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1

Urban flood analysis in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Flood insurance study information from the Federal Emergency Management Agency is utilized to estimate future flood hazard in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Techniques are described for estimating future urban runoff estimates. A method of developing stream cross section rating curves is explained. Future runoff estimates are used in conjuction with the rating curves to develop an estimate of 50- and 100- year flood profiles that would result from future urban development.

Tortorelli, Robert L.; Huntzinger, T. L.; Bergman, D. L.; Patneaude, A. L.

1983-01-01

2

Digital geologic map of Oklahoma City Quadrangle, central Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This data set consists of digital data and accompanying documentation of the surficial geology of the 1:250,000-scale Oklahoma City quadrangle, Oklahoma. The original data are from the Geologic Map, sheet 1 of 4, included in the Oklahoma Geological Survey publication, 'Reconnaissance of the water resources of the Oklahoma City quadrangle, central Oklahoma', Hydrologic Atlas 4, Bingham and Moore, 1975. The geology was compiled by R.H. Bingham and R.O. Fay, in 1973.

Cederstrand, J. R.

1997-01-01

3

Child and Family Resource Program (Oklahoma City, Oklahoma). Program Description.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report describes the Oklahoma City, Oklahoma site of the Child and Family Resource Program (CFRP), a Head Start-affiliated program designed to elicit community and family involvement in fostering optimum development of preschool children and their families. The Oklahoma City site, serving a rural black community, is one of 11 demonstration…

Development Associates, Inc., Washington, DC.

4

78 FR 32007 - Environmental Impact Statement for Tulsa-Oklahoma City Passenger Rail Corridor, Oklahoma, Lincoln...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Statement for Tulsa--Oklahoma City Passenger Rail Corridor, Oklahoma, Lincoln, Creek...Oklahoma Department of Transportation (ODOT) Rail Division intend to prepare an EIS pursuant...for the State of Oklahoma High-Speed Rail Initiative: Tulsa--Oklahoma City...

2013-05-28

5

West Lawn Site and Planting Plans Oklahoma City Civic ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

West Lawn Site and Planting Plans - Oklahoma City Civic Center, Bounded by N. Shartel Avenue to the West, N. Hudson Avenue to the East, Couch Drive to the North, and Colcord Drive to the South, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, OK

6

Site Plans (1936 and 2001) Oklahoma City Civic Center, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Site Plans (1936 and 2001) - Oklahoma City Civic Center, Bounded by N. Shartel Avenue to the West, N. Hudson Avenue to the East, Couch Drive to the North, and Colcord Drive to the South, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, OK

7

Municipal Building Planting Plan Oklahoma City Civic Center, Bounded ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Municipal Building Planting Plan - Oklahoma City Civic Center, Bounded by N. Shartel Avenue to the West, N. Hudson Avenue to the East, Couch Drive to the North, and Colcord Drive to the South, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, OK

8

Typical Raised Planter Oklahoma City Civic Center, Bounded by ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Typical Raised Planter - Oklahoma City Civic Center, Bounded by N. Shartel Avenue to the West, N. Hudson Avenue to the East, Couch Drive to the North, and Colcord Drive to the South, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, OK

9

Granite Monument Plaza Oklahoma City Civic Center, Bounded by ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Granite Monument Plaza - Oklahoma City Civic Center, Bounded by N. Shartel Avenue to the West, N. Hudson Avenue to the East, Couch Drive to the North, and Colcord Drive to the South, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, OK

10

Site Plans (2008 As Built) Oklahoma City Civic Center, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Site Plans (2008 As Built) - Oklahoma City Civic Center, Bounded by N. Shartel Avenue to the West, N. Hudson Avenue to the East, Couch Drive to the North, and Colcord Drive to the South, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, OK

11

Did Divorces Decline after the Oklahoma City Bombing?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Oklahoma City bombing in April 1995 was an act of terrorism that had many potential influences on the city and state, including influences on families. We analyzed divorce data from 1985 to 2000 for all 77 counties in Oklahoma to assess the divorce response to the Oklahoma City bombing. Our prediction was that divorce rates in Oklahoma would…

Nakonezny, Paul A.; Reddick, Rebecca; Rodgers, Joseph Lee

2004-01-01

12

Oklahoma City, Canadian River, OK, USA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This view of Oklahoma City, OK (35.5N, 97.5W) surrounded by the grasslands of the central plains, is detailed enough to use as a map of the major highways and throughfares within the city and surrounding area. Tinker Air Force Base and Will Rogers International Airport as well as Lakes Hefner, Stanley Draper and nearby recreation areas. The smaller community of Norman, on the banks of the Canadian River to the south, is home to the University of Oklahoma.

1991-01-01

13

Did the Oklahoma City Bombers Succeed?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The worst case of domestic terrorism in our country's history, the bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, led to the enactment of a landmark antiterrorism statute. Not surprisingly, several of the statute's provisions strengthen federal power in extraordinary and unprecedented ways to counter the threat of terrorism. But other provisions radically restrict the ability of

Jordan Steiker

2001-01-01

14

Seismogram offers insight into Oklahoma City bombing  

Microsoft Academic Search

The terrorist bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City on April 19, 1995, generated seismic waves that were recorded on two permanent seismographs about 7 and 26 km away from the bombing. The seismogram recorded at 26 km shows two low-frequency wave trains, discrete sets of oscillatory signals, that begin about 10 s apart. Public release

Thomas L. Holzer; Joe B. Fletcher; Gary S. Fuis; Trond Ryberg; Thomas M. Brocher; Christopher M. Dietel

1996-01-01

15

Disaster nursing in the Oklahoma City bombing.  

PubMed

The Oklahoma City Federal Building disaster quickly changed a routine day of eye surgical procedures into a chaotic trauma center for the victims with not only eye injuries, but multiple deep lacerations and other injuries. The devastating and disruptive effect of the bombing was stressful for the nursing staff who became disaster survivors of the emotional trauma involved. PMID:7594916

Atkinson, R; Keylon, K; Odor, P S; Walker, G; Hunt, L

1995-10-01

16

RAPTOR REHABILITATION AT THE OKLAHOMA CITY ZOO  

Microsoft Academic Search

A program of raptor rehabilitation has been conducted at the Oklahoma City Zoo in an effort to conserve wildlife, to assist the publid, and to gain knowledge about the care and treatment of injured birds. From October 1973 through December 1974 Red-tailed Hawks and Great Horned Owls constituted 45.3 percent of all birds donated. Donations from the public comprised 89.0

John C. Snelling

1975-01-01

17

Report for Consultation on the Metropolitan Oklahoma City Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Oklahoma).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report is intended to provide the basic background information to provide a basis for the adoption of regional air quality standards and the implementation of those standards. It proposes boundaries for the Oklahoma City Intrastate Air Quality Control...

1970-01-01

18

Psychological response to the Oklahoma City bombing.  

PubMed

The bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Office Building in Oklahoma City was the most devastating terrorist activity that has occurred in America. Prevention of revictimization of persons seriously affected by the bombing was central to the planned response to this tragedy. Coordination and collaboration among local, state, and national agencies promoted effective clinical services provision, research facilitation, and prevention of revictimization. Information gathered from this cooperative effort will contribute to the effort to minimize the potential for such tragedies in the future as well as help to develop prevention and intervention strategies to reduce the effects when the next such disaster occurs. PMID:8682905

Krug, R S; Nixon, S J; Vincent, R

1996-01-01

19

Forensic Seismology and the 1995 Oklahoma City Terrorist Bombing  

Microsoft Academic Search

The terrorist bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, on April 19, 1995, was recorded on 2 permanent seismographs, 7 and 26 km away. The more distant seismograph recorded 2 low-frequency wave trains separated by about 10 s. Militia groups speculated that the 2 wave trains were caused by separate explosions and hinted at a

T. L. Holzer

2002-01-01

20

Mass casualties in the Oklahoma City bombing.  

PubMed

The Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City was partially destroyed by a terrorist bomb on April 19, 1995. Injuries were sustained by 759 people, 168 of whom died. Fatalities occurred primarily among victims in the collapse zone of the federal building. Only 83 survivors required hospitalization. Twenty-two surviving victims sustained multiple fractures. Most victims arrived at local emergency departments by private vehicle within 2 hours. More severely injured survivors were transported by ambulance. The closer receiving hospitals used emergency department facilities and minor treatment areas. Few survivors were extricated from the bombing site more than 3 hours after the detonation. Mass casualty plans must provide for improved communications, diversion and retriage from facilities nearest the disaster site, and effective coordination of community and hospital resources. PMID:15187837

Teague, David C

2004-05-01

21

Seismogram offers insight into Oklahoma City bombing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The terrorist bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City on April 19, 1995, generated seismic waves that were recorded on two permanent seismographs about 7 and 26 km away from the bombing. The seismogram recorded at 26 km shows two low-frequency wave trains, discrete sets of oscillatory signals, that begin about 10 s apart. Public release of this record prompted speculation that each wave train was caused by a different energy source. On May 23, 1995, the U.S. Geological Survey monitored the demolition of the bomb-ravaged Federal Building with portable seismographs (Figure 1). Two wave trains were picked up again. The recordings indicate that the wave trains during both the bombing and demolition represent seismic waves traveling at different velocities. We conclude that the two wave trains recorded during the bombing are consistent with a single impulsive energy source.

Holzer, Thomas L.; Fletcher, Joe B.; Fuis, Gary S.; Ryberg, Trond; Brocher, Thomas M.; Dietel, Christopher M.

22

A Study on the Delivery of Lower Division Collegiate Programs and Services in the Metropolitan Oklahoma City Region for the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 1990, the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education authorized a study of lower-division education services offered by Central State University, El Reno Junior College, Oklahoma City Community College, Oklahoma State University Technical Branch, and Rose State College--all operating in the Oklahoma City metropolitan area. Special attention…

Parnell, Dale; Philips, Al

23

Tornadoes in the Oklahoma City Area Since 1890.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Oklahoma City (OKC), by virtue of its large areal extent and location near the heart of 'tornado alley,' has earned a reputation over the years as one of the tornado-prone cities in the United States. Each of the 93 tornado listings presented in this repo...

M. L. Branick

1994-01-01

24

Case finding and mental health services for children in the aftermath of the Oklahoma City bombing  

Microsoft Academic Search

The 1995 Oklahoma City bombing killed 168 people, including 19 children, and injured hundreds more. Children were a major focus of concern in the mental health response. Most services for them were delivered in the Oklahoma City Public Schools where approximately 40,000 students were enrolled at the time of the explosion. Middle and high school students in the Oklahoma City

Betty Pfefferbaum; Guy M. Sconzo; Brian W. Flynn; Lauri J. Kearns; Debby E. Doughty; Robin H. Gurwitch; Sara Jo Nixon; Shajitha Nawaz

2003-01-01

25

The impact of the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing on the partners of firefighters  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study explored the impact of the 1995 Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, bombing on the spouses and significant others of a volunteer\\u000a sample of Oklahoma City firefighters who participated in the bombing rescue effort. Twenty-seven partners of Oklahoma City\\u000a firefighters participated in this study, conducted 42 to 44 months after the bombing. These partners were assessed using a\\u000a structured diagnostic interview

Betty Pfefferbaum; Carol S. North; Kenneth Bunch; Teddy G. Wilson; Phebe Tucker; John K. Schorr

2002-01-01

26

Lower-Division Offerings in the Oklahoma City Metropolitan Area: Studies and Recommendations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report provides information on associate degree and certificate offerings at four two-year institutions in the Oklahoma and Tulsa City metropolitan areas and articulation between baccalaureate degree programs at the University of Central Oklahoma and four metropolitan area two-year institutions. Part I classifies Oklahoma City area…

Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education, Oklahoma City.

27

Personal Touches Warm up Oklahoma City U.'s Campus  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Oklahoma City University prides itself on treating its faculty and staff members like family. It is the kind of place where new employees are welcomed in the president's house, staff members kick in to raise money when a colleague faces hard times, and promising young workers are offered flexible work schedules and free tuition to help them…

Mangan, Katherine

2009-01-01

28

Emergency Department Impact of the Oklahoma City Terrorist Bombing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Study objective: To collect descriptive epidemiologic injury data on patients who suffered acute injuries after the April 19, 1995, Oklahoma City bombing and to describe the effect on metropolitan emergency departments. Methods: A retrospective review of the medical records of victims seen for injury or illness related to the bombing at 1 of the 13 study hospitals from 9:02 AM

David E Hogan; Joseph F Waeckerle; Daniel J Dire; Scott R Lillibridge

1999-01-01

29

Diurnal cycle of the Oklahoma City urban heat island  

Microsoft Academic Search

Between the dates of 28 June and 31 July 2003, the Joint Urban 2003 (JU2003) field project was conducted in Oklahoma City and was the largest urban dispersion experiment ever in North America. Because the focus of JU2003 was on atmospheric processes within the urban environment, an extremely dense network of instrumentation was deployed in and around the central business

Jeffrey B. Basara; Peter K. Hall; Amanda J. Schroeder; Bradley G. Illston; Kodi L. Nemunaitis

2008-01-01

30

Oklahoma City - Central State University Cooperative Program in Teacher Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Oklahoma City-Central State University Cooperative Program in Teacher Education is designed to provide student teachers preparing for middle school careers with a more realistic opportunity to integrate educational theories of learning and behavior with day-to-day public school experiences. A maximum of 25 students spend a full semester in an…

Central State Univ., Edmond, OK. Coll. of Education.

31

How a School Coped with the Oklahoma City Bombing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Following the Oklahoma City bombing, fifth graders at a nearby elementary school coped with ensuing uncertainty, pain, and loss. They wrote appreciative letters to fire and rescue workers; shared personal stories with classmates; compiled an anthology of poems, prayers, and stories; attended an assembly to honor parents participating in rescue…

Aspy, David N.; Aspy, Cheryl B.

1996-01-01

32

Oklahoma city: Disaster challenges mental health and medical administrators  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mental health and medical administrators responded to the Oklahoma City bombing with cooperative and overlapping efforts to meet community needs in the wake of terrorism. The major agencies assisted in the immediate rescue response, organized crisis hotlines, prepared mental health professionals to counsel bereaved families and victims, organized debriefing of rescuers, assessed mental health needs of local school children, planned

Phebe Tucker; Betty Pfefferbaum; Robert Vincent; Sharron D. Boehler; Sara Jo Nixon

1998-01-01

33

Oklahoma City: A Working Partnership in the Arts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Oklahoma City arts-in-education program uses community arts and educational organizations as resources for a program in which all offerings are carefully related to the curriculum, curriculum themes provide the arts with access to other subjects, and everything is designed to meet the objectives of the school system. (Author/IRT)

Frates, Mary Y.

1976-01-01

34

Evaluating Injury Prevention Programs: The Oklahoma City Smoke Alarm Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Illustrates how evaluating the Oklahoma City Smoke Alarm Project increased its success in reducing residential fire-related injuries and deaths. The program distributed and tested smoke alarms in residential dwellings and offered educational materials on fire prevention and safety. Evaluation provided sound data on program processes and outcomes,…

Mallonee, Sue

2000-01-01

35

A paradigm for multidisciplinary disaster research: the oklahoma city experience  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this article is to describe the creation and operation of a multidisciplinary group to examine the Oklahoma City (OKC) bombing. The OKC bombing presented an opportunity to study a major disaster within 2 days of the incident. The Disaster Health Studies Group (DHSG) was created to facilitate this effort. The creation, organization, and operation of the DHSG

Gary Quick

1998-01-01

36

Building a Learning City: Developing School and Community Coalitions in Oklahoma City  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This qualitative case study focuses on a district and community relations plan developed in Oklahoma City Public Schools. This article provides a description of the proposal regarding MAPS for KIDS (Metropolitan Area Projects for Keep Improving District Schools) in Oklahoma City from 1998 through November 2001, and it explores the coalitions that…

Garn, Gregg

2005-01-01

37

Diurnal cycle of the Oklahoma City urban heat island  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Between the dates of 28 June and 31 July 2003, the Joint Urban 2003 (JU2003) field project was conducted in Oklahoma City and was the largest urban dispersion experiment ever in North America. Because the focus of JU2003 was on atmospheric processes within the urban environment, an extremely dense network of instrumentation was deployed in and around the central business district (CBD) both prior to and during the field experiment. Among the variables collected were high-resolution observations of air temperature from various instrument sources. Additional observations of air temperature were also collected at Oklahoma Mesonet stations in the rural areas surrounding Oklahoma City. Using an index value, the diurnal cycle of the urban heat island (UHI) for Oklahoma City, with respect to the surrounding rural terrain, was quantified. The results revealed a consistent mean nocturnal UHI greater than 1.5°C at both 2 and 9 m. However, observations at 2 m during JU2003 revealed a significant urban "cool" island during the convective portion of the day. The mean variability of temperature within the urban core of Oklahoma City increased significantly after sunrise, increased to a maximum near solar noon, and decreased following sunset. These results were inconsistent with the rural observations wherein the variability among sites was maximized during the nocturnal period. Finally, the vertical temperature gradient between 2 and 9 m demonstrated a clear and strong diurnal trend at the rural locations, whereas observations from the urban environment were nearly isothermal and consistent with near-neutral conditions throughout JU2003.

Basara, Jeffrey B.; Hall, Peter K.; Schroeder, Amanda J.; Illston, Bradley G.; Nemunaitis, Kodi L.

2008-10-01

38

Oklahoma Today  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Published since the 1950s, Oklahoma Today is a production of several state agencies, and it is designed to showcase various cultural, historical, and social aspects of Oklahoma. Over the past several years, Oklahoma State University has digitized back issues of the magazine, and visitors can now read all the way back to the first issue from 1956. Visitors can browse back issues by decade, and they can also perform key-word searches. First-time visitors should start by reading through the spring 1960 issue, which contains pieces on rattlesnakes, Oklahoma wildflowers, and the Washington Irving Trail. While the name Washington Irving may not be commonly associated with Oklahoma, the author spent part of 1832 wandering through the state with a Native American guide. More recent issues feature profiles of singer Vince Gill and Route 66.

39

Relations among land cover, streamflow, and water quality in the North Canadian River Basin near Oklahoma City, Oklahoma: 1968-2009  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the city of Oklahoma City, has collected water-quality samples at the North Canadian River near Harrah, Oklahoma (the Harrah station), since 1968, and the North Canadian River at Britton Road at Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (the Britton Road station), since 1988. The North Canadian municipal wastewater-treatment plant, managed by the city of Oklahoma City, is the largest wastewater-treatment plant in the North Canadian River Basin and discharges effluent between the Britton Road and Harrah stations. Water-quality constituent concentrations were summarized, and trends in concentrations and frequencies of detection of selected constituents with time were evaluated to determine if changes in land cover, streamflow, and other potential sources of constituents in water had significant effects on water quality in the North Canadian River downstream from Oklahoma City.

Esralew, Rachel A.; Andrews, William J.; Smith, S. Jerrod

2011-01-01

40

After the bomb. Oklahoma City rescuers talk about their experiences.  

PubMed

Rather than trying to write a second-hand description of the response to the April 19 bombing of the Federal Building in Oklahoma City, we thought we'd let some of the people who were there caring for patients and searching for victims share their experiences in their own words. Marion Angell Garza, JEMS editorial/news coordinator, spoke at length with six responders, including paramedics, the triage and treatment officer, a firefighter/EMT-1 and an emergency physician. The following excerpts are from those interviews. PMID:10143265

Robinson, M; Kernes, R; Lindsay, W; Webster, M

1995-06-01

41

A study of the Oklahoma City urban heat island using ground measurements and remote sensing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Measurements of temperature and position were collected during the night from an instrumented van on routes through Oklahoma City and the rural outskirts. The measurements were taken as part of the Joint URBAN 2003 Tracer Field Experiment conducted in Oklahoma City from June 29, 2003 to July 30, 2003 (Allwine et al., 2004). The instrumented van was driven over four

Michael J. Brown; Austin Ivey; Timothy N. McPherson; David Boswell; Eric R. Pardyjak

2004-01-01

42

ECONOMIC IMPACT OF THE ARTS ON THE OKLAHOMA CITY AREA ECONOMY FOR 1978  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to determine the type and magnitude of economic impacts on the Oklahoma City economy by 34 arts agencies, organizations, festivals, shows, programs, and other events. The direct and secondary impacts on the Oklahoma City economy in terms of spending and employment were significant. Further analysis indicated that the industry was in need of state,

James V. Pinto

1980-01-01

43

Estimated flood peak discharges on Twin, Brock, and Lightning creeks, Southwest Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, May 8, 1993  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The flash flood in southwestern Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, May 8, 1993, was the result of an intense 3-hour rainfall on saturated ground or impervious surfaces. The total precipitation of 5.28 inches was close to the 3-hour, 100-year frequency and produced extensive flooding. The most serious flooding was on Twin, Brock, and Lightning Creeks. Four people died in this flood. Over 1,900 structures were damaged along the 3 creeks. There were about $3 million in damages to Oklahoma City public facilities, the majority of which were in the three basins. A study was conducted to determine the magnitude of the May 8, 1993, flood peak discharge in these three creeks in southwestern Oklahoma City and compare these peaks with published flood estimates. Flood peak-discharge estimates for these creeks were determined at 11 study sites using a step-backwater analysis to match the flood water-surface profiles defined by high-water marks. The unit discharges during peak runoff ranged from 881 cubic feet per second per square mile for Lightning Creek at SW 44th Street to 3,570 cubic feet per second per square mile for Brock Creek at SW 59th Street. The ratios of the 1993 flood peak discharges to the Federal Emergency Management Agency 100-year flood peak discharges ranged from 1.25 to 3.29. The water-surface elevations ranged from 0.2 foot to 5.9 feet above the Federal Emergency Management Agency 500-year flood water-surface elevations. The very large flood peaks in these 3 small urban basins were the result of very intense rainfall in a short period of time, close to 100 percent runoff due to ground surfaces being essentially impervious, and the city streets acting as efficient conveyances to the main channels. The unit discharges compare in magnitude to other extraordinary Oklahoma urban floods.

Tortorelli, R. L.

1996-01-01

44

Never Again Would We Be the Same: The Oklahoma City Bombing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A high school principal describes the day of the terrorist attack on the federal building in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. After meeting with assistant principals and the school nurse to make plans for dealing with possible repercussions, he told students what had happened, monitored TV broadcasts, evacuated the building during bomb scares, and…

Mathers, Kent

1996-01-01

45

Equal Educational Opportunity for Hispanic Students in the Oklahoma City Public Schools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report results from a community forum on educational equity in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, at which knowledgeable persons and school district personnel provided their perspectives on issues related to educational equity. Data from this forum reveal a serious problem in the large numbers of student suspensions at both the elementary and secondary…

Hernandez, Ascension

46

Image crustal structure of eastern Oklahoma City with TOMODD  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There has been a dramatic increase in earthquake activity in Oklahoma since 2009. This dramatic increase was also matched by a marked increase in the number of operating seismic stations within the region. The additional stations include the Earthscope Transportable Arrays and temporary stations provided by the U. S. Geological Survey. The additional seismic stations and earthquakes provide the ability to do local travel time tomography of the crust within the region. For this study we are focusing on the area near the Jones earthquake swarm, that occurred just east of Oklahoma City, and the M5.6, November 2011 Prague earthquake. Major structures are already known in the area, but little is known about crustal structure below the top of the Precambrian basement. We used regionally available and temporary seismic stations along with more than 2000 earthquakes within the region to develop a 3D tomographic model of the crust using TOMODD. The major structures within the area are the Nemaha Ridge, Wilzetta Fault, and Seminole Uplift, and they and other structures as well are expressed within the tomographic model. We are working on determining the resolution and interpretation of the tomographic images.

Chen, C.; Holland, A. A.; Keller, R. G.

2012-12-01

47

THE OKLAHOMA MESONET  

EPA Science Inventory

The Oklahoma Mesonet, operated and maintained by the Oklahoma Climatological Survey, is Oklahoma's premier climatological data collection system. For the area covered, which includes the entire state, no other system within the United States or internationally has the degree of ...

48

Forensic Seismology and the 1995 Oklahoma City Terrorist Bombing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The terrorist bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, on April 19, 1995, was recorded on 2 permanent seismographs, 7 and 26 km away. The more distant seismograph recorded 2 low-frequency wave trains separated by about 10 s. Militia groups speculated that the 2 wave trains were caused by separate explosions and hinted at a government cover up. Preliminary statements by the scientific community also contributed to the uncertainty. A public science organization issued a press release that stated "the location and source of the second surface wave-recording is unknown. Detailed investigations at the building site may offer an explanation as to the cause and origin of the second event." A prominent professional newsletter reported that the "first event was caused by energy from the explosion and the second from the fall of the building." To understand the seismic phases in the April 19 seismograms, the USGS monitored the demolition of the damaged building on May 23, 1995, with a portable seismic array. The array recorded the same 2 wave trains during the demolition and indicated the wave trains were a propagation effect and not the result of multiple sources. Modeling of the waveforms indicated that the 2 wave trains probably resulted from propagation of seismic energy in a near-surface zone with a strong velocity gradient. The first phase appeared to be a packet of scattered body waves and the second was the fundamental-mode Rayleigh wave. Timely resolution of the ambiguity of the seismogram and publication of results in a refereed publication, EOS, discouraged a conspiracy defense by the terrorists.

Holzer, T. L.

2002-05-01

49

75 FR 65524 - United Auto Workers Local 1999, Oklahoma City, OK; Notice of Negative Determination Regarding...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-71,863] United Auto Workers Local 1999, Oklahoma City, OK; Notice of Negative Determination Regarding Application for Reconsideration By application dated January 20, 2010,...

2010-10-25

50

Indochina Refugee Physician ECFMG Preparatory Course, Area III, Oklahoma City.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This is the final report on the ECFMG Preparatory Course for the Vietnamese Refugee Physicians under the contract number 231-76-0006 between the Department of Health, Education and Welfare and the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center. The course ...

1976-01-01

51

75 FR 40820 - City of Broken Bow, Oklahoma; Project No. 12470-001-Oklahoma Broken Bow Re-Regulation Dam...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Preservation Office (Oklahoma SHPO) that the Caddo Nation be included in the development of...and the Oklahoma SHPO on behalf of the Caddo Nation have identified an interest in issues...Tribal Historic Preservation Officer, Caddo Nation, P.O. Box 487, Binger,...

2010-07-14

52

Earthquake activity in Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oklahoma is one of the most seismically active areas in the southern Mid-Continent. From 1897 to 1988, over 700 earthquakes are known to have occurred in Oklahoma. The earliest documented Oklahoma earthquake took place on December 2, 1897, near Jefferson, in Grant County. The largest known Oklahoma earthquake happened near El Reno on April 9, 1952. This magnitude 5.5 (mb)

K. V. Luza; J. E. Jr. Lawson

1989-01-01

53

The EMS response to the Oklahoma City bombing.  

PubMed

This is a descriptive study of the Emergency Medical Services response to a bombing of a United States Federal Building in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma on 19 April 1995. The explosion emanated from a rented truck parked in the front of the building. The force of the explosion destroyed three of the four support columns in the front of the building and resulted in a pancaking effect of the upper floors onto the lower floors. There were three distinct phases of the medical response: 1) Immediately available local EMS ambulances and staff; 2) Additional ambulances staffed by recalled, off-duty personnel; and 3) mutual-aid ambulances and personnel from the surrounding communities. There were 361 persons in the building at the time of the explosion, 163 of these perished. Within the first hour of the explosion, 139 patients were transported to area hospitals. Of these, 32% were in critical condition. During the day of the explosion, 444 persons were treated for physical injuries: 410 of these were related to the explosion and 14, including one with fatal injuries, were sustained during search and rescue attempts. A total of 354 (80%) were treated and released from emergency departments, and 90 (20%) were admitted to hospitals. Six of the transported victims either were dead on arrival to the emergency department or died after admission to the hospital. Of those who died, 95% of the deaths were related to blunt trauma associated with the collapse of the structure. Only three persons were extricated alive after the first five hours following the explosion. The scene became flooded with volunteers who, although their intentions were to provide help and aid to those injured, created a substantial logistical problem for Incident Command. Several other lessons were learned: 1) Telephone lines and cells became overloaded, but the Hospital Emergency Administrative Radio system was operational only in three of the 15 hospitals; 2) Volunteer personnel should have responded to the hospitals and not to the scene; and 3) Training was an essential for the success of such a response. Thus, the success of this operation was a function of the intense training, practice, and coordination between multiple agencies. PMID:10187007

Maningas, P A; Robison, M; Mallonee, S

1997-01-01

54

Turbulent Kinetic Energy in the Oklahoma City Urban Environment  

SciTech Connect

A major field experiment, Joint URBAN 2003 (JU2003), was conducted in Oklahoma City in July 2003 to collect meteorological and tracer data sets for evaluating dispersion models in urban areas. The Department of Homeland Security and the Defense Threat Reduction Agency were the primary sponsors of JU2003. Investigators from five Department of Energy national laboratories, several other government agencies, universities, private companies, and international agencies conducted the experiment. Observations to characterize the meteorology in and around the urban area complemented the observation of the dispersion of SF6, an inert tracer gas. Over one hundred threedimensional sonic anemometers were deployed in and around the urban area to monitor wind speed, direction, and turbulence fluxes during releases of SF6. Sonic deployment locations included a profile of eight sonic anemometers mounted on a crane less than 1 km north of the central business district (CBD). Using data from these and other sonic anemometers deployed in the urban area, we can quantify the effect of the urban area on atmospheric turbulence and compare results seen in OKC to those in other urban areas to assess the parameters typically used in parameterizations of urban turbulence.

Lundquist, J; Leach, M; Gouveia, F

2004-06-24

55

Did fertility go up after the oklahoma city bombing? An analysis of births in metropolitan counties in Oklahoma, 1990–1999  

Microsoft Academic Search

Political and sociocultural events (e.g., Brown v. Board of Education in 1954 and the German reunification in 1989) and natural disasters (e.g., Hurricane Hugo in 1989) can affect fertility.\\u000a In our research, we addressed the question of whether the Oklahoma City bombing in April 1995, a man-made disaster, influenced\\u000a fertility patterns in Oklahoma. We defined three theoretical orientations—replacement theory, community

Joseph Lee Rodgers; Craig A. St. John; Ronnie Coleman

2005-01-01

56

A Study of Public Higher Education in the Oklahoma City Area with Special Focus on Community College Services. Report on the Delivery of Comprehensive Community College Services in Metropolitan Oklahoma City.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In response to a legislative mandate, a study was conducted to identify and address the basic factors which should be considered in the expansion of postsecondary educational opportunities in metropolitan Oklahoma City, with specific focus on the steps to be taken by Oklahoma City Community College (OCCC). Study findings, based on demographic…

Priest, Bill J.; And Others

57

Boundary-Layer Structure Upwind and Downwind of Oklahoma City during the Joint Urban 2003 Field Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Joint Urban 2003 field study in Oklahoma City in July 2003 provided a comprehensive data set that included measurements from sites upwind and downwind of Oklahoma City where sodars, radar wind profilers\\/RASSes, and radiosondes were deployed. Radiosonde measurements were taken during six daytime intensive observational periods (IOPs) and during four nighttime IOPs, while the sodars and radars operated almost

Stephan F. J. De Wekker; Larry K. Berg; K. Jerry Allwine; J. Christopher Doran; William J. Shaw

2004-01-01

58

Assessing the need for diabetes self-management education in the Oklahoma city vietnamese community  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction  To assess the diabetes self-management educational (DSME) needs of the Vietnamese diabetic population in the Oklahoma City\\u000a metropolitan area.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Participants in this explorative study included 50 Vietnamese adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes recruited from the offices\\u000a of four primary care physicians in the Oklahoma City metropolitan area. Participants completed a culturally sensitive survey\\u000a focused on their diabetes

Teresa Truong; Mark Britton; Donald Harrison; Nancy Letassy; Becky Armor; Darryl Tonemah; Ann Nguyen

2011-01-01

59

40 CFR 282.86 - Oklahoma State-Administered Program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...following elements submitted to EPA in Oklahoma's program application for final...Underground Storage Tank Program, Oklahoma Corporation Commission, Jim Thorpe Building, Room 238, Oklahoma City, OK 73105. (1) State...

2010-07-01

60

40 CFR 282.86 - Oklahoma State-Administered Program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...following elements submitted to EPA in Oklahoma's program application for final...Underground Storage Tank Program, Oklahoma Corporation Commission, Jim Thorpe Building, Room 238, Oklahoma City, OK 73105. (1) State...

2009-07-01

61

Texas-Oklahoma  

... Texas and Oklahoma. Traversing brush-covered and grassy plains, rolling hills, and prairies, the Red River and the Canadian River are ... formats available at JPL March 12, 2000 - Plains, rivers, and smoke plumes along the Texas-Oklahoma border. ...

2013-04-19

62

Impact of Configurations of Rapid Intermittent Assimilation of WSR-88D Radar Data for the 8 May 2003 Oklahoma City Tornadic Thunderstorm Case  

Microsoft Academic Search

Various configurations of the intermittent data assimilation procedure for Level-II Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler radar data are examined for the analysis and prediction of a tornadic thunderstorm that occurred on 8 May 2003 near Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Several tornadoes were produced by this thunderstorm, causing extensive damages in the south Oklahoma City area. Within the rapidly cycled assimilation system, the

Ming Hu; Ming Xue

2007-01-01

63

Sadness, tragedy and mass disaster in Oklahoma City: providing critical incident stress debriefings to a community in crisis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Shortly after 09:00 h on 19 April 1995, the Alfred P Murrah Federal Building, located in downtown Oklahoma City, was devastated with a bomb blast of such gigantic proportions that it was heard 60 miles away in neighbouring Norman, Oklahoma. Oklahomans routinely commuting to work on that sunny Wednesday morning went about their business as usual. A crude bomb chemically

J. A. Davis

1996-01-01

64

Information from 1989 and 1990 Oklahoma City Community College Graduates. Research Monograph VIII.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In September 1990 and June 1991, the Office of Institutional Research at Oklahoma City Community College (OKCCC) conducted follow-up studies of December 1988 and July 1990 OKCCC graduates, respectively. Questionnaires were sent to 365 graduates in 1990 and to 398 graduates in 1991. Survey findings, based on a 20.8% response rate in 1990 and 17.6%…

Oklahoma City Community Coll., OK. Office of Institutional Research.

65

Oklahoma City Alcohol Safety Action Project: Effectiveness and Efficiency; Analytic Study No. I.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report describes the progress and performance of the Oklahoma City Alcohol Safety Action Project (ASAP) during the five-year period 1972 - 1976. The findings of this study include: (1) ASAP enforcement personnel effected 17,187 DUI arrests in Oklahom...

R. F. Krenek

1977-01-01

66

Needs Assessment of Low Incidence Handicapped Children in the Oklahoma City Metro Area.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A general service delivery needs assessment was conducted in the Oklahoma City metropolitan area to determine a need for a cooperative inter-district delivery system for low incidence handicapped students. Secondary hearing impaired students were the primary focus of the study. Data obtained via needs assessment questionnaires from 20 school…

Hollingshead, Maybelle C.

67

Literacy Patterns of Production Workers in Small Manufacturing Companies in the Oklahoma City Metroplex.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Screening Battery of the Adult Basic Learning Examination and a demographic questionnaire were completed by 65 employees in small manufacturing firms in Oklahoma City. Despite overall educational attainment of 11.5 years, grade equivalents of scores were 7.6 for reading comprehension, 8.9 for problem solving; 21.5% were classified as…

Green, Gary; Sloan, Bobby R.

1994-01-01

68

Computational Fluid Dynamic Simulations of Plume Dispersion in Urban Oklahoma City  

Microsoft Academic Search

A 3D computational fluid dynamics study using Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes modeling was conducted and validated with field data from the Joint Urban 2003 dispersion study in Oklahoma City. The modeled flow field indicated that the many short buildings in this domain had a relatively small effect on the flow field, while the few tall buildings drove the transport and dispersion

Julia E. Flaherty; David E. Stock; Brian K. Lamb

2007-01-01

69

Preparing for armageddon: Citizen militias, the patriot movement and the Oklahoma city bombing  

Microsoft Academic Search

The devastating explosion in Oklahoma City on 19 April 1995 has drawn attention to the existence of citizen militias and the Patriot movement of which they are part. Opposed to gun control and taxation and strongly influenced by claims of concealed foreign troops, concentration camps and plans to impose a New World order, Patriots are the inheritors of a radical

Martin Durham

1996-01-01

70

Oklahoma City FILM Even Start Family Literacy Program Evaluation, 2000-2001.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report presents findings from the evaluation of the Oklahoma City Public Schools Even Start Program, also called the Family Intergenerational Literacy Model (FILM), now in its twelfth full year of operation. The evaluation focuses on the total population of adult students, preschoolers, adult graduates, and preschool graduates. The…

Richardson, Donna Castle; Shove, Joanie; Brickman, Sharon; Terrell, Sherry; Shields, Jane

71

Field applications of CORSIM: I-40 freeway design evaluation, Oklahoma City, OK  

Microsoft Academic Search

Simulation of traffic flow is an effective tool for evaluating alternative roadway designs, particularly in congested urban areas. CORSIM, a traffic simulation model with detailed representation of vehicles and their interactions, was used to study the performance of two alternatives for a freeway reconstruction project in Oklahoma City. The simulation identified problem areas in the two freeway design alternatives and

Gene Daigle; Michelle Thomas; Meenakshy Vasudevan

1998-01-01

72

Never Again Would We Be the Same: The Oklahoma City Bombing  

Microsoft Academic Search

A terrorist attack on the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City showed the nation that no area of the country was free from the possibility of violence or terrorism. This author describes the day and the aftermath of the tragedy.

Kent Mathers

1996-01-01

73

Coping, Functioning, and Adjustment of Rescue Workers After the Oklahoma City Bombing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Studies have not previously considered postdisaster adjustment in the context of psychiatric disorders. After the Oklahoma City bombing, a volunteer sample of 181 firefighters who served as rescue and recovery workers was assessed with a structured diagnostic interview. The firefighters had relatively low rates of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and described little functional impairment, positive social adjustment, and high job

Carol S. North; Laura Tivis; J. Curtis McMillen; Betty Pfefferbaum; Jann Cox; Edward L. Spitznagel; Kenneth Bunch; John Schorr; Elizabeth M. Smith

2002-01-01

74

Deaths in the 3 May 1999 Oklahoma City Tornado from a Historical Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT The 3 May 1999 Oklahoma City tornado was the deadliest in the United States in over 20 years, with 36 direct fatalities. To understand how this event fits into the historical context, the record of tornado deaths in the United States has been examined. Almost 20 000 deaths have been reported associated with more,than 3600 tornadoes in the United

Harold E. Brooks; Charles A. Doswell III

2002-01-01

75

Oklahoma City's killer tornadoes: how local hospitals responded to yet another extreme disaster.  

PubMed

On the evening of May 3rd, a group of high-powered tornadoes tore through Oklahoma--leaving more than 40 people dead and hundreds injured. The main twister formed about 45 miles south of Oklahoma City and was classified F5, the most severe type of tornado, with winds of more than 260 mph. It cut a path one mile wide; stayed on the ground for more than four hours; and, along with other twisters, demolished 60 miles of countryside. More than 7,000 homes were destroyed or damaged, and more than 5,000 families were left homeless. Oklahoma City was hit the hardest, with about 1,500 homes leveled in the storm. A total of 755 people were injured in Oklahoma City and the surrounding area, testing local hospital disaster plans to the maximum. The same hospitals had been called on in April 1995 to handle the over 500 persons injured in the bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, a terrorist blast that killed 168. The hospitals' latest response to a disaster situation is recorded in this report. PMID:10621277

1999-09-01

76

76 FR 15290 - Foreign-Trade Zone 106-Oklahoma City, OK Application for Reorganization/Expansion Under...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board [Docket 20-2011] Foreign-Trade Zone 106--Oklahoma City, OK Application for Reorganization/Expansion Under Alternative Site Framework An application has been submitted to the...

2011-03-21

77

HAEMOPROTEUS AND LEUCOCYTOZOON INFECTIONS IN BIRDS OF THE OKLAHOMA CITY ZOO  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRA(:T: A total of 222 birds, captive or free-flying in the Oklahoma City Zoo, were examined for blood parasites; 31 (14%) harbored Haenzoproteus and\\/or Leucocytozoon. While 21% of the indigenous avifauna were infected, only 891 of the exotic bird species harbored haemoproteids and these parasites were also exotic to North America. There was no evidence to indicate that exotic infections

Nancy Halpern; Gordon F. Bennett

78

Post-Disaster Stress Following the Oklahoma City BombingAn Examination of Three Community Groups  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article describes a study of 472 community members to determine the nature and course of the post-disaster response to the April 19, 1995, bombing in Oklahoma City. It was hypothesized that an individual's post-disaster reaction would resemble a linear function of the degree of exposure experienced, and that this dose-response relationship could be used to differentiate the expression of

GINNY SPRANG

1999-01-01

79

Observed winds, turbulence, and dispersion in built-up downtown areas of Oklahoma City and Manhattan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wind and tracer data from the Oklahoma City Joint Urban 2003 (JU2003) and the Manhattan Madison Square Garden 2005 (MSG05)\\u000a urban field experiments are being analyzed to aid in understanding air flow and dispersion near street-level in built-up downtown\\u000a areas. The mean winds are separately calculated for groups of anemometers having similar exposures such as “near street level”\\u000a and “on

Steven Hanna; John White; Ying Zhou

2007-01-01

80

Proceedings of Department of Defense Industrial Symposium (1ST) on Numerical Control Data 3-6 October 1966. Host Oklahoma City Air Materiel Area Tinker Air Force Base Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A report of the first Department of Defense-Industy Symposium on Numerical Control Data held in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, 3-6 October 1966. The purpose of the symposium was, 'to review the commonality of numerical control systems and to determine capabilit...

1966-01-01

81

Restoration of One-Room School Facilities in Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Within the last 4 years, four one-room school houses have been restored for use as educational museum facilities. These include the Pleasant Valley School in Stillwater, Oklahoma; the Rose Hill School at Perry, Oklahoma; the old school located on the grounds of the Harn Homestead Museum in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; and the Old Roll School, located…

McKinley, Kenneth H.

82

Aquatic Vegetation Restoration in Arcadia Lake, Oklahoma: A Case Study.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Arcadia Lake is located within the metropolitan area of Oklahoma City and Edmund, in Oklahoma County, Oklahoma, about 2.4 km (1.5 miles) southwest of Arcadia, Oklahoma (Figure 1). Construction of the earth-filled dam was authorized by the Flood Control Ac...

G. O. Dick R. M. Smart E. R. Gilliland

2004-01-01

83

Pride in Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet is intended to be used as background material by social studies and history classroom teachers as they develop and implement educational programs on Oklahoma's heritage. It includes background information on the land and people of Oklahoma (geology, climate, topography, vegetation, animals, prehistoric peoples, French explorers,…

Moore, Gordon; Blackburn, Bob L.

84

Nocturnal Low-Level-Jet-Dominated Atmospheric Boundary Layer Observed by a Doppler Lidar over Oklahoma City during JU2003  

Microsoft Academic Search

Boundary layer wind data observed by a Doppler lidar and sonic anemometers during the mornings of three intensive observational periods (IOP2, IOP3, and IOP7) of the Joint Urban 2003 (JU2003) field experiment are analyzed to extract the mean and turbulent characteristics of airflow over Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. A strong nocturnal low-level jet (LLJ) dominated the flow in the boundary layer

Yansen Wang; Cheryl L. Klipp; Dennis M. Garvey; David A. Ligon; Chatt C. Williamson; Sam S. Chang; Rob K. Newsom; Ronald Calhoun

2007-01-01

85

Geohydrology of the alluvial and terrace deposits of the North Canadian River from Oklahoma City to Eufaula Lake, central Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This investigation was undertaken to describe the geohydrology of the alluvial and terrace deposits along the North Canadian River between Lake Overholser and Eufaula Lake, an area of about 1,835 square miles, and to determine the maximum annual yield of ground water. A 1982 water-level map of the alluvial and terrace aquifer was prepared using field data and published records. Data from test holes and other data from the files of the U.S. Geological Survey and the Oklahoma Water Resources Board were used to establish the approximate thickness of the alluvial and terrace deposits. The North Canadian River from Lake Overholser, near Oklahoma City, to Eufaula Lake is paralleled by a 2- to 3-mile wide band of alluvium. Scattered terrace deposits on either side of the alluvium reach an extreme width of 8 miles. Rocks of Permian age bound the alluvial and terrace deposits from the west to the midpoint of the study area; Pennsylvanian rocks bound the alluvial and terrace deposits from that point eastward. Three major aquifers are present in the study area: the alluvial and terrace aquifer, consisting of alluvium and terrace deposits of Quaternary age in a narrow band on either side of the North Canadian River; the Garber-Wellington aquifer of Permian age, consisting of an upper unconfined zone and a lower confined zone separated by relatively impermeable shales; and the Ada-Vamoosa aquifer of Pennsylvanian age. At locations were the alluvial and terrace aquifer overlies either of the other aquifers, there is hydraulic continuity between the alluvial and terrace aquifer and the other aquifers, and water levels are the same. Most large-scale municipal and industrial pumping from the Garber-Wellington aquifer is from the lower zone and has little discernible effect upon the alluvial and terrace aquifer. The total estimated base flow of the North Canadian River for the studied reach is 264 cubic feet per second. Evapotranspiration from the basin in August is about 60 cubic feet per second for the North Canadian River from Lake Overholser to a measuring station above Eufaula Lake. Estimated recharge rates to the alluvial and terrace aquifer in the basin range from 1.7 inches at the west edge of the study area to 7.0 inches at the east edge. Total permitted withdrawal from the aquifer, according to records of the Oklahoma Water Resources Board, ranged from 2,107 acre-feet per year in 1942 to about 21,415 acre-feet per year in 1982. Simulations of the alluvial and terrace aquifer from Lake Overholser to Eufaula Lake were made using a finite-difference model developed by McDonald and Harbaugh (1984). The area of the aquifers was subdivided into a finite-difference grid having 30 rows and 57 columns with cells measuring 1 mile in the north-south direction and 2 miles in the east-west direction. The model was calibrated in two steps: A steady-state calibration simulated head distribution prior to extensive pumping of the aquifer in 1942, and a transient calibration simulated head distribution after extensive pumpage. The final horizontal hydraulic conductivity used for the alluvial and terrace aquifer was 0.0036 feet per second (310 feet per day) at all locations. The recharge rate for the alluvial and terrace aquifer ranged from 1.7 inch per year in the west to 7.0 inches per year in the east, and averaged about 3.3 inches per year. A specific yield of 15 percent was used for the transient simulation. Permitted pumpage for 1942 through 1982 was used in the digital model to estimate the annual volume of water in storage in the alluvial and terrace aquifer for the years for this time period. The 1982 permitted pumpage rates were used for projections for 1983 to 2020. The estimated volume of water in storage was 1,940,000 acre-feet in 1982. Because the estimated recharge rate is equal to the allowed pumpage rate in 1982, the projected volume of water in storage in both 1993 and 2020 was 1,890,000 acre-feet.

Havens, J. S.

1989-01-01

86

Washita Basin Project, Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Located adjacent to Americas arid west/humid east division line known as the 100th meridian, western Oklahomas rolling uplands are susceptible to unpredictable weather cycles. Erratic best describes seasonal and annual rainfall patterns, with periods of p...

J. M. Bailey

2008-01-01

87

East Lawn Site and Planting Plan with Section Oklahoma ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

East Lawn Site and Planting Plan with Section - Oklahoma City Civic Center, Bounded by N. Shartel Avenue to the West, N. Hudson Avenue to the East, Couch Drive to the North, and Colcord Drive to the South, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, OK

88

40 CFR 282.86 - Oklahoma State-Administered Program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...from the Underground Storage Tank Program, Oklahoma Corporation Commission, Jim Thorpe Building, Room 238, Oklahoma City, OK 73105. (1) State statutes and regulations . (i) The provisions cited in this paragraph are incorporated by...

2013-07-01

89

Evaluation and trends of land cover, streamflow, and water quality in the North Canadian River Basin near Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, 1968–2009  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the city of Oklahoma City, collected water-quality samples from the North Canadian River at the streamflow-gaging station near Harrah, Oklahoma (Harrah station), since 1968, and at an upstream streamflow-gaging station at Britton Road at Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (Britton Road station), since 1988. Statistical summaries and frequencies of detection of water-quality constituent data from water samples, and summaries of water-quality constituent data from continuous water-quality monitors are described from the start of monitoring at those stations through 2009. Differences in concentrations between stations and time trends for selected constituents were evaluated to determine the effects of: (1) wastewater effluent discharges, (2) changes in land-cover, (3) changes in streamflow, (4) increases in urban development, and (5) other anthropogenic sources of contamination on water quality in the North Canadian River downstream from Oklahoma City. Land-cover changes between 1992 and 2001 in the basin between the Harrah station and Lake Overholser upstream included an increase in developed/barren land-cover and a decrease in pasture/hay land cover. There were no significant trends in median and greater streamflows at either streamflow-gaging station, but there were significant downward trends in lesser streamflows, especially after 1999, which may have been associated with decreases in precipitation between 1999 and 2009 or construction of low-water dams on the river upstream from Oklahoma City in 1999. Concentrations of dissolved chloride, lead, cadmium, and chlordane most frequently exceeded the Criterion Continuous Concentration (a water-quality standard for protection of aquatic life) in water-quality samples collected at both streamflow-gaging stations. Visual trends in annual frequencies of detection were investigated for selected pesticides with frequencies of detection greater than 10 percent in all water samples collected at both streamflow-gaging stations. Annual frequencies of detection of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and bromacil increased with time. Annual frequencies of detection of atrazine, chlorpyrifos, diazinon, dichlorprop, and lindane decreased with time. Dissolved nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations were significantly greater in water samples collected at the Harrah station than at the Britton Road station, whereas specific conductance was greater at the Britton Road station. Concentrations of dissolved oxygen, biochemical oxygen demand, and fecal coliform bacteria were not significantly different between stations. Daily minimum, mean, and maximum specific conductance collected from continuous water-quality monitors were significantly greater at the Britton Road station than in water samples collected at the Harrah station. Daily minimum, maximum, and diurnal fluctuations of water temperature collected from continuous water-quality monitors were significantly greater at the Harrah station than at the Britton Road station. The daily maximums and diurnal range of dissolved oxygen concentrations were significantly greater in water samples collected at the Britton Road station than at the Harrah station, but daily mean dissolved oxygen concentrations in water at those streamflow-gaging stations were not significantly different. Daily mean and diurnal water temperature ranges increased with time at the Britton Road and Harrah streamflow-gaging stations, whereas daily mean and diurnal specific conductance ranges decreased with time at both streamflow-gaging stations from 1988–2009. Daily minimum dissolved oxygen concentrations collected from continuous water-quality monitors more frequently indicated hypoxic conditions at the Harrah station than at the Britton Road station after 1999. Fecal coliform bacteria counts in water decreased slightly from 1988–2009 at the Britton Road station. The Seasonal Kendall's tau test indicated significant downward trends in

Esralew, Rachel A.; Andrews, William J.; Smith, S. Jerrod

2011-01-01

90

30 CFR 936.20 - Approval of Oklahoma abandoned mine land reclamation plan.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... The Secretary approved the Oklahoma abandoned mine land reclamation...plan are available at: (a) Oklahoma Conservation Commission, 2800 N. Lincoln Blvd., Suite 160, Oklahoma City, OK 73105. (b) Office...

2010-07-01

91

30 CFR 936.20 - Approval of Oklahoma abandoned mine land reclamation plan.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... The Secretary approved the Oklahoma abandoned mine land reclamation...plan are available at: (a) Oklahoma Conservation Commission, 2800 N. Lincoln Blvd., Suite 160, Oklahoma City, OK 73105. (b) Office...

2009-07-01

92

40 CFR 272.1851 - Oklahoma State-administered program: Final authorization.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Statutes and Regulations. (1) The Oklahoma statutes and regulations cited...You may obtain copies of the Oklahoma regulations that are incorporated...of State, P.O. Box 53390, Oklahoma City, OK 73152-3390; Phone...

2010-07-01

93

Digital atlas of Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This compact disc contains 25 digital map data sets covering the State of Oklahoma that may be of interest to the general public, private industry, schools, and government agencies. Fourteen data sets are statewide. These data sets include: administrative boundaries; 104th U.S. Congressional district boundaries; county boundaries; latitudinal lines; longitudinal lines; geographic names; indexes of U.S. Geological Survey 1:100,000, and 1:250,000-scale topographic quadrangles; a shaded-relief image; Oklahoma State House of Representatives district boundaries; Oklahoma State Senate district boundaries; locations of U.S. Geological Survey stream gages; watershed boundaries and hydrologic cataloging unit numbers; and locations of weather stations. Eleven data sets are divided by county and are located in 77 county subdirectories. These data sets include: census block group boundaries with selected demographic data; city and major highways text; geographic names; land surface elevation contours; elevation points; an index of U.S. Geological Survey 1:24,000-scale topographic quadrangles; roads, streets and address ranges; highway text; school district boundaries; streams, river and lakes; and the public land survey system. All data sets are provided in a readily accessible format. Most data sets are provided in Digital Line Graph (DLG) format. The attributes for many of the DLG files are stored in related dBASE(R)-format files and may be joined to the data set polygon attribute or arc attribute tables using dBASE(R)-compatible software. (Any use of trade names in this publication is for descriptive purposes only and does not imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.) Point attribute tables are provided in dBASE(R) format only, and include the X and Y map coordinates of each point. Annotation (text plotted in map coordinates) are provided in AutoCAD Drawing Exchange format (DXF) files. The shaded-relief image is provided in TIFF format. All data sets except the shaded-relief image also are provided in ARC/INFO export-file format.

Rea, A. H.; Becker, C. J.

1997-01-01

94

Variability of wind power near Oklahoma City and implications for siting of wind turbines  

SciTech Connect

Data from five sites near Oklahoma City were examined to assess wind power availability. Wind turbines of identical manufacture were operated at three of the sites, one of which was also equipped with anemometers on a 100-ft tower. Comprehensive anemometric data were available from the other two sites. The study indicates that the average wind speed varies substantially over Oklahoma's rolling plains, which have often been nominally regarded as flat for purposes of wind power generation. Average wind differences may be as much as 5 mph at 20 ft above ground level, and 7 mph at 100 ft above ground level for elevation differences of about 200 ft above mean sea level, even in the absence of substantial features of local terrain. Local altitude above mean sea level seems to be as influential as the shape of local terrain in determining the average wind speed. The wind turbine used at a meteorologically instrumented site in the study produced the power expected from it for the wind regime in which it was situated. The observed variations of local wind imply variations in annual kWh of as much as a factor of four between identical turbines located at similar heights above ground level in shallow valleys and on hilltops or elevated extended flat areas. 17 refs., 39 figs., 11 tabs.

Kessler, E.; Eyster, R.

1987-09-01

95

The Competency-Based Degree Program at Oklahoma City University: The Program and the People It Serves.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Competency-Based Degree Program (CBDP) at Oklahoma City University is an effort by a traditional university to serve a new and expanded group of students while maintaining a high level of quality in the services it provides. The CBDP is unique in that it is truly a nontraditional program operating within a traditional university with well…

Westerheide, W. J.; Krueger, Reynold J.

96

A Needs Assessment Survey of Hispanic Oklahoma City Residents in High Density Areas. A Report of Findings.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A survey of Hispanic residents of Oklahoma City assessed their knowledge of and need for health, social, and educational services. Home interviews were conducted with 212 Hispanic households in areas identified as having a high density of Hispanics. One adult was interviewed in each household. Interviewee characteristics included 28% under age 25,…

Curiel, Herman; And Others

97

Boundary-Layer Structure Upwind and Downwind of Oklahoma City during the Joint Urban 2003 Field Study  

SciTech Connect

The Joint Urban 2003 field study in Oklahoma City in July 2003 provided a comprehensive data set that included measurements from sites upwind and downwind of Oklahoma City where sodars, radar wind profilers/RASSes, and radiosondes were deployed. Radiosonde measurements were taken during six daytime intensive observational periods (IOPs) and during four nighttime IOPs, while the sodars and radars operated almost continuously during the entire month of July. The upwind and downwind sites were located approximately 2 km south and 5 km north of downtown Oklahoma City, respectively. Boundary-layer heights and wind and temperature structure at both sites have been investigated and compared to determine effects of the urban area on mean boundary-layer structure. Initial results show that differences in boundary-layer structure between the upwind and downwind location are small, i.e., there is no detectable effect of downtown Oklahoma City on the mean boundary-layer structure 5 km downwind. These measurements are compared with a numerical model and simple analytical models such as those that predict the growth of an internal boundary layer after a roughness change, and an advective thermodynamic model used to determine mixing heights in an urban area.

De Wekker, Stephan; Berg, Larry K.; Allwine, K Jerry; Doran, J. C.; Shaw, William J.

2004-08-25

98

76 FR 42723 - Land Acquisitions; Osage Nation of Oklahoma  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Acquisitions; Osage Nation of Oklahoma AGENCY: Bureau of Indian...known as ``OMDE Ponca City,'' into trust for the Osage Nation of Oklahoma on July 8, 2011. FOR FURTHER...trust for the Osage Nation of Oklahoma under the authority of...

2011-07-19

99

Minerals Yearbook, 1992: Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The value of Oklahoma nonfuel mineral production was nearly $252.6 million in 1992, a decrease of $22.9 million from that reported to the U.S. Bureau of Mines by State mineral producers in 1991. The value of the top three commodities produced, crushed sto...

J. E. Zelten R. H. Arndt

1994-01-01

100

Oklahoma's Quest for Quality.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The passage of Bill 1706 by the Oklahoma State Legislature is a major step toward building professional schools of education and a true profession. Through the specifications of this law, the total process is to be strengthened, since changes in teacher education are severely limited if done in a piecemeal fashion. There are five major points…

Wisniewski, Richard

101

Special report. The Oklahoma City bombing: mass casualties and the local hospital response.  

PubMed

A morning blast at the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, Oklahoma City, OK, on April 19, 1995, killed 168 persons and injured more than 500 in the worst terrorist attack in U.S. history. Hospital workers, physicians, and volunteers at nine hospitals there mobilized, put their disaster emergency plans into operation, and treated 466 persons in emergency rooms--many of them later being admitted as patients. To complicate matters, two of the hospitals received bomb threats called in after the disaster. This report will look at the security plans put into force by each of the nine hospitals; the handling of the great influx of persons, including victims, relatives, friends, concerned persons, volunteers, and the news media; and the lessons hospital officials learned from their experiences. PMID:10151262

1995-09-01

102

Heat flow in Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Twenty new heat flow values are incorporated, along with 40 previously published data, into a heat flow map of Oklahoma. The new heat flow data were estimated using previous temperature measurements in boreholes made by American Petroleum Institute researchers and 1,498 thermal conductivity measurements on drill cuttings. The mean of 20 average thermal gradients is 30.50sp°C/km. In general, thermal gradients increase from SW (14.11sp°C/km) to NE (42.24sp°C/km). The range of 1,498 in situ thermal conductivity measurements (after corrections for anisotropy, in situ temperature, and porosity) is 0.90-6.1 W/m-K; the average is 1.68 W/m-K. Estimated near-surface heat flow (±20%) at 20 new sites in Oklahoma varies between 22 ± 4 mW/msp2 and 86 ± 17 mW/msp2; the average is 50 mW/msp2. Twenty-seven new heat-generation estimates, along with 22 previously published data, are used to create a heat generation map of Oklahoma. The range of heat production estimates is 1.1-3.5 muW/msp3, with an average of 2.5 muW/msp3. The heat flow regime in Oklahoma is primarily conductive in nature, except for a zone in northeast. Transient effects due to sedimentary processes and metamorphic/igneous activity, as well as past climatic changes, do not significantly influence the thermal state of the Oklahoma crust. Heat flow near the margins of the Arkoma and Anadarko Basins may be depressed or elevated by 5-13 mW/msp2 by refraction of heat from sedimentary rocks of relatively low thermal conductivity (1-2 W/m-K) into crystalline basement rocks of relatively high thermal conductivity (˜3-4 W/m-K). The heat generation-heat flow relationship shows a modest correlation. The relatively high heat flow (˜70-80 mW/msp2) in part of northeastern Oklahoma suggests that the thermal regime there may be perturbed by regional groundwater flow originating in the fractured outcrops of the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer in the Arbuckle Mountains.

Cranganu, Constantin

103

Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History & Culture  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The 46th state, Oklahoma, presents its unusual history with the online version of The Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture. The Encyclopedia was prepared by over 500 "university-based scholars and independent historians and scholars," and was a joint effort by The Oklahoma Historical Society and Oklahoma State University Library Electronic Publishing Center. Visitors can click on the "Table of Contents" link near the bottom of the homepage to "Browse Entries Alphabetically", "Browse Entries Chronologically", or "Browse Entries by Subject". Browsing via chronology introduces visitors to Oklahoma starting with the "Precontact Era", through the "Westward Expansion" and on to "Twentieth Century to Present". Subject categories include "African Americans", "Farming", "Military", and "Petroleum". When searching, visitors will be taken to the Electronic Publishing Center Search Page, so they will need to choose the specific collection, Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture, from the drop down box, to confine the search to the Encyclopedia.

104

Oklahoma Healthy Homes Initiative  

PubMed Central

Compelling scientific evidence suggests that a strong association exists between housing-related hazards and the health and safety of their residents. Health, safety, and environmental hazards (such as asthma and allergy triggers), unintentional injury hazards, lead-based paint hazards, and poor indoor air quality are interrelated with substandard housing conditions. This article describes a Healthy Homes initiative to address these hazards in a coordinated fashion in the home, rather than taking a categorical approach, even in the presence of multiple hazards. It also provides an overview of Oklahoma's Healthy Homes initiative and its pilot project, the Tulsa Safe and Healthy Housing Project, which is currently administered in Tulsa in collaboration with Children First, Oklahoma's Nurse-Family Partnership program. This pilot project seeks to open new areas of research that can lead to a greater understanding of environmental health issues related to substandard housing in the United States, which will eventually make homes safer and healthier.

Khan, Fahad

2011-01-01

105

Oklahoma Digital Maps  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A team of talented librarians at the Oklahoma State University Library have created this collection of 3,600 maps, a true find for those with an interest in Sooner history, geography, culture, and more. The cartographic resources are divided into four collections, including the WPA Collection and the USGS Collection. This first collection consists of almost 2,400 detailed county maps produced in the 1930s by the Works Progress Administration and the Oklahoma Tax Commission to determine real estate values. Moving on, the USGS Collection is made up of 300 detailed maps generated from 1892 to the 1950s documenting topographical conditions throughout the state. Interested parties can view all of the maps here via a nice digital image tool and are also welcome to search across the entire collection by keyword.

106

Heat flow in Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oklahoma is one area in which terrestrial heat flow data are sparse. The thermal state of the southern mid-continent, however, is a key to understanding several important geologic problems. These include thermal anomalies associated with Paleozoic fluid migrations and the formation of Mississippi Valley-type lead-zinc deposits, the thermal evolution of the Arkoma and Anadarko sedimentary basins, and the history of

C. Cranganu; D. Deming

1996-01-01

107

Heat flow in Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Twenty new heat flow values are incorporated, along with 40 previously published data, into a heat flow map of Oklahoma. The new heat flow data were estimated using previous temperature measurements in boreholes made by American Petroleum Institute researchers and 1,498 thermal conductivity measurements on drill cuttings. The mean of 20 average thermal gradients is 30.50sp°C\\/km. In general, thermal gradients

Constantin Cranganu

1997-01-01

108

Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the Elk City Aquifer in western Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

ARC/INFO export and nonproprietary format files This diskette contains digitized aquifer boundaries and maps of hydraulic conductivity, recharge, and ground-water level elevation contours for the Elk City aquifer in western Oklahoma. The aquifer covers an area of approximately 193,000 acres and supplies ground water for irrigation, domestic, and industrial purposes in Beckham, Custer, Roger Mills, and Washita Counties along the divide between the Washita and Red River basins. The Elk City aquifer consists of the Elk City Sandstone and overlying terrace deposits, made up of clay, silt, sand and gravel, and dune sands in the eastern part and sand and gravel of the Ogallala Formation (or High Plains aquifer) in the western part of the aquifer. The Elk City aquifer is unconfined and composed of very friable sandstone, lightly cemented with clay, calcite, gypsum, or iron oxide. Most of the grains are fine-sized quartz but the grain size ranges from clay to cobble in the aquifer. The Doxey Shale underlies the Elk City aquifer and acts as a confining unit, restricting the downward movement of ground water. All of the data sets were digitized and created from information and maps in a ground-water modeling thesis and report of the Elk City aquifer. The maps digitized were published at a scale of 1:63,360. Ground-water flow models are numerical representations that simplify and aggregate natural systems. Models are not unique; different combinations of aquifer characteristics may produce similar results. Therefore, values of hydraulic conductivity and recharge used in the model and presented in this data set are not precise, but are within a reasonable range when compared to independently collected data.

Becker, C. J.; Runkle, D. L.; Rea, Alan

1997-01-01

109

Determinants of exposure to volatile organic compounds in four Oklahoma cities  

Microsoft Academic Search

To begin to develop generalized models for estimating personal exposure to ambient air pollutants within diverse populations, the design of the Oklahoma Urban Air Toxics Study incorporated eight dichotomous macroenvironmental and household factors that were hypothesized to be potential determinants of exposure. Personal, indoor, and outdoor samples of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were collected over 24-h monitoring periods in 42

Margaret L Phillips; Nurtan A Esmen; Thomas A Hall; Robert Lynch

2005-01-01

110

An inter-comparison of three urban wind models using Oklahoma City Joint Urban 2003 wind field measurements  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three wind models are compared to near-surface time-averaged wind measurements obtained in downtown Oklahoma City during the Joint Urban 2003 Field Campaign. The models cover several levels of computational approximation and include in increasing order of computational demand: a mass-consistent empirical-diagnostic code, a Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model, and a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) CFD code. The

Marina Neophytou; Akshay Gowardhan; Michael Brown

2011-01-01

111

Proceedings of Annual Oklahoma Conference on Education, "Public Education: Time to Speak Up!" (3rd, Oklahoma City, OK, September 8-9, 1981).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Speeches, panel discussions, and a debate from the 1981 Oklahoma Conference on Education are presented. The topics of the speeches are: (1) administrative decision making in institutions of higher education and the effects of state legislation (Barbara Uehling); (2) experiences of an American hostage in Iran and subsequent feelings about the…

Brown, Diane, Ed.; And Others

112

Computational Fluid Dynamic Simulations of Plume Dispersion in Urban Oklahoma City  

SciTech Connect

A 3D computational fluid dynamics study using Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes modeling was conducted and validated with field data from the Joint Urban 2003 dispersion study in Oklahoma City. The modeled flow field indicated that the many short buildings in this domain had a relatively small effect on the flow field, while the few tall buildings drove the transport and dispersion of tracer gas through the domain. Modeled concentrations and wind speeds were compared to observations along a vertical profile located about 500 meters downwind of the source. The isothermal base case using the k-epsilon closure model was within 50% of the field measurements, while a convective case with ground and building surfaces 10 degrees C hotter than ambient temperatures improved the modeled profile to within 30% of observations. Varying wind direction and source location had a significant effect on the plume dispersion due to the irregularity of the urban landscape. The location of the tallest obstacle in this domain with respect to the source position defined the size and shape of tracer plumes in this study. Model results based upon a Reynolds stress closure scheme were also compared to the vertical concentration profiles. For this location, the isothermal case underestimated concentrations; however, the case with thermal buoyancy resulted in concentrations within 25% of the observations.

Flaherty, Julia E.; Stock, David E.; Lamb, Brian K.

2007-12-01

113

Posttraumatic stress two years after the Oklahoma City bombing in youths geographically distant from the explosion.  

PubMed

This article describes Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) symptomatology in 69 sixth-grade youths who resided within 100 miles of Oklahoma City at the time of the 1995 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building. These youths neither had any direct physical exposure nor personally knew anyone killed or injured in the explosion. A survey conducted two years after the bombing assessed exposure, PTSD symptoms, and functioning. PTSD symptom frequency was measured with the Impact of Event Scale--Revised. Our BCD criteria for defining PTSD caseness was modeled after DSM-IV B, C, and D criteria requiring one reexperiencing, three avoidance/numbing, and two arousal symptoms for diagnosis. Those who met our BCD criteria had significantly higher PTSD symptom scores than those who did not. Both increased mean PTSD symptom score and meeting our caseness definition were associated with increased functioning difficulties. Media exposure and indirect interpersonal exposure (having a friend who knew someone killed or injured) were significant predictors of symptomatology. These findings suggest that children geographically distant from disaster who have not directly experienced an interpersonal loss report PTSD symptoms and functional impairment associated with increased media exposure and indirect loss. PMID:11218559

Pfefferbaum, B; Seale, T W; McDonald, N B; Brandt, E N; Rainwater, S M; Maynard, B T; Meierhoefer, B; Miller, P D

2000-01-01

114

Observed winds, turbulence, and dispersion in built-up downtown areas of Oklahoma City and Manhattan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Wind and tracer data from the Oklahoma City Joint Urban 2003 (JU2003) and the Manhattan Madison Square Garden 2005 (MSG05) urban field experiments are being analyzed to aid in understanding air flow and dispersion near street-level in built-up downtown areas. The mean winds are separately calculated for groups of anemometers having similar exposures such as “near street level” and “on building top”. Several general results are found, such as the scalar wind speed at street level is about 1/3 of that at building top. Turbulent standard deviations of wind speed components and temperature, and vertical fluxes of momentum and sensible heat, are calculated from sonic anemometers near street level at 20 locations in JU2003 and five locations in MSG05, and from two rooftop locations in MSG05. The turbulence observations are consistent with observations in the literature at other cities, although the JU2003 and MSG05 data are unique in that many data are available near street level. For example, it is found that the local (i.e., at the measuring height) ?w/u_{ast} averages about 1.5 and the local u_{ast}/u averages about 0.25 in the two cities, where ?w is the standard deviation of vertical velocity fluctuations, u_{ast} is the friction velocity, and u is the wind speed. The ratio of temperature fluctuations to temperature scale, ?T/T_{ast} , averages about -3 in both cities, consistent with similarity theory for slightly unstable conditions, where ?T is the standard deviation of temperature fluctuations, and T_{ast} is the temperature scale. The calculated Obukhov length, L, is also consistent with slightly unstable conditions near street level, even at night during JU2003. The SF6 tracer concentration observations from JU2003 are analyzed. Values of uC_{max}/Q for the continuous releases are calculated for each release and arc distance, where C_{max} is the 30-min average arc maximum concentration, Q is the continuous source emission rate, and u is the spatial-averaged wind speed in the downtown area. The basic characteristics of the JU2003 plot of averaged uC_{max}/Q agree reasonably well with similar plots for other urban experiments in Salt Lake City and London (i.e., at x < 1000 m, C_{max}/Q = Ax^{-2}) . A is found to be about 3 during the day and about 10 during the night.

Hanna, Steven; White, John; Zhou, Ying

2007-12-01

115

A simple urban dispersion model tested with tracer data from Oklahoma City and Manhattan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A simple urban dispersion model is tested that is based on the Gaussian plume model and modifications to the Briggs urban dispersion curves. An initial dispersion coefficient ( ?o) of 40 m is assumed to apply in built-up downtown areas, and the stability is assumed to be slightly unstable during the day and slightly stable during the night. Observations from tracer experiments during the Joint Urban 2003 (JU2003) field study in Oklahoma City and the Madison Square Garden 2005 (MSG05) field study in Manhattan are used for model testing. The tracer SF 6 was released during JU2003 near ground level in the downtown area and concentrations were observed at over 100 locations within 4 km from the source. Six perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) gases were released near ground level during MSG05 and sampled by about 20 samplers at the surface and on building roofs. The evaluations compare concentrations normalized by source release rate, C/ Q, for each sampler location and each tracer release, where data were used only if both the observed and predicted concentrations exceeded threshold levels. At JU2003, for all samplers and release times, the fractional mean bias (FB) is about 0.2 during the day (20% mean underprediction) and 0.0 during the night. About 45 -50% of the predictions are within a factor of two (FAC2) of the observations day and night at JU2003. The maximum observed C/ Q is about two times the maximum predicted C/ Q both day and night. At MSG05, for all PFTs, surface samplers, and release times, FB is 0.14 and FAC2 is about 45%. The overall 60 min-averaged maximum C/ Q is underpredicted by about 40% for the surface samplers and is overpredicted by about 25% for the building-roof samplers.

Hanna, Steven; Baja, Emmanuel

116

Public Disclosure, January 22, 2008, Community Reinvestment Act Performance Evaluation: Shattuck National Bank, Charter Number 9987, Oklahoma City, OK.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The SNB is a community bank headquartered in Shattuck, Oklahoma. SNB is wholly-owned by Shattuck Bancshares, Inc., a one-bank holding company. The main bank with a drive-thru facility is located at 503 South Main Street in Shattuck, Oklahoma. A 24-hour ca...

2008-01-01

117

The New Canadian Urban Modelling System: Evaluation for Two Cases from the Joint Urban 2003 Oklahoma City Experiment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new Canadian numerical urban modelling system has been developed at the Meteorological Service of Canada to represent surface and boundary-layer processes in the urban environment. In this system, urban covers are taken into account by including the Town Energy Balance urban-canopy parameterization scheme in the Global Environmental Multiscale meteorological model. The new modelling system is run at 250-m grid size for two intensive observational periods of the Joint Urban 2003 experiment that was held in Oklahoma City, U.S.A. An extensive evaluation against near-surface and upper-air observations has been performed. The Town Energy Balance scheme correctly simulates the urban micro-climate, more particularly the positive nighttime urban heat island, and also reproduces the “cool” island during the morning but does not succeed in maintaining it during all of the daytime period. The vertical structure of the boundary layer above the city is reasonably well simulated, but the simulation of the nocturnal boundary layer is difficult, due to the complex interaction with the nighttime southerly low-level jet that crosses the domain. Sensitivity tests reveal that the daytime convective boundary layer is mainly driven by dry soil conditions in and around Oklahoma City and that the nighttime low-level jet reinforces the urban heat island in the first 300m through large-scale advection, leading to the development of a less stable layer above the city.

Lemonsu, Aude; Belair, Stephane; Mailhot, Jocelyn

2009-10-01

118

Measurement of the VOC Environment from an Aircraft Platform during an Aerosol-Cloud Interaction Study Near Oklahoma City  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The interaction and relationship between atmospheric aerosols and ambient VOC concentrations is a current area of activity in atmospheric research both in urban and remote environments. Current atmospheric models seriously under predict the amount of secondary organic aerosol (SOA), highlighting the importance of simultaneous particle and VOC measurements and their importance to climate change models. The Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS) campaign was conducted in June of 2007 near Oklahoma City to investigate the mutual interaction of anthropogenic aerosols and clouds on each other. An important part of this study was characterizing the temporally and spatially resolved VOC environment in which urban aerosols and cumuliform clouds in the Oklahoma City environment exist. We report results from the proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) aboard the DOE Gulfstream 1 (G1) research aircraft to perform time-resolved measurements of the ambient VOC species and concentrations in conjunction with the suite of aerosol, trace gas and meteorological instruments aboard the G1. Several classes of VOC's were observed. Benzene, toluene, C2-benzenes and other species indicative of primary urban emissions were found in the Oklahoma City plume, strongly correlated with CO and other inorganic urban trace gases. Oxygenated species such as methanol, acetone and acetaldehyde were observed with no well defined spatial or temporal variation. Finally, species typical of biogenic emissions, isoprene and its oxidation products were seen in broad but definite spatial distributions, not correlated with the urban gas phase products as measured with the PTR-MS and other instrumentation. The concentration levels of these species and possible ground-based sources will be investigated and reported in this presentation. Correlation with aerosol instrumentation such as the Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), nephelometer and other optical measurements will also be reported, both within and out of cloud environments. These correlations will be examined for possible influences of the local VOC species on the cloud-aerosol systems under study.

Alexander, M. L.; Newburn, M.; Hubbe, J.; Berg, L.; Berkowitz, C.; Springston, S.; Senum, G.; Lee, Y.; Andrews, E.

2007-12-01

119

Heat flow in Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Oklahoma is one area in which terrestrial heat flow data are sparse. The thermal state of the southern mid-continent, however, is a key to understanding several important geologic problems. These include thermal anomalies associated with Paleozoic fluid migrations and the formation of Mississippi Valley-type lead-zinc deposits, the thermal evolution of the Arkoma and Anadarko sedimentary basins, and the history of hydrocarbon generation and overpressuring in the Anadarko Basin. In the late 1920s, the American Petroleum Institute made a set of equilibrium temperature logs in idle oil wells. These temperature data are generally regarded as being high quality, accurate estimates of rock temperature and they cover the entire central part of Oklahoma. Average thermal gradients in the API survey range from 14 to 43 [sup 0]C/km (average 31.2 [sup 0]C/km) over depth intervals that extend from the surface to a an average depth of 961 m. Geothermal gradients decrease from NNE to SSW. The observed change in thermal gradients could be due to a number of factors. The change in thermal gradients could simply reflect changes in lithology and thermal conductivity. Alternatively, the variation in thermal gradients could be indicative of a change in heat flow related perhaps to variations in the concentration of radioactive heat-producing elements in the crust or heat transport by one or more regional groundwater flow systems. We are proceeding to reduce ambiguity in interpretation by estimating heat flow from thermal conductivity measurements on drill cuttings and heat production from available gamma-ray logs which penetrate basement rocks.

Cranganu, C.; Deming, D. (Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States))

1996-01-01

120

Promoting School Readiness in Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The results of the research, conducted on Oklahoma's universal Pre-kindergarten (Pre-k) program, on children of Tulsa Public Schools (TPS), the largest school district in the state to increase the school readiness are presented.

Gormley, William T., Jr.; Gayer, Ted

2005-01-01

121

Oklahoma Higher Education: Challenging the Conventional Wisdom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A major headline in recent years has been that cash-strapped state governments are cutting back support for many services, including public higher education. Oklahoma is no different. Indeed, in the most recent state budget crafted by Oklahoma policymakers, Oklahoma's public colleges and universities received a 5.8 percent cut in state…

Denhart, Matthew; Matgouranis, Christopher

2011-01-01

122

Even Start Family Literacy Program Evaluation, Oklahoma City Public Schools: A National Diffusion Network Approved Program, Family Intergenerational-Interaction Literacy Model 1993-94.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Even Start Family Literacy Program, in its fourth year of operation, provides a literacy environment based on the Family Intergenerational-Interaction Literacy Model (FILM) in the southwest area of Oklahoma City. The FILM model is designed to provide a family literacy education program for parents, extended family, and their preschool children…

Oklahoma City Univ., OK.

123

Simpson-Arbuckle contact revisited in Northwest Oklahoma County, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Joins Formation, the lowermost formation of the Simpson Group, is traditionally the least studied or understood of the Simpson formations. The Joins, not known to produce hydrocarbons in central Oklahoma, is frequently overlooked by those more interested in the productive Simpson formations above and the Arbuckle carbonates below. In a study of the lower Simpson to upper Arbuckle interval

M. D. Allison; R. W. Allen

1995-01-01

124

Simpson-Arbuckle contact revisited in Northwest Oklahoma County, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The Joins Formation, the lowermost formation of the Simpson Group, is traditionally the least studied or understood of the Simpson formations. The Joins, not known to produce hydrocarbons in central Oklahoma, is frequently overlooked by those more interested in the productive Simpson formations above and the Arbuckle carbonates below. In a study of the lower Simpson to upper Arbuckle interval in northwestern Oklahoma County, Oklahoma, the Joins Formation was found to be present. The central Oklahoma section consists of interbedded gray, olive gray and green splintery moderately waxy shale, cream to light gray homogeneous microcrystallin dolomite, and microcrystalline to fine crystalline fossiliferous slightly glauconitic well cemented sandstones are also noted. The entire Joins Formation is moderately to very fossiliferous; primarily consisting of crinoids, ostracods, brachiopods, and trilobites. The ostracod fauna closely resembles and correlates with the Arbuckle Mountain section, which has been extensively studied over the years by such authors as Taff, Ulrich and Harris. Beneath the Joins in this area is a normal section of Arbuckle dolomites. Due to the absence of a basal sand in the Joins the separation of the Joins and Arbuckle, utilizing electric logs only, is frequently tenuous. In comparison with the Arbuckle, the Joins tends to have higher gamma ray and S.P. values. Other tools, such as resistivity, bulk density and photoelectric (PE), are frequently inconclusive. For geologists studying the Simpson-Arbuckle contact in central Oklahoma, the presence or absence of the Joins Formation is best determined through conventional lithologic and palenontologic sample identification techniques. Once this has been done, correlation of electric logs with this type log is possible for the local area.

Allison, M.D.; Allen, R.W. [Kabodi Inc., Ardmore, OK (United States)

1995-09-01

125

The reason God made Oklahoma?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hot. Dusty. Shimmering north Texas noontime. Waves of heat flowing over my car, now making its fourth trip from Sarasota, Florida to Edmond, Oklahoma in the baking summer sun. Trunk of the car loaded with mountains of computer equipment for the Institute. Me praying it's cool enough in there for laser printer, monitor, modem, system case and accessories to survive

Anne M. Parker

1996-01-01

126

Nocturnal Low-Level-Jet-Dominated Atmospheric Boundary Layer Observed by a Doppler Lidar Over Oklahoma City during JU2003  

SciTech Connect

Boundary layer wind data observed by a Doppler lidar and sonic anemometers during the mornings of three intensive observational periods (IOP2, IOP3, and IOP7) of the Joint Urban 2003 (JU2003) field experiment are analyzed to extract the mean and turbulent characteristics of airflow over Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. A strong nocturnal low-level jet (LLJ) dominated the flow in the boundary layer over the measurement domain from midnight to the morning hours. Lidar scans through the LLJ taken after sunrise indicate that the LLJ elevation shows a gradual increase of 25-100 m over the urban area relative to that over the upstream suburban area. The mean wind speed beneath the jet over the urban area is about 10%-15% slower than that over the suburban area. Sonic anemometer observations combined with Doppler lidar observations in the urban and suburban areas are also analyzed to investigate the boundary layer turbulence production in the LLJ-dominated atmospheric boundary layer. The turbulence kinetic energy was higher over the urban domain mainly because of the shear production of building surfaces and building wakes. Direct transport of turbulent momentum flux from the LLJ to the urban street level was very small because of the relatively high elevation of the jet. However, since the LLJ dominated the mean wind in the boundary layer, the turbulence kinetic energy in the urban domain is correlated directly with the LLJ maximum speed and inversely with its height. The results indicate that the jet Richardson number is a reasonably good indicator for turbulent kinetic energy over the urban domain in the LLJ-dominated atmospheric boundary layer.

Wang, Yansen; Klipp, Cheryl L.; Garvey, Dennis M.; Ligon, David; Williamson, Chatt C.; Chang, Sam S.; Newsom, Rob K.; Calhoun, Ron

2007-12-01

127

Feasibility Assessment for Implementing a Geologic Solution for Arsenic Mitigation in Small Public Water Systems in Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In 2003 the Ground Water Protection Council (GWPC), in collaboration with the Association of Central Oklahoma Governments (ACOG), and the cities of Edmond, Nichols Hills and Piedmont, Oklahoma completed a project to investigate the geological and geochemi...

2009-01-01

128

Mass traumatic terror in Oklahoma City and the phases of adaptational coping, part II: Integration of cognitive, behavioral, dynamic, existential and pharmacologic interventions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Part II of the present contribution focuses on issues of prevention and post-traumatic disaster intervention. Prevention of\\u000a chronic post-traumatic stress disorder after the Oklahoma City bombing is a critical objective by debriefers and mental health\\u000a providers engaged in victim assistance programs. As the first major contribution on the traumatic sequelae of the blast on\\u000a individuals, families, and on the community

Erwin Randolph Parson

1995-01-01

129

Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the alluvial and terrace deposits along the North Canadian River from Oklahoma City to Eufaula Lake in east-central Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

ARC/INFO export and nonproprietary format files This diskette contains digitized aquifer boundaries and maps of of hydraulic conductivity, recharge, and ground-water level elevation contours for the alluvial and terrace deposits along the North Canadian River from Oklahoma City to Eufaula Lake in east-central Oklahoma. Ground water in 710 square miles of Quaternary-age alluvial and terrace deposits along the North Canadian River is an important source of water for irrigation, industrial, municipal, stock, and domestic supplies. The aquifer, composed of alluvial and terrace deposits, consists of sand, silt, clay, and gravel. The aquifer is underlain and in hydraulic connection with the upper zone of the Permian-age Garber-Wellington aquifer and the Pennsylvanian-age Ada-Vamoosa aquifer. Most of the lines in the four digital data sets were digitized from a published ground-water modeling report but portions of the aquifer boundary data set was extracted from published digital geologic data sets. Ground-water flow models are numerical representations that simplify and aggregate natural systems. Models are not unique; different combinations of aquifer characteristics may produce similar results. Therefore, values of hydraulic conductivity and recharge used in the model and presented in this data set are not precise, but are within a reasonable range when compared to independently collected data.

Adams, G. P.; Runkle, Donna; Rea, Alan; Becker, C. J.

1997-01-01

130

40 CFR 81.424 - Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Environment 18 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Oklahoma. 81.424 Section 81.424 Protection of Environment...Areas Where Visibility Is an Important Value § 81.424 Oklahoma. Area name Acreage Public Law establishing...

2013-07-01

131

Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Oklahoma, 2010  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper profiles the student subgroup achievement and gap trends in Oklahoma for 2010. Oklahoma made progress in narrowing achievement gaps for most major subgroups on the End-of-Instruction (EOI) test in Algebra I. Trends in achievement gaps could not be determined for other grades in math, or for any grades in reading, because the state…

Center on Education Policy, 2010

2010-01-01

132

Statistics of Oklahoma's petroleum industry, 1966  

Microsoft Academic Search

Exploratory wells were drilled in all but 9 counties of Oklahoma during 1966. The concentration of discoveries, extensions, outposts, and new pay horizons was in NW. Oklahoma in Beaver, Ellis, Roger Mills, Woods, and Woodward Counties. This area had a 40% success ratio, whereas the state-wide success ratio was 28% for exploratory wells. Tonkawa completions were the most numerous, followed

1967-01-01

133

Ground-water conditions in the vicinity of Enid, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This memorandum summaries matter discussed at a meeting of the City Commission of Enid, Oklahoma, on Thursday, January 15, 1948, at which the write presented a brief analysis of the ground-water resources available to the City of Enid and answered questions brought up by the commissioners.

Schoff, Stuart L.

1948-01-01

134

Oklahoma seismic network. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has established rigorous guidelines that must be adhered to before a permit to construct a nuclear-power plant is granted to an applicant. Local as well as regional seismicity and structural relationships play an integral role in the final design criteria for nuclear power plants. The existing historical record of seismicity is inadequate in a number of areas of the Midcontinent region because of the lack of instrumentation and (or) the sensitivity of the instruments deployed to monitor earthquake events. The Nemaha Uplift/Midcontinent Geophysical Anomaly is one of five principal areas east of the Rocky Mountain front that has a moderately high seismic-risk classification. The Nemaha uplift, which is common to the states of Oklahoma, Kansas, and Nebraska, is approximately 415 miles long and 12-14 miles wide. The Midcontinent Geophysical Anomaly extends southward from Minnesota across Iowa and the southeastern corner of Nebraska and probably terminates in central Kansas. A number of moderate-sized earthquakes--magnitude 5 or greater--have occurred along or west of the Nemaha uplift. The Oklahoma Geological Survey, in cooperation with the geological surveys of Kansas, Nebraska, and Iowa, conducted a 5-year investigation of the seismicity and tectonic relationships of the Nemaha uplift and associated geologic features in the Midcontinent. This investigation was intended to provide data to be used to design nuclear-power plants. However, the information is also being used to design better large-scale structures, such as dams and high-use buildings, and to provide the necessary data to evaluate earthquake-insurance rates in the Midcontinent.

Luza, K.V.; Lawson, J.E. Jr. [Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States)]|[Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). Energy Center

1993-07-01

135

Quartz Mountain/Oklahoma Summer Arts Institute.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the Quartz Mountain Oklahoma Summer Arts Institute program. It is designed to nurture artistic talent and to provide intensive arts experiences in music, dance, theater, and the visual arts for talented students aged 14-18. (AM)

Frates, Mary Y.; Madeja, Stanley S.

1982-01-01

136

Measurements Inside Oklahoma Thunderstorms during Project SESAME.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report presents the state parameter and hydrometeor measurements obtained with the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology (SDSMT) T-28 aircraft within Oklahoma convective clouds during the Severe Environmental Storms and Mesoscale Experiment (SE...

A. J. Heymsfield M. R. Hjelmfelt

1984-01-01

137

77 FR 26598 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00059  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Oklahoma. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes and Hail. DATES: Effective April 26, 2012. Incident Period: April 13, 2012 through April 15, 2012. Physical Loan...

2012-05-04

138

76 FR 31670 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00048  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Public Assistance Only for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA- 1970-DR), dated 05/06/2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, and Straight-line Winds. Incident Period: 04/14/2011. Effective Date: 05/06/2011. Physical Loan...

2011-06-01

139

75 FR 35103 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00040  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Public Assistance Only for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA- 1917-DR), dated 06/11/2010. Incident: Severe storms, tornadoes, and straight-line winds. Incident Period: 05/10/2010 through 05/13/2010. Effective Date:...

2010-06-21

140

75 FR 30871 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00038  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...declaration of a major disaster for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-1917-DR), dated 05/24/2010. Incident: Severe storms, tornadoes, and straight-line winds. Incident Period: 05/10/2010 through 05/13/2010. Effective Date:...

2010-06-02

141

Economic Impact of Interstate Highway 35 on Tonkawa, Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This interim report shows economic data gathered and analyzed, covering a 48 month period, involving the effects of the opening of Interstate 35 on Tonkawa, Oklahoma and compares these data with the control city of Woodward and the control county of Woodw...

1968-01-01

142

Ground water available in the Davenport area, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This memorandum describes the ground-water resources in the vicinity of Davenport, Lincoln County, Oklahoma. It is based on a one-day trip to Davenport made by the writer on February 11, 1948, to obtain information in addition to that in the ground-water files in Norman on the availability of ground water for public supply or other uses in the Davenport area. Davenport is a town of about 1,000 in east-central Lincoln County, Oklahoma, on U.S. Highway 66, about half way between Oklahoma City and Tulsa. It is in an area of undulating to gently rolling topography underlain by rocks of Pennsylvanian age. The area is drained into Deep Fork of the Canadian River, by Dry Creek and its tributary, Chuckaho Creek.

Schoff, Stuart L.

1948-01-01

143

75 FR 68755 - Agenda and Notice of Public Meeting of the Oklahoma Advisory Committee  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Agenda and Notice of Public Meeting of the Oklahoma Advisory Committee Notice is hereby given...FACA), that a planning meeting of the Oklahoma Advisory Committee to the Commission will...400 State Avenue, Suite 908, Kansas City, Kansas 66101. Comments may be...

2010-11-09

144

What Works in Oklahoma Schools: A Comprehensive Needs Assessment of Oklahoma Schools. Phase III Action Steps  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document contains the Phase III report from the "What Works in Oklahoma Schools" study. As opposed to describing the findings from the study that was conducted, it provides a tool-kit that can be used by Oklahoma principals and teachers to determine the best courses of action for their schools and classrooms. The tools provided in this report…

Marzano Research Laboratory, 2011

2011-01-01

145

Summary of Sonic Boom Rise Times Observed During FAA Community Response Studies over a 6-Month Period in the Oklahoma City Area  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The sonic boom signature data acquired from about 1225 supersonic flights, over a 6-month period in 1964 in the Oklahoma City area, was enhanced with the addition of data relating to rise times and total signature duration. These later parameters, not available at the time of publication of the original report on the Oklahoma City sonic boom exposures, are listed in tabular form along with overpressure, positive impulse, positive duration, and waveform category. Airplane operating information along with the surface weather observations are also included. Sonic boom rise times include readings to the 1/2, 3/4, and maximum overpressure values. Rise time relative probabilities for various lateral locations from the ground track of 0, 5, and 10 miles are presented along with the variation of rise times with flight altitude. The tabulated signature data, along with corresponding airplane operating conditions and surface and upper level atmospheric information, are also available on electronic files to provide it in the format for more efficient and effective utilization.

Maglieri, Domenic J.; Sothcott, Victor E.

1990-01-01

146

Reductive Dechlorination of Chlorinated Ethenes Under Oxidation-Reduction Conditions and Potentiometric Surfaces in Two Trichloroethene-Contaminated Zones at the Double Eagle and Fourth Street Superfund Sites in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Double Eagle Refining Superfund site and the Fourth Street Abandoned Refinery Superfund site are in northeast Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, adjacent to one another. The Double Eagle facility became a Superfund site on the basis of contamination from lead and volatile organic compounds; the Fourth Street facility on the basis of volatile organic compounds, pesticides, and acid-base neutral compounds. The study documented in this report was done to investigate whether reductive dechlorination of chlorinated ethenes under oxidation-reduction conditions is occurring in two zones of the Garber-Wellington aquifer (shallow zone 30?60 to 75 feet below land surface, deep zone 75 to 160 feet below land surface) at the sites; and to construct potentiometric surfaces of the two water-yielding zones to determine the directions of ground-water flow at the sites. The presence in some wells of intermediate products of reductive dechlorination, dichloroethene and vinyl chloride, is an indication that reductive dechlorination of trichloroethene is occurring. Dissolved oxygen concentrations (less than 0.5 milligram per liter) indicate that consumption of dissolved oxygen likely had occurred in the oxygen-reducing microbial process associated with reductive dechlorination. Concentrations of nitrate and nitrite nitrogen (generally less than 2.0 and 0.06 milligrams per liter, respectively) indicate that nitrate reduction probably is not a key process in either aquifer zone. Concentrations of ferrous iron greater than 1.00 milligram per liter in the majority of wells sampled indicate that iron reduction is probable. Concentrations of sulfide less than 0.05 milligram per liter in all wells indicate that sulfate reduction probably is not a key process in either zone. The presence of methane in ground water is an indication of strongly reducing conditions that facilitate reductive dechlorination. Methane was detected in all but one well. In the shallow zone in the eastern part of the study area, ground water flowing from the northwest and south coalesces in a potentiometric trough, then moves westward and ultimately northwestward. In the western part of the study area, ground water in the shallow zone flows northwest. In the deep zone in the eastern part of the study area, ground water generally flows northwestward; and in the western part of the study area, ground water in the deep zone generally flows northward.

Braun, Christopher L.

2004-01-01

147

Feasibility of a Theme Park in Fort Gibson, Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report describes a feasibility study for a potential 'Theme Park' in Eastern Oklahoma on the Grand River near Fort Gibson. The Oklahoma Gas and Electric Company, the Ozarks Regional Commission and the Three Forks Company have asked Economics Research ...

1972-01-01

148

76 FR 44030 - Oklahoma; Major Disaster and Related Determinations  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FEMA-2011-0001] Oklahoma; Major Disaster and Related Determinations AGENCY: Federal...the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-1988-DR...2011, the President issued a major disaster declaration under the authority of...

2011-07-22

149

76 FR 27076 - Oklahoma; Major Disaster and Related Determinations  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Emergency Management Agency [Internal Agency Docket No. FEMA-1970-DR; Docket ID FEMA-2011-0001] Oklahoma; Major Disaster...declaration of a major disaster for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-1970-DR), dated April 22, 2011, and related...

2011-05-10

150

Growth of Cities and Loss of Streams: Land Cover Change Impacts on Stream Channel Loss in Central Oklahoma from 1874 to 2010  

EPA Science Inventory

Central Oklahoma has undergone substantial land cover changes since the 1800’s. Accordingly, regional watersheds have been covered by impervious surfaces, peripheral agricultural areas have been subdivided or intensified, and large reservoirs have been constructed. Here, we...

151

77 FR 74689 - Land Acquisitions; Tonkawa Tribe of Oklahoma  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of Indian Affairs Land Acquisitions; Tonkawa Tribe of Oklahoma AGENCY: Bureau of Indian...127.65 acres of land in trust for the Tonkawa Tribe of Oklahoma on December 6, 2012...65 acres of land into trust for the Tonkawa Tribe of Oklahoma under the...

2012-12-17

152

Social and Economic Consequences of Indian Gaming in Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The balancing framework of Indian gaming as it operates in Oklahoma constrains Oklahoma Indian nations from operating facilities according to the dictates of the marketplace on a large-scale Class III basis. Indian gaming actually brings substantial net economic benefits to the state, contrary to claims that Oklahoma Indian gaming benefits come at…

Grant, Kenneth W., II; Spilde, Katherine A.; Taylor, Jonathan B.

2004-01-01

153

A climatic guide for North Central Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

This guide provides some climatological data pertaining to central and north central Oklahoma. The information was derived from standard reference material to reflect what general surface meteorological characteristics exist in that region. It is intended to assist those individuals involved in the implementation of the first ARM site in that locale. A similar guide already exists for the region involved in Kansas entitled, One Regional ARM Guide for Climatic Evaluation''. The Oklahoma Kansas area was selected as the first site from the process reported in the Identification, Recommendation and Justification of Potential Locales for ARM Sites''.

Brown, R.M.

1991-06-01

154

A climatic guide for North Central Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

This guide provides some climatological data pertaining to central and north central Oklahoma. The information was derived from standard reference material to reflect what general surface meteorological characteristics exist in that region. It is intended to assist those individuals involved in the implementation of the first ARM site in that locale. A similar guide already exists for the region involved in Kansas entitled, ``One Regional ARM Guide for Climatic Evaluation``. The Oklahoma Kansas area was selected as the first site from the process reported in the ``Identification, Recommendation and Justification of Potential Locales for ARM Sites``.

Brown, R.M.

1991-06-01

155

40 CFR 272.1851 - Oklahoma State-administered program: Final authorization.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Administrative Rules, Secretary of State, P.O. Box 53390, Oklahoma City, OK 73152-3390; Phone number: 405-521-4911; Web site: www.sos.state.ok.us/oar/oar_welcome.htm. The statutes are available from West...

2013-07-01

156

An economic assessment of the application of superconductor technology to magnetic-levitation trains in Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Specific objectives were to: (1) develop and refine a methodology that can be used to evaluate the feasibility of MAG-LEV trains; (2) apply this methodology to the state of Oklahoma. The methodology is based on an aggregate econometric demand model and mathematical programming. A city-pair network is constructed to evaluate alternative MAG-LEV routes between Oklahoma City and nine other cites

Sabbagh Kermani

1991-01-01

157

Oklahoma Pre-Kindergarten Curriculum Guidelines.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document presents curriculum guidelines intended for use as a recommended curriculum for children attending early childhood programs in Oklahoma. The introductory section describes critical characteristics of quality early childhood programs, noting that early childhood programs should be appropriate for the age, developmental level, and…

Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City.

158

Oklahoma Association of Teacher Educators Journal 2009  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Oklahoma Association of Teacher Educators 2009 Journal includes the following four peer reviewed articles: (1) The Changing Role of Grandparents (Fred D. Hammond, III, Terry E. Spigner, Charolette Myles-Nixon, and Pauline Holloway); (2) Pedagogical Agent Instructional Design Challenges (Jon Martens); (3) Differences in Relatedness across…

Green, Malinda Hendricks, Ed.

2009-01-01

159

Career Education: A Model for Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The booklet for implementing career education is one of the products of the career education project at Sand Springs Public Schools, Oklahoma. Areas of concern are: selection of staff, orienting the community, planning inservice training, developing goals and objectives, organizing an advisory council, establishing a placement function, using…

Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater.

160

Oklahoma Curriculum Guide for Teaching Safety Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Developed by classroom teachers, university professors, and personnel from the Oklahoma State Department of Education, this guide is an effort to assist teachers in locating and utilizing safety materials as well as to assist them in developing well-balanced safety programs for the children and young people in the state. The preschool and…

Oklahoma Curriculum Improvement Commission, Oklahoma City.

161

DISTRIBUTION OF PHYTOPLANKTON IN OKLAHOMA LAKES  

EPA Science Inventory

This is a data report presenting the species and abundance of phytoplankton in the 15 lakes sampled by the National Eutrophication Survey in the State of Oklahoma. Results from the calculation of several water quality indices are also included (Nygaard's Trophic State Index, Palm...

162

The Internship Program at Oklahoma State University.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The internship program in technical communications at Oklahoma State University is a 3-credit-hour course that offers students an opportunity to apply the principles of technical communication learned in the classroom to an on-the-job situation. The prerequisites for the course are 9 hours of English and a course on intermediate…

Southard, Sherry G.

163

Ethnicity and Identity in Northeastern Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The origins of the Oklahoma Delaware reflect a complex history of migration, forced relocation, and punitive concentration. Though 36 tribal identities survive today, they are not of equal cultural coherence. Among the Delaware, there is no simple relation between socioeconomic status, level of acculturation, and factional membership. Rather, the…

Roark, Sue N.

164

The Oklahoma Indian and Nature Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The product of a Title IX Ethnic Heritage Grant, this teaching-resource guide has been designed and evaluated by teams of Native American adults, teachers, and Indian and non-Indian students from three Oklahoma schools selected as project sites: Anadarko Public Schools; Muskogee Public Schools; and Sapula Public Schools. The guide is divided into…

Eyster, Ira; Chisholm, Anita

165

ASPECTS OF COWBIRD PARASITISM IN SOUTHERN OKLAHOMA  

Microsoft Academic Search

SPECTS of the parasitic breedin, u habits of the Brown-headed Cowbird (IMoZothrus ater) have been documented extensively by Friedmann (1929)) Laskey (1950)) Berger (1951)) Norris (1947), and others. It was the purpose of this study to investigate some of the major aspects of such parasitism in the breeding avifauna of southern Oklahoma. Particular em- phasis was placed on observation of

JOHN A. WIENS

166

Funding Equity in Oklahoma: The Extremes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report attempts to answer the question of whether or not there are school districts that are perennial to the extremes in the funding of Oklahoma Schools from SY-99 to SY-08. Using data collected from these years, calculations of fiscal neutrality were made and a rank ordering of districts was performed and then collated over the ten year…

Hancock, Kenneth; Schwab, Steve

2009-01-01

167

75 FR 42173 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00041  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Oklahoma dated 07/13/2010. Incident: Tornadoes, Severe Storms, Straight Line Winds and Flooding. Incident Period: 06/13/2010 through 06/15/2010. DATES:...

2010-07-20

168

40 CFR 81.126 - Northwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Northwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region...Regions § 81.126 Northwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Northwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality...

2013-07-01

169

40 CFR 81.65 - Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region... Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region...The Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality...

2013-07-01

170

78 FR 16036 - Service Level Environmental Impact Statement for the Texas Oklahoma Passenger Rail Study Corridor...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Statement for the Texas Oklahoma Passenger Rail Study Corridor, South Texas to Oklahoma...improved high- speed intercity passenger rail service along an 850-mile corridor...Level EIS, the Texas Oklahoma Passenger Rail Study (Study) also includes...

2013-03-13

171

A digital geologic map database for the state of Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This dataset is a composite of part or all of the 12 1:250,000 scale quadrangles that make up Oklahoma. The result looks like a geologic map of the State of Oklahoma. But it is only an Oklahoma shaped map clipped from the 1:250,000 geologic maps. This is not a new geologic map. No new mapping took place. The geologic information from each quadrangle is available within the composite dataset.

compiled by Heran, William D.; Green, Gregory N.; Stoeser, Douglas B.

2003-01-01

172

Oklahoma Center for High Energy Physics (OCHEP)  

SciTech Connect

The DOE EPSCoR implementation grant, with the support from the State of Oklahoma and from the three universities, Oklahoma State University, University of Oklahoma and Langston University, resulted in establishing of the Oklahoma Center for High Energy Physics (OCHEP) in 2004. Currently, OCHEP continues to flourish as a vibrant hub for research in experimental and theoretical particle physics and an educational center in the State of Oklahoma. All goals of the original proposal were successfully accomplished. These include foun- dation of a new experimental particle physics group at OSU, the establishment of a Tier 2 computing facility for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and Tevatron data analysis at OU and organization of a vital particle physics research center in Oklahoma based on resources of the three universities. OSU has hired two tenure-track faculty members with initial support from the grant funds. Now both positions are supported through OSU budget. This new HEP Experimental Group at OSU has established itself as a full member of the Fermilab D0 Collaboration and LHC ATLAS Experiment and has secured external funds from the DOE and the NSF. These funds currently support 2 graduate students, 1 postdoctoral fellow, and 1 part-time engineer. The grant initiated creation of a Tier 2 computing facility at OU as part of the Southwest Tier 2 facility, and a permanent Research Scientist was hired at OU to maintain and run the facility. Permanent support for this position has now been provided through the OU university budget. OCHEP represents a successful model of cooperation of several universities, providing the establishment of critical mass of manpower, computing and hardware resources. This led to increasing Oklahoma�¢����s impact in all areas of HEP, theory, experiment, and computation. The Center personnel are involved in cutting edge research in experimental, theoretical, and computational aspects of High Energy Physics with the research areas ranging from the search for new phenomena at the Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider to theoretical modeling, computer simulation, detector development and testing, and physics analysis. OCHEP faculty members participating on the D0 collaboration at the Fermilab Tevatron and on the ATLAS collaboration at the CERN LHC have made major impact on the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson search, top quark studies, B physics studies, and measurements of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) phenomena. The OCHEP Grid computing facility consists of a large computer cluster which is playing a major role in data analysis and Monte Carlo productions for both the D0 and ATLAS experiments. Theoretical efforts are devoted to new ideas in Higgs bosons physics, extra dimensions, neutrino masses and oscillations, Grand Unified Theories, supersymmetric models, dark matter, and nonperturbative quantum field theory. Theory members are making major contributions to the understanding of phenomena being explored at the Tevatron and the LHC. They have proposed new models for Higgs bosons, and have suggested new signals for extra dimensions, and for the search of supersymmetric particles. During the seven year period when OCHEP was partially funded through the DOE EPSCoR implementation grant, OCHEP members published over 500 refereed journal articles and made over 200 invited presentations at major conferences. The Center is also involved in education and outreach activities by offering summer research programs for high school teachers and college students, and organizing summer workshops for high school teachers, sometimes coordinating with the Quarknet programs at OSU and OU. The details of the Center can be found in http://ochep.phy.okstate.edu.

S. Nandi; M.J. Strauss; J. Snow; F. Rizatdinova; B. Abbott; K. Babu; P. Gutierrez; C. Kao; A. Khanov; K.A. Milton; H. Neaman; H. Severini, P. Skubic

2012-02-29

173

Investigation of nocturnal low-level jet-generated gravity waves over Oklahoma City during morning boundary layer transition period using Doppler wind lidar data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Low-level jet (LLJ)-generated gravity waves were observed over Oklahoma City by a scanning Doppler wind lidar during the transition periods of atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) from stable to convective conditions in the mornings after sunrise. The temperature profiles had a multilayer structure with a shallow neutral layer immediately above the ground and a stable cap layer above the neutral layer. The wind profiles exhibited a typical shape of a LLJ with nearly linear growth of wind speed with respect to height, and maximum wind speed occurred at the top of the stable cap layer. The average wavelength and its relation with mean wind and temperature profiles are characterized with data from Doppler wind lidar, radiosonde, and wind profiler. A linear stability analysis was performed to check the stratification conditions for wave occurrence. The wind signals from sonic anemometers near the ground were separated into waves and turbulence parts using a wavelet decomposition method, and the momentum fluxes due to the wave motions and turbulence were computed. The downward gravity wave momentum flux was 1.5 to 3.0 times of turbulent momentum flux. The analysis indicated that gravity wave momentum transport from the stable cap layer downward is one of the mechanisms of stable-to-convective transition in the LLJ-dominated ABL.

Wang, Yansen; Creegan, Edward; Felton, Melvin; Ligon, David; Huynh, Giap

2013-01-01

174

Development and Application to Oklahoma City of a New Mass, Energy, Vorticity, and Potential Enstrophy Conserving Scheme for 3D Nonhydrostatic Atmospheric Flows with Complex Boundaries  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a generalization of a mass, energy, vorticity, and potential enstrophy conserving numerical scheme for the 2D shallow water equations (SWEs) in domains with rigid boundaries (e.g. islands) to the governing equations for 3D nonhydrostatic atmospheric flows expressed in the altitude coordinate (as opposed to a terrain-following vertical coordinate). The scheme for the 2D SWEs consists of the scheme of Arakawa and Lamb (1981) (AL81) away from boundaries and the boundary scheme of Ketefian and Jacobson (2009) (KJ09) at boundaries. We generalize the combined AL81/KJ09 scheme to 3D atmospheric flows with rigid boundaries (e.g. hills and buildings) in such a way that, like the continuous equations governing these flows, the generalized 3D scheme conserves mass, energy, vorticity, and potential enstrophy in the special case of 2D barotropic flow. We perform 2D numerical simulations in a vertical plane to demonstrate the scheme's conservation properties. We also perform 3D simulations of flows in a domain with building-scale topography from Oklahoma City, and we use the velocity fields from these simulations to model the transport of an inert tracer around this topography. The generalized 3D scheme is useful because it conserves several important domain-summed quantities in atmospheric models that use the altitude coordinate, thereby avoiding the large errors in pressure-gradient calculations often found in models that use a terrain-following vertical coordinate.

Ketefian, G. S.; Jacobson, M. Z.

2010-12-01

175

DISABILITIES IN OKLAHOMA--ESTIMATES AND PROJECTIONS, REPORT OF THE OKLAHOMA SURVEY OF DISABILITIES.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THE PURPOSE OF THE STUDY WAS TO PROVIDE REASONABLY ACCURATE ESTIMATES OF THE NUMBER AND TYPES OF DISABLED PERSONS AND THEIR NEEDS AS A BASIS FOR BOTH PRESENT AND FUTURE PLANNING. PERSONAL INTERVIEWS WERE CONDUCTED WITH ADULT RESPONDENTS IN 3,000 HOUSEHOLDS IN OKLAHOMA, A RANDOM SAMPLE STATIFIED ON THE RURAL-URBAN DIMENSION. DATA FROM 2,058…

BOHLEBER, MICHAEL E.

176

Ground water in the Beggs area, Okmulgee County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This memorandum discusses the geology of the Beggs area in Okmulgee County, Oklahoma, as it is related to the availability of ground water. Geological reports and unpublished data from the files of the Oklahoma Geological Survey, together with local information furnished by R.W. Steinman, Beggs Water Superintendent, are the basis for the statements that follow.

Schoff, Stuart L.

1948-01-01

177

Literacy and Education among Adult Indians in Oklahoma. Volume I.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The U.S. Office of Education funded the Adult Indian Education Project (AIEP) for 15 months to identify literacy levels and educational needs of adult American Indians in Oklahoma. Using Native American field interviewers, the AIEP surveyed a 1.8% random sample of adults from 19 tribal groups representing 70% of the Indian population of Oklahoma.…

Hall, Paul R.; And Others

178

Oklahoma's Indian People: Images of Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Designed to be combined with the social studies curriculum, this guide promotes awareness of American Indian contributions to Oklahoma's development and cultural heritage. Lessons help students in grades 6 through 9 strengthen powers of critical thinking, practice writing skills, and develop creative expression, while learning about Oklahoma's 34…

Chisholm, Anita, Ed.

179

Oklahoma administrators' perceptions of applied science  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Scope and method of study. The purpose of this study was to assess the perceptions of Oklahoma Public School Superintendents when applied science courses such as Applied Biology/Chemistry and Applied Physics (Principles of Technology) are compared to traditional science courses such as Biology, Chemistry, and Physics. The study was conducted with a population of 69 Oklahoma comprehensive school superintendents who were under contract during the 1997/98 school year. Each participant was employed by a school district that offered either Applied Biology/Chemistry, Applied Physics (also known as Principles of Technology) or both. All participants completed an 18-question telephone survey. Combined means and percentages of participants responses to the survey were recorded to draw conclusions about the study. Findings and conclusions. Superintendents perceive teachers and students as having good acceptance of applied science courses. Superintendents believe students think of applied science courses as excellent hands-on science, and teachers think of them as acceptable alternative science. Superintendents are somewhat satisfied with applied science courses. They believe it makes no difference if a student is college bound, non-college bound, more motivated or less motivated as to whom benefits from applied science courses. Superintendents feel there is no difference in applied science courses and traditional science courses when teaching science concepts of "PASS Skills," or preparing students for college or work. They perceive the cost of applied science courses to be somewhat greater than traditional science courses. They also think additional training for applied science teachers should be in the form of a seminar. Superintendents feel full credit toward high school graduation and college entrance requirements should be given to the students of applied science courses. Superintendents believe there is no difference as to which course, applied science or traditional science, that utilize facilities better. They believe applied science courses should be offered as an alternative science class and that they have a good future in the Oklahoma educational system.

Horn, Stanley James

180

Chemical analyses of surface waters in Oklahoma, September - December 1944  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A preliminary survey of the industrial quality of surface waters in Oklahoma was started in August, 1944, by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Oklahoma Resources and Planning Board, with the Oklahoma A. & M. College, Engineering Experiment Station and Department of Chemistry. From September to December, 1944, three hundred and fifteen samples were obtained at eighty-four points where gages are maintained for measurement of discharge. Daily samples were collected at six stations, namely: Illinois River near Gore, Oklahoma Cimarron River near Oilton, Oklahoma Canadian River near Whitefield, Oklahoma Washita River near Durwood, Oklahoma Red River near Gainesville, Texas Red River at Denison Dam, Texas Sport samples were collected at the remainder of the stations. The analyses of the spot samples were made largely in a laboratory provided by the Oklahoma A. & M. College, under the supervision of Dr. O.M. Smith, Head, Department of Chemistry; Dr. S.R. Wood, Associate Professor of Chemistry; and W.W. Hastings, U.S. Geological Survey. The daily samples were analyzed in the water resources laboratory of the Geological Survey at Austin, Texas. These data have been summarized in a report to the Oklahoma Planning and Resources Board prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey, March 1, 1945. The streams of Oklahoma are classified into two major drainage basins: the Arkansas River and the Red River and their tributaries. The attached analyses are arranged in geographical order for their respective drainage basins, with records listed in downstream order for stations on the main stem first, followed by the analyses for the tributaries. When available, the mean daily discharge is given for the analyses. (available as photostat copy only)

Geological Survey (U.S.)

1945-01-01

181

Groundwater Quality and Water-Well Characteristics in the Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma Jurisdictional Area, Central Oklahoma, 1948-2011.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In 2012, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma, compiled historical groundwater-quality data collected from 1948 to 2011 and water-well completion information in parts of Lincoln, Oklahoma, and Pottawatomie Countie...

C. J. Becker

2013-01-01

182

Oklahoma v. FERC: the waning of cooperative federalism  

SciTech Connect

Oklahoma v. FERC (Federal Energy Regulatory Commission) is an important decision in the development of constitutional interpretations of the tenth amendment after the Supreme Court decision in National League of Cities v. Usery. Even though the legislative provisions of the Natural Gas Policy Act impinge upon state regulatory decision making to a greater degree than earlier environmental legislation, the federal interest in energy price regulation was held to justify the use of state administrative agencies to further federal goals. The extension of federal control over state regulatory machinery narrows the scope of state sovereignty as a limitation on the commerce power. 55 references.

Melton, T.M.

1983-01-01

183

Insights into Oklahoma's Increased Seismicity Aided by Incorporation of the Transportable Array in Regional Earthquake Monitoring  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Seismicity rates within Oklahoma increased more than an order of magnitude since 2009 roughly concurrent with the arrival of the Earthscope US Array Transportable Array (TA). It can be demonstrated the increased seismicity is not because of increased monitoring capability, but rather a marked increase in earthquake occurrence rates. This unique confluence of additional monitoring and additional seismicity has lead to new insights about the continuing earthquakes within Oklahoma. The additional seismic stations improved event detection within the region but also dramatically improved accuracy in earthquake locations and enabled the determination of 154 first-motion and moment tensor focal mechanisms throughout Oklahoma. Prior to the passage of the TA few if any focal mechanisms had been determined for earthquakes occurring within Oklahoma. These focal mechanisms show primarily strike-slip faulting on steeply dipping faults with strikes between 40-60° and 130-150°. Focal mechanisms associated with the Jones earthquake swarm, occurring just east of Oklahoma City, have clearly different orientations from those outside of the swarm area. The Jones earthquake swarm has a b-value of 1.3 while the remaining portions of Oklahoma continue to have a b-value near 1, even with the increased seismicity rates. The Jones earthquake swarm continues to average nearly 2 earthquakes each day with characteristics that clearly separate it from the rest of the observed earthquakes in Oklahoma. The additional seismic monitoring that the TA provided also helped to identify and more accurately quantify cases of possibly triggered seismicity throughout Oklahoma. The wells identified in possible cases of triggered seismicity represent a small fraction of all oil and gas activities within Oklahoma, but understanding these cases may help to mitigate such occurrences in the future. Accurately identifying cases of triggered seismicity helps to quantify the potential earthquake hazard induced seismicity may pose both in Oklahoma and throughout the country. The effect on the earthquake hazard for Oklahoma is demonstrated by comparing different probabilistic seismic hazard assessments based on the different observed seismicity rates.

Holland, A. A.

2012-12-01

184

Public Health Assessment for National Zinc Company, Bartlesville, Washington County, Oklahoma, Region 6. CERCLIS No. OKD000829440.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The proposed National Zinc Company (NZC) National Priorities List (NPL) Site is located in the City of Bartlesville in Washington and Osage Counties, Oklahoma. Based on the available information, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR...

1995-01-01

185

Water conservation as a long-range strategy in municipal water supply planning: the case of Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

This study is concerned with Oklahoma water managers' attitudes toward the adoption or rejection of long-term water conservation options in small and medium sized cities under 50,000 in population. In focusing upon Oklahoma water managers' attitudes, the following questions are addressed: (1) What factors influence Oklahoma water managers' attitudes toward the adoption or rejection of long-term water conservation measures. (2) What are the major incentives or disincentives that may encourage or discourage the adoption and implementing of long-term water conservation alternatives at the municipal level in Oklahoma. (3) What are the distinct geographical variations in attitudes toward adopting water conservation policies. To address these and related questions, a questionnaire was mailed to each of the water managers in the selected Oklahoma towns and cities. Results of the study indicated that local water managers considered local governments as the most appropriate body to deal with water management issues. Local water managers in Oklahoma also place heavy reliance upon traditional structural solutions. If these solutions prove to be inadequate, long-term water conservation alternatives become more appealing. However, Oklahoma water managers in the selected cities and towns expressed their profound concerns about the potential revenue loss if long-term water conservation measures were to be adopted and implemented.

Abdallah, A.L.

1985-01-01

186

Soil moisture determination study. [Guymon, Oklahoma  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Soil moisture data collected in conjunction with aircraft sensor and SEASAT SAR data taken near Guymon, Oklahoma are summarized. In order to minimize the effects of vegetation and roughness three bare and uniformly smooth fields were sampled 6 times at three day intervals on the flight days from August 2 through 17. Two fields remained unirrigated and dry. A similar pair of fields was irrigated at different times during the sample period. In addition, eighteen other fields were sampled on the nonflight days with no field being sampled more than 24 hours from a flight time. The aircraft sensors used included either black and white or color infrared photography, L and C band passive microwave radiometers, the 13.3, 4.75, 1.6 and .4 GHz scatterometers, the 11 channel modular microwave scanner, and the PRT5.

Blanchard, B. J.

1979-01-01

187

Oklahoma Climatological Survey: Outreach and Educational Materials  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Oklahoma Climatological Survey (OCS) provides outreach programs and educational materials to public safety agencies, agricultural interests, educators, and the general public. These include OK-FIRST, which provides weather data and training to public safety agencies; EarthStorm, a program for educators that integrates learning modules with real-time weather data; and Agweather, a website that provides information to help agricultural producers with weather-related decisions. The site also features a glossary of weather terminology, a set of lesson plans, and reference materials intended for use as refresher information by teachers. Other resources include information on tornado safety, case studies on the use of OCS training materials, and a set of maps and graphs with climatological data and information on severe weather phenomena.

188

A comparison of the speech patterns and dialect attitudes of Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The lexical dialect usage of Oklahoma has been well-studied in the past by the Survey of Oklahoma Dialects, but the acoustic speech production of the state has received little attention. Apart from two people from Tulsa and two people from Oklahoma City that were interviewed for the Atlas of North American English, no other acoustic work has been performed within the state. This dissertation begins to fill in these gaps by presenting twelve respondents interviewed by the Research on Dialects of English in Oklahoma (RODEO) project. For each speaker, a brief biography is given, including some of their regional and speech attitudes of Oklahoma. Then acoustic data from a wordlist and reading task are presented and compared. Analysis will consider plots of each speaker's vowel system as a whole, and will also examine many environments in isolation. These environments were chosen for their likely presence in Oklahoma, and include such dialect features as the Southern Shift, the pin/pen merger, the caught/cot merger, monophthongization of the PRICE vowel, and neutralization of tense vowels before /l./ After considering each respondent separately, some of their results will be pooled together to give a preliminary sense of the state of dialect within Oklahoma. Demographic variables such as age, gender, and urban/rural upbringing will be related to speakers' attitudes and acoustic production. This will serve two goals - first, to compare modern-day production to the findings of previous scholars, and second, to suggest a dialect trajectory for the state that could be studied further in additional research.

Bakos, Jon

189

MISR Scans the Texas-Oklahoma Border  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

These MISR images of Oklahoma and north Texas were acquired on March 12, 2000 during Terra orbit 1243. The three images on the left, from top to bottom, are from the 70-degree forward viewing camera, the vertical-viewing (nadir) camera, and the 70-degree aftward viewing camera. The higher brightness, bluer tinge, and reduced contrast of the oblique views result primarily from scattering of sunlight in the Earth's atmosphere, though some color and brightness variations are also due to differences in surface reflection at the different angles. The longer slant path through the atmosphere at the oblique angles also accentuates the appearance of thin, high-altitude cirrus clouds.

On the right, two areas from the nadir camera image are shown in more detail, along with notations highlighting major geographic features. The south bank of the Red River marks the boundary between Texas and Oklahoma. Traversing brush-covered and grassy plains, rolling hills, and prairies, the Red River and the Canadian River are important resources for farming, ranching, public drinking water, hydroelectric power, and recreation. Both originate in New Mexico and flow eastward, their waters eventually discharging into the Mississippi River.

A smoke plume to the north of the Ouachita Mountains and east of Lake Eufaula is visible in the detailed nadir imagery. The plume is also very obvious at the 70-degree forward view angle, to the right of center and about one-fourth of the way down from the top of the image.

MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

2000-01-01

190

78 FR 33464 - Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00071  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...a major disaster for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-4117-DR), dated 05/20/ 2013. Incident: Severe Storms and Tornadoes. Incident Period: 05/18/2013 through 05/27/2013. Effective Date: 05/27/2013. Physical Loan...

2013-06-04

191

Kay County, Oklahoma, Water and Sewerage Comprehensive Plan.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Kay County, Oklahoma Water and Sewerage Comprehensive Plan is essentially a statement of existing water, sewer and drainage conditions with recommendations and/or proposals relative to future physical development and utility needs of Kay County. Inclu...

1972-01-01

192

National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Enid Quadrangle, Oklahoma and Kansas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The uranium resources of the Enid Quadrangle, Oklahoma and Kansas, were evaluated to a depth of 1500 m using the available surface and subsurface geologic information, supplemented with an intensive geologic and geochemical reconnaissance of the quadrangl...

R. L. Eutsler S. Bloch K. S. Johnson

1982-01-01

193

National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Lawton Quadrangle, Oklahoma and Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Uranium resources of the Lawton Quadrangle, Oklahoma and Texas, were evaluated to a depth of 1500 m using National Uranium Resource Evaluation critieria. Five areas of uranium favorability were delineated. Diagenetically altered, quartzose and sublithic, ...

Z. Al-Shaieb R. G. Thomas G. F. Stewart

1982-01-01

194

Field trip guide to selected outcrops, Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Arbuckle Mountains, named for Brigadier General Matthew Arbuckle, are located in south-central Oklahoma. The formations that comprise the Arbuckle Mountains have been extensively studied for hydrocarbon source rock and reservoir rock characteristics t...

1991-01-01

195

Assessment of Nursing in Oklahoma - 1970 - Summary Report and Recommendations.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Results are reported of a study initiated by the Oklahoma Board of Nurse Registration and Nursing Education to obtain information that would assist individuals and groups to plan effectively for health care services in the State. The primary objective of ...

1971-01-01

196

A Resource Manual for Speech and Hearing Programs in Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Administrative aspects of the Oklahoma speech and hearing program are described, including state requirements, school administrator role, and organizational and operational procedures. Information on speech and language development and remediation covers language, articulation, stuttering, voice disorders, cleft palate, speech improvement,…

Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City.

197

75 FR 15450 - Oklahoma; Major Disaster and Related Determinations  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...The following areas of the State of Oklahoma have been designated as adversely affected by this major disaster: Alfalfa, Caddo, Cleveland, Comanche, Cotton, Delaware, Dewey, Ellis, Grady, Greer, Harmon, Haskell, Hughes, Jackson, Kiowa,...

2010-03-29

198

76 FR 50535 - Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00052  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Public Assistance Only for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-1989-DR), dated 06/21/2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, Straight-line Winds, and Flooding. Incident Period: 05/22/2011 through 05/25/2011. Effective Date:...

2011-08-15

199

76 FR 37166 - Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00050  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of a major disaster for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA--1989--DR), dated 06/06/ 2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, Straight-line Winds, and Flooding. Incident Period: 05/22/2011 through 05/25/2011. EFFECTIVE DATES:...

2011-06-24

200

AN OKLAHOMA WEATHER MODIFICATION PROGRAM STATUS REPORT AND PROJECT REVIEW  

Microsoft Academic Search

The recent history of the Oklahoma Weather Modification Program (OWMP) is presented, the 2001 field program summarized, and the current status of the statewide rainfall stimulation and hail suppression program reported. Some suggestions for program improvement are also enumerated.

Timothy E. Sedlock; Nathan R. Kuhnert; Rebecca L. Resler; Michael E. Mathis; Bruce A. Boe; Brian Vance

201

Pennsylvanian foreland deformation of Wichita uplift, southwest Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pennsylvanian foreland deformation associated with the Ouachita orogene reactivated a west-northwest-east-southeast Cambrian basement trend, the southern Oklahoma aulacogen, to form the Wichita uplift, southwest Oklahoma. The 30-km-wide subsurface Frontal fault zone separates the uplift from the Anadarko basin to the north. Horizontal shortening across this fault zone is estimated at 7-15 km (20-40%), vertical displacement totals 9-10 km from the

1986-01-01

202

Porosity trends of nonreservoir and reservoir sandstones, Anadarko basin, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The porosity of nonreservoir sandstones in Caddo County, Oklahoma, is determined using compensated-neutron and formation-density logs. The authors preliminary data set represents more than 3,000 net ft of Pennsylvanian and Permian age sandstones from 12 well locations. These porosity data and the average porosities of sandstone oil and gas reservoirs within the Anadarko basin of Oklahoma are each compared to

T. C. Hester; J. W. Schmoker

1991-01-01

203

Ground water in the Blanchard area, McClain County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A letter from Lloyd L. Bowser, City Clerk, dated January 8, 1948, in behalf of the town council and Mayor Walter Casey, indicates that a serious shortage of water is faced by the town of Blanchard, McClain County, Oklahoma. The town is near the eastern boundary of Grady County, where an investigation of the ground-water resources is being made by the Oklahoma Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Geological Survey as part of a State-wide investigation. Information obtained thus far may aid the town by showing where additional ground water for municipal supply may be sought.

Davis, Leon Virgil; Schoff, Stuart L.

1948-01-01

204

The Diurnal Wind Variation in the Lowest 1500 ft in Central Oklahoma: June 1966-May 1967.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

One year of wind data from a television tower in northern Oklahoma City has been analyzed on a diurnal basis. The annual mean speeds below the third level at 296 ft are lowest at night and highest during the day, and conversely the speeds up to the sevent...

K. C. Crawford H. R. Hudson

1972-01-01

205

Hyrogeology and Leachate Plume Delineation at a Closed Municipal Landfill, Norman, Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The City of Norman operated a solid-waste municipal landfill at two sites in the Canadian River alluvium in Cleveland County, Oklahoma from 1970 to 1985. The sites, referred to as the west and east cells of the landfill, were originally excavations in the...

C. J. Becker

2002-01-01

206

76 FR 70940 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Oklahoma; Infrastructure...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...the Central Oklahoma Early Action Compact (EAC) Area \\38\\ incorporated a Memorandum of Agreement...pollution control measures for the Central Oklahoma EAC area. The Attainment Demonstration for the Tulsa EAC Area \\39\\ incorporated a MOA between the...

2011-11-16

207

76 FR 29255 - Oklahoma; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Emergency Management Agency [Internal Agency Docket No. FEMA-1970-DR; Docket ID FEMA-2011-0001] Oklahoma; Amendment No...major disaster declaration for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-1970-DR), dated April 22, 2011, and related...

2011-05-20

208

First Two Years of Observations NASA ACTS Propagation Experiment Central Oklahoma Site.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Continuous observations from December 1, 1993 through November 30, 1995 were made at the ACTS Propagation Terminal on the roof of the Sarkeys Energy Center at the University of Oklahoma in Norman, Oklahoma. Beacon and radiometer observations were combined...

R. K. Crane

1996-01-01

209

78 FR 32161 - Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...as amended effective July 1, 2012. 3. Revisions of the Treatment 76 FR 34147-34157 Oklahoma Statutes Standards for Carbamate Wastes. August 12, 2011. Title 27A Section (Checklist 227). 2-7-101 et seq., Oklahoma Hazardous Waste...

2013-05-29

210

Mississippian facies relationships, eastern Anadarko basin, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Mississippian strata in the eastern Anadarko basin record a gradual deepening of the basin. Late and post-Mississippian tectonism (Wichita and Arbuckle orogenies) fragmented the single large basin into the series of paired basins and uplifts recognized in the southern half of Oklahoma today. Lower Mississippian isopach and facies trends (Sycamore and Caney Formations) indicate that basinal strike in the study area (southeastern Anadarko basin) was predominantly east-west. Depositional environment interpretations made for Lower Mississippian strata suggest that the basin was partially sediment starved and exhibited a low shelf-to-basin gradient. Upper Mississippian isopach and facies trends suggest that basinal strike within the study area shifted from dominantly east-west to dominantly northwest-southeast due to Late Mississippian and Early Pennsylvanian uplift along the Nemaha ridge. Within the study area, the Chester Formation, composed of gray to dove-gray shales with interbedded limestones deposited on a carbonate shelf, thins depositionally into the basin and is thinnest at its facies boundary with the Springer Group and the upper portion of the Caney Formation. As basin subsidence rates accelerated, the southern edge of the Chester carbonate shelf was progressively drowned, causing a backstepping of the Chester Formation calcareous shale and carbonate facies. Springer Group sands and black shales transgressed northward over the drowned Chester Formation shelf.

Peace, H.W. (Oryx Energy, Inc., Midland, TX (United States)); Forgotson, J.M. (Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman (United States))

1991-08-01

211

A proposed streamflow data program for Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An evaluation of the streamflow data available in Oklahoma has been made to provide guidelines for planning future data-collection programs. The basic steps in the evaluation procedure were (1) definition of the long-terms goals of the streamflow-data program in quantitative form, (2) examination and analysis of streamflow data to determine which goals have been met, and (3) consideration of alternate programs and techniques to meet the remaining goals. The study defines the individual relation between certain statistical streamflow characteristics and selected basin parameters. This relation is a multiple regression equation that could be used on a statewide basis to compute a selected natural-flow characteristic at any site on a stream. The study shows that several streamflow characteristics can be estimated within an accuracy equivalent to 10 years of record by use of a regression related to at least three climatic or basin parameters for any basin of 50 square miles or more. The study indicates that significant changes in the scope and character of the data-collection program would enhance the possibility of attaining the remaining goals. A streamflow-data program based on the guidelines developed in this study is proposed for the future.

Bohn, J. D.; Hoffman, G. L.

1970-01-01

212

77 FR 47089 - Land Acquisitions; United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians of Oklahoma  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Affairs Land Acquisitions; United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians of Oklahoma AGENCY...land into trust for the United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians of Oklahoma on July...land into trust for the United Keetoowah Band of Oklahoma Corporation under the...

2012-08-07

213

77 FR 19691 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History, Norman, OK  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History, Norman, OK AGENCY: National Park Service...The Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History has completed an inventory of human remains...the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History. Repatriation of the human remains...

2012-04-02

214

Tight Oklahoma gas sands remain an attractive play  

SciTech Connect

The Cherokee tight gas sands of Oklahoma remain an attractive play because of improvements in drilling and completion practices and actions by the Oklahoma Corporation Commission (OCC) that allow separate allowables for new wells. The expired federal tax credits for tight gas wells have not been the only reason for increased activity. Since decontrol of most regulated gas pricing and since 1986, the number of wells drilled and gas production per well have been increasing in the cherokee area while overall drilling in Oklahoma has decreased. These conclusions are based on wells as categorized by permit date and not by the spud, completion, or first production date. A few wells outside but adjacent to the Cherokee area may have been included, although, their impact on the conclusions is considered nominal. The paper discusses the tight gas credit, proration units, the concept of separate allowables, costs, completion efficiency, and the economic outlook for this area.

Cartwright, G.L. [Marathon Oil Co., Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

1995-04-24

215

The New Robotic Telescope at Oklahoma State University  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new, 0.6-m robotic telescope of Ritchey-Chrétien design was recently installed at the H. S. Mendenhall Observatory (HSMO) of Oklahoma State University (OSU), and is now undergoing operational tests. Funded by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research through the Defense University Research Instrumentation Program, it replaces HSMO's original 0.35-m Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope. Research programs will include the characterization of near-Earth objects and collaborative searches for transiting exoplanets, programs which will also open up new research opportunities for students in the Oklahoma-Arkansas region. Ideally, these opportunities will attract more undergraduate and graduate students to major in physics and astronomy, and foster the creation of degree programs in astronomy at OSU. Optical Guidance Systems was the contractor for both the telescope and dome automation. The telescope's ceramic 602-mm f/3 primary and 220-mm secondary mirrors yield an effective focal ratio of f/8 that can be changed to f/5.3 with a focal reducer / field flattener. Fields of view range from 0.75° at f/5.3 to 1.2° at f/8. The Strehl ratio is 0.954. The telescope's carbon-fiber Serrurier truss is supported by an equatorial fork mount equipped with friction drives. Telescope equipment includes a 35-mm-format CCD camera with UBVRI filters, field rotator, off-axis guider, and flip-mirror unit for quick switches to eyepiece observing. HSMO itself is conveniently located under reasonably dark skies at an elevation of 340 m about 15 km southwest of the city of Stillwater, whose population, including OSU, is approaching 50,000. HSMO's dome was completed in 2002, and funding is being raised for a control building near the dome. The observatory's URL is www.physics.okstate.edu/observatory.

Shull, Peter, Jr.

2007-12-01

216

Characteristics of successful aviation leaders of Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Scope and method of study. The purpose of the study was to examine the personal traits, skills, practices, behaviors, background, academic, and career success patterns of selected aviation leaders in Oklahoma. A purposive sample of 18 leaders who had achieved a top-ranked position of aviation leadership in an organization or a position of influence in the community was selected for interview. The leaders chosen for interview came from a variety of aviation organizations including government, academia, military, corporate aviation, and air carrier leadership as well as community leadership (specifically those aviation personnel who were engaged in a political or civic leadership role). Findings and conclusions. This study identified no common career choices, educational, family, or other background factors exclusively responsible for leadership success of all of the participants. Some of the more significant findings were that a high percentage of the leaders held undergraduate and advanced degrees; however, success had been achieved by some who had little or no college education. Aviation technical experience was not a prerequisite for aviation leadership success in that a significant number of the participants held no airman rating and some had entered positions of aviation leadership from non-aviation related careers. All had received some positive learning experience from their family background even those backgrounds which were less than desirable. All of the participants had been involved in volunteer civic or humanitarian leadership roles, and all had received numerous honors. The most frequently identified value expressed by the leaders was honesty; the predominant management style was participative with a strong backup style for directing, the most important skills were communication and listening skills, and the most frequently mentioned characteristics of success were honesty, credibility, vision, high standards, love for aviation and fiscal responsibility. The most frequently identified curriculum need across all aviation disciplines was that of communication skills.

Kutz, Mary N. Hill

217

Ground-water records for eastern Oklahoma, Part 2; water-quality records for wells, test-holes, and springs  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U. S. Geological Survey has collected data on Oklahoma's ground-water resources since 1934. Most of these data were collected as part of specific ground-water studies conducted in cooperation with various Federal, State, and local agencies. Data on construction, yield, water levels, and other physical well parameters are given in 'Ground-Water Records for Northeastern Oklahoma, Part 1 - Records of Wells, Test Holes, and Springs' and in 'Ground-Water Records for Southeastern Oklahoma, Part 1 - Records of Wells, Test Holes, and Springs.' These reports are available from the U.S. Department of the Interior, Geological Survey, Rm. 621, 201 N.W. Third, Oklahoma City, OK 73102. Although some water-quality data for wells, test-holes, and springs have been published, they are scattered through a variety of reports and are not readily available on a regional basis. Furthermore, a considerable amount of data have never been published and can be obtained only from the files of the Geological Survey. The purpose of this report is to make available both published and unpublished water-quality records for approximately 1,740 wells, test-holes, and springs in 23 counties in northeastern Oklahoma and 16 counties in southeastern Oklahoma. Acknowledgment is extended to the many hundreds of individuals who have provided the data compiled in this report.

Havens, John S.

1978-01-01

218

Public health assessment for Oklahoma Refining Company, Cyril, Caddo County, Oklahoma, Region 6. Cerclis No. OKD091598870. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Oklahoma Refining Company site, near the town of Cyril, Caddo County, Oklahoma, is approximately 160 acres. Contaminants associated with the site include volatile organic compounds, semi-volatile compounds, heavy metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and petroleum hydrocarbons. Heavy metals and PAHs are the primary contaminants at levels of health concern. During refinery operations, ambient air was likely to have been and could be a significant exposure pathway for on-site workers and off-site residents. Residents swimming in Gladys Creek downstream of the ORC site during refinery operations were likely to have been exposed to contaminants in surface water and sediment. The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) has concluded that the Oklahoma Refining Company site was a public health hazard during its past operation based on probable exposure during the release of wastes from the oil refinery process.

NONE

1995-02-09

219

A Total Lightning Perspective of the 20 May 2013 Moore, Oklahoma Supercell  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the early afternoon of 20 May 2013, a storm initiated to the west-southwest of Newcastle, Oklahoma. This storm would rapidly intensify into the parent supercell of the tornado that struck the city of Moore, Oklahoma. This article describes what contributions total lightning observations from the Oklahoma Lightning Mapping Array could provide to operational forecasters had these observations been available in real-time. This effort includes a focus on the GOES-R pseudo-geostationary lightning mapper demonstration product as well as the NASA SPoRT / Meteorological Development Laboratory's total lightning tracking tool. These observations and tools identified several contributions. Two distinct lightning jumps at 1908 and 1928 UTC provided a lead time of 19 minutes ahead of severe hail and 26 minutes ahead of the Moore, Oklahoma tornado's touchdown. These observations provide strong situational awareness to forecasters, as the lightning jumps are related to the rapid strengthening of the storm's updraft and mesocyclone and serve as a precursor to the stretching of the storm vortex ahead severe weather.

Stano, Geoffrey T.; Schultz, Christopher J.; Carey, Lawrence D.; MacGorman, Don R.; Calhoun, Kristin M.

2014-01-01

220

University of Oklahoma - High Energy Physics  

SciTech Connect

The High Energy Physics program at the University of Oklahoma, Pat Skubic, Principal Investigator, is attempting to understand nature at the deepest level using the most advanced experimental and theoretical tools. The four experimental faculty, Brad Abbott, Phil Gutierrez, Pat Skubic, and Mike Strauss, together with post-doctoral associates and graduate students, are finishing their work as part of the D0 collaboration at Fermilab, and increasingly focusing their investigations at the Large Hadron Collidor (LHC) as part of the ATLAS Collaboration. Work at the LHC has become even more exciting with the recent discovery by ATLAS and the other collaboration, CMS, of the long-sought Higgs boson, which plays a key role in generating masses for the elementary constituents of matter. Work of the OUHEP group has been in the three areas of hardware, software, and analysis. Now that the Higgs boson has been discovered, completing the Standard Model of fundamental physics, new efforts will focus on finding hints of physics beyond the standard model, such as supersymmetry. The OUHEP theory group (Kim Milton, PI) also consists of four faculty members, Howie Baer, Chung Kao, Kim Milton, and Yun Wang, and associated students and postdocs. They are involved in understanding fundamental issues in formulating theories of the microworld, and in proposing models that carry us past the Standard Model, which is an incomplete description of nature. They therefore work in close concert with their experimental colleagues. One also can study fundamental physics by looking at the large scale structure of the universe; in particular the ``dark energy'' that seems to be causing the universe to expand at an accelerating rate, effectively makes up about 3/4 of the energy in the universe, and yet is totally unidentified. Dark energy and dark matter, which together account for nearly all of the energy in the universe, are an important probe of fundamental physics at the very shortest distances, or at the very highest energies. The outcomes of the group's combined experimental and theoretical research will be an improved understanding of nature, at the highest energies reachable, from which applications to technological innovation will surely result, as they always have from such studies in the past.

Skubic, Patrick L. [University of Oklahoma] [University of Oklahoma

2013-07-31

221

University of Oklahoma: School of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The School of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Oklahoma offers information on research in the areas of bioengineering, polymers science and engineering, environmental engineering, and energy studies. Examples include the Engineering Virtual Library and the Chemical Engineering Virtual Library, related government research labs, discipline-specific groupings of Chemical Engineering online resources, and selected corporate Web pages.

222

The aerobiological significance of smut spores in Tulsa, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Few aerobiological studies have focused on smut spores, teliospores of fungi within the order Ustilaginales, but the scientific literature provides evidence of the potential aerobiological significance of these plant pathogens. The atmosphere in Tulsa, Oklahoma was monitored for the presence of smut teliospores using a Burkard Volumetric Spore Trap. Smut spores were identified in the atmospheric samples every day from

Victoria Crotzer; Estelle Levetin

1996-01-01

223

Policies and Procedures Manual for Special Education in Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The manual contains policies and procedures assuring all Oklahoma handicapped children the right to a free, appropriate public education. The manual establishes minimum standards for program approval, minimum standards for the determination of pupil eligibility, and considerations which will lead to appropriate programming within the least…

Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City. Div. of Special Education.

224

Bidding Documents for Asbestos Abatement in Oklahoma Public Buildings.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

All relevant specifications and forms for the removal of asbestos from Oklahoma public buildings are consolidated in this document. The specifications cover the entire procedure for asbestos removal beginning with solicitation for bids; contractor's responsibilities concerning date of completion, general cleanup, laying out work, wage scale, and…

Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City.

225

Conodont biostratigraphy of lower Ordovician rocks, Arbuckle Group, southern Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Arbuckle Group of southern Oklahoma displays the only complete exposure of the shallow-water carbonates that characterize the Lower Ordovician of interior North America. Trilobites have been described from some parts of this sequence and sporadic occurrences of other invertebrates are known, but much of the sequence is sparingly fossiliferous. As a consequence, these magnificent exposures have not contributed notably

R. I. Dresbach; R. L. Ethington

1989-01-01

226

Geology of the Cottonwood Creek field, Carter County, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

In late 1987, the Cottonwood Creek field, Carter County, Oklahoma, was heralded by flows of nearly 4,000 BOPD and 3 MMCFGD from the upper Arbuckle Group. The field structure is part of the buried Criner uplift along the southwest flank of the Ardmore basin. The uplift formed during a Late Mississippian\\/Early Pennsylvanian episode of bidirectional thrusting (northeast and southwest) probably

M. T. Roberts; D. L. Read

1990-01-01

227

Petroleum production and exploration in Ouachita region of Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Petroleum production in the Ouachita region of southeastern Oklahoma occurs in three geographic areas parallel to regional structure. The frontal gas, central oil, and central gas belts are distinguished by differences in structural setting, reservoir strata, and types of hydrocarbons. In the frontal belt, nearly 1 trillion ft³ of dry gas has been produced from thrusted and subthrust Morrowan and

N. H. Suneson; J. A. Campbell

1989-01-01

228

National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Enid Quadrangle, Oklahoma and Kansas  

Microsoft Academic Search

The uranium resources of the Enid Quadrangle, Oklahoma and Kansas, were evaluated to a depth of 1500 m using the available surface and subsurface geologic information, supplemented with an intensive geologic and geochemical reconnaissance of the quadrangle. Uranium occurrences reported in the literature were located, sampled, and described in detail. Areas of anomalous radioactivity and areas of known copper mineralization

R. L. Eutsler; S. Bloch; K. S. Johnson

1982-01-01

229

Student Data Report, Oklahoma Higher Education, 1996-97.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report provides data on student characteristics, enrollments, and flow in Oklahoma's postsecondary education institutions, public and private, including two-year colleges. Maps and tables, with some narrative, present information on enrollments as a percentage of population, rates of entry into postsecondary education, geographic distribution…

Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education, Oklahoma City.

230

Successful Concurrent Programs: An EXCELerate Program in Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The article presents the implementation and findings of a successful collaborative effort with the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education (OSRHE), Tulsa Community College (TCC), and two local public school districts, Tulsa Public Schools (TPS) and Union Public Schools (UPS). Known as EXCELerate, it's a five-semester dual enrollment pilot…

Vargas, Juanita Gamez; Roach, Rick; David, Kevin M.

2014-01-01

231

CATALOG OF EDUCATIONAL INNOVATIONS IN THE OKLAHOMA PUBLIC SCHOOLS.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHTEEN INSTRUCTIONAL INNOVATIONS IN SEVENTY FIVE OKLAHOMA SCHOOL DISTRICTS ARE DESCRIBED IN THIS BOOKLET. THE MATERIAL WAS CHOSEN EITHER BECAUSE IT PRESENTED A COMPLETELY NEW IDEA OR BECAUSE IT PRESENTED SOME INNOVATIVE MEANS OF IMPLEMENTING A FAMILIAR IDEA. INSTRUCTIONAL INNOVATIONS AND PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS ARE INCLUDED IN THE…

PETTY, PAUL V.; AND OTHERS

232

Annotated bibliography of the Anadarko basin area; Kansas - Oklahoma - Texas  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography contains 118 additional records related to the geology of the Anadarko basin area of Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas. Specific topics include, but are not limited to: petroleum, and natural gas deposits; mineralogy; lithology; petrology; tectonics; and geochemistry. The subject index provides listings of records related to each county and the geologic ages covered by this area.

McLaughlin, J.E.

1985-01-01

233

ACT Profile Report: State. Graduating Class 2012. Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report provides information about the performance of Oklahoma's 2012 graduating seniors who took the ACT as sophomores, juniors, or seniors; and self-reported at the time of testing that they were scheduled to graduate in 2012 and tested under standard time conditions. This report focuses on: (1) Performance: student test performance in the…

ACT, Inc., 2012

2012-01-01

234

Subsidence and basin development in the southern Oklahoma aulacogen  

Microsoft Academic Search

Development of the southern Oklahoma aulacogen was the result of Cambrian tectonism along Proterozoic zones of weakness that caused northwest-trending extensional normal faults related to a rifting event. These faults were reactivated during upper Paleozoic compressional stress with fault patterns indicative of sinistral transpressive and transtensional movement. Mapping in the region has allowed classification of the myriad of faults into

1991-01-01

235

Students' Perceptions of Bullying in Oklahoma Public Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We studied perceptions of Oklahoma public school students (n = 7,848) regarding bullying. Specifically, we asked for their thoughts about the seriousness of bullying, the hurtfulness of bullying, their involvement in bullying (as victim or perpetrator), their responses to being bullied or seeing someone else being bullied, and what they wanted…

Hughes, Patricia Paulsen; Middleton, Katherine M.; Marshall, David D.

2009-01-01

236

Preliminary Industrial Hygiene Survey Report of Conley Corporation, Tulsa, Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In July, 1984, a preliminary industrial hygiene survey was performed at Conley Corporation (SIC-3079) Tulsa, Oklahoma, where 4,4'-methylene-dianiline (101779) (4,4'-MDA) is used as a hardening agent in manufacturing fiberglass epoxy pipe and pipe fittings...

M. Boeniger

1986-01-01

237

Ground water in the Anadarko area [Caddo County], Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report offers a preliminary interpretation of the geology and ground-water hydrology of the Anadarko area, Oklahoma. L.V. Davis prepared the accompanying map from aerial photographs and furnished much of the geologic information, and records of the State Mineral Survey (WPA) were used in the preparation of the section on the Rush Springs sandstone. (available as photostat copy only)

Schoff, Stuart L.

1948-01-01

238

Relationship between College Readiness, Oklahoma State Testing Program, and EXPLORE  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Scope and Method of Study: The study investigated the relationship between performance on the Oklahoma State Testing Program (OSTP) for grades 3-7 and the EXPLORE in math and reading for 586 students. The EXPLORE test, a part of the ACT, is given in the eighth grade and provides college readiness benchmarks and a national percentile ranking (NPR)…

Martin, Rick

2010-01-01

239

University of Oklahoma: Chemical, Biological, and Materials Engineering  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The School of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Oklahoma offers information on research in the areas of bioengineering, polymers science and engineering, environmental engineering, and energy studies. Examples include the Engineering Virtual Library and the Chemical Engineering Virtual Library, related government research labs, discipline-specific groupings of Chemical Engineering online resources, and selected corporate Web pages.

240

Precipitation and Streamflow Variability in Northwestern Oklahoma, 1894-2003  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper utilizes time-series analysis to examine precipitation and stream- flow variability in northwestern Oklahoma over the period 1894-2003. Trends and periodicities in the hydroclimatic variables were investigated using, respectively, Mann- Kendall test and continuous wavelet transform (CWT) methods. Statistically significant trends were found in annual precipitation at individual gauging stations but with no spatial coherence to suggest evidence of

Joseph T. Zume; Aondover Tarhule

2006-01-01

241

78 FR 36632 - Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00071  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...declaration of a major disaster for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-4117-DR), dated 05/20/ 2013. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes and Flooding. Incident Period: 05/18/2013 through 06/02/2013. Effective Date: 06/11/2013. Physical Loan...

2013-06-18

242

Keeping Them from Coming Back to Prison in Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Only 16 percent of the graduates of the Nonviolent Intermediate Offender program at Lexington Training Center (Oklahoma) return to prison after release compared to 55 percent overall. Judges may reduce sentences of participants and make further training a condition of release. (JOW)

Dollar, Eugene M.

1988-01-01

243

Variation of oil composition in vicinity of Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Fifteen oils in an 8-county area in the vicinity of the Arbuckle Mountains were classified into 6 oil types: stable platform type, Mill Creek syncline type, Joiner City field type, Gloeocapsamorpha type, Hoover field A-type; and Fitts field type. The stable platform, Mill Creek syncline, and Joiner City field types have a common element (diminished C/sub 32/ hopane) and are thought to be derived from distinctly different facies of the Woodford Formation. The Viola Limestone oil is typical of oil generated from Ordovician rocks. The Hoover field A-type has an element of Ordovician composition and is thought to have been derived from an Arbuckle Group shale. The Fitts field oil has a unique composition and has not been assigned to a source. The variation of oil composition in the vicinity of the Arbuckle Mountains is attributed to (1) the large number of potential source rocks, (2) the variety of facies going from the stable platform into the southern Oklahoma aulacogen, and (3) biodegradation of oils in shallow reservoirs.

Zemmels, I.; Walters, C.C.

1987-08-01

244

Comparative analysis of wind energy production in Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Scope and method of study. In the last decades humanity has realized the necessity of developing alternative energy sources for its efficient economic development and simple survival in the future. During the last 30 years major improvements were made in renewable energy technologies and they started to become competitive with traditional energy sources (fossil fuels), especially with consideration of external costs. Among the renewable energy sources, wind energy is one of the cheapest and fastest growing nowadays. Oklahoma is a very promising site for wind energy development considering its excellent wind resources. Developing wind energy can allow not only electricity production for in-state consumption, but also exporting to other states. The development of wind energy could encourage economic growth with very few adverse impacts on the environment. However, traditional energy sources are still the cheapest and, thus, the introduction of the wind energy in Oklahoma should be critically analyzed from economic, ecological and social points of view. The goal of this study is to conduct analysis of wind energy electricity production in Oklahoma on the four main stages: (1) Investment Analysis from Private Perspective: Calculate present value net benefits for wind energy and traditional energy (natural gas), make sure that both of them are positive. (2) Investment Analysis from Social Perspective: Evaluate present value net private benefits (PVNPB) and present value net social benefit from both projects (PVNSB). (3) Government Subsidy Analysis: recognize the necessity of the subsidies and evaluate the amount of subsidies if any. (4) Investment Analysis from a Geographic Perspective: determine economic feasibility of wind power generation for 77 Oklahoma counties. Findings and conclusions. The final output of the study is the recommendations concerning wind energy development in Oklahoma with consideration of economic efficiency, ecological and social impacts. Study not only analyze possibilities for wind energy development in the state, but make recommendations on the county by county basis with consideration of wind power density, land cost, property tax and infrastructure development in each county.

Ermilova, Ekaterina Alexeevna

245

77 FR 15357 - Reorganization/Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 106 under Alternative Site Framework, Oklahoma...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Order No. 1816] Reorganization/Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 106 under Alternative Site Framework, Oklahoma City, OK Pursuant to its authority under the Foreign-Trade Zones Act of June 18, 1934, as amended (19 U.S.C. 81a-81u),...

2012-03-15

246

Water Flow in the High Plains Aquifer in Northwestern Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The High Plains is a major agricultural area, supported primarily by water from the High Plains aquifer, which is used to irrigate wheat and corn and to raise cattle and swine. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Oklahoma Water Resources Board (OWRB) began a study of the High Plains aquifer in 1996. One purpose of the study was to develop a ground-water flow model that the OWRB could use to allocate the amount of water withdrawn from the a aquifer. The study area in Oklahoma covers all or parts of Beaver, Cimarron, Dewey, Ellis, Harper, Texas, and Woodward Counties. To provide appropriate hydrologic boundaries for the ground-water flow model, the study area was expanded to include parts of Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico, and Texas.

Luckey, Richard R.; Osborn, Noel I.; Becker, Mark F.; Andrews, William J.

2000-01-01

247

Karst in Permian evaporite rocks of western Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Bedded evaporites (gypsum and salt) of Permian age have been dissolved naturally by ground water to form a major evaporite-karst region in western Oklahoma. The Blaine Formation and associated evaporites comprise 100--800 ft of strata that dip gently into broad, structural basins. Outcropping gypsum, dolomite, and red-bed shales of the Blaine display typical karstic features, such as sinkholes, caves, disappearing streams, and springs. Large caves are developed in gypsum beds 10--30 ft thick at several places, and a major gypsum/dolomite karst aquifer provides irrigation water to a large region in southwestern Oklahoma, where salt layers above and below the Blaine Formation have been partly dissolved at depths of 30--800 ft below the land surface. Salt dissolution causes development of brine-filled cavities, into which overlying strata collapse, and the brine eventually is emitted at the land surface in large salt plains.

Johnson, K.S. (Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States))

1993-02-01

248

Assessing carbon and nitrogen stocks of no-till systems in Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Intensive tillage during the last century has greatly reduced organic carbon contents of Oklahoma cropland. Increased public interest in carbon sequestration and the potential for carbon storage in no-till soils to offset CO2 emissions has brought about the need for accurate estimates of carbon sequestration in Oklahoma. Eight locations across Oklahoma were soil sampled to determine the impact of no-till

Silvano L. Abreu; Chad B. Godsey; Jeffrey T. Edwards; Jason G. Warren

249

Martin Van Buren Elementary School, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the title building, including educational context and design goals. Includes a general description; information on the architect, construction team, and manufacturers and suppliers; and a case study of costs and specifications. (EV)

Design Cost Data, 2003

2003-01-01

250

Construction of a Federal Office Building in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The project contemplates the construction of a Federal building, to provide space for multi-agency use on a site to be acquired. The facility will include approximately 441,000 gross square feet, 331,000 net square feet, 142,800 square feet will be used a...

1973-01-01

251

Area Wage Survey - Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, July 1973.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The first A-series tables provide information on wage levels at the time of the survey for selected office clerical, professional and technical, maintenance and powerplant, and custodial and material movement occupations. The last two A-series tables prov...

1973-01-01

252

Source of shallow Simpson Group Oil in Murray County, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oils produced from the Simpson Group (Middle Ordovician) in three shallow fields located north of the Arbuckle Mountains in Murray County, Oklahoma, have widely differing compositions: SW Sandy Creek, 28.9° API, 0.57% sulfur; Davis NE, 25.9° API, 0.72% sulfur; Sulfur NW, 16.4° API, 1.44% sulfur. From gas chromatography and biomarker analysis, they determined that the oils were derived from the

I. Zemmels; D. M. Tappmeyer; C. C. Walters

1987-01-01

253

Hydrology of the Arbuckle Mountains area, south-central Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Rocks that make up the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer crop out over ~500 mi2 in the Arbuckle Mountains province in south-central Oklahoma. The aquifer consists of limestone, dolomite, and sandstone of the Arbuckle and Simpson Groups of Late Cambrian to Middle Ordovician age and is about 5,000-9,000 ft thick. The rocks were subjected to intensive folding and faulting associated with major uplift of the area during Early to Late Pennsylvanian time.

Fairchild, Roy W.; Hanson, Ronald L.; Davis, Robert E.

1990-01-01

254

Persian leopard (Panthera pardus) attack in Oklahoma: case report.  

PubMed

The authors report a fatal case of a Persian leopard (Panthera pardus) attack in an animal sanctuary in Oklahoma. The victim was a 53-year-old Costa Rican woman who was attempting to feed the animal when she was attacked and killed. Autopsy, radiography, fingerprint analysis, microbiologic cultures, and dental impressions were used to evaluate the case. These simple techniques can be applied to similar cases involving wild and domestic animal attacks. PMID:10990290

Vogel, J S; Parker, J R; Jordan, F B; Coury, T L; Vernino, A R

2000-09-01

255

Antimicrobial Susceptibilities of Bacteria from Nursing Home Residents in Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

In vitro antimicrobial susceptibilities for 2,832 isolates from nursing home patients in Oklahoma (1992) were compiled retrospectively. An appreciable proportion of antimicrobial resistance was detected for ampicillin, sulfamethoxazole-trimetho-prim and ciprofloxacin among gram-negative bacilli. Of 301 Staphylococcus aureus isolates tested, 70% were resistant to methicillin and 72% resistant to ciprofloxacin. Vancomycin resistance occurred in 22% of Enterococcus faecium isolates. These findings

D. J. Flournoy

1994-01-01

256

Variable seismic response to fluid injection in central Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Seismicity in Oklahoma since 2009 has been concentrated in the central portion of the state, in the areas of Jones, Prague, and Luther. These three regions account for ~75% of earthquakes in the 2009-2013 Oklahoma Geological Survey catalog. A swarm in the Jones region began in late 2008, with a maximum magnitude of 4.0, and activity continuing to the present. After relocation, the initially diffuse earthquakes in the Jones swarm delineate multiple subparallel faults. The Wilzetta fault zone ruptured in the Prague region in 2010 and again in 2011, with magnitudes up to Mw5.7, and the Luther region experienced two earthquakes of M4.4 and M4.2, with related aftershocks, in 2013. The earthquakes near Prague have previously been linked to wastewater disposal; here we show that the earthquakes near Jones and Luther may also be induced by deep disposal based on the upsurge in seismicity in central Oklahoma coupled with local relationships to pumping and reservoir structure. The timing of each sequence with respect to injection and the distribution of seismic activity differs, highlighting the variability in seismic response to fluid injection related to local permeability structure.

Keranen, K. M.; Hogan, C.; Savage, H. M.; Abers, G. A.; van der Elst, N.

2013-12-01

257

Pennsylvanian foreland deformation of Wichita uplift, southwest Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Pennsylvanian foreland deformation associated with the Ouachita orogene reactivated a west-northwest-east-southeast Cambrian basement trend, the southern Oklahoma aulacogen, to form the Wichita uplift, southwest Oklahoma. The 30-km-wide subsurface Frontal fault zone separates the uplift from the Anadarko basin to the north. Horizontal shortening across this fault zone is estimated at 7-15 km (20-40%), vertical displacement totals 9-10 km from the uplift to the basin. Folds are mapped on an interformational scale within the Frontal fault zone, and on an intraformational scale (Cambro-Ordovician Arbuckle Group) in the Slick Hills, southwest Oklahoma. Additional shortening occurred along southwest dipping mountain flank thrusts and on bedding plane thrusts, respectively. Hanging wall blocks of major faults contain the shallow dipping limb and anticlinal hinge zone of the interformational scale folds. Oil and gas production is generally restricted to these anticlinal crests within Paleozoic rocks. Deep wells (> 6000 m) that have penetrated footwall imbricates of the mountain flank thrusts have drilled through steep-overturned beds and tight recumbent folds before passing through faults into a normal stratigraphic sequence. Basement thrust loading of the southern margin of the Anadarko basin controlled the trend (west-northwest-east-southeast) of the axis of maximum deposition within the basin during the Pennsylvanian.

McConnell, D.

1986-05-01

258

Digital Atlas of the Upper Washita River Basin, Southwestern Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Numerous types of environmental data have been collected in the upper Washita River basin in southwestern Oklahoma. However, to date these data have not been compiled into a format that can be comprehensively queried for the purpose of evaluating the effects of various conservation practices implemented to reduce agricultural runoff and erosion in parts of the upper Washita River basin. This U.S. Geological Survey publication, 'Digital atlas of the upper Washita River basin, southwestern Oklahoma' was created to assist with environmental analysis. This atlas contains 30 spatial data sets that can be used in environmental assessment and decision making for the upper Washita River basin. This digital atlas includes U.S. Geological Survey sampling sites and associated water-quality, biological, water-level, and streamflow data collected from 1903 to 2005. The data were retrieved from the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Information System database on September 29, 2005. Data sets are from the Geology, Geography, and Water disciplines of the U.S. Geological Survey and cover parts of Beckham, Caddo, Canadian, Comanche, Custer, Dewey, Grady, Kiowa, and Washita Counties in southwestern Oklahoma. A bibliography of past reports from the U.S. Geological Survey and other State and Federal agencies from 1949 to 2004 is included in the atlas. Additionally, reports by Becker (2001), Martin (2002), Fairchild and others (2004), and Miller and Stanley (2005) are provided in electronic format.

Becker, Carol J.; Masoner, Jason R.; Scott, Jonathon C.

2008-01-01

259

Red Fork sandstone of Oklahoma: depositional history and reservoir distribution  

SciTech Connect

The Middle Pennsylvanian Red Fork sandstone formed as a result of progradation across eastern Kansas and most of Oklahoma. The Red Fork is one of several transgressive-regressive sequences (cyclothems) developed within the Desmoinesian Cherokee Group. Sea level changes, together with varying subsidence, were dominant factors controlling the general stratigraphic (correlative) characteristics of the Red Fork interval. Progradation was episodic, with sand deposition in the more active part of the basin during lower sea level stands and valley-fill deposition in the more stable areas during sea level rises. A map of Red Fork sand trends reveals an alluvial-deltaic complex covering most of Oklahoma. The Red Fork consists primarily of alluvial-valley and plain (fluvial) bodies in the northernmost part of northeastern Oklahoma, alluvial-deltaic bodies in most of the remaining parts of the shelf area, and off-shelf submarine-fan and slope basinal-floor complexes within the deeper part of the Anadarko basin. Determination of reservoir trend and genesis requires integration of rock and log data. Logs need to be calibrated to cores in order to estimate depositional environments accurately and to make a reasonable assessment of diagenetic overprints. Much of the oil and gas has been trapped in stratigraphic traps, and a significant amount of oil is in channel sandstones with trends at high angles to the structural grain. In some areas, secondary clay, in particular chloritic clay, has resulted in microporosity, high water saturation, and correspondingly low resistivities in oil reserves.

Shelton, J.W.; Fritz, R.D.; Johnson, C.

1989-03-01

260

Remotely-Sensed Rainfall for the Wettest Season in Oklahoma on Record  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the summer of 2007 Oklahoma experienced the wettest June on record, Oklahoma City had 20 consecutive days of reported rainfall (also a record), and damaging flash floods occurred on 15 days. This study analyzes the spatial patterns, temporal variability, and magnitudes of remotely-sensed rainfall from TRMM satellite, PERSIANN-CCS, and the operational rainfall product in the US National Weather Service (NWS) that relies on radar data with adjustments from rain gauges and human quality control. Conclusions drawn from this part of the study will help guide future steps toward integrated, multisensor precipitation estimation as applied to a season of extreme rainfall. The second part of the study applies the rainfall estimates under evaluation to an extreme flash flood case over the heavily instrumented Ft. Cobb basin in Oklahoma. Discharge is simulated and compared to observed streamflow on three subbasins using the NWS's distributed hydrologic model. Results will help determine if satellite-based rainfall estimates can be used, given proper downscaling, as inputs to hydrologic prediction models for extreme, small-scale hydrometeorological events.

Flamig, Z.; Gourley, J.; Hong, Y.; Li, L.

2009-05-01

261

Groundwater quality and water-well characteristics in the Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma Jurisdictional Area, central Oklahoma, 1948--2011  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 2012, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma, compiled historical groundwater-quality data collected from 1948 to 2011 and water-well completion information in parts of Lincoln, Oklahoma, and Pottawatomie Counties in central Oklahoma to support the development of a comprehensive water-management plan for the Tribe’s jurisdictional area. In this study, water-quality data from 155 water wells, collected from 1948 to 2011, were retrieved from the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Information System database; these data include measurements of pH, specific conductance, and hardness and concentrations of the major ions, trace elements, and radionuclides that have Maximum Contaminant Levels or Secondary Maximum Contaminant Levels in public drinking-water supplies. Information about well characteristics includes ranges of well yield and well depth of private water wells in the study area and was compiled from the Oklahoma Water Resources Board Multi-Purpose Well Completion Report database. This report also shows depth to water from land surface by using shaded 30-foot contours that were created by using a geographic information system and spatial layers of a 2009 potentiometric surface (groundwater elevation) and land-surface elevation. Wells in the study area produce water from the North Canadian River alluvial and terrace aquifers, the underlying Garber Sandstone and Wellington Formation that compose the Garber–Wellington aquifer, and the Chase, Council Grove, and Admire Groups. Water quality varies substantially between the alluvial and terrace aquifers and bedrock aquifers in the study area. Water from the alluvial aquifer has relatively high concentrations of dissolved solids and generally is used for livestock only, whereas water from the terrace aquifer has low concentrations of dissolved solids and is used extensively by households in the study area. Water from the bedrock aquifer also is used extensively by households but may have high concentrations of trace elements, including uranium, in some areas where groundwater pH is above 8.0. Well yields vary and are dependent on aquifer characteristics and well-completion practices. Well yields in the unconsolidated alluvial and terrace aquifers generally are higher than yields from bedrock aquifers but are limited by the thickness and extent of these river deposits. Well yields in the alluvium and terrace aquifers commonly range from 50 to 150 gallons per minute and may exceed 300 gallons per minute, whereas well yields in the bedrock aquifers commonly range from 25 to 50 gallons per minute in the western one-third of study area (Oklahoma County) and generally less than 25 gallons per minute in the eastern two-thirds of the study area (Lincoln and Pottawatomie Counties).

Becker, Carol J.

2013-01-01

262

76 FR 25322 - Oklahoma Rose Water LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...13854-000] Oklahoma Rose Water LLC; Notice of Preliminary...September 30, 2010, Oklahoma Rose Water LLC filed an application, pursuant...otherwise enter upon lands or waters owned by others without the...125-foot-high, 1,700-foot-long earth embankment dam; (2) a...

2011-05-04

263

75 FR 9895 - Public Water System Supervision Program Revision for the State of Oklahoma  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

Notice is hereby given that the State of Oklahoma is revising its approved Public Water System Supervision Program adopting new regulations for the Lead and Copper Rule (LCR) Short-Term Regulatory Revisions and Clarifications, promulgated and published in the Federal Register at 72 FR 57782 on October 10, 2007. Oklahoma has adopted the LCR Short-Term Regulatory Revisions and Clarifications to......

2010-03-04

264

Preliminary study of the favorability for uranium in northeastern Oklahoma and southeastern Kansas  

Microsoft Academic Search

A preliminary study was conducted to assess the uranium favorability of northeastern Oklahoma and southeastern Kansas, an area underlain by a stratigraphic sequence that ranges in age from Precambrian to Late Pennsylvanian. The major structural features are the Nemaha anticline, the Ozark uplift, and the Cherokee basin. Water samples analyzed by the Oklahoma State Department of Occupational and Radiological Health

L. D. Brogdon; R. C. Pilcher

1977-01-01

265

A Program of Education for Exceptional Children in Oklahoma: Bulletin S.E. No. 11.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Intended for special education personnel, the handbook sets forth the Oklahoma state program for the education of handicapped, gifted, and talented children. Aspects covered include the number of special needs students in Oklahoma, state laws pertaining to the education of exceptional children, state department of education regulations, mediation…

Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City. Curriculum Div.

266

The Oklahoma's Promise Program: A National Model to Promote College Persistence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using a multi-method approach involving fixed effects and logistic regressions, this study examined the effect of the Oklahoma's Promise Program on student persistence in relation to the Pell and Stafford federal programs and according to socio-economic characteristics and class level. The Oklahoma's Promise is a hybrid state program that pays…

Mendoza, Pilar; Mendez, Jesse P.

2013-01-01

267

76 FR 31622 - Oklahoma; Amendment No. 2 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Docket ID FEMA-2011-0001; Internal Agency Docket No. FEMA-1970-DR] Oklahoma; Amendment No. 2 to Notice of a Major Disaster...major disaster declaration for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-1970-DR), dated April 22, 2011, and related...

2011-06-01

268

33 CFR 208.28 - Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma. 208.28 Section 208...28 Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma. The Bureau of Reclamation...flows in excess of bankfull on the Washita River downstream of the reservoir. In...

2010-07-01

269

33 CFR 208.28 - Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...false Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma. 208.28 Section 208...28 Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma. The Bureau of Reclamation...flows in excess of bankfull on the Washita River downstream of the reservoir. In...

2011-07-01

270

33 CFR 208.28 - Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...false Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma. 208.28 Section 208...28 Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma. The Bureau of Reclamation...flows in excess of bankfull on the Washita River downstream of the reservoir. In...

2012-07-01

271

Building Transitions from High School to College and Careers for Oklahoma's Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report organizes information from the forum in terms of how Oklahoma fares in building students' transitions, what challenges it faces in improving transitions and what actions it can take to improve students' high school to college and career transitions. On February 17, 2006, 33 Oklahoma state educational and policy leaders participated in…

Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2006

2006-01-01

272

76 FR 50753 - Notice of Invitation To Participate; Coal Exploration License Application OKNM 126630, Oklahoma  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...OKNM 126630) are available for review from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Friday: BLM New Mexico State Office, 301 Dinosaur Trail, Santa Fe, New Mexico; and BLM, Oklahoma Field Office, 7906 East 33rd Street Suite 101, Tulsa, Oklahoma....

2011-08-16

273

In situ Stress Analysis of Wellbore Breakouts from Oklahoma and the Texas Panhandle.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Orientations of crustal stresses are inferred from stress-induced breakouts (wellbore enlargements) in the eastern part of the Anadarko basin in central Oklahoma, the Marietta basin in south-central Oklahoma, and the Bravo dome area of the central Texas P...

R. L. Dart

1990-01-01

274

Ooh La La! Oklahoma Culinary Programs Cook up Great Partnerships with French Counterparts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The dream of a Franco-Oklahoma partnership began over a year ago when Chantal Manes, now from the French Ministry of Education, visited Oklahoma. The Technologie Academie in Soissons, France, had a goal for all the career and technical students in the Picardie Region of France to have an international experience before completing their technical…

McCharen, Belinda

2009-01-01

275

75 FR 72695 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Oklahoma; State Implementation Plan Revisions...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...nitrogen oxides (NO X ) as an ozone precursor in Oklahoma's PSD SIP for purposes...approving address NO X as an ozone precursor in Oklahoma's PSD SIP for purposes...that do not address NO X as an ozone precursor. More information on the SIP...

2010-11-26

276

33 CFR 208.28 - Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma. 208.28 Section 208...28 Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma. The Bureau of Reclamation...flows in excess of bankfull on the Washita River downstream of the reservoir. In...

2013-07-01

277

Oklahoma School Finance: A Study with Recommendations. Final Report, Special Joint Committee on School Finance.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The funding of public elementary and secondary schools in Oklahoma is examined in this report. In accordance with legislative requirements, a Special Joint Committee of the Oklahoma Legislature undertook an assessment of the current school finance formula for state aid and made recommendations on changes needed to provide equitable funding for…

Oklahoma State Legislature, Oklahoma City.

278

Seismicity of the salt areas of Texas, Louisiana, Oklahoma and Kansas  

Microsoft Academic Search

The results of a seismicity study of the salt deposit areas of Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas and Louisiana are presented. The study was conducted using some of the short-period seismic data recorded on film at the Wichita Mountain Observatory (WMSO), located in southern Oklahoma, during the years 1961 through 1968. Only data recorded on Sundays were analyzed to minimize the confusion

D. Racine; P. Klouda

1980-01-01

279

Evaluation of water resources for enhanced oil recovery operations, Cement Field, Caddo and Grady Counties, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report is based on the results of an investigation of the water resources local to the Cement Oil Field in Caddo and Grady Counties, southwestern, Oklahoma. The intent of the report is to present at least a semi-quantitative estimate of the volume, deliverability, and chemistry of the water potentially available for enhanced oil recovery in one or more Oklahoma

D. A. Preston; W. E. Harrison; K. V. Luza; L. Prater; R. J. Reddy

1982-01-01

280

Sensory, Health and Quality Evaluation of Two Blackberry (Rubus subgenus Rubus) Cultivars from Arkansas and Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Berries from two thornless, erect, blackberry (Rubus subgenus Rubus) cultivars, Apache and Ouachita were harvested in summer 2008 from the University of Arkansas Fruit Research Substation in Clarksville, Arkansas and a commercial berry farm in Broken Arrow, Oklahoma. Berries were frozen immediately after harvest for future analysis at Oklahoma State University (OSU), z Total Phenolic, Flavonoid and Anthocyanin Content (mg\\/100gBB)

Richelle A. Stafne; William G. McGlynn; Eric T. Stafne; Edralin A. Lucas; John R. Clark

281

SUBSURFACE WELL-LOG CORRELATION OF ARSENIC-BEARING LITHOFACIES IN THE PERMIAN GARBER SANDSTONE AND WELLINGTON FORMATION, CENTRAL OKLAHOMA AQUIFER (COA), CLEVELAND COUNTY, OKLAHOMA  

EPA Science Inventory

The fluvial Garber Sandstone and the underlying Wellington Formation are important sources of drinking water in central Oklahoma. These formations, which make up much of the COA, consist of amalgamated sandstones with some interbedded mudstones, siltstones, and local mudstone- a...

282

Assessment of non-hazardous industrial waste codisposal in Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

This study addresses the issues associated with the codisposal of the diverse non-hazardous industrial wastes (NHIWs) in Oklahoma's municipal sanitary waste landfills (MSWLs). One aspect of the study focused on the selection of a representative cross section of NHIWs, typical of those wastes currently being codisposed in Oklahoma, and to characterize the representative waste streams based on all available physical and chemical data. Following the waste characterizations, a NHIW classification scheme was developed to distinguish amongst the potential risks posed by the different NHIWs if codisposed in municipal landfills. Another aspect of the study examined other state regulatory programs in an effort to determine the overall direction of NHIW codisposal regulations, nationwide. All state agencies were contacted and subsequently interviewed by telephone, followed by a request to send any pertinent literature and/or regulations. A synopsis of each state's general solid waste management practices were included, in addition to any specific details on NHIW regulations and/or handling procedures. The results of this specific survey indicated that a wide spectrum of NHIW regulations and procedures are being implemented nationwide. A final aspect of the study identified the best management and disposal options currently available for the NHIWs requiring codisposal. The basis for the pretreatment and/or disposal recommendations includes data obtained from both the waste characterization documentation and other state programs. Finally, the study made recommendations to the Oklahoma State Department of Health for the step-by-step development of comprehensive NHIW codisposal guidelines and recommendations, i.e., a major objective of this study.

Raleigh, L.H.

1991-01-01

283

Sulfide mineralization and magnetization, Cement oil field, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Geochemical, petrographic, and rock-magnetic studies were undertaken to investigate possible sources for reported positive aeromagnetic anomalies over the Cement oil field, Oklahoma. Ferrimagnetic pyrrhotite (monoclinic, Fe7S8 ), intergrown with more-abundant, nonmagnetic pyrite (FeS2), is present in well-cutting, core, and quarry samples at Cement, and it is the only identified source of possible enhanced magnetization in rocks over the field. Magnetite, found only in well cuttings from Cement, is contamination from drilling. Magnetite was considered previously by others to be the source of magnetic anomalies at Cement.

Reynolds, Richard L.; Fishman, Neil S.; Webring, Michael W.; Wanty, Richard B.; Goldhaber, Martin B.

1989-01-01

284

Modeling Seismicity Rate Changes in Oklahoma and Arkansas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The rate of M?3 earthquakes in the central and eastern US increased beginning in 2009, particularly in regions such as Oklahoma and central Arkansas where fluid injection has occurred (Ellsworth et al., SSA abs, 2012; Horton, SRL, 2012). We compare rate changes observed in Oklahoma, which had a low background seismicity rate before 2009, to rate changes observed in central Arkansas, which had swarms prior to the start of wastewater injection (Chiu et al., BSSA, 1984; Horton, SRL, 2012). In both cases, stochastic Epidemic-Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS) models (Ogata, JASA, 1988) and statistical tests demonstrate that the background rate of independent events and the aftershock productivity must increase in 2009 in order to explain the observed increase in seismicity. Productivity is lower during the earlier tectonic swarms in Arkansas. The change in aftershock productivity may provide a way to distinguish manmade from natural earthquake rate changes and could provide insights into the physical mechanisms of induced seismicity. We fit the ETAS model, which is based on empirical aftershock scaling laws such as Omori's Law and the Gutenberg-Richter magnitude distribution, to a 1973-2011 USGS PDE catalog of M?3 Oklahoma earthquakes and a 1982-2012 ANSS catalog of M?2.2 Arkansas earthquakes. To determine whether a rate increase is due to a change in background seismicity rate, aftershock productivity, or some combination of the two, we do the following: 1) fit the model parameters to the data, 2) convert origin times to transformed times (Ogata, JGR, 1992), and 3) use Runs and autocorrelation function tests to test the null hypothesis that the transformed times are drawn from a Poisson distribution with constant rate (as expected when no external processes trigger earthquakes besides a constant tectonic loading rate). In both cases a single set of parameters cannot fit the entire time period, suggesting that significant changes in the underlying process occurred. The null hypothesis is rejected in both Oklahoma (p<0.001) and Arkansas (p=0.015). Then, given a change point in 2009 (Ellsworth et al., SSA abs, 2012; Horton, SRL, 2012), we estimate ETAS parameters for both time periods to determine which parameters must vary. Space-time models are unstable due to the low number of events and large location error in the earlier catalogs, but likelihood tests of the temporal models indicate the data are better fit when both background rate and productivity increase.

Llenos, A. L.; Michael, A. J.

2012-12-01

285

BLACK FORK MOUNTAIN ROADLESS AREA, ARAKANSAS AND OKLAHOMA.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Black Fork Mountain Roadless Area covers about 21 sq mi in the Ouachita National Forest in Polk County, Arkansas and LeFlore County, Oklahoma. On the basis of a mineral survey the area has little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral resources. Stone and sand and gravel suitable for construction purposes occur in the Jackfork Sandstone and the Stanley Shale which also occur outside the roadless area. Although the potential for gas and oil is unknown and no resource potential was identified, some investigators believe that there is a possibility for the occurrence of gas and oil in the roadless area.

Miller, Mary, H.

1984-01-01

286

Medical marijuana: the Will Foster case in Oklahoma.  

PubMed

Oklahoma prosecuted Will Foster in 1997 for growing marijuana in his basement to treat his severe rheumatoid arthritis. Although he had no criminal record, he was sentenced to 93 years in prison, 20 of which were for growing the marijuana in the presence of his own children, a charge he denies. Foster refused to plead guilty and accept a 12-year sentence, and instead demanded a jury trial. Since conviction, he has been moved to a Texas prison, was refused medications or minimal care for his arthritis, and the governor has rejected requests for clemency. PMID:11365004

James, J S

1998-01-23

287

Ground-water levels in observation wells in Oklahoma, 1975  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The objectives of the observation-well program are (1) to provide long-term records of water-level fluctuations in representative wells, (2) to facilitate the prediction of water-level trends and indicate the future availability of ground-water supplies, and (3) to provide information for use in basic research. These selected records serve as a framework to which other types of hydrologic data may be related. The stratigraphic nomenclature and age determinations used in this report are those accepted by the Oklahoma Geological Survey and do not necessarily agree with those of the U.S. Geological Survey.

Goemaat, Robert L.

1977-01-01

288

Oklahoma State University Department of Animal Science: Goats  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This great informational website from Oklahoma State University's Department of Animal Science is all about goats (_Capra hircus_). The site provides subpages with photos and information for many breeds of goats from Alpine to Zhongwei. Site visitors can search for specific goat breeds by clicking on a letter of the alphabet or by perusing an alphabetical list of goat breeds. Links are also provided to other breeds of livestock including cattle, horses, sheep, and swine. Additionally, visitors can link to information on livestock breeds by region, livestock research, and to the Virtual Livestock Library.

289

Epidemiology of homicide-suicide events: Oklahoma, 1994-2001.  

PubMed

In Oklahoma, all nonnatural deaths must be reported to the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner (ME), whose trained investigators report cause of death using a centralized, statewide, standardized reporting system. The purpose of this study was to determine temporal trends of Oklahoma homicide-suicide events and characterize the epidemiology of these events. By reviewing all ME reports of homicides and suicides from 1994 through 2001, we identified 73 homicide-suicide events resulting in 73 suicides and 89 homicides. Suicidal perpetrators of homicide-suicide events were most often white men aged >or=30 years who killed a current or ex-spouse or intimate partner. Homicide victims tended to be younger women the same race as their killer. Firearms were the predominant method of death in both homicides and suicides, with handguns used most frequently. Divorce/estrangement was the main contributing factor to these events, and the most common relationship type was possessive. The existence of a statewide, centralized, and computerized ME system and the ability to access the detailed information in the ME narratives were critical to identifying homicide-suicide events and obtaining the type of detailed information necessary to fully investigate these events. PMID:16121077

Comstock, R Dawn; Mallonee, Sue; Kruger, Elizabeth; Rayno, Kim; Vance, April; Jordan, Fred

2005-09-01

290

Conodont biostratigraphy of lower Ordovician rocks, Arbuckle Group, southern Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The Arbuckle Group of southern Oklahoma displays the only complete exposure of the shallow-water carbonates that characterize the Lower Ordovician of interior North America. Trilobites have been described from some parts of this sequence and sporadic occurrences of other invertebrates are known, but much of the sequence is sparingly fossiliferous. As a consequence, these magnificent exposures have not contributed notably to continuing efforts toward development of a comprehensive biostratigraphic scheme for the Lower Ordovician of the North American platform. Samples collected at 25-ft intervals through the Arbuckle Group along and adjacent to Interstate Highway 35 on the south flank of the Arbuckle anticline near Ardmore, Oklahoma, produced conodonts in abundances ranging from a few tens to over a thousand elements per kilogram and displaying good to excellent preservation with low CAI. These conodonts document a biostratigraphic continuum that provides a standard for correlation of Lower Ordovician rocks in the subsurface of central US and of the many localized and incomplete outcrops of generally equivalent strata in the Ozark and Upper Mississippi Valley regions. The stratigraphic continuity of the collections makes the I-35 section an ideal standard reference section for graphic correlation of Lower Ordovician rocks containing conodonts of the Mid-Continent Province.

Dresbach, R.I.; Ethington, R.L. (Univ. of Missouri, Columbia (USA))

1989-08-01

291

Improved Estimates of Evapotranspiration at Oklahoma Mesonet Sites (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Southern Great Plains (SGP) of the United States is a region of dynamic weather and climate. In addition, the SGP region has demonstrated significant coupling between the land surface and atmospheric processes across varying spatial and temporal scales during the warm season. As such, mesocsale events including deep convection as well as regional drought and pluvial periods are impacted by land-atmosphere inter actions and gradients in the surface conditions. With the establishment of the Oklahoma Mesonet in 1994 and subsequent upgrades to the sensors deployed at the over 100 sites across the state, near real-time, collocated observations of soil and atmospheric variables have been collected, quality assured, and archived. At the same time additional observing systems and field campaigns have increased the breadth of the information gathered on soil, vegetation, and atmospheric processes across the SGP region. Such datasets have led (a) to numerous studies that have increased the understanding of how land-atmosphere interactions impact the local weather and climate of the SGP region and (b) new techniques to link in situ observations with remote sensing to provide improved understanding of surface-atmosphere exchange. Most recently, Oklahoma Mesonet soil and atmospheric observations have been combined with near real-time land surface conditions via MODIS remotely sensed data to improve estimates of evapotranspiration at local and regional scales, understand the dynamics of flash drought, and address the water budget of the region.

Basara, J. B.; Illston, B. G.

2013-12-01

292

Environmental Characteristics and Geographic Information System Applications for the Development of Nutrient Thresholds in Oklahoma Streams  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S.Environmental Protection Agency has developed nutrient criteria using ecoregions to manage and protect rivers and streams in the United States. Individual states and tribes are encouraged by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to modify or improve upon the ecoregion approach. The Oklahoma Water Resources Board uses a dichotomous process that stratifies streams using environmental characteristics such as stream order and stream slope. This process is called the Use Support Assessment Protocols, subchapter15. The Use Support Assessment Protocols can be used to identify streams threatened by excessive amounts of nutrients, dependant upon a beneficial use designation for each stream. The Use Support Assessment Protocols, subchapter 15 uses nutrient and environmental characteristic thresholds developed from a study conducted in the Netherlands, but the Oklahoma Water Resources Board wants to modify the thresholds to reflect hydrologic and ecological conditions relevant to Oklahoma streams and rivers. Environmental characteristics thought to affect impairment from nutrient concentrations in Oklahoma streams and rivers were determined for 798 water-quality sites in Oklahoma. Nutrient, chlorophyll, water-properties, and location data were retrieved from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency STORET database including data from the U.S. Geological Survey, Oklahoma Conservation Commission, and Oklahoma Water Resources Board. Drainage-basin area, stream order, stream slope, and land-use proportions were determined for each site using a Geographic Information System. The methods, procedures, and data sets used to determine the environmental characteristics are described.

Masoner, Jason R.; Haggard, Brian E.; Rea, Alan

2002-01-01

293

Potential health impacts of heavy-metal exposure at the Tar Creek Superfund site, Ottawa County, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The potential impact of exposure to heavy metals and health problems was evaluated at the Tar Creek Superfund site, Ottawa\\u000a County, Oklahoma, USA. Observed versus expected mortality was calculated for selected conditions in the County and exposed\\u000a cities. Excess mortality was found for stroke and heart disease when comparing the exposed County to the state but not when\\u000a comparing the

John S. Neuberger; Stephen C. Hu; K. David Drake; Rebecca Jim

2009-01-01

294

Depth-Duration Frequency of Precipitation for Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A regional frequency analysis was conducted to estimate the depth-duration frequency of precipitation for 12 durations in Oklahoma (15, 30, and 60 minutes; 1, 2, 3, 6, 12, and 24 hours; and 1, 3, and 7 days). Seven selected frequencies, expressed as recurrence intervals, were investigated (2, 5, 10, 25, 50, 100, and 500 years). L-moment statistics were used to summarize depth-duration data and to determine the appropriate statistical distributions. Three different rain-gage networks provided the data (15minute, 1-hour, and 1-day). The 60-minute, and 1-hour; and the 24-hour, and 1-day durations were analyzed separately. Data were used from rain-gage stations with at least 10-years of record and within Oklahoma or about 50 kilometers into bordering states. Precipitation annual maxima (depths) were determined from the data for 110 15-minute, 141 hourly, and 413 daily stations. The L-moment statistics for depths for all durations were calculated for each station using unbiased L-mo-ment estimators for the mean, L-scale, L-coefficient of variation, L-skew, and L-kur-tosis. The relation between L-skew and L-kurtosis (L-moment ratio diagram) and goodness-of-fit measures were used to select the frequency distributions. The three-parameter generalized logistic distribution was selected to model the frequencies of 15-, 30-, and 60-minute annual maxima; and the three-parameter generalized extreme-value distribution was selected to model the frequencies of 1-hour to 7-day annual maxima. The mean for each station and duration was corrected for the bias associated with fixed interval recording of precipitation amounts. The L-scale and spatially averaged L-skew statistics were used to compute the location, scale, and shape parameters of the selected distribution for each station and duration. The three parameters were used to calculate the depth-duration-frequency relations for each station. The precipitation depths for selected frequencies were contoured from weighted depth surfaces to produce maps from which the precipitation depth-duration-frequency curve for selected storm durations can be determined for any site in Oklahoma.

Tortorelli, Robert L.; Rea, Alan; Asquith, William H.

1999-01-01

295

National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Enid Quadrangle, Oklahoma and Kansas  

SciTech Connect

The uranium resources of the Enid Quadrangle, Oklahoma and Kansas, were evaluated to a depth of 1500 m using the available surface and subsurface geologic information, supplemented with an intensive geologic and geochemical reconnaissance of the quadrangle. Uranium occurrences reported in the literature were located, sampled, and described in detail. Areas of anomalous radioactivity and areas of known copper mineralization were also investigated for uranium potential. One previously known occurrence and one new occurrence were investigated in detail. All mineralized areas occur in Upper Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian strata and are uneconomic. All surface and subsurface rocks in the quadrangle are considered to possess characteristics unfavorable for uranium potenial. The upper Arbuckle Group (Upper Cambrian-Lower Ordovician) was designated as an unevaluated environment. The Arbuckle has some favorable characteristics, but sufficient information is not available to consider it an environment favorable for uranium deposits.

Eutsler, R.L.; Bloch, S.; Johnson, K.S.

1982-09-01

296

Statistical Summaries of Streamflow in and near Oklahoma Through 2007  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Statistical summaries of streamflow records through 2007 for gaging stations in Oklahoma and parts of adjacent states are presented for 238 stations with at least 10 years of streamflow record. Streamflow at 120 of the stations is regulated for specific periods. Data for these periods were analyzed separately to account for changes in streamflow because of regulation by dams or other human modification of streamflow. A brief description of the location, drainage area, and period of record is given for each gaging station. A brief regulation history also is given for stations with a regulated streamflow record. This descriptive information is followed by tables of mean and median monthly and annual discharges, magnitude and probability of exceedance of annual instantaneous peak flows, durations of daily mean flow, magnitude and probability of nonexceedance of annual low flows, and magnitude and probability of nonexceedance of seasonal low flows.

Lewis, Jason M.; Esralew, Rachel A.

2009-01-01

297

Comparing reactions to two severe tornadoes in one Oklahoma community.  

PubMed

The authors compared the effect of the 3 May 1999 F5 and 8 May 2003 F3 tornadoes on the community of Moore, Oklahoma, by canvassing damaged areas after both tornadoes and surveying residents. Significantly more 1999 than 2003 residents reported property damage and injuries. Television and tornado sirens were the most common warnings each year, however, more 1999 residents received and responded to television warnings. Importantly, storm shelters were used more frequently in 2003. Fifty-one per cent of residents who experienced both tornadoes took the same amount of protective action in 2003 as they had in 1999; 22% took less; and 27% took more. Residents who took less action said that the reason for doing so was inadequate warning and shelter. First-hand experience of tornadoes prompts people to heed warnings when adequate notification is received and to take effective protective action when adequate shelter is available. PMID:16108992

Comstock, R Dawn; Mallonee, Sue

2005-09-01

298

Networked Observation of Precipitating Cloud Systems in Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Radars are inherently limited in their ability to resolve fine structure of cloud systems and completely image a volume of space. Both the radial nature of sampling and the issues of beam width mean that upper level features are often missed or poorly resolved. While constant azimuth scans (RHIs) give amazing insight into the vertical structure they are not capable of sampling full storm structure in within a time commensurate with the evolution of the storm system. This presentation will show results from the ARM multi-scale remote sensing facility in Lamont, Oklahoma where there is a network of three X-Band and a C-Band radar deployed. Taking care in quality control and using a flexible mapping methodology enables the combining of information from multiple sources. We will showcase some sample storm reconstructions highlighting the advantages of using the full capabilities of the observing system.

Collis, S. M.; Giangrande, S. E.; Bharadwaj, N.

2012-12-01

299

Exploitation and Optimization of Reservoir Performance in Hunton Formation, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

West Carney field--one of the newest fields discovered in Oklahoma--exhibits many unique production characteristics. These characteristics include: (1) decreasing water-oil ratio; (2) decreasing gas-oil ratio followed by an increase; (3) poor prediction capability of the reserves based on the log data; and (4) low geological connectivity but high hydrodynamic connectivity. The purpose of this investigation is to understand the principal mechanisms affecting the production, and propose methods by which we can extend the phenomenon to other fields with similar characteristics. In our experimental investigation section, we continue to describe the use of surfactant to alter the wettability of the rock. By altering the wettability, we may be able to recover additional oil through imbibition and gravity drainage process. In our Engineering and Geological Analysis section, we present a new technique to generate alternate permeability distributions at unsampled wells.

Mohan Kelkar

2006-01-01

300

Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibrations Stimulation in Osage County, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

This Technical Quarterly Report is for the reporting period July 1, 2001 to September 30, 2001. The report provides details of the work done on the project entitled ''Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma''. The project is divided into nine separate tasks. Several of the tasks are being worked on simultaneously, while other tasks are dependent on earlier tasks being completed. The vibration stimulation well is permitted as Well 111-W-27, section 8 T26N R6E Osage County Oklahoma. It was spud July 28, 2001 with Goober Drilling Rig No. 3. The well was drilled to 3090-feet cored, logged, cased and cemented. The Rig No.3 moved off August 6, 2001. Phillips Petroleum Co. has begun analyzing the cores recovered from the test well. Standard porosity, permeability and saturation measurements will be conducted. They will then begin the sonic stimulation core tests Calumet Oil Company, the operator of the NBU, has begun to collect both production and injection wells information to establish a baseline for the project in the pilot field test area. Green Country Submersible Pump Company, a subsidiary of Calumet Oil Company, will provide both the surface equipment and downhole tools to allow the Downhole Vibration Tool to be operated by a surface rod rotating system. The 7-inch Downhole Vibration Tool (DHVT) has been built and is ready for initial shallow testing. The shallow testing will be done in a temporarily abandoned well operated by Calumet Oil Co. in the Wynona waterflood unit. The data acquisition doghouse and rod rotating equipment have been placed on location in anticipation of the shallow test in Well No.20-12 Wynona Waterflood Unit. A notice of invention disclosure was submitted to the DOE Chicago Operations Office. DOE Case No.S-98,124 has been assigned to follow the documentation following the invention disclosure. A paper covering the material presented to the Oklahoma Geologic Survey (OGS)/DOE Annual Workshop in Oklahoma City May 8,9 2001 has been submitted for publication to the OGS. A technical paper draft has been submitted for the ASME/ETCE conference (Feb 2002) Production Technology Symposium. A one-day SPE sponsored short course which is planned to cover seismic stimulation efforts around the world, will be offered at the SPE/DOE Thirteenth Symposium on Improved Oil Recovery in Tulsa, OK, April 13-17, 2002. Dan Maloney, Phillips and Bob Westermark, OGCI will be the instructors. In addition, a proposed technical paper has been submitted for this meeting.

J. Ford Brett; Robert V. Westermark

2001-09-30

301

Petroleum production and exploration in Ouachita region of Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Petroleum production in the Ouachita region of southeastern Oklahoma occurs in three geographic areas parallel to regional structure. The frontal gas, central oil, and central gas belts are distinguished by differences in structural setting, reservoir strata, and types of hydrocarbons. In the frontal belt, nearly 1 trillion ft/sup 3/ of dry gas has been produced from thrusted and subthrust Morrowan and Atokan sandstone and carbonate reservoirs. Over 8000 bbl of oil have been produced in the central oil belt, southeast of the Ti Valley fault. Structures consist of imbricate thrusts and isoclinal to overturned folds. The fields are typically small, associated with asphaltite or tar sands, and produce from Carboniferous sandstone reservoirs. Farther southeast, small fields within the central gas belt have produced minor gas from Ordovician, Devonian, and Mississippian reservoirs. Six Ordovician through Mississippian Ouachita-facies shales are potential petroleum source rocks and occur in the middle to lower part of the oil window. However, Devonian and Mississippian strata are composed primarily of terrestrial organic matter and are probably gas prone. Oil in Carboniferous reservoirs probably migrated upward stratigraphically from older sources. Recent exploration has focused on extending production from Pennsylvanian reservoirs in the frontal gas belt. However, a significant Arbuckle discovery (ARCO 2 Yourman) and a Broken Bow uplift test (Sohio 1-22 Weyerhauser) in 1987 indicate that Cambrian-Ordovician Arbuckle Group carbonates may be prospective beneath all of the Oklahoma Ouachitas. Near-future rank-wildcat exploration will probably focus on subthrust, structurally and stratigraphically favorable Arbuckle plays.

Suneson, N.H.; Campbell, J.A.

1989-03-01

302

Porosity trends of nonreservoir and reservoir sandstones, Anadarko basin, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The porosity of nonreservoir sandstones in Caddo County, Oklahoma, is determined using compensated-neutron and formation-density logs. The authors preliminary data set represents more than 3,000 net ft of Pennsylvanian and Permian age sandstones from 12 well locations. These porosity data and the average porosities of sandstone oil and gas reservoirs within the Anadarko basin of Oklahoma are each compared to a broad, composite set of porosity data from numerous basins that represent sandstones in general, and they are also compared to each other. The porosity of nonreservoir sandstones in Caddo County declines predictably as a power function of increasing thermal maturity for vitrinite reflectance (R{sub 0}) of 0.5 to 1.3%. The rate of porosity decrease with increasing thermal maturity is more rapid than that of the average porosity-R{sub 0} trend of the composite set, but is still within the porosity-R{sub 0} envelope of sandstones in general. Hydrocarbon reservoir sandstones of the Anadarko basin, however, follow a different pattern. Their rate of porosity loss is much slower than that of both sandstones in general, and nonreservoir sandstones of Caddo County. This slow rate of porosity decline with increasing R{sub 0} could be due to inhibiting effects of early hydrocarbon emplacement on diagenesis and (or) to the bias of economic selection. In any case, as R{sub 0} increases beyond about 1%, the porosity of Anadarko basin reservoir sandstones is anomalously high compared to both nonreservoir Anadarko basin sandstones and sandstones in general.

Hester, T.C.; Schmoker, J.W. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

1991-03-01

303

Salvage Excavations of Prehistoric Human Burials at Altus and Foss Reservoirs, Southwestern Oklahoma: 1980-1984.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A series of four reports is presented which document seven human burials salvaged by Bureau of Reclamation staff archeologists. The burials were exposed by lake shore erosion at Altus and Foss Reservoirs in southwestern Oklahoma. A formal analysis of the ...

G. Agogino D. K. Boyd V. T. Button M. Etchieson B. Ferguson

1985-01-01

304

40 CFR 81.47 - Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.47 Section...ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of...

2013-07-01

305

40 CFR 81.79 - Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.79 Section...ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of...

2013-07-01

306

40 CFR 81.125 - Southwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false Southwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.125 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.125...

2013-07-01

307

40 CFR 81.124 - North Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false North Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.124 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.124 North...

2013-07-01

308

Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Midcontinent region (Kansas, Missouri, Oklahoma).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility/constraints of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers a select area of the United States. The Midcontinent (Kansas, Nssouri, Oklahoma) has produced significant ...

D. K. Olsen W. I. Johnson

1993-01-01

309

Health Systems Plan. Health Service Area 1 Oklahoma. Volume 5, Chapters 1-4.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Oklahoma Health Systems Agency compiled this data supplement to accompany its health systems plan. Contents: Demograph Data--presents general population characteristics and growth trends and a socioeconomic profile of the State; Target Populations--sp...

1978-01-01

310

Preliminary Study of the Favorability for Uranium in Northeastern Oklahoma and Southeastern Kansas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A preliminary study was conducted to assess the uranium favorability of northeastern Oklahoma and southeastern Kansas, an area underlain by a stratigraphic sequence that ranges in age from Precambrian to Late Pennsylvanian. The major structural features a...

L. D. Brogdon R. C. Pilcher

1977-01-01

311

Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance Basic Data for Ardmore NTMS Quadrangle, Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Results of a reconnaissance geochemical survey of the Ardmore Quadrangle, Oklahoma are reported. Field and laboratory data are presented for 745 groundwater samples and 782 stream sediment samples. Statistical and areal distributions of uranium and possib...

1978-01-01

312

77 FR 29275 - Oklahoma: Incorporation by Reference of State Hazardous Waste Management Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FRL-9652-8] Oklahoma: Incorporation by Reference of State Hazardous Waste Management Program...program. The EPA will incorporate by reference into the Code of Federal Regulations...EPA is codifying and incorporating by reference the State's hazardous waste...

2012-05-17

313

75 FR 36609 - Oklahoma: Incorporation by Reference of State Hazardous Waste Management Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FRL-9162-6] Oklahoma: Incorporation by Reference of State Hazardous Waste Management Program...program. The EPA will incorporate by reference into the Code of Federal Regulations...and [[Page 36610

2010-06-28

314

Ok Air for the Ok State: A Report on the Appraisal of Air Pollution in Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

There is assurance that Oklahoma is on the threshold of economic expansion that will require vigilance to prevent new air pollution. Analysis of available information reveals that there is no effective air pollution control program in existence in the sta...

J. D. McHard R. F. Wromble

1965-01-01

315

Live Weight-Dressed Weight Relationship for Commercial Fishes from Four Oklahoma Reservoirs.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Oklahoma commercial fishermen on Lakes Texoma, Grand, Eufaula, and Gibson were studied from July 1967 to June 1968. In each quarter samples of fish were weighed prior to cleaning, by a commercial fishermen, and immediately afterwards. Linear and curviline...

G. Mensinger B. E. Brown

1971-01-01

316

Oklahoma's Timber Industry: An Assessment of Timber Product Output and Use, 1996.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In 1996, roundwood output from Oklahoma's forests totaled 113 million cubic feet. Mill byproducts generated from primary manufacturers was 42 million cubic feet. Almost all plant residue was used primarily for fuel and fiber products. Saw logs were the le...

M. Howell T. G. Johnson

1998-01-01

317

76 FR 18927 - Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...govern Federal Hazardous Waste revisions promulgated...Section 2- Processed in a Gasification 7-101 et seq.; as...Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act, as amended...State RCRA hazardous waste program without altering...Significantly Affect Energy Supply,...

2011-04-06

318

Evaluation of Heavy-Oil Potential of Northeastern Craig and Northwestern Ottawa Counties, Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This project was undertaken to evaluate the heavy-oil (oil less than 25 exp 0 API) potential of northeastern Oklahoma - specifically, northwestern Ottawa and northeastern Craig Counties, the area considered to have the best possibility for shallow, heavy-...

W. E. Harrison J. F. Roberts L. J. Heath

1979-01-01

319

76 FR 81838 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Oklahoma; Interstate Transport of Pollution  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Implementation Plans; Oklahoma; Interstate Transport of Pollution AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION...307(b)(2).) List of Subjects in 40 CFR Part 52 Air pollution control, Environmental protection, Incorporation by...

2011-12-29

320

78 FR 73858 - Public Water System Supervision Program Revision for the State of Oklahoma  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

Notice is hereby given that the State of Oklahoma is revising its approved Public Water System Supervision Program. Oklahoma has adopted three EPA drinking water rules, namely the: (1) Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule (LT2), (2) the Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (DBP2), and (3) the Ground Water Rule (GWR). EPA has determined that the proposed LT2, DBP2,......

2013-12-09

321

Fracture density and spacing along Washita Valley fault, Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors document fracture density and spacing associated with the Washita Valley fault, a major strike-slip fault. The Washita Valley fault strikes northwest-southeast with up to 80 mi of exposure in southern Oklahoma and may be an early bounding fault of the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen (Ardmore\\/Marietta basins). Horizontal displacement on the fault has been estimated to be up to 40

C. D. Ferebee; J. B. Tapp

1989-01-01

322

Rb-Sr Isotopic Systematics of Felsic Igneous Rocks, Wichita Mountains, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recently determined Rb-Sr isotopic characteristics of twelve of the recognized felsic units of the Cambrian Southern Oklahoma Aulacogen, which crop out in the Wichita Mountains of the southwestern Oklahoma, give some clues to the petrogenesis of these felsic units. 1) Plots of 87Rb\\/86Sr vs. 87Sr\\/86Sr form subsets yielding dates of 516 Ma and 522 Ma, discrepancies of about 10 to

K. Min; M. C. Gilbert

2001-01-01

323

Simulating the impacts of groundwater pumping on stream–aquifer dynamics in semiarid northwestern Oklahoma, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Visual MODFLOW, a numerical groundwater flow model, was used to evaluate the impacts of groundwater exploitation on streamflow\\u000a depletion in the Alluvium and Terrace aquifer of the Beaver-North Canadian River (BNCR) in northwestern Oklahoma, USA. Water\\u000a demand in semi-arid northwestern Oklahoma is projected to increase by 53% during the next five decades, driven primarily by\\u000a irrigation, public water supply, and

Joseph Zume; Aondover Tarhule

2008-01-01

324

The Effects of Universal Pre-K in Oklahoma: Research Highlights and Policy Implications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract ,Oklahoma is one of only three states in the nation to offer a free pre-kindergarten(pre-K) program,to all students in participatingschool districts on a voluntary basis. Fortuitous circumstances in Tulsa, Oklahoma, the state’s largest school district, permitted an unusually rigorous evaluation of the pre-K program in Tulsa. Because four-year-olds beginning pre-K and five-year-olds beginning kindergarten were administered the same test

William T. Gormley; Deborah Phillips

2005-01-01

325

Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

This Technical Quarterly Report is for the reporting period July 1, 2000 to September 30, 2000. The report provides details of the work done on the project entitled ''Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma''. The project is divided into nine separate tasks. Since this is the first Quarterly report, much of the work done is of a preliminary nature. Several of the tasks are being worked on simultaneously, while other tasks are dependent on earlier tasks being completed. The selection of the pilot test area has been completed. The drilling of the test well is waiting on rig availability. Phillips has begun sonic core testing of offset cores, waiting on the core from the well to be drilled. Design work is progressing for the tool, which will be built to fit the test well. Installation of monitoring equipment and the downhole vibration tool will occur after the well is drilled. Technical transfer efforts have begun with the submission of an abstract for a technical paper for the Oklahoma City Society of Petroleum Engineers meeting in March 2001.

J. Ford Brett; Robert V. Westermark

2000-09-30

326

Bibliography of Oklahoma hydrology; reports prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey and principal cooperating agencies, 1901-93  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This bibliography lists reports on hydrology in Oklahoma prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey and the principal State cooperating agencies, the Oklahoma Geological Survey and the Oklahoma Water Resources Board. Included are citations of about 550 reports, abstracts, and journal articles issued from 1901 through July 1993. The reports are listed by agency and report type, and are indexed by author, subject, and USGS report number.

compiled by Havens, J. S.

1993-01-01

327

Bibliography of Oklahoma hydrology; reports prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey and principal cooperating agencies, 1901-88  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Reports on the hydrology of Oklahoma have been issued by the U.S. Geological Survey since 1901. This bibliography lists reports on hydrology in Oklahoma prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey and the principal State cooperating agencies, the Oklahoma Geological Survey and the Oklahoma Water Resources Board. Of the nearly 350 reports issued from 1901 through 1988, about 200 have been concerned primarily with groundwater; the remainder have dealt with some aspect of surface water, water quality, or geology. The reports are listed by agency and report type, and are indexed both by author and subject. (USGS)

Compiled by Havens, John S.

1989-01-01

328

Ore microscopy of the Paoli silver-copper deposit, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Paoli silver-copper deposit is located in south-central Oklahoma, 56 km south-southeast from Norman, Oklahoma. It was mined for high-grade silver-copper near the beginning of this century, and intensive exploratory drilling during the early 1970's delineated unmined portions of the deposit. A collaborative study between the U.S.G.S., the Kansas Geological Survey, and the University of Missouri-Rolla was undertaken to provide new information on the character of red bed copper deposits of the Midcontinent region. The Paoli deposit has been interpreted to occur as a roll-front type of deposit. The silver and copper mineralization occurs within paleochannels in the Permian Wellington Formation. The silver-copper interfaces appear to be controlled by oxidation-reduction interfaces that are marked by grey to red color changes in the host sandstone. Ore microscopic examinations of polished thin sections show that unoxidized ore consists of chalcocite, digenite, chalcopyrite, covellite and pyrite; and oxidized ores are characterized by covellite, bornite, hematite and goethite. In sandstone-hosted ores, chalcocite and digenite replace dolomite and border clastic quartz grains. In siltstone-hosted ores, the copper sulfide grains have varied shapes; most are irregular in shape and 5-25 ??m across, others have euhedral shapes suggestive of pyrite crystal replacements, and some are crudely spherical and are 120-200 ??m across. Chalcopyrite is the predominant copper sulfide at depth. Covellite and malachite replace chalcocite and digenite near the surface. Silver only occurs as native silver; most as irregularly shaped grains 40-80 ??m across, but some as cruciform crystals that are up to 3.5 mm across. The native silver has been deposited after copper sulfides, and locally replaces chalcocite. Surficial nodules of pyrite, malachite and hematite locally are present in outcrops at the oxidation-reduction fronts. Polished sections of the nodules show that malachite forms a cement around quartz sand grains, and brecciated pyrite grains are surrounded by rims of hematite and goethite. Dolomite is the principal sandstone cement. Cathodoluminescence microscopic study of the mineral has shown that it was deposited during seven periods before the copper sulfide mineralization. ?? 1991.

Thomas, C. A.; Hagni, R. D.; Berendsen, P.

1991-01-01

329

Subsurface imaging of an abandoned solid waste landfill site in Norman, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Leachate plume emanating from an old unlined municipal landfill site near the city of Norman, Oklahoma, is discharging into the underlying alluvial aquifer. Subsurface imaging techniques, electrical resistivity tomography and electrical conductivity (EC) logging, were used on the site to detect and map the position of the leachate plume. Anomalous EC zones, delineated with the two methods, correlated with the occurrence of the plume detected by water chemistry analyses from multilevel monitoring wells. Specific conductance, a potential indicator of leachate contamination, ranged from 1861 to 7710 ??S/cm in contaminated zones and from 465 to 2180 ??S/cm in uncontaminated ground water. Results are in agreement with those from earlier studies that the leachate plume emerges from the landfill along preferential pathways. Additionally, there are indications that the leading edge of the plume has migrated, at least, 200 m away from the landfill in the direction of ground water flow. ?? 2006 National Ground Water Association.

Zume, J. T.; Tarhule, A.; Christenson, S.

2006-01-01

330

The diurnal wind variation in the lowest 1500 ft in central Oklahoma - June 1966-May 1967.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A one-year accumulation of wind data from a television tower in northern Oklahoma City has been analyzed on a diurnal basis. The annual mean speeds below the third level at 296 ft are lowest at night and highest during the day, and conversely the speeds up to the seventh level at 1458 ft are lowest during the day and highest at night. Generally, speed changes occur in short time periods shortly after sunrise and near sunset. Resultant wind directions veer most with height from 1700 to 1000 CST and least during midday. At all levels winds veer with time between 2100 and approximately 1100 CST and then back with time during the remaining hours.

Crawford, K. C.; Hudson, H. R.

1973-01-01

331

Geographic Information Systems Methods for Determining Drainage-Basin Areas, Stream-Buffered Areas, Stream Length, and Land Uses for the Neosho and Spring Rivers in Northeastern Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Geographic Information Systems have many uses, one of which includes the reproducible computation of environmental characteristics that can be used to categorize hydrologic features. The Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation and the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality are investigating Geographic Information Systems techniques to determine partial drainage-basin areas, stream-buffer areas, stream length, and land uses (drainage basin and stream characteristics) in northeastern Oklahoma. The U.S Geological Survey, in cooperation with Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation and the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality, documented the methods used to determine drainage-basin and stream characteristics for the Neosho and Spring Rivers above Grand Lake Of the Cherokees in northeastern Oklahoma and calculated the characteristics. The drainage basin and stream characteristics can be used by the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation and the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality to aid in natural-resource assessments.

Masoner, Jason R.; March, Ferrella

2006-01-01

332

Ground water in the alluvium of Beaver Creek basin, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Beaver Creek is an 857 square-mile area in south-central Oklahoma. The tributaries head at an altitude as high as 1,400 feet and the mouth of Beaver Creek is at an altitude of 804 feet. Alluvial material has been deposited along all the major streams in the basin. The alluvium contains a high percentage of clay and fine sand and ranges in thickness from a few inches to 50 feet. Replenishment of water in the alluvium is from precipitation, lateral seepage and runoff from adjoining areas, and infiltration from the streams during high flows. The town of Ryan and Waurika have constructed municipal water-supply wells topping the alluvium and residents of the town of Sugden have private wells topping the alluvium. The other major use of ground water is transpiration by trees, which are very dense where the alluvial plain is wide. In the northern part of the basin the alluvium is thin and only domestic water supplies are available. (available as photostat copy only)

Hart, D. L., Jr.

1961-01-01

333

Source of shallow Simpson Group Oil in Murray County, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Oils produced from the Simpson Group (Middle Ordovician) in three shallow fields located north of the Arbuckle Mountains in Murray County, Oklahoma, have widely differing compositions: SW Sandy Creek, 28.9{degree} API, 0.57% sulfur; Davis NE, 25.9{degree} API, 0.72% sulfur; Sulfur NW, 16.4{degree} API, 1.44% sulfur. From gas chromatography and biomarker analysis, they determined that the oils were derived from the same source and that the differences in composition are due to biodegradation of the oils in the shallow reservoirs. A comparison of the biomarker assemblage of the Simpson Group oils to several other oils produced in the Arbuckle Mountain area showed that the Simpson Group assemblage highly resembled the assemblage of a Woodford Formation oil (Devonian) but had no similarity to a Viola Formation oil (upper Middle Ordovician). The Simpson Group oils also differed markedly from an oil produced from the Arbuckle Group (Lower Ordovician) in the nearby, shallow Southeast Hoover field. Their data suggest that the source of the shallow Simpson Group oils is the Woodford Formation located in the downthrown Mill Creek syncline south and west of these fields. A large vertical migration along faults or within the fault block is implied by this geometry. However, the Arbuckle Group oil from the Southeast Hoover field, south of the syncline, has a different source.

Zemmels, I.; Tappmeyer, D.M.; Walters, C.C. (Sun Exploration and Production Co., Dallas, TX (USA))

1987-02-01

334

Exploitation and Optimization of Reservoir Performance in Hunton Formation, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

West Carney field--one of the newest fields discovered in Oklahoma--exhibits many unique production characteristics. These characteristics include: (1) decreasing water-oil ratio; (2) decreasing gas-oil ratio followed by an increase; (3) poor prediction capability of the reserves based on the log data; and (4) low geological connectivity but high hydrodynamic connectivity. The purpose of this investigation is to understand the principal mechanisms affecting the production, and propose methods by which we can extend the phenomenon to other fields with similar characteristics. In our experimental investigation section, we continue to describe the use of surfactant to alter the wettability of the rock. By altering the wettability, we should be able to change the water-gas ratio in the reservoir and, hence, improve productivity from the well. In our Engineering and Geological Analysis section, we present our rock typing analysis work which combines the geological data with engineering data to develop a unique rock characteristics description. By using porosity as a variable, we can generate alternate rock type descriptions at logged wells. This procedure also allows us to quantify uncertainties in rock type description.

Mohan Kelkar

2005-10-01

335

Modified fracs increase recovery from Oklahoma tight formations  

SciTech Connect

Staged fracture stimulations with high sand concentrations have added recoverable reserves and improved the economics for developing tight formations in the Golden Trend of southern Oklahoma. Since the early 1950s, the Sycamore and Hunton formations have been recognized as formations requiring fracture stimulation for commercial production. Throughout the trend, numerous frac techniques have been used to stimulate the massive interval. Until 1992, high volume, slick water, and modified Kiel fracs were the favorite treatments because of low cost and relatively high initial producing rates. Because of the low gas prices that continued into the early part of 1992, new completions in the Golden Trend were attractive to only those companies that could take advantage of Section 29 tax credits. However, of the low gas prices that continued into the early part of 1992, new completions in the Golden Trend were attractive to only those companies that could take advantage of Section 29 tax credits. However, Chesapeake Energy Corp. could not use the tax credits and therefore focused on increasing gas recoveries and the rate of return from this area. By re-engineering the traditional completion and drilling practices, Chesapeake Energy added more than 1 bcf and 20,000 bbl of oil/well. Ultimate recoveries from each well are about 1.5--2.0 bcf and 30,000--40,000 bbl of oil. The paper describes the frac design, the frac team, treatment procedures, and production results after the first six months from 44 completions.

Veltri, D.L. (Veltri (D.L.), Houston, TX (United States))

1994-01-24

336

Oklahoma Cherokee formation study shows benefits of gas tax credits  

SciTech Connect

To no one's surprise, the administration's recently released energy initiative package does not advocate the use of tax incentives such as the Internal Revenue Code Sec. 29 (tight sand gas) credit that expired Dec. 31, 1992. This is unfortunate since tax credits do stimulate drilling, as the authors' recent study of Oklahoma's Pennsylvanian age Cherokee formation demonstrates. Within this 783,000 acre study area, more than 130 additional wells were drilled between 1991--92 because of tax credit incentives. And such tax credits also increase total federal tax revenues by causing wells to be drilled that would not have been drilled or accelerating the drilling of wells, thereby increasing taxable revenue. In short, tax credits create a win-win situation: they stimulate commerce, increase tax revenues, reduce the outflow of capital to foreign petroleum projects, and add to the nation's natural gas reserve, which is beneficial for national security, balance of payments, the environment, and gas market development. The paper discusses the study assumptions, study results, and the tax credit policy.

Stanley, B.J.; Cline, S.B. (Hefner Corp., Oklahoma City, OK (United States))

1994-01-10

337

Poorly characterized critical rock units within the southern Oklahoma Aulacogen  

SciTech Connect

The Southern Oklahoma Aulacogen (SOA) apparently developed during late Proterozoic-early Cambrian rifting of the southern continental margin. This margin appears to be related to the Grenville suture' formed when the Llano terrane was accreted to N.A. The SOA is representative, as well as the best exposed, of a series of penecontemporaneous rifts along the southern and eastern margin of the North American plate. Pronounced Pennsylvanian structural inversion has lifted the igneous basal sections of this rift (the SOA) to shallow crustal levels and exposed parts of it in the Wichita Mountains. Two previously identified but poorly characterized rock units within the SOA, the Tillman Metasedimentary Group and the Navajoe Mountain Basalt/Spilite Group, do not crop out at the surface, having only been recognized from well cuttings. No well-described or well-dated samples exist. The Tillman may be the basement rock which was extended during initial rifting and hosted the igneous infill of the SOA. The Navajoe may represent the earliest phase of magmatism in the SOA. Isotopic dating and geochemistry, and textural/structural relations, of 100--500 m core sections in these two units would go a long way toward clarifying paleotectonic relations and crustal structure in the late Proterozoic. Several drill sites for scientific holes up to 1 km in depth targeted to these enigmatic units can be identified and the rationale for their selection will be presented.

Gilbert, M.C.; Hogan, J.P. (Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). School of Geology and Geophysics); Denison, R.E. (Kingstree, Dallas, TX (United States)); Lidiak, E.G. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Geology and Planet Science)

1993-02-01

338

Multispectral analysis of limestone, dolomite, and granite, Mill Creek, Oklahoma  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Spectral reflectance and thermal emission data were collected at the Mill Creek, Oklahoma test site during NASA missions 132 and 133 in June 1970. The data were collected by three aircraft flown several times during the diurnal cycle at altitudes of 150 to 17,000 m above mean terrain. Reflectance of the main rock types (limestone, dolomite, and granite) was determined from the data collected using a 12-channel multispectral scanner during mission 133 and from thermal infrared images recorded during mission 132 on an RS-7 scanner from 17,000 m above terrain. A preliminary rock recognition map was generated automatically using data collected from 900 m above terrain. The discrimination provided by the map is reasonably accurate. Misidentification occurred in areas of unusually high dolomite reflectivity. High altitude thermal infrared (10 to 12 micrometers) images show regional folds and faults distinguished by the presence of thermally contrasting materials. Linear and curvilinear structural features two to three times smaller than the nominal 17 m resolution could be detected.

Rowan, L. C.; Watson, K.

1970-01-01

339

Subsidence and basin development in the southern Oklahoma aulacogen  

SciTech Connect

Development of the southern Oklahoma aulacogen was the result of Cambrian tectonism along Proterozoic zones of weakness that caused northwest-trending extensional normal faults related to a rifting event. These faults were reactivated during upper Paleozoic compressional stress with fault patterns indicative of sinistral transpressive and transtensional movement. Mapping in the region has allowed classification of the myriad of faults into six major systems, from the north to south: the Washita Valley, Madill-Aylesworth, Caddo, Criner, Horseshoe Bend, and Muenster systems. Development of the fault systems occurred somewhat independently as energy was transferred between them owing to changes in stress from the uneven collision of the Ouachita front. This model may account for the episodic movement recognized by past investigators. The determination of relative timing of development within these systems has shown that the Madill-Aylesworth and Criner systems were active during the Upper Mississippian. As deformation continued along the Criner system structural activity moved southward to include the Horseshoe Bend and Muenster systems during the Early Pennsylvanian. During the Middle Pennsylvanian, fault development along the southern margin of the aulacogen subsided, and deformation activity was initiated in the northern portions of the Ardmore basin. The amount of horizontal displacement along fault systems in the region is still unresolved. However, by regional mapping along the Criner systems, a minimum of 6 mi left-lateral movement can be documented as having occurred during the Upper Pennsylvanian using models of sediment deposition and transport in strike-slip basins.

Ferebee, C. (Univ. of Tulsa, OK (United States))

1991-03-01

340

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 6): Hardage/Criner, McClain County, Oklahoma, November 1986. First Remedial Action.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Hardage/Criner site is located in McClain County, Oklahoma, approximately 15 miles southwest of Norman, Oklahoma. The area is agricultural with land on all sides of the site used for grazing cattle. From September 1972 to November 1980, the site was o...

1986-01-01

341

25 CFR 151.5 - Trust acquisitions in Oklahoma under section 5 of the I.R.A.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... false Trust acquisitions in Oklahoma under section 5 of the I.R.A. 151.5 Section 151.5 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN...151.5 Trust acquisitions in Oklahoma under section 5 of the I.R.A. In addition to acquisitions for tribes which did...

2011-04-01

342

A Grid/Group Study of Gender Perceptions of the Culture of the Oklahoma Civil Air Patrol  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to describe member perceptions of the culture of the Oklahoma CAP using an online version of the Douglas Grid/Group typology. This study further described and compared differences in how men and women in the organization view its culture. All senior members of the Oklahoma CAP with a valid email address on file…

Wardlaw, Kelly Ann

2011-01-01

343

Monitoring temperature conditions in recently drilled nonproductive industry boreholes in Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Temperature conditions were monitored in seven industry petroleum-test wells (called holes-of-opportunity in this report) that were drilled in central and eastern Oklahoma. Five of these wells provided useful temperature information, and two wells were used to determine the length of time needed for the borehole-fluid temperature to achieve thermal equilibrium with the formation rocks. Four wells were used to verify the validity of a geothermal-gradient map of Oklahoma. Temperature surveys in two wells indicated a gradient lower than the predicted gradients on the geothermal-gradient map. When deep temperature data, between 5000 and 13,000 feet, are adjusted for mud-circulation effects, the adjusted gradients approximate the gradients on the geothermal-gradient map. The temperature-confirmation program appears to substantiate the geographic distribution of the high- and low-thermal-gradient regimes in Oklahoma. 13 refs., 18 figs., 7 tabs.

Harrison, W.E.; Luza, K.V.

1985-06-01

344

Chemical quality of surface waters in the Arkansas River basin of Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

One of the first requisites for intelligent planning of the utilization and control of water and for the administration of laws relating to its use, is data on the quantity, quality, and mode of occurence of water supplies. The collections, evaluation, interpretation, and publication of such data constitute the primary function of the Water Resources Division of the United States Geological Survey. Since 1895 the Congress has made appropriations to this agency for investigations of the water resources of the Nation. In 1929 the Congress adopted the policy of dollar-for-dollar cooperation with State and local governmental agencies for water-resources investigations. The Geological Survey's Federal-State cooperative program of quality-of-water investigations in Oklahoma was started in 1944 in cooperation with the Oklahoma Planning and Resources Board. Since July of this year the program has been carried on cooperatively with the newly created Oklahoma Water Resources Board. (available as photostat copy only)

Dover, T. B.

1957-01-01

345

Testing a Mahalanobis distance model of black bear habitat use in the Ouachita Mountains of Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Regional wildlife-habitat models are commonly developed but rarely tested with truly independent data. We tested a published habitat model for black bears {Ursus americanus) with new data collected in a different site in the same ecological region (i.e., Ouachita Mountains of Arkansas and Oklahoma, USA). We used a Mahalanobis distance model developed from relocations of black bears in Arkansas to produce a map layer of Mahalanobis distances on a study area in neighboring Oklahoma. We tested this modeled map layer with relocations of black bears on the Oklahoma area. The distributions of relocations of female black bears were consistent with model predictions. We conclude that this modeling approach can be used to predict regional suitability for a species of interest.

Hellgren, E. C.; Bales, S. L.; Gregory, M. S.; Leslie, Jr. , D. M.; Clark, J. D.

2007-01-01

346

Native American Conference on Petroleum Energy; November 16-17, 1996; Bartlesville, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Thirty-three Native American tribal members, council members, and other interested parties gathered in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, to attend the Native American Conference on Petroleum Energy on October 16 and 17 1996, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and BDM-Oklahoma, Inc. Tribes represented at the workshop included the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Hopi, Jicarilla Apache, Osage, Seminole, and Ute. Representatives of the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), and the Minerals Management Service (MMS) also attended. BDM-Oklahoma developed and organized the Native American Conference on Petroleum Energy to help meet the goals of the U.S. Department of Energy's Domestic Gas and Oil Initiative to help Native American Tribes become more self-sufficient in developing and managing petroleum resources.

NONE

1999-04-27

347

Public Education in Oklahoma: A Digest of the Report of a Survey of Public Education in the State of Oklahoma, Made at the Request of the Oklahoma State Educational Survey Commission under the Direction of the United States Commissioner of Education. Bulletin, 1923, No. 14  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This bulletin presents the results of a study on the special problems of education for Indians in Oklahoma. During the months of April and May of 1922, a committee of Oklahoma educators, under the direction of the Bureau of Education, conducted a series of educational tests and measurements in public schools in various parts of the State. The…

Bureau of Education, Department of the Interior, 1923

1923-01-01

348

The 3D Elevation Program: summary for Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Elevation data are essential to a broad range of applications, including forest resources management, wildlife and habitat management, national security, recreation, and many others. For the State of Oklahoma, elevation data are critical for flood risk management, infrastructure and construction management, agriculture and precision farming, natural resources conservation, wildlife and habitat management, and other business uses. Today, high-density light detection and ranging (lidar) data are the primary sources for deriving elevation models and other datasets. Federal, State, Tribal, and local agencies work in partnership to (1) replace data that are older and of lower quality and (2) provide coverage where publicly accessible data do not exist. A joint goal of local, State, and Federal partners is to acquire consistent, statewide coverage to support existing and emerging applications enabled by lidar data. The National Enhanced Elevation Assessment (NEEA; Dewberry, 2011) evaluated multiple elevation data acquisition options to determine the optimal data quality and data replacement cycle relative to cost to meet the identified requirements of the user community. The evaluation demonstrated that lidar acquisition at quality level 2 for the conterminous United States and quality level 5 interferometric synthetic aperture radar (ifsar) data for Alaska with a 6- to 10-year acquisition cycle provided the highest benefit/cost ratios. The 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) initiative selected an 8-year acquisition cycle for the respective quality levels. 3DEP, managed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Office of Management and Budget Circular A–16 lead agency for terrestrial elevation data, responds to the growing need for high-quality topographic data and a wide range of other 3D representations of the Nation’s natural and constructed features.

Carswell, William J., Jr.

2014-01-01

349

Geology of the Cottonwood Creek field, Carter County, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

In late 1987, the Cottonwood Creek field, Carter County, Oklahoma, was heralded by flows of nearly 4,000 BOPD and 3 MMCFGD from the upper Arbuckle Group. The field structure is part of the buried Criner uplift along the southwest flank of the Ardmore basin. The uplift formed during a Late Mississippian/Early Pennsylvanian episode of bidirectional thrusting (northeast and southwest) probably related to convergent strike-slip faulting. The basic field structure formed as a northeast-directed thrust plate, cored with Arbuckle Group carbonates and cut by a backthrust. The Cottonwood Creek anticline was near the crest of the uplift. It was erosionally denuded of its Simpson through Caney cover and karsted to depths of at least 1,600 ft. Subthrust strata include the Woodford source rocks. In the Middle to Late Pennsylvanian the uplift was buried by clastics (about 8,000 ft thick over cottonwood Creek). Culminating in the late Pennsylvanian, a second episode of wrench faulting sliced through the Criner uplift. About 3 mi of left-lateral slip occurred on this Criner-Healdton fault, which also dropped the anticline about 3,000 ft relative to the block to the south, completing the trap at Cottonwood Creek field. Fourteen wells have found oil in the anticline over an approximately 2.5 by 0.5-mi area. The oil column is at least 900 ft thick. Eight of the wells tested for 1,200-3,700 BOPD plus associated gas from a complex of fractures, Brown Zone dolomite, and karst-enhanced porosity in the West Spring Creek and Kindblade formations.

Roberts, M.T.; Read, D.L. (CNG Producing Co., Denver, CO (USA))

1990-05-01

350

Geological report on water conditions at Platt National Park, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Platt National Park, located in southern Oklahoma, containing 842 acres, was established by Acts of Congress in 1902, 1904, and 1906. The reason for the setting aside of this area was the presence in the area of some 30 'mineral' springs, the water from which contains sulphur, bromide, salt, and other minerals, which are believed to possess medicinal qualities. For many generations the sulphur springs of the Chickasaw Nation had been known for their reputed healing qualities. It had long been the custom for families to come from considerable distances on horseback and in wagons and camp near the springs, in order to drink the water. In course of time a primitive town, known as Sulphur Springs, grew up near a group of springs known since as Pavilion Springs at the mouth of Sulphur Creek, now known as Travertine Creek. This town was still in existence at the time of my first visit to the locality in July, 1901. At this time, in company with Joseph A. Taff, of the United States Geological Survey, I spent a week riding over the country making a preliminary survey looking toward the setting aside of the area for a National Park. After the establishment of the National Park, the old town of Sulphur Springs was abandoned, and when the present boundaries of the park had been established the present town of Sulphur, now county seat of Murray County, grew up. In July 1906, on request of Superintendent Joseph F. Swords, I visited the park and made an examination of the various springs and submitted a report, dated August 15, 1906, to Secretary of the Interior E.A. Hitchcock. Copies of this report are on file in the Regional Office and at Platt National Park. In this report I set forth the approximate amount of flow of the various springs, the character of the water in each, and the conditions of the springs as of that date. I also made certain recommendations regarding proposed improvements of each spring. In this report I say: 'In the town of Sulphur, four wells have been drilled to a depth of between 450 and 500 feet in which artesian water has been secured. These wells are said to flow 200,000 gallons each per day.' I also say: 'From a study of the log of one of these wells, it appears that the artesian water is derived from the upper part of the Simpson sandstone. It is very probable that the water of the springs is derived from the same source.' This early was recognized the relation between the water from the mineral springs and that from the artesian wells. As the years have passed, other wells have been drilled in the town of Sulphur, chiefly to supply water for mineral baths and for swimming pools, so that to date more than 30 wells have been drilled. The exact number is not known. The custom has usually been to turn the wells loose and permit them to flow at full capacity, although some of the wells have been 'valved in' and the flow reduced. An estimate furnished me by the Secretary of the Chamber of Commerce in 1937, referred to later in this report, indicated that at that time 16 wells were flowing approximately 28,800,000 gallons of water per day, practically all of which ran to waste. For many years geologists in Oklahoma and elsewhere have watched this unrestricted waste of water from the artesian wells at Sulphur with growing concern. Remembering the history of other artesian basins throughout the world, these geologists believed that in all probability it was only a question of time until the water in the Sulphur artesian basin would begin to fail. On two different occasions the State Geologist of Oklahoma, bearing these conditions in mind, has prepared and had introduced into the State Legislature a bill which, if enacted into law, would have regulated the flow of water in artesian wells throughout the State. Both bills died in committee. Partly on account of the drought of the past three years, the matter has been brought to a head. In September 1938, Buffalo and Antelope Springs at the hea

Gould, Charles Newton; Schoff, Stuart Leeson

1939-01-01

351

The Significance of Stratigraphy and Lithology in Landform Development in Washington County, Oklahoma  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This winning entry in the museum's Young Naturalist Awards 1999 by Katie, a 15 year old student from Oklahoma, takes a look at the development of Washington County, Oklahoma. Katie's essay has a field-journal focus and explains stratigraphy and lithology, two of the main factors controlling the shape of the land in her county. She provides an overview of the six different formations in the Skiatook Group and the five different formations that outcrop in the Bartlesville area. There are descriptions of the many rock samples she took for this study.

352

Estimate of self-supplied domestic water use in Oklahoma during 1980  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Reported or measured water-use data for the domestic self-supplied user were not available for Oklahoma; therefore estimates of water use within this classification were derived. The total self-supplied population in Oklahoma during 1980 was estimated to be 343,615, which was 11.4 percent of the total 1980 State population. The rate of water use by this group was estimated to be 56 gallons per capita per day. The estimated annual domestic self-supplied water use by county ranged from 10 to 1,180 acre-feet, with a total statewide use of 21,610 acre-feet.

Stoner, J. D.

1984-01-01

353

Processes of Hydrometeor Development in Oklahoma Convective Clouds.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study employs in situ measurements to examine cloud conditions in which hydrometeors develop in mature Oklahoma convective clouds and to develop hypotheses as to how they formed. The measurements were made from penetrations on six days using a T-28 aircraft. Values of the maximum vertical velocity W in cells ranged from 5 to 35 m s1, and the liquid water content (LWC) up to 6 gmminus;3;LWCs are usually less than adiabatic. Drops are found primarily in strong updrafts at T/>8°c. Graupel are present in low concentrations in the strong updrafts and in moderate concentrations in the weak to intermediate updrafts. Planar and needle ice crystals and aggregates are present in copious concentrations in regions of low LWC and W. Strong evidence exists for production of secondary ice crystals (SICS) through a Hallett and Mossop type of mechanism involving cloud droplets >24m in diameter.Particle growth calculations are used in conjunction with the measurements to infer the processes of formation of drops, graupel and hail, and secondary ice crystals. Most drops of diameters <500m found at temperatures below 0°C are inferred to form through coalescence growth and most of diameters >500m through shedding from growing and/or melting graupel and hail. Embryos of hailstones are found to develop to 1 cm in diameter most rapidly from millimetric size drops produced from shedding and from aggregates of planar ice-crystals. Most growth of particles to 1 cm hailstones occurs in the regions of intermediate values of LWC (1-2 gm3) and W (5-15 m sminus;1) at temperatures higher than 20°C. In these regions, moderate concentrations of ice particles can develop over appreciable periods and depletion of the liquid water content due to collection by ice particles is minimal. The regions of high LWC and W are found to be the least conducive to SIC production. Initially, most SICs come from riming of aggregates in clouds which develop embedded within cloud layers and from frozen drops in clouds which develop in isolation. The SICs themselves are found to produce abundant SICs in regions of low LWC and W. Secondary ice crystal production is found to be more copious in embedded than in isolated clouds.

Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Hjelmfelt, Mark R.

1984-10-01

354

Educating Counselors in Vocational Guidance: The Process and the Outcomes in Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Vocational Inservice Program (VIP) for Public School Counselors in Oklahoma apprised counselors of the role of career development, vocational guidance, and vocational education and raised their awareness of the resources and opportunities available to them and their students. VIP was composed of three 2-day workshops that offered training for…

Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Research Div.

355

Geologic Factors Which May Affect the Occurrence of Natural Gas in the Oklahoma Panhandle  

Microsoft Academic Search

Geologically, the Oklahoma Panhandle is situated along the NW. flank of the Anadarko Basin and separates the Dalhart Basin from the Hugoton Embayment of the Anadarko Basin. This is a geographic separation rather than a tectonic separation. As a result, the Panhandle has been subject to a basin-flank geological history as compared with the basin troughs on either side. Initial

Carl Moore

1969-01-01

356

Proposed Education Guidelines and Procedures: Sac and Fox Nation of Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

These educational guidelines and procedures were developed after extensive review of current education programs for the Sac and Fox Nations of Oklahoma. The guidelines, prepared by a committee of local educators appointed by a tribal business committee, examined the anticipated needs for future generations of the Sac and Fox people. The document…

Sac and Fox Nation, OK. Education Committee.

357

OATE Journal: Oklahoma Association of Teacher Educators. Volume 14, Spring 2010  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The "OATE Journal" is published annually by the Oklahoma Association of Teacher Educators. Articles in this issue include: (1) "The Transition of Middle School Students into High School" by Aric Sappington, Malinda Hendricks Green, Jennifer J. R. Endicott, and Susan C. Scott; (2) "Graduate Students' Perceptions of Teacher Effectiveness" by Sarah…

Green, Malinda Hendricks, Ed.

2010-01-01

358

The annual cycle and the cultural nexus of health care behavior among Oklahoma wheat farming families  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper explores the role of the 'annual cycle' in helping to account for the timing at which illness develops and\\/or visits are made to the family medicine clinic by members of farming families in the 'wheat belt' of northwestern Oklahoma. It is argued that the annual cycle, as one among many forms of temporal organization, can serve as a

Howard F. Stein

1982-01-01

359

Three Year Oklahoma Annual Program Plan for Adult Education. Fiscal Years 1983-1985.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document contains the State plan designed to enable the State Department of Education to implement an adult education program in Oklahoma that will meet the critical educational needs of the adult population. Sections of the plan include purpose; state definitions; legal authority; audits, goal statement, administrative provisions;…

Oklahoma State Board of Education, Oklahoma City.

360

Investing in Oklahoma: The Progress of Education Reform. Volumes 1-4, January 1996-January 1999.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

These four reports describe Oklahoma's education-reform efforts, which were mandated by the Education Reform and Funding Act of 1990. Each of the volumes offers an annual report of the ongoing changes in education. Volume 1 focuses on state-appropriated funds for education and per-pupil expenditures. It looks at school consolidation, greater…

Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City.

361

75 FR 19667 - Oklahoma Disaster # OK-00036 Declaration of Economic Injury  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) declaration for the State of Oklahoma, dated 04/09/2010. Incident: Severe Freezing Rain, Ice and Snowstorms. Incident Period: 01/28/2010 through 02/18/2010. Effective Date: 04/09/2010. EIDL...

2010-04-15

362

Estimating profile soil moisture and groundwater variations using GRACE and Oklahoma Mesonet soil moisture data  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study we estimate a time series of regional groundwater anomalies by combining terrestrial water storage estimates from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission with in situ soil moisture observations from the Oklahoma Mesonet. Using supplementary data from the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (DOE ARM) network, we develop an empirical scaling factor with which

Sean Swenson; James Famiglietti; Jeffrey Basara; John Wahr

2008-01-01

363

The 1998 Oklahoma-Texas Drought: Mechanistic Experiments with NCEP Global and Regional Models  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study presents results from mechanistic experiments to clarify the origin and maintenance of the Oklahoma-Texas (OK-TX) drought of the 1998 summer, using the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) global and regional models. In association with this unprecedented drought, three major mechanisms that can produce extended atmospheric anomalies have been identified: (i) sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies, (ii) soil

Song-You Hong; Eugenia Kalnay

2002-01-01

364

Literacy and Education among Adult Indians in Oklahoma. Volume III: Appendixes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The third in a 3-volume report on the Adult Indian Education Project (AIEP, a 15-month U.S. Office of Education project designed to identify the literacy levels and educational needs of Oklahoma's adult American Indians), this volume presents supporting data in the form of appendices to Volume I. These appendices include: (1) The Survey Instrument…

Hall, Paul R.; And Others

365

Food Habits of Adult Flathead Catfish, 'Pylodictus olivaris' (Rafinesque), in Oklahoma Reservoirs.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Food items were found in 47.0% of 1329 flathead catfish stomachs collected by gill and trammel nets from six Oklahoma reservoirs. The average number of food items was 1.6 per stomach and the average volume per stomach was 26.4 ml in stomachs with food. Fi...

P. R. Turner R. C. Summerfelt

1970-01-01

366

Reforms with Results: What Oklahoma Can Learn from Florida's K-12 Education Revolution  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Florida lawmakers began a comprehensive education reform effort in 1999 combining accountability, transparency, and parental choice with other far-reaching changes. In March 2010, the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) released new results showing just how successful Florida's reforms have been and how futile Oklahoma's efforts…

Ladner, Matthew

2010-01-01

367

75 FR 32493 - Oklahoma; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Amendment No. 1 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration AGENCY: Federal Emergency...This notice amends the notice of a major disaster declaration for the State of Oklahoma...SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The notice of a major disaster declaration for the State of...

2010-06-08

368

75 FR 15447 - Oklahoma; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Amendment No. 1 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration AGENCY: Federal Emergency...This notice amends the notice of a major disaster declaration for the State of Oklahoma...SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The notice of a major disaster declaration for the State of...

2010-03-29

369

76 FR 44027 - Oklahoma; Amendment No. 3 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Amendment No. 3 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration AGENCY: Federal Emergency...This notice amends the notice of a major disaster declaration for the State of Oklahoma...SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The notice of a major disaster declaration for the State of...

2011-07-22

370

76 FR 49781 - Oklahoma; Amendment No. 4 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Amendment No. 4 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration AGENCY: Federal Emergency...This notice amends the notice of a major disaster declaration for the State of Oklahoma...SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The notice of a major disaster declaration for the State of...

2011-08-11

371

Characteristics of Prison Sexual Assault Targets in Male Oklahoma Correctional Facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research on male inmate sexual assault has been quite limited in correctional literature. Even fewer of these studies have focused specifically on the characteristics of sexual assault targets. Therefore, data gathered from August 1998 to May 1999 via face-to-face interviews with 174 inmates in three male Oklahoma correctional facilities were drawn on to examine various demographic and organizational characteristics of

Christopher Hensley; Richard Tewksbury; Tammy Castle

2003-01-01

372

Rules of the University of Oklahoma Libraries Faculty, Including Criteria for Tenure, Promotion and Salary Increases.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This statement of rules, policies, and procedures of the University of Oklahoma Libraries covers the areas of library government and organization, library faculty relationships, and criteria for tenure promotion and salary increases. Regulations for the election of officers, holding meetings, dues collection, committees and councils, and…

Harrington, Sue; And Others

373

State Teacher Policy Yearbook: Progress on Teacher Quality, 2007. Oklahoma State Summary  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The "State Teacher Policy Yearbook" examines what is arguably the single most powerful authority over the teaching profession: state government. This Oklahoma edition of the National Council on Teacher Quality's (NCTQ's) "State Teacher Policy Yearbook" is the first of what will be an annual look at the status of state policies impacting the…

National Council on Teacher Quality, 2007

2007-01-01

374

State Teacher Policy Yearbook: What States Can Do to Retain Effective New Teachers, 2008. Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents the Oklahoma edition of the National Council on Teacher Quality's 2008 "State Teacher Policy Yearbook". The 2008 "Yearbook" focuses on how state policies impact the retention of effective new teachers. This policy evaluation is broken down into three areas that encompass 15 goals. Broadly, these goals examine the impact of…

National Council on Teacher Quality, 2008

2008-01-01

375

Delivering an Organizational Leadership PhD Program at a Distance: University of Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this chapter, the authors identify and review a number of key features in the successful development and maintenance of a PhD program delivered at a distance. The University of Oklahoma's PhD program in organizational leadership was developed in the early 1990s and delivered (primarily, but not completely) to military personnel and families…

Rodgers, Joseph Lee; Williams, T. H. Lee

2011-01-01

376

33 CFR 208.27 - Fort Cobb Dam and Reservoir, Pond (Cobb) Creek, Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...purpose, flows shall not exceed a 13.0-foot stage (1,300 cfs) on the USGS gage on Pond (Cobb) Creek near Fort Cobb, Oklahoma, river mile 5.0; a 19.0-foot stage (6,000 cfs) on the USGS gage on the Washita River near Anadarko,...

2013-07-01

377

Subsidence and thermal history of Southern Oklahoma aulacogen: implications for petroleum exploration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reconstructed subsidence curves and the thermal history of the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen support the concept of thermally controlled isostatic subsidence for the formation of the basin and indicate the significance of this concept for petroleum exploration. Two mechanisms - initial elastic flexure, followed by detachment and differential subsidence of the aulacogen - are inferred from the subsidence curves. Two methods

Feinstein

1981-01-01

378

Paleokarstic phenomena of the Lower Ordovician red bed sequences of the Arbuckle group, southern Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oil and gas production has been reported recently from paleokarstic Arbuckle reservoirs in the Ardmore and Arkoma basin. The West Spring Creek and the Kindblade formations apparently exhibit karstic features. The most extensive surface exposure of these formations is on the southern flank of the Arbuckle anticline along Interstate 35 north of Ardmore, Oklahoma. The lithology is predominantly limestone, ranging

Musselman

1991-01-01

379

Gravity Investigations of the Chickasaw National Recreation Area, South-Central Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The geological configuration of the Arbuckle Uplift in the vicinity of Chickasaw National Recreation Area in south-central Oklahoma plays a governing role in the distribution of fresh and mineral springs within the park and in the existence of artesian we...

D. S. Scheirer A. H. Scheirer

2006-01-01

380

Storm deposits (tempestites) in Ordovician cratonic carbonates (Arbuckle Group, south-central Oklahoma)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Early Ordovician Kindblade Formation (Arbuckle Group), exposed in the Arbuckle Mountains of south-central Oklahoma, is a shallow marine epicontinental carbonate sequence that contains numerous storm deposits. The storm deposits (tempestites) are of two types, proximal and distal; the latter dominates in terms of both number and aggregate thickness. Distal tempestites consist of a fining upward sequence, 5 to 50

R. K. Goldhammer; R. D. Elmore

1983-01-01

381

Evidence for existence of Sabkhalike conditions in Upper Arbuckle Group, Slick Hills, southwestern Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the Slick Hills of southwestern Oklahoma, the Ordovician upper Arbuckle Group carries a cryptic record of evaporite precipitation. This record is particularly well developed in the Cool Creek and, to a lesser extent, the West Spring Creek formations. Principal lines of evidence supporting this conclusion are (1) salt pseudomorphs (after gypsum( )) preserved in chert and, less commonly, in

D. A. Ragland; R. N. Donovan

1990-01-01

382

Southeast Hoover field: model of foreland tectonics of Arbuckle region, southern Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Southwest Hoover field, located on the northern side of the Arbuckel Mountains, typifies the structural style common to the foreland of southern Oklahoma. This oil field, which produces primarily from the upper Arbuckle Group carbonates, was created in response to the Late Pennsylvanian Arbuckle orogeny. Various interpretations of the mode of deformation have been proposed such as wrench faulting,

John H. Beck

1986-01-01

383

Faculty Research, Publications, In-Service Activities at Northeastern Oklahoma State University.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Contained in this publication of Northeastern Oklahoma State University are faculty publications and research reports; abstracts fo faculty-student research projects; a list of individual and group inservice activities and research in progress by college department and divisions; and a bibliography of published articles, books, and creative works.…

Northeastern Oklahoma State Univ., Tahlequah.

384

Developments in the Oklahoma portion of the Arkoma basin, 1960 to 1965  

Microsoft Academic Search

The first natural-gas production in the Arkoma basin in eastern Oklahoma was near Poteau in Le Flore County in 1910. In the next few years several fields were discovered and developed as far west as Quinton in Pittsburg County. Production was from Hartshorne and upper Atoka sandstones at depths of less than 3000 ft. The first deep natural-gas production was

1966-01-01

385

77 FR 46994 - Oklahoma: Incorporation by Reference of State Hazardous Waste Management Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FRL9701-6] Oklahoma: Incorporation by Reference of State Hazardous Waste Management Program...program. The EPA will incorporate by reference into the Code of Federal Regulations...this authorization and incorporation by reference during normal business hours at the...

2012-08-07

386

Sediment phosphorus flux in an Oklahoma reservoir suggests reconsideration of watershed management planning  

Microsoft Academic Search

A reservoir model of Lake Wister, Oklahoma, indicated that internal sources dominated phosphorus (P) loading to the waterbody, and that a watershed management plan need not address external P sources. To test this claim, we evaluated internal P loading by measuring sediment oxygen demand (SOD) and quantifying soluble reactive P (SRP) release from sediments to the overlying water column. Sediment

B. E. Haggard; J. T. Scott; S. Patterson

2012-01-01

387

78 FR 32223 - Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...9817-5] Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency...you want to comment on this action, you must do so at this time. DATES: Send your written comments by June 28, 2013....

2013-05-29

388

Thermal state of the Arkoma Basin and the Anadarko Basin, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the most fundamental physical processes that affects virtually all geologic phenomena in sedimentary basins is the flow of heat from the Earth's interiors. The Arkoma Basin and the Anadarko Basin, Oklahoma, are a prolific producer of both oil and natural gas. Both basins also have important geologic phenomena. Understanding the thermal state of the these basins is crucial

Youngmin Lee

1999-01-01

389

INTENSIVE SURVEY OF THE ILLINOIS RIVER (ARKANSAS AND OKLAHOMA) IN AUGUST 1985  

EPA Science Inventory

A water quality survey of the Illinois River Basin was conducted August 16-29, 1985, in response to concerns that water clarity had decreased in the lower reach which is designated as an Oklahoma scenic river. The survey results demonstrated that background phosphorus concentrati...

390

Health Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 90-047-2237, Jags Beauty Salon, Norman, Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In response to a request from the owner/operator of Jags Beauty Salon (SIC-7231), Norman, Oklahoma, an investigation was begun of the potential for chemical exposures, which may result from working with hair care products. The hair styling and hair cuttin...

D. Almaguer L. M. Blade

1992-01-01

391

'Right-to-Work' Laws and Economic Development in Oklahoma. Briefing Paper.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The bulk of this position paper consists of statements in opposition to a September 2001 referendum on adopting 'right-to-work' (RTW) legislation in Oklahoma. The statements are by Joan Fitzgerald, William Sschweke, Raymond Hogler, Steven Shulman, Stephan Weiler, Ann Markusen, Robert G. Lynch, David R. Howell, James Galbraith, Colin Gordon, Wim…

Mishel, Lawrence, Ed.

392

Stable-Isotope Ratios of Hydrogen and Oxygen in Precipitation at Norman, Oklahoma, 1996-2008.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Precipitation samples for measurement of stable-isotope ratios of hydrogen (a2H) and oxygen (a18O) were collected at the Norman Landfill Research Site in Norman, Oklahoma, from May 1996 to October 2008. Rainfall amounts also were measured at the site (U.S...

H. Qi I. M. Cozzarelli J. B. Jaeschke J. R. Masoner M. A. Scholl S. Christenson

2011-01-01

393

Oklahoma Long-Range Program for Library Development, 1979-1984.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report assesses the library and information needs of Oklahoma residents and proposes goals and objectives, plans of action, allocation of funds, program formulation, and priorities and evaluation procedures for dealing with these designated areas over a five year period. Based on data from a needs assessment study and library evaluations,…

Oklahoma State Dept. of Libraries, Oklahoma City.

394

The Economics of Elementary and Secondary Schooling in Oklahoma. Bulletin B-714.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Utilizing data from a random sample of Oklahoma elementary and secondary schools, the study examined interrelationships among the educational process, student achievement, and environment. Results revealed the importance of educational objectives, student backgrounds, high school curriculum, teacher salary, and student density upon optimal…

Tweeten, Luther; And Others

395

Baseline ambient gaseous ammonia concentrations in the Four Corners area and eastern Oklahoma, USA.  

PubMed

Ambient ammonia monitoring using Ogawa passive samplers was conducted in the Four Corners area and eastern Oklahoma, USA during 2007. The resulting data will be useful in the multipollutant management of ozone, nitrogen oxides, and visibility (atmospheric regional haze) in the Four Corners area, an area with growing oil/gas production and increasing coal-based power plant construction. The passive monitoring data also add new ambient ammonia concentration information for the U.S. and will be useful to scientists involved in present and future visibility modeling exercises. Three week integrated passive ammonia samples were taken at five sites in the Four Corners area and two sites in eastern Oklahoma from December, 2006 through December, 2007 (January, 2008 for two sites). Results show significantly higher regional background ammonia concentrations in eastern Oklahoma (1.8 parts per billion (ppb) arithmetic mean) compared to the Four Corners area (0.2 ppb arithmetic mean). Annual mean ammonia concentrations for all Four Corners area sites for the 2007 study ranged from 0.2 ppb to 1.5 ppb. Peak ambient ammonia concentrations occurred in the spring and summer in both areas. The passive samplers deployed at the Stilwell, Oklahoma site compared favorably with other passive samplers and a continuous ammonia monitoring instrument. PMID:18974901

Sather, Mark E; Mathew, Johnson; Nguyen, Nghia; Lay, John; Golod, George; Vet, Robert; Cotie, Joseph; Hertel, Terry; Aaboe, Erik; Callison, Ryan; Adam, Jacque; Keese, Danielle; Freise, Jeremy; Hathcoat, April; Sakizzie, Brenda; King, Michael; Lee, Chris; Oliva, Sylvia; San Miguel, George; Crow, Leon; Geasland, Frank

2008-11-01

396

The Actions of One Inspire the Power of Many: Laura Briley, Day Schools, Tulsa, Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Laura Briley is a person who makes things happen! Not only is she instrumental in creating a new World Forum Working Group for the Rights of Children in Children's Homes, but in April she organized the first ever Pikler Intensive Training in the United States by bringing two internationally famous infant development experts to Tulsa, Oklahoma. In…

Gonzalez-Mena, Janet

2010-01-01

397

Water Resources Data for Oklahoma, Water Year 1976. Volume 1. Arkansas River Basin.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Water resources data for the 1976 water year for Oklahoma consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage contents, and water quality of lakes or reservoirs. Volumes 1 and 2 of this report contain discharge records for 122 gagi...

1977-01-01

398

64 FR 60683 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation, Plans Oklahoma; Visibility Protection  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...6PD-L), at the EPA Region 6 Office listed below...appropriate office at least two working days in advance...the Oklahoma Visibility Protection Plan.'' The text of the...text of the 1985 Plan. The major difference in the plans...the State to visibility protection within the refuge boundary...subpart P, Visibility Protection. Section 8,......

1999-11-08

399

The Fiscal Impact of Tax-Credit Scholarships in Oklahoma. State Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study seeks to provide outcomes-based information on Oklahoma's proposal to give tax credits for contributing to organizations that provide scholarships to K-12 private schools. The study constructs a model to determine the fiscal impact of tax-credit scholarships on the state and on local school districts. The author estimates the impact…

Gottlob, Brian

2011-01-01

400

Serologic Survey of Oklahoma Rodents: Evidence for the Presence of a Hantavirus and an Arenavirus  

Microsoft Academic Search

We conducted a statewide survey of Oklahoma small mammals to test for antibod- ies against rodent-borne viral diseases. Four rodent species had antibody to Sin Nombre virus (SNV), the primary causative agent of hantavirus pulmonary syn- drome (HPS), and two species had antibody to Whitewater Arroyo virus, an arenavirus associated with human fatalities. The rodent reservoirs for other HPS- causing

Richard A. Nisbett; Michael D. Stuart; Gloria M. Caddell; Charles H. Calisher

2001-01-01

401

Distribution and Availability of State and Areawide Water Quality Reports in Oklahoma Libraries.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report examines the distribution and availability of water quality reports in the state of Oklahoma. Based on legislation from the Clean Water Act and regulations from the Environmental Protection Agency's "Public Participation Handbook for Water Quality Management," depository libraries must be established to provide citizen access to…

McClure, Charles R.; Million, Anne

402

Making Traditional Spaces: Cultural Compromise at Two-Spirit Gatherings in Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The ways in which men in the Green Country Two-Spirit Society of Oklahoma use the annual gathering to compensate for the lack of opportunities to express sexual identity and gender difference within mainstream Native cultural contexts is discussed. Two-spirit men have developed alternative communal spaces in which to express both their indigenous…

Gilley, Brian Joseph

2004-01-01

403

A Comparison of Needs Among Town Dwelling and Rural Elderly in South-Central Oklahoma 1980.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A 1980 sample of 271 elderly (133 rural, 138 urban) in 3 south-central Oklahoma counties (Coal, Murray, and Pontotoc) was surveyed to see if: an economical tool could be devised to assess program effectiveness; professionals providing services to the elderly were influenced by, and influenced the opinions of, recipients in urban areas due to their…

Eckert, Mark S.

404

78 FR 54670 - Miami Tribe of Oklahoma-Liquor Control Ordinance  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...the laws promulgated under this Ordinance; that the entity or individual has never been convicted of violating any of the gambling laws of Oklahoma, or any other state of the United States, or of this or any other tribe; that he has not had,...

2013-09-05

405

Backtracking from Oklahoma to North Carolina: An Interview with Robert J. Conley.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An author of historical fiction about the Cherokee Indians discusses how stories told by his Cherokee grandmother were woven into his books, differences between Cherokee reservation life in Oklahoma and North Carolina, the Cherokee education system, the writing system that Sequoyah developed, and the "ugly realities" of being a full-time writer.…

Conley, Robert J.

2001-01-01

406

Indian Education in Eastern Oklahoma. A Report of Fieldwork Among the Cherokee. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A field study of Cherokee Indians in Eastern Oklahoma revealed the following information: (1) educators were ignorant of and indifferent to the language, values, and cultural traditions of the Tribal (rural) Cherokee; (2) the Tribal Cherokees were an impoverished people; (3) both adults and children were educationally disadvantaged; and (4) Tribal…

Wax, Murray L.; And Others

407

Seismicity of the Salt Areas of Texas, Louisiana, Oklahoma and Kansas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The results of a seismicity study of the salt deposit areas of Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas and Louisiana are presented. The study was conducted using some of the short-period seismic data recorded on film at the Wichita Mountain Observatory (WMSO), located in...

D. Racine P. Klouda

1980-01-01

408

Seismicity and Tectonic Relationships of the Nemaha Uplift in Oklahoma, Part IV.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A lineament map was prepared for north-central Oklahoma. The Nemaha Uplift project area contains 90 linear features derived from Landsat imagery. Of these, eight are high confident, 16 are confident and 66 are low confident. One high confident lineament t...

K. V. Luza J. E. Lawson

1981-01-01

409

Ethnic Identity and the Boarding School Experience of West-Central Oklahoma American Indians.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book reports on a study of the perceptions of Oklahoma American Indians about their childhood experiences in government and church-sponsored boarding schools. Drawing on symbolic anthropology, the boarding school experience is interpreted to be a complex cultural symbol and symbolic process that contributes to group collectivity and belonging…

McBeth, Sally J.

410

Evaluation of Water Resources for Enhanced Oil Recovery Operations, Cement Field, Caddo and Grady Counties, Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report is based on the results of an investigation of the water resources local to the Cement Oil Field in Caddo and Grady Counties, southwestern, Oklahoma. The intent of the report is to present at least a semi-quantitative estimate of the volume, d...

D. A. Preston W. E. Harrison K. V. Luza L. Prater R. J. Reddy

1982-01-01

411

A Survey of Nurse Training Needs in Oklahoma Health Care Institutions. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study was conducted to identify staffing patterns for nursing personnel in the health care institutions of Oklahoma in order to predict future needs for nursing education and training. Structured interviews with administrators and directors of nursing from eighteen hospitals and eighteen nursing homes were used to elicit demographic data…

Frazier, William D.

412

Remagnetization by basinal fluids - Testing the hypothesis in the Viola Limestone, southern Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The widespread presence of late Paleozoic secondary magnetizations in the rocks of North America may be explained by the migration of orogenic or basinal fluids. The role of basinal fluids in leading to secondary magnetizations in the Ordovician Viola Limestone in southern Oklahoma is studied by evaluating the paleomagnetism and geochemistry of the unit. A pervasive Pennsylvanian synfolding magnetization is

R. D. Elmore; David London; Don Bagley; David Fruit; Guoqiu Gao

1993-01-01

413

The Evolution of an Oklahoma Dryline. Part I: A Meso and Subsynoptic-Scale Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

A study is made of the 8 June 1974 Oklahoma dryline and tornado outbreak case, using data synthesis 1) to fit existing concepts on dryline structure and behavior to this case, and 2) to identify processes contributing to moisture convergence along the dryline. The dryline undergoes a major transformation in structure (from sloped to slopeless) during the day, as implied

John McCarthy; Steven E. Koch

1982-01-01

414

Sauroposeidon proteles, a new sauropod from the early Cretaceous of Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sauroposeidon proteles, a new brachiosaurid sauropod, is represented by an articulated series of four mid-cervical vertebrae recovered from the Antlers Formation (Aptian–Albian) of southeastern Oklahoma. Most Early Cretaceous North American sauropod material has been referred to Pleurocoelus, a genus which is largely represented by juvenile material and is not well understood. Regardless of the status and affinities of Pleurocoelus, the

Mathew J. Wedel; Richard L. Cifelli; R. Kent Sanders

2000-01-01

415

Equivalent dose distribution analysis of Holocene eolian and fluvial quartz sands from Central Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Holocene quartz sands were collected from fluvial terrace deposits and eolian dune deposits adjacent to the North Canadian and Cimarron Rivers and their tributaries in Central Oklahoma. Single aliquot regenerative dose optically stimulated luminescence techniques were employed to generate equivalent dose (ED) distribution histograms for each sample. We hypothesize that the ED distributions are convolutions of the distribution arising from

Kenneth Lepper; Niels Agersnap Larsen; Stephen W. S McKeever

2000-01-01

416

Succession in grasslands: Thirty-two years of change in a central Oklahoma tallgrass prairie  

Microsoft Academic Search

Old field succession in Oklahoma has been reported to involve four stages of development: pioncer weeds, annual grass, bunch grass, and mature prairie. This sequence has been the basis for a number of analyses of grassland structure and function, but has never been documented on a single site. We used multivariate techniques to study succession on three permanent plots with

S. L. Collins; D. E. Adams

1983-01-01

417

A CONTROL THEORY APPROACH TO OPTIMAL IRRIGATION SCHEDULING IN THE OKLAHOMA PANHANDLE  

Microsoft Academic Search

Climatic conditions in semiarid regions like MODEL DEVELOPMENT the Oklahoma Panhandle result in wide fluctuations in rainfall, dryland crop yields, Optimal control has gained acceptance by and returns to agricultural producers in the economists as a tool for deriving optimal time area. Irrigated crop production increases per- path strategies in solving dynamic economic acre yields and significantly reduces fluctua- problems.

Thomas R. Harris; Harry P. Mapp Jr.

1980-01-01

418

Missouri and Oklahoma: A Comparative Study of State Higher Education Policy and Political Culture.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper summarizes the findings of a case study designed to determine if differences exist in the higher education planning and policy making process in Missouri and Oklahoma. A background and perspective section develops the definitions of key concepts relying on definitions from the work of Daniel Elazar. A section describing the study itself…

Freeman, C. Elaine

419

33 CFR 208.28 - Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...dam, will not produce flows in excess of bankfull on the Washita River downstream of the reservoir...accomplish this purpose, flows shall not exceed an 18...USGS gage on the Washita River near Clinton, Oklahoma...b) When the reservoir level exceeds elevation...

2009-07-01

420

The Charles J. Kappler ‘Indian Affairs: Laws and Treaties’ Internet site at the Oklahoma State University  

Microsoft Academic Search

Indigenous nations and issues are a worldwide concern and a number of WWW resources that support multidisciplinary research in this area have been previously identified. The availability of such tools is a boon to cost-effective collection development.One of the previously selected electronic resources was the Indian Affairs: Laws and Treaties Internet site at the Oklahoma State University. This commentary describes

Charles D. Bernholz; Suzanne L. Holcombe

2005-01-01

421

76 FR 23639 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00046 Declaration of Economic Injury  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of an Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) declaration for the State of Oklahoma, dated 04/19/2011. Incident: Severe snow storms. Incident Period: 01/31/2011 through 02/05/2011. Effective Date: 04/19/2011. EIDL Loan...

2011-04-27

422

CHARACTERIZATION OF SUBSURFACE BACTERIA ASSOCIATED WITH TWO SHALLOW AQUIFERS IN OKLAHOMA  

EPA Science Inventory

The bacterial microflora of two shallow aquifers in Oklahoma was characterized by direct observation with light (LM) and electron microscopy (EM), by plating, and by examination of colony morphology and distribution. Total cell counts varied only slightly from sample to sample, w...

423

Thermal state of the Arkoma Basin and the Anadarko Basin, Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

One of the most fundamental physical processes that affects virtually all geologic phenomena in sedimentary basins is the flow of heat from the Earth's interiors. The Arkoma Basin and the Anadarko Basin, Oklahoma, are a prolific producer of both oil and natural gas. Both basins also have important geologic phenomena. Understanding the thermal state of the these basins is crucial to understanding the timing and extent of hydrocarbon generation, the genesis of Mississippi Valley-type ore deposits, and the origin of overpressures in the Anadarko Basin. In chapter one, heat flow and heat production in the Arkoma basin and Oklahoma Platform are discussed. Results of this study are not generally supportive of theories which invoke topographically driven regional groundwater flow from the Arkoma Basin in Late Pennsylvanian-Early Permian time (˜290 Ma) to explain the genesis of geologic phenomena. In chapter 2, different types of thermal conductivity temperature corrections that are commonly applied in terrestrial heat flow studies are evaluated. The invariance of the relative rankings with respect to rock porosity suggests the rankings may be valid with respect to in situ conditions. Chapter three addresses heat flow and thermal history of the Anadarko Basin and the western Oklahoma Platform. We found no evidence for heat flow to increase significantly from the Anadarko Basin in the south to the Oklahoma Platform to the north. In chapter four, overpressures in the Anadarko Basin, southwestern Oklahoma are discussed. Using scale analyses and a simple numerical model, we evaluated two endmember hypotheses (compaction disequilibrium and hydrocarbon generation) as possible causes of overpressuring. Geopressure models which invoke compaction disequilibrium do not appear to apply to the Anadarko Basin. The Anadarko Basin belongs to a group of cratonic basins which are tectonically quiescent and are characterized by the association of abnormal pressures with natural gas. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

Lee, Youngmin

1999-12-01

424

Chemical analysis of water samples and geophysical logs from cored test holes drilled in the central Oklahoma Aquifer, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Chemical analyses of water from eight test holes and geophysical logs for nine test holes drilled in the Central Oklahoma aquifer are presented. The test holes were drilled to investigate local occurrences of potentially toxic, naturally occurring trace substances in ground water. These trace substances include arsenic, chromium, selenium, residual alpha-particle activities, and uranium. Eight of the nine test holes were drilled near wells known to contain large concentrations of one or more of the naturally occurring trace substances. One test hole was drilled in an area known to have only small concentrations of any of the naturally occurring trace substances. Water samples were collected from one to eight individual sandstone layers within each test hole. A total of 28 water samples, including four duplicate samples, were collected. The temperature, pH, specific conductance, alkalinity, and dissolved-oxygen concentrations were measured at the sample site. Laboratory determinations included major ions, nutrients, dissolved organic carbon, and trace elements (aluminum, arsenic, barium, beryllium, boron, cadmium, chromium, hexavalent chromium, cobalt, copper, iron, lead, lithium, manganese, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, silver, strontium, vanadium, and zinc). Radionuclide activities and stable isotope d values also were determined, including: gross-alpha-particle activity, gross-beta-particle activity, radium-226, radium-228, radon-222, uranium-234, uranium-235, uranium-238, total uranium, carbon-13/carbon-12, deuterium/hydrogen-1, oxygen-18/oxygen-16, and sulfur-34/sulfur-32. Additional analyses of arsenic and selenium species are presented for selected samples as well as analyses of density and iodine for two samples, tritium for three samples, and carbon-14 for one sample. Geophysical logs for most test holes include caliper, neutron, gamma-gamma, natural-gamma logs, spontaneous potential, long- and short-normal resistivity, and single-point resistance. Logs for test-hole NOTS 7 do not include long- and short-normal resistivity, spontaneous-potential, or single-point resistivity. Logs for test-hole NOTS 7A include only caliper and natural-gamma logs.

Schlottmann, Jamie L.; Funkhouser, Ron A.

1991-01-01

425

Changes in flow in the upper North Canadian river basin of western Oklahoma, pre-development to 2000  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water levels have declined in the southern part of the High Plains aquifer of the central USA since the mid-1960s in response to extensive irrigation development. The North Canadian River originates in western Oklahoma, and most of the basin is underlain by the High Plains aquifer. Average river flow in the headwaters near Guymon, Oklahoma, has decreased from about 0.9 m3/s before 1970 to near zero at present. Canton Lake, on the North Canadian River near Seiling, about 250 km downstream from Guymon, is a source of water supply for Oklahoma City. Precipitation data and streamflow data for gages upstream from Canton Lake were divided into an "early" period ending in 1971 and a "recent" period that begins in 1978. The early period represents conditions before ground-water levels had declined appreciably in the High Plains aquifer, and the recent period reflects the current condition, including the effects of storage reservoirs. Tests for trend and comparisons of flows between the early and recent periods show that the total annual volume of flow and the magnitudes of instantaneous annual peak discharges measured at most locations in the North Canadian River basin have decreased. Precipitation records for the area, however, show no corresponding changes. The decreases in average annual flow, expressed as a percentage of the average flows for the early period, ranged from 91 percent near Guymon to 37 percent near Canton Lake. A major contributing factor in the decreased flows appears to be the large declines in water levels in the High Plains aquifer.

Wahl, K. L.

2001-01-01

426

OUTCROP-BASED HIGH RESOLUTION GAMMA-RAY CHARACTERIZATION OF ARSENIC-BEARING LITHOFACIES IN THE PERMIAN GARBER SANDSTONE AND WELLINGTON FORMATION, CENTRAL OKLAHOMA AQUIFER (COA). CLEVELAND COUNTY, OKLAHOMA  

EPA Science Inventory

The COA supplies drinking water to a number of municipalities in central Oklahoma. Two major stratigraphic units in the COA, the Garber Sandstone and Wellington Formation, contain naturally occurring arsenic that exceeds government mandated drinking-water standards (EPA, 2001). ...

427

EXPLOITATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE IN HUNTON FORMATION, OKLAHOMA  

SciTech Connect

The main objectives of the proposed study are as follows: (1) To understand and evaluate an unusual primary oil production mechanism which results in decreasing (retrograde) oil cut (ROC) behavior as reservoir pressure declines. (2) To improve calculations of initial oil in place so as to determine the economic feasibility of completing and producing a well. (3) To optimize the location of new wells based on understanding of geological and petrophysical properties heterogeneities. (4) To evaluate various secondary recovery techniques for oil reservoirs producing from fractured formations. (5) To enhance the productivity of producing wells by using new completion techniques. These objectives are important for optimizing field performance from West Carney Field located in Lincoln County, Oklahoma. The field, which was discovered in 1980, produces from Hunton Formation in a shallow-shelf carbonate reservoir. The early development in the field was sporadic. Many of the initial wells were abandoned due to high water production and constraints in surface facilities for disposing excess produced water. The field development began in earnest in 1995 by Altex Resources. They had recognized that production from this field was only possible if large volumes of water can be disposed. Being able to dispose large amounts of water, Altex aggressively drilled several producers. With few exceptions, all these wells exhibited similar characteristics. The initial production indicated trace amount of oil and gas with mostly water as dominant phase. As the reservoir was depleted, the oil cut eventually improved, making the overall production feasible. The decreasing oil cut (ROC) behavior has not been well understood. However, the field has been subjected to intense drilling activity because of prior success of Altex Resources. In this work, we will investigate the primary production mechanism by conducting several core flood experiments. After collecting cores from representative wells, we will study the wettability of the rock and simulate the depletion behavior by mimicking such behavior under controlled lab conditions. The overall project goal would be to validate our hypothesis and to determine the best method to exploit reservoirs exhibiting ROC behavior. To that end, we have completed the Budget Period I and have fulfilled many of the objectives. We have developed a viable model to explain the reservoir mechanism and have been able to develop a correlation between core and log data so that we can extend our analysis to other, yet unexploited, regions. In Budget Period II, we will continue to drill several additional, geologically targeted wells. Depending on the depositional system, these wells can be either vertical or horizontal wells. We will closely examine the secondary recovery techniques to improve the ultimate recovery from this field. In the mean time, we will continue to refine our geological and petrophysical model so that we can extend our approach to other adjacent fields. In the Budget Period III, we will monitor the field performance and revise and refine our models to further optimize the performance.

Mohan Kelkar

2003-01-01

428

An Overview of the Application of the Public Competitive Bidding Statutes to School Districts Within the State of Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

After a brief overview of legislation on school district competitive bidding in Oklahoma, the author presents a section-by-section discussion of portions of the Public Competitive Bidding Act of 1974. (IRT)

Tinney, Michael B.

429

Gaseous Oxidized Mercury Dry Deposition Measurements in Southwestern USA: Comparison between texas, Eastern Oklahoma, and the Four Corners Area  

EPA Science Inventory

Gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) dry deposition measurements using aerodynamic surrogate surface passive samplers were collected in central and eastern Texas and eastern Oklahoma, from September 2011 to September 2012.The purpose of this study was to provide an initial characteriza...

430

Oklahoma Marriage Initiative: Using Research to Guide the Development of an Evolving Statewide Initiative. ASPE Research Brief.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

As a pioneer in broad-based marriage initiatives, the Oklahoma Marriage Initiative (OMI) has charted new territory. Recognizing that there was little prior information to guide implementation designs and strategies for pursuing its goals, OMI planners enl...

2008-01-01

431

Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the Enid isolated terrace aquifer in northwestern Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

ARC/INFO export and nonproprietary format files The data sets in this report include digitized aquifer boundaries and maps of hydraulic conductivity, recharge, and ground-water level elevation contours for the Enid isolated terrace aquifer in northwestern Oklahoma. The Enid isolated terrace aquifer covers approximately 82 square miles and supplies water for irrigation, domestic, municipal, and industrial use for the City of Enid and western Garfield County. The Quaternary-age Enid isolated terrace aquifer is composed of terrace deposits that consist of discontinuous layers of clay, sandy clay, sand, and gravel. The aquifer is unconfined and is bounded by the underlying Permian-age Hennessey Group on the east and the Cedar Hills Sandstone Formation of the Permian-age El Reno Group on the west. The Cedar Hills Sandstone Formation fills a channel beneath the thickest section of the Enid isolated terrace aquifer in the midwestern part of the aquifer. All of the data sets were digitized and created from information and maps in a ground-water modeling thesis and report of the Enid isolated terrace aquifer. The maps digitized were published at a scale of 1:62,500. Ground-water flow models are numerical representations that simplify and aggregate natural systems. Models are not unique; different combinations of aquifer characteristics may produce similar results. Therefore, values of hydraulic conductivity and recharge used in the model and presented in this data set are not precise, but are within a reasonable range when compared to independently collected data.

Becker, C. J. Runkle, D. L.; Rea, Alan

1997-01-01

432

Nutrient concentrations, loads, and yields in the Eucha-Spavinaw Basin, Arkansas and Oklahoma, 2002-09  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The city of Tulsa, Oklahoma, uses Lake Eucha and Spavinaw Lake in the Eucha-Spavinaw Basin in northwestern Arkansas and northeastern Oklahoma for public water supply. The city has spent millions of dollars over the last decade to eliminate taste and odor problems in the drinking water from the Eucha-Spavinaw system, which may be attributable to blue-green algae. Increases in the algal biomass in the lakes may be attributable to increases in nutrient concentrations in the lakes and in the waters feeding the lakes. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of Tulsa, investigated and summarized total nitrogen and total phosphorus concentrations in water samples and provided estimates of nitrogen and phosphorus loads, yields, and flow-weighted concentrations during base flow and runoff for two streams discharging to Lake Eucha for the period January 2002 through December 2009. This report updates a previous report that used data from water-quality samples collected from January 2002 through December 2006. Based on the results from the Mann-Whitney statistical test, unfiltered total nitrogen concentrations were significantly greater in runoff water samples than in base-flow water samples collected from Spavinaw Creek near Maysville and near Cherokee City, Arkansas; Spavinaw Creek near Colcord, Oklahoma, and Beaty Creek near Jay, Oklahoma. Nitrogen concentrations in runoff water samples collected from all stations generally increased with increasing streamflow. Nitrogen concentrations in base-flow and runoff water samples collected in Spavinaw Creek significantly increased from the station furthest upstream (near Maysville) to the Sycamore station and then significantly decreased from the Sycamore station to the station furthest downstream (near Colcord). Nitrogen concentrations in base-flow and runoff water samples collected from Beaty Creek were significantly less than base-flow and runoff water samples collected from Spavinaw Creek. Based on the results from the Mann-Whitney statistical test, unfiltered total phosphorus concentrations were significantly greater in runoff water samples than in base-flow water samples for the entire period for most stations, except in water samples collected from Spavinaw Creek near Cherokee City, in which no significant difference was detected for the entire period nor for any season. Phosphorus concentrations in runoff water samples collected from all stations generally increased with increasing streamflow. Based on results from a multi-stage Kruskal-Wallis statistical test, phosphorus concentrations in base-flow water samples collected from Spavinaw Creek significantly increased from the Maysville station to the Cherokee City station, probably because of discharge from a municipal wastewater-treatment plant between those stations. Phosphorus concentrations significantly decreased downstream from the Cherokee City station to the Colcord station. Phosphorus concentrations in base-flow water samples collected from Beaty Creek were significantly less than phosphorus in base-flow water samples collected from Spavinaw Creek downstream from the Maysville station. View report for unabridged abstract.

Esralew, Rachel A.; Tortorelli, Robert L.

2010-01-01

433

Water resources data, Oklahoma, water year 2004; Volume 2. Red River basin  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Volumes 1 and 2 of the water resources data for the 2004 water year for Oklahoma consists of record of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes or reservoirs; and water levels of ground-water wells. This report contains discharge records for 138 gaging stations; stage and contents for 18 lakes or reservoirs and 2 gage height stations; water quality for 55 gaging stations; 38 partial-record or miscellaneous streamflow stations and 4 ground-water sites. Also included are lists of discontinued surface-water discharge and water-quality sites. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Oklahoma.

Blazs, R. L.; Walters, D. M.; Coffey, T. E.; Boyle, D. L.; Wellman, J. J.

2004-01-01

434

Water resources data, Oklahoma, water year 2004;Volume 1. Arkansas River basin  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Volumes 1 and 2 of the water resources data for the 2004 water year for Oklahoma consists of record of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes or reservoirs; and water levels of ground-water wells. This report contains discharge records for 138 gaging stations; stage and contents for 18 lakes or reservoirs and 2 gage height stations; water quality for 55 gaging stations; 38 partial-record or miscellaneous streamflow stations and 4 ground-water sites. Also included are lists of discontinued surface-water discharge and water-quality sites. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Oklahoma.

Blazs, R. L.; Walters, D. M.; Coffey, T. E.; Boyle, D. L.; Wellman, J. J.

2004-01-01

435

Water resources data, Oklahoma, water year 2003; Volume 1. Arkansas River basin  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Volumes 1 and 2 of the water resources data for the 2003 water year for Oklahoma consists of record of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes or reservoirs; and water levels of ground-water wells. This report contains discharge records for 139 gaging stations; stage and contents for 17 lakes or reservoirs and 2 gage height stations; water quality for 46 gaging stations; 32 partial-record or miscellaneous streamflow stations and 5 ground-water sites. Also included are lists of discontinued surface-water discharge and water-quality sites. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Oklahoma.

Blazs, R. L.; Walters, D. M.; Coffey, T. E.; Boyle, D. L.; Wellman, J. J.

2004-01-01

436

Changes in chemical quality of the Arkansas River in Oklahoma and Arkansas (1946-52)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Systematic chemical quality-of-water investigations have been carried on in both Oklahoma and Arkansas by the Geological Survey in cooperation with State and Federal agencies during the past several years. Results of the Survey's quality-of-water investigations are usually published in the annual Water-Supply Papers. However, as the Geological Survey has made no sediment investigations in the Arkansas River Basin in Oklahoma and Arkansas, the published data do not include information on sediment concentrations or loads. This report attempts to summarize information collected to date in the Arkansas River Basin of the two States, and to show as clearly as possible from present information how the chemical quality of water in the Arkansas River changes downstream from the Oklahoma-Kansas State line to its confluence with the Mississippi River, and how it is affected by tributary inflows. Additional information is being collected and further studies are planned. Hence, the conclusions reached herein may be modified by more adequate information at a later date. The Arkansas River enters Oklahoma near Newkirk on the northern boundary just east of the 97th meridian, crosses the State in a general southeasterly direction flowing past Tulsa, enters Arkansas at its western boundary north of the 35th parallel near Fort Smith, still flowing in a general southeasterly direction past Little Rock near the center of the State, and empties into the Mississippi River east of Dumas. The Arkansas River is subject to many types of pollution downstream from the Oklahoma-Kansas State line, and its inferior quality along with an erratic flow pattern has caused it to be largely abandoned as a source of municipal and industrial water supply. At the present time, the Arkansas River is not directly used as a source of public supply in any part of the basin in either Oklahoma or Arkansas. In general, the river water increases in chemical concentration downstream from the Oklahoma-Kansas State line to Tulsa, due mainly to tributary inflow from the Salt Fork Arkansas River and the Cimarron River, both streams being sources of large amounts of both natural and artificial pollution. A decrease in chemical concentration is noted downstream from Tulsa due to tributary inflow from the Verdigris, Neosho, and Illinois rivers with an increase in chemical concentration then noted due to tributary inflow from the Canadian River which is largely artificial pollution. A steady decrease in concentration is then noted as the river progresses through Arkansas to the Mississippi River, as all major tributaries below the Canadian River have a dilution effect upon the chemical concentration of the Arkansas River water. Proposals for storage and regulating reservoirs on the Arkansas River in both Oklahoma and Arkansas have been made by the Corps of Engineers and others. Additional proposals are being considered in the present Arkansas-White-Red River Basin Inter-Agency Committee studies. If constructed, these reservoirs will provide an opportunity for control of flow and beneficial use of Arkansas River water, both at and downstream from these sites. Impoundment alone will greatly reduce the extremes in water quality, and by reasonable control of municipal and industrial wastes, the water would be comparable in quality to many existing basin municipal and industrial supplies. (available as photostat copy only)

Dover, T. B.; Geurin, J. W.

1953-01-01

437

Altitude and configuration of the 1980 water table in the High Plains regional aquifer, northwestern Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During 1978, the U.S. Geological Survey began a 5-year study of the High Plains regional aquifer system to provide hydrologic information for evaluation of the effects of long-term development of the aquifer and to develop computer models for prediction of aquifer response to alternative changes in ground-water management (Weeks, 1978). This report is one of a series presenting hydrologic information of the High Plains aquifer in Oklahoma. The altitude and configuration of the water table are shown for the eastern area, consisting of Harper, Ellis, Woodward, Dewey, and Roger Mills Counties (sheet 1), and for the Panhandle area, consisting of Cimarron, Texas, and Beaver Counties (sheet 2). Water levels were measured in January, February, and March 1980 by the Oklahoma Water Resources Board.

Havens, John S.

1982-01-01

438

Oil and gas developments in Oklahoma and Panhandle of Texas in 1987  

SciTech Connect

Exploration in 1987 focused on development and extension of existing fields, with development wells out-numbering exploratory wells 13 to 1. Operators completed 4.3% more exploratory wells and 25.7% fewer development wells than in 1986. The success rate for exploratory wells increased 7.7%; the success rate for development wells remained constant. The Cherokee shelf was the most active trend, with 53 exploratory wells completed in 1987. The dominant plays were the Atoka, Morrow, Springer, and Marchand in the Anadarko basin; the Misener in Grant County, Oklahoma, on the Sedgwick shelf; the Viola in the Golden Trend along the Pauls Valley uplift; and the Wapanucka, Cromwell, and Atoka in the Arkoma basin. Nineteen eight-seven was a year of major sales and acquisition of Oklahoma and Panhandle of Texas reserves and leases with more than 20 companies buying or selling out. 3 figs., 4 tabs.

Fryklund, R.E.

1988-10-01

439

Seismicity of the salt areas of Texas, Louisiana, Oklahoma and Kansas  

SciTech Connect

The results of a seismicity study of the salt deposit areas of Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas and Louisiana are presented. The study was conducted using some of the short-period seismic data recorded on film at the Wichita Mountain Observatory (WMSO), located in southern Oklahoma, during the years 1961 through 1968. Only data recorded on Sundays were analyzed to minimize the confusion of quarry blasts. All major quarries within 400 km of WMSO were located and some of the known blasts were studied for distinguishing characteristics. Inquiries were made to the appropriate state agencies for data to produce a list of historical seismic events which occurred during the 1961 to 1968 period. A salt deposit composite map of the areas was also produced and all historical and previously unreported events, as well as the known quarries, were plotted on this base map.

Racine, D.; Klouda, P.

1980-02-01

440

Climatic impacts on winter wheat in Oklahoma and potential applications to climatic and crop yield prediction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Climatic anomalies can pose severe challenges for farmers and resource managers. This is particularly significant with respect\\u000a to gradually developing anomalies such as droughts. The impact of the 1995–1996 drought on the Oklahoma wheat crop, and the\\u000a possibility that predictive information might have reduced some of the losses, is examined through a combined modeling approach\\u000a using climatological data and a

J. Scott Greene; Erin Maxwell

2007-01-01

441

Overlooked hole' found. [A meteorite crater in the Oklahoma oil field  

SciTech Connect

This paper briefly discusses a geologic structure in Oklahoma known as the Ames hole.' The origin of this hole' has been considered everything from a tectonic graben structure to a collapsed sinkhole structure. However, recent three-dimensional profiles tend to support a meteorite impact structure. The possible timing and effects of this impact are discussed. The paper goes on to determine the exploration potential of such a fractured reservoir and gives the results of recently successful wildcat wells in the area.

Shirley, K.

1992-05-01

442

Diagnosing Meteorological Conditions Associated with Sprites and Lightning with Large Charge Moment Changes (CMC) over Oklahoma  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Sprites are a category of Transient Luminous Events (TLEs) that occur in the upper atmosphere above the tops of Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCSs). They are commonly associated with lightning that produce large charge moment changes (CMCs). Synergistic use of satellite and radar-retrieved observations together with sounding data, forecasts, and lightning-detection networks allowed the diagnosis and analysis of the meteorological conditions associated with sprites as well as large-CMC lightning over Oklahoma.

Flores-Rivera, Lizxandra; Lang, Timothy J.

2014-01-01

443

Evidence of paleokarstic phenomena and burial diagenesis in Ordovician Arbuckle group of Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cores from various localities in south-central and north-central Oklahoma display surprisingly similar suites of karstic and diagenetic phenomena. Vadose dissolution tubes, solution-enlarged fractures, collapse breccias, and vugular porosity, where present are considered evidence of karstification. Primary speleothemic precipitates were not readily observed; either they were not present or were obscured by later hydrothermal dolomitization. A complex history of exposure and

M. Lynch; Z. Al-Shaieb

1989-01-01

444

Archaeal Diversity at the Great Salt Plains of Oklahoma Described by Cultivation and Molecular Analyses  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Great Salt Plains of Oklahoma is a natural inland terrestrial hypersaline environment that forms evaporite crusts of mainly\\u000a NaCl. Previous work described the bacterial community through the characterization of 105 isolates from 46 phylotypes. The\\u000a current report describes the archaeal community through both microbial isolation and culture-independent techniques. Nineteen\\u000a distinct archaea were isolated, and ten were characterized phenetically. Included

T. M. Caton; I. R. Caton; L. R. Witte; M. A. Schneegurt

2009-01-01

445

Ground-water levels in observation wells in Oklahoma, 1961-62  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The investigation of the ground-water resources of Oklahoma by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Oklahoma Water Resources Board includes a continuing program to collect records of water levels in selected observation wells on a systematic basis. These water-level records: (1) provide an index to available ground-water supplies; (2) facilitate the prediction of trends in water levels that will indicate likely changes in storage; (3) aid in the prediction of the base flow of streams; (4) provide information for use in basic research; and (5) provide long-time continuous records of fluctuations of water levels in representative wells; and (6) serve as a framework to which other types of hydrologic data my be related. Prior to 1956, measurements of water levels in observation wells in Oklahoma were included in water-supply papers published annually by the U.S. Geological Survey. Beginning with the 1956 calendar year, however, Geological Survey water-level reports will contain only records of a selected network of observation wells, and will be published at 5-year intervals. The first of this series, for the 1956-59 period was published in 1962. This report has been prepared primarily to present water-level records of wells not included in the Federal network. However, for the sake of completeness it includes water-level records of Federal wells that either have been or will be published in water-supply papers since 1955. This report, which contains water-level records for the 2-year period (1960-62), is the second of a series presenting water-level records for all permanent observations wells in Oklahoma. The first report, published in 1963, contains water-level records for the 5-year period of (1956-60). (available as photostat copy only)

Wood, P. R.; Moeller, M. D.

1964-01-01

446

Determination of reserves of methane from coal beds for use in rural communities in eastern Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Coal-bed methane has been classified as an unconventional source of gas by the U.S. Congress, and it has no Federal price limit. Thus, it is attracting considerable interest concerning its reserves, potential recovery, and use. Previous work in Oklahoma showed that approx. 1.3 tcf of identified coal-bed-methane resources is present in Haskell and Le Flore counties. Thus, the present study

1981-01-01

447

Heat flow and thermal history of the Anadarko Basin and the western Oklahoma Platform  

Microsoft Academic Search

The average geothermal gradient in the Anadarko Basin and the Oklahoma Platform estimated from 856 corrected bottom-hole temperatures (BHTs) is 21°C\\/km. Analysis of previously published thermal maturation data indicates that the Anadarko Basin has undergone from 1 to 3 km of erosion starting about 40 to 50 Ma. The average thermal gradient at the time of maximum burial was in

Youngmin Lee; David Deming

1999-01-01

448

Measurement of soil moisture trends with airborne scatterometers. [Guymon, Oklahoma and Dalhart, Texas  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In an effort to investigate aircraft multisensor responses to soil moisture and vegetation in agricultural fields, an intensive ground sampling program was conducted in Guymon, Oklahoma and Dalhart, Texas in conjunction with aircraft data collected for visible/infrared and passive and active microwave systems. Field selections, sampling techniques, data processing, and the aircraft schedule are discussed for both sites. Field notes are included along with final (normalized and corrected) data sets.

Jones, C. L.; Mcfarland, M. J.; Rosethal, W. D.; Theis, S. W. (principal investigators)

1982-01-01

449

Geology, petrology and reservoir characteristics of Marchand sandstone in Grady and Caddo counties, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Marchand Sandstone (Pennsylvanian-Missourian) oil production was discovered in 1967 at NE. Verden, T8N, R8W, Grady County, Oklahoma. The fields are on the E. flank of the E. end of the deep Anadarko Basin. At the end of May 1971, 74 producing wells had been completed on 160-acre spacing in a producing trend extending over 15 miles from just west of

Tom Graff

1971-01-01

450

Relationship of cliff swallows, ectoparasites, and an Alphavirus in west-central Oklahoma.  

PubMed

Approximately 250 isolates of a newly recognized virus, related to western equine encephalitis virus (family Togaviridae, genus Alphavirus), were obtained from cimicid bugs, Oeciacus vicarius; Cliff Swallows, Hirundo pyrrhonata; and House Sparrows, Passer domesticus in a study area in west-central Oklahoma at Buggy Creek and Caddo Canyons. Antigenicity of the virus strains varied slightly from isolate to isolate. This paper summarizes the ecology of the area by describing in general the flora and fauna there. PMID:8381870

Hopla, C E; Francy, D B; Calisher, C H; Lazuick, J S

1993-01-01

451

Analysis and modeling of spatial correlation structure in small-scale rainfall in Central Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Spatial correlation structure in small-scale rainfall is analyzed based on a dense cluster of raingauges in Central Oklahoma. This cluster, called the EVAC PicoNet, consists of 53 gauges installed in 25 measurement stations covering an area of about 3km by 3km. Two raingauges are placed in 24 stations and five in the central station. Three aspects of the estimated spatial

Grzegorz J. Ciach; Witold F. Krajewski

2006-01-01

452

Seasonal distribution of pathogenic free-living amebae in Oklahoma waters  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pathogenic free-living amebae cause serious human disease, including infection of the eye and the central nervous system. The purpose of this study was to sample aquatic environments in the Tulsa, Oklahoma, area year-round for the presence of these disease-causing amebae. A total of 34 pathogenic isolates were obtained from 2,016 processed water and swab samples. Pathogenicity was determined by the

David T. John; Marsha J. Howard

1995-01-01

453

Analysis of Video Disdrometer and Polarimetric Radar Data to Characterize Rain Microphysics in Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, data from three 2-dimensional video disdrometers (2DVDs) and an S-band polarimetric radar are used to characterize rain microphysics in Oklahoma. Sampling errors from the 2DVD measure- ments are quantified through side-by-side comparisons. In an attempt to minimize the sampling errors, a method of sorting and averaging based on two parameters (SATP) is proposed. The shape-slope (-) relation

Qing Cao; Guifu Zhang; Edward Brandes; Terry Schuur; Alexander Ryzhkov; Kyoko Ikeda

2008-01-01

454

Correlation of spring spore concentrations and meteorological conditions in Tulsa, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Different spore types are abundant in the atmosphere depending on the weather conditions. Ascospores generally follow precipitation,\\u000a while spore types such as Alternaria and Cladosporium are abundant in dry conditions. This project attempted to correlate fungal spore concentrations with meteorological data\\u000a from Tulsa, Oklahoma during May 1998 and May 1999. Air samples were collected and analyzed by the 12-traverse method.

C. Troutt; E. Levetin

2001-01-01

455

Digital data sets of depth-duration frequency of precipitation for Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

These geospatial data sets were produced as part of a regional precipitation frequency analysis for Oklahoma. The data sets consist of surface grids of precipitation depths for seven frequencies (expressed as recurrence intervals of 2-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, 100-, and 500-years) and 12 durations (15-, 30-, and 60-minutes; 1-, 2-, 3-, 6-, 12-, and 24-hours; and 1-, 3-, and 7-days). Eighty-four depth-duration-frequency surfaces were produced from precipitation-station data. Precipitation-station data from which the surfaces were interpolated and contour lines derived from each surface also are included. Contour intervals vary from 0.05 to 0.5 inch. Data were used from precipitation gage stations with at least 10 years of record within Oklahoma and a zone extending about 50 kilometers into bordering states. Three different rain gage networks provided the data (15-minute, 1-hour, and 1-day). Precipitation annual maxima (depths) were determined from the station data for each duration for 110 15-minute, 141 hourly, and 413 daily stations. Statistical methods were used to estimate precipitation depths for each duration-frequency at each station. These station depth-duration-frequency estimates were interpolated to produce continuous grids with grid-cell spacing of 2,000 meters. Contour lines derived from these surfaces (grids) were used to produce the maps in the 'Depth-Duration Frequency of Precipitation for Oklahoma,' by R.L. Tortorelli, Alan Rea, and W.H. Asquith, U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 99-4232. The geospatial data sets are presented in digital form for use with geographic information systems. These geospatial data sets may be used to determine an interpolated value of depth-duration-frequency of precipitation for any point in Oklahoma.

Rea, Alan; Tortorelli, Robert L.

1999-01-01

456

Evidence of long-distance transport of mountain cedar pollen into Tulsa, Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Previous study of Cupressaceae pollen in the Tulsa atmosphere during December and January suggested that the source of this pollen is the Juniperus ashei (mountain cedar) populations that occur mainly in southern Oklahoma and central Texas. The present investigation examined the evidence of long-distance transport of pollen from these populations during the 1996/1997 season at three sites in Oklahoma using Burkard traps. Two of the pollen-monitoring stations were operated in conjunction with Mesonet meteorological stations. It was found that the December and January Cupressaceae pollen occurs outside of the local season at Tulsa. Pollen concentrations are intermittent and correspond to days of peak concentrations at sites nearer the mountain cedar populations. Peak concentrations are associated with winds coming from the south over the mountain cedar areas. Diurnal rhythms show night-time peaks with a delay in timing at the northern-most site. These results are all consistent with the hypothesis that pollen is being transported over long distances from the mountain cedar populations to Tulsa, Oklahoma. These findings are important as they represent one of the few incidences of long-distance transport of pollen in significant concentrations to an area where the source vegetation is not present. Pollen-monitoring sites located in conjunction with Mesonet meteorological stations provide a unique opportunity to further examine atmospheric conditions during long-distance transport events. This will aid future studies of the spatial modeling of long-distance dispersal of pollen.

Rogers, C. A.; Levetin, E.

457

Southeast Hoover field: model of foreland tectonics of Arbuckle region, southern Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The Southwest Hoover field, located on the northern side of the Arbuckel Mountains, typifies the structural style common to the foreland of southern Oklahoma. This oil field, which produces primarily from the upper Arbuckle Group carbonates, was created in response to the Late Pennsylvanian Arbuckle orogeny. Various interpretations of the mode of deformation have been proposed such as wrench faulting, gravity sliding, and overthrusting. This research supports the idea of moderately dipping thrust faults created by northeast-southwest compression. Paleozoic rocks, originally deposited on the northern edge of the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen, have been transported to the northeast on southwest-dipping thrust faults, and now comprise the leading edge of the Arbuckle Mountains. In a detailed study, the Southeast Hoover field was reinterpreted in light of the compressional thrust-fault theory. Large-scale structural closure controls the location of hydrocarbon accumulation in the Arbuckle Group. Structures in the shallower horizons are characterized by detached anticlines that were created as a response to volume adjustments in adjacent upward-tightening synclines. Fault cutoff lengths and hanging-wall cutoff angles provide clues to predeformation fault-plane geometry. Comparison of the Southeast Hoover field with other structures in the Arbuckle region indicates a close similarity of style, which suggests this study can be used as a geologic model for interpreting foreland oil fields throughout southern Oklahoma.

Beck, J.H.

1986-05-01

458

Generalized altitude and configuration of the base of the High Plains regional aquifer, northwestern Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During 1978, the U.S. Geological Survey began a 5-year study of the High Plains regional aquifer system to provide hydrologic information for evaluation of the effects of long-term development of the aquifer and to develop computer models for prediction of aquifer response to alternative changes in ground-water management (Weeks, 1978). This report is one of a series presenting hydrologic information of the High Plains aquifer in Oklahoma. This report consists of two maps showing the altitude and configuration of the eroded pre-Ogallala bedrock surface (sheets 1 and 2) that forms the base of the aquifer. Bedrock slopes generally from west to east and is composed of rocks of Permian, Triassic-Jurassic, and Cretaceous age. The subcrop extent of these rocks is shown by Morton (1973) for Oklahoma and by Weeks and Gutentag (1981) for the entire High Plains study area. Altitudes of the aquifer base were determined from drillers' logs provided by the Oklahoma Water Resources Board and from published and unpublished information in the files of the U.S. Geological Survey. Where data were sparse, the total well depth was used as the aquifer base under the assumption that wells generally are not drilled very deep into non-water yielding bedrock.

Havens, John S.

1981-01-01

459

Depositional framework and reservoir distribution of Red Fork sandstone in Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The Middle Pennsylvanian Red Fork sandstone formed as a result of southward progradation across most of Oklahoma. The Red Fork is one of several cyclothemic (transgressive-regressive) sequences developed within the Desmoinesian Cherokee Group. Sea level changes and stability of the depositional area were dominant factors in determining the general stratigraphic characteristics of the Red Fork interval. Progradation was episodic, with sand deposition in the distal, more subsident part of the basin during lower sea level stands, and valley-fill deposition in the more stable areas during sea level rises. Red Fork sandstone trends depict an alluvial-deltaic complex covering most of Oklahoma. The Red Fork consists primarily of alluvial-valley and plain (fluvial) bodies in the northern part of northeastern Oklahoma, alluvial-deltaic bodies in most of the remaining parts of the shelf area, and off-shelf submarine-fan and slope/basin-floor complexes within the deeper part of the Anadarko basin. Determination of reservoir trend and genesis requires integration of rock data and log data, with logs calibrated to cores for estimating depositional environments and assessing diagenetic overprints. Much of the oil and gas has been trapped in stratigraphic traps, some of which represent channelized sandstones with trends at high angles to the structural grain. Secondary chlorite, in particular, is associated locally with development of productive reservoirs showing microporosity, high water saturation, and correspondingly low resistivities.

Shelton, J.W.; Fritz, R.D.; Johnson, C. (Masera Corp., Tulsa, OK (USA))

1989-08-01

460

A Reconnaissance of selected organic compounds in streams in tribal lands in Central Oklahoma, January-February 2009  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey worked in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma on two separate reconnaissance projects carried out concurrently. Both projects entailed the use of passive samplers as a sampling methodology to investigate the detection of selected organic compounds at stream sites in jurisdictional areas of several tribes in central Oklahoma during January-February 2009. The focus of the project with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency was the detection of pesticides and pesticide metabolites using Semipermeable Membrane Devices at five stream sites in jurisdictional areas of several tribes. The project with the Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma focused on the detection of pesticides, pesticide metabolites, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyl compounds, and synthetic organic compounds using Semipermeable Membrane Devices and Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Samplers at two stream sites adjacent to the Kickapoo tribal lands. The seven stream sites were located in central Oklahoma on the Cimarron River, Little River, North Canadian River, Deep Fork, and Washita River. Extracts from SPMDs submerged at five stream sites, in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, were analyzed for 46 pesticides and 6 pesticide metabolites. Dacthal, a pre-emergent herbicide, was detected at all five sites. Pendimethalin, also a pre-emergent, was detected at one site. The insecticides chlorpyrifos and dieldrin were detected at three sites and p,p'-DDE, a metabolite of the insecticide DDT, also was detected at three sites. SPMDs and POCIS were submerged at the upstream edge and downstream edge of the Kickapoo tribal boundaries. Both sites are downstream from the Oklahoma City metropolitan area and multiple municipal wastewater treatment plants. Extracts from the passive samplers were analyzed for 62 pesticides, 10 pesticide metabolites, 3 polychlorinated biphenyl compounds, 35 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and 49 synthetic organic compounds. Ten pesticides and four pesticide metabolites were detected at the upstream site and seven pesticides and four pesticide metabolites were detected at the downstream site. Pesticides detected at both sites were atrazine, chlorpyrifos, dacthal, dieldrin, metolachlor, pendimethalin, and trans-nonachlor. Additionally at the upstream site, heptachlor, pentachlorophenol, and prometon were detected. The pesticide metabolites p,p'-DDE, cis-chlordane, and trans-chlordane also were detected at both sites. Polychlorinated biphenyl compounds aroclor-1016/1242, aroclor-1254, and aroclor-1260 were detected at both sites. The upstream site had 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon detections and the downstream site had 8 detections. Because of chromatographic interference during analysis, a positive identification of 17 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons could not be made. Consequently, there may have been a greater number of these compounds detected at both sites. A total of 36 synthetic organic compounds were detected at the two sites adjacent to the Kickapoo tribal lands. The upstream site had 21 synthetic organic compound detections: three detergent metabolites, two fecal indicators, three flame retardants, seven industrial compounds, five compounds related to personal care products, and beta-sitosterol, a plant sterol. Fifteen synthetic organic compounds were detected at the downstream site and included: one fecal indicator, three flame retardants, six industrial compounds, and five compounds related to personal care products.

Becker, Carol J.

2010-01-01

461

Heat flow and thermal history of the Anadarko Basin and the western Oklahoma Platform  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The average geothermal gradient in the Anadarko Basin and the Oklahoma Platform estimated from 856 corrected bottom-hole temperatures (BHTs) is 21°C/km. Analysis of previously published thermal maturation data indicates that the Anadarko Basin has undergone from 1 to 3 km of erosion starting about 40 to 50 Ma. The average thermal gradient at the time of maximum burial was in the range of 22 to 25°C/km. There is no evidence that the thermal state of the Anadarko Basin has changed significantly since the late Paleozoic (250 Ma). To estimate heat flow in the Anadarko Basin and the Oklahoma Platform, we made 652 thermal conductivity measurements on drill cuttings from 9 oil and gas wells. All measurements were corrected for the effects of anisotropy, temperature, and porosity. Matrix conductivities perpendicular to bedding at 22°C range from 1.7 W m -1 K -1 for Permian age sandstone and shale, to 2.6 W m -1 K -1 for Devonian-Silurian age limestone and shale. In-situ thermal conductivities vary from 1.3 W m -1 K -1 to 1.9 W m -1 K -1. Estimated heat flow (±20%) ranges from 30 mW/m 2 to 42 mW/m 2, with a mean of 36 mW/m 2. We found no evidence for heat flow to increase significantly from the Anadarko Basin in the south to the Oklahoma Platform to the north. These results contradict a previous study which found heat flow increases from south to north, with heat flow in the Oklahoma Platform as much as 50% greater than heat flow in the Anadarko Basin. At the present time, we do not know if these differences are related to spatial variations or reflect methodological errors. If our results are averaged with those reported in previous work, mean heat flows in the Anadarko Basin and Oklahoma Platform are 39 mW/m 2 and 51 mW/m 2, respectively.

Lee, Youngmin; Deming, David

1999-11-01

462

Aerosol Optical and Chemical Properties Within and Without Clouds During an Airborne Field Campaign in Central Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The optical properties of aerosol particles are one of the controlling factors in determining direct aerosol radiative forcing. These optical properties depend on the chemical composition and size distribution of the aerosol particles, which can change due to various processes during the particles' lifetime in the atmosphere. Here we present preliminary results showing aerosol optical and chemical properties obtained during the CHAPS field campaign within cloud drops and outside of clouds. The Cumulis Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS), sponsored by the DOE Atmospheric Science Program (ASP), took place in the vicinity of Oklahoma City in June, 2007. The intention of the study was to investigate the influence of clouds on aerosols and of aerosol on clouds. Duplicate sets of in-situ aerosol optical instruments were deployed on the ASP G-1 aircraft during the CHAPS campaign. One set of instruments was downstream of an isokinetic inlet designed to sample the ambient aerosol, the other set was downstream of a counterflow virtual impactor (CVI) designed to sample and dry cloud droplets so that the cloud drop nuclei could be studied. Each instrument set comprised a 3-wavelength particle soot absorption photometer (PSAP) and integrating nephelometer to provide spectral aerosol absorption, scattering and back-scattering and a particle counter to obtain aerosol number concentration. In addition, a time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (ToF-AMS) was able to sample on either inlet to provide information about the non-refractory chemical composition of the aerosol and cloud drop residuals. The data presented here will describe both how aerosol optical properties change upstream and downstream of a mid-size conurbation (Oklahoma City) and how ambient aerosol optical properties differ from those of the cloud drop nuclei. These changes in aerosol optical properties will be placed in the context of differences in chemical composition derived from the ToF-AMS.

Andrews, E.; Lee, Y.; Alexander, M. L.; Hubbe, J. M.; Ogren, J. A.

2007-12-01

463

Radioactivity of Pennsylvanian black shales and coals in Kansas and Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The first field work for the purpose of determining the radioactivity of Pennsylvania black shales in Oklahoma was done in October, 1944, in the vicinity of Tulsa. Small phosphatic nodules were found to have relatively high radioactivity, particularly those in the black shale overlying the Checkerboard limestone. In May and June, 1945, more work was done in order to determine with more assurance, the abundance and radioactivity of the nodules. The later work covered all known black shale horizons in the Pennsylvanian system that could be found. The work extended as far north as Kansas City. A number of coals of Pennsylvanian age were tested. They are all much too low in radioactivity to be of further interest. The black shale over the Checkerboard limestone is the best horizon from the standpoint of abundance and radioactivity of nodules. One sample of nodules from this shale contains 0.186 percent equivalent uranium, 0.095 percent uranium. However, the distribution and radioactivity of the nodules are widely variable. The average nodule content of the black shale is about two percent over a thickness of about 2.5 feet. The average equivalent uranium content of the nodules is about 0.035 percent and the average uranium content 0.015 to 0.020 percent. With a product of this grade in view, the large mining operation necessary to produce a relatively small amount of nodules does not seem justified. Two black shale beds, each about two feet thick and neither of which contains any nodules, contain 0.024 and 0.017 percent equivalent uranium and 0.013 and 0.010 percent uranium respectively. Too little work was done to permit calculations of tonnage, but material of this grade does not merit more detailed work at this time.

Slaughter, Archibald L.

1945-01-01

464

Hydrogeology and water quality of the North Canadian River alluvium, Concho Reserve, Canadian County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A growing user population within the Concho Reserve in Canadian County, Oklahoma, has increased the need for drinking water. The North Canadian River alluvium is a reliable source of ground water for agriculture, industry, and cities in Canadian County and is the only ground-water source capable of meeting large demands. This study was undertaken to collect and analyze data to describe the hydrogeology and ground-water quality of the North Canadian River alluvium within the Concho Reserve. The alluvium forms a band about 2 miles long and 0.5 mile wide along the southern edge of the Concho Reserve. Thickness of the alluvium ranges from 19 to 75 feet thick and averages about 45 feet in the study area. Well cuttings and natural gamma-ray logs indicate the alluvium consists of interfingering lenses of clay, silt, and sand. The increase of coarse-grained sand and the decrease of clay and silt with depth suggests that the water-bearing properties of the aquifer within the study area improve with depth. A clay layer in the upper part of the aquifer may be partially responsible for surface water ponding in low areas after above normal precipitation and may delay the infiltration of potentially contaminated water from land surface. Specific conductance measurements indicate the ground-water quality improves in a northern direction towards the terrace. Water-quality properties, bacteria counts, major ion and nutrient concentrations, trace-element and radionuclide concentrations, and organic compound concentrations were measured in one ground-water sample at the southern edge of the Concho Reserve and comply with the primary drinking-water standards. Measured concentrations of iron, manganese, sulfate, and total dissolved solids exceed the secondary maximum contaminant levels set for drinking water. The ground water is a calcium sulfate bicarbonate type and is considered very hard, with a hardness of 570 milligrams per liter as calcium carbonate.

Becker, C. J.

1998-01-01

465

Variation of oil composition in vicinity of Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fifteen oils in an 8-county area in the vicinity of the Arbuckle Mountains were classified into 6 oil types: stable platform type, Mill Creek syncline type, Joiner City field type, Gloeocapsamorpha type, Hoover field A-type; and Fitts field type. The stable platform, Mill Creek syncline, and Joiner City field types have a common element (diminished Cââ hopane) and are thought

I. Zemmels; C. C. Walters

1987-01-01

466

Identification and evaluation of fluvial-dominated deltaic (Class 1 oil) reservoirs in Oklahoma. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Oklahoma Geological Survey (OGS), the Geological Information Systems department, and the School of Petroleum and Geological Engineering at the University of Oklahoma are engaging in a program to identify and address Oklahoma`s oil recovery opportunities in fluvial-dominated deltaic (FDD) reservoirs. This program includes the systematic and comprehensive collection and evaluation of information on all of Oklahoma`s FDD reservoirs and the recovery technologies that have been (or could be) applied to those reservoirs with commercial success. This data collection and evaluation effort will be the foundation for an aggressive, multifaceted technology transfer program that is designed to support all of Oklahoma`s oil industry, with particular emphasis on smaller companies and independent operators in their attempts to maximize the economic producibility of FDD reservoirs. Specifically, this project will identify all FDD oil reservoirs in the State; group those reservoirs into plays that have similar depositional and subsequent geologic histories; collect, organize and analyze all available data; conduct characterization and simulation studies on selected reservoirs in each play; and implement a technology transfer program targeted to the operators of FDD reservoirs to sustain the life expectancy of existing wells with the ultimate objective of increasing oil recovery. The elements of the technology transfer program include developing and publishing play portfolios, holding workshops to release play analyses and identify opportunities in each of the plays, and establishing a computer laboratory that is available for industry users.

Mankin, C.J. [Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States)] [Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States); Banken, M.K. [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States)] [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States)

1995-07-07

467

Identification and evaluation of fluvial-dominated deltaic (Class I oil) reservoirs in Oklahoma. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Oklahoma Geological Survey (OGS), the Geo Information Systems department, and the School of Petroleum and Geological Engineering at the University of Oklahoma are engaged in a program to identify and address Oklahoma`s oil recovery opportunities in fluvial-dominated deltaic (FDD) reservoirs. This program includes the systematic and comprehensive collection and evaluation of information on all of Oklahoma`s FDD reservoirs and the recovery technologies that have been (or could be) applied to those reservoirs with commercial success. This data collection and evaluation effort will be the foundation for an aggressive, multifaceted technology transfer program that is designed to support all of Oklahoma`s oil industry, with particular emphasis on smaller companies and independent operators in their attempts to maximize the economic producibility of FDD reservoirs. Specifically, this project will identify all FDD oil reservoirs in the State; group those reservoirs into plays that have similar depositional origins; collect, organize and analyze all available data conduct characterization and simulation studies on selected reservoirs in each play; and implement a technology transfer program targeted to the operators of FDD reservoirs. Activities were focused primarily on technology transfer elements of the project. This included regional play analysis and mapping, geologic field studies, and reservoir modeling for secondary water flood simulations as used in publication folios and workshops. The computer laboratory was fully operational for operator use. Computer systems design and database development activities were ongoing.

Mankin, C.J. [Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States)] [Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States); Banken, M.K. [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States)] [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States)

1995-11-30

468

Genetic diversity in the 3'-terminal region of papaya ringspot virus (PRSV-W) isolates from watermelon in Oklahoma.  

PubMed

The 3'-terminal region (1191 nt) containing part of the NIb gene, complete coat protein (CP) and poly-A tail of 64 papaya ringspot virus (PRSV-W) isolates collected during 2008-2009 from watermelon in commercial fields of four different counties of Oklahoma were cloned and sequenced. Nucleotide and amino acid sequence identities ranged from 95.2-100% and 97.1-100%, respectively, among the Oklahoman PRSV-W isolates. Phylogenetic analysis showed that PRSW-W isolates clustered according to the locations where they were collected within Oklahoma, and each cluster contained two subgroups. All subgroups of Oklahoman PRSV-W isolates were on separate branches when compared to 35 known isolates originating from other parts of the world, including the one reported previously from the USA. This study helps in our understanding about the genetic diversity of PRSV-W isolates infecting cucurbits in Oklahoma. PMID:22160129

Abdalla, Osama A; Ali, Akhtar

2012-03-01

469

Assessment of conservation practices in the Fort Cobb Reservoir watershed, southwestern Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Fort Cobb Reservoir watershed encompasses about 813 square kilometers of rural farm land in Caddo, Custer, and Washita Counties in southwestern Oklahoma. The Fort Cobb Reservoir and six stream segments were identified on the Oklahoma 1998 303(d) list as not supporting designated beneficial uses because of impairment by nutrients, suspended solids, sedimentation, pesticides, and unknown toxicity. As a result, State and Federal agencies, in collaboration with conservation districts and landowners, started conservation efforts in 2001 to decrease erosion and transport of sediments and nutrients to the reservoir and improve water quality in tributaries. The U.S. Department of Agriculture selected the Fort Cobb Reservoir watershed in 2003 as 1 of 14 benchmark watersheds under the Conservation Effectiveness Assessment Project with the objective of quantifying the environmental benefits derived from agricultural conservation programs in reducing inflows of sediments and phosphorus to the reservoir. In November 2004, the Biologic, Geographic, Geologic, and Water Disciplines of the U.S. Geological Survey, in collaboration with the Agricultural Research Service, Grazinglands Research Laboratory in El Reno, Oklahoma, began an interdisciplinary investigation to produce an integrated publication to complement this program. This publication is a compilation of 10 report chapters describing land uses, soils, geology, climate, and water quality in streams and the reservoir through results of field and remote sensing investigations from 2004 to 2007. The investigations indicated that targeting best-management practices to small intermittent streams draining to the reservoir and to the Cobb Creek subwatershed may effectively augment efforts to improve eutrophic to hypereutrophic conditions that continue to affect the reservoir. The three major streams flowing into the reservoir contribute nutrients causing eutrophication, but minor streams draining cultivated fields near the reservoir appeared to be disproportionate contributors of nutrients. Increasing conservation practices on small streams may have a greater effect in mitigating eutrophication in the reservoir than additional installation of such measures on the larger creeks.

Becker, Carol J.

2011-01-01

470

Watershed boundaries and digital elevation model of Oklahoma derived from 1:100,000-scale digital topographic maps  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This document provides a general description of the procedures used to develop the data sets included on this compact disc. This compact disc contains watershed boundaries for Oklahoma, a digital elevation model, and other data sets derived from the digital elevation model. The digital elevation model was produced using the ANUDEM software package, written by Michael Hutchinson and licensed from the Centre for Resource and Environmental Studies at The Australian National University. Elevation data (hypsography) and streams (hydrography) from digital versions of the U.S. Geological Survey 1:100,000-scale topographic maps were used by the ANUDEM package to produce a hydrologically conditioned digital elevation model with a 60-meter cell size. This digital elevation model is well suited for drainage-basin delineation using automated techniques. Additional data sets include flow-direction, flow-accumulation, and shaded-relief grids, all derived from the digital elevation model, and the hydrography data set used in producing the digital elevation model. The watershed boundaries derived from the digital elevation model have been edited to be consistent with contours and streams from the U.S. Geological Survey 1:100,000-scale topographic maps. The watershed data set includes boundaries for 11-digit Hydrologic Unit Codes (watersheds) within Oklahoma, and 8-digit Hydrologic Unit Codes (cataloging units) outside Oklahoma. Cataloging-unit boundaries based on 1:250,000-scale maps outside Oklahoma for the Arkansas, Red, and White River basins are included. The other data sets cover Oklahoma, and where available, portions of 1:100,000-scale quadrangles adjoining Oklahoma.

Cederstrand, J. R.; Rea, A. H.

1995-01-01

471

Identification and evaluation of fluvial-dominated deltaic (Class 1 oil) reservoirs in Oklahoma. Yearly technical progress report, January 1--December 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Oklahoma Geological Survey and the University of Oklahoma are engaged in a five-year program to identify and address Oklahoma`s oil recovery opportunities in fluvial-dominated deltaic (FDD) reservoirs. This program includes the systematic and comprehensive collection, evaluation, and distribution of information on all of Oklahoma`s FDD oil reservoirs and the recovery technologies that can be applied to those reservoirs with commercial success. To date, the lead geologists have defined the initial geographic extents of Oklahoma`s FDD plays, and compiled known information about those plays. Nine plays have been defined, all of them Pennsylvanian in age and most from the Cherokee Group. A bibliographic database has been developed to record the literature sources and their related plays. Trend maps are being developed to identify the FDD portions of the relevant reservoirs, through accessing current production databases and through compiling the literature results. A reservoir database system also has been developed, to record specific reservoir data elements that are identified through the literature, and through public and private data sources. The project team is working with the Oklahoma Nomenclature Committee of the Mid-Continent Oil and Gas Association to update oil field boundary definitions in the project area. Also, team members are working with several private companies to develop demonstration reservoirs for the reservoir characterization and simulation activities. All of the information gathered through these efforts will be transferred to the Oklahoma petroleum industry through a series of publications and workshops. Additionally, plans are being developed, and hardware and software resources are being acquired, in preparation for the opening of a publicly-accessible computer users laboratory, one component of the technology transfer program.

Mankin, C.J. [Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States)] [Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States); Banken, M.K. [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States)] [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States)

1995-11-21

472

Integration of geological, geochemical, and geophysical spatial data of the Cement oil field, Oklahoma, test site  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Measurement pertaining to geology, geochemistry, and geophysics of the Cement oil field, Oklahoma, test site were collected employing both airborne sensors and ground-based data collection. The measurements include: (1) airborne gamma-ray spectrometry (supplying bismuth 214, thalium 208, and potassium 40 gamma-ray intensities); (2) aeromagnetic survey data; (3) multi-frequency airborne resistivity survey data (supplying apparent electrical resistivity of near surface materials); (4) gravity data; (5) geological and topographic maps; and (6) image data from Landsat MSS and U-2 photography.

Termain, Patricia A.; Donovan, Terrence J.; Chavez, Pat S.

1980-01-01

473

Ground-water levels in observation wells in Oklahoma, 1967-68  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The investigation of the ground-water resources of Oklahoma by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Oklahoma Water Resources Board includes a continuing program to collect records of water levels in selected observation wells on a systematic basis. These water-level records: (1) provide an index to available ground-water supplies; (2) facilitate the prediction of trends in water levels that will indicate likely changes in storage; (3) aid in the prediction of the base flow of streams; (4) provide information for use in basic research; (5) provide long-time continuous records of fluctuations of water levels in representative wells; and (6) serve as a framework to which other types of hydrologic data my be related. Prior to 1956, measurements of water levels in observation wells in Oklahoma were included in water-supply papers published annually by the U.S. Geological Survey. Beginning with the 1956 calendar year, however, Geological Survey water-level reports will contain only records of a selected network of observation wells, and will be published at 5-year intervals. The first of this series, for the 1956-59 period was published in 1962. This report has been prepared primarily to present water-level records of wells not included in the Federal network. However, for the sake of completeness it includes water-level records of Federal wells that either have been or will be published in water-supply papers since 1955. This report, which contains water-level records for the 2-year period (1967-68), is the fifth in a series presenting water-level records for all permanent observations wells in Oklahoma. The first report, published in 1963, contains water-level records for the 2-year period of (1961-62); the second report, published in 1964, contains water-level records for the 2-year period (1961-62); the third report, published in 1965, contains water-level records for the 2-year period (1963-64); and the fourth report contains water-level records for the 2-year period (1965-66).

Bingham, R. H.

1969-01-01

474

Last Glacial Maximum Development of Parna Dunes in Panhandle Oklahoma, USA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Though dunefields are a ubiquitous feature of the North American Great Plains, those studied to date have consisted primarily of sand grains. In Beaver County of the Oklahoma panhandle, however, upland dune forms consist of sand-sized aggregates of silt and clay. These aptly named parna dunes occur in two swarms, range in height from 10-15 m, and have asymmetrical dome morphologies with approximate north-south dune orientations. Despite their morphological similarities to sand dunes of the region, their origin and evolution is unknown. Documenting parna dune formation in the Oklahoma panhandle will help improve our understanding of prehistoric landscape instability and climate change, particularly in the central Great Plains where such records are limited. Panhandle parna dunes are typified by Blue Mound, our best documented parna dune thus far. Coring has documented a basal paleosol buried at a depth equivalent to the surrounding landscape—14C ages from this soil indicate its formation about 25-21 ka. The paleosol is a hydric Mollisol with a pronounced C3 isotopic signature reflecting hydric plant communities, rather than the regionally dominated C4 prairie vegetation. Hydric soils are associated with many of the playas on the surrounding landscape today, which suggests that they may have been more prevalent during the LGM. The overlying 8-10 m of parna is low in organic C and high in calcite, with indications of up to ten major episodes of sediment flux, which are documented with magnetic, isotope, soil-stratigraphic, particle-size, and color data. Near-surface luminescence (OSL) ages from Blue Mound are similar to the 14C ages from the basal paleosol, indicating rapid dune construction, with little or no Holocene accumulation of sediment. Marine isotope stage (MIS) 3 loess records indicate that upland areas of the region were relatively stable with attendant widespread pedogenesis prior to development of the parna dunes. At the onset of the LGM, however, the landscape destabilized, and aeolian processes dominated. Peoria Loess began accumulating throughout parts of Oklahoma and much of Kansas, Nebraska, and beyond, until landscape stabilization was re-attained about 14-13 ka. Our chronological and geomorphic data suggest that parna dune construction in the Oklahoma panhandle was the result of strong, northerly winds, which precipitated aeolian activity at the beginning of MIS 2. Furthermore, these features appear to be more analogous to the regional loess record than the sand dune activation record, and, with more research, may prove to be a reliable record of late-Quaternary landscape change in the central Great Plains.

Johnson, W. C.; Halfen, A. F.; McGowen, S.; Carter, B.; Fine, S.; Bement, L. C.; Simms, A. R.

2012-12-01

475

Chemical quality of water in abandoned zinc mines in northeastern Oklahoma and southeastern Kansas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Onsite measurements of pH, specific conductance, and water temperature show that water in seven mine shafts in northeastern Oklahoma and southeastern Kansas is stratified. With increasing sampling depth, specific conductance and water temperature tend to increase, and pH tends to decrease. Concentrations of dissolved solids and chemical constituents in mine-shaft water, such as total and dissolved metals and dissolved sulfate also increase with depth. The apparently unstable condition created by cooler, denser water overlying warmer, less dense water is offset by the greater density of the lower water strata due to higher dissolved solids content.

Playton, Stephen J.; Davis, Robert E.; McClaflin, Roger G.

1980-01-01

476

Organic petrology of epi-impsonite at Page, Oklahoma, U.S.A.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Impsonite (asphaltic pyrobitumen) occurs as fracture-filling veins cutting massive sandstone in the frontal Ouachita Mountains near Page, Oklahoma. The Page impsonite formed from low-temperature alteration of crude oil. Mean maximum bitumen reflectance in oil immersion (Rmax) of seven samples is 1.41-1.96%. Mean apparent bireflectance of these samples is 0.15-0.54%. The Page deposit classifies at the upper end of epi-impsonite in the generic classification for solid bitumen, based on physical, chemical, and optical characteristics, and as post-oil with unlimited migration in the genetic classification for solid bitumen. ?? 1991.

Cardott, B. J.

1991-01-01

477

Occurrence of organic wastewater and other contaminants in cave streams in northeastern Oklahoma and northwestern Arkansas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The prevalence of organic wastewater compounds in surface waters of the United States has been reported in a number of recent studies. In karstic areas, surface contaminants might be transported to groundwater and, ultimately, cave ecosystems, where they might impact resident biota. In this study, polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCISs) and semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) were deployed in six caves and two surface-water sites located within the Ozark Plateau of northeastern Oklahoma and northwestern Arkansas in order to detect potential chemical contaminants in these systems. All caves sampled were known to contain populations of the threatened Ozark cavefish (Amblyopsis rosae). The surface-water site in Oklahoma was downstream from the outfall of a municipal wastewater treatment plant and a previous study indicated a hydrologic link between this stream and one of the caves. A total of 83 chemicals were detected in the POCIS and SPMD extracts from the surface-water and cave sites. Of these, 55 chemicals were detected in the caves. Regardless of the sampler used, more compounds were detected in the Oklahoma surface-water site than in the Arkansas site or the caves. The organic wastewater chemicals with the greatest mass measured in the sampler extracts included sterols (cholesterol and ??-sitosterol), plasticizers [diethylhexylphthalate and tris (2-butoxyethyl) phosphate], the herbicide bromacil, and the fragrance indole. Sampler extracts from most of the cave sites did not contain many wastewater contaminants, although extracts from samplers in the Oklahoma surfacewater site and the cave hydrologically linked to it had similar levels of diethylhexyphthalate and common detections of carbamazapine, sulfamethoxazole, benzophenone, N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide (DEET), and octophenol monoethoxylate. Further evaluation of this system is warranted due to potential ongoing transport of wastewaterassociated chemicals into the cave. Halogenated organics found in caves and surface-water sites included brominated flame retardants, organochlorine pesticides (chlordane and nonachlor), and polychlorinated biphenyls. The placement of samplers in the caves (near the cave mouth compared to farther in the system) might have influenced the number of halogenated organics detected due to possible aerial transport of residues. Guano from cave-dwelling bats also might have been a source of some of these chlorinated organics. Seven-day survival and growth bioassays with fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) exposed to samples of cave water indicated initial toxicity in water from two of the caves, but these effects were transient, with no toxicity observed in follow-up tests. ??Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009.

Bidwell, J. R.; Becker, C.; Hensley, S.; Stark, R.; Meyer, M. T.

2010-01-01

478

Low-cost digital image processing at the University of Oklahoma  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Computer assisted instruction in remote sensing at the University of Oklahoma involves two separate approaches and is dependent upon initial preprocessing of a LANDSAT computer compatible tape using software developed for an IBM 370/158 computer. In-house generated preprocessing algorithms permits students or researchers to select a subset of a LANDSAT scene for subsequent analysis using either general purpose statistical packages or color graphic image processing software developed for Apple II microcomputers. Procedures for preprocessing the data and image analysis using either of the two approaches for low-cost LANDSAT data processing are described.

Harrington, J. A., Jr.

1981-01-01

479

Analysis of natural gases, Oklahoma and northwest Arkansas, 1951-1991 (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Bureau of Mines diskette contains analysis and related source data for 2,653 natural gas samples collected from Oklahoma and the Arkoma Basin in Arkansas All samples were obtained and analyzed as part of the Bureau's investigations of occurrences of helium in natural gases of countries with free market economies. The survey has been conducted since 1917. The analysis contained on the diskette contain the full range of component analysis data. Five files are on the diskette: READ.ME, OKLA.TXT, OKLA.DBF, USHEANAL.DBF, and BASINCDE.TXT.

Not Available

1991-01-01

480

Occurrence of organic wastewater and other contaminants in cave streams in northeastern Oklahoma and northwestern Arkansas.  

PubMed

The prevalence of organic wastewater compounds in surface waters of the United States has been reported in a number of recent studies. In karstic areas, surface contaminants might be transported to groundwater and, ultimately, cave ecosystems, where they might impact resident biota. In this study, polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCISs) and semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) were deployed in six caves and two surface-water sites located within the Ozark Plateau of northeastern Oklahoma and northwestern Arkansas in order to detect potential chemical contaminants in these systems. All caves sampled were known to contain populations of the threatened Ozark cavefish (Amblyopsis rosae). The surface-water site in Oklahoma was downstream from the outfall of a municipal wastewater treatment plant and a previous study indicated a hydrologic link between this stream and one of the caves. A total of 83 chemicals were detected in the POCIS and SPMD extracts from the surface-water and cave sites. Of these, 55 chemicals were detected in the caves. Regardless of the sampler used, more compounds were detected in the Oklahoma surface-water site than in the Arkansas site or the caves. The organic wastewater chemicals with the greatest mass measured in the sampler extracts included sterols (cholesterol and beta-sitosterol), plasticizers [diethylhexylphthalate and tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate], the herbicide bromacil, and the fragrance indole. Sampler extracts from most of the cave sites did not contain many wastewater contaminants, although extracts from samplers in the Oklahoma surface-water site and the cave hydrologically linked to it had similar levels of diethylhexyphthalate and common detections of carbamazapine, sulfamethoxazole, benzophenone, N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide (DEET), and octophenol monoethoxylate. Further evaluation of this system is warranted due to potential ongoing transport of wastewater-associated chemicals into the cave. Halogenated organics found in caves and surface-water sites included brominated flame retardants, organochlorine pesticides (chlordane and nonachlor), and polychlorinated biphenyls. The placement of samplers in the caves (near the cave mouth compared to farther in the system) might have influenced the number of halogenated organics detected due to possible aerial transport of residues. Guano from cave-dwelling bats also might have been a source of some of these chlorinated organics. Seven-day survival and growth bioassays with fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) exposed to samples of cave water indicated initial toxicity in water from two of the caves, but these effects were transient, with no toxicity observed in follow-up tests. PMID:19763679

Bidwell, Joseph R; Becker, Carol; Hensley, Steve; Stark, Richard; Meyer, Michael T

2010-02-01

481

Dam-breach analysis and flood-inundation mapping for Lakes Ellsworth and Lawtonka near Lawton, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Dams provide beneficial functions such as flood control, recreation, and reliable water supplies, but they also entail risk: dam breaches and resultant floods can cause substantial property damage and loss of life. The State of Oklahoma requires each owner of a high-hazard dam, which the Federal Emergency Management Agency defines as dams for which failure or misoperation probably will cause loss of human life, to develop an emergency action plan specific to that dam. Components of an emergency action plan are to simulate a flood resulting from a possible dam breach and map the resulting downstream flood-inundation areas. The resulting flood-inundation maps can provide valuable information to city officials, emergency managers, and local residents for planning the emergency response if a dam breach occurs. Accurate topographic data are vital for developing flood-inundation maps. This report presents results of a cooperative study by the city of Lawton, Oklahoma, and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to model dam-breach scenarios at Lakes Ellsworth and Lawtonka near Lawton and to map the potential flood-inundation areas of such dam breaches. To assist the city of Lawton with completion of the emergency action plans for Lakes Ellsworth and Lawtonka Dams, the USGS collected light detection and ranging (lidar) data that were used to develop a high-resolution digital elevation model and a 1-foot contour elevation map for the flood plains downstream from Lakes Ellsworth and Lawtonka. This digital elevation model and field measurements, streamflow-gaging station data (USGS streamflow-gaging station 07311000, East Cache Creek near Walters, Okla.), and hydraulic values were used as inputs for the dynamic (unsteady-flow) model, Hydrologic Engineering Center's River Analysis System (HEC-RAS). The modeled flood elevations were exported to a geographic information system to produce flood-inundation maps. Water-surface profiles were developed for a 75-percent probable maximum flood scenario and a sunny-day dam-breach scenario, as well as for maximum flood-inundation elevations and flood-wave arrival times for selected bridge crossings. Some areas of concern near the city of Lawton, if a dam breach occurs at Lakes Ellsworth or Lawtonka, include water treatment plants, wastewater treatment plants, recreational areas, and community-services offices.

Rendon, Samuel H.; Ashworth, Chad E.; Smith, S. Jerrod

2012-01-01

482

Helicopter electromagnetic and magnetic geophysical survey data, Hunton anticline, south-central Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report is a digital data release for multiple geophysical surveys conducted in the Hunton anticline area of south-central Oklahoma. The helicopter electromagnetic and magnetic surveys were flown on March 16–17, 2007, in four areas of the Hunton anticline in south-central Oklahoma. The objective of this project is to improve the understanding of the geohydrologic framework of the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer. The electromagnetic sensor for the helicopter electromagnetic survey consisted of six different transmitter-receiver orientations that measured the earth's electrical response at six distinct frequencies from approximately 500 Hertz to approximately 115,000 Hertz. The electromagnetic measurements were converted to electrical resistivity values, which were gridded and plotted on georeferenced maps. The map from each frequency represents a different depth of investigation for each area. The range of subsurface investigation is comparable to the depth of shallow groundwater. The four areas selected for the helicopter electromagnetic study, blocks A–D, have different geologic and hydrologic settings. Geophysical and hydrologic information from U.S. Geological Survey studies are being used by modelers and resource managers to develop groundwater resource plans for the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer.

Smith, Bruce D.; Smith, David V.; Deszcz-Pan, Maryla; Blome, Charles D.; Hill, Patricia

2011-01-01

483

Fracture density and spacing along Washita Valley fault, Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The authors document fracture density and spacing associated with the Washita Valley fault, a major strike-slip fault. The Washita Valley fault strikes northwest-southeast with up to 80 mi of exposure in southern Oklahoma and may be an early bounding fault of the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen (Ardmore/Marietta basins). Horizontal displacement on the fault has been estimated to be up to 40 mi, with vertical displacement on the order of 10,000 ft. Samples collected from traverses across the Washita Valley fault have been analyzed. The traverses cross the fault at different stratigraphic levels from Proterozoic igneous basement, through the Cambrian-Ordovician Arbuckle Group, Ordovician Simpson and Viola Groups, to the Silurian-Devonian Hunton Group. Several types of fracture systems are documented that reflect mechanical stratigraphy, burial depth during deformation, and episodic movement on the fault. The fractures in the study area include open fracture systems, calcite-filled fractures, tension gashes, and fractures related to pressure solution. The samples were cut parallel to the strike of the fault, vertical-normal to the fault, and horizontal-normal to the fault. These cuts allow examination of the total fracture strain, characterization of the fractures, and statistical analysis of fracture density. From these data, fracture density is shown to decrease exponentially moving away from the primary fault zone. The increased understanding of fracture patterns and characteristics will assist future exploration and development programs involving carbonate reservoirs associated with strike-slip systems.

Ferebee, C.D.; Tapp, J.B. (Univ. of Tulsa, OK (USA))

1989-08-01

484

Three-dimensional geologic model of the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer, south-central Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer of south-central Oklahoma encompasses more than 850 square kilometers and is the principal water resource for south-central Oklahoma. Rock units comprising the aquifer are characterized by limestone, dolomite, and sandstones assigned to two lower Paleozoic units: the Arbuckle and Simpson Groups. Also considered to be part of the aquifer is the underlying Cambrian-age Timbered Hills Group that contains limestone and sandstone. The highly faulted and fractured nature of the Arbuckle-Simpson units and the variable thickness (600 to 2,750 meters) increases the complexity in determining the subsurface geologic framework of this aquifer. A three-dimensional EarthVision (Trademark) geologic framework model was constructed to quantify the geometric relationships of the rock units of the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer in the Hunton anticline area. This 3-D EarthVision (Trademark) geologic framework model incorporates 54 faults and four modeled units: basement, Arbuckle-Timbered Hills Group, Simpson Group, and post-Simpson. Primary data used to define the model's 54 faults and four modeled surfaces were obtained from geophysical logs, cores, and cuttings from 126 water and petroleum wells. The 3-D framework model both depicts the volumetric extent of the aquifer and provides the stratigraphic layer thickness and elevation data used to construct a MODFLOW version 2000 regional groundwater-flow model.

Faith, Jason R.; Blome, Charles D.; Pantea, Michael P.; Puckette, James O.; Halihan, Todd; Osborn, Noel; Christenson, Scott; Pack, Skip

2010-01-01

485

Records of water-level measurements in wells in the Oklahoma Panhandle, 1971-72  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Investigations of the ground-water resources of the Oklahoma panhandle by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Oklahoma Water Resources Board includes collection of water-level records; the systematic collection of these records began in 1937. Records of many shallow wells were compiled in 1937 and periodic measurements were made in a few wells until 1966. Owing to the heavy development of irrigation during the 1960's (fig. 1) an expanded network of observation wells established in Texas County in 1966 and in Beaver and Cimarron Counties in 1967; measurement of water levels have been made on an annual basis since those times. This report contains water-level records for the period 1971-72 and the water-level change for the period 1966-72 in Texas County, and for the period 1967-72 in Beaver and Cimarron Counties. At the present time (1972) the annual observation-well network includes 521 wells, of which 97 are in Beaver County, 203 are in Cimarron County, and 221 are in Texas County. These data provide an index to available ground-water supplies; they will be useful in planning and studying water resources development; and they will serve as a framework of data for the detailed hydrologic investigation now in progress in the panhandle. (available as photostat copy only)

Hart, Donald L., Jr.; Hoffman, George L.; Goemaat, Robert L.

1972-01-01

486

Records of water-level measurements in wells in the Oklahoma panhandle, 1966-70  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Investigations of the ground-water resources of the Oklahoma panhandle by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Oklahoma Water Resources Board includes collection of water-level records; the systematic collection of these records began in 1937. Records of many shallow wells were compiled in 1937 and periodic measurements were made in a few wells until 1966. Owing to the heavy development of irrigation during the 1960's (fig. 1) an expanded network of observation wells established in Texas County in 1966 and in Beaver and Cimarron Counties in 1967; measurement of water levels have been made on an annual basis since those times. This report contains water-level records for the period 1966-70 in Texas County, and for the period 1967-70 in Beaver and Cimarron Counties. At the present time (1971) the annual observation-well network includes 528 wells, of which 98 are in Beave