical programming. A city-pair network is constructed to evaluate alternative MAG-LEV routes between Oklahoma City and nine other cites in and out of the state of Oklahoma. Results obtained from the aggregate econometric demand model indicates that MAG-LEV trains would attract significant ridership along different types of origin-destination routes. All nine corridors exhibit induced demand for MAG-LEV trains as well as attracting riderships from other modes. Based on the results of both single and multiobjective LP models, fixed-capital-cost requirements and annual operating cost for each of the above corridors are estimated, and by using different scenarios for discount rates, both costs and revenue were converted to annual figures using an annual-cost method.

Sabbagh Kermani, M.

1991-01-01

213

Assessing carbon and nitrogen stocks of no-till systems in Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Intensive tillage during the last century has greatly reduced organic carbon contents of Oklahoma cropland. Increased public interest in carbon sequestration and the potential for carbon storage in no-till soils to offset CO2 emissions has brought about the need for accurate estimates of carbon sequestration in Oklahoma. Eight locations across Oklahoma were soil sampled to determine the impact of no-till

Silvano L. Abreu; Chad B. Godsey; Jeffrey T. Edwards; Jason G. Warren

214

Energy analysis of Oklahoma rangelands an improved pastures  

SciTech Connect

The energy costs of beef production were examined for native rangelands an improved pastures grazing systems in the State of Oklahoma. Energy analysis models were constructed to examine the necessary energy inputs and outputs of the grazing systems. Energy requirements to maintain improved pasture systems ranged from 10 to 100 times that to maintain native rangeland. Comparing only fossil-fuel expenditures showed that rangelands are two to three times more efficient producers of beef than the improved pastures, although their beef production is considerably lower per hectare. Regression analysis indicated that the maximum possible efficiency of beef production from fossil-fuel subsidies in Oklahoma is approximately 14.8%. 49 references, 5 figures, 7 tables.

Klopatek, J.M.; Risser, P.G.

1982-09-01

215

Water Flow in the High Plains Aquifer in Northwestern Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The High Plains is a major agricultural area, supported primarily by water from the High Plains aquifer, which is used to irrigate wheat and corn and to raise cattle and swine. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Oklahoma Water Resources Board (OWRB) began a study of the High Plains aquifer in 1996. One purpose of the study was to develop a ground-water flow model that the OWRB could use to allocate the amount of water withdrawn from the a aquifer. The study area in Oklahoma covers all or parts of Beaver, Cimarron, Dewey, Ellis, Harper, Texas, and Woodward Counties. To provide appropriate hydrologic boundaries for the ground-water flow model, the study area was expanded to include parts of Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico, and Texas.

Luckey, Richard R.; Osborn, Noel I.; Becker, Mark F.; Andrews, William J.

2000-01-01

216

Exploitation and Optimization of Reservoir Performance in Hunton Formation, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Hunton formation in Oklahoma has been the subject of attention for the last ten years. The new interest started with the drilling of the West Carney field in 1995 in Lincoln County. Subsequently, many other operators have expanded the search for oil and gas in Hunton formation in other parts of Oklahoma. These fields exhibit many unique production characteristics, including: (1) decreasing water-oil or water-gas ratio over time; (2) decreasing gas-oil ratio followed by an increase; (3) poor prediction capability of the reserves based on the log data; and (4) low geological connectivity but high hydrodynamic connectivity. The purpose of this investigation is to understand the principal mechanisms affecting the production, and propose methods by which we can optimize the production from fields with similar characteristics.

Mohan Kelkar

2007-06-30

217

Distribution and occurrence of carnivores in the Oklahoma panhandle  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Carnivores were sampled in the Oklahoma panhandle from October 1995 to February 1997 using aluminum, baited tracking plates and infra-red triggered cameras. Carnivore distributions on regional, landscape and local scales were examined using traditional univariate statistical techniques. A model of carnivore distribution in the panhandle was also developed using remotely sensed Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data and logistic regression. Five carnivore species representing three families were detected sufficiently to permit analysis. Carnivores were, in general, not distributed evenly over regional, landscape and local scales in the panhandle environment. Carnivores were also found to impact each others distributions both locally and at landscape level scales. Logistic regression modeling determined that carnivore distributions and canid distributions in particular, could be modeled according to their affiliations with remotely sensed Normalized Difference Vegetation Index data (NDVI) in the Oklahoma panhandle. This model provides a framework for predicting carnivore occurrence in habitats based upon remotely sensed vegetation spectral data.

Shaughnessy, Michael Joseph, Jr.

218

Source of shallow Simpson Group Oil in Murray County, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oils produced from the Simpson Group (Middle Ordovician) in three shallow fields located north of the Arbuckle Mountains in Murray County, Oklahoma, have widely differing compositions: SW Sandy Creek, 28.9° API, 0.57% sulfur; Davis NE, 25.9° API, 0.72% sulfur; Sulfur NW, 16.4° API, 1.44% sulfur. From gas chromatography and biomarker analysis, they determined that the oils were derived from the

I. Zemmels; D. M. Tappmeyer; C. C. Walters

1987-01-01

219

Geomorphic evidence for Late Cenozoic deformation, Wichita Moutains, Oklahoma  

E-print Network

of Delaware Chair of Advisory Committee: Mr. Norman R. Tilford Holocene displacement on the Meers fault has prompted an investigation into Late Cenozoic tectonic activity in southwestern Oklahoma. The emphasis of this study was on geomorphic evidence... be divided into two groups based on physiographic and geomorphic relationships. The upper group, containing the previously recognized Lake Altus granite platforms (western Wichita Mountains) and similar surfaces to the east, formed following Ogallala...

Snell, Charles Burton

2012-06-07

220

NESTING ECOLOGY OF THE LOGGERHEAD SHRIKE IN SOUTHWESTERN OKLAHOMA  

Microsoft Academic Search

AssraAcr.-Loggerhead Shrike (Lank ludovicianus) nests were studied in southwestern Oklahoma from 1985 through 1988. Pairing began in late February to early March, and completed nests were found from 13 March to 20 June. Nesting peaked in mid-April, with second nestings from late May to late June. Average length of the nesting season was 11 weeks. Almost one-third of all nests

JACK D. TYLER

221

A DIGITAL GEOLOGIC MAP DATABASE FOR THE STATE OF OKLAHOMA  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report consists of a compilation of twelve digital geologic maps provided in ARC\\/INFO interchange (e00) format for the state of Oklahoma. The source maps consisted of nine USGS 1:250,000-scale quadrangle maps and three 1:125,000 scale county maps. This publication presents a digital composite of these data intact and without modification across quadrangle boundaries to resolve geologic unit discontinuities. An

William D. Heran; Gregory N. Green; Douglas B. Stoeser

222

POSITION AVAILABLE Post-doctoral Research Associate at the University of Oklahoma  

E-print Network

research center at OU specializing in radar systems for both meteorological and defense- related will begin immediately. The University of Oklahoma offers competitive salaries and a comprehensive benefits

Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

223

Microfacies sedimentology of the Lower-Middle Kindblade Formation, Slick Hills, Southwestern Oklahoma.  

E-print Network

??MICROFACIES SEDIMENTOLOGY OF THE LOWER-MIDDLE KINDBLADE FORMATION (ORDOVICIAN), SLICK HILLS, SOUTHWESTERN OKLAHOMA In the late Cambrian (Franconian), a marine transgression took place on the Laurentian… (more)

Blair, Charles Grant

2013-01-01

224

Digital Atlas of the Upper Washita River Basin, Southwestern Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Numerous types of environmental data have been collected in the upper Washita River basin in southwestern Oklahoma. However, to date these data have not been compiled into a format that can be comprehensively queried for the purpose of evaluating the effects of various conservation practices implemented to reduce agricultural runoff and erosion in parts of the upper Washita River basin. This U.S. Geological Survey publication, 'Digital atlas of the upper Washita River basin, southwestern Oklahoma' was created to assist with environmental analysis. This atlas contains 30 spatial data sets that can be used in environmental assessment and decision making for the upper Washita River basin. This digital atlas includes U.S. Geological Survey sampling sites and associated water-quality, biological, water-level, and streamflow data collected from 1903 to 2005. The data were retrieved from the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Information System database on September 29, 2005. Data sets are from the Geology, Geography, and Water disciplines of the U.S. Geological Survey and cover parts of Beckham, Caddo, Canadian, Comanche, Custer, Dewey, Grady, Kiowa, and Washita Counties in southwestern Oklahoma. A bibliography of past reports from the U.S. Geological Survey and other State and Federal agencies from 1949 to 2004 is included in the atlas. Additionally, reports by Becker (2001), Martin (2002), Fairchild and others (2004), and Miller and Stanley (2005) are provided in electronic format.

Becker, Carol J.; Masoner, Jason R.; Scott, Jonathon C.

2008-01-01

225

Chemical analyses of surface waters in Oklahoma, September - December, 1944  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Red River at Denison Dam, Texas Sport samples were collected at the remainder of the stations. The analyses of the spot samples were made largely in a laboratory provided by the Oklahoma A. & M. College, under the supervision of Dr. O.M. Smith, Head, Department of Chemistry; Dr. S.R. Wood, Associate Professor of Chemistry; and W.W. Hastings, U.S. Geological Survey. The daily samples were analyzed in the water resources laboratory of the Geological Survey at Austin, Texas. These data have been summarized in a report to the Oklahoma Planning and Resources Board prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey, March 1, 1945. The streams of Oklahoma are classified into two major drainage basins: the Arkansas River and the Red River and their tributaries. The attached analyses are arranged in geographical order for their respective drainage basins, with records listed in downstream order for stations on the main stem first, followed by the analyses for the tributaries. When available, the mean daily discharge is given for the analyses.

U.S. Geological Survey

1945-01-01

226

The status and distribution of woodcock in Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The seasonal and spatial distributions of the American woodcock (Philohela minor) in Oklahoma were determined through field surveys and the collection of all known reports of woodcock sightings. Woodcock were reported in Oklahoma in all seasons and were most Jrequently sighted from 11 October to 10 January. The peak in fall migration occurred between 11 November and 10 December. Woodcock were found in 5 major areas across the eastern two-thirds of the state but 57 percent of the birds reported during the study were in the eastern one-third. A total of 148 displaying males were encountered on 25 sites in 15 of 29 counties included roadside singing ground surveys in 1975 and 1976. The peak number of displaying birds (58) was observed during the second IO-day period in February; displays occurred from January through late March. Personal observations plus data reported via volunteer survey cards, indicated that the typical site used for diurnal cover by woodcock in Oklahoma is a brushy bottomland with moist loamy soils, vegetated by oaks (Quercus spp.), elms (Ulmus spp,), bluestem grasses (Andropogon spp.), dogwoods (Cornus spp.) and green briars (Smilax spp.).

Barclay, J.S.; Smith, R.W.

1977-01-01

227

Chronology of migration by American coots in Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

American coots (Fulica americana) were studied on large reservoirs in north-central Oklahoma in 1979-1982 to determine chronologies of migrations by age- and sex class. Coots began migrating into Oklahoma in mid-September, numbers peaked in early to mid-October, and few birds were seen after 1 November. Some late migrants appeared in mid-December. In spring, coots began migrating in late February, numbers peaked in mid-April, and the last birds were seen in mid-May. Generally, adult and juvenile males and juvenile female coots migrated simultaneously in autumn, but adult females completed migration by 1 November. A few juveniles and adult males migrated in December. Adult coots preceded yearlings in spring. Despite annual and between-lake differences in chronology of autumn migration, most coots migrated before waterfowl hunting season in Oklahoma. Coot hunting seasons in mid-latitude states should commence before the general waterfowl season where management goals are to increase hunter interest and the harvest of birds.

Eddleman, William R.; Knopf, Fritz L.; Patterson, Craig T.

1985-01-01

228

Martin Van Buren Elementary School, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the title building, including educational context and design goals. Includes a general description; information on the architect, construction team, and manufacturers and suppliers; and a case study of costs and specifications. (EV)

Design Cost Data, 2003

2003-01-01

229

78 FR 78318 - Television Broadcasting Services; Oklahoma City, Oklahoma  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...the Commission instituted a freeze on the acceptance of full power television rulemaking petitions requesting channel...December 16, 2013, and released December 16, 2013. The full text of this document is available for public inspection...

2013-12-26

230

Records of wells and water quality for the Garber-Wellington Aquifer, northern Oklahoma and southern Logan Counties, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey has collected data on Oklahoma's ground-water resources since 1934. Most of these data were collected as part of specific ground-water studies conducted in cooperation with various Federal, State, and local agencies. In 1972, at the request of the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, the Geological Survey undertook a study of the Garber-Wellington aquifer in northern Oklahoma and southern Logan Counties. As a part of this project, records of about 120 wells were collected and 12 samples of ground water from the aquifer were analyzed in the laboratories of the Geological Survey; these records are included in this report. In addition, records of about 302 wells and analyses of 60 water samples were taken from a report by Wood and Burton (1966) and from the files of the Geological Survey. Also included in this report are selected references for those desiring more information on the area's ground-water resources. The stratigraphic nomenclature and age determinations used in this report are those accepted by the Oklahoma Geological Survey and do not necessarily agree with those of the U.S. Geological Survey. Acknowledgment is extended to the many hundred of individuals who have provided the data compiled in this report.

Carr, Jerry E.; Havens, John S.

1976-01-01

231

Remotely-Sensed Rainfall for the Wettest Season in Oklahoma on Record  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the summer of 2007 Oklahoma experienced the wettest June on record, Oklahoma City had 20 consecutive days of reported rainfall (also a record), and damaging flash floods occurred on 15 days. This study analyzes the spatial patterns, temporal variability, and magnitudes of remotely-sensed rainfall from TRMM satellite, PERSIANN-CCS, and the operational rainfall product in the US National Weather Service (NWS) that relies on radar data with adjustments from rain gauges and human quality control. Conclusions drawn from this part of the study will help guide future steps toward integrated, multisensor precipitation estimation as applied to a season of extreme rainfall. The second part of the study applies the rainfall estimates under evaluation to an extreme flash flood case over the heavily instrumented Ft. Cobb basin in Oklahoma. Discharge is simulated and compared to observed streamflow on three subbasins using the NWS's distributed hydrologic model. Results will help determine if satellite-based rainfall estimates can be used, given proper downscaling, as inputs to hydrologic prediction models for extreme, small-scale hydrometeorological events.

Flamig, Z.; Gourley, J.; Hong, Y.; Li, L.

2009-05-01

232

OBI Brangus Breed Testing Information 2009-2010 Please read the attached rules and regulations for Oklahoma BEEF, Incorporated (OBI).  

E-print Network

and regulations for Oklahoma BEEF, Incorporated (OBI). These procedures apply to all breeds evaluated at OBI-test are adjusted to 365 days on reports and catalogs. 7. A rule requiring that all bull(s) tested at Oklahoma BEEF

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

233

OBI Beefmaster Breed Testing Information 2009-2010 Please read the attached rules and regulations for Oklahoma BEEF, Incorporated (OBI).  

E-print Network

and regulations for Oklahoma BEEF, Incorporated (OBI). These procedures apply to all breeds evaluated at OBI bull(s) tested at Oklahoma BEEF Inc. must be BVD-PI negative has been imposed. We recommend that you

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

234

OBI Angus Breed Testing Information 2010-2011 Please read the attached rules and regulations for Oklahoma BEEF, Incorporated  

E-print Network

and regulations for Oklahoma BEEF, Incorporated (OBI). These procedures apply to all breeds evaluated at OBI Executive Secretary and Test Station Director. 11. A rule requiring that all bull(s) tested at Oklahoma BEEF

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

235

Status of the Oklahoma SOICC/NOICC Network. July 1, 1989 -June 30, 1990.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This 1989-1990 status report of the Oklahoma State Occupational Information Coordinating Committee (SOICC) includes the following: mission statement; organization chart; information on SOICC publications, including a labor supply and demand report; a listing of occupations licensed in Oklahoma, and a note on a career tabloid; descriptions of the…

Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Oklahoma State Occupational Information Coordinating Committee.

236

33 CFR 208.28 - Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma. 208.28 Section 208...28 Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma. The Bureau of Reclamation...flows in excess of bankfull on the Washita River downstream of the reservoir. In...

2010-07-01

237

33 CFR 208.28 - Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...false Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma. 208.28 Section 208...28 Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma. The Bureau of Reclamation...flows in excess of bankfull on the Washita River downstream of the reservoir. In...

2012-07-01

238

33 CFR 208.28 - Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma.  

...false Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma. 208.28 Section 208...28 Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma. The Bureau of Reclamation...flows in excess of bankfull on the Washita River downstream of the reservoir. In...

2014-07-01

239

33 CFR 208.28 - Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma. 208.28 Section 208...28 Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma. The Bureau of Reclamation...flows in excess of bankfull on the Washita River downstream of the reservoir. In...

2013-07-01

240

Moral Reconation Therapy and Problem Behavior in the Oklahoma Department of Corrections  

Microsoft Academic Search

In late 1993, Oklahoma Department of Corrections officials implemented Moral Reconation Therapy (MRT), a cognitive behavioral treatment program, throughout the correctional system. Relying on official records of institutional misconduct and community recidivism, the analysis of the Oklahoma implementation of the program compared the outcomes of individuals who participated in the MRT cognitive-behavioral program to both individuals who participated in other

Robert Brame; Doris Layton MacKenzie; Arnold R. Waggoner

241

The Fiscal Impact of Tax-Credit Scholarships in Oklahoma. School Choice Issues in the State  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This analysis examines the demographics of the special needs population in public and private schools in Oklahoma and estimates the impact on school enrollments providing tax credit funded scholarship grants for special needs students. The author and his colleagues develop a model that shows how the expenditures of Oklahoma's school districts vary…

Gottlob, Brian

2009-01-01

242

The Oklahoma's Promise Program: A National Model to Promote College Persistence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using a multi-method approach involving fixed effects and logistic regressions, this study examined the effect of the Oklahoma's Promise Program on student persistence in relation to the Pell and Stafford federal programs and according to socio-economic characteristics and class level. The Oklahoma's Promise is a hybrid state program that pays…

Mendoza, Pilar; Mendez, Jesse P.

2013-01-01

243

Current Report Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University  

E-print Network

Current Report Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources · Oklahoma State University Extension Entomologist Professor and Research Entomologist There are several arthropod pests that damage Canola Performance Tests EPP-7085 Pest Management Needs Assessment for Oklahoma Canola Producers EPP-7089

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

244

40 CFR 272.1851 - Oklahoma State-administered program: Final authorization.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...205, Hazardous Waste Management...Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act...205-1-2 “Transfer facility”, 252...205-1-2 “Transfer station”, 252:205-1-4...Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act...205-1-2 “Transfer facility”, 252...205-1-2 “Transfer station”,...

2012-07-01

245

40 CFR 272.1851 - Oklahoma State-administered program: Final authorization.  

...205, Hazardous Waste Management...Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act...205-1-2 “Transfer facility”, 252...205-1-2 “Transfer station”, 252:205-1-4...Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act...205-1-2 “Transfer facility”, 252...205-1-2 “Transfer station”,...

2014-07-01

246

Distribution, Abundance, and Habitat Affinities of Oklahoma Muskrats (Ondatra zibethicus): New Insight from Trapper Reports  

Microsoft Academic Search

Distributional records of the muskrat (Ondatra zibethicus) are missing for much of Okla- homa. In the spring of 2005, I further investigated the status of Oklahoma muskrats by collecting surveys from Oklahoma fur trappers and United States Department of Agri- culture wildlife technicians (government trappers). Surveyed individuals were asked to give county locations of muskrat sightings\\/collections, as well as habitats

Brandon McDonald

2006-01-01

247

Funding for Local Government and Schools in Rural Oklahoma. ERS Staff Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Oil, gas, and agriculture are the bases of rural Oklahoma's economy, and income from these sectors varied widely during the 1980s. This study investigated revenue sources and the effects of changing revenues for county and town governments and school systems in 36 rural Oklahoma counties. Major sources of local revenue were sales taxes, property…

Sloggett, Gordon; Doeksen, Gerald

248

40 CFR 272.1851 - Oklahoma State-administered program: Final authorization.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Oklahoma (ODEQ), signed by the EPA Regional Administrator on March 1, 2000, is... 63 FR 28556 5/26/98 Methods Innovation: SW-846 70 FR 3453870 FR 44150...State of Oklahoma, signed by the EPA Regional Administrator on November 11,...

2010-07-01

249

SUBSURFACE WELL-LOG CORRELATION OF ARSENIC-BEARING LITHOFACIES IN THE PERMIAN GARBER SANDSTONE AND WELLINGTON FORMATION, CENTRAL OKLAHOMA AQUIFER (COA), CLEVELAND COUNTY, OKLAHOMA  

EPA Science Inventory

The fluvial Garber Sandstone and the underlying Wellington Formation are important sources of drinking water in central Oklahoma. These formations, which make up much of the COA, consist of amalgamated sandstones with some interbedded mudstones, siltstones, and local mudstone- a...

250

Exploitation and Optimization of Reservoir Performance in Hunton Formation, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the work done so far on Hunton Formation in West Carney Field in Lincoln County, Oklahoma. West Carney Field produces oil and gas from the Hunton Formation. The field was developed starting in 1995. Some of the unique characteristics of the field include decreasing water oil and ratio over time, decreasing gas-oil ratio at the beginning of production, inability to calculate oil reserves in the field based on long data, and sustained oil rates over long periods of time.

Kelkar, Mohan

2001-05-08

251

Hydrogeology and simulation of groundwater flow in the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer, south-central Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Groundwater in the aquifer moves from areas of high head (altitude) to areas of low head along streams and springs. The potentiometric surface in the eastern Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer generally slopes from a topographic high from northwest to the southeast, indicating that regional groundwater flow is predominantly toward the southeast. Freshwater is known to extend beyond the aquifer outcrop near the City of Sulphur, Oklahoma, and Chickasaw National Recreation Area, where groundwater flows west from the outcrop of the eastern Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer and becomes confin

Christenson, Scott; Osborn, Noel I.; Neel, Christopher R.; Faith, Jason R.; Blome, Charles D.; Puckette, James; Pantea, Michael P.

2011-01-01

252

A study of the relationship between certain moisture parameters and severe convective storms in central Oklahoma  

E-print Network

Blanchard, 1934 CST 4. 500 mb Vinds for Tabler, 1745-0027 CST. . 18 25 52 5. TP1J, LP'V, and UPb1 for Tabler, 1745-0027 CST. . . 53 6. Vinds from Oklahoma City, 1800 CST. 61 LIST OF FIGURES Page 1. A sounding typical of the "Narfa" front. . 2. A... cloud model illustrating incloud circulation and entrainment of ambient air 3. NSSL WSR-57 radar system (after Wilk and Gray, 1970). 4. Surface observational network used in this study. . 13 5. Radiosonde network used in this study. . 14 6. Svrface...

Scott, Carven Allen

2012-06-07

253

The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center  

E-print Network

, particularly the section on continuation of health insurance benefits, if you have not yet returned to work. Your portion of the health insurance premiums will be deducted from any pay you receive during your 06/15/2012 Employee Address City, State, Zip Employee 06/01/2012 Creator's Name/Title Phone Number

Oklahoma, University of

254

The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center  

E-print Network

the section on continuation of health insurance benefits, if you have not yet returned to work. Your portion of the health insurance premiums will be deducted from any pay you receive during your absence. If portions Employee Name Address City, State Zip code March 12, 2010 Employee Name Creator's Name Creator's Job Title

Oklahoma, University of

255

The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center  

E-print Network

, particularly the section on continuation of health insurance benefits, if you have not yet returned to work. Your portion of the health insurance premiums will be deducted from any pay you receive during your 06/15/2012 Employee Name Address City, State, Zip Employee Name 06/01/2012 Creator's Name/Title Phone

Oklahoma, University of

256

Other, Describe: The University of Oklahoma  

E-print Network

records from any criminal justice agency in any or all federal, state, city and county jurisdictions for employment. Criminal background checks will be conducted in addition to the Standard Pre-Employment Screening and experience, along with reasons for termination of past employment, financial/credit history, criminal history

Oklahoma, University of

257

Epidemiology of homicide-suicide events: Oklahoma, 1994-2001.  

PubMed

In Oklahoma, all nonnatural deaths must be reported to the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner (ME), whose trained investigators report cause of death using a centralized, statewide, standardized reporting system. The purpose of this study was to determine temporal trends of Oklahoma homicide-suicide events and characterize the epidemiology of these events. By reviewing all ME reports of homicides and suicides from 1994 through 2001, we identified 73 homicide-suicide events resulting in 73 suicides and 89 homicides. Suicidal perpetrators of homicide-suicide events were most often white men aged >or=30 years who killed a current or ex-spouse or intimate partner. Homicide victims tended to be younger women the same race as their killer. Firearms were the predominant method of death in both homicides and suicides, with handguns used most frequently. Divorce/estrangement was the main contributing factor to these events, and the most common relationship type was possessive. The existence of a statewide, centralized, and computerized ME system and the ability to access the detailed information in the ME narratives were critical to identifying homicide-suicide events and obtaining the type of detailed information necessary to fully investigate these events. PMID:16121077

Comstock, R Dawn; Mallonee, Sue; Kruger, Elizabeth; Rayno, Kim; Vance, April; Jordan, Fred

2005-09-01

258

Conodont biostratigraphy of lower Ordovician rocks, Arbuckle Group, southern Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The Arbuckle Group of southern Oklahoma displays the only complete exposure of the shallow-water carbonates that characterize the Lower Ordovician of interior North America. Trilobites have been described from some parts of this sequence and sporadic occurrences of other invertebrates are known, but much of the sequence is sparingly fossiliferous. As a consequence, these magnificent exposures have not contributed notably to continuing efforts toward development of a comprehensive biostratigraphic scheme for the Lower Ordovician of the North American platform. Samples collected at 25-ft intervals through the Arbuckle Group along and adjacent to Interstate Highway 35 on the south flank of the Arbuckle anticline near Ardmore, Oklahoma, produced conodonts in abundances ranging from a few tens to over a thousand elements per kilogram and displaying good to excellent preservation with low CAI. These conodonts document a biostratigraphic continuum that provides a standard for correlation of Lower Ordovician rocks in the subsurface of central US and of the many localized and incomplete outcrops of generally equivalent strata in the Ozark and Upper Mississippi Valley regions. The stratigraphic continuity of the collections makes the I-35 section an ideal standard reference section for graphic correlation of Lower Ordovician rocks containing conodonts of the Mid-Continent Province.

Dresbach, R.I.; Ethington, R.L. (Univ. of Missouri, Columbia (USA))

1989-08-01

259

Fatal injuries in Oklahoma: descriptive epidemiology using Medical Examiner data.  

PubMed

To characterize mortality associated with injuries and other health problems in Oklahoma, we examined data from the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner of the State of Oklahoma for the years 1978 through 1984. Each year, approximately 1,500 and 800 deaths resulted from unintentional injury (UI) and intentional injury (ie, suicide and homicide), respectively. The medical examiner (ME) data differed substantially from the state's vital statistics (VS); over the seven years, the ME records showed 2,021 (16%) fewer UI deaths than did the VS, as well as 24 (1%) more cases of suicide and 499 (23%) more cases of homicide. Rates for UI and suicide were highest for young adults and for the elderly; in contrast, rates for homicide were highest for young adults, and then decreased with age. For each of the three categories of injury-related deaths, rates for male subjects were approximately three times those for female subjects; rates also varied by race-ethnic group. Deaths due to UI and homicide occurred more often in the summer and on weekends, though suicides did not vary by month and were slightly more common on weekdays. This study indicates that ME data represent an important source of epidemiologic information for the surveillance and study of injury-related mortality. PMID:2772684

Goodman, R A; Herndon, J L; Istre, G R; Jordan, F B; Kelaghan, J

1989-09-01

260

ERISA preemption and Oklahoma laws on managed care.  

PubMed

The Employee Retirement Income and Security Act of 1974 ("ERISA") affects Oklahoma managed care laws and thus the practice of medicine in complex and important ways. Because ERISA was enacted before managed care became an industry, ERISA's provisions have had unanticipated effects and become controversial. Insurers and managed care organizations have been quite successful in taking advantage of ERISA's preemption provisions to avoid being controlled by state laws, including those that regulate insurance. Congress is presently seeking to change this to varying degrees in the different versions of the "Patient Protection" bills. ERISA preempts state laws that "relate to" the administration of an ERISA covered plan. Numerous courts and legal scholars have sought to define what this language means with respect to state managed care laws. ERISA preemption affects patients' rights to sue utilization reviewers and insurers (as opposed to healthcare providers) for negligent determinations of "medical necessity" that interfere with treatment. Moreover, it interferes with Oklahoma's laws governing the quality of benefits, including those concerning external review of insurance benefit determinations. This article provides practitioners with a roadmap to one of the most important debates in healthcare today to facilitate informed participation in the political process on these issues. PMID:11799799

Robertson, Madeline J

2002-01-01

261

Environmental Characteristics and Geographic Information System Applications for the Development of Nutrient Thresholds in Oklahoma Streams  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S.Environmental Protection Agency has developed nutrient criteria using ecoregions to manage and protect rivers and streams in the United States. Individual states and tribes are encouraged by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to modify or improve upon the ecoregion approach. The Oklahoma Water Resources Board uses a dichotomous process that stratifies streams using environmental characteristics such as stream order and stream slope. This process is called the Use Support Assessment Protocols, subchapter15. The Use Support Assessment Protocols can be used to identify streams threatened by excessive amounts of nutrients, dependant upon a beneficial use designation for each stream. The Use Support Assessment Protocols, subchapter 15 uses nutrient and environmental characteristic thresholds developed from a study conducted in the Netherlands, but the Oklahoma Water Resources Board wants to modify the thresholds to reflect hydrologic and ecological conditions relevant to Oklahoma streams and rivers. Environmental characteristics thought to affect impairment from nutrient concentrations in Oklahoma streams and rivers were determined for 798 water-quality sites in Oklahoma. Nutrient, chlorophyll, water-properties, and location data were retrieved from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency STORET database including data from the U.S. Geological Survey, Oklahoma Conservation Commission, and Oklahoma Water Resources Board. Drainage-basin area, stream order, stream slope, and land-use proportions were determined for each site using a Geographic Information System. The methods, procedures, and data sets used to determine the environmental characteristics are described.

Masoner, Jason R.; Haggard, Brian E.; Rea, Alan

2002-01-01

262

Naturally Occurring Arsenic in Ground Water, Norman, Oklahoma, 2004, and Remediation Options for Produced Water  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 2000, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) reviewed the arsenic drinking water standard for public water supplies. Considering the available research and statistics on the health effects of arsenic ingestion, the EPA reduced the Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for public drinking water from 50 micrograms per liter (?g/L) to 10 ?g/L (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2001a). As a result of the more stringent standard, the EPA estimates that about 3,000 public water providers across the United States must take action to meet the new standard before it becomes effective on January 23, 2006 (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2001b). The City of Norman (City) is one of several Oklahoma municipalities affected by the new arsenic standard. About 20 percent of Norman?s water is supplied by wells completed in the Central Oklahoma (Garber-Wellington) aquifer; the rest is supplied by Lake Thunderbird (fig. 1) or purchased from Oklahoma City. The Norman well field is composed of 24 active wells, and water produced from about half of the wells will not be in compliance with the new MCL (figs. 2 and 3). Chemical treatment of water with elevated arsenic is possible, but it is generally cost prohibitive. Another costly solution is simply to abandon the high-arsenic wells and replace them with new wells in low-arsenic areas. In the next phase of well construction beginning in 2005, the City plans to construct as many as 30 new wells in northeast Norman (Bryan Mitchell, City of Norman, oral commun., 2005). The new wells will replace production lost to the new arsenic standard and add new production to keep pace with rapidly growing consumer demand. Well modification to exclude arsenic-bearing water from existing wells is a more cost-effective solution, but it requires a great deal of knowledge about local aquifer properties and individual well dynamics to decide which wells are good candidates for modification. With the goal of determining if well modification can be used to bring some of Norman?s high-arsenic wells into compliance with the new arsenic standard, the EPA Office of Research and Development (ORD) initiated a three-year research project in 2003 with participation from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Oklahoma State University, and the City of Norman. The primary objectives of the project are to: (1) determine where naturally occurring arsenic is entering wells by collecting water samples at different depths, (2) investigate the utility of new methods for collecting water-quality data in a pumping well, (3) better understand the stratigraphy and composition of aquifer rocks, (4) assess 10 wells for the possibility of arsenic remediation by well modification, and (5) evaluate the effectiveness of well modification in bringing marginal wells into compliance with the new arsenic MCL. The purpose of this report is to describe the occurrence of arsenic in ground water near Norman, Oklahoma, and available options for reducing arsenic concentrations in produced ground water.

Smith, S. Jerrod; Christenson, Scott

2005-01-01

263

Depth-Duration Frequency of Precipitation for Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A regional frequency analysis was conducted to estimate the depth-duration frequency of precipitation for 12 durations in Oklahoma (15, 30, and 60 minutes; 1, 2, 3, 6, 12, and 24 hours; and 1, 3, and 7 days). Seven selected frequencies, expressed as recurrence intervals, were investigated (2, 5, 10, 25, 50, 100, and 500 years). L-moment statistics were used to summarize depth-duration data and to determine the appropriate statistical distributions. Three different rain-gage networks provided the data (15minute, 1-hour, and 1-day). The 60-minute, and 1-hour; and the 24-hour, and 1-day durations were analyzed separately. Data were used from rain-gage stations with at least 10-years of record and within Oklahoma or about 50 kilometers into bordering states. Precipitation annual maxima (depths) were determined from the data for 110 15-minute, 141 hourly, and 413 daily stations. The L-moment statistics for depths for all durations were calculated for each station using unbiased L-mo-ment estimators for the mean, L-scale, L-coefficient of variation, L-skew, and L-kur-tosis. The relation between L-skew and L-kurtosis (L-moment ratio diagram) and goodness-of-fit measures were used to select the frequency distributions. The three-parameter generalized logistic distribution was selected to model the frequencies of 15-, 30-, and 60-minute annual maxima; and the three-parameter generalized extreme-value distribution was selected to model the frequencies of 1-hour to 7-day annual maxima. The mean for each station and duration was corrected for the bias associated with fixed interval recording of precipitation amounts. The L-scale and spatially averaged L-skew statistics were used to compute the location, scale, and shape parameters of the selected distribution for each station and duration. The three parameters were used to calculate the depth-duration-frequency relations for each station. The precipitation depths for selected frequencies were contoured from weighted depth surfaces to produce maps from which the precipitation depth-duration-frequency curve for selected storm durations can be determined for any site in Oklahoma.

Tortorelli, Robert L.; Rea, Alan; Asquith, William H.

1999-01-01

264

Synoptic Regulation of The 3 May 1999 Oklahoma Tornado Outbreak  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Despite the relatively successful long-lead-time forecasts of the storms during the 3 May 1999 tornadic outbreak in Oklahoma and Kansas, forecasters were unable to predict with confidence details concerning convective initiation and convective mode. The forecasters identified three synoptic processes they were monitoring for clues as to how the event would unfold. These elements were (a) the absence of strong surface convergence along a dryline in western Oklahoma and the Texas panhandle, (b) the presence of a cirrus shield that was hypothesized to limit surface heating, and (c) the arrival into Oklahoma of an upper-level wind-speed maximum (associated with the so- called southern PV anomaly) that was responsible for favorable synoptic-scale ascent and the cirrus shield. The Pennsylvania State University/National Center for Atmospheric Research Mesoscale Model Version 5 (MM5) is used in forecast mode (using the operational AVN run data to provide initial and lateral boundary conditions) to explore the sen- sitivity of the outbreak to these features using simulations down to 2-km horizontal grid spacing. A 30-h control simulation is compared to the available observations and captures important qualitative characteristics of the event, including convective initi- ation east of the dryline and organization of mesoscale convective systems into long lived, long-track supercells. Additional simulations in which the initial strength of the southern PV anomaly is altered suggest that synoptic regulation of the 3 May 1999 event was imposed by the effects of the southern PV anomaly. The model results in- dicate that: (1) convective initiation in the weakly forced environment was achieved through modification of the existing cap through both surface heating and synoptic- scale ascent associated with the southern PV anomaly; (2) supercellular organization was supported regardless of the strength of the southern PV anomaly, although weak- to-moderate forcing from this feature was most conducive to the production of long lived supercells and strong forcing resulted in a trend toward linear mesoscale convec- tive systems; (3) the cirrus shield was important in limiting development of convection and reducing competition between storms.

Schultz, D. M.; Roebber, P. J.; Romero, R.

265

Intersubtest discrepancies on the RBANS: results from the OKLAHOMA study.  

PubMed

The present study provides supplemental data for the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (Randolph, 1998) by reporting base rate data on discrepancies between subtests of this measure. These discrepancies are organized by general level of ability and include both age and education corrections. The data come from the Oklahoma Longitudinal Assessment of Health Outcomes in Mature Adults study and include cognitive performances of 718 community-dwelling older adults. These findings offer the possibility of increased sensitivity at detecting clinically significant differences that might not be identified when relying on base rate data from a greater age range. Similarly, these data highlight the mediating effects of the global level of cognitive functioning on discrepancy scores. PMID:21660759

Duff, Kevin; Patton, Doyle E; Schoenberg, Mike R; Mold, James; Scott, James G; Adams, Russell L

2011-04-01

266

Conservative leadership pays off at Oklahoma Gas and Electric Co  

SciTech Connect

Conservative management and hard work on the part of employees are expected to extend Oklahoma Gas and Electric (OG and E) Company's good performance record into the future. In 1982, the company gained 38.8% in net income for a total of $93.2 million, with only a 9.9% gain in revenues to $907.6 million due to a serious cost-control program. President James G. Harlow credits both the management team and the Public Utility Commission for helping the utility stay alert to changing conditions. Future financial strength will depend on successful rate petitions, especially a pending request to cover construction work in progress at Muskogee number 6. The conservative approach to using internally generated funds for construction and short lead times dates to 1969. Despite the overall economic slowdown, OG and E remains a relatively strong growth company. 1 figure. (DCK)

Not Available

1983-11-01

267

Trypanosoma cruzi infection in a dog from Oklahoma.  

PubMed

A dog with signs of weakness, labored breathing, and generalized edema was examined. It was heavily infested with fleas and had wounds resulting from a recent fight. Hematologic findings were not remarkable, except for parasites in the blood. The dog was treated for fleas and given antibiotics, but was euthanatized when it failed to respond. Blood and tissue specimens were found to contain Trypanosoma cruzi, and the serum contained antibodies to the organism. We believe this is the first confirmed case of T cruzi infection in dogs from Oklahoma. The public health implications of this finding are underscored by a report on the detection of T cruzi in raccoons in the same season and geographic area. PMID:3098711

Fox, J C; Ewing, S A; Buckner, R G; Whitenack, D; Manley, J H

1986-12-15

268

Small Wind Electric Systems: An Oklahoma Consumer's Guide  

SciTech Connect

Small Wind Electric Systems: An Oklahoma Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

Not Available

2007-08-01

269

75 FR 36609 - Oklahoma: Incorporation by Reference of State Hazardous Waste Management Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FRL-9162-6] Oklahoma: Incorporation by Reference of State Hazardous Waste Management Program...program. The EPA will incorporate by reference into the Code of Federal Regulations...and [[Page 36610

2010-06-28

270

77 FR 29275 - Oklahoma: Incorporation by Reference of State Hazardous Waste Management Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FRL-9652-8] Oklahoma: Incorporation by Reference of State Hazardous Waste Management Program...program. The EPA will incorporate by reference into the Code of Federal Regulations...EPA is codifying and incorporating by reference the State's hazardous waste...

2012-05-17

271

Supreme Court standing requirements: Has Wyoming v. Oklahoma set the stage for future conflict  

SciTech Connect

In Wyoming v. Oklahoma, an Oklahoma law requiring its coal-fired electric utilities to burn a minimum ten percent mixture of Oklahoma-mined coal was struck down by the United States Supreme Court. Describing the law as [open quotes]protectionist and discriminatory,[close quotes] the Court struck it down as a violation of the Commerce Clause. The majority opinion first focused on the issues of Wyoming's standing to sue and the Supreme Court's power to assert its original jurisdiction. Then the majority performed a textbook Dormant Commerce Clause analysis of the Oklahoma statute, finding it virtually per se invalid. This paper reviews the case and discusses the possible implications of Supreme Court standing requirements.

Not Available

1993-01-01

272

40 CFR 81.47 - Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

...2014-07-01 false Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.47 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.47 Central...

2014-07-01

273

40 CFR 81.79 - Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

... false Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.79 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.79...

2014-07-01

274

FEDERAL ORDER Domestic Quarantine of Counties in Oklahoma and Tennessee for  

E-print Network

.81-3 (c) allows the APHIS Administrator to include uninfested acreage within a quarantined area due to its counties: Oklahoma The following entire counties: Atoka, Coal, Cotton, Garvin, Jackson, Jefferson, Le

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

275

76 FR 81838 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Oklahoma; Interstate Transport of Pollution  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Implementation Plans; Oklahoma; Interstate Transport of Pollution AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION...307(b)(2).) List of Subjects in 40 CFR Part 52 Air pollution control, Environmental protection, Incorporation by...

2011-12-29

276

Determinants of Water Conservation Irrigation Practices: a Study of Park and Golf Turfgrass Management in Oklahoma.  

E-print Network

??With urban and suburban sprawl increasing throughout Oklahoma, areas of previously non-irrigated pasture and/or croplands are being converted to homeowner and commercial landscapes generally composed… (more)

Schmidt, JoDee Lynn

2011-01-01

277

A Brief History of Women in Oklahoma Corrections: Inmates and Employees  

E-print Network

The paper provides a brief history of women—both offenders and employees—within the adult criminal justice system in the state of Oklahoma. Generally using the periods of Statehood (1900-1909), the Traditional (1910-1979), and the Contemporary (1980 to the present), we examined historical development of Oklahoma Department of Corrections (ODOC) facilities for women, incarceration data, and selected characteristics of these offenders. The contribution of women to Oklahoma’s early history of corrections is documented in the work of Kate Barnard, Mabel Bassett, and Clara Waters. Additional information is provided with regard to the role of women in the present era in leadership positions as well as correctional officers and case management staff. It is clear that contemporary employees provide valuable services and leadership as did their predecessors.

D. Holley; Dennis Brewster

278

40 CFR 272.1851 - Oklahoma State-administered program: Final authorization.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Chapter 205, Hazardous Waste Management, effective...Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act...205-1-2 “Transfer facility”, 252:205-1-2 “Transfer station”, 252:205-1-4...authorized hazardous waste management...

2013-07-01

279

Biomarker and Paleontological Investigations of the Late Devonian Extinctions, Woodford Shale, Southern Oklahoma  

E-print Network

The Late Devonian extinctions at the Frasnian-Famennian (F-F) boundary and the Devonian-Carboniferous (D-C) boundary were investigated in the Woodford Shale of southcentral Oklahoma with organic geochemical, bulk geochemical, ...

Nowaczewski, Vincent Stephen

2011-12-31

280

78 FR 41073 - Oklahoma; Amendment No. 7 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Pushmataha, and Seminole Counties for Public Assistance, including...Canadian, Okfuskee, and Okmulgee Counties for Public Assistance, including...Cleveland, Lincoln, McClain, Oklahoma, and Pottawatomie Counties for Public Assistance...

2013-07-09

281

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research Center, Ada, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

U.S. EPA's Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research Center, Ada, Oklahoma, has reduced its annual energy consumption by 45% by upgrading its building mechanical system and incorporating renewable energy.

Farrar-Nagy, S.; Voss, P.; Van Geet, O.

2006-10-01

282

76 FR 16167 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Oklahoma; Regional Haze State Implementation...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...available docket materials are available...Oklahoma Gas and Electric (OG&E...Building Materials Rogers...fuel-fired steam electric plants OG...29\\ Electric Power Research...Absorber Material: Production, Characterization,...

2011-03-22

283

Porosity trends of nonreservoir and reservoir sandstones, Anadarko basin, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The porosity of nonreservoir sandstones in Caddo County, Oklahoma, is determined using compensated-neutron and formation-density logs. The authors preliminary data set represents more than 3,000 net ft of Pennsylvanian and Permian age sandstones from 12 well locations. These porosity data and the average porosities of sandstone oil and gas reservoirs within the Anadarko basin of Oklahoma are each compared to a broad, composite set of porosity data from numerous basins that represent sandstones in general, and they are also compared to each other. The porosity of nonreservoir sandstones in Caddo County declines predictably as a power function of increasing thermal maturity for vitrinite reflectance (R{sub 0}) of 0.5 to 1.3%. The rate of porosity decrease with increasing thermal maturity is more rapid than that of the average porosity-R{sub 0} trend of the composite set, but is still within the porosity-R{sub 0} envelope of sandstones in general. Hydrocarbon reservoir sandstones of the Anadarko basin, however, follow a different pattern. Their rate of porosity loss is much slower than that of both sandstones in general, and nonreservoir sandstones of Caddo County. This slow rate of porosity decline with increasing R{sub 0} could be due to inhibiting effects of early hydrocarbon emplacement on diagenesis and (or) to the bias of economic selection. In any case, as R{sub 0} increases beyond about 1%, the porosity of Anadarko basin reservoir sandstones is anomalously high compared to both nonreservoir Anadarko basin sandstones and sandstones in general.

Hester, T.C.; Schmoker, J.W. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

1991-03-01

284

Chromosomal homology among subspecies of Peromyscus maniculatus in Texas and Oklahoma  

E-print Network

CHROMOSOMAL HOMOLOGY AMONG SUBSPECIES OF PEROMYSCUS MANICULATUS IN TEXAS AND OKLAHOMA A Thesis by TERRY BRYCE VAN FLEET Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1985 Major Subject: Zoology CHROMOSOMAL HOMOLOGY AMONG SUBSPECIES OF PEROMYSCUS MANICULATUS IN TEXAS AND OKLAHOMA A Thesis by TERRY BRYCE VAN FLEET Approved as to style and content by: Ir . reenbaum (Ch i of Committee...

Van Fleet, Terry Bryce

2012-06-07

285

Recognition criteria for young multiple surface ruptures along the Meers fault in southwestern Oklahoma  

E-print Network

RECOGNITION CRITERIA FOR YOUNG MULTIPLE SURFACE RUPTURES ALONG THE PEERS FAULT IN SOUTHWESTERN OKLAHOMA A Thesis by DIANE PAULA NESTEN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1985 Major Subject. : Geology RECOGNITION CRITERIA FOR YOUNG MULTIPLE SURFACE RUPTURES ALONG THE MEERS FAULT IN SOUTHWESTERN OKLAHOMA A Thesis by DIANE PAULA WESTEN Approved as to style and content by: Norman R...

Westen, Diane Paula

2012-06-07

286

Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

This Technical Quarterly Report is for the reporting period July 1, 2000 to September 30, 2000. The report provides details of the work done on the project entitled ''Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma''. The project is divided into nine separate tasks. Since this is the first Quarterly report, much of the work done is of a preliminary nature. Several of the tasks are being worked on simultaneously, while other tasks are dependent on earlier tasks being completed. The selection of the pilot test area has been completed. The drilling of the test well is waiting on rig availability. Phillips has begun sonic core testing of offset cores, waiting on the core from the well to be drilled. Design work is progressing for the tool, which will be built to fit the test well. Installation of monitoring equipment and the downhole vibration tool will occur after the well is drilled. Technical transfer efforts have begun with the submission of an abstract for a technical paper for the Oklahoma City Society of Petroleum Engineers meeting in March 2001.

J. Ford Brett; Robert V. Westermark

2000-09-30

287

An Assessment of Water Resource Education in the K-16 Curricula: Conclusions and Recommendations. The Proceedings of the Oklahoma Water Education Planning Conference, Moore, Oklahoma, October 21, 1977.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reported are conclusions and recommendations from the Water Education Planning Conference held in October, 1977 in Oklahoma. The 51 participants, science educators, scientists, representatives from state and federal water agencies, and legislators, were given tasks and questionnaires concerning the national guidelines for water resource education…

Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater.

288

Oklahoma State University 106 Whitehurst, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 (405) 744-5449 g:\\information sheets\\qdro 2013.doc Revised July 2013  

E-print Network

. If the OSU employee or the divorced spouse presents a QDRO for Oklahoma Teachers' Retirement funds, Employee record of this transaction. 3. When Employee Services receives an inquiry regarding TIAA-CREF retirement of the employee should any question arises at the time of withdrawal or retirement. 9. If you are divorced

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

289

Geographic Information Systems Methods for Determining Drainage-Basin Areas, Stream-Buffered Areas, Stream Length, and Land Uses for the Neosho and Spring Rivers in Northeastern Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Geographic Information Systems have many uses, one of which includes the reproducible computation of environmental characteristics that can be used to categorize hydrologic features. The Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation and the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality are investigating Geographic Information Systems techniques to determine partial drainage-basin areas, stream-buffer areas, stream length, and land uses (drainage basin and stream characteristics) in northeastern Oklahoma. The U.S Geological Survey, in cooperation with Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation and the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality, documented the methods used to determine drainage-basin and stream characteristics for the Neosho and Spring Rivers above Grand Lake Of the Cherokees in northeastern Oklahoma and calculated the characteristics. The drainage basin and stream characteristics can be used by the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation and the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality to aid in natural-resource assessments.

Masoner, Jason R.; March, Ferrella

2006-01-01

290

After devastating storms tore through Oklahoma, youth from across the state and nation stepped up and began raising money and supplies to help those in need.  

E-print Network

efforts to aid 4-H families, Oklahoma farms and ranches, or the rebuilding effort for the Oklahoma Trap several years. The number of teens staying in 4-H continues to grow. While we do not have any formal data

Ghajar, Afshin J.

291

Paleokarstic and karstic features: Arbuckle and Hunton Groups, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Cores of the Ordovician-age Arbuckle Group and Ordovician-Silurian-Devonian-age Hunton Group contain evidence of paleokarst. Arbuckle and Hunton Group rocks display surprisingly similar suites of distinct paleo-karstic features. Vugs, solution-enlarged fractures, cavities, collapse breccias, and sediment-filled solution features are evident. Phreatic cements are more commonly observed than vadose cements, while primary speleothemic precipitates are rare. A complex history of exposure, subsidence, and diagenesis is recorded in these rocks. Hunton and Arbuckle carbonates have been subaerially exposed for periods of variable intensity and duration during geologic history. Paleokarst appears to have developed subjacent to disconformities within and between formations of the Arbuckle Group and where these rocks subcrop below regional unconformities. Hunton paleokarstic horizons are apparent below the regional pre-Woodford unconformity, while evidence of inter- and intra-formational subaerial exposure is tenuous. This complex hierarchy of unconformities can produce numerous porous horizons. Porosity preservation may depend on subsidence rates or sea level rises rapid enough to prevent extensive low-temperature phreatic cementation and sediment infill of the existing pore network. Caves in the Arbuckle Group in Murray County, Oklahoma contain many karstic features similar to those observed in cores. Cemented collapse breccia and sediment-filled solution cavities are evident in caves developed in the Cool Creek Formation. These caves are part of an extensive internal drainage system associated with Honey Creek near the crest of the Arbuckle anticline. Cave speleothems and surficial travertine deposits are by-product of karstification processes.

Al-Shaieb, Z.; Puckette, J.; Matthews, F. (Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States). School of Geology); Lynch, M. (Unocal, Oklahoma City, OK (United States))

1993-02-01

292

Identification and Evaluation of Fluvial-Dominated Deltaic (Class 1 Oil) Reservoirs in Oklahoma: Yearly technical progress report for January 1December 31, 1996  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Oklahoma Geological Survey (OGS), the Geo Information Systems department, and the School of Petroleum and Geological Engineering at the University of Oklahoma are engaged in a five-year program to identify and address Oklahoma`s oil recovery opportunities in fluvial-dominated deltaic (FDD) reservoirs. This program includes a systematic and comprehensive collection and evaluation of information on all FDD oil reservoirs in

M. K. Banken; R. Andrews

1997-01-01

293

Deterrents to Nurses' Participation in Continuing Professional Education as Perceived by Licensed Nurses in Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Little is known about the deterrents to licensed nurses' participation in continuing professional education (CPE) in Oklahoma, the licensed nurses' preferred method for obtaining CPE, and the ways in which employers support participation in CPE. A random sample of 78 licensed nurses in Oklahoma completed a 20 item questionnaire and a 40…

Fahnestock, Annetta Bethene

2012-01-01

294

Oklahoma School Testing Program: Writing Assessment Component. 1993 Summary Report. Stanford Writing Assessment Program for Grades 7 and 10.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report provides an overview of the Oklahoma School Testing Program (OSTP) and summarizes students' average writing assessment scores from 1987 through 1993. In 1992, the Stanford Writing Assessment replaced the MAT-6 Writing Test as the instrument for measuring writing achievement for 7th and 10th graders in Oklahoma. Student papers were hand…

Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City.

295

Oklahoma School Testing Program: Writing Assessment Component. 1992 Summary Report. Stanford Writing Assessment Program for Grades 7 and 10.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report provides an overview of the Oklahoma School Testing Program (OSTP) and summarizes students' average writing assessment scores from 1987 through 1992. Oklahoma has completed its 6th year of administering a state legislature mandated test to 10th graders and its 5th year of testing 7th graders. The Stanford Writing Assessment Program was…

Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City.

296

Political Protest, Conflict, and Tribal Nationalism: The Oklahoma Choctaws and the Termination Crisis of 1959-1970  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma is headquartered in southeastern Oklahoma and has a tribal citizenry of just over 175,000. The tribal government currently compacts almost all of the tribe's Bureau of Indian Affairs and Indian Health Service program funding and runs dozens of tribal businesses that today fund more than 80 percent of the tribal…

Lambert, Valerie

2007-01-01

297

A Grid/Group Study of Gender Perceptions of the Culture of the Oklahoma Civil Air Patrol  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to describe member perceptions of the culture of the Oklahoma CAP using an online version of the Douglas Grid/Group typology. This study further described and compared differences in how men and women in the organization view its culture. All senior members of the Oklahoma CAP with a valid email address on file…

Wardlaw, Kelly Ann

2011-01-01

298

Financial Aid and Persistence in Community Colleges: Assessing the Effectiveness of Federal and State Financial Aid Programs in Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using a longitudinal, state-wide dataset, this study assessed the effect of financial aid on the persistence of full-time students in associate's degree programs at the Oklahoma community colleges. Three financial-aid sources were examined: the Oklahoma Higher Learning Access Program (OHLAP), Pell grants, and Stafford loans. Results indicate that…

Mendoza, Pilar; Mendez, Jesse P.; Malcolm, Zaria

2009-01-01

299

The Effects of Universal Pre-K in Oklahoma: Research Highlights and Policy Implications. CROCUS Working Paper.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Oklahoma is one of three states to offer a free prekindergarten (pre-K) program to all students in participating school districts on a voluntary basis. Fortuitous circumstances in Tulsa, Oklahoma, the state's largest school district, permitted an unusually rigorous evaluation of the pre-K program in Tulsa. Because 4-year-olds beginning pre-K and…

Gormley, William T., Jr.; Phillips, Deborah

300

Ground-water-quality assessment of the central Oklahoma aquifer, Oklahoma - Analysis of available water-quality data through 1987  

SciTech Connect

The water quality of the Central Oklahoma aquifer was assessed using the information available through 1987. The following conclusions were drawn from the available data and the contingency-table statistics. The word common is used to describe situations where approximately 10% or more of the data exceeded a water quality standard: (1) groundwater concentrations of nitrate and selenium commonly exceed the 10 mg/L maximum contaminant level (MCL) in most parts of the study unit except of depths > 300 ft in the Garber Sandstone and Wellington Formation; (2) groundwater concentrations of arsenic and chromium commonly exceed the 50 micrograms/L MCL at depths > 300 ft in the Garber Sandstone and Wellington Formation, but rarely exceed the MCL in the rest of the study unit; (3) no data were available for residual-alpha radioactivity for many parts of the study unit. In the data that were available, concentrations exceeded the MCL most frequently in groundwater samples from the Chase, Council Grove, and Admire Groups; (4) groundwater pH values commonly exceed 8.5 at depths > 300 ft in the Garber Sandstone and the Wellington Formation and in the Vanoss Formation; and (5) groundwater concentrations of sulfate and chloride commonly exceed the 250 mg/L secondary MCL (SMCL) in most parts of the study unit and concentrations greater than the SMCL are most common in groundwater from the Hennessey Group.

Parkhurst, D.L.; Christenson, S.C.; Schlottmann, J.L.

1989-01-01

301

Native American Conference on Petroleum Energy; November 16-17, 1996; Bartlesville, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Thirty-three Native American tribal members, council members, and other interested parties gathered in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, to attend the Native American Conference on Petroleum Energy on October 16 and 17 1996, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and BDM-Oklahoma, Inc. Tribes represented at the workshop included the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Hopi, Jicarilla Apache, Osage, Seminole, and Ute. Representatives of the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), and the Minerals Management Service (MMS) also attended. BDM-Oklahoma developed and organized the Native American Conference on Petroleum Energy to help meet the goals of the U.S. Department of Energy's Domestic Gas and Oil Initiative to help Native American Tribes become more self-sufficient in developing and managing petroleum resources.

NONE

1999-04-27

302

Monitoring temperature conditions in recently drilled nonproductive industry boreholes in Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Temperature conditions were monitored in seven industry petroleum-test wells (called holes-of-opportunity in this report) that were drilled in central and eastern Oklahoma. Five of these wells provided useful temperature information, and two wells were used to determine the length of time needed for the borehole-fluid temperature to achieve thermal equilibrium with the formation rocks. Four wells were used to verify the validity of a geothermal-gradient map of Oklahoma. Temperature surveys in two wells indicated a gradient lower than the predicted gradients on the geothermal-gradient map. When deep temperature data, between 5000 and 13,000 feet, are adjusted for mud-circulation effects, the adjusted gradients approximate the gradients on the geothermal-gradient map. The temperature-confirmation program appears to substantiate the geographic distribution of the high- and low-thermal-gradient regimes in Oklahoma. 13 refs., 18 figs., 7 tabs.

Harrison, W.E.; Luza, K.V.

1985-06-01

303

Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Midcontinent region (Kansas, Missouri, Oklahoma)  

SciTech Connect

This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility/constraints of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers a select area of the United States. The Midcontinent (Kansas, Nssouri, Oklahoma) has produced significant oil, but contrary to early reports, the area does not contain the huge volumes of heavy oil that, along with the development of steam and in situ combustion as oil production technologies, sparked the area`s oil boom of the 1960s. Recovery of this heavy oil has proven economically unfeasible for most operators due to the geology of the formations rather than the technology applied to recover the oil. The geology of the southern Midcontinent, as well as results of field projects using thermal enhanced oil recovery (TEOR) methods to produce the heavy oil, was examined based on analysis of data from secondary sources. Analysis of the performance of these projects showed that the technology recovered additional heavy oil above what was produced from primary production from the consolidated, compartmentalized, fluvial dominated deltaic sandstone formations in the Cherokee and Forest City basins. The only projects producing significant economic and environmentally acceptable heavy oil in the Midcontinent are in higher permeability, unconsolidated or friable, thick sands such as those found in south-central Oklahoma. There are domestic heavy oil reservoirs in other sedimentary basins that are in younger formations, are less consolidated, have higher permeability and can be economically produced with current TEOR technology. Heavy oil production from the carbonates of central and wester Kansas has not been adequately tested, but oil production is anticipated to remain low. Significant expansion of Midcontinent heavy oil production is not anticipated because the economics of oil production and processing are not favorable.

Olsen, D.K.; Johnson, W.I.

1993-08-01

304

EXPLOITATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE IN HUNTON FORMATION, OKLAHOMA  

SciTech Connect

The main objectives of the proposed study are as follows: (1) To understand and evaluate an unusual primary oil production mechanism which results in decreasing (retrograde) oil cut (ROC) behavior as reservoir pressure declines. (2) To improve calculations of initial oil in place so as to determine the economic feasibility of completing and producing a well. (3) To optimize the location of new wells based on understanding of geological and petrophysical properties heterogeneities. (4) To evaluate various secondary recovery techniques for oil reservoirs producing from fractured formations. (5) To enhance the productivity of producing wells by using new completion techniques. These objectives are important for optimizing field performance from West Carney Field located in Lincoln County, Oklahoma. The field, which was discovered in 1980, produces from Hunton Formation in a shallow-shelf carbonate reservoir. The early development in the field was sporadic. Many of the initial wells were abandoned due to high water production and constraints in surface facilities for disposing excess produced water. The field development began in earnest in 1995 by Altex Resources. They had recognized that production from this field was only possible if large volumes of water can be disposed. Being able to dispose large amounts of water, Altex aggressively drilled several producers. With few exceptions, all these wells exhibited similar characteristics. The initial production indicated trace amount of oil and gas with mostly water as dominant phase. As the reservoir was depleted, the oil cut eventually improved, making the overall production feasible. The decreasing oil cut (ROC) behavior has not been well understood. However, the field has been subjected to intense drilling activity because of prior success of Altex Resources. In this work, we will investigate the primary production mechanism by conducting several core flood experiments. After collecting cores from representative wells, we will study the wettability of the rock and simulate the depletion behavior by mimicking such behavior under controlled lab conditions.

Mohan Kelkar

2002-09-30

305

Summary of proceedings: Oklahoma and Texas wind energy forum, April 2-3, 1981  

SciTech Connect

The Wind Energy Forum for Oklahoma and Texas was held at the Amarillo Quality Inn in Amarillo, Texas on April 2-3, 1981. Its purpose was to bring together the diverse groups involved in wind energy development in the Oklahoma and Texas region to explore the future commercial potential and current barriers to achieving this potential. Major topics of discussion included utility interconnection of wind machines and the buy-back rate for excess power, wind system reliability and maintenance concerns, machine performance standards, and state governmental incentives. A short summary of each presentation is included.

Nelson, S.C.; Ball, D.E.

1981-06-01

306

Log-derived regional source-rock characteristics of the Woodford Shale, Anadarko Basin, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The Woodford Shale is an organic-rich, highly compacted, black shale of Late Devonian and Early Mississippian age that is widely regarded as a major hydrocarbon source rock in the Anadarko basin of Oklahoma. The report describes regional depositional trends and organic-carbon content of the Woodford Shale as evidenced by wire-line logs in the Oklahoma portion of the Anadarko basin. The relation between depositional patterns and organic-carbon content is discussed, and the mass and distribution of organic carbon in thermally immature and mature areas of the Woodford Shale is estimated.

Hester, T.C.; Schmoker, J.W.; Sahl, H.L.

1990-01-01

307

Estimate of self-supplied domestic water use in Oklahoma during 1980  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Reported or measured water-use data for the domestic self-supplied user were not available for Oklahoma; therefore estimates of water use within this classification were derived. The total self-supplied population in Oklahoma during 1980 was estimated to be 343,615, which was 11.4 percent of the total 1980 State population. The rate of water use by this group was estimated to be 56 gallons per capita per day. The estimated annual domestic self-supplied water use by county ranged from 10 to 1,180 acre-feet, with a total statewide use of 21,610 acre-feet.

Stoner, J. D.

1984-01-01

308

The Significance of Stratigraphy and Lithology in Landform Development in Washington County, Oklahoma  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This winning entry in the museum's Young Naturalist Awards 1999 by Katie, a 15 year old student from Oklahoma, takes a look at the development of Washington County, Oklahoma. Katie's essay has a field-journal focus and explains stratigraphy and lithology, two of the main factors controlling the shape of the land in her county. She provides an overview of the six different formations in the Skiatook Group and the five different formations that outcrop in the Bartlesville area. There are descriptions of the many rock samples she took for this study.

309

Management Training Activities and Training Needs within Selected Business and Industry Organizations in Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A survey of 393 business/industry managers in Oklahoma found that 60% have a staff training specialist. Only in larger organizations was training the specialists' primary responsibility. Organization size had the most effect on amount and variety of training offered and amount spent. Lack of time, staff, and money were the most common barriers.…

Kunneman, Dale E.; Key, James P.; Sleezer, Catherine M.

2000-01-01

310

University of Oklahoma Food Services Policy on Food I. Purpose of policy  

E-print Network

in their food allergies should notify OU Health Services5 of such allergies and provide medical documentation prescribed medication to treat the effects of food allergies. It is the responsibility of students with foodUniversity of Oklahoma Food Services Policy on Food Allergies I. Purpose of policy The purpose

Oklahoma, University of

311

Discrimination against and Adaptation of Italians in the Coal Counties of Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the late 1800s and early 1900s coal reigned supreme in what is now southeastern Oklahoma. As was the case in the northeastern United States, Italians and other immigrants from southern and eastern Europe were brought in as a form of inexpensive labor to work the mines. Italians had different customs, a different language, a unique appearance,…

LoConto, David G.

2004-01-01

312

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Marley Beem  

E-print Network

Beem Assistant Extension Specialist In many areas increasing numbers of people are moving onto small. Harvesting crops is noisy and apt to disturb the sleep of neighbors. Farmers accept all these and other the statetakingadvantageofruraldevelopmentplanningexpertise from the Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service. Working Toward Solutions When a cooperative

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

313

OKLAHOMA NATIVE AMERICAN YOUTH LANGUAGE FAIR Song in Native American Language  

E-print Network

OKLAHOMA NATIVE AMERICAN YOUTH LANGUAGE FAIR Song in Native American Language Category Description Students are invited to perform in songs in Native American languages, and be accompanied by music if needed. Please remember that the point of the ONAYLF is to demonstrate Native American language use

Oklahoma, University of

314

OKLAHOMA NATIVE AMERICAN YOUTH LANGUAGE FAIR Spoken Language with Power Point  

E-print Network

OKLAHOMA NATIVE AMERICAN YOUTH LANGUAGE FAIR Spoken Language with Power Point® Category Description® presentation in a Native American language. Presentations may cover any number of topics and should use is to demonstrate Native American language use, so the focus of the Power Point® should be Native American language

Oklahoma, University of

315

Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History Department of Native American Languages  

E-print Network

Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History Department of Native American Languages Restrictions archives for language materials, especially for Native Americans. A. The Department of Native American collections in the Department of Native American Languages archives: · central location for Tribal access

Oklahoma, University of

316

77 FR 46994 - Oklahoma: Incorporation by Reference of State Hazardous Waste Management Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FRL9701-6] Oklahoma: Incorporation by Reference of State Hazardous Waste Management Program...program. The EPA will incorporate by reference into the Code of Federal Regulations...this authorization and incorporation by reference during normal business hours at the...

2012-08-07

317

TITLE 21, SECTION 1190 OKLAHOMA STATUTESHAZING A. No student organization or any person  

E-print Network

TITLE 21, SECTION 1190 OKLAHOMA STATUTES­HAZING A. No student organization or any person associated or institution of higher education in this stated shall engage or participate in hazing. B. Any hazing activity of the public or private school or institution of higher education which prohibits hazing shall be given to each

Oklahoma, University of

318

Integrated basin chemical modelling redefines the geothermal evolution of the Arkoma Basin, Oklahoma, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Amoco utilized a variety of exploration technologies to become the economic success leader (EPs > 65%) in the thrusted Pennsylvanian Spiro sandstone play of the Arkoma basin, Oklahoma. It was found early in exploitation analysis that conventional thermal-history methodologies gave convicting results about the overall geothermal evolution of the basin. Within the thrusted terrain, vitrinite reflectance and bottom-hole temperature data

S. S. Foland; I. D. Meshri; S. L. Bolton

1995-01-01

319

Joseph P. Havlicek, Chuong T. Nguyen, and Mark Yeary University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, USA  

E-print Network

for discriminating infrared targets and backgrounds. Keywords: AM-FM models, filter banks, Gabor filters, modulation of computing AM-FM models for infrared imagery and develop adaptive Gabor filters for extracting estimates of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, USA ABSTRACT We compute joint AM-FM models that characterize infrared targets

Havlicek, Joebob

320

Pioneering Education Leadership for 2001: Oklahoma's CSPD Initiative from a Rural Regional Perspective.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Oklahoma's Comprehensive System of Personnel Development (CSPD) initiative was developed to meet requirements of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. CSPD compensates for the state's geographic diversity through regionalization, which allows a grassroots approach to determining preservice and inservice training activities for special…

Beckner, Claudia

321

40 CFR 81.65 - Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Air Quality Control Region, designated on December 8, 1970, and consisting of the counties of Barton, Jasper, McDonald, and Newton in the State of Missouri and Craig, Delaware, and Ottawa in the State of Oklahoma, is revoked effective upon...

2011-07-01

322

40 CFR 81.65 - Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Air Quality Control Region, designated on December 8, 1970, and consisting of the counties of Barton, Jasper, McDonald, and Newton in the State of Missouri and Craig, Delaware, and Ottawa in the State of Oklahoma, is revoked effective upon...

2013-07-01

323

40 CFR 81.65 - Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region.  

...Air Quality Control Region, designated on December 8, 1970, and consisting of the counties of Barton, Jasper, McDonald, and Newton in the State of Missouri and Craig, Delaware, and Ottawa in the State of Oklahoma, is revoked effective upon...

2014-07-01

324

Ethnic Identity and the Boarding School Experience of West-Central Oklahoma American Indians.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book reports on a study of the perceptions of Oklahoma American Indians about their childhood experiences in government and church-sponsored boarding schools. Drawing on symbolic anthropology, the boarding school experience is interpreted to be a complex cultural symbol and symbolic process that contributes to group collectivity and belonging…

McBeth, Sally J.

325

78 FR 54670 - Miami Tribe of Oklahoma-Liquor Control Ordinance  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...the laws promulgated under this Ordinance; that the entity or individual has never been convicted of violating any of the gambling laws of Oklahoma, or any other state of the United States, or of this or any other tribe; that he has not had,...

2013-09-05

326

Ghosts in the Bureaucratic MachineResurrecting the Principles of Administration in the Oklahoma Health Department  

Microsoft Academic Search

An Oklahoma health department scandal erupted when the acting director was arrested for taking a bribe. More revelations quickly followed, including the existence of multiple “ghost employees” on payroll but having no identifiable job functions. More than 30 employees were terminated. Many faced criminal prosecution. TheTulsa World reported that malfeasance at the agency might have contributed to as many as

Brett S. Sharp; Steven W. Housel

2004-01-01

327

Fort Cobb Reservoir Watershed, Oklahoma and Thika River Watershed, Kenya Twinning Pilot Project  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Fort Cobb Reservoir Watershed (FCRW) (830 km2) is a watershed within the HELP Washita Basin, located in Caddo and Washita Counties, OK. It is also a benchmark watershed under USDA's Conservation Effects Assessment Project, a national project to quantify environmental effects of USDA and other conservation programs. Population in south-western Oklahoma, in which FCRW is located, is sparse and

D. Moriasi; J. Steiner; J. Arnold; P. Allen; J. Dunbar; C. Shisanya; J. Gathenya; J. Nyaoro; J. Sang

2007-01-01

328

OATE Journal: Oklahoma Association of Teacher Educators. Volume 14, Spring 2010  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The "OATE Journal" is published annually by the Oklahoma Association of Teacher Educators. Articles in this issue include: (1) "The Transition of Middle School Students into High School" by Aric Sappington, Malinda Hendricks Green, Jennifer J. R. Endicott, and Susan C. Scott; (2) "Graduate Students' Perceptions of Teacher Effectiveness" by Sarah…

Green, Malinda Hendricks, Ed.

2010-01-01

329

In Light of Oklahoma SQ 755: How Islamic Law Antecedes in Solving Minorities’ Personal Law Issues?  

Microsoft Academic Search

In November 2010, a proposal was passed to amend Section 1 of Article VII of the Oklahoma State Constitution to prevent considering Sharia Law in making judicial decisions as well as international law. This amendment is being challenged in the court by Muslims and a temporary restraining order has been granted. In this paper, I will show, in contrast to

Mansour A. Alhaidary

2011-01-01

330

Reforms with Results: What Oklahoma Can Learn from Florida's K-12 Education Revolution  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Florida lawmakers began a comprehensive education reform effort in 1999 combining accountability, transparency, and parental choice with other far-reaching changes. In March 2010, the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) released new results showing just how successful Florida's reforms have been and how futile Oklahoma's efforts…

Ladner, Matthew

2010-01-01

331

Applied Logic for Hardware and Software Rex Page University of Oklahoma  

E-print Network

Applied Logic for Hardware and Software Rex Page ­ University of Oklahoma 1 Software Properties Applied Logic for Hardware and Software #12;Logic for Hardware and Software Rex Page ­ University elements in either sequence to the end #12;Logic for Hardware and Software Rex Page ­ University

Page, Rex L.

332

OKLAHOMA NATIVE AMERICAN YOUTH LANGUAGE FAIR Poster Art on the Language Theme  

E-print Network

posters must have students name, age/grade, tribe(s), language used, school/program, and title on backOKLAHOMA NATIVE AMERICAN YOUTH LANGUAGE FAIR Poster Art on the Language Theme Category Description Students are invited create a poster using the theme for the next year's Language Fair to create original

Oklahoma, University of

333

Depositional environments of upper Morrow sandstone in southeast Tracy and southeast Eva fields, Texas County, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Southeast Tracy field, Texas County, Oklahoma, produces gas from an upper Morrow sandstone. The field has produced over 33 bcf of gas and a negligible amount of oil from 12 wells, since its discovery in November 1958. Development drilling on the southern end of the Southeast Tracy field has extended its boundary to within 1.4 mi of the Southeast Eva

Harvey O. Vick

1987-01-01

334

Classroom Projects and Linguistic Laboratory for Non-English Speaking Children of Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The 5 most pressing educational needs of children of Mexican American migratory workers in Oklahoma are seen to be in (1) inadequate command of the English language, (2) nutritional deficiencies, (3) social adjustment problems, (4) proper physical hygiene, and (5) curricular planning and bilingual personnel. In an effort to meet these needs, the…

Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City.

335

Patterns of Communication and Interethnic Integration: A Study of American Indians in Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Interviews with 182 American Indians in Oklahoma examined the extent to which they were communicatively engaged within and outside the Indian community and the relationship between these two areas of communication and psychological and functional integration into mainstream society. Intraethnic and interethnic communication were positively…

Kim, Young Yun; Lujan, Philip; Dixon, Lynda Dee

1998-01-01

336

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Case Medlin  

E-print Network

),Scotchthistle(Onopordiumacanthium),distaffthistle (Carthamus lanatus), and Canada thistle (Cirsium arvense). These five thistles were introduced from Europe not allowed to flower, and no other infestations have been reported. Canada thistle (Cirsium arvense) (Figure in Oklahoma include bull thistle (Cirsium vulgare), musk thistle (Carduus nutans

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

337

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University William G. Ross  

E-print Network

William G. Ross Assistant Professor Extension Forestry Specialistst Introduction This is the second Oklahoma Division of Forestry office. Assuming one is ready to order seedlings, a number of questions must describes, is a seedling with only the stem and the root supplied to the landowner for planting. The major

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

338

Faculty Productivity. Report & Recommendations to the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A review of Oklahoma higher education faculty productivity at state supported institutions resulted in recommendations to enhance quality while working within policy goals. The review identified faculty workload as the central issue and found that studies consistently show that full-time faculty members work 50 to 65 hours a week with about half…

Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education, Oklahoma City.

339

Faculty Research, Publications, In-Service Activities at Northeastern Oklahoma State University.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Contained in this publication of Northeastern Oklahoma State University are faculty publications and research reports; abstracts fo faculty-student research projects; a list of individual and group inservice activities and research in progress by college department and divisions; and a bibliography of published articles, books, and creative works.…

Northeastern Oklahoma State Univ., Tahlequah.

340

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Terrence G. Bidwell  

E-print Network

of Research Tall Timbers Research Station Ronald J. Tyrl Professor Department of Botany Oklahoma has more than redcedar, become invasive because of the reduction in natural ecological processes such as fire. Whether. Bidwell Professor and Extension Specialist Rangeland Ecology and Management Ronald E. Masters Director

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

341

76 FR 70940 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Oklahoma; Infrastructure...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

... value exceeding 140.4 [micro]g/m\\3\\ since 2006 establish...Oklahoma do not exceed 140.4 [micro]g/m\\3\\. The PM 2...below this level (140.4 [micro]g/m\\3\\), and furthermore...related episodes to protect the environment and public health. Given...

2011-11-16

342

Delivering an Organizational Leadership PhD Program at a Distance: University of Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this chapter, the authors identify and review a number of key features in the successful development and maintenance of a PhD program delivered at a distance. The University of Oklahoma's PhD program in organizational leadership was developed in the early 1990s and delivered (primarily, but not completely) to military personnel and families…

Rodgers, Joseph Lee; Williams, T. H. Lee

2011-01-01

343

'Right-to-Work' Laws and Economic Development in Oklahoma. Briefing Paper.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The bulk of this position paper consists of statements in opposition to a September 2001 referendum on adopting 'right-to-work' (RTW) legislation in Oklahoma. The statements are by Joan Fitzgerald, William Sschweke, Raymond Hogler, Steven Shulman, Stephan Weiler, Ann Markusen, Robert G. Lynch, David R. Howell, James Galbraith, Colin Gordon, Wim…

Mishel, Lawrence, Ed.

344

NOTES ON FOODS OF GREAT HORNED OWLS (BUBO VIRGINIANUS) IN JACKSON COUNTY, OKLAHOMA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Prey species were identified from 169 pellets cast by a pair of great horned owls (Bubo virginianus) and their young in Jackson County, southwestern Oklahoma. Pellets were collected monthly between February and August, 1977. In decreasing order of importance, prey species were: cottontails (Sylvilagus spp.), cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus), and mice (Perognathus hispidus, Peromyscus spp., and Reithrodontomys spp.).

Jack D. Tyler; Jill F. Jensen

1981-01-01

345

The annual cycle and the cultural nexus of health care behavior among Oklahoma wheat farming families  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper explores the role of the 'annual cycle' in helping to account for the timing at which illness develops and\\/or visits are made to the family medicine clinic by members of farming families in the 'wheat belt' of northwestern Oklahoma. It is argued that the annual cycle, as one among many forms of temporal organization, can serve as a

Howard F. Stein

1982-01-01

346

OSU Human Resources 106 Whitehurst, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 (405) 744-5449 MILITARY LEAVE  

E-print Network

OSU Human Resources ­ 106 Whitehurst, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 ­ (405) 744-5449 MILITARY LEAVE Military leave is time off work for service in the military or to fulfill Reserve or National Guard duty of Attorney to make benefits changes on your behalf. Military Benefits While on Active Duty: If you

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

347

American Indian Women and Screening Mammography: Findings from a Qualitative Study in Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Breast cancer is an important public health issue within the American Indian (AI) community in Oklahoma; however, there is limited information to explain the low screening mammography rates among AI women. Purpose: To identify the motivational factors affecting an AI woman's decision to obtain a mammogram. Methods: Through the use of…

Tolma, Eleni; Batterton, Chasity; Hamm, Robert M.; Thompson, David; Engelman, Kimberly K.

2012-01-01

348

Fire History in the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma Michael C. Stambaugh & Richard P. Guyette &  

E-print Network

was reconstructed from 324 tree-ring dated fire scars occurring on 49 shortleaf pine (Pinus echinata) remnant treesFire History in the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma Michael C. Stambaugh & Richard P. Guyette & Joseph Marschall # Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013 Abstract The role of humans in historic fire

Stambaugh, Michael C

349

75 FR 56923 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Oklahoma; State Implementation Plan Revisions...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...www.regulations.gov (docket...the portion of the SIP revision...emissions as a precursor to ozone...portions of the February...Oklahoma PSD regulations necessary... X as a precursor for the 1997...emissions as a precursor for ozone...provisions of the Act and...applicable Federal regulations. 42...

2010-09-17

350

Integrating Remotely Sensed and Hydrologically Modeled ET for Better Water Resources Management in Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Evapotranspiration (ET) is a major component of the hydrologic cycle and links diverse disciplines such as those involved in water resource planning with agriculture, ecology and climate science. Oklahoma typically hosts irrigated agriculture, rainfed wetlands, and riparian vegetation. As demand for water increases, water managers need to know how much water is actually consumed. For the past decades, the primary

S. Khan; Y. Hong; B. Vieux; K. Crawford

2008-01-01

351

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Terrence G. Bidwell  

E-print Network

. Males appear darker than females. Eastern turkeys have tan tipped tail feathers while Rio Grandes Early records indicate that historically the eastern wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo silvestris) was found throughout the eastern two-thirds of Oklahoma and the Rio Grande turkey (Meleagris gallopavo

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

352

Three Year Oklahoma Annual Program Plan for Adult Education. Fiscal Years 1983-1985.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document contains the State plan designed to enable the State Department of Education to implement an adult education program in Oklahoma that will meet the critical educational needs of the adult population. Sections of the plan include purpose; state definitions; legal authority; audits, goal statement, administrative provisions;…

Oklahoma State Board of Education, Oklahoma City.

353

Africanized Honey Bees in Oklahoma History of the Africanized Honey Bee  

E-print Network

Africanized Honey Bees in Oklahoma History of the Africanized Honey Bee South America Africanized honey bees (AHB) were first imported to the Americas in 1956 by the prominent Brazilian geneticist breed of honey bees, which would be less defensive than the wild African bees but which would be more

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

354

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Frequently Used Forestry  

E-print Network

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources · Oklahoma State University NREM-5022 Specialist Jacques R. Drapeau Extension Program Associate area-sensitive species: A species of animal with public, private, and industrial foresters and other natural resources professionals, with the end result

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

355

Developments in the Oklahoma portion of the Arkoma basin, 1960 to 1965  

Microsoft Academic Search

The first natural-gas production in the Arkoma basin in eastern Oklahoma was near Poteau in Le Flore County in 1910. In the next few years several fields were discovered and developed as far west as Quinton in Pittsburg County. Production was from Hartshorne and upper Atoka sandstones at depths of less than 3000 ft. The first deep natural-gas production was

1966-01-01

356

ASSESSING SENTENCING REFORM: AN EX ANTE IMPACT ASSESSMENT OF THE OKLAHOMA TRUTH IN SENTENCING’ ACT  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oklahoma is currently involved in a reform of its criminal sentencing statutes. These reform efforts involve eliminating parole and the indeterminate sentencing structure of the present statutes and replacing these with a “truth in sentencing” framework. Under the proposed structure judges would retain discretion; however, the punishment ranges available to the sentencing court would be significantly restricted. Moreover, convicted offenders

John K. Cochran; Mitchell B. Chamlin; Michael A. Jones; William Chown

1997-01-01

357

Funding of Oklahoma Common Schools with a Texas Tax Plan: A Cautionary Note.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report examines the theoretical result of a change in the way Oklahoma could fund its common schools if it used a Texas tax system that relied heavily on an ad valorum tax structure or another taxation system. Using data from the 1999 school year, calculations of state aid for the more than 540 school districts were made for four scenarios:…

Hancock, Kenneth

358

THE MUSSELS (UNIONACEAE:BIVALVIA) OF OKLAHOMA-PART 3: LAMPSILINI  

Microsoft Academic Search

Keys and distribution data for the genera and species of the tribe Lampsilini known from Oklahoma are presented. Ptychobranchus occidentalis, Obliquaria reflexa, Cyprogenia aberti, Glebula rotundata, Ellipsaria lineolata, Carunculina glans, C. texasensis, C. parva, Ligumia nasuta, L. recta, Obovaria olivaria, O. jacksoniana, Plagiola triquetra, Truncilla truncata, T. macrodon, T. donaciformis, Leptodea amphichaena, L. leptodon, L. fragilis, L. laevissima, Proptera alata,

Branley Allan Branson

1984-01-01

359

The Vascular Flora of the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve, Osage County, Oklahoma  

E-print Network

The Vascular Flora of the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve, Osage County, Oklahoma Michael W. Palmer collected between 1992 and 2007 were examined to obtain a vouchered flora of the preserve. The known flora of the vascular flora of the TGPP, both to assist research and to serve as a baseline inventory in case management

Palmer, Michael W.

360

Early Monitoring and Long-Term College Success in Oklahoma. Issue Brief  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report describes the differences in early and long-term college outcomes for Oklahoma ACT-tested students between those who were monitored early with ACT Explore® and ACT Plan® and those who did not take these two assessments prior to taking the ACT® Test. Findings support that early monitoring of college and career readiness with ACT Explore…

ACT, Inc., 2013

2013-01-01

361

Developing a program of holistic evangelism for the First Baptist Church of Stillwater, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of the project was to train twenty or more members of the First Baptist Church of Stillwater, Oklahoma, to demonstrate a lifestyle of holistic evangelism. Holistic evangelism incorporates the use of prayer evangelism, servant evangelism, and personal evangelism. Accordingly, the participants were trained to do all three such forms of evangelism in the context of their neighborhoods and\\/or

J. Matthew Miles

2001-01-01

362

40 CFR 272.1851 - Oklahoma State-administered program: Final authorization.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Amendments to 40 CFR 63 FR 28556 5/26/98 Methods Innovation: SW-846 70 FR 3453870 FR 44150 6/14/058/1/05...EPA Region 6 and the State of Oklahoma, signed by the EPA Regional Administrator on November 11, 2009, is referenced as...

2011-07-01

363

77 FR 15273 - Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...273; and 40 CFR part 279. The DEQ is the lead Department to cooperate and share information...1236-1262 Oklahoma Statutes Shipments of Spend Lead-Acid January 8, 2010. Title 27A Section Batteries. (Checklist 222). 2-7-101 et...

2012-03-15

364

Ecological Investigation of the Invasive White Perch in Kaw Lake, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Following an unintentional introduction of white perch (Morone americana) into Kaw Reservoir, Oklahoma, questions were raised about the potential impacts this new spe- cies may have on resident sport fish populations. White perch, white crappie (Pomoxis annularis), and white bass (Morone chrysops) were collected from 2001 through 2004 using a variety of sampling techniques. White perch catch rates were low

Kurt E. Kuklinski

2007-01-01

365

The Effects of Technology Inclusion on School Bond Election Success in Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the effects of including technology funding in Oklahoma school district bond issues on their voting percentages and pass/fail rates during fiscal years 1995-96 through 1999-2000. Finds that percent of technology funding included in bond issue dollar amount was significantly related to positive voting percentages and predictive of issue…

Beckham, James; Maiden, Jeffrey

2003-01-01

366

A Survey of Nurse Training Needs in Oklahoma Health Care Institutions. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study was conducted to identify staffing patterns for nursing personnel in the health care institutions of Oklahoma in order to predict future needs for nursing education and training. Structured interviews with administrators and directors of nursing from eighteen hospitals and eighteen nursing homes were used to elicit demographic data…

Frazier, William D.

367

Thermal state of the Arkoma Basin and the Anadarko Basin, Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

One of the most fundamental physical processes that affects virtually all geologic phenomena in sedimentary basins is the flow of heat from the Earth's interiors. The Arkoma Basin and the Anadarko Basin, Oklahoma, are a prolific producer of both oil and natural gas. Both basins also have important geologic phenomena. Understanding the thermal state of the these basins is crucial to understanding the timing and extent of hydrocarbon generation, the genesis of Mississippi Valley-type ore deposits, and the origin of overpressures in the Anadarko Basin. In chapter one, heat flow and heat production in the Arkoma basin and Oklahoma Platform are discussed. Results of this study are not generally supportive of theories which invoke topographically driven regional groundwater flow from the Arkoma Basin in Late Pennsylvanian-Early Permian time (˜290 Ma) to explain the genesis of geologic phenomena. In chapter 2, different types of thermal conductivity temperature corrections that are commonly applied in terrestrial heat flow studies are evaluated. The invariance of the relative rankings with respect to rock porosity suggests the rankings may be valid with respect to in situ conditions. Chapter three addresses heat flow and thermal history of the Anadarko Basin and the western Oklahoma Platform. We found no evidence for heat flow to increase significantly from the Anadarko Basin in the south to the Oklahoma Platform to the north. In chapter four, overpressures in the Anadarko Basin, southwestern Oklahoma are discussed. Using scale analyses and a simple numerical model, we evaluated two endmember hypotheses (compaction disequilibrium and hydrocarbon generation) as possible causes of overpressuring. Geopressure models which invoke compaction disequilibrium do not appear to apply to the Anadarko Basin. The Anadarko Basin belongs to a group of cratonic basins which are tectonically quiescent and are characterized by the association of abnormal pressures with natural gas. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

Lee, Youngmin

1999-12-01

368

Changes in flow in the upper North Canadian river basin of western Oklahoma, pre-development to 2000  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water levels have declined in the southern part of the High Plains aquifer of the central USA since the mid-1960s in response to extensive irrigation development. The North Canadian River originates in western Oklahoma, and most of the basin is underlain by the High Plains aquifer. Average river flow in the headwaters near Guymon, Oklahoma, has decreased from about 0.9 m3/s before 1970 to near zero at present. Canton Lake, on the North Canadian River near Seiling, about 250 km downstream from Guymon, is a source of water supply for Oklahoma City. Precipitation data and streamflow data for gages upstream from Canton Lake were divided into an "early" period ending in 1971 and a "recent" period that begins in 1978. The early period represents conditions before ground-water levels had declined appreciably in the High Plains aquifer, and the recent period reflects the current condition, including the effects of storage reservoirs. Tests for trend and comparisons of flows between the early and recent periods show that the total annual volume of flow and the magnitudes of instantaneous annual peak discharges measured at most locations in the North Canadian River basin have decreased. Precipitation records for the area, however, show no corresponding changes. The decreases in average annual flow, expressed as a percentage of the average flows for the early period, ranged from 91 percent near Guymon to 37 percent near Canton Lake. A major contributing factor in the decreased flows appears to be the large declines in water levels in the High Plains aquifer.

Wahl, K. L.

2001-01-01

369

OUTCROP-BASED HIGH RESOLUTION GAMMA-RAY CHARACTERIZATION OF ARSENIC-BEARING LITHOFACIES IN THE PERMIAN GARBER SANDSTONE AND WELLINGTON FORMATION, CENTRAL OKLAHOMA AQUIFER (COA). CLEVELAND COUNTY, OKLAHOMA  

EPA Science Inventory

The COA supplies drinking water to a number of municipalities in central Oklahoma. Two major stratigraphic units in the COA, the Garber Sandstone and Wellington Formation, contain naturally occurring arsenic that exceeds government mandated drinking-water standards (EPA, 2001). ...

370

EXPLOITATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE IN HUNTON FORMATION, OKLAHOMA  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the work done so far on Hunton Formation in West Carney Field in Lincoln County, Oklahoma. West Carney Field produces oil and gas from the Hunton Formation. The field was developed starting in 1995. Some of the unique characteristics of the field include decreasing water oil ratio over time, decreasing gas-oil ratio at the beginning of production, inability to calculate oil reserves in the field based on log data, and sustained oil rates over long periods of time. To understand the unique characteristics of the field, an integrated evaluation was undertaken. Production data from the field were meticulously collected, and over forty wells were cored and logged to better understand the petrophysical and engineering characteristics. Based on the work done in this budget period so far, some of the preliminary conclusions can be listed as follows: (1) Based on PVT analysis, the field most likely contains volatile oil with bubble point close to initial reservoir pressure of 1,900 psia. (2) The initial oil in place, which is contact with existing wells, can be determined by newly developed material balance technique. The oil in place, which is in communication, is significantly less than determined by volumetric analysis, indicating heterogeneous nature of the reservoir. The oil in place, determined by material balance, is greater than determined by decline curve analysis. This difference may lead to additional locations for in fill wells. (3) The core and log evaluation indicates that the intermediate pores (porosity between 2 and 6 %) are very important in determining production potential of the reservoir. These intermediate size pores contain high oil saturation. (4) The limestone part of the reservoir, although low in porosity (mostly less than 6 %) is much more prolific in terms of oil production than the dolomite portion of the reservoir. The reason for this difference is the higher oil saturation in low porosity region. As the average porosity increases, the remaining oil saturation decreases. This is evident from log and core analysis. (5) Using a compositional simulator, we are able to reproduce the important reservoir characteristics by assuming a two layer model. One layer is high permeability region containing water and the other layer is low permeability region containing mostly oil. The results are further verified by using a dual porosity model. Assuming that most of the volatile oil is contained in the matrix and the water is contained in the fractures, we are able to reproduce important reservoir performance characteristics. (6) Evaluation of secondary mechanisms indicates that CO{sub 2} flooding is potentially a viable option if CO{sub 2} is available at reasonable price. We have conducted detailed simulation studies to verify the effectiveness of CO{sub 2} huff-n-puff process. We are in the process of conducting additional lab tests to verify the efficacy of the same displacement. (7) Another possibility of improving the oil recovery is to inject surfactants to change the near well bore wettability of the rock from oil wet to water wet. By changing the wettability, we may be able to retard the water flow and hence improve the oil recovery as a percentage of total fluid produced. If surfactant is reasonably priced, other possibility is also to use huff-n-puff process using surfactants. Laboratory experiments are promising, and additional investigation continues. (8) Preliminary economic evaluation indicates that vertical wells outperform horizontal wells. Future work in the project would include: (1) Build multi-well numerical model to reproduce overall reservoir performance rather than individual well performance. Special emphasis will be placed on hydrodynamic connectivity between wells. (2) Collect data from adjacent Hunton reservoirs to validate our understanding of what makes it a productive reservoir. (3) Develop statistical methods to rank various reservoirs in Hunton formation. This will allow us to evaluate other Hunton formations based on old well logs, and determine, apriori, if

Mohan Kelkar

2003-10-01

371

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Weed Control in Christmas tree plantations is one of  

E-print Network

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources · Oklahoma State University Weed Control.Weedscompeteforwater,nutrients,andlight andextendthetimerequiredtoproduceamarketabletree. Successful weed control helps the grower produce high.Finally, reductionofweedsreducesinterferencewithlaborandequip- mentmovementandimprovestheplantation'sappearance forconsumers. Methods of Weed Control Site

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

372

The Impact of Declining Groundwater Supply in the Northern High Plains of Texas and Oklahoma on Expenditures for Community Services  

E-print Network

TR- 71 1976 The Impact of the Declining Groundwater Supply in the Northern High Plains of Texas and Oklahoma on Expenditures for Community Services G.H. Williford B.R. Beattie R.D. Lacewell...TR- 71 1976 The Impact of the Declining Groundwater Supply in the Northern High Plains of Texas and Oklahoma on Expenditures for Community Services G.H. Williford B.R. Beattie R.D. Lacewell...

Williford, G. H.; Beattie, B. R.; Lacewell, R. D.

373

The depositional environment and reservoir characteristics of the Upper Morrow "A" sandstone, Postle field, Texas County, Oklahoma  

E-print Network

THE DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENT AND RESERVOIR CHARACTERISTICS OF THE UPPER MORROW 'A' SANDSTONE, POSTLE FIELD, TEXAS COUNTY, OKLAHOMA A Thesis by LYNN SUZANNE TRAVIS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1987 Major subject: Geology THE DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENT AND RESERVOIR CHARACTERISTICS OF THE UPPER MORROW 'A' SANDSTONE POSTLE FIELD, TEXAS COUNTY, OKLAHOMA A Thesis by LYNN...

Travis, Lynn Suzanne

2012-06-07

374

Atokan (Pennsylvanian) Berlin field: genesis of recycled detrital Dolomite Reservoir, deep Anadarko basin, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The Berlin gas field in Beckham County, Oklahoma, was discovered in 1977 and is the largest Atoka (Pennsylvanian) hydrocarbon accumulation in the Anadarko basin. It is an overpressured reservoir 15,000 ft (4,572 m) deep and occupies a surface area of 41 miS (106 kmS). The reservoir rock consists primarily of recycled, detrital Arbuckle Dolomite (Cambrian-Ordovician), and contains ultimate recoverable reserves of 242 to 362 bcf (6,850 to 10,250 X 10W mT). The deep Elk City structure consists of an upthrust block bounded by the late Atokan unconformity which is genetically associated with the Berlin fan delta. The present relief on the upthrust block and overlying anticlinal folds was formed during post-Atokan growth of the structure. The Berlin field provides a model of a large, localized detrital deposit derived from uplift and erosion of a prominent structure, and it is an example of the potential for large detrital stratigraphic traps around the perimeters of prominent structures containing crestal unconformities.

Lyday, J.R.

1985-11-01

375

Identification and evaluation of fluvial-dominated deltaic (Class I oil) reservoirs in Oklahoma. Final report, August 1998  

SciTech Connect

The Oklahoma Geological Survey (OGS), the Geo Information Systems department, and the School of Petroleum and Geological Engineering at the University of Oklahoma have engaged in a five-year program to identify and address Oklahoma`s oil recovery opportunities in fluvial-dominated deltaic (FDD) reservoirs. This program included a systematic and comprehensive collection and evaluation of information on all FDD oil reservoirs in Oklahoma and the recovery technologies that have been (or could be) applied to those reservoirs with commercial success. The execution of this project was approached in phases. The first phase began in January, 1993 and consisted of planning, play identification and analysis, data acquisition, database development, and computer systems design. By the middle of 1994, many of these tasks were completed or nearly finished including the identification of all FDD reservoirs in Oklahoma, data collection, and defining play boundaries. By early 1995, a preliminary workshop schedule had been developed for project implementation and technology transfer activities. Later in 1995, the play workshop and publication series was initiated with the Morrow and the Booch plays. Concurrent with the initiation of the workshop series was the opening of a computer user lab that was developed for use by the petroleum industry. Industry response to the facility initially was slow, but after the first year lab usage began to increase and is sustaining. The remaining six play workshops were completed through 1996 and 1997, with the project ending on December 31, 1997.

Banken, M.K.

1998-11-01

376

Induced earthquakes. Sharp increase in central Oklahoma seismicity since 2008 induced by massive wastewater injection.  

PubMed

Unconventional oil and gas production provides a rapidly growing energy source; however, high-production states in the United States, such as Oklahoma, face sharply rising numbers of earthquakes. Subsurface pressure data required to unequivocally link earthquakes to wastewater injection are rarely accessible. Here we use seismicity and hydrogeological models to show that fluid migration from high-rate disposal wells in Oklahoma is potentially responsible for the largest swarm. Earthquake hypocenters occur within disposal formations and upper basement, between 2- and 5-kilometer depth. The modeled fluid pressure perturbation propagates throughout the same depth range and tracks earthquakes to distances of 35 kilometers, with a triggering threshold of ~0.07 megapascals. Although thousands of disposal wells operate aseismically, four of the highest-rate wells are capable of inducing 20% of 2008 to 2013 central U.S. seismicity. PMID:24993347

Keranen, K M; Weingarten, M; Abers, G A; Bekins, B A; Ge, S

2014-07-25

377

Changes in chemical quality of the Arkansas River in Oklahoma and Arkansas (1946-52)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Systematic chemical quality-of-water investigations have been carried on in both Oklahoma and Arkansas by the Geological Survey in cooperation with State and Federal agencies during the past several years. Results of the Survey's quality-of-water investigations are usually published in the annual Water-Supply Papers. However, as the Geological Survey has made no sediment investigations in the Arkansas River Basin in Oklahoma and Arkansas, the published data do not include information on sediment concentrations or loads. This report attempts to summarize information collected to date in the Arkansas River Basin of the two States, and to show as clearly as possible from present information how the chemical quality of water in the Arkansas River changes downstream from the Oklahoma-Kansas State line to its confluence with the Mississippi River, and how it is affected by tributary inflows. Additional information is being collected and further studies are planned. Hence, the conclusions reached herein may be modified by more adequate information at a later date. The Arkansas River enters Oklahoma near Newkirk on the northern boundary just east of the 97th meridian, crosses the State in a general southeasterly direction flowing past Tulsa, enters Arkansas at its western boundary north of the 35th parallel near Fort Smith, still flowing in a general southeasterly direction past Little Rock near the center of the State, and empties into the Mississippi River east of Dumas. The Arkansas River is subject to many types of pollution downstream from the Oklahoma-Kansas State line, and its inferior quality along with an erratic flow pattern has caused it to be largely abandoned as a source of municipal and industrial water supply. At the present time, the Arkansas River is not directly used as a source of public supply in any part of the basin in either Oklahoma or Arkansas. In general, the river water increases in chemical concentration downstream from the Oklahoma-Kansas State line to Tulsa, due mainly to tributary inflow from the Salt Fork Arkansas River and the Cimarron River, both streams being sources of large amounts of both natural and artificial pollution. A decrease in chemical concentration is noted downstream from Tulsa due to tributary inflow from the Verdigris, Neosho, and Illinois rivers with an increase in chemical concentration then noted due to tributary inflow from the Canadian River which is largely artificial pollution. A steady decrease in concentration is then noted as the river progresses through Arkansas to the Mississippi River, as all major tributaries below the Canadian River have a dilution effect upon the chemical concentration of the Arkansas River water. Proposals for storage and regulating reservoirs on the Arkansas River in both Oklahoma and Arkansas have been made by the Corps of Engineers and others. Additional proposals are being considered in the present Arkansas-White-Red River Basin Inter-Agency Committee studies. If constructed, these reservoirs will provide an opportunity for control of flow and beneficial use of Arkansas River water, both at and downstream from these sites. Impoundment alone will greatly reduce the extremes in water quality, and by reasonable control of municipal and industrial wastes, the water would be comparable in quality to many existing basin municipal and industrial supplies. (available as photostat copy only)

Dover, T.B.; Geurin, J.W.

1953-01-01

378

Determination of reserves of methane from coal beds for use in rural communities in eastern Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Coal-bed methane has been classified as an unconventional source of gas by the U.S. Congress, and it has no Federal price limit. Thus, it is attracting considerable interest concerning its reserves, potential recovery, and use. Previous work in Oklahoma showed that approx. 1.3 tcf of identified coal-bed-methane resources is present in Haskell and Le Flore counties. Thus, the present study was undertaken to determine the feasibility of using methane from coal beds in rural areas in East Oklahoma, and to recommend general locations in which to drill from 500 to 1,800 ft deep to selected coal beds for methane production. Coal-bed-methane reserves have been identified in the Hartshorne coals (Desmoinesian) in the vicinities of Spiro and Poteau in Le Flore County and of Keota in Haskell County, all in the Arkoma Basin. These areas are recommended for exploratory drilling and production of coal-bed methane. 21 references.

Friedman, S.A.

1981-01-01

379

University of Oklahoma Employee's Report of Injury*-To be completed by the employee in black ink. Must be legible and completed in full. Incomplete forms will be returned to your department. Retain a copy of this report and give  

E-print Network

to and including termination. Under the Workers' Compensation Act, and injured employee of the UniversityUniversity of Oklahoma Employee's Report of Injury*- To be completed by the employee in black ink: Home Address: Street: City: State: Zip: Home Phone: Date of Birth SSN: Employee ID Marital Status

Oklahoma, University of

380

Spatial patterns of ice storm disturbance in the forested landscape of Ouachita Mountains, Arkansas and Oklahoma  

E-print Network

SPATIAL PATTERNS OF ICE STORM DISTURBANCE IN THE FORESTED LANDSCAPE OF OUACHITA MOUNTAINS, ARKANSAS AND OKLAHOMA A Thesis by RACHEL E. ISAACS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... by RACHEL E. ISAACS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved by: Chair of Committee, Charles W. Lafon Committee Members, Andrew...

Isaacs, Rachel E.

2009-05-15

381

Measurement of soil moisture trends with airborne scatterometers. [Guymon, Oklahoma and Dalhart, Texas  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In an effort to investigate aircraft multisensor responses to soil moisture and vegetation in agricultural fields, an intensive ground sampling program was conducted in Guymon, Oklahoma and Dalhart, Texas in conjunction with aircraft data collected for visible/infrared and passive and active microwave systems. Field selections, sampling techniques, data processing, and the aircraft schedule are discussed for both sites. Field notes are included along with final (normalized and corrected) data sets.

Jones, C. L.; Mcfarland, M. J.; Rosethal, W. D.; Theis, S. W. (principal investigators)

1982-01-01

382

Drought adaptation in rural eastern Oklahoma in the 1930s: lessons for climate change adaptation research  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the mid-1930s, eastern Oklahoma, USA, suffered an unusually harsh mixture of droughts and extreme rainfall events that\\u000a led to widespread crop failure over several years. These climatic conditions coincided with low commodity prices, agricultural\\u000a restructuring and general economic collapse, creating tremendous hardship in rural and agriculturally dependent areas. Using\\u000a a previously developed typology of agricultural adaptation, this paper reports

Robert McLeman; Dick Mayo; Earl Strebeck; Barry Smit

2008-01-01

383

Electric and kinematic structure of the Oklahoma mesoscale convective system of 7 June 1989  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Balloon soundings of electric field in Oklahoma mesoscale convective systems (MCS) were obtained by the National Severe Storms Laboratory in the spring of 1989. This study focuses on a sounding made in the rearward edge of an MCS stratiform rain area on 7 June 1989. Data from Doppler radars, a lightning ground-strike location system, satellite, and other sources is used to relate the mesoscale attributes of the MCS to the observed electric-field profile.

Hunter, Steven M.; Schur, Terry J.; Marshall, Thomas C.; Rust, W. D.

1992-01-01

384

Digital data sets of depth-duration frequency of precipitation for Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

These geospatial data sets were produced as part of a regional precipitation frequency analysis for Oklahoma. The data sets consist of surface grids of precipitation depths for seven frequencies (expressed as recurrence intervals of 2-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, 100-, and 500-years) and 12 durations (15-, 30-, and 60-minutes; 1-, 2-, 3-, 6-, 12-, and 24-hours; and 1-, 3-, and 7-days). Eighty-four depth-duration-frequency surfaces were produced from precipitation-station data. Precipitation-station data from which the surfaces were interpolated and contour lines derived from each surface also are included. Contour intervals vary from 0.05 to 0.5 inch. Data were used from precipitation gage stations with at least 10 years of record within Oklahoma and a zone extending about 50 kilometers into bordering states. Three different rain gage networks provided the data (15-minute, 1-hour, and 1-day). Precipitation annual maxima (depths) were determined from the station data for each duration for 110 15-minute, 141 hourly, and 413 daily stations. Statistical methods were used to estimate precipitation depths for each duration-frequency at each station. These station depth-duration-frequency estimates were interpolated to produce continuous grids with grid-cell spacing of 2,000 meters. Contour lines derived from these surfaces (grids) were used to produce the maps in the 'Depth-Duration Frequency of Precipitation for Oklahoma,' by R.L. Tortorelli, Alan Rea, and W.H. Asquith, U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 99-4232. The geospatial data sets are presented in digital form for use with geographic information systems. These geospatial data sets may be used to determine an interpolated value of depth-duration-frequency of precipitation for any point in Oklahoma.

Rea, Alan; Tortorelli, Robert L.

1999-01-01

385

Predictability of littoral-zone fish communities through ontogeny in Lake Texoma, Oklahoma-Texas, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Synopsis  We sampled larval, juvenile and adult fishes from littoral-zone areas of a large reservoir (Lake Texoma, Oklahoma-Texas) (1) to characterize environmental factors that influenced fish community structure, (2) to examine how consistent fish–environment relationships were through ontogeny (i.e., larval vs. juvenile and adult), and (3) to measure the concordance of larval communities sampled during spring to juvenile and adult communities

Michael A. Eggleton; Raul Ramirez; Chad W. Hargrave; Keith B. Gido; Jason R. Masoner; Gary D. Schnell; William J. Matthews

2005-01-01

386

Baseline Limnology of Boomer Lake, Oklahoma, a Recently Reexcavated Urban Reservoir  

Microsoft Academic Search

Physicochemical and botanical limnological characteristics were determined for Boomer Lake, Oklahoma, a recently reexcavated 70 year old urban impoundment. The lake is alkaline (median pH 8.1, range 6.9—8.8) and extremely turbid with suspended clay (median Secchi depths 0.35 m at the shallow upper reach and 0.6 m near the dam, with vertical attenuation coefficients of 1.4—4.7 m), although it is

William J. Henley

1998-01-01

387

Detection of Trichinella murrelli in coyotes ( Canis latrans) from Oklahoma and North Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

We determined the prevalence and mean intensity of Trichinella sp. infection in coyotes from six counties in Oklahoma and one in northern Texas. Tongues from 77 coyotes were examined using histology and artificial tissue digestion. Histological examination showed a prevalence of 3.9% (3 of 77) whereas the prevalence was 6.5% (5 of 77) based on artificial digestion of 5.0g of

Mason V. Reichard; Kathryn E. Tiernan; Kelsey L. Paras; Maria Interisano; Michael H. Reiskind; Roger J. Panciera; Edoardo Pozio

2011-01-01

388

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF OKLAHOMA ABANDONED DRILLING AND PRODUCTION SITES AND ASSOCIATED PUBLIC EDUCATION/OUTREACH ACTIVITIES  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy has participated with the Oklahoma Energy Resource Board (OERB) since 1995 by providing grant funding for on-going work in both environmental assessment of abandoned oilfield exploration and production sites and associated public education/outreach activities. The OERB, a state agency created in 1993 by the Oklahoma legislature, administers programs funded by an assessment of one tenth of one percent on all oil and natural gas produced and sold in the state of Oklahoma. Approximately one half of the funds are used to assess and remediate abandoned oilfield sites and the other half are being used to educate about the importance of the oil and natural gas industry and OERB's environmental efforts. Financial participation through grant funding by the U.S. D.O.E. has been $200,000 annually which represents approximately 3 percent of OERB's private funding. Most of OERB's revenues come from an assessment of 1/10th of 1% on the sale of crude and natural gas in Oklahoma. The assessment is considered voluntary in that any interest owner may ask for a refund annually of their contributions to the fund. On average, 95% of the assessment dollars have remained with OERB, which shows tremendous support by the industry. This Final Report summarizes the progress of the three year grant. The purpose of this three-year project was to continue the progress of the OERB to accomplish its environmental and educational objectives and transfer information learned to other organizations and producing states in the industry.

Mike Terry

2002-03-01

389

Life History and Secondary Production of Caenis latipennis (Ephemeroptera: Caenidae) in Honey Creek, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The life history and production of Caenis latipennis Banks (Ephemeroptera: Caenidae) is described from Honey Creek, Oklahoma. Emergence behavior, fecundity, voltinism, and secondary production were analyzed.C.latipennis had an extended emergence with Þve peaks. Females emerged, molted, mated, and oviposited in an estimated 37 min. Mean fecundity was 888.4 291.9 eggs per individual (range, 239 Ð1,576). Adult female head capsule widths

Jason M. Taylor; James H. Kennedy

2006-01-01

390

Linear features determined from Landsat imagery in the Texas and Oklahoma panhandles  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A map (scale 1:500,000) shows the linear features determined from Landsat imagery in the Texas and Oklahoma panhandles. The linear features, sometimes called linear trends or lineaments, are not identified as to type or origin. Most probably represent fractures or fracture zones, which may affect the movement of water or other fluids through rocks. The linear features are classified as to length--less than 30 mi/mg and more than 30 mi/mg. (USGS)

Cooley, M.E.

1984-01-01

391

Discrete and Continuous Gravity Studies of the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer, South-Central Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present the results of a high-resolution gravity study using traditional and novel observational methods focused on the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer (ASA), a major ground-water system in Oklahoma that is experiencing demand from distant regions. We have partnered with the National Park Service to conduct gravity surveys of prominent faults near the Chickasaw National Recreation Area. These structures, created during late

D. Scheirer; A. Hosford Scheirer; R. Herr

2005-01-01

392

Determination of reserves of methane from coal beds for use in rural communities in eastern Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Coal-bed methane has been classified as an unconventional source of gas by the U.S. Congress, and it has no Federal price limit. Thus, it is attracting considerable interest concerning its reserves, potential recovery, and use. Previous work in Oklahoma showed that approx. 1.3 tcf of identified coal-bed-methane resources is present in Haskell and Le Flore counties. Thus, the present study

1981-01-01

393

Atokan (Pennsylvanian) Berlin field: genesis of recycled detrital dolomite reservoir, deep Anadarko Basin, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The Berlin gas field in Beckham County, Oklahoma, was discovered in 1977 and is the largest Atoka (Pennsylvanian) hydrocarbon accumulation in the Anadarko basin. It is an overpressured reservoir 15,000 ft (4572 m) deep and occupies a surface area of 41 mi/sup 2/ (106 km/sup 2/). The reservoir rock consists primarily of recycled, detrital Arbuckle Dolomite (Cambrian-Ordovician), and contains ultimate recoverable reserves of 242 to 362 bcf (6850 to 10,250 x 10/sup 6/ m/sup 3/). The Arbuckle Dolomite and limited exposures of Precambrian granite rocks were eroded from the Amarillo-Wichita mountains during the Atokan and were deposited as a terrigenous, sandy dolomite clastic wedge adjacent to the uplift. During the late Atokan, the Elk City structure was uplifted and subaerially exposed in the vicinity of the northern limit of the dolomite clastic wedge. The detrital dolomite on the structure was concurrently eroded and recycled northward as a shallow marine fan delta. Subsequent recrystallization destroyed the detrital depositional texture and created the present intercrystalline porosity. The deep Elk City structure consists of an upthrust block bounded by the late Atokan unconformity which is genetically associated with the Berlin fan delta. The present relief on the upthrust block and overlying anticlinal folds was formed during post-Atokan growth of the structure. The Berlin field provides a model of a large, localized detrital deposit derived from uplift and erosion of a prominent structure, and it is an example of the potential for large detrital stratigraphic traps around the perimeters of prominent structures containing crestal unconformities. 14 figures, 1 table.

Lyday, J.R.

1985-11-01

394

Iron-rich Oklahoma clays as a natural source of chromium in monitoring wells.  

PubMed

Water samples, drawn from groundwater monitoring wells located southeast of Oklahoma City, OK, were found to contain elevated concentrations of total chromium with an apparent source localized to the area surrounding each well. Since these monitoring wells are located in areas with no historic chromium usage, industrial sources of chromium were ruled out. Water testing was performed on twelve monitoring wells in the area that historically had elevated total chromium concentrations ranging from 10-4900 micrograms per litre. Filtered water samples were found to be free of chromium contamination, indicating that the source of the chromium is the suspended solids. Analysis of these solids by acid digestion and a sequential extraction technique revealed that the chromium was primarily associated with iron-containing solids. X-ray diffraction identified goethite, an iron oxide hydroxide, as the dominant iron-containing phase in the suspended solids. The mineralogy in this region is dominated by interbedded red-bed sandstone and mudstone whose mineral content includes mixed-layer illite-smectite, hematite, goethite, gypsum and dolomite. Elemental analysis of soil samples collected as a function of depth in the locale of the monitoring wells indicated that the iron rich clays contain a natural source of chromium. The elevated levels of total chromium are most likely due to the dissolution of silica and alumina from the chromium containing iron clays in the basic well water, resulting in the release of fine suspended solids that naturally have high chromium concentrations. These results should be applicable to other areas containing iron-rich clays. PMID:22027925

Scott, Dane; Apblett, Allen; Materer, Nicholas F

2011-12-01

395

The General Catalog was produced by the University of Oklahoma Office of Academic Bulletins, Judy K. Cain, Editor, assisted by Jean Ware, Manager of  

E-print Network

by Edward Buntario, graphic artist, in collaboration with Judy K. Cain. The cover design is generously. This publication, printed by University Printing Services in April 2004, is issued by The University of Oklahoma the period for which the Catalog is in effect. The University of Oklahoma reserves the right at all times

Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

396

Identification and evaluation of fluvial-dominated deltaic (class 1 oil) reservoirs in Oklahoma. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Oklahoma Geological Survey (OGS), the Geological Information Systems department, and the School of Petroleum and Geological Engineering at the University of Oklahoma are engaging in a program to identify and address Oklahoma`s oil recovery opportunities in fluvial-dominated deltaic (FDD) reservoirs. This program includes the systematic and comprehensive collection and evaluation of information on all of Oklahoma`s FDD reservoirs and the recovery technologies that have been (or could be) applied to those reservoirs with commercial success. This data collection and evaluation effort will be the foundation for an aggressive, multifaceted technology transfer program that is designed to support all of Oklahoma`s oil industry, with particular emphasis on smaller companies and independent operators in their attempts to maximize the economic producibility of FDD reservoirs. Specifically, this project will identify all FDD oil reservoirs in the State; group those reservoirs into plays that have similar depositional and subsequent geologic histories; collect, organize and analyze all available data; conduct characterization and simulation studies on selected reservoirs in each play; and implement a technology transfer program targeted to the operators of FDD reservoirs to sustain the life expectancy of existing wells with the ultimate objective of increasing oil recovery.

Mankin, C.J. [Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States); Banken, M.K. [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States)

1994-04-28

397

Identification and evaluation of fluvial-dominated deltaic (Class I oil) reservoirs in Oklahoma. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1993--June 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Oklahoma Geological Survey (OGS), the Geological Information Systems department, and the School of Petroleum and Geological Engineering at the University of Oklahoma are engaging in a program to identify and address Oklahoma`s oil recovery opportunities in fluvial-dominated deltaic (FDD) reservoirs. This program includes the systematic and comprehensive collection and evaluation of information on all of Oklahoma`s FDD reservoirs and the recovery-technologies that have been (or could be) applied to those reservoirs with commercial success. This data collection and evaluation effort will be the foundation for an aggressive, multifaceted technology transfer program that is designed to support all of Oklahoma`s oil industry, with particular emphasis on smaller companies and independent operators in their attempts to maximize the economic producibility of FDD reservoirs. Specifically, this project will identify all FDD oil reservoirs in the State; group those reservoirs into plays that have similar depositional and subsequent geologic histories; collect, organize and analyze all available data; conduct characterization and simulation studies on selected reservoirs in each play; and implement a technology transfer program targeted to the operators of FDD reservoirs to sustain the life expectancy of existing wells with the ultimate objective of increasing oil recovery.

Mankin, G.J. [Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States); Banken, M.K. [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States)

1993-09-28

398

Identification and evaluation of fluvial-dominated deltaic (Class 1 oil) reservoirs in Oklahoma. Yearly technical progress report, January 1--December 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Oklahoma Geological Survey and the University of Oklahoma are engaged in a five-year program to identify and address Oklahoma`s oil recovery opportunities in fluvial-dominated deltaic (FDD) reservoirs. This program includes the systematic and comprehensive collection, evaluation, and distribution of information on all of Oklahoma`s FDD oil reservoirs and the recovery technologies that can be applied to those reservoirs with commercial success. To date, the lead geologists have defined the initial geographic extents of Oklahoma`s FDD plays, and compiled known information about those plays. Nine plays have been defined, all of them Pennsylvanian in age and most from the Cherokee Group. A bibliographic database has been developed to record the literature sources and their related plays. Trend maps are being developed to identify the FDD portions of the relevant reservoirs, through accessing current production databases and through compiling the literature results. A reservoir database system also has been developed, to record specific reservoir data elements that are identified through the literature, and through public and private data sources. The project team is working with the Oklahoma Nomenclature Committee of the Mid-Continent Oil and Gas Association to update oil field boundary definitions in the project area. Also, team members are working with several private companies to develop demonstration reservoirs for the reservoir characterization and simulation activities. All of the information gathered through these efforts will be transferred to the Oklahoma petroleum industry through a series of publications and workshops. Additionally, plans are being developed, and hardware and software resources are being acquired, in preparation for the opening of a publicly-accessible computer users laboratory, one component of the technology transfer program.

Mankin, C.J. [Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States)] [Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States); Banken, M.K. [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States)] [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States)

1995-11-21

399

Late Mississippian productoid brachiopods Inflatia, Keokukia, and Adairia, Ozark region of Oklahoma and Arkansas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Specimens of the Late Mississippian productoid genera Inflatia and Keokukia from northeastern Oklahoma and northwestern Arkansas, collected from the Boone and "Moorefield' formations, Hindsville Limestone, and Fayetteville Shale, display morphologic similarities and differences that delineate species and determine their biostratigraphic ranges. Generic assignments are based primarily on internal characters. Systematic descriptions include seven species of Inflatia Muir-Wood and Cooper. Also proposed and described is a new genus, Adairia, with its type species Productus (Marginifera) adairensis Drake. All these species of Inflatia, Keokukia and Adairia have biostratigraphically restricted ranges within the Meramecian and Chesterian sequence in the Ozark region. -from Authors

Gordon, M., Jr.; Henry, T.W.; Treworgy, J.D.

1993-01-01

400

Last Glacial Maximum Development of Parna Dunes in Panhandle Oklahoma, USA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Though dunefields are a ubiquitous feature of the North American Great Plains, those studied to date have consisted primarily of sand grains. In Beaver County of the Oklahoma panhandle, however, upland dune forms consist of sand-sized aggregates of silt and clay. These aptly named parna dunes occur in two swarms, range in height from 10-15 m, and have asymmetrical dome morphologies with approximate north-south dune orientations. Despite their morphological similarities to sand dunes of the region, their origin and evolution is unknown. Documenting parna dune formation in the Oklahoma panhandle will help improve our understanding of prehistoric landscape instability and climate change, particularly in the central Great Plains where such records are limited. Panhandle parna dunes are typified by Blue Mound, our best documented parna dune thus far. Coring has documented a basal paleosol buried at a depth equivalent to the surrounding landscape—14C ages from this soil indicate its formation about 25-21 ka. The paleosol is a hydric Mollisol with a pronounced C3 isotopic signature reflecting hydric plant communities, rather than the regionally dominated C4 prairie vegetation. Hydric soils are associated with many of the playas on the surrounding landscape today, which suggests that they may have been more prevalent during the LGM. The overlying 8-10 m of parna is low in organic C and high in calcite, with indications of up to ten major episodes of sediment flux, which are documented with magnetic, isotope, soil-stratigraphic, particle-size, and color data. Near-surface luminescence (OSL) ages from Blue Mound are similar to the 14C ages from the basal paleosol, indicating rapid dune construction, with little or no Holocene accumulation of sediment. Marine isotope stage (MIS) 3 loess records indicate that upland areas of the region were relatively stable with attendant widespread pedogenesis prior to development of the parna dunes. At the onset of the LGM, however, the landscape destabilized, and aeolian processes dominated. Peoria Loess began accumulating throughout parts of Oklahoma and much of Kansas, Nebraska, and beyond, until landscape stabilization was re-attained about 14-13 ka. Our chronological and geomorphic data suggest that parna dune construction in the Oklahoma panhandle was the result of strong, northerly winds, which precipitated aeolian activity at the beginning of MIS 2. Furthermore, these features appear to be more analogous to the regional loess record than the sand dune activation record, and, with more research, may prove to be a reliable record of late-Quaternary landscape change in the central Great Plains.

Johnson, W. C.; Halfen, A. F.; McGowen, S.; Carter, B.; Fine, S.; Bement, L. C.; Simms, A. R.

2012-12-01

401

Assessment of factors that predict physical activity among Oklahoma clergy: a theory of planned behavior approach.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to examine predictors of physical activity among clergy members in Oklahoma, using the theory of planned behavior. A 51-item valid and reliable instrument, measuring theory of planned behavior constructs and physical activity, was developed and administered to 141 clergy members. Results indicated that the majority of those surveyed were white (93%), college educated (97%), and overweight or obese (84%). Stepwise multiple regression analysis found that intentions accounted for 13.8% of the variance of physical activity whereas attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control accounted for 54.8% of the variance of intention. Implications for intervention development are discussed. PMID:23718955

Gwin, Shannon; Taylor, E Laurette; Branscum, Paul; Hofford, Craig

2013-01-01

402

Low-cost digital image processing at the University of Oklahoma  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Computer assisted instruction in remote sensing at the University of Oklahoma involves two separate approaches and is dependent upon initial preprocessing of a LANDSAT computer compatible tape using software developed for an IBM 370/158 computer. In-house generated preprocessing algorithms permits students or researchers to select a subset of a LANDSAT scene for subsequent analysis using either general purpose statistical packages or color graphic image processing software developed for Apple II microcomputers. Procedures for preprocessing the data and image analysis using either of the two approaches for low-cost LANDSAT data processing are described.

Harrington, J. A., Jr.

1981-01-01

403

Variational optimization analysis of the 8 June 1974 severe storms in Oklahoma  

E-print Network

states that for squall line formation to take place, cold air advection in the middle or high levels of the trop- osphere is essential. One feature that seems to be important in all severe-storm en- vironments in Oklahoma is the presence of dry air... kilometers. Miller (1972) stresses the importance of the intrusion of dry air above the moist Gulf of Mexico air as a mechanism of squall-line development. He also states that the initial outbreak of severe thund rstorms is in the area of maximum dry...

Liles, Charlie A

2012-06-07

404

Oklahoma prosthesis: resection of tumor of clavicle and chest wall reconstructed with a custom composite graft.  

PubMed

Tumors involving the clavicle by primary or metastatic growth may require clavicular resection often with rib resection. The resulting cosmetic and functional impairment of clavicular resection may be significant with a sloped appearing shoulder girdle and chronically impaired movement of the upper extremity. We report a 48-year-old woman presenting with a bulky metastatic renal cell mass of her left clavicle extending to the chest wall. We report en-bloc clavilculectomy and chest wall resection with a novel method of reconstruction using a single methyl methacrylate and prolene composite prosthesis in a configuration resembling the state of Oklahoma. PMID:16798248

Vartanian, Shant M; Colaco, Shanthi; Orloff, Lisa E; Theodore, Pierre R

2006-07-01

405

SOIL SURVEY OF PAYNE COUNTY, OKLAHOMA OSURR Section 4  

E-print Network

Source of Map: Natural Resources Conservation Service Web Soil Survey URL: http: 2/20/1995; 2/21/1995 MAP LEGEND Soil Map Units Cities Detailed Counties Detailed States Interstate Highways Roads Rails Water Hydrography Oceans Escarpment, bedrock Escarpment, non-bedrock Gulley Levee

Ghajar, Afshin J.

406

LittleRockCreek SOIL SURVEY OF ATOKA COUNTY, OKLAHOMA  

E-print Network

Source of Map: Natural Resources Conservation Service Web Soil Survey URL: http: 3/8/1995; 3/10/1995 MAP LEGEND Soil Map Units Cities Detailed Counties Detailed States Interstate Highways Roads Rails Water Hydrography Oceans Escarpment, bedrock Escarpment, non-bedrock Gulley Levee

Ghajar, Afshin J.

407

SOIL SURVEY OF PAYNE COUNTY, OKLAHOMA OSURR Section 17  

E-print Network

Map Units Cities Detailed Counties Detailed States Interstate Highways Roads Rails Water Hydrography Conservation Service Web Soil Survey URL: http://websoilsurvey.nrcs.usda.gov Coordinate System: UTM Zone 14 Miscellaneous Water Rock Outcrop Saline Spot Sandy Spot Slide or Slip Sinkhole Sodic Spot Spoil Area Stony Spot

Ghajar, Afshin J.

408

Department of Legal Assistant Education University of Oklahoma Law Center  

E-print Network

only in accordance with the 1968 Civil Rights Act as amended. United States citizens only) Which group assistants cannot give legal advice, accept cases, set legal fees, represent clients in court, or perform any Name: Last 4 digits of Social Security No. (Last) (First) (Middle) Mailing Address: City: State: Zip

Oklahoma, University of

409

Effects of Occupational Education Programs Offered by the Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education, Skills Centers Division, on the Recidivism Rate of Selected Groups of Released Offenders in Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Scope and Method of Study: The purpose of this study was to describe the effects of career and technical education (CTE) on recidivism for offenders enrolled in the Oklahoma Department of Corrections CareerTech Skills Center School Systems (SCSS) programs. Specifically, the study mined existing CareerTech and ODOC data to: (a) compare the…

Ely, Joseph William

2012-01-01

410

I have been advised that the University of Oklahoma Staff Handbook is available on the University of Oklahoma web page at http://hr.ou.edu/handbook/default.asp.  

E-print Network

accompany the ePAF (electronic personnel action form). This document is not an application for employment. The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center is an equal opportunity affirmative action employer maintains cultural identification through tribal affiliation or community attachment. VETERAN STATUS Mark

Oklahoma, University of

411

I have been advised that the University of Oklahoma Staff Handbook is available on the University of Oklahoma web page at http://hr.ou.edu/handbook/default.asp.  

E-print Network

accompany the ePAF (electronic personnel action form). This document is not an application for employment. The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center is an equal opportunity affirmative action employer affiliation or community attachment. VETERAN STATUS Mark all that apply: BY SIGNING THIS DOCUMENT, I affirm

Oklahoma, University of

412

Tracing the flow: Climate change actor-networks in Oklahoma secondary science education  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This dissertation reports research about the translation of climate change in science education. Public controversies about climate change education raises questions about the lived experiences of teachers in Oklahoma and the role of science education in increasing public understanding. A mixed methods research design included rhetorical analysis of climate change denial media, key informant interviews with science education stakeholders, and a survey questionnaire of secondary science teachers. Final analysis was further informed by archival research and supplemented by participant observation in state-wide meetings and science teacher workshops. The results are organized into three distinct manuscripts intended for publication across the fields of communication, science education, and climate science. As a whole the dissertation answers the research question, how does manufactured scientific controversy about climate change present specific challenges and characterize negotiations in secondary science education in Oklahoma? Taken together, the findings suggest that manufactured controversy about climate change introduces a logic of non-problematicity, challenges science education policy making, and undermines scientific consensus about global warming.

Colston, Nicole Marie

413

Outbreak of meningococcal disease associated with an elementary school -- Oklahoma, March 2010.  

PubMed

During March 10-31, 2010, the Oklahoma State Department of Health (OSDH) investigated an outbreak of meningococcal (Neisseria meningitidis) disease involving a consolidated school district of 1,850 students in rural northeastern Oklahoma. An OSDH field investigation team and the Rogers County Health Department (RCHD) established operations at the affected elementary school as soon as the outbreak was recognized. Five cases of meningococcal disease (including one probable case) were identified among four elementary school students and one high school student. Two students died; two recovered fully, and one survivor required amputation of all four limbs and facial reconstruction. All N. meningitidis isolates were serogroup C with the same multilocus sequence type and an indistinguishable pulsed-field gel electrophoresis pattern. To interrupt the outbreak, mass vaccination and chemoprophylaxis clinics were conducted in the population at risk; 1,459 vaccinations and 1,063 courses of antibiotics were administered. Children eligible for the Vaccines for Children (VFC) program received 1,092 of the vaccine doses, demonstrating that VFC is a feasible funding source for vaccine during an outbreak response. PMID:22475849

2012-04-01

414

Three-dimensional geologic model of the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer, south-central Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer of south-central Oklahoma encompasses more than 850 square kilometers and is the principal water resource for south-central Oklahoma. Rock units comprising the aquifer are characterized by limestone, dolomite, and sandstones assigned to two lower Paleozoic units: the Arbuckle and Simpson Groups. Also considered to be part of the aquifer is the underlying Cambrian-age Timbered Hills Group that contains limestone and sandstone. The highly faulted and fractured nature of the Arbuckle-Simpson units and the variable thickness (600 to 2,750 meters) increases the complexity in determining the subsurface geologic framework of this aquifer. A three-dimensional EarthVision (Trademark) geologic framework model was constructed to quantify the geometric relationships of the rock units of the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer in the Hunton anticline area. This 3-D EarthVision (Trademark) geologic framework model incorporates 54 faults and four modeled units: basement, Arbuckle-Timbered Hills Group, Simpson Group, and post-Simpson. Primary data used to define the model's 54 faults and four modeled surfaces were obtained from geophysical logs, cores, and cuttings from 126 water and petroleum wells. The 3-D framework model both depicts the volumetric extent of the aquifer and provides the stratigraphic layer thickness and elevation data used to construct a MODFLOW version 2000 regional groundwater-flow model.

Faith, Jason R.; Blome, Charles D.; Pantea, Michael P.; Puckette, James O.; Halihan, Todd; Osborn, Noel; Christenson, Scott; Pack, Skip

2010-01-01

415

A geographic analysis of the status of mountain lions in Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The geographic distribution of sightings and sign of mountain lions (Puma concolor) in Oklahoma was investigated. Mail survey questionnaires were sent to natural resource professionals throughout Oklahoma to gather temporal and spatial information on sightings of mountain lions from 1985 to 1995. We used a geographic information system (GIS) to compare locations of sightings and sign in the state with ecoregions, deer harvest, human population densities, locations of licensed owners and breeders of mountain lions, and generalized topography. Sightings and sign of mountain lions occurred significantly more often in the Central Rolling Red Plains than elsewhere in the state. Sightings of mountain lions increased with total deer harvest statewide (R2=0.828, P<0.001). Numbers of sightings of mountain lions were correlated negatively with density of the human population (R2=0.885, P=0.017). Surveys are a valuable method to assess the status of rare wildlife species when other methods are not available and when those receiving the survey are qualified.

Pike, J. R.; Shaw, J. H.; Leslie, Jr. , D. M.; Shaw, M. G.

1999-01-01

416

Naturally occurring and experimentally transmitted Hepatozoon americanum in coyotes from Oklahoma.  

PubMed

Twenty free-ranging coyotes (Canis latrans) in Oklahoma (USA) were examined for the presence of naturally occurring infections with Hepatozoon americanum and to determine if bone lesions attributable to H. americanum were present. Although eight of the 20 free-ranging coyotes were found to be naturally infected with H. americanum, no bone lesions were detected. In addition, two coyote pups were exposed to H. americanum oocysts collected from experimentally infected ticks and the course of the resulting infection was followed. Both experimentally infected coyotes developed hepatozoonosis detectable by specific muscle lesions beginning 4 wk after exposure. Bone lesions were detected grossly and histologically at necropsy. Histologic evidence of periosteal bone proliferation ranged from segmental areas of plump hypercellularity and thickening of the periosteum, with minor degrees of osteogenesis, to extensive proliferation of woven bone and periosteal hypercellularity and thickening. Nymphal Amblyomma maculatum that fed on one of the experimentally infected coyote pups became infected and mature H. americanum oocysts were recovered when the ticks molted to adults. These results demonstrate that coyotes in some parts of Oklahoma are naturally infected with H. americanum, that experimentally infected coyotes can develop clinical disease, including characteristic bone lesions, and that A. maculatum nymphs can acquire infections by feeding on them. PMID:10682757

Kocan, A A; Cummings, C A; Panciera, R J; Mathew, J S; Ewing, S A; Barker, R W

2000-01-01

417

Identification of brome grass infestations in southwest Oklahoma using multi-temporal Landsat imagery  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The extensive infestation of brome grasses (Cheatgrass, Rye brome and Japanese brome) in southwest Oklahoma imposes negative impacts on local economy and ecosystem in terms of decreasing crop and forage production and increasing fire risk. Previously proposed methodologies on brome grass detection are found ill-suitable for southwest Oklahoma as a result of similar responses of background vegetation to inter-annual variability of rainfall. In this study, we aim to identify brome grass infestations by detecting senescent brome grasses using the 2011 Cultivated Land Cover Data Sets and the difference Normalized Difference Infrared Index (NDII) derived from multi-temporal Landsat imagery. Landsat imageries acquired on May 18th and June 10th 2013 by Operational Land Imager and Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus were used. The imagery acquisition dates correspond to the peak growth and senescent time of brome grasses, respectively. The difference NDII was calculated by subtracting the NDII image acquired in May from the June NDII image. Our hypotheses is that senescent brome grasses and crop/pasture fields harvested between the two image acquisition dates can be distinguished from background land cover classes because of their increases in NDII due to decreased water absorption by senescent vegetation in the shortwave infrared region. The Cultivated Land Cover Data Sets were used to further separate senescent brome grass patches from newly harvested crop/pasture fields. Ground truth data collected during field trips in June, July and August of 2013 were used to validate the detection results.

Yan, D.; de Beurs, K.

2013-12-01

418

Stabilization of Oklahoma expensive soils using lime and class C fly ash  

SciTech Connect

This study uses lime and class C fly ash, an industrial byproduct of electric power production produced from burning lignite and subbituminous coal, to study the plasticity reduction in highly expensive natural clays from Idabel, Oklahoma. This study is important, especially in Oklahoma, because most of the native soils are expansive and cause seasonal damage to roadways and structures. The addition of lime or fly ash helps to arrest the shrinkage and swelling behavior of soil. Four soil samples with the same AASHTO classification were used in this study to show shrinkage variability within a soil group with the addition of lime and class C fly ash. The plasticity reduction in this study was quantified using the linear shrinkage test. It was found that soils classified within the same AASHTO group had varying shrinkage characteristics. It was also found that both lime and fly ash reduced the lienar shrinkage, however, the addition of lime reduced the linear shrinkage to a greater degree than the same percentage of class C fly ash. Even though it takes much less lime than fly ash to reduce the plasticity of a highly expansive soil, it may be less expensive to utilize fly ash, which is a waste product of electric power production. Lime also has a lower unit weight than fly ash so weight percentage results may be misleading.

Buhler, R.L.; Cerato, A.B. (eds.) [University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (USA). Dept. of Civil Engineering and Environmental Science

2007-01-15

419

Modeling earthquake rate changes in Oklahoma and Arkansas: possible signatures of induced seismicity  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The rate of ML?3 earthquakes in the central and eastern United States increased beginning in 2009, particularly in Oklahoma and central Arkansas, where fluid injection has occurred. We find evidence that suggests these rate increases are man?made by examining the rate changes in a catalog of ML?3 earthquakes in Oklahoma, which had a low background seismicity rate before 2009, as well as rate changes in a catalog of ML?2.2 earthquakes in central Arkansas, which had a history of earthquake swarms prior to the start of injection in 2009. In both cases, stochastic epidemic?type aftershock sequence models and statistical tests demonstrate that the earthquake rate change is statistically significant, and both the background rate of independent earthquakes and the aftershock productivity must increase in 2009 to explain the observed increase in seismicity. This suggests that a significant change in the underlying triggering process occurred. Both parameters vary, even when comparing natural to potentially induced swarms in Arkansas, which suggests that changes in both the background rate and the aftershock productivity may provide a way to distinguish man?made from natural earthquake rate changes. In Arkansas we also compare earthquake and injection well locations, finding that earthquakes within 6 km of an active injection well tend to occur closer together than those that occur before, after, or far from active injection. Thus, like a change in productivity, a change in interevent distance distribution may also be an indicator of induced seismicity.

Llenos, Andrea L.; Michael, Andrew J.

2013-01-01

420

Hydrogeologic data for the Blaine aquifer and associated units in southwestern Oklahoma and northwestern Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report is a compilation of hydrogeologic data collected for an areal ground-water investigation of the Blaine aquifer and associated units in southwestern Oklahoma and northwestern Texas. The study area includes parts of Greer, Harmon, and Jackson counties in Oklahoma and parts of Childress, Collingsworth, Hall, Hardeman, and Wilbarger counties in Texas. The Blaine aquifer consists of cavernous gypsum and dolomite beds. Water from the Blaine aquifer supports a local agriculture based mainly on irrigated cotton and wheat. The purpose of the study was to determine the availability, quantity, and quality of ground water from the Blaine aquifer and associated units. This report provides a reference for some of the data that was used as input into a computer ground-water flow model that simulates ground-water flow in the Blaine aquifer. The data in this report consists of: (1) Monthly or periodic water-level measurements in 134 wells; (2) daily mean water-level measurements for 11 wells equipped with water-level recorders; (3) daily total precipitation measurements from five precipitation gages; (4) low-flow stream-discharge measurements for 89 stream sites; (5) miscellaneous stream-discharge measurements at seven stream sites; (6) chemical analyses of surface water from 78 stream sites during low-flow periods; (7) chemical analyses of ground water from 41 wells; and (8) chemical analyses of runoff water collected at five sites.

Runkle, D.L.; Bergman, D.L.; Fabian, R.S.

1997-01-01

421

Preliminary Gravity and Ground Magnetic Data in the Arbuckle Uplift near Sulphur, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Improving knowledge of the geology and geophysics of the Arbuckle Uplift in south-central Oklahoma is a goal of the Framework Geology of Mid-Continent Carbonate Aquifers project sponsored by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program (NCGMP). In May 2007, we collected ground magnetic and gravity observations in the Hunton Anticline region of the Arbuckle Uplift, near Sulphur, Oklahoma. These observations complement prior gravity data collected for a project sponsored by the National Park Service and helicopter electromagnetic (HEM) and aeromagnetic data collected in March 2007 for the NCGMP project. This report describes the instrumentation and processing that was utilized in the May 2007 geophysical fieldwork, and it presents preliminary results as gravity anomaly maps and magnetic anomaly profiles. Digital tables of gravity and magnetic observations are provided as a supplement to this report. Future work will generate interpretive models of these anomalies and will involve joint analysis of these ground geophysical measurements with airborne and other geophysical and geological observations, with the goal of understanding the geological structures influencing the hydrologic properties of the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer.

Scheirer, Daniel S.; Aboud, Essam

2008-01-01

422

Fish assemblage structure in an Oklahoma Ozark stream before and after rainbow trout introduction  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss have been widely stocked throughout the United States as a popular sport fish. Our study was initiated to evaluate potential effects of rainbow trout introduction on native fishes to inform future decisions about trout stocking in northeastern Oklahoma streams. We sampled fish assemblages in pools, glides, and riffles in Brush Creek, Delaware County, Oklahoma, from February 2000 to September 2002, and experimentally stocked rainbow trout into the stream from November 2000 to March 2001 and November 2001 to March 2002. We used a combination of multivariate analyses to evaluate seasonal and habitat effects on native fish assemblages and to compare assemblage structure between prestocking, the first year of stocking, and the second year of stocking. Mesohabitat type significantly affected assemblage structure among years, whereas we did not detect an effect of season. We did not detect differences in assemblage structure among years in glide or riffle habitats. Native fish assemblage structure in pool habitats before rainbow trout introduction differed from assemblage structure in both the first and second year of stocking. Declines in seven species, including two native game fish (smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieu and bluegill Lepomis machrochirus), contributed to assemblage dissimilarity in pool habitats between prestocking conditions and the second year of stocking. Our results indicate that stocking rainbow trout may cause local disruption in assemblage structure in pool habitats. ?? 2004 by the American Fisheries Society.

Walsh, M. G.; Winkelman, D. L.

2005-01-01

423

Potential ecological distribution of Cytauxzoon felis in domestic cats in Oklahoma, Missouri, and Arkansas.  

PubMed

The ecological distribution of Cytauxzoon felis, an often-fatal tick-borne apicomplexan that infects domestic cats, has not been evaluated or identified despite its continued emergence. Infection of C. felis is characterized by lethargy, icterus, fever, anorexia, anemia, and death. The natural vertebrate reservoir of C. felis is the bobcat (Lynx rufus). To determine the possible distribution of C. felis in three states where infection is common (Oklahoma, Missouri, and Arkansas), two separate approaches to ecological niche modeling were implemented. First, a model relating several different climatic layers to geographic locations where cases of C. felis infection were confirmed in domestic cats was developed to predict the possible distribution of the parasite. The second model incorporated occurrences of bobcats with environmental layers and land cover suitable for tick vectors to identify areas of overlap where C. felis transmission was likely. Results of both models indicated a high probability of C. felis from central Oklahoma to south-central Missouri. However, other predicted areas of C. felis occurrence varied between the two modeling approaches. Modeling the vertebrate reservoir and the tick vector predicted a broader possible distribution compared to modeling cases of C. felis infection in domestic cats. Our results suggest that C. felis is likely to extend beyond areas predicted by case modeling due to the presence of both the vector and reservoir. PMID:23131576

Mueller, Elisha K; Baum, Kristen A; Pape?, Monica; Cohn, Leah A; Cowell, Annette K; Reichard, Mason V

2013-02-18

424

Intermediate Photovoltaic System Application Experiment. Oklahoma Center for Science and Arts. Phase II. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the key results of the Phase II efforts for the Intermediate PV System Applications Experiment at the Oklahoma Center for Science and Arts (OCSA). This phase of the project involved fabrication, installation and integration of a nominal 140 kW flat panel PV system made up of large, square polycrystalline-silicon solar cell modules, each nominally 61 cm x 122 cm in size. The output of the PV modules, supplied by Solarex Corporation, was augmented, 1.35 to 1 at peak, by a row of glass reflectors, appropriately tilted northward. The PV system interfaces with the Oklahoma Gas and Electric Utility at the OCSA main switchgear. Any excess power generated by the system is fed into the utility under a one to one buyback arrangement. Except for a shortfall in the system output, presently suspected to be due to the poor performance of the modules, no serious problems were encountered. Certain value engineering changes implemented during construction and early operational failure events associated with the power conditioning system are also described. The system is currently undergoing extended testing and evaluation.

Not Available

1984-01-01

425

A Computerized Information System Model for Decision Making for the Oklahoma State Department of Vocational and Technical Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The objectives of the study presented in the dissertation were to identify present and anticipated information requirements of the various departments within the Oklahoma State Department of Vocational and Technical Education, to design a computerized information system model utilizing an integrated systems concept to meet information…

Smith, Hubert Gene

426

A Comparative Study of the Ichthyofauna in Selected Streams on the Salt Plains National Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper lists fishes and their abundances in seine collections from streams of the Salt Plains National Wildlife Refuge (SPNWR) in Oklahoma. We collected a total of 15 species and one hybrid. Dominant species included the cyprinids Cyprinella lutrensis, Hybognathus placitus, Notropis atherinoides, and the atherinid Menidia beryllina. Shannon-Wiener diversity (H') and evenness measures for sites located in upstream reaches

Nicholas A. Ashbaugh; Robert K. Reichert; Steven E. Franklin; Matthew N. Mercer; Heather A. Lanman; Berry S. Mantooth

427

Daily Fish and Zooplankton Abundances in the Littoral Zone of Lake Texoma, Oklahoma-Texas, in Relation to Abiotic Variables  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many studies have shown the effects of yearly or monthly environmental conditions on the structure of fish and zooplankton communities. Environmental conditions can also vary greatly on much shorter time scales. We tested the effects of abiotic conditions on the daily abundance of fish and zooplankton in the littoral zone of Lake Texoma, Oklahoma-Texas. After date was removed statistically from

Philip W. Lienesch; William J. Matthews

2000-01-01

428

Forensic bird-strike identification techniques used in an accident investigation at Wiley Post Airport, Oklahoma, 2008  

Microsoft Academic Search

On March 4, 2008, a Cessna Citation 1 (Model 500) crashed in a wooded area near Wiley Post Airport, Oklahoma, killing all 5 people on board. This paper describes the detailed forensic methods and expertise used by the Smithsonian Institution's Feather Identification Lab to identify the bird that caused this bird-strike incident. We used standard methods of whole-feather analysis, microscopic

Ma R

429

Employee Performance Evaluation & Development Guidelines University of Oklahoma staff performance evaluations will be conducted in accordance with the  

E-print Network

head/supervisor. (Continued on the next page) #12;Performance Evaluation & Development GuidelinesEmployee Performance Evaluation & Development Guidelines University of Oklahoma staff performance evaluation and development system is designed to: · Assess past levels of goal achievements; · Assess past

Oklahoma, University of

430

Zinc and Lead Poisoning in Wild Birds in the Tri-State Mining District (Oklahoma, Kansas, and Missouri)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Tri-State Mining District (Oklahoma, Kansas, and Missouri) is contaminated with Pb, Cd, and Zn from mining, milling and smelting. Metals have been dispersed heterogeneously throughout the District in the form of milled mine waste (“chat”), as flotation tailings and from smelters as aerial deposition or slag. This study was conducted to determine if the habitat has been contaminated to

W. N. Beyer; J. Dalgarn; S. Dudding; J. B. French; R. Mateo; J. Miesner; L. Sileo; J. Spann

2004-01-01

431

Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Robert M. Kerr Food & Agricultural Products Center  

E-print Network

a formula for a gelatin salad. Likewise, formulas that contain ingredients of a similar color might scale Resources FAPC-165 Robert M. Kerr Food & Agricultural Products Center FOOD TECHNOLOGY FACT SHEET 405-744-6071 · www.fapc.bizAdding Value to Oklahoma f a p c Scaling Up Your Food Process Darren D. Scott FAPC Food

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

432

Depth Distribution of Striped Bass and Other Fish in Lake Texoma (Oklahoma-Texas) during Summer Stratification  

Microsoft Academic Search

In May and June 1982, before stratification, echolocator charts indicated that fish in the main basin of Lake Texoma (Oklahoma-Texas) were distributed from the surface to the bottom. With the onset of stratification and oxygen depletion in the hypolimnion in July, fish moved upward in the water column, avoiding anoxic conditions near the bottom. Stratification (defined more conspicuously by dissolved

William J. Matthews; Loren G. Hill; Scott M. Schellhaass

1985-01-01

433

ENDOWED PROFESSORSHIP IN ELECTRIC ENERGY SYSTEMS The University of Oklahoma School of Electrical and Computer Engineering invites applications for the  

E-print Network

ENDOWED PROFESSORSHIP IN ELECTRIC ENERGY SYSTEMS The University of Oklahoma School of Electrical or tenure-track appointment to an endowed position at the rank of Professor. Exceptional candidates with a record of professional achievement sufficient for tenured or tenure-track appointment to an endowed

Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

434

A Vision for the Future: Henry G. Bennett Memorial Library, Southeastern Oklahoma State University Strategic Plan, 2002-2007.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document presents the five-year strategic plan developed by the library director, staff, and the Library Committee for the Henry G. Bennett Memorial Library, Southeastern Oklahoma State University. The goal of this plan is to provide a framework that the library can use to focus energy and resources in fulfilling the mission of the library…

Davis, Dorothy

435

Current ReportOklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets are also available on our website at: osufacts.okstate.edu  

E-print Network

.Forage-onlyproducersmightplacemore importance on planting an awnless wheat variety or one that germinates readily in hot soil conditions popular wheat varieties grown in Oklahoma. Management factors such as planting date, seeding rate is just one consideration in deciding which wheat variety to plant. Dual-purpose wheat producers

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

436

Developing Flexible Dual Master's Degree Programs at UPAEP (Universidad Popular Autonoma del Estado de Puebla) and OSU (Oklahoma State University)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 2006, UPAEP (Universidad Popular Autonoma del Estado de Puebla) and OSU (Oklahoma State University) signed a MOU (memorandum of understanding) to develop more than 20 dual master's degree programs. This special partnership has allowed students from Mexico and the United States to study two master degree programs, in two languages, in two…

Fabregas-Janeiro, Maria G.; de la Parra, Pablo Nuno

2012-01-01

437

Value and Expectations of Supervised Agricultural Experiences as Expressed by Agriculture Instructors in Oklahoma Who Were Alternatively Certified  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to determine the value and expectations for student participation in supervised agricultural experience (SAE) programs, as expressed by first-year, agricultural education teachers in Oklahoma who were alternatively certified. This study revealed that teachers in this study value the fact that…

Robinson, J. Shane; Haynes, J. Chris

2011-01-01

438

HIV on Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU): A Study of Five Campuses in Texas, Oklahoma, Louisiana  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students (N = 1,146) from five Historically Black Colleges and Universities in Texas, Louisiana, and Oklahoma participated in this study. Although students report a moderate level of HIV knowledge, they are deficient on three items related to the role of Nonoxynol-9 on HIV transmission, role of prior STD history on HIV transmission, and meaning of…

Chng, Chwee-Lye; Carlon, Alfonso; Toynes, Brian

2006-01-01

439

Analysis of Best Hydraulic Fracturing Practices in the Golden Trend Fields of Oklahoma Shahab D. Mohaghegh, West Virginia University  

E-print Network

Analysis of Best Hydraulic Fracturing Practices in the Golden Trend Fields of Oklahoma Shahab D of optimized hydraulic fracturing procedure. Detail stimulation data from more than 230 wells in the Golden of hydraulic fractures. Therefore, it is highly recommended that the clastic and carbonate formations

Mohaghegh, Shahab

440

An Updated Checklist of the Food Items of the Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus: Strigiformes: Strigidae) in Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper provides an updated checklist of prey items known to be taken by the Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus) in Oklahoma. The checklist is based on the prey remains in 17,744 Great Horned Owl pellets collected and analyzed throughout the state from 1976 to 1999 as well as those prey items listed in previously published reports. The pel- lets

Vanessa C. Kittredge; Paul W. Wilson; William Caire

441

OSU Human Resources 106 Whitehurst, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 (405) 744-5449 COBRA AND LIFE INSURANCE CONVERSION  

E-print Network

OSU Human Resources ­ 106 Whitehurst, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 ­ (405) 744-5449 COBRA AND LIFE INSURANCE CONVERSION The Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1986 (COBRA) allows you and your date premiums are paid. COBRA QUALIFYING EVENTS 18 Months Continuation of Coverage: Employees

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

442

Turbine Passage of Juvenile and Adult Fish at a Warmwater Hydroelectric Facility in Northeastern Oklahoma: Monitoring Associated with Relicensing  

Microsoft Academic Search

We estimated annual turbine passage rates and susceptibilities of juvenile and adult fish at the Pensacola Dam hydroelectric facility on Grand Lake O' the Cherokees (Grand Lake) in northeastern Oklahoma as part of the relicensing of the facility. Our study was purposefully exploratory in that its primary objective was to determine if turbine passage of valuable fishes was sufficient to

Kent M. Sorenson; William L. Fisher; Alexander V. Zale

1998-01-01

443

Arsenic pilot plant operation and results:Weatherford, Oklahoma.  

SciTech Connect

Narasimhan Consulting Services, Inc. (NCS), under a contract with the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), designed and operated pilot scale evaluations of the adsorption and coagulation/filtration treatment technologies aimed at meeting the recently revised arsenic maximum contaminant level (MCL) for drinking water. The standard of 10 {micro}g/L (10 ppb) is effective as of January 2006. The pilot demonstration is a project of the Arsenic Water Technology Partnership program, a partnership between the American Water Works Association Research Foundation (AwwaRF), SNL and WERC (A Consortium for Environmental Education and Technology Development). The pilot evaluation was conducted at Well 30 of the City of Weatherford, OK, which supplies drinking water to a population of more than 10,400. Well water contained arsenic in the range of 16 to 29 ppb during the study. Four commercially available adsorption media were evaluated side by side for a period of three months. Both adsorption and coagulation/filtration effectively reduced arsenic from Well No.30. A preliminary economic analysis indicated that adsorption using an iron oxide media was more cost effective than the coagulation/ filtration technology.

Aragon, Malynda Jo; Arora, H. (Narasimhan Consulting Services Inc., Phoenix, Arizona); Karori, Saqib (Narasimhan Consulting Services Inc., Phoenix, Arizona); Pathan, Sakib (Narasimhan Consulting Services Inc., Phoenix, Arizona)

2007-05-01

444

P and S Travel Time Tomography Using a Dense Array of Portable Seismographs and Earthquake Sources in Central Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two pockets of increased seismicity rates in Central Oklahoma provide a unique opportunity to study the deep crustal structure of the area using passive travel-time tomography to analyze data from 156 single-channel seismic recorders with spacings between 0.4 and 0.8 km. The consistency of the seismicity in these areas provided the equivalent of a detailed, reversed seismic refraction/wide-angle reflection profile. The November 5, 2011, M5.6 earthquake in Lincoln County, Oklahoma, was followed by a series of aftershocks, which provided the sources on the eastern end of the profile, and an earthquake swarm 50km to the west, which has been ongoing since October 2009 in Oklahoma County, provided the western sources. Previous studies of these earthquake sequences, using the Oklahoma Geological Survey's Regional Seismic Network, aided by additional stations from the U. S. Geological Survey, provided reasonably well-constrained velocity models and double-differenced relocations for each earthquake. During the four nights the instruments were recording, eight earthquakes with magnitudes between M0.9 and M2.3 were recorded for this study: two were a part of the Oklahoma County swarm, and the other six were of the Lincoln County sequence. These earthquakes yielded a combined total of approximately 2,500 travel times for direct and refracted P and S phases, and provided ray coverage into the Conrad discontinuity, as well as arrivals that appear to be deep reflections. The earthquake sources also provided strong S-wave arrivals.

Toth, C. R.; Holland, A. A.; Keller, G. R.; Holloway, S. D.

2012-12-01

445

Chesterian davidsoniacean and orthotetacean brachiopods, Ozark region of Arkansas and Oklahoma.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Three species of orthotetaceans and one species of davidsoniacean are among the strophomenid brachiopods from Chesterian (Upper Mississippian) rocks of northern Arkansas and northeastern Oklahoma. Type material from the Fayetteville Shale, Orthotetes subglobosus and O. subglobosus var. protensus, is figured for the first time. We regard these species, and O. subglobosus var. batesvillensis Girty from the Batesville Sandstone, as distinct species, for which we are selecting lectotypes. We describe a fourth species, O. stenopsis n.sp., from the Pitkin Limestone. Another species, described from the Pitkin as Streptorhynchus suspectum, has an impunctate shell and is thus not an orthotetacean. This bizarre species generally has a long twisted beak, high interarea, and large forked cardinal process; a myophragm may occur in either valve, but more commonly is in the brachial valve alone. We designate a lectotype for this species and propose a new genus Adectorhynchus and a new family Adectorhynchidae, under the Davidsoniacea, for this taxon.-from Authors

Henry, T.W.; Gordon, M., Jr.

1985-01-01

446

Flood of August 27-28, 1977, West Cache Creek and Blue Beaver Creek, southwestern Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report documents a major storm which occurred August 27-28, 1977, in southwest Oklahoma near the communities of Cache and Faxon, OK. Blue Beaver Creek and West Cache Creek and their tributaries experienced extensive flooding that caused an estimated $1 million in damages. Reported rainfall amounts of 8 to 12 inches in 6 hours indicate the storm had a frequency in excess of the 100-year rainfall. Peak discharges on Blue Beaver Creek near Cache and West Cache Creek near Faxon were 13,500 cubic feet per second and 45,700 cubic feet per second respectively. The estimated flood frequency was in excess of 100 years on Blue Beaver Creek and in excess of 50 years on West Cache Creek. Unit runoff on small basins were in excess of 2000 cubic feet per second per square mile. Surveyed highwater marks were used to map the flooded area. (USGS)

Corley, Robert K.; Huntzinger, Thomas L.

1979-01-01

447

Hemoprotozoa in mourning doves and other small birds of western Oklahoma.  

PubMed

Blood smears obtained from 370 birds live-trapped in western Oklahoma were examined for hemoprotozoa. Haemoproteus spp. were found in 189 (90.4%) mourning doves (Zenaida macroura), one oriole (Icterus galbula), two mockingbirds (Mimus polyglottos), and three brown thrashers (Toxostoma rufum). Plasmodium sp. was present in one brown thrasher. Haemoproteus spp. in the mourning dove were identified as H. sacharovi and H. maccallumi, with the latter species predominating. The average parasitemia for doves infected only with H. sacharovi was 0.1% of the erythrocytes, for doves infected only with H. maccallumi it was 0.9%, and in doves with dual infections 1.8% of the erythrocytes were infected. PMID:811816

Lewis, J C; Carpenter, J W; Morrison, J A

1975-10-01

448

Emergence of Autochthonous Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Northeastern Texas and Southeastern Oklahoma  

PubMed Central

Autochthonous human cases of leishmaniasis in the United States are uncommon. We report three new cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis and details of a previously reported case, all outside the known endemic range in Texas. Surveys for enzootic rodent reservoirs and sand fly vectors were conducted around the residences of three of the case-patients during the summer of 2006; female Lutzomyia anthophora sand flies were collected at a north Texas and southeast Oklahoma residence of a case-patient, indicating proximity of a suitable vector. Urban sprawl, climatologic variability, or natural expansion of Leishmania mexicana are possible explanations for the apparent spread to the north and east. Enhanced awareness among healthcare providers in the south central region of the United States is important to ensure clinical suspicion of leishmaniasis, diagnosis, and appropriate patient management. PMID:23185078

Clarke, Carmen F.; Bradley, Kristy K.; Wright, James H.; Glowicz, Janet

2013-01-01

449

Analysis of sedimentary facies and petrofacies of lower Morrowan-upper Chesterian sandstones, Anadarko Basin, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Three major lithofacies have been identified within the Morrow (Pennsylvanian) and Springer (Pennsylvanian-Mississippian) units, in core from 30 drill holes ranging from the Oklahoma Panhandle to the southwestern portion of the Anadarko basin. The study included inspection of ~6,500 ft of core, examination of ~100 thin sections, and a scanning-electron-microscope study of butts of the material used for thin-section preparation. The lithofacies identified are (1) fluvial-influenced coastal, which includes the deltaic facies described by Swanson (1979), (2) tidal-influenced nearshore, and (3) mixed, which shows mixed tidal and nontidal marine influence. Our interpretation is supported by the investigations of Moore (1979), Haiduk (1987), and Swanson (1979). The fluvial-influenced coastal facies is restricted to the northwestern (Panhandle) portion of the Anadarko basin.

Keighin, C. William; Flores, Romeo M.

1989-01-01

450

Ozonesonde measurements from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site in Billings, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Ozonesonde instruments were prepared and released at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site located near Billings, Oklahoma. Ozone sensors, associated radiosondes, balloons, and other parts and pieces required for the ozone observations were provided by WFF on a reimbursable arrangement with ANL. Observations were scheduled daily at 1,700 UTC beginning on September 22, 1995. Attempts to maintain this schedule were frustrated by a few simultaneous operations involving different electronic devices in use resulting in considerable rf noise. Since radiosondes are necessarily low-cost instruments their reception is particularly susceptible to noisy rf fields. Overall, however, 36 ozonesonde flights were made with the last observation occurring on November 1, 1995. Ozone data were processed on-site through the ground-station software and preliminary data delivered to Mike Splitt at the ARM site.

NONE

1998-12-01

451

Chemical analyses of water samples from the Picher mining area, northeast Oklahoma and southeast Kansas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Chemical analyses are presented for 169 water samples from Tar Creek drainage and the Picher lead-zinc mining area of northeast Oklahoma and southeast Kansas. Water samples were taken from November 1983 through February 1986 from the abandoned mines, from points of mine-water discharge, and from surface-water locations upstream and downstream from mine discharge area. The pH, temperature, alkalinity, dissolved oxygen, and specific conductance were measured in the field. Laboratory analyses routinely included the major ions plus aluminum, cadmium, copper, iron, lead, manganese, nickel, and zinc. Non-routine analyses of dissolved gases and tritium are presented. Stable carbon-isotope ratios for 11 mine-water samples and three carbonate-rock samples are reported. Miscellaneous stream-discharge measurements made at the time of sampling or taken from gaging-station records are included in the report.

Parkhurst, David L.

1987-01-01

452

Post-carboniferous tectonics in the Anadarko Basin, Oklahoma: Evidence from side-looking radar imagery  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Anadarko Basin of western Oklahoma is a WNW-ESE elongated trough filled with of Paleozoic sediments. Most models call for tectonic activity to end in Pennsylvanian times. NASA Shuttle Imaging Radar revealed a distinctive and very straight lineament set extending virtually the entire length of the Anadarko Basin. The lineaments cut across the relatively flat-lying Permian units exposed at the surface. The character of these lineaments is seen most obviously as a tonal variation. Major streams, including the Washita and Little Washita rivers, appear to be controlled by the location of the lineaments. Subsurface data indicate the lineaments may be the updip expression of a buried major fault system, the Mountain View fault. Two principal conclusions arise from this analysis: (1) the complex Mountain View Fault system appears to extend southeast to join the Reagan, Sulphur, and/or Mill Creek faults of the Arbuckle Mountains, and (2) this fault system has been reactivated in Permian or younger times.

Nielsen, K. C.; Stern, R. J.

1985-01-01

453

Transition year labeling error characterization study. [Kansas, Minnesota, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Oklahoma  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Labeling errors made in the large area crop inventory experiment transition year estimates by Earth Observation Division image analysts are identified and quantified. The analysis was made from a subset of blind sites in six U.S. Great Plains states (Oklahoma, Kansas, Montana, Minnesota, North and South Dakota). The image interpretation basically was well done, resulting in a total omission error rate of 24 percent and a commission error rate of 4 percent. The largest amount of error was caused by factors beyond the control of the analysts who were following the interpretation procedures. The odd signatures, the largest error cause group, occurred mostly in areas of moisture abnormality. Multicrop labeling was tabulated showing the distribution of labeling for all crops.

Clinton, N. J. (principal investigators)

1980-01-01

454

Dryland pasture and crop conditions as seen by HCMM. [Washita Watershed, Oklahoma  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Techniques developed from aircraft flights over the Washita watershed in central Oklahoma were applied to HCMM data analysis. Results show that (1) canopy temperatures were accurately measured remotely; (2) pasture surface temperature differences detected relative soil moisture differences; (3) pasture surface temperature differences were related to stress in nearby wheat fields; and (4) no relationship was developed between final yield differences, thermal infrared data, and soil moisture stress at critical growth stages due to a lack of satellite thermal data at critical growth stages. The HCMM thermal data proved to be quite adequate in detecting relative moisture differences; however, with a 16 day day/night overpass frequency, more frequent overpasses are required to analyze more cases within a 7 day period after the storm. Better normalization techniques are also required.

Harlan, J. C. (principal investigator); Rosenthal, W. D.; Blanchard, B. J.

1981-01-01

455

Large Charge Moment Change Lightning in an Oklahoma Mesoscale Convective System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

On 31 May 2013, a line of severe thunderstorms developed during the local afternoon in central Oklahoma, USA. One of the supercells produced the El Reno tornado, which caused significant damage and killed several people. During the 2300 UTC hour (during the mature supercell stage and just after the tornado began), the storm produced several positive cloud-to-ground (+CG) lightning strokes that featured large (> 75 C km) impulse charge moment changes (iCMCs - charge moment during the first 2 ms after the return stroke). These discharges occurred mainly in convection, in contrast to the typical pattern of large-CMC and sprite-parent +CGs occurring mainly in stratiform precipitation regions. After this time, the line of thunderstorms evolved over several hours into a large mesoscale convective system (MCS). By the 0700 UTC hour on 1 June 2013, the large- CMC pattern had changed markedly. Large-CMC negative CGs, which were absent early in the storm's lifetime, occurred frequently within convection. Meanwhile, large- CMC +CGs had switched to occurring mainly within the broad stratiform region that had developed during the intervening period. The evolution of the large-CMC lightning in this case will be examined using a mix of polarimetric data from individual radars, national mosaics of radar reflectivity, the Oklahoma Lightning Mapping Array (OKLMA), the Charge Moment Change Network (CMCN), and the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN). A major goal of this study is understanding how storm structure and evolution affected the production of large-CMC lightning. It is anticipated that this will lead to further insight into how and why storms produce the powerful lightning that commonly causes sprites in the upper atmosphere.

Lang, Timothy J.; Cummer, Steven; Beasley, William; Flores-Rivera, Lizxandra; Lyons, Walt; MacGorman, Donald

2014-01-01

456

Large Charge Moment Change Lightning in an Oklahoma Mesoscale Convective System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

On 31 May 2013, a line of severe thunderstorms developed during the local afternoon in central Oklahoma, USA. One of the supercells produced the El Reno tornado, which caused significant damage and killed several people. During the 2300 UTC hour (during the mature supercell stage and just after the tornado began), the storm produced several positive cloud-to-ground (+CG) lightning strokes that featured large (> 100 C km) impulse charge moment changes (iCMCs; charge moment during the first 2 ms after the return stroke). These discharges occurred mainly in convection, in contrast to the typical pattern of large-CMC and sprite-parent +CGs occurring mainly in stratiform precipitation regions. After this time, the line of thunderstorms evolved over several hours into a large mesoscale convective system (MCS). By the 0700 UTC hour on 1 June 2013, the large-CMC pattern had changed markedly. Large-CMC negative CGs, which were absent early in the storm's lifetime, occurred frequently within convection. Meanwhile, large-CMC +CGs had switched to occurring mainly within the broad stratiform region that had developed during the intervening period. The evolution of the large-CMC lightning in this case will be examined using a mix of national mosaics of radar reflectivity, the Oklahoma Lightning Mapping Array (OKLMA), the Charge Moment Change Network (CMCN), and the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN). A major goal of this study is understanding how storm structure and evolution affected the production of large-CMC lightning. It is anticipated that this will lead to further insight into how and why storms produce the powerful lightning that commonly causes sprites in the upper atmosphere.

Lang, Timothy J.; Cummer, Steven; Petersen, Danyal; Flores-Rivera, Lizxandra; Lyons, Walt; MacGorman, Donald; Beasley, William

2014-01-01

457

Statistical characteristics of storm interevent time, depth, and duration for eastern New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The design of small runoff-control structures, from simple floodwater-detention basins to sophisticated best-management practices, requires the statistical characterization of rainfall as a basis for cost-effective, risk-mitigated, hydrologic engineering design. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Texas Department of Transportation, has developed a framework to estimate storm statistics including storm interevent times, distributions of storm depths, and distributions of storm durations for eastern New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas. The analysis is based on hourly rainfall recorded by the National Weather Service. The database contains more than 155 million hourly values from 774 stations in the study area. Seven sets of maps depicting ranges of mean storm interevent time, mean storm depth, and mean storm duration, by county, as well as tables listing each of those statistics, by county, were developed. The mean storm interevent time is used in probabilistic models to assess the frequency distribution of storms. The Poisson distribution is suggested to model the distribution of storm occurrence, and the exponential distribution is suggested to model the distribution of storm interevent times. The four-parameter kappa distribution is judged as an appropriate distribution for modeling the distribution of both storm depth and storm duration. Preference for the kappa distribution is based on interpretation of L-moment diagrams. Parameter estimates for the kappa distributions are provided. Separate dimensionless frequency curves for storm depth and duration are defined for eastern New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas. Dimension is restored by multiplying curve ordinates by the mean storm depth or mean storm duration to produce quantile functions of storm depth and duration. Minimum interevent time and location have slight influence on the scale and shape of the dimensionless frequency curves. Ten example problems and solutions to possible applications are provided.

Asquith, William H.; Roussel, Meghan C.; Cleveland, Theodore G.; Fang, Xing; Thompson, David B.

2006-01-01

458

Preliminary Focal Mechanism Analysis of the 6 November 2011 M 5.7 Oklahoma sequence  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A M5.7 strike-slip earthquake occurred on 6 November 2011 near Prague, Oklahoma and was followed by hundreds of aftershocks in the subsequent months. While earthquakes are not unknown to Oklahoma, seismicity rates in the region have risen steadily since 2008, with increases in both the frequency and intensity of the earthquakes observed. The M5.7 earthquake is the largest quake recorded during this recent period of increased seismicity. Prior to the mainshock, 19 seismometers were located within approximately 100 km of the event. An additional 28 seismometers were temporarily deployed after the mainshock to record the aftershock sequence. We use data collected from these seismometers to calculate the focal mechanisms for a subset of the aftershocks. Here, we examine the 80 largest aftershocks that occur prior to 31 December 2011. P-wave arrivals and polarities are manually identified on the vertical component of each station. Polarities are marked as impulsive or emergent and the pick is given a quality rating (0-4). We then use HASH (Hardebeck and Shearer, 2002) and a 1-D velocity model to calculate the focal mechanisms. For each event, HASH outputs a set of acceptable mechanisms and, based on how clustered the set of acceptable mechanisms is, a quality and uncertainty is assigned. The early aftershock locations suggest that the 5 November 2011 M5.0 foreshock, 6 November 2011 M5.7 mainshock, and the largest (8 November 2011 M5.0) aftershock may have occurred on faults with strikes of 34°, 55°, and 90°, respectively. Given this change in fault strike for the largest events in the sequence, we will investigate whether there is also a systematic variation in the aftershock focal mechanisms with time. We will also investigate spatial variation in focal mechanism type (e.g. strike-slip, normal, or thrust) and inferred fault strike.

Wei, M.; Sumy, D. F.; Cochran, E. S.; Keranen, K. M.; Abers, G. A.; Savage, H. M.

2012-12-01

459

Summary of the stratigraphy, sedimentology, and mineralogy of Pennsylvanian and permian rocks of Oklahoma in relation to uranium-resource potential  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pennsylvanian-Permian strata in Oklahoma were deposited in environments which ranged from deep marine to alluvial fan. The former was most common in the Ouachita geosyncline during Early Pennsylvanian, but parts of the Anadarko basin were also relatively deep water during Middle and Late Pennsylvanian. Alluvial-fan deposits in Oklahoma are related primarily to the Amarillo-Wichita-Criner, Arbuckle, and Ouachita uplifts. As a

R. W. Olmsted; R. E. Hanson; R. T. May; R. T. Owens

1976-01-01

460

Plant Selection Factors The City of  

E-print Network

Plant Selection Factors The City of OKLAHOMA CITY UTILITIES DEPARTMENT Oklahoma Cooperative-433 #12;Plan Before you Plant Plants add value to the home, provide shade, define space, and make us happy. Consider the following five plant selection factors when choosing plants for your landscape. Keep

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

461

`Thus I salute the Kentucky Daisey's claim': gender, social memory, and the mythic West at a proposed Oklahoma monument  

Microsoft Academic Search

On 22 April 1889, at the beginning of the first Oklahoma land run when the US federal government allowed non-Indian settlers to claim what had been Native American lands, Nannita R.H. Daisey entered the newly opened territory by train to become one of the very first women to stake a quarter-section land claim, on land today part of Edmond. According

Dydia DeLyser

2008-01-01

462

Interpretation of Pennsylvania Bartlesville sandstone in southeastern Kansas and northeastern Oklahoma from continuous dipmeter and gamma-ray logs  

E-print Network

INTERPRETATION OF PENNSYLVANIAN BARTLESVILLE SANDSTONE IN SOUTHEASTERN KANSAS AND NORTHEASTERN OKLAHOMA FROM CONTINUOUS DIPMETER AND GAMMA-RAY LOGS A Thesis by DWIGHT STANLEY KRANZ Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University... Dipmeter Tool Regional Geology Bartlesville Stratigraphy . Production History Local Areas Methods . CHARACTERISTICS OF THE MIDDLE BARTLESVILLE SANDSTONES Introduction Log Character . Sedimentary Structures. Maggie Temple 1 Ralph Peters 1 J. Lips...

Kranz, Dwight Stanley

2012-06-07

463

Nobloedischia rasnitsyni, a new genus and species of Oedischiidae (Orthoptera) from the Lower Permian Wellington Formation of Oklahoma, USA  

E-print Network

deposit facies are derived from marginal marine lagoon sediments, with insect remains likely comprised of allochthonous mate- rial washed in by streams. Acknowledgments Thanks to Don Arnold and Richard Grantham of Oklahoma State University for al- lowing... to the Palaeodictyoptera, Odonata, Protoperlaria, Copeognatha and Neuroptera. American Journal of Science, Fifth Series 33(194): 81–110. Zalessky GM (1934) Sur deux reprèsentants permiens nouveaux de l’ordre des Protorthoptéres. Annales de la Sociètè Entomologique de...

Beckemeyer, Roy J.

2011-09-24

464

LANDSAT Study of Alteration Aureoles in Surface Rocks Overlying Petroleum Deposits. [Cement and Davenport oil fields, Oklahoma  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The author has identified the following significant results. A series of low altitude underflight remote sensing experiments were flown at Cement and Davenport oil fields, Oklahoma. An experimental algorithm which employs a sinusoidal stretch of brightness values was developed and applied to a January 1973 scene (bands 4, 5, and 6) of Cement. The results, although not spectacular, are extremely encouraging and for the first time demonstrate that the alteration anomaly at Cement may be defined through enhanced LANDSAT images.

Donovan, T. J. (principal investigator)

1975-01-01

465

Cohort dynamics of an over- wintering Caenis latipennis population in Honey Creek, Oklahoma, U.S.A  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eggs were collected from a south-central Oklahoma population of Caenis latipennis and reared at three different temperatures: 15, 20, and 25ºC. Eggs took 132 degree-days on average to hatch. Nymphs were reared to adults at 20ºC and emerged on average in 1709 degree-days. Degree-day estimates were applied to fall and winter stream temperatures to predict hatching and emergence times. These

JASON M. TAYLOR; JAMES H. KENNEDY

466

Use of preserved museum fish to evaluate historical and current mercury contamination in fish from two rivers in Oklahoma, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examined the effects of a commonly used preservation technique on mercury concentration in fish tissue. After fixing fish\\u000a muscle tissue in formalin followed by preservation in isopropanol, we found that mercury concentration in fish muscle tissue\\u000a increased by 18%, reaching an asymptote after 40 days. We used formalin–isopropanol-preserved longear sunfish (Lepomis megalotis) from the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural

J. Jaron Hill; Matthew M. Chumchal; Ray W. Drenner; John E. Pinder; S. Matthew Drenner

2010-01-01

467

Annual yield and selected hydrologic data for the Arkansas River basin compact Arkansas-Oklahoma, 1995 water year  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The computed annual yield and deficiency of the subbasins as defined in the Arkansas River Basin Compact, Arkansas-Oklahoma, are given in tables for the 1995 water year. Actual runoff from the subbasins and depletion caused by major reservoirs in the compact area also are given in tabular form. Monthly mean discharges are shown for the 17 streamflow stations used in computing annual yield. Water-quality data are shown for 20 water-quality stations sampled in the Arkansas River Basin.

Porter, J. E.

1996-01-01

468

Patterns of size change in late Neogene pocket gophers from the Meade Basin of Kansas and Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

A dense late Neogene history of pocket gophers from the Meade Basin of south-western Kansas and north-western Oklahoma preserves a detailed record of size change, as indicated by mean length of the lower fourth premolar. A ‘time for space substitution’ interpretation results in the tentative recognition of a pattern analogous to character displacement, in which the small to medium-sized Pliogeomys

Robert A. Martin; Pablo Peláez-Campomanes; Christopher Mecklin

2012-01-01

469

SEROLOGICAL PREVALENCE AND ISOLATION OF BABESIA ODOCOILE! AMONG WHITE-TAILED DEER (ODOCOILEUS VIRGINIANUS) IN TEXAS AND OKLAHOMA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Serum samples collected from 581 white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) from Texas and from 124 white-tailed deer from Oklahoma were tested by the indirect fluorescent antibody technique against Babesia odocoilei. Prevalence of seropositive reactors varied from site to site in both states. Prevalence rates were statistically ranked as high, intermediate or low. Deer <12-mo-old had a significantly lower prevalence than all

K. A. Waldrup; A. A. Kocan; T. Qureshi; D. S. Davis; D. Baggett; G. G. Wagner

470

A new species of Eimeria (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the northern myotis, Myotis septentrionalis (Chiroptera: Vespertilionidae), in Oklahoma.  

PubMed

During September 2004, 4 adult northern myotis, Myotis septentrionalis, were collected from LeFlore County, Oklahoma (n ?=? 2), and Logan (n ?=? 1) and Yell (n ?=? 1) counties, Arkansas, and their feces examined for coccidian parasites. Three of 4 bats (75%) were passing oocysts of Eimeria spp. Oocysts of Eimeria tumlisoni n. sp. were subspherical, 17.6 × 16.8 (16-19 × 14-18) µm with a shape index of 1.0 (1.0-1.1). A micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, although 1-2 bilobed polar granules were often present. Sporocysts were ovoidal, 10.5 × 5.9 (9-12 × 5-7) µm with a shape index of 1.8 (1.6-2.0). A Stieda body was present, but substieda and parastieda bodies were absent. A sporocyst residuum was present consisting of compact to dispersed granules between the sporozoites. The sporozoites were elongate, with subspherical anterior refractile body and spherical posterior refractile body; a nucleus was not discernable. This is the second coccidian reported from this host and the first instance of a bat coccidian reported from Oklahoma. We also document a new geographic record for Eimeria catronensis in Oklahoma and provide an emended description. PMID:22509940

McAllister, Chris T; Seville, R Scott; Roehrs, Zachary P

2012-10-01

471

A NEW SPECIES OF EIMERIA (APICOMPLEXA: EIMERIIDAE) FROM THE NORTHERN MYOTIS, MYOTIS SEPTENTRIONALIS (CHIROPTERA: VESPERTILIONIDAE), IN OKLAHOMA  

PubMed Central

During September 2004, 4 adult northern myotis, Myotis septentrionalis, were collected from LeFlore County, Oklahoma (n = 2), and Logan (n = 1) and Yell (n = 1) counties, Arkansas, and their feces examined for coccidian parasites. Three of 4 bats (75%) were passing oocysts of Eimeria spp. Oocysts of Eimeria tumlisoni n. sp. were ovoidal, 17.6 × 16.8 (16–19 × 14–18) ?m with a shape index of 1.0 (1.0–1.1). A micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, although 1–2 bilobed polar granules were often present. Sporocysts were ovoidal, 10.5 × 5.9 (9–12 × 5–7) ?m with a shape index of 1.8 (1.6–2.0). A Stieda body was present, but sub–Stieda and para–Stieda bodies were absent. A sporocyst residuum was present consisting of compact to dispersed granules between the sporozoites. The sporozoites were elongate, with subspherical anterior refractile body and spherical posterior refractile body; a nucleus was not discernable. This is the second coccidian reported from this host and the first instance of a bat coccidian reported from Oklahoma. We also document a new geographic record for Eimeria catronensis in Oklahoma, and provide an emended description. PMID:22509940

McAllister, Chris T.; Seville, R. Scott; Roehrs, Zachary P.

2012-01-01

472

A NEW SPECIES OF CARYOSPORA (APICOMPLEXA: EIMERIIDAE) FROM THE FLATHEAD SNAKE, TANTILLA GRACILIS (OPHIDIA: COLUBRIDAE), IN SOUTHEASTERN OKLAHOMA  

PubMed Central

A single flathead snake, Tantilla gracilis, collected in early October 2010 from Choctaw County, Oklahoma, was found to harbor an undescribed species of Caryospora. Oocysts of Caryospora choctawensis n. sp. were spherical to subspherical, 15.8 × 15.0 (14–18 × 14–16) ?m with a thick bilayered wall and a shape index (length/width) of 1.1. A micropyle and an oocyst residuum are absent but prominent Stieda and bubble-like sub-Stieda bodies were present as well as a bilobed polar granule near the oocyst wall. Sporocysts were ovoidal, 10.8 × 9.0 (10–12 × 8–9) ?m with a shape index of 1.3. The sporocyst residuum was spherical and composed of a cluster of granules often membrane-bound. This is the second time a caryosporan species has been reported from T. gracilis, but the first coccidian ever described from a reptilian host in Oklahoma. Additional T. gracilis from Arkansas (n = 6), Oklahoma (n = 1), and Texas (n = 7) were examined and a single specimen from Newton County, Arkansas, harbored Caryospora gracilis Upton, McAllister, Trauth, and Bibb, 1992, previously reported from T. gracilis collected in Arkansas and Texas. PMID:22191621

McAllister, Chris T.; Roehrs, Zachary P.; Seville, R. Scott

2012-01-01

473

Were the 2011 Prague, Oklahoma Earthquakes Natural, Induced, or Something in Between?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two hypotheses have been proposed for the origin of the Prague, Oklahoma earthquake sequence, which is under debate. I offer a third explanation, whereby this sequence was triggered by approximately 12 million cubic m of wastewater injected into the epicentral zone, from five high-volume injection wells. This sequence included three earthquakes of M5 or greater: a M5 foreshock, the M5.7 main shock, and a M5 aftershock (Keranen et al., Geology, 2013). The main shock, which caused substantial damage, is of exceptional importance in the central and eastern United States because it is the second largest earthquake that has been recorded in this vast region. Because of its importance in assessing seismic hazard, especially in central Oklahoma, there is an urgent need to understand its origin. The first hypothesis argues that the Prague earthquakes are of natural origin (Keller and Holland, OGS website, 2013). As shown by Ellsworth et al. (abstract, SSA Meeting, 2012,), the seismicity in central Oklahoma has increased dramatically starting in 2009. This increase is inconsistent with natural processes that are likely to occur in this geologically stable area. Instead, it seems more likely that the increase in seismicity is related to the increase of fluid injection activities related to expanding oil and gas operations. Even so, the Prague earthquakes themselves could be a natural sequence. The second hypothesis argues that the M5 foreshock was triggered by pore pressure increase due to wastewater injected from two wells near the northeast end of the epicentral zone. This M5 event, in turn, increased the Coulomb stress on a pre-existing fault triggering the M5.7 mainshock and its numerous aftershocks (Keranen, et al., 2013). This hypothesis focuses on two nearly co-located disposal wells, Stasta 1 and 2, that together injected nearly 100,000 cubic m of wastewater into the basal aquifer during the years leading up to the Prague earthquakes. There are, however, five much higher-volume disposal wells in the zone of epicenters, each of which injected more than 1 million cubic m into the same aquifer. Indeed, the highest volume well, Wilzetta 1, which injected nearly 4 million cubic m starting in 1999, is also at the northeast end of the zone of epicenters, close to the two Stasta wells. Accordingly, the third hypothesis, favored here, is based on a relationship developed by McGarr (2013, manuscript submitted for publication) that gives the maximum seismic moment as less than or equal to the product of the total volume of injected fluid and the modulus of rigidity. This upper bound is consistent with observations of seismic moments and corresponding injected volumes from numerous case histories during the past 50 years including the Prague sequence for which a total injected volume of 12 million cubic m resulted in a maximum seismic moment of about 3.9e17 Nm.

McGarr, A.

2013-12-01

474

Rb-Sr Isotopic Systematics of Felsic Igneous Rocks, Wichita Mountains, Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recently determined Rb-Sr isotopic characteristics of twelve of the recognized felsic units of the Cambrian Southern Oklahoma Aulacogen, which crop out in the Wichita Mountains of the southwestern Oklahoma, give some clues to the petrogenesis of these felsic units. 1) Plots of 87Rb/86Sr vs. 87Sr/86Sr form subsets yielding dates of 516 Ma and 522 Ma, discrepancies of about 10 to 20 Ma from the U-Pb zircon age for the Mount Scott Granite of 534 Ma, probably attributable to a systematic loss of radiogenic 87Sr for these units. 2) The Mount Scott Granite and related units (n=7) including Medicine Park Granite and Saddle Mountain Granite give a probable pseudoisochron of 516\\pm4{}Ma and an initial 87Sr/86Sr of 0.7045\\pm4{}, indicating derivation from a primitive mantle source with little crustal contamination. 3) A well-regressed line of 522\\pm2{} Ma with an initial 87Sr/86Sr of 0.7059\\pm7{} is shown by the Long Mountain Granite (n=3), one of the finer-grained western granites, and the Fort Sill Section of the Carlton Rhyolite (n=2) in the eastern Wichitas, which indicates that both were possibly derived contemporaneously from a mixed crustal-mantle source. 4) The Lugert Granite of the western Wichitas has variable and relatively high 87Sr/86Sr initials at 516 Ma probably indicating heterogeneous crustal sources. Interpretation of these data can be made with the following scenario: The earliest known felsic unit is the Carlton Rhyolite, Fort Sill Section. This must have been generated mostly from crustal melting around large mafic plutons in the mid- to lower crust. Crustal melting around the mafic plutons continued to generate liquids rising to the emplacement position, e.g., Long Mountain Granite. Following this, the host magma for the Mount Scott set of units originated dominantly by fractional crystallization from the mafic plutons. Subsequently, additional mafic magma must have moved into the lower- to mid-crust, at some other stratigraphic level, melting a more heterogeneous mixture of rock types to yield the Lugert Granite. Thus, in this rather narrow rift zone, felsic magmas of varying origin, but similar chemistry, have risen to the same emplacement level.

Min, K.; Gilbert, M. C.

2001-12-01

475

Magnetic, Electromagnetic, and Bathymetric Survey of the Lake of the Arbuckles, South-Central Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In August 2009, we conducted a week-long geophysical and sonar survey of the Lake of the Arbuckles, within Chickasaw National Recreation Area in south-central Oklahoma. In this region, Pennsylvanian-aged orogenic deformation and sedimentation created the conditions that now govern the groundwater recharge, storage, and flow in the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer, one of the most important bedrock aquifers in Oklahoma. The Lake of the Arbuckles reservoir, filled about 40 years ago, occupies an area where two major faults disrupt the geologic units that constitute the aquifer. The Reagan fault and the Mill Creek fault are hypothesized to intersect beneath the lake, based on available geologic exposures and inferences from gravity, magnetic, and helicopter electromagnetic (EM) observations in areas surrounding the lake. To understand the obscured geometry of these faults, we developed a pontoon-raft to carry a broad-band (15 kHz - 135 kHz) EM bird and a cesium-vapor magnetic sensor across the lake. We towed the raft 15 m behind a small boat to minimize EM and magnetic interference from the vessel, and we collected data on 200-m-spaced transects across much of the lake. The Reagan fault has a large electrical conductivity contrast and magnetic signature due to its juxtaposition at shallow depth of magnetic Proterozoic basement rocks with Paleozoic carbonate and clastic rocks. Initial results will show how the lake survey magnetic transects help to define the location of this fault beneath the lake. In addition, we collected dual-frequency sonar data to map the present-day bathymetry of the lake, and we collected vertical, water-column profiles of sound velocity, conductivity, temperature, pH, redox potential, and dissolved oxygen. The water-column profiles allow correction of the sonar travel-times to depth and estimation of the EM response of the lake water, which will be essential in later inversion modeling of the EM data. In addition, comparisons of the present-day bathymetry with pre-reservoir topographic contours and with sedimentation range line transects surveyed prior to the filling of the reservoir will yield estimates of sedimentation rates and patterns of the lake.

Scheirer, D. S.; Smith, D. V.; Coffee, R.; Cason, J.

2009-12-01

476

Predictors of regular mammography use among American Indian women in Oklahoma: a cross-sectional study  

PubMed Central

Background There are significant disparities in breast cancer screening and survivorship between American Indian (AI) and non-Hispanic white women. This study aimed to identify the salient beliefs AI women from Oklahoma have on regular mammography screening, and to determine which beliefs and health- related practices are associated with past mammography screening behavior. Methods This study used an integrated model of the Theory of Planned Behavior as the guiding theoretical framework. Data were collected from 255 (mean age?=?51 years, SD 7.64 years) AI women randomly selected from a rural Oklahoma medical clinic (response rate: 79%). Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with self-reported past mammography within the last two years while controlling for demographic variables. Associations were summarized using odds ratios (OR), the ratio of the odds of past mammography per a 1-unit increase in continuous independent factor scales (subjective physician norm, cultural affiliation, fatalism, knowledge of mammography screening guidelines, and perceived behavior control barriers) or between groups defined by categorical variables, and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results Of the participants, 65% (n?=?167) reported a screening mammogram within the last two years. After adjustment for age and educational status, women with a higher total subjective-norm physician score (OR?=?1.15, 95% CI: 1.06-1.24), a higher knowledge of mammography screening guidelines (OR?=?1.52, 95% CI: 1.00-2.31), a family history of breast cancer (OR?=?9.97, 95% CI: 3.05-32.62), or reporting an annual versus none or a single physician breast examination (OR?=?5.57, 95% CI: 1.79-17.37) had a higher odds of past mammography. On the other hand, women who were more culturally affiliated (OR?=?0.42, 95% CI: 0.24-0.74), perceived more barriers (OR?=?0.86, 0.78-0.94), or had higher fatalistic attitudes toward breast cancer (OR?=?0.90, 95% CI: 0.82-0.99) had lower odds of past mammography. Conclusion In the development of culturally-appropriate interventions promoting mammography among AI communities, emphasis could be put on the following: a) promoting clinic-related practices (e.g. physician recommendation, physician breast examination); b) promoting community-related practices (e.g. knowledge about mammography while eliminating fatalistic attitudes); and c) reducing environmental barriers. PMID:25169207

2014-01-01

477

Emerging contaminants at a closed and an operating landfill in Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Landfills are the final depositories for a wide range of solid waste from both residential and commercial sources, and therefore have the potential to produce leachate containing many organic compounds found in consumer products such as pharmaceuticals, plasticizers, disinfectants, cleaning agents, fire retardants, flavorings, and preservatives, known as emerging contaminants (ECs). Landfill leachate was sampled from landfill cells of three different age ranges from two landfills in Central Oklahoma. Samples were collected from an old cell containing solid waste greater than 25 years old, an intermediate age cell with solid waste between 16 and 3 years old, and operating cell with solid waste less than 5 years old to investigate the chemical variability and persistence of selected ECs in landfill leachate of differing age sources. Twenty-eight of 69 analyzed ECs were detected in one or more samples from the three leachate sources. Detected ECs ranged in concentration from 0.11 to 114 ?g/L and included 4 fecal and plant sterols, 13 household\\industrial, 7 hydrocarbon, and 4 pesticide compounds. Four ECs were solely detected in the oldest leachate sample, two ECs were solely detected in the intermediate leachate sample, and no ECs were solely detected in the youngest leachate sample. Eleven ECs were commonly detected in all three leachate samples and are an indication of the contents of solid waste deposited over several decades and the relative resistance of some ECs to natural attenuation processes in and near landfills.

Andrews, William J.; Masoner, Jason R.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.

2012-01-01

478

Characterizing contaminant concentrations with depth by using the USGS well profiler in Oklahoma, 2003-9  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 2007, the USGS well profiler was used to investigate saline water intrusion in a deep public-supply well completed in the Ozark (Roubidoux) aquifer. In northeast Oklahoma, where the Ozark aquifer is known to be susceptible to contamination from mining activities, the well profiler also could be used to investigate sources (depths) of metals contamination and to identify routes of entry of metals to production wells.Water suppliers can consider well rehabilitation as a potential remediation strategy because of the ability to identify changes in contaminant concentrations with depth in individual wells with the USGS well profiler. Well rehabilitation methods, which are relatively inexpensive compared to drilling and completing new wells, involve modifying the construction or operation of a well to enhance the production of water from zones with lesser concentrations of a contaminant or to limit the production of water from zones with greater concentrations of a contaminant. One of the most effective well rehabilitation methods is zonal isolation, in which water from contaminated zones is excluded from production through installation of cement plugs or packers. By using relatively simple and inexpensive well rehabilitation methods, water suppliers may be able to decrease exposure of customers to contaminants and avoid costly installation of additional wells, conveyance infrastructure, and treatment technologies.

Smith, S. Jerrod; Becker, Carol J.

2011-01-01

479

Density and habitat associations of Barred Owls at the edge of their range in Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We assessed breeding-pair density and habitat associations of Barred Owls (Strix varia) at the edge of their range in north-central Oklahoma in 1995-1996. We played taped calls of Barred Owls to solicit and record responses (visual and auditory) and thereby determine density in our 1155-ha study area. Numbers of owls ranged from 7 pairs in 1995 to 11 pairs in 1996, or 1 Barred Owl pair/105-165 ha in a relatively contiguous bottomland forest. To assess habitat associations, we overlaid core areas of owl activity, as inferred from the locations of Barred Owl responses, on aerial photographs and quantified habitats in a 0.65-km2 cell surrounding owl core areas. Barred owl pairs were associated with closed-canopy forest (62.8%), fallow agricultural fields (10.6%), water (8.1%), and treeless (open) areas (6.2%), which differed from single owls (presumed nonbreeders) that showed a greater affinity for open-canopy forest and agricultural fields.

Winton, B.R.; Leslie, D.M., Jr.

2004-01-01

480

Distribution patterns of imported fire ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) on a sheep and goat farm in Oklahoma.  

PubMed

Imported fire ant colonies were quantified in 1,000-m(2) circular subplots spaced approximately 125 m apart on a sheep and goat farm in Oklahoma. Social form (percent polygyny), mound density, cumulative above-ground mound volume, and average mound volume were subjected to multiple regression analyses to examine trends related to landscape metrics and habitat characteristics. Monogyne populations were spatially autocorrelated, and polygyne mounds tended to be smaller and more numerous. A model incorporating the effects of percent polygyny, canopy cover, and 1-d cumulative incident solar radiation explained 34% of the variation in mound density. Percent polygyny was not significantly related to cumulative mound volume, which provides a better estimate of overall ant biomass. A model incorporating the effects of 1-d cumulative incident solar radiation on the summer solstice, elevation, canopy cover, distance from cisterns, distance from water, and distance from trees explained 42% of the variation in cumulative mound volume. Monogyne mounds in areas that were flat and close to water in low-lying areas were largest. Results indicate that remotely sensed data in combination with publicly available U.S. Geological Survey data may be useful in predicting areas of high and low fire ant abundance at a field scale. PMID:19508763

Vogt, James T; Allen, Margaret L; Wallet, Bradley; Boykin, Debbie; Smith, Wayne A

2009-06-01

481

Ground water in the alluvial deposits of Cottonwood Creek Basin, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Cottonwood Creek basin is a 377 square mile area in central Oklahoma. The rim of the basin has altitudes as high as 1,300 feet, and the mouth is at an altitude of 910. Deposits of Quaternary age consist of alluvium along the stream courses and high terrace deposits along the southern rim of the basin. The alluvium contains a high percentage of clay and silt, ranges in thickness from a few inches to 40 feet, and underlies about 36 square miles of the basin. Sandstone, siltstone, and shale of Permian age, which form the bedrock, consist of the Garber sandstone along the eastern edge, the Hennessey shale through the central part, and Flowerpot shale along the western edge. Replenishment of water in the alluvium is from precipitation, lateral seepage and runoff from adjoining areas, and infiltration from the stream channels during high flows. The major use of ground water in the alluvium is transpiration by cottonwood and willow trees. Virtually no water is withdrawn from the alluvium by wells. (available as photostat copy only)

Stacy, B.L.

1960-01-01

482

Quantitative analysis and paleoecology of the Secor Coal and roof-shale floras (middle Pennsylvania, Oklahoma)  

SciTech Connect

The Secor Coal of Oklahoma (Boggy Formation, lower Desmoinesian/Westphalian D equivalent) is one of the few coals discovered, to date, in which Anabathra pulcherrima (=Paralycopodites brevifolius) was a dominant element. Anabathra and Lepidophloios define the major assemblages in the coal, which also contains elements of medullosan pteridosperms and Cardiocarpus spinatus producing cordaites. The Lepidophloios to Medullosa gradient is not obscured by the numerous Anabathra-dominated zones, and a disturbance element is suggested in association with Anabathra abundance. Comparison of the coal-ball flora with a clastic-compression flora from the roof of the coal reveals widely divergent patterns of dominance and diversity. The compression flora is strongly dominated by medullosan pteridosperms with subdominant marattialean tree ferns. As in most instances, the compression flora from the immediate roof of the coal is not an accurate representation of the peat-forming vegetation, at either the level of species composition or the relative abundance of major groups of plants. The swamp and surrounding clastic deltaic environments were edaphically distinct and supported separate floras between which there was limited species exchange.

Dimichele, W.A.; McBrinn, G.E. (Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC (United States)); Phillips, T.L. (Univ. of Illinois, Urbana (United States))

1991-08-01

483

Middle Whiterockian conodonts of the Pruitt Ranch Member (Oil Creek Formation), southern Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The Pruitt Ranch Member, which is exposed in the Criner Hills of southern Oklahoma, consists of 27 meters of fossil-poor, pelsparite and burrowed micrite. It overlies an oolitic facies of the middle Oil Creek Formation and is overlain by fossiliferous limestone assigned to the McLish Formation. The Pruitt Ranch represents a regressive phase of sedimentation during which oolite shoals were overridden by tidal-flat sediments. Pruitt Ranch conodonts include species of Leptochirognathus, Parapanderodus, and Scandodus which indicate a middle Whiterockian age. Conodont collections recovered from above and below the Pruitt Ranch are more diverse and contain representatives of Neomultioistodus, Paraprioniodus, Pteracontiodus, Histiodella, and Oistodus. Conodont frequency and diversity in Oil Creek and lowermost McLish samples reflect changing paleoenvironments. Faunas derived from oolitic and shallow subtidal facies are more diverse and were generated by paleoecologic factors and mechanical transport. The Pruitt Ranch conodont fauna is relatively low in diversity and is probably an accurate representation of the impoverished biocoenosis living in highly stressed, peritidal environments.

Bauer, J.A. (Shawnee State Univ., Portsmouth, OH (United States). Science Dept.)

1993-03-01

484

Regional geologic characteristics relevant to horizontal drilling, Woodford Shale, Anadarko basin, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Horizontal drilling in the Late Devonian-Early Mississippian Bakken Formation of the Williston basin has spurred new interest in other black shales as primary hydrocarbon reservoirs. The Late Devonian-Early Mississippian Woodford Shale, which is similar in some respects to the Bakken Formation, is a major source of oil and gas in the Anadarko basin of Oklahoma and could prove to be a significant reservoir rock as well. The three regional geologic characteristics of the Woodford discussed here are of likely importance to horizontal drilling programs, although direct relations to drilling strategy cannot be developed until empirical data from horizontal tests become available. First, the Woodford Shale is composed of three distinct depositional units (the upper, middle, and lower informal members) with different physical and geochemical properties. Second, a paleotopographic high that was rising before and during Woodford deposition divided the Woodford Shale into northeast and southwest depocenters. Third, Woodford depositional patterns are overprinted by thermal-maturity trends shaped primarily by differential burial of the Woodford during Pennsylvanian and Permian time. The Woodford Shale northeast of the forebulge is generally immature to marginally mature, whereas its thermal maturity southwest of the forebulge ranges from mature to postmature with respect to oil generation. A formation resistivity of about 35 ohm-m approximates the updip limit of oil-saturated Woodford Shale from which free oil might be produced from fracture systems.

Hester, T.C.; Schmoker, J.W. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

1991-06-01

485

Optical losses of solar mirrors due to atmospheric contamination at Liberal, Kansas and Oologah, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

An assessment is presented of the effect of outdoor exposure on mirrors located at two sites selected for potential solar cogeneration/repowering facilities: Liberal, Kansas and Oologah, Oklahoma. Mirror coupons were placed on tracking heliostat simulators located in the proposed heliostat fields and were removed periodically. The spectral hemispherical and diffuse reflectances of these coupons were measured. Representative samples were analyzed for the chemical composition of the dust particulates using SEM/EDX. Other samples were washed with a high pressure spray and recharacterized to determine the effects of the residual dust. Average specular reflectance losses over the entire test period (up to 504 days) were 6 to 12%, with a range of 1 to 30%. Specular reflectance losses varied widely from day to day depending on local weather conditions. The losses due to scattering were 2 to 5 times greater than the losses due to absorptance. The average degradation rate over the first thirty days was an order of magnitude larger than the average degradation rate over the entire sampling period. Specular reflectance loss rates averaged 0.5% per day and greater between periods of natural cleaning. The chemical composition of the dust on the mirrors was characteristic of the indigenous soil, with some samples also showing the presence of sulfur and chlorine, possibly from cooling tower drift.

Dake, L.S.; Lind, M.A.

1981-09-01

486

Prevalence and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Campylobacter spp. in Oklahoma Conventional and Organic Retail Poultry  

PubMed Central

Campylobacter is one of the most important foodborne pathogens that cause bacterial gastroenteritis.This study was conducted to investigate the prevalence and antimicrobial resistance of Campylobacter in conventional and organic retail poultry samples purchased from grocery stores in Tulsa, Oklahoma.One hundred and fifty six chilled retail chicken samples (85 conventional and 71 organic) and 65 chilled retail conventional turkey samples were collected in this study. The prevalence of Campylobacter in the conventional chicken samples 32/85 (38%) was higher than in the organic ones 21/71 (30%). The prevalence of Campylobacter in the conventional turkey samples was 11/65 (17%). Of the 53 positive chicken samples, 42 were C. jejuni, 8 were C. coli and three isolates were contaminated with both species. Of the 11 positive turkey samples, 8 contained C. jejuni and 3 harbored C. coli isolates. The antimicrobial susceptibility of one hundred and forty nine recovered Campylobacter isolates (130 chickens and 19 turkeys) towards sixteen antimicrobials was determined. The majority of the recovered turkey isolates (13/19) showed resistance to more than 7 antimicrobials while most of the recovered chicken ones (82/130) were resistant to 5 to 7 antimicrobials. Multidrug resistance was not limited to isolates from conventional sources but was also available in isolates of an organic background and was generally lower in C. jejuni isolates when compared to the C. coli ones. PMID:25408778

Noormohamed, Aneesa; Fakhr, Mohamed K

2014-01-01

487

Index of published surface-water quality data for Oklahoma 1946-1975  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Surface-water-quality data for Oklahoma have been published by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with various State agencies on an annual basis since 1949. The published data represents 2,733 station-years of data from 527 stations, ranging from one sample from a station once during the thirty--year period to a continuously operating daily station were more than one hundred samples were collected in a year. The last comprehensive index was published in 1963; since that time various unpublished indexes have been in use, none of which were complete. Most of the water-quality data collected and published prior to 1970 was for the common inorganic constituents such as, calcium, magnesium, sodium, alkalinity, chloride and sulfate. Since 1970 other types of data such as the minor or trace metals, organic compounds including pesticides, nutrients, oxygen resources, and biologic information have been collected and published with ever increasing frequency. This index was designed to provide the data user a means of rapid search for stations by downstream order (Table 2), county (Table 4), and alphabetically by stream or station name (Table 1). Table 1 also provides a breakdown of the data into 10 broad water-quality categories.

Stoner, J.D.

1977-01-01

488

Integrating care coordination home telehealth and home based primary care in rural Oklahoma: a pilot study.  

PubMed

The purpose of this program was to evaluate the benefits of integrating VA Care Coordination Home Telehealth and Telemental health within HBPC. A case study design was used to determine quality assurance and quality improvement of incorporating additional home telehealth equipment within Home Based Primary Care (HBPC). Veterans with complex medical conditions and their caregivers living in rural Oklahoma were enrolled. Veterans received the same care other HBPC patients received with the addition of home telehealth equipment. Members from the interdisciplinary treatment team were certified to use the telehealth equipment. Veterans and their caregivers were trained on use of the equipment in their homes. Standard HBPC program measures were used to assess the program success. Assessments from all disciplines on the HBPC team were at baseline, 3, and 6 months, and participants provided satisfaction and interview data to assess the benefits of integrating technology into standard care delivery within an HBPC program. Six veterans were enrolled (mean age = 72 yrs) with a range of physical health conditions including: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cerebrovascular accident, spinal cord injury, diabetes, hypertension, and syncope. Primary mental health conditions included depression, dementia, anxiety, and PTSD. Scores on the Mini-Mental State Examination ranged from 18 to 30. Over a 6-month period, case studies indicated improvements in strength, social functioning, decreased caregiver burden, and compliance with treatment plan. This integration of CCHT and HBPC served previously underserved rural veterans having complex medical conditions and appears both feasible and clinically beneficial to veterans and their caregivers. PMID:23937085

Sorocco, Kristen H; Bratkovich, Kristi L; Wingo, Rita; Qureshi, Saleem M; Mason, Patrick J

2013-08-01

489

Health Hazard Evaluation determination report HHE 81-000-113, Martin-Marietta Cement, Tulsa, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

In response to a request from the United Cement, Lime, Gypsum and Allied Workers Union Local 421, an investigation was made of possible health hazards occurring from the burning of high sulfur coal which exposed workers to sulfur-dioxide, carbon-dioxide, and hydrogen-sulfide at Martin-Marietta Cement, Tulsa, Oklahoma. Mail questionnaires were sent to employees prior to a hazard survey, and were followed up with medical interviews focusing on neurological symptoms, syncope, strokes, chest pain, and mucous membrane irritation. Environmental samples were collected for sulfur-dioxide, sulfates, sulfites, carbon-monoxide, nitrogen-dioxide, and hydrogen-sulfide, and measured predominately in work areas near the back end of the kiln. Eighteen of 29 questionnaire respondents and 20 of 21 interviewed workers reported mucous membrane irritation compatible with sulfur-dioxide exposure. The NIOSH recommended limit for sulfur-dioxide was 0.5ppm as a time weighted average. The authors conclude that a health hazard did exist at the time of the survey, and recommend that controls be implemented to minimize sulfur-dioxide exposure in the facility.

Sanderson, W.; Hodgson, M.J.

1992-01-01

490

Assessment of Local Recharge Area Characteristics of Four Caves in Northern Arkansas and Northeastern Oklahoma, 2004-07  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A study was conducted from 2004 to 2007 by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to assess the characteristics of the local recharge areas of four caves in northern Arkansas and northeastern Oklahoma that provide habitat for a number of unique organisms. Characterization of the local recharge areas are important because the caves occur in a predominately karst system and because land use proximal to the caves, including areas suspected to lie within the local recharge areas, may include activities with potentially deleterious effects to cave water quality. An integrated approach was used to determine the hydrogeologic characteristics and the extent of the local recharge areas of Civil War Cave, January-Stansbury Cave, Nesbitt Spring Cave, and Wasson's Mud Cave. This approach incorporated methods of hydrology, structural geology, geomorphology, and geochemistry. Continuous water-level and water-temperature data were collected at each cave for various periods to determine recharge characteristics. Field investigations were conducted to determine surficial controls affecting the groundwater flow and connections of the groundwater system to land-surface processes in each study area. Qualitative groundwater tracing also was conducted at each cave to help define the local recharge areas. These independent methods of investigation provided multiple lines of evidence for effectively describing the behavior of these complex hydrologic systems. Civil War Cave is located near the city of Bentonville in Benton County, Arkansas, and provides habitat for the Ozark cavefish. Civil War Cave is developed entirely within the epikarst of the upper Boone Formation, and recharge to Civil War Cave occurs from the Boone Formation (Springfield Plateau aquifer). The daily mean discharge for the period of study was 0.59 cubic feet per second and ranged from 0.19 to 2.8 cubic feet per second. The mean water temperature for Civil War Cave was 14.0 degrees Celsius. The calculated recharge area for Civil War Cave ranged from 0.13 to 2.5 square miles using the water-balance equation to 3.80 square miles using a normalized base-flow method. Tracer tests indicated a portion of the water within Civil War Cave was from across a major topographic divide located to the southwest. January-Stansbury Cave is located in Delaware County in northeastern Oklahoma, and provides habitat for the Oklahoma cave crayfish and the Ozark cavefish. January-Stansbury Cave is developed in the St. Joe Limestone member of the Boone Formation. The daily mean discharge for the period of study was 1.0 cubic foot per second and ranged from 0.35 to 8.7 cubic feet per second. The mean water temperature for January-Stansbury Cave was 14.3 degrees. The calculated recharge area for January-Stansbury Cave using the water-balance equation ranged from approximately 0.04 to 0.83 square miles. Tracer tests generally showed water discharging from January-Stansbury Cave during high flow originates from within the topographic drainage area and from an area outside the topographic drainage area to the southwest. Nesbitt Spring Cave is located near the city of Mountain View in north-central Arkansas and provides habitat for the Hell Creek cave crayfish. Nesbitt Spring Cave is developed in the Plattin Limestone (Ozark aquifer) and is recharged through the Boone Formation (Springfield Plateau aquifer). The mean daily discharge for the period of study was 4.5 cubic feet per second and ranged from 0.39 to 70.7 cubic feet per second. The mean water temperature for Nesbitt Spring Cave was 14.2 degrees Celsius. The calculated recharge area for Nesbitt Spring Cave using the water-balance equation ranged from 0.49 square mile to 4.0 square miles. Tracer tests generally showed a portion of water discharging from Nesbitt Spring during high flow originates from outside the topographic drainage area. Wasson's Mud Cave is located near the city of Springtown

Gillip, Jonathan A.; Galloway, Joel M.; Hart, Rheannon M.

2009-01-01

491

Certification From Attending Physician The University of Oklahoma Shared Leave Program What Is This Form For? Employees experiencing a catastrophic or life threatening illness that limit their ability to work do not always have  

E-print Network

Certification From Attending Physician The University of Oklahoma Shared Leave Program What to work do not always have enough paid leave hours to cover their illness-related time off. These employees have the option to request a donation of paid leave from the University of Oklahoma Shared Leave

Oklahoma, University of

492

OSU Human Resources 106 Whitehurst, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 (405) 744-5449 g:\\ben\\employee services\\employee info handouts\\otrs withdraw 2013.doc Reviewed March 2013  

E-print Network

services\\employee info handouts\\otrs withdraw 2013.doc Reviewed March 2013 OKLAHOMA TEACHERS' RETIREMENT, contact Employee Services at (405) 744-5449. Tax Implications: Any early withdrawal of retirement fundsOSU Human Resources ­ 106 Whitehurst, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 ­ (405) 744-5449 g:\\ben\\employee

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

493

Techniques for estimating flood peak discharges for unregulated streams and streams regulated by small floodwater retarding structures in Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Statewide regression relations for Oklahoma were determined for estimating peak discharge of floods for selected recurrence intervals from 2 to 500 years. The independent variables required for estimating flood discharge for rural streams are contributing drainage area and mean annual precipitation. Main-channel slope, a variable used in previous reports, was found to contribute very little to the accuracy of the relations and was not used. The regression equations are applicable for watersheds with drainage areas less than 2,500 square miles that are not significantly affected by regulation from manmade works. These relations are presented in graphical form for easy application. Limitations on the use of the regression relations and the reliability of regression estimates for rural unregulated streams are discussed. Basin and climatic characteristics, log-Pearson Type III statistics and the flood-frequency relations for 226 gaging stations in Oklahoma and adjacent states are presented. Regression relations are investigated for estimating flood magnitude and frequency for watersheds affected by regulation from small FRS (floodwater retarding structures) built by the U.S. Soil Conservation Service in their watershed protection and flood prevention program. Gaging-station data from nine FRS regulated sites in Oklahoma and one FRS regulated site in Kansas are used. For sites regulated by FRS, an adjustment of the statewide rural regression relations can be used to estimate flood magnitude and frequency. The statewide regression equations are used by substituting the drainage area below the FRS, or drainage area that represents the percent of the basin unregulated, in the contributing drainage area parameter to obtain flood-frequency estimates. Flood-frequency curves and flow-duration curves are presented for five gaged sites to illustrate the effects of FRS regulation on peak discharge.

Tortorelli, R. L.; Bergman, D. L.

1985-01-01

494

Techniques for estimating peak-streamflow frequency for unregulated streams and streams regulated by small floodwater retarding structures in Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Statewide regression equations for Oklahoma were determined for estimating peak discharge and flood frequency for selected recurrence intervals from 2 to 500 years for ungaged sites on natural unregulated streams. The most significant independent variables required to estimate peak-streamflow frequency for natural unregulated streams in Oklahoma are contributing drainage area, main-channel slope, and mean-annual precipitation. The regression equations are applicable for watersheds with drainage areas less than 2,510 square miles that are not affected by regulation from manmade works. Limitations on the use of the regression relations and the reliability of regression estimates for natural unregulated streams are discussed. Log-Pearson Type III analysis information, basin and climatic characteristics, and the peak-stream-flow frequency estimates for 251 gaging stations in Oklahoma and adjacent states are listed. Techniques are presented to make a peak-streamflow frequency estimate for gaged sites on natural unregulated streams and to use this result to estimate a nearby ungaged site on the same stream. For ungaged sites on urban streams, an adjustment of the statewide regression equations for natural unregulated streams can be used to estimate peak-streamflow frequency. For ungaged sites on streams regulated by small floodwater retarding structures, an adjustment of the statewide regression equations for natural unregulated streams can be used to estimate peak-streamflow frequency. The statewide regression equations are adjusted by substituting the drainage area below the floodwater retarding structures, or drainage area that represents the percentage of the unregulated basin, in the contributing drainage area parameter to obtain peak-streamflow frequency estimates.

Tortorelli, Robert L.

1997-01-01

495

Integrated basin chemical modelling redefines the geothermal evolution of the Arkoma Basin, Oklahoma, USA  

SciTech Connect

Amoco utilized a variety of exploration technologies to become the economic success leader (EPs > 65%) in the thrusted Pennsylvanian Spiro sandstone play of the Arkoma basin, Oklahoma. It was found early in exploitation analysis that conventional thermal-history methodologies gave convicting results about the overall geothermal evolution of the basin. Within the thrusted terrain, vitrinite reflectance and bottom-hole temperature data give abnormally low paleo-temperatures. Apatite fission track analysis was unusable for sub-surface samples due to extremely high paleo-temperatures (>110{degrees}C at 450m until 50Mya). Integrated Basin Chemical Modelling (MCM) was used to determine timing of critical events (thrusting, tinting of maximum paleo-temperature, generation, expulsion and diagenetic, evolution). Preliminary modelling results indicate that maximum temperature post-dates thrusting of the Ouachitas - eliminating the necessity to palinspastically restore individual thrust sheets to determine spatial relationships of traps to migration pathways. Complex hydrologic flow is concentrated within the porous Spiro reservoir section and along thrust planes. IBCM modelling indicates the critical flow direction reverses several times during basin evolution. The Arkoma basin is divided into two distinct thermal provinces, each experiencing a separate, complex thermal history. Fission track analysis of surface samples indicates two periods of regional cooling - Late Paleozoic and Late Cretaceous to Early Tertiary. Timing of these cooling events correlates to flow reversals indicated from IBCM modelling. Hydrologic flow reversals indicate multiple periods of migration/charge and the possibility of subtle stratigraphic traps formed from diagenetic changes within the prospective reservoir intervals.

Foland, S.S. [Amoco Corp., Denver, CO (United States); Meshri, I.D.; Bolton, S.L. [Amoco Production Research, Tulsa, OK (United States)] [and others

1995-08-01

496

Deep-to-shallow carbonate ramp transition in Viola Limestone (Ordovician), southwest Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The Viola Limestone (Middle and Upper Ordovician) of the southwest Arbuckle Mountains was deposited on a carbonate ramp within the southern Oklahoma Aulacogen. Depositional environments include (1) anaerobic, deep-ramp setting represented by microfacies RL, CH, CGL, and A, (2) dysaerobic, mid-ramp setting represented by microfacies B, and (3) aerobic, shallow-ramp setting represented by microfacies C and D. Deposition in the deep- and mid-ramp environments was dominated by bottom-hugging currents produced by off-platform flow of denser waters. Primary sedimentary structures include millimeter-size laminations, starved ripples, and concave-up and inclined erosional surfaces. Shelly benthic fauna are rare in A and B; trace fossils are common only in B. Deposits associated with the line-source gully, microfacies RL, CH, and CGL, are laterally confined; they have been observed only in the southwest Arbuckle Mountains. Primary sedimentary structures present in RL include wavy and ripple-cross laminae. Microfacies CH, contained within RL and interpreted as a submarine channel deposit, is present only at one locality. Primary sedimentary structures present in CH include an erosional base and several internal erosional surfaces, lateral accretionary sets, and imbricated, locally derived intraclasts. High total organic carbon (TOC) values have been reported for the lower Viola. TOC values of 1% have been reported from microfacies A, and TOC values of 5% have been reported from microfacies RL. These high values suggest that A and RL may act as hydrocarbon source rocks. Recognition of these microfacies in the subsurface will contribute to our knowledge of the Viola Limestone as an exploration target.

Glavin, P.K.

1983-03-01

497

A discussion of the depositional environment and silica sources of the novaculite in Broken Bow, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

There has been considerable research and speculation concerning the depositional environment for the silica sources of the Arkansas Novaculite in the Ouachita Mountains. Arkansas Novaculite conformably overlies Missouri Mountain Shale and underlies the Mississippian Stanley Shale group. Structural evidence in the Ouachita's supports a continent-continent collision and/or island arc subduction involving the continental margin of North America during Late Mississippian, after the novaculite sequence (Thomas, 1989, Appalachian-Ouachita orogen beneath the eastern gulf coastal plain, DNAG F-2). When considering the amount of silica required for deposition of massive and relatively pure silica-rich novaculite, the following were taken into account: (1) the source of the silica, (2) what environment will support silica-based marine life, and (3) what environmental conditions would account for thick, clean silica beds. Great quantities of silica most likely came from several sources. Structural evidence supports sources from the suspect Ouachita wedge and volcanic ash. Abundant fossil evidence suggests that a large portion of the silica source can be attributed to marine life such as radiolaria and sponge spicules. Though the role of metamorphic activity could be key in the formation of these novaculites, correlation of structural and sedimentary depositional features, and fossil evidence overwhelmingly indicate a marine environment for the silica source. The predisposition of radiolaria for an open ocean environment, the conodonts' restricted ranges, the preference of most siliceous sponges for a deep ocean environment, and the lack of stratigraphic evidence pointing to a shallowing of the seas, suggest that the Arkansas-Oklahoma novaculites from deep-marine radiolaria deposits with additional deposition from sedimentary sources.

Dubois, P.F. (Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States). Earth and Planetary Sciences Dept.)

1993-03-01

498

A study of secondary recovery possibilities of the Hogshooter field, Washington County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Hogshooter field, located in east central Washington County, Oklahoma, was first developed during the period 1906 to 1913. The field was extended later during the period 1918 to 1922. The principal producing horizon is the Bartlesville sand, found at an average depth of 1,150 feet. To January 1, 1944, the Bartlesville sand has produced 7,566,000 barrels of oil from 5,610 productive acres and 871 oil wells. Peak production, averaging 2,025 barrels per day for the year, was attained in the year 1910. The accumulation of oil in the Bartlesville sand is not related to structure. The total recovery from the Bartlesville sand in the Hogshooter field to January 1, 1944, is estimated to represent 10.3 per cent of the original oil in place, and the total residual oil is estimated to average 11,776 barrels per acre. Widespread application of vacuum, started in 1915, has had little beneficial effect on production. Some gas-repressuring in recent years has increased recovery to a small extent. Conservatively estimated water-flood recovery possibilities are: 3,500 barrels per acre for an area consisting of 1,393 acres (4,875,000 barrels total) with a reasonable profit at the present price of crude oil, and 2,500 barrels per acre for an area of 2,248 acres (5,620,000 barrels total), with no profit indicated under existing conditions. The latter area would show a profit equal to the first-mentioned area only with an increase in price of crude oil of forty-five cents per barrel. Subsurface waters at depths of 1,400 to 1,700 feet are indicated as a satisfactory source for use in water-flooding operations.

Fox, I. William; Thigpen, Claude H.; Ginter, Roy L.; Alden, George P.

1945-01-01

499

Environmental and hydrologic setting of the Ozark Plateaus study unit, Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The environmental and hydrologic setting of the Ozark Plateaus National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) study unit and the factors that affect water quality are described in this report. The primary natural and cultural features that affect water- quality characteristics and the potential for future water-quality problems are described. These environmental features include climate, physio- graphy, geology, soils, population, land use, water use, and surface- and ground-water flow systems. The study-unit area is approximately 47,600 square miles and includes most of the Ozark Plateaus Province and parts of the adjacent Osage Plains and Mississippi Alluvial Plain in parts of Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma. The geology is characterized by basement igneous rocks overlain by a thick sequence of dolomites, limestones, sandstones, and shales of Paleozoic age. Land use in the study unit is predominantly pasture and forest in the southeastern part, and pasture and cropland in the northwestern part. All or part of the White, Neosho-lllinois, Osage, Gasconade, Meramec, St. Francis, and Black River Basins are within the study unit. Streams in the Boston Mountains contain the least mineralized water, and those in the Osage Plains contain the most mineralized water. The study unit contains eight hydrogeologic units including three major aquifers--the Springfield Plateau, Ozark, and St. Francois aquifers. Streams and aquifers in the study unit generally contain calcium or calcium-magnesium bicarbonate waters. Ground- and surface-water interactions are greatest in the Salem and Springfield Plateaus and least in the Boston Mountains and Osage Plains. Geology, land use, and population probably are the most important environmental factors that affect water quality.

Adamski, James C.; Petersen, James C.; Freiwald, David A.; Davis, Jerri V.

1995-01-01

500

An Integrated Approach to Quantify Groundwater - Surface Water Interactions: the Norman Research Site, Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An intensive investigation of hydrogeologic and biogeochemical processes controlling contaminant migration and attenuation is in progress at the Norman Landfill Research Site in Oklahoma. The site involves a wetland that overlies a landfill leachate plume. The wetland-aquifer system actively exchanges contaminants and nutrients. These chemicals move from the wetland to the aquifer and vice versa depending on the groundwater-surface water (GW-SW) exchange rate and flow direction. The GW-SW flux has to be quantified to better understand the fate and transport of contaminants and nutrients. Different types of data have been collected at the site over a period of ten years including meteorological data, isotopic composition of water samples, water levels, pan evap